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Sample records for 12-week resistance exercise

  1. Effects of a 12-week resistance exercise program on physical self-perceptions in college students.

    PubMed

    Moore, Justin B; Mitchell, Nathanael G; Bibeau, Wendy S; Bartholomew, John B

    2011-06-01

    There is an increase in literature suggesting exercise can promote positive changes in physical self-perceptions that can manifest as an increase in global self-esteem. In the present study, we assessed self-esteem using the hierarchical framework of the Exercise and Self-Esteem Model (EXSEM) along with cognitive facets at the subdomain level (e.g., competence, certainty, importance, and ideal self-discrepancy). This allowed for an analysis of cognitive facets as possible contributors to changes in physical self-perceptions. We addressed these aims with a sample of 120 college-age adults who completed a 12-week resistance exercise program. Results indicated significant improvements in self-perception constructs at all levels of the EXSEM. The hierarchical structure of the EXSEM was partially supported, as we observed successively smaller improvements at each level of the model (e.g., self-esteem showed lesser improvements than physical self-worth). In addition, a path model developed to explain the impact of strength changes on self-esteem proved a good fit for the data. Results are discussed in terms of contemporary models of self-perception, potential mediators of exercise on self-esteem, and the need to consider cognitive facets of self-perception. PMID:21699109

  2. Effects of 12 weeks combined aerobic and resistance exercise on heart rate variability in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seol-Jung; Ko, Kwang-Jun; Baek, Un-Hyo

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effects of 12 weeks combined aerobic and resistance exercise on heart rate variability in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 16 female patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus selected among the participants of a chronic disease management exercise class at C Region Public Health Center in South Korea. Subjects were randomly assigned to the exercise group (n=8; age, 55.97 ± 7.37) or the control group (n=8; age, 57.53 ± 4.63) The exercise group performed aerobic and resistance exercises for 60 minutes per day, 3 times per week for 12 weeks. Anthropometric measurements, biochemical markers, physical fitness, and heart rate variability were examined. [Results] After 12 weeks of exercise, weight, body fat percentage, waist circumference, blood glucose, insulin resistance, glycated hemoglobin level, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure significantly decreased and cardiorespiratory fitness and muscular strength significantly increased in the exercise group. Although heart rate variability measures showed favorable changes with the exercise program, none were significant. [Conclusion] Although the exercise program did not show notable changes in heart rate variability in patients with Type 2 diabetes within the timeframe of the study, exercise may contribute to the prevention and control of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy. PMID:27512271

  3. Effects of 12 weeks combined aerobic and resistance exercise on heart rate variability in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seol-Jung; Ko, Kwang-Jun; Baek, Un-Hyo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effects of 12 weeks combined aerobic and resistance exercise on heart rate variability in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 16 female patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus selected among the participants of a chronic disease management exercise class at C Region Public Health Center in South Korea. Subjects were randomly assigned to the exercise group (n=8; age, 55.97 ± 7.37) or the control group (n=8; age, 57.53 ± 4.63) The exercise group performed aerobic and resistance exercises for 60 minutes per day, 3 times per week for 12 weeks. Anthropometric measurements, biochemical markers, physical fitness, and heart rate variability were examined. [Results] After 12 weeks of exercise, weight, body fat percentage, waist circumference, blood glucose, insulin resistance, glycated hemoglobin level, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure significantly decreased and cardiorespiratory fitness and muscular strength significantly increased in the exercise group. Although heart rate variability measures showed favorable changes with the exercise program, none were significant. [Conclusion] Although the exercise program did not show notable changes in heart rate variability in patients with Type 2 diabetes within the timeframe of the study, exercise may contribute to the prevention and control of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy. PMID:27512271

  4. Effects of a 12-Week Resistance Exercise Program on Physical Self-Perceptions in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Justin B.; Mitchell, Nathanael G.; Bibeau, Wendy S.; Bartholomew, John B.

    2011-01-01

    There is an increase in literature suggesting exercise can promote positive changes in physical self-perceptions that can manifest as an increase in global self-esteem. In the present study, we assessed self-esteem using the hierarchical framework of the Exercise and Self-Esteem Model (EXSEM) along with cognitive facets at the subdomain level…

  5. Effects of 12-week exercise training on osteocalcin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and insulin resistance in elderly females with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Nayoung; Kim, Kijin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of exercise training on bone metabolism markers, inflammatory markers, and physical fitness in patients with osteoporosis from an osteoporosis-related immunological perspective. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine elderly female subjects (age, 74.2 ± 3.2 years) were classified into normal, osteopenia, and osteoporosis groups based on the T-score measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The exercise was performed voluntarily by the patients for 1 hour per day, three times per week, for 12 weeks. [Results] The differences between bone mineral content, bone mineral density, and osteocalcin concentrations increased significantly in the osteoporosis group after 12 weeks of exercise and were significantly higher than those in the normal and osteopenia groups. However, the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance score decreased significantly in the osteoporosis group after 12 weeks of exercise. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations tended to decrease in all groups after 12 weeks of exercise and showed an inverse correlation with osteocalcin concentration; however, no statistical significance was observed. [Conclusion] Our findings suggest that an exercise program in patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis effectively reduces the risk of osteoporotic fracture and related diseases since it improves bone density and physical fitness and reduces inflammatory marker levels.

  6. A 12-week aerobic exercise program reduces hepatic fat accumulation and insulin resistance in obese, Hispanic adolescents.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rise in obesity-related morbidity in children and adolescents requires urgent prevention and treatment strategies. Currently, only limited data are available on the effects of exercise programs on insulin resistance, and visceral, hepatic, and intramyocellular fat accumulation. We hypothesized t...

  7. Sustained improvements in fitness and exercise tolerance in obese adolescents after a 12 week exercise intervention.

    PubMed

    Gow, Megan L; van Doorn, Nancy; Broderick, Carolyn R; Hardy, Louise L; Ho, Mandy; Baur, Louise A; Cowell, Chris T; Garnett, Sarah P

    2016-01-01

    A 12 week exercise program was evaluated for its effect on aerobic fitness, anaerobic threshold, physical activity and sedentary behavior levels in obese insulin resistant adolescents post intervention and at follow up. 111 obese insulin resistant 10-17 year olds were recruited to a 12 month lifestyle intervention, known as RESIST. From months 4 to 6, adolescents participated in supervised exercise sessions twice per week (45-60min/session). Aerobic fitness and anaerobic threshold were measured by gas analysis at baseline, 6 months (post intervention) and 12 months (follow up). Self-reported physical activity and sedentary behavior was measured using the CLASS questionnaire. At 6 months aerobic fitness and time to reach the anaerobic threshold had improved by 5.8% [95% CI: 0.8-11.3] and 19.7% [95% CI: 10.4-29.0], respectively compared with baseline. These improvements were maintained at 12 months. Compared to baseline, 6 month physical activity levels increased by 19min/day [95% CI: 5-33] and screen time decreased by 49min/day [95% CI: 23-74] but returned to baseline levels by 12 months. Improved fitness and anaerobic threshold can be sustained up to 6 months following completion of an exercise program possibly enhancing capacity to perform daily functional tasks. PMID:25959765

  8. The effect of 12-week Pilates exercises on wellness in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Su Yeon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the efficiency of 12-week Pilates exercises on wellness in the elderly. Before Pilates exercises training, the 88 elderly (63 females, 25 males) were given and completed a Wellness Scale. Then, the elderly participated in Pilates exercises and completed the same scale afterwards. Results of paired t-test showed that participants in 12-week Pilates exercises experienced significant improvement in physical (t=2.762, P<0.01), social (t=3.362, P<0.001), spiritual (t=2.307, P<0.05), and emotional wellness (t=2.489, P<0.05). Consequently, Pilates exercises helped improve wellness of the elderly. PMID:27162774

  9. The effect of 12-week Pilates exercises on wellness in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Roh, Su Yeon

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the efficiency of 12-week Pilates exercises on wellness in the elderly. Before Pilates exercises training, the 88 elderly (63 females, 25 males) were given and completed a Wellness Scale. Then, the elderly participated in Pilates exercises and completed the same scale afterwards. Results of paired t-test showed that participants in 12-week Pilates exercises experienced significant improvement in physical (t=2.762, P<0.01), social (t=3.362, P<0.001), spiritual (t=2.307, P<0.05), and emotional wellness (t=2.489, P<0.05). Consequently, Pilates exercises helped improve wellness of the elderly. PMID:27162774

  10. Effects of a 12-week healthy-life exercise program on oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and carotid intima-media thickness in obese elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Hwan; Park, Hyuntae; Lim, Seung-Taek; Park, Jin-Kee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of a 12-week exercise program on plasma level of oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in obese elderly women, who are at increased risk of heart disease morbidity. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty participants were assigned into either a control (n = 10) or a supervised exercise program (n = 10) group. The 12-week exercise intervention was performed 3 days per week and involved combined aerobic exercise, resistance exercise, and traditional Korean dance. [Results] Two-factor analysis of variance revealed significant group × time interactions for body mass, diastolic blood pressure, appendicular muscle mass. For high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the ratio of oxidized low-/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, two-factor analysis of variance revealed significant interactions (group × time), indicating responses differed significantly between the control and exercise groups after 12 weeks. [Conclusion] A 12-week low- to moderate-intensity exercise program appears to be beneficial for obese elderly women by improving risk factors for cardiovascular disease. PMID:26157235

  11. Effects of a 12-week healthy-life exercise program on oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and carotid intima-media thickness in obese elderly women.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwan; Park, Hyuntae; Lim, Seung-Taek; Park, Jin-Kee

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of a 12-week exercise program on plasma level of oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in obese elderly women, who are at increased risk of heart disease morbidity. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty participants were assigned into either a control (n = 10) or a supervised exercise program (n = 10) group. The 12-week exercise intervention was performed 3 days per week and involved combined aerobic exercise, resistance exercise, and traditional Korean dance. [Results] Two-factor analysis of variance revealed significant group × time interactions for body mass, diastolic blood pressure, appendicular muscle mass. For high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the ratio of oxidized low-/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, two-factor analysis of variance revealed significant interactions (group × time), indicating responses differed significantly between the control and exercise groups after 12 weeks. [Conclusion] A 12-week low- to moderate-intensity exercise program appears to be beneficial for obese elderly women by improving risk factors for cardiovascular disease. PMID:26157235

  12. The effect of 12 weeks Prop Pilates Exercise Program (PPEP) on body stability and pain for fruit farmers with MSDs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Nam, Sang-Nam; Bae, Ung Ryel; Hwang, Ryong; Lee, Jong-Bok; Kim, Jong-Hyuck

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine possible effects of 12-week Prop Pilates Exercise Program (PPEP) for the fruit farmers (grape, tomato, apple) with musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) on body stability and pain. 131 fruit farmers with MSD were selected and asked to join a 12-week Prop Pilates Exercise Program (PPEP) from 2009 to 2012. The subjects (female=74, male=57) aged 50 to 65 years old voluntarily participated. As a result, it was found that lateral-medial and anterior-posterior of body stability significantly improved in male and female fruit farmers. It was found that pain index (VAS) after 12-week Prop Pilates Exercise Program (PPEP) showed a significant decrease. PMID:24704650

  13. Effect of 12 Weeks of Periodized Resistance Training Upon Total Plasma Adiponectin Concentration in Healthy Young Men.

    PubMed

    Davis, Greggory R; Stephens, Jacqueline M; Nelson, Arnold G

    2015-11-01

    The effects of resistance training on adiponectin have thus far yielded equivocal results. However, the effect of periodized resistance training on plasma adiponectin in offspring of type 2 diabetic and nondiabetic (ND) parents (first-degree family history) has yet to be determined. Untrained healthy young men with and without a first-degree family history of type 2 diabetes were assigned to an exercise intervention group (E) or an active control group (C). The E group performed a 12-week periodized resistance training program, whereas the C group did not participate in any structured exercise program. Fasting plasma samples were obtained pre- and posttraining. Total plasma adiponectin changed significantly in the E group (33.7 ± 14.7%, p = 0.025) but not in the C group (10.8 ± 19.2%). Offspring of type 2 diabetic parents subjects had significantly greater improvements in plasma adiponectin (69.3 ± 34.8%) compared with ND subjects (-3.2 ± 29.9%, p = 0.046). Regular aerobic exercise was significantly correlated with average plasma adiponectin (r = 0.32), whereas first-degree family history of type 2 diabetes (r = -0.58) and decreases in body fat percentage (r = -0.77) were inversely correlated with average plasma adiponectin. Periodized high-intensity resistance training seems to increase plasma adiponectin, particularly in individuals with a first-degree family history of type 2 diabetes or those who experience a significant loss of fat mass. The direct correlation between regular aerobic exercise and adiponectin further suggests that a combination of aerobic and resistance training yields greater improvements in plasma adiponectin compared with resistance training alone. PMID:26274372

  14. 12 Weeks of Combined Endurance and Resistance Training Reduces Innate Markers of Inflammation in a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wens, Inez; Nuyts, Amber H.; Hens, Niel; De Winter, Benedicte Y.; Koppen, Gudrun; Goossens, Herman; Van Damme, Pierre; Berneman, Zwi N.; Eijnde, Bert O.

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we reported that patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) demonstrate improved muscle strength, exercise tolerance, and lean tissue mass following a combined endurance and resistance exercise program. However, the effect of exercise on the underlying disease pathogenesis remains elusive. Since recent evidence supports a crucial role of dendritic cells (DC) in the pathogenesis of MS, we investigated the effect of a 12-week combined exercise program in MS patients on the number and function of DC. We demonstrate an increased number of plasmacytoid DC (pDC) following the exercise program. These pDC display an activated phenotype, as evidenced by increased numbers of circulating CD62L+ and CD80+ pDC. Interestingly, the number of CD80+ pDC positively correlates with the presence of IL-10-producing regulatory type 1 cells (Tr1), an important cell type for maintaining peripheral tolerance to self-antigens. In addition, decreased production of the inflammatory mediators, TNF-α and MMP-9, upon Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation was found at the end of the exercise program. Overall, our findings suggest that the 12-week exercise program reduces the secretion of inflammatory mediators upon TLR stimulation and promotes the immunoregulatory function of circulating pDC, suggestive for a favorable impact of exercise on the underlying immunopathogenesis of MS. PMID:26903712

  15. Predictors of adherence to a 12-week exercise program among men treated for prostate cancer: ENGAGE study.

    PubMed

    Craike, Melinda; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J; Courneya, Kerry S; Fraser, Steve F; Salmon, Jo; Owen, Patrick J; Broadbent, Suzanne; Livingston, Patricia M

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the factors that influence adherence to exercise programs is necessary to develop effective interventions for people with cancer. We examined the predictors of adherence to a supervised exercise program for participants in the ENGAGE study - a cluster randomized controlled trial that assessed the efficacy of a clinician-referred 12-week exercise program among men treated for prostate cancer. Demographic, clinical, behavioral, and psychosocial data from 52 participants in the intervention group were collected at baseline through self-report and medical records. Adherence to the supervised exercise program was assessed through objective attendance records. Adherence to the supervised exercise program was 80.3%. In the univariate analyses, cancer-specific quality of life subscales (role functioning r = 0.37, P = 0.01; sexual activity r = 0.26, P = 0.06; fatigue r = -0.26, P = 0.06, and hormonal symptoms r = -0.31, P = 0.03) and education (d = -0.60, P = 0.011) were associated with adherence. In the subsequent multivariate analysis, role functioning (B = 0.309, P = 0.019) and hormonal symptoms (B = -0.483, P = 0.054) independently predicted adherence. Men who experienced more severe hormonal symptoms had lower levels of adherence to the exercise program. Those who experienced more positive perceptions of their ability to perform daily tasks and leisure activities had higher levels of adherence to the exercise program. Hormonal symptoms and role functioning need to be considered when conducting exercise programs for men who have been treated for prostate cancer. PMID:26872005

  16. Changes in selected cardiorespiratory responses to exercise and in body composition following a 12-week aerobic dance programme.

    PubMed

    Williams, L D; Morton, A R

    1986-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory and body composition changes were evaluated in 25 sedentary females, aged 18 to 30 years, following 12 weeks of aerobic dance training (3 days a week, 45 min a session). Fifteen subjects, from the same population, comprised a control group: they maintained their normal activity and dietary habits over the course of the study. Analysis of variance of the values for selected cardiorespiratory responses revealed that the aerobic dance programme produced training effects in the experimental group. These training effects were indicated by significant improvements in O2 pulse, VE, heart rate and perceived exertion during submaximal exercise. Significant improvements were also noted in VO2 max, maximal O2 pulse, VE max, maximal heart rate and maximal running time on the treadmill. Additionally, increases in lean body mass and body density, together with decreases in percentage body fat and the sum of four skinfold thicknesses were found to be significant for the experimental group. No significant improvements in any of these variables were found for the control group. It was concluded that this 12-week aerobic dance programme was successful in promoting beneficial changes in cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition. PMID:3586112

  17. A 12-Week Exercise Program for Pregnant Women with Obesity to Improve Physical Activity Levels: An Open Randomised Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Alméras, Natalie; Dufresne, Sébastien S.; Robitaille, Julie; Rhéaume, Caroline; Bujold, Emmanuel; Frenette, Jérôme; Tremblay, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether a 12-week supervised exercise program promotes an active lifestyle throughout pregnancy in pregnant women with obesity. Methods In this preliminary randomised trial, pregnant women (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2) were allocated to either standard care or supervised training, from 15 to 27 weeks of gestation. Physical activity was measured by accelerometry at 14, 28 and 36 weeks, while fitness (oxygen consumption (VO2) at the anaerobic threshold), nutrition (caloric intake and macronutrients percentage) and anthropometry were assessed at 14 and 28 weeks of gestation. Analyses were performed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results A total of fifty (50) women were randomised, 25 in each group. There was no time-group interaction for time spent at moderate and vigorous activity (pinteraction = 0.064), but the exercise group’s levels were higher than controls’ at all times (pgroup effect = 0.014). A significant time-group interaction was found for daily physical activity (p = 0.023); similar at baseline ((22.0 ± 6.7 vs 21.8 ± 7.3) x 104 counts/day) the exercise group had higher levels than the control group following the intervention ((22.8 ± 8.3 vs 19.2 ± 4.5) x 104 counts/day, p = 0.020) and at 36 weeks of gestation ((19.2 ± 1.5 vs 14.9 ± 1.5) x 104 counts/day, p = 0.034). Exercisers also gained less weight than controls during the intervention period despite similar nutritional intakes (difference in weight change = -0.1 kg/week, 95% CI -0.2; -0.02, p = 0.016) and improved cardiorespiratory fitness (difference in fitness change = 8.1%, 95% CI 0.7; 9.5, p = 0.041). Conclusions Compared with standard care, a supervised exercise program allows pregnant women with obesity to maintain fitness, limit weight gain and attenuate the decrease in physical activity levels observed in late pregnancy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01610323 PMID:26375471

  18. Promoting healthful diets and exercise: efficacy of a 12-week after-school program in urban African Americans.

    PubMed

    Engels, Hermann-J; Gretebeck, Randall J; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A; Jiménez, Linda

    2005-03-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a unique extracurricular after-school initiative designed to promote healthy diets and exercise in urban African Americans. The Students and Parents Actively Involved in Being Fit after-school program was offered for 12 weeks to students and their parents/guardians at an urban middle school. Specific aims of the intervention were to increase participants' vegetable and fruit intake by using established 5 A Day for Better Health educational resource materials/activities and to affect their health-related fitness through dance, games, and fitness activities. Fifty-six children and 25 parents/guardians completed a standard battery of evaluations before and after the program. Pre-post pairwise t test revealed that both children and their parents/guardians showed an increase in fruit consumption and a reduction in diastolic blood pressure (P <.05). Moreover, children showed improvements in systolic blood pressure and fruit juice, salad, and nonfried potato consumption while parents/guardians showed a decrease in body fat, body mass index, and endurance walk/run time (P <.05). Overall, findings indicate that children tended to gain more diet-related benefits while parents/guardians tended to derive more fitness-related benefits. After-school programs like the Students and Parents Actively Involved in Being Fit initiative can potentially contribute to improved health levels in urban African Americans. PMID:15746836

  19. Do soccer and Zumba exercise improve fitness and indicators of health among female hospital employees? A 12-week RCT.

    PubMed

    Barene, S; Krustrup, P; Jackman, S R; Brekke, O L; Holtermann, A

    2014-12-01

    This randomized controlled study investigated the effectiveness of soccer and Zumba on fitness and health indicators in female participants recruited from a workplace. One hundred seven hospital employees were cluster-randomized to either a soccer group (SG), Zumba group (ZG), or control group (CG). Intervention effects for the two training groups were compared with CG. The training was conducted outside working hours as 2-3 1-h sessions per week for 12 weeks. Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak ), fat percentage, fat mass, bone mineral content, and plasma osteocalcin were measured before and after the intervention period. Based on intention-to-treat-analyses, SG significantly improved the VO2peak relative to body mass (5%; P = 0.02) and decreased heart rate during 100-W cycle exercise (-7 bpm; P = 0.01), total body fat percentage (-1.1%; P = 0.002), and total body fat mass (-1.0 kg; P = 0.001) compared with CG. ZG significantly improved the VO2peak relative to body mass (5%; P = 0.03) and decreased total fat mass (-0.6 kg; P < 0.05) compared with CG. Plasma osteocalcin increased in SG (21%; P < 0.001) and ZG (10%; P = 0.01) compared with CG. The present study indicates that workplace initiated short-term soccer training as well as Zumba outside working hours may result in fitness and modest health benefits among female hospital employees. PMID:24151956

  20. The impact of a 12-week resistance training program on strength, body composition, and self-concept of Hispanic adolescents.

    PubMed

    Velez, Amelia; Golem, Devon L; Arent, Shawn M

    2010-04-01

    Current evidence suggests that a resistance training program may be physically and psychologically beneficial for adolescents. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a structured resistance training program on strength, body composition, and self-concept in normal and overweight Hispanic adolescents. Male and female participants (n = 28; 16.1 +/- 0.2 y; 164.5 +/- 1.4 cm; 63.3 +/- 2.5 kg; 20.0 +/- 1.7% body fat [BF]) were recruited from a predominantly Hispanic high school. Prior to the 12-week program, strength, body composition, and self-concept were assessed. Subjects were randomly assigned to a control group (CON; n = 15) or to a resistance training group (RT; n = 13) that participated in supervised strength training 3 days/week. All measures were repeated at the end of the 12-week program. RT had significantly greater strength increases for bench press (p < 0.001), seated row (p = 0.002), shoulder press (p < 0.001), and squats (p = 0.002). RT had significant reductions in %BF (p = 0.001), whereas CON had slightly increased %BF. RT had an increase in condition/stamina competence (p = 0.008), attractive body adequacy (p = 0.017), and global self-worth (p = 0.013) from pretest to posttest, whereas no change was observed for CON. In conclusion, resistance training resulted in significant physiological and psychological improvements in Hispanic adolescents compared to typical school-based activities. These findings indicate that resistance training can be incorporated into the activities of Hispanic adolescents to promote improved health and fitness. PMID:20375719

  1. Effect of an herbal/botanical supplement on strength, balance, and muscle function following 12-weeks of resistance training: a placebo controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background StemSport (SS; StemTech International, Inc. San Clemente, CA) contains a proprietary blend of the botanical Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and several herbal antioxidant and anti-inflammatory substances. SS has been purported to accelerate tissue repair and restore muscle function following resistance exercise. Here, we examine the effects of SS supplementation on strength adaptations resulting from a 12-week resistance training program in healthy young adults. Methods Twenty-four young adults (16 males, 8 females, mean age = 20.5 ± 1.9 years, mass = 70.9 ± 11.9 kg, stature = 176.6 ± 9.9 cm) completed the twelve week training program. The study design was a double-blind, placebo controlled parallel group trial. Subjects either received placebo or StemSport supplement (SS; mg/day) during the training. 1-RM bench press, 1-RM leg press, vertical jump height, balance (star excursion and center of mass excursion), isokinetic strength (elbow and knee flexion/extension) and perception of recovery were measured at baseline and following the 12-week training intervention. Results Resistance training increased 1-RM strength (p < 0.008), vertical jump height (p < 0.03), and isokinetic strength (p < 0.05) in both SS and placebo groups. No significant group-by-time interactions were observed (all p-values >0.10). Conclusions These data suggest that compared to placebo, the SS herbal/botanical supplement did not enhance training induced adaptations to strength, balance, and muscle function above strength training alone. PMID:24910543

  2. Effects of a 12-week Rehabilitation Program with Music & Exercise Groups on Range of Motion in Young Children with Severe Burns

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Christine Tuden; Serghiou, Michael; Herndon, David N.; Suman, Oscar E.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that rehabilitation programs supplemented with a strength and endurance-based exercise program improve lean body mass, pulmonary function, endurance, strength, and functional outcomes in severely burned children over the age of 7-years when compared to standard of care. To date, supplemental exercise programming for severely burned children under the age of 7-years has not yet been explored. The purpose of this study was to determine if a 12-week rehabilitation program supplemented with music & exercise, was more effective in improving functional outcomes than the standard of care alone. METHODS This is a descriptive study that measured elbow and knee range of motion (ROM) in 24 severely burned children between ages two and six years. Groups were compared for demographics as well as active and passive ROM to bilateral elbows and knees. A total of 15 patients completed the rehabilitation with supplemental music and exercise, and data was compared to 9 patients who received standard of care. RESULTS Patients receiving the 12-week program significantly improved ROM in all joints assessed except for one. Patients receiving standard of care showed a significant improvement in only one of the joints assessed. CONCLUSION Providing a structured supplemental music and exercise program in conjunction with occupational and physical therapy seems to improve both passive and active ROM to a greater extent than the standard of care alone. PMID:18849852

  3. Effects of a 12-week rehabilitation program with music & exercise groups on range of motion in young children with severe burns.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Christine Tuden; Serghiou, Michael; Herndon, David N; Suman, Oscar E

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that rehabilitation programs supplemented with a strength and endurance-based exercise program improve lean body mass, pulmonary function, endurance, strength, and functional outcomes in severely burned children over the age of 7-years when compared with standard of care (SOC). To date, supplemental exercise programming for severely burned children under the age of 7-years has not yet been explored. The purpose of this study was to determine if a 12-week rehabilitation program supplemented with music & exercise, was more effective in improving functional outcomes than the SOC alone. This is a descriptive study that measured elbow and knee range of motion (ROM) in 24 severely burned children between ages 2 and 6 years. Groups were compared for demographics as well as active and passive ROM to bilateral elbows and knees. A total of 15 patients completed the rehabilitation with supplemental music and exercise, and data was compared with 9 patients who received SOC. Patients receiving the 12-week program significantly improved ROM in all joints assessed except for one. Patients receiving SOC showed a significant improvement in only one of the joints assessed. Providing a structured supplemental music and exercise program in conjunction with occupational and physical therapy seems to improve both passive and active ROM to a greater extent than the SOC alone. PMID:18849852

  4. Magnesium Replacement Does Not Improve Insulin Resistance in Patients With Metabolic Syndrome: A 12-Week Randomized Double-Blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Lima de Souza e Silva, Maria de Lourdes; Cruz, Thomaz; Rodrigues, Luiz Erlon; Ladeia, Ana Marice; Bomfim, Olivia; Olivieri, Lucas; Melo, Juliana; Correia, Raquel; Porto, Mirna; Cedro, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effect of magnesium (Mg) replacement on insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk factors in women with metabolic syndrome (MS) without diabetes. Methods This 12-week clinical randomized double-blind study compared the effects of 400 mg/day of Mg with those of a placebo (n = 72) on fasting glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, lipid profile and CRP. Mg was measured in serum (SMg) and in mononuclear cells (MMg). Results Hypomagnesemia (SMg < 1.7 mg/dL) was seen in 23.2% of patients and intracellular depletion in 36.1% of patients. The MMg means were lower in patients with obesity (0.94 ± 0.54 μg/mg vs. 1.19 ± 0.6 μg/mg, P = 0.04), and insulin resistance (0.84 ± 0.33 μg/mg vs. 1.14 ± 0.69 µg/mg, P < 0.05). Mg replacement did not alter SMg (1.82 ± 0.14 mg/dL vs. 1.81 ± 0.16 mg/dL, P = 0.877) and tended to increment MMg (0.90 ± 0.40 μg/mg vs. 1.21 ± 0.73 μg/mg, P = 0.089). HOMA-IR did not alter in interventions nor in placebo group (3.2 ± 2.0 to 2.8 ± 1.9, P = 0.368; 3.6 ± 1.9 to 3.2 ± 1.8, respectively), neither did other metabolic parameters. Conclusion Serum and intracellular Mg depletion is common in patients with MS; however, Mg replacement in recommended dosage did not increase significantly Mg levels, neither reduced insulin resistance or metabolic control. PMID:25247020

  5. Effect of a 12-Week Low vs. High Intensity Aerobic Exercise Training on Appetite-Regulating Hormones in Obese Adolescents: A Randomized Exercise Intervention Study.

    PubMed

    Prado, Wagner Luiz; Lofrano-Prado, Mara Cristina; Oyama, Lila Missae; Cardel, Michelle; Gomes, Priscyla Praxedes; Andrade, Maria Laura S S; Freitas, Camila R M; Balagopal, Prabhakaran; Hill, James O

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about how the intensity of aerobic training influences appetite-regulating hormones in obese adolescents. Our goal was to assess the effect of low and high intensity aerobic trainings on food intake and appetite-regulating hormones in obese adolescents. Forty three obese adolescents (age: 13-18y, BMI: 34.48 ± 3.94 kg/m2) were randomized into high intensity training (HIT; n = 20) or low intensity training (LIT; n = 23) groups for 12 weeks. All participants also received the same nutritional, psychological and clinical counseling. Pre- and postintervention energy intake (EI) and circulating levels of insulin, leptin, peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36) and ghrelin were measured. Adolescents in the HIT showed a reduction in total EI and an increase in PYY3-36 (p < .05). Aerobic exercise training performed at ventilatory threshold 1 intensity, reduced EI and augmented PYY3-36 in obese adolescents, compared with LIT. The data suggest that HIT and LIT have differential effects in the regulation of appetite signals and subsequent EI in obese adolescents. PMID:26680421

  6. Portuguese Special Course: 12 Weeks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This 12-week course in beginning Portuguese comprises four volumes of student text (Lessons 1-55) and a fifth volume of Portuguese-English/English-Portuguese vocabulary. Lesson materials consist of basic dialogs with English translation, recombination dialogs, readings and comprehension questions, oral exercises, and in later units, additional…

  7. A 12 week aerobic exercise program improves fitness, hepatic insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in obese Hispanic adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rise in obesity related morbidity in children and adolescents requires urgent prevention and treatment strategies. Strictly controlled exercise programs might be useful tools to improve insulin sensitivity and glucose kinetics. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that a 12-wk aerobic exerci...

  8. Swahili 12 Weeks Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This 12-weeks course in basic Swahili comprises 55 lesson units in five volumes. The general course format consists of (1) perception drills for comprehension, oral production, and association using "situational picture" illustrations; (2) dialogs in English and Swahili, with cartoon guides; (3) sequenced pattern and recombination drills, and (4)…

  9. Resistance exercise training and the orthostatic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, J. P.; Bamman, M. M.; Yelle, J. M.; LeBlanc, A. D.; Rowe, R. M.; Greenisen, M. C.; Lee, S. M.; Spector, E. R.; Fortney, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been suggested to increase blood volume, increase the sensitivity of the carotid baroreceptor cardiac reflex response (BARO), and decrease leg compliance, all factors that are expected to improve orthostatic tolerance. To further test these hypotheses, cardiovascular responses to standing and to pre-syncopal limited lower body negative pressure (LBNP) were measured in two groups of sedentary men before and after a 12-week period of either exercise (n = 10) or no exercise (control, n = 9). Resistance exercise training consisted of nine isotonic exercises, four sets of each, 3 days per week, stressing all major muscle groups. After exercise training, leg muscle volumes increased (P < 0.05) by 4-14%, lean body mass increased (P = 0.00) by 2.0 (0.5) kg, leg compliance and BARO were not significantly altered, and the maximal LBNP tolerated without pre-syncope was not significantly different. Supine resting heart rate was reduced (P = 0.03) without attenuating the heart rate or blood pressure responses during the stand test or LBNP. Also, blood volume (125I and 51Cr) and red cell mass were increased (P < 0.02) by 2.8% and 3.9%, respectively. These findings indicate that intense resistance exercise increases blood volume but does not consistently improve orthostatic tolerance.

  10. Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Damon C. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An exercise device 10 is particularly well suited for use in low gravity environments, and includes a frame 12 with plurality of resistance elements 30,82 supported in parallel on the frame. A load transfer member 20 is moveable relative to the frame for transferring the applied force to the free end of each captured resistance element. Load selection template 14 is removably secured both to the load transfer member, and a plurality of capture mechanisms engage the free end of corresponding resistance elements. The force applying mechanism 53 may be a handle, harness or other user interface for applying a force to move the load transfer member.

  11. A 12 WEEKS EXERCISE PROGRAM RESULTED IN REDUCED VISCERAL FAT AND FASTING INSULIN BUT NOT TOTAL AND INTRAMYOCELLULAR FAT IN HISPANIC OBESE ADOLESCENTS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The high prevalence of obesity in children and adolescents is a serious public health concern. Weight loss is known to improve insulin sensitivity but is difficult to achieve. The independent effects of exercise on body fat distribution and insulin sensitivity in the absence of overall w...

  12. A 12-Week Vigorous Exercise Protocol in a Healthy Group of Persons over 65: Study of Physical Function by means of the Senior Fitness Test.

    PubMed

    Todde, Francesco; Melis, Franco; Mura, Roberto; Pau, Massimiliano; Fois, Francesco; Magnani, Sara; Ibba, Gianfranco; Crisafulli, Antonio; Tocco, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 -9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 -15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 -8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults. PMID:27243035

  13. A 12-Week Vigorous Exercise Protocol in a Healthy Group of Persons over 65: Study of Physical Function by means of the Senior Fitness Test

    PubMed Central

    Todde, Francesco; Melis, Franco; Mura, Roberto; Pau, Massimiliano; Fois, Francesco; Magnani, Sara; Ibba, Gianfranco; Crisafulli, Antonio; Tocco, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults. PMID:27243035

  14. Exercise training versus diet-induced weight-loss on metabolic risk factors and inflammatory markers in obese subjects: a 12-week randomized intervention study.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Tore; Paulsen, Søren K; Bruun, Jens M; Pedersen, Steen B; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise training and diet-induced weight loss alone or in combination on inflammatory markers in circulation, in adipose tissue (AT) and in skeletal muscle (SM) in obese subjects. Seventy-nine obese subjects were randomized into a 12-wk intervention: 1) exercise only (EXO), 2) diet-induced weight loss using a very low energy diet (DIO), and 3) exercise and diet-induced weight-loss combined (DEX). Blood samples (metabolic and inflammatory markers) and AT and SM biopsies (mRNA expression) were collected at baseline and after 12 wk. In the EXO group the weight loss was 3.5 kg and in the DIO and DEX groups it was 12 kg in both. Vo(2max) was increased by 14-18% in the EXO and DEX groups with no changes in the DIO group. In the DIO and DEX groups, circulating levels of MCP-1, MIP-1alpha, IL-15, and IL-18 were decreased, and adiponectin was increased (P < 0.05 for all). In the EXO group, MCP-1 was decreased with 10% (P = 0.06). By combining the weight loss in all three groups, we found a correlation between the degree of weight loss and improvement in several of the inflammatory markers (P < 0.05). In AT biopsies, subjects in the DIO and DEX groups achieved a general beneficial but nonsignificant effect on the gene expression of inflammatory markers. In the EXO group, no changes in AT adipokine mRNA were found except for an increment of adiponectin (P < 0.05). In SM, the only observed change was that the gene expression of IL-6 was increased in all three groups (P < 0.05). In conclusion, rather large weight losses (>5-7%) were found to have beneficial effects on circulating inflammatory markers in these obese subjects. Aerobic exercise for 12 wk, which increased Vo(2max), was found to have no effects on circulating inflammatory markers in these obese patients. It is suggested that more intensive exercise may be necessary to affect systemic inflammation. PMID:20086201

  15. Advanced resistive exercise device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor); Niebuhr, Jason (Inventor); Cruz, Santana F. (Inventor); Lamoreaux, Christopher D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to an exercise device, which includes a vacuum cylinder and a flywheel. The flywheel provides an inertial component to the load, which is particularly well suited for use in space as it simulates exercising under normal gravity conditions. Also, the present invention relates to an exercise device, which has a vacuum cylinder and a load adjusting armbase assembly.

  16. Compact, Controlled Resistance Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulus, David C.; DeWitt, John K.; Reich, Alton J.; Shaw, James E.; Deaconu, Stelu S.

    2011-01-01

    Spaceflight leads to muscle and bone atrophy. Isoinertial (free-weight) exercises provide a sufficient stimulus to elicit increases in both muscle strength and bone mineral density in Earth-based studies. While exercise equipment is in use on the International Space Station for crewmember health maintenance, current devices are too large to place in a transport vehicle or small spacecraft. Therefore, a portable computer controlled resistance exercise device is being developed that is able to simulate the inertial loading experienced when lifting a mass on Earth. This portable device weighs less than 50 lb and can simulate the resistance of lifting and lowering up to 600 lb of free-weights. The objective is to allow crewmembers to perform resistance exercise with loads capable of maintaining muscle and bone health. The device is reconfigurable and allows for the performance of typical Earth-based free-weight exercises. Forces exerted, volume of work, range of motion, time-under-tension, and speed/ acceleration of movement are recorded and can be remotely monitored to track progress and modify individual protocols based on exercise session data. A performance evaluation will be completed and data will be presented that include ground-reaction force comparisons between the device and free-weight dead-lifts over a spectrum of resistance levels. Movement biomechanics will also be presented.

  17. Simple Resistance Exercise helps Patients with Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, A; Abe, K; Usami, K; Imaizumi, H; Hayashi, M; Okai, K; Kanno, Y; Tanji, N; Watanabe, H; Ohira, H

    2015-10-01

    To date, only limited evidence has supported the notion that resistance exercise positively impacts non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. We evaluated the effects of resistance exercise on the metabolic parameters of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in 53 patients who were assigned to either a group that performed push-ups and squats 3 times weekly for 12 weeks (exercise group; n=31) or a group that did not (control; n=22). Patients in the control group proceeded with regular physical activities under a restricted diet throughout the study. The effects of the exercise were compared between the 2 groups after 12 weeks. Fat-free mass and muscle mass significantly increased, whereas hepatic steatosis grade, mean insulin and ferritin levels, and the homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance index were significantly decreased in the exercise group. Compliance with the resistance exercise program did not significantly correlate with patient background characteristics such as age, sex, BMI and metabolic complications. These findings show that resistance exercise comprising squats and push-ups helps to improve the characteristics of metabolic syndrome in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:26090879

  18. Aerobic exercise augments muscle transcriptome profile of resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Tommy R; Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; Tesch, Per A; Rullman, Eric; Gustafsson, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Recent reports suggest that aerobic exercise may boost the hypertrophic response to short-term resistance training. This study explored the effects of an acute aerobic exercise bout on the transcriptional response to subsequent resistance exercise. Ten moderately trained men performed ∼45 min cycling on one leg followed by 4 × 7 maximal knee extensions for each leg, 15 min later. Thus, one limb performed aerobic and resistance exercise (AE + RE) while the opposing leg did resistance exercise only (RE). Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of each leg 3 h after the resistance exercise bout. Using DNA microarray, we analyzed differences [≥1.5-fold, false discovery rate (FDR) ≤10%] in gene expression profiles for the two modes of exercise. There were 176 genes up (127)- or downregulated (49) by AE + RE compared with RE. Among the most significant differentially expressed genes were established markers for muscle growth and oxidative capacity, novel cytokines, transcription factors, and micro-RNAs (miRNAs). The most enriched functional categories were those linked to carbohydrate metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Upstream analysis revealed that vascular endothelial growth factor, cAMP-response element-binding protein, Tet methylcytosine dioxygenase, and mammalian target of rapamycin were regulators highly activated by AE + RE, whereas JnK, NF-κβ, MAPK, and several miRNAs were inhibited. Thus, aerobic exercise alters the skeletal muscle transcriptional signature of resistance exercise to initiate important gene programs promoting both myofiber growth and improved oxidative capacity. These results provide novel insight into human muscle adaptations to diverse exercise modes and offer the very first genomic basis explaining how aerobic exercise may augment, rather than compromise, muscle growth induced by resistance exercise. PMID:27101291

  19. Resistance exercise: how much is enough?

    PubMed

    Loveless, Melinda S; Ihm, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organizations recommend that resistance exercise be part of an adult health and fitness regimen. Extensive research has been done over the years on how to appropriately use a resistance exercise program to increase strength and power for general health and improve athletic performance. This article will review the literature on the components of a resistance exercise program and the recommendations for increasing strength and power in healthy adults. PMID:25968856

  20. Resistance exercise in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yardley, Jane E; Sigal, Ronald J; Perkins, Bruce A; Riddell, Michael C; Kenny, Glen P

    2013-12-01

    It is relatively well known that moderate-intensity aerobic exercise increases the risk of hypoglycemia in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Conversely, brief high-intensity (anaerobic) activity can cause post-exercise hyperglycemia. Recent evidence has indicated that including small amounts of anaerobic activity, either in the form of short sprints or as resistance exercise (weight lifting), during aerobic exercise sessions may decrease the drop in blood glucose levels associated with moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. This review discusses the recent developments in the area of exercise and type 1 diabetes, with a particular focus on the effects of resistance exercise. Practical exercise recommendations, as well as suggestions for the future direction of research in this area, are also provided. PMID:24321724

  1. Resistance Exercise in Pregnancy and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Ruben; Perales, Maria

    2016-09-01

    As the health benefits of exercise are increasingly recognized, the traditional advice to rest during pregnancy has changed toward a more healthy and active pregnancy, therefore different forms of exercise have been integrated into the life of the pregnant woman. Although the benefits of using a combination of resistance and aerobic exercises are not yet determined, studies about resistance and strengthen training programs are few although no adverse outcomes were reported. PMID:27388962

  2. Effects of hydraulic-resistance exercise on strength and power in untrained healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, SungChul; Islam, Mohammod M; Rogers, Michael E; Kusunoki, Masanobu; Okada, Akiyoshi; Takeshima, Nobuo

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of hydraulic-resistance exercise (HDRE) in improving strength and power in healthy older adults. Thirty-nine older adults (68.6 ± 4.9 years; 15 men, 24 women) were divided into a training group or control group (CON). Hydraulic-resistance exercise consisted of a 12-week supervised program, 50 min · d(-1), 3 d · wk(-1). Hydraulic-resistance exercise was used for 10 exercises: Chest press and pull, shoulder press and pull, low back flexion and extension squat, leg adduction/abduction, leg press, and elbow extension/flexion. The number of the sets and the hydraulic-resistance dial setting (D) were gradually increased in 3 stages during the 12-week program. Strength, rating of perceived exertion, and relative intensity during exercise increased significantly from stage to stage whereas repetition velocity decreased. Total work was higher in the second stage compared with the first but lower in the final stage because of reduced repetitions. Peak torque at D2 and D11 increased (p < 0.05) for knee extension (58 and 9%) and flexion (94 and 21%), chest press (35 and 12%) and pull (29 and 14%), shoulder press (14 and 18%) and pull (75 and 18%), and low back flexion (59 and 46%) and extension (84 and 34%). Peak power at D2 and D11 also increased (p < 0.05) for knee extension (140 and 26%) and flexion (96 and 36%), chest press (54 and 28%) and pull (62 and 23%), shoulder press (55 and 31%) and pull (159 and 30%), and low back flexion (177 and 127%) and extension (104 and 66%). There were no significant changes in the CON. Hydraulic-resistance exercise elicits significant improvements in strength and power in older adults. Therefore, HDRE is an effective form of resistance training that provides benefits using low and moderate intensity of training for older adults. PMID:20664367

  3. Strength Gains as a Result of Brief, Infrequent Resistance Exercise in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James; Steele, James; McKinnon, Pat; McKinnon, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Chronological aging is associated with a decrease in skeletal muscle mass and bone mineral density, an increase in fat mass, frequency of falls and fractures, and the likelihood of obesity, diabetes, and coronary heart disease. Resistance exercise has been shown to counter all of these effects of aging and, in turn, reduce the risk of all-cause mortality. However, variables such as volume and frequency have become contentious issues, with recent publications suggesting that similar physiological adaptations are possible with both high- and low-volume approaches. The aim of this research was to consider strength increases as a result of brief, infrequent resistance exercise. The present study offers data from 33 (14 male and 19 female) older adults (M = 55 years) who underwent brief (<15 minutes per exercise session), infrequent (2×/week), resistance exercise to a high intensity of effort (6-repetition maximum) at a controlled repetition duration (10 seconds concentric : 10 seconds eccentric) on 5 resistance machines (chest press, leg press, pull-down, seated row, and overhead press). Data is presented for training interventions of 12 weeks (male) and 19 weeks (female). Significant strength increases were identified for all exercises. With the detailed health benefits obtainable, the present study suggests that resistance exercise can be efficacious in much smaller volumes than previously considered. PMID:26464894

  4. A Constant-Force Resistive Exercise Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colosky, Paul; Ruttley, Tara

    2010-01-01

    A constant-force resistive exercise unit (CFREU) has been invented for use in both normal gravitational and microgravitational environments. In comparison with a typical conventional exercise machine, this CFREU weighs less and is less bulky: Whereas weight plates and associated bulky supporting structures are used to generate resistive forces in typical conventional exercise machines, they are not used in this CFREU. Instead, resistive forces are generated in this CFREU by relatively compact, lightweight mechanisms based on constant-torque springs wound on drums. Each such mechanism is contained in a module, denoted a resistive pack, that includes a shaft for making a torque connection to a cable drum. During a stroke of resistive exercise, the cable is withdrawn from the cable drum against the torque exerted by the resistance pack. The CFREU includes a housing, within which can be mounted one or more resistive pack(s). The CFREU also includes mechanisms for engaging any combination of (1) one or more resistive pack(s) and (2) one or more spring(s) within each resistive pack to obtain a desired level of resistance.

  5. The immune response to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Simonson, S R

    2001-08-01

    The immune response to exercise has received increased attention in the last decade. Most of this attention has focused on aerobic exercise (AEX), whereas the effect of resistance exercise (REX) has received comparatively little notice. Resistance exercise and AEX have different physiologic impacts; perhaps this also applies to the immune system. The purpose of this review was to determine a consensus from the REX immune studies that have been completed. This is complicated by the multitude of immune parameters, the varying methods used to assess them, and the paucity of studies performed. Thus, it is difficult to make a blanket statement. There is a REX-induced leukocytosis. Resistance conditioning (RCO) does not alter this response or affect the resting immune system. From these data, it appears that neither REX nor RCO demonstrates a significant impact on peripheral immunosurveillance. PMID:11710669

  6. Resistance exercise enhances cognitive function in mouse.

    PubMed

    Suijo, K; Inoue, S; Ohya, Y; Odagiri, Y; Takamiya, T; Ishibashi, H; Itoh, M; Fujieda, Y; Shimomitsu, T

    2013-04-01

    Physical exercise has been shown to increase adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and to enhance synaptic plasticity. It has been demonstrated that these neuroprotective effects can be observed following aerobic exercise. However, it remains unknown whether plasticity molecules, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), are expressed in the hippocampus following resistance exercise. We applied voluntary progressive-resistance wheel exercise (RE) for 14 days, and measured BDNF and CREB in the hippocampus. The Morris water maze was also performed to estimate learning and memory. Furthermore, we measured RE effects on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) mediating muscle protein synthesis in the soleus. As a result, we found that RE enhanced cognition and elevated BDNF and CREB expressions in the hippocampus. Also, RE activated the mTOR-p70S6K signaling pathway in the soleus. We found that phosphorylated mTOR and p70S6K were significantly positively correlated with BDNF expression. Our results indicated that resistance exercise drove the protein synthesis signaling pathway in the soleus and enhanced hippocampal synaptic plasticity-related molecules. These results suggest the beneficial effects of resistance exercise on cognitive function. PMID:23041964

  7. Tachycardia During Resistance Exercise: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Andrew C.; Parks, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    This case study examined a weight-trained (WT) male who had an unusually high heart rate response to heavy resistance exercise and self-administered anabolic androgenic steroids as an ergogenic aid to training. The subject was compared to 18 other WT people. His tachycardia response occurred only in the presence of a pressure load and not with a…

  8. Japanese 12-Week Course. Volume I, Introduction and Lessons 1-15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Educational Systems Development Center.

    This first volume in the Defense Language Institute's 12-week course in Japanese presents an introduction to Japanese phonology for the non-linguist beginning student, and a description of the format used throughout the DLI series (perception drills, dialogues with English equivalents, grammar notes, and exercises and conversations). This volume…

  9. Exercise Device Would Exert Selectable Constant Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Damon C.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus called the resistive exercise device (RED) has been proposed to satisfy a requirement for exercise equipment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) that could passively exert a selectable constant load on both the outward and return strokes. The RED could be used alone; alternatively, the RED could be used in combination with another apparatus called the treadmill with vibration isolation and stabilization (TVIS), in which case the combination would be called the subject load device (SLD). The basic RED would be a passive device, but it could incorporate an electric motor to provide eccentric augmentation (augmentation to make the load during inward movement greater than the load during outward movement). The RED concept represents a unique approach to providing a constant but selectable resistive load for exercise for the maintenance and development of muscles. Going beyond the original ISS application, the RED could be used on Earth as resistive weight training equipment. The advantage of the RED over conventional weight-lifting equipment is that it could be made portable and lightweight.

  10. Articulating Support for Horizontal Resistive Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundo, Daniel; Schaffner, Grant; Bentley, Jason; Loehr, James A.

    2005-01-01

    A versatile mechanical device provides support for a user engaged in any of a variety of resistive exercises in a substantially horizontal orientation. The unique features and versatility of the device promise to be useful in bedrest studies, rehabilitation, and specialized strength training. The device affords a capability for selectively loading and unloading of portions of the user s body through its support mechanisms, so that specific parts of the body can be trained with little or no effect on other parts that may be disabled or in the process of recovery from injury. Thus, the device is ideal for rehabilitation exercise programs prescribed by physicians and physical therapists. The capability for selective loading and support also offers potential benefits to strength and conditioning trainers and athletes who wish to selectively strengthen selected parts. The principal innovative aspect of the device is that it supports the subject s weight while enabling the subject, lying substantially horizontally, to perform an exercise that closely approximates a full standing squat. The device includes mechanisms that support the subject in such a way that the hips are free to translate both horizontally and vertically and are free to rotate about the line connecting the hips. At the same time, the shoulders are free to translate horizontally while the upper back is free to rotate about the line connecting the shoulders. Among the mechanisms for hip motion and support is a counterbalance that offsets the weight of the subject as the subject s pelvis translates horizontally and vertically and rotates the pelvis about the line connecting the hips. The counterbalance is connected to a pelvic support system that allows these pelvic movements. The subject is also supported at the shoulder by a mechanism that can tilt to provide continuous support of the upper back while allowing the rotation required for arching the back as the pelvis is displaced. The shoulder support

  11. Effects of a 12-week strength training program on experimented fencers' movement time.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Juan C; Alonso, Cruz J; Sedano, Silvia; de Benito, Ana M

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 12-week strength training program on movement time (MT) on fencers of national level. Twelve male fencers were randomly divided into 2 groups: the control group (CG: N = 6; age, 22.3 ± 8.1 years) and the treatment group (TG: N = 6; age, 24.8 ± 7.2 years). The CG fencers followed the standard physical conditioning program, which was partially modified for the TG. The TG participated in a 12-week strength training program divided into 2 parts: maximal strength training, including weightlifting exercises (2 days a week for 6 weeks) and explosive strength training, with combined weights and plyometric exercises (2 days a week for 6 weeks). Body mass, body fat, muscle mass, jumping ability, maximal strength, reaction time, and MT were measured on 4 separate occasions. The TG demonstrated significant increases (p ≤ 0.05) in maximal strength and jumping ability after 6 weeks of training and in MT after 12 weeks. These improvements remained unaltered during the 4-week detraining period. It may be concluded that a 12-week strength training program can improve maximal and explosive strength, and these increases can be transferred to MT performance. However, fencers need time to transfer the gains. PMID:24942170

  12. Resistance exercise: an effective strategy to reverse muscle wasting in hemodialysis patients?

    PubMed

    Rhee, Connie M; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2014-09-01

    Muscle wasting is a common complication afflicting maintenance hemodialysis (HD) patients, and it is associated with decreased muscle function, exercise performance, physical function, and quality of life. Meanwhile, numerous epidemiologic studies have consistently shown that greater muscle mass (ascertained by body anthropometry surrogates, body composition tests such as dual x-ray absorptiometry, and/or serum creatinine in patients with little to no residual kidney function) is associated with increased survival in this population. The pathophysiology of muscle wasting in HD patients is complex and may be caused by poor dietary intake, catabolic effects of dialysis therapy, hormonal alterations (e.g., decreased levels or resistance to anabolic hormones, increased levels of catabolic hormones), inflammation, metabolic acidosis, and concurrent comorbidities. Muscle disuse resulting from low physical activity is an important yet under-appreciated risk factor for muscle wasting. Intra-dialytic resistance exercise training has been suggested as a potential strategy to correct and/or prevent this complication in HD patients, but prior studies examining this exercise modality as an anabolic intervention have shown mixed results. In a recently published 12-week randomized controlled trial of a novel intra-dialytic progressive resistance exercise training (PRET) program vs. control therapy conducted in HD and non-HD patients, PRET resulted in increased muscle volume and strength in both groups. At this time, further study is needed to determine if anabolic improvements imparted by resistance exercise translates into improved physical function and quality of life, decreased hospitalization and mortality risk, and greater cost-effectiveness in HD patients. PMID:25163460

  13. Resistance to Aerobic Exercise Training Causes Metabolic Dysfunction and Reveals Novel Exercise-Regulated Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Sarah J.; Rivas, Donato A.; Alves-Wagner, Ana B.; Hirshman, Michael F.; Gallagher, Iain J.; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Atkins, Ryan; Greenhaff, Paul L.; Qi, Nathan R.; Gustafsson, Thomas; Fielding, Roger A.; Timmons, James A.; Britton, Steven L.; Koch, Lauren G.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2013-01-01

    Low aerobic exercise capacity is a risk factor for diabetes and a strong predictor of mortality, yet some individuals are “exercise-resistant” and unable to improve exercise capacity through exercise training. To test the hypothesis that resistance to aerobic exercise training underlies metabolic disease risk, we used selective breeding for 15 generations to develop rat models of low and high aerobic response to training. Before exercise training, rats selected as low and high responders had similar exercise capacities. However, after 8 weeks of treadmill training, low responders failed to improve their exercise capacity, whereas high responders improved by 54%. Remarkably, low responders to aerobic training exhibited pronounced metabolic dysfunction characterized by insulin resistance and increased adiposity, demonstrating that the exercise-resistant phenotype segregates with disease risk. Low responders had impaired exercise-induced angiogenesis in muscle; however, mitochondrial capacity was intact and increased normally with exercise training, demonstrating that mitochondria are not limiting for aerobic adaptation or responsible for metabolic dysfunction in low responders. Low responders had increased stress/inflammatory signaling and altered transforming growth factor-β signaling, characterized by hyperphosphorylation of a novel exercise-regulated phosphorylation site on SMAD2. Using this powerful biological model system, we have discovered key pathways for low exercise training response that may represent novel targets for the treatment of metabolic disease. PMID:23610057

  14. Computational Models of Exercise on the Advanced Resistance Exercise Device (ARED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, Nate; Caldwell, Erin; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Peters,Brian; Fincke, Renita; DeWitt, John; Poutz-Snyder, Lori

    2011-01-01

    Muscle and bone loss remain a concern for crew returning from space flight. The advanced resistance exercise device (ARED) is used for on-orbit resistance exercise to help mitigate these losses. However, characterization of how the ARED loads the body in microgravity has yet to be determined. Computational models allow us to analyze ARED exercise in both 1G and 0G environments. To this end, biomechanical models of the squat, single-leg squat, and deadlift exercise on the ARED have been developed to further investigate bone and muscle forces resulting from the exercises.

  15. The Role of Resistance Exercise in Weight Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Jeffrey L.

    2002-01-01

    Explains the role of weight training in weight loss, noting how weight training contributes to the creation of a negative energy balance and explaining how resistance exercise can cause an increase in fat oxidation, both acutely and chronically. Resistance exercise has an indirect impact on weight and fat loss through increasing resting metabolic…

  16. Metabolic consequences of resistive-type exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    This brief review concerns acute and chronic metabolic responses to resistive-type exercise (RTE) (i.e., Olympic/power weight lifting and bodybuilding). Performance of RTE presents power output substantially greater (10-15-fold) than that evident with endurance-type exercise. Accordingly, RTE relies heavily on the anaerobic enzyme machinery of skeletal muscle for energy supply, with alterations in the rate of aerobic metabolism being modest. Hydrolysis of high energy phosphate compounds (PC, ATP), glycogenolysis, and glycolysis are evident during an acute bout of RTE as indicated by metabolic markers in mixed fiber type skeletal muscle samples. The type of RTE probably influences the magnitude of these responses since the increase in blood lactate is much greater during a typical "bodybuilding" than "power lifting" session. The influence of RTE training on acute metabolic responses to RTE has received little attention. An individual's inherent metabolic characteristics are apparently sufficient to meet the energy demands of RTE as training of this type does not increase VO2max or substantially alter the content of marker enzymes in mixed fiber type skeletal muscle. Analyses of pools of fast- vs slow-twitch fibers, however, indicate that RTE-induced changes may be fiber type specific. Future studies should better delineate the metabolic responses to RTE and determine whether these are related to the enhanced performance associated with such training.

  17. Central and Peripheral Fatigue During Resistance Exercise - A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Zając, Adam; Chalimoniuk, Małgorzata; Maszczyk, Adam; Gołaś, Artur; Lngfort, Józef

    2015-12-22

    Resistance exercise is a popular form of conditioning for numerous sport disciplines, and recently different modes of strength training are being evaluated for health benefits. Resistance exercise differs significantly in nature, and several variables determine the direction and range of adaptive changes that occur in the muscular and skeletal system of the body. Some modes of resistance training can also be effective in stimulating the cardiovascular system. These variables include exercise selection (general, specific, single or multi joint, dynamic, explosive), type of resistance (free weights, variable resistance, isokinetics), order of exercise (upper and lower body or push and pull exercises), and most of all the training load which includes intensity expressed as % of 1RM, number of repetitions, number of sets and the rest interval between sets. Manipulating these variables allows for specific adaptive changes which may include gains in muscle mass, muscle strength or muscle endurance. It has been well established that during resistance exercise fatigue occurs, regardless of the volume and intensity of work applied. The peripheral mechanisms of fatigue have been studied and explained in more detail than those related to the CNS. This review is an attempt to bring together the latest knowledge regarding fatigue, both peripheral and central, during resistance exercise. The authors of this review concentrated on physiological and biochemical mechanisms underlying fatigue in exercises performed with maximal intensity, as well as those performed to exhaustion with numerous repetitions and submaximal load. PMID:26839616

  18. Towards standardization of the nomenclature of resistance training exercises.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Matthew C; Brown, Lee E; Coburn, Jared W; Judelson, Daniel A; Cullen-Carroll, Nick

    2013-05-01

    There is a disagreement surrounding the names of resistance training exercises. The purpose of this study was to survey different professionals regarding the nomenclature of resistance training exercises. Two hundred five participants volunteered for the study, of which, 64.9 % were male. Participants self-identified as either certified athletic trainer (22.4%), academic (18.5%), strength and conditioning coach (25.9%), personal trainer (15.6%), or clinician (17.6%). Participants were asked to name 10 resistance training exercises as depicted by pictures. A χ2 for exercise name by current profession analysis was used to analyze frequency differences. All exercises in the survey yielded inconsistent terminology primarily related to the responders' profession and 3 items in their naming patterns as follows: specification, equipment, and exercise. These results reveal a need to establish consistent naming pattern guidelines for resistance training exercises. The use of a consistent naming pattern may provide direction and clarity when working with athletes and clients in a strength training environment. We suggest a "specification, equipment, exercise" (e.g., 1 arm dumbbell row) naming pattern be used when naming resistance training exercises. PMID:23439332

  19. The effect of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise on balancing ability of scoliosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gui Bin; Kim, Jwa Jun; Park, Eun Cho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to closely examine the efficiency of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise in improving the on the static balancing ability by applying them to patients with scoliosis and to compare the effects of the interventions. [Subjects] Forty scoliosis patients were divided into a Swiss ball exercise group (SEG, N = 20) and a Resistance exercise group (REG, N = 20) randomly. [Methods] SEG conducted chest stretching, trunk exercise using the Swiss ball. REG conducted chest stretching, trunk exercise with therapist’s resistance. Both groups received training 30 min per day, five times per week, for eight weeks. [Results] Both SEG and REG showed significant differences between pre- and post-mediation in terms of weight distribution, sway area, sway length, sway speed, and limit of stability. Sway speed and limit of stability had increased more significantly in REG than in SEG. [Conclusion] According to the result of this study, both Swiss ball exercise and chest Resistance exercise were effective for improving on the static balancing ability. But we suggest resistance exercise is more efficient to increase of sway speed, limit of stability. PMID:26834372

  20. The effect of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise on balancing ability of scoliosis patients.

    PubMed

    Song, Gui Bin; Kim, Jwa Jun; Park, Eun Cho

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to closely examine the efficiency of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise in improving the on the static balancing ability by applying them to patients with scoliosis and to compare the effects of the interventions. [Subjects] Forty scoliosis patients were divided into a Swiss ball exercise group (SEG, N = 20) and a Resistance exercise group (REG, N = 20) randomly. [Methods] SEG conducted chest stretching, trunk exercise using the Swiss ball. REG conducted chest stretching, trunk exercise with therapist's resistance. Both groups received training 30 min per day, five times per week, for eight weeks. [Results] Both SEG and REG showed significant differences between pre- and post-mediation in terms of weight distribution, sway area, sway length, sway speed, and limit of stability. Sway speed and limit of stability had increased more significantly in REG than in SEG. [Conclusion] According to the result of this study, both Swiss ball exercise and chest Resistance exercise were effective for improving on the static balancing ability. But we suggest resistance exercise is more efficient to increase of sway speed, limit of stability. PMID:26834372

  1. Design of the Resistance and Endurance exercise After ChemoTherapy (REACT) study: A randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of exercise interventions after chemotherapy on physical fitness and fatigue

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Preliminary studies suggest that physical exercise interventions can improve physical fitness, fatigue and quality of life in cancer patients after completion of chemotherapy. Additional research is needed to rigorously test the effects of exercise programmes among cancer patients and to determine optimal training intensity accordingly. The present paper presents the design of a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a high intensity exercise programme compared to a low-to-moderate intensity exercise programme and a waiting list control group on physical fitness and fatigue as primary outcomes. Methods After baseline measurements, cancer patients who completed chemotherapy are randomly assigned to either a 12-week high intensity exercise programme or a low-to-moderate intensity exercise programme. Next, patients from both groups are randomly assigned to immediate training or a waiting list (i.e. waiting list control group). After 12 weeks, patients of the waiting list control group start with the exercise programme they have been allocated to. Both interventions consist of equal bouts of resistance and endurance interval exercises with the same frequency and duration, but differ in training intensity. Additionally, patients of both exercise programmes are counselled to improve compliance and achieve and maintain an active lifestyle, tailored to their individual preferences and capabilities. Measurements will be performed at baseline (t = 0), 12 weeks after randomization (t = 1), and 64 weeks after randomization (t = 2). The primary outcome measures are cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength assessed by means of objective performance indicators, and self-reported fatigue. Secondary outcome measures include health-related quality of life, self-reported physical activity, daily functioning, body composition, mood and sleep disturbances, and return to work. In addition, compliance and satisfaction with the

  2. Effect of a 12-week complex training on the body composition and cardiorespiratory system of female college students

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seungsuk; Han, Gunsoo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a complex exercise program on the body composition and cardiorespiratory system of female college students. [Subjects and Methods] This study included 20 female college students who had not participated in any particular sports in the last 3 months. The complex exercise program consisted of two parts, aerobic exercise and weight training. First, aerobic exercise was implemented (30 min 5 times a week for 12 weeks) according to the participants’ exercise tolerance. Second, weight training was implemented (40 min 5 times a week for 12 weeks) with 60% of 1 repetition maximum (RM). [Results] The t-test results showed significant differences in body composition between the before and after the complex exercise program. The subjects’ body weights and body fat percentages were decreased, and their skeletal muscle masses were increased. Increased levels of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), maximal expiratory volume (VEmax), and maximal heart rate (HRmax) were also observed. [Conclusion] In conclusion, the 12-week complex exercise program, including aerobic and weight training, had positive effects on the body composition and cardiorespiratory system of the female college students.

  3. Strengthening the Gluteus Medius Using Various Bodyweight and Resistance Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Tufano, James J.; Golas, Artur; Petr, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT THE GLUTEUS MEDIUS (Gmed) IS AN IMPORTANT MUSCLE AND, IF WEAK, CAN CAUSE KNEE, HIP, OR LOWER-BACK PATHOLOGIES. THIS ARTICLE REVIEWS METHODS OF Gmed STRENGTH ASSESSMENT, PROVIDES EXERCISES THAT TARGET THE Gmed BASED ON ELECTROMYOGRAPHY, PRESENTS HOW TO IMPLEMENT Gmed STRENGTHENING IN HEAVY RESISTANCE TRAINING PROGRAMS, AND EXPLAINS THE IMPORTANCE OF INCLUDING THESE EXERCISES IN THESE PROGRAMS. PMID:27340373

  4. Core Muscle Activity, Exercise Preference, and Perceived Exertion during Core Exercise with Elastic Resistance versus Machine

    PubMed Central

    Vinstrup, Jonas; Sundstrup, Emil; Brandt, Mikkel; Jakobsen, Markus D.; Calatayud, Joaquin; Andersen, Lars L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate core muscle activity, exercise preferences, and perceived exertion during two selected core exercises performed with elastic resistance versus a conventional training machine. Methods. 17 untrained men aged 26–67 years participated in surface electromyography (EMG) measurements of five core muscles during torso-twists performed from left to right with elastic resistance and in the machine, respectively. The order of the exercises was randomized and each exercise consisted of 3 repetitions performed at a 10 RM load. EMG amplitude was normalized (nEMG) to maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVC). Results. A higher right erector spinae activity in the elastic exercise compared with the machine exercise (50% [95% CI 36–64] versus 32% [95% CI 18–46] nEMG) was found. By contrast, the machine exercise, compared with the elastic exercise, showed higher left external oblique activity (77% [95% CI 64–90] versus 54% [95% CI 40–67] nEMG). For the rectus abdominis, right external oblique, and left erector spinae muscles there were no significant differences. Furthermore, 76% preferred the torso-twist with elastic resistance over the machine exercise. Perceived exertion (Borg CR10) was not significantly different between machine (5.8 [95% CI 4.88–6.72]) and elastic exercise (5.7 [95% CI 4.81–6.59]). Conclusion. Torso-twists using elastic resistance showed higher activity of the erector spinae, whereas torso-twist in the machine resulted in higher activity of the external oblique. For the remaining core muscles the two training modalities induced similar muscular activation. In spite of similar perceived exertion the majority of the participants preferred the exercise using elastic resistance. PMID:26557405

  5. Exercise-induced stress resistance is independent of exercise controllability and the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Benjamin N; Spence, Katie G; Crevling, Danielle M; Clark, Peter J; Craig, Wendy C; Fleshner, Monika

    2013-02-01

    Exercise increases resistance against stress-related disorders such as anxiety and depression. Similarly, the perception of control is a powerful predictor of neurochemical and behavioral responses to stress, but whether the experience of choosing to exercise, and exerting control over that exercise, is a critical factor in producing exercise-induced stress resistance is unknown. The current studies investigated whether the protective effects of exercise against the anxiety- and depression-like consequences of stress are dependent on exercise controllability and a brain region implicated in the protective effects of controllable experiences, the medial prefrontal cortex. Adult male Fischer 344 rats remained sedentary, were forced to run on treadmills or motorised running wheels, or had voluntary access to wheels for 6 weeks. Three weeks after exercise onset, rats received sham surgery or excitotoxic lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex. Rats were exposed to home cage or uncontrollable tail shock treatment three weeks later. Shock-elicited fear conditioning and shuttle box escape testing occurred the next day. Both forced and voluntary wheel running, but not treadmill training, prevented the exaggerated fear conditioning and interference with escape learning produced by uncontrollable stress. Lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex failed to eliminate the protective effects of forced or voluntary wheel running. These data suggest that exercise controllability and the medial prefrontal cortex are not critical factors in conferring the protective effects of exercise against the affective consequences of stressor exposure, and imply that exercise perceived as forced may still benefit affect and mental health. PMID:23121339

  6. Effect of concurrent aerobic and resistance circuit exercise training on fitness in older adults.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Nobuo; Rogers, Michael E; Islam, Mohammod M; Yamauchi, Tomoko; Watanabe, Eiji; Okada, Akiyoshi

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the physiological effects of a programmed accommodating circuit exercise (PACE) program consisting of aerobic exercise and hydraulic-resistance exercise (HRE) on fitness in older adults. Thirty-five volunteers were randomly divided into two groups [PACE group (PG) 8 men and 10 women, 68.3 (4.9) years, and non-exercise control group (CG) 7 men and 10 women, 68.0 (3.4) years). The PG participated in a 12-week, 3 days per week supervised program consisting of 10 min warm-up and 30 min of PACE (moderate intensity HRE and aerobic movements at 70% of peak heart rate) followed by 10 min cool-down exercise. PACE increased ( P<0.05) oxygen uptake ( V(.)O(2)) at lactate threshold [PG, pre 0.79 (0.20) l min(-1), post 1.02 (0.22) l min(-1), 29%; CG, pre 0.87 (0.14) l min(-1), post 0.85 (0.15) l min(-1), -2%] and at peak V(.)O(2) [PG, pre 1.36 (0.24) l min(-1), post 1.56 (0.28) l min(-1), 15%; CG, pre 1.32 (0.29) l min(-1), post 1.37 (0.37) l min(-1), 4%] in PG measured using an incremental cycle ergometer. Muscular strength evaluated by a HRE machine increased at low to high resistance dial settings for knee extension (9-52%), knee flexion (14-76%), back extension (18-92%) and flexion (50-70%), chest pull (6-28%) and press (3-17%), shoulder press (18-31%) and pull (26-85%), and leg press (21%). Body fat (sum of three skinfolds) decreased (16%), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) increased (10.9 mg dl(-1)) for PG. There were no changes in any variables for CG. These results indicate that PACE training incorporating aerobic exercise and HRE elicits significant improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength, body composition, and HDLC for older adults. Therefore, PACE training is an effective well-rounded exercise program that can be utilized as a means to improve health-related components of fitness in older adults. PMID:15293053

  7. Effects of Diet and Exercise on Insulin Resistance during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Clapp, James F

    2006-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that both diet and exercise can alter the usual increase in insulin resistance seen in Western societies during mid and late pregnancy. A low-glycemic diet combined with a low-volume exercise regimen during pregnancy decreases the glucose and insulin response to both mixed caloric intake and exercise, and probably lowers both 24-h blood glucose concentrations and the maternal substrate utilization ratio of carbohydrate/fat. The end result is a marked decrease in both maternal weight gain and size at birth. Regular weight-bearing exercise alone lowers markers of insulin resistance and lowers blood glucose concentration during and immediately after exercise during pregnancy. Changes in diet and/or physical activity appear to prevent the onset of gestational diabetes mellitus in at-risk women and may be of value in the treatment of those who develop gestational diabetes. PMID:18370754

  8. ARED (Advanced-Resistive Exercise Device) Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes ARED which is a new hardware exercise device for use on the International Space Station. Astronaut physiological adaptations, muscle parameters, and cardiovascular parameters are also reviewed.

  9. Creatine Loading, Resistance Exercise Performance, and Muscle Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Scott W.; Dudley, Gary A.

    2001-01-01

    Examined whether creatine (CR) monohydrate loading would alter resistance exercise performance, isometric strength, or in vivo contractile properties of the quadriceps femoris muscle compared with placebo loading in resistance-trained athletes. Overall, CR loading did not provide an ergogenic benefit for the unilateral dynamic knee extension…

  10. Resistance exercise training in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Volaklis, Konstantinos A; Tokmakidis, Savvas P

    2005-01-01

    The utility, safety and physiological adaptations of resistance exercise training in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) are reviewed and recommendations based on current research are presented. Patients with CHF have a poor clinical status and impaired exercise capacity due to both cardiac limitations and peripheral maladaptations of the skeletal musculature. Because muscle atrophy has been demonstrated to be a hallmark of CHF, the main principle of exercise programmes in such patients is to train the peripheral muscles effectively without producing great cardiovascular stress. For this reason, new modes of training as well as new training methods have been applied. Dynamic resistance training, based on the principles of interval training, has recently been established as a safe and effective mode of exercise in patients with CHF. Patients perform dynamic strength exercises slowly, on specific machines at an intensity usually in the range of 50-60% of one repetition maximum; work phases are of short duration (< or =60 seconds) and should be followed by an adequate recovery period (work/recovery ratio >1 : 2). Patients with a low cardiac reserve can use small free weights (0.5, 1 or 3 kg), elastic bands with 8-10 repetitions, or they can perform resistance exercises in a segmental fashion. Based on recent scientific evidence, the application of specific resistance exercise programmes is safe and induces significant histochemical, metabolic and functional adaptations in skeletal muscles, contributing to the treatment of muscle weakness and specific myopathy occurring in the majority of CHF patients. Increased exercise tolerance and peak oxygen consumption (V-dotO(2peak)), changes in muscle composition, increases in muscle mass, alterations in skeletal muscle metabolism, improvement in muscular strength and endurance have also been reported in the literature after resistance exercise alone or in combination with aerobic exercise. According to new scientific

  11. Changes in plasma volume and baroreflex function following resistance exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz, L. L.; Tatro, D. L.; Dudley, G. A.; Convertino, V. A.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamics of change in plasma volume (PV) and baroreflex responses have been reported over 24 h immediately following maximal cycle exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine if PV and baroreflex showed similar changes for 24 h after resistance exercise. Eight men were studied on 2 test days, 1 week apart. On 1 day, per cent change (% delta) in PV was estimated at 0,3, and 6 h after resistance exercise using haematocrit and haemoglobin. Baseline PV was measured 24 h after exercise using Evans blue dye. The carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex response was measured before, and 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 h post-exercise. Each subject performed six sets of the bench press and leg press with 10 repetitions per set with a load that induced failure within each set. On a control day, the protocol was used without exercise. Plasma volume did not change during the control day. There was a 20% decrease in PV immediately post-exercise; the recovery of the PV was rapid and complete within 3 h. PV was 20% greater 24 h post-exercise than on the control day. There were no differences in any of the baroreflex measurements. Therefore, it is suggested that PV shifts may occur without altering baroreflex sensitivity.

  12. Gravity-independent constant force resistive exercise unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colosky, Jr., Paul E. (Inventor); Ruttley, Tara M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    This invention describes a novel gravity-independent exercise unit designed for use in microgravity, or on the ground, as a means by which to counter muscle atrophy and bone degradation due to disuse or underuse. Modular resistive packs comprising constant torque springs provide constant force opposing the withdrawal of an exercise cable from the device. In addition to uses within the space program, the compact resistive packs of the CFREU allow the unit to be small enough for easy use as a home gym for personal use, or as a supplement for rehabilitation programs. Resistive packs may be changed conveniently out of the CFREU according to the desired exercise regimen. Thus, the resistive packs replace the need for expensive, heavy, and bulky traditional weight plates. The CFREU may be employed by hospitals, rehabilitation and physical therapy clinics, and other related professional businesses.

  13. Crosstalk between exercise and galanin system alleviates insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Fang, Penghua; He, Biao; Shi, Mingyi; Zhu, Yan; Bo, Ping; Zhang, Zhenwen

    2015-12-01

    Studies have demonstrated that aerobic exercise can enhance insulin sensitivity, however, the precise mechanism for this outcome is not entirely identified. Emerging evidences point out that exercise can upregulate galanin protein and mRNA expression, resulting in improvement of insulin sensitivity via an increase in translocation of glucose transporter 4 and subsequent glucose uptake in myocytes and adipocytes of healthy and type 2 diabetic rats, which may be blocked by galanin antagonist. In return, galanin can exert the exercise-protective roles to prevent excessive movement of skeletal muscle and to accelerate exercise trauma repair in exercise-relative tissues. Studies also implicated that combination of aerobic exercise and activation of galanin system may make more significant improvement in insulin sensitivity than that of either one did. These suggest that galanin system is essential for physical activity to alleviate insulin resistance, namely, the beneficial effect of physical activity on glucose uptake is at least partly mediated by galanin system. Besides, co-treatment with galanin and exercise is an effective therapeutic strategy for reducing insulin resistance. PMID:26542124

  14. Development of Magnetorheological Resistive Exercise Device for Rowing Machine.

    PubMed

    Grigas, Vytautas; Šulginas, Anatolijus; Žiliukas, Pranas

    2015-01-01

    Training equipment used by professional sportsmen has a great impact on their sport performance. Most universal exercisers may help only to improve the general physical condition due to the specific kinematics and peculiar resistance generated by their loading units. Training of effective techniques and learning of psychomotor skills are possible only when exercisers conform to the movements and resistance typical for particular sports kinematically and dynamically. Methodology of developing a magnetorheological resistive exercise device for generating the desired law of passive resistance force and its application in a lever-type rowing machine are described in the paper. The structural parameters of a controllable hydraulic cylinder type device were found by means of the computational fluid dynamics simulation performed by ANSYS CFX software. Parameters describing the magnetorheological fluid as non-Newtonian were determined by combining numerical and experimental research of the resistance force generated by the original magnetorheological damper. A structural scheme of the device control system was developed and the variation of the strength of magnetic field that affects the magnetorheological fluid circulating in the device was determined, ensuring a variation of the resistance force on the oar handle adequate for the resistance that occurs during a real boat rowing stroke. PMID:27293479

  15. Development of Magnetorheological Resistive Exercise Device for Rowing Machine

    PubMed Central

    Žiliukas, Pranas

    2016-01-01

    Training equipment used by professional sportsmen has a great impact on their sport performance. Most universal exercisers may help only to improve the general physical condition due to the specific kinematics and peculiar resistance generated by their loading units. Training of effective techniques and learning of psychomotor skills are possible only when exercisers conform to the movements and resistance typical for particular sports kinematically and dynamically. Methodology of developing a magnetorheological resistive exercise device for generating the desired law of passive resistance force and its application in a lever-type rowing machine are described in the paper. The structural parameters of a controllable hydraulic cylinder type device were found by means of the computational fluid dynamics simulation performed by ANSYS CFX software. Parameters describing the magnetorheological fluid as non-Newtonian were determined by combining numerical and experimental research of the resistance force generated by the original magnetorheological damper. A structural scheme of the device control system was developed and the variation of the strength of magnetic field that affects the magnetorheological fluid circulating in the device was determined, ensuring a variation of the resistance force on the oar handle adequate for the resistance that occurs during a real boat rowing stroke. PMID:27293479

  16. Effect of a 12-week aerobic training program on perceptual and affective responses in obese women

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Luís Alberto Garcia; Ferreira, Sandro dos Santos; Freitas, Rosemari Queiroz; Henrique de Souza, Carlos; Garcia, Erick Doner Santos de Abreu; Gregorio da Silva, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to observe the effect of self-selected intensity or imposed intensity during aerobic training on perceptual and affective responses in obese women. [Subjects] The study included 26 obese women aged 30–60 years. [Methods] The subjects were randomly divided into two groups, with 13 subjects in each group: self-selected intensity and imposed intensity (10% above ventilatory threshold) groups. All subjects completed an intervention program that lasted 12 weeks, with three exercise sessions a week. The rating of perceived exertion and affective responses (Feeling Scale and Felt Arousal Scale) were monitored in the first, sixth, and twelfth weeks. [Results] Significant differences were observed between groups in heart rate and rating of perceived exertion. The affective responses during exercise were more negative in the imposed intensity group. [Conclusion] Use of a self-selected exercise intensity can promote smaller negative affective responses during exercise and provide a sufficient stimulus for improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness. PMID:26311958

  17. Comparison of deep and superficial abdominal muscle activity between experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors and controls during stabilization exercise.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Hyun; Hong, Sang-Min; Kim, Chang-Won; Shin, Yun-A

    2015-06-01

    Pilates and resistance exercises are used for lumbar stabilization training. However, it is unclear which exercise is more effective for lumbar stabilization. In our study, we aimed to compare surface muscle activity and deep muscle thickness during relaxation and spinal stabilization exercise in experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors. This study is a retrospective case control study set in the Exercise Prescription Laboratory and Sports Medicine Center. The participants included Pilates instructors (mean years of experience, 3.20±1.76; n=10), resistance exercise instructors (mean years of experience, 2.53±0.63; n=10), and controls (n=10). The participants performed 4 different stabilization exercises: abdominal drawing-in maneuver, bridging, roll-up, and one-leg raise. During the stabilization exercises, surface muscle activity was measured with electromyography, whereas deep muscle thickness was measured by ultrasound imaging. During the 4 stabilization exercises, the thickness of the transverse abdominis (TrA) was significantly greater in the Pilates-trained group than the other 2 other groups. The internal oblique (IO) thickness was significantly greater in the Pilates- and resistance-trained group than the control group, during the 4 exercises. However, the surface muscle activities were similar between the groups. Both Pilates and resistance exercise instructors had greater activation of deep muscles, such as the TrA and IO, than the control subjects. Pilates and resistance exercise are both effective for increasing abdominal deep muscle thickness. PMID:26171383

  18. Exerciser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lem, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The Mark I exerciser which was added for the second and third Skylab missions, was used for a number of arm and leg exercises. This unit is a modified version of a commercial device. This is an iso-kinetic, or constant velocity, exerciser which retards the speed at which the user is allowed to move. The user applies a maximum effort and the device automatically varies the opposing resistance to maintain speed of translation at a constant preselected value.

  19. Exercise Training and Insulin Resistance: A Current Review

    PubMed Central

    Keshel, Tyler E; Coker, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    There is a general perception that increased physical activity will improve glucose homeostasis in all individuals. While this is an attractive concept, this conclusion may be overly simplistic and even misleading. The topic was reviewed extensively over 30 years ago and it was concluded that acute exercise enhances glucose uptake. However, in some cases the chronic influence of interventions utilizing exercise may have little effect on glucose metabolism. Moreover, insulin resistance often returns to near baseline levels within a couple of days following cessation of the exercise bout; leaving the overall effectiveness of the intervention in question. Since improving glucose homeostasis should be the focal endpoint of any intervention designed to mitigate the overwhelming degree of insulin resistance in individuals at risk for metabolic disease, it is essential to evaluate the key components of a successful approach. PMID:26523243

  20. Effects of resistance exercise on cardiopulmonary factors in sedentary individuals

    PubMed Central

    Janyacharoen, Taweesak; Thayon, Methiya; Bushong, Wanwisa; Jaikla, Nussamol; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of resistance exercise on cardiopulmonary functions in young sedentary subjects. [Subjects] Forty-two young and healthy subjects with a sedentary lifestyle were included in this study. [Methods] The subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups: control and experimental. The control group (n=21) received health education and continued with normal activities of daily living. The experimental group (n=21) underwent resistance training, health education, and continued with normal activities of daily living. The resistance exercise program consisted of 3 postural exercises: chest press, dumbbell pullover, and flat-bench dumbbell fly. The subjects received this intervention 3 times/week for 8 weeks. [Results] The baseline characteristics were comparable between the 2 groups. The 6-minute-walk test score, peak expiratory flow, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, maximal voluntary ventilation, and chest expansions were significantly improved post-intervention in the experimental group and between the 2 groups. [Conclusion] Cardiopulmonary functions in young sedentary subjects were significantly improved with the 8-week resistance exercise program. PMID:26957760

  1. RESISTANCE EXERCISE IN MAINTENANCE DIALYSIS-FEASIBILITY STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance exercise has been shown to counteract muscle wasting and inflammation in chronic kidney disease, but its benefits have not been tested in patients with kidney failure treated by maintenance hemodialysis. Prior to beginning a randomized controlled trial, we conducted a feasibility study to...

  2. Effects of resistance exercise on cardiopulmonary factors in sedentary individuals.

    PubMed

    Janyacharoen, Taweesak; Thayon, Methiya; Bushong, Wanwisa; Jaikla, Nussamol; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of resistance exercise on cardiopulmonary functions in young sedentary subjects. [Subjects] Forty-two young and healthy subjects with a sedentary lifestyle were included in this study. [Methods] The subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups: control and experimental. The control group (n=21) received health education and continued with normal activities of daily living. The experimental group (n=21) underwent resistance training, health education, and continued with normal activities of daily living. The resistance exercise program consisted of 3 postural exercises: chest press, dumbbell pullover, and flat-bench dumbbell fly. The subjects received this intervention 3 times/week for 8 weeks. [Results] The baseline characteristics were comparable between the 2 groups. The 6-minute-walk test score, peak expiratory flow, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, maximal voluntary ventilation, and chest expansions were significantly improved post-intervention in the experimental group and between the 2 groups. [Conclusion] Cardiopulmonary functions in young sedentary subjects were significantly improved with the 8-week resistance exercise program. PMID:26957760

  3. Instability Resistance Training Across the Exercise Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Behm, David G.; Colado Sanchez, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Context: Instability resistance training (IRT; unstable surfaces and devices to strengthen the core or trunk muscles) is popular in fitness training facilities. Objective: To examine contradictory IRT recommendations for health enthusiasts and rehabilitation. Data Sources: A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, SPORT Discus, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases from 1990 to 2012. Study Selection: Databases were searched using key terms, including “balance,” “stability,” “instability,” “resistance training,” “core,” “trunk,” and “functional performance.” Additionally, relevant articles were extracted from reference lists. Data Extraction: To be included, research questions addressed the effect of balance or IRT on performance, healthy and active participants, and physiologic or performance outcome measures and had to be published in English in a peer-reviewed journal. Results: There is a dichotomy of opinions on the effectiveness and application of instability devices and conditions for health and performance training. Balance training without resistance has been shown to improve not only balance but functional performance as well. IRT studies document similar training adaptations as stable resistance training programs with recreationally active individuals. Similar progressions with lower resistance may improve balance and stability, increase core activation, and improve motor control. Conclusion: IRT is highly recommended for youth, elderly, recreationally active individuals, and highly trained enthusiasts. PMID:24427423

  4. Effects of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise on respiratory function and trunk control ability in patients with scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jwa Jun; Song, Gui Bin; Park, Eun Cho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effects of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise on the respiratory function and trunk control ability of patients with scoliosis. [Subjects] Forty scoliosis patients were randomly divided into the Swiss ball exercise group (n= 20) and resistance exercise group (n = 20). [Methods] The Swiss ball and resistance exercise groups performed chest expansion and breathing exercises with a Swiss ball and a therapist’s resistance, respectively. Both groups received training 30 min per day, 5 times per week for 8 weeks. [Results] Both groups exhibited significant changes in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and trunk impairment scale after the intervention. However, there was no significant change in the forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity ratio after the intervention in either group. Meanwhile, forced expiratory volume in one second and trunk impairment scale were significantly greater in the resistance exercise group after the intervention. [Conclusion] Both Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise are effective for improving the respiratory function and trunk control ability of patients with scoliosis. However, resistance exercise is more effective for increasing the forced expiratory volume in one second and trunk control ability. PMID:26180318

  5. Effects of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise on respiratory function and trunk control ability in patients with scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jwa Jun; Song, Gui Bin; Park, Eun Cho

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effects of Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise on the respiratory function and trunk control ability of patients with scoliosis. [Subjects] Forty scoliosis patients were randomly divided into the Swiss ball exercise group (n= 20) and resistance exercise group (n = 20). [Methods] The Swiss ball and resistance exercise groups performed chest expansion and breathing exercises with a Swiss ball and a therapist's resistance, respectively. Both groups received training 30 min per day, 5 times per week for 8 weeks. [Results] Both groups exhibited significant changes in forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and trunk impairment scale after the intervention. However, there was no significant change in the forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity ratio after the intervention in either group. Meanwhile, forced expiratory volume in one second and trunk impairment scale were significantly greater in the resistance exercise group after the intervention. [Conclusion] Both Swiss ball exercise and resistance exercise are effective for improving the respiratory function and trunk control ability of patients with scoliosis. However, resistance exercise is more effective for increasing the forced expiratory volume in one second and trunk control ability. PMID:26180318

  6. Impact of dehydration on a full body resistance exercise protocol.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Justin A; Green, James M; Bishop, Phillip A; Richardson, Mark T; Neggers, Yasmin H; Leeper, James D

    2010-05-01

    This study examined effects of dehydration on a full body resistance exercise workout. Ten males completed two trials: heat exposed (with 100% fluid replacement) (HE) and dehydration (approximately 3% body mass loss with no fluid replacement) (DEHY) achieved via hot water bath (approximately 39 degrees C). Following HE and DEHY, participants performed three sets to failure (using predetermined 12 repetition maximum) of bench press, lat pull down, overhead press, barbell curl, triceps press, and leg press with a 2-min recovery between each set and 2 min between exercises. A paired t test showed total repetitions (all sets combined) were significantly lower for DEHY: (144.1 +/- 26.6 repetitions) versus HE: (169.4 +/- 29.1 repetitions). ANOVAs showed significantly lower repetitions (approximately 1-2 repetitions on average) per exercise for DEHY versus HE (all exercises). Pre-set rate of perceived exertion (RPE) and pre-set heart rate (HR) were significantly higher [approximately 0.6-1.1 units on average in triceps press, leg press, and approached significance in lat pull down (P = 0.14) and approximately 6-13 b min(-1) on average in bench press, lat pull down, triceps press, and approached significance for overhead press (P = 0.10)] in DEHY versus HE. Session RPE difference approached significance (DEHY: 8.6 +/- 1.9, HE: 7.4 +/- 2.3) (P = 0.12). Recovery HR was significantly higher for DEHY (116 +/- 15 b min(-1)) versus HE (105 +/- 13 b min(-1)). Dehydration (approximately 3%) impaired resistance exercise performance, decreased repetitions, increased perceived exertion, and hindered HR recovery. Results highlight the importance of adequate hydration during full body resistance exercise sessions. PMID:20066432

  7. Executive function and endocrinological responses to acute resistance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chia-Liang; Wang, Chun-Hao; Pan, Chien-Yu; Chen, Fu-Chen; Huang, Tsang-Hai; Chou, Feng-Ying

    2014-01-01

    This study had the following two aims: First, to explore the effects of acute resistance exercise (RE, i.e., using exercise machines to contract and stretch muscles) on behavioral and electrophysiological performance when performing a cognitive task involving executive functioning in young male adults; Second, to investigate the potential biochemical mechanisms of such facilitative effects using two neurotrophic factors [i.e., growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)] and the cortisol levels elicited by such an exercise intervention mode with two different exercise intensities. Sixty young male adults were recruited and randomly assigned to a high-intensity (HI) exercise group, moderate-intensity (MI) exercise group, and non-exercise-intervention (NEI) group. Blood samples were taken, and the behavioral and electrophysiological indices were simultaneously measured when individuals performed a Go/No-Go task combined with the Erikson Flanker paradigm at baseline and after either an acute bout of 30 min of moderate- or high-intensity RE or a control period. The results showed that the acute RE could not only benefit the subjects' behavioral (i.e., RTs and accuracy) performance, as found in previous studies, but also increase the P3 amplitude. Although the serum GH and IGF-1 levels were significantly increased via moderate or high intensity RE in both the MI and HI groups, the increased serum levels of neurotrophic factors were significantly decreased about 20 min after exercise. In addition, such changes were not correlated with the changes in cognitive (i.e., behavioral and electrophysiological) performance. In contrast, the serum levels of cortisol in the HI and MI groups were significantly lower after acute RE, and the changes in cortisol levels were significantly associated with the changes in electrophysiological (i.e., P3 amplitude) performance. The findings suggest the beneficial effects of acute RE on executive functioning could be due to

  8. Effect of shoulder flexion angle and exercise resistance on the serratus anterior muscle activity during dynamic hug exercise.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The primary aim of this study was to determine the effect of shoulder flexion angle and exercise resistance on the serratus anterior muscle during dynamic hug exercise. [Subjects] Ten men aged 22-32 years were recruited. [Methods] The subjects performed dynamic hug exercise at different shoulder flexion angles and under resistance weight conditions. Serratus anterior muscle activities were measured by using the surface electromyographic system during the dynamic hug exercises. After performing the exercise, each subject described the exercise intensity by using the Borg rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale. [Results] The normalized serratus anterior muscle activity increased significantly in the order of Conditions 1 and 4 < Condition 3 < Condition 2. The Borg RPE scale increased significantly in the order of Condition 1 < Condition 2 < Condition 3 < Condition 4. [Conclusion] The results suggest that dynamic hug exercise with the use of a multi-air-cushion biofeedback device is an effective scapular stability exercise. PMID:26957774

  9. The relation between anthropometric and physiological variables and bat velocity of high-school baseball players before and after 12 weeks of training.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, David J; Szymanski, Jessica M; Schade, Ryan L; Bradford, T Jason; McIntyre, Joseph S; DeRenne, Coop; Madsen, Nels H

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this article was to investigate the relation between anthropometric and physiological variables to linear bat swing velocity (BV) of 2 groups of high-school baseball players before and after completing a 12-week periodized resistance exercise program. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 training groups using a stratified sampling technique. Group 1 (n = 24) and group 2 (n = 25) both performed a stepwise periodized resistance exercise program and took 100 swings a day, 3 d·wk-1, for 12 weeks with their normal game bat. Group 2 performed additional rotational and full-body medicine ball exercises 3 d·wk-1 for 12 weeks. Fourteen variables were measured or calculated before and after 12 weeks of training. Anthropometric and physiological variables tested were height, body mass, percent body fat, lean body mass (LBM), dominant torso rotational strength (DTRS) and nondominant torso rotational strength (NDTRS), sequential hip-torso-arm rotational strength measured by a medicine ball hitter's throw (MBHT), estimated 1 repetition maximum parallel squat (PS) and bench press (BP), vertical jump (VJ), estimated peak power, angular hip velocity (AHV), and angular shoulder velocity (ASV). The baseball-specific skill of linear BV was also measured. Statistical analysis indicated a significant moderately high positive relationship (p ≤ 0.05) between prelinear BV and pre-NDTRS for group 1, pre-LBM, DTRS, NDTRS, peak power, and ASV for group 2; moderate positive relationship between prelinear BV and preheight, LBM, DTRS, peak power, BP, PS, and ASV for group 1, preheight, body mass, MBHT, BP, and PS for group 2. Significantly high positive relationships were indicated between postlinear BV and post-NDTRS for group 1, post-DTRS and NDTRS for group 2; moderately high positive relationships between postlinear BV and post-LBM, DTRS, peak power, BP, and PS for group 1, postheight, LBM, VJ, peak power for group 2; moderate positive relationships between

  10. Effects of resistance exercise on fatigue and quality of life in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martina E; Wiskemann, Joachim; Armbrust, Petra; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Steindorf, Karen

    2015-07-15

    Multiple exercise interventions have shown beneficial effects on fatigue and quality of life (QoL) in cancer patients, but various psychosocial interventions as well. It is unclear to what extent the observed effects of exercise interventions are based on physical adaptations or rather on psychosocial factors associated with supervised, group-based programs. It needs to be determined which aspects of exercise programs are truly effective. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether resistance exercise during chemotherapy provides benefits on fatigue and QoL beyond potential psychosocial effects of group-based interventions. One-hundred-one breast cancer patients starting chemotherapy were randomly assigned to resistance exercise (EX) or a relaxation control (RC) group. Both interventions were supervised, group-based, 2/week over 12 weeks. The primary endpoint fatigue was assessed with a 20-item multidimensional questionnaire, QoL with the EORTC QLQ-C30/BR23. Analyses of covariance for individual changes from baseline to Week 13 were calculated. In RC, total and physical fatigue worsened during chemotherapy, whereas EX showed no such impairments (between-group p = 0.098 and 0.052 overall, and p = 0.038 and 0.034 among patients without severe baseline depression). Differences regarding affective or cognitive fatigue were not significant. Benefits of EX were also seen to affect role and social function. Effect sizes were between 0.43 and 0.48. Explorative analyses indicated significant effect modification by thyroxin use (p-interaction = 0.044). In conclusion, resistance exercise appeared to mitigate physical fatigue and maintain QoL during chemotherapy beyond psychosocial effects inherent to supervised group-based settings. Thus, resistance exercise could be an integral part of supportive care for breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. PMID:25484317

  11. Resistive exercise training in cardiac rehabilitation. An update.

    PubMed

    Verrill, D E; Ribisl, P M

    1996-05-01

    Resistive exercise training has become very popular for patients of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes (CRPs). For decades, CRPs focused almost exclusively on improving cardiorespiratory endurance and most programmes ignored muscular fitness development. Moreover, resistance training was thought to be potentially hazardous for the cardiac patient due to the risk of cardiovascular complications from adverse haemodynamic responses. We now know that resistive exercise testing and training is very safe for properly screened patients, even at relatively high workloads. Improvement in muscular strength facilitates return to daily vocational and avocational activities and is important for the CRP participant to regain lost strength and resume work soon after a cardiac event. Circuit weight training (CWT) is helpful in this respect and has been shown to increase muscular strength, cardiovascular endurance, body composition, bone density and mineral content, self-confidence, and self-efficacy in various populations. This article presents an update on current research in cardiac patients and also presents guidelines for implementing a properly supervised cardiac resistive exercise programme. PMID:8724203

  12. Change in energy expenditure and physical activity in response to aerobic and resistance exercise programs.

    PubMed

    Drenowatz, Clemens; Grieve, George L; DeMello, Madison M

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is considered an important component of a healthy lifestyle but there remains controversy on effects of exercise on non-exercise physical activity (PA). The present study examined the prospective association of aerobic and resistance exercise with total daily energy expenditure and PA in previously sedentary, young men. Nine men (27.0 ± 3.3 years) completed two 16-week exercise programs (3 exercise sessions per week) of aerobic and resistance exercise separated by a minimum of 6 weeks in random order. Energy expenditure and PA were measured with the SenseWear Mini Armband prior to each intervention as well as during week 1, week 8 and week 16 of the aerobic and resistance exercise program. Body composition was measured via dual x-ray absorptiometry. Body composition did not change in response to either exercise intervention. Total daily energy expenditure on exercise days increased by 443 ± 126 kcal/d and 239 ± 152 kcal/d for aerobic and resistance exercise, respectively (p < 0.01). Non-exercise moderate-to-vigorous PA, however, decreased on aerobic exercise days (-148 ± 161 kcal/d; p = 0.03). There was no change in total daily energy expenditure and PA on non-exercise days with aerobic exercise while resistance exercise was associated with an increase in moderate-to-vigorous PA during non-exercise days (216 ± 178 kcal/d, p = 0.01). Results of the present study suggest a compensatory reduction in PA in response to aerobic exercise. Resistance exercise, on the other hand, appears to facilitate non-exercise PA, particularly on non-exercise days, which may lead to more sustainable adaptations in response to an exercise program. PMID:26702387

  13. Using Session RPE to Monitor Different Methods of Resistance Exercise

    PubMed Central

    D. Egan, Alison; B. Winchester, Jason; Foster, Carl; R. McGuigan, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare session rating of perceived exertion for different resistance training techniques in the squat exercise. These techniques included traditional resistance training, super slow, and maximal power training. Fourteen college-age women (Mean ± SD; age = 22 ± 3 years; height = 1.68 ± 0. 07 m) completed three experimental trials in a randomized crossover design. The traditional resistance training protocol consisted of 6 sets of 6 repetitions of squats using 80% of 1-RM. The super slow protocol consisted of 6 sets of 6 repetitions using 55% of 1-RM. The maximal power protocol consisted of 6 sets of 6 repetitions using 30% of 1-RM. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) measures were obtained following each set using Borg’s CR-10 scale. In addition, a session RPE value was obtained 30 minutes following each exercise session. When comparing average RPE and session RPE, no significant difference was found. However, power training had significantly lower (p < 0.05) average and session RPE (4.50 ± 1.9 and 4.5 ± 2.1) compared to both super slow training (7.81 ± 1.75 and 7.43 ± 1.73) and traditional training (7.33 ± 1.52 and 7.13 ± 1.73). The results indicate that session RPE values are not significantly different from the more traditional methods of measuring RPE during exercise bouts. It does appear that the resistance training mode that is used results in differences in perceived exertion that does not relate directly to the loading that is used. Using session RPE provides practitioners with the same information about perceived exertion as the traditional RPE measures. Taking a single measure following a training session would appear to be much easier than using multiple measures of RPE throughout a resistance training workout. However, practitioners should also be aware that the RPE does not directly relate to the relative intensity used and appears to be dependent on the mode of resistance exercise that is used. Key Points The

  14. Resistance exercise countermeasures for space flight: implications of training specificity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamman, M. M.; Caruso, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    While resistance exercise should be a logical choice for prevention of strength loss during unloading, the principle of training specificity cannot be overlooked. Our purpose was to explore training specificity in describing the effect of our constant load exercise countermeasure on isokinetic strength performance. Twelve healthy men (mean +/- SD: 28.0 +/- 5.2 years, 179.4 +/- 3.9 cm, 77.5 +/- 13.6 kg) were randomly assigned to no exercise or resistance exercise (REX) during 14 days of bed rest. REX performed five sets of leg press exercise to volitional fatigue (6-10 repetitions) every other day. Unilateral isokinetic concentric-eccentric knee extension testing performed before and on day 15 prior to reambulation included torque-velocity and power-velocity relationships at four velocities (0.52, 1.75, 2.97, and 4.19 rad s-1), torque-position relationship, and contractile work capacity (10 repetitions at 1.05 rad s-1). Two (group) x 2 (time) ANOVA revealed no group x time interactions; thus, groups were combined. Across velocities, angle-specific torque fell 18% and average power fell 20% (p < 0.05). No velocity x time or mode (concentric/eccentric) x time interactions were noted. Torque x position decreased on average 24% (p < 0.05). Total contractile work dropped 27% (p < 0.05). Results indicate bed rest induces rapid and marked reductions in strength and our constant load resistance training protocol did not prevent isokinetic strength losses. Differences between closed-chain training and open-chain testing may explain the lack of protection.

  15. Resistance exercise countermeasures for space flight: implications of training specificity.

    PubMed

    Bamman, M M; Caruso, J F

    2000-02-01

    While resistance exercise should be a logical choice for prevention of strength loss during unloading, the principle of training specificity cannot be overlooked. Our purpose was to explore training specificity in describing the effect of our constant load exercise countermeasure on isokinetic strength performance. Twelve healthy men (mean +/- SD: 28.0 +/- 5.2 years, 179.4 +/- 3.9 cm, 77.5 +/- 13.6 kg) were randomly assigned to no exercise or resistance exercise (REX) during 14 days of bed rest. REX performed five sets of leg press exercise to volitional fatigue (6-10 repetitions) every other day. Unilateral isokinetic concentric-eccentric knee extension testing performed before and on day 15 prior to reambulation included torque-velocity and power-velocity relationships at four velocities (0.52, 1.75, 2.97, and 4.19 rad s-1), torque-position relationship, and contractile work capacity (10 repetitions at 1.05 rad s-1). Two (group) x 2 (time) ANOVA revealed no group x time interactions; thus, groups were combined. Across velocities, angle-specific torque fell 18% and average power fell 20% (p < 0.05). No velocity x time or mode (concentric/eccentric) x time interactions were noted. Torque x position decreased on average 24% (p < 0.05). Total contractile work dropped 27% (p < 0.05). Results indicate bed rest induces rapid and marked reductions in strength and our constant load resistance training protocol did not prevent isokinetic strength losses. Differences between closed-chain training and open-chain testing may explain the lack of protection. PMID:11543414

  16. Lung function profiles and aerobic capacity of adult cigarette and hookah smokers after 12 weeks intermittent training

    PubMed Central

    Koubaa, Abdessalem; Triki, Moez; Trabelsi, Hajer; Masmoudi, Liwa; Zeghal, Khaled N.; Sahnoun, Zouhair; Hakim, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary function is compromised in most smokers. Yet it is unknown whether exercise training improves pulmonary function and aerobic capacity in cigarette and hookah smokers and whether these smokers respond in a similar way as do non-smokers. Aim To evaluate the effects of an interval exercise training program on pulmonary function and aerobic capacity in cigarette and hookah smokers. Methods Twelve cigarette smokers, 10 hookah smokers, and 11 non-smokers participated in our exercise program. All subjects performed 30 min of interval exercise (2 min of work followed by 1 min of rest) three times a week for 12 weeks at an intensity estimated at 70% of the subject's maximum aerobic capacity (V.O2max). Pulmonary function was measured using spirometry, and maximum aerobic capacity was assessed by maximal exercise testing on a treadmill before the beginning and at the end of the exercise training program. Results As expected, prior to the exercise intervention, the cigarette and hookah smokers had significantly lower pulmonary function than the non-smokers. The 12-week exercise training program did not significantly affect lung function as assessed by spirometry in the non-smoker group. However, it significantly increased both forced expiratory volume in 1 second and peak expiratory flow (PEF) in the cigarette smoker group, and PEF in the hookah smoker group. Our training program had its most notable impact on the cardiopulmonary system of smokers. In the non-smoker and cigarette smoker groups, the training program significantly improved V.O2max (4.4 and 4.7%, respectively), v V.O2max (6.7 and 5.6%, respectively), and the recovery index (7.9 and 10.5%, respectively). Conclusions After 12 weeks of interval training program, the increase of V.O2max and the decrease of recovery index and resting heart rate in the smoking subjects indicated better exercise tolerance. Although the intermittent training program altered pulmonary function only partially, both

  17. Training Monitoring for Resistance Exercise: Theory and Applications.

    PubMed

    Scott, Brendan R; Duthie, Grant M; Thornton, Heidi R; Dascombe, Ben J

    2016-05-01

    Resistance exercise is difficult to quantify owing to its inherent complexity with numerous training variables contributing to the training dose (type of exercise, load lifted, training volume, inter-set rest periods, and repetition velocity). In addition, the intensity of resistance training is often inadequately determined as the relative load lifted (% 1-repetition maximum), which does not account for the effects of inter-set recovery periods, repetition velocity, or the number of repetitions performed in each set at a given load. Methods to calculate the volume load associated with resistance training, as well as the perceived intensity of individual sets and entire training sessions have been shown to provide useful information regarding the actual training stimulus. In addition, questionnaires to subjectively assess how athletes are coping with the stressors of training and portable technologies to quantify performance variables such as concentric velocity may also be valuable. However, while several methods have been proposed to quantify resistance training, there is not yet a consensus regarding how these methods can be best implemented and integrated to complement each other. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to provide practical information for strength coaches to highlight effective methods to assess resistance training, and how they can be integrated into a comprehensive monitoring program. PMID:26780346

  18. A Comparison of 12 Weeks of Pilates and Aquatic Training on the Dynamic Balance of Women with Mulitple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Marandi, Sayyed Mohammad; Nejad, Vahid Shayegan; Shanazari, Zohreh; Zolaktaf, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a disabling chronic disease of the nervous system in which the myelin system of the central nervous system is deteriorated. The objective of this study is to understand the effect of Pilates exercises and aquatic training for a 12 week period on the dynamic balance of MS patients. Methods: The research method is semi-experimental. As a result, among the female patients visiting the MS clinic of Kashani hospital in Esfahan, 57 patients with disease intensity levels between 0 and 4.5 were taken as samples. The average length of the disease was 8 ± 2 years, 20;40 years old, and they were randomly divided into three groups of Pilates exercise group, aquatic training group, and the control group. The exercise schedule for the experiment groups consisted of 12 weeks, three sessions per week, and 1 hour for each session. The dynamic balance of the patients, before and after the exercises was measured by Six Spot Step Test. Results: The adjusted mean differences of Timed Up and Go Test (TUGT) scores of the experimental groups are significantly different (P<0.05). Therefore, it can be said that Pilates exercise interventions and aquatic training can significantly increase the dynamic balance of the examinees in the post-experiment stage. Conclusions: Performing the Pilate exercises and aquatic training increases dynamic balance of the MS patients. Considering the role of dynamic balance on physical fitness and enabling the person in doing is daily chores and routines, and its direct effect on the quality of life, it leads the specialists in applying these exercises as a supplementary treatment along with the medicinal treatments for MS patients. PMID:23717760

  19. Effect of resistance training on muscle use during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz, Lori L.; Tesch, Per A.; Biro, Ronald L.; Dudley, Gary A.

    1994-01-01

    This study examined the effect of resistance training on exercise-induced contrast shift in magnetic resonance (MR) images. It was hypothesized that a given load could be lifted after training with less muscle showing contrast shift, thereby suggesting less muscle was used to perform the exercise. Nine males trained the left quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle 2 days/wk for 9 wk using 3-6 sets of 12 knee extensions each day. The right QF served as a control. Exercise-induced contrast shifts in MR images evoked by each of three bouts of exercise (5 sets of 10 knee extensions with a load equal to 50, 75, and 100% of the maximum pretraining load that could be lifted for 5 sets of 10 repetitions) were quantified pre- and posttraining. MR image contrast shift was quantified by determining QF cross-sectional area (CSA) showing increased spin-spin relaxation time. One repetition maximum increased 14% in the left trained QF and 7% in the right untrained QF. Left QF CSA increased 5%, with no change in right QSF CSA. Left QF CSA showing contrast shift was less after each bout of the exercise test posttraining. This was also true, to a lesser extent, for the right QF at the higher two loads. The results suggest that short-term resistance training reduces MR image contrast shift evoked by a given effort, thereby reflecting the use of less muscle to lift the load. Because this response was evident in both trained and contralateral untrained muscle, neural factors are suggested to be responsible. The consequence of this adaptation could be to increase 'stress' per unit area of active muscle during the course of training and thereby evoke hypertrophy.

  20. Postactivation potentiation effects after heavy resistance exercise on running speed.

    PubMed

    Chatzopoulos, Dimitris E; Michailidis, Charalambos J; Giannakos, Athanasios K; Alexiou, Kostas C; Patikas, Dimitrios A; Antonopoulos, Christos B; Kotzamanidis, Christos M

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the postactivation potentiation effect after a heavy resistance stimulus (HRS) on running speed (RS). Fifteen amateur team game players (basketball, volleyball, handball, and soccer players), ages 18-23 years running the 30-m dash and the intermediate phase of 0-10 and 0-30 m sprints, were used to evaluate RS. Resistance training consisted of 10 single repetitions at 90% of 1 repetition maximum. The running tests were performed 3 times--(a) 3 minutes prior the HRS, (b) 3 minutes after the HRS, and (c) 5 minutes after the HRS--in separated training sessions. Results showed that RS was not affected 3 minutes after the resistance training, but it increased for both selected running phases (0-10 and 0-30 m) 5 minutes after the HRS (p < 0.05). These findings indicate that heavy resistance exercise improves 10- and 30-m sprint performance when performed 5 minutes after the exercise bout. PMID:18076255

  1. Cardiorespiratory responses of pregnant and nonpregnant women during resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Bgeginski, Roberta; Almada, Bruna P; Martins Kruel, Luiz F

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine cardiorespiratory responses in pregnant and nonpregnant women during the execution of resistance exercises for upper and lower body. Twenty healthy women (10 pregnant: 22-24 weeks, 25.20 ± 4.44 years, 69.80 ± 9.52 kg, 161.60 ± 5.21 cm and 10 nonpregnant: 25.20 ± 3.73 years, 62.36 ± 8.60 kg, 162.40 ± 3.97 cm) performed 5 experimental sessions. Session 1: familiarization with the equipments and the determination of 1 estimated maximum repetition. Sessions 2, 3, 4, and 5: determination of the cardiorespiratory responses during the execution of resistance exercise on the bilateral leg extension and pec-deck fly, with 1 and 3 sets of 15 repetitions, 50% of 1 estimated maximum repetition. Systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressure (BP) responses were lower (p = 0.029, 0.018, 0.009, respectively) in the pregnant group. When the exercises were performed with a single set, heart rate showed increased values for bilateral leg extension (pregnant: 109.40 ± 10.75 b·min, nonpregnant: 108.51 ± 19.05 b·min) compared with pec-deck (pregnant: 101.59 ± 14.83 b·min, nonpregnant: 100.37 ± 12.36 b·min); however, when the exercises were performed with 3 sets, bilateral leg extension showed increased values for the heart rate (pregnant: 114.70 ± 13.58 b·min, nonpregnant: 121.29 ± 10.86 b·min), systolic (pregnant: 124.50 ± 17.32 mm Hg, nonpregnant: 136.00 ± 17.79 mm Hg), diastolic (pregnant: 68.10 ± 8.23 mm Hg, nonpregnant: 77.89 ± 15.25 mm Hg), and mean BP (pregnant: 86.90 ± 10.38 mm Hg, nonpregnant: 97.73 ± 12.64 mm Hg), ventilation (pregnant: 12.88 ± 4.05 L·min, nonpregnant: 15.02 ± 4.19 L·min), and oxygen consumption (pregnant: 0.41 ± 0.08 L·min, nonpregnant: 0.42 ± 0.09 L·min) compared with pec-deck fly exercise. We concluded that the pressure response was unaffected by pregnancy and showed to be safe during the performance of resistance exercises. PMID:25226315

  2. Training with the International Space Station interim resistive exercise device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Suzanne M.; Amonette, William E.; Blazine, Kristi; Bentley, Jason; Lee, Stuart M C.; Loehr, James A.; Moore, Alan D Jr; Rapley, Michael; Mulder, Edwin R.; Smith, Scott M.

    2003-01-01

    A unique, interim elastomer-based resistive exercise device (iRED) is being used on the International Space Station. PURPOSE: This study characterized iRED training responses in a 1-g environment by: 1) determining whether 16 wk of high-intensity training with iRED produces increases in muscle strength and volume and bone mineral density (BMD), 2) comparing training responses with iRED to free weights, and 3) comparing iRED training responses at two training volumes. METHODS: Twenty-eight untrained men were assigned to four groups of seven subjects each: a no exercise control group (CON), an iRED group who trained with three sets/exercise (iRED3), a free-weight group (FW) who trained with three sets/exercise, and an iRED group who trained with six sets/exercise (iRED6). Training exercises included squat (SQ), heel raise (HR), and dead lift (DL) exercises, 3 d.wk(-1) for 16 wk. RESULTS: For CON, no changes occurred pre- to posttraining. For iRED3, increases (P< or =0.05) in one-repetition maximum (1-RM) strength (SQ 21 +/- 4%, HR 17 +/- 4%, DL 29 +/- 5%), leg lean mass (3.1 +/- 0.5%) by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and thigh (4.5 +/- 0.9%) and calf (5.9 +/- 0.7%) muscle volume (by magnetic resonance imaging) occurred after training with no changes in BMD (DXA). For FW, increases in 1-RM strength (SQ 22 +/- 5%, HR 24 +/- 3%, DL 41 +/- 7%), whole body (3.0 +/- 1.1%) and leg lean mass (5.4 +/- 1.2%), thigh (9.2 +/- 1.3%) and calf (4.2 +/- 1.0%) muscle volumes, and lumbar BMD (4.2 +/- 0.7%) occurred after training. For iRED6, all responses were similar to iRED3. CONCLUSION: High-intensity training with the iRED produced muscle responses similar to FW but was not effective in stimulating bone. Bed rest and spaceflight studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of the iRED to prevent microgravity deconditioning.

  3. Set Configuration in Resistance Exercise: Muscle Fatigue and Cardiovascular Effects

    PubMed Central

    Río-Rodríguez, Dan; Iglesias-Soler, Eliseo; Fernández del Olmo, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cardiovascular responses of traditional resistance (TS) training have been extensively explored. However, the fatigue mechanisms associated with an intra-set rest configuration (ISR) have not been investigated. This study compares two modalities of set configurations for resistance exercise that equates work to rest ratios and measures the central and peripheral fatigue in combination with cortical, hemodynamic and cardiovascular measures. Methods 11 subjects performed two isometric knee extension training sessions using TS and ISR configurations. Voluntary activation (VA), single twitch amplitude, low frequency fatigue (LFF), Mwave, motor evoked potential (MEP), short intracortical inhibition (SICI), intracortical facilitation (ICF) and heart rate variability were evaluated before and after each training session. During each session beat to beat heart rate, blood pressure and rate pressure product (RPP) were also evaluated. Results After exercise VA decreased significantly for TS but not for ISR (P < 0.001), single twitch amplitude and LFF values were lower for TS than ISR (P < 0.004), and SICI was reduced only for the TS configuration (P = 0.049). During exercise RPP values were significantly higher for the TS than for ISR (P = 0.001). RPP correlated with VA for TS (r = -.85 P < 0.001) suggesting a relationship between central fatigue and cardiovascular stress. Conclusions We conclude that ISR induced lower central and peripheral fatigue as well as lower cardiovascular stress in comparison with TS configuration. Our study suggests that set configuration is a key factor in the regulation of the neuromuscular and cardiovascular responses of resistance training. PMID:26982500

  4. Hypertrophy of chronically unloaded muscle subjected to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Tesch, P A; Trieschmann, J T; Ekberg, A

    2004-04-01

    In an effort to simulate the compromised function and atrophy of lower limb muscles experienced by astronauts after spaceflight, 21 men and women age 30-56 yr were subjected to unilateral lower limb unloading for 5 wk. Whereas 10 of these subjects performed unilateral knee extensor resistance exercise (ULRE) two or three times weekly, 11 subjects (UL) refrained from training. The exercise regimen consisted of four sets of seven maximal actions, using an apparatus that offers concentric and eccentric resistance by utilizing the inertia of rotating flywheel(s). Knee extensor muscle strength was measured before and after UL and ULRE, and knee extensor and ankle plantar flexor muscle volumes were determined by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Surface electromyographic activity measured after UL inferred increased muscle use to perform a given motor task. UL induced an 8.8% decrease (P < 0.05) in knee extensor muscle volume. After ULRE and as a result of only approximately 16 min of maximal contractile activity over the 5-wk course, muscle volume increased 7.7% (P < 0.05). Muscle strength decreased 24-32% (P < 0.05) in response to UL. Group ULRE showed maintained (P > 0.05) strength. Ankle plantar flexor muscle volume of the unloaded limb decreased (P < 0.05) in both groups (UL 10.5%; ULRE 11.1%). In neither group did the right weight-bearing limb show any change (P > 0.05) in muscle volume or strength. The results of this study provide evidence that resistance exercise not only may offset muscle atrophy but is in fact capable of promoting marked hypertrophy of chronically unloaded muscle. PMID:14660503

  5. Salivary Cortisol Responses and Perceived Exertion during High Intensity and Low Intensity Bouts of Resistance Exercise

    PubMed Central

    McGuigan, Michael R.; Egan, Alison D.; Foster, Carl

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the salivary cortisol response to different intensities of resistance exercise. In addition, we wanted to determine the reliability of the session rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale to monitor resistance exercise intensity. Subjects (8 men, 9 women) completed 2 trials of acute resistance training bouts in a counterbalanced design. The high intensity resistance exercise protocol consisted of six, ten-repetition sets using 75% of one repetition maximum (RM) on a Smith machine squat and bench press exercise (12 sets total). The low intensity resistance exercise protocol consisted of three, ten-repetition sets at 30% of 1RM of the same exercises as the high intensity protocol. Both exercise bouts were performed with 2 minutes of rest between each exercise and sessions were repeated to test reliability of the measures. The order of the exercise bouts was randomized with least 72 hours between each session. Saliva samples were obtained immediately before, immediately after and 30 mins following each resistance exercise bout. RPE measures were obtained using Borg’s CR-10 scale following each set. Also, the session RPE for the entire exercise session was obtained 30 minutes following completion of the session. There was a significant 97% increase in the level of salivary cortisol immediately following the high intensity exercise session (P<0.05). There was also a significant difference in salivary cortisol of 145% between the low intensity and high intensity exercise session immediately post-exercise (P<0.05). The low intensity exercise did not result in any significant changes in cortisol levels. There was also a significant difference between the session RPE values for the different intensity levels (high intensity 7.1 vs. low intensity 1.9) (P<0.05). The intraclass correlation coefficient for the session RPE measure was 0.95. It was concluded that the session RPE method is a valid and reliable method of quantifying

  6. Cardiac autonomic responses after resistance exercise in treated hypertensive subjects

    PubMed Central

    Trevizani, Gabriela A.; Peçanha, Tiago; Nasario-Junior, Olivassé; Vianna, Jeferson M.; Silva, Lilian P.; Nadal, Jurandir

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and to compare heart rate variability (HRV) after resistance exercise (RE) in treated hypertensive and normotensive subjects. Nine hypertensive men [HT: 58.0 ± 7.7 years, systolic blood pressure (SBP) = 133.6 ± 6.5 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) = 87.3 ± 8.1 mmHg; under antihypertensive treatment] and 11 normotensive men (NT: 57.1 ± 6.0 years, SBP = 127 ± 8.5 mmHg, DBP = 82.7 ± 5.5 mmHg) performed a single session of RE (2 sets of 15–20 repetitions, 50% of 1 RM, 120 s interval between sets/exercise) for the following exercises: leg extension, leg press, leg curl, bench press, seated row, triceps push-down, seated calf flexion, seated arm curl. HRV was assessed at resting and during 10 min of recovery period by calculating time (SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50) and frequency domain (LF, HF, LF/HF) indices. Mean values of HRV indices were reduced in the post-exercise period compared to the resting period (HT: lnHF: 4.7 ± 1.4 vs. 2.4 ± 1.2 ms2; NT: lnHF: 4.8 ± 1.5 vs. 2.2 ± 1.1 ms2, p < 0.01). However, there was no group vs. time interaction in this response (p = 0.8). The results indicate that HRV is equally suppressed after RE in normotensive and hypertensive individuals. These findings suggest that a single session of RE does not bring additional cardiac autonomic stress to treated hypertensive subjects. PMID:26441677

  7. Resistance exercise, but not endurance exercise, induces IKKβ phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle of training-accustomed individuals.

    PubMed

    Møller, Andreas Buch; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Clasen, Berthil Forrest; Schjerling, Peter; Vissing, Kristian; Jessen, Niels

    2013-12-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is considered an important role in the muscular adaptations to exercise. It has been proposed that exercise-induced signaling to mTORC1 do not require classic growth factor PI3K/Akt signaling. Activation of IKKβ and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) Erk1/2 and p38 has been suggested to link inflammation and cellular stress to activation of mTORC1 through the tuberous sclerosis 1 (TSC1)/tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) complex. Consequently, activation of these proteins constitutes potential alternative mechanisms of mTORC1 activation following exercise. Previously, we demonstrated that mTOR is preferentially activated in response to resistance exercise compared to endurance exercise in trained individuals without concomitant activation of Akt. In the present study, we extended this investigation by examining IκB kinase complex (IKK), TSC1, MAPK, and upstream Akt activators, along with gene expression of selected cytokines, in skeletal muscles from these subjects. Biopsies were sampled prior to, immediately after, and in the recovery period following resistance exercise, endurance exercise, and control interventions. The major finding was that IKKβ phosphorylation increased exclusively after resistance exercise. No changes in TSC1, Erk1/2, insulin receptor, or insulin receptor substrate 1 phosphorylation were observed in any of the groups, while p38 phosphorylation was higher in the resistance exercise group compared to both other groups immediately after the intervention. Resistance and endurance exercise increased IL6, IL8, and TNFα gene expression immediately after exercise. The non-exercise control group demonstrated that cytokine gene expression is also sensitive to repeated biopsy sampling, whereas no effect of repeated biopsy sampling on protein expression and phosphorylation was observed. In conclusion, resistance exercise, but not endurance exercise, increases IKKβ phosphorylation in trained

  8. Stimulation of Myofibrillar Protein Synthesis in Hindlimb Suspended Rats by Resistance Exercise and Growth Hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linderman, Jon K.; Whittall, Justen B.; Gosselink, Kristin L.; Wang, Tommy J.; Mukku, Venkat R.; Booth, Frank W.; Grindeland, Richard E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the ability of a single bout of resistance exercise alone or in combination with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) to stimulate myofibrillar protein synthesis (Ks) in hindlimb suspended (HLS) adult female rats. Plantar flexor muscles were stimulated with resistance exercise, consisting of 10 repetitions of ladder climbing on a 1 m grid (85 deg.), carrying an additional 50% of their body weight attached to their tails. Saline or rhGH (1 mg/kg) was administered 30' prior to exercise, and Ks was determined with a constant infusion of H-3-Leucine at 15', 60', 180', and 360' following exercise. Three days of HLS depressed Ks is approx. equal to 65% and 30-40% in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, respectively (p is less than or equal to 0.05). Exercise increased soleus Ks in saline-treated rats 149% 60' following exercise (p less than or equal to 0.05), decaying to that of non-exercised animals during the next 5 hours. Relative to suspended, non-exercised rats rhGH + exercise increased soleus Ks 84%, 108%, and 72% at 15', 60' and 360' following exercise (p is less than or equal to 0.05). Gastrocnemius Ks was not significantly increased by exercise or the combination of rhGH and exercise up to 360' post-exercise. Results from this study indicate that resistance exercise stimulated Ks 60' post-exercise in the soleus of HLS rats, with no apparent effect of rhGH to enhance or prolong exercise-induced stimulation. Results suggests that exercise frequency may be important to maintenance of the slow-twitch soleus during non-weightbearing, but that the ability of resistance exercise to maintain myofibrillar protein content in the gastrocnemius of hindlimb suspended rats cannot be explained by acute stimulation of synthesis.

  9. Exercise training reduces insulin resistance and upregulates the mTOR/p70S6k pathway in cardiac muscle of diet-induced obesity rats.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Cleber; Frederico, Marisa J; da Luz, Gabrielle; Pauli, José R; Silva, Adelino S R; Pinho, Ricardo A; Velloso, Lício A; Ropelle, Eduardo R; De Souza, Cláudio T

    2011-03-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are rapidly expanding public health problems. These disturbances are related to many diseases, including heart pathology. Acting through the Akt/mTOR pathway, insulin has numerous and important physiological functions, such as the induction of growth and survival of many cell types and cardiac hypertrophy. However, obesity and insulin resistance can alter mTOR/p70S6k. Exercise training is known to induce this pathway, but never in the heart of diet-induced obesity subjects. To evaluate the effect of exercise training on mTOR/p70S6k in the heart of obese Wistar rats, we analyzed the effects of 12 weeks of swimming on obese rats, induced by a high-fat diet. Exercise training reduced epididymal fat, fasting serum insulin and plasma glucose disappearance. Western blot analyses showed that exercise training increased the ability of insulin to phosphorylate intracellular molecules such as Akt (2.3-fold) and Foxo1 (1.7-fold). Moreover, reduced activities and expressions of proteins, induced by the high-fat diet in rats, such as phospho-JNK (1.9-fold), NF-kB (1.6-fold) and PTP-1B (1.5-fold), were observed. Finally, exercise training increased the activities of the transduction pathways of insulin-dependent protein synthesis, as shown by increases in Raptor phosphorylation (1.7-fold), p70S6k phosphorylation (1.9-fold), and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation (1.4-fold) and a reduction in atrogin-1 expression (2.1-fold). Results demonstrate a pivotal regulatory role of exercise training on the Akt/mTOR pathway, in turn, promoting protein synthesis and antagonizing protein degradation. PMID:20717955

  10. Resistance exercise biology: manipulation of resistance exercise programme variables determines the responses of cellular and molecular signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Spiering, Barry A; Kraemer, William J; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Nindl, Bradley C; Volek, Jeff S; Maresh, Carl M

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology have elucidated some of the mechanisms that regulate skeletal muscle growth. Logically, muscle physiologists have applied these innovations to the study of resistance exercise (RE), as RE represents the most potent natural stimulus for growth in adult skeletal muscle. However, as this molecular-based line of research progresses to investigations in humans, scientists must appreciate the fundamental principles of RE to effectively design such experiments. Therefore, we present herein an updated paradigm of RE biology that integrates fundamental RE principles with the current knowledge of muscle cellular and molecular signalling. RE invokes a sequential cascade consisting of: (i) muscle activation; (ii) signalling events arising from mechanical deformation of muscle fibres, hormones, and immune/inflammatory responses; (iii) protein synthesis due to increased transcription and translation; and (iv) muscle fibre hypertrophy. In this paradigm, RE is considered an 'upstream' signal that determines specific downstream events. Therefore, manipulation of the acute RE programme variables (i.e. exercise choice, load, volume, rest period lengths, and exercise order) alters the unique 'fingerprint' of the RE stimulus and subsequently modifies the downstream cellular and molecular responses. PMID:18557656

  11. Anabolic responses to acute and chronic resistance exercise are enhanced when combined with aquatic treadmill exercise.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Brad S; Shimkus, Kevin L; Fluckey, James D; Riechman, Steven E; Greene, Nicholas P; Cardin, Jessica M; Crouse, Stephen F

    2015-02-01

    Aquatic treadmill (ATM) running may simultaneously promote aerobic fitness and enhance muscle growth when combined with resistance training (RT) compared with land-treadmill (LTM) running. Therefore, we examined acute and chronic physiological responses to RT, concurrent RT-LTM, and concurrent RT-ATM. Forty-seven untrained volunteers (men: n = 23, 37 ± 11 yr, 29.6 ± 4.6 kg/m(2); women: n = 24, 38 ± 12 yr, 27.53 ± 6.4 kg/m(2)) from the general population were tested for V̇o2max, body composition, and strength before and after training. All groups performed 12 wk of RT (2 wk, 3 × 8-12 sets at 60 to approximately 80% 1-repetition maximum). The RT-LTM and RT-ATM groups also performed 12 wk of LTM or ATM training (2 wk immediately post-RT and 1 wk in isolation, 60-85% V̇o2max, 250-500 kcal/session). Additionally, 25 subjects volunteered for muscle biopsy prior to and 24 h post-acute exercise before and after training. Stable isotope labeling (70% (2)H2O, 3 ml/kg) was utilized to quantify 24 h post-exercise myofibrillar fractional synthesis rates (myoFSR). Mixed-model ANOVA revealed that RT-ATM but not RT-LTM training produced greater chronic increases in lean mass than RT alone (P < 0.05). RT-LTM training was found to elicit the greatest decreases in percent body fat (-2.79%, P < 0.05). In the untrained state, acute RT-ATM exercise elicited higher 24-h myoFSRs compared with RT (+5.68%/day, P < 0.01) and RT-LTM (+4.08%/day, P < 0.05). Concurrent RT-ATM exercise and training elicit greater skeletal muscle anabolism than RT alone or RT-LTM. PMID:25425002

  12. Muscle Volume Increases Following 16 Weeks of Resistive Exercise Training with the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and Free Weights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, R. E.; Loehr, J. A.; Lee, S. M. C.; English, K. L.; Evans, H.; Smith, S. A.; Hagan, R. D.

    2009-01-01

    Space flight-induced muscle atrophy, particularly in the postural and locomotorymuscles, may impair task performance during long-duration space missions and planetary exploration. High intensity free weight (FW) resistive exercise training has been shown to prevent atrophy during bed rest, a space flight analog. NASA developed the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) to simulate the characteristics of FW exercise (i.e. constant mass, inertial force) and to be used as a countermeasure during International Space Station (ISS) missions. PURPOSE: To compare the efficacy of ARED and FW training to induce hypertrophy in specific muscle groups in ambulatory subjects prior to deploying ARED on the ISS. METHODS: Twenty untrained subjects were assigned to either the ARED (8 males, 3 females) or FW (6 males, 3 females) group and participated in a periodizedtraining protocol consisting of squat (SQ), heel raise (HR), and deadlift(DL) exercises 3 d wk-1 for 16 wks. SQ, HR, and DL muscle strength (1RM) was measured before, after 8 wks, and after 16 wks of training to prescribe exercise and measure strength changes. Muscle volume of the vastigroup (V), hamstring group (H), hip adductor group (ADD), medial gastrocnemius(MG), lateral gastrocnemius(LG), and deep posterior muscles including soleus(DP) was measured using MRI pre-and post-training. Consecutive cross-sectional images (8 mm slices with a 2 mm gap) were analyzed and summed. Anatomical references insured that the same muscle sections were analyzed pre-and post-training. Two-way repeated measures ANOVAs (p<0.05) were used to test for differences in muscle strength and volume between training devices. RESULTS: SQ, HR, and DL 1RM increased in both FW (SQ: 49+/-6%, HR: 12+/-2%, DL: 23+/-4%) and ARED (SQ: 31+/-4%, HR: 18+/-2%, DL: 23+/-3%) groups. Both groups increased muscle volume in the V (FW: 13+/-2%, ARED: 10+/-2%), H (FW: 3+/-1%, ARED: 3+/-1 %), ADD (FW: 15=/-2%, ARED: 10+/-1%), LG (FW: 7+/-2%, ARED: 4+/-1%), MG (FW

  13. Ursolic acid stimulates mTORC1 signaling after resistance exercise in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Riki; Sato, Koji; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Nakazato, Koichi; Fujita, Satoshi

    2013-09-15

    A recent study identified ursolic acid (UA) as a potent stimulator of muscle protein anabolism via PI3K/Akt signaling, thereby suggesting that UA can increase Akt-independent mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activation induced by resistance exercise via Akt signaling. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of UA on resistance exercise-induced mTORC1 activation. The right gastrocnemius muscle of male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 11 wk was isometrically exercised via percutaneous electrical stimulation (stimulating ten 3-s contractions per set for 5 sets), while the left gastrocnemius muscle served as the control. UA or placebo (PLA; corn oil only) was injected intraperitoneally immediately after exercise. The rats were killed 1 or 6 h after the completion of exercise and the target tissues removed immediately. With placebo injection, the phosphorylation of p70(S6K) at Thr(389) increased 1 h after resistance exercise but attenuated to the control levels 6 h after the exercise. On the other hand, the augmented phosphorylation of p70(S6K) was maintained even 6 h after exercise when UA was injected immediately after exercise. A similar trend of prolonged phosphorylation was observed in PRAS40 Thr(246), whereas UA alone or resistance exercise alone did not alter its phosphorylation level at 6 h after intervention. These results indicate that UA is able to sustain resistance exercise-induced mTORC1 activity. PMID:23900420

  14. Ischemic Preconditioning and Placebo Intervention Improves Resistance Exercise Performance.

    PubMed

    Marocolo, Moacir; Willardson, Jeffrey M; Marocolo, Isabela C; Ribeiro da Mota, Gustavo; Simão, Roberto; Maior, Alex S

    2016-05-01

    Marocolo, M, Willardson, JM, Marocolo, IC, da Mota, GR, Simão, R, and Maior, AS. Ischemic preconditioning and PLACEBO intervention improves resistance exercise performance. J Strength Cond Res 30(5): 1462-1469, 2016-This study evaluated the effect of ischemic preconditioning (IPC) on resistance exercise performance in the lower limbs. Thirteen men participated in a randomized crossover design that involved 3 separate sessions (IPC, PLACEBO, and control). A 12-repetition maximum (12RM) load for the leg extension exercise was assessed through test and retest sessions before the first experimental session. The IPC session consisted of 4 cycles of 5 minutes of occlusion at 220 mm Hg of pressure alternated with 5 minutes of reperfusion at 0 mm Hg for a total of 40 minutes. The PLACEBO session consisted of 4 cycles of 5 minutes of cuff administration at 20 mm Hg of pressure alternated with 5 minutes of pseudo-reperfusion at 0 mm Hg for a total of 40 minutes. The occlusion and reperfusion phases were conducted alternately between the thighs, with subjects remaining seated. No ischemic pressure was applied during the control (CON) session and subjects sat passively for 40 minutes. Eight minutes after IPC, PLACEBO, or CON, subjects performed 3 repetition maximum sets of the leg extension (2-minute rest between sets) with the predetermined 12RM load. Four minutes after the third set for each condition, blood lactate was assessed. The results showed that for the first set, the number of repetitions significantly increased for both the IPC (13.08 ± 2.11; p = 0.0036) and PLACEBO (13.15 ± 0.88; p = 0.0016) conditions, but not for the CON (11.88 ± 1.07; p > 0.99) condition. In addition, the IPC and PLACEBO conditions resulted insignificantly greater repetitions vs. the CON condition on the first set (p = 0.015; p = 0.007) and second set (p = 0.011; p = 0.019), but not on the third set (p = 0.68; p > 0.99). No difference (p = 0.465) was found in the fatigue index and lactate

  15. Exploring the dose-response relationship between resistance exercise intensity and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Kai; Etnier, Jennifer L

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the dose-response relationship between resistance exercise intensity and cognitive performance. Sixty-eight participants were randomly assigned into control, 40%, 70%, or 100% of 10-repetition maximal resistance exercise groups. Participants were tested on Day 1 (baseline) and on Day 2 (measures were taken relative to performance of the treatment). Heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion, self-reported arousal, and affect were assessed on both days. Cognitive performance was assessed on Day 1 and before and following treatment on Day 2. Results from regression analyses indicated that there is a significant linear effect of exercise intensity on information processing speed, and a significant quadratic trend for exercise intensity on executive function. Thus, there is a dose-response relationship between the intensity of resistance exercise and cognitive performance such that high-intensity exercise benefits speed of processing, but moderate intensity exercise is most beneficial for executive function. PMID:20016113

  16. Resistance exercise prevents plantar flexor deconditioning during bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamman, M. M.; Hunter, G. R.; Stevens, B. R.; Guilliams, M. E.; Greenisen, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    Because resistance exercise (REX) and unloading induce opposing neuromuscular adaptations, we tested the efficacy of REX against the effects of 14 d of bed rest unloading (BRU) on the plantar flexor muscle group. Sixteen men were randomly assigned to no exercise (NOE, N = 8) or REX (N = 8). REX performed 5 sets x 6-10 repetitions to failure of constant resistance concentric/eccentric plantar flexion every other day during BRU. One-repetition maximum (1RM) strength was tested on the training device. The angle-specific torque-velocity relationship across 5 velocities (0, 0.52, 1.05, 1.75, and 2.97 rad.s-1) and the full range-of-motion power-velocity relationship were assessed on a dynamometer. Torque-position analyses identified strength changes at shortened, neutral, and stretched muscle lengths. Concentric and eccentric contractile work were measured across ten repetitions at 1.05 rad.s-1. Maximal neural activation was measured by surface electromyography (EMG). 1RM decreased 9% in NOE and improved 11% in REX (P < 0.05). Concentric (0.52 and 1.05 rad.s-1), eccentric (0.52 and 2.97 rad.s-1), and isometric angle-specific torques decreased (P < 0.05) in NOE, averaging 18%, 17%, and 13%, respectively. Power dropped (P < 0.05) in NOE at three eccentric (21%) and two concentric (14%) velocities. REX protected angle-specific torque and average power at all velocities. Concentric and eccentric strength decreased at stretched (16%) and neutral (17%) muscle lengths (P < 0.05) in NOE while REX maintained or improved strength at all joint positions. Concentric (15%) and eccentric (11%) contractile work fell in NOE (P < 0.05) but not in REX. Maximal plantar flexor EMG did not change in either group. In summary, constant resistance concentric/eccentric REX completely prevented plantar flexor performance deconditioning induced by BRU. The reported benefits of REX should prove useful in prescribing exercise for astronauts in microgravity and for patients susceptible to functional

  17. Ventilatory response to moderate incremental exercise performed 24 h after resistance exercise with concentric and eccentric contractions.

    PubMed

    Yunoki, Takahiro; Arimitsu, Takuma; Yamanaka, Ryo; Lian, Chang-Shun; Afroundeh, Roghhayye; Matsuura, Ryouta; Yano, Tokuo

    2011-08-01

    In order to test our hypothesis that muscle condition has an effect on the cognition of self-motion and consequently on the ventilatory response during exercise, six healthy subjects performed a moderate incremental exercise test (IET) on a cycle ergometer under two conditions [resistance exercise condition (REC) and control condition (CC)]. In the REC, resistance exercise (30 incline leg presses) was conducted during two sessions scheduled at 48 and then 24 h prior to the IET. For the CC, the subjects were instructed to refrain from participating in strenuous exercise for a period of 2 days prior to the IET. In the IET, the workload was increased from 78 to 118 watts in steps of 8 watts every 3 min. Although the ventilatory response during the IET was significantly higher in the REC than in the CC, there were no significant differences in cognitive indexes (RPE and awareness of change in workload) between the two conditions. In addition, the magnitude of muscle soreness was significantly higher in the REC than in the CC. However, the level of soreness in the REC was very low, and there were no significant differences in blood lactate concentration and integrated EMG between the two conditions. These results suggest that a change in peripheral neural reflex is the primary cause of increased ventilatory response to moderate exercise after resistance exercise, although the role of a cognitive element cannot be absolutely excluded. PMID:21221990

  18. Salivary hormonal values from high-speed resistive exercise workouts.

    PubMed

    Caruso, John F; Lutz, Brant M; Davidson, Mark E; Wilson, Kyle; Crane, Chris S; Craig, Chrsity E; Nissen, Tim E; Mason, Melissa L; Coday, Michael A; Sheaff, Robert J; Potter, William T

    2012-03-01

    Our study purpose examined salivary hormonal responses to high-speed resistive exercise. Healthy subjects (n = 45) performed 2 elbow flexor workouts on a novel (inertial kinetic exercise; Oconomowoc, WI, USA) strength training device. Our methods included saliva sample collection at both preexercise and immediately postexercise; workouts entailed two 60-second sets separated by a 90-second rest period. The samples were analyzed in duplicate for their testosterone and cortisol concentrations ([T], [C]). Average and maximum elbow flexor torque were measured from each exercise bout; they were later analyzed with a 2(gender) × 2(workout) analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures for workout. The [T] and [C] each underwent a 2(gender) × 2(time) ANOVA with repeated measures for time. A within-subject design was used to limit error variance. Average and maximum torque each had gender (men > women; p < 0.05) effects. The [T] elicited a 2-way interaction (p < 0.05), as men incurred a significant 14% increase over time, but women's values were unchanged. Yet multivariate regression revealed that 3 predictor variables (body mass and average and maximum torques) did not account for a significant amount of variance associated with the rise in male [T]. Changes in [C] were not significant. In conclusion, changes in [T] concur with the results from other studies that showed significant elevations in male [T], despite the brevity of current workouts and the rather modest volume of muscle mass engaged. Practical applications imply that salivary assays may be a viable alternative to blood draws from athletes, yet coaches and others who may administer this treatment should know that our results may have produced greater pre-post hormonal changes if postexercise sample collection had occurred at a later time point. PMID:22310520

  19. Lower Body Negative Pressure Treadmill Exercise and Resistive Exercise Countermeasures Maintain Physiologic Function in Women during Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macias, B. R.; Schneider, S. M.; Lee, S. M. C.; Guinet, P.; Hughson, R. L.; Smith, Scott M.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    We hypothesized that supine LBNP treadmill exercise combined with Flywheel resistive exercise maintains upright physiologic responses following 60-days of head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest (BR). METHODS: 16 healthy women (age 25-40 years) underwent 60-days HDT (-6deg.) BR. Women were assigned to either a non-exercise control group (CON, n=8) or to an exercise group (EX, n=8). EX subjects performed a 40-min, variable intensity LBNP exercise protocol at foot-ward forces between 1.0-1.1 times body weight, followed by 10- min of resting LBNP 3-4 days/week. Resistive exercise of maximal concentric and eccentric supine leg press and heel raise exercises were performed using a flywheel ergometer 2-3 days/week. IRBs approved this study with informed/written consent. RESULTS: Post-BR VO2pk was not different in EX (-3.3+/-1.2%) but decreased significantly in CON (-21.2+/-2.1%), p< 0.05. Post-BR orthostatic tolerance time (mean se) decreased significantly less in EX (19.3+/-1.3 to 14.4+/-1.5 min) than in CON (17.5+/-0.1 to 9.1+/- 1.5 min), p=0.03. Post-BR muscle strength decreased significantly in CON, but was preserved in EX. Post-BR bone resorption was greater than pre-BR in both groups (p<0.05). Bone formation markers, were significantly elevated (p<0.05) in EX than in CON. CONCLUSIONS: Supine LBNP treadmill exercise along with flywheel resistive exercise maintains upright exercise capacity, orthostatic responses and muscle strength during 60-days HDT BR.

  20. Resistance exercise increase lean body mass and improves basal and hepatic insulin sensitivity in obese adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the metabolic effects of resistance exercise, for instance, weight lifting. We studied whether a resistance exercise program improves insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in sedentary obese adolescents. Elevn obese subjects (15.7 +/- 0.4 year; 35.4 +/- 0.8 kg/m2; 41.3 +/-...

  1. Force and power characteristics of a resistive exercise device for use in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Hans E.; Tesch, Per A.

    We have developed a non-gravity dependent mechanical device, which provides resistance during coupled concentric and eccentric muscle actions, through the inertia of a spinning fly-wheel (Fly-Wheel Ergometry; FWE). Our research shows that lower-limb FWE exercise can produce forces and thus muscular stress comparable to what is typical of advanced resistance training using free weights. FWE also offers greater training stimuli during eccentric relative to concentric muscle actions, as evidenced by force and electromyographic (EMG) measurements. Muscle use of specific muscle groups, as assessed by the exercise-induced contrast shift of magnetic resonance images, is similar during lower-limb FWE and the barbell squat. Unlike free-weight exercise, FWE allows for maximal voluntary effort in each repetition of an exercise bout. Likewise, FWE exercise, not unassisted free-weight exercise, produces eccentric "overload". Collectively, the inherent features of this resistive exercise device and the results of the physiological evaluations we have performed, suggest that resistance exercise using FWE could be used as an effective exercise counter-measure in space. The flywheel principle can be employed to any exercise configuration and designed into a compact device allowing for exercises stressing those muscles and bone structures, which are thought to be most affected by long-duration spaceflight.

  2. A single bout of resistance exercise can enhance episodic memory performance

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Lisa; Hasni, Anita; Shinohara, Minoru; Duarte, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    Acute aerobic exercise can be beneficial to episodic memory. This benefit may occur because exercise produces a similar physiological response as physical stressors. When administered during consolidation, acute stress, both physical and psychological, consistently enhances episodic memory, particularly memory for emotional materials. Here we investigated whether a single bout of resistance exercise performed during consolidation can produce episodic memory benefits 48 hours later. We used a one-leg knee extension/flexion task for the resistance exercise. To assess the physiological response to the exercise, we measured salivary alpha amylase (a biomarker of central norepinephrine), heart rate, and blood pressure. To test emotional episodic memory, we used a remember-know recognition memory paradigm with equal numbers of positive, negative, and neutral IAPS images as stimuli. The group that performed the exercise, the active group, had higher overall recognition accuracy than the group that did not exercise, the passive group. We found a robust effect of valence across groups, with better performance on emotional items as compared to neutral items and no difference between positive and negative items. This effect changed based on the physiological response to the exercise. Within the active group, participants with a high physiological response to the exercise were impaired for neutral items as compared to participants with a low physiological response to the exercise. Our results demonstrate that a single bout of resistance exercise performed during consolidation can enhance episodic memory and that the effect of valence on memory depends on the physiological response to the exercise. PMID:25262058

  3. Acute and training effects of resistance exercise on heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, J Derek; Figueroa, Arturo

    2016-05-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used as a non-invasive method to evaluate heart rate (HR) regulation by the parasympathetic and sympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system. In this review, we discuss the effect of resistance exercise both acutely and after training on HRV in healthy individuals and in those with diseases characterized by autonomic dysfunction, such as hypertension and fibromyalgia. HR recovery after exercise is influenced by parasympathetic reactivation and sympathetic recovery to resting levels. Therefore, examination of HRV in response to acute exercise yields valuable insight into autonomic cardiovascular modulation and possible underlying risk for disease. Acute resistance exercise has shown to decrease cardiac parasympathetic modulation more than aerobic exercise in young healthy adults suggesting an increased risk for cardiovascular dysfunction after resistance exercise. Resistance exercise training appears to have no effect on resting HRV in healthy young adults, while it may improve parasympathetic modulation in middle-aged adults with autonomic dysfunction. Acute resistance exercise appears to decrease parasympathetic activity regardless of age. This review examines the acute and chronic effects of resistance exercise on HRV in young and older adults. PMID:25524332

  4. Central and Peripheral Fatigue During Resistance Exercise – A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Zając, Adam; Chalimoniuk, Małgorzata; Maszczyk, Adam; Gołaś, Artur; Lngfort, Józef

    2015-01-01

    Resistance exercise is a popular form of conditioning for numerous sport disciplines, and recently different modes of strength training are being evaluated for health benefits. Resistance exercise differs significantly in nature, and several variables determine the direction and range of adaptive changes that occur in the muscular and skeletal system of the body. Some modes of resistance training can also be effective in stimulating the cardiovascular system. These variables include exercise selection (general, specific, single or multi joint, dynamic, explosive), type of resistance (free weights, variable resistance, isokinetics), order of exercise (upper and lower body or push and pull exercises), and most of all the training load which includes intensity expressed as % of 1RM, number of repetitions, number of sets and the rest interval between sets. Manipulating these variables allows for specific adaptive changes which may include gains in muscle mass, muscle strength or muscle endurance. It has been well established that during resistance exercise fatigue occurs, regardless of the volume and intensity of work applied. The peripheral mechanisms of fatigue have been studied and explained in more detail than those related to the CNS. This review is an attempt to bring together the latest knowledge regarding fatigue, both peripheral and central, during resistance exercise. The authors of this review concentrated on physiological and biochemical mechanisms underlying fatigue in exercises performed with maximal intensity, as well as those performed to exhaustion with numerous repetitions and submaximal load. PMID:26839616

  5. Intensive resistance exercise and circadian salivary testosterone concentrations among young male recreational lifters.

    PubMed

    Shariat, Ardalan; Kargarfard, Mehdi; Danaee, Mahmoud; Bahri Mohd Tamrin, Shamsul

    2015-01-01

    Strength and morphological adaptations to resistance exercise are mediated in part by anabolic hormones such as testosterone, yet the time course of variability in circadian hormone concentrations is not well characterized. This study, investigated how the circadian rhythm of salivary testosterone is altered by resistance exercise in young men. Twenty healthy young male recreational lifters (age, 18.0 ± 1.3 years) with 2 years of experience in weightlifting were recruited. A randomized controlled trial was conducted, and subjects were randomly assigned to either the resistance exercise group (n = 10), who completed a series of resistance exercise (3 times a week, in the afternoon, 6-7 repetitions, at 85% of 1 repetition maximum for 3 weeks), or a control group (n = 10), who did not exercise during the 3 weeks. Before and after the study, an unstimulated saliva sample (2 ml) was taken every 2 hours for a maximum of 16 hours during each day. A significant decrease was observed in the resistance exercise (44.2%, p = 0.001) and control group (46.1%, p = 0.001) for salivary testosterone at each time point compared with baseline (p = 0.001). There was also no significant difference between the exercise and resting conditions in both groups for salivary testosterone (p > 0.05), except a significantly higher increase by 38.4% vs. -0.02% (p = 0.001), at 1730 hours during exercise sessions in the resistance exercise group compared with the control group. Resistance exercise has no noteworthy effect on circadian secretion of salivary testosterone throughout the 16 waking hours. These results indicate that athletes can undertake resistance exercise in either the morning or afternoon with the knowledge that a similar testosterone response can be expected regardless of the time of day. PMID:25051005

  6. Swahili 12 Weeks Course. Volume VI, Vocabulary List: Swahili-English, English-Swahili.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This Swahili-English/English-Swahili vocabulary list accompanies the Defense Language Institute's 12-weeks course in Swahili. For a description of the first five volumes (55 lesson units), see ED 026 651. (AMM)

  7. Human subject evaluation of the controlled resistance exercise device (C-red) for spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Paulus, David C; DeWitt, John

    2015-01-01

    Resistance exercise is an effective countermeasure to the muscle and bone atrophy associated with the unloading experienced during spaceflight. Long duration spaceflight will require compact exercise devices that are capable of delivering sufficient loading to prevent physiological losses while meeting strict mass and volume requirements. Accordingly, a controlled resistance exercise device (C-RED), developed as an advanced exercise concept for NASA, uses an electric motor for resistance and is programmed to simulate inertial loading based on barbell acceleration and desired resistance mass. The barbell acts as a movable pulley increasing efficiency by doubling the created load. Human subject testing of the functionality of the device was conducted in a laboratory at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. Subjects performed ten resistance exercises typically used by astronauts at three freely chosen load levels. The results indicate that subjects were able to perform all exercises with resistance loads that were typical to those used in the gymnasium with loads ranges of 4-1600 N, and bilateral symmetry of ground reaction force was quantified for the deadlift. A survey also was given to each subject to allow the users to express their opinions regarding the device. The subject questionnaire showed that the dumbbell attachment exercises were preferred to the barbell exercises. The positive preliminary results indicate promise for the device. PMID:25996698

  8. Systemic and forearm vascular resistance changes after upright bicycle exercise in man.

    PubMed

    Coats, A J; Conway, J; Isea, J E; Pannarale, G; Sleight, P; Somers, V K

    1989-06-01

    1. Blood pressure, cardiac function and forearm blood flow following voluntary maximal upright bicycle exercise were studied in thirteen normal volunteers in a cross-over design against a control day. 2. After exercise there was a short-lived (5-10 min) increase in systolic blood pressure, peak aortic blood velocity and aortic acceleration suggesting a persistence of the positive inotropic influence of exercise. 3. Systemic vasodilation, which was seen immediately exercise stopped, lasted at least 60 min. This was associated with a reduction in diastolic blood pressure for the whole hour. After 30 min systolic blood pressure was also reduced. Heart rate and cardiac output were still significantly elevated and systemic vascular resistance still reduced at 60 min post-exercise. 4. A non-exercising limb vascular bed (forearm) showed a marked vasodilation for 1 h after predominately leg exercise indicating the presence of a vasodilatory influence affecting vascular beds other than the exercising muscle groups. PMID:2600851

  9. Kegel Exercises for Your Pelvic Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... control until after 6 to 12 weeks of daily exercises. Still, most women notice an improvement after just ... Weak pelvic muscles often lead to urine leakage. Daily exercises can strengthen pelvic muscles. These exercises often improve ...

  10. A single resistance exercise session improves myocardial contractility in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, A A; Faria, T de O; Ribeiro Júnior, R F; Costa, G P; Marchezini, B; Silveira, E A; Angeli, J K; Stefanon, I; Vassallo, D V; Lizardo, J H

    2015-09-01

    Resistance training evokes myocardial adaptation; however, the effects of a single resistance exercise session on cardiac performance are poorly understood or investigated. This study aimed to investigate the effects of a single resistance exercise session on the myocardial contractility of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Male 3-month-old SHRs were divided into two groups: control (Ct) and exercise (Ex). Control animals were submitted to sham exercise. Blood pressure was measured in conscious rats before the exercise session to confirm the presence of arterial hypertension. Ten minutes after the exercise session, the animals were anesthetized and killed, and the hearts were removed. Cardiac contractility was evaluated in the whole heart by the Langendorff technique and by isometric contractions of isolated left ventricular papillary muscles. SERCA2a, phospholamban (PLB), and phosphorylated PLB expression were investigated by Western blot. Exercise increased force development of isolated papillary muscles (Ex=1.0±0.1 g/mg vs Ct=0.63±0.2 g/mg, P<0.05). Post-rest contraction was greater in the exercised animals (Ex=4.1±0.4% vs Ct=1.7±0.2%, P<0.05). Papillary muscles of exercised animals developed greater force under increasing isoproterenol concentrations (P<0.05). In the isolated heart, exercise increased left ventricular isovolumetric systolic pressure (LVISP; Δ +39 mmHg; P<0.05) from baseline conditions. Hearts from the exercised rats presented a greater response to increasing diastolic pressure. Positive inotropic intervention to calcium and isoproterenol resulted in greater LVISP in exercised animals (P<0.05). The results demonstrated that a single resistance exercise session improved myocardial contractility in SHRs. PMID:26176315

  11. A single resistance exercise session improves myocardial contractility in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, A.A.; Faria, T. de O.; Ribeiro, R.F.; Costa, G.P.; Marchezini, B.; Silveira, E.A.; Angeli, J.K.; Stefanon, I.; Vassallo, D.V.; Lizardo, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance training evokes myocardial adaptation; however, the effects of a single resistance exercise session on cardiac performance are poorly understood or investigated. This study aimed to investigate the effects of a single resistance exercise session on the myocardial contractility of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Male 3-month-old SHRs were divided into two groups: control (Ct) and exercise (Ex). Control animals were submitted to sham exercise. Blood pressure was measured in conscious rats before the exercise session to confirm the presence of arterial hypertension. Ten minutes after the exercise session, the animals were anesthetized and killed, and the hearts were removed. Cardiac contractility was evaluated in the whole heart by the Langendorff technique and by isometric contractions of isolated left ventricular papillary muscles. SERCA2a, phospholamban (PLB), and phosphorylated PLB expression were investigated by Western blot. Exercise increased force development of isolated papillary muscles (Ex=1.0±0.1 g/mg vs Ct=0.63±0.2 g/mg, P<0.05). Post-rest contraction was greater in the exercised animals (Ex=4.1±0.4% vs Ct=1.7±0.2%, P<0.05). Papillary muscles of exercised animals developed greater force under increasing isoproterenol concentrations (P<0.05). In the isolated heart, exercise increased left ventricular isovolumetric systolic pressure (LVISP; Δ +39 mmHg; P<0.05) from baseline conditions. Hearts from the exercised rats presented a greater response to increasing diastolic pressure. Positive inotropic intervention to calcium and isoproterenol resulted in greater LVISP in exercised animals (P<0.05). The results demonstrated that a single resistance exercise session improved myocardial contractility in SHRs. PMID:26176315

  12. Intensity of Resistance Exercise Determines Adipokine and Resting Energy Expenditure Responses in Overweight Elderly Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Fatouros, Ioannis G.; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Tournis, Symeon; Nikolaidis, Michalis G.; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Douroudos, Ioannis I.; Papassotiriou, Ioannis; Thomakos, Petros M.; Taxildaris, Kyriakos; Mastorakos, George; Mitrakou, Asimina

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the time course of leptin, adiponectin, and resting energy expenditure (REE) responses in overweight elderly males after acute resistance exercise protocols of various intensity configurations. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Forty inactive men (65–82 years) were randomly assigned to one of four groups (n = 10/group): control, low-intensity resistance exercise, moderate-intensity resistance exercise, and high-intensity resistance exercise. Exercise energy cost, REE, leptin, adiponectin, cortisol, insulin, lactate, glucose, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs), and glycerol were determined at baseline, immediately after exercise, and during a 72-h recovery period. RESULTS Exercise energy cost was lower in high-intensity than in low-intensity and moderate-intensity groups (221.6 ± 8.8 vs. 295.6 ± 10.7 and 281.6 ± 9.8 kcal, P < 0.001). Lactate, glucose, NEFAs, and glycerol concentrations increased (P < 0.001) after exercise and returned to baseline thereafter in all groups. REE increased (P < 0.001) in all groups at 12 h in an intensity-dependent manner (P < 0.05). REE reached baseline after 48 h in the low- and moderate-intensity groups and after 72 h in the high-intensity group. Cortisol peaked in all active groups after exercise (P < 0.001) and remained elevated (P < 0.001) for 12 h. After adjustment for plasma volume shifts, leptin remained unaltered. Adiponectin concentration increased after 12 h and remained elevated for 24 h only in the high-intensity group (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Resistance exercise does not alter circulating leptin concentration but does increase REE and adiponectin in an intensity-dependent manner for as long as 48 and 24 h, respectively, in overweight elderly individuals. It appears that resistance exercise may represent an effective approach for weight management and metabolic control in overweight elderly individuals. PMID:19729520

  13. WISE 2005: LBNP Exercise and Flywheel Resistive Exercise as an Effective Countermeasure Combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meuche, S.; Schneider, S. M.; Lee, S. M. C.; Macias, B. R.; Smith, S. M.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term exposure to microgravity can cause a severe musculoskeletal loss and cardiovascular deconditioning in astronauts. In this report, the effectiveness of combined supine treadmill exercise in a lower body negative pressure chamber (LBNPex) and flywheel resistive exercise (Rex) countermeasures was determined to prevent bone loss, reduced aerobic upright exercise capacity and reduced muscle strength. We hypothesized that exercise subjects (EX) would show less decrease in bone mineral density (BMD), peak oxygen consumption (VO2pk) and knee extensor strength (KES) than control subjects (CON). Sixteen healthy female subjects (34 plus or minus 4yrs, 164 plus or minus 6.5cm, 58 plus or minus 5kg; mean plus or minus SD) participated in a 60-d 6 degree head-down tilt bed rest (BR) study after providing written informed consent. Subjects were assigned to one of two groups: a non- exercising CON group or an EX group performing LBNPex 2-4 d/wk and Rex every 3rd-d. VO2pk was measured with a maximal, graded, upright treadmill test performed pre-BR and on 3-d after BR. BMD was assessed pre-BR and 3-d after BR by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry total body DEXA scan (DEXA; HOLOGIC QDR 4500 Elite ). A Cybex dynamometer was employed to measure the isokinetic KES before and 5-d after BR. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA were performed with time as the repeated factor. Statistical significance was set at p less than 0.05. CON experienced a significant decrease in BMD in the trochanter (PRE: 0.670 0.045; POST: 0.646 0.352 g(raised dot) per square centimeter) and in the whole hip (PRE: 0.894 0.059; POST: 0.858 0.057 g(raised dot) per square centimeter). BMD also decreased significantly in EX in the trochanter (PRE: 0.753 plus or minus 0.0617; POST: 0.741 plus or minus 0.061 g(raised dot) per square centimeter) and whole hip (PRE: 0.954 plus or minus 0.067; POST: 0.935 plus or minus 0.069 g(raised dot) per square centimeter). BMD losses were significantly less in EX than in CON

  14. Adaptive Motor Resistance Video Game Exercise Apparatus and Method of Use Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reich, Alton (Inventor); Shaw, James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The invention comprises a method and/or an apparatus using computer configured exercise equipment and an electric motor provided physical resistance in conjunction with a game system, such as a video game system, where the exercise system provides real physical resistance to a user interface. Results of user interaction with the user interface are integrated into a video game, such as running on a game console. The resistance system comprises: a subject interface, software control, a controller, an electric servo assist/resist motor, an actuator, and/or a subject sensor. The system provides actual physical interaction with a resistance device as input to the game console and game run thereon.

  15. Postdinner resistance exercise improves postprandial risk factors more effectively than predinner resistance exercise in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Heden, Timothy D.; Winn, Nathan C.; Mari, Andrea; Booth, Frank W.; Rector, R. Scott; Thyfault, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormally elevated postprandial glucose and triacylglycerol (TAG) concentrations are risk factors for cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes. The most effective time to exercise to lower postprandial glucose and TAG concentrations is unknown. Thus the aim of this study was to determine what time is more effective, either pre- or postdinner resistance exercise (RE), at improving postprandial risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Thirteen obese patients with type 2 diabetes completed three trials in a random order in which they consumed a dinner meal with 1) no RE (NoRE), 2) predinner RE (RE → M), and 3) postdinner RE beginning 45 min after dinner (M → RE). Clinical outcome measures included postprandial glucose and TAG concentrations. In addition, postprandial acetaminophen (gastric emptying), endocrine responses, free fatty acids, and β-cell function (mathematical modeling) were measured to determine whether these factors were related to changes in glucose and TAG. The TAG incremental area under the curve (iAUC) was ∼92% lower (P ≤ 0.02) during M → RE compared with NoRE and RE → M, an effect due in part to lower very-low-density lipoprotein-1 TAG concentrations. The glucose iAUC was reduced (P = 0.02) by ∼18 and 30% during the RE → M and M → RE trials, respectively, compared with NoRE, with no difference between RE trials. RE → M and M → RE reduced the insulin iAUC by 35 and 48%, respectively, compared with NoRE (P < 0.01). The glucagon-like peptide-1 iAUC was ∼50% lower (P ≤ 0.02) during M → RE compared with NoRE and RE → M. Given that predinner RE only improves postprandial glucose concentrations, whereas postdinner RE improves both postprandial glucose and TAG concentrations, postdinner RE may lower the risk of cardiovascular disease more effectively. PMID:25539939

  16. Standardization of resistance exercise training: effects in diabetic ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Sanches, I C; Conti, F F; Sartori, M; Irigoyen, M C; De Angelis, K

    2014-04-01

    This study was carried out with a 3-fold aim: 1) to standardize a maximal load test (MLT) on ladders for prescription of resistance exercise training (RET) in rats, 2) to prescribe moderate-intensity RET based on this MLT and 3) to test the effect of this RET in diabetic ovariectomized rats. Female Wistar rats were divided into control (C), diabetic ovariectomized sedentary (DOS) and trained (DOT) groups. The MLT was standardized with increased load applied to the rat tail for each climb, and blood lactate was measured to identify lactate threshold in C rats. MLT was applied in the 1st, 4th and 8th week of the protocol. After 8 weeks of RET, the arterial pressure was directly recorded. DOS group reduced performance in MLT, body weight, left ventricular, plantar and soleus muscles mass (vs. C). DOT rats showed an improvement in MLT associated with plantar muscle mass increased (vs. C and DOS), with attenuation of hypotension and bradycardia (vs. DOS). In conclusion, the results provide a useful method for determining the maximal load and applying RET in rats. Moreover, this study showed that moderate intensity RET improves hemodynamic status in diabetic ovariectomized rats, thereby reinforcing the role of RET in diabetes management. PMID:24022577

  17. Understanding and Overcoming the Sticking Point in Resistance Exercise.

    PubMed

    Kompf, Justin; Arandjelović, Ognjen

    2016-06-01

    In the context of resistance training the so-called "sticking point" is commonly understood as the position in a lift in which a disproportionately large increase in the difficulty to continue the lift is experienced. If the lift is taken to the point of momentary muscular failure, the sticking point is usually where the failure occurs. Hence the sticking point is associated with an increased chance of exercise form deterioration or breakdown. Understanding the mechanisms that lead to the occurrence of sticking points as well as different training strategies that can be used to overcome them is important to strength practitioners (trainees and coaches alike) and instrumental for the avoidance of injury and continued progress. In this article we survey and consolidate the body of existing research on the topic: we discuss different definitions of the sticking point adopted in the literature and propose a more precise definition, describe different muscular and biomechanical aspects that give rise to sticking points, and review the effectiveness of different training modalities used to address them. PMID:26758462

  18. Resistance Exercise in Already-Active Diabetic Individuals (READI): study rationale, design and methods for a randomized controlled trial of resistance and aerobic exercise in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yardley, Jane E; Kenny, Glen P; Perkins, Bruce A; Riddell, Michael C; Goldfield, Gary S; Donovan, Lois; Hadjiyannakis, Stasia; Wells, George A; Phillips, Penny; Sigal, Ronald J

    2015-03-01

    The Resistance Exercise in Already Active Diabetic Individuals (READI) trial aimed to examine whether adding a 6-month resistance training program would improve glycemic control (as reflected in reduced HbA₁c) in individuals with type 1 diabetes who were already engaged in aerobic exercise compared to aerobic training alone. After a 5-week run-in period including optimization of diabetes care and low-intensity exercise, 131 physically active adults with type 1 diabetes were randomized to two groups for 22weeks: resistance training three times weekly, or waiting-list control. Both groups maintained the same volume, duration and intensity of aerobic exercise throughout the study as they did at baseline. HbA₁c, body composition, frequency of hypoglycemia, lipids, blood pressure, apolipoproteins B and A-1 (ApoB and ApoA1), the ApoB-ApoA1 ratio, urinary albumin excretion, serum C-reactive protein, free fatty acids, total daily insulin dose, health-related quality of life, cardiorespiratory fitness and musculoskeletal fitness were recorded at baseline, 3 (for some variables), and 6 months. To our knowledge, READI is the only trial to date assessing the incremental health-related impact of adding resistance training for individuals with type 1 diabetes who are already aerobically active. Few exercise trials have been completed in this population, and even fewer have assessed resistance exercise. With recent improvements in the quality of diabetes care, the READI study will provide conclusive evidence to support or refute a major clinically relevant effect of exercise type in the recommendations for physical activity in patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:25559915

  19. Low-Load High Volume Resistance Exercise Stimulates Muscle Protein Synthesis More Than High-Load Low Volume Resistance Exercise in Young Men

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Nicholas A.; West, Daniel W. D.; Staples, Aaron W.; Atherton, Philip J.; Baker, Jeff M.; Moore, Daniel R.; Holwerda, Andrew M.; Parise, Gianni; Rennie, Michael J.; Baker, Steven K.; Phillips, Stuart M.

    2010-01-01

    Background We aimed to determine the effect of resistance exercise intensity (% 1 repetition maximum—1RM) and volume on muscle protein synthesis, anabolic signaling, and myogenic gene expression. Methodology/Principal Findings Fifteen men (21±1 years; BMI = 24.1±0.8 kg/m2) performed 4 sets of unilateral leg extension exercise at different exercise loads and/or volumes: 90% of repetition maximum (1RM) until volitional failure (90FAIL), 30% 1RM work-matched to 90%FAIL (30WM), or 30% 1RM performed until volitional failure (30FAIL). Infusion of [ring-13C6] phenylalanine with biopsies was used to measure rates of mixed (MIX), myofibrillar (MYO), and sarcoplasmic (SARC) protein synthesis at rest, and 4 h and 24 h after exercise. Exercise at 30WM induced a significant increase above rest in MIX (121%) and MYO (87%) protein synthesis at 4 h post-exercise and but at 24 h in the MIX only. The increase in the rate of protein synthesis in MIX and MYO at 4 h post-exercise with 90FAIL and 30FAIL was greater than 30WM, with no difference between these conditions; however, MYO remained elevated (199%) above rest at 24 h only in 30FAIL. There was a significant increase in AktSer473 at 24h in all conditions (P = 0.023) and mTORSer2448 phosphorylation at 4 h post-exercise (P = 0.025). Phosporylation of Erk1/2Tyr202/204, p70S6KThr389, and 4E-BP1Thr37/46 increased significantly (P<0.05) only in the 30FAIL condition at 4 h post-exercise, whereas, 4E-BP1Thr37/46 phosphorylation was greater 24 h after exercise than at rest in both 90FAIL (237%) and 30FAIL (312%) conditions. Pax7 mRNA expression increased at 24 h post-exercise (P = 0.02) regardless of condition. The mRNA expression of MyoD and myogenin were consistently elevated in the 30FAIL condition. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that low-load high volume resistance exercise is more effective in inducing acute muscle anabolism than high-load low volume or work matched resistance exercise modes. PMID

  20. Resistance exercise enhances the molecular signaling of mitochondrial biogenesis induced by endurance exercise in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Mascher, Henrik; Psilander, Niklas; Blomstrand, Eva; Sahlin, Kent

    2011-11-01

    Combining endurance and strength training (concurrent training) may change the adaptation compared with single mode training. However, the site of interaction and the mechanisms are unclear. We have investigated the hypothesis that molecular signaling of mitochondrial biogenesis after endurance exercise is impaired by resistance exercise. Ten healthy subjects performed either only endurance exercise (E; 1-h cycling at ∼65% of maximal oxygen uptake), or endurance exercise followed by resistance exercise (ER; 1-h cycling + 6 sets of leg press at 70-80% of 1 repetition maximum) in a randomized cross-over design. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and after exercise (1 and 3 h postcycling). The mRNA of genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis [(peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1 (PGC-1)α, PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC)] related coactivator) and substrate regulation (pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4) increased after both E and ER, but the mRNA levels were about twofold higher after ER (P < 0.01). Phosphorylation of proteins involved in the signaling cascade of protein synthesis [mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), ribosomal S6 kinase 1, and eukaryotic elongation factor 2] was altered after ER but not after E. Moreover, ER induced a larger increase in mRNA of genes associated with positive mTOR signaling (cMyc and Rheb). Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and Akt increased similarly at 1 h postcycling (P < 0.01) after both types of exercise. Contrary to our hypothesis, the results demonstrate that ER, performed after E, amplifies the adaptive signaling response of mitochondrial biogenesis compared with single-mode endurance exercise. The mechanism may relate to a cross talk between signaling pathways mediated by mTOR. The results suggest that concurrent training may be beneficial for the adaptation of muscle oxidative capacity. PMID:21836044

  1. Foot-Ground Reaction Force During Resistance Exercise in Parabolic Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Cobb, Kendall; Loehr, James A.; Nguyen, Daniel; Schneider, Suzanne M.

    2003-01-01

    An interim Resistance Exercise Device (iRED) was designed to provide resistive exercise as a countermeasure to space flight-induced loss of muscle strength and endurance as well as decreased bone mineral density. The purpose of this project was to compare foot-ground reaction force during iRED exercise in normal gravity (l-g) versus micro gravity (O-g) achieved during parabolic flight. METHODS: Four subjects performed three exercises using the iRED (squat, heel raise, and deadlift) during I-g and O-g at a moderate intensity (60% of maximum strength during deadlift exercise). Foot-ground reaction force was measured in three axes (x,y,z) using a force plate, and the magnitude of the resultant force vector was calculated (r = X 2 + y2 + Z2 ). Range of motion (ROM) was measured using a linear encoder. Peak force (PkF) and total work (TW) were calculated using a customized computer program. Paired t-tests were used to test if significant differences (p.::::0.05) were observed between I-g and O-g exercise. RESULTS: PkF and TW measured in the resultant axis were significantly less in O-g for each of the exercises tested. During O-g, PkF was 42-46% and TW was 33- 37% of that measured during I-g. ROM and average time to complete each repetition were not different from I-g to O-g. CONCLUSIONS: When performing exercises in which body mass is a portion of the resistance during I-g, PkF and TW measured during resistive exercise were reduced approximately 60-70% during O-g. Thus, a resistive exercise device during O-g will be required to provided higher resistances to induce a similar training stimulus to that on Earth.

  2. A longitudinal, integrated, clinical, histological and mRNA profiling study of resistance exercise in myositis.

    PubMed

    Nader, Gustavo A; Dastmalchi, Maryam; Alexanderson, Helene; Grundtman, Cecilia; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Esbjörnsson, Mona; Wang, Zuyi; Rönnelid, Johan; Hoffman, Eric P; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Lundberg, Ingrid E

    2010-01-01

    Polymyositis and dermatomyositis are orphan, chronic skeletal muscle disorders characterized by weakness, infiltrations by mononuclear inflammatory cells, and fibrosis. Until recently, patients were advised to refrain from physical activity because of fears of exacerbation of muscle inflammation. However, recent studies have shown that moderate exercise training in combination with immunosuppressive drugs can improve muscle performance. Despite the positive effects of exercise training, the molecular mechanisms underlying the exercise-associated clinical improvements remain poorly understood. The present study was designed to define, at the molecular level, the effects of resistance exercise training on muscle performance and disease progression in myositis patients. We evaluated changes in muscle strength, histology and genome-wide mRNA profiles to determine the beneficial effects of exercise and determine the possible molecular changes associated with improved muscle performance. A total of 8 myositis patients underwent a 7-wk resistance exercise training program that resulted in improved muscle strength and increased maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)). Training also resulted in marked reductions in gene expression, reflecting reductions in proinflammatory and profibrotic gene networks, changes that were also accompanied by a reduction in tissue fibrosis. Consistent with the exercise-associated increase in VO(2max), a subset of transcripts was associated with a shift toward oxidative metabolism. The changes in gene expression reported in the present study are in agreement with the performance improvements induced by exercise and suggest that resistance exercise training can induce a reduction in inflammation and fibrosis in skeletal muscle. PMID:20809047

  3. A Longitudinal, Integrated, Clinical, Histological and mRNA Profiling Study of Resistance Exercise in Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Gustavo A; Dastmalchi, Maryam; Alexanderson, Helene; Grundtman, Cecilia; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Esbjörnsson, Mona; Wang, Zuyi; Rönnelid, Johan; Hoffman, Eric P; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Lundberg, Ingrid E

    2010-01-01

    Polymyositis and dermatomyositis are orphan, chronic skeletal muscle disorders characterized by weakness, infiltrations by mononuclear inflammatory cells, and fibrosis. Until recently, patients were advised to refrain from physical activity because of fears of exacerbation of muscle inflammation. However, recent studies have shown that moderate exercise training in combination with immunosuppressive drugs can improve muscle performance. Despite the positive effects of exercise training, the molecular mechanisms underlying the exercise-associated clinical improvements remain poorly understood. The present study was designed to define, at the molecular level, the effects of resistance exercise training on muscle performance and disease progression in myositis patients. We evaluated changes in muscle strength, histology and genome-wide mRNA profiles to determine the beneficial effects of exercise and determine the possible molecular changes associated with improved muscle performance. A total of 8 myositis patients underwent a 7-wk resistance exercise training program that resulted in improved muscle strength and increased maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Training also resulted in marked reductions in gene expression, reflecting reductions in proinflammatory and profibrotic gene networks, changes that were also accompanied by a reduction in tissue fibrosis. Consistent with the exercise-associated increase in VO2max, a subset of transcripts was associated with a shift toward oxidative metabolism. The changes in gene expression reported in the present study are in agreement with the performance improvements induced by exercise and suggest that resistance exercise training can induce a reduction in inflammation and fibrosis in skeletal muscle. PMID:20809047

  4. Natriuretic peptide resistance of mesenteric arteries in spontaneous hypertensive rat is alleviated by exercise.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Zhang, B; Su, X-L; Tie, R; Chang, P; Zhang, X-C; Wang, J-B; Zhao, G; Zhu, M-Z; Zhang, H-F; Chen, B-Y

    2016-06-20

    Proximal resistance vessels, such as the mesenteric arteries, contribute substantially to the peripheral resistance. The reactivity of resistance vessels to vasoactive substance like natriuretic peptides plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure. In current study, we investigated the reactivity of mesenteric arteries to atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a well known vasodilating factor, in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), as well as the effects of exercise training on it. As a result, ANP-induced vasorelaxation was attenuated in SHR with significantly increased phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5), and decreased cGMP/ANP ratio, compared with WKY rats as control. Intriguingly, the decreased reactivity to ANP in SHR was markedly reversed by exercise training. In addition, ANP resistance of in vitro mesenteric arteries was diminished by sildenafil a potent selective inhibitor of PDE5. In conclusion, ANP resistance occurs in resistance vessels of SHR, suggesting predisposition to hypertension, which can be reversed by exercise. PMID:26447511

  5. Structural remodeling of coronary resistance arteries: effects of age and exercise training

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Mina A.; Taylor, Curtis R.; Chen, Bei; La, Hae-Sun; Maraj, Joshua J.; Kilar, Cody R.; Behnke, Bradley J.; Delp, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Age is known to induce remodeling and stiffening of large-conduit arteries; however, little is known of the effects of age on remodeling and mechanical properties of coronary resistance arteries. We employed a rat model of aging to investigate whether 1) age increases wall thickness and stiffness of coronary resistance arteries, and 2) exercise training reverses putative age-induced increases in wall thickness and stiffness of coronary resistance arteries. Young (4 mo) and old (21 mo) Fischer 344 rats remained sedentary or underwent 10 wk of treadmill exercise training. Coronary resistance arteries were isolated for determination of wall-to-lumen ratio, effective elastic modulus, and active and passive responses to changes in intraluminal pressure. Elastin and collagen content of the vascular wall were assessed histologically. Wall-to-lumen ratio increased with age, but this increase was reversed by exercise training. In contrast, age reduced stiffness, and exercise training increased stiffness in coronary resistance arteries from old rats. Myogenic responsiveness was reduced with age and restored by exercise training. Collagen-to-elastin ratio (C/E) of the wall did not change with age and was reduced with exercise training in arteries from old rats. Thus age induces hypertrophic remodeling of the vessel wall and reduces the stiffness and myogenic function of coronary resistance arteries. Exercise training reduces wall-to-lumen ratio, increases wall stiffness, and restores myogenic function in aged coronary resistance arteries. The restorative effect of exercise training on myogenic function of coronary resistance arteries may be due to both changes in vascular smooth muscle phenotype and expression of extracellular matrix proteins. PMID:25059239

  6. Sympathetic vasomotor outflow and blood pressure increase during exercise with expiratory resistance.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Keisho; Itoh, Yuka; Saito, Mitsuru; Koike, Teruhiko; Ishida, Koji

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the effect of increasing expiratory muscle work on sympathetic vasoconstrictor outflow and arterial blood pressure (BP) during dynamic exercise. We hypothesized that expiratory muscle fatigue would elicit increases in sympathetic vasomotor outflow and BP during submaximal exercise. The subjects performed four submaximal exercise tests; two were maximal expiratory pressure (PE max) tests and two were muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) tests. In each test, the subjects performed two 10-min exercises at 40% peak oxygen uptake using a cycle ergometer in a semirecumbent position [spontaneous breathing for 5 min and voluntary hyperpnoea with and without expiratory resistive breathing for 5 min (breathing frequency: 60 breaths/min, inspiratory and expiratory times were set at 0.5 sec)]. PE max was estimated before and immediately after exercises. MSNA was recorded via microneurography of the right median nerve at the elbow. PE max decreased following exercise with expiratory resistive breathing, while no change was found without resistance. A progressive increase in MSNA burst frequency (BF) appeared during exercise with expiratory resistance (MSNA BF, without resistance: +22 ± 5%, with resistance: +44 ± 8%, P < 0.05), accompanied by an augmentation of BP (mean BP, without resistance: +5 ± 2%, with resistance: +29 ± 5%, P < 0.05). These results suggest that an enhancement of expiratory muscle activity leads to increases in sympathetic vasomotor outflow and BP during dynamic leg exercise. PMID:26019293

  7. Sympathetic vasomotor outflow and blood pressure increase during exercise with expiratory resistance

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Keisho; Itoh, Yuka; Saito, Mitsuru; Koike, Teruhiko; Ishida, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the effect of increasing expiratory muscle work on sympathetic vasoconstrictor outflow and arterial blood pressure (BP) during dynamic exercise. We hypothesized that expiratory muscle fatigue would elicit increases in sympathetic vasomotor outflow and BP during submaximal exercise. The subjects performed four submaximal exercise tests; two were maximal expiratory pressure (PEmax) tests and two were muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) tests. In each test, the subjects performed two 10-min exercises at 40% peak oxygen uptake using a cycle ergometer in a semirecumbent position [spontaneous breathing for 5 min and voluntary hyperpnoea with and without expiratory resistive breathing for 5 min (breathing frequency: 60 breaths/min, inspiratory and expiratory times were set at 0.5 sec)]. PEmax was estimated before and immediately after exercises. MSNA was recorded via microneurography of the right median nerve at the elbow. PEmax decreased following exercise with expiratory resistive breathing, while no change was found without resistance. A progressive increase in MSNA burst frequency (BF) appeared during exercise with expiratory resistance (MSNA BF, without resistance: +22 ± 5%, with resistance: +44 ± 8%, P < 0.05), accompanied by an augmentation of BP (mean BP, without resistance: +5 ± 2%, with resistance: +29 ± 5%, P < 0.05). These results suggest that an enhancement of expiratory muscle activity leads to increases in sympathetic vasomotor outflow and BP during dynamic leg exercise. PMID:26019293

  8. The influence of a 12-week program of physical activity on changes in body composition and lipid and carbohydrate status in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Pilch, Wanda Barbara; Mucha, Dariusz Mikołaj; Pałka, Tomasz Adam; Suder, Agnieszka Ewa; Tyka, Anna Katarzyna; Tota, Łukasz Marcin; Ambroży, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction For years there have been studies on what kind of physical activity is optimal for maintaining proper health condition. Besides well known and approved endurance training of moderate intensity, an importance of interval exercise where short term, sudden intensification of work is performed at low endurance load is emphasized. The aim of the work was to assess the effects of a program of physical activity applied to postmenopausal women regarding improvement of their body composition and biochemical indices of lipid and carbohydrate status. Material and methods The program of physical activity contained 12-week trainings of Nordic walking (NW) and gymnastic-dance classes (G-D). The intensity of effort during the NW training was at the level of 60% HRmax, whereas intensity of G-D exercises was selected based on a subjective assessment of effort according to the scale of American College of Sports Medicine. Results The 12-week program of physical activity resulted in statistically significant lowering of total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL) fraction levels. An increase in high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level was observed, whereas the values of triacylglycerols (TG) did not change. The average fasting blood glucose level decreased significantly. Similar changes were noted for the insulin level. The analysed body biometrical-structural indices did not change significantly. Conclusions The applied 12-week program of physical activity without changes of dietary habits contributed to an improvement in plasma lipid profile and an increased insulin sensitivity, but it did not affect significantly body composition. PMID:26848294

  9. High-Velocity Resistance Exercise Protocols in Older Women: Effects on Cardiovascular Response

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rodrigo P.; Novaes, Jefferson; Oliveira, Ricardo J.; Gentil, Paulo; Wagner, Dale; Bottaro, Martim

    2007-01-01

    Acute cardiovascular responses to different high-velocity resistance exercise protocols were compared in untrained older women. Twelve apparently healthy volunteers (62.6 ± 2.9 y) performed three different protocols in the bench press (BP). All protocols involved three sets of 10 repetitions performed with a 10RM load and 2 minutes of rest between sets. The continuous protocol (CP) involved ten repetitions with no pause between repetitions. The discontinuous protocols were performed with a pause of five (DP5) or 15 (DP15) seconds between the fifth and sixth repetitions. Heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), rate pressure product (RPP), Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE), and blood lactate (BLa) were assessed at baseline and at the end of all exercise sets. Factorial ANOVA was used to compare the cardiovascular response among different protocols. Compared to baseline, HR and RPP were significantly (p < 0.05) higher after the third set in all protocols. HR and RPP were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in DP5 and DP15 compared with CP for the BP exercise. Compared to baseline, RPE increased significantly (p < 0.05) with each subsequent set in all protocols. Blood lactate concentration during DP5 and DP15 was significantly lower than CP. It appears that discontinuous high-velocity resistance exercise has a lower cardiovascular demand than continuous resistance exercise in older women. Key pointsThe assessment of cardiovascular responses to high-velocity resistance exercise in older individuals is very important for exercise prescription and rehabilitation in elderly population.Discontinuous protocol decrease myocardial oxygen consumption (HR x SBP) during the performance of dynamic high-velocity resistance exercise in older women.The decrease in RPP (~ 8.5%) during the discontinuous protocol has clinical implications when developing high-velocity resistance exercise strategies for elderly individuals. PMID:24149492

  10. Verification, Validation and Credibility Assessment of a Computational Model of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, C. R.; Humphreys, B. T.; Mulugeta, L.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) is the resistive exercise device used by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) to mitigate bone loss and muscle atrophy due to extended exposure to microgravity (micro g). The Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) has developed a multi-body dynamics model of biomechanics models for use in spaceflight exercise physiology research and operations. In an effort to advance model maturity and credibility of the ARED model, the DAP performed verification, validation and credibility (VV and C) assessment of the analyses of the model in accordance to NASA-STD-7009 'Standards for Models and Simulations'.

  11. Early myogenic responses to acute exercise before and after resistance training in young men

    PubMed Central

    Caldow, Marissa K; Thomas, Emily E; Dale, Michael J; Tomkinson, Grant R; Buckley, Jonathan D; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    To enable dynamic regulation of muscle mass and myofiber repair following injury, a satellite cell precursor population exists to supply additional nuclei. Activated satellite cells express many genes and associated proteins necessary for maturation and incorporation into the damaged fiber. There is little knowledge about the response of these markers following whole-body resistance exercise training. We investigated the impact of 12 weeks of progressive whole-body resistance training on the expression of MRFs, PAX7, NCAM, and FA1, incorporating both acute and chronic resistance exercise components. Ten young recreationally active males (21.2 ± 3.5 years) performed 12 weeks of whole-body resistance training at 70–85% of their predetermined one-repetition maximum (1RM). At the initiation and completion of the training period, muscular strength was assessed by RM and dynamometer testing, and vastus lateralis samples were obtained prior to and 3 h following an acute resistance exercise test (both whole-body and isometric exercises). Increased mRNA expression of PAX7 (threefold), NCAM (threefold), MYF5 (threefold), MYOD (threefold) and MYOGENIN (twofold) was observed 3 h after the acute resistance exercise test, both pre and posttraining. Similarly, PAX7 (11-fold) and FA1 (twofold) protein abundance increased after acute exercise, while resting NCAM (eightfold) and FA1 (threefold) protein abundance increased following 12 weeks of resistance training. It is possible that these molecular changes are primarily due to the preceding exercise bout, and are not modified by long-term or whole-body exercise training. PMID:26359239

  12. Effect of hydration state on resistance exercise-induced endocrine markers of anabolism, catabolism, and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Judelson, Daniel A; Maresh, Carl M; Yamamoto, Linda M; Farrell, Mark J; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S; Spiering, Barry A; Casa, Douglas J; Anderson, Jeffrey M

    2008-09-01

    Hypohydration (decreased total body water) exacerbates the catabolic hormonal response to endurance exercise with unclear effects on anabolic hormones. Limited research exists that evaluates the effect of hypohydration on endocrine responses to resistance exercise; this work merits attention as the acute postexercise hormonal environment potently modulates resistance training adaptations. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of hydration state on the endocrine and metabolic responses to resistance exercise. Seven healthy resistance-trained men (age = 23 +/- 4 yr, body mass = 87.8 +/- 6.8 kg, body fat = 11.5 +/- 5.2%) completed three identical resistance exercise bouts in different hydration states: euhydrated (EU), hypohydrated by approximately 2.5% body mass (HY25), and hypohydrated by approximately 5.0% body mass (HY50). Investigators manipulated hydration status via controlled water deprivation and exercise-heat stress. Cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, testosterone, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin, glucose, lactate, glycerol, and free fatty acids were measured during euhydrated rest, immediately preceding resistance exercise, immediately postexercise, and during 60 min of recovery. Body mass decreased 0.2 +/- 0.4, 2.4 +/- 0.4, and 4.8 +/- 0.4% during EU, HY25, and HY50, respectively, supported by humoral and urinary changes that clearly indicated subjects achieved three distinct hydration states. Hypohydration significantly 1) increased circulating concentrations of cortisol and norepinephrine, 2) attenuated the testosterone response to exercise, and 3) altered carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. These results suggest that hypohydration can modify the hormonal and metabolic response to resistance exercise, influencing the postexercise circulatory milieu. PMID:18617629

  13. Resistance exercise induced mTORC1 signaling is not impaired by subsequent endurance exercise in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Apró, William; Wang, Li; Pontén, Marjan; Blomstrand, Eva; Sahlin, Kent

    2013-07-01

    The current dogma is that the muscle adaptation to resistance exercise is blunted when combined with endurance exercise. The suggested mechanism (based on rodent experiments) is that activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) during endurance exercise impairs muscle growth through inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). The purpose of this study was to investigate potential interference of endurance training on the signaling pathway of resistance training [mTORC1 phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1)] in human muscle. Ten healthy and moderately trained male subjects performed on two separate occasions either acute high-intensity and high-volume resistance exercise (leg press, R) or R followed by 30 min of cycling (RE). Muscle biopsies were collected before and 1 and 3 h post resistance exercise. Phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser²⁴⁴⁸) increased 2-fold (P < 0.05) and that of S6K1 (Thr³⁸⁹) 14-fold (P < 0.05), with no difference between R and RE. Phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2, Thr⁵⁶) was reduced ~70% during recovery in both trials (P < 0.05). An interesting finding was that phosphorylation of AMPK (Thr¹⁷²) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC, Ser⁷⁹) decreased ~30% and ~50%, respectively, 3 h postexercise (P < 0.05). Proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1 (PGC-1α) mRNA increased more after RE (6.5-fold) than after R (4-fold) (RE vs. R: P < 0.01) and was the only gene expressed differently between trials. These data show that the signaling of muscle growth through the mTORC1-S6K1 axis after heavy resistance exercise is not inhibited by subsequent endurance exercise. It is also suggested that prior activation of mTORC1 signaling may repress subsequent phosphorylation of AMPK. PMID:23632629

  14. Achondrogenesis type 2 diagnosed by transvaginal ultrasound at 12 weeks' gestation.

    PubMed

    Soothill, P W; Vuthiwong, C; Rees, H

    1993-06-01

    Ultrasound examination at 12 weeks' gestation revealed severe generalised subcutaneous oedema in a pregnancy at risk for achondrogenesis type II. Transvaginal scanning confirmed the oedema and suggested abnormal limb development. The prenatal diagnosis was confirmed by X-ray examination after transvaginal termination. PMID:8372079

  15. The Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS): Methods and Message at 12 Weeks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    March, John; Silva, Susan; Vitiello, Benedetto

    2006-01-01

    Funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS) is intended to evaluate the short-term (12 weeks) and longer-term (36 weeks) effectiveness of four treatments for adolescents with DSM-IV major depressive disorder: clinical management with fluoxetine (FLX), cognitive-behavioral therapy…

  16. The Effects of a 12-Week Walking Program on Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Shun-Ping; Tsai, Tzu-I; Lii, Yun-Kung; Yu, Shu; Chou, Chen-Liang; Chen, I-Ju

    2009-01-01

    Walking is a popular and easily accessible form of physical activity. However, walking instruction for older adults is based on the evidence gathered from younger populations. This study evaluated walking conditions, strength, balance, and subjective health status after a 12-week walking-training program in community-dwelling adults greater than…

  17. Japanese 12-Week Course. Volume IV, Lessons 42-55. Volume V, Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Educational Systems Development Center.

    These two volumes comprise Lesson Units 42-55 (Volume IV), and a comprehensive Glossary (Volume V) which accompanies this 12-week Defense Language Institute course in beginning Japanese. (See AL 002 223 for Volume I--Introduction and Lesson Units 1-15, and AL 002 224 for Volumes II and III--Lesson Units 16-27 and 28-41.) (AMM)

  18. Japanese 12-Week Course. Volume II, Lessons 16-27. Volume III, Lessons 28-41.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Educational Systems Development Center.

    These two volumes contain Lesson Units 16-41 in the Defense Language Institute's 12-week course in Japanese. (See AL 002 223 for Volume I, Lessons Units 1-15 and AL 002 225 for Volume IV, Lesson Units 42-55 and Volume V, Glossary.) (AMM)

  19. Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) COPD: Lifestyle Management Exercises Exercises Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... riding a stationary bike. Medication to Help You Exercise People with COPD often use a metered-dose ...

  20. Reducing workplace burnout: the relative benefits of cardiovascular and resistance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Bretland, Rachel Judith

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The global burden of burnout cost is in excess of $300 billion annually. Locally, just under half of working Australians experience high levels of occupational burnout. Consequently, burnout interventions are paramount to organisational productivity. Exercise has the potential to provide a multilevel and cost effective burnout intervention. The current study aims to extend the literature by comparing cardiovascular with resistance exercise to assess their relative effectiveness against well-being, perceived stress, and burnout. Design. Participants were 49 (36 females and 13 males) previously inactive volunteers ranging in age from 19 to 68 that completed a four week exercise program of either cardiovascular, resistance, or no exercise (control). Randomised control trial design was employed. Method. Participants were measured against the Subjective Exercise Experience Scale, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Results. After four weeks of exercise participants had greater positive well-being and personal accomplishment, and concomitantly less psychological distress, perceived stress, and emotional exhaustion. Cardiovascular exercise was found to increase well-being and decrease psychological distress, perceived stress, and emotional exhaustion. Resistance training was noticeably effective in increasing well-being and personal accomplishment and to reduce perceived stress. The present findings revealed large effect sizes suggesting that exercise may be an effective treatment for burnout. However, given a small sample size further research needs to be conducted. Conclusion. Exercise has potential to be an effective burnout intervention. Different types of exercise may assist employees in different ways. Organisations wishing to proactively reduce burnout can do so by encouraging their employees to access regular exercise programs. PMID:25870778

  1. Exhaustive submaximal endurance and resistance exercises induce temporary immunosuppression via physical and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chan-Ho; Paik, Il-Young; Kwak, Yi-Sub; Jee, Yong-Seok; Kim, Joo-Young

    2015-01-01

    Regular running and strength training are the best ways to improve aerobic capacity and develop the size of skeletal muscles. However, uncontrolled physical activities can often lead to an undertraining or over-training syndrome. In particular, overtraining causes persistent fatigue and reduces physical performance due to changes in the various physiological and immunological factors. In this study, we gave an exhaustive submaximal endurance or resistance exercise to participants and investigated the relationship between physical stress (cortisol level in blood), oxidative stress (intracellular ROS accumulation), and adaptive immune response (CD4:CD8 ratio). Materials and Methods Ten male volunteers were recruited, and performed a submaximal endurance or resistance exercise with 85% of VO2max or 1-repetition maximum until exhaustion. Blood samples were collected at rest, and at 0 and 30 min after the exercise. Cortisol levels, oxidative stress, and immune cell phenotypes in peripheral blood were evaluated. Cortisol levels in the sera increased after the exhaustive endurance and resistance exercises and such increments were maintained through the recovery. Intra-cellular ROS levels also increased after the exhaustive endurance and resistance exercises. The ratio of CD4+ T cells to CD8+ T cells after each type of submaximal exercise decreased compared with that at the resting stage, and returned to the resting level at 30 min after the exercise. In this study, an exhaustive endurance or a resistance exercise with submaximal intensity caused excessive physical stress, intra-cellular oxidative stress, and post-exercise immunosuppression. This result suggests that excessive physical stress induced temporary immune dysfunction via physical and oxidative stress. PMID:26331134

  2. mTOR signaling response to resistance exercise is altered by chronic resistance training and detraining in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Riki; Kobayashi, Koji; Tsutaki, Arata; Lee, Kihyuk; Abe, Takashi; Fujita, Satoshi; Nakazato, Koichi; Ishii, Naokata

    2013-04-01

    Resistance training-induced muscle anabolism and subsequent hypertrophy occur most rapidly during the early phase of training and become progressively slower over time. Currently, little is known about the intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying changes in the sensitivity of muscles to training stimuli. We investigated the changes in the exercise-induced phosphorylation of hypertrophic signaling proteins during chronic resistance training and subsequent detraining. Male rats were divided into four groups: 1 bout (1B), 12 bouts (12B), 18 bouts (18B), and detraining (DT). In the DT group, rats were subjected to 12 exercise sessions, detrained for 12 days, and then were subjected to 1 exercise session before being killed. Isometric training consisted of maximum isometric contraction, which was produced by percutaneous electrical stimulation of the gastrocnemius muscle every other day. Muscles were removed 24 h after the final exercise session. Levels of total and phosphorylated p70S6K, 4E-BP1, rpS6, and p90RSK levels were measured, and phosphorylation of p70S6K, rpS6, and p90RSK was elevated in the 1B group compared with control muscle (CON) after acute resistance exercise, whereas repeated bouts of exercise suppressed those phosphorylation in both 12B and 18B groups. Interestingly, these phosphorylation levels were restored after 12 days of detraining in the DT group. On the contrary, phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 was not altered with chronic training and detraining, indicating that, with chronic resistance training, anabolic signaling becomes less sensitive to resistance exercise stimuli but is restored after a short detraining period. PMID:23372143

  3. Foot-ground reaction force during resistive exercise in parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M C.; Cobb, Kendall; Loehr, James A.; Nguyen, Daniel; Schneider, Suzanne M.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: An interim resistance exercise device (iRED) was designed to provide resistive exercise as a countermeasure to spaceflight-induced loss of muscle strength and endurance as well as decreased bone mineral density. The purpose of this project was to compare foot-ground reaction force during iRED exercise in normal gravity (1 G) vs. microgravity (0 G) achieved during parabolic flight. METHODS: There were four subjects who performed three exercises (squat, heel raise, and deadlift) using the iRED during 1 G and 0 G at a moderate intensity (60% of maximum strength during deadlift exercise). Foot-ground reaction force was measured in the three orthogonal axes (x, y, z) using a force plate, and the magnitude of the resultant force vector was calculated (r = square root(x2 + y2 + z2)). Linear displacement (LD) was measured using a linear transducer. Peak force (Fpeak) and an index of total work (TWi) were calculated using a customized computer program. Paired t-tests were used to test if significant differences (p < or = 0.05) were observed between 1 G and 0 G exercise. RESULTS: Fpeak and TWi measured in the resultant axis were significantly less in 0 G for each of the exercises tested. During 0 G, Fpeak was 42-46% and TWi was 33-37% of that measured during 1 G. LD and average time to complete each repetition were not different from 1 G to 0 G. CONCLUSIONS: Crewmembers who perform resistive exercises during spaceflight that include the movement of a large portion of their body mass will require much greater external resistive force during 0 G than 1 G exercise to provide a sufficient stimulus to maintain muscle and bone mass.

  4. Acute and chronic cytokine responses to resistance exercise and training in people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kjølhede, T; Dalgas, U; Gade, A B; Bjerre, M; Stenager, E; Petersen, T; Vissing, K

    2016-07-01

    Exercise is a well-established part of rehabilitation for people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), and it has been hypothesized to stimulate an anti-inflammatory environment that might be disease modifying. Yet, investigations on exercise-induced immune responses are scarce and generally not paying attention to the medical treatments of the patient. At present, PwMS are routinely enrolled in immunosuppressive medication, but exercise-induced immunomodulatory effects have not been investigated under these circumstances. The objective of this study was to investigate the acute and chronic cytokines responses to resistance exercise training in medicated PwMS. Thirty-five people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with interferon (IFN)-β, were randomized to a 24-week progressive resistance training (PRT) or control group. Plasma interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-10, IL-17F, IL-23, tumor necrosis factor-α and IFN-γ were measured before and after 24 weeks of PRT. The acute effect was evaluated following standardized single-bout resistance exercise in the untrained and the trained state. No changes were observed in resting cytokine levels after PRT. However, an indication of reduced IL-17F secretion following resistance exercise was observed in the trained compared with the untrained state. This study suggests little acute and chronic effect of PRT on cytokine levels in IFN-treated PwMS. PMID:26105554

  5. Intermittent Palm Cooling's Impact on Resistive Exercise Performance.

    PubMed

    Caruso, J F; Barbosa, A; Erickson, L; Edwards, R; Perry, R; Learmonth, L; Potter, W T

    2015-10-01

    To examine palm cooling's (15 °C) impact, subjects performed 3 four-set leg press workouts in a randomized sequence. Per workout they received 1 of 3 treatments: no palm cooling, palm cooling between sets, or palm cooling between sets and post-exercise. Dependent variables were examined with three-way ANOVAs; average power underwent a three-way ANCOVA with body fat percentage as the covariate. Simple effects analysis was our post hoc and α=0.05. Left hand skin temperatures produced a two-way interaction (no palm cooling, palm cooling between sets>palm cooling between sets and post-exercise at several time points). A "high responder" subset had their data analyzed with an additional three-way ANOVA that again produced a two-way interaction (palm cooling between sets>no palm cooling>palm cooling between sets and post-exercise at multiple time points). Blood lactate results included a two-way interaction (no palm cooling>palm cooling between sets, palm cooling between sets and post-exercise at 0 min post-exercise). Average power yielded a two-way interaction (palm cooling between sets, palm cooling between sets>no palm cooling for the fourth set). Intermittent palm cooling hastened heat removal and blood lactate clearance, as well as delayed average power decrements. PMID:26038879

  6. FAST CP: protocol of a randomised controlled trial of the efficacy of a 12-week combined Functional Anaerobic and Strength Training programme on muscle properties and mechanical gait deficiencies in adolescents and young adults with spastic-type cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Gillett, Jarred G; Lichtwark, Glen A; Boyd, Roslyn N; Barber, Lee A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) have muscles that are smaller, weaker and more resistant to stretch compared to typically developing people. Progressive resistance training leads to increases in muscle size and strength. In CP, the benefits of resistance training alone may not transfer to improve other activities such as walking; however, the transfer of strength improvements to improved mobility may be enhanced by performing training that involves specific functional tasks or motor skills. This study aims to determine the efficacy of combined functional anaerobic and strength training in (1) influencing muscle strength, structure and function and (2) to determine if any changes in muscle strength and structure following training impact on walking ability and gross motor functional capacity and performance in the short (following 3 months of training) and medium terms (a further 3 months post-training). Methods and analysis 40 adolescents and young adults with CP will be recruited to undertake a 12-week training programme. The training programme will consist of 3×75 min sessions per week, made up of 5 lower limb resistance exercises and 2–3 functional anaerobic exercises per session. The calf muscles will be specifically targeted, as they are the most commonly impacted muscles in CP and are a key muscle group involved in walking. If, as we believe, muscle properties change following combined strength and functional training, there may be long-term benefits of this type of training in slowing the deterioration of muscle function in people with spastic-type CP. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the ethics committees at The University of Queensland (2014000066) and Children's Health Queensland (HREC/15/QRCH/30). The findings will be disseminated by publications in peer-reviewed journals, conferences and local research organisations’ media. Trial registration number Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials

  7. Thomas L. DeLorme and the science of progressive resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Todd, Janice S; Shurley, Jason P; Todd, Terry C

    2012-11-01

    In the latter years of the Second World War, the number of American servicemen who had sustained orthopedic injuries was overwhelming the nation's military hospitals. The backlog of patients was partly because of the sheer number of soldiers involved in the war effort, but it was exacerbated by rehabilitation protocols that required lengthy recovery times. In 1945, an army physician, Dr. Thomas L. DeLorme experimented with a new rehabilitation technique. DeLorme had used strength training to recover from a childhood illness and reasoned that such heavy training would prove beneficial for the injured servicemen. DeLorme's new protocol consisted of multiple sets of resistance exercises in which patients lifted their 10-repetition maximum. DeLorme refined the system by 1948 to include 3 progressively heavier sets of 10 repetitions, and he referred to the program as "Progressive Resistance Exercise." The high-intensity program was markedly more successful than older protocols and was quickly adopted as the standard in both military and civilian physical therapy programs. In 1951, DeLorme published the text Progressive Resistance Exercise: Technic and Medical Application, which was widely read by other physicians and medical professionals. The book, and DeLorme's academic publications on progressive resistance exercise, helped legitimize strength training and played a key role in laying the foundation for the science of resistance exercise. PMID:22592167

  8. Influence of Two Different Exercise Programs on Physical Fitness and Cognitive Performance in Active Older Adults: Functional Resistance-Band Exercises vs. Recreational Oriented Exercises.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Bravo, Hernán; Ponce, Christian; Feriche, Belén; Padial, Paulino

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the impact of a resistance-band functional exercise program, compared with a recreational exercise program, on physical fitness and reaction times in persons older than 60 years. Fifty-four community-dwelling volunteers (71.76 ± 6.02 years) were assigned to a specific exercise program: Functional activity program (focused on resistance-band multi-joint activities; experimental group, EG), or recreational physical activity program (with gross motor activities of ludic content; control group, CG). Before and after the intervention, we determined cognitive capacity in terms of simple reaction time (S-RT), choice reaction time (C-RT) and fitness. In both groups physical performance improved, though this improvement was more marked in the EG for grip strength, arm strength and gross motor abilities (p < 0.05). Reaction times were better only in EG (S-RT = 10.70%, C-RT = 14.34%; p < 0.05) after the corresponding physical training intervention. The training period showed no effect on the moderate relationship between both RT and gross motor abilities in the CG, whereas the EG displayed an enhanced relationship between S-RT and grip-strength as well as the C-RT with arm strength and aerobic capacity (r ~ 0.457; p < 0.05). Our findings indicate that a functional exercise program using a resistance band improves fitness and cognitive performance in healthy older adults. Key pointsBetter cognitive processes can be achieved as physical condition improvesExercise sessions of a more recreational type do not seem to constitute a stimulus able to improve both physical and cognitive performance in healthy active older adultsThe improvement of cognitive function, as assessed through reaction times, seems more linked to the workload and strength component of the training program. PMID:26664267

  9. Influence of Two Different Exercise Programs on Physical Fitness and Cognitive Performance in Active Older Adults: Functional Resistance-Band Exercises vs. Recreational Oriented Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Ponce-Bravo, Hernán; Ponce, Christian; Feriche, Belén; Padial, Paulino

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the impact of a resistance-band functional exercise program, compared with a recreational exercise program, on physical fitness and reaction times in persons older than 60 years. Fifty-four community-dwelling volunteers (71.76 ± 6.02 years) were assigned to a specific exercise program: Functional activity program (focused on resistance-band multi-joint activities; experimental group, EG), or recreational physical activity program (with gross motor activities of ludic content; control group, CG). Before and after the intervention, we determined cognitive capacity in terms of simple reaction time (S-RT), choice reaction time (C-RT) and fitness. In both groups physical performance improved, though this improvement was more marked in the EG for grip strength, arm strength and gross motor abilities (p < 0.05). Reaction times were better only in EG (S-RT = 10.70%, C-RT = 14.34%; p < 0.05) after the corresponding physical training intervention. The training period showed no effect on the moderate relationship between both RT and gross motor abilities in the CG, whereas the EG displayed an enhanced relationship between S-RT and grip-strength as well as the C-RT with arm strength and aerobic capacity (r ~ 0.457; p < 0.05). Our findings indicate that a functional exercise program using a resistance band improves fitness and cognitive performance in healthy older adults. Key points Better cognitive processes can be achieved as physical condition improves Exercise sessions of a more recreational type do not seem to constitute a stimulus able to improve both physical and cognitive performance in healthy active older adults The improvement of cognitive function, as assessed through reaction times, seems more linked to the workload and strength component of the training program. PMID:26664267

  10. Lateralization of infant holding by mothers: A longitudinal evaluation of variations over the first 12 weeks.

    PubMed

    Todd, Brenda K; Banerjee, Robin

    2016-01-01

    The maternal preference to hold infants on the left rather than right side of the body was examined longitudinally, with attention to 4 explanations: maternal monitoring of infant state, maternal handedness, infant proximity to the mother's heartbeat, and preferred infant head position. The side and site of holding were measured over the first 12 weeks of the lives of 24 infants. Information about group and individual consistency in holding side allowed novel evaluation of the theories. A strong bias to hold on the left dropped below significance when the infants were aged 12 weeks and was limited to specific holding positions. Findings were generally consistent with the monitoring hypothesis, and little support was found for the 3 alternative explanations. PMID:26314871

  11. Remote Adaptive Motor Resistance Training Exercise Apparatus and Method of Use Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reich, Alton (Inventor); Shaw, James (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The invention comprises a method and/or an apparatus using a computer configured exercise system equipped with an electric motor to provide physical resistance to user motion in conjunction with means for sharing exercise system related data and/or user performance data with a secondary user, such as a medical professional, a physical therapist, a trainer, a computer generated competitor, and/or a human competitor. For example, the exercise system is used with a remote trainer to enhance exercise performance, with a remote medical professional for rehabilitation, and/or with a competitor in a competition, such as in a power/weightlifting competition or in a video game. The exercise system is optionally configured with an intelligent software assistant and knowledge navigator functioning as a personal assistant application.

  12. RESISTANCE TRAINING AS A PRECONDITIONING STRATEGY FOR ENHANCING AEROBIC EXERCISE TRAINING OUTCOMES IN COPD

    PubMed Central

    Covey, Margaret K.; Collins, Eileen G.; Reynertson, Sandra I.; Dilling, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Aerobic exercise training is a recognized approach for improving functional capacity in COPD. People with greater disease severity often have difficulty achieving higher aerobic exercise training intensity. The effects of resistance training prior to aerobic training were examined to determine if this sequential approach was associated with greater gains in functional status than aerobic training alone or concurrent aerobic and resistance training. Methods Patients were randomized to: 1) sequential resistance then aerobic training (RT-then-AT) (8 weeks resistance training followed by 8 weeks aerobic exercise training), 2) control group (CE-then-AT+RT) (8 weeks of ‘sham’ training followed by 8 weeks concurrent aerobic and resistance training), 3) control group (CE-then-AT) (8 weeks ‘sham’ training followed by 8 weeks aerobic training). Outcomes were assessed at study entry, after week 8, and after week 16: aerobic exercise performance; muscle strength and endurance. Results 75 patients completed training: FEV1 %pred 40±10, V̇O2peak %predicted, 71±22, fat-free mass index 19.5±3.1. RT-then-AT had greater acquisition of peripheral muscle endurance than CE-then-AT+RT and CE-then-AT, but improvements in aerobic exercise performance were similar. Improvements in muscle strength were similar between RT-then-AT and CE-then-AT+RT. Sarcopenia was associated with poorer attendance, and lower aerobic and resistance training volumes. Conclusion Although the sequential approach to resistance and aerobic training yielded a greater increase in muscle endurance and higher resistance training volume compared to concurrent resistance and aerobic training, other training outcomes were similar between the two groups, thus the sequential approach is not clearly superior to the concurrent approach in severe COPD. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01058213. PMID:24958605

  13. High genetic-risk individuals benefit less from resistance exercise intervention

    PubMed Central

    Klimentidis, Yann C.; Bea, Jennifer W.; Lohman, Timothy; Hsieh, Pei-Shan; Going, Scott; Chen, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Genetic factors play an important role in body mass index (BMI) variation, and also likely play a role in the weight-loss and body composition response to physical activity/exercise. With the recent identification of BMI–associated genetic variants, it is possible to investigate the interaction of these genetic factors with exercise on body composition outcomes. Subjects/Methods In a block-randomized clinical trial of resistance exercise among women (n=148), we examined whether the putative effect of exercise on weight and DXA-derived body composition measurements differs according to genetic risk for obesity. Approximately one-half of the sample was randomized to an intervention consisting of a supervised, intensive, resistance exercise program, lasting one year. Genetic risk for obesity was defined as a genetic risk score (GRS) comprised of 21 SNPs known to be associated with normal BMI variation. We examined the interaction of exercise intervention and the GRS on anthropometric and body composition measurements after one year of the exercise intervention. Results We found statistically significant interactions for body weight (p=0.01), body fat (p=0.01), body fat % (p=0.02), and abdominal fat (p=0.02), whereby the putative effect of exercise is greater among those with a lower level of genetic risk for obesity. No single SNP appears to be a major driver of these interactions. Conclusions The weight-loss response to resistance exercise, including changes in body composition, differs according to an individual’s genetic risk for obesity. PMID:25924711

  14. Energy intake and appetite-related hormones following acute aerobic and resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Balaguera-Cortes, Liliana; Wallman, Karen E; Fairchild, Timothy J; Guelfi, Kym J

    2011-12-01

    Previous research has shown that resistance and aerobic exercise have differing effects on perceived hunger and circulating levels of appetite-related hormones. However, the effect of resistance and aerobic exercise on actual energy intake has never been compared. This study investigated the effect of an acute bout of resistance exercise, compared with aerobic exercise, on subsequent energy intake and appetite-regulating hormones. Ten active men completed 3 trials in a counterbalanced design: 45 min of resistance exercise (RES; free and machine weights), aerobic exercise (AER; running), or a resting control trial (CON). Following exercise or CON, participants had access to a buffet-style array of breakfast foods and drinks to consume ad libitum. Plasma concentrations of a range of appetite-regulating hormones were measured throughout each trial. Despite significantly higher energy expenditure with AER compared with RES (p < 0.05), there was no difference in total energy intake from the postexercise meal between trials (p = 0.779). Pancreatic polypeptide was significantly higher prior to the meal after both RES and AER compared with CON. In contrast, active ghrelin was lower following RES compared with both CON and AER (p ≤ 0.05), while insulin was higher following RES compared with CON (p = 0.013). In summary, the differential response of appetite-regulating hormones to AER and RES does not appear to influence energy intake in the postexercise meal. However, given the greater energy expenditure associated with AER compared with RES, AER modes of exercise may be preferable for achieving short-term negative energy balance. PMID:22111518

  15. Immune Function Alterations during 12 Weeks of Abstinence in Heroin Users.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Yang, X-R; Song, H; Cao, B-R; Yin, F; An, Z-M; Kang, L; Li, J

    2015-01-01

    The intent of the study was to evaluate immune system changes during 12 weeks of abstinence in heroin users. We recruited men (N = 65) aged 18-45 years and collected demographic and heroin use pattern data. Serum blood levels of total interleukin 2 (IL-2), interferon γ (IFN-γ), immunoglobulin (Ig) A, IgG, and IgM were assessed at five time points. The IL-2 level was increased on day 84 as compared to that in healthy controls. The IFN-γ level was higher in heroin users than in healthy controls between days 0 and 28, and was decreased on day 84. IgG and IgM levels in heroin users were higher than those in healthy controls in our 12-week study, and were in positive correlation with the way of using the drug, duration of heroin dependence, and daily heroin intake. Our data revealed that the immune system was not restored during the 12 weeks of heroin withdrawal. PMID:26789146

  16. Kinematic Measurement of 12-week Head Control Correlates with 12-month Neurodevelopment in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Bentzley, Jessica P; Coker-Bolt, Patty; Moreau, Noelle; Hope, Kathryn; Ramakrishnan, Viswanathan; Brown, Truman; Mulvihill, Denise; Jenkins, Dorothea

    2015-01-01

    Background Although new interventions treating neonatal brain injury show great promise, our current ability to predict clinical functional outcomes is poor. Quantitative biomarkers of long-term neurodevelopmental outcome are critically needed to gauge treatment efficacy. Kinematic measures derived from commonly used developmental tasks may serve as early objective markers of future motor outcomes. Aim To develop reliable kinematic markers of head control at 12 weeks corrected gestational age (CGA) from two motor tasks: head lifting in prone and pull-to-sit Study design and subjects Prospective observational study of 22 preterm infants born between 24 and 34 weeks of gestation Outcome measures Bayley Scales of Infant Development III (Bayley) motor scores Results Intrarater and interrater reliability of prone head lift angles and pull-to-sit head angles were excellent. Prone head lift angles at 12 weeks CGA correlated with white matter NAA/Cho, concurrent Test of Infant Motor Performance (TIMP) scores, and 12-month Bayley motor scores. Head angles during pull-to-sit at 12-weeks CGA correlated with TIMP scores. Conclusions Poor ability to lift the head in prone and an inability to align the head with the trunk during the pull-to-sit task were associated with poorer future motor outcome scores. Kinematic measurements of head control in early infancy may serve as reliable objective quantitative markers of future motor impairment and neurodevelopmental outcome. PMID:25621433

  17. Resistance to exercise-induced weight loss: compensatory behavioral adaptations.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Edward L; Keadle, Sarah Kozey; Donnelly, Joseph E; Braun, Barry; King, Neil A

    2013-08-01

    In many interventions that are based on an exercise program intended to induce weight loss, the mean weight loss observed is modest and sometimes far less than what the individual expected. The individual responses are also widely variable, with some individuals losing a substantial amount of weight, others maintaining weight, and a few actually gaining weight. The media have focused on the subpopulation that loses little weight, contributing to a public perception that exercise has limited utility to cause weight loss. The purpose of the symposium was to present recent, novel data that help explain how compensatory behaviors contribute to a wide discrepancy in exercise-induced weight loss. The presentations provide evidence that some individuals adopt compensatory behaviors, that is, increased energy intake and/or reduced activity, that offset the exercise energy expenditure and limit weight loss. The challenge for both scientists and clinicians is to develop effective tools to identify which individuals are susceptible to such behaviors and to develop strategies to minimize their effect. PMID:23470300

  18. Resistance to exercise-induced weight loss: compensatory behavioral adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Melanson, Edward L.; Keadle, Sarah Kozey; Donnelly, Joseph E.; Braun, Barry; King, Neil A.

    2013-01-01

    In many interventions that are based on an exercise program intended to induce weight loss, the mean weight loss observed is modest and sometimes far less than the individual expected. The individual responses are also widely variable, with some individuals losing a substantial amount of weight, others maintaining weight, and a few actually gaining weight. The media have focused on the sub-population that loses little weight, contributing to a public perception that exercise has limited utility to cause weight loss. The purpose of the symposium was to present recent, novel data that help explain how compensatory behaviors contribute to a wide discrepancy in exercise-induced weight loss. The presentations provide evidence that some individuals adopt compensatory behaviors, i.e. increased energy intake and/or reduced activity, that offset the exercise energy expenditure and limit weight loss. The challenge for both scientists and clinicians is to develop effective tools to identify which individuals are susceptible to such behaviors, and to develop strategies to minimize their impact. PMID:23470300

  19. RESISTIVE EXERCISES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF MUSCULAR STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BURNHAM, STAN; MCCRAW, LYNN W.

    A STUDY WAS CONCERNED WITH A COMPARISON OF ISOTONIC, ISOMETRIC, AND SPEED EXERCISE PROGRAMS AS A MEANS OF DEVELOPING MUSCLE STRENGTH, ENDURANCE, SPEED, AND POWER. SUBJECTS FOR THE INVESTIGATION WERE 93 FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORE MEN ENROLLED IN A PHYSICAL EDUCATION CLASS. AFTER MEASUREMENT OF INITIAL STATUS IN THE ATTRIBUTES UNDER CONSIDERATION, THE…

  20. Voluntary resistance exercise improves blood hemoglobin concentration in severely iron-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Tatsuhiro; Kang, Hyung-Sook; Suzuki, Hiroo; Suzuki, Masashige

    2002-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of long-term voluntary resistance exercise (climbing) compared with aerobic exercise (swimming) on iron status in severely (4 mg Fe/kg diet) and mildly (18-29 mg Fe/kg diet) iron-deficient rats, we trained male Wistar rats for 8 wk to climb a wire-mesh tower (phi20 cm x 200 cm, CLIMB) and to swim in a plastic pool (phi50 cm x 50 cm, SWIM). These rats were compared with sedentary (SED) rats. After the experimental period, blood hemoglobin level, plasma iron concentration, and transferrin saturation were significantly lower in the 4 mg Fe/kg diet rats than in the 18, 29, and 40 mg Fe/kg diet rats. In 4 mg Fe/kg diet rats, the hemoglobin level was significantly higher in the CLIMB group than in the SED and SWIM groups. On the other hand, neither exercise affected iron status in mildly iron-deficient rats. Bone marrow delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity was significantly higher in the CLIMB group than in the SWIM and SED groups. These results suggest that long-term resistance exercise is more effective than aerobic exercise in improving blood hemoglobin concentration in severely iron-deficient rats, probably because of an increase in heme biosynthesis. Resistance exercise may be a useful therapy for iron-deficient anemia. PMID:12171438

  1. Acute Inflammatory Response to Low-, Moderate-, and High-Load Resistance Exercise in Women With Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Cormie, Prue; Singh, Benjamin; Hayes, Sandi; Peake, Jonathan M; Galvão, Daniel A; Taaffe, Dennis R; Spry, Nigel; Nosaka, Kazunori; Cornish, Bruce; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Newton, Robert U

    2016-09-01

    Background Resistance exercise is emerging as a potential adjunct therapy to aid in the management of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). However, the mechanisms underlying the relationships between the acute and long-term benefits of resistance exercise on BCRL are not well understood. Purpose To examine the acute inflammatory response to upper-body resistance exercise in women with BCRL and to compare these effects between resistance exercises involving low, moderate, and high loads. The impact on lymphedema status and associated symptoms was also compared. Methods A total of 21 women, 62 ± 10 years old, with BCRL participated in the study. Participants completed low-load (15-20 repetition maximum [RM]), moderate-load (10-12 RM), and high-load (6-8 RM) exercise sessions consisting of 3 sets of 6 upper-body resistance exercises. Sessions were completed in a randomized order separated by a 7- to 10-day wash-out period. Venous blood samples were obtained to assess markers of exercise-induced muscle damage and inflammation. Lymphedema status was assessed using bioimpedance spectroscopy and arm circumferences, and associated symptoms were assessed using Visual Analogue Scales for pain, heaviness, and tightness. Measurements were conducted before and 24 hours after the exercise sessions. Results No significant changes in creatine kinase, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α were observed following the 3 resistance exercise sessions. There were no significant changes in arm swelling or symptom severity scores across the 3 resistance exercise conditions. Conclusions The magnitude of acute exercise-induced inflammation following upper-body resistance exercise in women with BCRL does not vary between resistance exercise loads. PMID:26582633

  2. Metabolomic Response of Skeletal Muscle to Aerobic Exercise Training in Insulin Resistant Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dotzert, Michelle S.; Murray, Michael R.; McDonald, Matthew W.; Olver, T. Dylan; Velenosi, Thomas J.; Hennop, Anzel; Noble, Earl G.; Urquhart, Brad L.; Melling, C. W. James

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of insulin resistance in Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is unknown, however it affects approximately 20% of T1D patients. Intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) have been identified as a mechanism of insulin resistance. We examined skeletal muscle of T1D rats to determine if alterations in lipid metabolism were evident and whether aerobic exercise training improves IMCL and insulin resistance. To do so, 48 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control (C), sedentary diabetes (D) and diabetes exercise (DX) groups. Following multiple low-dose Streptozotocin (STZ) injections (20 mg/kg), glycemia (9–15 mM) was maintained using insulin treatment. DX were treadmill trained at high intensity (~75% V02max; 5days/week) for 10 weeks. The results demonstrate that D exhibited insulin resistance compared with C and DX, indicated by decreased glucose infusion rate during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (p < 0.05). There were no differences between C and DX, suggesting that exercise improved insulin resistance (p < 0.05). Metabolomics analysis revealed a significant shift in lipid metabolism whereby notable fatty acid metabolites (arachidonic acid, palmitic acid and several polyunsaturated fatty acids) were significantly elevated in D compared to C and DX. Based on the intermediates observed, insulin resistance in T1D is characterized by an insulin-desensitizing intramyocellular fatty acid metabolite profile that is ameliorated with exercise training. PMID:27197730

  3. Metabolomic Response of Skeletal Muscle to Aerobic Exercise Training in Insulin Resistant Type 1 Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Dotzert, Michelle S; Murray, Michael R; McDonald, Matthew W; Olver, T Dylan; Velenosi, Thomas J; Hennop, Anzel; Noble, Earl G; Urquhart, Brad L; Melling, C W James

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of insulin resistance in Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is unknown, however it affects approximately 20% of T1D patients. Intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) have been identified as a mechanism of insulin resistance. We examined skeletal muscle of T1D rats to determine if alterations in lipid metabolism were evident and whether aerobic exercise training improves IMCL and insulin resistance. To do so, 48 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control (C), sedentary diabetes (D) and diabetes exercise (DX) groups. Following multiple low-dose Streptozotocin (STZ) injections (20 mg/kg), glycemia (9-15 mM) was maintained using insulin treatment. DX were treadmill trained at high intensity (~75% V02max; 5days/week) for 10 weeks. The results demonstrate that D exhibited insulin resistance compared with C and DX, indicated by decreased glucose infusion rate during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (p < 0.05). There were no differences between C and DX, suggesting that exercise improved insulin resistance (p < 0.05). Metabolomics analysis revealed a significant shift in lipid metabolism whereby notable fatty acid metabolites (arachidonic acid, palmitic acid and several polyunsaturated fatty acids) were significantly elevated in D compared to C and DX. Based on the intermediates observed, insulin resistance in T1D is characterized by an insulin-desensitizing intramyocellular fatty acid metabolite profile that is ameliorated with exercise training. PMID:27197730

  4. Nutritional regulation of muscle protein synthesis with resistance exercise: strategies to enhance anabolism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Provision of dietary amino acids increases skeletal muscle protein synthesis (MPS), an effect that is enhanced by prior resistance exercise. As a fundamentally necessary process in the enhancement of muscle mass, strategies to enhance rates of MPS would be beneficial in the development of interventions aimed at increasing skeletal muscle mass particularly when combined with chronic resistance exercise. The purpose of this review article is to provide an update on current findings regarding the nutritional regulation of MPS and highlight nutrition based strategies that may serve to maximize skeletal muscle protein anabolism with resistance exercise. Such factors include timing of protein intake, dietary protein type, the role of leucine as a key anabolic amino acid, and the impact of other macronutrients (i.e. carbohydrate) on the regulation of MPS after resistance exercise. We contend that nutritional strategies that serve to maximally stimulate MPS may be useful in the development of nutrition and exercise based interventions aimed at enhancing skeletal muscle mass which may be of interest to elderly populations and to athletes. PMID:22594765

  5. Load dependence of changes in forearm and peripheral vascular resistance after acute leg exercise in man.

    PubMed

    Piepoli, M; Isea, J E; Pannarale, G; Adamopoulos, S; Sleight, P; Coats, A J

    1994-07-15

    1. It is known that acute exercise is often followed by a reduction in arterial blood pressure. Little is known about the time course of the recovery of the blood pressure or the influence of the intensity of the exercise on this response. Controversy exists, in particular, concerning the changes in peripheral resistance that occur during this period. 2. Eight normal volunteers performed, in random order on separate days, voluntary upright bicycle exercise of three different intensities (maximal, moderate and minimal load) and, on another day, a control period of sitting on a bicycle. They were monitored for 60 min after each test. 3. Diastolic pressure fell after maximal exercise at 5 min (-15.45 mmHg) and 60 min (-9.45 mmHg), compared with the control day. Systolic and mean pressure also fell (non-significantly) after 45 min; heart rate was significantly elevated for the whole hour of recovery (at 60 min, +7.23 beats min-1). No changes in post-exercise blood pressure and heart rate were observed on the days of moderate and minimal exercises. 4. An increase in cardiac index was observed after maximal exercise compared with control (at 60 min, 2.6 +/- 0.3 vs. 1.9 +/- 0.2 l min-1 m-2). This was entirely accounted for by the persistent increase in heart rate, with no significant alteration in stroke volume after exercise on any day.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7965851

  6. Moving Beyond Cardio: The Value of Resistance Training, Balance Training, and Other Forms of Exercise in the Management of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Colberg, Sheri R.; Sigal, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF Traditionally, aerobic training has been a central focus of exercise promotion for diabetes management. However, people with diabetes have much to gain from other forms of exercise. This article reviews the evidence and recommendations on resistance, balance, and flexibility training, as well as other, less traditional, forms of exercise such as yoga and Tai Chi. PMID:25717274

  7. On-the-Field Resistance-Tubing Exercises for Throwers: An Electromyographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Joseph B; Pasquale, Maria R; Laudner, Kevin G; Sell, Timothy C; Bradley, James P; Lephart, Scott M

    2005-01-01

    Context: Athletes who throw commonly use rubber-tubing resistance exercises in the field setting to assist with warm-up before throwing. Yet no researchers have described which muscles are being activated or which exercises are most effective during rubber-tubing exercises used by throwers for warm-up. Objective: To describe the effectiveness of 12 rubber-tubing resistance exercises commonly used by throwers in activating the shoulder muscles important for throwing. Design: Descriptive research design. Setting: An applied biomechanics research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Fifteen physically active male subjects with no history of shoulder injury. Main Outcome Measure(s): Subjects randomly performed 12 rubber-tubing resistance exercises while we assessed muscle activation of the subscapularis, supraspinatus, teres minor, and rhomboid major by indwelling electromyography. Activation of the sternal portion of the pectoralis major, anterior deltoid, middle deltoid, latissimus dorsi, serratus anterior, biceps brachii, triceps brachii, lower trapezius, and infraspinatus muscles was assessed by surface electromyography. Results: Performance of 7 exercises (external rotation at 90° of abduction, throwing deceleration, humeral flexion, humeral extension, low scapular rows, throwing acceleration, and scapular punch) resulted in the highest level of muscle activation of all muscles tested. Conclusions: These 7 exercises exhibited moderate activation (>20% maximal voluntary isometric contraction) in each muscle of the rotator cuff, the primary humeral movers, and the scapular stabilizer muscles. The results suggest that these exercises are most effective in activating the muscles important to the throwing motion and may be beneficial for throwers during their prethrowing warm-up routine. PMID:15902319

  8. Acute molecular responses to concurrent resistance and high-intensity interval exercise in untrained skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Jamie K; Faulkner, Steve H; Jackson, Andrew P; King, James A; Nimmo, Myra A

    2015-01-01

    Concurrent training involving resistance and endurance exercise may augment the benefits of single-mode training for the purpose of improving health. However, muscle adaptations, associated with resistance exercise, may be blunted by a subsequent bout of endurance exercise, via molecular interference. High-intensity interval training (HIIT), generating similar adaptations to endurance exercise, may offer an alternative exercise mode to traditional endurance exercise. This study examined the influence of an acute HIIT session on the molecular responses following resistance exercise in untrained skeletal muscle. Ten male participants performed resistance exercise (4 × 8 leg extensions, 70% 1RM, (RE)) or RE followed by HIIT (10 × 1 min at 90% HRmax, (RE+HIIT)). Muscle biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis before, 2 and 6 h post-RE to determine intramuscular protein phosphorylation and mRNA responses. Phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) decreased at 6 h in both trials (P < 0.05). Phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser2448) was higher in RE+HIIT (P < 0.05). All PGC-1α mRNA variants increased at 2 h in RE+HIIT with PGC-1α and PGC-1α-ex1b remaining elevated at 6 h, whereas RE-induced increases at 2 and 6 h for PGC-1α-ex1b only (P < 0.05). Myostatin expression decreased at 2 and 6 h in both trials (P < 0.05). MuRF-1 was elevated in RE+HIIT versus RE at 2 and 6 h (P < 0.05). Atrogin-1 was lower at 2 h, with FOXO3A downregulated at 6 h (P < 0.05). These data do not support the existence of an acute interference effect on protein signaling and mRNA expression, and suggest that HIIT may be an alternative to endurance exercise when performed after resistance exercise in the same training session to optimize adaptations. PMID:25902785

  9. Can a Single Session of a Community-Based Group Exercise Program Combining Step Aerobics and Bodyweight Resistance Exercise Acutely Reduce Blood Pressure?

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Romeu; Sousa, Nelson; Garrido, Nuno; Cavaco, Braulio; Quaresma, Luís; Reis, Victor Machado

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the acute effects of a single session of a community-based group exercise program combining step aerobics and bodyweight resistance exercise on blood pressure in healthy young adult women. Twenty-three healthy young adult women (aged 31.57 ± 7.87 years) participated in two experimental sessions (exercise and control) in a crossover study design. Blood pressure was monitored before, immediately after and at 10, 20 and 30 min of recovery. The exercise session consisted of four phases: 1) a warm-up (5 min of dance aerobics); 2) aerobic exercise training (30 min of step aerobics); 3) resistance exercise training (six sets of 12 repetitions of three bodyweight exercises in a circuit mode, 10 min); and 4) a cool-down (5 min of breathing and flexibility exercises); totaling 50 min of duration. Systolic blood pressure after exercise was significantly lower compared to control at the 10th min (−10.83 ± 2.13 vs. −2.6 ± 2.13 mmHg; p = 0.009), 20th min (−11.26 ± 2.13 vs. −3.04 ± 2.13 mmHg; p = 0.009) and 30th min of recovery (−10.87 ± 2.39 vs. −0.48 ± 2.39 mmHg; p = 0.004). A single session of a community-based group exercise program combining step aerobics and bodyweight resistance exercise was effective in inducing significant post-exercise hypotension in healthy young adult women. This type of low-cost exercise interventions may have an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and in community health promotion. PMID:25713644

  10. Resistance exercise-induced fluid shifts: change in active muscle size and plasma volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Convertino, V. A.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the reduction in plasma volume (PV) induced by resistance exercise reflects fluid loss to the extravascular space and subsequently selective increase in cross-sectional area (CSA) of active but not inactive skeletal muscle. We compared changes in active and inactive muscle CSA and PV after barbell squat exercise. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify muscle involvement in exercise and to determine CSA of muscle groups or individual muscles [vasti (VS), adductor (Add), hamstring (Ham), and rectus femoris (RF)]. Muscle involvement in exercise was determined using exercise-induced contrast shift in spin-spin relaxation time (T2)-weighted MR images immediately postexercise. Alterations in muscle size were based on the mean CSA of individual slices. Hematocrit, hemoglobin, and Evans blue dye were used to estimate changes in PV. Muscle CSA and PV data were obtained preexercise and immediately postexercise and 15 and 45 min thereafter. A hierarchy of muscle involvement in exercise was found such that VS > Add > Ham > RF, with the Ham and RF showing essentially no involvement. CSA of the VS and Add muscle groups were increased 10 and 5%, respectively, immediately after exercise in each thigh with no changes in Ham and RF CSA. PV was decreased 22% immediately following exercise. The absolute loss of PV was correlated (r2 = 0.75) with absolute increase in muscle CSA immediately postexercise, supporting the notion that increased muscle size after resistance exercise reflects primarily fluid movement from the vascular space into active but not inactive muscle.

  11. A rat resistance exercise regimen attenuates losses of musculoskeletal mass during hindlimb suspension.

    PubMed

    Fluckey, J D; Dupont-Versteegden, E E; Montague, D C; Knox, M; Tesch, P; Peterson, C A; Gaddy-Kurten, D

    2002-12-01

    Exposure to microgravity and/or spaceflight causes dramatic losses in both muscle and bone mass. In normal gravity, resistance exercise has been effectively used to increase muscle and bone mass. We tested a novel form of resistance exercise training using flywheel technology as a countermeasure to offset the loss of musculoskeletal mass during 4 weeks of adult rat hindlimb suspension (HS), an unloading model of microgravity. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats (6-month old) were operantly conditioned to perform resistance exercise, and then randomly assigned to groups of sedentary control (CON), HS, and HS with resistance exercise training (HSRT; 2 sets of approximately 21 repetitions, 3 days week(-1) for 4 weeks during suspension). In soleus, HS resulted in lower (P < 0.05) muscle mass to body mass ratio (approximately 50% of controls) and rates of protein synthesis. HSRT significantly attenuated the loss of muscle mass in soleus muscle, and rates of protein synthesis for soleus were similar for HSRT and controls. There were no differences among groups for mass or rates of protein synthesis in extensor digitorum longus. In cancellous regions of the distal femur, HS resulted in significant reductions of bone mineral density (BMD), but this was restored to control levels with HSRT. Cortical regions of the femur were not different among HS, HSRT or control groups. Together, these data suggest that resistance training using flywheel technology may be a promising tool to attenuate losses of the musculoskeletal system during periods of hindlimb unloading. PMID:12444935

  12. Cognitive Fatigue Influences Time-On-Task during Bodyweight Resistance Training Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Head, James R.; Tenan, Matthew S.; Tweedell, Andrew J.; Price, Thomas F.; LaFiandra, Michael E.; Helton, William S.

    2016-01-01

    Prior investigations have shown measurable performance impairments on continuous physical performance tasks when preceded by a cognitively fatiguing task. However, the effect of cognitive fatigue on bodyweight resistance training exercise task performance is unknown. In the current investigation 18 amateur athletes completed a full body exercise task preceded by either a cognitive fatiguing or control intervention. In a randomized repeated measure design, each participant completed the same exercise task preceded by a 52 min cognitively fatiguing intervention (vigilance) or control intervention (video). Data collection sessions were separated by 1 week. Participants rated the fatigue intervention with a significantly higher workload compared to the control intervention (p < 0.001). Additionally, participants self-reported significantly greater energetic arousal for cognitively fatiguing task (p = 0.02). Cognitive fatigue did not significantly impact number of repetitions completed during the exercise task (p = 0.77); however, when cognitively fatigued, participants had decreased percent time-on-task (57%) relative to the no fatigue condition (60%; p = 0.04). RPE significantly changed over time (p < 0.001), but failed to show significant differences between the cognitive fatigue intervention and control intervention (p > 0.05). There was no statistical difference for heart rate or metabolic expenditure as a function of fatigue intervention during exercise. Cognitively fatigued athletes have decreased time-on-task in bodyweight resistance training exercise tasks.

  13. Reliability of Strength Testing using the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device and Free Weights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, Kirk L.; Loehr, James A.; Laughlin, Mitzi A.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Hagan, R. Donald

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) was developed for use on the International Space Station as a countermeasure against muscle atrophy and decreased strength. This investigation examined the reliability of one-repetition maximum (1RM) strength testing using ARED and traditional free weight (FW) exercise. Methods: Six males (180.8 +/- 4.3 cm, 83.6 +/- 6.4 kg, 36 +/- 8 y, mean +/- SD) who had not engaged in resistive exercise for at least six months volunteered to participate in this project. Subjects completed four 1RM testing sessions each for FW and ARED (eight total sessions) using a balanced, randomized, crossover design. All testing using one device was completed before progressing to the other. During each session, 1RM was measured for the squat, heel raise, and deadlift exercises. Generalizability (G) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated for each exercise on each device and were used to predict the number of sessions needed to obtain a reliable 1RM measurement (G . 0.90). Interclass reliability coefficients and Pearson's correlation coefficients (R) also were calculated for the highest 1RM value (1RM9sub peak)) obtained for each exercise on each device to quantify 1RM relationships between devices.

  14. Cognitive and mood effects in healthy children during 12 weeks' supplementation with multi-vitamin/minerals.

    PubMed

    Haskell, Crystal F; Scholey, Andrew B; Jackson, Philippa A; Elliott, Jade M; Defeyter, Margaret A; Greer, Joanna; Robertson, Bernadette C; Buchanan, Tom; Tiplady, Brian; Kennedy, David O

    2008-11-01

    Adequate levels of vitamins and minerals are essential for optimal neural functioning. A high proportion of individuals, including children, suffer from deficiencies in one or more vitamins or minerals. This study investigated whether daily supplementation with vitamins/minerals could modulate cognitive performance and mood in healthy children. In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel groups investigation, eighty-one healthy children aged from 8 to 14 years underwent laboratory assessments of their cognitive performance and mood pre-dose and at 1 and 3 h post-dose on the first and last days of 12 weeks' supplementation with a commercially available vitamins/mineral product (Pharmaton Kiddi). Interim assessments were also completed at home after 4 and 8 weeks at 3 h post-dose. Each assessment comprised completion of a cognitive battery, delivered over the Internet, which included tasks assessing mood and the speed and accuracy of attention and aspects of memory (secondary, semantic and spatial working memory). The vitamin/mineral group performed more accurately on two attention tasks: 'Arrows' choice reaction time task at 4 and 8 weeks; 'Arrow Flankers' choice reaction time task at 4, 8 and 12 weeks. A single task outcome (Picture Recognition errors) evinced significant decrements at 12 weeks. Mood was not modulated in any interpretable manner. Whilst it is possible that the significant improvements following treatment were due to non-significant numerical differences in performance at baseline, these results would seem to suggest that vitamin/mineral supplementation has the potential to improve brain function in healthy children. This proposition requires further investigation. PMID:18507881

  15. Dynamic inter-limb resistance exercise device for long-duration space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwandt, Douglas F.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Parazynski, Scott E.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1991-01-01

    Essential for fitness on Earth, resistive exercise is even more important for astronauts, who must maintain muscle and bone strength in the absence of gravity. To meet this need, designers and scientists at NASA Ames Research Center, Life Science Division, have worked to develop more effective exercise devices for long-duration exposure to microgravity. One of these concepts is the Inter-Limb Resistance Device which allows the subject to exercise one limb directly against another, strengthening muscle groups in the arms, legs, and back. It features a modular harness with an inelastic cable and instrumented pulley. Forces similar to other high resistance exercise equipment are generated. Sensors in the pulley measure force and velocity for performance feedback display and data acquisition. This free-floating apparatus avoids vibration of sensitive experiments on board spacecraft. Compact with low mass, this hardware is also well suited for a 'safe haven' from radiation on board Space Station Freedom, and may prove useful in confined environments on Earth, such as Antarctic stations, submarines, and other underwater habitats. Potential spin-offs of this technology include products for personal strengthening and cardiovascular conditioning, rehabilitation of hospital patients, fitness exercise for the disabled, and retraining after sports injuries.

  16. Oxygen Consumption and Substrate Utilization During and After Resistance Exercises Performed with Different Muscle Mass

    PubMed Central

    FARINATTI, PAULO; CASTINHEIRAS NETO, ANTONIO G.; AMORIM, PAULO R.S.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the energy expenditure (EE) and substrate utilization reflected by the respiratory-exchange ratio (RER) during and after resistance exercises performed with different muscle mass. Ten male volunteers (mean±SD; 26±4yr, 179±6cm, 77±8kg) performed multiple sets of the horizontal leg press (LP) and chest fly (CF) (5 sets of 10 repetitions with 15 repetition-maximum, 1-minute between-set intervals) in a counterbalanced design. Oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production were measured during 40 minutes of resting; resistance exercise protocols (sets and intervals); 90 minutes of post-exercise recovery. Total fat and carbohydrate oxidation rates were calculated according to the non-protein respiratory quotient. Both exercise conditions elicited net excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) of similar duration (approximately 40min). The EPOC magnitude at 40 minutes was greater after LP than after CF (7.36±1.10L vs. 4.73±0.99L; P<0.001). The RER was higher in LP (1.30±0.04) than CF (1.16±0.05, P=0.0003) during exercise. During recovery the RER was similar in LP and CF (P>0.05) and lower than pre-exercise (Pre-exercise=0.78±0.04 vs. CF40min=0.74±0.04; CF90min=0.68±0.02 and LP50min=0.73±0.06; LP90min=0.65±0.04, P<0.05). However, fat oxidation after LP was greater than CF between 30–90 minutes of recovery (mean total fat oxidation: LP=10.9 g vs. CF=8.4 g; P<0.01). The increases of EE and fat oxidation during post-exercise recovery were greater after multiple sets of resistance exercises performed with larger muscle mass than smaller muscle mass. This finding has practical implications for resistance training designed as part of weight management programs. PMID:27293507

  17. Acute exercise improves endothelial function despite increasing vascular resistance during stress in smokers and nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Rooks, Cherie R; McCully, Kevin K; Dishman, Rod K

    2011-09-01

    The present study examined the effect of acute exercise on flow mediated dilation (FMD) and reactivity to neurovascular challenges among female smokers and nonsmokers. FMD was determined by arterial diameter, velocity, and blood flow measured by Doppler ultrasonography after forearm occlusion. Those measures and blood pressure and heart rate were also assessed in response to forehead cold and the Stroop Color-Word Conflict Test (CWT) before and after 30 min of rest or an acute bout of cycling exercise (∼50% VO₂ peak). Baseline FMD and stress responses were not different between smokers and nonsmokers. Compared to passive rest, exercise increased FMD and decreased arterial velocity and blood flow responses during the Stroop CWT and forehead cold in both groups. Overall, acute exercise improved endothelial function among smokers and nonsmokers despite increasing vascular resistance and reducing limb blood flow during neurovascular stress. PMID:21457274

  18. Resistance exercise as a countermeasure to disuse-induced bone loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, L. C.; LeBlanc, A. D.; Driscoll, T. B.; Evans, H. J.; Rianon, N. J.; Smith, S. M.; Spector, E.; Feeback, D. L.; Lai, D.

    2004-01-01

    During spaceflight, skeletal unloading results in loss of bone mineral density (BMD). This occurs primarily in the spine and lower body regions. This loss of skeletal mass could prove hazardous to astronauts on flights of long duration. In this study, intense resistance exercise was used to test whether a training regimen would prevent the loss of BMD that accompanies disuse. Nine subjects (5 men, 4 women) participated in a supine maximal resistance exercise training program during 17 wk of horizontal bed rest. These subjects were compared with 18 control subjects (13 men, 5 women) who followed the same bed rest protocol without exercise. Determination of treatment effect was based on measures of BMD, bone metabolism markers, and calcium balance obtained before, during, and after bed rest. Exercisers and controls had significantly (P < 0.05) different means, represented by the respective following percent changes: lumbar spine BMD, +3% vs. -1%; total hip BMD, +1% vs. -3%; calcaneus BMD, +1% vs. -9%; pelvis BMD, -0.5% vs. -3%; total body BMD, 0% vs. -1%; bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, +64% vs. 0%; alkaline phosphatase, +31% vs. +5%; osteocalcin, +43% vs. +10%; 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D, +12% vs. -15%; parathyroid hormone intact molecule, +18% vs. -25%; and serum and ionized calcium, -1% vs. +1%. The difference in net calcium balance was also significant (+21 mg/day vs. -199 mg/day, exercise vs. control). The gastrocnemius and soleus muscle volumes decreased significantly in the exercise group, but the loss was significantly less than observed in the control group. The results indicate that resistance exercise had a positive treatment effect and thus might be useful as a countermeasure to prevent the deleterious skeletal changes associated with long-duration spaceflight.

  19. Resistance exercise as a countermeasure to disuse-induced bone loss.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, L C; LeBlanc, A D; Driscoll, T B; Evans, H J; Rianon, N J; Smith, S M; Spector, E; Feeback, D L; Lai, D

    2004-07-01

    During spaceflight, skeletal unloading results in loss of bone mineral density (BMD). This occurs primarily in the spine and lower body regions. This loss of skeletal mass could prove hazardous to astronauts on flights of long duration. In this study, intense resistance exercise was used to test whether a training regimen would prevent the loss of BMD that accompanies disuse. Nine subjects (5 men, 4 women) participated in a supine maximal resistance exercise training program during 17 wk of horizontal bed rest. These subjects were compared with 18 control subjects (13 men, 5 women) who followed the same bed rest protocol without exercise. Determination of treatment effect was based on measures of BMD, bone metabolism markers, and calcium balance obtained before, during, and after bed rest. Exercisers and controls had significantly (P < 0.05) different means, represented by the respective following percent changes: lumbar spine BMD, +3% vs. -1%; total hip BMD, +1% vs. -3%; calcaneus BMD, +1% vs. -9%; pelvis BMD, -0.5% vs. -3%; total body BMD, 0% vs. -1%; bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, +64% vs. 0%; alkaline phosphatase, +31% vs. +5%; osteocalcin, +43% vs. +10%; 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D, +12% vs. -15%; parathyroid hormone intact molecule, +18% vs. -25%; and serum and ionized calcium, -1% vs. +1%. The difference in net calcium balance was also significant (+21 mg/day vs. -199 mg/day, exercise vs. control). The gastrocnemius and soleus muscle volumes decreased significantly in the exercise group, but the loss was significantly less than observed in the control group. The results indicate that resistance exercise had a positive treatment effect and thus might be useful as a countermeasure to prevent the deleterious skeletal changes associated with long-duration spaceflight. PMID:15220316

  20. Development of a High Fidelity Dynamic Module of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Using Adams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, B. T.; Thompson, W. K.; Lewandowski, B. E.; Cadwell, E. E.; Newby, N. J.; Fincke, R. S.; Sheehan, C.; Mulugeta, L.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) implements well-vetted computational models to predict and assess spaceflight health and performance risks, and enhance countermeasure development. DAP provides expertise and computation tools to its research customers for model development, integration, or analysis. DAP is currently supporting the NASA Exercise Physiology and Countermeasures (ExPC) project by integrating their biomechanical models of specific exercise movements with dynamic models of the devices on which the exercises were performed. This presentation focuses on the development of a high fidelity dynamic module of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) on board the ISS. The ARED module, illustrated in the figure below, was developed using the Adams (MSC Santa Ana, California) simulation package. The Adams package provides the capabilities to perform multi rigid body, flexible body, and mixed dynamic analyses of complex mechanisms. These capabilities were applied to accurately simulate: Inertial and mass properties of the device such as the vibration isolation system (VIS) effects and other ARED components, Non-linear joint friction effects, The gas law dynamics of the vacuum cylinders and VIS components using custom written differential state equations, The ARED flywheel dynamics, including torque limiting clutch. Design data from the JSC ARED Engineering team was utilized in developing the model. This included solid modeling geometry files, component/system specifications, engineering reports and available data sets. The Adams ARED module is importable into LifeMOD (Life Modeler, Inc., San Clemente, CA) for biomechanical analyses of different resistive exercises such as squat and dead-lift. Using motion capture data from ground test subjects, the ExPC developed biomechanical exercise models in LifeMOD. The Adams ARED device module was then integrated with the exercise subject model into one integrated dynamic model. This presentation will describe the

  1. Resistance training exercise program for intervention to enhance gait function in elderly chronically ill patients: multivariate multiscale entropy for center of pressure signal analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Shu; Jiang, Bernard C

    2014-01-01

    Falls are unpredictable accidents, and the resulting injuries can be serious in the elderly, particularly those with chronic diseases. Regular exercise is recommended to prevent and treat hypertension and other chronic diseases by reducing clinical blood pressure. The "complexity index" (CI), based on multiscale entropy (MSE) algorithm, has been applied in recent studies to show a person's adaptability to intrinsic and external perturbations and widely used measure of postural sway or stability. The multivariate multiscale entropy (MMSE) was advanced algorithm used to calculate the complexity index (CI) values of the center of pressure (COP) data. In this study, we applied the MSE & MMSE to analyze gait function of 24 elderly, chronically ill patients (44% female; 56% male; mean age, 67.56 ± 10.70 years) with either cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, or osteoporosis. After a 12-week training program, postural stability measurements showed significant improvements. Our results showed beneficial effects of resistance training, which can be used to improve postural stability in the elderly and indicated that MMSE algorithms to calculate CI of the COP data were superior to the multiscale entropy (MSE) algorithm to identify the sense of balance in the elderly. PMID:25295070

  2. Resistance Training Exercise Program for Intervention to Enhance Gait Function in Elderly Chronically Ill Patients: Multivariate Multiscale Entropy for Center of Pressure Signal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bernard C.

    2014-01-01

    Falls are unpredictable accidents, and the resulting injuries can be serious in the elderly, particularly those with chronic diseases. Regular exercise is recommended to prevent and treat hypertension and other chronic diseases by reducing clinical blood pressure. The “complexity index” (CI), based on multiscale entropy (MSE) algorithm, has been applied in recent studies to show a person's adaptability to intrinsic and external perturbations and widely used measure of postural sway or stability. The multivariate multiscale entropy (MMSE) was advanced algorithm used to calculate the complexity index (CI) values of the center of pressure (COP) data. In this study, we applied the MSE & MMSE to analyze gait function of 24 elderly, chronically ill patients (44% female; 56% male; mean age, 67.56 ± 10.70 years) with either cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, or osteoporosis. After a 12-week training program, postural stability measurements showed significant improvements. Our results showed beneficial effects of resistance training, which can be used to improve postural stability in the elderly and indicated that MMSE algorithms to calculate CI of the COP data were superior to the multiscale entropy (MSE) algorithm to identify the sense of balance in the elderly. PMID:25295070

  3. Creatine Kinase Activity Weakly Correlates to Volume Completed Following Upper Body Resistance Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado, Marco; Willardson, Jeffrey M.; Silva, Dailson P.; Frigulha, Italo C.; Koch, Alexander J.; Souza, Sergio C.

    2012-01-01

    In the current study, we examined the relationship between serum creatine kinase (CK) activity following upper body resistance exercise with a 1- or 3-min rest between sets. Twenty men performed two sessions, each consisting of four sets with a 10-repetition maximum load. The results demonstrated significantly greater volume for the 3-min…

  4. Predicting Aerobic versus Resistance Exercise Using the Theory of Planned Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Angela D.; Rocheleau, Courtney A.

    2002-01-01

    Tested the theory of planned behavior (TPB) in aerobic versus resistance training, investigating relationships between TPB variables, extroversion, and perceived health among college students who completed initial and follow-up measurements and provided reasons for exercise. TPB variables, extroversion, and perceived health collectively accounted…

  5. Sex differences in the response to resistance exercise training in older people.

    PubMed

    Da Boit, Mariasole; Sibson, Rachael; Meakin, Judith R; Aspden, Richard M; Thies, Frank; Mangoni, Arduino A; Gray, Stuart Robert

    2016-06-01

    Resistance exercise training is known to be effective in increasing muscle mass in older people. Acute measurement of protein metabolism data has indicated that the magnitude of response may differ between sexes. We compared adaptive responses in muscle mass and function to 18 weeks resistance exercise training in a cohort of older (>65 years) men and women. Resistance exercise training improved knee extensor maximal torque, 4 m walk time, time to complete five chair rises, muscle anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA) and muscle quality with no effect on muscle fat/water ratio or plasma glucose, insulin, triacylglycerol, IL-6, and TNF-α Differences between sexes were observed for knee extensor maximal torque and muscle quality with greater increases observed in men versus women (P < 0.05). Maximal torque increased by 15.8 ± 10.6% in women and 41.7 ± 25.5% in men, whereas muscle quality increased by 8.8 ± 17.5% in women and by 33.7 ± 25.6% in men. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated a difference in the magnitude of adaptation, of some of the outcome measures employed, in response to 18 weeks of resistance exercise training between men and women. The mechanisms underlying this observation remain to be established. PMID:27354538

  6. Mechanism Development, Testing, and Lessons Learned for the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamoreaux, Christopher D.; Landeck, Mark E.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) has been developed at NASA Johnson Space Center, for the International Space Station (ISS) program. ARED is a multi-exercise, high-load resistive exercise device, designed for long duration, human space missions. ARED will enable astronauts to effectively maintain their muscle strength and bone mass in the micro-gravity environment more effectively than any other existing devices. ARED's resistance is provided via two, 20.3 cm (8 in) diameter vacuum cylinders, which provide a nearly constant resistance source. ARED also has a means to simulate the inertia that is felt during a 1-G exercise routine via the flywheel subassembly, which is directly tied to the motion of the ARED cylinders. ARED is scheduled to fly on flight ULF 2 to the ISS and will be located in Node 1. Presently, ARED is in the middle of its qualification and acceptance test program. An extensive testing program and engineering evaluation has increased the reliability of ARED by bringing potential design issues to light before flight production. Some of those design issues, resolutions, and design details will be discussed in this paper.

  7. The development and validation of using inertial sensors to monitor postural change in resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Gleadhill, Sam; Lee, James Bruce; James, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    This research presented and validated a method of assessing postural changes during resistance exercise using inertial sensors. A simple lifting task was broken down to a series of well-defined tasks, which could be examined and measured in a controlled environment. The purpose of this research was to determine whether timing measures obtained from inertial sensor accelerometer outputs are able to provide accurate, quantifiable information of resistance exercise movement patterns. The aim was to complete a timing measure validation of inertial sensor outputs. Eleven participants completed five repetitions of 15 different deadlift variations. Participants were monitored with inertial sensors and an infrared three dimensional motion capture system. Validation was undertaken using a Will Hopkins Typical Error of the Estimate, with a Pearson׳s correlation and a Bland Altman Limits of Agreement analysis. Statistical validation measured the timing agreement during deadlifts, from inertial sensor outputs and the motion capture system. Timing validation results demonstrated a Pearson׳s correlation of 0.9997, with trivial standardised error (0.026) and standardised bias (0.002). Inertial sensors can now be used in practical settings with as much confidence as motion capture systems, for accelerometer timing measurements of resistance exercise. This research provides foundations for inertial sensors to be applied for qualitative activity recognition of resistance exercise and safe lifting practices. PMID:27038542

  8. Effects of Resistance Exercise Applied Early After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ximenes, Nayana Nazaré Pessoa Sousa; Borges, Daniel Lago; Lima, Reijane Oliveira; Silva, Mayara Gabrielle Barbosa e; da Silva, Luan Nascimento; Costa, Marina de Albuquerque Gonçalves; Baldez, Thiago Eduardo Pereira; Nina, Vinícius José da Silva

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise applied early after coronary artery bypass grafting. METHODS It is a randomized controlled trial with 34 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting between August 2013 and May 2014. Patients were randomized into two groups by simple draw: a control group (n=17), who received conventional physical therapy and an intervention group (n=17), who received, additionally, resistance exercise. Pulmonary function and functional capacity were evaluated in preoperative period and hospital discharge by spirometry and the six-minute walk test. For statistical analysis, we used the following tests: Shapiro-Wilk, Mann-Whitney, Student's t and Fisher's exact. Variables with P<0.05 were considered significant. RESULTS Groups were homogeneous in terms of demographic, clinical and surgical variables. Resistance exercise exerted no effect on pulmonary function of intervention group compared to control group. However, intervention group maintained functional capacity at hospital discharge measured by percentage of predict distance in 6MWT (54.122.7% vs. 52.515.5%, P=0.42), while control group had a significant decrease (59.211.1% vs. 50.69.9%, P<0.016). CONCLUSION Our results indicate that resistance exercise, applied early, may promote maintenance of functional capacity on coronary artery bypass grafting patients, having no impact on pulmonary function when compared to conventional physical therapy. PMID:26934401

  9. Interleukin-1 polymorphisms are associated with the inflammatory response in human muscle to acute resistance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Richard A; Trappe, Todd A; Simpson, Pippa; Carroll, Chad; Emma Huang, B; Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan; Bearden, Edward; Gurley, Cathy; Duff, Gordon W; Evans, William J; Kornman, Kenneth; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2004-01-01

    Inflammation appears to play an important role in the repair and regeneration of skeletal muscle after damage. We tested the hypothesis that the severity of the inflammatory response in muscle after an acute bout of resistance exercise is associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously shown to alter interleukin-1 (IL-1) activity. Using a double-blind prospective design, sedentary young men were screened (n = 100) for enrolment (n = 24) based upon having 1 of 4 haplotype patterns composed of five polymorphic sites in the IL-1 gene cluster: IL-1A (+4845), IL-1B (+3954), IL-1B (−511), IL-1B (−3737) and IL-1RN (+2018). Subjects performed a standard bout of resistance leg exercise and vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained pre-, and at 24, and 72 h post-exercise. Inflammatory marker mRNAs (IL-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)) and the number of CD68+ macrophages were quantified. Considerable variation was observed in the expression of these gene products between subjects. At 72 h post-exercise, IL-1β had increased in a number of subjects (n = 10) and decreased (n = 4) or did not change (n = 10) in others. Inflammatory responses were significantly associated with specific haplotype patterns and were also influenced by individual SNPs. Subjects with genotypes 1.1 at IL-1B (+3954) or 2.2 at IL-1B (−3737) had approximately a 2-fold higher median induction of several markers, but no increase in macrophages, suggesting that cytokine gene expression is elevated per macrophage. The IL-1RN (+2018) SNP maximized the response specifically within these groups and was associated with increased macrophage recruitment. This is the first report that IL-1 genotype is associated with the inflammation of skeletal muscle following acute resistance exercise that may potentially affect the adaptations to chronic resistance exercise. PMID:15331687

  10. Introduction of misoprostol for the treatment of incomplete abortion beyond 12 weeks of pregnancy in Benin.

    PubMed

    Adisso, Sosthène; Hounkpatin, Benjamin I B; Komongui, Gounnou D; Sambieni, Olivier; Perrin, René X

    2014-07-01

    Improving the care of women who have undergone a spontaneous or induced abortion is an important step in reducing abortion-related morbidity and mortality. Both the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) and the World Health Organization recommend the use of manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) and misoprostol rather than sharp curettage to treat incomplete abortion. MVA was introduced into the public healthcare service in Benin in 2006 and since 2008 misoprostol has been available in 3 large maternity hospitals. The present study opted to use an oral dose of 800 μg and not to limit to pregnancies of up to 12 weeks, but to include women with second trimester abortions. After 5 years, results show that around three-quarters of the women treated with misoprostol at 13-18 weeks of pregnancy required MVA to complete uterine evacuation and approximately one-quarter had severe bleeding, confirming that the indication of misoprostol for incomplete abortion should be limited to pregnancies of up to 12 weeks. PMID:24800660

  11. Intake of Novel Red Clover Supplementation for 12 Weeks Improves Bone Status in Healthy Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Thorup, Anne Cathrine; Lambert, Max Norman; Kahr, Henriette Strøm; Bjerre, Mette; Jeppesen, Per Bendix

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effect by which daily consumption of a novel red clover (RC) extract influences bone health, inflammatory status, and cardiovascular health in healthy menopausal women. Design. A 12-week randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial involving 60 menopausal women receiving a daily dose of 150 mL RC extract containing 37.1 mg isoflavones (33.8 mg as aglycones) or placebo. Methods. Bone parameters were changes in bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), and T-score at the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Bone turnover (CTx) and inflammatory markers were measured in plasma and finally blood pressure (BP) was evaluated. Results. RC extract had positive effect on bone health, and only the women receiving the placebo experienced a decline in BMD (p < 0.01) at the lumbar spine. T-score at the lumbar spine only decreased in the placebo group (p < 0.01). CTx decreased in the RC group with −9.94 (±4.93)%, although not significant. Conclusion. Daily consumption of RC extract over a 12-week period was found to have a beneficial effect on bone health in menopausal women based on BMD and T-score at the lumbar spine and plasma CTx levels. No changes in BP or inflammation markers were found and no side effects were observed. PMID:26265926

  12. ISS Squat and Deadlift Kinematics on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, N.; Caldwell, E.; Sibonga, J.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2014-01-01

    Visual assessment of exercise form on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) on orbit is difficult due to the motion of the entire device on its Vibration Isolation System (VIS). The VIS allows for two degrees of device translational motion, and one degree of rotational motion. In order to minimize the forces that the VIS must damp in these planes of motion, the floor of the ARED moves as well during exercise to reduce changes in the center of mass of the system. To help trainers and other exercise personnel better assess squat and deadlift form a tool was developed that removes the VIS motion and creates a stick figure video of the exerciser. Another goal of the study was to determine whether any useful kinematic information could be obtained from just a single camera. Finally, the use of these data may aid in the interpretation of QCT hip structure data in response to ARED exercises performed in-flight. After obtaining informed consent, four International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers participated in this investigation. Exercise was videotaped using a single camera positioned to view the side of the crewmember during exercise on the ARED. One crewmember wore reflective tape on the toe, heel, ankle, knee, hip, and shoulder joints. This technique was not available for the other three crewmembers, so joint locations were assessed and digitized frame-by-frame by lab personnel. A custom Matlab program was used to assign two-dimensional coordinates to the joint locations throughout exercise. A second custom Matlab program was used to scale the data, calculate joint angles, estimate the foot center of pressure (COP), approximate normal and shear loads, and to create the VIS motion-corrected stick figure videos. Kinematics for the squat and deadlift vary considerably for the four crewmembers in this investigation. Some have very shallow knee and hip angles, and others have quite large ranges of motion at these joints. Joint angle analysis showed that crewmembers

  13. Hemorheological responses to progressive resistance exercise training in healthy young males

    PubMed Central

    Kilic-Toprak, Emine; Ardic, Fusun; Erken, Gulten; Unver-Kocak, Fatma; Kucukatay, Vural; Bor-Kucukatay, Melek

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background This study aimed to explore the effects of progressive resistance exercise training (PRET) on hemorheology. Material/Methods Exercise sessions included 1–3 sets of 8–12 repetitions at 40–60% of 1-repetition maximum (1-RM) for 3 weeks and at 75–80% of 1-RM during weeks 4–12. Red blood cell (RBC) deformability and aggregation were determined by ektacytometry, plasma and whole blood viscosities (WBV) by rotational viscometry. Lactate concentration was evaluated by an analyzer and fibrinogen was evaluated by coagulometry. Plasma total oxidant/antioxidant status was measured by colorimetry. Results Following an acute increase after exercise on the first day, RBC deformability was elevated during weeks 3 and 4 (p=0.028; p=0.034, respectively). The last exercise protocol applied in week 12 again caused an acute increase in this parameter (p=0.034). RBC aggregation was increased acutely on the first day, but decreased after that throughout the protocol (p<0.05). At weeks 4 and 12 pre-exercise measurements of WBV at standard hematocrit and plasma viscosity were decreased (p=0.05; p=0.041, respectively), while post-exercise values were increased (p=0.005; p=0.04, respectively). Post-exercise WBV at autologous hematocrit measured at week 12 was increased (p=0.01). Lactate was elevated after each exercise session (p<0.05). Fibrinogen was decreased on the third week (p<0.01), while it was increased on the 4th week (p=0.005). Plasma antioxidant status was increased at week 3 (p=0.034) and oxidative stress index was decreased at week 4 (p=0.013) after exercise. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that PRET may have positive effects on hemorheological parameters. PMID:22648250

  14. Health markers in obese adolescents improved by a 12-week recreational soccer program: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Vasconcellos, Fabrício; Seabra, Andre; Cunha, Felipe; Montenegro, Rafael; Penha, Jociene; Bouskela, Eliete; Nogueira Neto, José Firmino; Collett-Solberg, Paulo; Farinatti, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    The effects of a recreational soccer program (RSP) upon body composition, heart rate variability (HRV), biochemical markers, cardio-respiratory fitness, and endothelial function in obese adolescents were investigated. A randomised controlled clinical trial was conducted with 30 adolescents aged 12-17 years and body mass index (BMI) >2 standard deviations of WHO reference values, which were assigned to RSP (n = 10, 2 girls) and obese control (n = 10, 4 girls) groups. The 12-week RSP included 60-min sessions performed 3 times/week. BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, blood glucose, lipid profile, insulin, C-reactive protein, HRV, and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2peak) were evaluated following standardised procedures. Body composition was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and endothelial function by venous occlusion plethysmography. After intervention, RSP exhibited significant reductions in BMI (-0.7 ± 0.2 kg · m(-2)), waist circumference (-8.2 ± 1.4 cm), %body fat (-2.2 ± 0.4%), systolic blood pressure (-5.0 ± 2.3 mmHg), total cholesterol (-16.2 ± 5.8 mg · dL(-1)), triglycerides (-20.5 ± 12.9 mg · dL(-1)), C-reactive protein (-0.06 ± 0.01 mg · dL(-1)), insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, -1.4 ± 0.6), and sympathetic activity (LF, -13.9 ± 6.6 un) vs. controls (P < 0.05). Significant increase was observed in parasympathetic activity (HF, 13.9 ± 6.6 un), VO2peak (7.9 ± 2.8 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (11.0 ± 6.3 mg · dL(-1)) (P < 0.05). Vascular conductance (19.5 ± 8.1 ml · min(-1) · 100 ml, P = 0.005) increased and vascular resistance (-5.9 ± 2.4 ml · min(-1) · 100 ml, P = 0.041) decreased in RSP, but not in controls. A 12-week recreational soccer intervention was effective to improve biochemical, cardiovascular, and fitness health markers in obese adolescents. PMID:26208409

  15. Inhibition of Myostatin Signaling through Notch Activation following Acute Resistance Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Mark; Patton, Amy; Baar, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Myostatin is a TGFβ family member and negative regulator of muscle size. Due to the complexity of the molecular pathway between myostatin mRNA/protein and changes in transcription, it has been difficult to understand whether myostatin plays a role in resistance exercise-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy. To circumvent this problem, we determined the expression of a unique myostatin target gene, Mighty, following resistance exercise. Mighty mRNA increased by 6 h (82.9±24.21%) and remained high out to 48 h (56.5±19.67%) after resistance exercise. Further examination of the soleus, plantaris and tibialis anterior muscles showed that the change in Mighty mRNA at 6 h correlated with the increase in muscle size associated with this protocol (R2 = 0.9996). The increase in Mighty mRNA occurred both independent of Smad2 phosphorylation and in spite of an increase in myostatin mRNA (341.8±147.14% at 3 h). The myostatin inhibitor SKI remained unchanged. However, activated Notch, another potential inhibitor of TGFβ signaling, increased immediately following resistance exercise (83±11.2%) and stayed elevated out to 6 h (78±16.6%). Electroportion of the Notch intracellular domain into the tibialis anterior resulted in an increase in Mighty mRNA (63±13.4%) that was equivalent to the canonical Notch target HES-1 (94.4±7.32%). These data suggest that acute resistance exercise decreases myostatin signaling through the activation of the TGFβ inhibitor Notch resulting in a decrease in myostatin transcriptional activity that correlates well with muscle hypertrophy. PMID:23844238

  16. Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Flight Software (FSW): A Unique Approach to Exercise in Long Duration Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangieri, Mark

    2005-01-01

    ARED flight instrumentation software is associated with an overall custom designed resistive exercise system that will be deployed on the International Space Station (ISS). This innovative software application fuses together many diverse and new technologies into a robust and usable package. The software takes advantage of touchscreen user interface technology by providing a graphical user interface on a Windows based tablet PC, meeting a design constraint of keyboard-less interaction with flight crewmembers. The software interacts with modified commercial data acquisition (DAQ) hardware to acquire multiple channels of sensor measurment from the ARED device. This information is recorded on the tablet PC and made available, via International Space Station (ISS) Wireless LAN (WLAN) and telemetry subsystems, to ground based mission medics and trainers for analysis. The software includes a feature to accept electronically encoded prescriptions of exercises that guide crewmembers through a customized regimen of resistive weight training, based on personal analysis. These electronically encoded prescriptions are provided to the crew via ISS WLAN and telemetry subsystems. All personal data is securely associated with an individual crew member, based on a PIN ID mechanism.

  17. Acute Cardiovascular Response during Resistance Exercise with Whole-body Vibration in Sedentary Subjects: A Randomized Cross-over Trial.

    PubMed

    Dias, Thaisa; Polito, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the acute cardiovascular responses during and after resistance exercise with and without whole-body vibration. Nineteen sedentary adults randomly performed one session of isometric squats without vibration and the same exercise with vibration. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) were measured. SBP, DBP and HR were also measured for 20 min after the sessions. The exercise with vibration demonstrated significant values ​​(P < 0.05) for SBP (second to sixth sets), DBP (third to sixth sets) and SVR (second to sixth sets) compared with the exercise without vibration. After the sessions, the values ​​of SBP for both exercises were significantly lower than the respective resting values; with no difference between the sessions. In conclusion, exercise with vibration caused increases in SBP, DBP and SVR compared with exercise with no vibration in sedentary adults. PMID:26031551

  18. Tracking Connections: An Exercise about Series and Parallel Resistances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankovic, Srdjan

    2010-01-01

    Unlike many other topics in basic physics, series and parallel resistances are rarely noticed in the real life of an ordinary individual, making it difficult to design a laboratory activity that can simulate something familiar. The activities described here entail minimal costs and are based on a puzzle-like game of tracking wire connections. A…

  19. Results of the International Space Station Interim Resistance Exercise Device Man-in-the-Loop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. D., Jr.; Amonette, W. E.; Bentley, J. R.; Rapley, M. G.; Blazine, K. L.; Loehr, J. A.; Collier, K. R.; Boettcher, C. R.; Skrocki, J. S.; Hohrnann, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Interim Resistance Exercise Device (iRED), developed for the International Space Station (ISS), was evaluated using human subjects for a Man-In-The-Loop Test (MILT). Thirty-two human subjects exercised using the iRED in a test that was conducted over a 63-working-day period. The subjects performed the same exercises will be used on board ISS, and the iRED operating constraints that are to be used on ISS were followed. In addition, eight of the subjects were astronauts who volunteered to be in the evaluation in order to become familiar with the iRED and provide a critique of the device. The MILT was scheduled to last for 57,000 exercise repetitions on the iRED. This number of repetitions was agreed to as a number typical of that expected during a 3-person, 17-week ISS Increment. One of the canisters of the iRED failed at the 49,683- repetition mark (87.1% of targeted goal). The remaining canister was operated using the plan for operations if one canister fails during flight (contingency operations). This canister remained functional past the 57,000-repetition mark. This report details the results of the iRED MILT, and lists specific recommendations regarding both operation of the iRED and future resistance exercise device development.

  20. The resistive and elastic work of breathing during exercise in patients with chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Troy J.; Sabapathy, Surendan; Beck, Kenneth C.; Morris, Norman R.; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) display numerous derangements in ventilatory function, which together serve to increase the work of breathing (Wb) during exercise. However, the extent to which the resistive and elastic properties of the respiratory system contribute to the higher Wb in these patients is unknown. We quantified the resistive and elastic Wb in patients with stable HF (n=9; New York Heart Association functional class I–II) and healthy control subjects (n=9) at standardised levels of minute ventilation (V′E) during graded exercise. Dynamic lung compliance was systematically lower for a given level of V′E in HF patients than controls (p<0.05). HF patients displayed slightly higher levels of inspiratory elastic Wb with greater amounts of ventilatory constraint and resistive Wb than control subjects during exercise (p<0.05). Our data indicates that the higher Wb in HF patients is primarily due to a greater resistive, rather than elastic, load to breathing. The greater resistive Wb in these patients probably reflects an increased hysteresivity of the airways and lung tissues. The marginally higher inspiratory elastic Wb observed in HF patients appears related to a combined decrease in the compliances of the lungs and chest wall. The clinical and physiological implications of our findings are discussed. PMID:22034652

  1. Age-related anabolic resistance after endurance-type exercise in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Durham, William J.; Casperson, Shanon L.; Dillon, Edgar L.; Keske, Michelle A.; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Sanford, Arthur P.; Hickner, Robert C.; Grady, James J.; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda

    2010-01-01

    Age-related skeletal muscle loss is thought to stem from suboptimal nutrition and resistance to anabolic stimuli. Impaired microcirculatory (nutritive) blood flow may contribute to anabolic resistance by reducing delivery of amino acids to skeletal muscle. In this study, we employed contrast-enhanced ultrasound, microdialysis sampling of skeletal muscle interstitium, and stable isotope methodology, to assess hemodynamic and metabolic responses of older individuals to endurance type (walking) exercise during controlled amino acid provision. We hypothesized that older individuals would exhibit reduced microcirculatory blood flow, interstitial amino acid concentrations, and amino acid transport when compared with younger controls. We report for the first time that aging induces anabolic resistance following endurance exercise, manifested as reduced (by ∼40%) efficiency of muscle protein synthesis. Despite lower (by ∼40–45%) microcirculatory flow in the older than in the younger participants, circulating and interstitial amino acid concentrations and phenylalanine transport into skeletal muscle were all equal or higher in older individuals than in the young, comprehensively refuting our hypothesis that amino acid availability limits postexercise anabolism in older individuals. Our data point to alternative mediators of age-related anabolic resistance and importantly suggest correction of these impairments may reduce requirements for, and increase the efficacy of, dietary protein in older individuals. Durham, W. J., Casperson, S. L., Dillon, E. L., Keske, M. A., Paddon-Jones, D., Sanford, A. P., Hickner, R. C., Grady, J. J., Sheffield-Moore, M. Age-related anabolic resistance after endurance-type exercise in healthy humans. PMID:20547663

  2. Palm Cooling and Heating Delays Fatigue During Resistance Exercise in Women.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young S; Robergs, Robert A; Mermier, Christine M; Schneider, Suzanne M; Gurney, Alfred B

    2015-08-01

    We previously reported that cold application to the palms between sets of high-intensity bench press exercise produces an ergogenic effect in men. In this study, we hypothesized that palm cooling (PC) or heating during rest intervals between high-intensity weight training sets will increase total repetitions and exercise volume load (kilograms) in resistance trained female subjects in a thermoneutral (TN) environment. Eight female subjects (mean ± SD, age = 25 ± 6 years, height = 160 ± 6 cm, body mass = 56 ± 7 kg, 1-repetition maximum [1RM] = 52 ± 6 kg, weight training experience = 6 ± 2 years) completed 4 sets of 85% 1RM bench press exercise to failure, with 3-minute rest intervals. Exercise trials were performed in a counterbalanced order on 3 days, separated by at least 3 days in TN, Palm heating (PH), and PC conditions. Heating and cooling were applied by placing both hands in a hand cooling device with the hand plate set to 45° C for heating and 10° C for cooling. Data were analyzed using a 2-factor repeated-measures analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc tests. Palm cooling repetitions were significantly higher than TN repetitions during the second set, and PH repetitions were significantly higher than those of TN during the fourth set. Total exercise volume load (kilograms) for both PC (1,387 ± 358) and PH (1,349 ± 267) were significantly higher than TN (1,187 ± 262). In women, both heating and cooling of the palms between sets of resistance exercise increased the total exercise volume load performed. This ergogenic response to a peripheral sensory input is consistent with the central governor theory of muscular fatigue. PMID:23722108

  3. Endurance training improves the resistance of rat diaphragm to exercise-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Oh-ishi, S; Kizaki, T; Ookawara, T; Sakurai, T; Izawa, T; Nagata, N; Ohno, H

    1997-11-01

    The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that endurance training improves the ability of the diaphragm muscle to resist exercise-induced oxidative stress. Twenty-eight male Wistar rats were assigned to either untrained or trained groups. Trained rats were treadmill-trained for 9 wk. Each group was subdivided into acutely exercised or nonexercised groups. Diaphragm muscle from each rat was analyzed to determine the levels of certain antioxidant enzymes: Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD), glutathione peroxidase, and catalase. In addition, interleukin-1 and myeloperoxidase levels were determined. Endurance training upregulated all of the antioxidant enzymes. Conversely, acute exercise increased glutathione peroxidase and catalase in untrained rats, while it had no overt effect on any antioxidant enzymes in trained rats. Both Mn-SOD and Cu,Zn-SOD contents and activities were increased with endurance training. However, the mRNA expressions of both forms of SOD did not show any significant change with endurance training. Acute exercise also increased the levels of interleukin-1 and myeloperoxidase in untrained rats but not in trained rats. Moreover, acute exercise significantly increased the ability of neutrophils to produce superoxide, especially in untrained rats. The results from this study demonstrate that endurance training can upregulate certain antioxidant enzyme activities in rat diaphragm muscle, indicating the potential for improvement of the resistance to intracellular reactive oxygen species. The results of this study also suggest that acute exercise may cause oxidative damage in rat diaphragm through the activation of the inflammatory pathway and that endurance training may minimize such an extracellular oxidative stress by acute exercise. PMID:9372679

  4. Muscle Adaptations Following Short-Duration Bed Rest with Integrated Resistance, Interval, and Aerobic Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackney, Kyle J.; Scott, Jessica M.; Buxton, Roxanne; Redd-Goetchius, Elizabeth; Crowell, J. Brent; Everett, Meghan E.; Wickwire, Jason; Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2011-01-01

    Unloading of the musculoskeletal system during space flight results in deconditioning that may impair mission-related task performance in astronauts. Exercise countermeasures have been frequently tested during bed rest (BR) and limb suspension; however, high-intensity, short-duration exercise prescriptions have not been fully explored. PURPOSE: To determine if a high intensity resistance, interval, and aerobic exercise program could protect against muscle atrophy and dysfunction when performed during short duration BR. METHODS: Nine subjects (1 female, 8 male) performed a combination of supine exercises during 2 weeks of horizontal BR. Resistance exercise (3 d / wk) consisted of squat, leg press, hamstring curl, and heel raise exercises (3 sets, 12 repetitions). Aerobic (6 d / wk) sessions alternated continuous (75% VO2 peak) and interval exercise (30 s, 2 min, and 4 min) and were completed on a supine cycle ergometer and vertical treadmill, respectively. Muscle volumes of the upper leg were calculated pre, mid, and post-BR using magnetic resonance imaging. Maximal isometric force (MIF), rate of force development (RFD), and peak power of the lower body extensors were measured twice before BR (averaged to represent pre) and once post BR. ANOVA with repeated measures and a priori planned contrasts were used to test for differences. RESULTS: There were no changes to quadriceps, hamstring, and adductor muscle volumes at mid and post BR time points compared to pre BR (Table 1). Peak power increased significantly from 1614 +/- 372 W to 1739 +/- 359 W post BR (+7.7%, p = 0.035). Neither MIF (pre: 1676 +/- 320 N vs. post: 1711 +/- 250 N, +2.1%, p = 0.333) nor RFD (pre: 7534 +/- 1265 N/ms vs. post: 6951 +/- 1241 N/ms, -7.7%, p = 0.136) were significantly impaired post BR.

  5. Salivary hormone and immune responses to three resistance exercise schemes in elite female athletes.

    PubMed

    Nunes, João A; Crewther, Blair T; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Tricoli, Valmor; Viveiros, Luís; de Rose, Dante; Aoki, Marcelo S

    2011-08-01

    This study examined the salivary hormone and immune responses of elite female athletes to 3 different resistance exercise schemes. Fourteen female basketball players each performed an endurance scheme (ES-4 sets of 12 reps, 60% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM) load, 1-minute rest periods), a strength-hypertrophy scheme (SHS-1 set of 5RM, 1 set of 4RM, 1 set of 3RM, 1 set of 2RM, and 1set of 1RM with 3-minute rest periods, followed by 3 sets of 10RM with 2-minute rest periods) and a power scheme (PS-3 sets of 10 reps, 50% 1RM load, 3-minute rest periods) using the same exercises (bench press, squat, and biceps curl). Saliva samples were collected at 07:30 hours, pre-exercise (Pre) at 09:30 hours, postexercise (Post), and at 17:30 hours. Matching samples were also taken on a nonexercising control day. The samples were analyzed for testosterone, cortisol (C), and immunoglobulin A concentrations. The total volume of load lifted differed among the 3 schemes (SHS > ES > PS, p < 0.05). Postexercise C concentrations increased after all schemes, compared to control values (p < 0.05). In the SHS, the postexercise C response was also greater than pre-exercise data (p < 0.05). The current findings confirm that high-volume resistance exercise schemes can stimulate greater C secretion because of higher metabolic demand. In terms of practical applications, acute changes in C may be used to evaluate the metabolic demands of different resistance exercise schemes, or as a tool for monitoring training strain. PMID:21572351

  6. Effect of Training Status on Oxygen Consumption in Women After Resistance Exercise.

    PubMed

    Benton, Melissa J; Waggener, Green T; Swan, Pamela D

    2016-03-01

    This study compared acute postexercise oxygen consumption in 11 trained women (age, 46.5 ± 1.6 years; body mass index [BMI], 28.4 ± 1.7 kg·m(-2) and 11 untrained women (age, 46.5 ± 1.5 years; BMI, 27.5 ± 1.5 kg·m(-2)) after resistance exercise (RE). Resistance exercise consisted of 3 sets of 8 exercises (8-12 repetitions at 50-80% 1 repetition maximum). Oxygen consumption (VO2 ml·min(-1)) was measured before and after (0, 20, 40, 60, 90, and 120 minutes) RE. Immediately after cessation of RE (time 0), oxygen consumption increased in both trained and untrained women and remained significantly above baseline through 60 minutes after exercise (p < 0.01). Total oxygen consumption during recovery was 31.3 L in trained women and 27.4 L in untrained women (p = 0.07). In trained women, total oxygen consumption was strongly related to absolute (kg) lean mass (r = 0.88; p < 0.001), relative (kilogram per square meter) lean mass (r = 0.91; p < 0.001), and duration of exercise (r = 0.68; p ≤ 0.05), but in untrained women, only training volume-load was related to total oxygen consumption (r = 0.67; p ≤ 0.05). In trained women, 86% of the variance in oxygen consumption was explained by lean mass and exercise duration, whereas volume-load explained 45% in untrained women. Our findings suggest that, in women, resistance training increases metabolic activity of lean tissue. Postexercise energy costs of RE are determined by the duration of stimulation provided by RE rather than absolute work (volume-load) performed. This phenomenon may be related to type II muscle fibers and increased protein synthesis. PMID:26907844

  7. Abnormal protein turnover and anabolic resistance to exercise in sarcopenic obesity.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Mats I; Dobson, Justin P; Greene, Nicholas P; Wiggs, Michael P; Shimkus, Kevin L; Wudeck, Elyse V; Davis, Amanda R; Laureano, Marissa L; Fluckey, James D

    2013-10-01

    Obesity may impair protein synthesis rates and cause anabolic resistance to growth factors, hormones, and exercise, ultimately affecting skeletal muscle mass and function. To better understand muscle wasting and anabolic resistance with obesity, we assessed protein 24-h fractional synthesis rates (24-h FSRs) in selected hind-limb muscles of sedentary and resistance-exercised lean and obese Zucker rats. Despite atrophied hind-limb muscles (-28% vs. lean rats), 24-h FSRs of mixed proteins were significantly higher in quadriceps (+18%) and red or white gastrocnemius (+22 or +38%, respectively) of obese animals when compared to lean littermates. Basal synthesis rates of myofibrillar (+8%) and mitochondrial proteins (-1%) in quadriceps were not different between phenotypes, while manufacture of cytosolic proteins (+12%) was moderately elevated in obese cohorts. Western blot analyses revealed a robust activation of p70S6k (+178%) and a lower expression of the endogenous mTOR inhibitor DEPTOR (-28%) in obese rats, collectively suggesting that there is an obesity-induced increase in net protein turnover favoring degradation. Lastly, the protein synthetic response to exercise of mixed (-7%), myofibrillar (+6%), and cytosolic (+7%) quadriceps subfractions was blunted compared to the lean phenotype (+34, +40, and +17%, respectively), indicating a muscle- and subfraction-specific desensitization to the anabolic stimulus of exercise in obese animals. PMID:23804240

  8. TNF-α and TNFR1 responses to recovery therapies following acute resistance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Jeremy R.; Hoffman, Jay R.; Fragala, Maren S.; Jajtner, Adam R.; Gonzalez, Adam M.; Wells, Adam J.; Mangine, Gerald T.; Fukuda, David H.; Stout, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the effect of two commonly used therapeutic modalities (a) neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and (b) cold water immersion (CWI) on circulating tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and monocyte TNF-α receptor (TNFR1) expression following intense acute resistance exercise and subsequent recovery. Thirty (n = 30) resistance trained men (22.5 ± 2.7 y) performed an acute heavy resistance exercise protocol on three consecutive days followed by one of three recovery methods (CON, NMES, and CWI). Circulating TNF-α levels were assayed and TNFR1 expression on CD14+ monocytes was measured by flow cytometry measured PRE, immediately post (IP), 30-min post (30M), 24 h post (24H), and 48 h post (48H) exercise. Circulating TNF-α was elevated at IP (p = 0.001) and 30M (p = 0.005) and decreased at 24H and 48H recovery from IP in CON (p = 0.015) and CWI (p = 0.011). TNF-α did not significantly decrease from IP during recovery in NMES. TNFR1 expression was elevated (p < 0.001) at 30M compared to PRE and all other time points. No significant differences between groups were observed in TNFR1 expression. During recovery (24H, 48H) from muscle damaging exercise, NMES treatment appears to prevent the decline in circulating TNF-α observed during recovery in those receiving no treatment or CWI. PMID:25741287

  9. Effects of systemic hypoxia on human muscular adaptations to resistance exercise training.

    PubMed

    Kon, Michihiro; Ohiwa, Nao; Honda, Akiko; Matsubayashi, Takeo; Ikeda, Tatsuaki; Akimoto, Takayuki; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Hirano, Yuichi; Russell, Aaron P

    2014-06-01

    Hypoxia is an important modulator of endurance exercise-induced oxidative adaptations in skeletal muscle. However, whether hypoxia affects resistance exercise-induced muscle adaptations remains unknown. Here, we determined the effect of resistance exercise training under systemic hypoxia on muscular adaptations known to occur following both resistance and endurance exercise training, including muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), one-repetition maximum (1RM), muscular endurance, and makers of mitochondrial biogenesis and angiogenesis, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), citrate synthase (CS) activity, nitric oxide synthase (NOS), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), and capillary-to-fiber ratio. Sixteen healthy male subjects were randomly assigned to either a normoxic resistance training group (NRT, n = 7) or a hypoxic (14.4% oxygen) resistance training group (HRT, n = 9) and performed 8 weeks of resistance training. Blood and muscle biopsy samples were obtained before and after training. After training muscle CSA of the femoral region, 1RM for bench-press and leg-press, muscular endurance, and skeletal muscle VEGF protein levels significantly increased in both groups. The increase in muscular endurance was significantly higher in the HRT group. Plasma VEGF concentration and skeletal muscle capillary-to-fiber ratio were significantly higher in the HRT group than the NRT group following training. Our results suggest that, in addition to increases in muscle size and strength, HRT may also lead to increased muscular endurance and the promotion of angiogenesis in skeletal muscle. PMID:24907297

  10. Development of the Vibration Isolation System for the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niebuhr, Jason H.; Hagen, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Vibration Isolation System for the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device from conceptual design to lessons learned. Maintaining a micro-g environment on the International Space Station requires that experiment racks and major vibration sources be isolated. The challenge in characterizing exercise loads and testing the system in the presence of gravity led to a decision to qualify the system by analysis. Available data suggests that the system is successful in attenuating loads, yet there has been a major component failure and several procedural issues during its 3 years of operational use.

  11. Resistance Exercise Attenuates High-Fructose, High-Fat-Induced Postprandial Lipemia

    PubMed Central

    Wilburn, Jessie R; Bourquin, Jeffrey; Wysong, Andrea; Melby, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Meals rich in both fructose and fat are commonly consumed by many Americans, especially young men, which can produce a significant postprandial lipemic response. Increasing evidence suggests that aerobic exercise can attenuate the postprandial increase in plasma triacylglycerols (TAGs) in response to a high-fat or a high-fructose meal. However, it is unknown if resistance exercise can dampen the postprandial lipemic response to a meal rich in both fructose and fat. METHODS Eight apparently healthy men (Mean ± SEM; age = 27 ± 2 years) participated in a crossover study to examine the effects of acute resistance exercise on next-day postprandial lipemia resulting from a high-fructose, high-fat meal. Participants completed three separate two-day conditions in a random order: (1) EX-COMP: a full-body weightlifting workout with the provision of additional kilocalories to compensate for the estimated net energy cost of exercise on day 1, followed by the consumption of a high-fructose, high-fat liquid test meal the next morning (day 2) (~600 kcal) and the determination of the plasma glucose, lactate, insulin, and TAG responses during a six-hour postprandial period; (2) EX-DEF: same condition as EX-COMP but without exercise energy compensation on day 1; and (3) CON: no exercise control. RESULTS The six-hour postprandial plasma insulin and lactate responses did not differ between conditions. However, the postprandial plasma TAG concentrations were 16.5% and 24.4% lower for EX-COMP (551.0 ± 80.5 mg/dL × 360 minutes) and EX-DEF (499.4 ± 73.5 mg/dL × 360 minutes), respectively, compared to CON (660.2 ± 95.0 mg/dL × 360 minutes) (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS A single resistance exercise bout, performed ~15 hours prior to a high-fructose, high-fat meal, attenuated the postprandial TAG response, as compared to a no-exercise control condition, in healthy, resistance-trained men. PMID:26508874

  12. Exercise Type Affects Cardiac Vagal Autonomic Recovery After a Resistance Training Session.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Xián; Iglesias-Soler, Eliseo; Fariñas-Rodríguez, Juán; Fernández-Del-Olmo, Miguel; Kingsley, J Derek

    2016-09-01

    Mayo, X, Iglesias-Soler, E, Fariñas-Rodríguez, J, Fernández-del-Olmo, M, and Kingsley, JD. Exercise type affects cardiac vagal autonomic recovery after a resistance training session. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2565-2573, 2016-Resistance training sessions involving different exercises and set configurations may affect the acute cardiovascular recovery pattern. We explored the interaction between exercise type and set configuration on the postexercise cardiovagal withdrawal measured by heart rate variability and their hypotensive effect. Thirteen healthy participants (10 repetitions maximum [RM] bench press: 56 ± 10 kg; parallel squat: 91 ± 13 kg) performed 6 sessions corresponding to 2 exercises (Bench press vs. Parallel squat), 2 set configurations (Failure session vs. Interrepetition rest session), and a Control session of each exercise. Load (10RM), volume (5 sets), and rest (720 seconds) were equated between exercises and set configurations. Parallel squat produced higher reductions in cardiovagal recovery vs. Bench press (p = 0.001). These differences were dependent on the set configuration, with lower values in Parallel squat vs. Bench press for Interrepetition rest session (1.816 ± 0.711 vs. 2.399 ± 0.739 Ln HF/IRR × 10, p = 0.002), but not for Failure session (1.647 ± 0.904 vs. 1.808 ± 0.703 Ln HF/IRR × 10, p > 0.05). Set configuration affected the cardiovagal recovery, with lower values in Failure session in comparison with Interrepetition rest (p = 0.027) and Control session (p = 0.022). Postexercise hypotension was not dependent on the exercise type (p > 0.05) but was dependent on the set configuration, with lower values of systolic (p = 0.004) and diastolic (p = 0.011) blood pressure after the Failure session but not after an Interrepetition rest session in comparison with the Control session (p > 0.05). These results suggest that the exercise type and an Interrepetition rest design could blunt the decrease of cardiac vagal activity after

  13. Similar magnitude of post-exercise hyperglycemia despite manipulating resistance exercise intensity in type 1 diabetes individuals.

    PubMed

    Turner, D; Gray, B J; Luzio, S; Dunseath, G; Bain, S C; Hanley, S; Richards, A; Rhydderch, D C; Ayles, M; Kilduff, L P; Campbell, M D; West, D J; Bracken, R M

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the glycemic and glucoregulatory hormone responses to low- and moderate-intensity morning resistance exercise (RE) sessions in type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Following maximal strength assessments (1RM), eight T1DM (HbA1C :72 ± 12 mmol/mol, age:34 ± 7 years, body mass index:25.7 ± 1.6 kg/m(2) ) participants attended the research facility on two separate occasions, having fasted and taken their usual basal insulin but omitting rapid-acting insulin. Participants performed six exercises for two sets of 20 repetitions at 30%1RM during one session [low-intensity RE session (LOW)] and two sets of 10 repetitions at 60%1RM during another session [moderate-intensity RE session (MOD)], followed by 65-min recovery. Sessions were matched for total mass lifted (kg). Venous blood samples were taken before and after exercise. Data (mean ± SEM) were analyzed using analysis of variance (P ≤ 0.05). There were no hypoglycemic occurrences throughout the study. Blood glucose rose similarly between sessions during exercise (P = 0.382), remaining comparable between sessions throughout recovery (P > 0.05). There was no effect of RE intensity on metabolic acidosis (P > 0.05) or peak growth hormone responses (P = 0.644), but a tendency for greater catecholamine responses under LOW (individualized peak concentrations: adrenaline MOD 0.55 ± 0.13 vs LOW 1.04 ± 0.37 nmol/L, P = 0.155; noradrenaline MOD 4.59 ± 0.86 vs LOW 7.11 ± 1.82 nmol/L, P = 0.082). The magnitude of post-exercise hyperglycemia does not differ between equal volume low and moderate intensity RE sessions performed in the morning. PMID:25919405

  14. Evaluating the Training Effects of Two Swallowing Rehabilitation Therapies Using Surface Electromyography-Chin Tuck Against Resistance (CTAR) Exercise and the Shaker Exercise.

    PubMed

    Sze, Wei Ping; Yoon, Wai Lam; Escoffier, Nicolas; Rickard Liow, Susan J

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the efficacy of two dysphagia interventions, the Chin Tuck against Resistance (CTAR) and Shaker exercises, were evaluated based on two principles in exercise science-muscle-specificity and training intensity. Both exercises were developed to strengthen the suprahyoid muscles, whose contractions facilitate the opening of the upper esophageal sphincter, thereby improving bolus transfer. Thirty-nine healthy adults performed two trials of both exercises in counter-balanced order. Surface electromyography (sEMG) recordings were simultaneously collected from suprahyoid muscle group and sternocleidomastoid muscle during the exercises. Converging results using sEMG amplitude analyses suggested that the CTAR was more specific in targeting the suprahyoid muscles than the Shaker exercise. Fatigue analyses on sEMG signals further indicated that the suprahyoid muscle group were equally or significantly fatigued (depending on metric), when participants carried out CTAR compared to the Shaker exercise. Importantly, unlike during Shaker exercise, the sternocleidomastoid muscles were significantly less activated and fatigued during CTAR. Lowering the chin against resistance is therefore sufficiently specific and intense to fatigue the suprahyoid muscles. PMID:26837612

  15. Efficacy of Olibra: A 12-Week Randomized Controlled Trial and a Review of Earlier Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rebello, Candida J; Martin, Corby K; Johnson, William D; O'Neil, Carol E; Greenway, Frank L

    2012-01-01

    Background Intervention strategies that harness the body's appetite and satiety regulating signals provide a means of countering excessive energy intake. Methods Eighty-two subjects were enrolled (18–60 years, body mass index: 25–40 kg/m2) in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel trial. During a 12-week period, the effects of Olibra™ fat emulsion (2.1 g twice daily) on food intake, appetite, satiety, weight, and body composition were compared with those of a twice daily administered placebo (1.95 g milk fat). On days -7, 0, and 28, Olibra or the placebo added to 200 g of yogurt was served at breakfast and lunch. Food intake, appetite, and satiety were assessed after lunch and dinner. Body weight was measured on days -7, 0, 14, 28, 56, and 84. Body fat, waist circumference, and waist-hip ratio were determined on days 0 and 84. The Eating Inventory was administered at screening and on day 28. Data relating to 71 subjects were analyzed using analysis of covariance. Results At 12 weeks, body weight was reduced in the test group (2.17 ± 0.46 kg standard error of the mean, p < .0001) and the control group (1.68 ± 0.42 kg, p < .0001). Waist circumference decreased by 2.93 ± 0.85 cm in the test group (p = .001) and by 1.78 ± 0.74 cm in the control group (p = .02). Differential weight and waist circumference reductions were not significant. Hunger scores (Eating Inventory) decreased more in the test group (p = .0082). Differential group effects were not significant for body fat, waist-hip ratio, food intake, appetite, and satiety. Conclusions At this dose, Olibra did not exert a consistent effect on food intake, appetite regulation, body weight, or body composition. PMID:22768902

  16. Variable effects of 12 weeks of omega-3 supplementation on resting skeletal muscle metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gerling, Christopher J; Whitfield, Jamie; Mukai, Kazutaka; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2014-09-01

    Omega-3 supplementation has been purported to improve the function of several organs in the body, including reports of increased resting metabolic rate (RMR) and reliance on fat oxidation. However, the potential for omega-3s to modulate human skeletal muscle metabolism has received little attention. This study examined the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation on whole-body RMR and the content of proteins involved in fat metabolism in human skeletal muscle. Recreationally active males supplemented with 3.0 g/day of EPA and DHA (n = 21) or olive oil (n = 9) for 12 weeks. Resting muscle biopsies were sampled in a subset of 10 subjects before (pre) and after (post) omega-3 supplementation. RMR significantly increased (5.3%, p = 0.040) following omega-3 supplementation (Pre, 1.33 ±0.05; Post, 1.40 ±0.04 kcal/min) with variable individual responses. When normalizing for body mass, this effect was lost (5.2%, p = 0.058). Omega-3s did not affect whole-body fat oxidation, and olive oil did not alter any parameter assessed. Omega-3 supplementation did not affect whole muscle, sarcolemmal, or mitochondrial FAT/CD36, FABPpm, FATP1 or FATP4 contents or mitochondrial electron chain and PDH proteins, but did increase the long form of UCP3 by 11%. In conclusion, supplementation with a high dose of omega-3s for 12 weeks increased RMR in a small and variable manner in a group of healthy young men. Omega-3 supplementation also had no effect on several proteins involved in skeletal muscle fat metabolism and did not cause mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25054452

  17. Do 12-Week Yoga Program Influence Respiratory Function of Elderly Women?

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Lídia Aguiar; de Melo, Helton Fabrício; Garay, Ana Paula; Reis, Victor Machado; Aidar, Felipe José; Bodas, Ana Rita; Garrido, Nuno Domingos; de Oliveira, Ricardo Jacó

    2014-01-01

    Aging produces several respiratory limitations and reduces tolerance to physical efforts, sometimes leading to pulmonary diseases in the elderly. The literature draws attention to the possible benefits of Yoga practice among the elderly, presenting evidence for significant improvements in quality of life. It was hypothesized that yoga practice can improve respiratory function in the elderly. The effects of a yoga program on pulmonary volumes and respiratory muscle strength were verified in 36 elderly women divided into a yoga group [YG] (63.1 ± 13.3 years of age) and a control group (61.0 ± 6.9 years of age). Maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressure (MIP and MEP) were assessed by a manovacuometer and tidal volume (VT), vital capacity (VC) and minute ventilation (VE) were measured by a ventilometer. The program comprised 65 min sessions, 3 times/week during 12 weeks. The heart rate and respiratory rate decreased significantly in the YG (76-39 ± 8-03 vs. 74-61±10.26 bpm and 18.61 ± 3.15 vs. 16.72 ± 3.12 resp/min, respectively). In the YG, VT and VE increased significantly (0.55 ± 0.22 vs. 0.64 ± 0.2 ml and 9.19 ± 2.39 vs. 10.05 ± 2.11 ml, respectively), as well as VC (1.48 ± 0.45 vs. 2.03 ± 0.72 ml). Improvements were also found in MIP and MEP in the YG (62.17 ± 14.77 vs. 73.06 ± 20.16 cmH2O and 80.56 ± 23.94 vs. 86.39 ± 20.16 cmH2O, respectively). It was concluded that a 12-week yoga program significantly improves pulmonary function of aged women. PMID:25713658

  18. Clinical pharmacology study of cariprazine (MP-214) in patients with schizophrenia (12-week treatment)

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tadakatsu; Kubota, Tomoko; Iwakaji, Atsushi; Imada, Masayoshi; Kapás, Margit; Morio, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cariprazine is a potent dopamine D3-preferring D3/D2 receptor partial agonist in development for the treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar mania, and depression. Pharmacokinetics of cariprazine and the two clinically relevant metabolites (desmethyl- and didesmethyl-cariprazine) was evaluated in a clinical pharmacology study. Methods This was a multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, fixed-dose (3, 6, or 9 mg/day) study of 28-week duration (≤4-week observation, 12-week open-label treatment, and 12-week follow-up). Once-daily cariprazine was administered to 38 adult patients with schizophrenia. The pharmacokinetics of cariprazine, metabolites, and total active moieties (sum of cariprazine and two metabolites) was evaluated; efficacy and safety were also assessed. Results Steady state was reached within 1–2 weeks for cariprazine and desmethyl-cariprazine, 4 weeks for didesmethyl-cariprazine, and 3 weeks for total active moieties. Cariprazine and desmethyl-cariprazine levels decreased >90% within 1 week after the last dose, didesmethyl-cariprazine decreased ~50% at 1 week, and total active moieties decreased ~90% within 4 weeks. Terminal half-lives of cariprazine, desmethyl-cariprazine, and didesmethyl-cariprazine ranged from 31.6 to 68.4, 29.7 to 37.5, and 314 to 446 hours, respectively. Effective half-life (calculated from time to steady state) of total active moieties was ~1 week. Incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events was 97.4%; 15.8% of patients discontinued due to adverse events. No abnormal laboratory values or major differences from baseline in extrapyramidal symptoms were observed. Conclusion Cariprazine and its active metabolites reached steady state within 4 weeks, and exposure was dose proportional over the range of 3–9 mg/day. Once-daily cariprazine was generally well tolerated in adult patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26834462

  19. Protein supplementation does not alter intramuscular anabolic signaling or endocrine response after resistance exercise in trained men.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Adam M; Hoffman, Jay R; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Boone, Carleigh H; Beyer, Kyle S; Baker, Kayla M; Wells, Adam J; Church, David D; Mangine, Gerald T; Oliveira, Leonardo P; Moon, Jordan R; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2015-11-01

    The mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway appears to be the primary regulator of muscle protein synthesis. A variety of stimuli including resistance exercise, amino acids, and hormonal signals activate mTORC1 signaling. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a protein supplement on mTORC1 signaling following a resistance exercise protocol designed to promote elevations in circulating hormone concentrations. We hypothesized that the protein supplement would augment the intramuscular anabolic signaling response. Ten resistance-trained men (age, 24.7 ± 3.4 years; weight, 90.1 ± 11.3 kg; height, 176.0 ± 4.9 cm) received either a placebo or a supplement containing 20 g protein, 6 g carbohydrates, and 1 g fat after high-volume, short-rest lower-body resistance exercise. Blood samples were obtained at baseline, immediately, 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, and 5 hours after exercise. Fine-needle muscle biopsies were completed at baseline, 1 hour, and 5 hours after exercise. Myoglobin, lactate dehydrogenase, and lactate concentrations were significantly elevated after resistance exercise (P < .0001); however, no differences were observed between trials. Resistance exercise also elicited a significant insulin, growth hormone, and cortisol response (P < .01); however, no differences were observed between trials for insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin, testosterone, growth hormone, or cortisol. Intramuscular anabolic signaling analysis revealed significant elevations in RPS6 phosphorylation after resistance exercise (P = .001); however, no differences were observed between trials for signaling proteins including Akt, mTOR, p70S6k, and RPS6. The endocrine response and phosphorylation status of signaling proteins within the mTORC1 pathway did not appear to be altered by ingestion of supplement after resistance exercise in resistance-trained men. PMID:26428621

  20. Order effects of concurrent endurance and resistance training on post-exercise response of non-trained women.

    PubMed

    Di Blasio, Andrea; Gemello, Eugenio; Di Iorio, Angelo; Di Giacinto, Gabriella; Celso, Tiziana; Di Renzo, Donatella; Sablone, Andrea; Ripari, Patrizio

    2012-01-01

    Physical exercise is used for the promotion and maintenance of good health and for the improvement of physical fitness. Both endurance and resistance exercises are needed to carry out a complete training program. Because time may be a barrier to physical exercise practice, the aim of this study was to verify whether the order of execution of endurance and resistance exercises, in concurrent training, has different effects on the metabolic responses during recovery. Thirteen healthy women [24.40 (1.67) years, Mean (SD)] were investigated for energy expenditure (EE), oxygen consumption (VO2), ventilation (Ve), respiratory frequency (RF), proportion of oxygen in expired air (FeO2) and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) both before and after three concurrent endurance and resistance trainings, carried out in different orders: endurance-resistance training (ERT), resistance-endurance training (RET) and alternating endurance-resistance training (AERT). AERT elicited a significantly greater increase of EE, VO2, and Ve and a greater decrease of FeO2. ERT elicited a lower increase of RPE. Acute post-exercise physiological responses to concurrent endurance and resistance physical exercise seem to depend on the order of execution of the two parts: among the selected protocols, AERT seems to elicit the best responses. Key pointsThe concurrent execution of both endurance and resistance exercise, in the same training session, could be a practical solution to conform to guidelines for health in the presence of lack of time.The order of concurrent execution of both endurance and resistance exercise, in the same training session, influences the amplitude of some post-exercise physiological responses. PMID:24149345

  1. Tracking Connections: An Exercise about Series and Parallel Resistances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, Srdjan

    2010-09-01

    Unlike many other topics in basic physics, series and parallel resistances are rarely noticed in the real life of an ordinary individual, making it difficult to design a laboratory activity that can simulate something familiar. The activities described here entail minimal costs and are based on a puzzle-like game of tracking wire connections. A simple resistor-based device is built by students, which enables them to use a common multimeter to track down wire connections in a set of unmarked wires. A similar approach is sometimes used by electricians to identify wire connections.

  2. Running economy is impaired following a single bout of resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Palmer, C D; Sleivert, G G

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a low-volume high-intensity resistance training session influenced running economy during a subsequent aerobic treadmill run. Nine well trained distance runners (mean +/- SD; VO2max, 66.6 +/- 10.2 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1); weight, 65.8 +/- 10.2 kg; height, 173.4 +/- 7.8 cm; age 20 +/- 1.1 years) with resistance training experience performed treadmill running at two different speeds (0.56 m x sec(-1) and 0.20 m x sec(-1) below speed corresponding to lactate equilibrium) either rested or 1, 8 or 24 hours after a 50-minute whole body resistance training session. Running economy was assessed using open circuit spirometry while heart rate was recorded telemetrically. The contractile properties of the quadriceps femoris were also determined following each resistance training session and prior to each treadmill run using percutaneous electrical stimulation. Submaximal oxygen consumption was significantly increased one hour (2.6 +/- 2.3%, p= 0.007), and eight hours (1.6 +/- 2.5%, p= 0.032), but not 24 hours after resistance training. No significant differences were found in exercising heart rate, ventilation, respiratory exchange ratio, ratings of perceived exertion, or running mechanics. Peak twitch torque, time to peak torque, and half relaxation time of the quadriceps femoris were significantly reduced immediately following resistance training while peak twitch torque was also lower one hour following resistance training. Running economy following a resistance training session is impaired for up to 8 hours. This change was not paralleled by a concomitant change in exercising heart rate. The mechanism responsible for increased oxygen consumption following resistance training may be related to impairment of the force generating capacity of skeletal muscle, as there was a significant decrement in the contractile properties of the quadriceps femoris following resistance training. PMID:11905938

  3. Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... article Exercise / physical activity with MS Judy Boone, physical therapist Lynn Williams, Dan Melfi and Dave Altman discuss ... adjusted as changes occur in MS symptoms. A physical therapist experienced with MS can be helpful in designing, ...

  4. Comparison of Energy Expenditure During Single-Set vs. Multiple-Set Resistance Exercise.

    PubMed

    Mookerjee, Swapan; Welikonich, Michael J; Ratamess, Nicholas A

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare energy expenditure (EE) of single-set and multiple-set resistance exercise protocols using indirect calorimetry. Twelve men and twelve women (age = 21.4 ± 1.3 years) performed a single-set (SS) and multiple-set (MS) resistance exercise protocol in random order. The subjects performed two protocols at 70% of their 1-repetition maximum. The protocols consisted of 5 upper-body exercises of either 1 or 3 sets per exercise performed in random order. Metabolic and cardiorespiratory data were recorded over the entire exercise session and during 5 minutes of recovery by a portable metabolic measurement system. Gross (167.9 ± 58.7 kcal) and net (88.3 ± 41.6 kcal) EE for the MS protocol were significantly greater (p < 0.001) than gross (71.3 ± 26.5 kcal) and net (36.3 ± 18.7 kcal) EE of the SS protocol. Conversely, there was no significant difference in the rate of EE between both protocols. Significant gender differences (p < 0.001) in absolute and relative EE were observed for both protocols where values in men were higher than women. Heart rate, respiratory rate, relative V[Combining Dot Above]O2, respiratory exchange ratio, and minute ventilation values were significantly higher during the MS than the SS protocol. The results of this study indicated that MS protocols yield greater metabolic and cardiovascular demands than SS protocols when the number of exercises performed is the same. PMID:26466137

  5. Changes in transcriptional output of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells following resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Lara A; Tighe, S W; Kenefick, R W; Dragon, J; Westcott, N W; Leclair, R J

    2011-12-01

    Various types of exercise alter the population of circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and change their transcriptional output. This work examines changes in PBMC populations and transcription in response to resistance exercise training (RET), and identify key transcriptional changes in PBMCs that may play a role in altering peripheral tissues in response to RET. Ten resistance-trained men (20-24 years), performed an acute bout of RET for ~30 min following a 12 h fast. Venous blood was sampled at rest, immediately following exercise, and at 2 h post-exercise and analyzed for total and differential leukocytes and global gene expression using Affymetrix Genechips. Results showed elevated leukocytes, monocytes, lymphocytes, and lactate values immediately post-exercise (P < 0.05) over baseline. At 2 h post-exercise, leukocytes, and granulocytes remained elevated (P < 0.05), whereas lymphocytes were lower than (P < 0.05) baseline values. Initial microarray results showed the greatest transcriptional changes in pathways related to immune response, inflammation, and cellular communication. The change in PBMC population (2 h time point) correlated with a dramatic decrease in the expression of CD160, and XCL1, markers of lymphocyte populations. At the 2 h recovery time point upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9, orosomucoid 1, dishevelled-associated activator of morphogenesis 2, and arginase 1 suggest an induction in muscle damage and repair during this time frame. These results demonstrate that an acute bout of RET disrupts cellular homeostasis, induces a transient redistribution of certain leukocytes, and results in transcriptional changes in PBMCs translating into systemic changes in response to RET. PMID:21437602

  6. Effects of a 12-Week Physical Activity Protocol Delivered by YMCA After-School Counselors (Youth Fit for Life) on Fitness and Self-Efficacy Changes in 5-12-Year-Old Boys and Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annesi, James J.; Westcott, Wayne L.; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Unruh, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    To address reduced physical education (PE) in elementary schools, a 12-week physical activity protocol was tested on 5-12-year-old, primarily African American, girls (n = 226) and boys (n = 344) at 14 YMCA after-school care sites. The 3 times/week, 45-min session curriculum included cardiovascular, resistance, and flexibility training, in which…

  7. Physical performance during high-intensity resistance exercise in normoxic and hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Scott, Brendan R; Slattery, Katie M; Sculley, Dean V; Hodson, Jacob A; Dascombe, Ben J

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to determine whether different levels of hypoxia affect physical performance during high-intensity resistance exercise or subsequent cardiovascular and perceptual responses. Twelve resistance-trained young men (age, 25.3 ± 4.3 years; height, 179.0 ± 4.5 cm; body mass, 83.4 ± 9.1 kg) were tested for 1 repetition maximum (1RM) in the back squat and deadlift. Following this, participants completed 3 separate randomized trials of 5 × 5 repetitions at 80% 1RM, with 3 minutes rest between sets, in normoxia (NORM; fraction of inspired oxygen [FIO2] = 0.21), moderate-level hypoxia (FIO2 = 0.16), or high-level hypoxia (FIO2 = 0.13) by a portable hypoxic unit. Peak and mean force and power variables were monitored during exercise. Arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2), heart rate (HR), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were assessed immediately following each set. No differences in force or power variables were evident between conditions. Similar trends were evident in these variables across each set and across the exercise session in each condition. SpO2 was lower in hypoxic conditions than in NORM, whereas HR was higher following sets performed in hypoxia. There were no differences between conditions in RPE. These results indicate that a hypoxic stimulus during high-intensity resistance exercise does not alter physical performance during repetitions and sets or affect how strenuous exercise is perceived to be. This novel training strategy can be used without adversely affecting the physical training dose experienced and may provide benefits over the equivalent training in NORM. PMID:25226332

  8. A single bout of resistance exercise improves memory consolidation and increases the expression of synaptic proteins in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Jansen; Soares, Juliana Carlota Kramer; do Amaral Baliego, Luiz Guilherme Zaccaro; Arida, Ricardo Mario

    2016-08-01

    Over the past decade, several studies have indicated that chronic resistance exercise (i.e., strength training, weight lifting, etc.) is beneficial for brain health and cognitive function. However, little is known about the effects of a single bout of resistance exercise on brain function, particularly on memory consolidation. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to examine the effects of a single bout of resistance exercise applied immediately after the training of fear conditioning on memory consolidation and on the expression of IGF-1 and synaptic proteins in the hippocampus. Male Wistar rats were familiarized with climbing a ladder without a load for 3 days and randomly assigned into control (CTL) and resistance exercise (RES) groups. The RES group was subjected to a single bout of resistance exercise applied immediately after fear conditioning training. Subsequently, the animals were tested for contextual (24 h) and tone (48 h) fear memory. Another group of animals were subjected to a single bout of resistance exercise and euthanized 24 h later for hippocampal analysis of IGF-1 and synaptic proteins (synapsin I, synaptophysin, and PSD-95). The exercised rats improved contextual but not tone fear memory. Hippocampal IGF-1 was not altered by resistance exercise. However, the levels of synapsin I, synaptophysin, and PSD-95 increased significantly in the RES group. The results suggested that a single bout of resistance exercise applied immediately after fear conditioning could improve contextual memory, probably through the activation of pre- and postsynaptic machinery required for memory consolidation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27008926

  9. Reliability of telemetric electromyography and near-infrared spectroscopy during high-intensity resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Scott, Brendan R; Slattery, Katie M; Sculley, Dean V; Lockie, Robert G; Dascombe, Ben J

    2014-10-01

    This study quantified the inter- and intra-test reliability of telemetric surface electromyography (EMG) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during resistance exercise. Twelve well-trained young men performed high-intensity back squat exercise (12 sets at 70-90% 1-repetition maximum) on two occasions, during which EMG and NIRS continuously monitored muscle activation and oxygenation of the thigh muscles. Intra-test reliability for EMG and NIRS variables was generally higher than inter-test reliability. EMG median frequency variables were generally more reliable than amplitude-based variables. The reliability of EMG measures was not related to the intensity or number of repetitions performed during the set. No notable differences were evident in the reliability of EMG between different agonist muscles. NIRS-derived measures of oxyhaemoglobin, deoxyhaemoglobin and tissue saturation index were generally more reliable during single-repetition sets than multiple-repetition sets at the same intensity. Tissue saturation index was the most reliable NIRS variable. Although the reliability of the EMG and NIRS measures varied across the exercise protocol, the precise causes of this variability are not yet understood. However, it is likely that biological variation during multi-joint isotonic resistance exercise may account for some of the variation in the observed results. PMID:25127493

  10. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on resistance to fatigue of respiratory muscles during exhaustive exercise.

    PubMed

    Segizbaeva, M O; Timofeev, N N; Donina, Zh A; Kur'yanovich, E N; Aleksandrova, N P

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on resistance to fatigue of the diaphragm (D), parasternal (PS), sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and scalene (SC) muscles in healthy humans during exhaustive exercise. Daily inspiratory muscle strength training was performed for 3 weeks in 10 male subjects (at a pressure threshold load of 60% of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) for the first week, 70% of MIP for the second week, and 80% of MIP for the third week). Before and after training, subjects performed an incremental cycle test to exhaustion. Maximal inspiratory pressure and EMG-analysis served as indices of inspiratory muscle fatigue assessment. The before-to-after exercise decreases in MIP and centroid frequency (fc) of the EMG (D, PS, SCM, and SC) power spectrum (P<0.05) were observed in all subjects before the IMT intervention. Such changes were absent after the IMT. The study found that in healthy subjects, IMT results in significant increase in MIP (+18%), a delay of inspiratory muscle fatigue during exhaustive exercise, and a significant improvement in maximal work performance. We conclude that the IMT elicits resistance to the development of inspiratory muscles fatigue during high-intensity exercise. PMID:25248344

  11. Efficacy of the long-acting nitro vasodilator pentaerithrityl tetranitrate in patients with chronic stable angina pectoris receiving anti-anginal background therapy with beta-blockers: a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Münzel, Thomas; Meinertz, Thomas; Tebbe, Ulrich; Schneider, Heinrich Theodor; Stalleicken, Dirk; Wargenau, Manfred; Gori, Tommaso; Klingmann, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Background The organic nitrate pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN) has been shown to have ancillary properties that prevent the development of tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre study (‘CLEOPATRA’ study) was designed to investigate the anti-ischaemic efficacy of PETN 80 mg b.i.d. (morning and mid-day) over placebo in patients with chronic stable angina pectoris. Methods and results A total of 655 patients were evaluated in the intention-to-treat population, randomized to PETN (80 mg b.i.d., n = 328) or placebo (n = 327) and completed the study. Patients underwent treadmill exercise tests at randomization, after 6 and 12 weeks of treatment. Treatment with PETN over 12 weeks did not modify the primary endpoint total exercise duration (TED, P = 0.423). In a pre-specified sub-analysis of patients with reduced exercise capacity (TED at baseline ≤9 min, n = 257), PETN appeared more effective than placebo treatment (P = 0.054). Superiority of PETN over placebo was evident in patients who were symptomatic at low exercise levels (n = 120; P = 0.017). Pentaerithrityl tetranitrate 80 mg b.i.d. was well tolerated, and the overall safety profile was comparable with placebo. Conclusion Although providing no additional benefit in unselected patients with known coronary artery disease, PETN therapy, administered in addition to modern anti-ischaemic therapy, could increase exercise tolerance in symptomatic patients with reduced exercise capacity. PMID:24071762

  12. Effects of aging and exercise training on skeletal muscle blood flow and resistance artery morphology

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Michael W.; Stabley, John N.; Dominguez, James M.; Davis, Robert T.; McCullough, Danielle J.; Muller-Delp, Judy M.; Delp, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    With old age, blood flow to the high-oxidative red skeletal muscle is reduced and blood flow to the low-oxidative white muscle is elevated during exercise. Changes in the number of feed arteries perforating the muscle are thought to contribute to this altered hyperemic response during exercise. We tested the hypothesis that exercise training would ameliorate age-related differences in blood flow during exercise and feed artery structure in skeletal muscle. Young (6–7 mo old, n = 36) and old (24 mo old, n = 25) male Fischer 344 rats were divided into young sedentary (Sed), old Sed, young exercise-trained (ET), and old ET groups, where training consisted of 10–12 wk of treadmill exercise. In Sed and ET rats, blood flow to the red and white portions of the gastrocnemius muscle (GastRed and GastWhite) and the number and luminal cross-sectional area (CSA) of all feed arteries perforating the muscle were measured at rest and during exercise. In the old ET group, blood flow was greater to GastRed (264 ± 13 and 195 ± 9 ml·min−1·100 g−1 in old ET and old Sed, respectively) and lower to GastWhite (78 ± 5 and 120 ± 6 ml·min−1·100 g−1 in old ET and old Sed, respectively) than in the old Sed group. There was no difference in the number of feed arteries between the old ET and old Sed group, although the CSA of feed arteries from old ET rats was larger. In young ET rats, there was an increase in the number of feed arteries perforating the muscle. Exercise training mitigated old age-associated differences in blood flow during exercise within gastrocnemius muscle. However, training-induced adaptations in resistance artery morphology differed between young (increase in feed artery number) and old (increase in artery CSA) animals. The altered blood flow pattern induced by exercise training with old age would improve the local matching of O2 delivery to consumption within the skeletal muscle. PMID:23042906

  13. Resistance Exercise Restores Endothelial Function and Reduces Blood Pressure in Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; da Silva, Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga; Fontes, Milene Tavares; Barreto, André Sales; Araújo, João Eliakim dos Santos; de Oliveira, Antônio Cesar Cabral; Wichi, Rogério Brandão; Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance exercise effects on cardiovascular parameters are not consistent. Objectives The effects of resistance exercise on changes in blood glucose, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were evaluated in diabetic rats. Methods Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group (n = 8); sedentary diabetic (n = 8); and trained diabetic (n = 8). Resistance exercise was carried out in a squat device for rats and consisted of three sets of ten repetitions with an intensity of 50%, three times per week, for eight weeks. Changes in vascular reactivity were evaluated in superior mesenteric artery rings. Results A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2%) and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3%) without changing potency. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group. Furthermore, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in mean arterial blood pressure was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (104.9 ± 5 to 126.7 ± 5 mmHg) as compared to that in the control group. However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg) as compared to the sedentary diabetic group. Conclusions Resistance exercise could restore endothelial function and prevent an increase in arterial blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats. PMID:25120082

  14. A 4-Week Home-Based Aerobic and Resistance Exercise Program During Radiation Therapy: A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mustian, Karen M.; Peppone, Luke; Darling, Tom V.; Palesh, Oxana; Heckler, Charles E.; Morrow, Gary R.

    2011-01-01

    During radiation therapy, cancer patients may report cancer-related fatigue (CRF), which impairs aerobic capacity, strength, muscle mass, and, ultimately, quality of life (QOL). The purpose of this pilot clinical trial was to examine the feasibility and initial efficacy of a home-based aerobic and progressive resistance exercise intervention for aerobic capacity, strength, muscle mass, CRF, and QOL. Daily steps walked (DSW), daily minutes of resistance exercise (MRE), and number of resistance exercise days (RED) were assessed to evaluate intervention adherence. Breast and prostate cancer patients (n = 38) beginning radiation therapy were randomized to undergo 4 weeks of exercise or no exercise. Participants in the exercise group demonstrated good adherence to the exercise intervention, with significantly more DSW, MRE, and RED at post intervention and 3 month follow-up than controls. Participants in the exercise intervention exhibited significantly higher QOL and significantly lower CRF post intervention and at 3-month follow-up than controls. Results of this pilot study provide positive preliminary evidence that exercise during radiation may be beneficial for cancer patients. PMID:19831159

  15. Effect of a pre-workout energy supplement on acute multi-joint resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Adam M; Walsh, Allyson L; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Kang, Jie; Hoffman, Jay R

    2011-01-01

    The effect of a pre-workout energy supplement on acute multi- joint resistance exercise was examined in eight resistance-trained college-age men. Subjects were randomly provided either a placebo (P) or a supplement (S: containing caffeine, taurine, glucuronolactone, creatine, β-alanine, and the amino acids; leucine, isoleucine, valine, glutamine and arginine) 10 minutes prior to resistance exercise. Subjects performed 4 sets of no more than 10 repetitions of either barbell squat or bench press at 80% of their pre-determined 1 repetition- maximum (1RM) with 90 seconds of rest between sets. Dietary intake 24 hours prior to each of the two training trials was kept constant. Results indicate that consuming the pre-workout energy drink 10 minutes prior to resistance exercise enhances performance by significantly increasing the number of repetitions successfully performed (p = 0.022) in S (26.3 ± 9.2) compared to P (23.5 ± 9.4). In addition, the average peak and mean power performance for all four sets was significantly greater in S compared to P (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). No differences were observed between trials in subjective feelings of energy during either pre (p = 0.660) or post (p = 0.179) meaures. Similary, no differences between groups, in either pre or post assessments, were observed in subjective feelings of focus (p = 0.465 and p = 0.063, respectively), or fatigue (p = 0.204 and p = 0.518, respectively). Results suggest that acute ingestion of a high-energy supplement 10 minutes prior to the onset of a multi-joint resistance training session can augment training volume and increase power performance during the workout. Key pointsConsumption of a pre-workout energy supplement containing caffeine, taurine, glucuronolactone, creatine, β-alanine, and amino acids consumed 10 minutes prior to a bout of resistance exercise enhances the total number of repetitions performed during the exercise bout.Power outputs for each repetition during the

  16. Exercise training improves endothelial function in resistance arteries of young prehypertensives.

    PubMed

    Beck, D T; Martin, J S; Casey, D P; Braith, R W

    2014-05-01

    Prehypertension is associated with reduced conduit artery endothelial function and perturbation of oxidant/antioxidant status. It is unknown whether endothelial dysfunction persists to resistance arteries and whether exercise training affects oxidant/antioxidant balance in young prehypertensives. We examined resistance artery function using venous occlusion plethysmography measurement of forearm (FBF) and calf blood flow (CBF) at rest and during reactive hyperaemia (RH), as well as lipid peroxidation (8-iso-PGF2α) and antioxidant capacity (Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity; TEAC) before and after exercise intervention or time control. Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive and 15 matched normotensive time controls met screening requirements and participated in the study (age: 21.1±0.8 years). Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to resistance exercise training (PHRT; n=15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n=13) or time-control groups (PHTC; n=15). Treatment groups exercised 3 days per week for 8 weeks. Peak and total FBF were lower in prehypertensives than normotensives (12.7±1.2 ml min(-1) per100 ml tissue and 89.1±7.7 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue vs 16.3±1.0 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue and 123.3±6.4 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue, respectively; P<0.05). Peak and total CBF were lower in prehypertensives than normotensives (15.3±1.2 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue and 74±8.3 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue vs 20.9±1.4 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue and 107±9.2 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue, respectively; P<0.05). PHRT and PHET improved humoral measures of TEAC (+24 and +30%) and 8-iso-PGF2α (-43 and -40%, respectively; P < or = 0.05). This study provides evidence that young prehypertensives exhibit reduced resistance artery endothelial function and that short-term (8 weeks) resistance or endurance training are effective in improving resistance artery endothelial function and oxidant

  17. EXERCISE TRAINING IMPROVES ENDOTHELIAL FUNCTION IN RESISTANCE ARTERIES OF YOUNG PREHYPERTENSIVES

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Darren T.; Martin, Jeffrey S.; Casey, Darren P.; Braith, Randy W.

    2013-01-01

    Prehypertension is associated with reduced conduit artery endothelial function and perturbation of oxidant/antioxidant status. It is unknown if endothelial dysfunction persists to resistance arteries and if exercise training effects oxidant/antioxidant balance in young prehypertensives. We examined resistance artery function using venous occlusion plethysmography measurement of forearm (FBF) and calf blood flow (CBF) at rest and during reactive hyperemia, as well as lipid peroxidation (8-iso-PGF2α) and antioxidant capacity (Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity; TEAC) before and after exercise intervention or time-control. Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive and fifteen matched normotensive time-controls met screening requirements and participated in the study (age: 21.1±0.8 years). Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to resistance exercise training (PHRT; n=15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n=13) or time-control groups (PHTC; n=15). Treatment groups exercised 3 days per week for 8 weeks. Peak and total FBF were lower in prehypertensives than normotensives (12.7±1.2 ml/min/100ml tissue and 89.1±7.7 ml/min/100ml tissue vs. 16.3±1.0 ml/min/100ml tissue and 123.3±6.4 ml/min/100ml tissue, respectively; p<0.05). Peak and total CBF were lower in prehypertensives than normotensives (15.3±1.2 ml/min/100ml tissue and 74±8.3 ml/min/100ml tissue vs. 20.9±1.4 ml/min/100ml tissue and 107±9.2 ml/min/100ml tissue, respectively; p<0.05). PHRT and PHET improved humoral measures of Trolox-equivalent antioxidant-capacity (TEAC) (+24% and +30%) and 8-iso-PGF2α (−43% and −40%, respectively; p<0.05). This study provides evidence that young prehypertensives exhibit reduced resistance artery endothelial function and that short term (8weeks) resistance or endurance training are effective in improving resistance artery endothelial function and oxidant/antioxidant balance in young prehypertensives. PMID:24172292

  18. WIse-2005: Combined Aerobic and Resistive Exercise May Help Mitigate Bone Loss During 60-D Simulated Microgravity in Women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, S. R.; Heer, M. A.; Lee, S. M. C.; Macias, B. R.; Schneider, S. M.; Trappe, S. M.; Hargens, A. R.

    2006-01-01

    Exercise can attenuate bone loss associated with disuse during bed rest (BR), an analog of space flight. Previous studies have examined the efficacy of aerobic or resistive exercise countermeasures, but not in combination. We sought to determine the effect of a combined resistive and aerobic exercise regimen on bone metabolism during BR. After a 20-d ambulatory adaptation to confinement and diet, 16 women participated in a 60-d head-down-tilt BR. Control subjects (CN, n=8) performed no countermeasures. Exercise subjects, (EX, n=8) participated in exercise alternating daily between supine treadmill exercise within lower body negative pressure and resistive fly-wheel exercise (6-d wk(sup -1)). In the last week of BR, bone resorption was greater (p less than 79 plus or minus 44%, mean plus or minus SD) and EX groups (64 50%). N-telopeptide also increased (CN: 51 plus or minus 34%; EX: 43 plus or minus 56%). However, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, a bone formation marker, tended to be higher in EX (26 plus or minus 18%) than in CN (8 plus or minus 33%) groups. The combination of resistive and aerobic exercise does not prevent bone resorption, but may promote formation, potentially mitigating the net bone loss associated with simulated microgravity. This study was supported by CNES, CSA, ESA, NASA, and NASA grant NNJ04HF71G to ARH. MEDES (French Institute for Space Medicine and Physiology) organized the study.

  19. Resistance Exercise with Older Fallers: Its Impact on Intermuscular Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Janelle L.; Marcus, Robin L.; Morrell, Glen; LaStayo, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Greater skeletal muscle fat infiltration occurs with age and contributes to numerous negative health outcomes. The primary purpose was to determine whether intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) can be influenced by an exercise intervention and if a greater reduction in IMAT occurs with eccentric versus traditional resistance training. Methods. Seventy-seven older adults (age 75.5 ± 6.8) with multiple comorbidities and a history of falling completed a three-month exercise intervention paired with either eccentric or traditional resistance training. MRI of the mid-thigh was examined at three time points to determine changes in muscle composition after intervention. Results. No differences in IMAT were observed over time, and there were no differences in IMAT response between intervention groups. Participants in the traditional group lost a significant amount of lean tissue (P = 0.007) in the nine months after intervention, while participants in the eccentric group did not (P = 0.32). When IMAT levels were partitioned into high and low IMAT groups, there were differential IMAT responses to intervention with the high group lowering thigh IMAT. Conclusions. There is no decrease in thigh IMAT after a three-month exercise intervention in older adults at risk for falling and no benefit to eccentric training over traditional resistance training for reducing IMAT in these individuals. PMID:24804220

  20. Effect of growth hormone and resistance exercise on muscle growth in young men.

    PubMed

    Yarasheski, K E; Campbell, J A; Smith, K; Rennie, M J; Holloszy, J O; Bier, D M

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether growth hormone (GH) administration enhances the muscle anabolism associated with heavy-resistance exercise. Sixteen men (21-34 yr) were assigned randomly to a resistance training plus GH group (n = 7) or to a resistance training plus placebo group (n = 9). For 12 wk, both groups trained all major muscle groups in an identical fashion while receiving 40 micrograms recombinant human GH.kg-1.day-1 or placebo. Fat-free mass (FFM) and total body water increased (P less than 0.05) in both groups but more (P less than 0.01) in the GH recipients. Whole body protein synthesis rate increased more (P less than 0.03), and whole body protein balance was greater (P = 0.01) in the GH-treated group, but quadriceps muscle protein synthesis rate, torso and limb circumferences, and muscle strength did not increase more in the GH-treated group. In the young men studied, resistance exercise with or without GH resulted in similar increments in muscle size, strength, and muscle protein synthesis, indicating that 1) the larger increase in FFM with GH treatment was probably due to an increase in lean tissue other than skeletal muscle and 2) resistance training supplemented with GH did not further enhance muscle anabolism and function. PMID:1550219

  1. The effects of a strategic strength resistance exercise program on the isokinetic muscular function of the ankle

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoung-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Young; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a strategic strength resistance exercise program on the isokinetic muscular function of the ankle joint. [Subjects] This study included 22 males in their twenties who were diagnosed with functional injury of the ankle joint. [Methods] To strengthen plantar flexion and dorsiflexion of the ankle joint, 8 weeks of weight, resistance band, and plyometric training, and training using props were performed. [Results] A medical examination by interview indicated that pain, swelling, instability, running, and support capacity of the ankle joint significantly improved with the strategic strength resistance exercise program. For the isokinetic peak torque of the ankles, significant differences were observed in right plantar flexion and bilateral dorsiflexion. [Conclusion] The strategic strength resistance exercise program is highly recommended for the functional stability of the ankle joint. Efficient exercise therapy is useful for muscle damage prevention, muscle strengthening, and functional interventions. PMID:26644696

  2. Evolution of the electrocardiogram in young dogs during the first 12 weeks of life.

    PubMed

    Trautvetter, E; Detweiler, D K; Patterson, D F

    1981-07-01

    In 36 normal pups the evolution of the ECG during the first 12 weeks was studied. Sixteen pups were randomly selected, healthy pups; 20 were normal littermates from dog families with congenital heart disease. The direction of P, QRS, and T vectors was determined, and the modal QRS axis (vector) was constructed from lead I and AVF in the frontal, from lead I and V10 in the transverse, and from lead AVF and V10 in the sagittal plane. Except for the T wave directly after birth, no marked difference in the ECG evolution between the two groups was found. After birth the modal QRS vector was almost exclusively directed to the right. The modal QRS vectors in the first, second, and third weeks were significantly different from each other. By the twelfth week all vectors were directed to the left and the majority was oriented leftward and caudally. In the serial ECG tracings the change from right ventricular to left ventricular dominance was seen to be progressive. The R/S ratio in the left chest leads increased from less than 1.0 at week 1 to a multiple of 1.0 after the sixth week. The changes occurring in scaler ECG's were mirrored in VCG's recorded in selected pups. PMID:7264504

  3. Metabolomics unveils urinary changes in subjects with metabolic syndrome following 12-week nut consumption.

    PubMed

    Tulipani, Sara; Llorach, Rafael; Jáuregui, Olga; López-Uriarte, Patricia; Garcia-Aloy, Mar; Bullo, Mònica; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Andrés-Lacueva, Cristina

    2011-11-01

    Through an HPLC-Q-TOF-MS-driven nontargeted metabolomics approach, we aimed to discriminate changes in the urinary metabolome of subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS), following 12 weeks of mixed nuts consumption (30 g/day), compared to sex- and age-matched individuals given a control diet. The urinary metabolome corresponding to the nut-enriched diet clearly clustered in a distinct group, and the multivariate data analysis discriminated relevant mass features in this separation. Metabolites corresponding to the discriminating ions (MS features) were then subjected to multiple tandem mass spectrometry experiments using LC-ITD-FT-MS, to confirm their putative identification. The metabolomics approach revealed 20 potential markers of nut intake, including fatty acid conjugated metabolites, phase II and microbial-derived phenolic metabolites, and serotonin metabolites. An increased excretion of serotonin metabolites was associated for the first time with nut consumption. Additionally, the detection of urinary markers of gut microbial and phase II metabolism of nut polyphenols confirmed the understanding of their bioavailability and bioactivity as a priority area of research in the determination of the health effects derived from nut consumption. The results confirmed how a nontargeted metabolomics strategy may help to access unexplored metabolic pathways impacted by diet, thereby raising prospects for new intervention targets. PMID:21905751

  4. Baroreflex-mediated heart rate and vascular resistance responses 24 h after maximal exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Plasma volume, heart rate (HR) variability, and stimulus-response relationships for baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR) and HR were studied in eight healthy men after and without performing a bout of maximal exercise to test the hypotheses that acute expansion of plasma volume is associated with 1) reduction in baroreflex-mediated HR response, and 2) altered operational range for central venous pressure (CVP). METHODS: The relationship between stimulus (DeltaCVP) and vasoconstrictive reflex response (DeltaFVR) during unloading of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors was assessed with lower-body negative pressure (LBNP, 0, -5, -10, -15, -20 mm Hg). The relationship between stimulus (Deltamean arterial pressure (MAP)) and cardiac reflex response (DeltaHR) during loading of arterial baroreceptors was assessed with steady-state infusion of phenylephrine (PE) designed to increase MAP by 15 mm Hg alone and during application of LBNP (PE+LBNP) and neck pressure (PE+LBNP+NP). Measurements of vascular volume and autonomic baroreflex responses were conducted on two different test days, each separated by at least 1 wk. On one day, baroreflex response was tested 24 h after graded cycle exercise to volitional exhaustion. On another day, measurement of baroreflex response was repeated with no exercise (control). The order of exercise and control treatments was counterbalanced. RESULTS: Baseline CVP was elevated (P = 0.04) from a control value of 10.5 +/- 0.4 to 12.3 +/- 0.4 mm Hg 24 h after exercise. Average DeltaFVR/DeltaCVP during LBNP was not different (P = 0.942) between the exercise (-1.35 +/- 0.32 pru x mm Hg-1) and control (-1.32 +/- 0.36 pru x mm Hg-1) conditions. However, maximal exercise caused a shift along the reflex response relationship to a higher CVP and lower FVR. HR baroreflex response (DeltaHR/DeltaMAP) to PE+LBNP+NP was lower (P = 0.015) after maximal exercise (-0.43 +/- 0.15 beats x min-1 x mm Hg-1) compared with the control

  5. Impact of single and multiple sets of resistance exercise in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Turner, D; Luzio, S; Gray, B J; Dunseath, G; Rees, E D; Kilduff, L P; Campbell, M D; West, D J; Bain, S C; Bracken, R M

    2015-02-01

    To examine glycemic and glucoregulatory responses to resistance exercise (RE) sessions of different volume in type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Eight T1DM (seven males: one female; age: 38 ± 6 years, HbA1C : 8.7 ± 1.0%/71 ± 11 mmol/mol) attended the research facility fasted and on four separate occasions, having taken their usual basal insulin, but omitted morning rapid-acting insulin. Participants completed a 1SET (14 min), 2SET (28 min), 3SET (42 min) RE session (eight exercises × 10 repetitions) at 67 ± 3% one-repetition-maximum followed by 60-min recovery, or a resting trial (CON). Venous blood samples were taken before and after exercise. Data (mean ± SEM) were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance (P ≤ 0.05). RE did not induce hypoglycemia (BG < 4 mmol/L). During recovery, blood glucose (BG) concentrations remained above pre-exercise after 1SET (15-60 min, P < 0.05) and 2SET (0-60 min, P < 0.05) but comparable (P > 0.05) with pre-exercise after 3SET. BGIAUC(area-under-curve) (mmol/L/60 min) was greater after 1SET and 2SET vs CON (1SET 103.6 ± 36.9 and 2SET 128.7 ± 26.1 vs CON -24.3 ± 15.2, P < 0.05), but similar between 3SET and CON (3SET 40.7 ± 59.3, P > 0.05). Under all trials, plasma creatine kinase levels at 24 h post-exercise were similar (P > 0.05) to pre-exercise. RE does not induce acute hypoglycemia or damage muscle. BG progressively rose after one and two sets of RE. However, inclusion of a third set attenuated exercise-induced hyperglycemia and returned BG to that of a non-exercise trial. PMID:24646137

  6. High Intensity Exercise in Multiple Sclerosis: Effects on Muscle Contractile Characteristics and Exercise Capacity, a Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vandenabeele, Frank; Grevendonk, Lotte; Verboven, Kenneth; Hansen, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Low-to-moderate intensity exercise improves muscle contractile properties and endurance capacity in multiple sclerosis (MS). The impact of high intensity exercise remains unknown. Methods Thirty-four MS patients were randomized into a sedentary control group (SED, n = 11) and 2 exercise groups that performed 12 weeks of a high intensity interval (HITR, n = 12) or high intensity continuous cardiovascular training (HCTR, n = 11), both in combination with resistance training. M.vastus lateralis fiber cross sectional area (CSA) and proportion, knee-flexor/extensor strength, body composition, maximal endurance capacity and self-reported physical activity levels were assessed before and after 12 weeks. Results Compared to SED, 12 weeks of high intensity exercise increased mean fiber CSA (HITR: +21±7%, HCTR: +23±5%). Furthermore, fiber type I CSA increased in HCTR (+29±6%), whereas type II (+23±7%) and IIa (+23±6%,) CSA increased in HITR. Muscle strength improved in HITR and HCTR (between +13±7% and +45±20%) and body fat percentage tended to decrease (HITR: -3.9±2.0% and HCTR: -2.5±1.2%). Furthermore, endurance capacity (Wmax +21±4%, time to exhaustion +24±5%, VO2max +17±5%) and lean tissue mass (+1.4±0.5%) only increased in HITR. Finally self-reported physical activity levels increased 73±19% and 86±27% in HCTR and HITR, respectively. Conclusion High intensity cardiovascular exercise combined with resistance training was safe, well tolerated and improved muscle contractile characteristics and endurance capacity in MS. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01845896 PMID:26418222

  7. Effects of β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate Free Acid Ingestion and Resistance Exercise on the Acute Endocrine Response

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Jeremy R.; Hoffman, Jay R.; Gonzalez, Adam M.; Jajtner, Adam R.; Boone, Carleigh H.; Robinson, Edward H.; Mangine, Gerald T.; Wells, Adam J.; Fragala, Maren S.; Fukuda, David H.; Stout, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine the endocrine response to a bout of heavy resistance exercise following acute β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate free acid (HMB-FA) ingestion. Design. Twenty resistance trained men were randomized and consumed either 1 g of HMB-FA (BetaTor) or placebo (PL) 30 min prior to performing an acute heavy resistance exercise protocol. Blood was obtained before (PRE), immediately after (IP), and 30 min after exercise (30P). Circulating concentrations of testosterone, growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), and insulin were assayed. Data were analyzed with a repeated measures ANOVA and area under the curve (AUC) was analyzed by the trapezoidal rule. Results. The resistance exercise protocol resulted in significant elevations from PRE in testosterone (P < 0.01), GH (P < 0.01), and insulin (P = 0.05) at IP, with GH (P < 0.01) and insulin (P < 0.01) remaining elevated at 30P. A significant interaction was noted between groups in the plasma GH response at IP, which was significantly higher following HMB-FA compared to PL (P < 0.01). AUC analysis revealed an elevated GH and IGF-1 response in the HMB-FA group compared to PL. Conclusion. HMB-FA prior to resistance exercise augments the GH response to high volume resistance exercise compared to PL. These findings provide further support for the potential anabolic benefits associated with HMB supplementation. PMID:25792982

  8. Timing and distribution of protein ingestion during prolonged recovery from resistance exercise alters myofibrillar protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Areta, José L; Burke, Louise M; Ross, Megan L; Camera, Donny M; West, Daniel W D; Broad, Elizabeth M; Jeacocke, Nikki A; Moore, Daniel R; Stellingwerff, Trent; Phillips, Stuart M; Hawley, John A; Coffey, Vernon G

    2013-01-01

    Quantity and timing of protein ingestion are major factors regulating myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS). However, the effect of specific ingestion patterns on MPS throughout a 12 h period is unknown. We determined how different distributions of protein feeding during 12 h recovery after resistance exercise affects anabolic responses in skeletal muscle. Twenty-four healthy trained males were assigned to three groups (n= 8/group) and undertook a bout of resistance exercise followed by ingestion of 80 g of whey protein throughout 12 h recovery in one of the following protocols: 8 × 10 g every 1.5 h (PULSE); 4 × 20 g every 3 h (intermediate: INT); or 2 × 40 g every 6 h (BOLUS). Muscle biopsies were obtained at rest and after 1, 4, 6, 7 and 12 h post exercise. Resting and post-exercise MPS (l-[ring-13C6] phenylalanine), and muscle mRNA abundance and cell signalling were assessed. All ingestion protocols increased MPS above rest throughout 1–12 h recovery (88–148%, P < 0.02), but INT elicited greater MPS than PULSE and BOLUS (31–48%, P < 0.02). In general signalling showed a BOLUS>INT>PULSE hierarchy in magnitude of phosphorylation. MuRF-1 and SLC38A2 mRNA were differentially expressed with BOLUS. In conclusion, 20 g of whey protein consumed every 3 h was superior to either PULSE or BOLUS feeding patterns for stimulating MPS throughout the day. This study provides novel information on the effect of modulating the distribution of protein intake on anabolic responses in skeletal muscle and has the potential to maximize outcomes of resistance training for attaining peak muscle mass. PMID:23459753

  9. Post-resistance exercise hemodynamic and autonomic responses: Comparison between normotensive and hypertensive men.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, A C C; Sousa, J C S; Cavalli, A A P; Silva, N D; Costa, L A R; Tobaldini, E; Montano, N; Silva, G V; Ortega, K; Mion, D; Tinucci, T; Forjaz, C L M

    2015-08-01

    To compare post-resistance exercise hypotension (PREH) and its mechanisms in normotensive and hypertensive individuals, 14 normotensives and 12 hypertensives underwent two experimental sessions: control (rest) and exercise (seven exercises, three sets, 50% of one repetition maximum). Hemodynamic and autonomic clinic measurements were taken before (Pre) and at two moments post-interventions (Post 1: between 30 and 60 min; Post 2: after 7 h). Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) was monitored for 24 h. At Post 1, exercise decreased systolic BP similarly in normotensives and hypertensives (-8 ± 2 vs -13 ± 2 mmHg, P > 0.05), whereas diastolic BP decreased more in hypertensives (-4 ± 1 vs -9 ± 1 mmHg, P < 0.05). Cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance did not change in normotensives and hypertensives (0.0 ± 0.3 vs 0.0 ± 0.3 L/min; -1 ± 1 vs -2 ± 2 U, P > 0.05). After exercise, heart rate (+13 ± 3 vs +13 ± 2 bpm) and its variability (low- to high-frequency components ratio, 1.9 ± 0.4 vs +1.4 ± 0.3) increased whereas stroke volume (-14 ± 5 vs -11 ± 5 mL) decreased similarly in normotensives and hypertensives (all, P > 0.05). At Post 2, all variables returned to pre-intervention, and ambulatory data were similar between sessions. Thus, a session of resistance exercise promoted PREH in normotensives and hypertensives. Although this PREH was greater in hypertensives, it did not last during the ambulatory period, which limits its clinical relevance. In addition, the mechanisms of PREH were similar in hypertensives and normotensives. PMID:24981630

  10. Skeletal muscle amino acid transporter expression is increased in young and older adults following resistance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Christopher S.; Glynn, Erin L.; Timmerman, Kyle L.; Dickinson, Jared M.; Walker, Dillon K.; Gundermann, David M.; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B.

    2011-01-01

    Amino acid transporters and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling are important contributors to muscle protein anabolism. Aging is associated with reduced mTORC1 signaling following resistance exercise, but the role of amino acid transporters is unknown. Young (n = 13; 28 ± 2 yr) and older (n = 13; 68 ± 2 yr) subjects performed a bout of resistance exercise. Skeletal muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were obtained at basal and 3, 6, and 24 h postexercise and were analyzed for amino acid transporter mRNA and protein expression and regulators of amino acid transporter transcription utilizing real-time PCR and Western blotting. We found that basal amino acid transporter expression was similar in young and older adults (P > 0.05). Exercise increased L-type amino acid transporter 1/solute-linked carrier (SLC) 7A5, CD98/SLC3A2, sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2/SLC38A2, proton-assisted amino acid transporter 1/SLC36A1, and cationic amino acid transporter 1/SLC7A1 mRNA expression in both young and older adults (P < 0.05). L-type amino acid transporter 1 and CD98 protein increased only in younger adults (P < 0.05). eukaryotic initiation factor 2 α-subunit (S52) increased similarly in young and older adults postexercise (P < 0.05). Ribosomal protein S6 (S240/244) and activating transcription factor 4 nuclear protein expression tended to be higher in the young, while nuclear signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) (Y705) was higher in the older subjects postexercise (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the rapid upregulation of amino acid transporter expression following resistance exercise may be regulated differently between the age groups, but involves a combination of mTORC1, activating transcription factor 4, eukaryotic initiation factor 2 α-subunit, and STAT3. We propose an increase in amino acid transporter expression may contribute to enhanced amino acid sensitivity following exercise in young and older

  11. Do whole-body vibration exercise and resistance exercise modify concentrations of salivary cortisol and immunoglobulin A?

    PubMed

    Roschel, H; Barroso, R; Batista, M; Ugrinowitsch, C; Tricoli, V; Arsati, F; Lima-Arsati, Y B; Araújo, V C; Moreira, A

    2011-06-01

    A single bout of resistance exercise (RE) induces hormonal and immune responses, playing an important role in a long-term adaptive process. Whole-body vibration (WBV) has also been shown to affect hormonal responses. Evidence suggests that combining WBV with RE may amplify hormonal and immune responses due to the increased neuromuscular load. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate salivary cortisol (Scortisol) and salivary IgA (SIgA) concentrations following a RE session combined or not with WBV. Nine university students (22.9 ± 5.1 years, 175.8 ± 5.2 cm, and 69.2 ± 7.3 kg) performed five sets of squat exercise (70% one-repetition-maximum) combined (R+V30) or not (R) with WBV at 30 Hz. Saliva samples were obtained before and after exercise. Subjects also rated their effort according to the Borg CR-10 scale (RPE). Data were analyzed by a mixed model. RPE was higher after R+V30 (8.3 ± 0.7) compared to R (6.2 ± 0.7). However, Scortisol (pre: 10.6 ± 7.6 and 11.7 ± 7.6, post: 8.3 ± 6.3 and 10.2 ± 7.2 ng/mL for R and R+V30, respectively) and SIgA concentrations (pre: 98.3 ± 22.6 and 116.1 ± 51.2, post: 116.6 ± 64.7 and 143.6 ± 80.5 µg/mL for R and R+V30, respectively) were unaffected. No significant correlations were observed between Scortisol and RPE (r = 0.45, P = 0.22; r = 0.30, P = 0.42, for R and R+V30, respectively). On the basis of these data, neither protocol modified salivary cortisol or IgA, although RPE was higher after R+V30 than R. PMID:21584438

  12. Supine Treadmill Exercise in Lower Body Negative Pressure Combined with Resistive Exercise Counteracts Bone Loss, Reduced Aerobic Upright Exercise Capacity and Reduced Muscle Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meuche, Sabine; Schneider, S. M.; Lee, S. M. C.; Macias, B. R.; Smith, S. M.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term exposure to weightlessness leads to cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning. In this report, the effectiveness of combined supine treadmill exercise in a lower body negative pressure chamber (LBNPex) and flywheel resistive exercise (Rex) countermeasures was determined to prevent bone loss, reduced aerobic upright exercise capacity and reduced muscle strength. We hypothesized that exercise subjects would show less decrease in bone mineral density (BMD), peak oxygen consumption (VO2pk) and knee extensor strength (KES) than control subjects. Sixteen healthy female subjects participated in a 60-d 6(sup 0) head-down tilt bed rest (BR) study after providing written informed consent. Subjects were assigned to one of two groups: a non-exercising control group CON or an exercise group EX performing LBNPex 2-4 d/wk and Rex every 3rd-d. VO2pk was measured with a maximal, graded, upright treadmill test performed pre-BR and on 3-d after BR. BMD was assessed before and 3-d after BR. Isokinetic KES was measured before and 5-d after BR. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA were performed. Statistical significance was set at p less than 0.05. CON experienced a significant decrease in BMD in the trochanter (PRE: 0.670 plus or minus 0.045; POST: 0.646 plus or minus 0.352 g (raised dot) per square centimeter) and in the whole hip (PRE=0.894 plus or minus 0.059; POST: 0.858 plus or minus 0.057 g (raised dot) per square centimeter). BMD also decreased significantly in EX in the trochanter (PRE: 0.753 plus or minus 0.0617; POST: 0.741 plus or minus 0.061 g (raised dot) per square centimeter) and whole hip (PRE: 0.954 plus or minus 0.067; POST: 0.935 plus or minus 0.069 g (raised dot) per square centimeter). BMD losses were significantly less in EX than in CON subjects. VO2pk was significantly decreased in the CON after BR (PRE: 38.0 plus or minus 4.8; POST: 29.9 plus or minus 4.2 ml (raised dot) per kilogram per minute), but not in the EX (PRE: 39.0 plus or minus 2.0; POST

  13. Forced and voluntary exercise counteract insulin resistance in rats: the role of coping style.

    PubMed

    Boersma, Gretha J; Barf, R Paulien; Benthem, Lambertus; van Dijk, Gertjan; Scheurink, Anton J W

    2012-06-01

    There are large individual differences in the success rates of exercise intervention programs aimed at the prevention and treatment of obesity-related disorders. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that differences in coping style may impact the success rates of these intervention programs. We tested insulin responses before and after voluntary wheel running in both passive (insulin resistant) Roman Low Avoidance (RLA) and proactive (insulin sensitive) Roman High Avoidance (RHA) rats using intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTTs). To control for a potential difference between voluntary and forced exercise, we also included RLA and RHA rats that were subjected to forced running. We found the following: 1) when given the opportunity to run voluntarily in a running wheel, passive RLA rats run more than proactively than RHA rats; 2) voluntary exercise leads to a normalization of insulin responses during an IVGTTs in RLA rats; and 3) there were no behavioral and physiological differences in efficacy between voluntary and forced running. We conclude that exercise, both forced and voluntary, is a successful lifestyle intervention for the treatment of hyperinsulinemia, especially in individuals with a passive coping style. PMID:22609426

  14. A randomised placebo controlled 12 week trial of budesonide and prednisolone in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kirwan, J; Hallgren, R; Mielants, H; Wollheim, F; Bjorck, E; Persson, T; Book, C; Bowman, S; Byron, M; Cox, N; Field, M; Kanerud, L; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Malaise, M; Mohammad, A; Palmer, R; Petersson, I; Ringertz, B; Sheldon, P; Simonsson, M; Snowden, N; Van den Bosch, F

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To compare budesonide, a locally acting glucocorticoid with minimal systemic exposure, with conventional glucocorticoid treatment and placebo in rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: A double blind, randomised, controlled trial over 12 weeks in 143 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis, comparing budesonide 3 mg daily, budesonide 9 mg daily, prednisolone 7.5 mg daily, and placebo. Particular attention was paid to the pattern of clinical response and to changes in the four week period following discontinuation of treatment. Results: There were improvements in tender joint count and swollen joint count on budesonide 9 mg compared with placebo (28% for tender and 34% for swollen joint counts, p<0.05). Prednisolone 7.5 mg gave similar results, while budesonide 3 mg was less effective. ACR20 response criteria were met by 25% of patients on placebo, 22% on budesonide 3 mg, 42% on budesonide 9 mg, and 56% on prednisolone 7.5 mg. A rapid and significant reduction in symptoms and signs in response to budesonide 9 mg and prednisolone 7.5 mg was evident by two weeks and maximal at eight weeks. There was no evidence that budesonide provided a different pattern of symptom control from prednisolone, or that symptoms became worse than placebo treatment levels after discontinuation of glucocorticoid treatment. Adverse effects attributable to glucocorticoids were equally common in all groups. Conclusions: The symptomatic benefits of budesonide 9 mg and prednisolone 7.5 mg are achieved within a short time of initiating treatment, are maintained for three months, and are not associated with any rebound in symptoms after stopping treatment. PMID:15140776

  15. Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema and Resistance Exercise: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nicole L

    2016-09-01

    Nelson, NL. Breast cancer-related lymphedema and resistance exercise: a systematic review. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2656-2665, 2016-Breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) is characterized by the accumulation of fluid in the interstitial tissues in the arm, shoulder, neck, or torso and attributed to the damage of lymph nodes during breast cancer treatments involving radiation and axillary node dissection. Resistance exercise training (RET) has recently shown promise in the management of BCRL. The aims of this review were twofold: (a) To summarize the results of recent randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effect of resistance exercise in those with, or at risk for, BCRL. (b) To determine whether breast cancer survivors can perform RET at sufficient intensities to elicit gains in strength without causing BCRL flare-up or incidence. A search was performed on the electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, SPORT Discus, and Science Direct, up to July 10, 2015, using the following keywords: breast cancer-related lymphedema, strength training, resistance training, systematic review, and breast cancer. Manual searches of references were also conducted for additional relevant studies. A total of 6 RCTs, involving 805 breast cancer survivors, met the inclusion criteria and corresponded to the aims of this review. The methodological quality of included RCTs was good, with a mean score 6.8 on the 10-point PEDro scale. The results of this review indicate that breast cancer survivors can perform RET at high-enough intensities to elicit strength gains without triggering changes to lymphedema status. There is strong evidence indicating that RET produces significant gains in muscular strength without provoking BCRL. PMID:26840439

  16. Salivary cortisol and testosterone responses to resistance and plyometric exercise in 12- to 14-year-old boys.

    PubMed

    Klentrou, Panagiota; Giannopoulou, Angeliki; McKinlay, Brandon J; Wallace, Phillip; Muir, Cameron; Falk, Bareket; Mack, Diane

    2016-07-01

    This study examined changes in salivary testosterone and cortisol following resistance and plyometric exercise protocols in active boys. In a crossover experimental design, 26 peri-pubertal (12- to 14-year-old) soccer players performed 2 exercise trials in random order, on separate evenings, 1 week apart. Each trial included a 30 min control session followed by 30 min of either resistance or plyometric exercise. Saliva was collected at baseline, post-control (i.e., pre-exercise), and 5 and 30 min post-exercise. There were no significant differences in the baseline hormone concentrations between trials or between weeks (p > 0.05). A significant effect for time was found for testosterone (p = 0.02, [Formula: see text] = 0.14), which increased from pre-exercise to 5 min post-exercise in both the resistance (27% ± 5%) and plyometric (12% ± 6%) protocols. Cortisol decreased to a similar extent in both trials (p = 0.009, [Formula: see text] = 0.19) from baseline to post-control and then to 5 min post-exercise, following its typical circadian decrease in the evening hours. However, a significant protocol-by-time interaction was observed for cortisol, which increased 30 min after the plyometrics (+31% ± 12%) but continued to decrease following the resistance protocol (-21% ± 5%). Our results suggest that in young male athletes, multiple modes of exercise can lead to a transient anabolic state, thus maximizing the beneficial effects on growth and development, when exercise is performed in the evening hours. PMID:27176936

  17. Effects Ala54Thr polymorphism of FABP2 on obesity index and biochemical variable in response to a aerobic exercise training

    PubMed Central

    Han, Tae Kyung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether or not the FABP2 gene polymorphism modulated obesity indices, hemodynamic factor, blood lipid factor, and insulin resistance markers through 12-week aerobic exercise training in abdominal obesity group of Korean mid-life women. A total of 243 abdominally obese subjects of Korean mid-life women voluntarily participated in aerobic exercise training program for 12 weeks. Polymerase Chain Reaction with Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay was used to assess the FABP2 genotype of the participants (117 of AA homozygotes, 100 of AT heterozygotes, 26 of TT homozygotes). Prior to the participation of the exercise training program, baseline obesity indices, hemodynamic factor, blood lipid factor, and insulin resistance markers were measured. All the measurements were replicated following the 12-week aerobic exercise training program, and then the following results were found. After 12-week aerobic exercise training program, wild type (Ala54Ala) and mutant type (Ala54Thr+Thr54Thr) significantly decreased weight (P > .001), BMI (P > .001), %bf (P > .001), waist circumference (P > .001), WHR (P > .001), muscle mass (wild type p < .022; mutant type P > .001), RHR (P > .001), viseceral adipose area (wild type p < .005; mutant type P > .001), subcutaneous area (P > .001), insulin (wild type p < .005; mutant type P > .001) and significantly increased VO2max (P > .001). And wild type significantly decresed NEFA (P > .05), glucose (P > .05), OGTT 120min glucose (P > .05) and significantly increased HDLC (p > .005). Mutant type significantly decreased SBP (P > .001), DBP (P > .01), TC (P > .01), LPL (P > .05), LDL (P > .001), HOMA index (P > .01). The result of the present study represents that regular aerobic exercise training may beneficially prevent obesity index, blood pressure, blood lipids and insulin resistance markers independent of FABP Ala54Thr wild type and mutant type. PMID:25566432

  18. Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance: Underlying Causes and Modification by Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Christian K.; Hevener, Andrea L.; Barnard, R. James

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a collection of cardiometabolic risk factors that includes obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Although there has been significant debate regarding the criteria and concept of the syndrome, this clustering of risk factors is unequivocally linked to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Regardless of the true definition, based on current population estimates, nearly 100 million have MS. It is often characterized by insulin resistance, which some have suggested is a major underpinning link between physical inactivity and MS. The purpose of this review is to: (i) provide an overview of the history, causes and clinical aspects of MS, (ii) review the molecular mechanisms of insulin action and the causes of insulin resistance, and (iii) discuss the epidemiological and intervention data on the effects of exercise on MS and insulin sensitivity. PMID:23720280

  19. Nandrolone decanoate and resistance exercise training favor the occurrence of lesions and activate the inflammatory response in the ventral prostate.

    PubMed

    Gomes, F C; Chuffa, L G A; Scarano, W R; Pinheiro, P F F; Fávaro, W J; Domeniconi, R F

    2016-05-01

    Age is a key factor in the development of prostatic lesions. An increase in reactive oxygen species levels occurs during aging. Furthermore, the indiscriminate use of anabolic androgenic steroids and physical exercise alter the availability of hormones and may promote the appearance of lesions. This study examined whether the use of nandrolone decanoate (ND), associated or not with resistance exercise training, affects the pathways related to the inflammatory response in the ventral prostate of adult and aged rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were distributed into eight experimental groups: sedentary with ND, sedentary without ND, exercise with ND, and exercise without ND. The animals performed resistance exercise training and received ND two times/week (5 mg/kg, i.m.) for 8 weeks. Adult rats were killed immediately following treatment completion, and aged rats remained untreated until reaching 300 days of age. The adult animals that received ND and performed resistance exercise training showed a higher occurrence of lesions with TLR4 activation. Marked IL-6 expression occurred in the group that performed resistance exercise training. The group exposed to ND showed overexpression of TLR2, TLR4, NOX1, Nrf2, TNF-α, and P38MAPK. The animals that received ND and performed training showed increase levels of NFκB, IRF3, IL-6, TNF-α, and NOX1. TLR2 and TLR4 showed no upregulation in the aged animals. The groups exercise + ND showed lesions in the adult stage and after aging, followed by molecular alterations. We concluded that nandrolone decanoate and resistance exercise training can promote the onset of prostatic tumors in the adult stage, and during aging, activating pathways involved in the inflammatory response. PMID:27011054

  20. The effects of progressive-resisted exercises on muscle strength and health-related quality of life in persons with HIV-related poly-neuropathy in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Mkandla, Khumbula; Myezwa, Hellen; Musenge, Eustasius

    2016-05-01

    Distal symmetrical poly-neuropathy (DSP) is a neurological complication associated with HIV/AIDS and stavudine (d4T) containing antiretroviral therapy. People with DSP experience pain, numbness and muscle weakness, which affect their quality of life (QOL). The purpose of this study was to establish the effect of a progressive-resisted exercise (PRE) intervention on health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) in people living with HIV/AIDS-related DSP. An assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial was conducted, with participants sourced from 10 clinics with HIV services, the family care clinic at Wilkins Hospital and 2 large hospitals in Harare, Zimbabwe. A 12-week PRE intervention was conducted twice weekly for 80 participants, while the control group with 80 participants continued with usual daily activities. The main outcome variable was HR-QOL for which we controlled for demographic and clinical measures in generalised estimating equation population-averaged models. Data were summarised and analysed using an intention to treat analysis approach using the Stata v10 program. Mean age of participants was 42.2 years (SD = 8.5). While d4T was used by 59% (n = 94), an equal proportion of the participants also had moderate to severe neuropathy. PRE was found to significantly improve HR-QOL in the intervention group based on the mean difference between the intervention group mean change and the mean change in the control group (F ratio 4.24; p = .04). This study established that PREs have positive effects on HR-QOL for people living with HIV/AIDS-related DSP. PMID:26729347

  1. Oxidative stress and antioxidant responses to progressive resistance exercise intensity in trained and untrained males

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, F; Çolak, R

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between oxidative stress and some exercise components of resistance exercise (e.g. intensity, exercise volume) has not been clearly defined. Additionally, the oxidative stress markers may respond differently in various conditions. This study aims to determine the effects of progressive intensity of resistance exercise (RE) on oxidative stress and antioxidants in trained and untrained men, and also to investigate the possible threshold intensity required to evoke oxidative stress. RE trained (N=8) and untrained (N=8) men performed the leg extension RE at progressive intensities standardized for total volume: 1x17 reps at 50% of one-repetition maximum (1RM); 1x14 reps at 60% of 1RM; 1x12 reps at 70% of 1RM; 2x5 reps at 80% of 1RM; and 3x3 reps at 90% of 1RM. Blood samples were drawn before (PRE) and immediately after each intensity, and after 30 minutes, 60 minutes and 24 hours following the RE. Lipid-hydroperoxide (LHP) significantly increased during the test and then decreased during the recovery in both groups (p<0.05); the POST-24 h LHP level was lower than PRE-LHP. Protein carbonyl (PCO) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) significantly increased (p<0.05); however, 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and glutathione (GSH) were not affected by the RE (p > 0.05). The results indicated that there was no significant training status x intensity interaction for examined variables (p > 0.05). Standardized volume of RE increased oxidative stress responses. Our study suggests that lower intensity (50%) is enough to increase LHP, whereas higher intensity (more than 80%) is required to evoke protein oxidation. PMID:26681835

  2. Exercise Responses to Gravity-Independent Flywheel Aerobic and Resistance Training

    PubMed Central

    Owerkowicz, Tomasz; Cotter, Joshua A.; Haddad, Fadia; Yu, Alvin M.; Camilon, Marinelle L.; Hoang, Theresa; Jimenez, Daniel; Kreitenberg, Arthur; Tesch, Per A.; Caiozzo, Vincent J.; Adams, Gregory R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although a number of exercise systems have been developed to mitigate the physiological deconditioning that occurs in microgravity, few have the capacity to positively impact multiple physiological systems and still meet the volume/mass requirements needed for missions beyond low earth orbit. The purpose of this study was to test the gravity-independent Multi-Mode Exercise Device (M-MED) for both resistance (RE) and aerobic (AE) training stimuli. Methods Eight men and nine women (mean age 22.0±0.4 years) completed five weeks of training on the M-MED: RE 4×7 squats two days a week, and AE 4×4-min rowing bouts at ~90% VO2max three days a week. Pre- and post-training data collection included an aerobic capacity test, MR imaging, strength testing, and vastus lateralis muscle biopsy. Results VO2max increased 8%, 3RM strength 18%, and quadriceps femoris cross-sectional area (CSA) 10%. Knee extensor strength increased at all isokinetic speeds tested. Subjects also demonstrated improved resistance to fatigue in knee extension. At the cellular and molecular level, the biopsy revealed increases in mixed myofiber CSA (13%), citrate synthase activity (26%), total RNA concentration (24%), IGF-I mRNA (77%), Type IIa Myosin Heavy Chain (MHC) mRNA (8%), and concomitant decrease in Type IIx MHC mRNA (−23%). None of the changes were gender-specific. Discussion Both the functional outcomes and biomarker changes indicate that a very low volume of M-MED exercise results in robust adaptation in the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems. The M-MED has the potential to provide a wide range of countermeasure exercises and should be considered for testing in ground-based spaceflight simulation. PMID:26802373

  3. Short-term Recovery Following Resistance Exercise Leading or not to Failure.

    PubMed

    González-Badillo, J J; Rodríguez-Rosell, D; Sánchez-Medina, L; Ribas, J; López-López, C; Mora-Custodio, R; Yañez-García, J M; Pareja-Blanco, F

    2016-04-01

    This study analyzed the time course of recovery following 2 resistance exercise protocols differing in level of effort: maximum (to failure) vs. half-maximum number of repetitions per set. 9 males performed 3 sets of 4 vs. 8 repetitions with their 80% 1RM load, 3×4(8) vs. 3×8(8), in the bench press and squat. Several time-points from 24 h pre- to 48 h post-exercise were established to assess the mechanical (countermovement jump height, CMJ; velocity against the 1 m·s(-1) load, V1-load), biochemical (testosterone, cortisol, GH, prolactin, IGF-1, CK) and heart rate variability (HRV) and complexity (HRC) response to exercise. 3×8(8) resulted in greater neuromuscular fatigue (higher reductions in repetition velocity and velocity against V1-load) than 3×4(8). CMJ remained reduced up to 48 h post-exercise following 3×8(8), whereas it was recovered after 6 h for 3×4(8). Significantly greater prolactin and IGF-1 levels were found for 3×8(8) vs. 3×4(8). Significant reductions in HRV and HRC were observed for 3×8(8) vs. 3×4(8) in the immediate recovery. Performing a half-maximum number of repetitions per set resulted in: 1) a stimulus of faster mean repetition velocities; 2) lower impairment of neuromuscular performance and faster recovery; 3) reduced hormonal response and muscle damage; and 4) lower reduction in HRV and HRC following exercise. PMID:26667923

  4. Acute resistance exercise-induced IGF1 expression and subsequent GLUT4 translocation.

    PubMed

    Kido, Kohei; Ato, Satoru; Yokokawa, Takumi; Makanae, Yuhei; Sato, Koji; Fujita, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    Acute aerobic exercise (AE) is a major physiological stimulus for skeletal muscle glucose uptake through activation of 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). However, the regulation of glucose uptake by acute resistance exercise (RE) remains unclear. To investigate the intracellular regulation of glucose uptake after acute RE versus acute AE, male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: RE, AE, or nonexercise control. After fasting for 12 h overnight, the right gastrocnemius muscle in the RE group was exercised at maximum isometric contraction via percutaneous electrical stimulation (3 × 10 sec, 5 sets). The AE group ran on a treadmill (25 m/min, 60 min). Muscle samples were taken 0, 1, and 3 h after completion of the exercises. AMPK, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and TBC1D1 phosphorylation were increased immediately after both forms of exercise and returned to baseline levels by 3 h. Muscle IGF1 expression was increased by RE but not AE, and maintained until 3 h after RE Additionally, Akt and AS160 phosphorylation were sustained for 3 h after RE, whereas they returned to baseline levels by 3 h after AE Similarly, GLUT4 translocation remained elevated 3 h after RE, although it returned to the baseline level by 3 h after AE Overall, this study showed that AMPK/TBC1D1 and IGF1/Akt/AS160 signaling were enhanced by acute RE, and that GLUT4 translocation after acute RE was more prolonged than after acute AE These results suggest that acute RE-induced increases in intramuscular IGF1 expression might be a distinct regulator of GLUT4 translocation. PMID:27550988

  5. Cold water immersion enhances recovery of submaximal muscle function after resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Llion A; Nosaka, Kazunori; Coombes, Jeff S; Peake, Jonathan M

    2014-10-15

    We investigated the effect of cold water immersion (CWI) on the recovery of muscle function and physiological responses after high-intensity resistance exercise. Using a randomized, cross-over design, 10 physically active men performed high-intensity resistance exercise followed by one of two recovery interventions: 1) 10 min of CWI at 10°C or 2) 10 min of active recovery (low-intensity cycling). After the recovery interventions, maximal muscle function was assessed after 2 and 4 h by measuring jump height and isometric squat strength. Submaximal muscle function was assessed after 6 h by measuring the average load lifted during 6 sets of 10 squats at 80% of 1 repetition maximum. Intramuscular temperature (1 cm) was also recorded, and venous blood samples were analyzed for markers of metabolism, vasoconstriction, and muscle damage. CWI did not enhance recovery of maximal muscle function. However, during the final three sets of the submaximal muscle function test, participants lifted a greater load (P < 0.05, Cohen's effect size: 1.3, 38%) after CWI compared with active recovery. During CWI, muscle temperature decreased ∼7°C below postexercise values and remained below preexercise values for another 35 min. Venous blood O2 saturation decreased below preexercise values for 1.5 h after CWI. Serum endothelin-1 concentration did not change after CWI, whereas it decreased after active recovery. Plasma myoglobin concentration was lower, whereas plasma IL-6 concentration was higher after CWI compared with active recovery. These results suggest that CWI after resistance exercise allows athletes to complete more work during subsequent training sessions, which could enhance long-term training adaptations. PMID:25121612

  6. Dysanapsis and the resistive work of breathing during exercise in healthy men and women.

    PubMed

    Dominelli, Paolo B; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Bingham, Derek; Swartz, Philippa M; Road, Jeremy D; Foster, Glen E; Sheel, A William

    2015-11-15

    We asked if the higher work of breathing (Wb) during exercise in women compared with men is explained by biological sex. We created a statistical model that accounts for both the viscoelastic and the resistive components of the total Wb and independently compares the effects of biological sex. We applied the model to esophageal pressure-derived Wb values obtained during an incremental cycle test to exhaustion. Subjects were healthy men (n = 17) and women (n = 18) with a range of maximal aerobic capacities (V̇o2 max range: men = 40-68 and women = 39-60 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)). We also calculated the dysanapsis ratio using measures of lung recoil and forced expiratory flow as index of airway caliber. By applying the model we found that the differences in the total Wb during exercise in women are due to a higher resistive Wb rather than viscoelastic Wb. We also found that the higher resistive Wb is independently explained by biological sex. To account for the known effect of lung volumes on the dysanapsis ratio we compared the sexes with an analysis of covariance procedures and found that when vital capacity was accounted for the adjusted mean dysanapsis ratio is statistically lower in women (0.17 vs. 0.25 arbitrary units; P < 0.05). Our collective findings suggest that innate sex-based differences may exist in human airways, which result in significant male-female differences in the Wb during exercise in healthy subjects. PMID:26359483

  7. A Mixed Methods Evaluation of a 12-Week Insurance-Sponsored Weight Management Program Incorporating Cognitive-Behavioral Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abildso, Christiaan; Zizzi, Sam; Gilleland, Diana; Thomas, James; Bonner, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity is critical in healthy weight loss, yet there is still much to be learned about psychosocial mechanisms of physical activity behavior change in weight loss. A sequential mixed methods approach was used to assess the physical and psychosocial impact of a 12-week cognitive-behavioral weight management program and explore factors…

  8. Effects of Combined Aerobic and Resistance Exercise on Exercise Capacity, Muscle Strength and Quality of Life in HIV-Infected Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gomes Neto, Mansueto; Conceição, Cristiano Sena; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; Brites, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background Many HIV-infected patients demonstrate disability and lower aerobic capacity. The inclusion of resistance training combined with aerobic exercise in a single program is known as combined aerobic and resistance exercise (CARE) and seems to be an effective strategy to improve muscle weakness, as well as aerobic capacity in HIV-infected patients. We performed a meta-analysis to investigate the effects of CARE in HIV-infected patients. Methods We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, EMBASE, CINAHL (from the earliest date available to august 2014) for controlled trials that evaluated the effects of CARE in HIV-infected patients. Weighted mean differences (WMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated, and heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 test. Results Seven studies met the study criteria. CARE resulted in improvement in Peak VO2 WMD (4.48 mL·kg-1·min-1 95% CI: 2.95 to 6.0), muscle strength of the knee extensors WMD (25.06 Kg 95% CI: 10.46 to 39.66) and elbow flexors WMD (4.44 Kg 95% CI: 1.22 to 7.67) compared with no exercise group. The meta-analyses also showed significant improvement in Health status, Energy/Vitality and physical function domains of quality of life for participants in the CARE group compared with no exercise group. A nonsignificant improvement in social function domain of quality of life was found for participants in the CARE group compared with no exercise group. Conclusions Combined aerobic and resistance exercise may improve peak VO2, muscle strength and health status, energy and physical function domains of quality of life and should be considered as a component of care of HIV-infected individuals. PMID:26378794

  9. Effect of the low- versus high-intensity exercise training on endoplasmic reticulum stress and GLP-1 in adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Soo; Yoo, Jae Ho; So, Yong Seok

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The primary objective of this study was to investigate the effect of low-intensity exercise training compare with high-intensity exercise training on endoplasmic reticulum stress and glucagon-like peptide-1 in adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus. [Subjects and Methods] The low-intensity exercise training group performed aerobic exercise training at an intensity of ≤ 45% of the heart rate reserve. The high-intensity interval exercise training group performed interval exercise training at an intensity of ≥ 80% of the heart rate reserve. The exercise-related energy consumption was determined for both groups on a per-week basis (1,200 kcal/week). [Results] Both groups showed improvement in the glucose-regulated protein 78 and dipeptidyl peptidase-4, but the size of the between-group effect was not statistically significant. The high-intensity interval exercise training group showed a significant reduction in percentage body fat. The C-peptide level increased after the 12-weeks programs and was significantly different, between the groups. Fasting glucose, insulin resistance in the fasting state according to homeostasis model assessment, and leptin decreased after the 12-weeks exercise program and were significantly different between the groups, and glucagon-like peptide-1 increased after the 12-week exercise programs and was significantly different between the groups. [Conclusion] In conclusion high-intensity interval exercise training, as defined in this study, may lead to improvements in body composition, glycemic control, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and the glucagon-like peptide-1 in adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26644644

  10. Influence of Differences in Exercise-intensity and Kilograms/Set on Energy Expenditure During and After Maximally Explosive Resistance Exercise

    PubMed Central

    MAZZETTI, SCOTT A.; WOLFF, CHRISTOPHER; COLLINS, BRITTANY; KOLANKOWSKI, MICHAEL T.; WILKERSON, BRITTANY; OVERSTREET, MATTHEW; GRUBE, TROY

    2011-01-01

    With resistance exercise, greater intensity typically elicits increased energy expenditure, but heavier loads require that the lifter perform more sets of fewer repetitions, which alters the kilograms lifted per set. Thus, the effect of exercise-intensity on energy expenditure has yielded varying results, especially with explosive resistance exercise. This study was designed to examine the effect of exercise-intensity and kilograms/set on energy expenditure during explosive resistance exercise. Ten resistance-trained men (22±3.6 years; 84±6.4 kg, 180±5.1 cm, and 13±3.8 %fat) performed squat and bench press protocols once/week using different exercise-intensities including 48% (LIGHT-48), 60% (MODERATE-60), and 72% of 1-repetition-maximum (1-RM) (HEAVY-72), plus a no-exercise protocol (CONTROL). To examine the effects of kilograms/set, an additional protocol using 72% of 1-RM was performed (HEAVY-72MATCHED) with kilograms/set matched with LIGHT-48 and MODERATE-60. LIGHT-48 was 4 sets of 10 repetitions (4×10); MODERATE-60 4×8; HEAVY-72 5×5; and HEAVY-72MATCHED 4×6.5. Eccentric and concentric repetition speeds, ranges-of-motion, rest-intervals, and total kilograms were identical between protocols. Expired air was collected continuously throughout each protocol using a metabolic cart, [Blood lactate] using a portable analyzer, and bench press peak power were measured. Rates of energy expenditure were significantly greater (p≤0.05) with LIGHT-48 and HEAVY-72MATCHED than HEAVY-72 during squat (7.3±0.7; 6.9±0.6 > 6.1±0.7 kcal/min), bench press (4.8±0.3; 4.7±0.3 > 4.0±0.4 kcal/min), and +5min after (3.7±0.1; 3.7±0.2 > 3.3±0.3 kcal/min), but there were no significant differences in total kcal among protocols. Therefore, exercise-intensity may not effect energy expenditure with explosive contractions, but light loads (~50% of 1-RM) may be preferred because of higher rates of energy expenditure, and since heavier loading requires more sets with lower

  11. Design of a resistive exercise device for use on the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Dennis L.; Durrani, Mohammed; Redilla, Christi L.

    1992-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration in conjunction with the Universities Space Research Association sponsored the design of a Resistive Exercise Device (RED) for use on the Space Shuttle. The device must enable the astronauts to perform a number of exercises to prevent skeletal muscle atrophy and neuromuscular deconditioning in microgravity environments. The RED must fit the requirements for limited volume and weight and must provide a means of restraint during exercise. The design team divided the functions of the device into three major groups: methods of supplying force, methods of adjusting force, and methods of transmitting the force to the user. After analyzing the three main functions of the RED and developing alternatives for each, the design team used a comparative decision process to choose the most feasible components for the overall design. The design team selected the constant force spring alternative for further embodiment. The device consists of an array of different sized constant force springs which can be pinned in different combinations to produce the required output forces. The force is transmitted by means of a shaft and gear system. The final report is divided into four sections. An introduction section discusses the sponsor background, problem background and requirements of the device. The second section covers the alternative designs for each of the main functions. The design solution and pertinent calculations comprises the third section. The final section contains design conclusions and recommendations including topics of future work.

  12. Maximal strength on different resistance training rowing exercises predicts start phase performance in elite kayakers.

    PubMed

    Ualí, Ismael; Herrero, Azael J; Garatachea, Nuria; Marín, Pedro J; Alvear-Ordenes, Ildefonso; García-López, David

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationship existing between maximum strength values in 2 common resistance training row exercises (bilateral bench pull [BBP] and one-arm cable row [OACR]) and short sprint performance in elite kayakers. Ten junior kayakers (5 women and 5 men) were tested on different days for 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and maximal voluntary isometric contraction in both exercises. Moreover, a 12-m sprint kayak was performed in a dew pond to record split times (2, 5, and 10 m), peak velocity, distance completed considering the first 8 strokes, and mean acceleration induced by right blade and left blade strokes. No differences (p > 0.05) were observed when right and left arms were compared in sprint testing or strength testing variables. Maximal strength values in BBP and OACR were significantly correlated with short sprint performance variables, showing the bilateral exercise with slightly stronger correlation coefficients than the unilateral seated row. Moreover, the relationship between strength testing and sprint testing variables is stronger when maximal force is measured through a dynamic approach (1RM) in comparison with an isometric approach. In conclusion, maximal strength in BBP and OACR is a good predictor of the start phase performance in elite sprint kayakers, mainly the 1RM value in BBP. PMID:22446667

  13. The influence of muscle action on heart rate, RPE, and affective responses after upper-body resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Miller, Paul C; Hall, Eric E; Chmelo, Elizabeth A; Morrison, Jeffrey M; DeWitt, Rachel E; Kostura, Christine M

    2009-03-01

    Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) are routinely used to monitor, assess, and prescribe aerobic exercise. Heart rate (HR) is another measure used to evaluate exercise intensity. Additionally, affective responses to aerobic exercise have been studied and seem to be influenced by the intensity of the exercise. The perceptual, HR, and affective responses to resistance exercise have not been effectively established. The purpose of this study was to examine whether differences in affect, RPE, and HR exist among college-aged women (n = 31) performing three different modes of resistance training: concentric (CE), eccentric (EE), and traditional concentric/eccentric (TE) performed at varying resistances. The women were asked to complete four sessions of resistance training on variable resistance machines: chest press, seated row, overhead press, and biceps curl. The first session was used to establish the 10-repetition maximum (RM) load for each station. Subsequent sessions involved the execution of training in one of the three test conditions: CE, EE, or TE. The participants performed three sets of each lift at 80% 10-RM, 100% 10-RM, and 120% 10-RM. The data revealed lower RPE during EE than the other test conditions. Similarly, EE elicited more mild HR response than either CE or TE. This finding is potentially important for the establishment of training programs, especially for those individuals recovering from an illness, who had been previously sedentary, and who are involved in rehabilitation of an injury. PMID:19204573

  14. Effects of a 12-week Pilates course on lower limb muscle strength and trunk flexibility in women living in the community.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yu-Hsiu; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Huang, Yi-Ching; Tsai, Ya-Wen; Wang, Kuo-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Researchers in Taiwan studying regular adult physical activity found that among married women aged 26 to 55 years, 56% participated in physical activity, and that the convenience and safety of the activity were major factors contributing to their willingness to exercise. Muscle weakness and poor trunk flexibility are closely related to some chronic diseases in women. In this cross-sectional survey, we used the Polestar Pilates™ method to explore the effects of a 12-week Pilates course on the physical fitness of women living in the community. Fifty-three members of the experimental group (mean age: 42.30 ± 9.97) and 43 of the control group (mean age: 41.23 ± 9.83) were included. We confirm that a convenient Pilates exercise intervention can significantly improve muscle strength and trunk flexibility in women. Our findings serve as an important reference for health authorities in Taiwan and provide higher awareness of women's health and physical fitness, which can help prevent chronic and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24611630

  15. Selective Modulation of MicroRNA Expression with Protein Ingestion Following Concurrent Resistance and Endurance Exercise in Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Camera, Donny M.; Ong, Jun N.; Coffey, Vernon G.; Hawley, John A.

    2016-01-01

    We examined changes in the expression of 13 selected skeletal muscle microRNAs (miRNAs) implicated in exercise adaptation responses following a single bout of concurrent exercise. In a randomized cross-over design, seven healthy males undertook a single trial consisting of resistance exercise (8 × 5 leg extension, 80% 1 Repetition Maximum) followed by cycling (30 min at ~70% VO2peak) with either post-exercise protein (PRO: 25 g whey protein) or placebo (PLA) ingestion. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were obtained at rest and 4 h post-exercise. Detection of miRNA via quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) revealed post-exercise increases in miR-23a-3p (~90%), miR-23b-3p (~39%), miR-133b (~80%), miR-181-5p (~50%), and miR-378-5p (~41%) at 4 h post-exercise with PRO that also resulted in higher abundance compared to PLA (P < 0.05). There was a post-exercise decrease in miR-494-3p abundance in PLA only (~88%, P < 0.05). There were no changes in the total abundance of target proteins post-exercise or between conditions. Protein ingestion following concurrent exercise can modulate the expression of miRNAs implicated in exercise adaptations compared to placebo. The selective modulation of miRNAs with target proteins that may prioritize myogenic compared to oxidative/metabolic adaptive responses indicate that miRNAs can play a regulatory role in the molecular machinery enhancing muscle protein synthesis responses with protein ingestion following concurrent exercise. PMID:27014087

  16. Selective Modulation of MicroRNA Expression with Protein Ingestion Following Concurrent Resistance and Endurance Exercise in Human Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Camera, Donny M; Ong, Jun N; Coffey, Vernon G; Hawley, John A

    2016-01-01

    We examined changes in the expression of 13 selected skeletal muscle microRNAs (miRNAs) implicated in exercise adaptation responses following a single bout of concurrent exercise. In a randomized cross-over design, seven healthy males undertook a single trial consisting of resistance exercise (8 × 5 leg extension, 80% 1 Repetition Maximum) followed by cycling (30 min at ~70% VO2peak) with either post-exercise protein (PRO: 25 g whey protein) or placebo (PLA) ingestion. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were obtained at rest and 4 h post-exercise. Detection of miRNA via quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) revealed post-exercise increases in miR-23a-3p (~90%), miR-23b-3p (~39%), miR-133b (~80%), miR-181-5p (~50%), and miR-378-5p (~41%) at 4 h post-exercise with PRO that also resulted in higher abundance compared to PLA (P < 0.05). There was a post-exercise decrease in miR-494-3p abundance in PLA only (~88%, P < 0.05). There were no changes in the total abundance of target proteins post-exercise or between conditions. Protein ingestion following concurrent exercise can modulate the expression of miRNAs implicated in exercise adaptations compared to placebo. The selective modulation of miRNAs with target proteins that may prioritize myogenic compared to oxidative/metabolic adaptive responses indicate that miRNAs can play a regulatory role in the molecular machinery enhancing muscle protein synthesis responses with protein ingestion following concurrent exercise. PMID:27014087

  17. Using Social Media While Waiting in Pain: A Clinical 12-Week Longitudinal Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Kathleen; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Mantopoulos, Steven; Hogg, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic pain places an enormous burden on health care systems. Multidisciplinary pain management services are well documented as an effective means to improve patient outcomes. However, waiting lists to access these services are long and outcomes deteriorate. Innovative solutions such as social media are gaining attention as a way to decrease this burden and improve outcomes. It is a challenge to design research that demonstrates whether social media are acceptable to patients and clinically effective. Objective The aim was to conduct a longitudinal pilot study to understand what aspects of research design are key to the success of running a larger-scale study of social media use in the clinical management of chronic pain. Methods A 12-week study examined social media use by patients on the waiting list for the Royal Melbourne Hospital Pain Management Service. Selected social media resources were suggested for use by patients waiting for an appointment at the clinic. Patients filled out measures for pain interference and pain self-efficacy before and after the study. Follow-up was conducted at monthly intervals via telephone semistructured interviews to discuss engagement and garner individual perceptions towards social media use. A social media-use instrument was also administered as part of the after-study questionnaire. Results Targeted recruitment refined 235 patient referrals to 138 (58.7%) suitable potential participants. Contact was made with 84 out of 138 (60.9%) patients. After a further exclusion of 54 out of 84 (64%) patients for various reasons, this left 30 out of 84 (36%) patients fitting the inclusion criteria and interested in study participation. A final study cohort of 17 out of 30 (57%) was obtained. Demographics of the 17 patients were mixed. Low back pain was the primary condition reported as leading to chronic pain. Semistructured interviews collected data from 16 out of 17 (94%) patients who started the trial, and at final follow

  18. Human inflammatory and resolving lipid mediator responses to resistance exercise and ibuprofen treatment

    PubMed Central

    Markworth, James F.; Vella, Luke; Lingard, Benjamin S.; Tull, Dedreia L.; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W.; Sinclair, Andrew J.; Maddipati, Krishna Rao

    2013-01-01

    Classical proinflammatory eicosanoids, and more recently discovered lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory and proresolving bioactivity, exert a complex role in the initiation, control, and resolution of inflammation. Using a targeted lipidomics approach, we investigated circulating lipid mediator responses to resistance exercise and treatment with the NSAID ibuprofen. Human subjects undertook a single bout of unaccustomed resistance exercise (80% of one repetition maximum) following oral ingestion of ibuprofen (400 mg) or placebo control. Venous blood was collected during early recovery (0–3 h and 24 h postexercise), and serum lipid mediator composition was analyzed by LC-MS-based targeted lipidomics. Postexercise recovery was characterized by elevated levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and 2-derived prostanoids (TXB2, PGE2, PGD2, PGF2α, and PGI2), lipooxygenase (5-LOX, 12-LOX, and 15-LOX)-derived hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), and leukotrienes (e.g., LTB4), and epoxygenase (CYP)-derived epoxy/dihydroxy eicosatrienoic acids (EpETrEs/DiHETrEs). Additionally, we detected elevated levels of bioactive lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory and proresolving properties, including arachidonic acid-derived lipoxins (LXA4 and LXB4), and the EPA (E-series) and DHA (D-series)-derived resolvins (RvD1 and RvE1), and protectins (PD1 isomer 10S, 17S-diHDoHE). Ibuprofen treatment blocked exercise-induced increases in COX-1 and COX-2-derived prostanoids but also resulted in off-target reductions in leukotriene biosynthesis, and a diminished proresolving lipid mediator response. CYP pathway product metabolism was also altered by ibuprofen treatment, as indicated by elevated postexercise serum 5,6-DiHETrE and 8,9-DiHETrE only in those receiving ibuprofen. These findings characterize the blood inflammatory lipid mediator response to unaccustomed resistance exercise in humans and show that acute proinflammatory signals are mechanistically linked to the induction of a

  19. A Two Year Randomized Controlled Trial of Progressive Resistance Exercise for Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Corcos, Daniel M.; Robichaud, Julie A.; David, Fabian J.; Leurgans, Sue E.; Vaillancourt, David E.; Poon, Cynthia; Rafferty, Miriam R.; Kohrt, Wendy M.; Comella, Cynthia L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The effects of progressive resistance exercise (PRE) on the motor signs of Parkinson’s disease have not been studied in controlled trials. Our aim was to compare 6, 12, 18, and 24 month outcomes of patients with Parkinson’s disease who received PRE to a stretching, balance, and strengthening exercise program. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial between September 2007 and July 2011. Pairs of patients, matched by sex and off-medication Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale, motor subscale (UPDRS-III), were randomly assigned to the interventions with a 1:1 allocation ratio. The PRE group performed a weight lifting program. The Modified Fitness Counts (mFC) group performed a stretching, balance, and strengthening exercise program. Patients exercised two days per week for 24 months at a gym. A personal trainer directed both weekly sessions for the first six months and one weekly session after six months. The primary outcome was the off-medication UPDRS-III score. Patients were followed for 24 months at six-month intervals. Results Of 51 patients, 20 in PRE and 18 in mFC completed the trial. At 24 months, the mean off-medication UPDRS-III score decreased more with PRE than with mFC (mean difference: - 7·3 points; 95% CI: -11·3 to -3·6; P < 0·001). The PRE group had ten adverse events. The mFC group had seven adverse events. Conclusions PRE demonstrated a statistically and clinically significant reduction in UPDRS-III scores compared to mFC and is recommended as a useful adjunct therapy to improve Parkinsonian motor signs. PMID:23536417

  20. Impact of resistance exercise during bed rest on skeletal muscle sarcopenia and myosin isoform distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamman, M. M.; Clarke, M. S.; Feeback, D. L.; Talmadge, R. J.; Stevens, B. R.; Lieberman, S. A.; Greenisen, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Because resistance exercise (REx) and bed-rest unloading (BRU) are associated with opposing adaptations, our purpose was to test the efficacy of REx against the effects of 14 days of BRU on the knee-extensor muscle group. Sixteen healthy men were randomly assigned to no exercise (NoEx; n = 8) or REx (n = 8). REx performed five sets of leg press exercise with 80-85% of one repetition maximum (1 RM) every other day during BRU. Muscle samples were removed from the vastus lateralis muscle by percutaneous needle biopsy. Myofiber distribution was determined immunohistochemically with three monoclonal antibodies against myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms (I, IIa, IIx). MHC distribution was further assessed by quantitative gel electrophoresis. Dynamic 1-RM leg press and unilateral maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) were determined. Maximal neural activation (root mean squared electromyogram) and rate of torque development (RTD) were measured during MVC. Reductions (P < 0.05) in type I (15%) and type II (17%) myofiber cross-sectional areas were found in NoEx but not in REx. Electrophoresis revealed no changes in MHC isoform distribution. The percentage of type IIx myofibers decreased (P < 0.05) in REx from 9 to 2% and did not change in NoEx. 1 RM was reduced (P < 0.05) by 9% in NoEx but was unchanged in REx. MVC fell by 15 and 13% in NoEx and REx, respectively. The agonist-to-antagonist root mean squared electromyogram ratio decreased (P < 0.05) 19% in REx. RTD slowed (P < 0.05) by 54% in NoEx only. Results indicate that REx prevented BRU-induced myofiber atrophy and also maintained training-specific strength. Unlike spaceflight, BRU did not induce shifts in myosin phenotype. The reported benefits of REx may prove useful in prescribing exercise for astronauts in microgravity.

  1. Endurance, interval sprint, and resistance exercise training: impact on microvascular dysfunction in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Olver, T Dylan; Laughlin, M Harold

    2016-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) alters capillary hemodynamics, causes capillary rarefaction in skeletal muscle, and alters endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype, resulting in impaired vasodilatory responses. These changes contribute to altered blood flow responses to physiological stimuli, such as exercise and insulin secretion. T2D-induced microvascular dysfunction impairs glucose and insulin delivery to skeletal muscle (and other tissues such as skin and nervous), thereby reducing glucose uptake and perpetuating hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. In patients with T2D, exercise training (EX) improves microvascular vasodilator and insulin signaling and attenuates capillary rarefaction in skeletal muscle. EX-induced changes subsequently augment glucose and insulin delivery as well as glucose uptake. If these adaptions occur in a sufficient amount of tissue, and skeletal muscle in particular, chronic exposure to hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia and the risk of microvascular complications in all vascular beds will decrease. We postulate that EX programs that engage as much skeletal muscle mass as possible and recruit as many muscle fibers within each muscle as possible will generate the greatest improvements in microvascular function, providing that the duration of the stimulus is sufficient. Primary improvements in microvascular function occur in tissues (skeletal muscle primarily) engaged during exercise, and secondary improvements in microvascular function throughout the body may result from improved blood glucose control. We propose that the added benefit of combined resistance and aerobic EX programs and of vigorous intensity EX programs is not simply "more is better." Rather, we believe the additional benefit is the result of EX-induced adaptations in and around more muscle fibers, resulting in more muscle mass and the associated microvasculature being changed. Thus, to acquire primary and secondary improvements in microvascular function and improved

  2. Effects of exercise intensity on postexercise hypotension after resistance training session in overweight hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Paula Andréa M; Rica, Roberta L; Evangelista, Alexandre L; Serra, Andrey J; Figueira, Aylton; Pontes, Francisco Luciano; Kilgore, Lon; Baker, Julien S; Bocalini, Danilo S

    2015-01-01

    Among all nonpharmacological treatments, aerobic or resistance training (RT) has been indicated as a significantly important strategy to control hypertension. However, postexercise hypotension responses after intensity alterations in RT are not yet fully understood. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of differing intensities of RT on hypertensive older women. Twenty hypertensive older women participated voluntarily in this study. After a maximum voluntary contraction test (one repetition maximum) and determination of 40% and 80% experimental loads, the protocol (3 sets/90″ interset rest) was performed in a single session with the following exercises: leg press, leg extension, leg curl, chest press, elbow flexion, elbow extension, upper back row, and abdominal flexion. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were evaluated at rest, during exercise peak, and after 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes of exercise and compared to the control. Both experimental loads were effective (P<0.01) in promoting postexercise systolic hypotension (mmHg) compared to controls, after 30, 45, and 60 minutes, respectively, at 40% (113±2, 112±4, and 110±3 mmHg) and 80% (111±3, 111±4, and 110±4 mmHg). Both procedures promoted hypotension with similar systolic blood pressures (40%: -11%±1.0% and 80%: -13%±0.5%), mean arterial blood pressures (40%: -12%±5.5% and 80%: -12%±3.4%), and rate-pressure products (40%: -15%±2.1% and 80%: -17%±2.4%) compared to control measures (systolic blood pressure: 1%±1%, mean arterial blood pressure:\\ 0.6%±1.5%, rate-pressure product: 0.33%±1.1%). No differences were found in diastolic blood pressure and heart rate measures. In conclusion, hypertensive older women exhibit postexercise hypotension independently of exercise intensity without expressed cardiovascular overload during the session. PMID:26425078

  3. Effects of exercise intensity on postexercise hypotension after resistance training session in overweight hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante, Paula Andréa M; Rica, Roberta L; Evangelista, Alexandre L; Serra, Andrey J; Figueira, Aylton; Pontes, Francisco Luciano; Kilgore, Lon; Baker, Julien S; Bocalini, Danilo S

    2015-01-01

    Among all nonpharmacological treatments, aerobic or resistance training (RT) has been indicated as a significantly important strategy to control hypertension. However, postexercise hypotension responses after intensity alterations in RT are not yet fully understood. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of differing intensities of RT on hypertensive older women. Twenty hypertensive older women participated voluntarily in this study. After a maximum voluntary contraction test (one repetition maximum) and determination of 40% and 80% experimental loads, the protocol (3 sets/90″ interset rest) was performed in a single session with the following exercises: leg press, leg extension, leg curl, chest press, elbow flexion, elbow extension, upper back row, and abdominal flexion. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were evaluated at rest, during exercise peak, and after 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes of exercise and compared to the control. Both experimental loads were effective (P<0.01) in promoting postexercise systolic hypotension (mmHg) compared to controls, after 30, 45, and 60 minutes, respectively, at 40% (113±2, 112±4, and 110±3 mmHg) and 80% (111±3, 111±4, and 110±4 mmHg). Both procedures promoted hypotension with similar systolic blood pressures (40%: −11%±1.0% and 80%: −13%±0.5%), mean arterial blood pressures (40%: −12%±5.5% and 80%: −12%±3.4%), and rate-pressure products (40%: −15%±2.1% and 80%: −17%±2.4%) compared to control measures (systolic blood pressure: 1%±1%, mean arterial blood pressure:\\ 0.6%±1.5%, rate-pressure product: 0.33%±1.1%). No differences were found in diastolic blood pressure and heart rate measures. In conclusion, hypertensive older women exhibit postexercise hypotension independently of exercise intensity without expressed cardiovascular overload during the session. PMID:26425078

  4. The Effect of Structured Exercise Intervention on Intensity and Volume of Total Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wasenius, Niko; Venojärvi, Mika; Manderoos, Sirpa; Surakka, Jukka; Lindholm, Harri; Heinonen, Olli J.; Aunola, Sirkka; Eriksson, Johan G.; Mälkiä, Esko

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of a 12-week structured exercise intervention on total physical activity and its subcategories. Twenty-three overweight or obese middle aged men with impaired glucose regulation were randomized into a 12-week Nordic walking group, a power-type resistance training group, and a non-exercise control group. Physical activity was measured with questionnaires before the intervention (1–4 weeks) and during the intervention (1–12 weeks) and was expressed in metabolic equivalents of task. No significant change in the volume of total physical activity between or within the groups was observed (p > 0.050). The volume of total leisure-time physical activity (structured exercises + non-structured leisure-time physical activity) increased significantly in the Nordic walking group (p < 0.050) but not in the resistance training group (p > 0.050) compared to the control group. In both exercise groups increase in the weekly volume of total leisure-time physical activity was inversely associated with the volume of non-leisure-time physical activities. In conclusion, structured exercise intervention did not increase the volume of total physical activity. Albeit, endurance training can increase the volume of high intensity physical activities, however it is associated with compensatory decrease in lower intensity physical activities. To achieve effective personalized exercise program, individuality in compensatory behavior should be recognised. Key Points Structured NW or RT training does not increase the volume of total physical activity. NW intervention can increase the volume of higher intensity activities. The increased in volume of LTPA induced by the structured NW and RT interventions was associated with the decreased volume of NLTPA. PMID:25435776

  5. Cortical Activity during a Highly-Trained Resistance Exercise Movement Emphasizing Force, Power or Volume

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Shawn D.; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Comstock, Brett A.; Maresh, Carl M.; Volek, Jeff S.; Denegar, Craig R.; Kraemer, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Cortical activity is thought to reflect the biomechanical properties of movement (e.g., force or velocity of movement), but fatigue and movement familiarity are important factors that require additional consideration in electrophysiological research. The purpose of this within-group quantitative electroencephalogram (EEG) investigation was to examine changes in cortical activity amplitude and location during four resistance exercise movement protocols emphasizing rate (PWR), magnitude (FOR), or volume (VOL) of force production, while accounting for movement familiarity and fatigue. EEG signals were recorded during each complete repetition and were then grouped by functional region, processed to eliminate artifacts, and averaged to compare overall differences in the magnitude and location of cortical activity between protocols over the course of six sets. Biomechanical, biochemical, and exertional data were collected to contextualize electrophysiological data. The most fatiguing protocols were accompanied by the greatest increases in cortical activity. Furthermore, despite non-incremental loading and lower force levels, VOL displayed the largest increases in cortical activity over time and greatest motor and sensory activity overall. Our findings suggest that cortical activity is strongly related to aspects of fatigue during a high intensity resistance exercise movement. PMID:24961265

  6. The effect of inter-set rest intervals on resistance exercise-induced muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Henselmans, Menno; Schoenfeld, Brad J

    2014-12-01

    Due to a scarcity of longitudinal trials directly measuring changes in muscle girth, previous recommendations for inter-set rest intervals in resistance training programs designed to stimulate muscular hypertrophy were primarily based on the post-exercise endocrinological response and other mechanisms theoretically related to muscle growth. New research regarding the effects of inter-set rest interval manipulation on resistance training-induced muscular hypertrophy is reviewed here to evaluate current practices and provide directions for future research. Of the studies measuring long-term muscle hypertrophy in groups employing different rest intervals, none have found superior muscle growth in the shorter compared with the longer rest interval group and one study has found the opposite. Rest intervals less than 1 minute can result in acute increases in serum growth hormone levels and these rest intervals also decrease the serum testosterone to cortisol ratio. Long-term adaptations may abate the post-exercise endocrinological response and the relationship between the transient change in hormonal production and chronic muscular hypertrophy is highly contentious and appears to be weak. The relationship between the rest interval-mediated effect on immune system response, muscle damage, metabolic stress, or energy production capacity and muscle hypertrophy is still ambiguous and largely theoretical. In conclusion, the literature does not support the hypothesis that training for muscle hypertrophy requires shorter rest intervals than training for strength development or that predetermined rest intervals are preferable to auto-regulated rest periods in this regard. PMID:25047853

  7. Blood flow restriction: effects of cuff type on fatigue and perceptual responses to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Loenneke, J P; Thiebaud, R S; Fahs, C A; Rossow, L M; Abe, T; Bemben, M G

    2014-06-01

    Blood flow restriction (BFR) combined with low load resistance training has been shown to result in muscle hypertrophy similar to that observed with higher loads. However, not all studies have found BFR efficacious, possibly due to methodological differences. It is presently unclear whether there are differences between cuffs of similar size (5 cm) but different material (nylon vs. elastic). The purpose was to determine if there are differences in repetitions to fatigue and perceptual ratings of exertion (RPE) and discomfort between narrow elastic and narrow nylon cuffs. Sixteen males and females completed three sets of BFR knee extension exercise in a randomized cross-over design using either elastic or nylon restrictive cuffs applied at the proximal thigh. There were no differences in repetitions to fatigue (marker of blood flow) or perceptual ratings between narrow elastic and narrow nylon cuffs. This data suggests that either elastic or nylon cuffs of the same width should cause similar degrees of BFR at the same pressure during resistance exercise. PMID:24901077

  8. Dietary protein safety and resistance exercise: what do we really know?

    PubMed

    Lowery, Lonnie M; Devia, Lorena

    2009-01-01

    Resistance trainers continue to receive mixed messages about the safety of purposely seeking ample dietary protein in their quest for stimulating protein synthesis, improving performance, or maintaining health. Despite protein's lay popularity and the routinely high intakes exhibited by strength athletes, liberal and purposeful protein consumption is often maligned by "experts". University textbooks, instructors, and various forms of literature from personal training groups and athletic organizations continue to use dissuasive language surrounding dietary protein. Due to the widely known health benefits of dietary protein and a growing body of evidence on its safety profile, this is unfortunate. In response, researchers have critiqued unfounded educational messages. As a recent summarizing example, the International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) Position Stand: Protein and Exercise reviewed general literature on renal and bone health. The concluding remark that "Concerns that protein intake within this range [1.4 - 2.0 g/kg body weight per day] is unhealthy are unfounded in healthy, exercising individuals." was based largely upon data from non-athletes due to "a lack of scientific evidence". Future studies were deemed necessary. This assessment is not unique in the scientific literature. Investigators continue to cite controversy, debate, and the lack of direct evidence that allows it. This review discusses the few existing safety studies done specific to athletes and calls for protein research specific to resistance trainers. Population-specific, long term data will be necessary for effective education in dietetics textbooks and from sports governing bodies. PMID:19138405

  9. Acute Bone Marker Responses to Whole-Body Vibration and Resistance Exercise in Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Sherk, Vanessa D.; Chrisman, Carmen; Smith, Jessica; Young, Kaelin C.; Singh, Harshvardhan; Bemben, Michael G.; Bemben, Debra A.

    2014-01-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) augments the musculoskeletal effects of resistance exercise (RE). However, its acute effects on bone turnover markers (BTM) have not been determined. This study examined BTM responses to acute high intensity RE and high intensity RE with WBV (WBV+RE) in young women (n=10) taking oral contraceptives in a randomized, cross-over repeated measures design. WBV+RE exposed subjects to 5 one-minute bouts of vibration (20 Hz, 3.38 peak–peak displacement, separated by 1 minute of rest) prior to RE. Fasting blood samples were obtained before (Pre), immediately post WBV (PostVib), immediately post RE (IP), and 30 minutes post RE (P30). Bone ALP did not change at any time point. TRAP5b significantly (p<0.05) increased from the Pre to PostVib, then decreased from IP to P30 for both conditions. CTX significantly decreased (p<0.05) from Pre to PostVib and from Pre to P30 only for WBV+RE. WBV+RE showed a greater decrease in CTX than RE (-12.6 ± 4.7% vs. -1.13 ± 3.5%). In conclusion, WBV was associated with acute decreases in CTX levels not elicited with resistance exercise alone in young women. PMID:22902255

  10. Blood Flow Restriction Enhances Post–Resistance Exercise Angiogenic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    LARKIN, KELLY A.; MACNEIL, R. GAVIN; DIRAIN, MARVIN; SANDESARA, BHANUPRESAD; MANINI, TODD M.; BUFORD, THOMAS W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of blood flow restriction (BFR) on muscle oxygenation during low-intensity resistance exercise as well as postexercise expression of molecules related to physiological angiogenesis. Methods Using a randomized cross-over design, six apparently healthy young adults (22 ± 1 yr) performed 120 unilateral knee extensions at 40% of 1 repetition maximum with and without BFR (CNTRL). Near-infrared spectroscopy was used to measure oxygenation of the vastus lateralis during exercise. Serum and muscle expression of Post–Resistance vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were determined preexercise, 4 h postexercise, and 24 h postexercise. Transcript (mRNA) expression of VEGF and other angiogenic genes was also determined. Results BFR increased muscle hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations during exercise (14.4 ± 1.6 vs. 0.9 ± 1.6, P = 0.002), driven largely by an increase in deoxygenated Hb (11.0 ± 2.5 vs. 0.5 ± 1.1, P = 0.030). BFR also increased (P < 0.05) transcript expression of VEGF, VEGF-R2, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha, inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and neuronal NOS. The most dramatic change in response to BFR was an increase in VEGF mRNA at 4 h postexercise (4.1 ± 0.6 vs. 0.6 ± 0.2-fold change, P = 0.028). Compared with control, transcript expression of endothelial NOS, serum VEGF, or muscle protein expression of VEGF was not altered in response to BFR (P > 0.05). Conclusion Acute BFR increases postexercise expression of mRNA related to skeletal muscle angiogenesis, plausibly in response to changes in muscle Hb concentrations. PMID:22677927

  11. Nociceptive and Neuronal Evaluation of the Sciatic Nerve of Wistar Rats Subjected to Compression Injury and Treated with Resistive Exercise.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Juliana Sobral; Lovison, Keli; Karvat, Jhenifer; Peretti, Ana Luiza; Vieira, Lizyana; Higuchi, Guilherme Hideaki; Brancalhão, Rose Meire Costa; Ribeiro, Lucinéia de Fátima Chasko; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate the climb stairs resistance exercise on nociception and axonal regeneration in the sciatic nerve of rats. Methods. 24 Wistar rats were divided: control group (CG-no injury), exercise group (EG-no injury with physical exercise), lesion group (LG-injury, but without exercise), and treated group (LEG-injury and physical exercise). LG and LEG were subjected to sciatic nerve compression with hemostat. From the 3rd day after injury began treatment with exercise, and after 22 days occurs the removal of a nerve fragment for morphological analysis. Results. Regarding allodynia, CG obtained values less than EG (p = 0.012) and larger than LG and LEG (p < 0.001). Histological results showed that CG and EG had normal appearance, as LG and LEG showed up with large amounts of inflammatory infiltration, degeneration and disruption of nerve fibers, and reduction of the myelin sheath; however LEG presented some regenerated fibers. From the morphometric data there were significant differences, for nerve fiber diameter, comparing CG with LG and LEG and comparing axon diameter and the thickness of the myelin of the CG to others. Conclusion. Climb stairs resistance exercise was not effective to speed up the regenerative process of axons. PMID:27594795

  12. Nociceptive and Neuronal Evaluation of the Sciatic Nerve of Wistar Rats Subjected to Compression Injury and Treated with Resistive Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Juliana Sobral; Lovison, Keli; Karvat, Jhenifer; Peretti, Ana Luiza; Vieira, Lizyana; Higuchi, Guilherme Hideaki; Ribeiro, Lucinéia de Fátima Chasko

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate the climb stairs resistance exercise on nociception and axonal regeneration in the sciatic nerve of rats. Methods. 24 Wistar rats were divided: control group (CG—no injury), exercise group (EG—no injury with physical exercise), lesion group (LG—injury, but without exercise), and treated group (LEG—injury and physical exercise). LG and LEG were subjected to sciatic nerve compression with hemostat. From the 3rd day after injury began treatment with exercise, and after 22 days occurs the removal of a nerve fragment for morphological analysis. Results. Regarding allodynia, CG obtained values less than EG (p = 0.012) and larger than LG and LEG (p < 0.001). Histological results showed that CG and EG had normal appearance, as LG and LEG showed up with large amounts of inflammatory infiltration, degeneration and disruption of nerve fibers, and reduction of the myelin sheath; however LEG presented some regenerated fibers. From the morphometric data there were significant differences, for nerve fiber diameter, comparing CG with LG and LEG and comparing axon diameter and the thickness of the myelin of the CG to others. Conclusion. Climb stairs resistance exercise was not effective to speed up the regenerative process of axons. PMID:27594795

  13. Clinical trial to assess the effect of physical exercise on endothelial function and insulin resistance in pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Preeclampsia (PE) is a common maternal disease that complicates 5 to 10% of pregnancies and remains as the major cause of maternal and neonatal mortality. Cost-effective interventions aimed at preventing the development of preeclampsia are urgently needed. However, the pathogenesis of PE is not well known. Multiple mechanisms such as oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance may contribute to its development. Regular aerobic exercise recovers endothelial function; improves insulin resistance and decreases oxidative stress. Therefore the purpose of this clinical trial is to determine the effect of regular aerobic exercise on endothelial function, on insulin resistance and on pregnancy outcome. Methods and design 64 pregnant women will be included in a blind, randomized clinical trial, and parallel assignment. The exercise group will do regular aerobic physical exercise: walking (10 minutes), aerobic exercise (30 minutes), stretching (10 minutes) and relaxation exercise (10 minutes) in three sessions per week. Control group will do the activities of daily living (bathing, dressing, eating, and walking) without counselling from a physical therapist. Trial registration NCT00741312. PMID:19919718

  14. Acute oxygen uptake and resistance exercise performance using different rest interval lengths: the influence of maximal aerobic capacity and exercise sequence.

    PubMed

    Ratamess, Nicholas A; Rosenberg, Joseph G; Kang, Jie; Sundberg, Samantha; Izer, Kerrie A; Levowsky, Jaclyn; Rzeszutko, Christina; Ross, Ryan E; Faigenbaum, Avery D

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between VO2max and acute resistance exercise performance and the acute metabolic effects of exercise sequencing. Seventeen resistance-trained men were tested for VO2max and 1 repetition maximum (1RM) strength. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a group that performed the squat first in sequence followed by the bench press (S; n = 8) or a group that performed the bench press first followed by the squat (BP; n = 9). Each group performed 3 protocols (using 1-, 2-, or 3-minute rest intervals [RIs] between sets in random order) consisting of 5 sets of each exercise with 75% of their 1RM for up to 10 repetitions while oxygen consumption was measured. Total repetitions completed were highest with 3-minute RI and lowest with 1-minute RI. Mean VO2 was significantly highest with 1-minute RI and lowest using 3-minute RI. Analysis of each exercise revealed a tendency (p = 0.07) for mean bench press VO2 to be higher when it was performed after the squat using 1- and 2-minute RIs. VO2max was significantly negatively correlated to 1RM bench press and squat (r = -0.79 and -0.60, respectively) and was significantly correlated to squat repetitions (r = 0.43-0.57) but did not correlate to bench press performance. It seems that VO2max is related to lower-body resistance exercise performance when short RIs are used, and the metabolic response to the bench press is augmented when it follows the squat in sequence using short RIs. PMID:24714546

  15. Effects of aerobic versus resistance exercise without caloric restriction on abdominal fat, intrahepatic lipid, and insulin sensitivity in obese adolescent boys: a randomized, controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The optimal exercise modality for reductions of abdominal obesity and risk factors for type 2 diabetes in youth is unknown. We examined the effects of aerobic exercise (AE) versus resistance exercise (RE) without caloric restriction on abdominal adiposity, ectopic fat, and insulin sensitivity and se...

  16. High Intensity Resistive and Rowing Exercise Countermeasures Do Not Prevent Orthostatic Intolerance Following 70 Days of Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Stenger, Michael B.; Laurie, Steven S.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.; Platts, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    More than 60% of US astronauts participating in Mir and early International Space Station missions (greater than 5 months) were unable to complete a 10-min 80 deg head-up tilt test on landing day. This high incidence of post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance may be related to limitations of the inflight exercise hardware that prevented high intensity training. PURPOSE: This study sought to determine if a countermeasure program that included intense lower-body resistive and rowing exercises designed to prevent cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning during 70 days of 6 deg head-down tilt bed rest (BR), a spaceflight analog, also would protect against post- BR orthostatic intolerance. METHODS: Sixteen males participated in this study and performed no exercise (Control, n=10) or performed an intense supine exercise protocol with resistive and aerobic components (Exercise, n=6). On 3 days/week, exercise subjects performed lower body resistive exercise and a 30-min continuous bout of rowing (greater than or equal to 75% max heart rate). On 3 other days/week, subjects performed only high-intensity, interval-style rowing. Orthostatic intolerance was assessed using a 15-min 80 deg head-up tilt test performed 2 days (BR-2) before and on the last day of BR (BR70). Plasma volume was measured using a carbon monoxide rebreathing technique on BR-3 and before rising on the first recovery day (BR+0). RESULTS: Following 70 days of BR, tilt tolerance time decreased significantly in both the Control (BR-2: 15.0 +/- 0.0, BR70: 9.9 +/- 4.6 min, mean +/- SD) and Exercise (BR-2: 12.2 +/- 4.7, BR70: 4.9 +/- 1.9 min) subjects, but the decreased tilt tolerance time was not different between groups (Control: -34 +/- 31, Exercise: -56 +/- 16%). Plasma volume also decreased (Control: -0.56 +/- 0.40, Exercise: -0.48 +/- 0.33 L) from pre to post-BR, with no differences between groups (Control: -18 +/- 11%, Exerciser: -15 +/-1 0%). CONCLUSIONS: These findings confirm previous reports

  17. Plasma catecholamine and serum testosterone responses to four units of resistance exercise in young and adult male athletes.

    PubMed

    Pullinen, T; Mero, A; MacDonald, E; Pakarinen, A; Komi, P V

    1998-04-01

    The plasma noradrenaline (NA) and adrenaline (A) concentration responses of seven young male athletes [15 (SD 1) years] and seven adult male athletes [25 (SD 6) years] were investigated together with the serum testosterone (Tes) concentration responses in four different half-squatting exercises. The loads, number of repetitions, exercise intensity and recovery between the sets were manipulated such that different types of metabolic demand could be expected. However, the amount of work done was kept equal in each kind of exercise. After the most exhausting unit of exercise (E3; two sets of 30 repetitions with 50% of 1 repetition maximum and with 2-min recovery between the sets) the plasma NA concentration was significantly lower in the younger than in the adult subjects [15.7 (SD 7.8) vs 32.7 (SD 13.2) nmol x l(-1), P < 0.05], while the A concentrations were similar. In the other three exercises no differences in the plasma catecholamine concentration responses among the groups were observed. The postexercise Tes concentrations, however, were significantly lower in the younger than in the adult subjects in every exercise unit. No correlations between the plasma catecholamine and serum Tes concentration responses were observed in any of the exercise units in either group. The results of the present study may suggest reduced sympathetic nervous activity in the younger subjects compared to the adults in response to exhausting resistance exercise. The results may also suggest that the catecholamines were less involved in eliciting an increase in Tes secretion in these resistance exercises. PMID:9562291

  18. Acute Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Responses to Resistance Exercise in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Volaklis, Konstantinos A.; Smilios, Ilias; Spassis, Apostolos T.; Zois, Christos E.; Douda, Helen T.; Halle, Martin; Tokmakidis, Savvas P.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the inflammatory effects of resistance exercise in healthy and even less in diseased individuals such as cardiac patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute pro- and anti-inflammatory responses during resistance exercise (RE) in patients with coronary artery disease. Eight low risk patients completed two acute RE protocols at low (50% of 1 RM; 2x18 rps) and moderate intensity (75% of 1 RM; 3x8 rps) in random order. Both protocols included six exercises and had the same total load volume. Blood samples were obtained before, immediately after and 60 minutes after each protocol for the determination of lactate, TNFα, INF-γ, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, and hsCRP concentrations. IL-6 and IL-10 levels increased (p < 0.05) immediately after both RE protocols with no differences between protocols. INF-γ was significantly lower (p < 0.05) 60 min after the low intensity protocol, whereas TGF-β1 increased (p < 0.05) immediately after the low intensity protocol. There were no differences in TNF-& and hs-CRP after both RE protocols or between protocols. The above data indicate that acute resistance exercise performed at low to moderate intensity in low risk, trained CAD patients is safe and does not exacerbate the inflammation associated with their disease. Key points Acute resistance exercise is safe without exacerbating inflammation in patients with CAD. Both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) elicit desirable pro-and anti-inflammatory responses. With both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) acceptable clinical hemodynamic alterations were observed. PMID:25729295

  19. A single prior bout of exercise protects against palmitate-induced insulin resistance despite an increase in total ceramide content.

    PubMed

    Thrush, A Brianne; Harasim, Ewa; Chabowski, Adrian; Gulli, Roberto; Stefanyk, Leslie; Dyck, David J

    2011-05-01

    Ceramide accumulation has been implicated in the impairment of insulin-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle following saturated fatty acid (FA) exposure. Importantly, a single bout of exercise can protect against acute lipid-induced insulin resistance. The mechanism by which exercise protects against lipid-induced insulin resistance is not completely known but may occur through a redirection of FA toward triacylglycerol (TAG) and away from ceramide and diacylglycerol (DAG). Therefore, in the current study, an in vitro preparation was used to examine whether a prior bout of exercise could confer protection against palmitate-induced insulin resistance and whether the pharmacological [50 μM fumonisin B(1) (FB1)] inhibition of ceramide synthesis in the presence of palmitate could mimic the protective effect of exercise. Soleus muscle of sedentary (SED), exercised (EX), and SED in the presence of FB1 (SED+FB1) were incubated with or without 2 mM palmitate for 4 h. This 2-mM palmitate exposure impaired insulin-stimulated glucose transport (-28%, P < 0.01) and significantly increased ceramide, DAG, and TAG accumulation in the SED group (P < 0.05). A single prior bout of exercise prevented the detrimental effects of palmitate on insulin signaling and caused a partial redistribution of FA toward TAG (P < 0.05). However, the net increase in ceramide content in response to palmitate exposure in the EX group was not different compared with SED, despite the maintenance of insulin sensitivity. The incubation of soleus from SED rats with FB1 (SED+FB1) prevented the detrimental effects of palmitate and caused a redirection of FA toward TAG accumulation (P < 0.05). Therefore, this research suggests that although inhibiting ceramide accumulation can prevent the detrimental effects of palmitate, a single prior bout of exercise appears to protect against palmitate-induced insulin resistance, which may be independent of changes in ceramide content. PMID:21325642

  20. The Outcomes of a 12-Week Internet Intervention Aimed at Improving Fitness and Health-Related Quality of Life in Overweight Adolescents: The Young & Active Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Riiser, Kirsti; Løndal, Knut; Ommundsen, Yngvar; Småstuen, Milada Cvancarova; Misvær, Nina; Helseth, Sølvi

    2014-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity among adolescents may have consequences, with potentially lasting effects on health and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Excess weight is also associated with decreases in physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness. The aim of the current study was to investigate the short-term effects of a 12-week Internet intervention in a primary care setting intended to increase cardiorespiratory fitness and HRQoL among overweight and obese adolescents. Methods In this controlled trial, participants (13–15 years) were non-randomly allocated to an intervention- or a control group. The intervention group received 12-weeks access to an online program providing tailored physical activity counseling based on principles from Self-determination Theory and Motivational Interviewing. The control group received standard follow-up by the school nurses. The primary outcome measure of cardiorespiratory fitness was determined using a shuttle run test. The secondary outcomes: HRQoL, leisure time exercise, body image and self-determined motivation for physical activity and exercise, were assessed by self-report measures. Age- and gender-adjusted body mass index (BMI) was calculated based on measurements of height and weight. To compare pre-to post intervention differences within groups, a paired samples t-test was used while crude differences between groups were analyzed with an independent samples t-test. Results Of the 120 participants, 108 completed the study, 75 in the intervention group and 33 in the control group. Exposure to the intervention had a small effect on cardiorespiratory fitness (0.14; 95% CI [0.01;0.28]; P = 0.04), and a moderate effect on HRQoL (5.22; 95% CI [0.90; 9.53]; P = 0.02). Moreover, the control group increased significantly in BMI, yielding a moderate preventive effect on BMI (−0.39; 95% CI [−0.74;−0.03]; P = 0.03) for the intervention group. Conclusion The results suggest that the Internet

  1. Right Breast Mastectomy and Reconstruction with Tissue Expander under Thoracic Paravertebral Blocks in a 12-Week Parturient

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Christopher Allen-John; Weyker, Paul David; Cohn, Shara; Wheeler, Amanda; Lee, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Paravertebral blocks are becoming increasingly utilized for breast surgery with studies showing improved postoperative pain control, decreased need for opioids, and less nausea and vomiting. We describe the anesthetic management of an otherwise healthy woman who was 12 weeks pregnant presenting for treatment of her breast cancer. For patients undergoing breast mastectomy and reconstruction with tissue expanders, paravertebral blocks offer an anesthetic alternative when general anesthesia is not desired. PMID:26229692

  2. Exercise training is beneficial for Alzheimer's patients.

    PubMed

    Santana-Sosa, E; Barriopedro, M I; López-Mojares, L M; Pérez, M; Lucia, A

    2008-10-01

    Decreased ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) associated with deterioration in physical capacity are key determinants of the poor quality of life and loss of independence of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 12-week training program (including resistance, flexibility, joint mobility and balance/coordination exercises) for Spanish patients with AD on their i) overall functional capacity (muscle strength and flexibility, agility and balance while moving, and endurance fitness), and ii) ability to perform ADLs. Using a randomized block design, 16 patients were assigned to a training (mean [SD] age: 76 [4] yrs) or control group (73 [4] yrs) (n = 8 subjects [3 male, 5 female] per group). The results showed significant improvements after training (p < 0.05) in upper and lower body muscle strength and flexibility, agility and dynamic balance, and endurance fitness (using the Senior Fitness test), gait and balance abilities (with subsequent decrease in risk of falls) (Tinetti scale) and in the ability to perform ADLs independently (Katz and Barthel scores). No changes (p > 0.05) were found in the control group over the 12-week period. Exercise training could be included in the overall medical/nursing care protocol for patients with AD. PMID:18401810

  3. THE ANABOLIC RESPONSE TO RESISTANCE EXERCISE AND A PROTEIN-RICH MEAL IS NOT DIMINISHED BY AGE

    PubMed Central

    SYMONS, T. BROCK; SHEFFIELD-MOORE, M.; MAMEROW, M.M.; WOLFE, R.R.; PADDON-JONES, D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The synergistic effect of resistance exercise and protein ingestion on muscle protein anabolism in young adults has been well described. However, it is unclear if this relationship is maintained in older adults who are at greater risk of sarcopenic muscle loss. To this end, we sought to determine if the synergistic response to a bout of resistance exercise and a protein-rich lean beef meal was altered by age. Setting The University of Texas Medical Branch, Clinical Research Center, Galveston, Texas. Participants: Healthy young (n=7, 29±3 y) and older (n=7, 67±2 y) adults. Design Mixed muscle fractional synthesis rate (FSR) was calculated during a 3 h post-absorptive/rest period and again during a 5 h period following ingestion of a protein-rich meal (340 g lean beef) and bout of resistance exercise (6 sets of 8 repetitions of isotonic knee extension exercise at 80% one repetition maximum). Measurements Venous blood samples and vastus lateralis muscle biopsy samples were obtained during a primed (2.0 μmol/kg) constant infusion (0.08 μmol·kg−1min−1) of L-[ring-13C6] phenylalanine. Results Mixed muscle FSR increased by approximately 108% in both young [pre: 0.073±0.008; post: 0.156±0.021(SE) %/h, p<0.001] and older adults (pre: 0.075±0.004; post: 0.152±0.017 %/h, p=0.003) following the meal and resistance exercise bout. Conclusion Aging does not diminish the increase in muscle protein synthesis following a high-quality protein rich meal and bout of resistance exercise. PMID:21528164

  4. Construct and Concurrent Validation of a New Resistance Intensity Scale for Exercise with Thera-Band® Elastic Bands

    PubMed Central

    Colado, Juan C.; Garcia-Masso, Xavier; Triplett, N. Travis; Calatayud, Joaquin; Flandez, Jorge; Behm, David; Rogers, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    The construct and concurrent validity of the Thera-Band Perceived Exertion Scale for Resistance Exercise with elastic bands (EB) was examined. Twenty subjects performed two separate sets of 15 repetitions of both frontal and lateral raise exercise over two sessions. The criterion variables were myoelectric activity and heart rate. One set was performed with an elastic band grip width that permitted 15 maximum repetitions in the selected exercise, and another set was performed with a grip width 50% more than the 15RM grip. Following the final repetition of each set, active muscle (AM) and overall body (O) ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were collected from the Thera-Band® resistance exercise scale and the OMNI-Resistance Exercise Scale of perceived exertion with Thera-Band® resistance bands (OMNI-RES EB). Construct validity was established by correlating the RPE from the OMNI-RES EB with the Thera-Band RPE scale using regression analysis. The results showed significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in myoelectric activity, heart rate, and RPE scores between the low- and high-intensity sets. The intraclass correlation coefficient for active muscles and overall RPE scale scores was 0.67 and 0.58, respectively. There was a positive linear relationship between the RPE from the OMNI-RES EB and the Thera-Band scale. Validity coefficients for the RPE AM were r2 = 0.87 and ranged from r2 = 0.76 to 0.85 for the RPE O. Therefore, the Thera-Band Perceived Exertion Scale for Resistance Exercise can be used for monitoring elastic band exercise intensity. This would allow the training dosage to be better controlled within and between sessions. Moreover, the construct and concurrent validity indicates that the OMNI-RES EB measures similar properties of exertion as the Thera-Band RPE scale during elastic resistance exercise. Key points This new resistance intensity scale is an appropriate and valid tool for assessing perceived exertion during strength training with elastic bands

  5. Clinical Application of Revised Laboratory Classification Criteria for Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: Is the Follow-Up Interval of 12 Weeks Instead of 6 Weeks Significantly Useful?

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Hyuk; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Chi, Hyun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Background. According to revised classification criteria of true antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, at least one of three antiphospholipid antibodies should be present on two or more occasions at least 12 weeks apart. However, it can be inconvenient to perform follow-up tests with interval of 12 weeks. We investigated clinical application of follow-up tests with interval of 12 weeks. Method. Totals of 67, 199, and 332 patients tested positive initially for the lupus anticoagulants confirm, the anti-β2 glycoprotein-I antibody, and the anti-cardiolipin antibody test, respectively, from Jan 2007 to Jul 2009. We investigated clinical symptoms of patients, follow-up interval, and results of each test. Results. Among patients with initial test positive, 1.5%–8.5% were subjected to follow-up tests at interval of more than 12 weeks. Among 25 patients with negative conversion in tests, patients with interval of more than 12 weeks showed clinical symptom positivity of 33.3%, which was higher than that of 12.5% with 6–12 weeks. Among 34 patients with persistent test positive, clinical symptoms positivity trended to be more evident in patients at interval of 6–12 weeks (47.4% versus 26.7%, P = 0.191) than more than 12 weeks. Conclusion. Less than 10% of patients with initial test positive had follow-up tests at interval of more than 12 weeks and the patients with persistent test positive at interval of more than 12 weeks showed trends toward having lower clinical symptoms than 6–12 weeks. More research is needed focused on the evidence that follow-up test at interval of more than 12 weeks should be performed instead of 6 weeks. PMID:27610369

  6. Clinical Application of Revised Laboratory Classification Criteria for Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: Is the Follow-Up Interval of 12 Weeks Instead of 6 Weeks Significantly Useful?

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Hyuk; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Chi, Hyun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Background. According to revised classification criteria of true antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, at least one of three antiphospholipid antibodies should be present on two or more occasions at least 12 weeks apart. However, it can be inconvenient to perform follow-up tests with interval of 12 weeks. We investigated clinical application of follow-up tests with interval of 12 weeks. Method. Totals of 67, 199, and 332 patients tested positive initially for the lupus anticoagulants confirm, the anti-β 2 glycoprotein-I antibody, and the anti-cardiolipin antibody test, respectively, from Jan 2007 to Jul 2009. We investigated clinical symptoms of patients, follow-up interval, and results of each test. Results. Among patients with initial test positive, 1.5%-8.5% were subjected to follow-up tests at interval of more than 12 weeks. Among 25 patients with negative conversion in tests, patients with interval of more than 12 weeks showed clinical symptom positivity of 33.3%, which was higher than that of 12.5% with 6-12 weeks. Among 34 patients with persistent test positive, clinical symptoms positivity trended to be more evident in patients at interval of 6-12 weeks (47.4% versus 26.7%, P = 0.191) than more than 12 weeks. Conclusion. Less than 10% of patients with initial test positive had follow-up tests at interval of more than 12 weeks and the patients with persistent test positive at interval of more than 12 weeks showed trends toward having lower clinical symptoms than 6-12 weeks. More research is needed focused on the evidence that follow-up test at interval of more than 12 weeks should be performed instead of 6 weeks. PMID:27610369

  7. THE FEASIBILITY AND EFFICACY OF ECCENTRIC EXERCISE WITH OLDER CANCER SURVIVORS: A PRELIMINARY STUDY

    PubMed Central

    LaStayo, Paul C.; Larsen, Stephanie; Smith, Sheldon; Dibble, Lee; Marcus, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Older individuals who have survived cancer, and the commensurate treatment, often experience a reduced quality of life in part due to their impaired muscular abilities and deficits in mobility. The purpose of this preliminary study was to determine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of resistance exercise via negative, eccentrically-induced work (RENEW) with older cancer survivors. Methods Older cancer survivors with a perception of moderate muscle weakness and fatigue participated in 12 weeks of RENEW. Measures of feasibility included: 1) the participant’s ability to progress the total amount of work of RENEW; 2) whether peak knee extension torque production became impaired; and 3) whether RENEW induced leg muscle pain as measured on a visual analog scale. The preliminary measure of efficacy included: the performance of a timed up and go mobility test. Results The participants significantly increased the total average work per week over the 12 weeks of RENEW. Participants increased (p<0.001) their work ~3-fold from week 3 (7.6± 5.1 kJ) to week 12 (22.1±14.8kJ) without muscle pain over the 12 week RENEW training period. Knee extension peak torque production improved (11%) significantly (p=0.02) (pretest: 248 ±92 N; posttest: 275±99 N) after 12 weeks of RENEW. The time to perform the TUG test improved (14%) significantly (p<0.001) (pretest: 8.4±2.7; posttest: 7.2±2.3 s) after 12 weeks of RENEW, suggesting preliminary efficacy. Conclusion Collectively, RENEW appears feasible and potentially efficacious for older, weak and fatigued cancer survivors. Implications for Cancer Survivors The use of eccentric muscle exercise may be ideally suited for older cancer survivors due to its high force and low energetic cost capabilities. PMID:21155509

  8. Physiologic and metabolic responses to a continuous functional resistance exercise workout.

    PubMed

    Lagally, Kristen M; Cordero, Jeanine; Good, Jon; Brown, Dale D; McCaw, Steven T

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the physiologic and perceptual responses to a continuous functional exercise workout. Ten men and 10 women (21.2 +/- 2.4 and 21.0 +/- 1.5 years) completed a maximal oxygen uptake test, strength test, and body composition analysis. Subjects then participated in 3 familiarization sessions, during which they followed a videotaped routine that consisted of a series of functional resistance exercises performed in a continuous manner. Subjects performed the same routine in a final session, during which VO2, VCO2, respiratory exchange ratio (RER), RPE, and heart rate were measured and blood samples were taken and analyzed for blood lactic acid concentration. Descriptive statistics were calculated for RPE, RER, blood lactic acid concentration, energy expenditure, and absolute and relative oxygen uptake and heart rate. Energy expenditure was calculated using VO2 and RER. Independent t-tests were used to examine differences between men and women for oxygen consumption, weight lifted, and energy expenditure during the workout. Subjects had a mean VO2 of 27.8 ml.kg.min (51% of VO2 peak and 47.8% of VO2 reserve), a mean heart rate of 156 bpm (83% of maximum heart rate), and a mean RER of 0.91. The mean RPE was 5.9, and the mean difference between pre and post lactic acid concentration was 2.5 mmol.L. The mean total caloric expenditure was 289 kcal. Men lifted significantly heavier weights and expended more total calories than women. Caloric expenditure (kcal x kg x min), VO2, and weight lifted were similar between men and women when expressed relatively. Performing dynamic functional exercises in a continuous manner resulted in energy expenditure values, but not relative VO2 values, that meet the American College of Sports Medicine recommendations. PMID:19197213

  9. Resistance exercise training modulates acute gene expression during human skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Nader, G A; von Walden, F; Liu, C; Lindvall, J; Gutmann, L; Pistilli, E E; Gordon, P M

    2014-03-15

    We sought to determine whether acute resistance exercise (RE)-induced gene expression is modified by RE training. We studied the expression patterns of a select group of genes following an acute bout of RE in naïve and hypertrophying muscle. Thirteen untrained subjects underwent supervised RE training for 12 wk of the nondominant arm and performed an acute bout of RE 1 wk after the last bout of the training program (training+acute). The dominant arm was either unexercised (control) or subjected to the same acute exercise bout as the trained arm (acute RE). Following training, men (14.8 ± 2.8%; P < 0.05) and women (12.6 ± 2.4%; P < 0.05) underwent muscle hypertrophy with increases in dynamic strength in the trained arm (48.2 ± 5.4% and 72.1 ± 9.1%, respectively; P < 0.01). RE training resulted in attenuated anabolic signaling as reflected by a reduction in rpS6 phosphorylation following acute RE. Changes in mRNA levels of genes involved in hypertrophic growth, protein degradation, angiogenesis, and metabolism commonly expressed in both men and women was determined 4 h following acute RE. We show that RE training can modify acute RE-induced gene expression in a divergent and gene-specific manner even in genes belonging to the same ontology. Changes in gene expression following acute RE are multidimensional, and may not necessarily reflect the actual adaptive response taking place during the training process. Thus RE training can selectively modify the acute response to RE, thereby challenging the use of gene expression as a marker of exercise-induced adaptations. PMID:24458751

  10. Quality of Life in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome after a Program of Resistance Exercise Training.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Fabiene K Picchi; Lara, Lúcia Alves da Silva; Kogure, Gislaine Satyko; Silva, Rafael Costa; Ferriani, Rui Alberto; Silva de Sá, Marcos Felipe; Reis, Rosana Maria Dos

    2016-07-01

    Purpose Aerobic exercises may improve quality of life (QoL) in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, there is no data on the effect of resistance exercise training (RET) programs on the QoL of women with PCOS. Thus, this study aimed to assess the effect of a 16-week RET program on QoL in PCOS women. Methods This 16-week case-control study enrolled 43 women with PCOS (PCOS group, PCOSG) and 51 healthy pre-menopausal controls aged 18 to 37 years (control group, CG). All women underwent a supervised RET program for 16 weeks, and were evaluated in two different occasions: week-0 (baseline), and week-16 (after RET). Quality of life was assessed using the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Results Testosterone reduced significantly in both groups after RET (p < 0.01). The PCOSG had improvements in functional capacity at week-16 relative to week-0 (p = 0.02). The CG had significant improvements in vitality, social aspects, and mental health at week-16 relative to week-0 (p ≤ 0.01). There was a weak correlation between social aspects of the SF-36 domain and testosterone levels in PCOS women. Conclusion A 16-week RET program modestly improved QoL in women with PCOS. PMID:27472811

  11. Acute Resistance Exercise Induces Antinociception by Activation of the Endocannabinoid System in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Galdino, Giovane; Romero, Thiago; da Silva, José Felippe Pinho; Aguiar, Daniele; de Paula, Ana Maria; Cruz, Jader; Parrella, Cosimo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Duarte, Igor; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Perez, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance exercise (RE) is also known as strength training, and it is performed to increase the strength and mass of muscles, bone strength and metabolism. RE has been increasingly prescribed for pain relief. However, the endogenous mechanisms underlying this antinociceptive effect are still largely unexplored. Thus, we investigated the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in RE-induced antinociception. Methods Male Wistar rats were submitted to acute RE in a weight-lifting model. The nociceptive threshold was measured by a mechanical nociceptive test (paw pressure) before and after exercise. To investigate the involvement of cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoids in RE-induced antinociception, cannabinoid receptor inverse agonists, endocannabinoid metabolizing enzyme inhibitors and an anandamide reuptake inhibitor were injected before RE. After RE, CB1 cannabinoid receptors were quantified in rat brain tissue by Western blot and immunofluorescence. In addition, endocannabinoid plasma levels were measured by isotope dilution-liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Results RE-induced antinociception was prevented by preinjection with CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor inverse agonists. By contrast, preadministration of metabolizing enzyme inhibitors and the anandamide reuptake inhibitor prolonged and enhanced this effect. RE also produced an increase in the expression and activation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in rat brain tissue and in the dorsolateral and ventrolateral periaqueductal regions and an increase of endocannabinoid plasma levels. Conclusion The present study suggests that a single session of RE activates the endocannabinoid system to induce antinociception. PMID:24977916

  12. Near-Infrared Light Therapy to Attenuate Strength Loss After Strenuous Resistance Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Larkin-Kaiser, Kelly A.; Christou, Evangelos; Tillman, Mark; George, Steven; Borsa, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Near-infrared (NIR) light therapy is purported to act as an ergogenic aid by enhancing the contractile function of skeletal muscle. Improving muscle function is a new avenue for research in the area of laser therapy; however, very few researchers have examined the ergogenic effects of NIR light therapy and the influence it may have on the recovery process during rehabilitation. Objective: To evaluate the ergogenic effect of NIR light therapy on skeletal muscle function. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Controlled laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-nine healthy men (n = 21) and women (n = 18; age = 20.0 ± 0.2 years, height = 169 ± 2 cm, mass = 68.4 ± 1.8 kg, body mass index = 23.8 ± 0.4 kg/m2). Intervention(s): Each participant received active and sham treatments on the biceps brachii muscle on 2 separate days. The order of treatment was randomized. A class 4 laser with a cumulative dose of 360 J was used for the active treatment. After receiving the treatment on each day, participants completed an elbow-flexion resistance-exercise protocol. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent variables were elbow range of motion, muscle point tenderness, and strength (peak torque). Analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to assess changes in these measures between treatments at baseline and at follow-up, 48 hours postexercise. Additionally, immediate strength loss postexercise was compared between treatments using a paired t test. Results: Preexercise to postexercise strength loss for the active laser treatment, although small, was less than with the sham treatment (P = .05). Conclusions: Applied to skeletal muscle before resistance exercise, NIR light therapy effectively attenuated strength loss. Therefore, NIR light therapy may be a beneficial, noninvasive modality for improving muscle function during rehabilitation after musculoskeletal injury. However, future studies using higher treatment doses are warranted. PMID:25397864

  13. Unique Positioning for Using Elastic Resistance Band in Providing Strengthening Exercise to the Muscles Surrounding the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Bandy, William D.

    2007-01-01

    Ankle sprains are among the most common injuries incurred by participants in athletics. Conservative management of the patient after an ankle sprain includes a comprehensive rehabilitation program of which the resistance exercises are a part and are frequently advised by the clinician, many times as part of a home exercise program. The purpose of this Clinical Suggestion is to present a unique method of using elastic resistance band to provide strengthening activities to the inverters, ever-tors, plantarflexors, and dorsiflexors of the ankle. The method is unique, as well as convenient and efficient, as it allows the subject to perform all four exercises with a minimum of change in position, while staying seated in a chair. PMID:21522203

  14. The acute effect of neuromuscular activation in resistance exercise on human skeletal muscle with the interpolated twitch technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Yeon; Yoon, Wan-Young

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to perform a quantitative assessment of neuromechanical adaptation in skeletal muscles and to propose the scientific underpinnings of the acute effects induced by resistance exercise. [Subjects] The subjects in this study were 11 healthy adult men in their 20s who had no orthopedic history at the time of the study. To examine any signs of resistance exercise-induced changes in the ankle plantar flexor, the subjects were directed to perform a standing barbell calf raise routine. [Methods] Subjects were to carry a load equal to their weights and to perform five sets of ten repetitions. The maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, resting twitch torque, muscle inhibition, root mean square of muscular activation, contraction time, and half relaxation time were analyzed by synchronizing a dynamometer, an electrical stimulator, and an electromyography system. [Results] The maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque appeared to decline, but the change was not statistically significant. The decline of resting twitch torque, on the other hand, was found to be statistically significant. Muscle inhibition and root mean square of muscular activation were both reduced, but both changes were not statistically significant. Lastly, contraction time and half relaxation time both statistically decreased significantly after resistance exercise. [Conclusion] These results indicate that the acute effects of resistance exercise have a greater impact on the peripheral mechanical system itself, rather than on neurological factors, in terms of the generation of muscle force. PMID:26504316

  15. Heart Rate Recovery and Variability Following Combined Aerobic and Resistance Exercise Training in Adults with and without Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendonca, Goncalo V.; Pereira, Fernando D.; Fernhall, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Persons with Down syndrome (DS) are at high risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and there is compelling evidence of autonomic dysfunction in these individuals. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether a combined aerobic and resistance exercise intervention produces similar results in cardiac autonomic function between…

  16. The acute effect of neuromuscular activation in resistance exercise on human skeletal muscle with the interpolated twitch technique

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae-Yeon; Yoon, Wan-Young

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to perform a quantitative assessment of neuromechanical adaptation in skeletal muscles and to propose the scientific underpinnings of the acute effects induced by resistance exercise. [Subjects] The subjects in this study were 11 healthy adult men in their 20s who had no orthopedic history at the time of the study. To examine any signs of resistance exercise-induced changes in the ankle plantar flexor, the subjects were directed to perform a standing barbell calf raise routine. [Methods] Subjects were to carry a load equal to their weights and to perform five sets of ten repetitions. The maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, resting twitch torque, muscle inhibition, root mean square of muscular activation, contraction time, and half relaxation time were analyzed by synchronizing a dynamometer, an electrical stimulator, and an electromyography system. [Results] The maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque appeared to decline, but the change was not statistically significant. The decline of resting twitch torque, on the other hand, was found to be statistically significant. Muscle inhibition and root mean square of muscular activation were both reduced, but both changes were not statistically significant. Lastly, contraction time and half relaxation time both statistically decreased significantly after resistance exercise. [Conclusion] These results indicate that the acute effects of resistance exercise have a greater impact on the peripheral mechanical system itself, rather than on neurological factors, in terms of the generation of muscle force. PMID:26504316

  17. Effectiveness of Functional Progressive Resistance Exercise Training on Walking Ability in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholtes, Vanessa A.; Becher, Jules G.; Janssen-Potten, Yvonne J.; Dekkers, Hurnet; Smallenbroek, Linda; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of functional progressive resistance exercise (PRE) training on walking ability in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Fifty-one ambulant children with spastic CP (mean age 10 years 5 months, 29 boys) were randomized to an intervention (n=26) or control group (n=25, receiving usual care).…

  18. Effects of Nordic Walking Compared to Conventional Walking and Band-Based Resistance Exercise on Fitness in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Takeshima, Nobuo; Islam, Mohammod M.; Rogers, Michael E.; Rogers, Nicole L.; Sengoku, Naoko; Koizumi, Daisuke; Kitabayashi, Yukiko; Imai, Aiko; Naruse, Aiko

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of Nordic walking with conventional walking and band-based resistance exercise on functional fitness, static balance and dynamic balance in older adults. Volunteers (n = 65) were divided into four groups: Nordic walking (NW), conventional walking (CW), resistance (RES), and control. Each group performed activity 50-70 min·day−1 (warm-up 10-15 min, main exercise 30-40, and cool down 10-15 min), 3 days·week−1 (NW and CW) or 2 day·week−1 (RES) for 12 wks. Upper-body strength improved (p < 0. 05) in the RES (22.3%) and the NW (11.6%) groups compared to the CW and control groups. Cardio- respiratory fitness improved more in the NW (10.9%) and CW (10.6%) groups compared to the RES and control groups. Upper- and lower-body flexibility also improved in all exercise groups compared to the control group. There were no improvements in balance measures in any group. While all modes of exercise improved various components of fitness, Nordic walking provided the best well-rounded benefits by improving upper-body strength, cardiovascular endurance, and flexibility. Therefore, Nordic walking is recommended as an effective and efficient mode of concurrent exercise to improve overall functional fitness in older adults. Key Points Nordic walking, conventional walking, and resistance training are beneficial for older adults. Nordic walking and conventional walking both improve cardio-respiratory fitness while resistance training does not. Nordic walking provides additional benefits in upper-body muscular strength compared to conventional walking. Nordic walking is an effective and efficient mode of exercise to improve overall fitness in older adults. PMID:24149147

  19. Work distribution influences session ratings of perceived exertion response during resistance exercise matched for total volume.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Justin A; Green, James M; Gast, Tyler M

    2014-07-01

    Session ratings of perceived exertion (SRPE) are sensitive to changes in total work volume and work rate during resistance training. This study examined the influence of work distribution (varied load, set, and repetitions [reps]) on SRPE in 2 resistance exercise trials matched for total work volume (sets × reps × percentage of 1 repetition maximum [% 1RM]) and work rate (total work volume/time). Participants completed a low load/high rep (LLHR) trial (2 sets × 12 reps × 3-minute recovery at ∼60% 1RM) and a high load/low rep (HLLR) trial (3 sets × 6 reps × 1.5-minute recovery at ∼80% 1RM) of the bench press, lat pull-down, overhead press, upright row, triceps extension, and biceps curl. A 2-minute recovery separated each exercise in both trials. Session ratings of perceived exertion and recovery heart rate (HR) were recorded 20 minutes after exercise. Preset and postset RPE and HR were higher for HLLR vs. LLHR (3.1 ± 1.6; 104 ± 15 b·min-1 vs. 2.1 ± 1.3; 98 ± 10 b·min-1) and (5.5 ± 0.9; 139 ± 14 b·min-1 vs. 4.4 ± 0.9; 131 ± 12 b·min-1), respectively. Session RPE was higher for HLLR (5.7 ± 1.4) vs. LLHR (4.3 ± 1.4) with no difference in recovery HR. Session ratings of perceived exertion was greater with higher load despite matched total volumes and work rates. Higher preset acute RPE and HR in HLLR may indicate differences in recovery between sets. Higher postset acute RPE and HR in HLLR indicated increased difficulty of individual sets in HLLR, which likely contributed to SRPE differences. Practitioners can be confident that SRPE accurately reflects changes in training load when the number of sets, reps, and loads are altered within routine training. PMID:24378665

  20. Comparison of high-intensity vs. high-volume resistance training on the BDNF response to exercise.

    PubMed

    Church, David D; Hoffman, Jay R; Mangine, Gerald T; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Beyer, Kyle S; Wang, Ran; La Monica, Michael B; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2016-07-01

    This study compared the acute and chronic response of circulating plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to high-intensity low-volume (HI) and low-intensity high volume (HV) resistance training. Twenty experienced resistance-trained men (23.5 ± 2.6 y, 1.79 ± 0.05 m, 75.7 ± 13.8 kg) volunteered for this study. Before the resistance training program (PRE), participants performed an acute bout of exercise using either the HI [3-5 reps; 90% of one repetition maximum (1RM)] or HV (10-12 reps; 70% 1RM) training paradigm. The acute exercise protocol was repeated after 7 wk of training (POST). Blood samples were obtained at rest (BL), immediately (IP), 30 min (30P), and 60 min (60P) post exercise at PRE and POST. A three-way repeated measure ANOVA was used to analyze acute changes in BDNF concentrations during HI and HV resistance exercise and the effect of 7 wk of training. No training × time × group interaction in BDNF was noted (P = 0.994). Significant main effects for training (P = 0.050) and time (P < 0.001) in BDNF were observed. Significant elevations in BDNF concentrations were seen from BL at IP (P = 0.001), 30P (P < 0.001), and 60P (P < 0.001) in both HI and HV combined during PRE and POST. BDNF concentrations were also observed to increase from PRE to POST when collapsed across groups and time. No significant group × training interaction (P = 0.342), training (P = 0.105), or group (P = 0.238) effect were noted in the BDNF area under the curve response. Results indicate that BDNF concentrations are increased after an acute bout of resistance exercise, regardless of training paradigm, and are further increased during a 7-wk training program in experienced lifters. PMID:27231312

  1. Effect of timing of protein and carbohydrate intake after resistance exercise on nitrogen balance in trained and untrained young men

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance exercise alters the post-exercise response of anabolic and catabolic hormones. A previous study indicated that the turnover of muscle protein in trained individuals is reduced due to alterations in endocrine factors caused by resistance training, and that muscle protein accumulation varies between trained and untrained individuals due to differences in the timing of protein and carbohydrate intake. We investigated the effect of the timing of protein and carbohydrate intake after resistance exercise on nitrogen balance in trained and untrained young men. Methods Subjects were 10 trained healthy men (mean age, 23 ± 4 years; height, 173.8 ± 3.1 cm; weight, 72.3 ± 4.3 kg) and 10 untrained healthy men (mean age, 23 ± 1 years; height, 171.8 ± 5.0 cm; weight, 64.5 ± 5.0 kg). All subjects performed four sets of 8 to 10 repetitions of a resistance exercise (comprising bench press, shoulder press, triceps pushdown, leg extension, leg press, leg curl, lat pulldown, rowing, and biceps curl) at 80% one-repetition maximum. After each resistance exercise session, subjects were randomly divided into two groups with respect to intake of protein (0.3 g/kg body weight) and carbohydrate (0.8 g/kg body weight) immediately after (P0) or 6 h (P6) after the session. All subjects were on an experimental diet that met their individual total energy requirement. We assessed whole-body protein metabolism by measuring nitrogen balance at P0 and P6 on the last 3 days of exercise training. Results The nitrogen balance was significantly lower in the trained men than in the untrained men at both P0 (P <0.05) and P6 (P <0.01). The nitrogen balance in trained men was significantly higher at P0 than at P6 (P <0.01), whereas that in the untrained men was not significantly different between the two periods. Conclusion The timing of protein and carbohydrate intake after resistance exercise influences nitrogen balance differently in trained and

  2. Serum levels of sex steroids and metabolites following 12 weeks of intravaginal 0.50% DHEA administration.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yuyong; Labrie, Fernand; Gonthier, Renaud; Simard, Jean-Nicolas; Bergeron, Danielle; Martel, Céline; Vaillancourt, Mario; Montesino, Marlene; Lavoie, Lyne; Archer, David F; Balser, John; Moyneur, Erick

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the present phase III, placebo-controlled, double-blind, prospective and randomized study was to confirm the efficacy of daily intravaginal administration of 0.50% dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA; prasterone) ovules for 12 weeks on moderate to severe dyspareunia (or pain at sexual activity) as most bothersome symptom of vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA) while having serum steroid concentrations within normal postmenopausal values. To this end, serum levels of DHEA, DHEA-sulfate (DHEA-S), Androst-5-ene-diol-3β, 17β-diol (5-diol), testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), androstenedione (4-dione), estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), estrone sulfate (E1-S), androsterone glucuronide (ADT-G), and androstane-3α, 17β-diol 17-glucuronide (3α-diol-17G) were measured by validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In agreement with the mechanisms of intracrinology, all serum sex steroids and metabolites concentrations after 12 weeks of daily intravaginal administration of 0.50% DHEA remain well within the limits of normal postmenopausal women. More specifically, the 12-week serum E2 concentration was measured at 22% below the average normal postmenopausal value (3.26 versus 4.17 pg/ml), thus eliminating any fear of E2 exposure outside the vagina. In addition, serum E1-S, a particularly reliable indicator of global estrogenic activity, shows serum levels practically superimposable to the value observed in normal postmenopausal women (219 versus 220 pg/ml). Similarly, serum ADT-G, the major metabolite of androgens, remains within normal postmenopausal values. The present data confirm the intracellular transformation of DHEA in the vagina resulting in local efficacy without any systemic exposure to sex steroids, observations which are in agreement with the physiological mechanisms of menopause. PMID:26291918

  3. Exercise Intensity Modulates Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion when Adjusted for Adipose, Liver and Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Malin, Steven K.; Rynders, Corey A.; Weltman, Judy Y.; Barrett, Eugene J.; Weltman, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of exercise intensity on compensatory changes in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) when adjusted for adipose, liver and skeletal muscle insulin resistance (IR). Fifteen participants (8F, Age: 49.9±3.6yr; BMI: 31.0±1.5kg/m2; VO2peak: 23.2±1.2mg/kg/min) with prediabetes (ADA criteria, 75g OGTT and/or HbA1c) underwent a time-course matched Control, and isocaloric (200kcal) exercise at moderate (MIE; at lactate threshold (LT)), and high-intensity (HIE; 75% of difference between LT and VO2peak). A 75g OGTT was conducted 1 hour post-exercise/Control, and plasma glucose, insulin, C-peptide and free fatty acids were determined for calculations of skeletal muscle (1/Oral Minimal Model; SMIR), hepatic (HOMAIR), and adipose (ADIPOSEIR) IR. Insulin secretion rates were determined by deconvolution modeling for GSIS, and disposition index (DI; GSIS/IR; DISMIR, DIHOMAIR, DIADIPOSEIR) calculations. Compared to Control, exercise lowered SMIR independent of intensity (P<0.05), with HIE raising HOMAIR and ADIPOSEIR compared with Control (P<0.05). GSIS was not reduced following exercise, but DIHOMAIR and DIADIPOSEIR were lowered more following HIE compared with Control (P<0.05). However, DISMIR increased in an intensity based manner relative to Control (P<0.05), which corresponded with lower post-prandial blood glucose levels. Taken together, pancreatic insulin secretion adjusts in an exercise intensity dependent manner to match the level of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, liver and adipose tissue. Further work is warranted to understand the mechanism by which exercise influences the cross-talk between tissues that regulate blood glucose in people with prediabetes. PMID:27111219

  4. PGC-1 isoforms and their target genes are expressed differently in human skeletal muscle following resistance and endurance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Silvennoinen, Mika; Ahtiainen, Juha P; Hulmi, Juha J; Pekkala, Satu; Taipale, Ritva S; Nindl, Bradley C; Laine, Tanja; Häkkinen, Keijo; Selänne, Harri; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Kainulainen, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the acute gene expression responses of PGC-1 isoforms and PGC-1α target genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis (cytochrome C), angiogenesis (VEGF-A), and muscle hypertrophy (myostatin), after a resistance or endurance exercise bout. In addition, the study aimed to elucidate whether the expression changes of studied transcripts were linked to phosphorylation of AMPK and MAPK p38. Nineteen physically active men were divided into resistance exercise (RE, n = 11) and endurance exercise (EE, n = 8) groups. RE group performed leg press exercise (10 × 10 RM, 50 min) and EE walked on a treadmill (∼80% HRmax, 50 min). Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle before, 30 min, and 180 min after exercise. EE and RE significantly increased the gene expression of alternative promoter originated PGC-1α exon 1b- and 1bxs’-derived isoforms, whereas the proximal promoter originated exon 1a-derived transcripts were less inducible and were upregulated only after EE. Truncated PGC-1α transcripts were upregulated both after EE and RE. Neither RE nor EE affected the expression of PGC-1β. EE upregulated the expression of cytochrome C and VEGF-A, whereas RE upregulated VEGF-A and downregulated myostatin. Both EE and RE increased the levels of p-AMPK and p-MAPK p38, but these changes were not linked to the gene expression responses of PGC-1 isoforms. The present study comprehensively assayed PGC-1 transcripts in human skeletal muscle and showed exercise mode-specific responses thus improving the understanding of early signaling events in exercise-induced muscle adaptations. PMID:26438733

  5. PGC-1 isoforms and their target genes are expressed differently in human skeletal muscle following resistance and endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Silvennoinen, Mika; Ahtiainen, Juha P; Hulmi, Juha J; Pekkala, Satu; Taipale, Ritva S; Nindl, Bradley C; Laine, Tanja; Häkkinen, Keijo; Selänne, Harri; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Kainulainen, Heikki

    2015-10-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the acute gene expression responses of PGC-1 isoforms and PGC-1α target genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis (cytochrome C), angiogenesis (VEGF-A), and muscle hypertrophy (myostatin), after a resistance or endurance exercise bout. In addition, the study aimed to elucidate whether the expression changes of studied transcripts were linked to phosphorylation of AMPK and MAPK p38. Nineteen physically active men were divided into resistance exercise (RE, n = 11) and endurance exercise (EE, n = 8) groups. RE group performed leg press exercise (10 × 10 RM, 50 min) and EE walked on a treadmill (~80% HRmax, 50 min). Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle before, 30 min, and 180 min after exercise. EE and RE significantly increased the gene expression of alternative promoter originated PGC-1α exon 1b- and 1bxs'-derived isoforms, whereas the proximal promoter originated exon 1a-derived transcripts were less inducible and were upregulated only after EE. Truncated PGC-1α transcripts were upregulated both after EE and RE. Neither RE nor EE affected the expression of PGC-1β. EE upregulated the expression of cytochrome C and VEGF-A, whereas RE upregulated VEGF-A and downregulated myostatin. Both EE and RE increased the levels of p-AMPK and p-MAPK p38, but these changes were not linked to the gene expression responses of PGC-1 isoforms. The present study comprehensively assayed PGC-1 transcripts in human skeletal muscle and showed exercise mode-specific responses thus improving the understanding of early signaling events in exercise-induced muscle adaptations. PMID:26438733

  6. Endurance exercise training ameliorates insulin resistance and reticulum stress in adipose and hepatic tissue in obese rats.

    PubMed

    da Luz, Gabrielle; Frederico, Marisa J S; da Silva, Sabrina; Vitto, Marcelo F; Cesconetto, Patricia A; de Pinho, Ricardo A; Pauli, José R; Silva, Adelino S R; Cintra, Dennys E; Ropelle, Eduardo R; De Souza, Cláudio T

    2011-09-01

    Obesity-induced endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress has been demonstrated to underlie the induction of obesity-induced JNK and NF-κB activation inflammatory responses, and generation of peripheral insulin resistance. On the other hand, exercise has been used as a crucial tool in obese and diabetic patients, and may reduce inflammatory pathway stimulation. However, the ability of exercise training to reverse endoplasmatic reticulum stress in adipose and hepatic tissue in obesity has not been investigated in the literature. Here, we demonstrate that exercise training ameliorates ER stress and insulin resistance in DIO-induced rats. Rats were fed with standard rodent chow (3,948 kcal kg(-1)) or high-fat diet (5,358 kcal kg(-1)) for 2 months. After that rats were submitted to swimming training (1 h per day, 5 days for week with 5% overload of the body weight for 8 weeks). Samples from epididymal fat and liver were obtained and western blot analysis was performed. Our results showed that swimming protocol reduces pro-inflammatory molecules (JNK, IκB and NF-κB) in adipose and hepatic tissues. In addition, exercise leads to reduction in ER stress, by reducing PERK and eIF2α phosphorylation in these tissues. In parallel, an increase in insulin pathway signaling was observed, as confirmed by increases in IR, IRSs and Akt phosphorylation following exercise training in DIO rats. Thus, results suggest that exercise can reduce ER stress, improving insulin resistance in adipose and hepatic tissue. PMID:21249392

  7. Effect of Regular Exercise on Inflammation Induced by Drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus 3089 in ICR mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Kook; Luchian, Tudor; Park, Yoonkyung

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is often associated with irregular dietary habits and reduced physical activity. Regular exercise induces a metabolic response that includes increased expression of various cytokines, signaling proteins and hormones, and reduced adipocyte size. In this study, mice performed a swimming exercise for 10 min/day, 5 days/week for 3 weeks. We then investigated the effect of this exercise regimen on inflammation induced by infection with drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain 3089 (DRSA). In humans, DRSA causes dermatitis and pneumonitis. Similarly, DRSA induced inflammatory pneumonitis in both no-exercise (No-EX) and swim-trained (SW-EX) ICR mice. Regular exercise increased levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β and nitric oxide in both serum and whole lung tissue in SW-EX, as compared to No-EX control mice. Moreover, levels of the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin were significantly increased in visceral adipose tissue and whole lung tissue in the SW-EX group, and this was accompanied by a reduction in the size of visceral adipocytes. In addition, levels of the inflammation marker peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1) were not increased in the lung tissue of SW-EX mice. These findings suggest that in these model mice, regular exercise strengthens immune system responses, potentially preventing or mitigating infectious disease. PMID:26542343

  8. EFFECTS OF RESISTANCE EXERCISES AND COMPLEX DECONGESTIVE THERAPY ON ARM FUNCTION AND MUSCULAR STRENGTH IN BREAST CANCER RELATED LYMPHEDEMA.

    PubMed

    Do, J H; Kim, W; Cho, Y K; Lee, J; Song, E J; Chun, Y M; Jeon, J Y

    2015-12-01

    The incorporation of resistance exercises into the lifestyle of patients with lymphedema is understudied and an emerging interest. We investigated the effectiveness and results of adding a moderate intensity resistance exercise program for 8 weeks in conjunction with intensive CDT for 1 or 2 weeks (depending on severity) on arm volume, arm function, QOL, and muscular strength in patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema. This prospective, pilot trial included forty-four patients with a history of breast cancer who were beginning complex decongestive therapy for lymphedema. They were assigned to either the intervention (n = 22) or control (n = 22). groups. The intervention comprised of resis- tance band exercises 5 times a week for 8 weeks. These were initially supervised during the intensive lymphedema treatment, but performed independently during the study period. Limb volume, muscular strength, and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL Questionnaire C30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), EORTC-Breast Cancer-Specific QOL Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-BR23), and Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaires were assessed at baseline and at 8 weeks. After 8 weeks, the intervention group demonstrated statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) in the DASH score and muscular strength compared to the control group. Our results indicate that upper body resistance exercise demonstrates a positive effect on arm function and muscular strength without increasing arm volume in breast cancer related lymphedema during and shortly post intensive CDT lymphedema treatment. PMID:27164764

  9. Assessment of Airway Resistance in Normal Trained and Fat Untrained Adolescent Boys Influenced by Exercise Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarzadeh, Mohsen; Habibi, Abdolhamid; Shakeriyan, Said

    2013-01-01

    Background Overweight and obese children are at increased risk of a wide range of health conditions including respiratory diseases. In addition, inactivity can decrease pulmonary function. This study assessed the effect of obesity and inactivity on pulmonary function impairment in adolescents. Materials and Methods This study was conducted on 80 adolescents. Subjects were divided into two groups. Group I included 40 untrained (VO2max= 29.30±4.20) fat adolescents (UO). Group II included 40 healthy trained (VO2max= 58.11±2.23) normal weight adolescents (TN). Body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage and waist to hip ratio (WHR) were calculated and pulmonary function tests were carried out according to the standard protocols. Data were analyzed using student's “t” test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results UO had significantly lower pulmonary function values than the TN group. They also showed lower FEV1/FVC ratio when compared to TN group (P < 0.05). In UO group, BMI, body fat percentage and WHR had a significant negative correlation with pulmonary function whereas in TN group only BMI had significant negative correlation with pulmonary function. A significant decrease in FEV1 was observed in the two groups, which led to a decrease in FEV1/FVC% after the exercise compared to before. Thus, exercise test induced airway resistance in both groups. Conclusion untrained obese adolescents have more respiratory symptoms than their normal weight trained peers, and these factors are recommended to be used as a predictor of pulmonary function in assessment of obese children in epidemiological studies. In addition, obesity and inactivity can surcharge pulmonary function abnormalities in adolescents. PMID:25191449

  10. Effect of exercise training on cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, G. W.; Convertino, V. A.; Nadel, E. R.

    1993-01-01

    We studied the stimulus-response characteristics of cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR) in four groups of male volunteer subjects: i) unfit, ii) physically fit, iii) before and after 10 wk of endurance training (chronic blood volume expansion), and iv) before and after acute blood volume expansion. We assessed the relationship between reflex stimulus, i.e., changes in central venous pressure and response, i.e., FVR, during unloading of cardiopulmonary mechanoreceptors with lower body negative pressure (LBNP, 0 to -20 mm Hg). The slope of the linear relationship between FVR and CVP, the index of the responsiveness of this baroreflex, was significantly diminished (> 50%) in the fit subjects compared with the unfit. The slope of the FVR-CVP relationship was inversely correlated with the subject's total blood volume, suggesting that blood volume expansion was related to the attenuated CP baroreflex. In the exercise training study, maximal oxygen consumption and blood volume increased following 10 wk of endurance training (N = 14) but were unchanged in the time control group (N = 7). The slope of the FVR-CVP relationship was significantly reduced (32%) following 10 wk of training but was unchanged in the time control group. The reduction in slope of the FVR-CVP relationship was inversely related to the increase in blood volume associated with exercise training. Acute blood volume expansion 8 ml.kg-1 body weight with 5% human serum albumin solution) significantly reduced the slope of the FVR-CVP relationship. These data support the hypothesis that the attenuated forearm vascular reflex in physically fit individuals is related to a training-induced hypervolemia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  11. Cardiac autonomic recovery after a single session of resistance exercise with and without vascular occlusion.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Nilo M; Pedro, Rafael E; Leicht, Anthony S; de Paula Ramos, Solange; Nakamura, Fábio Y

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the heart rate variability (HRV) after resistance training with and without vascular occlusion. It was hypothesized that low intensity (LI) with vascular occlusion (LIO) would elicit comparable postexercise HRV responses with that of high intensity (HI) without vascular occlusion. Nine subjects undertook 4 experimental sessions of leg press exercise on different days: (a) 1 repetition maximum (1RM) test, (b) 4 sets of 8 repetitions + 1 set until exhaustion at 80% of 1RM without vascular occlusion (HI), (c) 4 sets of 16 repetitions + 1 set until exhaustion at 40% of 1RM with vascular occlusion (LIO), and (d) 4 sets of 16 repetitions + 1 set with the number of repetitions equal to the last set of LIO but at 40% of 1RM without vascular occlusion (LI). Heart rate variability was analyzed 10 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 1 hour, 5 hours, and 24 hours after the HI, LIO, and LI sessions. The HI session increased the heart rate (HR) and reduced the root mean square of the successive difference of R-R intervals (RMSSD) and log-transformed high-frequency (lnHF) power during prolonged recovery (HR = 5 hours; RMSSD = 30 minutes; lnHF = 1 hour) at a greater magnitude when compared with LIO and LI. Despite the same intensity of exercise for LIO and LI, the occlusion delayed the recovery of HR and HRV variables. Postexercise blood lactate concentration was moderate to strongly correlated with peak HR (r = 0.87), RMSSD (r = -0.64), and lnHF (r = -0.68). This study has demonstrated that LIO was able to reduce cardiac autonomic stress when compared with HI. PMID:24077384

  12. Resistance exercise load does not determine training-mediated hypertrophic gains in young men

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Cameron J.; Churchward-Venne, Tyler A.; West, Daniel W. D.; Burd, Nicholas A.; Breen, Leigh; Baker, Steven K.

    2012-01-01

    We have reported that the acute postexercise increases in muscle protein synthesis rates, with differing nutritional support, are predictive of longer-term training-induced muscle hypertrophy. Here, we aimed to test whether the same was true with acute exercise-mediated changes in muscle protein synthesis. Eighteen men (21 ± 1 yr, 22.6 ± 2.1 kg/m2; means ± SE) had their legs randomly assigned to two of three training conditions that differed in contraction intensity [% of maximal strength (1 repetition maximum)] or contraction volume (1 or 3 sets of repetitions): 30%-3, 80%-1, and 80%-3. Subjects trained each leg with their assigned regime for a period of 10 wk, 3 times/wk. We made pre- and posttraining measures of strength, muscle volume by magnetic resonance (MR) scans, as well as pre- and posttraining biopsies of the vastus lateralis, and a single postexercise (1 h) biopsy following the first bout of exercise, to measure signaling proteins. Training-induced increases in MR-measured muscle volume were significant (P < 0.01), with no difference between groups: 30%-3 = 6.8 ± 1.8%, 80%-1 = 3.2 ± 0.8%, and 80%-3= 7.2 ± 1.9%, P = 0.18. Isotonic maximal strength gains were not different between 80%-1 and 80%-3, but were greater than 30%-3 (P = 0.04), whereas training-induced isometric strength gains were significant but not different between conditions (P = 0.92). Biopsies taken 1 h following the initial resistance exercise bout showed increased phosphorylation (P < 0.05) of p70S6K only in the 80%-1 and 80%-3 conditions. There was no correlation between phosphorylation of any signaling protein and hypertrophy. In accordance with our previous acute measurements of muscle protein synthetic rates a lower load lifted to failure resulted in similar hypertrophy as a heavy load lifted to failure. PMID:22518835

  13. The Effect of Exercise on Respiratory Resistance in Athletes With and Without Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Nancy Pearl; Johnson, Arthur T.; Vossoughi, Jafar; Tian, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose An investigational, portable instrument was used to assess inspiratory (Ri) and expiratory (Re) resistances during resting tidal breathing (RTB), postexercise breathing (PEB), and recovery breathing (RB) in athletes with and without paradoxical vocal fold motion disorder (PVFMD). Method Prospective, controlled, repeated measures within-subject and between-groups design. Twenty-four teenage female athletes, 12 with and 12 without PVFMD, breathed into the Airflow Perturbation Device for baseline measures of respiratory resistance and for two successive 1-min trials after treadmill running for up to 12 min. Exercise duration and dyspnea ratings were collected and compared across groups. Results Athletes with PVFMD had lower than control Ri and Re values during RTB that significantly increased at PEB and decreased during RB. Control athletes' Re decreased significantly from RTB to PEB but not from PEB to RB, whereas Ri did not change from RTB to PEB but decreased from PEB to RB. Athletes without PVFMD ran longer, providing lower dyspnea ratings. Conclusion Immediately following exercise, athletes with PVFMD experienced increased respiratory resistance that affected their exercise performance. The difference in resting respiratory resistances between groups is intriguing and could point to anatomical differences or neural adaptation in teenagers with PVFMD. The Airflow Perturbation Device appears to be a clinically feasible tool that can provide insight into PVFMD and objective data for tracking treatment progress. PMID:26001627

  14. Celiac trunk and branches dissection due to energy drink consumption and heavy resistance exercise: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    González, Wilma; Altieri, Pablo I; Alvarado, Enrique; Banchs, Héctor L; Colón, Edgar; Escobales, Nelson; Crespo, María

    2015-01-01

    Higher doses and consumption of energy drinks leads to cardiovascular effects and potential consequences. Principal components found in energy drinks such as caffeine, guarana and taurine has been related to dilatation, aneurysm formation, dissection and ruptures. There is no evidence showing an integration of these components and its effects in endothelium and aortic walls due to higher levels of pressure during exercises. We report a case of a 44 years male with celiac trunk and branches dissection due to long-term consumption of energy drinks and intense exercise routine. Our proposition relates cell and vessel walls alterations including elasticity in endothelial wall due to higher blood pressure, resistance by intense exercise routine and long-term consumption of energy drinks. PMID:26035983

  15. Myofibrillar protein synthesis following ingestion of soy protein isolate at rest and after resistance exercise in elderly men

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased amino acid availability stimulates muscle protein synthesis, however, aged muscle appears less responsive to the anabolic effects of amino acids when compared to the young. We aimed to compare changes in myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) in elderly men at rest and after resistance exercise following ingestion of different doses of soy protein and compare the responses to those we previously observed with ingestion of whey protein isolate. Methods Thirty elderly men (age 71 ± 5 y) completed a bout of unilateral knee-extensor resistance exercise prior to ingesting no protein (0 g), or either 20 g or 40 g of soy protein isolate (0, S20, and S40 respectively). We compared these responses to previous responses from similar aged men who had ingested 20 g and 40 g of whey protein isolate (W20 and W40). A primed constant infusion of L-[1-13 C]leucine and L-[ring-13 C6]phenylalanine and skeletal muscle biopsies were used to measure whole-body leucine oxidation and MPS over 4 h post-protein consumption in both exercised and non-exercised legs. Results Whole-body leucine oxidation increased with protein ingestion and was significantly greater for S20 vs. W20 (P = 0.003). Rates of MPS for S20 were less than W20 (P = 0.02) and not different from 0 g (P = 0.41) in both exercised and non-exercised leg muscles. For S40, MPS was also reduced compared with W40 under both rested and post-exercise conditions (both P < 0.005); however S40 increased MPS greater than 0 g under post-exercise conditions (P = 0.04). Conclusions The relationship between protein intake and MPS is both dose and protein source-dependent, with isolated soy showing a reduced ability, as compared to isolated whey protein, to stimulate MPS under both rested and post-exercise conditions. These differences may relate to the lower postprandial leucinemia and greater rates of amino acid oxidation following ingestion of soy versus whey protein. PMID

  16. Benefits for bone from resistance exercise and nutrition in long-duration spaceflight: Evidence from biochemistry and densitometry.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott M; Heer, Martina A; Shackelford, Linda C; Sibonga, Jean D; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Zwart, Sara R

    2012-09-01

    Exercise has shown little success in mitigating bone loss from long-duration spaceflight. The first crews of the International Space Station (ISS) used the "interim resistive exercise device" (iRED), which allowed loads of up to 297 lb(f) (or 1337 N) but provided little protection of bone or no greater protection than aerobic exercise. In 2008, the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED), which allowed absolute loads of up to 600 lb(f) (1675 N), was launched to the ISS. We report dietary intake, bone densitometry, and biochemical markers in 13 crewmembers on ISS missions from 2006 to 2009. Of these 13, 8 had access to the iRED and 5 had access to the ARED. In both groups, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase tended to increase during flight toward the end of the mission (p = 0.06) and increased 30 days after landing (p < 0.001). Most markers of bone resorption were also increased in both groups during flight and 30 days after landing (p < 0.05). Bone densitometry revealed significant interactions (time and exercise device) for pelvis bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (p < 0.01), hip femoral neck BMD (p < 0.05), trochanter BMD (p < 0.05), and total hip BMD (p < 0.05). These variables were unchanged from preflight only for ARED crewmembers, who also returned from flight with higher percent lean mass and lower percent fat mass. Body mass was unchanged after flight in both groups. All crewmembers had nominal vitamin D status (75 ± 17 nmol/L) before and during flight. These data document that resistance exercise, coupled with adequate energy intake (shown by maintenance of body mass determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry [DXA]) and vitamin D, can maintain bone in most regions during 4- to 6-month missions in microgravity. This is the first evidence that improving nutrition and resistance exercise during spaceflight can attenuate the expected BMD deficits previously observed after prolonged missions. PMID

  17. Can Energy Cost During Low-Intensity Resistance Exercise be Predicted by the OMNI-RES Scale?

    PubMed

    Vianna, Jefferson M; Reis, Victor M; Saavedra, Francisco; Damasceno, Vinicius; Silva, Sérgio G; Goss, Fredric

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the precision of the OMNI-RES scale to predict energy cost (EC) at low intensity in four resistance exercises (RE). 17 male recreational body builders (age = 26.6 ± 4.9 years; height = 177.7 ± 0.1 cm; body weight = 79.0 ± 11.1 kg and percent body fat = 10.5 ± 4.6%) served as subjects. Initially tests to determine 1RM for four resistance exercises (bench press, half squat, lat pull down and triceps extension) were administered. Subjects also performed resistance exercise at 12, 16, 20, and 24% of 1RM at a rate of 40 bpm until volitional exhaustion. Oxygen uptake (VO2) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) using the OMNI-RES were obtained during and after all RE. EC was calculated using VO2 and the caloric values of VO2 for non-protein RER. Regression analyses were performed for every RE, using EC as the dependent and RPE as the predictor variable. The triceps extension, lat pull down and bench press, RPE correlated strongly with EC (R > 0.97) and predicted EC with a error of less than 0.2 kcal.min(-1). In conclusion, RPE using the OMNI-RES scale can be considered as an accurate indicator of EC in the bench press, lat pull down and triceps extension performed by recreational bodybuilders, provided lower intensities are used (up to 24% of 1-RM) and provided each set of exercise is performed for the maximal sustainable duration. It would be interesting in future studies to consider having the subjects exercise at low intensities for longer durations than those in the present study. PMID:23486188

  18. Can Energy Cost During Low-Intensity Resistance Exercise be Predicted by the OMNI-RES Scale?

    PubMed Central

    Vianna, Jefferson M.; Reis, Victor M.; Saavedra, Francisco; Damasceno, Vinicius; Silva, Sérgio G.; Goss, Fredric

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the precision of the OMNI-RES scale to predict energy cost (EC) at low intensity in four resistance exercises (RE). 17 male recreational body builders (age = 26.6 ± 4.9 years; height = 177.7 ± 0.1 cm; body weight = 79.0 ± 11.1 kg and percent body fat = 10.5 ± 4.6%) served as subjects. Initially tests to determine 1RM for four resistance exercises (bench press, half squat, lat pull down and triceps extension) were administered. Subjects also performed resistance exercise at 12, 16, 20, and 24% of 1RM at a rate of 40 bpm until volitional exhaustion. Oxygen uptake (VO2) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) using the OMNI-RES were obtained during and after all RE. EC was calculated using VO2 and the caloric values of VO2 for non-protein RER. Regression analyses were performed for every RE, using EC as the dependent and RPE as the predictor variable. The triceps extension, lat pull down and bench press, RPE correlated strongly with EC (R > 0.97) and predicted EC with a error of less than 0.2 kcal.min−1. In conclusion, RPE using the OMNI-RES scale can be considered as an accurate indicator of EC in the bench press, lat pull down and triceps extension performed by recreational bodybuilders, provided lower intensities are used (up to 24% of 1-RM) and provided each set of exercise is performed for the maximal sustainable duration. It would be interesting in future studies to consider having the subjects exercise at low intensities for longer durations than those in the present study. PMID:23486188

  19. Turkish 12 Week Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This audiolingual beginner's course has been prepared for the Defense Language Institute intensive program in modern spoken Turkish. The course, consisting of six volumes of basic text in 55 units begins with an introductory section which presents the linguistic background, phonology, and distinguishing features of Turkish. The lesson format…

  20. Effects of anabolic androgenic steroids on sleep patterns of individuals practicing resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Venâncio, Daniel Paulino; Tufik, Sergio; Garbuio, Silvério Aparecido; da Nóbrega, Antonio Claudio Lucas; de Mello, Marco Túlio

    2008-03-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) abuse has become a public health problem in many countries, and is associated with many psychiatric disorders. Epidemiological studies have also found increasing numbers of sleep disorders reported by individuals using AASs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate sleep patterns and disorders in anabolic androgenic users who practice resistance exercise. The sample comprised 58 males divided into three groups: (1) 20 current AAS users aged 26 +/- 1.2, (2) 21 controls with no history of AAS use, aged 26 +/- 1 and (3) 17 sedentary men with no sleep disorders aged 27.2 +/- 0.34. The volunteers spent a night in the sleep laboratory for polysomnography. Comparing the three groups, the user group showed reduced sleep efficiency and more wakings after sleep onset than the sedentary group (P = 0.001). The sedentary group showed a higher percentage of stage 4 than the non-users group. We suggest that using of anabolic steroids reduced sleep efficiency and alters sleep architecture. PMID:18043934

  1. Outcomes of a Mobile Health Coaching Platform: 12-Week Results of a Single-Arm Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, James K

    2016-01-01

    Background The number of mobile health coaching applications is expanding at a rapid rate. An application that uses a guiding intelligence to deliver an individualized structured program has the potential to provide a significant benefit. However, there are few studies of this approach that examine multiple clinical outcomes in a longitudinal manner. Objective The objective of the study was to conduct a 12-week evaluation of participants using the YouPlus Health mobile coaching platform, specifically examining the effects on body weight, waist measurement, blood pressure, lipid profile, glycohemoglobin (A1C), and maximum volume of oxygen consumption (VO2 max). Methods A quasi-experimental research design was used. This included a single-arm pre and post intervention assessment of outcomes. Participants underwent a 12-week intervention in which they received the entirety of the mobile health coaching program via an application on their mobile phones and were evaluated in the same physician’s office setting every two weeks. Data regarding app usage was continuously collected and maintained in a database. Results 10 subjects were enrolled in and completed the pilot study. The mean weight loss was 13.5 lbs. which represented 7.3% of baseline (P=.005). Mean waist circumference was reduced by 7.2 cm or 6.6% of baseline (P=.005). Both systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure measures were significantly lower after 12 weeks of intervention. Mean SBP fell 18.6 mmHg (P=.005) and mean DBP declined 6.4 mmHg (P=.005). VO2 max increased by an average of 3.13 ml/kg/min from baseline to study end (P=.005). From baseline to end-of-study HDL levels increased significantly by 4.0 mg/dL (P=.04) Total cholesterol, LDL, triglycerides, and glycohemoglobin (A1C) trended in the desired direction but did not meet statistical significance. All of the participants in the study completed the necessary in-app tutorials and also completed the in-app questions and received feedback

  2. WISE-2005: effect of aerobic and resistive exercises on orthostatic tolerance during 60 days bed rest in women

    PubMed Central

    Guinet, Patrick; Schneider, Suzanne M.; Macias, Brandon R.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Hughson, Richard L.; Le Traon, Anne Pavy; Bansard, Jean-Yves; Hargens, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular deconditioning after long duration spaceflight is especially challenging in women who have a lower orthostatic tolerance (OT) compared with men. We hypothesized that an exercise prescription, combining supine aerobic treadmill exercise in a Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) chamber followed by 10 min of resting LBNP, 3 to 4 times a week, and flywheel resistive training every third day would maintain orthostatic tolerance (OT) in women during a 60-day head-down-tilt bed rest (HDBR). Sixteen women were assigned to two groups (exercise, control). Pre and post HDBR OT was assessed with a tilt/LBNP test until presyncope. OT time (mean ± SE) decreased from 17.5±1.0 min to 9.1±1.5 min (−50±6%) in control group (p<0.001) and from 19.3 ±1.3 min to 13.0 ± 1.9 min (−35±7%) in exercise group (p<0.001), with no significant difference in OT time between the two groups after HDBR (p=0.13). Nevertheless compared with controls post HDBR, exercisers had a lower heart rate (mean±SE) during supine rest (71±3 versus 85±4, p<0.01), a slower increase in heart rate and a slower decrease in stroke volume over the course of tilt/LBNP test (p<0.05). Blood volume (mean±SE) decreased in controls (−9±2%, p<0.01) but was maintained in exercisers (−4±3%, p=0.17). Our results suggest that the combined exercise countermeasure fails to protect OT but improves cardiovascular response to subtolerance levels of orthostatic stress. PMID:19247686

  3. Reliability of a Simple Physical Therapist Screening Tool to Assess Errors during Resistance Exercises for Musculoskeletal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrup, Emil

    2014-01-01

    The main objective was to investigate the intra- and intertester reliability of a simple screening tool assessing errors in exercise execution by visual observation. 38 participants with no previous resistance exercise experience practiced for two weeks four typical upper limb exercises using elastic tubing. At 2-week follow-up, the participants were invited for a test-retest assessment on errors in technical execution. The assessment was based on ordinal deviation of joint position from neutral of the shoulder, elbow, and wrist in a single plane by visual observation. Moderate intratester reliability weighted kappa (wΚ) score ranging from 0.50 (0.21–0.71) to 0.57 (0.24–0.82) for observer 1 and a fair to moderate intratester reliability wΚ score ranging from 0.27 (0.09–0.43) to 0.52 (0.15–0.86) for observer 2 across the four exercises was observed. For intertester reliability moderate to substantial mean wΚ scores were found between the two observers, slightly improving from round one to round two ranging from 0.40 (0.20–0.59) to 0.68 (0.45–0.91) in round one to 0.52 (0.20–0.80) to 0.69 (0.39–0.86) in round two. The exercise error assessment demonstrated fair to substantial intratester and intertester reliability, which is congruent with previously published studies. Hence the simplicity of defining a neutral joint position for each of the involved joints in the exercise and categorizing the deviation in “some deviation” and “substantial deviation” to either side in a single plane is a viable and inexpensive solution when assessing for errors during exercise. PMID:24738079

  4. Development of a Ground-Based Analog to the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, Nathaniel J.; Scott-Pandorf, M. M.; Caldwell, E.; DeWitt, J.K.; Fincke, R.; Peters, B.T.

    2010-01-01

    NASA and Wyle engineers constructed a Horizontal Exercise Fixture (HEF) that was patented in 2006. Recently modifications were made to HEF with the goal of creating a device that mimics squat exercise on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and can be used by bed rest subjects who must remain supine during exercise. This project posed several engineering challenges, such as how best to reproduce the hip motions (we used a sled that allowed hip motion in the sagittal plane), how to counterweight the pelvis against gravity (we used a pulley and free-weight mechanism), and how to apply large loads (body weight plus squat load) to the shoulders while simultaneously supporting the back against gravity (we tested a standard and a safety bar that allowed movement in the subject s z-axis, both of which used a retractable plate for back support). METHODS An evaluation of the HEF was conducted with human subjects (3F, 3M), who performed sets of squat exercises of increasing load from 10-repetition maximum (RM) up to 1-RM. Three pelvic counterweight loads were tested along with each of the two back-support squat bars. Data collection included 3-dimensional ground reaction forces (GRF), muscle activation (EMG), body motion (video-based motion capture), and subjective comments. These data were compared with previous ground-based ARED study data. RESULTS All subjects in the evaluation were able to perform low- to high-loading squats on the HEF. Four of the 6 subjects preferred a pelvic counterweight equivalent to 60 percent of their body weight. Four subjects preferred the standard squat bar, whereas 2 female subjects preferred the safety bar. EMG data showed muscle activation in the legs and low back typical of squat motion. GRF trajectories and eccentric-concentric loading ratios were similar to ARED. CONCLUSION: Squat exercise performed on HEF approximated squat exercise on ARED.

  5. Growth hormone/IGF-I and/or resistive exercise maintains myonuclear number in hindlimb unweighted muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. L.; Linderman, J. K.; Roy, R. R.; Grindeland, R. E.; Mukku, V.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study of rats, we examined the role, during 2 wk of hindlimb suspension, of growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I (GH/IGF-I) administration and/or brief bouts of resistance exercise in ameliorating the loss of myonuclei in fibers of the soleus muscle that express type I myosin heavy chain. Hindlimb suspension resulted in a significant decrease in mean soleus wet weight that was attenuated either by exercise alone or by exercise plus GH/IGF-I treatment but was not attenuated by hormonal treatment alone. Both mean myonuclear number and mean fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) of fibers expressing type I myosin heavy chain decreased after 2 wk of suspension compared with control (134 vs. 162 myonuclei/mm and 917 vs. 2,076 micron2, respectively). Neither GH/IGF-I treatment nor exercise alone affected myonuclear number or fiber CSA, but the combination of exercise and growth-factor treatment attenuated the decrease in both variables. A significant correlation was found between mean myonuclear number and mean CSA across all groups. Thus GH/IGF-I administration and brief bouts of muscle loading had an interactive effect in attenuating the loss of myonuclei induced by chronic unloading.

  6. Mechanisms for greater insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in normal and insulin-resistant skeletal muscle after acute exercise.

    PubMed

    Cartee, Gregory D

    2015-12-15

    Enhanced skeletal muscle and whole body insulin sensitivity can persist for up to 24-48 h after one exercise session. This review focuses on potential mechanisms for greater postexercise and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (ISGU) by muscle in individuals with normal or reduced insulin sensitivity. A model is proposed for the processes underlying this improvement; i.e., triggers initiate events that activate subsequent memory elements, which store information that is relayed to mediators, which translate memory into action by controlling an end effector that directly executes increased insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Several candidates are potential triggers or memory elements, but none have been conclusively verified. Regarding potential mediators in both normal and insulin-resistant individuals, elevated postexercise ISGU with a physiological insulin dose coincides with greater Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) phosphorylation without improved proximal insulin signaling at steps from insulin receptor binding to Akt activity. Causality remains to be established between greater AS160 phosphorylation and improved ISGU. The end effector for normal individuals is increased GLUT4 translocation, but this remains untested for insulin-resistant individuals postexercise. Following exercise, insulin-resistant individuals can attain ISGU values similar to nonexercising healthy controls, but after a comparable exercise protocol performed by both groups, ISGU for the insulin-resistant group has been consistently reported to be below postexercise values for the healthy group. Further research is required to fully understand the mechanisms underlying the improved postexercise ISGU in individuals with normal or subnormal insulin sensitivity and to explain the disparity between these groups after similar exercise. PMID:26487009

  7. Resistance exercise training attenuates wasting of the extensor digitorum longus muscle in mice bearing the colon-26 adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    al-Majid, S; McCarthy, D O

    2001-01-01

    Progressive wasting of skeletal muscle is a significant side effect of malignancy. Perturbations in protein metabolism contribute to this state of wasting. Resistance exercise increases protein synthesis and mass of healthy muscles and counteracts muscle wasting associated with several catabolic conditions. It is not known whether resistance exercise training can counteract cancer-induced muscle wasting. This study examined the effect of resistance exercise training on muscle mass and protein content in 9 mice bearing the colon-26 adenocarcinoma. The dorsiflexor (extensor digitorum longus [EDL] and tibialis anterior) and plantar flexor (soleus, plantaris, and gastrocnemius) muscles of 1 leg of the tumor-bearing and the control mice were stimulated to contract eccentrically and concentrically, respectively, using an electrical stimulation protocol consisting of 10 sets of 6 repetitions per session. The muscles were stimulated on alternate days for a total of 8 sessions. The weight and protein content of the stimulated EDL muscle in the tumor-bearing mice were significantly higher (62% and 25%, respectively) than those of the nonstimulated EDL. Training did not have significant effects on the weight or protein content of the other muscles of the tumor-bearing mice, nor did it have significant effects on the muscles of the controls. These findings demonstrated that resistance training attenuated cancer-induced muscle wasting and protein depletion in the EDL muscle. The lack of an effect of the same training protocol on the EDL muscle in the control mice suggests that the amount and intensity of exercise training that is adequate to attenuate muscle wasting may not be adequate to induce hypertrophy of healthy muscles. PMID:11547537

  8. Malignant uveal schwannoma with peripheral nerve extension in a 12-week-old color-dilute Labrador Retriever.

    PubMed

    Duke, F D; Teixeira, L B C; Galle, L E; Green, N; Dubielzig, R R

    2015-01-01

    The formalin-fixed, amber-colored right globe from a 12-week-old female silver Labrador Retriever dog was submitted to the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin for light microscopic evaluation. The clinical history described a collapsed anterior chamber and multifocal nodular lesions in the peripheral iris. Histologically, immunohistochemically, and ultrastructurally, the uveal mass was consistent with a malignant schwannoma; there was extension along peripheral nerves within the sclera. The signalment and behavior of the neoplasm distinguish it from the uveal schwannoma of blue-eyed dogs and bear some resemblance to the ocular lesions in human neurofibromatosis. The dilute color mutation may contribute to the cause. Six weeks later, the dog did not develop any additional masses. PMID:24513800

  9. Neural adaptations to resistive exercise: mechanisms and recommendations for training practices.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, David A; Kamen, Gary; Frost, Gail

    2006-01-01

    It is generally accepted that neural factors play an important role in muscle strength gains. This article reviews the neural adaptations in strength, with the goal of laying the foundations for practical applications in sports medicine and rehabilitation. An increase in muscular strength without noticeable hypertrophy is the first line of evidence for neural involvement in acquisition of muscular strength. The use of surface electromyographic (SEMG) techniques reveal that strength gains in the early phase of a training regimen are associated with an increase in the amplitude of SEMG activity. This has been interpreted as an increase in neural drive, which denotes the magnitude of efferent neural output from the CNS to active muscle fibres. However, SEMG activity is a global measure of muscle activity. Underlying alterations in SEMG activity are changes in motor unit firing patterns as measured by indwelling (wire or needle) electrodes. Some studies have reported a transient increase in motor unit firing rate. Training-related increases in the rate of tension development have also been linked with an increased probability of doublet firing in individual motor units. A doublet is a very short interspike interval in a motor unit train, and usually occurs at the onset of a muscular contraction. Motor unit synchronisation is another possible mechanism for increases in muscle strength, but has yet to be definitely demonstrated. There are several lines of evidence for central control of training-related adaptation to resistive exercise. Mental practice using imagined contractions has been shown to increase the excitability of the cortical areas involved in movement and motion planning. However, training using imagined contractions is unlikely to be as effective as physical training, and it may be more applicable to rehabilitation. Retention of strength gains after dissipation of physiological effects demonstrates a strong practice effect. Bilateral contractions are

  10. In Hispanic, obese adolescents, a controlled aerobic exercise program teduced visceral and hepatic fat and improved insulin sensitivity, while resistance training only increased lean body mass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adolescent obesity is a serious public health concern. Aerobic and/or resistance exercise are potential strategies to improve metabolism, but data are scarce on the effects of well-controlled exercise programs in adolescents. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that a 12-wk controlled aerobic o...

  11. Effect of resistance exercise intensity on the expression of PGC-1α isoforms and the anabolic and catabolic signaling mediators, IGF-1 and myostatin, in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Neil A; McKinley-Barnard, Sarah K; Spillane, Mike B; Andre, Thomas L; Gann, Joshua J; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute messenger (mRNA) expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) isoforms, insulin-like growth factor-1Ea (IGF-1Ea), and myostatin in response to 2 resistance exercise intensities. In a uniform-balanced, crossover design, 10 participants performed 2 separate testing sessions involving a lower body resistance exercise component consisting of a lower intensity (50% of 1-repetition maximum; 1RM) protocol and a higher intensity (80% of 1RM) protocol of equal volumes. Muscle samples were obtained at before exercise, 45 min, 3 h, 24 h, and 48 h postexercise. Resistance exercise did not alter total PGC-1α mRNA expression; however, distinct responses of each PGC-1α isoform were observed. The response of each isoform was consistent between sessions, suggesting no effect of resistance exercise intensity on the complex transcriptional expression of the PGC-1α gene. IGF-1Ea mRNA expression significantly increased following the higher intensity session compared with pre-exercise and the lower intensity session. Myostatin mRNA expression was significantly reduced compared with pre-exercise values at all time points with no difference between exercise intensity. Further research is needed to determine the effects of the various isoforms of PGC-1α in human skeletal muscle on the translational level as well as their relation to the expression of IGF-1 and myostatin. PMID:27467217

  12. Changes of Heart Rate Variability during Methylphenidate Treatment in Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Children: A 12-Week Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hayeon Jennifer; Yang, Jaewon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between the autonomic nervous system and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) rating scales and to evaluate the usefulness of heart rate variability (HRV) as a psychophysiological biomarker for ADHD. Materials and Methods Subjects were recruited from outpatients in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Korea University Medical Center from August 2007 to December 2010. Subjects received methylphenidate. Time- and frequency-domain analyses of HRV, the Korean ADHD rating scale (K-ARS), and computerized ADHD diagnostic system were evaluated before treatment. After a 12-week period of medication administration, we repeated the HRV measurements and K-ARS rating. Results Eighty-six subjects were initially enrolled and 37 participants completed the 12-week treatment and HRV measurements subsequent to the treatment. Significant correlations were found between the K-ARS inattention score and some HRV parameters. All of the HRV parameters, except the standard deviations of the normal-to-normal interval, very low frequency, and low frequency to high frequency, showed a significant positive correlation between baseline and endpoint measures in completers. High frequency (HF) and the square root of the mean squared differences of successive normal-to-normal intervals (RMSSD), which are related to parasympathetic vagal tone, showed significant decreases from baseline to endpoint. Conclusion The HRV test was shown to be reproducible. The decrease in HF and RMSSD suggests that parasympathetic dominance in ADHD can be altered by methylphenidate treatment. It also shows the possibility that HRV parameters can be used as psychophysiological markers in the treatment of ADHD. PMID:26256981

  13. Effects of 12-week supervised treadmill training on spatio-temporal gait parameters in patients with claudication.

    PubMed

    Konik, Anita; Kuklewicz, Stanisław; Rosłoniec, Ewelina; Zając, Marcin; Spannbauer, Anna; Nowobilski, Roman; Mika, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate selected temporal and spatial gait parameters in patients with intermittent claudication after completion of 12-week supervised treadmill walking training. The study included 36 patients (26 males and 10 females) aged: mean 64 (SD 7.7) with intermittent claudication. All patients were tested on treadmill (Gait Trainer, Biodex). Before the programme and after its completion, the following gait biomechanical parameters were tested: step length (cm), step cycle (cycle/s), leg support time (%), coefficient of step variation (%) as well as pain-free walking time (PFWT) and maximal walking time (MWT) were measured. Training was conducted in accordance with the current TASC II guidelines. After 12 weeks of training, patients showed significant change in gait biomechanics consisting in decreased frequency of step cycle (p < 0.05) and extended step length (p < 0.05). PFWT increased by 96% (p < 0.05). MWT increased by 100% (p < 0.05). After completing the training, patients' gait was more regular, which was expressed via statistically significant decrease of coefficient of variation (p < 0.05) for both legs. No statistically significant relation between the post-training improvement of PFWT and MWT and step length increase and decreased frequency of step cycle was observed (p > 0.05). Implications for Rehabilitation Twelve-week treadmill walking training programme may lead to significant improvement of temporal and spatial gait parameters in patients with intermittent claudication. Twelve-week treadmill walking training programme may lead to significant improvement of pain-free walking time and maximum walking time in patients with intermittent claudication. PMID:26314413

  14. Initial response as a predictor of 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone treatment response in a prescription opioid dependent population

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Katherine A.; Griffin, Margaret L.; Connery, Hilary S.; Hilario, E. Yvette; Fiellin, David A.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Weiss, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Initial medication response has been shown to predict treatment outcome across a variety of substance use disorders, but no studies have examined the predictive power of initial response to buprenorphine-naloxone in the treatment of prescription opioid dependence. We therefore conducted a secondary analysis of data from the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study to determine whether initial response to buprenorphine-naloxone predicted 12-week treatment outcome in a prescription opioid-dependent population. Method Using data from a multi-site, randomized controlled trial of buprenorphine-naloxone plus counseling for DSM-IV prescription opioid dependence (June 2006–July 2009), we conducted a secondary analysis to investigate the relationship between initial medication response and 12-week treatment outcome to establish how soon the efficacy of buprenorphine-naloxone could be predicted. Outcomes were determined from the Substance Use Report, a self-report measure of substance use, and confirmatory urinalysis. Predictive values were calculated to determine the importance of abstinence vs. use at various time points within the first month of treatment (week 1, weeks 1–2, 1–3, or 1–4) in predicting successful vs. unsuccessful treatment outcome (based on abstinence or near-abstinence from opioids) in the last 4 weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone treatment (weeks 9–12). Results Outcome was best predicted by medication response after two weeks of treatment. Two weeks of initial abstinence was moderately predictive of treatment success (positive predictive value = 71%), while opioid use in both of the first two weeks was strongly predictive of unsuccessful treatment outcome (negative predictive value (NPV) = 84%), especially when successful outcome was defined as total abstinence from opioids in weeks 9–12 (NPV = 94%). Conclusion Evaluating prescription opioid-dependent patients after two weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone treatment may help determine

  15. Child Support Grant access and receipt among 12-week-old infants in an urban township setting in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Zembe-Mkabile, Wanga; Doherty, Tanya; Sanders, David; Jackson, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Background Cash transfers (CTs) are increasingly used as a strategy to alleviate poverty and improve child health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries. The Child Support Grant (CSG) is the largest CT programme in South Africa, and on the continent, targeting poor children from birth until the age of 18 with a monthly sum of R300 (USD30). Evidence on the CSG shows that early receipt of the grant is associated with improved child health outcomes. Since its implementation, one of the major concerns about the grant has been take-up rates, particularly for younger children. This paper reports results on take-up rates for 12-week-old infants residing in an urban township in South Africa. Methods This is a descriptive study utilising data from a community-based, cluster-randomised trial which evaluated a programme providing pregnancy and post-natal home visits by community health workers to 3,494 mothers in Umlazi township, South Africa. Results At the 12-week visit, half (52%) of the mothers who had enrolled in the study had applied for the CSG on behalf of their children, while 85% of the mothers who had not applied were still planning to apply. Only 38% (1,327) of all children had received the CSG. Conclusions In this study, many mothers had not applied for the CSG in the first few months after delivery, and only a third of children had accessed the grant. Further research is needed to understand what the current barriers are that prevent mothers from applying for this important form of social protection in the early months after delivery. PMID:25160516

  16. Effect of 12-week-long aerobic training programme on body composition, aerobic capacity, complete blood count and blood lipid profile among young women

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Robert; Jastrzębski, Zbigniew; Zarębska, Aleksandra; Bichowska, Marta; Drobnik-Kozakiewicz, Izabela; Radzimiński, Łukasz; Leońska-Duniec, Agata; Ficek, Krzysztof; Cięszczyk, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Background Numerous data suggest that aerobic-type exercise improves lipoprotein-lipid profiles, cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition in young women. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biological response to high-low impact aerobic fitness among young women. Materials and methods Thirty-four young women aged 22 (19-24) years were divided into three groups: underweight (N = 10), normal weight (N = 12) and overweight (N = 12). Aerobic capacity, anthropometry and body composition together with complete blood count and lipid profile were determined before and after completion of a 12-week-long training period. Results The training programme caused a significant decrease in weight (by 4.3 kg, P = 0.003), body mass index (by 1.3 kg/m2, P = 0.003), free fat mass (by 2.1 kg, P = 0.002), total body water (by 0.4 kg, P = 0.036), percentage of fat (by 3 percent points, P = 0.002), all analyzed skinfolds thicknesses, as well as the lipid profile in overweight group, and no changes in normal weight group. Significant changes in weight (by 4.2 kg, P = 0.005), body mass index (by 0.9 kg/m2, P = 0.005), crus skinfold thickness (by 3.3 mm, P = 0.028), and in maximum oxygen uptake (by 2.49 mL/kg/min; P = 0.047) were observed among underweight women. No change in total blood count was observed in all groups. Conclusion Twelve-week-long fitness training programme of two alternating styles (low and high impact) has a beneficial effect on overweight young women. PMID:25672474

  17. High force development augments skeletal muscle signalling in resistance exercise modes equalized for time under tension.

    PubMed

    Gehlert, Sebastian; Suhr, Frank; Gutsche, Katrin; Willkomm, Lena; Kern, Julia; Jacko, Daniel; Knicker, Axel; Schiffer, Thorsten; Wackerhage, Henning; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2015-06-01

    How force development and time under tension (TUT) during resistance exercise (RE) influence anabolic signalling of skeletal muscle is incompletely understood. We hypothesized that high force development during RE is more important for post-exercise-induced signalling than submaximal and fatiguing RE with lower force development but similar TUT. Twenty-two male subjects (24 ± 6 years, 181 ± 9 cm, 79 ± 2 kg) performed three distinct RE modes in the fed state with equal TUT but distinct force output: (i) maximal eccentric RE (ECC, n = 7) three sets, eight reps, 100% eccentric dynamic force; (ii) standard RE (STD, n = 7), three sets, 10 reps, 75% dynamic force; and (iii) high fatiguing single-set RE (HIT, n = 8), 20 reps, 100% eccentric-concentric force; vastus lateralis biopsies were collected at baseline, 15, 30, 60, 240 min and 24 h after RE, and the signalling of mechanosensitive and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-related proteins was determined. The phosphorylation levels of pFAK(Tyr397), pJNK(Thr183/Tyr185), pAKT(Thr308/Ser473), pmTOR(Ser2448), p4E-BP1(Thr37/46), p70s6k(Thr389)/(Ser421/Thr424) and pS6(Ser235/236) were significantly higher in ECC than those in STD and HIT at several time points (P < 0.01). pJNK(Thr183/Tyr185) and pS6(Ser235/236) levels were significantly higher in type II myofibres in ECC compared with STD and HIT. HIT exerted throughout the weakest signalling response. We conclude that high force development during acute RE is superior for anabolic skeletal muscle signalling than fatiguing RE with lower force output but similar TUT. Our results suggest that this response is substantially driven by the higher activation of type II myofibres during RE. PMID:25070178

  18. Physiological and Psychophysical Responses to Listening to Music during Warm-Up and Circuit-Type Resistance Exercise in Strength Trained Men

    PubMed Central

    Arazi, Hamid; Asadi, Abbas; Purabed, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of listening to music during warm-up and resistance exercise on physiological (heart rate and blood pressure) and psychophysical (rating of perceived exertion) responses in trained athletes. Twelve strength trained male participants performed warm-up and resistance exercise without music (WU+RE without M), warm-up and resistance exercise with music (WU+RE with M), WU with M and RE without M, and WU without M and RE with M, with 48 hours space between sessions. After completing each session, the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was measured. Also, heart rate (HR), systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and rate pressure product (RPP) were assessed before, after, and 15, 30, 45, and 60 min after exercise. Results indicated that RPE was higher for WU+RE without M condition in comparison with other conditions. All conditions showed increases in cardiovascular variables after exercise. The responses of HR, SBP, and RPP were higher for WU+RE without M condition. Thus, using music during warm-up and resistance exercise is a legal method for decreasing RPE and cardiovascular responses due to resistance exercise. PMID:26464896

  19. The relationship of pulmonary vascular resistance and compliance to pulmonary artery wedge pressure during submaximal exercise in healthy older adults

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Stephen P.; Granton, John T.; Esfandiari, Sam; Goodman, Jack M.

    2016-01-01

    Key points A consistent inverse hyperbolic relationship has been observed between pulmonary vascular resistance and compliance, although changes in pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP) may modify this relationship.This relationship predicts that pulmonary artery systolic, diastolic and mean pressure maintain a consistent relationship relative to the PAWP.We show that, in healthy exercising human adults, both pulmonary vascular resistance and compliance decrease in relation to exercise‐associated increases in PAWP.Pulmonary artery systolic, diastolic and mean pressures maintain a consistent relationship with one another, increasing linearly with increasing PAWP.Increases in PAWP in the setting of exercise are directly related to a decrease in pulmonary vascular compliance, despite small decreases in pulmonary vascular resistance, thereby increasing the pulsatile afterload to the right ventricle. Abstract The resistive and pulsatile components of right ventricular afterload (pulmonary vascular resistance, Rp; compliance, Cp) are related by an inverse hyperbolic function, expressed as their product known as RpCp‐time. The RpCp‐time exhibits a narrow range, although it may be altered by the pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP). Identifying the determinants of RpCp‐time should improve our understanding of the physiological behaviour of pulmonary arterial systolic (PASP), diastolic (PADP) and mean (mPAP) pressures in response to perturbations. We examined the effect of exercise in 28 healthy non‐athletic adults (55 ± 6 years) who underwent right heart catheterization to assess haemodynamics and calculate Rp and Cp. Measurements were made at rest and during two consecutive 8–10 min stages of cycle ergometry, at targeted heart‐rates of 100 beats min–1 (Light) and 120 beats min–1 (Moderate). Cardiac output increased progressively during exercise. PASP, PADP, mPAP and PAWP increased for Light exercise, without any further rise for Moderate

  20. The effect of rowing ergometry and resistive exercise on skeletal muscle structure and function during bed rest.

    PubMed

    Krainski, Felix; Hastings, Jeffrey L; Heinicke, Katja; Romain, Nadine; Pacini, Eric L; Snell, Peter G; Wyrick, Phil; Palmer, M Dean; Haller, Ronald G; Levine, Benjamin D

    2014-06-15

    Exposure to microgravity causes functional and structural impairment of skeletal muscle. Current exercise regimens are time-consuming and insufficiently effective; an integrated countermeasure is needed that addresses musculoskeletal along with cardiovascular health. High-intensity, short-duration rowing ergometry and supplemental resistive strength exercise may achieve these goals. Twenty-seven healthy volunteers completed 5 wk of head-down-tilt bed rest (HDBR): 18 were randomized to exercise, 9 remained sedentary. Exercise consisted of rowing ergometry 6 days/wk, including interval training, and supplemental strength training 2 days/wk. Measurements before and after HDBR and following reambulation included assessment of strength, skeletal muscle volume (MRI), and muscle metabolism (magnetic resonance spectroscopy); quadriceps muscle biopsies were obtained to assess muscle fiber types, capillarization, and oxidative capacity. Sedentary bed rest (BR) led to decreased muscle volume (quadriceps: -9 ± 4%, P < 0.001; plantar flexors: -19 ± 6%, P < 0.001). Exercise (ExBR) reduced atrophy in the quadriceps (-5 ± 4%, interaction P = 0.018) and calf muscle, although to a lesser degree (-14 ± 6%, interaction P = 0.076). Knee extensor and plantar flexor strength was impaired by BR (-14 ± 15%, P = 0.014 and -22 ± 7%, P = 0.001) but preserved by ExBR (-4 ± 13%, P = 0.238 and +13 ± 28%, P = 0.011). Metabolic capacity, as assessed by maximal O2 consumption, (31)P-MRS, and oxidative chain enzyme activity, was impaired in BR but stable or improved in ExBR. Reambulation reversed the negative impact of BR. High-intensity, short-duration rowing and supplemental strength training effectively preserved skeletal muscle function and structure while partially preventing atrophy in key antigravity muscles. Due to its integrated cardiovascular benefits, rowing ergometry could be a primary component of exercise prescriptions for astronauts or patients suffering from severe

  1. Comparison of Gait During Treadmill Exercise While Supine in Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP), Supine with Bungee Resistance and Upright in Normal Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boda, Wanda; Hargens, Alan R.; Aratow, Michael; Ballard, Richard E.; Hutchinson, Karen; Murthy, Gita; Campbell, James

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare footward forces, gait kinematics, and muscle activation patterns (EMG) generated during supine treadmill exercise against LBNP with the same parameters during supine bungee resistance exercise and upright treadmill exercise. We hypothesize that the three conditions will be similar. These results will help validate treadmill exercise during LBNP as a viable technique to simulate gravity during space flight. We are evaluating LBNP as a means to load the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems without gravity. Such loading should help prevent physiologic deconditioning during space flight. The best ground-based simulation of LBNP treadmill exercise in microgravity is supine LBNP treadmill exercise on Earth because the supine footward force vector is neither directed nor supplemented by Earth's gravity. Previous results from HR-95 ("Dynamics of footward force and leg intramuscular pressure during exercise against supine LBNP and upright standing in normal gravity") indicate that supine plantar-/dorsiflexion exercise in LBNP at 100 mm Hg produces similar ground reaction forces, musculoskeletal stress, and VO2 to those during upright exercise against Earth's gravity. However, elevations of leg volume and heart rate indicate that cardiovascular stress during 100 mm Hg LBNP exercise exceeds that during 1 g exercise. Therefore, the need arose to reduce the cardiovascular stress of LBNP, while maintaining LBNP-induced reaction forces. To this end, we determined that mild plantar-/dorsiflexion exercise during LBNP significantly improves tolerance to LBNP via musculovenous pumping and sympathoexcitation; more intense exercise such as walking and running may further improve LBNP tolerance. In addition, two methodological advances have permited us to simulate upright 1 g exercise better with supine LBNP exercise. First, a newly-designed waist seal allows decreased levels of LBNP (50-60 mm Hg) to produce a footward force equaling one

  2. The Effect of Post-Resistance Exercise Amino Acids on Plasma MCP-1 and CCR2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Adam J.; Hoffman, Jay R.; Jajtner, Adam R.; Varanoske, Alyssa N.; Church, David D.; Gonzalez, Adam M.; Townsend, Jeremy R.; Boone, Carleigh H.; Baker, Kayla M.; Beyer, Kyle S.; Mangine, Gerald T.; Oliveira, Leonardo P.; Fukuda, David H.; Stout, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    The recruitment and infiltration of classical monocytes into damaged muscle is critical for optimal tissue remodeling. This study examined the effects of an amino acid supplement on classical monocyte recruitment following an acute bout of lower body resistance exercise. Ten resistance-trained men (24.7 ± 3.4 years; 90.1 ± 11.3 kg; 176.0 ± 4.9 cm) ingested supplement (SUPP) or placebo (PL) immediately post-exercise in a randomized, cross-over design. Blood samples were obtained at baseline (BL), immediately (IP), 30-min (30P), 1-h (1H), 2-h (2H), and 5-h (5H) post-exercise to assess plasma concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), myoglobin, cortisol and insulin concentrations; and expressions of C-C chemokine receptor-2 (CCR2), and macrophage-1 antigen (CD11b) on classical monocytes. Magnitude-based inferences were used to provide inferences on the true effects of SUPP compared to PL. Changes in myoglobin, cortisol, and insulin concentrations were similar between treatments. Compared to PL, plasma MCP-1 was “very likely greater” (98.1% likelihood effect) in SUPP at 2H. CCR2 expression was “likely greater” at IP (84.9% likelihood effect), “likely greater” at 1H (87.7% likelihood effect), “very likely greater” at 2H (97.0% likelihood effect), and “likely greater” at 5H (90.1% likelihood effect) in SUPP, compared to PL. Ingestion of SUPP did not influence CD11b expression. Ingestion of an amino acid supplement immediately post-exercise appears to help maintain plasma MCP-1 concentrations and augment CCR2 expression in resistance trained men. PMID:27384580

  3. Increased Resistance during Jump Exercise Does Not Enhance Cortical Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Boudreaux, Ramon D.; Swift, Joshua M.; Gasier, Heath G.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Hogan, Harry A.; Fluckey, James D.; Bloomfield, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study sought to elucidate the effects of a low- and high-load jump resistance exercise (RE) training protocol on cortical bone of the tibia and femur mid-diaphyses. METHODS Sprague-Dawley rats (male, 6-mos-old) were randomly assigned to high-load RE (HRE; n = 16), low-load RE (LRE; n = 15) or cage control (CC; n = 11) groups. Animals in the HRE and LRE groups performed 15 sessions of jump RE for 5 weeks. Load in the HRE group was progressively increased from 80g added to a weighted vest (50 repetitions) to 410g (16 repetitions). The LRE rats completed the same protocol as the HRE group (same number of repetitions) with only a 30g vest applied. RESULTS Low- and high-load jump RE resulted in 6–11% higher cortical bone mineral content (BMC) and cortical bone area compared to controls as determined by in vivo pQCT measurements. In the femur, however, only LRE demonstrated improvements in cortical volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD; +11%) and cross-sectional moment of inertia (CSMI; +20%) versus CC group. Three-point bending to failure revealed a marked increase in tibial max force (25–29%), stiffness (19–22%), and energy to max force (35–55%), and a reduction in elastic modulus (−11–14%) in both LRE and HRE compared to controls. Dynamic histomorphometry assessed at the tibia mid-diaphysis determined that both LRE and HRE resulted in 20–30% higher periosteal mineralizing surface versus CC group. Mineral apposition rate (MAR) and bone formation rate (BFR) were significantly greater in LRE animals (27%, 39%) than in the HRE group. CONCLUSION These data demonstrate that jump training with minimal loading is equally, and sometimes more, effective at augmenting cortical bone integrity compared to overload training in skeletally mature rats. PMID:24743108

  4. Influence of Resistance Exercise on Lean Body Mass in Aging Adults: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Mark D.; Sen, Ananda; Gordon, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Sarcopenia plays a principal role in the pathogenesis of frailty and functional impairment that occurs with aging. There are few published accounts which examine the overall benefit of resistance exercise (RE) for lean body mass (LBM), while considering a continuum of dosage schemes and/or age ranges. Therefore the purpose of this meta-analysis was to determine the effects of RE on LBM in older men and women, while taking these factors into consideration. Methods This study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses recommendations. Randomized controlled trials and randomized or non-randomized studies among adults ≥ 50 years, were included. Heterogeneity between studies was assessed using the Cochran Q and I2 statistics, and publication bias was evaluated through physical inspection of funnel plots as well as formal rank-correlation statistics. Mixed-effects meta-regression was incorporated to assess the relationship between RE dosage and changes in LBM. Results Data from forty-nine studies, representing a total of 1328 participants were pooled using random-effect models. Results demonstrated a positive effect for lean body mass and there was no evidence of publication bias. The Cochran Q statistic for heterogeneity was 497.8, which was significant (p < 0.01). Likewise, I2 was equal to 84%, representing rejection of the null hypothesis of homogeneity. The weighted pooled estimate of mean lean body mass change was 1.1 kg (95% CI, 0.9 kg to 1.2 kg). Meta-regression revealed that higher volume interventions were associated (β = 0.05, p < 0.01) with significantly greater increases in lean body mass, whereas older individuals experienced less increase (β = -0.03, p = 0.01). Conclusions RE is effective for eliciting gains in lean body mass among aging adults, particularly with higher volume programs. Findings suggest that RE participation earlier in life may provide superior effectiveness. PMID:20543750

  5. The metabolic and temporal basis of muscle hypertrophy in response to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Brook, Matthew S; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J

    2016-09-01

    Constituting ∼40% of body mass, skeletal muscle has essential locomotory and metabolic functions. As such, an insight into the control of muscle mass is of great importance for maintaining health and quality-of-life into older age, under conditions of cachectic disease and with rehabilitation. In healthy weight-bearing individuals, muscle mass is maintained by the equilibrium between muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle protein breakdown; when this balance tips in favour of MPS hypertrophy occurs. Despite considerable research into pharmacological/nutraceutical interventions, resistance exercise training (RE-T) remains the most potent stimulator of MPS and hypertrophy (in the majority of individuals). However, the mechanism(s) and time course of hypertrophic responses to RE-T remain poorly understood. We would suggest that available data are very much in favour of the notion that the majority of hypertrophy occurs in the early phases of RE-T (though still controversial to some) and that, for the most part, continued gains are hard to come by. Whilst the mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy represent the culmination of mechanical, auto/paracrine and endocrine events, the measurement of MPS remains a cornerstone for understanding the control of hypertrophy - mainly because it is the underlying driving force behind skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Development of sophisticated isotopic techniques (i.e. deuterium oxide) that lend to longer term insight into the control of hypertrophy by sustained RE-T will be paramount in providing insights into the metabolic and temporal regulation of hypertrophy. Such technologies will have broad application in muscle mass intervention for both athletes and for mitigating disease/age-related cachexia and sarcopenia, alike. PMID:26289597

  6. Modulation of autophagy signaling with resistance exercise and protein ingestion following short-term energy deficit.

    PubMed

    Smiles, William J; Areta, José L; Coffey, Vernon G; Phillips, Stuart M; Moore, Daniel R; Stellingwerff, Trent; Burke, Louise M; Hawley, John A; Camera, Donny M

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy contributes to remodeling of skeletal muscle and is sensitive to contractile activity and prevailing energy availability. We investigated changes in targeted genes and proteins with roles in autophagy following 5 days of energy balance (EB), energy deficit (ED), and resistance exercise (REX) after ED. Muscle biopsies from 15 subjects (8 males, 7 females) were taken at rest following 5 days of EB [45 kcal·kg fat free mass (FFM)(-1)·day(-1)] and 5 days of ED (30 kcal·kg FFM(-1)·day(-1)). After ED, subjects completed a bout of REX and consumed either placebo (PLA) or 30 g whey protein (PRO) immediately postexercise. Muscle biopsies were obtained at 1 and 4 h into recovery in each trial. Resting protein levels of autophagy-related gene protein 5 (Atg5) decreased after ED compared with EB (∼23%, P < 0.001) and remained below EB from 1 to 4 h postexercise in PLA (∼17%) and at 1 h in PRO (∼18%, P < 0.05). In addition, conjugated Atg5 (cAtg12) decreased below EB in PLA at 4 h (∼20, P < 0.05); however, its values were increased above this time point in PRO at 4 h alongside increases in FOXO1 above EB (∼22-26%, P < 0.05). Notably, these changes were subsequent to increases in unc-51-like kinase 1(Ser757) phosphorylation (∼60%) 1 h postexercise in PRO. No significant changes in gene expression of selected autophagy markers were found, but EGR-1 increased above ED and EB in PLA (∼417-864%) and PRO (∼1,417-2,731%) trials 1 h postexercise (P < 0.001). Postexercise protein availability, compared with placebo, can selectively promote autophagic responses to REX in ED. PMID:26136534

  7. Reduced ribosomal protein s6 phosphorylation after progressive resistance exercise in growing adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, Nathan J; Nokleby, Jessica J; Thicke, Bethany M; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate moderate intensity progressive resistance exercise (PRE) in growing adolescent rats and its effect on muscle hypertrophy (defined as an increase in fiber cross-sectional area [CSA]). We hypothesized that in adolescent animals moderate intensity PRE would increase (a) fiber CSA; (b) myosin heavy chain (MyHC) content; and (c) expression and phosphorylation of cell signaling molecules involved in translational regulation, compared with that in age-matched sedentary (SED) controls. In the PRE group, 3-week-old male rats were trained to climb a vertical ladder as a mode of PRE training such that by 10 weeks all animals in the PRE group had progressed to carry an additional 80% of their body weight per climb. In agreement with our hypotheses, we observed that 10 weeks of moderate PRE in adolescent animals was sufficient to increase the CSA of muscle fibers and increase MyHC content. The average muscle fiber CSA increased by >10%, and the total MyHC content increased by 35% (p < 0.05) in the PRE group compared with that in the SED animals. Concurrently, we investigated sustained changes in the expression and phosphorylation of key signaling molecules that are previously identified regulators of hypertrophy in adult animal models. Contrary to our hypotheses, expression and phosphorylation of the translational regulators mammalian target of rapamycin and Akt were not increased in the PRE group. In addition, we observed that the ratio of phosphorylated-to-unphosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) was reduced over sixfold in PRE animals (p < 0.05) and that total rpS6 protein levels were unchanged between PRE and SED animals (p > 0.05). We conclude that moderate intensity PRE is sufficient to induce muscle hypertrophy in adolescent animals, whereas the signaling mechanisms associated with muscle hypertrophy may differ between growing adolescents and adults. PMID:22614147

  8. Resistance exercise training and in vitro skeletal muscle oxidative capacity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Flack, Kyle D; Davy, Brenda M; DeBerardinis, Martin; Boutagy, Nabil E; McMillan, Ryan P; Hulver, Matthew W; Frisard, Madlyn I; Anderson, Angela S; Savla, Jyoti; Davy, Kevin P

    2016-07-01

    Whether resistance exercise training (RET) improves skeletal muscle substrate oxidative capacity and reduces mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species in older adults remains unclear. To address this, 19 older males (≥60 years) were randomized to a RET (n = 11) or to a waitlist control group (n = 8) that remained sedentary for 12 weeks. RET was comprised of three upper body and four lower body movements on resistance machines. One set of 8-12 repetitions to failure of each movement was performed on three nonconsecutive days/week. Improvements in chest press and leg press strength were assessed using a three-repetition maximum (3 RM). Body composition was assessed via dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle at baseline and at both 3 weeks and 12 weeks. Palmitate and pyruvate oxidation rates were measured from the (14)CO2 produced from [1-(14)C] palmitic acid and [U-(14)C] pyruvate, respectively, during incubation of muscle homogenates. PGC-1α, TFAM, and PPARδ levels were quantified using qRT-PCR Citrate synthase (CS) and β-HAD activities were determined spectrophotometrically. Mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed using the Amplex Red Hydrogen Peroxide/Peroxidase assay. There were no significant changes in body weight or body composition following the intervention. Chest press and leg press strength (3RM) increased ~34% (both P < 0.01) with RET There were no significant changes in pyruvate or fatty acid oxidation or in the expression of target genes with the intervention. There was a modest increase (P < 0.05) in βHAD activity with RET at 12 weeks but the change in CS enzyme activity was not significant. In addition, there were no significant changes in ROS production in either group following RET Taken together, the findings of this study suggest that 12 weeks of low volume RET does not increase skeletal muscle oxidative capacity or reduce ROS

  9. 12-Week, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Add-on Riluzole in the Treatment of Childhood-Onset Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Paul J; Joseph, Lisa A; Farmer, Cristan A; Luckenbaugh, David A; Lougee, Lorraine C; Zarate, Carlos A; Swedo, Susan E

    2014-01-01

    Many children with childhood-onset obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) fail to respond adequately to standard therapies. Evidence from preclinical and clinical studies suggests that the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system might be an alternative treatment target. This study examined the efficacy of riluzole, a glutamatergic modulator, as an adjunctive therapy for children with treatment-resistant OCD. In a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 60 treatment-resistant children and adolescents (mean age=14.5±2.4 years), with moderate to severe OCD (mean Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive–Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS)=28.2±3.7), 17 of whom also had concomitant autism spectrum disorder, were randomized to receive riluzole (final dose of 100 mg/day) or placebo in addition to the existing treatment regimen. Fifty-nine subjects completed the randomized trial. Primary outcome measures were changes on the CY-BOCS, the Clinical Global Impressions Scale, and the Children's Global Assessment Scale. Riluzole was fairly well tolerated, although it was associated with one case of pancreatitis and five instances of slight increases in transaminases. All subjects showed significant reductions in CY-BOCS scores during treatment; however, there was no significant difference between placebo and riluzole on any of the primary or secondary outcome measures. The study failed to demonstrate superiority of riluzole over placebo as an adjunctive treatment for children with childhood-onset OCD. However, future studies may show benefits for less treatment-refractory children with fewer concomitant medications. PMID:24356715

  10. Bone loss during partial weight bearing (1/6th gravity) is mitigated by resistance and aerobic exercise in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreaux, R. D.; Metzger, C. E.; Macias, B. R.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Hogan, H. A.; Bloomfield, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    Astronauts on long duration missions continue to experience bone loss, as much as 1-2% each month, for up to 4.5 years after a mission. Mechanical loading of bone with exercise has been shown to increase bone formation, mass, and geometry. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of two exercise protocols during a period of reduced gravitational loading (1/6th body weight) in mice. Since muscle contractions via resistance exercise impart the largest physiological loads on the skeleton, we hypothesized that resistance training (via vertical tower climbing) would better protect against the deleterious musculoskeletal effects of reduced gravitational weight bearing when compared to endurance exercise (treadmill running). Young adult female BALB/cBYJ mice were randomly assigned to three groups: 1/6 g (G/6; n=6), 1/6 g with treadmill running (G/6+RUN; n=8), or 1/6 g with vertical tower climbing (G/6+CLB; n=9). Exercise was performed five times per week. Reduced weight bearing for 21 days was achieved through a novel harness suspension system. Treadmill velocity (12-20 m/min) and daily run time duration (32-51 min) increased incrementally throughout the study. Bone geometry and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) at proximal metaphysis and mid-diaphysis tibia were assessed by in vivo peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) on days 0 and 21 and standard dynamic histomorphometry was performed on undemineralized sections of the mid-diaphysis after tissue harvest. G/6 caused a significant decrease (P<0.001) in proximal tibia metaphysis total vBMD (-9.6%). These reductions of tibia metaphyseal vBMD in G/6 mice were mitigated in both G/6+RUN and G/6+CLB groups (P<0.05). After 21 days of G/6, we saw an absolute increase in tibia mid-diaphysis vBMD and in distal metaphysis femur vBMD in both G/6+RUN and G/6+CLB mice (P<0.05). Substantial increases in endocortical and periosteal mineralizing surface (MS/BS) at mid-diaphysis tibia in G/6+CLB demonstrate that

  11. Post-exercise changes in myostatin and actRIIB expression in obese insulin-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Bueno, P G; Bassi, D; Contrera, D G; Carnielli, H M; Silva, R N; Nonaka, K O; Selistre-de-Araújo, H S; Leal, A M O

    2011-06-01

    We evaluated the expression of MSTN and ActRIIB mRNA in muscle and adipose tissue in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in rats subjected to exercise. There was no difference in the expression of MSTN between exercised and sedentary high-fat fed rats in muscle after swimming training. The expression of ActRIIB mRNA in muscle was not significantly different among the groups. In BAT, MSTN mRNA expression was higher in exercised high-fat fed group (EHF) compared with sedentary high-fat fed group (SHF). ActRIIB mRNA expression in BAT was higher in EHF compared with SHF. In mesenteric fat, MSTN mRNA was lower in EHF compared with SHF and ActRIIB mRNA was lower in EHF compared with SHF. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that the expression of MSTN and ActRIIB mRNA changes in both adipose tissue and skeletal muscle in diet-induced obese and exercised rats and suggest the participation of MSTN in energy homeostasis. PMID:21539891

  12. Hippocampal UCP2 is essential for cognition and resistance to anxiety but not required for the benefits of exercise.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Zhai, X; Chen, P; Yang, M; Zhao, J; Dong, J; Liu, H

    2014-09-26

    Uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) reduces oxidative stress by facilitating the influx of protons into mitochondrial matrix, thus dissociating mitochondrial oxidation from ATP synthesis. UCP2 is expressed abundantly in brain areas and plays a key role in neuroprotection. Here, we sought to determine if UCP2 deficiency produces cognitive impairment and anxiety in young mice, and to determine if hippocampal UCP2 is essential for the beneficial effects of voluntary exercise. Antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) was used to produce UCP2 knockdown in mice. Our results firstly showed that UCP2-targeted ASO significantly reduced UCP2 mRNA and protein expression in the hippocampus. ASO treatment impaired learning and memory of the mice in Y-maze, T-maze, and object recognition tests (ORT). ASO-treated mice exhibited more anxiously in OPT, light/dark box test, and elevated plus maze (EPM) than the control mice. We also found that wheel running ameliorated cognitive dysfunction and anxiety-like behaviors in ASO-treated mice. Furthermore, voluntary exercise reversed ASO-induced changes in hippocampal levels of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA), and norepinephrine (NE). However, UCP2 protein in the hippocampus was not correlated with cognitive and anxiolytic benefits of exercise. These findings suggest that hippocampal UCP2 is essential for cognitive function and the resistance to anxiety of mice, but not required for the beneficial effects of exercise. PMID:25003714

  13. Voluntary Exercise Can Ameliorate Insulin Resistance by Reducing iNOS-Mediated S-Nitrosylation of Akt in the Liver in Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Hideko; Kaneki, Masao; Goto, Sataro; Shimokado, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Naito, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Voluntary exercise can ameliorate insulin resistance. The underlying mechanism, however, remains to be elucidated. We previously demonstrated that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the liver plays an important role in hepatic insulin resistance in the setting of obesity. In this study, we tried to verify our hypothesis that voluntary exercise improves insulin resistance by reducing the expression of iNOS and subsequent S-nitrosylation of key molecules of glucose metabolism in the liver. Twenty-one Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats, a model of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and 18 non-diabetic control Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats were randomly assigned to a sedentary group or exercise group subjected to voluntary wheel running for 20 weeks. The voluntary exercise significantly reduced the fasting blood glucose and HOMA-IR in the OLETF rats. In addition, the exercise decreased the amount of iNOS mRNA in the liver in the OLETF rats. Moreover, exercise reduced the levels of S-nitrosylated Akt in the liver, which were increased in the OLETF rats, to those observed in the LETO rats. These findings support our hypothesis that voluntary exercise improves insulin resistance, at least partly, by suppressing the iNOS expression and subsequent S-nitrosylation of Akt, a key molecule of the signal transduction pathways in glucose metabolism in the liver. PMID:26172834

  14. The effects of long-term resistance exercise on the relationship between neurocognitive performance and GH, IGF-1, and homocysteine levels in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chia-Liang; Wang, Chun-Hao; Pan, Chien-Yu; Chen, Fu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of a long-term resistance exercise intervention on executive functions in healthy elderly males, and to further understand the potential neurophysiological mechanisms mediating the changes. The study assessed forty-eight healthy elderly males randomly assigned to exercise (n = 24) or control (n = 24) groups. The assessment included neuropsychological and neuroelectric measures during a variant of the oddball task paradigm, as well as growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and homocysteine levels at baseline and after either a 12 month intervention of resistance exercise training or control period. The results showed that the control group had a significantly lower accuracy rate and smaller P3a and P3b amplitudes in the oddball condition after 12 months. The exercise group exhibited improved reaction times (RTs), sustained P3a and P3b amplitudes, increased levels of serum IGF-1, and decreased levels of serum homocysteine. The changes in IGF-1 levels were significantly correlated with the changes in RT and P3b amplitude of the oddball condition in the exercise group. In conclusion, significantly enhanced serum IGF-1 levels after 12 months of resistance exercise were inversely correlated with neurocognitive decline in the elderly. These findings suggest that regular resistance exercise might be a promising strategy to attenuate the trajectory of cognitive aging in healthy elderly individuals, possibly mediated by IGF-1. PMID:25713518

  15. Reduced AMPK-ACC and mTOR signaling in muscle from older men, and effect of resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengyao; Verdijk, Lex B; Sakamoto, Kei; Ely, Brian; van Loon, Luc J C; Musi, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key energy-sensitive enzyme that controls numerous metabolic and cellular processes. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is another energy/nutrient-sensitive kinase that controls protein synthesis and cell growth. In this study we determined whether older versus younger men have alterations in the AMPK and mTOR pathways in skeletal muscle, and examined the effect of a long term resistance type exercise training program on these signaling intermediaries. Older men had decreased AMPKα2 activity and lower phosphorylation of AMPK and its downstream signaling substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). mTOR phosphylation also was reduced in muscle from older men. Exercise training increased AMPKα1 activity in older men, however, AMPKα2 activity, and the phosphorylation of AMPK, ACC and mTOR, were not affected. In conclusion, older men have alterations in the AMPK-ACC and mTOR pathways in muscle. In addition, prolonged resistance type exercise training induces an isoform-selective up regulation of AMPK activity. PMID:23000302

  16. Exercise ameliorates insulin resistance via Ca2+ signals distinct from those of insulin for GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae-Ryoung; Park, Kwang-Hyun; Kim, Byung-Ju; Yoon, Chung-Su; Kim, Uh-Hyun

    2015-04-01

    Muscle contraction and insulin induce glucose uptake in skeletal muscle through GLUT4 membrane translocation. Beneficial effects of exercise on glucose homeostasis in insulin-resistant individuals are known to be due to their distinct mechanism between contraction and insulin action on glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. However, the underlying mechanisms are not clear. Here we show that in skeletal muscle, distinct Ca(2+) second messengers regulate GLUT4 translocation by contraction and insulin treatment; d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate/nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) and cyclic ADP-ribose/NAADP are main players for insulin- and contraction-induced glucose uptake, respectively. Different patterns of phosphorylation of AMPK and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II were shown in electrical stimuli (ES)- and insulin-induced glucose uptake pathways. ES-induced Ca(2+) signals and glucose uptake are dependent on glycolysis, which influences formation of NAD(P)-derived signaling messengers, whereas insulin-induced signals are not. High-fat diet (HFD) induced a defect in only insulin-mediated, but not ES-mediated, Ca(2+) signaling for glucose uptake, which is related to a specifically lower NAADP formation. Exercise decreases blood glucose levels in HFD-induced insulin resistance mice via NAADP formation. Thus we conclude that different usage of Ca(2+) signaling in contraction/insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle may account for the mechanism by which exercise ameliorates glucose homeostasis in individuals with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25409702

  17. Effects of 12 weeks of aerobic training on autonomic modulation, mucociliary clearance, and aerobic parameters in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Marceli Rocha; Ramos, Ercy Mara Cipulo; Kalva-Filho, Carlos Augusto; Freire, Ana Paula Coelho Figueira; de Alencar Silva, Bruna Spolador; Nicolino, Juliana; de Toledo-Arruda, Alessandra Choqueta; Papoti, Marcelo; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Ramos, Dionei

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exhibit aerobic function, autonomic nervous system, and mucociliary clearance alterations. These parameters can be attenuated by aerobic training, which can be applied with continuous or interval efforts. However, the possible effects of aerobic training, using progressively both continuous and interval sessions (ie, linear periodization), require further investigation. Aim To analyze the effects of 12-week aerobic training using continuous and interval sessions on autonomic modulation, mucociliary clearance, and aerobic function in patients with COPD. Methods Sixteen patients with COPD were divided into an aerobic (continuous and interval) training group (AT) (n=10) and a control group (CG) (n=6). An incremental test (initial speed of 2.0 km·h−1, constant slope of 3%, and increments of 0.5 km·h−1 every 2 minutes) was performed. The training group underwent training for 4 weeks at 60% of the peak velocity reached in the incremental test (vVO2peak) (50 minutes of continuous effort), followed by 4 weeks of sessions at 75% of vVO2peak (30 minutes of continuous effort), and 4 weeks of interval training (5×3-minute effort at vVO2peak, separated by 1 minute of passive recovery). Intensities were adjusted through an incremental test performed at the end of each period. Results The AT presented an increase in the high frequency index (ms2) (P=0.04), peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) (P=0.01), vVO2peak (P=0.04), and anaerobic threshold (P=0.02). No significant changes were observed in the CG (P>0.21) group. Neither of the groups presented changes in mucociliary clearance after 12 weeks (AT: P=0.94 and CG: P=0.69). Conclusion Twelve weeks of aerobic training (continuous and interval sessions) positively influenced the autonomic modulation and aerobic parameters in patients with COPD. However, mucociliary clearance was not affected by aerobic training. PMID:26648712

  18. Oral Microbiota Shift after 12-Week Supplementation with Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and PTA 5289; A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Romani Vestman, Nelly; Chen, Tsute; Lif Holgerson, Pernilla; Öhman, Carina; Johansson, Ingegerd

    2015-01-01

    Background Lactobacillus spp. potentially contribute to health by modulating bacterial biofilm formation, but their effects on the overall oral microbiota remain unclear. Methods and Findings Oral microbiota was characterized via 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA hypervariable region V3-V4 after 12 weeks of daily Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and PTA 5289 consumption. Forty-four adults were assigned to a test group (n = 22) that received lactobacilli lozenges (108 CFU of each strain/lozenge) or a control group that received placebo (n = 22). Presence of L. reuteri was confirmed by cultivation and species specific PCR. Tooth biofilm samples from 16 adults before, during, and after exposure were analyzed by pyrosequencing. A total of 1,310,292 sequences were quality filtered. After removing single reads, 257 species or phylotypes were identified at 98.5% identity in the Human Oral Microbiome Database. Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria were the most abundant phyla. Streptococcus was the most common genus and the S. oralis/S. mitis/S. mitis bv2/S. infantis group comprised the dominant species. The number of observed species was unaffected by L. reuteri exposure. However, subjects who had consumed L. reuteri were clustered in a principal coordinates analysis relative to scattering at baseline, and multivariate modeling of pyrosequencing microbiota, and culture and PCR detected L. reuteri separated baseline from 12-week samples in test subjects. L. reuteri intake correlated with increased S. oralis/S. mitis/S. mitis bv2/S. infantis group and Campylobacter concisus, Granulicatella adiacens, Bergeyella sp. HOT322, Neisseria subflava, and SR1 [G-1] sp. HOT874 detection and reduced S. mutans, S. anginosus, N. mucosa, Fusobacterium periodicum, F. nucleatum ss vincentii, and Prevotella maculosa detection. This effect had disappeared 1 month after exposure was terminated. Conclusions L. reuteri consumption did not affect species

  19. EFFECTS OF COMPRESSION ON LYMPHEDEMA DURING RESISTANCE EXERCISE IN WOMEN WITH BREAST CANCER-RELATED LYMPHEDEMA: A RANDOMIZED, CROSS-OVER TRIAL.

    PubMed

    Singh, B; Newton, R U; Cormie, P; Galvao, D A; Cornish, B; Reul-Hirche, H; Smith, C; Nosaka, K; Hayes, S C

    2015-06-01

    The use of compression garments during exercise is recommended for women with breast cancer-related lymphedema, but the evidence behind this clinical recommendation is unclear. The aim of this randomized, cross-over trial was to compare the acute effects of wearing versus not wearing compression during a single bout of moderate-load resistance exercise on lymphedema status and its associated symptoms in women with breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Twenty-five women with clinically diagnosed, stable unilateral breast cancer-related lymphedema completed two resistance exercise sessions, one with compression and one without, in a randomized order separated by a minimum 6 day wash-out period. The resistance exercise session consisted of six upper-body exercises, with each exercise performed for three sets at a moderate-load (10-12 repetition maximum). Primary outcome was lymphedema, assessed using bioimpedance spectroscopy (L-Dex score). Secondary outcomes were lymphedema as assessed by arm circumferences (percent inter-limb difference and sum-of-circumferences), and symptom severity for pain, heaviness and tightness, measured using visual analogue scales. Measurements were taken pre-, immediately post- and 24 hours post-exercise. There was no difference in lymphedema status (i.e., L-Dex scores) pre- and post-exercise sessions or between the compression and non-compression condition [Mean (SD) for compression pre-, immediately post- and 24 hours post-exercise: 17.7 (21.5), 12.7 (16.2) and 14.1 (16.7), respectively; no compression: 15.3 (18.3), 15.3 (17.8), and 13.4 (16.1), respectively]. Circumference values and symptom severity were stable across time and treatment condition. An acute bout of moderate-load, upper-body resistance exercise performed in the absence of compression does not exacerbate lymphedema in women with BCRL. PMID:26714372

  20. [Improving of muscle mass and force in rehabilitation of heart-lung patients. Aerobic interval training, resistance-exercises, excentric exercises, vibration].

    PubMed

    Apor, Péter; Tihanyi, József; Borka, Péter

    2005-09-18

    Improvement of muscle mass and force which got depleted by inactivity or pathological processes is one of the aims and also a prerequisite of a rehabilitative intervention. Metabolically active larger and stronger muscles diminish the cardiovascular risk, permit the aerobic preventive and rehabilitative activities and enables a higher quality of life. Interval forms of aerobic exercise improves also the muscles. The resistance training plays an important part in rehabilitation. Beside the traditional dynamic strength training with weights, gym machines, body weight etc. the excentric type of muscle activity potentiates higher muscle load with lesser energy consumption, therefore it is suitable in the case of smaller performance ability. Vibration of the whole body or parts of it by machines improves the co-activity of the motor units and results in force development with small metabolic involvement. PMID:16238250

  1. Comparison of Gait During Treadmill Exercise While Supine in Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP), Supine with Bungee Resistance and Upright in Normal Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boda, Wanda; Hargens, Alan R.; Aratow, Michael; Ballard, Richard E.; Hutchinson, Karen; Murthy, Gita; Campbell, James

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare footward forces, gait kinematics, and muscle activation patterns (EMG) generated during supine treadmill exercise against LBNP with the same parameters during supine bungee resistance exercise and upright treadmill exercise. We hypothesize that the three conditions will be similar. These results will help validate treadmill exercise during LBNP as a viable technique to simulate gravity during space flight. We are evaluating LBNP as a means to load the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems without gravity. Such loading should help prevent physiologic deconditioning during space flight. The best ground-based simulation of LBNP treadmill exercise in microgravity is supine LBNP treadmill exercise on Earth because the supine footward force vector is neither directed nor supplemented by Earth's gravity.

  2. Knee Extension Range of Motion at 4 Weeks Is Related to Knee Extension Loss at 12 Weeks After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Sarah; Garrison, J. Craig; Bothwell, James; Conway, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is commonly torn, and surgical reconstruction is often required to allow a patient to return to their prior level of activity. Avoiding range of motion (ROM) loss is a common goal, but little research has been done to identify when ROM loss becomes detrimental to a patient’s future function. Purpose: To determine whether there is a relationship between early knee side-to-side extension difference after ACL reconstruction and knee side-to-side extension difference at 12 weeks. The hypothesis was that early (within the first 8 weeks) knee side-to-side extension difference will be predictive of knee side-to-side extension difference seen at 12 weeks. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Knee side-to-side extension difference measures were taken on 74 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction rehabilitation at the initial visit and 4, 8, and 12 weeks postoperatively. Visual analog scores (VAS) and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores were also recorded at these time frames. Results: There was a strong relationship between knee extension ROM at 4 and 12 weeks (r = 0.639, P < .001) and 8 and 12 weeks (r = 0.742, P < .001). When the variables of knee extension ROM at initial visit and 4 and 8 weeks were entered into a regression analysis, the predictor variable explained 61% (R2 = 0.611) of variance for knee extension ROM at 12 weeks, with 4 weeks (R2 = 0.259) explaining the majority of this variance. Conclusion: This study found that a patient’s knee extension at 4 weeks was strongly correlated with knee extension at 12 weeks. Clinical Relevance: This information may be useful for clinicians treating athletic patients who are anxious for return to sport by providing them an initial goal to work toward in hopes of ensuring successful rehabilitation of their knee. PMID:26675061

  3. Alcohol expectancy changes over a 12-week cognitive-behavioral therapy program are predictive of treatment success.

    PubMed

    Young, Ross McD; Connor, Jason P; Feeney, Gerald F X

    2011-01-01

    This study examines if outcome expectancies (perceived consequences of engaging in certain behavior) and self-efficacy expectancies (confidence in personal capacity to regulate behavior) contribute to treatment outcome for alcohol dependence. Few clinical studies have examined these constructs. The Drinking Expectancy Profile (DEP), a psychometric measure of alcohol expectancy and drinking refusal self-efficacy, was administered to 298 alcohol-dependent patients (207 males) at assessment and on completion of a 12-week cognitive-behavioral therapy alcohol abstinence program. Baseline measures of expectancy and self-efficacy were not strong predictors of outcome. However, for the 164 patients who completed treatment, all alcohol expectancy and self-efficacy factors of the DEP showed change over time. The DEP scores approximated community norms at the end of treatment. Discriminant analysis indicated that change in social pressure drinking refusal self-efficacy, sexual enhancement expectancies, and assertion expectancies successfully discriminated those who successfully completed treatment from those who did not. Future research should examine the basis of expectancies related to social functioning as a possible mechanism of treatment response and a means to enhance treatment outcome. PMID:20864294

  4. Treatment of feline lymphoma using a 12-week, maintenance-free combination chemotherapy protocol in 26 cats.

    PubMed

    Limmer, S; Eberle, N; Nerschbach, V; Nolte, I; Betz, D

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this prospective clinical trial was to investigate the efficacy and toxicity of a short-term, maintenance-free chemotherapy protocol in feline lymphoma. Twenty-six cats with confirmed diagnosis of high-/intermediate-grade lymphoma were treated with a 12-week protocol consisting of cyclic administration of l-asparaginase, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and prednisolone. Complete (CR) and partial remission (PR) rates were 46 and 27%, respectively. Median duration of first CR was 394 days compared with a median PR duration of 41 days. No factor was identified to significantly influence the likelihood to reach CR. Overall survival amounted to 78 days (range: 9-2230 days). Median survival in CR cats was 454 days and in PR cats was 82 days. Toxicosis was mainly low grade with anorexia seen most frequently. In cats achieving CR, maintenance-free chemotherapy may be sufficient to attain long-term remission and survival. Factors aiding in prognosticating the likelihood for CR, strategies enhancing response and targeting chemotherapy-induced anorexia need to be identified in future. PMID:24548273

  5. Effect of 12 Weeks High Oleic Peanut Consumption on Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors and Body Composition

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Jayne A.; Howe, Peter R. C.; Buckley, Jonathan D.; Bryan, Janet; Coates, Alison M.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates an inverse association between nut consumption and obesity, inflammation, hyperlipidaemia and glucose intolerance. We investigated effects of high oleic peanut consumption vs. a nut free diet on adiposity and cardio-metabolic risk markers. In a randomised cross-over design, 61 healthy subjects (65 ± 7 years, body mass index (BMI) 31 ± 4 kg/m2) alternated either high oleic peanuts (15%–20% of energy) or a nut free diet for 12 weeks. Body composition and mass, waist circumference, C-reactive protein (CRP), lipids, glucose and insulin were assessed at baseline and after each phase. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) compared the two diets. Consistent with other nut studies, there were no differences in lipids, CRP, glucose and insulin with peanut consumption. In contrast, some reports have demonstrated benefits, likely due to differences in the study cohort. Energy intake was 10% higher (853 kJ, p < 0.05), following peanut consumption vs. control, attributed to a 30% increase in fat intake (p < 0.001), predominantly monounsaturated (increase 22 g, p < 0.05). Despite greater energy intake during the peanut phase, there were no differences in body composition, and less than predicted increase (0.5 kg) in body weight for this additional energy intake, possibly due to incomplete nutrient absorption and energy utilisation. PMID:26404365

  6. Evaluating the effect of a haemoglobin spray on size reduction in chronic DFUs: clinical outcomes at 12 weeks.

    PubMed

    Dawn Hunt, Sharon; Haycocks, Samantha; McCardle, Joanne; Guttormsen, Karl

    2016-06-23

    A recent multi-centre observational evaluation investigated the effect of a topical haemoglobin spray (Granulox, Infirst), used as an adjunct to standard care, on wound size reduction in 17 patients (4 females/13 males) with 20 chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) over a 4-week period. In 14 of the 18 wounds that completed the evaluation (one patient dropped out due to an infection) there was a mean reduction of 53.8% (range: 11.9-100%). The product was acceptable to both patients and clinicians, who all found it easy to use. This article describes the outcomes for the remaining 13 patients (with 15 wounds) who continued using the spray after the 4-week evaluation ended. (Data are not available for two patients and the one patient who healed during the 4-week evaluation.) By 12 weeks, three wounds (20%) had healed, eight (53%) were progressing towards healing, three (20%) increased in size and one (7%) was slow healing. PMID:27345086

  7. A 12-Week Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Flexible-Dose Trial of Vilazodone in Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Careri, Jason M.; Draine, Ann E.; Hanover, Rita; Liebowitz, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of vilazodone for subjects (aged 18–75 years) with generalized social anxiety disorder. Method: Forty-four subjects with generalized social anxiety disorder (DSM-IV-TR criteria) were randomized to vilazodone or placebo in a 12-week double-blind, flexible-dose trial. Change from baseline to endpoint on the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) was the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures included response and remission rates and changes in depression and anxiety. Data were collected between November 2012 and April 2014. The study was conducted at a private clinical trials facility in New York, New York. Results: The mean baseline LSAS score was 91.9 (SD = 17.5) and the mean Clinical Global Impressions–Severity scale score was 5.3 (SD = 0.56), indicating marked to severe illness. There were no significant baseline differences in severity of social anxiety between the treatment groups. At the end of treatment, in the intent-to-treat sample (n = 39), the vilazodone group had improved significantly more than the placebo group by 14.3 points on the LSAS (t = 1.80, P = .04, one-tail test) (Cohen d = 0.58). Conclusions: The findings suggest that vilazodone may be a promising treatment for social anxiety disorder. Further study is needed given the limited sample size. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01712321 PMID:27057414

  8. Exercise and dietary change ameliorate high fat diet induced obesity and insulin resistance via mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Ju Yong; Shin, Ki Ok; Woo, Jinhee; Woo, Sang Heon; Jang, Ki Soeng; Lee, Yul Hyo; Kang, Sunghwun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise and dietary change on obesity and insulin resistance and mTOR signaling protein levels in skeletal muscles of obese rats. [Methods] Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into CO (Normal diet) and HF (High Fat diet) groups in order to induce obesity for 15 weeks. The rats were then subdivided into CO, COT (CO + Training), HF, HFT (HF + Training), HFND (Dietary change), and HFNDT (HFND + Training) groups (10 rats / group). The training groups underwent moderate-intensity treadmill exercise for 8 weeks, after which soleus muscles were excised and analyzed. Data was statistically analyzed by independent t-test and One-way ANOVA tests with a 0.05 significance level. [Results] Fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin, and HOMA-IR in the HF group were significantly higher, as compared with other groups (p <.05). Protein levels of insulin receptor subunit-1 (IRS-1), IRS-2, and p-Akt were significantly higher in the HFT, HFND, and HFNDT groups, as compared with HF group. In addition, the protein levels of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 were significantly decreased by exercise and dietary change (p <.05). However, mTORC2 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase were significantly increased (p <.05). [Conclusion] In summary, despite the negative impact of continuous high fat intake, regular exercise and dietary change showed a positive effect on insulin resistance and mTOR signaling protein levels. PMID:27508151

  9. Acute Post-Exercise Myofibrillar Protein Synthesis Is Not Correlated with Resistance Training-Induced Muscle Hypertrophy in Young Men

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Cameron J.; Churchward-Venne, Tyler A.; Parise, Gianni; Bellamy, Leeann; Baker, Steven K.; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J.; Phillips, Stuart M.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle hypertrophy following resistance training (RT) involves activation of myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) to expand the myofibrillar protein pool. The degree of hypertrophy following RT is, however, highly variable and thus we sought to determine the relationship between the acute activation of MPS and RT-induced hypertrophy. We measured MPS and signalling protein activation after the first session of resistance exercise (RE) in untrained men (n = 23) and then examined the relation between MPS with magnetic resonance image determined hypertrophy. To measure MPS, young men (24±1 yr; body mass index  = 26.4±0.9 kg•m2) underwent a primed constant infusion of L-[ring-13C6] phenylalanine to measure MPS at rest, and acutely following their first bout of RE prior to 16 wk of RT. Rates of MPS were increased 235±38% (P<0.001) above rest 60–180 min post-exercise and 184±28% (P = 0.037) 180–360 min post exercise. Quadriceps volume increased 7.9±1.6% (−1.9–24.7%) (P<0.001) after training. There was no correlation between changes in quadriceps muscle volume and acute rates of MPS measured over 1–3 h (r = 0.02), 3–6 h (r = 0.16) or the aggregate 1–6 h post-exercise period (r = 0.10). Hypertrophy after chronic RT was correlated (r = 0.42, P = 0.05) with phosphorylation of 4E-BP1Thr37/46 at 1 hour post RE. We conclude that acute measures of MPS following an initial exposure to RE in novices are not correlated with muscle hypertrophy following chronic RT. PMID:24586775

  10. Resistance exercise leading to failure versus not to failure: effects on cardiovascular control

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the acute effects of resistance exercise (RE) leading to failure and RE that was not to failure on 24 h blood pressure (BP) and heart rate variability (HRV) in sedentary normotensive adult women. Methods Ten women (33.2 ± 5.8 years; 159.3 ± 9.4 cm; 58.0 ±6.4 kg; body fat 28.4 ± 2.8%) randomly underwent three experimental sessions: control (40 minutes of seated rest), RE leading to failure with 3 sets of 10 repetitions maximum (10-RM), and RE not to failure at 60% of 10-RM with 3 sets of 10 repetitions. Immediately post session BP and HRV were measured for 24 h. Results Ratings of perceived exertion and heart rate were higher during the 10-RM session when compared with 60% of 10-RM (6.4 ± 0.5 vs 3.5 ± 0.8 and 123.7 ± 13.9 vs 104.5 ± 7.3 bpm, respectively). The systolic, diastolic and mean BP decreased at 07:00 a.m. after the 10-RM session when compared with the control session (−9.0 ± 7.8 mmHg, -16.0 ± 12.9 mmHg and −14.3 ± 11.2 mmHg, respectively). The root mean square of the squared differences between R-R intervals decreased after both the 60% of 10-RM and 10-RM sessions compared with the control session. Conclusions An acute RE session leading to failure induced a higher drop of BP upon awakening, while both RE sessions reduced cardiac parasympathetic modulation. RE may be an interesting training strategy to acutely decrease BP in adult women. PMID:24252583

  11. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of aerobic vs. resistance exercise training on visceral fat.

    PubMed

    Ismail, I; Keating, S E; Baker, M K; Johnson, N A

    2012-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that the location of excess adiposity, particularly increased deposition of visceral adipose tissue (VAT), is important when determining the adverse health effects of overweight and obesity. Exercise therapy is an integral component of obesity management, but the most potent exercise prescription for VAT benefit is unclear. We aimed to evaluate the independent and synergistic effects of aerobic exercise (AEx) and progressive resistance training (PRT) and to directly compare the efficacy of AEx and PRT for beneficial VAT modulation. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to assess the efficacy of exercise interventions on VAT content/volume in overweight and obese adults. Relevant databases were searched to November 2010. Included studies were randomized controlled designs in which AEx or PRT in isolation or combination were employed for 4 weeks or more in adult humans, where computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used for quantification of VAT pre- and post-intervention. Of the 12196 studies from the initial search, 35 were included. After removal of outliers, there was a significant pooled effect size (ES) for the comparison between AEx therapy and control (-0.33, 95% CI: -0.52 to -0.14; P < 0.01) but not for the comparison between PRT therapy and control (0.09, 95% CI: -0.17 to -0.36; P = 0.49). Of the available nine studies which directly compared AEx with PRT, the pooled ES did not reach statistical significance (ES = 0.23, 95% CI: -0.02 to 0.50; P = 0.07 favouring AEx). The pooled ES did not reach statistical significance for interventions that combined AEx and PRT therapy vs. control (-0.28, 95% CI: -0.69 to 0.14; P = 0.19), for which only seven studies were available. These data suggest that aerobic exercise is central for exercise programmes aimed at reducing VAT, and that aerobic exercise below current recommendations for overweight/obesity management may be sufficient for beneficial VAT

  12. Effect of creatine supplementation and resistance-exercise training on muscle insulin-like growth factor in young adults.

    PubMed

    Burke, Darren G; Candow, Darren G; Chilibeck, Philip D; MacNeil, Lauren G; Roy, Brian D; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Ziegenfuss, Tim

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare changes in muscle insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) content resulting from resistance-exercise training (RET) and creatine supplementation (CR). Male (n=24) and female (n=18) participants with minimal resistance-exercise-training experience (=1 year) who were participating in at least 30 min of structured physical activity (i.e., walking, jogging, cycling) 3-5 x/wk volunteered for the study. Participants were randomly assigned in blocks (gender) to supplement with creatine (CR: 0.25 g/kg lean-tissue mass for 7 days; 0.06 g/kg lean-tissue mass for 49 days; n=22, 12 males, 10 female) or isocaloric placebo (PL: n=20, 12 male, 8 female) and engage in a whole-body RET program for 8 wk. Eighteen participants were classified as vegetarian (lacto-ovo or vegan; CR: 5 male, 5 female; PL: 3 male, 5 female). Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were taken before and after the intervention and analyzed for IGF-I using standard immunohistochemical procedures. Stained muscle cross-sections were examined microscopically and IGF-I content quantified using image-analysis software. Results showed that RET increased intramuscular IGF-I content by 67%, with greater accumulation from CR (+78%) than PL (+54%; p=.06). There were no differences in IGF-I between vegetarians and nonvegetarians. These findings indicate that creatine supplementation during resistance-exercise training increases intramuscular IGF-I concentration in healthy men and women, independent of habitual dietary routine. PMID:18708688

  13. 39-week toxicity and toxicokinetic study of ponezumab (PF-04360365) in cynomolgus monkeys with 12-week recovery period.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Gary B; Lin, John C; Pons, Jaume; Raha, Nancy M

    2012-01-01

    Ponezumab (PF-04360365) is a novel humanized IgG2Δa monoclonal antibody that binds to amyloid-β (Aβ). It is designed to have reduced immune effector function compared to other passive immunotherapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Toxicity was evaluated in cynomolgus monkeys treated intravenously with vehicle or 10, 30, or 100 mg/kg of ponezumab every 10th day for up to 39 weeks, and after a 12-week recovery phase. The Aβ peptide sequence of monkeys is identical to that of humans. No substantial difference in test article exposure between sexes was observed, and mean plasma Cmax and AUC0-n were approximately dose-proportional. Ponezumab was detectable approximately 9 weeks after cessation of dosing. All animals, except two males given 10 mg/kg, maintained exposure to test article. One of these males tested positive for anti-ponezumab antibodies. Ponezumab was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of animals given active treatment. The estimated CSF/plasma ponezumab concentration ratio was <0.008 after multiple doses. At the end of the dosing and recovery phases, plasma Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-x were increased in treated animals versus controls. No test article-related effects were seen after ophthalmogical, cardiovascular, physical examinations, and clinical and anatomic pathology evaluations. Plasma concentrations of ponezumab on day 261 at the no observed adverse effect level of 100 mg/kg were 22.4 and 5.3 times greater on a Cmax and AUC basis, respectively, than human exposures at the highest dose (10 mg/kg) in a single-dose Phase I trial. These data suggest an acceptable safety profile for ponezumab as an immunotherapy for AD. PMID:22045481

  14. Linagliptin monotherapy compared with voglibose monotherapy in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing hemodialysis: a 12-week randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Katsuhito; Emoto, Masanori; Shoji, Tetsuo; Inaba, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Objective Focusing on efficacy and tolerability, we compared linagliptin monotherapy with voglibose monotherapy in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing hemodialysis (HD). Research design and methods In this multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, active-controlled study, 78 patients were randomized (1:1) to receive a 12-week treatment with 5 mg linagliptin once daily or 0.2 mg voglibose three times a day. To assess whether linagliptin was superior to voglibose, the primary efficacy end point was the change in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level between baseline and week 12. Secondary efficacy end points included changes between baseline and week 12 in glycated albumin (GA) and casual plasma glucose (PG) levels. Results At week 12, the adjusted mean HbA1c levels had decreased by −0.60% after treatment with linagliptin and by −0.20% after treatment with voglibose (treatment difference: −0.40%, 95% CI −0.74% to −0.06%, p=0.022). A significant reduction in casual PG level was also observed after treatment with linagliptin compared with treatment with voglibose. Relative to voglibose, linagliptin tended to elicit reductions in GA, although without statistical significance. No hypoglycemic symptoms or severe hypoglycemia occurred during the study. Conclusions In patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing HD, linagliptin monotherapy provided significantly better glycemic control without severe hypoglycemia than voglibose monotherapy. Linagliptin represents a promising agent for glycemic management in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing HD. Trial registration number UMIN000007635; results. PMID:27547421

  15. Effects of a 12 Week SAQ Training Programme on Agility with and without the Ball among Young Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Milanović, Zoran; Sporiš, Goran; Trajković, Nebojša; James, Nic; Samija, Krešimir

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 12 week conditioning programme involving speed, agility and quickness (SAQ) training and its effect on agility performance in young soccer players. Soccer players were randomly assigned to two groups: experimental group (EG; n = 66, body mass: 71.3 ± 5.9 kg; body height: 1.77 ± 0.07 m) and control group (CG; n = 66, body mass: 70.6 ± 4.9 kg; body height: 1.76 ± 0.06 m). Agility performance was assessed using field tests: Slalom; Slalom with ball; Sprint with 90° turns; Sprint with 90° turns with ball; Sprint with 180° turns; Sprint with backward and forward running; Sprint 4 x 5 m. Statistically significant improvements (p < 0.05) between pre and post training were evident for almost all measures of agility, with and without the ball, with the exception being the Sprint with backward and forward running. This suggests that SAQ training is an effective way of improving agility, with and without the ball, for young soccer players and can be included in physical conditioning programmes. Key pointsSAQ training appears to be an effective way of improving agility with and without the ball in young soccer playersSoccer coaches could use this training during pre-season and in-season trainingCompared with pre-training, there was a statistically significant improvement in all but one measure of agility, both with and without the ball after SAQ training. PMID:24149731

  16. Combination therapy with nifedipine GITS 60 mg: subanalysis of a prospective, 12-week observational study (AdADOSE)

    PubMed Central

    Motaweih, Ahmed K.; Usova, Elena; Hussain, Wajid; Dello, Ziad; Petri, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: AdADOSE was a 12-week, international, observational study conducted in the Middle East and Russia where patients received nifedipine gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) at a daily dose of 30, 60, or 90 mg as part of an antihypertensive combination therapy. This subgroup analysis of the AdADOSE study assesses the efficacy and tolerability of nifedipine GITS combination therapy when used specifically at the 60-mg strength. Methods: Patients with hypertension who received a daily nifedipine GITS dose of 60 mg, either at constant dose (n = 686) or up-titrated from 30 mg (n = 392), were analyzed. Target blood pressure (BP) was <140/90 mmHg (or <130/80 mmHg for those at high/very high cardiovascular risk). Results: Following nifedipine GITS combination therapy, target BP was achieved by 33.7% patients in the 60 mg group (previously untreated, 42.5%; previously treated, 32.0%) and 32.4% patients in the 30–60 mg group (previously untreated, 45.2%; previously treated, 30.7%). Mean systolic BP/diastolic BP changes were −40.3/−20.7 mmHg and −35.6/−18.5 mmHg, respectively, and were similar regardless of previous antihypertensive treatment or the number of concomitant diseases. Incidences of drug-related adverse events (AEs) were low (3.2%, 60 mg; 2.0%, 30–60 mg group), few patients discontinued because of AEs (0.6% and 1.0%, respectively), and there were no serious AEs. Conclusion: Combination therapy with nifedipine GITS 60 mg in a real-life observational setting was effective and well tolerated in hypertensive patients, with low rates of treatment-related AEs. PMID:26331311

  17. Effects of a 12 Week SAQ Training Programme on Agility with and without the Ball among Young Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Milanović, Zoran; Sporiš, Goran; Trajković, Nebojša; James, Nic; Šamija, Krešimir

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 12 week conditioning programme involving speed, agility and quickness (SAQ) training and its effect on agility performance in young soccer players. Soccer players were randomly assigned to two groups: experimental group (EG; n = 66, body mass: 71.3 ± 5.9 kg; body height: 1.77 ± 0.07 m) and control group (CG; n = 66, body mass: 70.6 ± 4.9 kg; body height: 1.76 ± 0.06 m). Agility performance was assessed using field tests: Slalom; Slalom with ball; Sprint with 90° turns; Sprint with 90° turns with ball; Sprint with 180° turns; Sprint with backward and forward running; Sprint 4 x 5 m. Statistically significant improvements (p < 0.05) between pre and post training were evident for almost all measures of agility, with and without the ball, with the exception being the Sprint with backward and forward running. This suggests that SAQ training is an effective way of improving agility, with and without the ball, for young soccer players and can be included in physical conditioning programmes. Key points SAQ training appears to be an effective way of improving agility with and without the ball in young soccer players Soccer coaches could use this training during pre-season and in-season training Compared with pre-training, there was a statistically significant improvement in all but one measure of agility, both with and without the ball after SAQ training PMID:24149731

  18. Exercise for Adolescents with Depressive Disorders: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Dopp, Richard R.; Mooney, Ann J.; Armitage, Roseanne; King, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Adolescence is associated with increased depressive symptoms and decreased aerobic exercise, yet the relationship between exercise and clinical depression among adolescents requires further examination. This study assessed the feasibility of a 12-week intervention designed to increase exercise for adolescents with depressive disorders: Will a teenager with depression exercise? Methods. Participants were 13 adolescents with depression reporting low levels of aerobic exercise. They completed a 12-week intervention (15 supervised exercise sessions and 21 independent sessions). Exercise was measured through the aerobic exercise Questionnaire, actigraphy, and heart-rate monitoring. Depression was measured with the Children's Depression Rating Scale, Revised, and Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology, Self-Report. Results. All participants who started the intervention completed the protocol, attending all supervised exercise sessions. Actigraphy verified 81% adherence to the protocol's independent sessions. Analysis of secondary outcomes showed a significant increase in exercise levels and a significant decrease in depression severity. Initially, ten participants were overweight or obese, and three were healthy weight. After 12 weeks of exercise, the number of participants in the healthy-weight category doubled. Conclusions. Adolescents suffering from depression can complete a rigorous protocol requiring structured increases in aerobic exercise. Participants showed significant increases in exercise, and significant decreases in depressive symptoms. PMID:22888415

  19. Effect of progressive resistance exercise with neuromuscular joint facilitation on the dynamic balance performance of junior soccer players

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongzhao; Huo, Ming; Guan, Peipei; Onoda, Ko; Chen, Di; Huang, Qiuchen; Maruyama, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the change in dynamic balance performance of junior soccer players after progressive resistance treatment with neuromuscular joint facilitation (NJF). [Subjects] The subjects were 14 healthy males who were divided into two groups, namely the NJF and control groups. The NJF group consisted of 8 subjects, and the control group consisted of 6 subjects. [Methods] The participants in the NJF group received NJF progressive resistance treatment. Dynamic balance performance was measured before and after 3 weeks of exercise. [Results] Significant improvement in dynamic balance performance was observed both in the NJF and control groups. In the NJF group, dynamic balance performance was significantly increased compared with that in the control group. [Conclusion] The NJF intervention shortened movement time, which implies that NJF is effective for dynamic balance performance. PMID:26696714

  20. Association between myosin heavy chain protein isoforms and intramuscular anabolic signaling following resistance exercise in trained men.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Adam M; Hoffman, Jay R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Jajtner, Adam R; Wells, Adam J; Beyer, Kyle S; Willoughby, Darryn S; Oliveira, Leonardo P; Fukuda, David H; Fragala, Maren S; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Resistance exercise stimulates an increase in muscle protein synthesis regulated by intracellular anabolic signaling molecules in a mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent pathway. The purpose of this study was to investigate acute anabolic signaling responses in experienced, resistance-trained men, and to examine the association between myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition and the magnitude of anabolic signaling. Eight resistance-trained men (24.9 ± 4.3 years; 91.2 ± 12.4 kg; 176.7 ± 8.0 cm; 13.3 ± 3.9 body fat %) performed a whole body, high-volume resistance exercise protocol (REX) and a control protocol (CTL) in a balanced, randomized order. Participants were provided a standardized breakfast, recovery drink, and meal during each protocol. Fine needle muscle biopsies were completed at baseline (BL), 2 h (2H) and 6 h post-exercise (6H). BL biopsies were analyzed for MHC isoform composition. Phosphorylation of proteins specific to the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway and MHC mRNA expression was quantified. Phosphorylation of p70S6k was significantly greater in REX compared to CTL at 2H (P = 0.04). MHC mRNA expression and other targets in the Akt/mTOR pathway were not significantly influenced by REX. The percentage of type IIX isoform was inversely correlated (P < 0.05) with type I and type IIA MHC mRNA expression (r = -0.69 to -0.93). Maximal strength was also observed to be inversely correlated (P < 0.05) with Type I and Type IIA MHC mRNA expression (r = -0.75 to -0.77) and p70S6k phosphorylation (r = -0.75). Results indicate that activation of p70S6k occurs within 2-h following REX in experienced, resistance-trained men. Further, results also suggest that highly trained, stronger individuals have an attenuated acute anabolic response. PMID:25626869

  1. Intramuscular anabolic signaling and endocrine response following high volume and high intensity resistance exercise protocols in trained men

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Adam M; Hoffman, Jay R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Jajtner, Adam R; Boone, Carleigh H; Beyer, Kyle S; Baker, Kayla M; Wells, Adam J; Mangine, Gerald T; Robinson, Edward H; Church, David D; Oliveira, Leonardo P; Willoughby, Darryn S; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Resistance exercise paradigms are often divided into high volume (HV) or high intensity (HI) protocols, however, it is unknown whether these protocols differentially stimulate mTORC1 signaling. The purpose of this study was to examine mTORC1 signaling in conjunction with circulating hormone concentrations following a typical HV and HI lower-body resistance exercise protocol. Ten resistance-trained men (24.7 ± 3.4 years; 90.1 ± 11.3 kg; 176.0 ± 4.9 cm) performed each resistance exercise protocol in a random, counterbalanced order. Blood samples were obtained at baseline (BL), immediately (IP), 30 min (30P), 1 h (1H), 2 h (2H), and 5 h (5H) postexercise. Fine needle muscle biopsies were completed at BL, 1H, and 5H. Electromyography of the vastus lateralis was also recorded during each protocol. HV and HI produced a similar magnitude of muscle activation across sets. Myoglobin and lactate dehydrogenase concentrations were significantly greater following HI compared to HV (P = 0.01–0.02), whereas the lactate response was significantly higher following HV compared to HI (P = 0.003). The growth hormone, cortisol, and insulin responses were significantly greater following HV compared to HI (P = 0.0001–0.04). No significant differences between protocols were observed for the IGF-1 or testosterone response. Intramuscular anabolic signaling analysis revealed a significantly greater (P = 0.03) phosphorylation of IGF-1 receptor at 1H following HV compared to HI. Phosphorylation status of all other signaling proteins including mTOR, p70S6k, and RPS6 were not significantly different between trials. Despite significant differences in markers of muscle damage and the endocrine response following HV and HI, both protocols appeared to elicit similar mTORC1 activation in resistance-trained men. PMID:26197935

  2. Genotypic Detection of Antibiotic Resistance in "Escherichia Coli.": A Classroom Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longtin, Sarah; Guilfoile, Patrick; Asper, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance remains a problem of clinical importance. Current microbiological methods for determining antibiotic resistance are based on culturing bacteria, and may require up to 48 hours to complete. Molecular methods are increasingly being developed to speed the identification of antibiotic resistance and to determine its…

  3. Insulinogenic sucrose+amino acid mixture ingestion immediately after resistance exercise has an anabolic effect on bone compared with non-insulinogenic fructose+amino acid mixture in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Notomi, Takuya; Karasaki, Ikuaki; Okazaki, Yuichi; Okimoto, Nobukazu; Kato, Yushi; Ohura, Kiyoshi; Noda, Masaki; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Suzuki, Masashige

    2014-08-01

    Maximizing peak bone mass is an important factor in osteoporosis prevention. Resistance exercise increases bone mass and strength, while nutritional supplements have beneficial effects on bone loss reduction. We have previously shown that the combined intake of sucrose and amino acids (AA), which is strongly insulinogenic, efficiently increased muscle protein synthesis. To investigate the effects of sugar and an AA solution immediately after resistance exercise, we compared insulinogenic sucrose and non-insulinogenic fructose combined with an AA solution with or without resistance exercise. Sucrose intake immediately after resistance exercise increased the trabecular bone mass and compressive maximum load compared with fructose+AA intake after exercise. Additionally, combined sucrose+AA and exercise increased trabecular bone formation and decreased bone resorption more than combined fructose and exercise. Serum insulin levels were greatly increased by sucrose+AA intake with exercise. In culture experiments, neither sugar+AA affected osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation. In a gene expression study, sucrose+AA intake after resistance exercise was shown to upregulate the Runx2 expression level and decrease RANKL/OPG ratio. These results suggest that the combined intake of sucrose and an AA solution immediately after resistance exercise exerts anabolic effects on bone by altering gene expression related to bone remodeling. Although translation of our bone remodeling findings from animal to human studies has been challenging, our findings suggest that exercise with sugar+AA intake may contribute to improved bone health. PMID:24815919

  4. A prospective randomised longitudinal MRI study of left ventricular adaptation to endurance and resistance exercise training in humans.

    PubMed

    Spence, Angela L; Naylor, Louise H; Carter, Howard H; Buck, Christopher L; Dembo, Lawrence; Murray, Conor P; Watson, Philip; Oxborough, David; George, Keith P; Green, Daniel J

    2011-11-15

    The principle that 'concentric' cardiac hypertrophy occurs in response to strength training, whilst 'eccentric' hypertrophy results from endurance exercise has been a fundamental tenet of exercise science. This notion is largely based on cross-sectional comparisons of athletes using echocardiography. In this study, young (27.4 ± 1.1 years) untrained subjects were randomly assigned to supervised, intensive, endurance (END, n = 10) or resistance (RES, n = 13) exercise and cardiac MRI scans and myocardial speckle tracking echocardiography were performed at baseline, after 6 months of training and after a subsequent 6 weeks of detraining. Aerobic fitness increased significantly in END (3.5 to 3.8 l min(-1), P < 0.05) but was unchanged in RES. Muscular strength significantly improved compared to baseline in both RES and END ( = 53.0 ± 1.1 versus 36.4 ± 4.5 kg, both P < 0.001) as did lean body mass (2.3 ± 0.4 kg, P < 0.001 versus 1.4 ± 0.6 kg P < 0.05). MRI derived left ventricular (LV) mass increased significantly following END (112.5 ± 7.3 to 121.8 ± 6.6 g, P < 0.01) but not RES, whilst training increased end-diastolic volume (LVEDV, END: +9.0 ± 5.0 versus RES +3.1 ± 3.6 ml, P = 0.05). Interventricular wall thickness significantly increased with training in END (1.06 ± 0.0 to 1.14 ± 0.06, P < 0.05) but not RES. Longitudinal strain and strain rates did not change following exercise training. Detraining reduced aerobic fitness, LV mass and wall thickness in END (P < 0.05), whereas LVEDV remained elevated. This study is the first to use MRI to compare LV adaptation in response to intensive supervised endurance and resistance training. Our findings provide some support for the 'Morganroth hypothesis', as it pertains to LV remodelling in response to endurance training, but cast some doubt over the proposal that remodelling occurs in response to resistance training. PMID:21969450

  5. Time-course of prednisone effects on hormonal and inflammatory responses at rest and during resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Collomp, K; Zorgati, H; Cottin, F; Do, M-C; Labsy, Z; Gagey, O; Lasne, F; Prieur, F; Collomp, R

    2015-06-01

    Glucocorticoids are among the most commonly used drugs. They are widely administered for acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain, as well as for several other pain syndromes, although their therapeutic use is sometimes diverted for doping purposes. Their time-course effects on hormonal and inflammatory responses nevertheless remain poorly understood, both at rest and during exercise. We therefore studied the alterations induced by 1 week of prednisone treatment (60 mg daily) in recreationally trained male athletes after 2 days (i. e., acute) and 7 days (i. e., short-term). Hormonal (i. e., DHEA, DHEA-S, aldosterone, and testosterone) and pro- and anti-inflammatory markers (i. e., IL-6, IL-10, and IL-1β) were investigated at rest and after resistance exercise. A significant decrease in DHEA and DHEA-S (p<0.01) without change in the DHEA/DHEA-S ratio, aldosterone, or testosterone was demonstrated after acute prednisone intake. A significant increment in IL-10 and a significant decrement in IL-6 (p<0.05) were also observed with prednisone both at rest and during exercise, without significant change in IL-1β. Continued prednisone treatment led to another significant decrease in both DHEA and DHEA-S (p<0.05), whereas no change in the inflammatory markers was observed between days 2 and 7. Our data demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of prednisone were maximal and stable from the beginning of treatment, both in rest and exercise conditions. However, hormonal concentrations continued to decline during short-term intake. Further studies are needed to determine the effects of hormonal time-course alterations with longer glucocorticoid treatment and the clinical consequences. PMID:25611207

  6. A Laboratory Exercise in Physics: Determining the Resistance of Single Resistors and Series and Parallel Combinations of Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    Presented is a secondary level physics unit which introduces students to electrical resistance in series and parallel combinations, use of the voltmeter and ammeter, wiring simple circuits, and writing scientific reports. (SL)

  7. Effects of resistance and aerobic exercise on physical function, bone mineral density, OPG and RANKL in older women.

    PubMed

    Marques, Elisa A; Wanderley, Flávia; Machado, Leandro; Sousa, Filipa; Viana, João L; Moreira-Gonçalves, Daniel; Moreira, Pedro; Mota, Jorge; Carvalho, Joana

    2011-07-01

    This study compared the effects of a resistance training protocol and a moderate-impact aerobic training protocol on bone mineral density (BMD), physical ability, serum osteoprotegerin (OPG), and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) levels. Seventy-one older women were randomly assigned to resistance exercise (RE), aerobic exercise (AE) or a control group (CON). Both interventions were conducted 3 times per week for 8 months. Outcome measures included proximal femur BMD, muscle strength, balance, body composition, serum OPG, and RANKL levels. Potential confounding variables included dietary intake, accelerometer-based physical activity (PA), and molecularly defined lactase nonpersistence. After 8 months, only RE group exhibited increases in BMD at the trochanter (2.9%) and total hip (1.5%), and improved body composition. Both RE and AE groups improved balance. No significant changes were observed in OPG and RANKL levels, and OPG/RANKL ratio. Lactase nonpersistence was not associated with BMD changes. No group differences were observed in baseline values or change in dietary intakes and daily PA. Data suggest that 8 months of RE may be more effective than AE for inducing favourable changes in BMD and muscle strength, whilst both interventions demonstrate to protect against the functional balance control that is strongly related to fall risk. PMID:21316442

  8. Saffron with resistance exercise improves diabetic parameters through the GLUT4/AMPK pathway in-vitro and in-vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Firouzeh; Hajiaghaalipour, Fatemeh; Yusof, Ashril; Muniandy, Sekaran; Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Heydari, Sedigheh; Salim, Landa Zeenelabdin Ali; Azarbayjani, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Saffron is consumed as food and medicine to treat several illnesses. This study elucidates the saffron effectiveness on diabetic parameters in-vitro and combined with resistance exercise in-vivo. The antioxidant properties of saffron was examined. Insulin secretion and glucose uptake were examined by cultured RIN-5F and L6 myotubes cells. The expressions of GLUT2, GLUT4, and AMPKα were determined by Western blot. Diabetic and non-diabetic male rats were divided into: control, training, extract treatment, training + extract treatment and metformin. The exercise and 40 mg/kg/day saffron treatments were carried out for six weeks. The antioxidant capacity of saffron was higher compare to positive control (P < 0.01). High dose of saffron stimulated insulin release in RIN-5F cells and improved glucose uptake in L6 myotubes. GLUT4 and AMPKα expressions increased in both doses of saffron (P < 0.01), whereas GLUT2 not changed (p > 0.05). Serum glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein, very low-density lipoprotein, insulin resistance, and glycated hemoglobin levels decreased in treated rats compared to untreated (p < 0.01). However, no significant differences were observed in the high-density lipoprotein, insulin, adiponectin, and leptin concentration levels in all groups (p > 0.05). The findings suggest that saffron consuming alongside exercise could improve diabetic parameters through redox-mediated mechanisms and GLUT4/AMPK pathway to entrap glucose uptake. PMID:27122001

  9. Saffron with resistance exercise improves diabetic parameters through the GLUT4/AMPK pathway in-vitro and in-vivo.

    PubMed

    Dehghan, Firouzeh; Hajiaghaalipour, Fatemeh; Yusof, Ashril; Muniandy, Sekaran; Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Heydari, Sedigheh; Salim, Landa Zeenelabdin Ali; Azarbayjani, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Saffron is consumed as food and medicine to treat several illnesses. This study elucidates the saffron effectiveness on diabetic parameters in-vitro and combined with resistance exercise in-vivo. The antioxidant properties of saffron was examined. Insulin secretion and glucose uptake were examined by cultured RIN-5F and L6 myotubes cells. The expressions of GLUT2, GLUT4, and AMPKα were determined by Western blot. Diabetic and non-diabetic male rats were divided into: control, training, extract treatment, training + extract treatment and metformin. The exercise and 40 mg/kg/day saffron treatments were carried out for six weeks. The antioxidant capacity of saffron was higher compare to positive control (P < 0.01). High dose of saffron stimulated insulin release in RIN-5F cells and improved glucose uptake in L6 myotubes. GLUT4 and AMPKα expressions increased in both doses of saffron (P < 0.01), whereas GLUT2 not changed (p > 0.05). Serum glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein, very low-density lipoprotein, insulin resistance, and glycated hemoglobin levels decreased in treated rats compared to untreated (p < 0.01). However, no significant differences were observed in the high-density lipoprotein, insulin, adiponectin, and leptin concentration levels in all groups (p > 0.05). The findings suggest that saffron consuming alongside exercise could improve diabetic parameters through redox-mediated mechanisms and GLUT4/AMPK pathway to entrap glucose uptake. PMID:27122001

  10. Comparison of the Effects of Resistance Exercise Orders on Number of Repetitions, Serum IGF-1, Testosterone and Cortisol Levels in Normal-Weight and Obese Men

    PubMed Central

    Sheikholeslami-Vatani, Dariush; Ahmadi, Slahadin; Salavati, Rashad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exercise order affects repetition performance and acute hormonal responses to resistance training (RT) programs. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of two different resistance exercise orders (REO) on number of repetitions and serum Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1), testosterone and cortisol levels in normal-weight and obese men. Materials and Methods: 25 untrained college-aged men were assigned to either obese (n = 11) or normal-weight (n = 15) groups. Subjects performed two REO protocols in 2 exercise groups. In the first group subjects began with large-muscle group and progressed to small-muscle group (Protocol A), while in the other group subjects performed the same exercise but in reverse sequence (Protocol B). Each activity was performed in 3 consecutive sets of 10 repetitions maximum to near fatigue. Results: REOs did not affect number of repetitions in none of the groups. The average rating of perceived exertion was higher for protocol B in both groups. IGF-1 and testosterone increased immediately post exercise for both protocols and in both groups, however immediately post exercise increase in IGF-1 and testosterone were lower in obese group. Cortisol response to REO was weaker in obese group. Conclusions: Performing large muscle group exercises first in RE training and progressing to small muscle group produced greater anabolic hormonal response relative to reverse sequence in normal-weight young adult men. Anabolic hormonal response to REOs was blunted in the obese group. PMID:27217934

  11. Exercise-like effects by Estrogen-related receptor-gamma in muscle do not prevent insulin resistance in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Badin, Pierre-Marie; Vila, Isabelle K; Sopariwala, Danesh H; Yadav, Vikas; Lorca, Sabina; Louche, Katie;