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Sample records for 121-foot wing span

  1. Effects of Wing Platform on the Aerodynamic Performance of Finite-Span Flapping Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Meilin; Wang, Z. J.; Hu, Hui

    2010-11-01

    A numerical study is conducted to investigate the effects of wing platform on the aerodynamics performance of finite-span flapping wings. A three-dimensional high-order Navier-Stokes compressible flow solver was developed using the spectral difference method and dynamic grids. An AUSM^+-up Riemann solver was implemented to simulate the unsteady low Mach number flows over finite-span flapping wings with explicit third order Runge-Kutta time integration. The studied finite-span flapping wings, which include a rectangular flapping wing, an elliptic flapping wing and a bio-inspired flapping wing, have the same wing span, aspect ratio of the platform and the characteristics of the flapping motion (i.e., sinusoidal trajectory of the flapping wing tip, Strouhal number and reduced frequency). In the present study, the Strouhul number (Str) of the finite-span flapping wings was selected to be well within the optimal range usually used by flying insects and birds and swimming fishes (i.e., 0.2 < Str < 0.4). The effects of the wing platform on the aerodynamics performance of the finite-span flapping wings were elucidated in the terms of the evolutions and dynamic interaction between the leading edge vortices (LEV) and the wing tip vortices as well as the resultant aerodynamic forces (both lift and thrust) generated by the flapping wings.

  2. Span load distribution for tapered wings with partial-span flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, H A

    1937-01-01

    Tables are given for determining the load distribution of tapered wings with partial-span flaps placed either at the center or at the wing tips. Seventy-two wing-flap combinations, including two aspect ratios, four taper ratios, and nine flap lengths, are included. The distributions for the flapped wing are divided into two parts, one a zero lift distribution due primarily to the flaps and the other an additional lift distribution due to an angle of attack of the wing as a whole. Comparison between theoretical and experimental results for wings indicate that the theory may be used to predict the load distribution with sufficient accuracy for structural purposes.

  3. Span efficiency of wings with leading edge protuberances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custodio, Derrick; Henoch, Charles; Johari, Hamid

    2013-11-01

    Past work has shown that sinusoidal leading edge protuberances resembling those found on humpback whale flippers alter the lift and drag coefficients of full- and finite-span foils and wings depending on the angle of attack and leading edge geometry. Although the load characteristics of protuberance modified finite-span wings have been reported for flipper-like geometries at higher Reynolds numbers and for rectangular planforms at lower Reynolds numbers, the effects of leading edge geometry on the span efficiency, which is indicative of the deviation of the spanwise lift distribution from elliptical and the viscous effects, for a range of planforms and Reynolds numbers have not been addressed. The lift and drag coefficients of 7 rectangular, 2 swept, and 2 flipper-like planform models with aspect ratios of 4.3, 4.0, and 8.86, respectively, were used to compute the span efficiency at Reynolds numbers ranging from 0.9 to 4.5 × 105. The span efficiency, based on the data at lower angles of attack, of modified wings was compared with the unmodified models. For the cases considered, the span efficiencies of the leading edge modified models were less than those of the equivalent unmodified models. The dependence of span efficiency on the leading edge geometry, planform, and Reynolds number will be presented. Supported by the ONR-ULI program.

  4. Distribution of Structural Weight of Wing Along the Span

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savelyev, V. V.

    1946-01-01

    In the present report the true weight distribution law of the wing structure along the span is investigated. It is shown that the triangular distribution and that based on the proportionality to the chords do not correspond to the actual weight distribution, On the basis of extensive data on wings of the CAHI type airplane formulas are obtained from which it is possible to determine the true diagram of the structural weight distribution along the span from a knowledge of only the geometrical dimensions of the wing. At the end of the paper data are presented showing how the structural weight is distributed between the straight center portion and the tapered portion as a function of their areas.

  5. Full Scale Span Load Distribution on a Tapered Wing with Split Flaps of Various Spans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, John F; Silverstein, Abe

    1937-01-01

    Pressure-distribution tests were conducted in the full-scale wind tunnel on a 2:1 tapered U.S.A. 45 airfoil equipped with 20 percent chord split trailing-edge flaps of various spans. A special installation was employed in the tests utilizing a half-span airfoil mounted vertically above a reflection plane. The airfoil has a constant chord center section and rounded tips and is tapered in thickness from 18 percent c at the root to 9 percent c at the tip. The aerodynamic characteristics, given by the usual dimension less coefficients, are presented graphically as functions of flap span and angle of attack as well as by semispan load diagrams. The results indicate, in general, that only a relatively small increase in the normal-force coefficient is to be expected by extending the flap span of an airfoil-flap combination, similar to the one tested, beyond 70 percent of the wing span.

  6. Computational wing optimization and comparisons with experiment for a semi-span wing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waggoner, E. G.; Haney, H. P.; Ballhaus, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    A computational wing optimization procedure was developed and verified by an experimental investigation of a semi-span variable camber wing model in the NASA Ames Research Center 14 foot transonic wind tunnel. The Bailey-Ballhaus transonic potential flow analysis and Woodward-Carmichael linear theory codes were linked to Vanderplaats constrained minimization routine to optimize model configurations at several subsonic and transonic design points. The 35 deg swept wing is characterized by multi-segmented leading and trailing edge flaps whose hinge lines are swept relative to the leading and trailing edges of the wing. By varying deflection angles of the flap segments, camber and twist distribution can be optimized for different design conditions. Results indicate that numerical optimization can be both an effective and efficient design tool. The optimized configurations had as good or better lift to drag ratios at the design points as the best designs previously tested during an extensive parametric study.

  7. Lift and Drag of Wings with Small Span

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinig, F.

    1947-01-01

    The lift coefficient of!a wing of small span at first shows a linear increase for the increasing angle of attack, but to a lesser degree then was to be expected according to the theory of the lifting line; thereafter the lift coefficient increases more rapidly than linearity, as contrasted with the the theory of the lifting line. The induced drag coefficient for a given lift coefficient, on the other hand, is obviously much smaller than it would be according to the theory. A mall change in the theory of the lifting line will cover these deviations.

  8. Prediction of span loading of straight-wing/propeller combinations up to stall. [propeller slipstreams and wing loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcveigh, M. A.; Gray, L.; Kisielowski, E.

    1975-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the spanwise lift distribution on straight-wing/propeller combinations. The method combines a modified form of the Prandtl wing theory with a realistic representation of the propeller slipstream distribution. The slipstream analysis permits calculations of the nonuniform axial and rotational slipstream velocity field of propeller/nacelle combinations. This nonuniform field was then used to calculate the wing lift distribution by means of the modified Prandtl wing theory. The theory was developed for any number of nonoverlapping propellers, on a wing with partial or full-span flaps, and is applicable throughout an aspect ratio range from 2.0 and higher. A computer program was used to calculate slipstream characteristics and wing span load distributions for a number of configurations for which experimental data are available, and favorable comparisons are demonstrated between the theoretical predictions and the existing data.

  9. Effect of wing loading, aspect ratio, and span loading of flight performances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gothert, B

    1940-01-01

    An investigation is made of the possible improvements in maximum, cruising, and climbing speeds attainable through increase in the wing loading. The decrease in wing area was considered for the two cases of constant aspect ratio and constant span loading. For a definite flight condition, an investigation is made to determine what loss in flight performance must be sustained if, for given reasons, certain wing loadings are not to be exceeded. With the aid of these general investigations, the trend with respect to wing loading is indicated and the requirements to be imposed on the landing aids are discussed

  10. Theoretical span loading and moments of tapered wings produced by aileron deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, H A

    1937-01-01

    The effect of tapered ailerons on linearly tapered wings is theoretically determined. Four different aileron spans are considered for each of three wing aspect ratios and each of four wing taper ratios. The change in lift on one half of the wing, the rolling moment, the additional induced drag, and the yawing moment, due to aileron deflection, are represented by non dimensional coefficients. Similar coefficients are given for the damping and yawing moments, the additional drag, and the change in lift, due to rolling. It was found possible to effect a fairly close agreement between the theoretical and experimental rolling moments by introducing into the theoretical expression for the rolling moment an effective change in angle of attack obtained from an analysis of flap data. The theoretical curves show that the highly tapered wing with long ailerons has a lower ratio of yawing to rolling moment and a lower additional induced drag than wings with less taper.

  11. Experimental Investigation of Dynamic Stall on a Finite Span NACA 0012 Wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spellman, Wyatt; Bohl, Douglas

    2015-11-01

    In this work the velocity and vorticity fields around finite and ``infinite'' span wings with a NACA 0012 profile undergoing constant rate pitching were quantified using Molecular Tagging Velocimetry (MTV). The ``infinite'' span wing was bounded by walls to reduce the effects of the wing tip vortex while the finite span wing was bounded by a wall on one end and unbounded on the other. The wings were pitched from α = 0 to 55° with a constant non-dimensional pitch rate of Ω* = 0.1 at Rec = 12000. The Dynamic Stall Vortex (DSV) was identified and tracked using the `` Γ criteria.'' The results showed that the formation and trajectory of the DSV for the finite wing case varied with the spanwise location, with the location of the DSV remaining progressively closer to the airfoil surface towards the wingtip. These results were consistent with the ``Omega'' vortex structure previously observed in flow visualization. The DSV was also found to remain closer, and convect away from the airfoil surface slower, at all spanwise measurement planes when compared to the infinite span results. This work was supported by NSF Grant #845882.

  12. Analytic State Space Model for an Unsteady Finite-Span Wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izraelevitz, Jacob; Zhu, Qiang; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Real-time control of unsteady flows, such as force control in flapping wings, requires simple wake models that easily translate into robust control designs. We analytically derive a state-space model for the unsteady trailing vortex system behind a finite aspect-ratio flapping wing. Contrary to prior models, the downwash and lift distributions over the span can be arbitrary, including tip effects. The wake vorticity is assumed to be a fully unsteady distribution, with the exception of quasi-steady (no rollup) geometry. Each discretization along the span has one to four states to represent the local unsteady wake-induced downwash, lift, and circulation. The model supports independently time-varying velocity, heave, and twist along the span. We validate this state-space model through comparison with existing analytic solutions for elliptic wings and an unsteady inviscid panel method.

  13. Unsteady transonic flow simulation on a full-span-wing-body configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Goorjian, Peter M.

    1987-01-01

    The presence of a body influences both the aerodynamic and aeroelastic performance of wings. Such effects are more pronounced in the transonic regime. To accurately account for the effect of the body, particularly when the wings are experiencing asymmetric modal motions, it is necessary to model the full configuration in the nonlinear transonic regime. In this study, full-span-wing-body configurations are simulated for the first time by a theoretical method that uses the unsteady potential equations based on the small-disturbance theory. The body geometry is modeled exactly as the physical shape, instead of as a rectangular box, which has been done in the past. Steady pressure computations for wing-body configurations compare well with the available experimental data. Unsteady pressure computations when the wings are oscillating in asymmetric modes show significant influence of the body.

  14. Tip aerodynamics from wind tunnel test of semi-span wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanaken, Johannes M.; Stroub, Robert H.

    1986-01-01

    Presented are the results of a low-speed wind tunnel test on a 5.33-aspect-ratio, semi-span wing with 30- and 35 deg swept tapered tips. The test results include aerodynamic data for the tip itself and for the entire wing including the tip. The metric tip extended inboard 1.58 wing chord lengths. The aerodynamic drag data show the strong influence of tip incidence angle on tip drag for various lift levels. Pitching-moment characteristics show the effect of a moment center at 0.13 c and 0.25 c.

  15. Comparison of wing-span averaging effects on lift, rolling moment, and bending moment for two span load distributions and for two turbulence representations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenstein, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical method of computing the averaging effect of wing-span size on the loading of a wing induced by random turbulence was adapted for use on a digital electronic computer. The turbulence input was assumed to have a Dryden power spectral density. The computations were made for lift, rolling moment, and bending moment for two span load distributions, rectangular and elliptic. Data are presented to show the wing-span averaging effect for wing-span ratios encompassing current airplane sizes. The rectangular wing-span loading showed a slightly greater averaging effect than did the elliptic loading. In the frequency range most bothersome to airplane passengers, the wing-span averaging effect can reduce the normal lift load, and thus the acceleration, by about 7 percent for a typical medium-sized transport. Some calculations were made to evaluate the effect of using a Von Karman turbulence representation. These results showed that using the Von Karman representation generally resulted in a span averaging effect about 3 percent larger.

  16. Sensitivity Analysis of Flutter Response of a Wing Incorporating Finite-Span Corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Issac, Jason Cherian; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M.

    1994-01-01

    Flutter analysis of a wing is performed in compressible flow using state-space representation of the unsteady aerodynamic behavior. Three different expressions are used to incorporate corrections due to the finite-span effects of the wing in estimating the lift-curve slope. The structural formulation is based on a Rayleigh-Pitz technique with Chebyshev polynomials used for the wing deflections. The aeroelastic equations are solved as an eigen-value problem to determine the flutter speed of the wing. The flutter speeds are found to be higher in these cases, when compared to that obtained without accounting for the finite-span effects. The derivatives of the flutter speed with respect to the shape parameters, namely: aspect ratio, area, taper ratio and sweep angle, are calculated analytically. The shape sensitivity derivatives give a linear approximation to the flutter speed curves over a range of values of the shape parameter which is perturbed. Flutter and sensitivity calculations are performed on a wing using a lifting-surface unsteady aerodynamic theory using modules from a system of programs called FAST.

  17. Some theoretical low-speed span loading characteristics of swept wings in roll and sideslip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, John D

    1950-01-01

    The Weissinger method for determining additional span loading for incompressible flow is used to find the damping in roll, the lateral center of pressure of the rolling for wing plan forms of various aspect ratios, taper ratios, and sweep angles. In addition, the applicability of the method to the determination of certain other aerodynamic derivatives is investigated, and corrections for the first-order effects of compressibility are indicated. The agreement obtained between experimentally and theoretically determined values for the aerodynamic coefficients indicates that the method of Weissinger is well suited to the calculation of such resulting aerodynamic derivatives of wings as do not involve considerations of tip suction.

  18. An experimental study of the flow in a wing with a partial span drooped leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkelmann, A. E.; Tsao, C. P.

    1981-01-01

    The flow field produced by a low aspect ratio wing (AR = 3.0) with a partial span leading edge droop was investigated in a series of low speed wind tunnel tests (Reynolds number based on 17.8 cm chord = 560,000). Photographs were obtained of surface oil flow patterns over an angle of attack range of alpha = 0 to 29 deg. Flow field surveys of the partially stalled wing at alpha = 25 deg were completed using a hot-wire probe, a split-film probe and a Conrad probe. The flow field survey data was presented using a color video display. The data indicated regions of apparent reversed flow in the separation region behind the wing and indicated the general cross-sectional shape of the separated wake flow.

  19. On the application of transonic similarity rules to wings of finite span

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spreiter, John R

    1953-01-01

    The transonic aerodynamic characteristics of wings of finite span are discussed from the point of view of a unified small perturbation theory for subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flows about thin wings. This approach avoids certain ambiguities which appear if one studies transonic flows by means of equations derived under the more restrictive assumption that the local velocities are everywhere close to sonic velocity. The relation between the two methods of analysis of transonic flow is examined, the similarity rules and known solutions of transonic flow theory are reviewed, and the asymptotic behavior of the lift, drag, and pitching-moment characteristics of wings of large and small aspect ratio is discussed. It is shown that certain methods of data presentation are advantageous for the effective display of these characteristics.

  20. Theoretical span load distributions and rolling moments for sideslipping wings of arbitrary plan form in incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queijo, M J

    1956-01-01

    A method of computing span loads and the resulting rolling moments for sideslipping wings of arbitrary plan form in incompressible flow is derived. The method requires that the span load at zero sideslip be known for the wing under consideration. Because this information is available for a variety of wings, this requirement should not seriously restrict the application of the present method. The basic method derived herein requires a mechanical differentiation and integration to obtain the rolling moment for the general wing in sideslip. For wings having straight leading and trailing edges over each semispan, the rolling moment due to sideslip is given by a simple equation in terms of plan-form parameters and the lateral center of pressure of the lift due to angle of attack. Calculated span loads and rolling-moment parameters are compared with experimental values. The comparison indicates good agreement between calculations and available experimental data.

  1. Aerodynamic Comparison of Hyper-Elliptic Cambered Span (HECS) Wings with Conventional Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazos, Barry S.; Visser, Kenneth D.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to examine the aerodynamic and flow field characteristics of hyper-elliptic cambered span (HECS) wings and compare results with more conventional configurations used for induced drag reduction. Previous preliminary studies, indicating improved L/D characteristics when compared to an elliptical planform prompted this more detailed experimental investigation. Balance data were acquired on a series of swept and un-swept HECS wings, a baseline elliptic planform, two winglet designs and a raked tip configuration. Seven-hole probe wake surveys were also conducted downstream of a number of the configurations. Wind tunnel results indicated aerodynamic performance levels of all but one of the HECS wings exceeded that of the other configurations. The flow field data surveys indicate the HECS configurations displaced the tip vortex farther outboard of the wing than the Baseline configuration. Minimum drag was observed on the raked tip configuration and it was noted that the winglet wake lacked the cohesive vortex structure present in the wakes of the other configurations.

  2. Method to Generate Full-Span Ice Shape on Swept Wing Using Icing Tunnel Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sam; Camello, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    There is a collaborative research program by NASA, FAA, ONERA, and university partners to improve the fidelity of experimental and computational simulation methods for swept-wing ice accretion formulations and resultant aerodynamic effects on large transport aircraft. This research utilizes a 65 scale Common Research Model as the baseline configuration. In order to generate the ice shapes for the aerodynamic testing, ice-accretion testing will be conducted in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel utilizing hybrid model from the 20, 64, and 83 spanwise locations. The models will have full-scale leading edges with truncated chord in order to fit the IRT test section. The ice shapes from the IRT tests will be digitized using a commercially available articulated-arm 3D laser scanning system. The methodology to acquire 3D ice shapes using a laser scanner was developed and validated in a previous research effort. Each of these models will yield a 1.5ft span of ice than can be used. However, a full-span ice accretion will require 75 ft span of ice. This means there will be large gaps between these spanwise ice sections that must be filled, while maintaining all of the important aerodynamic features. A method was developed to generate a full-span ice shape from the three 1.5 ft span ice shapes from the three models.

  3. Spanwise loading distribution and wake velocity surveys of a semi-span wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felker, F. F., III; Piziali, R. A.; Gall, J. K.

    1982-01-01

    The spanwise distribution of bound circulation on a semi-span wing and the flow velocities in its wake were measured in a wind tunnel. Particular attention was given to documenting the flow velocities in and around the development tip vortex. A two-component laser velocimeter was used to make the velocity measurements. The spanwise distribution of bound circulation, three components of the time-averaged velocities throughout the near wake their standard deviations, and the integrated forces and moments on a metric tip as measured by an internal strain gage balance are presented without discussion.

  4. Steady, subsonic, lifting surface theory for wings with swept, partial span, trailing edge control surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medan, R. T.

    1973-01-01

    A method for computing the lifting pressure distribution on a wing with partial span, swept control surfaces is presented. This method is valid within the framework of linearized, steady, potential flow theory and consists of using conventional lifting surface theory in conjuction with a flap pressure mode. The cause of a numerical instability that can occur during the quadrature of the flap pressure mode is discussed, and an efficient technique to eliminate the instability is derived. This technique is valid for both the flap pressure mode and regular pressure modes and could be used to improve existing lifting surface methods. Examples of the use of the flap pressure mode and comparisons among this method, other theoretical methods, and experiments are given. Discrepancies with experiment are indicated and candidate causes are presented. It is concluded that the method can lead to an efficient and accurate solution of the mathematical problem when a partial span, trailing edge flap is involved.

  5. Low-speed aerodynamic performance of an aspect-ratio-10 supercritical-wing transport model equipped with a full-span slat and part-span and full-span double-slotted flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, H. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 4 by 7 Meter Tunnel to determine the static longitudinal and lateral directional aerodynamic characteristics of an advanced aspect ratio 10 supercritical wing transport model equipped with a full span leading edge slat as well as part span and full span trailing edge flaps. This wide body transport model was also equipped with spoiler and aileron roll control surfaces, flow through nacelles, landing gear, and movable horizontal tails. Six basic wing configurations were tested: (1) cruise (slats and flaps nested), (2) climb (slats deflected and flaps nested), (3) part span flap, (4) full span flap, (5) full span flap with low speed ailerons, and (6) full span flap with high speed ailerons. Each of the four flapped wing configurations was tested with leading edge slat and trailing edge flaps deflected to settings representative of both take off and landing conditions. Tests were conducted at free stream conditions corresponding to Reynolds number of 0.97 to 1.63 x 10 to the 6th power and corresponding Mach numbers of 0.12 to 0.20, through an angle of attack range of 4 to 24, and a sideslip angle range of -10 deg to 5 deg. The part and full span wing configurations were also tested in ground proximity.

  6. Determination of the Mass Moments and Radii of Inertia of the Sections of a Tapered Wing and the Center-of-Gravity Line along the Wing Span

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savelyev, V. V.

    1943-01-01

    For computing the critical flutter velocity of a wing among the data required are the position of the line of centers of gravity of the wing sections along the span and the mass moments and radii of inertia of any section of the wing about the axis passing through the center of gravity of the section. A sufficiently detailed computation of these magnitudes even if the weights of all the wing elements are known, requires a great deal of time expenditure. Thus a rapid competent worker would require from 70 to 100 hours for the preceding computations for one wing only, while hundreds of hours would be required if all the weights were included. With the aid of the formulas derived in the present paper, the preceding work can be performed with a degree of accuracy sufficient for practical purposes in from one to two hours, the only required data being the geometric dimensions of the outer wing (tapered part), the position of its longerons, the total weight of the outer wing, and the approximate weight of the longerons, The entire material presented in this paper is applicable mainly to wings of longeron construction of the CAHI type and investigations are therefore being conducted by CAHI for the derivation of formulas for the determination of the preceding data for wings of other types.

  7. Experimental investigation into wing span and angle-of-attack effects on sub-scale race car wing/wheel interaction aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diasinos, S.; Gatto, A.

    2008-09-01

    This paper details a quantitative 3D investigation using LDA into the interaction aerodynamics on a sub-scale open wheel race car inverted front wing and wheel. Of primary importance to this study was the influence of changing wing angle of attack and span on the resulting near-field and far-field flow characteristics. Results obtained showed that both variables do have a significant influence on the resultant flow-field, particularly on wing vortex and wheel wake development and propagation.

  8. Theoretical symmetric span loading due to flap deflection for wings of arbitrary plan form at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, John

    1952-01-01

    A simplified lifting-surface theory is applied to the problem of evaluating span loading due to flap deflection for arbitrary wing plan forms. With the resulting procedure, the effects of flap deflection on the span loading and associated aerodynamic characteristics can be easily computed for any wing which is symmetrical about the root chord and which has a straight quarter-chord line over the wing semispan. The effects of compressibility and spanwise variation of section lift-curve slope are taken into account by the procedure. The method presented can also be used to calculate the downwash in the vertical center of the wake of a wing which has arbitrary spanwise loading.

  9. Effect of wing aspect ratio and flap span on aerodynamic characteristics of an externally blown jet-flap STOL model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine the effects of flap span and wing aspect ratio on the static longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics and chordwise and spanwise pressure distributions on the wing and trailing-edge flap of a straight-wing STOL model having an externally blown jet flap without vertical and horizontal tail surfaces. The force tests were made over an angle-of-attack range for several thrust coefficients and two flap deflections. The pressure data are presented as tabulated and plotted chordwise pressure-distribution coefficients for angles of attack of 1 and 16. Pressure-distribution measurements were made at several spanwise stations.

  10. Pressure-distribution measurements on a rectangular wing with a partial-span split flap in curved flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rokus, Frank G

    1939-01-01

    Pressure-distribution tests were made on the 32-foot whirling arm of the Daniel Guggenheim Airship Institute of a rectangular wing of NACA 23012 section to determine the rolling and the yawing moment due to angular velocity in yaw. The model was tested at 0 and 5 degree pitch; 0, +/- 5, and +/- 10 degrees yaw; and with no flap and with split flaps 25, 50 and 75 percent of the wing span and deflected 60 degrees. The results are given in the form of span load distributions and as calculated moment coefficients. The experimental values of rolling- and yawing-moment coefficients were in fairly close agreement with theory.

  11. Dead or Alive: Deformed Wing Virus and Varroa destructor Reduce the Life Span of Winter Honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jay D.; Chen, Yan Ping; Gauthier, Laurent; Neumann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Elevated winter losses of managed honeybee colonies are a major concern, but the underlying mechanisms remain controversial. Among the suspects are the parasitic mite Varroa destructor, the microsporidian Nosema ceranae, and associated viruses. Here we hypothesize that pathogens reduce the life expectancy of winter bees, thereby constituting a proximate mechanism for colony losses. A monitoring of colonies was performed over 6 months in Switzerland from summer 2007 to winter 2007/2008. Individual dead workers were collected daily and quantitatively analyzed for deformed wing virus (DWV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), N. ceranae, and expression levels of the vitellogenin gene as a biomarker for honeybee longevity. Workers from colonies that failed to survive winter had a reduced life span beginning in late fall, were more likely to be infected with DWV, and had higher DWV loads. Colony levels of infection with the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and individual infections with DWV were also associated with reduced honeybee life expectancy. In sharp contrast, the level of N. ceranae infection was not correlated with longevity. In addition, vitellogenin gene expression was significantly positively correlated with ABPV and N. ceranae loads. The findings strongly suggest that V. destructor and DWV (but neither N. ceranae nor ABPV) reduce the life span of winter bees, thereby constituting a parsimonious possible mechanism for honeybee colony losses. PMID:22179240

  12. Using stereo multigrid DPIV (SMDPIV) measurements to investigate the vortical skeleton behind a finite-span flapping wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, K.; Ellenrieder, K. D. Von; Soria, J.

    2005-08-01

    The structure of the flow behind wings with finite span (3D) is significantly more complex than the flow behind infinite span (2D) wings. It has been shown that the presence of wingtip vortices behind finite span wings significantly modifies the geometry of the wake flow. It is felt that this modification alters the dynamics of interaction between leading and trailing edge vorticity in a manner that affects the ability of 2D flapping wings to produce thrust. A model of the mean flow skeleton has been proposed from qualitative flow visualization experiments. An unambiguous quantitative representation of the actual flow is required for comparison to the proposed model. To accomplish this the full 3D 3C velocity is required in the volume behind the 3D flapping wing. It is proposed to use stereoscopic multigrid digital particle image velocimetry (SMDPIV) measurements to investigate this unsteady oscillatory flow. This paper reports preliminary SMDPIV measurements along the plane of a symmetrical NACA-profile wing at a Strouhal number of 0.35. Phase averaged measurements are used to investigate the complex flow topology and the influence of the forcing flow on the evolution of the large scale structure of a jet-flow. This paper focuses on optimizing the SMDPIV experimental methodology applied to liquid flows. By refining the 2D 3C technique, the 3D topology of the flow can be investigated with a high degree of accuracy and repeatability. Preliminary results show that the flow is characterized by two pairs of coherent structures of positive and negative vorticity. The arrangement of these structures in the flow is controlled by the motion of the wing. Vorticity of opposite rotation is shed at the extreme heave and pitch positions of the aerofoil to set up a thrust indicative vortex street in support of the suggested topological model.

  13. Pressure-distribution Measurements on a Tapered Wing with a Full-span Split Flap in Curved Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troller, TH; Rokaus, F

    1939-01-01

    Pressure-distribution tests were made on the 32-foot whirling arm of the Daniel Guggenheim Airship Institute of a tapered wing to determine the rolling and yawing moments due to an angular velocity in yaw. The model was tested at 0 degree and 5 degrees pitch, -1 degree and 5 degree yaw, and with a full-span flap deflected 60 degrees. The results are given in the form of span load distributions and in calculated moment coefficients. The rolling-moment coefficients are in fairly close agreement with those derived by means of a simple approximate theory even for high deflection of the full-span flap.

  14. Investigation of certain wing shapes with sections varying progressively along the span

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arsandaux, L

    1931-01-01

    This investigation has a double object: 1) the calculation of the general characteristics of certain wings with progressively varying sections; 2) the determination of data furnishing, in certain cases, some information on the actual distribution of the external forces acting on a wing. We shall try to show certain advantages belonging to the few wing types of variable section which we shall study and that, even if the general aerodynamic coefficients of these wings are not often clearly superior to those of certain wings of uniform section, the wings of variable section nevertheless have certain advantages over those of uniform section in the distribution of the attainable stresses.

  15. Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Simulations of Two Partial-Span Flap Wing Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takalluk, M. A.; Laflin, Kelly R.

    1998-01-01

    Structured Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations of two partial-span flap wing experiments were performed. The high-lift aerodynamic and aeroacoustic wind-tunnel experiments were conducted at both the NASA Ames 7-by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel and at the NASA Langley Quiet Flow Facility. The purpose of these tests was to accurately document the acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics associated with the principle airframe noise sources, including flap side-edge noise. Specific measurements were taken that can be used to validate analytic and computational models of the noise sources and associated aerodynamic for configurations and conditions approximating flight for transport aircraft. The numerical results are used to both calibrate a widely used CFD code, CFL3D, and to obtain details of flap side-edge flow features not discernible from experimental observations. Both experimental set-ups were numerically modeled by using multiple block structured grids. Various turbulence models, grid block-interface interaction methods and grid topologies were implemented. Numerical results of both simulations are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements and flow visualization observations. The flow field in the flap-edge region was adequately resolved to discern some crucial information about the flow physics and to substantiate the merger of the two vortical structures. As a result of these investigations, airframe noise modelers have proposed various simplified models which use the results obtained from the steady-state computations as input.

  16. Interaction of a finite-span synthetic jet near the tip of a sweptback wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, Joseph D.; Amitay, Michael

    2015-06-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to study the three-dimensional flow interaction of a finite-span (aspect ratio of 18) synthetic jet located near the tip of a sweptback wing (cross-sectional profile of NACA 4421, aspect ratio of 4, and sweep angle of 30°) at a Reynolds number of 105 and at three angles of attack of 0°, 9°, and 15.5° (covering the range of attached to separated flow in the vicinity of the synthetic jet). Three blowing ratios were considered as 0.8, 1.2, and 2. Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry data were collected at multiple 2-D planes in the vicinity of the jet's orifice, which were then used to reconstruct the flow volume, and the effect of the jet's blowing ratio was analyzed using time-averaged and phase-averaged statistics. The study showed that the flow field in the vicinity of the synthetic jet orifice becomes highly three-dimensional and is governed by the streamwise structures that are associated with the finite span of the orifice (edge vortices). Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the baseline flow field that develops over a swept-back configuration (characterized by spanwise and streamwise vorticity components) is responsible for the immediate breakdown of the coherent structures that are introduced by the synthetic jet orifice and for the formation of the secondary flow structures that were seen in the time-averaged flow field. Moreover, the presence of a tip vortex results in the development of a non-uniform (in the spanwise direction) spanwise boundary layer that becomes more pronounced with increasing angle of attack. Consequently, the development of the flow structures is altered. Finally, the present work suggests that the location of the synthetic jet along the span is not as important (as the angle of attack and the blowing ratio) in the overall formation and evolution of the flow structures issued from the jet. However, the size and strength of these structures are affected by the jet's spanwise location.

  17. Pressure-distribution measurements on a tapered wing with a partial-span split flap in curved flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troller, TH; Rokus, F

    1939-01-01

    Pressure-distribution tests were made on the 32-foot whirling arm of the Daniel Guggenheim Airship Institute of a tapered wing to determine the rolling and the yawing moments due to an angular velocity in yaw. The model was tested at 0 degree and 5 degree pitch; 0 degree, 5 degree, and 10 degree yaw; and with split flaps covering 25, 50, 75, and 100 percent of the wing span and deflected 60 degrees. The results are given in the form of load distributions and as calculated moment coefficients. The experimental values of rolling- and yawing- moment coefficients were in fairly close agreement with theory.

  18. Wind-tunnel investigation of rectangular and tapered NACA 23012 wings with plain ailerons and full-span split flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzinger, Carl J; Ames, Milton B , Jr

    1938-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine the aerodynamic properties of rectangular and tapered NACA 23012 wings with plain ailerons and a full-span split flap, the flap retracting ahead of the ailerons. Measurements were made of lift and drag and of pitching, rolling, yawing, and hinge moments for all conditions of full-span flaps neutral and deflected at different chord locations. The results of the tests showed that a 0.20c(sub w) full span split flap located at approximately the 0.75c(sub w) point gave higher lift coefficients than had previously been obtained with a conventional 0.20c(sub w) partial-span split flap of a length to permit satisfactory control with plain ailerons. Still higher lifts were obtained if the full-span flap, when deflected, was moved back to the aileron axis. Moving the flap back to the aileron, in general, improved the aileron characteristics over those with the flap retracted. The most promising arrangement of full-span split flap and plain aileron combination tested, both for high lift and lateral control, was the rectangular wing with 0.20c(sub w) deflected 60 degrees at the 0.90c(sub w) location with 0.10c(sub w) semispan ailerons.

  19. Finite-span rotating wings: three-dimensional vortex formation and variations with aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Z. R.; Chen, C.; Ringuette, M. J.

    2013-02-01

    We investigate experimentally the effect of aspect ratio ( [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] ) on the time-varying, three-dimensional flow structure of flat-plate wings rotating from rest at 45° angle of attack. Plates of [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] = 2 and 4 are tested in a 50 % by mass glycerin-water mixture, with a total rotation of ϕ = 120° and a matched tip Reynolds number of 5,000. The time-varying, three-component volumetric velocity field is reconstructed using phase-locked, phase-averaged stereoscopic digital particle image velocimetry in multiple, closely-spaced chordwise planes. The vortex structure is analyzed using the {Q}-criterion, helicity density, and spanwise quantities. For both [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] s, the flow initially consists of a connected and coherent leading-edge vortex (LEV), tip vortex (TV), and trailing-edge vortex (TEV) loop; the LEV increases in size with span and tilts aft. Smaller, discrete vortices are present in the separated shear layers at the trailing and tip edges, which wrap around the primary TEV and TV. After about ϕ = 20°, the outboard-span LEV lifts off the plate and becomes arch-like. A second, smaller LEV and the formation of corner vortex structures follow. For [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] = 4, the outboard LEV moves farther aft, multiple LEVs form ahead of it, and after about ϕ = 50° a breakdown of the lifted-off LEV and the TV occurs. However, for [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] = 2, the outboard LEV lift-off is not progressive, and the overall LEV-TV flow remains more coherent and closer to the plate, with evidence of breakdown late in the motion. Inboard of about 50 % span, the [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] = 4 LEV is stable for the motion duration. Up to approximately 60 % span, the [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] = 2 LEV is distinct from the TV and is similarly stable

  20. Design of a Large Span-Distributed Load Flying-Wing Cargo Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jernell, L. S.; Quartero, C. B.

    1977-01-01

    The design and operation of very large, long-range, subsonic cargo aircraft are considered. A design concept which distributes the payload along the wingspan to counterbalance the aerodynamic loads, with a resultant decrease in the in-flight wing bending moments and shear forces, is described. The decreased loading of the wing structure, coupled with the very thick wing housing the cargo, results in a relatively low overall structural weight in comparison to that of conventional aircraft.

  1. Theoretical antisymmetric span loading for wings of arbitrary plan form at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, John

    1951-01-01

    A simplified lifting-surface theory that includes effects of compressibility and spanwise variation of section lift-curve slope is used to provide charts with which antisymmetric loading due to arbitrary antisymmetric angle of attack can be found for wings having symmetric plan forms with a constant spanwise sweep angle of the quarter-chord line. Consideration is given to the flexible wing in roll. Aerodynamic characteristics due to rolling, deflected ailerons, and sideslip of wings with dihedral are considered. Solutions are presented for straight-tapered wings for a range of swept plan forms.

  2. Technical and economic assessment of swept-wing span-distributed load concepts for civil and military air cargo transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of large freighter aircraft was assessed, including the impact of military requirements on the performance, economics, and fuel consumption characteristics. Only configurations having net payloads of 272,155 to 544,311 kilograms contained within swept wings of constant chord were studied. These configurations were of advanced composite construction with controllable winglets and full-span digitally-controlled trailing-edge surfaces. Civil, military, and joint civil/military production programs were considered.

  3. Viscous/potential flow about multi-element two-dimensional and infinite-span swept wings - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, L. E.; Dvorak, F. A.

    1976-01-01

    The viscous subsonic flow past two-dimensional and infinite-span swept multi-component airfoils is studied theoretically and experimentally. The computerized analysis is based on iteratively coupled boundary-layer and potential-flow analysis. The method, which is restricted to flows with only slight separation, gives surface pressure distribution, chordwise and spanwise boundary-layer characteristics, lift, drag, and pitching moment for airfoil configurations with up to four elements. Merging confluent boundary layers are treated. Theoretical predictions are compared with an exact theoretical potential flow solution and with experimental measures made in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel for both two-dimensional and infinite-span swept wing configurations. Section lift characteristics are accurately predicted for zero and moderate sweep angles where flow separation effects are negligible.

  4. Viscous/potential flow about multi-element two-dimensional and infinite-span swept wings: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, L. E.; Dvorak, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous subsonic flow past two-dimensional and infinite-span swept multi-component airfoils is studied theoretically and experimentally. The computerized analysis is based on iteratively coupled boundary layer and potential flow analysis. The method, which is restricted to flows with only slight separation, gives surface pressure distribution, chordwise and spanwise boundary layer characteristics, lift, drag, and pitching moment for airfoil configurations with up to four elements. Merging confluent boundary layers are treated. Theoretical predictions are compared with an exact theoretical potential flow solution and with experimental measures made in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel for both two-dimensional and infinite-span swept wing configurations. Section lift characteristics are accurately predicted for zero and moderate sweep angles where flow separation effects are negligible.

  5. Investigation of a Spoiler-Type Lateral Control System on a Wing with Full-Span Flaps in the Langley 19-Foot Pressure Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deters, Owen J; Russell, Robert T

    1947-01-01

    Tests of a partial-span model of a large bomber-type air1ane were conducted to determine the. aerodynamic characteristics of the wing equipped with full-span flaps and a retractable spoiler end aileron lateral control system. The arrangement consisted of (1) a double slotted flap extending over aproximate1y 86 percent of the wing semispan, (2) a 20-percent constant-percentage-chord aileron extending from the outboard end of the flap to the wing tip, and (3) a retractable spoiler, located at the 65-percent wing-chord station and extending from approximately 63 percent of the wing semispan to the wing tip. In addition, tests were made of a wing vent (of 1 and 2 percent of the wing chord located directly behind the spoiler), perforations in the spoiler, a blot or cut-out along the lower edge of the spoiler and spoilers of various spans. With full-span flaps deflected and with the 2-percent vent open or closed the initial stalling of the wing occurred at the tips, but with the vents closed there probably would be no appreciable loss in lateral control until maximum lift was reached. The l-percent vent increased the rolling effectiveness of the spoiler at small spoi1er deflections, particularly at high angles of attack with flaps deflected. With flaps deflected the 2-percent vent caused a large reduction in both the wing lift and rolling effectiveness of the spoiler at large angles of attack. However, at small angle of attack the 2-percent vent increased the rolling effectiveness of the spoiler at small spoiler deflections. The simultaneous operation of the spoiler and vent (in contrast to a vent fixed in the wing) would result in a large increase in the effectiveness of the spoiler and would avoid any loss in wing lift as in a fixed vent arrangement. The tests of the spoiler modifications revealed that (1) the spoiler perforations reduced the rolling-moment and yawing-moment coefficients but caused the spoiler hinge-moment coefficients to become more positive; (2) the

  6. Preliminary study of a large span-distributed-load flying-wing cargo airplane concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jernell, L. S.

    1978-01-01

    An aircraft capable of transporting containerized cargo over intercontinental distances is analyzed. The specifications for payload weight, density, and dimensions in essence configure the wing and establish unusually low values of wing loading and aspect ratio. The structural weight comprises only about 18 percent of the design maximum gross weight. Although the geometric aspect ratio is 4.53, the winglet effect of the wing-tip-mounted vertical tails, increase the effective aspect ratio to approximately 7.9. Sufficient control power to handle the large rolling moment of inertia dictates a relatively high minimum approach velocity of 315 km/hr (170 knots). The airplane has acceptable spiral, Dutch roll, and roll-damping modes. A hardened stability augmentation system is required. The most significant noise source is that of the airframe. However, for both take-off and approach, the levels are below the FAR-36 limit of 108 db. The design mission fuel efficiency is approximately 50 percent greater than that of the most advanced, currently operational, large freighter aircraft. The direct operating cost is significantly lower than that of current freighters, the advantage increasing as fuel price increases.

  7. Investigation of spoiler ailerons for use as speed brakes or glide-path controls on two NACA 65-series wings equipped with full-span slotted flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischel, Jack; Watson, James M

    1951-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was made to determine the characteristics of spoiler ailerons used as speed brakes or glide-path controls on an NACA 65-210 wing and an NACA 65-215 wing equipped with full-span slotted flaps. Several plug aileron and retractable-aileron configurations were investigated on two wing models with the full-span flaps retracted and deflected. Tests were made at various Mach numbers between 0.13 and 0.71. The results of this investigation have indicated that the use of plug or retractable ailerons, either alone or in conjunction with wing flaps, as speed brakes or glide-path controls is feasible and very effective.

  8. Full-scale semi-span tests of an advanced NLF business jet wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.; Davis, Patrick J.; Muchmore, C. Byram

    1987-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center's 30- by 60-Foot Wind Tunnel on a full-scale semispan model to evaluate and document the low-speed, high-lift characteristics of a business-jet class wing utilizing the HSNLF(1)-0213 airfoil section and a single slotted flap system. In addition to the high-lift studies, evaluations of boundary layer transition effects, the effectiveness of a segmented leading-edge droop for improved stall/spin resistance, and roll control effectiveness with and without flap deflection were made. The wind-tunnel investigation showed that deployment of a single-slotted trailing-edge flap provided substantial increments in lift. Fixed transition studies indicated no adverse effects on lift and pitching-moment characteristics for either the cruise or landing configuration. Subscale roll damping tests also indicated that stall/spin resistance could be enhanced through the use of a properly designed leading-edge droop.

  9. Active Flow Control Using Sweeping Jet Actuators on a Semi-Span Wing Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti

    2016-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were performed using active flow control on an unswept semispan wing model with a 30% chord trailing edge flap to aid in the selection of actuators for a planned high Reynolds number experiment. Two sweeping jet actuator sizes were investigated to determine the influence of actuator size on the active flow control system efficiency. Sweeping jet actuators with orifice sizes of 1 mm x 2 mm and 2 mm x 4 mm were selected because of the differences in actuator jet sweep angle. The parameters that were varied include actuator momentum, freestream velocity, and trailing edge flap deflection angle. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the two actuators. In addition to the wind tunnel experiments, benchtop studies of the actuators were performed to characterize the jets produced by each actuator. Benchtop investigations of the smaller actuator reveal that the jet exiting the actuator has a reduced sweep angle compared to published data for larger versions of this type of actuator. The larger actuator produces an oscillating jet that attaches to the external di?user walls at low supply pressures and produces the expected sweep angles. The AFC results using the smaller actuators show that while the actuators can control flow separation, the selected spacing of 3.3 cm may be too large due to the reduced sweep angle. In comparison, the spacing for the larger actuators, 6.6 cm, appears to be optimal for the Mach numbers investigated. Particle Image Velocimetry results are presented and show how the wall jets produced by the actuators cause the flow to attach to the flap surface.

  10. Investigation of a free-tip rotor configuration for research on spanwise life distributions and wake velocity surveys of a semi-span wing with a discontinuous twist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortin, Paul; Kumagai, Hiroyuki

    1989-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted in the NASA Ames 7 x 10 Foot Wind Tunnel to investigate the lift distribution on a semi-span wing with a discontinuous change in spanwise twist. The semi-span wing had a tip with an adjustable pitch angle independent on the inboard section pitch angle simulating the free-tip rotor blade when its free-tip is at a deflected position. The spanwise lift distribution over the wing and the tip were measured and three component velocity surveys behind the wing were obtained with a three dimensional laser Doppler velocimeter (LV) with the wing at one angle of attack and the tip deflected at different pitch angles. A six component internal strain gage balance was also used to measure total forces and moments on the tip. The three dimensional lift was computed from the two dimensional life distributions obtained from the LV and from the strain gage balance. The results from both experimental methods are shown to be in agreement with predictions made by a steady, three dimensional panel code, VSAERO.

  11. Lift, Drag, and Pitching Moment of Low-Aspect-Ratio Wings at Subsonic and Supersonic Speeds: Triangular Wing of Aspect Ratio 2 with NACA 0005-63 Thickness Distribution, Cambered and Twisted for a Trapezoidal Span Load Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Willard G.; Phelps, E. Ray

    1951-01-01

    A wing-body combination having a plane triangular wing of aspect ratio 2 with NACA 0005-63 thickness distribution in streamwise planes, and twisted and cambered for a trapezoidal span load distribution has been investigated at both subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers. The lift, drag, and pitching moment of the model are presented for Mach numbers from 0.60 to 0.90 and 1.30 to 1.70 at a Reynolds number of 3.0 million. The variations of the characteristics with Reynolds number are also shown for several Mach numbers.

  12. Spanwise lift distributions and wake velocity surveys of a semi-span wing with a discontinuous twist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki

    1989-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted in the NASA-Ames 7 x 10 ft wind tunnel to investigate the lift distribution on a semispan wing with a discontinuous change in spanwise twist. The semispan wing had a tip with an adjustable pitch angle independent on the inboard section pitch angle simulating the free tip rotor blade when its free tip is at a deflected position. The spanwise lift distribution over the wing and the tip were measured and three component velocity surveys behind the wing were obtained with a 3-D laser Doppler velocimeter (LV) with the wing at one angle of attack and the tip deflected at different pitch angles. A six-component internal strain gage balance was also used to measure total forces and moments on the tip. The 3-D lift was computed from the 2-D lift distributions obtained from the LV and from the strain gage balance. The results from both experimental methods are shown to be in agreement with predictions made by a steady, 3-D panel code, VSAERO.

  13. Pretest Report for the Full Span Propulsive Wing/Canard Model Test in the NASA Langley 4 x 7 Meter Low Speed Wind Tunnel Second Series Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, V. R.

    1986-01-01

    A full span propulsive wing/canard model is to be tested in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) 4 x 7 meter low speed wind tunnel. These tests are a continuation of the tests conducted in Feb. 1984, NASA test No.290, and are being conducted under NASA Contract NAS1-17171. The purpose of these tests is to obtain extensive lateral-directional data with a revised fuselage concept. The wings, canards, and vertical tail of this second test series model are the same as tested in the previous test period. The fuselage and internal flow path have been modified to better reflect an external configuration suitable for a fighter airplane. Internal ducting and structure were changed as required to provide test efficiency and blowing control. The model fuselage tested during the 1984 tests was fabricated with flat sides to provide multiple wing and canard placement variations. The locations of the wing and canard are important variables in configuration development. With the establishment of the desired relative placement of the lifting surfaces, a typically shaped fuselage has been fabricated for these tests. This report provides the information necessary for the second series tests of the propulsive wing/canard model. The discussion in this report is limited to that affected by the model changes and to the second series test program. The pretest report information for test 290 which is valid for the second series test was published in Rockwell report NR 83H-79. This report is presented as Appendix 1 and the modified fuselage stress report is presented as Appendix 2 to this pretest report.

  14. Exploratory investigation of lift induced on a swept wing by a two-dimensional partial-span deflected jet at Mach numbers from 0.20 to 1.30

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    An exploratory investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.20 to 1.30 to determine the induced lift characteristics of a body and swept-wing configuration having a partial-span two-dimensional propulsive nozzle with exhaust exit in the notch of the swept-wing trailing edge. The Reynolds number per meter varied from 4,900,000 to 14,030,000. The effects on wing-body characteristics of deflecting the propulsive jet in the flap mode at nominal exhaust-nozzle deflection angles of 0 deg and 30 deg were studied for two nozzle designs with different geometry and wing spans.

  15. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Wings with Ordinary Ailerons and Full-Span External-Airfoil Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Robert C; Shortal, Joseph A

    1937-01-01

    Report presents an investigation carried out in the NACA 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel of an NACA 23012 airfoil equipped, first, with a full-span NACA 23012 external-airfoil flap having a chord 0.20 of the main airfoil chord and with a full-span aileron with a chord 0.12 of the main airfoil chord on the trailing edge of the main airfoil and equipped second, with a 0.30-chord full-span NACA 23012 external-airfoil flap and a 0.13-chord full-span aileron. The results are arranged in three groups, the first two of which deal with the airfoil characteristics of the two airfoil-flap combinations and with the internal-control characteristics of the airfoil-flap-aileron combinations. The third group of tests deals with several means for balancing ailerons mounted on a special large-chord NACA 23012 external-airfoil flap. The tests included an ordinary aileron, a curtained-nose balance, a frise balance, and a tab.

  16. Effects of Small Angles of Sweep and Moderate Amounts of Dihedral on Stalling and Lateral Characteristics of a Wing-Fuselage Combination Equipped with Partial- and Full-Span Double Slotted Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teplitz, Jerome

    1944-01-01

    Tests of a wing-fuselage combinations incorporating NACA 65-series airfoil sections were conducted in the NACA 19-foot pressure tunnel. The investigation included the tests with flaps neutral and with partial- and full-span double slotted flaps deflected to determine the effects of (1) variations of wing sweep between -4 degrees and 8 degrees on stalling and lateral stability and control characteristics and (2) variations of dihedral between 0 degree and 6.75 degrees on lateral stability characteristics.

  17. Finite-span rotating flat-plate wings at low reynolds number and the effects of aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Zakery R.

    In the complex and dangerous environments of the modern warrior and emergency professional, the small size, maneuverability, and stealth of flapping-wing micro air vehicles (MAVs), scaled to the size of large insects or hummingbirds, has the potential to provide previously inaccessible levels of situational awareness, reconnaissance capability, and flexibility directly to the front lines. Although development of such an efficient, autonomous, and capable MAV is years away, there are immediate contributions that can be made to the fundamental science of the flapping-wing-type propulsion that makes MAVs so attractive. This investigation contributes to those fundamentals by considering the unsteady vortex dynamics problem of a rigid, rectangular flat plate at a fixed angle of attack rotating from rest---a simplified hovering half-stroke. Parameters are chosen to be biologically-relevant and relevant to MAVs operating at Reynolds numbers of O (103), and experiments are performed in a 50% by mass glycerin-water mixture. These experiments use novel application of methodologies verified by rigorous uncertainty analysis. The overall objective is to understand the vortex formation and forces as well as aspect ratio ( AR) effects. Of interest is the overall, time-varying, three-dimensional vortex structure obtained qualitatively from dye visualization and quantitatively from volumes reconstructed using planar stereoscopic digital particle image velocimetry (S-DPIV) measurements. The velocity information from S-DPIV also allows statements to be made on leading-edge vortex (LEV) stability, spanwise flow, LEV and tip-vortex (TV) circulation, and numerous circulation scalings. Force measurements are made and the lift coefficient is discussed in the context of the flow structure, the dimensional lift and the ability to relate velocity and force measurements going forward. AR effects is a topic of continued interest to those performing MAV-related research and also a primary

  18. Longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics at Mach numbers from 1.60 to 2.86 for a fixed-span missile with three wing planforms. [conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.; Sawyer, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    Effects of wing planform modifications on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a fixed span, maneuverable cruciform missile configuration were determined. A basic delta planform and two alternate trapezoidal planforms having progressively increasing tip chords were included. Data were obtained for angles of attack up to approximately -32 deg, model roll angles of 0 deg to 45 deg, and tail control deflections of 0 deg and -20 deg. The experimental drag due to lift was compared with linear values.

  19. Slotted Aircraft Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLean, James D. (Inventor); Witkowski, David P. (Inventor); Campbell, Richard L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A swept aircraft wing includes a leading airfoil element and a trailing airfoil element. At least one full-span slot is defined by the wing during at least one transonic condition of the wing. The full-span slot allows a portion of the air flowing along the lower surface of the leading airfoil element to split and flow over the upper surface of the trailing airfoil element so as to achieve a performance improvement in the transonic condition.

  20. Charts for Determining Preliminary Values of Span-load, Shear, Bending-moment, and Accumulated-torque Distributions of Swept Wings of Various Taper Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollner, Bertram C

    1948-01-01

    Contains charts for use in determining preliminary values of the spanwise-load, shear, bending-moment, and accumulated-torque distributions of swept wings. The charts are based on strip theory and include four aerodynamic-load distributions, two section-moment distributions, and two inertia-load distributions. The taper ratios considered cover the range from 1.0 to 0 and the results are applicable to any angle of sweep.

  1. Effects of Compressibility on the Maximum Lift Characteristics and Spanwise Load Distribution of a 12-Foot-Span Fighter-Type Wing of NACA 230-Series Airfoil Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, F E

    1945-01-01

    Lift characteristics and pressure distribution for a NACA 230 wing were investigated for an angle of attack range of from -10 to +24 degrees and Mach range of from 0.2 to 0.7. Maximum lift coefficient increased up to a Mach number of 0.3, decreased rapidly to a Mach number of 0.55, and then decreased moderately. At high speeds, maximum lift coefficient was reached at from 10 to 12 degrees beyond the stalling angle. In high-speed stalls, resultant load underwent a moderate shift outward.

  2. Detail of northeast wing wall and guiderail. The section of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of northeast wing wall and guiderail. The section of the wing wall in the foreground is a historic extension of this element. - Chester County Bridge No. 225, Spanning Tweed Creek at Hopewell Road, Oxford, Chester County, PA

  3. 6. DETAIL OF MASONRY ON SOUTHWEST WING WALL. MASONRY ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF MASONRY ON SOUTHWEST WING WALL. MASONRY ON WING WALLS IS LAID IN A RANDOM RUBBLE PATTERN. - Core Creek County Bridge, Spanning Core Creek, approximately 1 mile South of State Route 332 (Newtown Bypass), Newtown, Bucks County, PA

  4. Contribution to the Problem of Airfoils Spanning a Free Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuper, J

    1936-01-01

    After a brief discussion of the work done up to now on an unwarped wing of constant chord spanning a free jet, the computation of the circulation and lift distribution for different forms of warped wings spanning rectangular and circular jets was carried out. The computed values are compared with test values and the agreement is found to be good. The effect of placing the wing eccentrically is slight and may be applied as a correction factor to the data obtained for wing placed in middle of jet.

  5. Avian Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Kuykendoll, K.; Rhew, R.; Jones, S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the avian wing geometry (Seagull, Merganser, Teal and Owl) extracted from non-contact surface measurements using a three-dimensional laser scanner. The geometric quantities, including the camber line and thickness distribution of airfoil, wing planform, chord distribution, and twist distribution, are given in convenient analytical expressions. Thus, the avian wing surfaces can be generated and the wing kinematics can be simulated. The aerodynamic characteristics of avian airfoils in steady inviscid flows are briefly discussed. The avian wing kinematics is recovered from videos of three level-flying birds (Crane, Seagull and Goose) based on a two-jointed arm model. A flapping seagull wing in the 3D physical space is re-constructed from the extracted wing geometry and kinematics.

  6. Hydrodynamics of penguin wing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noca, Flavio; Cuong Duong, Nhut; Herpich, Jerome

    2010-11-01

    The three-dimensional kinematics of penguin wings were obtained from movie footage in aquariums. A 1:1 scale model of the penguin wing (with an identical planform but with a flat section profile and a rigid configuration) was actuated with a robotic arm in a water channel. The experiments were performed at a chord Reynolds number of about 10^4 (an order of magnitude lower than for the observed penguin). The dynamics of the wing were analyzed with force and flowfield measurements. The two main results are: 1. a net thrust on both the upstroke and downstroke movement; 2. the occurence of a leading edge vortex (LEV) along the wing span. The effects of section profile, wing flexibility, and a higher Reynolds number will be investigated in the future.

  7. Active Dihedral Control System for a Torisionally Flexible Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Greg T. (Inventor); Lisoski, Derek L. (Inventor); Morgan, Walter R. (Inventor); Griecci, John A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A span-loaded, highly flexible flying wing, having horizontal control surfaces mounted aft of the wing on extended beams to form local pitch-control devices. Each of five spanwise wing segments of the wing has one or more motors and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other wing segments, to minimize inter-segment loads. Wing dihedral is controlled by separately controlling the local pitch-control devices consisting of a control surface on a boom, such that inboard and outboard wing segment pitch changes relative to each other, and thus relative inboard and outboard lift is varied.

  8. AST Composite Wing Program: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karal, Michael

    2001-01-01

    The Boeing Company demonstrated the application of stitched/resin infused (S/RFI) composite materials on commercial transport aircraft primary wing structures under the Advanced Subsonic technology (AST) Composite Wing contract. This report describes a weight trade study utilizing a wing torque box design applicable to a 220-passenger commercial aircraft and was used to verify the weight savings a S/RFI structure would offer compared to an identical aluminum wing box design. This trade study was performed in the AST Composite Wing program, and the overall weight savings are reported. Previous program work involved the design of a S/RFI-base-line wing box structural test component and its associated testing hardware. This detail structural design effort which is known as the "semi-span" in this report, was completed under a previous NASA contract. The full-scale wing design was based on a configuration for a MD-90-40X airplane, and the objective of this structural test component was to demonstrate the maturity of the S/RFI technology through the evaluation of a full-scale wing box/fuselage section structural test. However, scope reductions of the AST Composite Wing Program pre-vented the fabrication and evaluation of this wing box structure. Results obtained from the weight trade study, the full-scale test component design effort, fabrication, design development testing, and full-scale testing of the semi-span wing box are reported.

  9. Effect of wing flexibility on the experimental aerodynamic characteristics of an oblique wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, E. J.; Yee, S. C.

    1977-01-01

    A solid-aluminum oblique wing was designed to deflect considerably under load so as to relieve the asymmetric spanwise stalling that is characteristic of this type of wing by creating washout on the trailing wing panel and washin on the leading wing panel. Experimental forces, and pitching, rolling and yawing moments were measured with the wing mounted on a body of revolution. In order to vary the dynamic pressure, measurements were made at several unit Reynolds numbers, and at Mach numbers. The wing was investigated when unswept (at subsonic Mach numbers only) and when swept 45 deg, 50 deg, and 60 deg. The wing was straight tapered in planform, had an aspect ratio of 7.9 (based on the unswept span), and a profile with a maximum thickness of 4 percent chord. The results substantiate the concept that an oblique wing designed with the proper amount of flexibility self relieves itself of asymmetric spanwise stalling and the associated nonlinear moment curves.

  10. Joukowski wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margoulis, W

    1922-01-01

    To sum up, Professor Joukowski's theory of supporting wings renders it possible to calculate the coefficient of lift in terms of the angle of attack, and Prandtl's coefficient of induced drag and the correction of the angle of attack in terms of the disposition and aspect ratio of the wings.

  11. Wing Damage Effects on Dragonfly's maneuverability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zhe; Gai, Kuo; Zeyghami, Samane; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Group (FSRG) Team

    2011-11-01

    In this work, how the insect flight behavior contributes to its adaptability to limited performance condition is studied through a combined experimental and computational study. High speed photogrammetry is used to collect the data of dragonflies' takeoffs with intact and damaged wings along the chord and span separately. Then the effect of the spanwise and chordwise damage on the dragonfly wing is investigated. Results show that both changes have different effects on the wing and body kinematics and the merit of maneuverability. Two theories will be introduced to explain the wing damage tolerance behavior of the dragonfly flight. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1055949.

  12. Scapular Winging

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Benjamin W. T.; Geoghegan, John M.; Wallace, W. Angus; Manning, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    This review explores the causes of scapula winging, with overview of the relevant anatomy, proposed aetiology and treatment. Particular focus is given to lesions of the long thoracic nerve, which is reported to be the most common aetiological factor.

  13. An aerodynamic model for one and two degree of freedom wing rock of slender delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, John

    1993-01-01

    The unsteady aerodynamic effects due to the separated flow around slender delta wings in motion were analyzed. By combining the unsteady flow field solution with the rigid body Euler equations of motion, self-induced wing rock motion is simulated. The aerodynamic model successfully captures the qualitative characteristics of wing rock observed in experiments. For the one degree of freedom in roll case, the model is used to look into the mechanisms of wing rock and to investigate the effects of various parameters, like angle of attack, yaw angle, displacement of the separation point, and wing inertia. To investigate the roll and yaw coupling for the delta wing, an additional degree of freedom is added. However, no limit cycle was observed in the two degree of freedom case. Nonetheless, the model can be used to apply various control laws to actively control wing rock using, for example, the displacement of the leading edge vortex separation point by inboard span wise blowing.

  14. Rotor/Wing Interactions in Hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Derby, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Hover predictions of tiltrotor aircraft are hampered by the lack of accurate and computationally efficient models for rotor/wing interactional aerodynamics. This paper summarizes the development of an approximate, potential flow solution for the rotor-on-rotor and wing-on-rotor interactions. This analysis is based on actuator disk and vortex theory and the method of images. The analysis is applicable for out-of-ground-effect predictions. The analysis is particularly suited for aircraft preliminary design studies. Flow field predictions from this simple analytical model are validated against experimental data from previous studies. The paper concludes with an analytical assessment of the influence of rotor-on-rotor and wing-on-rotor interactions. This assessment examines the effect of rotor-to-wing offset distance, wing sweep, wing span, and flaperon incidence angle on tiltrotor inflow and performance.

  15. Nonlinear Aerodynamics and the Design of Wing Tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, Ilan

    1991-01-01

    The analysis and design of wing tips for fixed wing and rotary wing aircraft still remains part art, part science. Although the design of airfoil sections and basic planform geometry is well developed, the tip regions require more detailed consideration. This is important because of the strong impact of wing tip flow on wing drag; although the tip region constitutes a small portion of the wing, its effect on the drag can be significant. The induced drag of a wing is, for a given lift and speed, inversely proportional to the square of the wing span. Concepts are proposed as a means of reducing drag. Modern computational methods provide a tool for studying these issues in greater detail. The purpose of the current research program is to improve the understanding of the fundamental issues involved in the design of wing tips and to develop the range of computational and experimental tools needed for further study of these ideas.

  16. Wing rotation and lift in SUEX flapping wing mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateti, Kiron; Byrne-Dugan, Rory A.; Tadigadapa, Srinivas A.; Rahn, Christopher D.

    2013-01-01

    This research presents detailed modeling and experimental testing of wing rotation and lift in the LionFly, a low cost and mass producible flapping wing mechanism fabricated monolithically from SUEX dry film and powered by piezoelectric bimorph actuators. A flexure hinge along the span of the wing allows the wing to rotate in addition to flapping. A dynamic model including aerodynamics is developed and validated using experimental testing with a laser vibrometer in air and vacuum, stroboscopic photography and high definition image processing, and lift measurement. The 112 mg LionFly produces 46° flap and 44° rotation peak to peak with 12° phase lag, which generates a maximum average lift of 71 μN in response to an applied sinusoidal voltage of 75 V AC and 75 V DC at 37 Hz. Simulated wing trajectories accurately predict measured wing trajectories at small voltage amplitudes, but slightly underpredict amplitude and lift at high voltage amplitudes. By reducing the length of the actuator, reducing the mechanism amplification and tuning the rotational hinge stiffness, a redesigned device is simulated to produce a lift to weight ratio of 1.5.

  17. 1. View south. North elevation Walpole span, link span, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View south. North elevation - Walpole span, link span, and Westminster span. - Walpole-Westminster Bridge, Spanning Connecticut River between Walpole, NH & Westminster, VT, Walpole, Cheshire County, NH

  18. 2. View northeast. South elevation Westminster span, link span, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View northeast. South elevation - Westminster span, link span, Walpole span. - Walpole-Westminster Bridge, Spanning Connecticut River between Walpole, NH & Westminster, VT, Walpole, Cheshire County, NH

  19. Induced drag ideal efficiency factor of arbitrary lateral-vertical wing forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, J.

    1980-01-01

    A relatively simple equation is presented for estimating the induced drag ideal efficiency factor e for arbitrary cross sectional wing forms. This equation is based on eight basic but varied wing configurations which have exact solutions. The e function which relates the basic wings is developed statistically and is a continuous function of configuration geometry. The basic wing configurations include boxwings shaped as a rectangle, ellipse, and diamond; the V-wing; end-plate wing; 90 degree cruciform; circle dumbbell; and biplane. Example applications of the e equations are made to many wing forms such as wings with struts which form partial span rectangle dumbbell wings; bowtie, cruciform, winglet, and fan wings; and multiwings. Derivations are presented in the appendices of exact closed form solutions found of e for the V-wing and 90 degree cruciform wing and for an asymptotic solution for multiwings.

  20. The Nichols Wing Cutting Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, James B

    1923-01-01

    Described here is wing cutting equipment for the economical production of metal wings for wind tunnel models. The machine will make any size of constant-section wing or strut up to one-sixth inch chord by 36-inch span and up to a thickness of one and one-quarter inches. It cuts a smooth, true model that is accurate to within two-thousandths of an inch on any ordinate. The holding jaws are so designed as to leave the model free of chip marks, and the only hand finishing necessary after the cutting is a rub with amunite to remove burrs. The actual change on ordinate in this finishing rub is less than .0002 inches.

  1. Determination of the characteristics of tapered wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Raymond F

    1937-01-01

    This report presents tables and charts for use in determining the characteristics of tapered wings. Theoretical factors are given from which the following characteristics of tapered wings may be found: the span lift distribution, the induced-angle-of attack distribution, the lift-curve slope, the angle of zero lift, the induced drag, the aerodynamic-center position, and the pitching moment about the aerodynamic center.

  2. 3. VIEW NORTH SHOWING FIXED SPAN, COVERED SPAN, MOVEABLE TRANSITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTH SHOWING FIXED SPAN, COVERED SPAN, MOVEABLE TRANSITION SPAN AND PONTOON FLOATING SPAN - Lacey V. Murrow Memorial Floating Bridge, Spanning Lake Washington at I-90, Seattle, King County, WA

  3. Inflatable wing

    DOEpatents

    Priddy, Tommy G.

    1988-01-01

    An inflatable wing is formed from a pair of tapered, conical inflatable tubes in bonded tangential contact with each other. The tubes are further connected together by means of top and bottom reinforcement boards having corresponding longitudinal edges lying in the same central diametral plane passing through the associated tube. The reinforcement boards are made of a stiff reinforcement material, such as Kevlar, collapsible in a direction parallel to the spanwise wing axis upon deflation of the tubes. The stiff reinforcement material cooperates with the inflated tubes to impart structural I-beam characteristics to the composite structure for transferring inflation pressure-induced tensile stress from the tubes to the reinforcement boards. A plurality of rigid hoops shaped to provide airfoil definition are spaced from each other along the spanwise axis and are connected to the top and bottom reinforcement boards. Tension lines are employed for stabilizing the hoops along the trailing and leading edges thereof.

  4. Empirical corrections to the span load distribution at the tip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, H A

    1937-01-01

    An analysis of existing pressure-distribution data was made to determine the variation of the tip loading with wing plan form. A series of empirical tip corrections was derived that may be added to theoretical curves in certain cases to obtain a closer approach to the actual loading at the tip. The analysis indicated that the need for a tip correction decreases as either the aspect ratio or the wing taper is increased. In general, it may be said that, for wings of conventional aspect ratio, corrections to the theoretical span load curves are necessary only if the wing is tapered less than 2:1 and has a blunt tip. If the tip is well rounded in plan form, no correction appears necessary even for a wing with no taper.

  5. 4. DETAIL VIEW OF STONE MASONRY, WING WALL AND WHAT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW OF STONE MASONRY, WING WALL AND WHAT REMAINS OF ORIGINAL WALKWAY RAILING. - Main Street Parker Pony Truss Bridge, Main Street (Route 170) spanning Yellow Creek, Poland, Mahoning County, OH

  6. 1. VIEW OF WEST HEADWALL AND WING WALL, FROM BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF WEST HEADWALL AND WING WALL, FROM BRIDGE TO THE WEST, FACING EAST. - Cut Stone Bridge, Southern Pacific Railroad line spanning runoff channel at South Spruce Avenue, South San Francisco, San Mateo County, CA

  7. 2. VIEW OF WEST HEADWALL AND WING WALL, FROM EMBANKMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF WEST HEADWALL AND WING WALL, FROM EMBANKMENT TO THE SOUTHWEST, FACING NORTHEAST. - Cut Stone Bridge, Southern Pacific Railroad line spanning runoff channel at South Spruce Avenue, South San Francisco, San Mateo County, CA

  8. 9. South abutment, detail of collapsed east wing wall; also ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. South abutment, detail of collapsed east wing wall; also detail of bottom lateral bracing and stringers; looking southeast - Dodd Ford Bridge, County Road 147 Spanning Blue Earth River, Amboy, Blue Earth County, MN

  9. 4. DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION. DETAIL OF BUTTRESS ADDITION ON NORTHEAST WING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION. DETAIL OF BUTTRESS ADDITION ON NORTHEAST WING WALL. - Core Creek County Bridge, Spanning Core Creek, approximately 1 mile South of State Route 332 (Newtown Bypass), Newtown, Bucks County, PA

  10. Detail of southeast wing wall, facing east. Note recessed panel, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of southeast wing wall, facing east. Note recessed panel, indicative of the stripped classicism style. - Oakland Avenue Viaduct, Oakland Avenue spanning U.S. Route 62 (State Route 2302) & Pine Run, Sharon, Mercer County, PA

  11. SPAN: Astronomy and astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Valerie L.; Green, James L.; Warren, Wayne H., Jr.; Lopez-Swafford, Brian

    1987-01-01

    The Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN) is a multi-mission, correlative data comparison network which links science research and data analysis computers in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. The purpose of this document is to provide Astronomy and Astrophysics scientists, currently reachable on SPAN, with basic information and contacts for access to correlative data bases, star catalogs, and other astrophysic facilities accessible over SPAN.

  12. 37. VIEW SOUTHWEST, CENTER SPAN OF THREE SPAN FRAME SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. VIEW SOUTHWEST, CENTER SPAN OF THREE SPAN FRAME SHOWING BRACING SYSTEM (SPAN 50) - Route 1 Extension, Southbound Viaduct, Spanning Conrail Yards, Wilson Avenue, Delancy Street, & South Street on Routes 1 & 9 Southbound, Newark, Essex County, NJ

  13. 4. View northwest. South elevation Walpole span, link span, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View northwest. South elevation - Walpole span, link span, and Westminster span. Structure on east pier is stream level gauge station. - Walpole-Westminster Bridge, Spanning Connecticut River between Walpole, NH & Westminster, VT, Walpole, Cheshire County, NH

  14. 6. DETAIL OF VERTICAL LIFT SPAN AND FIXED SPAN IMMEDIATELY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF VERTICAL LIFT SPAN AND FIXED SPAN IMMEDIATELY NORTH OF VERTICAL LIFT SPAN, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Shippingsport Bridge, Spanning Illinois River at State Route 51, La Salle, La Salle County, IL

  15. 4. DETAIL VIEW FIXED SPAN INCLUDING TRUSS, MOVEABLE SPAN WHICH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW FIXED SPAN INCLUDING TRUSS, MOVEABLE SPAN WHICH THE NEXT UNIT TO THE RIGHT, AND FIRST UNIT OF PONTOON FLOATING SPAN. - Lacey V. Murrow Memorial Floating Bridge, Spanning Lake Washington at I-90, Seattle, King County, WA

  16. 20. Vertical lift span, north tower, bascule span, and Warren ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Vertical lift span, north tower, bascule span, and Warren truss spans, facing north - Sault Ste. Marie International Railroad Bridge, Spanning Soo Locks at St. Marys Falls Canal, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  17. Experimental investigation of non-planar sheared outboard wing planforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, D. A.; Ostowari, C.

    1988-01-01

    The outboard planforms of wings have been found to be of prime importance in studies of induced drag reduction. This conclusion is based on an experimental and theoretical study of the aerodynamic characteristics of planar and nonplanar outboard wing forms. Six different configurations; baseline rectangular, planar sheared, sheared with dihedral, sheared with anhedral, rising arc, and drooping arc were investigated for two different spans. Span efficiencies as much as 20 percent greater than baseline can be realized with nonplanar wing forms. Optimization studies show that this advantage can be achieved along with a bending moment benefit. Parasite drag and lateral stability estimations were not included in the analysis.

  18. Measurements of Supersonic Wing Tip Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Michael K.; Kalkhoran, Iraj M.; Benston, James

    1994-01-01

    An experimental survey of supersonic wing tip vortices has been conducted at Mach 2.5 using small performed 2.25 chords down-stream of a semi-span rectangular wing at angle of attack of 5 and 10 degrees. The main objective of the experiments was to determine the Mach number, flow angularity and total pressure distribution in the core region of supersonic wing tip vortices. A secondary aim was to demonstrate the feasibility of using cone probes calibrated with a numerical flow solver to measure flow characteristics at supersonic speeds. Results showed that the numerically generated calibration curves can be used for 4-hole cone probes, but were not sufficiently accurate for conventional 5-hole probes due to nose bluntness effects. Combination of 4-hole cone probe measurements with independent pitot pressure measurements indicated a significant Mach number and total pressure deficit in the core regions of supersonic wing tip vortices, combined with an asymmetric 'Burger like' swirl distribution.

  19. Aerodynamics of high frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng; Roll, Jesse; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic performance of high frequency flapping wings using a 2.5 gram robotic insect mechanism developed in our lab. The mechanism flaps up to 65Hz with a pair of man-made wing mounted with 10cm wingtip-to-wingtip span. The mean aerodynamic lift force was measured by a lever platform, and the flow velocity and vorticity were measured using a stereo DPIV system in the frontal, parasagittal, and horizontal planes. Both near field (leading edge vortex) and far field flow (induced flow) were measured with instantaneous and phase-averaged results. Systematic experiments were performed on the man-made wings, cicada and hawk moth wings due to their similar size, frequency and Reynolds number. For insect wings, we used both dry and freshly-cut wings. The aerodynamic force increase with flapping frequency and the man-made wing generates more than 4 grams of lift at 35Hz with 3 volt input. Here we present the experimental results and the major differences in their aerodynamic performances.

  20. Bridge Types: Suspension Bridge Spans, Section AA; Cantilever Truss Spans, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bridge Types: Suspension Bridge Spans, Section A-A; Cantilever Truss Spans, Section B-B; Through Truss Spans, Section C-C; Deck Truss Spans, Section D-D - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  1. Study of Semi-Span Model Testing Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Gregory M.; McGhee, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel in order to further the development of semi-span testing capabilities. A twin engine, energy efficient transport (EET) model with a four-element wing in a takeoff configuration was used for this investigation. Initially a full span configuration was tested and force and moment data, wing and fuselage surface pressure data, and fuselage boundary layer measurements were obtained as a baseline data set. The semi-span configurations were then mounted on the wind tunnel floor, and the effects of fuselage standoff height and shape as well as the effects of the tunnel floor boundary layer height were investigated. The effectiveness of tangential blowing at the standoff/floor juncture as an active boundary-layer control technique was also studied. Results indicate that the semi-span configuration was more sensitive to variations in standoff height than to variations in floor boundary layer height. A standoff height equivalent to 30 percent of the fuselage radius resulted in better correlation with full span data than no standoff or the larger standoff configurations investigated. Undercut standoff leading edges or the use of tangential blowing in the standoff/ floor juncture improved correlation of semi-span data with full span data in the region of maximum lift coefficient.

  2. Numerical study of the trailing vortex of a wing with wing-tip blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Hock-Bin

    1994-01-01

    Trailing vortices generated by lifting surfaces such as helicopter rotor blades, ship propellers, fixed wings, and canard control surfaces are known to be the source of noise, vibration, cavitation, degradation of performance, and other hazardous problems. Controlling these vortices is, therefore, of practical interest. The formation and behavior of the trailing vortices are studied in the present research. In addition, wing-tip blowing concepts employing axial blowing and spanwise blowing are studied to determine their effectiveness in controlling these vortices and their effects on the performance of the wing. The 3D, unsteady, thin-layer compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a time-accurate, implicit, finite difference scheme that employs LU-ADI factorization. The wing-tip blowing is simulated using the actuator plane concept, thereby, not requiring resolution of the jet slot geometry. Furthermore, the solution blanking feature of the chimera scheme is used to simplify the parametric study procedure for the wing-tip blowing. Computed results are shown to compare favorably with experimental measurements. It is found that axial wing-tip blowing, although delaying the rolling-up of the trailing vortices and the near-field behavior of the flowfield, does not dissipate the circulation strength of the trailing vortex farther downstream. Spanwise wing-tip blowing has the effect of displacing the trailing vortices outboard and upward. The increased 'wing-span' due to the spanwise wing-tip blowing has the effect of lift augmentation on the wing and the strengthening of the trailing vortices. Secondary trailing vortices are created at high spanwise wing-tip blowing intensities.

  3. 60. VIEW SHOWING SWING SPAN CLEARING TRESTLE SPANS OF SHOOFLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. VIEW SHOWING SWING SPAN CLEARING TRESTLE SPANS OF SHOOFLY BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTHWEST FROM BENEATH M STREET BRIDGE, January 17, 1935 - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  4. 23. Span 1, detail view, central section of span front ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Span 1, detail view, central section of span front below; view to south. - Fifth Street Bridge, Spanning MBTA Fitchburg Commuter Rail Line tracks, Conrail Fitchburg Secondary Line & North Nashua River, Fitchburg, Worcester County, MA

  5. 2. Skew Span on left to Span 3 on right ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Skew Span on left to Span 3 on right from north bank-up river. - Monongahela Connecting Railroad Company, Hot Metal Bridge, Spanning Monongahela River at mile post 3.1, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  6. View of approach span and movable span, looking southeast from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of approach span and movable span, looking southeast from navy land. Note that navigational channel exists only on north side of movable span. - Naval Supply Annex Stockton, Rough & Ready Island, Stockton, San Joaquin County, CA

  7. 4. From Skew Span to portal on span 1 looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. From Skew Span to portal on span 1 looking up grade toward the south end. - Monongahela Connecting Railroad Company, Hot Metal Bridge, Spanning Monongahela River at mile post 3.1, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  8. 11. Span 2 foreground, Span 3 beyondunderneath from riverbank vicinity ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Span 2- foreground, Span 3 beyond-underneath from riverbank vicinity Pier 1 toward Pier 2 in river. - Monongahela Connecting Railroad Company, Main Bridge, Spanning Monongahela River at mile post 3.1, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  9. 5. From Span 6 to portal on span 5 looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. From Span 6 to portal on span 5 looking down grade toward north end. - Monongahela Connecting Railroad Company, Hot Metal Bridge, Spanning Monongahela River at mile post 3.1, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  10. 3. Span 4 on right to Skew Span on leftfrom ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Span 4 on right to Skew Span on left-from south bank-up river. - Monongahela Connecting Railroad Company, Hot Metal Bridge, Spanning Monongahela River at mile post 3.1, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  11. 25. Spans 25, underview of Span 4 and western elevation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Spans 2-5, underview of Span 4 and western elevation of Pier 4; view to northeast. - Fifth Street Bridge, Spanning MBTA Fitchburg Commuter Rail Line tracks, Conrail Fitchburg Secondary Line & North Nashua River, Fitchburg, Worcester County, MA

  12. EAST END FROM MID SPAN OF EASTERN SPAN (THREE DIFFERENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST END FROM MID SPAN OF EASTERN SPAN (THREE DIFFERENT TRUSSES, EAST SOUTHEAST 110 DEGREES) - Honey Run Bridge, Spanning Butte Creek, bypassed section of Honey Run Road (originally Carr Hill Road), Paradise, Butte County, CA

  13. 22. VIEW OF FIXED SPAN SUBSTRUCTURE, EAST SPAN, SHOWING CANTILEVEREDBEAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. VIEW OF FIXED SPAN SUBSTRUCTURE, EAST SPAN, SHOWING CANTILEVERED-BEAM SIDEWALK SUPPORTS, LONGITUDINAL GIRDER AND TRANSVERSE ROADBED BEAMS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Congress Street Bascule Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel at Congress Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  14. View east, showing Northwest Wing (Wing 5) and rear elevations ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View east, showing Northwest Wing (Wing 5) and rear elevations of facade and tis flaking wings (Wings 1 and 2) - Hospital for Sick Children, 1731 Bunker Hill Road, Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. Preservation of wing leading edge suction at the plane of symmetry as a factor in wing-fuselage design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larrabee, E. E.

    1975-01-01

    Most fuselage geometries cover a portion of the wing leading edge near the plane of symmetry, and it seems reasonable to expect that a large fraction of the leading edge suction which would be developed by the covered wing at high angles of attack is not developed on the fuselage. This is one of the reasons that the Oswald span efficiency factor for the wing body combination fails to approach the value predicted by lifting line theory for the isolated wing. Some traditional and recent literature on wing-body interference is discussed and high Reynolds number data on wing-body-nacelle drag are reviewed. An exposed central leading edge geometry has been developed for a sailplane configuration. Low Reynolds number tests have not validated the design concept.

  16. Flexible flapping wings with self-organized microwrinkles.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroto; Okada, Hiroyuki; Shimasue, Yosuke; Liu, Hao

    2015-08-01

    Bio-inspired flapping wings with a wrinkled wing membrane were designed and fabricated. The wings consist of carbon fibre-reinforced plastic frames and a polymer film with microscale wrinkles inspired by bird feathers and the corrugations of insect wings. The flexural and tensile stiffness of the wrinkled film can be controlled by modifying the orientations and waveforms of the wrinkles, thereby expanding the design space of flexible wings for micro flapping-wing aerial robots. A self-organization phenomenon was exploited in the fabrication of the microwrinkles such that microscale wrinkles spanning a broad wing area were spontaneously created. The wavy shape of these self-organized wrinkles was used as a mould, and a Parylene film was deposited onto the mould to form a wrinkled wing film. The effect of the waveforms of the wrinkles on the film stiffness was investigated theoretically, computationally and experimentally. Compared with a flat film, the flexural stiffness was increased by two orders of magnitude, and the tensile stiffness was reduced by two orders of magnitude. To demonstrate the effect of the wrinkles on the actual deformation of the flapping wings and the resulting aerodynamic forces, the fabricated wrinkled wings were tested using a tethered electric flapping mechanism. Chordwise unidirectional wrinkles were found to prevent fluttering near the trailing edge and to produce a greater aerodynamic lift compared with a flat wing or a wing with spanwise wrinkles. Our results suggest that the fine stiffness control of the wing film that can be achieved by tuning the microwrinkles can improve the aerodynamic performance of future flapping-wing aerial robots. PMID:26119657

  17. View east, showing Northwest Wing (Wing 5), west wall of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View east, showing Northwest Wing (Wing 5), west wall of the North Wing (Wing 2) and rear elevations of the facade and its flanking wings (Wings 1 and 2) - Hospital for Sick Children, 1731 Bunker Hill Road, Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  18. Upstroke wing flexion and the inertial cost of bat flight

    PubMed Central

    Riskin, Daniel K.; Bergou, Attila; Breuer, Kenneth S.; Swartz, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    Flying vertebrates change the shapes of their wings during the upstroke, thereby decreasing wing surface area and bringing the wings closer to the body than during downstroke. These, and other wing deformations, might reduce the inertial cost of the upstroke compared with what it would be if the wings remained fully extended. However, wing deformations themselves entail energetic costs that could exceed any inertial energy savings. Using a model that incorporates detailed three-dimensional wing kinematics, we estimated the inertial cost of flapping flight for six bat species spanning a 40-fold range of body masses. We estimate that folding and unfolding comprises roughly 44 per cent of the inertial cost, but that the total inertial cost is only approximately 65 per cent of what it would be if the wing remained extended and rigid throughout the wingbeat cycle. Folding and unfolding occurred mostly during the upstroke; hence, our model suggests inertial cost of the upstroke is not less than that of downstroke. The cost of accelerating the metacarpals and phalanges accounted for around 44 per cent of inertial costs, although those elements constitute only 12 per cent of wing weight. This highlights the energetic benefit afforded to bats by the decreased mineralization of the distal wing bones. PMID:22496186

  19. Vortex wake alleviation studies with a variable twist wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holbrook, G. T.; Dunham, D. M.; Greene, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Vortex wake alleviation studies were conducted in a wind tunnel and a water towing tank using a multisegmented wing model which provided controlled and measured variations in span load. Fourteen model configurations are tested at a Reynolds number of one million and a lift coefficient of 0.6 in the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel and the Hydronautics Ship Model Basin water tank at Hydronautics, Inc., Laurel, Md. Detailed measurements of span load and wake velocities at one semispan downstream correlate well with each other, with inviscid predictions of span load and wake roll up, and with peak trailing-wing rolling moments measured in the far wake. Average trailing-wing rolling moments are found to be an unreliable indicator of vortex wake intensity because vortex meander does not scale between test facilities and free-air conditions. A tapered-span-load configuration, which exhibits little or no drag penalty, is shown to offer significant downstream wake alleviation to a small trailing wing. The greater downstream wake alleviation achieved with the addition of spoilers to a flapped-wing configuration is shown to result directly from the high incremental drag and turbulence associated with the spoilers and not from the span load alteration they cause.

  20. Theory of wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C.-H.; Lan, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Wing rock is one type of lateral-directional instabilities at high angles of attack. To predict wing rock characteristics and to design airplanes to avoid wing rock, parameters affecting wing rock characteristics must be known. A new nonlinear aerodynamic model is developed to investigate the main aerodynamic nonlinearities causing wing rock. In the present theory, the Beecham-Titchener asymptotic method is used to derive expressions for the limit-cycle amplitude and frequency of wing rock from nonlinear flight dynamics equations. The resulting expressions are capable of explaining the existence of wing rock for all types of aircraft. Wing rock is developed by negative or weakly positive roll damping, and sustained by nonlinear aerodynamic roll damping. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained.

  1. Investigating the Force Production of Functionally-Graded Flexible Wings in Flapping Wing Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudbhari, Durlav; Erdogan, Malcolm; He, Kai; Bateman, Daniel; Lipkis, Rory; Moored, Keith

    2015-11-01

    Birds, insects and bats oscillate their wings to propel themselves over long distances and to maneuver with unprecedented agility. A key element to achieve their impressive aerodynamic performance is the flexibility of their wings. Numerous studies have shown that homogeneously flexible wings can enhance force production, propulsive efficiency and lift efficiency. Yet, animal wings are not homogenously flexible, but instead have varying material properties. The aim of this study is to characterize the force production and energetics of functionally-graded flexible wings. A partially-flexible wing composed of a rigid section and a flexible section is used as a first-order model of functionally-graded materials. The flexion occurs in the spanwise direction and it is affected by the spanwise flexion ratio, that is, the ratio of the length of the rigid section compared to the total span length. By varying the flexion ratio as well as the material properties of the flexible section, the study aims to examine the force production and energetics of flapping flight with functionally-graded flexible wings. Supported by the Office of Naval Research under Program Director Dr. Bob Brizzolara, MURI grant number N00014-14-1-0533.

  2. 5. VIEW OF SPAN ADJOINING SPAN TO THE NORTH OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF SPAN ADJOINING SPAN TO THE NORTH OF THE VERTICAL LIFT SPAN (IN THE DISTANCE IS THE RECENTLY COMPLETED NEW STATE ROUTE 51 BRIDGE CROSSING THE ILLINOIS RIVER). - Shippingsport Bridge, Spanning Illinois River at State Route 51, La Salle, La Salle County, IL

  3. Effect of Variation of Chord and Span of Ailerons on Rolling and Yawing Moments at Several Angles of Pitch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heald, R H; Strother, D H; Monish, B H

    1931-01-01

    This report presents the results of an extension to higher angles of attack of the investigation of the rolling and yawing moments due to ailerons of various chords and spans on two airfoils having the Clark Y and U. S. A. 27 wings. The measurements were made at various angles of pitch but at zero angle of roll and yaw, the wing chord being set at an angle of +4 degrees to the fuselage axis. In the case of the Clark Y airfoil the measurements have been extended to a pitch angle of 40 degrees, using ailerons of span equal to 67 per cent of the wing semispan and chord equal to 20 and 30 per cent of the wing chord. The work was conducted on wing models of 60-inch span and 10-inch chord.

  4. Flapping of Insectile Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yangyang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Insects use flight muscles attached at the base of the wings to produce impressive wing flapping frequencies. Yet the effects of muscle stiffness on the performance of insect wings remain unclear. Here, we construct an insectile wing model, consisting of two rigid wings connected at their base by an elastic torsional spring and submerged in an oscillatory flow. The wing system is free to rotate and flap. We first explore the extent to which the flyer can withstand roll perturbations, then study its flapping behavior and performance as a function of spring stiffness. We find an optimal range of spring stiffness that results in large flapping amplitudes, high force generation and good storage of elastic energy. We conclude by conjecturing that insects may select and adjust the muscle spring stiffness to achieve desired movement. These findings may have significant implications on the design principles of wings in micro air-vehicles.

  5. Problem of the slotted wing : a communication from the Aerodynamic Institute of the Aachen Technical High School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemperer, W

    1922-01-01

    It is to be expected that the advantageous properties, hitherto discovered in many slotted wing sections, depend very largely on the contour of the slot and the structural details of the wing. It is therefore of interest, aside from measurements on wings of constant cross-section along the span, to measure also wing models in which the structural details have already been given practical consideration.

  6. Supersonic Wave Drag of Sweptback Tapered Wings at Zero Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Kenneth

    1947-01-01

    On the basis of a recently developed theory for sweptback wings at supersonic velocities, equations are derived for the wave drag of sweptback tapered wings with thin symmetrical double-wedge sections at zero lift. Calculations of section wave-drag distributions and wing wave drag are presented for families of tapered plan forms. Distributions of section wave drag along the span of tapered wings are, in general, very similar in shape to those of untapered plan forms. For a given taper ratio and aspect ratio, an appreciable reduction in wing wave-drag coefficient with increased sweepback is noted for the entire range of Mach number considered. For a given sweep and taper ratio, higher aspect ratios reduce the wing wave-drag coefficient at substantially subcritical supersonic Mach numbers. At Mach numbers approaching the critical value, that is, a value equal to the secant of the sweepback angle, the plan forms of low aspect ratio have lower drag coefficients. Calculations for wings of equal root bending stress (and hence different aspect ratio) indicate that tapering the wing reduces the wing wave-drag coefficient at Mach numbers considerably less than the critical value and a decrease of the drag coefficient with taper at Mach numbers near the critical value.

  7. Theoretical study of aerodynamic characteristics of wings having vortex flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of slender wings having separation induced vortex flows are investigated by employing three different computer codes--free vortex sheet, quasi vortex lattice, and suction analogy methods. Their capabilities and limitations are examined, and modifications are discussed. Flat wings of different configurations: arrow, delta, and diamond shapes, as well as cambered delta wings, are studied. The effect of notch ratio on the load distributions and the longitudinal characteristics of a family of arrow and diamond wings is explored. The sectional lift coefficients and the accumulated span loadings are determined for an arrow wing and are seen to be unusual in comparison with the attached flow results. The theoretically predicted results are compared with the existing experimental values.

  8. Computational wing design studies relating to natural laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waggoner, Edgar G.

    1986-01-01

    Two research studies are described which directly relate to the application of natural laminar flow (NLF) technology to transonic transport-type wing planforms. Each involved using state-of-the-art computational methods to design three-dimensional wing contours which generate significant runs of favorable pressure gradients. The first study supported the Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment and involves design of a full-span glove which extends from the leading edge to the spoiler hinge line on the upper surface of an F-14 outer wing panel. A wing was designed computationally for a corporate transport aircraft in the second study. The resulting wing design generated favorable pressure gradients from the leading edge aft to the mid-chord on both upper and lower surfaces at the cruise design point. Detailed descriptions of the computational design approach are presented along with the various constraints imposed on each of the designs.

  9. A possible method for preventing the autorotation of airplane wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrenk, Oskar

    1930-01-01

    At the suggestion of Professor Betz, the following device was tested with the object of reducing the autorotational speed of airplane wings. The model of a normal wing with the Gottigen profile 420, 1 meter span and 0.2 meter chord was provided with a pair of symmetrical slots on the suction side, connected with each other inside the wing. The arrangement of the testing equipment and models are given and the effect of the slots can be seen in the experimental curves that are included.

  10. Chordwise and compressibility corrections to slender-wing theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Harvard; Sluder, Loma

    1952-01-01

    Corrections to slender-wing theory are obtained by assuming a spanwise distribution of loading and determining the chordwise variation which satisfies the appropriate integral equation. Such integral equations are set up in terms of the given vertical induced velocity on the center line or, depending on the type of wing plan form, its average value across the span at a given chord station. The chordwise distribution is then obtained by solving these integral equations. Results are shown for flat-plate rectangular, and triangular wings.

  11. Application of the joined wing to tiltrotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolkovitch, Julian; Wainfan, Barnaby; Ben-Harush, Yitzhak; Johnson, Wayne

    1989-01-01

    A study was made to determine the potential speed improvements and other benefits resulting from the application of the joined wing concept to tiltrotor aircraft. Using the XV-15 as a baseline, the effect of replacing the cantilever wing by a joined-wing pair was studied. The baseline XV-15 cantilever wing has a thickness/chord ratio of 23 percent. It was found that this wing could be replaced by a joined-wing pair of the same span and total area employing airfoils of 12 percent thickness/chord ratio. The joined wing meets the same static strength requirements as the cantilever wing, but increases the limiting Mach Number of the aircraft from M=0.575 to M=0.75, equivalent to an increase of over 100 knots in maximum speed. The joined wing configuration studied is lighter than the cantilever and has approximately 11 percent less wing drag in cruise. Its flutter speed of 245 knots EAS is not high enough to allow the potential Mach number improvement to be attained at low altitude. The flutter speed can be raised either by employing rotors which can be stopped and folded in flight at speeds below 245 knots EAS, or by modifying the airframe to reduce adverse coupling with the rotor dynamics. Several modifications of wing geometry and nacelle mass distribution were investigated, but none produced a flutter speed above 260 knots EAS. It was concluded that additional research is required to achieve a more complete understanding of the mechanism of rotor/wing coupling.

  12. ER-20037 LLNL eternal pathfinder wing spar design study report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This document outlines the results of a design study performed by EDO-FSD on the LLNL Eternal Pathfinder Wing Spar/Fuel Tank. The main focus of the design study was the weight minimization of the composite wall of the mid span spar section of the aircraft. The torque, shear, moment and pressure loading requirements, as well as LLNL`s preliminary drawings, were used to develop a reduced weight mid-span spar design. The design study also encompassed details such as the pressure bulkheads, wing rod connectors, and attachment flanges.

  13. 13. General view of the stringer system, swing span (Span ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. General view of the stringer system, swing span (Span G), showing also the floor beams and anti-sway bracing; looking NNW. (Harms) - Rock Island Arsenal, Rock Island Bridge, Fort Armstrong Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  14. Aerodynamic performance and particle image velocimetery of piezo actuated biomimetic manduca sexta engineered wings towards the design and application of a flapping wing flight vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, Anthony M.

    the wing. Th 60° angle stop wing achieved the largest total stroke angle and generated the most lift for the lowest power consumption of the wings tested. 2. Phase averaged stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) data was collected at eight phases through the flap cycle on the 30°, 45°, and 60° angle stop wings. Wings were mounted transverse and parallel to the interrogating laser sheet, and planar velocity intersections at the wing mid-span, one chord below the wing, were compared to one another to verify data fidelity. A Rankine-Froude actuator disk model was adapted to calculate the approximate vertical thrust generated from the total momentum flux through the flapping semi-disk using the velocity field measurements. Three component stereo u, v, and w-velocity contour measurements confirmed the presence of extensive vortical structures in the vicinity of the wing. The leading edge vortex was successfully tracked through the stroke cycle appearing at approximately 25% span, increasing in circulatory strength and translational velocity down the span toward the tip, and dissipating just after 75% span. Thrust calculations showed the vertically mounted wing more accurately represented the vertical forces when compared to its corresponding force balance measurement than the horizontally mounted wing. The mid-span showed the highest vertical velocity profile below the wing; and hence, was the location responsible for the majority of lift production along the span.

  15. Sectional lift coefficient of a rotating wing at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jieun; Kweon, Jihoon; Choi, Haecheon

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the characteristics of sectional lift force on a rotating wing at low Reynolds number using three-dimensional numerical simulation. Three different types of flat plate wings (fruit-fly, rectangular and triangular wings) are considered but keeping their aspect ratio (wing span/wing chord) the same at 3.74. The wings rotate at a constant angular velocity and the angle of attack is fixed during rotation (5° ~45°). The Reynolds number is 136 based on the wing chord length and the translational velocity at the wing tip, corresponding to that of the flapping fruit-fly wing in hovering flight. An immersed boundary method in a non-inertial reference frame (Kim and Choi, JCP, 2006) is used to simulate the flow. During the first rotation, the sectional lift coefficient decreases from the wing root to the wing tip for all cases. After several rotations, however, the sectional lift coefficient becomes nearly constant except near the wing root and tip at low angles of attack (<=15°), but maintains a similar behavior to that of first rotation at high angle of attack (~45°). Finally, the wing shape does not significantly change the spanwise distribution of sectional lift coefficient. Supported by the NRF Program (2011-0028032).

  16. 6. VIEW OF APPROACH SPAN AND MAIN SPAN OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF APPROACH SPAN AND MAIN SPAN OF THE ACCESS BRIDGE AND INTAKE PIER, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  17. 56. VIEW SOUTH, WEST SIDE AT CANTILEVER SPAN (SPAN 70) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. VIEW SOUTH, WEST SIDE AT CANTILEVER SPAN (SPAN 70) SHOWING FACADE, DOUBLE CROSS BRACING AT COLUMNS, AND CONCRETE BASE - Route 1 Extension, Southbound Viaduct, Spanning Conrail Yards, Wilson Avenue, Delancy Street, & South Street on Routes 1 & 9 Southbound, Newark, Essex County, NJ

  18. View of approach span and movable span, looking southeast from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of approach span and movable span, looking southeast from navy land. Note that navigational channel exists only on north side of movable span. - Naval Supply Annex Stockton, Daggett Road Bridge, Daggett Road traversing Burns Cut Off, Stockton, San Joaquin County, CA

  19. Optimum hovering wing planform.

    PubMed

    Nabawy, Mostafa R A; Crowther, William J

    2016-10-01

    Theoretical analysis is used to identify the optimum wing planform of a flapping/revolving wing in hover. This solution is of interest as a benchmark to which hovering wing geometries driven by broader multidisciplinary evolutionary or engineering constraints can be compared. Furthermore, useful insights into the aerodynamic performance of untwisted hovering wings are delivered. It is shown that profile power is minimised by using an untwisted elliptical planform whereas induced power is minimised by a more highly tapered planform similar to that of a hummingbird. PMID:27329340

  20. Wing Warping and Its Impact on Aerodynamic Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Ben; Jacob, Jamey

    2007-11-01

    Inflatable wings have been demonstrated in many applications such as UAVs, airships, and missile stabilization surfaces. A major concern presented by the use of an inflatable wing has been the lack of traditional roll control surfaces. This leaves the designer with several options in order to have control about the roll axis. Since inflatable wings have a semi-flexible structure, wing warping is the obvious solution to this problem. The current method is to attach servos and control linkages to external surface of the wing that results in variation of profile chamber and angle of attack from leading edge or trailing edge deflection. Designs using internal muscles will also be discussed. This creates a lift differential between the half-spans, resulting in a roll moment. The trailing edge on the other half-span can also be deflected in the opposite direction to increase the roll moment as well as to reduce roll-yaw coupling. Comparisons show that higher L/D ratios are possible than using traditional control surfaces. An additional benefit is the ability to perform symmetric warping to achieve optimum aerodynamic performance. Via warping alone, an arbitrary span can be warped such that it has the same aerodynamic characteristics as an elliptical planform. Comparisons between lifting line theory and test results will be presented.

  1. Force generation and wing deformation characteristics of a flapping-wing micro air vehicle 'DelFly II' in hovering flight.

    PubMed

    Percin, M; van Oudheusden, B W; de Croon, G C H E; Remes, B

    2016-06-01

    The study investigates the aerodynamic performance and the relation between wing deformation and unsteady force generation of a flapping-wing micro air vehicle in hovering flight configuration. Different experiments were performed where fluid forces were acquired with a force sensor, while the three-dimensional wing deformation was measured with a stereo-vision system. In these measurements, time-resolved power consumption and flapping-wing kinematics were also obtained under both in-air and in-vacuum conditions. Comparison of the results for different flapping frequencies reveals different wing kinematics and deformation characteristics. The high flapping frequency case produces higher forces throughout the complete flapping cycle. Moreover, a phase difference occurs in the variation of the forces, such that the low flapping frequency case precedes the high frequency case. A similar phase lag is observed in the temporal evolution of the wing deformation characteristics, suggesting that there is a direct link between the two phenomena. A considerable camber formation occurs during stroke reversals, which is mainly determined by the stiffener orientation. The wing with the thinner surface membrane displays very similar characteristics to the baseline wing, which implies the dominance of the stiffeners in terms of providing rigidity to the wing. Wing span has a significant effect on the aerodynamic efficiency such that increasing the span length by 4 cm results in a 6% enhancement in the cycle-averaged X-force to power consumption ratio compared to the standard DelFly II wings with a span length of 28 cm. PMID:27194392

  2. The Lift Distribution of Swept-Back Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissinger, J.

    1947-01-01

    Two procedures for calculating the lift distribution along the span are given in which a better account is taken of the distribution of circulation over te area than in the Prandtl lifting-line theory. The methods are also applicable to wing sweepback. Calculated results for the two methods were in agreement.

  3. 15. MERRITT PARKWAY UNDER SPORT HILL ROAD, FRAME AND WING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. MERRITT PARKWAY UNDER SPORT HILL ROAD, FRAME AND WING WALL DETAILS. Photocopy of drawing (original in Connecticut Department of Transportation, Wethersfield); Connecticut State Highway Department, Approved February 1936. - Merritt Parkway, Bridge No. 744, Spanning Merritt Parkway at Route 59, Fairfield, Fairfield County, CT

  4. Computational Investigation of a Semi-Span Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathias, Donovan, L.; Roth, Karlin R.; Ross, James C.; Rogers, Stuart E.; Cummings, Russell M.; Olson, Lawrence E. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The current study computationally examines one of the principle three-dimensional features of the flow over a high-lift system, the flow associated with a flap edge. Structured, overset grids were used in conjunction with an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver to compute the flow over a two-element high-lift configuration. The computations were run in a fully turbulent mode using the one-equation Baldwin-Barth model. Specific interest was given to the details of the flow in the vicinity of the flap edge, so the geometry was simplified to isolate this region. The geometry consisted of an unswept wing, which spanned a wind tunnel test section, equipped with a single element flap. Two flap configurations were computed; a full-span and a half-span Fowler flap. The chord based Reynolds number was 3.7 million for all cases. The results for the full-span flap agreed with two-dimensional experimental results and verified the method. Grid topologies and related issues for the half-span flap geometry are discussed. Results of the half-span flap case are presented with emphasis on the flow features associated with the flap edge.

  5. Wing-Wake Interactions between Ipsilateral Wings in Dragonfly Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Haibo; Liang, Zongxian

    2009-11-01

    Bilateral and ipsilateral wing-wing interactions can be commonly observed in insect flights. As a representative example of ipsilateral wing-wing interaction, dragonflies in flight have been widely studied. An important fact is that the flow over their hindwings is affected by the presence of the forewings. Wake capture and phase-change play very important role on aerodynamic performance of the hindwings We present a direct numerical simulation of a modeled dragonfly (Aeshna juncea) in slow flight as studied in Azuma et al (JEB 1985). Realistic morphologies of wing, body, and kinematics are used for maximum including wing and body features of a dragonfly. This work aims to study the relations between wake-topology and aerodynamic performance due to wing-wing and wing-wake interactions of dragonfly ipsilateral wings. DNS results are also compared with Local Momentum Theory (Azuma et al).

  6. Aerodynamic characteristics of wing-body configuration with two advanced general aviation airfoil sections and simple flap systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, H. L., Jr.; Paulson, J. W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics of a general aviation wing equipped with NACA 65 sub 2-415, NASA GA(W)-1, and NASA GA(PC)-1 airfoil sections were examined. The NASA GA(W)-1 wing was equipped with plain, split, and slotted partial- and full-span flaps and ailerons. The NASA GA(PC)-1 wing was equipped with plain, partial- and full-span flaps. Experimental chordwise static-pressure distribution and wake drag measurements were obtained for the NASA GA(PC)-1 wing at the 22.5-percent spanwise station. Comparisons were made between the three wing configurations to evaluate the wing performance, stall, and maximum lift capabilities. The results of this investigation indicated that the NASA GA(W)-1 wing had a higher maximum lift capability and almost equivalent drag values compared with both the NACA 65 sub 2-415 and NASA GA(PC)-1 wings. The NASA GA(W)-1 had a maximum lift coefficient of 1.32 with 0 deg flap deflection, and 1.78 with 41.6 deg deflection of the partial-span slotted flap. The effectiveness of the NASA GA(W)-1 plain and slotted ailerons with differential deflections were equivalent. The NASA GA(PC)-1 wing with full-span flaps deflected 0 deg for the design climb configuration showed improved lift and drag performance over the cruise flap setting of -10 deg.

  7. A theory for lateral wing-tip blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavella, D.; Roberts, L.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of lateral blowing consists in utilizing thin jets of air, which are ejected in the spanwise direction from slots at the tips of straight and swept wings, or along the leading edges of delta wings, to generate aerodynamic forces without the assistance of deflecting solid surfaces. For weak intensities of blowing the so-generated forces could be used for roll and lateral control of aircraft. In this work a theory for this concept as applied to straight wings is presented, revealing the analytical relationship between blowing and aerodynamic forces. The approach is based on perturbing the span of an elliptically loaded wing. Scaling laws involving blowing intensity, aspect ratio, and angle of attack are derived and compared with experiments. It is concluded that this concept has potential as a novel roll and lateral control device.

  8. Unsteady-Pressure and Dynamic-Deflection Measurements on an Aeroelastic Supercritical Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, David A.; Sandford, Maynard C.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.

    1991-01-01

    Transonic steady and unsteady pressure tests were conducted on a large elastic wing. The wing has a supercritical airfoil, a full span aspect ratio of 10.3, a leading edge sweepback angle of 28.8 degrees, and two inboard and one outboard trailing edge control surfaces. Only the outboard control surface was deflected statically and dynamically to generate steady and unsteady flow over the wing. The unsteady surface pressure and dynamic deflection measurements of this elastic wing are presented to permit correlations of the experimental data with theoretical predictions.

  9. Application of a panel method to wake-vortex/wing interaction and comparison with experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brian E.; Ross, James C.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of the Vortex Separation AEROdynamics (VSAERO) program to calculate aerodynamic loads on wings due to interaction with free vortices was studied. The loads were calculated for various positions of a downstream following wing relative to an upstream vortex-generating wing. Calculated vortex-induced span loads, rolling-moment coefficients, and lift coefficients on the following wing were compared with experimental results of McMillan et al. and El-Ramly et al. Comparisons of calculated and experimental vortex tangential velocities were also made.

  10. Flying wings / flying fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper has documented the historical relationships between various classes of all lifting vehicles, which includes the flying wing, all wing, tailless, lifting body, and lifting fuselage. The diversity in vehicle focus was to ensure that all vehicle types that map have contributed to or been influenced by the development of the classical flying wing concept was investigated. The paper has provided context and perspective for present and future aircraft design studies that may employ the all lifting vehicle concept. The paper also demonstrated the benefit of developing an understanding of the past in order to obtain the required knowledge to create future concepts with significantly improved aerodynamic performance.

  11. Slotted Aircraft Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassberg, John C. (Inventor); Gea, Lie-Mine (Inventor); McLean, James D. (Inventor); Witowski, David P. (Inventor); Krist, Steven E. (Inventor); Campbell, Richard L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An aircraft wing includes a leading airfoil element and a trailing airfoil element. At least one slot is defined by the wing during at least one transonic condition of the wing. The slot may either extend spanwise along only a portion of the wingspan, or it may extend spanwise along the entire wingspan. In either case, the slot allows a portion of the air flowing along the lower surface of the leading airfoil element to split and flow over the upper surface of the trailing airfoil element so as to achieve a performance improvement in the transonic condition.

  12. Pressure Distribution Over a Thick, Tapered and Twisted Monoplane Wing Model-NACA 81-J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzinger, Carl J

    1932-01-01

    This reports presents the results of pressure distribution tests on a thick, tapered and twisted monoplane wing model. The investigation was conducted for the purpose of obtaining data on the aerodynamic characteristics of the new wing and to provide additional information suitable for use in the design of tapered cantilever wings. The tests included angles of attack up to 90 degrees. The span loading over the wing was approximately of elliptical shape, which gave rise to relatively small bending moments about the root. The angle of zero lift for all sections along the span varied only within plus or minus 0.4 degree of the angle of zero lift for the whole wing, resulting in small leading edge loads for the high-speed condition of flight. The results also add to the available information for the study of large angles of attack.

  13. Aerodynamic characteristics of a propulsive wing-canard concept at STOL speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, V. R.

    1985-01-01

    A full span model of a wing/canard concept representing a fighter configuration has been tested at STOL conditions in the NASA Langley 4 x 7 meter tunnel. The results of this test are presented, and comparisons are made to previous data of the same configuration tested as a semispan model. The potential of the propulsive wing/canard to develop very high lift coefficients was investigated with several nozzle spans (nozzle aspect ratios). Although longitudinal trim was not accomplished with the blowing distributions and configurations tested, the propulsive wing/canard appears to offer an approach to managing the large negative pitching moments associated with trailing edge flap blowing. Also presented are data showing the effects of large flap deflections and relative wing/canard positions. Presented in the appendix to the report are limited lateral-directional and ground effects data, as well as wing downwash measurements.

  14. Exhaust Plume Effects on Sonic Boom for a Delta Wing and a Swept Wing-Body Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Lake, Troy

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic travel is not allowed over populated areas due to the disturbance caused by the sonic boom. Research has been performed on sonic boom reduction and has included the contribution of the exhaust nozzle plume. Plume effect on sonic boom has progressed from the study of isolated nozzles to a study with four exhaust plumes integrated with a wing-body vehicle. This report provides a baseline analysis of the generic wing-body vehicle to demonstrate the effect of the nozzle exhaust on the near-field pressure profile. Reductions occurred in the peak-to-peak magnitude of the pressure profile for a swept wing-body vehicle. The exhaust plumes also had a favorable effect as the nozzles were moved outward along the wing-span.

  15. Computational Optimization of a Natural Laminar Flow Experimental Wing Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartshom, Fletcher

    2012-01-01

    Computational optimization of a natural laminar flow experimental wing glove that is mounted on a business jet is presented and discussed. The process of designing a laminar flow wing glove starts with creating a two-dimensional optimized airfoil and then lofting it into a three-dimensional wing glove section. The airfoil design process does not consider the three dimensional flow effects such as cross flow due wing sweep as well as engine and body interference. Therefore, once an initial glove geometry is created from the airfoil, the three dimensional wing glove has to be optimized to ensure that the desired extent of laminar flow is maintained over the entire glove. TRANAIR, a non-linear full potential solver with a coupled boundary layer code was used as the main tool in the design and optimization process of the three-dimensional glove shape. The optimization process uses the Class-Shape-Transformation method to perturb the geometry with geometric constraints that allow for a 2-in clearance from the main wing. The three-dimensional glove shape was optimized with the objective of having a spanwise uniform pressure distribution that matches the optimized two-dimensional pressure distribution as closely as possible. Results show that with the appropriate inputs, the optimizer is able to match the two dimensional pressure distributions practically across the entire span of the wing glove. This allows for the experiment to have a much higher probability of having a large extent of natural laminar flow in flight.

  16. Accelerated development and flight evaluation of active controls concepts for subsonic transport aircraft. Volume 1: Load alleviation/extended span development and flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    Active wing load alleviation to extend the wing span by 5.8 percent, giving a 3 percent reduction in cruise drag is covered. The active wing load alleviation used symmetric motions of the outboard ailerons for maneuver load control (MLC) and elastic mode suppression (EMS), and stabilizer motions for gust load alleviation (GLA). Slow maneuvers verified the MLC, and open and closed-loop flight frequency response tests verified the aircraft dynamic response to symmetric aileron and stabilizer drives as well as the active system performance. Flight tests in turbulence verified the effectiveness of the active controls in reducing gust-induced wing loads. It is concluded that active wing load alleviation/extended span is proven in the L-1011 and is ready for application to airline service; it is a very practical way to obtain the increased efficiency of a higher aspect ratio wing with minimum structural impact.

  17. Ground and Flight Evaluation of a Small-Scale Inflatable-Winged Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, James E.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Thornton, Stephen V.; Vogus, Shannon; Frackowiak, Tony; Mello, Joe; Norton, Brook; Bauer, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A small-scale, instrumented research aircraft was flown to investigate the night characteristics of innersole wings. Ground tests measured the static structural characteristics of the wing at different inflation pressures, and these results compared favorably with analytical predictions. A research-quality instrumentation system was assembled, largely from commercial off-the-shelf components, and installed in the aircraft. Initial flight operations were conducted with a conventional rigid wing having the same dimensions as the inflatable wing. Subsequent flights were conducted with the inflatable wing. Research maneuvers were executed to identify the trim, aerodynamic performance, and longitudinal stability and control characteristics of the vehicle in its different wing configurations. For the angle-of-attack range spanned in this flight program, measured flight data demonstrated that the rigid wing was an effective simulator of the lift-generating capability of the inflatable wing. In-flight inflation of the wing was demonstrated in three flight operations, and measured flight data illustrated the dynamic characteristics during wing inflation and transition to controlled lifting flight. Wing inflation was rapid and the vehicle dynamics during inflation and transition were benign. The resulting angles of attack and of sideslip ere small, and the dynamic response was limited to roll and heave motions.

  18. Wing pressure distributions from subsonic tests of a high-wing transport model. [in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Zachary T.; Gentry, Garl L., Jr.; Takallu, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted on a generic, high-wing transport model in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. This report contains pressure data that document effects of various model configurations and free-stream conditions on wing pressure distributions. The untwisted wing incorporated a full-span, leading-edge Krueger flap and a part-span, double-slotted trailing-edge flap system. The trailing-edge flap was tested at four different deflection angles (20 deg, 30 deg, 40 deg, and 60 deg). Four wing configurations were tested: cruise, flaps only, Krueger flap only, and high lift (Krueger flap and flaps deployed). Tests were conducted at free-stream dynamic pressures of 20 psf to 60 psf with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 1.22 x 10(exp 6) to 2.11 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers of 0.12 to 0.20. The angles of attack presented range from 0 deg to 20 deg and were determined by wing configuration. The angle of sideslip ranged from minus 20 deg to 20 deg. In general, pressure distributions were relatively insensitive to free-stream speed with exceptions primarily at high angles of attack or high flap deflections. Increasing trailing-edge Krueger flap significantly reduced peak suction pressures and steep gradients on the wing at high angles of attack. Installation of the empennage had no effect on wing pressure distributions. Unpowered engine nacelles reduced suction pressures on the wing and the flaps.

  19. Analysis of iced wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Chen, H. H.; Kaups, K.; Schimke, S.; Shin, J.

    1992-01-01

    A method for computing ice shapes along the leading edge of a wing and a method for predicting its aerodynamic performance degradation due to icing is described. Ice shapes are computed using an extension of the LEWICE code which was developed for airfoils. The aerodynamic properties of the iced wing are determined with an interactive scheme in which the solutions of the inviscid flow equations are obtained from a panel method and the solutions of the viscous flow equations are obtained from an inverse three-dimensional finite-difference boundary-layer method. A new interaction law is used to couple the inviscid and viscous flow solutions. The application of the LEWICE wing code to the calculation of ice shapes on a MS-317 swept wing shows good agreement with measurements. The interactive boundary-layer method is applied to a tapered ice wing in order to study the effect of icing on the aerodynamic properties of the wing at several angles of attack.

  20. Wind tunnel research concerning lateral control devices, particularly at high angles of attack VII : Handley Page tip and full-span slots with ailerons and spoilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weick, Fred E; Wenzinger, Carl J

    1933-01-01

    Tests were made with ordinary ailerons and different sizes of spoilers on rectangular Clark Y wing models with Handley Page tip and full span slots. The tests showed the effect of the control devices on the general performance of the wings as well as on the lateral control and lateral stability characteristics.

  1. Development of the NTF-117S Semi-Span Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, Keith C.

    2010-01-01

    A new high-capacity semi-span force and moment balance has recently been developed for use at the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. This new semi-span balance provides the NTF a new measurement capability that will support testing of semi-span test models at transonic high-lift testing regimes. Future testing utilizing this new balance capability will include active circulation control and propulsion simulation testing of semi-span transonic wing models. The NTF has recently implemented a new highpressure air delivery station that will provide both high and low mass flow pressure lines that are routed out to the semi-span models via a set high/low pressure bellows that are indirectly linked to the metric end of the NTF-117S balance. A new check-load stand is currently being developed to provide the NTF with an in-house capability that will allow for performing check-loads on the NTF-117S balance in order to determine the pressure tare affects on the overall performance of the balance. An experimental design is being developed that will allow for experimentally assessing the static pressure tare affects on the balance performance.

  2. Sonic-box method employing local Mach number for oscillating wings with thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruo, S. Y.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program was developed to account approximately for the effects of finite wing thickness in the transonic potential flow over an oscillating wing of finite span. The program is based on the original sonic-box program for planar wing which was previously extended to include the effects of the swept trailing edge and the thickness of the wing. Account for the nonuniform flow caused by finite thickness is made by application of the local linearization concept. The thickness effect, expressed in terms of the local Mach number, is included in the basic solution to replace the coordinate transformation method used in the earlier work. Calculations were made for a delta wing and a rectangular wing performing plunge and pitch oscillations, and the results were compared with those obtained from other methods. An input quide and a complete listing of the computer code are presented.

  3. The Aerodynamics of Deforming Wings at Low Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Albert

    responsive to flexibility satisfying an inverse proportionality to stiffness. In hover, an effective pitch angle can be defined in a flexible wing that accounts for deflection which shifts results toward trend lines of rigid wings. Three-dimensional simulations examining the effects of two distinct deformation modes undergoing prescribed deformation associated with root and tip deflection demonstrated a greater aerodynamic response to tip deflection in hover. Efficiency gains in flexion wings over rigid wing counterpart were shown to be dependent on Reynolds number with efficiency in both modes increasing with increased Reynolds number. Additionally, while the leading-edge vortex axis proved insensitive to deformation, the shape and orientation of the LEV core is modified. Experiments on three-dimensional dynamically-scaled fruit fly wings with passive deformation operating in the bursting limit Reynolds number regime revealed enhanced leading-edge vortex bursting with tip deflection promoting greater LEV core flow deceleration in stroke. Experimental studies on rotary wings highlights a universal formation time of the leading-edge vortex independent of Reynolds number, acceleration profile and aspect ratio. Efforts to replicate LEV bursting phenomena of higher aspect ratio wings in a unity aspect ratio wing such that LEV growth is no limited by span but by the LEV traversing the chord revealed a flow regime of oscillatory lift generation reminiscent of behavior exhibited in translating wings that also maintains magnitude peak to peak.

  4. Effect of 3D stall-cells on the pressure distribution of a laminar NACA64-418 wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragni, Daniele; Ferreira, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    A 3D stall-cell flow-field has been studied in a 4.8 aspect-ratio wing obtained by linear extrusion of a laminar NACA64-418 airfoil profile. The span-wise change in the velocity and pressure distribution along the wing has been quantified with respect to the development of cellular structures from 8° to 20° angle of attack. Oil-flow visualizations help localizing the regular cellular pattern in function of the angle of attack. Multi-plane stereoscopic PIV measurements obtained by traversing the entire setup along the wing span show that the flow separation is not span-wise uniform. The combination of different stereoscopic fields into a 3D volume of velocity data allows studying the global effect of the stall-cell pattern on the wing flow. Integration of the experimentally computed pressure gradient from the Navier-Stokes equation is employed to compute the span-wise distribution of the mean surface pressure. Comparison of the results with the ones obtained from pressure taps installed in the wing evidences a span-wise periodic loading on the wing. The periodic loading has maxima confined in the stream-wise direction between the location of the highest airfoil curvature and the one of the airfoil flow separation. Estimation of the periodic loading is found within 2-6 % of the sectional wing lift.

  5. The Interference Effects of a Body on the Spanwise Load Distributions of Two 45 Degree Sweptback Wings of Aspect Ratio 8.02 from Low-Speed Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martina, Albert P.

    1956-01-01

    Tests of two wing-body combinations have been conducted in the Langley 19-foot pressure tunnel at a Reynolds number of 4 x 10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.19 to determine the effects of the bodies on the wing span load distributions. The wings had 45 degrees sweepback of the quarter-chord line, aspect ratio 8.02, taper ratio 0.45, and incorporated 12-percent-thick airfoil sections streamwise. One wing was untwisted and uncambered whereas the second wing incorporated both twist and camber. Identical bodies of revolution, of 10:1 fineness ratio, having diameter-to-span ratios of 0.10, were mounted in mid-high-wing arrangements. The effects of wind incidence, wing fences, and flap deflection were determined for the plane uncambered wing. The addition of the body to the plane wing increased the exposed wing loading at a given lift coefficient as much as 10 percent with the body at 0 degrees incidence and 4 percent at 4 degrees incidence. The bending-moment coefficients at the wing-body juncture were increased about 2 percent with the body at 0 degrees incidence, whereas the increases were as much as 10 percent with the body at 4 degrees incidence. The spanwise load distributions due to the body on the plane wing as calculated by using a swept-wing method employing 19 spanwise lifting elements and control points generally showed satisfactory agreement with experiment. The spanwise load distributions due to body on the flapped plane wing and on the twisted and cambered wing were dissimilar to those obtained on the plane wing. Neither of the methods of calculation which were employed yielded distributions that agreed consistently with experiment for either the flapped plane wing or the twisted and cambered wing.

  6. Experimental wing and canard jet-flap aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, D. B.; Durston, D. A.; Stewart, V. R.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of upper surface blowing on the aerodynamics of a 1/2-span wing/body/canard configuration are shown. The results expand a data base that is limited at high subsonic Mach numbers (M = 0.6-0.9), data that are needed if computational techniques are to be developed for the complex flowfields generated by jet blowing. At lift coefficients greater than about 1.0, the thrust removed drag coefficient was lower with jet blowing than without jet blowing. This favorable effect increased with increasing jet blowing coefficient, and, for a fixed coefficient, simultaneous wing/canard jet blowing was slightly more effective than blowing either surface alone.

  7. Nonplanar wing load-line and slender wing theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, J.

    1977-01-01

    Nonplanar load line, slender wing, elliptic wing, and infinite aspect ratio limit loading theories are developed. These are quasi two dimensional theories but satisfy wing boundary conditions at all points along the nonplanar spanwise extent of the wing. These methods are applicable for generalized configurations such as the laterally nonplanar wing, multiple nonplanar wings, or wing with multiple winglets of arbitrary shape. Two dimensional theory infers simplicity which is practical when analyzing complicated configurations. The lateral spanwise distribution of angle of attack can be that due to winglet or control surface deflection, wing twist, or induced angles due to multiwings, multiwinglets, ground, walls, jet or fuselage. In quasi two dimensional theory the induced angles due to these extra conditions are likewise determined for two dimensional flow. Equations are developed for the normal to surface induced velocity due to a nonplanar trailing vorticity distribution. Application examples are made using these methods.

  8. Effect of Aspect Ratio on the Low-Speed Lateral Control Characteristics of Untapered Low-Aspect-Ratio Wings Equipped with Flap and with Retractable Ailerons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischel, Jack; Naeseth, Rodger L; Hagerman, John R; O'Hare, William M

    1952-01-01

    A low-speed wind-tunnel investigation was made to determine the lateral control characteristics of a series of untapered low-aspect-ratio wings. Sealed flap ailerons of various spans and spanwise locations were investigated on unswept wings of aspect ratios 1.13, 1.13, 4.13, and 6.13; and various projections of 0.60-semispan retractable ailerons were investigated on the unsweptback wings of aspect ratios 1.13, 2.13, and 4.13 and on a 45 degree sweptback wing. The retractable ailerons investigated on the unswept wings spanned the outboard stations of each wing; whereas the plain and stepped retractable ailerons investigated on the sweptback wing were located at various spanwise stations. Design charts based on experimental results are presented for estimating the flap aileron effectiveness for low-aspect-ratio, untapered, unswept.

  9. Wind-tunnel investigation of aerodynamic characteristics and wing pressure distributions of an airplane with variable-sweep wings modified for laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallissy, James B.; Phillips, Pamela S.

    1989-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and wing pressure distributions of a variable wing sweep aircraft having wing panels that are modified to promote laminar flow. The modified wing section shapes were incorporated over most of the exposed outer wing panel span and were obtained by extending the leading edge and adding thickness to the existing wing upper surface forward of 60 percent chord. Two different wing configurations, one each for Mach numbers 0.7 and 0.8, were tested on the model simultaneously, with one wing configuration on the left side and the other on the right. The tests were conducted at Mach numbers 0.20 to 0.90 for wing sweep angles of 20, 25, 30, and 35 degrees. Longitudinal, lateral and directional aerodynamic characteristics of the modified and baseline configurations, and selected pressure distributions for the modified configurations, are presented in graphical form without analysis. A tabulation of the pressure data for the modified configuration is available as microfiche.

  10. 4D metrology of flapping-wing micro air vehicle based on fringe projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qican; Huang, Lei; Chin, Yao-Wei; Keong, Lau-Gih; Asundi, Anand

    2013-06-01

    Inspired by dominant flight of the natural flyers and driven by civilian and military purposes, micro air vehicle (MAV) has been developed so far by passive wing control but still pales in aerodynamic performance. Better understanding of flapping wing flight mechanism is eager to improve MAV's flight performance. In this paper, a simple and effective 4D metrology technique to measure full-field deformation of flapping membrane wing is presented. Based on fringe projection and 3D Fourier analysis, the fast and complex dynamic deformation, including wing rotation and wing stroke, of a flapping wing during its flight can be accurately reconstructed from the deformed fringe patterns recorded by a highspeed camera. An experiment was carried on a flapping-wing MAV with 5-cm span membrane wing beating at 30 Hz, and the results show that this method is effective and will be useful to the aerodynamicist or micro aircraft designer for visualizing high-speed complex wing deformation and consequently aid the design of flapping wing mechanism to enhanced aerodynamic performance.

  11. A comparison of several tapered wings designed to avoid tip stalling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Raymond F

    1939-01-01

    Optimum proportions of tapered wings were investigated by a method that involved a comparison of wings designed to be aerodynamically equal. The conditions of aerodynamic equality were equality in stalling speed, in induced drag at a low speed, and in the total drag at cruising speed. After the wings were adjusted to aerodynamic equivalence, the weights of the wings were calculated as a convenient method of indicating the optimum wing. The aerodynamic characteristics were calculated from wing theory and test data for the airfoil sections. Various combinations of washout, camber increase in the airfoil sections from the center to the tips, and sharp leading edges at the center were used to bring about the desired equivalence of maximum lift and center-stalling characteristics. In the calculation of the weights of the wings, a simple type of spar structure was assumed that permitted an integration across the span to determine the web and the flange weights. The covering and the remaining weight were taken in proportion to the wing area. The total weights showed the wings with camber and washout to have the lowest weights and indicated the minimum for wings with a taper ratio between 1/2 and 1/3.

  12. Overview of the ARPA/WL Smart Structures and Materials Development-Smart Wing contract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudva, Jayanth N.; Jardine, A. Peter; Martin, Christopher A.; Appa, Kari

    1996-05-01

    While the concept of an adaptive aircraft wing, i.e., a wing whose shape parameters such as camber, wing twist, and thickness can be varied to optimize the wing shape for various flight conditions, has been extensively studied, the complexity and weight penalty of the actuation mechanisms have precluded their practical implementation. Recent development of sensors and actuators using smart materials could potentially alleviate the shortcomings of prior designs, paving the way for a practical, `smart' adaptive wing which responds to changes in flight and environmental conditions by modifying its shape to provide optimal performance. This paper presents a summary of recent work done on adaptive wing designs under an on-going ARPA/WL contract entitled `Smart Structures and Materials Development--Smart Wing.' Specifically, the design, development and planned wind tunnel testing of a 16% model representative of a fighter aircraft wing and incorporating the following features, are discussed: (1) a composite wing torque box whose span-wise twist can be varied by activating built-in shape memory alloy (SMA) torque tubes to provide increased lift and enhanced maneuverability at multiple flight conditions, (2) trailing edge control surfaces deployed using composite SMA actuators to provide smooth, hingeless aerodynamic surfaces, and (3) a suite of fiber optic sensors integrated into the wing skin which provide real-time strain and pressure data to a feedback control system.

  13. The characterization of tandem and corrugated wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yongsheng; Broering, Timothy; Hord, Kyle; Prater, Russell

    2014-02-01

    Dragonfly wings have two distinct features: a tandem configuration and wing corrugation. Both features have been extensively studied with the aim to understand the superior flight performance of dragonflies. In this paper we review recent development of tandem and corrugated wing aerodynamics. With regards to the tandem configuration, this review will focus on wing/wing and wing/vortex interactions at different flapping modes and wing spacing. In addition, the aerodynamics of tandem wings under gusty conditions will be reviewed and compared with isolated wings to demonstrate the gust resistance characteristics of flapping wings. Regarding corrugated wings, we review their structural and aerodynamic characteristics.

  14. Aileron and Krueger nose flap effectiveness measured on an oblique wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, E. J.; Lovette, G. H.

    1977-01-01

    The effects that deflection of conventional ailerons have on the lateral/directional characteristics of an oblique wing mounted on top of a body of revolution were measured. The wing had an aspect ratio of 6 (based on the unswept wing span) and was tested at various sweep angles ranging from 0 deg to 60 deg. Krueger nose flaps mounted on drooped-nose flaps were investigated on the downstream wing panel (for sweep angles of 45 deg and 60 deg) in an attempt to create more symmetrical spanwise wing stalling at high lift coefficients. The tests were conducted over a Mach number range of 0.25 to 1.4 and an angle-of-attack range from -3 deg to 28 deg. With the oblique wing in the swept position, considerable difference in the aileron effectiveness was measured for positive or negative differential aileron deflections. With the wing swept 45 deg at a Mach number of 0.8 and above, an extension of the span of the Krueger nose flaps on the downstream wing panel did not improve the linearity of the pitching-, rolling-, and yawing-moment curves.

  15. Smart wing wind tunnel test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Lewis B.; Martin, Christopher A.; Appa, Kari; Kudva, Jayanth N.; West, Mark N.

    1997-05-01

    The use of smart materials technologies can provide unique capabilities in improving aircraft aerodynamic performance. Northrop Grumman built and tested a 16% scale semi-span wind tunnel model of the F/A-18 E/F for the on-going DARPA/WL Smart Materials and Structures-Smart Wing Program. Aerodynamic performance gains to be validated included increase in the lift to drag ratio, increased pitching moment (Cm), increased rolling moment (Cl) and improved pressure distribution. These performance gains were obtained using hingeless, contoured trailing edge control surfaces with embedded shape memory alloy (SMA) wires and spanwise wing twist via a SMA torque tube and are compared to a conventional wind tunnel model with hinged control surfaces. This paper presents an overview of the results from the first wind tunnel test performed at the NASA Langley's 16 ft Transonic Dynamic Tunnel. Among the benefits demonstrated are 8 - 12% increase in rolling moment due to wing twist, a 10 - 15% increase in rolling moment due to contoured aileron, and approximately 8% increase in lift due to contoured flap, and improved pressure distribution due to trailing edge control surface contouring.

  16. Theory of wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C. H.; Lan, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    A theory is developed for predicting wing rock characteristics. From available data, it can be concluded that wing rock is triggered by flow asymmetries, developed by negative or weakly positive roll damping, and sustained by nonlinear aerodynamic roll damping. A new nonlinear aerodynamic model that includes all essential aerodynamic nonlinearities is developed. The Beecham-Titchener method is applied to obtain approximate analytic solutions for the amplitude and frequency of the limit cycle based on the three degree-of-freedom equations of motion. An iterative scheme is developed to calculate the average aerodynamic derivatives and dynamic characteristics at limit cycle conditions. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained.

  17. Status of wing flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussner, H G

    1936-01-01

    This report presents a survey of previous theoretical and experimental investigations on wing flutter covering thirteen cases of flutter observed on airplanes. The direct cause of flutter is, in the majority of cases, attributable to (mass-) unbalanced ailerons. Under the conservative assumption that the flutter with the phase angle most favorable for excitation occurs only in two degrees of freedom, the lowest critical speed can be estimated from the data obtained on the oscillation bench. Corrective measures for increasing the critical speed and for definite avoidance of wing flutter, are discussed.

  18. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2010-01-01

    Of all the types of drag, induced drag is associated with the creation and generation of lift over wings. Induced drag is directly driven by the span load that the aircraft is flying at. The tools by which to calculate and predict induced drag we use were created by Ludwig Prandtl in 1903. Within a decade after Prandtl created a tool for calculating induced drag, Prandtl and his students had optimized the problem to solve the minimum induced drag for a wing of a given span, formalized and written about in 1920. This solution is quoted in textbooks extensively today. Prandtl did not stop with this first solution, and came to a dramatically different solution in 1932. Subsequent development of this 1932 solution solves several aeronautics design difficulties simultaneously, including maximum performance, minimum structure, minimum drag loss due to control input, and solution to adverse yaw without a vertical tail. This presentation lists that solution by Prandtl, and the refinements by Horten, Jones, Kline, Viswanathan, and Whitcomb

  19. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2011-01-01

    Of all the types of drag, induced drag is associated with the creation and generation of lift over wings. Induced drag is directly driven by the span load that the aircraft is flying at. The tools by which to calculate and predict induced drag we use were created by Ludwig Prandtl in 1903. Within a decade after Prandtl created a tool for calculating induced drag, Prandtl and his students had optimized the problem to solve the minimum induced drag for a wing of a given span, formalized and written about in 1920. This solution is quoted in textbooks extensively today. Prandtl did not stop with this first solution, and came to a dramatically different solution in 1932. Subsequent development of this 1932 solution solves several aeronautics design difficulties simultaneously, including maximum performance, minimum structure, minimum drag loss due to control input, and solution to adverse yaw without a vertical tail. This presentation lists that solution by Prandtl, and the refinements by Horten, Jones, Kline, Viswanathan, and Whitcomb.

  20. Technical and Economic Assessment of Span-Distributed Loading Cargo Aircraft Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, W. M.; Muehlbauer, J. C.; Eudaily, R. R.; Farmer, B. T.; Monrath, J. F.; Thompson, S. G.

    1976-01-01

    A 700,000 kg (1,540,000-lb) aircraft with a cruise Mach number of 0.75 was found to be optimum for the specified mission parameters of a 272 155-kg (600,000-lb) payload, a 5560-km (3000-n.mi.) range, and an annual productivity of 113 billion revenue-ton km (67 billion revenue-ton n. mi.). The optimum 1990 technology level spanloader aircraft exhibited the minimum 15-year life-cycle costs, direct operating costs, and fuel consumption of all candidate versions. Parametric variations of wing sweep angle, thickness ratio, rows of cargo, and cargo density were investigated. The optimum aircraft had two parallel rows of 2.44 x 2.44-m (8 x 8-ft) containerized cargo with a density of 160 kg/cu m (10 lb/ft 3) carried throughout the entire 101-m (331-ft) span of the constant chord, 22-percent thick, supercritical wing. Additional containers or outsized equipment were carried in the 24.4-m (80-ft) long fuselage compartment preceding the wing. Six 284,000-N (64,000-lb) thrust engines were mounted beneath the 0.7-rad (40-deg) swept wing. Flight control was provided by a 36.6-m (120-ft) span canard surface mounted atop the forward fuselage, by rudders on the wingtip verticals and by outboard wing flaperons.

  1. Utilization of Optimization for Design of Morphing Wing Structures for Enhanced Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detrick, Matthew Scott

    Conventional aircraft control surfaces constrain maneuverability. This work is a comprehensive study that looks at both smart material and conventional actuation methods to achieve wing twist to potentially improve flight capability using minimal actuation energy while allowing minimal wing deformation under aerodynamic loading. A continuous wing is used in order to reduce drag while allowing the aircraft to more closely approximate the wing deformation used by birds while loitering. The morphing wing for this work consists of a skin supported by an underlying truss structure whose goal is to achieve a given roll moment using less actuation energy than conventional control surfaces. A structural optimization code has been written in order to achieve minimal wing deformation under aerodynamic loading while allowing wing twist under actuation. The multi-objective cost function for the optimization consists of terms that ensure small deformation under aerodynamic loading, small change in airfoil shape during wing twist, a linear variation of wing twist along the length of the wing, small deviation from the desired wing twist, minimal number of truss members, minimal wing weight, and minimal actuation energy. Hydraulic cylinders and a two member linkage driven by a DC motor are tested separately to provide actuation. Since the goal of the current work is simply to provide a roll moment, only one actuator is implemented along the wing span. Optimization is also used to find the best location within the truss structure for the actuator. The active structure produced by optimization is then compared to simulated and experimental results from other researchers as well as characteristics of conventional aircraft.

  2. Boundary-layer measurements on a transonic low-aspect ratio wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, Earl R.

    1985-01-01

    Tabulations and plots are presented of boundary-layer velocity and flow-direction surveys from wind-tunnel tests of a large-scale (0.90 m semi-span) model of the NASA/Lockheed Wing C. This wing is a generic, transonic, supercritical, highly three-dimensional, low-aspect-ratio configuration designed with the use of a three-dimensional, transonic full-potential-flow wing code (FLO22). Tests were conducted at the design angle of attack of 5 deg over a Mach number range from 0.25 to 0.96 and a Reynolds number range of 3.4x10 to the 6th power. Wing pressures were measured at five span stations, and boundary-layer surveys were measured at the midspan station. The data are presented without analysis.

  3. Winged cargo return vehicle conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA is committed to placing a permanent space station in Earth orbit in the 1990's. Space Station Freedom (SSF) will be located in a 220 n.m. orbit at 28.5 degrees inclination. The Winged Cargo Return Vehicle's (CRV) primary mission is to support SSF crew by flying regular resupply missions. The winged CRV is designed to be reusable, dry land recoverable, and unmanned. The CRV will be launched inline on three liquid hydrogen/oxygen rocket boosters with a payload capacity of 113,000 lbs. The three boosters will take the CRV to an orbit of 50 by 110 n.m. From this altitude the orbital manuevering engine will place the vehicle in synchronous orbit with the space station. The winged CRV will deliver cargo modules to the space station by direct docking or by remaining outside the SSF command zone and using the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) to transfer cargo. After unloading/loading, the CRV will deorbit and fly back to Kennedy Space Center. The CRV has a wing span of 57.8 feet, a length of 76.0 feet, and a dry weight of 61.5 klb. The cargo capacity of the vehicle is 44.4 klb. The vehicle has a lift-drag ratio of 1.28 (hypersonic) and 6.0 (subsonic), resulting in a 1351 n.m. cross range. The overall mission length ranges between 18.8 and 80.5 hr. The operational period will be the years 2000 to 2020.

  4. An experimental study of spanwise flow effects on lift generation in flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Youngsun

    Using a combination of force transducer measurement to quantify net lift force, a high frame rate camera to quantify and subtract inertial contributions, and Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) to calculate aerodynamic contributions in the spanwise plane, the contribution of spanwise flow to the generation of lift force in wings undergoing a pure flapping motion in hover is shown as a function of flapping angle throughout the flapping cycle. When flapping a flat plate wing and a wing of identical wing area and aspect ratio, but cambered in span (both wings in hover with no change in pitch), the spanwise cambered wing was found to generate a greater mean lift force through the whole flap cycle under the same acceleration. However, depending on the angle in flapping arc, the spanwise cambered wing can generate less lift than the flat wing. Additionally, since the lift force generated by the wingtip vortex in the spanwise plane resulting from the flapping motion has yet to be directly quantified, the wingtip vortex is investigated to determine precisely how it augments the lift force through the various phases in the flapping motion. Vortices in the vicinity of the wingtip generate lift force in the spanwise plane of flapping wings. In classical fixed wing aerodynamics, the presence of wing tip vortices has been shown to increase the lift locally near the tip. Also, the impingement of large vortices on the upper surface of delta wings is considered to contribute largely to the lift force at higher angles of attack. This study determined that vortices in the spanwise plane (streamwise vorticity) generate lift in a similar manner in flapping wings. Using a mechanical ornithopter with wings fabricated in-house, vortices were identified at several different locations along the span of the wing, and at numerous different points throughout the flapping cycle under a variety of operating conditions. The lift generated by these spanwise planar oriented vortices was

  5. Lift force of delta wings

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Ho, Chihming )

    1990-09-01

    On a delta wing, the separation vortices can be stationary due to the balance of the vorticity surface flux and the axial convection along the swept leading edge. These stationary vortices keep the wing from losing lift. A highly swept delta wing reaches the maximum lift at an angle of attack of about 40, which is more than twice as high as that of a two-dimensional airfoil. In this paper, the experimental results of lift forces for delta wings are reviewed from the perspective of fundamental vorticity balance. The effects of different operational and geometrical parameters on the performance of delta wings are surveyed.

  6. Calculation of tapered monoplane wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amstutz, E

    1930-01-01

    The tapered wing shape increases the lift in the middle of the wing and thus reduces the bending moment of the lifting forces in the plane of symmetry. Since this portion of the wing is the thickest, the stresses of the wing material are reduced and desirable space is provided for stowing the loads in the wing. This statically excellent form of construction, however, has aerodynamic disadvantages which must be carefully weighed, if failures are to be avoided. This treatise is devoted to the consideration of these problems.

  7. Aerodynamic Influence of a Slat on a Flapped Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathias, Donovan L.; Baker, M. David; Roth, Karlin R.; Cummings, Russell M.; VanDalegen, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Three high-lift configurations were computationally studied to assess the aerodynamic influence of slats. A flapped wing was simulated with no slat, a full-span slat, and a three quarter-span slat at a chord based Reynolds number of 3.7 million. The flows were computed using a compressible Navier-Stokes solver on structured grids with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. All cases were compared with experimental data to validate the approach. The slats not only increase the lift generated by the wing but alter the topology of the flowfield considerably. The changes in the flow give insight into the working of a slat and contribute to a better understanding of high-lift flows in general.

  8. Analysis of transonic flow about lifting wing-body configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnwell, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical solution was obtained for the perturbation velocity potential for transonic flow about lifting wing-body configurations with order-one span-length ratios and small reduced-span-length ratios and equivalent-thickness-length ratios. The analysis is performed with the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The angles of attack which are considered are small but are large enough to insure that the effects of lift in the region far from the configuration are either dominant or comparable with the effects of thickness. The modification to the equivalence rule which accounts for these lift effects is determined. An analysis of transonic flow about lifting wings with large aspect ratios is also presented.

  9. Charts for the Determination of Wing Torsional Stiffness Required for Specified Rolling Characteristics or Aileron Reversal Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Henry A; Aiken, William S , Jr

    1944-01-01

    A series of charts are presented by which the wing torsional stiffness required to meet a given standard of rolling effectiveness may be quickly determined. The charts may also be used to obtain quickly the aileron reversal speed and the variation of the loss in rolling effectiveness with airspeed. The charts apply to linearly tapered wings and elliptical wings of tubular-shell construction having various aspect ratios with aileron span and location of ailerons as variables. In the derivation of the charts, induced lift effects have been taken into account and the form of the wing-torsional-stiffness curve has been assumed.

  10. On the distribution of lift along the span of an airfoil with displaced ailerons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, Max M

    1924-01-01

    The effect of an aileron displacement on the distribution of the lift along the span is computed for an elliptic wing of aspect ratio 6 for three conditions. The lift distribution caused by the aileron displacement is uniform and extends normally beyond the inner end of the ailerons. Hence, the displacement of an aileron with constant chord length may bring about passing the stalling point of the adjacent wing sections, if these were near this point before. Hence, such ailerons can become ineffective at low speeds. Tapering the aileron towards the inside suggests itself as a remedy.

  11. Flutter study of an advanced composite wing with external stores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stanley R.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.; Nagaraja, K. S.

    1987-01-01

    A flutter test using a scaled model of an advanced composite wing for a Navy attack aircraft has been conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The model was a wall-mounted half-span wing with a semi-span of 6.63 ft. The wing had an aspect ratio of 5.31, taper ratio of 0.312, and quarter-chord sweep of 25 degrees. The model was supported in a manner that simulated the load path in the carry-through structure of the aircraft and the symmetric boundary condition at the fuselage centerline. The model was capable of carrying external stores from three pylon locations on the wing. Flutter tests were conducted for the wing with and without external stores. No flutter was encountered for the clean wing at test conditions which simulated the scaled airplane operating envelope. Flutter boundaries were obtained for several external store configurations. The flutter boundaries for the fuel tanks were nearly Mach number independent (occurring at constant dynamic pressure). To study the aerodynamic effect of the fuel tank stores, pencil stores (slender cylindrical rods) which had the same mass and pitch and yaw inertia as the fuel tanks were tested on the model. These pencil store configurations exhibited a transonic dip in the flutter dynamic pressure, indicating that the aerodynamic effect of the actual fuel tanks on flutter was significant. Several flutter analyses methods were used in an attempt to predict the flutter phenomenon exhibited during the wind-tunnel test. The analysis gave satisfactory predictions of flutter for the pencil store configurations, but unsatisfactory correlation for the actual fuel tank configurations.

  12. Life Span Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Mary Alice

    2005-01-01

    This chapter, rooted in life span developmental research and theory, examines domains of subjective well-being: emotional, social, and psychological. What is the impact of these domains on the learner's experience of education? It invites the reader to consider implications for learning through the use of learners' narratives.

  13. Power of the wingbeat: modelling the effects of flapping wings in vertebrate flight

    PubMed Central

    Heerenbrink, M. Klein; Johansson, L. C.; Hedenström, A.

    2015-01-01

    Animal flight performance has been studied using models developed for man-made aircraft. For an aeroplane with fixed wings, the energetic cost as a function of flight speed can be expressed in terms of weight, wing span, wing area and body area, where more details are included in proportionality coefficients. Flying animals flap their wings to produce thrust. Adopting the fixed wing flight model implicitly incorporates the effects of wing flapping in the coefficients. However, in practice, these effects have been ignored. In this paper, the effects of reciprocating wing motion on the coefficients of the fixed wing aerodynamic power model for forward flight are explicitly formulated in terms of thrust requirement, wingbeat frequency and stroke-plane angle, for optimized wingbeat amplitudes. The expressions are obtained by simulating flights over a large parameter range using an optimal vortex wake method combined with a low-level blade element method. The results imply that previously assumed acceptable values for the induced power factor might be strongly underestimated. The results also show the dependence of profile power on wing kinematics. The expressions introduced in this paper can be used to significantly improve animal flight models. PMID:27547098

  14. The spanwise distribution of lift for minimum induced drag of wings having a given lift and a given bending moment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1950-01-01

    The problem of the minimum induced drag of wings having a given lift and a given span is extended to include cases in which the bending moment to be supported by the wing is also given. The theory is limited to lifting surfaces traveling at subsonic speeds. It is found that the required shape of the downwash distribution can be obtained in an elementary way which is applicable to a variety of such problems. Expressions for the minimum drag and the corresponding spanwise load distributions are also given for the case in which the lift and the bending moment about the wing root are fixed while the span is allowed to vary. The results show a 15-percent reduction of the induced drag with a 15-percent increase in span as compared with results for an elliptically loaded wing having the same total lift and bending moment.

  15. Aeroacoustic theory for noncompact wing-gust interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, R.; Widnall, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Three aeroacoustic models for noncompact wing-gust interaction were developed for subsonic flow. The first is that for a two dimensional (infinite span) wing passing through an oblique gust. The unsteady pressure field was obtained by the Wiener-Hopf technique; the airfoil loading and the associated acoustic field were calculated, respectively, by allowing the field point down on the airfoil surface, or by letting it go to infinity. The second model is a simple spanwise superposition of two dimensional solutions to account for three dimensional acoustic effects of wing rotation (for a helicopter blade, or some other rotating planform) and of finiteness of wing span. A three dimensional theory for a single gust was applied to calculate the acoustic signature in closed form due to blade vortex interaction in helicopters. The third model is that of a quarter infinite plate with side edge through a gust at high subsonic speed. An approximate solution for the three dimensional loading and the associated three dimensional acoustic field in closed form was obtained. The results reflected the acoustic effect of satisfying the correct loading condition at the side edge.

  16. The SPAN cookbook: A practical guide to accessing SPAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Stephanie; Tencati, Ronald D.; Stern, David M.; Capps, Kimberly D.; Dorman, Gary; Peters, David J.

    1990-01-01

    This is a manual for remote users who wish to send electronic mail messages from the Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN) to scientific colleagues on other computer networks and vice versa. In several instances more than one gateway has been included for the same network. Users are provided with an introduction to each network listed with helpful details about accessing the system and mail syntax examples. Also included is information on file transfers, remote logins, and help telephone numbers.

  17. Close-Range Photogrammetric Measurement of Static Deflections for an Aeroelastic Supercritical Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrdsong, Thomas A.; Adams, Richard R.; Sandford, Maynard C.

    1990-01-01

    Close range photogrammetric measurements were made for the lower wing surface of a full span aspect ratio 10.3 aeroelastic supercritical research wing. The measurements were made during wind tunnel tests for quasi-steady pressure distributions on the wing. The tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at Mach numbers up to 0.90 and dynamic pressures up to 300 pounds per square foot. Deflection data were obtained for 57 locations on the wing lower surface using dual non-metric cameras. Representative data are presented as graphical overview to show variations and trends of spar deflection with test variables. Comparative data are presented for photogrammetric and cathetometric results of measurements for the wing tip deflections. A tabulation of the basic measurements is presented in a supplement to this report.

  18. Experimental Investigation of the Unsteady Flow Structures of Two Interacting Pitching Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, Melike; Moored, Keith

    2015-11-01

    Birds, insects and fish propel themselves with unsteady motions of their wings and fins. Many of these animals are also found to fly or swim in three-dimensional flocks and schools. Numerous studies have explored the three-dimensional steady flow interactions and the two-dimensional unsteady flow interactions in collectives. Yet, the characterization of the three-dimensional unsteady interactions remains relatively unexplored. This study aims to characterize the flow structures and interactions between two sinusoidally pitching finite-span wings. The arrangement of the wings varies from a tandem to a bi-plane configuration. The vortex structures for these various arrangements are quantified by using particle image velocimetry. The vortex-wing interactions are also characterized as the synchrony between the wings is modified.

  19. Investigation of Seal-to-Floor Effects on Semi-Span Transonic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleppy, Mark A.; Engel, Eric A.; Watson, Kevin T.; Atler, Douglas M.

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to achieve the maximum possible Reynolds number (Re) when conducting production testing for flight loads aerodynamic databases, it has been the preferred practice of The Boeing Company / Commercial Airplanes (BCA) -- Loads and Dynamics Group since the early 1990's to test large scale semi-span models in the 11- By 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel (TWT) leg of the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). There are many problems related to testing large scale semi-span models of high aspect ratio flexible transport wings, such as; floor boundary layer effects, wing spanwise wall effects, solid blockage buoyancy effects, floor mechanical interference effects, airflow under the model effects, or tunnel flow gradient effects. For most of these issues, BCA has developed and implemented either standard testing methods or numerical correction schemes and these will not be discussed in this document. Other researchers have reported on semi-span transonic testing correction issues, however most of the reported research has been for low Mach testing. Some of the reports for low Mach testing address the difficult problem of preventing undesirable airflow under a semi-span model while ensuring unrestricted main balance functionality, however, for transonic models this issue has gone unresolved. BCA has been cognizant for sometime that there are marked differences in wing pressure distributions from semi-span transonic model testing than from full model or flight testing. It has been suspected that these differences are at least in part due to airflow under the model. Previous efforts by BCA to address this issue have proven to be ineffective or inconclusive and in one situation resulted in broken hardware. This paper reports on a Boeing-NASA collaborative investigation based on a series of small tests conducted between June 2006 and November 2007 in the 11 by 11 foot Transonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames on three large commercial jet

  20. Effects of Horizontal-Control Planform and Wing-Leading-Edge Modification on Low-Speed Longitudinal Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Canard Airplane Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Bernard, Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation at low subsonic speeds has been conducted in the Langley 300-MPH 7- by 10-foot tunnel. The basic wing had a trapezoidal planform, an aspect ratio of 3.0., a taper ratio of 0.143, and an unswept 80-percent-chord line. Modifications to the basic wing included deflectable full-span and partial-span leading-edge chord-extensions. A trapezoidal horizontal control similar in planform to the basic wing and a 60 deg sweptback delta horizontal control were tested in conjunction with the wing. The total planform area of each horizontal control was 16 percent of the total basic-wing area. Modifications to these horizontal controls included addition of a full-span chord-extension to the trapezoidal planform and a fence to the delta planform.

  1. Flow Structure on a Flapping Wing: Quasi-Steady Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozen, Cem; Rockwell, Donald

    2011-11-01

    The flapping motion of an insect wing typically involves quasi-steady motion between extremes of unsteady motion. This investigation characterizes the flow structure for the quasi-steady limit via a rotating wing in the form of a thin rectangular plate having a low aspect ratio (AR =1). Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is employed, in order to gain insight into the effects of centripetal and Coriolis forces. Vorticity, velocity and streamline patterns are used to describe the overall flow structure with an emphasis on the leading-edge vortex. A stable leading-edge vortex is maintained over effective angles of attack from 30° to 75° and it is observed that at each angle of attack the flow structure remains relatively same over the Reynolds number range from 3,600 to 14,500. The dimensionless circulation of the leading edge vortex is found to be proportional to the effective angle of attack. Quasi-three-dimensional construction of the flow structure is used to identify the different regimes along the span of the wing which is then complemented by patterns on cross flow planes to demonstrate the influence of root and tip swirls on the spanwise flow. The rotating wing results are also compared with the equivalent of translating wing to further illustrate the effects of the rotation.

  2. ACTE Wing Loads Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE) project modified a Gulfstream III (GIII) aircraft with a new flexible flap that creates a seamless transition between the flap and the wing. As with any new modification, it is crucial to ensure that the aircraft will not become overstressed in flight. To test this, Star CCM a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software program was used to calculate aerodynamic data for the aircraft at given flight conditions.

  3. Wing on a String

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Mike; Brand, Lance

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors present an activity that shows students how flight occurs. The "wing on a string" is a simple teacher-made frame that consists of PVC pipe, fishing line, and rubber bands--all readily available hardware store items. The only other materials/tools involved are a sheet of paper, some pieces of a soda straw, a stapler,…

  4. Exploring the Dimensionality of Digit Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Stephen C.; Petrauskas, Vilija M.; Bardenhagen, Fiona J.; Meade, Catherine E.; Simpson, Leonie C.

    2013-01-01

    The Digit Span subtest from the Wechsler Scales is used to measure Freedom from Distractibility or Working Memory. Some published research suggests that Digit Span forward should be interpreted differently from Digit Span backward. The present study explored the dimensionality of the Wechsler Memory Scale-III Digit Span (forward and backward)…

  5. Aerodynamic cause of the asymmetric wing deformation of insect wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Haoxiang; Tian, Fangbao; Song, Jialei; Lu, Xi-Yun

    2012-11-01

    Insect wings typically exhibit significant asymmetric deformation patterns, where the magnitude of deflection during upstroke is greater than during downstroke. Such a feature is beneficial for the aerodynamics since it reduces the projected wing area during upstroke and leads to less negative lift. Previously, this asymmetry has been mainly attributed to the directional bending stiffness in the wing structure, e.g., one-way hinge, or a pre-existing camber in the wing surface. In the present study, we demonstrate that the asymmetric pattern can also be caused by the asymmetric force due to the flow, while the wing structure and kinematics are symmetric. A two-dimensional translating/pitching wing in a free stream is used as the model, and the wing is represented by an elastic sheet with large displacement. The result shows that, interestingly, the wing experiences larger deformation during upstroke even though the aerodynamic force is greater during downstroke. The physical mechanism of the phenomenon can be explained by the modulating effect of the aerodynamic force on the timing of storage/release of the elastic energy in the wing. Supported by NSF (No. CBET-0954381).

  6. Detailed pressure distribution measurements obtained on several configurations of an aspect-ratio-7 variable twist wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holbrook, G. T.; Dunham, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    Detailed pressure distribution measurements were made for 11 twist configurations of a unique, multisegmented wing model having an aspect ratio of 7 and a taper ratio of 1. These configurations encompassed span loads ranging from that of an untwisted wing to simple flapped wings both with and without upper-surface spoilers attached. For each of the wing twist configurations, electronic scanning pressure transducers were used to obtain 580 surface pressure measurements over the wing in about 0.1 sec. Integrated pressure distribution measurements compared favorably with force-balance measurements of lift on the model when the model centerbody lift was included. Complete plots and tabulations of the pressure distribution data for each wing twist configuration are provided.

  7. Fog spontaneously folds mosquito wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Andrew K.; Liu, Xing; Zhu, Ting; Hu, David L.

    2015-02-01

    The flexibility of insect wings confers aerodynamic benefits, but can also present a hazard if exposed to fog or dew. Fog can cause water to accumulate on wings, bending them into tight taco shapes and rendering them useless for flight. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we use high-speed video to film the spontaneous folding of isolated mosquito wings due to the evaporation of a water drop. We predict shapes of the deformed wing using two-dimensional elastica theory, considering both surface tension and Laplace pressure. We also recommend fold-resistant geometries for the wings of flapping micro-aerial vehicles. Our work reveals the mechanism of insect wing folding and provides a framework for further study of capillarity-driven folding in both natural and biomimetic systems at small scales.

  8. Postnatal development in Andersen's leaf-nosed bat Hipposideros pomona: flight, wing shape, and wing bone lengths.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ai-Qing; Jin, Long-Ru; Shi, Li-Min; Sun, Ke-Ping; Berquist, Sean W; Liu, Ying; Feng, Jiang

    2011-04-01

    Postnatal changes in flight development, wing shape and wing bone lengths of 56 marked neonate Hipposideros pomona were investigated under natural conditions in southwest China. Flight experiments showed that pups began to flutter with a short horizontal displacement at 10 days and first took flight at 19 days, with most achieving sustained flight at 1 month old. Analysis of covariance on wingspan, wing area, and the other seven wing characteristics between 'pre-flight' and 'post-volancy' periods supports the hypothesis that growth had one 'pre-flight' trajectory and a different 'post-volancy' trajectory in bats. Wingspan, handwing length and area, armwing length and area, and total wing area increased linearly until the age of first flight, after which the growth rates decreased (all P < 0.001). Wing loading declined linearly until day 19 before ultimately decreasing to adult levels (P < 0.001). Additionally, the relationship of different pairwise combinations of bony components composing span-wise length and chord-wise length was evaluated to test the hypothesis that compensatory growth of wing bones in H. pomona occurred in both 'pre-flight' and 'post-volancy' periods. The frequency of short-long and long-short pairs was significantly greater than that of short-short, long-long pairs in most pairs of bone elements in adults. The results indicate that a bone 'shorter than expected' would be compensated by a bone or bones 'longer than expected', suggesting compensatory growth in H. pomona. The pairwise comparisons conducted in adults were also performed in young bats during 'pre-flight' and 'post-volancy' periods, demonstrating that compensatory growth occurred throughout postnatal ontogeny. PMID:21435853

  9. Supersonic aerodynamics of delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    Through the empirical correlation of experimental data and theoretical analysis, a set of graphs has been developed which summarize the inviscid aerodynamics of delta wings at supersonic speeds. The various graphs which detail the aerodynamic performance of delta wings at both zero-lift and lifting conditions were then employed to define a preliminary wing design approach in which both the low-lift and high-lift design criteria were combined to define a feasible design space.

  10. Wing flapping with minimum energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    A technique employed by Prandtl and Munk is adapted for the case of a wing in flapping motion to determine its lift distribution. The problem may be reduced to one of minimizing induced drag for a specified and periodically varying bending moment at the wing root. It is concluded that two wings in close tandem arrangement, moving in opposite phase, would eliminate the induced aerodynamic losses calculated

  11. Energetics and optimum motion of oscillating lifting surfaces of finite span

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmadi, A. R.; Widnall, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    In certain modes of animal propulsion in nature, such as bird flight and fish swimming, the efficiency compared to man-made vehicles is very high. In such cases, wing and tail motions are typically associated with relatively high Reynolds numbers, where viscous effects are confined to a thin boundary layer at the surface and a thin trailing wake. The propulsive forces, which are generated primarily by the inertial forces, can be calculated from potential-flow theory using linearized unsteady-wing theory (for small-amplitude oscillations). In the present study, a recently developed linearized, low-frequency, unsteady lifting-line theory is employed to calculate the (sectional and total) energetic quantities and optimum motion of an oscillating wing of finite span.

  12. An Investigation of the Wing and the Wing-Fuselage Combination of a Full-Scale Model of the Republic XP-91 Airplane in the Ames 40-by 80-Foot Wing Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunton, Lynn W.; Dew, Joseph K.

    1948-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests of a full-scale model of the Republic XP-91 airplane were conducted to determine the longitudinal and lateral characteristics of the wing alone and the wing-fuselage combination, the characteristics of the aileron, and the damping in roll af the wing alone. Various high-lift devices were investigated including trailing-edge split flaps and partial- and full-span leading-edge slats and Krueger-type nose flaps. Results of this investigation showed that a very significant gain in maximum lift could be achieved through use of the proper leading-edge device, The maximum lift coefficient of the model with split flaps and the original partial-span straight slats was only 1.2; whereas a value of approximately 1.8 was obtained by drooping the slat and extending it full span, Improvement in maximum lift of approximately the same amount resulted when a full-span nose flap was substituted for the original partial-span slat.

  13. Simulation of iced wing aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, M. G.; Bragg, M. B.; Kwon, O. J.; Sankar, L. N.

    1991-01-01

    The sectional and total aerodynamic load characteristics of moderate aspect ratio wings with and without simulated glaze leading edge ice were studied both computationally, using a three dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes solver, and experimentally. The wing has an untwisted, untapered planform shape with NACA 0012 airfoil section. The wing has an unswept and swept configuration with aspect ratios of 4.06 and 5.0. Comparisons of computed surface pressures and sectional loads with experimental data for identical configurations are given. The abrupt decrease in stall angle of attack for the wing, as a result of the leading edge ice formation, was demonstrated numerically and experimentally.

  14. Technical and economic assessment of span-distributed loading cargo aircraft concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlow, D. H.; Whitner, P. C.

    1976-01-01

    A preliminary design study of the performance and economics resulting from the application of the distributed load concept to large freighter aircraft was made. The study was limited to configurations having the payload entirely contained in unswept wings of constant chord with conventional tail surfaces supported from the wing by twin booms. A parametric study based on current technology showed that increases in chord had a similar effect on the economics as increases in span. Increases in both span and chord or airplane size had the largest and most favorable effect. At 600,000 lbs payload a configuration was selected and refined to incorporate advanced technology that could be in production by 1990 and compared with a reference conventional airplane having similar technology.

  15. Axial flow effects on robustness of vortical structures about actively deflected wings in flapping flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Albert; Kweon, Jihoon; Choi, Haecheon; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2012-11-01

    Flapping wing flight has garnered much attention in the past decade driven by our desire to understand capabilities observed in nature and to develop agile small-scale aerial vehicles. Nature has demonstrated the breadth of maneuverability achievable by flapping wing flight. However, despite recent advances the role of wing flexibility remains poorly understood. In an effort to develop a deeper understanding of wing deflection effects and to explore novel approaches to increasing leading-edge vortex robustness, this three-dimensional computational study explores the aerodynamics of low aspect ratio plates, in hovering kinematics, with isolated flexion lines undergoing prescribed deflection. Major flexion lines, recognized as the primary avenue for deflection in biological fliers, are isolated here in two distinct configurations, resulting in deflection about the wing root and the wing tip, respectively. Of interest is the interaction between axial flow along the span and the vortical structures about the wing. It is proposed that the modes of deflection explored may provide a means of axial flow control for favorably promoting LEV robustness over a broad range of flapping conditions, and provide insight into the nature of flexibility in flapping wing flight. National Science Foundation, National Research Foundation of Korea.

  16. Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Sean; Bigatel, Patrick

    2004-10-17

    Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by this DOE category one Inventions and Innovations grant to successfully research, develop, test, patent, market, and sell innovative fuel and emissions saving aerodynamic attachments for the trucking industry. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck's fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Market research early in this project revealed the demands of truck fleet operators regarding aerodynamic attachments. Products must not only save fuel, but cannot interfere with the operation of the truck, require significant maintenance, add significant weight, and must be extremely durable. Furthermore, SAE/TMC J1321 tests performed by a respected independent laboratory are necessary for large fleets to even consider purchase. Freight Wing used this information to create a system of three practical aerodynamic attachments for the front, rear and undercarriage of standard semi trailers. SAE/TMC J1321 Type II tests preformed by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy with all three products. If Freight Wing is successful in its continued efforts to gain market penetration, the energy and environmental savings would be considerable. Each truck outfitted saves approximately 1,100 gallons of fuel every 100,000 miles, which prevents over 12 tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere. If all applicable trailers used the technology, the country could save approximately 1.8 billion gallons of diesel fuel, 18 million tons of emissions and 3.6 billion dollars annually.

  17. Effects of Wing Sweep on In-flight Boundary-layer Transition for a Laminar Flow Wing at Mach Numbers from 0.60 to 0.79

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bianca Trujillo; Meyer, Robert R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The variable sweep transition flight experiment (VSTFE) was conducted on an F-14A variable sweep wing fighter to examine the effect of wing sweep on natural boundary layer transition. Nearly full span upper surface gloves, extending to 60 percent chord, were attached to the F-14 aircraft's wings. The results are presented of the glove 2 flight tests. Glove 2 had an airfoil shape designed for natural laminar flow at a wing sweep of 20 deg. Sample pressure distributions and transition locations are presented with the complete results tabulated in a database. Data were obtained at wing sweeps of 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 deg, at Mach numbers ranging from 0.60 to 0.79, and at altitudes ranging from 10,000 to 35,000 ft. Results show that a substantial amount of laminar flow was maintained at all the wing sweeps evaluated. The maximum transition Reynolds number obtained was 18.6 x 10(exp 6) at 15 deg of wing sweep, Mach 0.75, and at an altitude of 10,000 ft.

  18. Use of a Viscous Flow Simulation Code for Static Aeroelastic Analysis of a Wing at High-Lift Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akaydin, H. Dogus; Moini-Yekta, Shayan; Housman, Jeffrey A.; Nguyen, Nhan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a static aeroelastic analysis of a wind tunnel test model of a wing in high-lift configuration using a viscous flow simulation code. The model wing was tailored to deform during the tests by amounts similar to a composite airliner wing in highlift conditions. This required use of a viscous flow analysis to predict the lift coefficient of the deformed wing accurately. We thus utilized an existing static aeroelastic analysis framework that involves an inviscid flow code (Cart3d) to predict the deformed shape of the wing, then utilized a viscous flow code (Overflow) to compute the aerodynamic loads on the deformed wing. This way, we reduced the cost of flow simulations needed for this analysis while still being able to predict the aerodynamic forces with reasonable accuracy. Our results suggest that the lift of the deformed wing may be higher or lower than that of the non-deformed wing, and the washout deformation of the wing is the key factor that changes the lift of the deformed wing in two distinct ways: while it decreases the lift at low to moderate angles of attack simply by lowering local angles of attack along the span, it increases the lift at high angles of attack by alleviating separation.

  19. Effect of torsional stiffness and inertia on the dynamics of low aspect ratio flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qing; Hu, Jianxin; Liu, Hao

    2014-03-01

    Micro air vehicle-motivated aerodynamics in biological flight has been an important subject in the past decade. Inspired by the novel flapping wing mechanisms in insects, birds and bats, we have carried out a numerical study systematically investigating a three-dimensional flapping rigid wing with passively actuated lateral and rotational motion. Distinguishing it from the limited existing studies, this work performs a systematic examination on the effects of wing aspect ratio (AR = 1.0 to infinity), inertia (density ratio σ = 4-32), torsional stiffness (frequency ratio F = 1.5-10 and infinity) and pivot point (from chord-center to leading edge) on the dynamics response of a low AR rectangular wing under an initial zero speed flow field condition. The simulation results show that the symmetry breakdown of the flapping wing results in a forward/backward motion with a rotational pitching. When the wing reaches its stable periodic state, the induced pitching frequency is identical to its forced flapping frequency. However, depending on various kinematic and dynamic system parameters, (i.e. flapping frequency, density ratio and pitching axis), the lateral induced velocity shows a number of different oscillating frequencies. Furthermore, compared with a one degree of freedom (DoF) wing in the lateral direction only, the propulsion performance of such a two DoF wing relies very much on the magnitude of torsional stiffness adding on the pivot point, as well as its pitching axis. In all cases examined here, thrust force and moment generated by a long span wing is larger than that of a short wing, which is remarkably linked to the strong reverse von Kármán vortex street formed in the wake of a wing. PMID:24434625

  20. Self-induced wing rock of slender delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L. T.; Yip, L. P.; Chambers, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    As part of a research program aimed at exploring basic mechanisms that cause wing rock in combat aircraft, an investigation was conducted to study the aerodynamic factors which cause the low-speed wing rock exhibited by slender delta wings. A flat-plate delta wing with 80 deg leading-edge sweep was subjected to conventional static-force tests and dynamic wind-tunnel experiments which included forced-oscillation, rotary, and free-to-roll tests. In addition, visualization of the flow phenomena involved was obtained by observing tuft patterns and using a helium-bubble technique. This paper summarizes the results of this study. Fundamental information is presented on the aerodynamic mechanisms that cause the wing rock and the problem of mathematically modeling the aerodynamics and motions is discussed.

  1. Constructing Gloved wings for aerodynamic studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohn-Meyer, Marta R.

    1988-01-01

    Recently, two aircraft from the Dryden Flight Research Facility were used in the general study of natural laminar flow (NLF). The first, an F-14A aircraft on short-term loan from the Navy, was used to investigate transonic natural laminar flow. The second, an F-15A aircraft on long-term loan from the Air Force, was used to examine supersonic NLF. These tests were follow-on experiments to the NASA F-111 NLF experiment conducted in 1979. Both wings of the F-14A were gloved, in a two-phased experiment, with full-span(upper surface only) airfoil shapes constructed primarily of fiberglass, foam, and resin. A small section of the F-15A right wing was gloved in a similar manner. Each glove incorporated provisions for instrumentation to measure surface pressure distributions. The F-14A gloves also had provisions for instrumentation to measure boundary layer profiles, acoustic environments, and surface pitot pressures. Discussions of the techniques used to construct the gloves and to incorporate the required instrumentation are presented.

  2. Computation of Lifting Wing-Flap Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian; Kwak, Dochan

    1996-01-01

    Research has been carried out on the computation of lifting wing-flap configurations. The long term goal of the research is to develop improved computational tools for the analysis and design of high lift systems. Results show that state-of-the-art computational methods are sufficient to predict time-averaged lift and overall flow field characteristics on simple high-lift configurations. Recently there has been an increased interest in the problem of airframe generated noise and experiments carried out in the 7 x 10 wind tunnel at NASA Ames have identified the flap edge as an important source of noise. A follow-on set of experiments will be conducted toward the end of 1995. The computations being carried out under this project are coordinated with these experiments. In particular, the model geometry being used in the computations is the same as that in the experiments. The geometry consists of a NACA 63-215 Mod B airfoil section which spans the 7 x lO tunnel. The wing is unswept and has an aspect ratio of two. A 30% chord Fowler flap is deployed modifications of the flap edge geometry have been shown to be effective in reducing noise and the existing code is currently being used to compute the effect of a modified geometry on the edge flow.

  3. Control of a swept wing tailless aircraft through wing morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiler, Richard W.

    Inspired by flight in nature, work done by Lippisch, the Hortens, and Northrop offered insight to achieving the efficiency of bird flight with swept-wing tailless aircraft. Tailless designs must incorporate aerodynamic compromises for control, which have inhibited potential advantages. A morphing mechanism, capable of changing the twist of wing and that can also provide pitch, roll and yaw control for a tailless swept wing aircraft is the first step to a series of morphing techniques, which will lead to more fluid, bird-like flight. This research focuses on investigating the design of a morphing wing to improve the flight characteristics of swept wing Horten type tailless aircraft. Free flight demonstrators, wind tunnel flow visualization, wind-tunnel force and moment data along with CFD studies have been used to evaluate the stability, control and efficiency of a morphing swept wing tailless aircraft. A wing morphing mechanism for the control of a swept wing tailless aircraft has been developed. This new control technique was experimentally and numerically compared to an existing elevon equipped tailless aircraft and has shown the potential for significant improvement in efficiency. The feasibility of this mechanism was also validated through flight testing of a flight weight version. In the process of comparing the Horten type elevon equipped aircraft and the morphing model, formal wind tunnel verification of wingtip induced thrust, found in Horten (Bell Shaped Lift distribution) type swept wing tailless aircraft was documented. A more complete physical understanding of the highly complex flow generated in the control region of the morphing tailless aircraft has been developed. CFD models indicate the possibility of the presence of a Leading Edge Vortex (LEV) on the control section morphing wing when the tip is twisted between +3.5 degrees and +7 degrees. The presence of this LEV causes a reduction of drag while lift is increased. Similar LEVs have been

  4. Influence of Finite Span and Sweep on Active Flow Control Efficacy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2007-01-01

    Active flow control efficacy was investigated by means of leading-edge and flap-shoulder zero mass-flux blowing slots on a semispan wing model that was tested in unswept (standard) and swept configurations. On the standard configuration, stall commenced inboard, but with sweep the wing stalled initially near the tip. On both configurations, leading-edge perturbations increased C(sub L,max) and post stall lift, both with and without deflected flaps. Without sweep, the effect of control was approximately uniform across the wing span but remained effective to high angles of attack near the tip; when sweep was introduced a significant effect was noted inboard, but this effect degraded along the span and produced virtually no meaningful lift enhancement near the tip, irrespective of the tip configuration. In the former case, control strengthened the wingtip vortex; in the latter case, a simple semi-empirical model, based on the trajectory or streamline of the evolving perturbation, served to explain the observations. Control on finite-span flaps did not differ significantly from their two-dimensional counterpart, while control over a tip flap produced significant variations to all three moments in the presence of large deflection and these variations were linear with input slot momentum. Control from the flap produced expected lift enhancement and CL,max improvements in the absence of sweep, but these improvements degraded with the introduction of sweep.

  5. Influence of Finite Span and Sweep on Active Flow Control Efficacy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    Active flow control efficacy was investigated by means of leading-edge and flap-shoulder zero mass-flux blowing slots on a semispan wing model that was tested in unswept (standard) and swept configurations. On the standard configuration, stall commenced inboard, but with sweep the wing stalled initially near the tip. On both configurations, leading-edge perturbations increased CL,max and post stall lift, both with and without deflected flaps. Without sweep, the effect of control was approximately uniform across the wing span but remained effective to high angles of attack near the tip; when sweep was introduced a significant effect was noted inboard, but this effect degraded along the span and produced virtually no meaningful lift enhancement near the tip, irrespective of the tip configuration. In the former case, control strengthened the wingtip vortex; in the latter case, a simple semi-empirical model, based on the trajectory or "streamline" of the evolving perturbation, served to explain the observations. In the absence of sweep, control on finite-span flaps did not differ significantly from their nominally twodimensional counterpart. Control from the flap produced expected lift enhancement and CL,max improvements in the absence of sweep, but these improvements degraded with the introduction of sweep.

  6. Application of a Navier-Stokes Solver to the Analysis of Multielement Airfoils and Wings Using Multizonal Grid Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kenneth M.; Biedron, Robert T.; Whitlock, Mark

    1995-01-01

    A computational study was performed to determine the predictive capability of a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes code (CFL3D) for two-dimensional and three-dimensional multielement high-lift systems. Three configurations were analyzed: a three-element airfoil, a wing with a full span flap and a wing with a partial span flap. In order to accurately model these complex geometries, two different multizonal structured grid techniques were employed. For the airfoil and full span wing configurations, a chimera or overset grid technique was used. The results of the airfoil analysis illustrated that although the absolute values of lift were somewhat in error, the code was able to predict reasonably well the variation with Reynolds number and flap position. The full span flap analysis demonstrated good agreement with experimental surface pressure data over the wing and flap. Multiblock patched grids were used to model the partial span flap wing. A modification to an existing patched- grid algorithm was required to analyze the configuration as modeled. Comparisons with experimental data were very good, indicating the applicability of the patched-grid technique to analyses of these complex geometries.

  7. The natural flow wing-design concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1992-01-01

    A wing-design study was conducted on a 65 degree swept leading-edge delta wing in which the wing geometry was modified to take advantage of the naturally occurring flow that forms over a slender wing in a supersonic flow field. Three-dimensional nonlinear analysis methods were used in the study which was divided into three parts: preliminary design, initial design, and final design. In the preliminary design, the wing planform, the design conditions, and the near-conical wing-design concept were derived, and a baseline standard wing (conventional airfoil distribution) and a baseline near-conical wing were chosen. During the initial analysis, a full-potential flow solver was employed to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the baseline standard delta wing and to investigate modifications to the airfoil thickness, leading-edge radius, airfoil maximum-thickness position, and wing upper to lower surface asymmetry on the baseline near-conical wing. The final design employed an Euler solver to analyze the best wing configurations found in the initial design and to extend the study of wing asymmetry to develop a more refined wing. Benefits resulting from each modification are discussed, and a final 'natural flow' wing geometry was designed that provides an improvement in aerodynamic performance compared with that of a baseline conventional uncambered wing, linear-theory cambered wing, and near-conical wing.

  8. Semi-span model testing in the national transonic facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chokani, Ndaona

    1994-01-01

    The present work was motivated by an ongoing research program at NASA Langley Research Center to develop a semi-span testing capability for the National Transonic Facility (NTF). This test technique is being investigated as a means to design and optimize high-lift devices at flight Reynolds numbers in a ground test facility. Even though the freestream Mach numbers of interest are around .20, the flow around a transport wing with high lift devices deployed may contain regions of compressible flow. Thus to properly model the flow physics, a compressible flow solver may be required. However, the application of a compressible flow solver at low Mach numbers can be problematic. The objective of this phase of the project is to directly compare the performance of two widely used three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes solvers at low Mach numbers to both experimental data and to results obtained from an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver. The geometries of interest are two isolated wings with different leading edge sweep angles. The compressible Navier-Stokes solvers chosen, TLNS3D-MB and CFL3D, which were developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), represent the current state-of-the-art in compressible 3-D Navier-Stokes solvers. The incompressible Navier-Stokes solver, INS3D-UP, developed recently at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), represents the current state-of-the-art in incompressible Navier-Stokes solvers.

  9. Beetle wings are inflatable origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rui; Ren, Jing; Ge, Siqin; Hu, David

    2015-11-01

    Beetles keep their wings folded and protected under a hard shell. In times of danger, they must unfold them rapidly in order for them to fly to escape. Moreover, they must do so across a range of body mass, from 1 mg to 10 grams. How can they unfold their wings so quickly? We use high-speed videography to record wing unfolding times, which we relate to the geometry of the network of blood vessels in the wing. Larger beetles have longer unfolding times. Modeling of the flow of blood through the veins successfully accounts for the wing unfolding speed of large beetles. However, smaller beetles have anomalously short unfolding times, suggesting they have lower blood viscosity or higher driving pressure. The use of hydraulics to unfold complex objects may have implications in the design of micro-flying air vehicles.

  10. Large-Scale Boundary-Layer Control Tests on Two Wings in the NACA 20-Foot Wind Tunnel, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Hugh B.

    1935-01-01

    Tests were made in the N.A.C.A. 20-foot wind tunnel on: (1) a wing, of 6.5-foot span, 5.5-foot chord, and 30 percent maximum thickness, fitted with large end plates and (2) a 16-foot span 2.67-foot chord wing of 15 percent maximum thickness to determine the increase in lift obtainable by removing the boundary layer and the power required for the blower. The results of the tests on the stub wing appeared more favorable than previous small-scale tests and indicated that: (1) the suction method was considerably superior to the pressure method, (2) single slots were more effective than multiple slots (where the same pressure was applied to all slots), the slot efficiency increased rapidly for increasing slot widths up to 2 percent of the wing chord and remained practically constant for all larger widths tested, (3) suction pressure and power requirements were quite low (a computation for a light airplane showed that a lift coefficient of 3.0 could be obtained with a suction as low as 2.3 times the dynamic pressure and a power expenditure less than 3 percent of the rated engine power), and (4) the volume of air required to be drawn off was quite high (approximately 0.5 cubic feet per second per unit wing area for an airplane landing at 40 miles per hour with a lift coefficient of 3,0), indicating that considerable duct area must be provided in order to prevent flow losses inside the wing and insure uniform distribution of suction along the span. The results from the tests of the large-span wing were less favorable than those on the stub wing. The reasons for this were, probably: (1) the uneven distribution of suction along the span, (2) the flow losses inside the wing, (3) the small radius of curvature of the leading edge of the wing section, and (4) the low Reynolds Number of these tests, which was about one half that of the stub wing. The results showed a large increase in the maximum lift coefficient with an increase in Reynolds Number in the range of the tests. The

  11. Subsonic longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic characteristics for a systematic series of strake-wing configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    A systematic wind tunnel study was conducted in the Langley 7 by 10 foot high speed tunnel to help establish a parametric data base of the longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic characteristics for configurations incorporating strake-wing geometries indicative of current and proposed maneuvering aircraft. The configurations employed combinations of strakes with reflexed planforms having exposed spans of 10%, 20%, and 30% of the reference wing span and wings with trapezoidal planforms having leading edge sweep angles of approximately 30, 40, 44, 50, and 60 deg. Tests were conducted at Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 0.8 and at angles of attack from approximately -4 to 48 deg at zero sideslip.

  12. The effect of torsional flexibility on the rolling characteristics at supersonic speeds of tapered unswept wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Warren A; Nelson, Robert L

    1950-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the effect of torsional flexibility on the rolling characteristics at supersonic speeds of tapered unswept wings with partial-span constant-percent-chord ailerons extending inboard from the wing tip. The geometric variables considered are aspect ratio, taper ratio, aileron span, and aileron chord. The shape of the wing-torsional-stiffness curve is assumed and the twisting moment is considered to result solely from the pressure distribution caused by aileron deflection, so that the necessity of using a successive-approximation method is avoided. Because of the complexity of the equations resulting from the analysis, numerical calculations from the equations are presented in a series of figures. A computational form is provided to be used in conjunction with these figures so that calculations can be made without reference to the analysis.

  13. The aerodynamic characteristics of a propulsive wing/canard concept in STOL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, V. R.; Paulson, J. W. JR.

    1984-01-01

    The potential of the propulsive wing in developing very high lift coefficients for STOL operation has been investigated with several nozzle aspect ratios. The use of the propulsive wing/canard appears to offer an approach to managing the large negative pitching moments associated with trailing-edge blowing. A full-span model of a wing/canard concept representing a fighter configuration has been tested at STOL conditions in the Langley 4 by 7 Meter Tunnel. The results of this test are presented, and comparisons are made to previous tests of the same configuration tested as a semispan model (Stewrt, 1983). Also presented are data showing the effects of large flap deflection and the effect of nozzle span. Comparisons of the test results with jet-flap theory are made and indicate good agreement.

  14. Life-Span Learning: A Developmental Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, James E.

    2003-01-01

    The article discusses learning as embedded processes of development and aging, and as social activity over the life course. The concept of life-span learning is proposed and outlined to discuss these processes as aspects of and propositions in life-span development and aging theory. Life-span learning processes arise and continuously develop in a…

  15. C-SPAN Networks: Professors' Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    C-SPAN in the Classroom, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The intention of this guide is to serve as a forum for college faculty members to share ideas and articles about using C-SPAN programming in college classrooms and in academic research. The first article, "C-SPAN as a 'Lecture Launcher'" (Stephen Frantzich) illustrates how well-chosen segments of C-SPAN programming can be used to stimulate…

  16. Aeroelastic Analysis of Aircraft: Wing and Wing/Fuselage Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H. H.; Chang, K. C.; Tzong, T.; Cebeci, T.

    1997-01-01

    A previously developed interface method for coupling aerodynamics and structures is used to evaluate the aeroelastic effects for an advanced transport wing at cruise and under-cruise conditions. The calculated results are compared with wind tunnel test data. The capability of the interface method is also investigated for an MD-90 wing/fuselage configuration. In addition, an aircraft trim analysis is described and applied to wing configurations. The accuracy of turbulence models based on the algebraic eddy viscosity formulation of Cebeci and Smith is studied for airfoil flows at low Mach numbers by using methods based on the solutions of the boundary-layer and Navier-Stokes equations.

  17. Propeller slipstream wing interactions at Mach no. 0.8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencze, D. P.; Smith, R. C.; Welge, H. R.; Crowder, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Configuration and results of a wind tunnel test of the aerodynamic interactions between propeller slipstream and a supercritical wing at transonic Mach numbers are discussed. The test was conducted over a free-stream Mach number range from 0.7 to 0.84, with the slipstream simulator and the wing-body model installed in the tunnel. The angle of attack and the spanning lift coefficients were varied from 1 to 3 deg and from 0.4 to 0.7 deg respectively, while the slipstream swirl angle was varied from 0 to 11 deg with an upwash on the inboard side of the wing. It was found that at a free-stream Mach number of 0.8 and a lift coefficient of 0.5, incremental drag results for 7 deg of swirl and a slipstream Mach number of 0.87 indicated a penalty equivalent to a 0.024 loss in propeller efficiency, whereas at 11 deg the drag increment was favorable. Swirl had significant effects on the chordwise pressure distributions of the inboard section of the wing within the slipstream. Neither surface nor wake pressures showed signs of significant flow separation induced by the slipstream.

  18. Incompressible Turbulent Wing-Body Junction Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, R.; Cagle, Corey D.; Chandra, S.

    1998-01-01

    -stream flow. The lateral curvature of the wing/strat causes the oncoming turbulent layer to skew about am axis (x-axis) parallel to the plane (xz-plane) of the mean shear. This is the principle mechanism for the generation of secondary flow. Such skew-induced secondary flows are slow to be attenuated by Reynolds stresses. Additional contribution to the generation of secondary flow comes from anisotropies in Reynolds stresses. Upstream of the strut, the mean-vorticity is directed span wise (along the y-direction). The presence of secondary flow in the vicinity of the strut causes the vorticity to stretch around the obstacle in a horse-shoe shape, with each leg having a vorticity of the opposite sense. The blockage effect of the strut imposes a severe adverse pressure gradient on the oncoming turbulent shear layer, causing boundary layer separation ahead of the leading edge, resulting in a vortex that rolls up and flows downstream into the juncture region. The separation vortices trailing in the wake of the wing can alter the lift or drag characteristics of the surfaces downstream of the wing-body juncture. Likewise, on submarines, the wake flow behind the appendage can degrade the performance of the propeller located downstream. The complex nature of this flow is caused by the presence of all six components of Reynolds stresses. Devenport and Simpson report that in the vicinity of the horse-shoe vortex there is intense recirculation with turbulent stresses being much larger than those normally observed in turbulent flows. These features contribute to making this flow a challenge to predict numerically. Some of the past studies provide useful insights into this flow that would guide our numerical efforts. In measurements reported by Shabaka and Bradshaw, the eddy viscosity tensor is seen to be non-isotropic and has negative components in certain regions. In an effort to evaluate the closure assumptions of various turbulence models, Devenport and Simpson used their own extensive

  19. Clean wing airframe noise modeling for multidisciplinary design and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosder, Serhat

    A new noise metric has been developed that may be used for optimization problems involving aerodynamic noise from a clean wing. The modeling approach uses a classical trailing edge noise theory as the starting point. The final form of the noise metric includes characteristic velocity and length scales that are obtained from three-dimensional, steady, RANS simulations with a two equation k-o turbulence model. The noise metric is not the absolute value of the noise intensity, but an accurate relative noise measure as shown in the validation studies. One of the unique features of the new noise metric is the modeling of the length scale, which is directly related to the turbulent structure of the flow at the trailing edge. The proposed noise metric model has been formulated so that it can capture the effect of different design variables on the clean wing airframe noise such as the aircraft speed, lift coefficient, and wing geometry. It can also capture three dimensional effects which become important at high lift coefficients, since the characteristic velocity and the length scales are allowed to vary along the span of the wing. Noise metric validation was performed with seven test cases that were selected from a two-dimensional NACA 0012 experimental database. The agreement between the experiment and the predictions obtained with the new noise metric was very good at various speeds, angles of attack, and Reynolds Number, which showed that the noise metric is capable of capturing the variations in the trailing edge noise as a relative noise measure when different flow conditions and parameters are changed. Parametric studies were performed to investigate the effect of different design variables on the noise metric. Two-dimensional parametric studies were done using two symmetric NACA four-digit airfoils (NACA 0012 and NACA 0009) and two supercritical (SC(2)-0710 and SC(2)-0714) airfoils. The three-dimensional studies were performed with two versions of a conventional

  20. Design and wind tunnel tests of winglets on a DC-10 wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilkey, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented of a wind tunnel test utilizing a 4.7 percent scale semi-span model in the Langley Research Center 8-foot transonic pressure wind tunnel to establish the cruise drag improvement potential of winglets as applied to the DC-10 wide body transport aircraft. Winglets were investigated on both the DC-10 Series 10 (domestic) and 30/40 (intercontinental) configurations and compared with the Series 30/40 configuration. The results of the investigation confirm that for the DC-10 winglets provide approximately twice the cruise drag reduction of wing-tip extensions for about the same increase in bending moment at the wing fuselage juncture. Furthermore, the winglet configurations achieved drag improvements which were in close agreement to analytical estimates. It was observed that relatively small changes in wing-winglet tailoring effected large improvements in drag and visual flow characteristics. All final winglet configurations exhibited visual flow characteristics on the wing and winglets

  1. Loads calibrations of strain gage bridges on the DAST project Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstrom, C. V.

    1986-01-01

    Results from and details of the procedure used to calibrate strain gage bridges for measurements of wing structural loads, shear (V), bending moment (M), and torque (T), at three semispan stations on both the left and right semispans of the ARW-2 wing are presented. The ARW-2 wing has a reference area of 35 square feet, a span of 19 feet, an aspect ratio of 10.3, a midchord line sweepback angle of 25 degrees, and a taper ratio of 0.4. The ARW-2 wing was fabricated using aluminum spars and ribs covered with a fiberglass/honeycomb sandwich skin material. All strain gage bridges are mounted along with an estimate of their accuracy by means of a comparison of computed loads versus actual loads for three simulated flight conditions.

  2. Structural Response and Failure of a Full-Scale Stitched Graphite-Epoxy Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Bush, Harold G.

    2001-01-01

    Analytical and experimental results of the test for an all-composite full-scale wing box are presented. The wing box is representative of a section of a 220-passenger commercial transport aircraft wing box and was designed and constructed by The Boeing Company as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) program. The semi-span wing was fabricated from a graphite-epoxy material system with cover panels and spars held together using Kevlar stitches through the thickness. No mechanical fasteners were used to hold the stiffeners to the skin of the cover panels. Tests were conducted with and without low-speed impact damage, discrete source damage and repairs. Up-bending down-bending and brake roll loading conditions were applied. The structure with nonvisible impact damage carried 97% of Design Ultimate Load prior to failure through a lower cover panel access hole. Finite element and experimental results agree for the global response of the structure.

  3. Improved sonic-box computer program for calculating transonic aerodynamic loads on oscillating wings with thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruo, S. Y.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program was developed to account approximately for the effects of finite wing thickness in transonic potential flow over an oscillation wing of finite span. The program is based on the original sonic box computer program for planar wing which was extended to account for the effect of wing thickness. Computational efficiency and accuracy were improved and swept trailing edges were accounted for. Account for the nonuniform flow caused by finite thickness was made by application of the local linearization concept with appropriate coordinate transformation. A brief description of each computer routine and the applications of cubic spline and spline surface data fitting techniques used in the program are given, and the method of input was shown in detail. Sample calculations as well as a complete listing of the computer program listing are presented.

  4. Investigations on the downwash behind a tapered wing with fuselage and propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muttray, H

    1938-01-01

    The new downwash measurements behind a tapered wing with parallel center section described in the present report can be brought into good agreement with theoretical calculations if made on the basis of not-rolled-up vortex sheet and allowance is made for the lowering of the sheet. The test values are about 1 degree higher than the "upper limit" established for it, as against approximately 0.5 degrees in the earlier tests behind a rectangular and elliptical wing. The measurements on lateral axes, especially if lying below the wing on a level with the vortex train, disclosed in accord with the lift distribution, a marked change in angle over the span of the tail in contrast to the rectangular and elliptical wing.

  5. Structural Testing of a Stitched/Resin Film Infused Graphite-Epoxy Wing Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Bush, Harold G.

    2001-01-01

    The results of a series of tests conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to evaluate the behavior of an all-composite full-scale wing box are presented. The wing box is representative of a section of a 220-passenger commercial transport aircraft wing box and was designed and constructed by The Boeing Company as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) program. The semi-span wing was fabricated from a graphite-epoxy material system with cover panels and spars held together using Kevlar stitches through the thickness. No mechanical fasteners were used to hold the stiffeners to the skin of the cover panels. Tests were conducted with and without low-speed impact damage, discrete source damage and repairs. Up-bending, down-bending and brake roll loading conditions were applied. The structure with non-visible impact damage carried 97% of Design Ultimate Load prior to failure through a lower cover panel access hole.

  6. Peak-Seeking Optimization of Spanwise Lift Distribution for Wings in Formation Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curtis E.; Ryan, Jack

    2012-01-01

    A method is presented for the in-flight optimization of the lift distribution across the wing for minimum drag of an aircraft in formation flight. The usual elliptical distribution that is optimal for a given wing with a given span is no longer optimal for the trailing wing in a formation due to the asymmetric nature of the encountered flow field. Control surfaces along the trailing edge of the wing can be configured to obtain a non-elliptical profile that is more optimal in terms of minimum combined induced and profile drag. Due to the difficult-to-predict nature of formation flight aerodynamics, a Newton-Raphson peak-seeking controller is used to identify in real time the best aileron and flap deployment scheme for minimum total drag. Simulation results show that the peak-seeking controller correctly identifies an optimal trim configuration that provides additional drag savings above those achieved with conventional anti-symmetric aileron trim.

  7. Wing-vortex interaction: unraveling the flowfield of a hovering rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, Mahendra J.; Caradonna, Francis X.; Ramasamy, Manikandan

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on one of the most prominent flow features of the hovering rotor wake, the close interaction of the tip vortex with a following blade. Such vortex interactions are fundamental determinants of rotor performance, loads, and noise. Yet, they are not completely understood, largely due to the lack of sufficiently comprehensive experimental data. The present study aims to perform such comprehensive measurements, not on hovering helicopter rotors (which hugely magnifies test complexity) but using fixed-wing models in controlled wind tunnel tests. The experiments were designed to measure, in considerable detail, the aerodynamic loading resulting from a vortex interacting with a semi-span wing, as well as the wake resulting from that interaction. The goal of the present study is to answer fundamental questions such as (a) the influence of a vortex passing below a wing on the lift, drag, tip vortex, and the wake of that wing and (b) the strength of the forming tip vortex and its relation to the wing loading and/or the tip loading. This paper presents detailed wing surface pressure measurements that result from the interaction of the wing with an interacting vortex trailing from an upstream wing. The data show large lift distribution changes for a range of wing-vortex interactions including the effects of close encounter with the vortex core. Significant asymmetry in the vortex-induced lift loading was observed, with the increase in wing sectional lift outboard of the interacting vortex (closer to the tip) being much smaller than the corresponding decrease inboard of the vortex.

  8. Development and flight evaluation of active controls in the L-1011. [including wing load alleviation and stability augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, J. F.; Urie, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    Active controls in the Lockheed L-1011 for increased energy efficiency are discussed. Active wing load alleviation for extended span, increased aspect ratio, and active stability augmentation with a smaller tail for reduced drag and weight are among the topics considered. Flight tests of active wing load alleviation on the baseline aircraft and moving-base piloted simulation developing criteria for stability augmentation are described.

  9. Time-varying span efficiency through the wingbeat of desert locusts

    PubMed Central

    Henningsson, Per; Bomphrey, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    The flight performance of animals depends greatly on the efficacy with which they generate aerodynamic forces. Accordingly, maximum range, load-lifting capacity and peak accelerations during manoeuvres are all constrained by the efficiency of momentum transfer to the wake. Here, we use high-speed particle image velocimetry (1 kHz) to record flow velocities in the near wake of desert locusts (Schistocerca gregaria, Forskål). We use the measured flow fields to calculate time-varying span efficiency throughout the wing stroke cycle. The locusts are found to operate at a maximum span efficiency of 79 per cent, typically at a plateau of about 60 per cent for the majority of the downstroke, but at lower values during the upstroke. Moreover, the calculated span efficiencies are highest when the largest lift forces are being generated (90% of the total lift is generated during the plateau of span efficiency) suggesting that the combination of wing kinematics and morphology in locust flight perform most efficiently when doing the most work. PMID:22112649

  10. Analytical study of takeoff and landing performance for a jet STOL transport configuration with full-span, externally blown, triple-slotted flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, H. P.; Gibbons, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    Takeoff and landing performance characteristics and field length requirements were determined analytically for a jet STOL transport configuration with full-span, externally blown, tripleslotted flaps. The configuration had a high wing, high T-tail, and four pod-mounted high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines located under and forward of the wing. One takeoff and three approach and landing flap settings were evaluated. The effects of wing loading, thrust-to-weight ratio, weight, ambient temperature, altitude on takeoff and landing field length requirements are discussed.

  11. Validation of Vortex-Lattice Method for loads on wings in lift-generated wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, J.

    1994-01-01

    A study is described that evaluates the accuracy of vortex-lattice methods when they are used to compute the loads induced on aircraft as they encounter lift-generated wakes. The evaluation is accomplished by use of measurements made in the 80- by 120-foot wind tunnel of the lift, rolling-moment, and downwash in the wake of three configurations of a model of a subsonic transport aircraft. The downwash measurements are used as input for a vortex-lattice code in order to compute the lift and rolling moment induced on wings that have a span of 0.186, 0.510, or 1.022 times the span of the wake-generating model. Comparison of the computed results with the measured lift and rolling moment distributions are used to determine the accuracy of the vortex-lattice code. It was found that the vortex-lattice method is very reliable as long as the span of the encountering of following wing is less than about 0.2 of the generator span. As the span of the following wing increases above 0.2, the vortex-lattice method continues to correctly predict the trends and nature of the induced loads, but it overpredicts the magnitude of the loads by increasing amounts. The increase in deviation of the computed from the measured loads with size of the following wing is attributed to the increase in distortion of the structure of the vortex wake as it approaches and passes the larger following wings.

  12. Determination of mean camber surfaces for wings having uniform chordwise loading and arbitrary spanwise loading in subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzoff, S; Faison, M Frances; Dubose, Hugh C

    1954-01-01

    The field of a uniformly loaded wing in subsonic flow is discussed in terms of the acceleration potential. It is shown that, for the design of such wings, the slope of the mean camber surface at any point can be determined by a line integration around the wing boundary. By an additional line integration around the wing boundary, this method is extended to include the case where the local section lift coefficient varies with spanwise location (the chordwise loading at every section still remaining uniform). For the uniformly loaded wing of polygonal plan form, the integrations necessary to determine the local slope of the surface and the further integration of the slopes to determine the ordinate can be done analytically. An outline of these integrations and the resulting formulas are included. Calculated results are given for a sweptback wing with uniform chordwise loading and a highly tapered spanwise loading, a uniformly loaded delta wing, a uniformly loaded sweptback wing, and the same sweptback wing with uniform chordwise loading but elliptical span load distribution.

  13. Aerodynamic characteristics of a distinct wing-body configuration at Mach 6: Experiment, theory, and the hypersonic isolation principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penland, J. A.; Pittman, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the effect of wing leading edge sweep and wing translation on the aerodynamic characteristics of a wing body configuration at a free stream Mach number of about 6 and Reynolds number (based on body length) of 17.9 x 10 to the 6th power. Seven wings with leading edge sweep angles from -20 deg to 60 deg were tested on a common body over an angle of attack range from -12 deg to 10 deg. All wings had a common span, aspect ratio, taper ratio, planform area, and thickness ratio. Wings were translated longitudinally on the body to make tests possible with the total and exposed mean aerodynamic chords located at a fixed body station. Aerodynamic forces were found to be independent of wing sweep and translation, and pitching moments were constant when the exposed wing mean aerodynamic chord was located at a fixed body station. Thus, the Hypersonic Isolation Principle was verified. Theory applied with tangent wedge pressures on the wing and tangent cone pressures on the body provided excellent predictions of aerodynamic force coefficients but poor estimates of moment coefficients.

  14. Airplane wing vibrations due to atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastel, R. L.; Caruthers, J. E.; Frost, W.

    1981-01-01

    The magnitude of error introduced due to wing vibration when measuring atmospheric turbulence with a wind probe mounted at the wing tip was studied. It was also determined whether accelerometers mounted on the wing tip are needed to correct this error. A spectrum analysis approach is used to determine the error. Estimates of the B-57 wing characteristics are used to simulate the airplane wing, and von Karman's cross spectrum function is used to simulate atmospheric turbulence. It was found that wing vibration introduces large error in measured spectra of turbulence in the frequency's range close to the natural frequencies of the wing.

  15. Extended attention span training system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, Alan T.; Bogart, Edward H.

    1991-01-01

    Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) is a behavioral disorder characterized by the inability to sustain attention long enough to perform activities such as schoolwork or organized play. Treatments for this disorder include medication and brainwave biofeedback training. Brainwave biofeedback training systems feed back information to the trainee showing him how well he is producing the brainwave pattern that indicates attention. The Extended Attention Span Training (EAST) system takes the concept a step further by making a video game more difficult as the player's brainwaves indicate that attention is waning. The trainee can succeed at the game only by maintaining an adequate level of attention. The EAST system is a modification of a biocybernetic system that is currently being used to assess the extent to which automated flight management systems maintain pilot engagement. This biocybernetic system is a product of a program aimed at developing methods to evaluate automated flight deck designs for compatibility with human capabilities. The EAST technology can make a contribution in the fields of medical neuropsychology and neurology, where the emphasis is on cautious, conservative treatment of youngsters with attention disorders.

  16. The frequencies of cantilever wings in beam and torsional vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, C P

    1940-01-01

    Methods are described for calculating the period and frequency of vibration of cantilever wings and similar structures in which the weight and moment of inertia vary along the span. Both the beam and torsional frequencies may be calculated by these methods. The procedure is illustrated by examples. It is shown that a surprisingly close approximation to the beam frequency may be obtained by a very brief calculation in which the curvature of the wing in vibration is assumed to be constant. A somewhat longer computation permits taking account of the true curvature of the beam by a series of successive approximations which are shown to be strongly convergent. Analogous methods are applied to calculations of the torsional frequency. For the first approximation it is assumed that the angle of twist varies linearly alone the semispan. True variation of the twist is computed by successive approximations which are strongly convergent, as in the case of beam vibrations.

  17. The aerodynamic analysis of the gyroplane rotating-wing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheatley, John B

    1934-01-01

    An aerodynamic analysis of the gyroplane rotating-wing system is presented herein. This system consists of a freely rotating rotor in which opposite blades are rigidly connected and allowed to rotate or feather freely about their span axis. Equations have been derived for the lift, the lift-drag ratio, the angle of attack, the feathering angles, and the rolling and pitching moments of a gyroplane rotor in terms of its basic parameters. Curves of lift-drag ratio against lift coefficient have been calculated for a typical case, showing the effect of varying the pitch angle, the solidarity, and the average blade-section drag coefficient. The analysis expresses satisfactorily the qualitative relations between the rotor characteristics and the rotor parameters. As disclosed by this investigation, the aerodynamic principles of the gyroplane are sound, and further research on this wing system is justified.

  18. Preliminary Weight Savings Estimate for a Commercial Transport Wing Using Rod-Stiffened Stitched Composite Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    A structural concept called pultruded rod stitched efficient unitized structure (PRSEUS) was developed by the Boeing Company to address the complex structural design aspects associated with a pressurized hybrid wing body (HWB) aircraft configuration. While PRSEUS was an enabling technology for the pressurized HWB structure, limited investigation of PRSEUS for other aircraft structures, such as circular fuselages and wings, has been done. Therefore, a study was undertaken to investigate the potential weight savings afforded by using the PRSEUS concept for a commercial transport wing. The study applied PRSEUS to the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Program composite semi-span test article, which was sized using three load cases. The initial PRSEUS design was developed by matching cross-sectional stiffnesses for each stringer/skin combination within the wing covers, then the design was modified to ensure that the PRSEUS design satisfied the design criteria. It was found that the PRSEUS wing design exhibited weight savings over the blade-stiffened composite AST Program wing of nearly 9%, and a weight savings of 49% and 29% for the lower and upper covers, respectively, compared to an equivalent metallic wing.

  19. Aerodynamic Analysis of Flexible Flapping Wing Micro Aerial Vehicle Using Quasi-Steady Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, Kolandapaiyan; Chandrasekhar, Uttam; Chandrashekhar, Nagaraj

    2016-04-01

    In recent times flexible flapping-wing aerodynamics has generated a great deal of interest and is the topic of contemporary research because of its potential application in micro aerial vehicles (MAVs). The prominent features of MAVs include low Reynolds Number, changing the camber of flapping wings, development of related mechanisms, study of the suitability airfoil shape selection and other parameters. Generally, low Reynolds Number is similar to that of an insect or a bird (103-105). The primary goal of this project work is to perform CFD analysis on flexible flapping wing MAVs in order to estimate the lift and drag by using engineering methods such as quasi-steady approach. From the wind tunnel data, 3-D deformation is obtained. For CFD analysis, two types of quasi-steady methods are considered. The first method is to slice the wing section chord-wise and span wise at multiple regions, frame by frame, and obtain the 2-D corrugated camber section for each frame. This 2-D corrugated camber is analysed using CFD techniques and all the individual 2-D corrugated camber results are summed up frame by frame, to obtain the total lift and drag for one wing beat. The second method is to consider the 3D wing in entirety and perform the CFD analysis to obtain the lift and drag for five wing beat.

  20. A mathematical model for the thrust force generated by a flapping elastic wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Alexander E.; Sumbatyan, Mezhlum A.

    2012-11-01

    The physical nature of the thrust force generated by flapping wings is of a long-time interest of many researchers. The idea of the thrust effect came from the observation of birds' flight. Apparently, Leonardo da Vinci was first who tried to explain the mechanism of the flapping wing trust, for possible engineering applications. Nevertheless, the fundamental basics of a theoretical study of wing oscillations were laid only near the beginning of the 20th century. The thrust effect of the flapping wing was explained by Knoller in 1909 and Betz in 1912, independently. The principal problem in this theory is to define an optimal deformation law which provides the flapping wing to work with highest efficiency. In the present paper we study a rectangular elastic wing of finite span as a propulsion device. We propose an analytical approach, to study harmonic oscillations of a thin elastic rectangular wing at zero attack angle in a flow of inviscid incompressible fluid. The problem is reduced to an integro-differential equation, in frames of the "plane sections" hypothesis.

  1. Validation of Vortex-Lattice Method for Loads on Wings in Lift-Generated Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    1995-01-01

    A study is described that evaluates the accuracy of vortex-lattice methods when they are used to compute the loads induced on aircraft as they encounter lift-generated wakes. The evaluation is accomplished by the use of measurements made in the 80 by 120 ft Wind Tunnel of the lift, rolling moment, and downwash in the wake of three configurations of a model of a subsonic transport aircraft. The downwash measurements are used as input for a vortex-lattice code in order to compute the lift and rolling moment induced on wings that have a span of 0.186, 0.510, or 1.022 times the span of the wake-generating model. Comparison of the computed results with the measured lift and rolling-moment distributions the vortex-lattice method is very reliable as long as the span of the encountering or following wing is less than about 0.2 of the generator span. As the span of the following wing increases above 0.2, the vortex-lattice method continues to correctly predict the trends and nature of the induced loads, but it overpredicts the magnitude of the loads by increasing amounts.

  2. 1. From north bankup riverSpan 2 on left to Span ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. From north bank-up river-Span 2 on left to Span 6 on right. Coke Plant in distance (under Span 3). - Monongahela Connecting Railroad Company, Hot Metal Bridge, Spanning Monongahela River at mile post 3.1, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  3. An insect-inspired flapping wing micro air vehicle with double wing clap-fling effects and capability of sustained hovering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Quoc-Viet; Chan, Woei Leong; Debiasi, Marco

    2015-03-01

    We present our recent flying insect-inspired Flapping-Wing Micro Air Vehicle (FW-MAV) capable of hovering flight which we have recently achieved. The FW-MAV has wing span of 22 cm (wing tip-to-wing tip), weighs about 16.6 grams with onboard integration of radio control system including a radio receiver, an electronic speed control (ESC) for brushless motor, three servos for attitude flight controls of roll, pitch, and yaw, and a single cell lithium-polymer (LiPo) battery (3.7 V). The proposed gear box enables the FW-MAV to use one DC brushless motor to synchronously drive four wings and take advantage of the double clap-and-fling effects during one flapping cycle. Moreover, passive wing rotation is utilized to simplify the design, in addition to passive stabilizing surfaces for flight stability. Powered by a single cell LiPo battery (3.7 V), the FW-MAV flaps at 13.7 Hz and produces an average vertical force or thrust of about 28 grams, which is sufficient for take-off and hovering flight. Finally, free flight tests in terms of vertical take-off, hovering, and manual attitude control flight have been conducted to verify the performance of the FW-MAV.

  4. Design of supercritical swept wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garabedian, P.; Mcfadden, G.

    1982-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics are used to discuss problems inherent to transonic three-dimensional flow past supercritical swept wings. The formulation for a boundary value problem for the flow past the wing is provided, including consideration of weak shock waves and the use of parabolic coordinates. A swept wing code is developed which requires a mesh of 152 x 10 x 12 points and 200 time cycles. A formula for wave drag is calculated, based on the idea that the conservation form of the momentum equation becomes an entropy inequality measuring the drag, expressible in terms of a small-disturbance equation for a potential function in two dimensions. The entropy inequality has been incorporated in a two-dimensional code for the analysis of transonic flow over airfoils. A method of artificial viscosity is explored for optimum pressure distributions with design, and involves a free boundary problem considering speed over only a portion of the wing.

  5. Origin Story: Blended Wing Body

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA is partnering with the Boeing Company, among others, to develop and test the blended wing body aircraft. The BWB has the potential to significantly reduce fuel use and noise. In this video, Bo...

  6. Embedded Wing Propulsion Conceptual Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun D.; Saunders, John D.

    2003-01-01

    As a part of distributed propulsion work under NASA's Revolutionary Aeropropulsion Concepts or RAC project, a new propulsion-airframe integrated vehicle concept called Embedded Wing Propulsion (EWP) is developed and examined through system and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. The idea behind the concept is to fully integrate a propulsion system within a wing structure so that the aircraft takes full benefits of coupling of wing aerodynamics and the propulsion thrust stream. The objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of the EWP concept applied to large transport aircraft such as the Blended-Wing-Body aircraft. In this paper, some of early analysis and current status of the study are presented. In addition, other current activities of distributed propulsion under the RAC project are briefly discussed.

  7. SHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH PRINCIPLE CANTILEVER SPAN SHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH PRINCIPLE CANTILEVER SPAN SHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH PRINCIPLE CANTILEVER SPAN SHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH PRINCIPLE CANTILEVER SPAN SHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH PRINCIPLE CANTILEVER SPAN SHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH PRINCIPLE CANTILEVER SPAN vSHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH PRINCIPLE CANTILEVER SPAN SHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH PRINCIPLE CANTILEVER SPAN SHARP OBLIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF DECK AND APPROACH SPANS ALONG WITH PRINCIPLE CANTILEVER SPAN - Snake River Bridge at Lyons' Ferry, State Route 261 spanning Snake River, Starbuck, Columbia County, WA

  8. The buzzing of flies' wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easton, Don

    1999-02-01

    The object of this science-fair project was to determine the wing-beat frequency of common house flies from the frequency of the sound produced when they buzz their wings. The data produced a pattern that I have seen many times and felt sure that I knew what was going on. Like many interesting and seemingly simple phenomena, the longer that I look at this one the more intriguing and less explicable it becomes.

  9. Oblique-wing supersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An aircraft including a single fuselage having a main wing and a horizontal stabilizer airfoil pivotally attached at their centers to the fuselage is described. The pivotal attachments allow the airfoils to be yawed relative to the fuselage for high speed flight, and to be positioned at right angles with respect to the fuselage during takeoff, landing, and low speed flight. The main wing and the horizontal stabilizer are upwardly curved from their center pivotal connections towards their ends to form curvilinear dihedrals.

  10. Novel Composites for Wing and Fuselage Applications. Task 1; Novel Wing Design Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, J. A.; Buttitta, C.; Flanagan, G.; DeSilva, T.; Egensteiner, W.; Bruno, J.; Mahon, J.; Rutkowski, C.; Collins, R.; Fidnarick, R.; Maiden, J.; Neves, J.

    1996-01-01

    Design trade studies were conducted to arrive at advanced wing designs that integrated new material forms with innovative structural concepts and cost-effective fabrication methods. A representative spar was selected for design, fabrication, and test to validate the predicted performance. Textile processes, such as knitting, weaving and stitching, were used to produce fiber preforms that were later fabricated into composite span through epoxy Resin Transfer Molding (RTM), Resin Film Infusion (RFI), and consolidation of commingled thermoplastic and graphite tows. The target design ultimate strain level for these innovative structural design concepts was 6000 mu in. per in. The spars were subjected to four-point beam bending to validate their structural performance. The various material form /processing combination Y-spars were rated for their structural efficiency and acquisition cost. The acquisition cost elements were material, tooling, and labor.

  11. Computations on Wings With Full-Span Oscillating Control Surfaces Using Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    2013-01-01

    A dual-level parallel procedure is presented for computing large databases to support aerospace vehicle design. This procedure has been developed as a single Unix script within the Parallel Batch Submission environment utilizing MPIexec and runs MPI based analysis software. It has been developed to provide a process for aerospace designers to generate data for large numbers of cases with the highest possible fidelity and reasonable wall clock time. A single job submission environment has been created to avoid keeping track of multiple jobs and the associated system administration overhead. The process has been demonstrated for computing large databases for the design of typical aerospace configurations, a launch vehicle and a rotorcraft.

  12. Velocity and rolling-moment measurements in the wake of a swept-wing model in the 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, V. J.; Corsiglia, V. R.; Schwind, R. G.; Frick, J. K. D.; Lemmer, O. J.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made in the wake of a swept wing model to study the structure of lift generated vortex wakes shed by conventional span loadings and by several span loadings designed to reduce wake velocities. Variations in the span loading on the swept wing generator were obtained by deflecting seven flap segments on each side by amounts determined by vortex lattice theory to approximate the desired span loadings. The resulting wakes were probed with a three component, hot wire probe to measure velocity, and with a wing to measure the rolling moment that would be induced on a following aircraft. The experimental techniques are described herein, and the measured velocity and rolling moments are presented, along with some comparisons with the applicable theories.

  13. Dew-driven folding of insect wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Andrew; Beadles, Sam; Clement, Courtney; Hu, David

    2013-11-01

    Small insect wings fold into tacos when exposed to dewfall or fog for extended times. Such shapes are tightly held together and require great force or long evaporation times for the wings to unfold. In this experimental investigation, we use time-lapse and high-speed videography on a mosquito wing exposed to fog to characterize the folding process from a flat wing to a taco. We observe a taco is formed through a series of processes involving wing bending, unbending, and subsequent tight folding of the wing following the sliding of the drop off the wing. We use a simplified 2D model to determine the forces coalescing drops exert on the wing, and present folding-resistant design suggestions for micro-aerial vehicle wings.

  14. Pressure distributions and oil-flow patterns for a swept circulation-control wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, Earl R.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.; Wood, Norman J.

    1987-01-01

    Pressure distributions and photographs of oil flow patterns are presented for a circulation control wing. The model was an aspect ratio four semispan wing mounted on the side wall of the NASA Ames Transonic Wind Tunnel. The airfoil was a 20 percent thick ellipse, modified with circular leading and trailing edges of 4 percent radius, and had a 25.4 cm constant chord. This configuration does not represent a specific wing design, but is generic. A full span, tangetial, rearward blowing, circulation control slot was incorporated ahead of the trailing edge on the upper surface. The wing was tested at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.75 at sweep angle of 0 to 45 deg with internal to external pressure ratios of 1.0 to 3.0. Lift and pitching momemt coefficients were obtained from measured pressure distributions at five span stations. When the conventional corrections resulting from sweep angle are applied to the lift and moment of circulation control sections, no additional corrections are necessary to account for changes in blowing efficiency. This is demonstrated for an aft sweep angle of 45 deg. An empirical technique for estimating the downwash distribution of a swept wing was validated.

  15. Spanwise gradients in flow speed help stabilize leading-edge vortices on revolving wings.

    PubMed

    Jardin, T; David, L

    2014-07-01

    While a leading-edge vortex on an infinite translating wing is shed after a short distance of travel, its counterpart on a finite span revolving insect wing or maple seed membrane exhibits robust attachment. The latter explains the aerodynamic lift generated by such biological species. Here we analyze the mechanisms responsible for leading-edge vortex attachment. We compute the Navier-Stokes solution of the flow past a finite span wing (i) embedded in a uniform oncoming flow, (ii) embedded in a spanwise varying oncoming flow, and (iii) revolving about its root. We show that over flapping amplitudes typical of insect flight (ϕ = 120°), the spanwise gradient of the local wing speed may suffice in maintaining leading-edge vortex attachment. We correlate this result with the development of spanwise flow, driven by the spanwise gradient of pressure, and we evaluate the sensitivity of such a mechanism to the Reynolds number. It is noted, however, that leading-edge vortex attachment through the spanwise gradient of the local wing speed does not promote large lift, which ultimately arises from centrifugal and Coriolis effects. PMID:25122373

  16. An asymptotic theory for the interference of large aspect ratio swept wings and multiple propeller slipstreams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, R. K.; Liu, C. H.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents an asymptotic method for the analysis of the interference of multiple tractor propeller slipstream with large aspect ratio swept wings. It is assumed that the height of the slipstream is of the order of the wing chord and its spanwise extent is of the order of the wing span. Three different flow regions are identified by employing different stretching transformations. Asymptotic expansions are made in each of the three regions, using the chord to span ratio as the small expansion parameter. The details of the nonuniform flow in the slipstream enter into the wing sectional analysis. In the outer limit, the wing shrinks to a swept lifting line, and the slipstream reduces to a thin sheet of jet carrying the momentum gain from the propeller. The curvature of this jet sheet results in a pressure difference which is represented by a vortex sheet. The governing equations are solved by discretization. Several examples are considered for which experimental data are available. Comparison of the present results with the experimental data as well as other numerical solutions showed generally good agreement.

  17. The spanwise lift distribution on a wing from flow-field velocity surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orloff, K. L.

    1978-01-01

    The application of the incompressible three-dimensional momentum integral equation to a finite wing is reviewed. The objective is to interpret the resulting equations in a way that suggests an alternate experimental method for determining the span-wise distribution of lift. Consideration is given to constraints that must be placed on the character of the vortex wake of the wing to provide the familiar relationship between lift and bound vorticity. A novel technique is then presented for obtaining, from behind the wing, the spanwise lift distribution from velocity surveys that are made over only a short distance above and below the wing trailing edge. The necessary formalism is developed to use these measured values to obtain the actual span loading by using an equivalent single horseshoe vortex model to account for the unmeasured portion of the downward (or upward) momentum. The results of a numerical simulation are presented for a typical loading distribution. The technique is then verified experimentally using laser velocimeter data for the flow field around a model wing.

  18. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of dynamics of plunge and pitch of 3D flexible wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dewei; Shyy, Wei

    2008-11-01

    The method of lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulation has been used to simulate fluid structures and motion of a flexible insect wing in a 3D space. In the method, a beam has been discretized into a chain of rigid segments. Each segment is connected through ball and socket joints at its ends. One segment may be bent and twisted with its neighboring segment. A constraint force is applied to each joint to ensure the solid structure moving as a whole flexible elastic body.We have demonstrated that the LB method is suitable for modeling of aerodynamics of insects flight at low Reynolds numbers. First, a simulation of plunging and pitching of a rigid wing is performed at Re=75 in a 2D space and the results of lift forces and flow structures are in excellent agreement with the previous results. Second, plunging and pitching of a flexible wing in span-wise direction is simulated at Re=136 in a 3D space. We found that when twisting elasticity is large enough the twisting angle could be controlled at a level of smaller than 0.2 degree. It is shown that as bending and twisting elasticity is large enough, the motion of flexible wing approaches that of a rigid membrane wing. The simulation results show that the optimization of flexibility in span-wise direction will benefit thrust and an intermediate level is favorable. The results are consistent with experimental finding.

  19. Aerodynamic characteristics of scissor-wing geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selberg, Bruce P.; Rokhsaz, Kamran; Housh, Clinton S.

    1991-01-01

    A scissor-wing configuration, consisting of two independently sweeping-wing surfaces, is compared with an equivalent fixed-wing geometry baseline over a wide Mach number range. The scissor-wing configuration is shown to have a higher total lift-to-drag ratio than the baseline in the subsonic region primarily due to the slightly higher aspect ratio of the unswept scissor wing. In the transonic region, the scissor wing is shown to have a higher lift-to-drag ratio than the baseline for values of lift coefficient greater than 0.35. It is also shown that, through the use of wing decalage, the lift of the two independent scissor wings can be equalized. In the supersonic regime, the zero lift wave drag of the scissor-wing at maximum sweep is shown to be 50 and 28 percent less than the zero lift wave drag of the baseline at Mach numbers 1.5 and 3.0, respectively. In addition, a pivot-wing configuration is introduced and compared with the scissor wing. The pivot-wing configuration is shown to have a slightly higher total lift-to-drag ratio than the scissor wing in the supersonic region due to the decreased zero lift wave drag of the pivot-wing configuration.

  20. Insect-like flapping wing mechanism based on a double spherical Scotch yoke.

    PubMed

    Galiński, Cezary; Zbikowski, Rafał

    2005-06-22

    We describe the rationale, concept, design and implementation of a fixed-motion (non-adjustable) mechanism for insect-like flapping wing micro air vehicles in hover, inspired by two-winged flies (Diptera). This spatial (as opposed to planar) mechanism is based on the novel idea of a double spherical Scotch yoke. The mechanism was constructed for two main purposes: (i) as a test bed for aeromechanical research on hover in flapping flight, and (ii) as a precursor design for a future flapping wing micro air vehicle. Insects fly by oscillating (plunging) and rotating (pitching) their wings through large angles, while sweeping them forwards and backwards. During this motion the wing tip approximately traces a "figure-of-eight" or a "banana" and the wing changes the angle of attack (pitching) significantly. The kinematic and aerodynamic data from free-flying insects are sparse and uncertain, and it is not clear what aerodynamic consequences different wing motions have. Since acquiring the necessary kinematic and dynamic data from biological experiments remains a challenge, a synthetic, controlled study of insect-like flapping is not only of engineering value, but also of biological relevance. Micro air vehicles are defined as flying vehicles approximately 150 mm in size (hand-held), weighing 50-100g, and are developed to reconnoitre in confined spaces (inside buildings, tunnels, etc.). For this application, insect-like flapping wings are an attractive solution and hence the need to realize the functionality of insect flight by engineering means. Since the semi-span of the insect wing is constant, the kinematics are spatial; in fact, an approximate figure-of-eight/banana is traced on a sphere. Hence a natural mechanism implementing such kinematics should be (i) spherical and (ii) generate mathematically convenient curves expressing the figure-of-eight/banana shape. The double spherical Scotch yoke design has property (i) by definition and achieves (ii) by tracing

  1. Effect of wing-transition location and slotted and unslotted flaps on aerodynamic characteristics of a fighter model at high subsonic speeds. [conducted in langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayers, T. G.

    1969-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 8 foot transonic pressure tunnel to determine the effects of wing transition location and of slotted and unslotted full span flaps on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a 1/15 scale model of a variable wing sweep tactical fighter model. Tests were at Mach numbers from 0.70 to 0.85 for a wing leading edge sweep of 26 deg.

  2. Effect of multiple engine placement on aeroelastic trim and stability of flying wing aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardanpour, Pezhman; Richards, Phillip W.; Nabipour, Omid; Hodges, Dewey H.

    2014-01-01

    Effects of multiple engine placement on flutter characteristics of a backswept flying wing resembling the HORTEN IV are investigated using the code NATASHA (Nonlinear Aeroelastic Trim And Stability of HALE Aircraft). Four identical engines with defined mass, inertia, and angular momentum are placed in different locations along the span with different offsets from the elastic axis while fixing the location of the aircraft c.g. The aircraft experiences body freedom flutter along with non-oscillatory instabilities that originate from flight dynamics. Multiple engine placement increases flutter speed particularly when the engines are placed in the outboard portion of the wing (60-70% span), forward of the elastic axis, while the lift to drag ratio is affected negligibly. The behavior of the sub- and supercritical eigenvalues is studied for two cases of engine placement. NATASHA captures a hump body-freedom flutter with low frequency for the clean wing case, which disappears as the engines are placed on the wings. In neither case is there any apparent coalescence between the unstable modes. NATASHA captures other non-oscillatory unstable roots with very small amplitude, apparently originating with flight dynamics. For the clean-wing case, in the absence of aerodynamic and gravitational forces, the regions of minimum kinetic energy density for the first and third bending modes are located around 60% span. For the second mode, this kinetic energy density has local minima around the 20% and 80% span. The regions of minimum kinetic energy of these modes are in agreement with calculations that show a noticeable increase in flutter speed if engines are placed forward of the elastic axis at these regions.

  3. Investigation into the Role of Dragonfly Wing Flexibility During Passive Wing Pitch Reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, Yousaf; Williams, Ventress; Ren, Yan; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Group Team

    2013-11-01

    Wing deformation is a characteristic part of flapping wing flight. In dragonflies, a torsion wave can be observed propagating from the tip to the root during stroke reversal. In this paper, we utilize high-speed photogrammetry and 3d surface reconstruction techniques to quantify wing deformation and kinematics of a dragonfly. We then use finite elements in the absolute nodal coordinate formulation to estimate strain energy in the wing during wing pitch reversal. We use this data to analyze the role of wing structure in facilitating wing rotation and bringing about the characteristic torsion wave. The influence of the elastic force in facilitating wing rotation is then compared with inertial and aerodynamic forces as well. A quantitative look into the variation of strain energy within the insect wing during wing rotation could lead to more efficient design of dynamic wing pitching mechanisms. Supported by NSF CBET-1343154.

  4. The aerodynamic effects of wing-wing interaction in flapping insect wings.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf; Sane, Sanjay P; Dickinson, Michael

    2005-08-01

    We employed a dynamically scaled mechanical model of the small fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster (Reynolds number 100-200) to investigate force enhancement due to contralateral wing interactions during stroke reversal (the ;clap-and-fling'). The results suggest that lift enhancement during clap-and-fling requires an angular separation between the two wings of no more than 10-12 degrees . Within the limitations of the robotic apparatus, the clap-and-fling augmented total lift production by up to 17%, but depended strongly on stroke kinematics. The time course of the interaction between the wings was quite complex. For example, wing interaction attenuated total force during the initial part of the wing clap, but slightly enhanced force at the end of the clap phase. We measured two temporally transient peaks of both lift and drag enhancement during the fling phase: a prominent peak during the initial phase of the fling motion, which accounts for most of the benefit in lift production, and a smaller peak of force enhancement at the end fling when the wings started to move apart. A detailed digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) analysis during clap-and-fling showed that the most obvious effect of the bilateral ;image' wing on flow occurs during the early phase of the fling, due to a strong fluid influx between the wings as they separate. The DPIV analysis revealed, moreover, that circulation induced by a leading edge vortex (LEV) during the early fling phase was smaller than predicted by inviscid two-dimensional analytical models, whereas circulation of LEV nearly matched the predictions of Weis-Fogh's inviscid model at late fling phase. In addition, the presence of the image wing presumably causes subtle modifications in both the wake capture and viscous forces. Collectively, these effects explain some of the changes in total force and lift production during the fling. Quite surprisingly, the effect of clap-and-fling is not restricted to the dorsal part of the

  5. Reynolds Number, Compressibility, and Leading-Edge Bluntness Effects on Delta-Wing Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of Reynolds number, compressibility, and leading edge bluntness effects is presented for a 65 degree delta wing. The results of this study address both attached and vortex-flow aerodynamics and are based upon a unique data set obtained in the NASA-Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF) for i) Reynolds numbers ranging from conventional wind-tunnel to flight values, ii) Mach numbers ranging from subsonic to transonic speeds, and iii) leading-edge bluntness values that span practical slender wing applications. The data were obtained so as to isolate the subject effects and they present many challenges for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) studies.

  6. Some aspects of hybrid-zeppelins. [optimization of delta wings for airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackrodt, P. A.

    1975-01-01

    To increase an airship's maneuverability and payload capacity as well as to save bouyant gas it is proposed to outfit it with a slender delta-wing, which carries about one half of the total take-off weight of the vehicle. An optimization calculation based on the data of LZ 129 (the last airship, which saw passenger-service) leads to a Hybrid-Zeppelin with a wing of aspect-ratio 1.5 and 105 m span. The vehicle carries a payload of 40% of it's total take-off weight and consumes 0.8 t fuel per ton payload over a distance of 10000 km.

  7. Experimental study of supersonic viscous leeside flow over a slender delta wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szodruch, J.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to study in detail the vortical flow over the leeward side of a 70 deg swept delta wing having subsonic and supersonic leading edges. Two types of flow were encountered and studied, namely leading edge separation and separation with a shock. Especially for the latter type, Reynolds number plays an important role and unexpected strong streamwise vortices were observed. An optical method is described to obtain a first aproximation of shear stress values in the streamwise direction across the wing span.

  8. Numerical study of wingtip shed vorticity reduction by wing Boundary Layer Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, Jose Alejandro

    computed pressure coefficient values compare very well (Figure 90). The present simulations were also validated by comparison with wake survey and balance type experimental measurements done by Chometon and Laurent on a NACA 643-018 wing. Lift, induced drag, and profile drag coefficients agree very well with Chometon and Laurent data. More than one hundred simulations were performed with different BLC suction slot geometries. Suction slots were used in the chord-wise and span-wise locations near the wing tip region. Blowing slots were evaluated at the wing center line, the wing tip upper surface, and span-wise outside of the wing tip. For an elliptically loaded wing, 50% of the bound vorticity is shed at the wing tips over a length of 7% of the wing span. The turbulent boundary layer thickness for a Cessna 206 aircraft at cruise is estimated as 0.09 ft. Theoretically the power required to remove by suction all the upper and lower surface boundary layer over the tip region for this aircraft at take-off is 2.6 HP, which would be very small compared to the 70 HP induced drag power saved. This would only be true if 100% wingtip vortex elimination could be obtained.

  9. Effect of drooped-nose flaps on the experimental force and moment characteristics of an oblique wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, E. J.; Lovette, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    Six-component experimental force and moment data are presented for a low aspect ratio, oblique wing equipped with drooped-nose flaps and mounted on top of a body of revolution. These flaps were investigated on the downstream wing panel with the nose drooped 5 deg, 10 deg, 20 deg, and 30 deg, and on both wing panels with the nose drooped 30 deg. It was to determine if such flaps would make the moment curves more linear by controlling the flow separation on the downstream wing panel at high lift coefficients. The wing was elliptical in planform and had an aspect ratio of 6.0 (based on the unswept wing span). The wing was tested at sweep angles of 45 deg and 50 deg throughout the Mach number range from 0.25 to 0.95. The drooped-nose flaps alone were not effective in making the moment curves more linear; however, a previous study showed that Kruger nose flaps improved the linearity of the moment curves when the Kruger flaps were used on only the downstream wing panel equipped with drooped-nose flaps deflected 5 deg.

  10. Perspective on the span-distributed-load concept for application to large cargo aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, A. H., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Results of a simplified analysis of the span-distributed-load concept (in which payload is placed within the wing structure) are presented. It is shown that a design based on these principles has a high potential for application to future large air cargo transport. Significant improvements are foreseen in increased payload fraction and productivity and in reduced fuel consumption and operating costs. A review of the efforts in the 1940's to develop all-wing aircraft shows the potential of transferring those early technological developments to current design of distributed-load aircraft. Current market analyses are projected to 1990 to show the future commercial demand for large capacity freighters. Several configuration designs which would serve different market requirements for these large freighters are discussed as are some of the pacing-technology requirements.

  11. Node degree distribution in spanning trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozrikidis, C.

    2016-03-01

    A method is presented for computing the number of spanning trees involving one link or a specified group of links, and excluding another link or a specified group of links, in a network described by a simple graph in terms of derivatives of the spanning-tree generating function defined with respect to the eigenvalues of the Kirchhoff (weighted Laplacian) matrix. The method is applied to deduce the node degree distribution in a complete or randomized set of spanning trees of an arbitrary network. An important feature of the proposed method is that the explicit construction of spanning trees is not required. It is shown that the node degree distribution in the spanning trees of the complete network is described by the binomial distribution. Numerical results are presented for the node degree distribution in square, triangular, and honeycomb lattices.

  12. Aircraft wing structural detail design (wing, aileron, flaps, and subsystems)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, Robert; Zable, Mike; Hughes, James; Heiser, Terry; Adrian, Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this project was to design, in detail, the wing, flaps, and ailerons for a primary flight trainer. Integrated in this design are provisions for the fuel system, the electrical system, and the fuselage/cabin carry-through interface structure. This conceptual design displays the general arrangement of all major components in the wing structure, taking into consideration the requirements set forth by the appropriate sections of Federal Aviation Regulation Part 23 (FAR23) as well as those established in the statement of work.

  13. Effect of canard location and size on canard-wing interference and aerodynamic center shift related to maneuvering aircraft at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloss, B. B.

    1974-01-01

    A generalized wind-tunnel model, typical of highly maneuverable aircraft, was tested in the Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.70 to 1.20 to determine the effects of canard location and size on canard-wing interference effects and aerodynamic center shift at transonic speeds. The canards had exposed areas of 16.0 and 28.0 percent of the wing reference area and were located in the chord plane of the wing or in a position 18.5 percent of the wing mean geometric chord above or below the wing chord plane. Two different wing planforms were tested, one with leading-edge sweep of 60 deg and the other 44 deg; both wings had the same reference area and span. The results indicated that the largest benefits in lift and drag were obtained with the canard above the wing chord plane for both wings tested. The low canard configuration for the 60 deg swept wing proved to be more stable and produced a more linear pitching-moment curve than the high and coplanar canard configurations for the subsonic test Mach numbers.

  14. Computation of spanwise distribution of circulation and lift coefficient for flapped wings of arbitrary planform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razak, K.

    1980-01-01

    The question of the effect of distribution and magnitude of spanwise circulation and shed vorticity from an airplane wing on the distribution pattern of agricultural products distributed from an airplane was studied. The first step in an analysis of this question is the determination of the actual distribution of lift along an airplane wing, from which the pattern of shed vorticity can be determined. A procedure is developed to calculate the span loading for flapped and unflapped wings of arbitrary aspect ratio and taper ratio. The procedure was programmed on a small programmable calculator, the Hewlett Packard HP-97, and also was programmed in BASIC language. They could be used to explore the variations in span loading that can be secured by variable flap deflections or the effect of flying at varying air speeds at different airplane gross weights. Either an absolute evaluation of span loading can be secured or comparative span loading can be evaluated to determine their effect on swath width and swath distribution pattern. The programs are intended to assist the user in evaluating the effect of a given spanload distribution.

  15. Analysis of Asymmetric Aircraft Aerodynamics Due to an Experimental Wing Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartshorn, Fletcher

    2011-01-01

    Aerodynamic analysis on a business jet with a wing glove attached to one wing is presented and discussed. If a wing glove is placed over a portion of one wing, there will be asymmetries in the aircraft as well as overall changes in the forces and moments acting on the aircraft. These changes, referred to as deltas, need to be determined and quantified to make sure the wing glove does not have a drastic effect on the aircraft flight characteristics. TRANAIR, a non-linear full potential solver was used to analyze a full aircraft, with and without a glove, at a variety of flight conditions and angles of attack and sideslip. Changes in the aircraft lift, drag and side force, along with roll, pitch and yawing moment are presented. Span lift and moment distributions are also presented for a more detailed look at the effects of the glove on the aircraft. Aerodynamic flow phenomena due to the addition of the glove and its fairing are discussed. Results show that the glove used here does not present a drastic change in forces and moments on the aircraft, but an added torsional moment around the quarter-chord of the wing may be a cause for some structural concerns.

  16. Calculation of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of upper-surface-blown wing-flap configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, M. R.; Spangler, S. B.

    1978-01-01

    An engineering method for predicting the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of wing-flap configurations with upper surface blowing (USB) was developed. Potential flow models were incorporated into the prediction method: a wing and flap lifting surface model and a jet wake model. The wing-flap model used a vortex-lattice to represent the wing and flaps. The wing had an arbitrary planform and camber and twist, and the flap system was made up of a Coanda flap and other flap segments of arbitrary size. The jet wake model consisted of a series of closely spaced rectangular vortex rings. The wake was positioned such that it was tangent to the upper surface of the wing and flap between the exhaust nozzle and the flap trailing edge. It was specified such that the mass, momentum, and spreading rates were similar to actual USB jet wakes. Comparisons of measured and predicted pressure distributions, span load distributions, and total lift and pitching-moment coefficients on swept and unswept USB configurations are included. A wide range of thrust coefficients and flap deflection angles were considered at angles of attack up to the onset of stall.

  17. Static Aeroelastic Scaling and Analysis of a Sub-Scale Flexible Wing Wind Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the development of a scaled wind tunnel model for static aeroelastic similarity with a full-scale wing model. The full-scale aircraft model is based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with flexible wing structures referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The baseline stiffness of the ESAC wing represents a conventionally stiff wing model. Static aeroelastic scaling is conducted on the stiff wing configuration to develop the wind tunnel model, but additional tailoring is also conducted such that the wind tunnel model achieves a 10% wing tip deflection at the wind tunnel test condition. An aeroelastic scaling procedure and analysis is conducted, and a sub-scale flexible wind tunnel model based on the full-scale's undeformed jig-shape is developed. Optimization of the flexible wind tunnel model's undeflected twist along the span, or pre-twist or wash-out, is then conducted for the design test condition. The resulting wind tunnel model is an aeroelastic model designed for the wind tunnel test condition.

  18. Comparison of aerodynamic theory and experiment for jet-flap wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gainer, T. G.; Yip, L. P.; Vogler, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    Aerodynamic theory predictions made for a jet flapped wing were compared with experimental data obtained in a fairly extensive series of tests in the Langley V/STOL tunnel. The tests were made on a straight, rectangular wing and investigated two types of jet flap concepts: a pure jet flap with high jet deflection and a wing with blowing at the knee of a plain trailing edge flap. The tests investigated full and partial span blowing for wing aspect ratios of 8.0 and 5.5 and momentum coefficients from 0 to about 4. The total lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients predicted by the theory were in excellent agreement with experimental values for the pure jet flap, even with the high jet deflection. The pressure coefficients on the wing, and hence the circulation lift coefficients, were underpredicted, however, because of the linearizing assumptions of the planar theory. The lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients, as well as pressure coefficients, were underpredicted for the wing with blowing over the flap because of the failure of the theory to account for the interaction effect of the high velocity jet passing over the flap.

  19. 3. View west. North elevation Walpole span in foreground, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View west. North elevation - Walpole span in foreground, link span; Westminster span in background. - Walpole-Westminster Bridge, Spanning Connecticut River between Walpole, NH & Westminster, VT, Walpole, Cheshire County, NH

  20. 7. DETAIL OF LATERAL BRACING OF THROUGH TRUSS SPAN (THIS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL OF LATERAL BRACING OF THROUGH TRUSS SPAN (THIS SPAN IS IMMEDIATELY SOUTH OF THE VERTICAL LIFT SPAN). - Shippingsport Bridge, Spanning Illinois River at State Route 51, La Salle, La Salle County, IL

  1. 8. General view of movable span from water level, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. General view of movable span from water level, showing piers turntable, movable span, parts of west land span and east viaduct. VIEW NORTHEAST - Broadway Bridge, Spanning Foundry Street, MBTA Yard, Fort Point Channel, & Lehigh Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  2. 2. DETAIL VIEW OF ON RIGHT FOREGROUND FIXED SPAN TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL VIEW OF ON RIGHT FOREGROUND FIXED SPAN TO TRANSITIONAL MOVEABLE SPAN TO FLOATING SPAN IN MIDDLEGROUND - Lacey V. Murrow Memorial Floating Bridge, Spanning Lake Washington at I-90, Seattle, King County, WA

  3. Aircraft wing structure detail design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, Garrett L.; Roberts, Ron; Mallon, Bob; Alameri, Mohamed; Steinbach, Bill

    1993-01-01

    The provisions of this project call for the design of the structure of the wing and carry-through structure for the Viper primary trainer, which is to be certified as a utility category trainer under FAR part 23. The specific items to be designed in this statement of work were Front Spar, Rear Spar, Aileron Structure, Wing Skin, and Fuselage Carry-through Structure. In the design of these parts, provisions for the fuel system, electrical system, and control routing were required. Also, the total weight of the entire wing planform could not exceed 216 lbs. Since this aircraft is to be used as a primary trainer, and the SOW requires a useful life of 107 cycles, it was decided that all of the principle stresses in the structural members would be kept below 10 ksi. The only drawback to this approach is a weight penalty.

  4. Incompressible Turbulent Wing-Body Junction Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, R.; Cagle, Corey D.; Chandra, S.

    1998-01-01

    -stream flow. The lateral curvature of the wing/strat causes the oncoming turbulent layer to skew about am axis (x-axis) parallel to the plane (xz-plane) of the mean shear. This is the principle mechanism for the generation of secondary flow. Such skew-induced secondary flows are slow to be attenuated by Reynolds stresses. Additional contribution to the generation of secondary flow comes from anisotropies in Reynolds stresses. Upstream of the strut, the mean-vorticity is directed span wise (along the y-direction). The presence of secondary flow in the vicinity of the strut causes the vorticity to stretch around the obstacle in a horse-shoe shape, with each leg having a vorticity of the opposite sense. The blockage effect of the strut imposes a severe adverse pressure gradient on the oncoming turbulent shear layer, causing boundary layer separation ahead of the leading edge, resulting in a vortex that rolls up and flows downstream into the juncture region. The separation vortices trailing in the wake of the wing can alter the lift or drag characteristics of the surfaces downstream of the wing-body juncture. Likewise, on submarines, the wake flow behind the appendage can degrade the performance of the propeller located downstream. The complex nature of this flow is caused by the presence of all six components of Reynolds stresses. Devenport and Simpson report that in the vicinity of the horse-shoe vortex there is intense recirculation with turbulent stresses being much larger than those normally observed in turbulent flows. These features contribute to making this flow a challenge to predict numerically. Some of the past studies provide useful insights into this flow that would guide our numerical efforts. In measurements reported by Shabaka and Bradshaw, the eddy viscosity tensor is seen to be non-isotropic and has negative components in certain regions. In an effort to evaluate the closure assumptions of various turbulence models, Devenport and Simpson used their own extensive

  5. Aerodynamic control with passively pitching wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravish, Nick; Wood, Robert

    Flapping wings may pitch passively under aerodynamic and inertial loads. Such passive pitching is observed in flapping wing insect and robot flight. The effect of passive wing pitch on the control dynamics of flapping wing flight are unexplored. Here we demonstrate in simulation and experiment the critical role wing pitching plays in yaw control of a flapping wing robot. We study yaw torque generation by a flapping wing allowed to passively rotate in the pitch axis through a rotational spring. Yaw torque is generated through alternating fast and slow upstroke and and downstroke. Yaw torque sensitively depends on both the rotational spring force law and spring stiffness, and at a critical spring stiffness a bifurcation in the yaw torque control relationship occurs. Simulation and experiment reveal the dynamics of this bifurcation and demonstrate that anomalous yaw torque from passively pitching wings is the result of aerodynamic and inertial coupling between the pitching and stroke-plane dynamics.

  6. Results of experiments with slotted wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachmann, G

    1924-01-01

    This report recounts some of the successful experiments conducted in England and Germany on slotted wings and ailerons. Wind tunnel test results are given and examples of aircraft constructed with these new wing components are described.

  7. Interference drag in a simulated wing-fuselage juncture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubendran, L. R.; Mcmahon, H.; Hubbartt, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    The interference drag in a wing fuselage juncture as simulated by a flat plate and a body of constant thickness having a 1.5:1 elliptical leading edge is evaluated experimentally. The experimental measurements consist of mean velocity data taken with a hot wire at a streamwise location corresponding to 16 body widths downstream of the body leading edge. From these data, the interference drag is determined by calculating the total momentum deficit (momentum area) in the juncture and also in the two dimensional turbulent boundary layers on the flat plate and body at locations sufficiently far from the juncture flow effect. The interference drag caused by the juncture drag as measured at this particular streamwise station is -3% of the total drag due to the flat plate and body boundary layers in isolation. If the body is considered to be a wing having a chord and span equal to 16 body widths, the interference drag due to the juncture is only -1% of the frictional drag of one surface of such a wing.

  8. Commercial winged booster to launch satellites from B-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covault, Craig

    1988-06-01

    A newly developed commercial winged space booster, the Pegasus, which will launch satellites from a B-52, is described. The booster will be able to launch a 600 lb, 72 in long craft into a 250 nm equatorial orbit. The Pegasus is 49.2 ft long with a 22 ft wing span and a weight of 40,000 lb. The winged design allows for an angle of attack of 20 degrees and a supersonic lift over drag ratio of 4:1. It operates with three solid rocket motors and will be launched from a B-52 at an altitude of 40,000 ft. The first motor provides an average of 112,000 lbs of thrust for about 82 seconds; burnout occurs at 208,000 ft and Mach 8.7. The third stage provides 9,000 lbs of thrust for 65 seconds, accelerating the vehicle into 25,000 fps orbital velocity. The first launch will be a 400 lb relay satellite targeted for July 1989 over the Pacific Ocean. Future launches will be possible from any site and will cost 10 million dollars. The Pegasus can also carry a 1500 payload at high altitude Mach cruise flights that do not achieve orbit, providing data to validate spaceplane conceptual fluid dynamic codes generated by computer.

  9. Aerodynamic Design of Wing based on Humpback Whale Flipper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akram, Saif; Baig, Faisal

    2013-11-01

    The tubercles provide a bio-inspired design that has commercial viability for wing-like structures. Wind tunnel tests at low speeds of model humpback flippers with leading-edge tubercles have demonstrated improvements tubercles make, such as a staggering 32% reduction in drag, 8% improvement in lift, and a 40% increase in angle of attack over smooth flippers before stalling. The tubercles on the leading edge act as a passive-flow control device that improves the performance and maneuverability of the flipper. Possible fluid-dynamic mechanisms for improved performance include delay of stall through generation of a vortex and modification of the boundary layer, and increase in effective span by reduction of both spanwise flow and strength of the tip vortex. In the present work, numerical investigation of a 3D wing with scalloped leading edge inspired by the humpback whale flipper is carried out at high subsonic speeds with variation in angle of attack from 0 to 25 degrees. The effect of using different turbulence models is also investigated in order to attain a better understanding of mechanism(s) responsible for improved aerodynamic performance. This new understanding of humpback whale flipper aerodynamics has strong implications for wing design.

  10. Secondary Wing System for Use on an Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brian E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A secondary wing system for use on an aircraft augments the lift, stability, and control of the aircraft at subsonic speeds. The secondary wing system includes a mechanism that allows the canard to be retracted within the contour of the aircraft fuselage from an operational position to a stowed position. The top surface of the canard is exposed to air flow in the stowed position, and is contoured to integrate aerodynamically and smoothly within the contour of the fuselage when the canard is retracted for high speed flight. The bottom portion of the canard is substantially flat for rotation into a storage recess within the fuselage. The single canard rotates about a vertical axis at its spanwise midpoint. The canard can be positioned between a range of sweep angles during flight and a stowed position in which its span is substantially parallel to the aircraft fuselage. The canard can be deployed and retracted during flight. The deployment mechanism includes a circular mounting ring and drive mechanism that connects the canard with the fuselage and permits it to rotate and to change incidence. The deployment mechanism further includes retractable fairings which serve to streamline the wing when it is retracted into the top of the fuselage.

  11. Flexible-Wing-Based Micro Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifju, Peter G.; Jenkins, David A.; Ettinger, Scott; Lian, Yong-Sheng; Shyy, Wei; Waszak, Martin R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper documents the development and evaluation of an original flexible-wing-based Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) technology that reduces adverse effects of gusty wind conditions and unsteady aerodynamics, exhibits desirable flight stability, and enhances structural durability. The flexible wing concept has been demonstrated on aircraft with wingspans ranging from 18 inches to 5 inches. Salient features of the flexible-wing-based MAV, including the vehicle concept, flexible wing design, novel fabrication methods, aerodynamic assessment, and flight data analysis are presented.

  12. Free wing assembly for an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolowicz, C. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A free wing is attached to a fuselage of an aircraft in a manner such that the wing is free to pivot about a spanwise axis forward of its aerodynamic center. The wing is angularly displaced about the axis by aerodynamic pitching moments, resulting from lift, and is trimmed through a use of a trimmable free stabilizer comprising a floating canard mounted on a strut rigidly connected to the wing and projected forward from it.

  13. Advancements in adaptive aerodynamic technologies for airfoils and wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepson, Jeffrey Keith

    Although aircraft operate over a wide range of flight conditions, current fixed-geometry aircraft are optimized for only a few of these conditions. By altering the shape of the aircraft, adaptive aerodynamics can be used to increase the safety and performance of an aircraft by tailoring the aircraft for multiple flight conditions. Of the various shape adaptation concepts currently being studied, the use of multiple trailing-edge flaps along the span of a wing offers a relatively high possibility of being incorporated on aircraft in the near future. Multiple trailing-edge flaps allow for effective spanwise camber adaptation with resulting drag benefits over a large speed range and load alleviation at high-g conditions. The research presented in this dissertation focuses on the development of this concept of using trailing-edge flaps to tailor an aircraft for multiple flight conditions. One of the major tasks involved in implementing trailing-edge flaps is in designing the airfoil to incorporate the flap. The first part of this dissertation presents a design formulation that incorporates aircraft performance considerations in the inverse design of low-speed laminar-flow adaptive airfoils with trailing-edge cruise flaps. The benefit of using adaptive airfoils is that the size of the low-drag region of the drag polar can be effectively increased without increasing the maximum thickness of the airfoil. Two aircraft performance parameters are considered: level-flight maximum speed and maximum range. It is shown that the lift coefficients for the lower and upper corners of the airfoil low-drag range can be appropriately adjusted to tailor the airfoil for these two aircraft performance parameters. The design problem is posed as a part of a multidimensional Newton iteration in an existing conformal-mapping based inverse design code, PROFOIL. This formulation automatically adjusts the lift coefficients for the corners of the low-drag range for a given flap deflection as

  14. Sexual conflict, life span, and aging.

    PubMed

    Adler, Margo I; Bonduriansky, Russell

    2014-08-01

    The potential for sexual conflict to influence the evolution of life span and aging has been recognized for more than a decade, and recent work also suggests that variation in life span and aging can influence sexually antagonistic coevolution. However, empirical exploration of these ideas is only beginning. Here, we provide an overview of the ideas and evidence linking inter- and intralocus sexual conflicts with life span and aging. We aim to clarify the conceptual basis of this research program, examine the current state of knowledge, and suggest key questions for further investigation. PMID:24938876

  15. Sexual Conflict, Life Span, and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Margo I.; Bonduriansky, Russell

    2014-01-01

    The potential for sexual conflict to influence the evolution of life span and aging has been recognized for more than a decade, and recent work also suggests that variation in life span and aging can influence sexually antagonistic coevolution. However, empirical exploration of these ideas is only beginning. Here, we provide an overview of the ideas and evidence linking inter- and intralocus sexual conflicts with life span and aging. We aim to clarify the conceptual basis of this research program, examine the current state of knowledge, and suggest key questions for further investigation. PMID:24938876

  16. X-Wing Research Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    One of the most unusual experimental flight vehicles appearing at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center) in the 1980s was the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA) X-Wing aircraft, seen here on the ramp. The craft was developed originally and then modified by Sikorsky Aircraft for a joint NASA-Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) program and was rolled out 19 August 1986. Taxi tests and initial low-altitude flight tests without the main rotor attached were carried out at Dryden before the program was terminated in 1988. The unusual aircraft that resulted from the Ames Research Center/Army X-Wing Project was flown at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, beginning in the spring of 1984, with a follow-on program beginning in 1986. The program, was conceived to provide an efficient combination of the vertical lift characteristic of conventional helicopters and the high cruise speed of fixed-wing aircraft. It consisted of a hybrid vehicle called the NASA/Army Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA), which was equipped with advanced X-wing rotor systems. The program began in the early 1970s to investigate ways to increase the speed of rotor aircraft, as well as their performance, reliability, and safety . It also sought to reduce the noise, vibration, and maintenance costs of helicopters. Sikorsky Aircraft Division of United Technologies Laboratories built two RSRA aircraft. NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, did some initial testing and transferred the program to Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California, for an extensive flight research program conducted by Ames and the Army. The purpose of the 1984 tests was to demonstrate the fixed-wing capability of the helicopter/airplane hybrid research vehicle and explore its flight envelope and flying qualities. These tests, flown by Ames pilot G. Warren Hall and Army Maj (soon

  17. Experimental Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Oblique Wing for the F-8 OWRA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Carmichael, Ralph L.; Smith, Stephen C.; Strong, James M.; Kroo, Ilan M.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted during June-July 1987 in the NASA Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel to study the aerodynamic performance and stability and control characteristics of a 0.087-scale model of an F-8 airplane fitted with an oblique wing. This effort was part of the Oblique Wing Research Aircraft (OWRA) program performed in conjunction with Rockwell International. The Ames-designed, aspect ratio 10.47, tapered wing used specially designed supercritical airfoils with 0.14 thickness/chord ratio at the root and 0.12 at the 85% span location. The wing was tested at two different mounting heights above the fuselage. Performance and longitudinal stability data were obtained at sweep angles of 0deg, 30deg, 45deg, 60deg, and 65deg at Mach numbers ranging from 0.30 to 1.40. Reynolds number varied from 3.1 x 10(exp 6)to 5.2 x 10(exp 6), based on the reference chord length. Angle of attack was varied from -5deg to 18deg. The performance of this wing is compared with that of another oblique wing, designed by Rockwell International, which was tested as part of the same development program. Lateral-directional stability data were obtained for a limited combination of sweep angles and Mach numbers. Sideslip angle was varied from -5deg to +5deg. Landing flap performance was studied, as were the effects of cruise flap deflections to achieve roll trim and tailor wing camber for various flight conditions. Roll-control authority of the flaps and ailerons was measured. A novel, deflected wing tip was evaluated for roll-control authority at high sweep angles.

  18. Downwash in the plane of symmetry of an elliptically loaded wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    A closed-form solution for the downwash in the plane of symmetry of an elliptically loaded line is given. This theoretical result is derived from Prandtl's lifting-line theory and assumes that: (1) a three-dimensional wing can be replaced by a straight lifting line, (2) this line is elliptically loaded, and (3) the trailing wake is a flat-sheet which does not roll up. The first assumption is reasonable for distances greater than about 1 chord from the wing aerodynamic center. The second assumption is satisfied by any combination of wing twist, spanwise camber variation, or planform that approximates elliptic loading. The third assumption is justified only for high-aspect-ratio wings at low lift coefficients and downstream distances less than about 1 span from the aerodynamic center. It is shown, however, that assuming the wake to be fully rolled up gives downwash values reasonably close to those of the flat-sheet solution derived in this paper. The wing can therefore be modeled as a single horseshoe vortex with the same lift and total circulation as the equivalent ellipticity loaded line, and the predicted downwash will be a close approximation independent of aspect ratio and lift coefficient. The flat-sheet equation and the fully rolled up wake equation are both one-line formulas that predict the upwash field in front of the wing, as well as the downwash field behind it. These formulas are useful for preliminary estimates of the complex aerodynamic interaction between two wings (i.e., canard, tandem wing, and conventional aircraft) including the effects of gap and stagger.

  19. Elevated histone expression promotes life span extension.

    PubMed

    Feser, Jason; Truong, David; Das, Chandrima; Carson, Joshua J; Kieft, Jeffrey; Harkness, Troy; Tyler, Jessica K

    2010-09-10

    Changes to the chromatin structure accompany aging, but the molecular mechanisms underlying aging and the accompanying changes to the chromatin are unclear. Here, we report a mechanism whereby altering chromatin structure regulates life span. We show that normal aging is accompanied by a profound loss of histone proteins from the genome. Indeed, yeast lacking the histone chaperone Asf1 or acetylation of histone H3 on lysine 56 are short lived, and this appears to be at least partly due to their having decreased histone levels. Conversely, increasing the histone supply by inactivation of the histone information regulator (Hir) complex or overexpression of histones dramatically extends life span via a pathway that is distinct from previously known pathways of life span extension. This study indicates that maintenance of the fundamental chromatin structure is critical for slowing down the aging process and reveals that increasing the histone supply extends life span. PMID:20832724

  20. [Winged scapula in lyme borreliosis].

    PubMed

    Rausch, V; Königshausen, M; Gessmann, J; Schildhauer, T A; Seybold, D

    2016-06-01

    Here we present the case of a young patient with one-sided winged scapula and lyme borreliosis. This disease can be very delimitating in daily life. If non-operative treatment fails, dynamic or static stabilization of the scapula can be a therapeutic option. PMID:26849378

  1. The Wings for Angels Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Liberty; McMillan, Ellen; Ayers, Ann

    2012-01-01

    How can the spirits of critically ill children be raised? Alexis Weisel (co-president of the Monarch High School National Art Honor Society, 2010-2011) had this question in mind when she initiated and developed the Wings for Angels Project after hearing about the Believe in Tomorrow (BIT) organization through her art teacher, Ellen McMillan. The…

  2. On Wings: Aerodynamics of Eagles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millson, David

    2000-01-01

    The Aerodynamics Wing Curriculum is a high school program that combines basic physics, aerodynamics, pre-engineering, 3D visualization, computer-assisted drafting, computer-assisted manufacturing, production, reengineering, and success in a 15-hour, 3-week classroom module. (JOW)

  3. Rotary wing aerodynamically generated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. J.; Morse, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    The history and methodology of aerodynamic noise reduction in rotary wing aircraft are presented. Thickness noise during hover tests and blade vortex interaction noise are determined and predicted through the use of a variety of computer codes. The use of test facilities and scale models for data acquisition are discussed.

  4. Effect of Wing Thickness and Sweep on the Oscillating Hinge-Moment and Flutter Characteristics of a Flap-Type Control at Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, William C., Jr.; Gainer, Thomas G.

    1959-01-01

    Free-oscillation tests were made in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the effects of wing thickness and wing sweep on the hinge-moment and flutter characteristics of a trailing-edge flap-type control. The untapered semispan wings had full-span aspect ratios of 5 and NACA 65A-series airfoil sections. Unswept wings having ratios of wing thickness to chord of 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, and 0.10 were investigated. The swept wings were 6 percent thick and had sweep angles of 30 deg and 45 deg. The full-span flap-type controls had a total chord of 50 percent of the wing chord and were hinged at the 0.765-wing-chord line. Tests were made at zero angle of attack over a Mach number range from 0.60 to 1.02, control oscillation amplitudes up to about 12 deg, and a range of control-reduced frequencies. Static hinge-moment data were also obtained. Results indicate that the control aerodynamic damping for the 4-percent-thick wing-control model was unstable in the Mach number range from 0.92 to 1.02 (maximum for these tests). Increasing the ratio of wing thickness to chord to 0.06, 0.08, and then to 0.10 had a stabilizing effect on the aerodynamic damping in this speed range so that the aerodynamic damping was stable for the 10-percent-thick model at all Mach numbers. The 6-percent-thick unswept-wing-control model generally had unstable aerodynamic damping in the Mach number range from 0.96 to 1.02. Increasing the wing sweep resulted in a general decrease in the stable aerodynamic damping at the lower Mach numbers and in the unstable aerodynamic damping at the higher Mach numbers. The one-degree-of-freedom control-surface flutter which occurred in the transonic Mach number range (0.92 to 1.02) for the 4-, 6-, and 8-percent-thick unswept-wing-control models could be eliminated by further increasing the ratio of thickness to chord to 0.10. Flutter could also be eliminated by increasing the wing sweep angle to either 30 deg or 45 deg. The magnitude of variation in

  5. Analysis of the effects of wing interference on the tail contributions to the rolling derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, William H , Jr

    1952-01-01

    An analysis of the effects of wing interference on the tail contributions to the rolling stability derivatives of complete airplane configurations is made by calculating the angularity of the air stream at the vertical tail due to rolling and determining the resulting forces and moments. Some of the important factors which affect the resultant angularity on the vertical tail are wing aspect ratio and sweepback, vertical-tail span, and considerations associated with angle of attack and airplane geometry. Some calculated sidewash results for a limited range of plan forms and vertical-tail sizes are presented. Equations taking into account the sidewash results are given for determining the tail contributions to the rolling derivatives. Comparisons of estimated and experimental results indicate that a consideration of wing interference effects improves the estimated values of the tail contributions to the rolling derivatives and that fair agreement with available experimental data is obtained.

  6. Calculated spanwise lift distributions, influence functions, and influence coefficients for unswept wings in subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diederich, Franklin W; Zlotnick, Martin

    1955-01-01

    Spanwise lift distributions have been calculated for nineteen unswept wings with various aspect ratios and taper ratios and with a variety of angle-of-attack or twist distributions, including flap and aileron deflections, by means of the Weissinger method with eight control points on the semispan. Also calculated were aerodynamic influence coefficients which pertain to a certain definite set of stations along the span, and several methods are presented for calculating aerodynamic influence functions and coefficients for stations other than those stipulated. The information presented in this report can be used in the analysis of untwisted wings or wings with known twist distributions, as well as in aeroelastic calculations involving initially unknown twist distributions.

  7. Polarization-Controllable Winged Nanocone Tip Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huttunen, Mikko J.; Mäkitalo, Jouni; Kauranen, Martti

    We propose winged metal nanocone optical antennas for efficient coupling of far-field radiation into the near-field of sharp metal tips. Unlike normal sharp metal tips, the winged nanocones require no oscillating field along the tip axis for the excitation of the tips. We calculate extinction spectra and local-field enhancements for single and winged gold nanocones and show that the field enhancements in the tips of the winged cones are due to a combination of particle plasmon resonances and a lightning-rod effect. We also propose that the winged nanocones could be used for optical far-field background suppression for tip-enhanced microscopy.

  8. F-8 oblique wing structural feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koltko, E.; Katz, A.; Bell, M. A.; Smith, W. D.; Lauridia, R.; Overstreet, C. T.; Klapprott, C.; Orr, T. F.; Jobe, C. L.; Wyatt, F. G.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of fitting a rotating oblique wing on an F-8 aircraft to produce a full scale manned prototype capable of operating in the transonic and supersonic speed range was investigated. The strength, aeroelasticity, and fatigue life of such a prototype are analyzed. Concepts are developed for a new wing, a pivot, a skewing mechanism, control systems that operate through the pivot, and a wing support assembly that attaches in the F-8 wing cavity. The modification of the two-place NTF-8A aircraft to the oblique wing configuration is discussed.

  9. Preliminary analysis of the span-distributed-load concept for cargo aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, A. H., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A simplified computer analysis of the span-distributed-load airplane (in which payload is placed within the wing structure) has shown that the span-distributed-load concept has high potential for application to future air cargo transport design. Significant increases in payload fraction over current wide-bodied freighters are shown for gross weights in excess of 0.5 Gg (1,000,000 lb). A cruise-matching calculation shows that the trend toward higher aspect ratio improves overall efficiency; that is, less thrust and fuel are required. The optimal aspect ratio probably is not determined by structural limitations. Terminal-area constraints and increasing design-payload density, however, tend to limit aspect ratio.

  10. An Experimental Study of the Aerodynamics of a Swept and Unswept Semispan Wing with a Simulated Glaze Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    Two semispan wings, one with a rectangular planform and one with 30 degrees of leading edge sweep were tested. Both had a NACA 0012 airfoil section, and both were tested clean and with simulated glaze ice shapes on their leading edges. Several surface roughness were tested. Each model geometry is documented and each surface roughness is explained. Aerodynamic performance of the wing in the form of sectional lift and integrated three-dimensional lift is documented through pressure measurements obtained from rows of surface pressure taps placed at five span locations on the wing. For the rectangular wing, sectional drag near the midspan is obtained from wake total pressure profiles. The data is presented in tabular and graphical form and is also available on computer disk.

  11. Evaluation of the Structural Response and Failure of a Full-Scale Stitched Graphite-Epoxy Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Bush, Harold G.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2001-01-01

    Analytical and experimental results for an all-composite full-scale wing box are presented. The wing box is representative of a section of a 220-passenger commercial transport aircraft wing box and was designed and constructed by The Boeing Company as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) program. The semi-span wing was fabricated from a graphite-epoxy material system with cover panels and spars held together using Kevlar stitches through the thickness. No mechanical fasteners were used to hold the stiffeners to the skin of the cover panels. Tests were conducted with and without low-speed impact damage, discrete source damage and repairs. Upbending, down-bending and brake roll loading conditions were applied. The structure with nonvisible impact damage carried 97% of Design Ultimate Load prior to failure through a lower cover panel access hole. Finite element and experimental results agree for the global response of the structure.

  12. Wind-tunnel investigation of a Fowler flap and spoiler for an advanced general aviation wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, J. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The wing was tested without fuselage or empennage and was fitted with approximately three-quarter span Fowler flaps and half span spoilers. The spoilers were hinged at the 70 percent chord point and vented when the flaps were deflected. Static longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic data were obtained over an angle of attack range of -8 deg to 22 deg for various flap deflections and positions, spoiler geometries, and vent lip geometries. Lateral characteristics indicate that the spoilers are generally adequate for lateral control. In general, the spoiler effectiveness increases with increasing angle of attack, increases with increasing flap deflections, and is influenced by vent lip geometry. In addition, the data show that some two-dimensional effects on spoiler effectiveness are reduced in the three-dimensional case. Results also indicate significant increase in lift coefficient as the Fowler flaps are deflected; when the flap was fully deflected, the maximum wing lift coefficient was increased about 96 percent.

  13. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an NACA Low-Drag Tapered Wing with Straight Trailing Edge and Simple Split Flaps, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muse, Thomas C.; Neely, Robert H.

    1941-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NACA 19-foot pressure wind tunnel of a tapered wing with straight railing edge having NACA 66 series low-drag airfoil sections and equipped with full-span and partial-span simple split flaps. The airfoil sections used were the NACA 66,2-116 at the root and the 66,2-216 at the tip. The primary purpose of the investigation was to determine the effect of the split flaps on the aerodynamic characteristics of the tapered wing. Complete lift, drag, and pitching-moment coefficients were determined for the plain wing and for each flap arrangement through a Reynold number range of 2,600,000 to 4,600,000. The results of this investigation indicate that values of maximum lift coefficient comparable to values obtained on tapered wings with conventional sections and similar flap installations can be obtained from wings with the NACA low-drag sections. The increment of maximum lift due to the split flap was found to vary somewhat with Reynold number over the range investigated. The C(sub L)max of the wing alone is 1.49 at a Reynolds number of 4,600,000; whereas with the partial-span simple split flap it is 2.22 and with the full-span arrangement, 2.80. Observations of wool tufts on the wing indicate that the addition of split flaps did not appreciable alter the pattern of the stall; even though the stall did occur more abruptly than with the wing alone.

  14. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Subsonic Longitudinal Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Tiltable-Wing Vertical-Take-Off-and-Landing Supersonic Bomber Configuration Including Turbojet Power Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert F.; Vogler, Raymond D.; Moseley, William C., Jr.

    1959-01-01

    Jet-powered model tests were made to determine the low-speed longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a vertical-take-off and-landing supersonic bomber configuration. The configuration has an unique engine-wing arrangement wherein six large turbojet engines (three on each side of the fuselage) are buried in a low-aspect-ratio wing which is tilted into the vertical plane for take-off. An essentially two-dimensional variable inlet, spanning the leading edge of each wing semispan, provides air for the engines. Jet flow conditions were simulated for a range of military (nonafterburner) and afterburner turbojet-powered flight at subsonic speeds. Three horizontal tails were tested at a station down-stream of the jet exit and at three heights above the jet axes. A semi-span model was used and test parameters covered wing-fuselage incidence angles from 0 deg to 15 deg, wing angles of attack from -4 deg to 36 deg, a variable range of horizontal-tail incidence angles, and some variations in power simulation conditions. Results show that, with all horizontal tails tested, there were large variations in static stability throughout the lift range. When the wing and fuselage were alined, the model was statically stable throughout the test range only with the largest tail tested (tail span of 1.25 wing span) and only when the tail was located in the low test position which placed the tail nearest to the undeflected jet. For transition flight conditions, none of the tail configurations provided satisfactory longitudinal stability or trim throughout the lift range. Jet flow was destabilizing for most of the test conditions, and varying the jet-exit flow conditions at a constant thrust coefficient had little effect on the stability of this model. Wing leading-edge simulation had some important effects on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics.

  15. Rotor/wing aerodynamic interactions in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felker, F. F.; Light, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of rotor/wing aerodynamic interactions in hover is described. The experimental investigation consisted of both a large-scale and small-scale test. A 0.658-scale, V-22 rotor and wing was used in the large-scale test. Wind download, wing surface pressure, rotor performance, and rotor downwash data from the large-scale test are presented. A small-scale experiment was conducted to determine how changes in the rotor/wing geometry affected the aerodynamic interactions. These geometry variations included the distance between the rotor and wing, wing incidence angle, and configurations both with the rotor axis at the tip of the wing (tilt rotor configuration) and with the rotor axis at the center of the wing (compound helicopter configuration). A wing with boundary-layer control was also tested to evaluate the effect of leading and trailing edge upper surface blowing on the wing download. A computationally efficient, semi-empirical theory was developed to predict the download on the wing. Finally, correlations between the theoretical predictions and test data are presented.

  16. Piezoelectrically actuated insect scale flapping wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sujoy; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2010-04-01

    An energy method is used in order to derive the non-linear equations of motion of a smart flapping wing. Flapping wing is actuated from the root by a PZT unimorph in the piezofan configuration. Dynamic characteristics of the wing, having the same size as dragonfly Aeshna Multicolor, are analyzed using numerical simulations. It is shown that flapping angle variations of the smart flapping wing are similar to the actual dragonfly wing for a specific feasible voltage. An unsteady aerodynamic model based on modified strip theory is used to obtain the aerodynamic forces. It is found that the smart wing generates sufficient lift to support its own weight and carry a small payload. It is therefore a potential candidate for flapping wing of micro air vehicles.

  17. Locomotion by Tandem and Parallel Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanida, Yoshimichi

    A two-dimensional analysis was carried out on the locomotion by tandem and parallel wings in relation to the free flight of dragonflies and beetles, remarking the mutual interference between fore and hind wings. The results obtained are summarized as follows: In the case of tandem wings, (1)High thrust and propulsive efficiency can be achieved when the forewing oscillates with a definite phase lag behind the hindwing, as in the case of real dragonflies, (2)Somewhat smaller amplitude of hindwing leads to optimum condition for work sharing of two wings, (3)The hard forewing does not serve for the thrust and propulsive efficiency, whereas the hard hindwing does for the augmentation of them; In the case of parallel wings, (4)The hard wing placed near the soft wing acts nearly as an infinite plate, as for the ground effect, increasing both thrust and propulsive efficiency.

  18. Numerical optimization techniques for bound circulation distribution for minimum induced drag of nonplanar wings: Basic formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, J.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical method was developed for determining the optimum span load distribution for minimum induced drag for subsonic nonplanar configurations. The undistorted wing wake is assumed to have piecewise linear variation of shed vortex sheet strength, resulting in a quadratic variation of bound circulation and span load. The optimum loading is obtained either through a direct technique, whereby derivatives of the drag expression are calculated analytically in terms of the unknown wake vortex sheet strengths. Both techniques agree well with each other and with available exact solutions for minimum induced drag.

  19. Reflection-plane tests of spoilers on an advanced technology wing with a large Fowler flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, W. H., Jr.; Volk, C. G., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of spoilers applied to a finite-span wing which utilizes the GA(W)-1 airfoil section and a 30% chord full-span Fowler flap. A series of spoiler cross sectioned shapes were tested utilizing a reflection-plane model. Five-component force characteristics and hinge moment measurements were obtained. Results confirm earlier two-dimensional tests which showed that spoilers could provide large lift increments at any flap setting, and that spoiler control reversal tendencies could be eliminated by providing a vent path from lower surface to upper surface. Performance penalties due to spoiler leakage airflow were measured.

  20. Pressure distribution data from tests of 2.29-meter (7.5-ft.) span EET high-lift research model in Langley 4- by 7-meter tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, H. L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A 2.29 m (7.5 ft.) span high-lift research model equipped with full-span leading-edge slat and part-span double-slotted trailing-edge flap was tested in the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel to determine the low speed performance characteristics of a representative high aspect ratio suprcritical wing. These tests were performed in support of the Energy Efficient Transport (EET) program which is one element of the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) project. Static longitudinal forces and moments and chordwise pressure distributions at three spanwise stations were measured for cruise, climb, two take-off flap, and two landing flap wing configurations. The tabulated and plotted pressure distribution data is presented without analysis or discussion.

  1. Trapezoidal Wing Experimental Repeatability and Velocity Profiles in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannon, Judith A.; Washburn, Anthony E.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Watson, Ralph D.

    2012-01-01

    The AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Technical Committee sponsored a High Lift Prediction Workshop held in June 2010. For this first workshop, data from the Trapezoidal Wing experiments were used for comparison to CFD. This paper presents long-term and short-term force and moment repeatability analyses for the Trapezoidal Wing model tested in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. This configuration was chosen for its simplified high-lift geometry, publicly available set of test data, and previous CFD experience with this configuration. The Trapezoidal Wing is a three-element semi-span swept wing attached to a body pod. These analyses focus on configuration 1 tested in 1998 (Test 478), 2002 (Test 506), and 2003 (Test 513). This paper also presents model velocity profiles obtained on the main element and on the flap during the 1998 test. These velocity profiles are primarily at an angle of attack of 28 degrees and semi-span station of 83% and show confluent boundary layers and wakes.

  2. From wakes to wings: using a multi-fidelity approach to design flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, David J.; Salehipour, Hesam

    2014-06-01

    We present two potential flow based computational tools for the design and analysis of efficient, low Reynolds number flapping wings. Our approach starts with a series of wake-only momentum and energetics analyses. We have used and extended the classical wake-only approach to efficiently perform a large number of computations over the flapping parameter space. The method considers the balance of flight forces in the coupled prediction of wing flapping kinematics and flight energetics. Following the wake-only energetics analysis, a quasi-inverse doublet lattice method (qi-DLM) is applied to determine flapping wing shape including localized wing morphing and deformation. This local wing morphing prescribed so that the wing may achieve the desired, minimum power wake vorticity distribution defined by the wake-only analysis. In this paper we illustrate these methods and perform a preliminary study to assess the impact of wing taper, wing camber and wing twist variations on efficient flapping flight.

  3. Overview of recent progress on the DARPA/USAF Wright Laboratory Smart Materials and Structures Development--Smart Wing program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudva, Jayanth N.; Appa, Kari; Jardine, A. Peter; Martin, Christopher A.; Carpenter, Bernie F.

    1997-05-01

    The concept of an adaptive aircraft wing, i.e., whose shape parameters such as camber, span-wise twist, and thickness can be varied to optimize the wing shape for various flight conditions, has been extensively studied by numerous researchers. While the aerodynamic benefits (in terms of increased lift/drag ratios, improved maneuverability, and delayed flow separation) have been analytically and experimentally established, the complexity and weight penalty of the designs and actuation using smart materials could potentially alleviate the shortcomings of prior designs, leading the way to a more practical `smart' adaptive wing which responds to changes in flight and environmental conditions by optimally modifying its shape. A summary of recent work in the area of adaptive wing concepts incorporating smart structures technologies is presented. Emphasis is placed on continuing research at Northrop Grumman under a United States Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency contract entitled `Smart Structures and Materials Development-Smart Wing,'. Limitations and potential benefits of adaptive wing designs, applications and advantages of smart material actuators and sensors, and results of recent tests are discussed. Recommendations for future work required to develop an operational smart adaptive wing are also outlined.

  4. Effect of wing inertia on hovering performance of flexible flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Bo; Luo, Haoxiang

    2010-11-01

    Insect wings in flight typically deform under the combined aerodynamic force and wing inertia; whichever is dominant depends on the mass ratio defined as m∗=ρsh/(ρfc), where ρsh is the surface density of the wing, ρf is the density of the air, and c is the characteristic length of the wing. To study the differences that the wing inertia makes in the aerodynamic performance of the deformable wing, a two-dimensional numerical study is applied to simulate the flow-structure interaction of a flapping wing during hovering flight. The wing section is modeled as an elastic plate, which may experience nonlinear deformations while flapping. The effect of the wing inertia on lift production, drag resistance, and power consumption is studied for a range of wing rigidity. It is found that both inertia-induced deformation and flow-induced deformation can enhance lift of the wing. However, the flow-induced deformation, which corresponds to the low-mass wing, produces less drag and leads to higher aerodynamic power efficiency. In addition, the wing deformation has a significant effect on the unsteady vortices around the wing. The implication of the findings on insect flight is discussed.

  5. Preliminary study of a wing-tip vortex using laser velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, R. K.; Mcalister, K. W.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements have been made in the wake of a semi-span NACA 0015 airfoil with emphasis on the region of the wing tip vortex. The spanwise and streamwise velocity components were measured using a two-component laser Doppler velocimeter. The purpose of the study was to initiate the operation of a laser velocimeter system and to perform preliminary wake measurements in preparation for a more extensive study of the structure and near field development of a tip vortex.

  6. Hypersonic incipient separation on delta wing with trailing-edge flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    The paper reviews the experimental data on the incipient separation characteristics of planar delta wings of 75 degree sharp leading edges, with full-span trailing edge flap deflected into the windward flow. The local Reynolds number range for these investigations covered laminar, transitional and turbulent conditions. It is shown that, while turbulent boundary layer data correlates with two dimensional results, in the laminar and transitional cases, there is a nearly parallel shift to higher flap angles for incipient separation.

  7. Wing spar stress charts and wing truss proportions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P

    1926-01-01

    In order to simplify the calculation of beams continuous over three supports, a series of charts have been calculated giving the bending moments at all the critical points and the reactions at all supports for such members. Using these charts as a basis, calculations of equivalent bending moments, representing the total stresses acting in two bay-wing trusses of proportions varying over a wide range, have been determined, both with and without allowance for column effect. This leads finally to the determination of the best proportions for any particular truss or the best strut locations in any particular airplane. The ideal proportions are found to vary with the thickness of the wing section used, the aspect ratio, and the ratio of gap to chord.

  8. Similitude relations for buffet and wing rock on delta wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabey, D. G.

    1997-08-01

    Vortex flow phenomena at high angles of incidence are of great interest to the designers of advanced combat aircraft. The steady phenomena (such as steady lift and pitching moments) are understood fairly well, whereas the unsteady phenomena are still uncertain. This paper addresses two important unsteady phenomena on delta wings. With regard to the frequency parameter of the quasi-periodic excitation caused by vortex bursting, a new correlation is established covering a range of sweep back from 60 to 75°. With regard to the much lower frequency parameter of limit-cycle rigid-body wing-rock, a new experiment shows conclusively that although the motion is non-linear, the frequency parameter can be predicted by quasi-steady theory. As a consequence, for a given sweep angle, the frequency parameter is inversely proportional to the square root of the inertia in roll. This is an important observation when attempting to extrapolate from model tests in wind tunnels to predict the wing-rock characteristics of aircraft.

  9. The effect of aspect ratio on the leading-edge vortex over an insect-like flapping wing.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Nathan; Knowles, Kevin; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    Insect wing shapes are diverse and a renowned source of inspiration for the new generation of autonomous flapping vehicles, yet the aerodynamic consequences of varying geometry is not well understood. One of the most defining and aerodynamically significant measures of wing shape is the aspect ratio, defined as the ratio of wing length (R) to mean wing chord (c). We investigated the impact of aspect ratio, AR, on the induced flow field around a flapping wing using a robotic device. Rigid rectangular wings ranging from AR = 1.5 to 7.5 were flapped with insect-like kinematics in air with a constant Reynolds number (Re) of 1400, and a dimensionless stroke amplitude of 6.5c (number of chords traversed by the wingtip). Pseudo-volumetric, ensemble-averaged, flow fields around the wings were captured using particle image velocimetry at 11 instances throughout simulated downstrokes. Results confirmed the presence of a high-lift, separated flow field with a leading-edge vortex (LEV), and revealed that the conical, primary LEV grows in size and strength with increasing AR. In each case, the LEV had an arch-shaped axis with its outboard end originating from a focus-sink singularity on the wing surface near the tip. LEV detachment was observed for AR > 1.5 around mid-stroke at ~70% span, and initiated sooner over higher aspect ratio wings. At AR > 3 the larger, stronger vortex persisted under the wing surface well into the next half-stroke leading to a reduction in lift. Circulatory lift attributable to the LEV increased with AR up to AR = 6. Higher aspect ratios generated proportionally less lift distally because of LEV breakdown, and also less lift closer to the wing root due to the previous LEV's continuing presence under the wing. In nature, insect wings go no higher than AR ~ 5, likely in part due to architectural and physiological constraints but also because of the reducing aerodynamic benefits of high AR wings. PMID:26451802

  10. Span graphics display utilities handbook, first edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Green, J. L.; Newman, R.

    1985-01-01

    The Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN) is a computer network connecting scientific institutions throughout the United States. This network provides an avenue for timely, correlative research between investigators, in a multidisciplinary approach to space physics studies. An objective in the development of SPAN is to make available direct and simplified procedures that scientists can use, without specialized training, to exchange information over the network. Information exchanges include raw and processes data, analysis programs, correspondence, documents, and graphite images. This handbook details procedures that can be used to exchange graphic images over SPAN. The intent is to periodically update this handbook to reflect the constantly changing facilities available on SPAN. The utilities described within reflect an earnest attempt to provide useful descriptions of working utilities that can be used to transfer graphic images across the network. Whether graphic images are representative of satellite servations or theoretical modeling and whether graphics images are of device dependent or independent type, the SPAN graphics display utilities handbook will be the users guide to graphic image exchange.

  11. Experimental study of the flow field induced by a resonating piezoelectric flapping wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidakhvidi, M. Ahmadi; Shirzadeh, R.; Steenackers, G.; Vanlanduit, S.

    2013-11-01

    Flexible plate structures with integrated piezoelectric patches offer interesting possibilities when considered as actuation mechanisms for energy harvesting devices, cooling devices and propulsion devices of micro-aerial vehicles. Most of the studies reported in literature are based on the assumption of a 2D aerodynamic flow. However, the flow behind a finite span wing is significantly more complex than that of an infinite span wing. In order to corroborate this statement, the present experimental study contains high-speed particle image velocimetry measurements performed on a piezoelectric finite span wing oscillating in air, at 84.8 Hz. The paper focuses on the situation of low Keulegan-Carpenter numbers (KC < 3). The dimensionless KC number describes the relative importance of the drag forces over inertia forces for objects that oscillate in a fluid flow at rest. The evolution of the unsteady vortex structures near the plate is characterized for different conditions. This allows a better understanding of the unsteady aerodynamics of flapping flight. The accomplished experimental data analysis has shown that the flow phenomena are strongly dependent on the KC values.

  12. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re ≈ 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small robotic

  13. Subsonic longitudinal and lateral-directional static aerodynamic characteristics of a general research fighter model employing a strake-wing concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, C. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A general research fighter model was tested in the Langley 7 by 10 foot high speed tunnel at a Mach number of 0.3. Strakes with exposed semi-spans of 10 percent, 20 percent, and 30 percent of the wing reference semi-span were tested in combination with wings having leading edge sweep angles of 30, 44, and 60 degrees. The angle of attack range was from -4 degrees to approximately 48 degrees at sideslip angles of 0, -5, and 5 degrees. The data are presented without analysis in order to expedite publication.

  14. Exploratory study of the effects of wing-leading-edge modifications on the stall/spin behavior of a light general aviation airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Configurations with full-span and segmented leading-edge flaps and full-span and segmented leading-edge droop were tested. Studies were conducted with wind-tunnel models, with an outdoor radio-controlled model, and with a full-scale airplane. Results show that wing-leading-edge modifications can produce large effects on stall/spin characteristics, particularly on spin resistance. One outboard wing-leading-edge modification tested significantly improved lateral stability at stall, spin resistance, and developed spin characteristics.

  15. Aerodynamic-structural study of canard wing, dual wing, and conventional wing systems for general aviation applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selberg, B. P.; Cronin, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical aerodynamic-structural airplane configuration study was conducted to assess performance gains achievable through advanced design concepts. The mission specification was for 350 mph, range of 1500 st. mi., at altitudes between 30,000 and 40,000 ft. Two payload classes were studied - 1200 lb (6 passengers) and 2400 lb (12 passengers). The configurations analyzed included canard wings, closely coupled dual wings, swept forward - swept rearward wings, joined wings, and conventional wing tail arrangements. The results illustrate substantial performance gains possible with the dual wing configuration. These gains result from weight savings due to predicted structural efficiencies. The need for further studies of structural efficiencies for the various advanced configurations was highlighted.

  16. Analysis of Asymmetric Aircraft Aerodynamics Due to an Experimental Wing Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartshorn, Fletcher

    2011-01-01

    Aerodynamic computational fluid dynamics analysis of a wing glove attached to one wing of a business jet is presented and discussed. A wing glove placed on only one wing will produce asymmetric aerodynamic effects that will result in overall changes in the forces and moments acting on the aircraft. These changes, referred to as deltas, need to be determined and quantified to ensure that the wing glove does not have a significant effect on the aircraft flight characteristics. TRANAIR (Calmar Research Corporation, Cato, New York), a nonlinear full potential solver, and Star-CCM+ (CD-adapco, Melville, New York), a finite volume full Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics solver, are used to analyze a full aircraft with and without the glove at a variety of flight conditions, aircraft configurations, and angles of attack and sideslip. Changes in the aircraft lift, drag, and side force along with roll, pitch, and yaw are presented. Span lift and moment distributions are also presented for a more detailed look at the effects of the glove on the aircraft. Aerodynamic flow phenomena due to the addition of the glove are discussed. Results show that the glove produces only small changes in the aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the aircraft, most of which are insignificant.

  17. Calculation of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of wing-flap configurations with externally blown flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, M. R.; Spangler, S. B.; Nielsen, J. N.; Goodwin, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was carried out to extend and improve an existing method for predicting the longitudinal characteristics of wing flap configurations with externally blown flaps (EBF). Two potential flow models were incorporated into the prediction method: a wing and flap lifting-surface model and a turbofan engine wake model. The wing-flap model uses a vortex-lattice approach to represent the wing and flaps. The jet wake model consists of a series of closely spaced vortex rings normal to a centerline which may have vertical and lateral curvature to conform to the local flow field beneath the wing and flaps. Comparisons of measured and predicted pressure distributions, span load distributions on each lifting surface, and total lift and pitching moment coefficients on swept and unswept EBF configurations are included. A wide range of thrust coefficients and flap deflection angles is considered at angles of attack up to the onset of stall. Results indicate that overall lift and pitching-moment coefficients are predicted reasonably well over the entire range. The predicted detailed load distributions are qualitatively correct and show the peaked loads at the jet impingement points, but the widths and heights of the load peaks are not consistently predicted.

  18. A Comparison of Metallic, Composite and Nanocomposite Optimal Transonic Transport Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Graeme J.; Kenway, Gaetan K. W.; Martins, Joaquim R. R.

    2014-01-01

    Current and future composite material technologies have the potential to greatly improve the performance of large transport aircraft. However, the coupling between aerodynamics and structures makes it challenging to design optimal flexible wings, and the transonic flight regime requires high fidelity computational models. We address these challenges by solving a series of high-fidelity aerostructural optimization problems that explore the design space for the wing of a large transport aircraft. We consider three different materials: aluminum, carbon-fiber reinforced composites and an hypothetical composite based on carbon nanotubes. The design variables consist of both aerodynamic shape (including span), structural sizing, and ply angle fractions in the case of composites. Pareto fronts with respect to structural weight and fuel burn are generated. The wing performance in each case is optimized subject to stress and buckling constraints. We found that composite wings consistently resulted in lower fuel burn and lower structural weight, and that the carbon nanotube composite did not yield the increase in performance one would expect from a material with such outstanding properties. This indicates that there might be diminishing returns when it comes to the application of advanced materials to wing design, requiring further investigation.

  19. DARPA/AFRL Smart Wing Phase 2 wind tunnel test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Lewis B.; Martin, C. A.; Sanders, Brian P.; West, Mark N.; Pinkerton-Florance, Jennifer L.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Fleming, Gary A.

    2002-07-01

    Northrop Grumman Corporation built and twice tested a 30 percent scale wind tunnel model of a proposed uninhabited combat air vehicle under the DARPA/AFRL Smart Materials and Structures Development - Smart Wing Phase 2 program to demonstrate the applicability of smart control surfaces on advanced aircraft configurations. The model constructed was a full span, sting mounted model with smart leading and trailing edge control surfaces on the right wing and conventional, hinged trailing edge control surfaces on the left wing. Among the performance benefits that were quantified were increased pitching moment, increased rolling moment and improved pressure distribution of the smart wing over the conventional wing. This paper present an overview of the result from the wind tunnel test performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Transonic Dynamic Tunnel in March 2000 and May 2001. Successful results included: (1) improved aileron effectiveness at high dynamic pressures, (2) demonstrated improvements in lateral and longitudinal effectiveness with smooth contoured smart trailing edge over conventional hinged control surfaces, (3) chordwise and spanwise shape control of the smart trailing edge control surface, and (4) smart trailing edge control surface deflection rates over 80 deg/sec.

  20. Wing-wake interaction reduces power consumption in insect tandem wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    Insects are capable of a remarkable diversity of flight techniques. Dragonflies, in particular, are notable for their powerful aerial manoeuvres and endurance during prey catching or territory flights. While most insects such as flies, bees and wasps either reduced their hinds wings or mechanically coupled fore and hind wings, dragonflies have maintained two independent-controlled pairs of wings throughout their evolution. An extraordinary feature of dragonfly wing kinematics is wing phasing, the shift in flapping phase between the fore and hind wing periods. Wing phasing has previously been associated with an increase in thrust production, readiness for manoeuvrability and hunting performance. Recent studies have shown that wing phasing in tandem wings produces a twofold modulation in hind wing lift, but slightly reduces the maximum combined lift of fore and hind wings, compared to two wings flapping in isolation. Despite this disadvantage, however, wing phasing is effective in improving aerodynamic efficiency during flight by the removal of kinetic energy from the wake. Computational analyses demonstrate that this increase in flight efficiency may save up to 22% aerodynamic power expenditure compared to insects flapping only two wings. In terms of engineering, energetic benefits in four-wing flapping are of substantial interest in the field of biomimetic aircraft design, because the performance of man-made air vehicles is often limited by high-power expenditure rather than by lift production. This manuscript provides a summary on power expenditures and aerodynamic efficiency in flapping tandem wings by investigating wing phasing in a dynamically scaled robotic model of a hovering dragonfly.

  1. Wing-wake interaction reduces power consumption in insect tandem wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2009-05-01

    Insects are capable of a remarkable diversity of flight techniques. Dragonflies, in particular, are notable for their powerful aerial manoeuvres and endurance during prey catching or territory flights. While most insects such as flies, bees and wasps either reduced their hinds wings or mechanically coupled fore and hind wings, dragonflies have maintained two independent-controlled pairs of wings throughout their evolution. An extraordinary feature of dragonfly wing kinematics is wing phasing, the shift in flapping phase between the fore and hind wing periods. Wing phasing has previously been associated with an increase in thrust production, readiness for manoeuvrability and hunting performance. Recent studies have shown that wing phasing in tandem wings produces a twofold modulation in hind wing lift, but slightly reduces the maximum combined lift of fore and hind wings, compared to two wings flapping in isolation. Despite this disadvantage, however, wing phasing is effective in improving aerodynamic efficiency during flight by the removal of kinetic energy from the wake. Computational analyses demonstrate that this increase in flight efficiency may save up to 22% aerodynamic power expenditure compared to insects flapping only two wings. In terms of engineering, energetic benefits in four-wing flapping are of substantial interest in the field of biomimetic aircraft design, because the performance of man-made air vehicles is often limited by high-power expenditure rather than by lift production. This manuscript provides a summary on power expenditures and aerodynamic efficiency in flapping tandem wings by investigating wing phasing in a dynamically scaled robotic model of a hovering dragonfly.

  2. Effects of wing deformation on aerodynamic performance of a revolving insect wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Ryusuke; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Liu, Hao

    2014-12-01

    Flexible wings of insects and bio-inspired micro air vehicles generally deform remarkably during flapping flight owing to aerodynamic and inertial forces, which is of highly nonlinear fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems. To elucidate the novel mechanisms associated with flexible wing aerodynamics in the low Reynolds number regime, we have built up a FSI model of a hawkmoth wing undergoing revolving and made an investigation on the effects of flexible wing deformation on aerodynamic performance of the revolving wing model. To take into account the characteristics of flapping wing kinematics we designed a kinematic model for the revolving wing in two-fold: acceleration and steady rotation, which are based on hovering wing kinematics of hawkmoth, Manduca sexta. Our results show that both aerodynamic and inertial forces demonstrate a pronounced increase during acceleration phase, which results in a significant wing deformation. While the aerodynamic force turns to reduce after the wing acceleration terminates due to the burst and detachment of leading-edge vortices (LEVs), the dynamic wing deformation seem to delay the burst of LEVs and hence to augment the aerodynamic force during and even after the acceleration. During the phase of steady rotation, the flexible wing model generates more vertical force at higher angles of attack (40°-60°) but less horizontal force than those of a rigid wing model. This is because the wing twist in spanwise owing to aerodynamic forces results in a reduction in the effective angle of attack at wing tip, which leads to enhancing the aerodynamics performance by increasing the vertical force while reducing the horizontal force. Moreover, our results point out the importance of the fluid-structure interaction in evaluating flexible wing aerodynamics: the wing deformation does play a significant role in enhancing the aerodynamic performances but works differently during acceleration and steady rotation, which is mainly induced by

  3. Flexible Wing Model for Structural Sizing and Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of a Strut-Braced Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gern, Frank H.; Naghshineh, Amir H.; Sulaeman, Erwin; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a structural and aeroelastic model for wing sizing and weight calculation of a strut-braced wing. The wing weight is calculated using a newly developed structural weight analysis module considering the special nature of strut-braced wings. A specially developed aeroelastic model enables one to consider wing flexibility and spanload redistribution during in-flight maneuvers. The structural model uses a hexagonal wing-box featuring skin panels, stringers, and spar caps, whereas the aerodynamics part employs a linearized transonic vortex lattice method. Thus, the wing weight may be calculated from the rigid or flexible wing spanload. The calculations reveal the significant influence of the strut on the bending material weight of the wing. The use of a strut enables one to design a wing with thin airfoils without weight penalty. The strut also influences wing spanload and deformations. Weight savings are not only possible by calculation and iterative resizing of the wing structure according to the actual design loads. Moreover, as an advantage over the cantilever wing, employment of the strut twist moment for further load alleviation leads to increased savings in structural weight.

  4. Boundary Spanning Leadership Practices for Population Health.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R; White-Williams, Connie

    2015-09-01

    This department highlights change management strategies that may be successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change initiatives. In this article, the authors discuss boundary spanning leadership practices for achieving the Triple Aim of simultaneously improving the health of populations, improving the patient experience, and reducing per-capita cost of health care. Drawing on experience with an existing population-focused heart failure clinic borne of an academic-practice partnership, the authors discuss boundary spanning leadership practices aimed at achieving the Triple Aim concept and its intended design. PMID:26301546

  5. Kinematics and wing shape across flight speed in the bat, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae

    PubMed Central

    Von Busse, Rhea; Hedenström, Anders; Winter, York; Johansson, L. Christoffer

    2012-01-01

    Summary The morphology and kinematics of a flying animal determines the resulting aerodynamic lift through the regulation of the speed of the air moving across the wing, the wing area and the lift coefficient. We studied the detailed three-dimensional wingbeat kinematics of the bat, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae, flying in a wind tunnel over a range of flight speeds (0–7 m/s), to determine how factors affecting the lift production vary across flight speed and within wingbeats. We found that the wing area, the angle of attack and the camber, which are determinants of the lift production, decreased with increasing speed. The camber is controlled by multiple mechanisms along the span, including the deflection of the leg relative to the body, the bending of the fifth digit, the deflection of the leading edge flap and the upward bending of the wing tip. All these measures vary throughout the wing beat suggesting active or aeroelastic control. The downstroke Strouhal number, Std, is kept relatively constant, suggesting that favorable flow characteristics are maintained during the downstroke, across the range of speeds studied. The Std is kept constant through changes in the stroke plane, from a strongly inclined stroke plane at low speeds to a more vertical stroke plane at high speeds. The mean angular velocity of the wing correlates with the aerodynamic performance and shows a minimum at the speed of maximum lift to drag ratio, suggesting a simple way to determine the optimal speed from kinematics alone. Taken together our results show the high degree of adjustments that the bats employ to fine tune the aerodynamics of the wings and the correlation between kinematics and aerodynamic performance. PMID:23259057

  6. 20. DETAIL OF WEST ANCHOR SPAN, CANTILEVER ARMS AND WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL OF WEST ANCHOR SPAN, CANTILEVER ARMS AND WEST HALF OF SUSPENDED SPAN OF THROUGH TRUSS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  7. Detail, south (breslau) approach span, from west, showing end block ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, south (breslau) approach span, from west, showing end block and railing at approach span - Breslau Bridge, Spanning North Branch of Susquehanna River at Hannover Street, Plymouth, Luzerne County, PA

  8. 21. VIEW SOUTHWEST, DETAIL OF TRANSITION FROM CONCRETE SPAN TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. VIEW SOUTHWEST, DETAIL OF TRANSITION FROM CONCRETE SPAN TO STEEL SPAN AT PIER NUMBER 116 - Route 1 Extension, South Street Viaduct, Spanning Conrail & Wheeler Point Road at South Street, Newark, Essex County, NJ

  9. 12. DETAIL OF UNDERSIDE OF NORTH APPROACH SPANS, SHOWING ROADWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL OF UNDERSIDE OF NORTH APPROACH SPANS, SHOWING ROADWAY DECK AND APPROACH SPAN PIERS. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Navajo Bridge, Spanning Colorado River at U.S. Highway 89 Alternate, Page, Coconino County, AZ

  10. 2. THREEQUARTER VIEW FROM ADJACENT ACCESS ROAD SHOWING THREE SPANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. THREE-QUARTER VIEW FROM ADJACENT ACCESS ROAD SHOWING THREE SPANS AND NORTHWEST APPROACH SPANS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Red River Bridge, Spanning Red River at U.S. Highway 82, Garland, Miller County, AR

  11. 11. View underside of draw span, with fender in foreground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. View underside of draw span, with fender in foreground and concrete deck spans and pile visible at rear, looking northeast - Colonel Alexander Scammell Memorial Bridge, Spanning Bellamy River at U.S. Route 4, Dover, Strafford County, NH

  12. 13. OBLIQUE OF UNDERSIDE OF SOUTH TRUSS SPAN, SOUTH APPROACH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. OBLIQUE OF UNDERSIDE OF SOUTH TRUSS SPAN, SOUTH APPROACH SPAN, AND SOUTH PIER, SHOWING FLOOR SYSTEM AND BEARINGS. LOOKING NORTH. - Flintville Bridge, Spanning Broad Creek at Flintville Road (Maryland Route 623), Castleton, Harford County, MD

  13. 10. DETAIL, SOUTHEAST SPAN THROUGH CANAL, VIEW BLOCKED BY STEEL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL, SOUTHEAST SPAN THROUGH CANAL, VIEW BLOCKED BY STEEL, CLAD COUNTER WEIGHT, WATER SPAN RAISED OUT OF VIEW - Cape Cod Canal Lift Bridge, Spanning Cape Cod Canal, Buzzards Bay, Barnstable County, MA

  14. 347. Caltrans, Photographer April 10, 1935 "500 FT. SPANS"; VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    347. Caltrans, Photographer April 10, 1935 "500 FT. SPANS"; VIEW OF THROUGH TRUSS (500 FT. SPANS) UNDER CONSTRUCTION. 7-613 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  15. Interior view of eastern lift span, with decking above, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of eastern lift span, with decking above, looking back from center of span, toward lift mechanism area. - Arlington Memorial Bridge, Spanning Potomac River between Lincoln Memorial & Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  16. 2. WEST ELEVATION, SHOWING ENTIRE STRUCTURE: PENNSYLVANIA TRUSS MAIN SPANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. WEST ELEVATION, SHOWING ENTIRE STRUCTURE: PENNSYLVANIA TRUSS MAIN SPANS AND PONY TRUSS APPROACH SPANS - Coraopolis Bridge, Spanning Ohio River back channel at Ferree Street & Grand Avenue, Coraopolis, Allegheny County, PA

  17. 12. DETAIL VIEW OF TYPICAL PIER, ENDPOSTS, AND BEARINGS (SPAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL VIEW OF TYPICAL PIER, ENDPOSTS, AND BEARINGS (SPAN 3 right AND SPAN 4 left, LOOKING NORTHWEST (135mm lens) - Salinas River Bridge, Spanning Salinas River on Chualar River Road, Chualar, Monterey County, CA

  18. 47. DRAW SPAN OVER PASSAIC RIVER Drawing No. 54 General ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. DRAW SPAN OVER PASSAIC RIVER Drawing No. 54 General Details of Wedge Operating Machinery for Draw Span Scale 1-1/2'=1'; April 1897 - Jackson Street Bridge, Spanning Passaic River, Newark, Essex County, NJ

  19. Constraints on the wing morphology of pterosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Colin; Dyke, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    Animals that fly must be able to do so over a huge range of aerodynamic conditions, determined by weather, wind speed and the nature of their environment. No single parameter can be used to determine—let alone measure—optimum flight performance as it relates to wing shape. Reconstructing the wings of the extinct pterosaurs has therefore proved especially problematic: these Mesozoic flying reptiles had a soft-tissue membranous flight surface that is rarely preserved in the fossil record. Here, we review basic mechanical and aerodynamic constraints that influenced the wing shape of pterosaurs, and, building on this, present a series of theoretical modelling results. These results allow us to predict the most likely wing shapes that could have been employed by these ancient reptiles, and further show that a combination of anterior sweep and a reflexed proximal wing section provides an aerodynamically balanced and efficient theoretical pterosaur wing shape, with clear benefits for their flight stability. PMID:21957137

  20. A Discrete-Vortex Method for Studying the Wing Rock of Delta Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gainer, Thomas G.

    2002-01-01

    A discrete-vortex method is developed to investigate the wing rock problem associated with highly swept wings. The method uses two logarithmic vortices placed above the wing to represent the vortex flow field and uses boundary conditions based on conical flow, vortex rate of change of momentum, and other considerations to position the vortices and determine their strengths. A relationship based on the time analogy and conical-flow assumptions is used to determine the hysteretic positions of the vortices during roll oscillations. Static and dynamic vortex positions and wing rock amplitudes and frequencies calculated by using the method are generally in good agreement with available experimental data. The results verify that wing rock is caused by hysteretic deflections of the vortices and indicate that the stabilizing moments that limit wing rock amplitudes are the result of the one primary vortex moving outboard of the wing where it has little influence on the wing.

  1. Evaluation of installed performance of a wing-tip-mounted pusher turboprop on a semispan wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James C., Jr.; Bartlett, Glynn R.

    1987-01-01

    An exploratory investigation has been conducted at the Langley Research Center to determine the effect of a wing-tip-mounted pusher turboprop on the aerodynamic characteristics of a semispan wing. Tests were conducted on a semispan model with an upswept, untapered wing and an airdriven motor that powered an SR-2 high-speed propeller located on the tip of the wing as a pusher propeller. All tests were conducted at a Mach number of 0.70 over an angle-of-attack range from approximately -2 to 4 deg at a Reynolds number of 3.82 x 10 to the 6th based on the wing reference chord of 13 in. The data indicate that, as a result of locating the propeller behind the wing trailing edge at the wing tip in the crossflow of the wing-tip vortex, it is possible to improve propeller performance and simultaneously reduce the lift-induced drag.

  2. Elements of the Wing Section Theory and of the Wing Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, Max M.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented of the theory of wings and of wing sections which are of immediate practical value. They are proven and demonstrated by the use of the simple conceptions of kinetic energy and momentum only.

  3. Conceptual design for a laminar-flying-wing aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, T. I.

    The laminar-flying-wing aircraft appears to be an attractive long-term prospect for reducing the environmental impact of commercial aviation. In assessing its potential, a relatively straightforward initial step is the conceptual design of a version with restricted sweep angle. Such a design is the topic of this thesis. Subject to constraints, this research aims to; provide insight into the parameters affecting practical laminar-flow-control suction power requirements; identify a viable basic design specification; and, on the basis of this, an assessment of the fuel efficiency through a detailed conceptual design study. It is shown that there is a minimum power requirement independent of the suction system design, associated with the stagnation pressure loss in the boundary layer. This requirement increases with aerofoil section thickness, but depends only weakly on Mach number and (for a thick, lightly-loaded laminar flying wing) lift coefficient. Deviation from the optimal suction distribution, due to a practical chamber-based architecture, is found to have very little effect on the overall suction coefficient. In the spanwise direction, through suitable choice of chamber depth, the pressure drop due to frictional and inertial effects may be rendered negligible. Finally, it is found that the pressure drop from the aerofoil surface to the pump collector ducts determines the power penalty. To identify the viable basic design specification, a high-level exploration of the laminar flying wing design space is performed. The characteristics of the design are assessed as a function of three parameters: thickness-to-chord ratio, wingspan, and unit Reynolds number. A feasible specification, with 20% thickness-to-chord, 80 m span and a unit Reynolds number of 8 x 106 m-1, is identified; it corresponds to a 187 tonne aircraft which cruises at Mach 0.67 and altitude 22,500 ft, with lift coefficient 0.14. On the basis of this specification, a detailed conceptual design is

  4. General closeup view of the swing span bridge in the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General close-up view of the swing span bridge in the close position, looking upriver. The pivot/center pier is positioned in the center of Tennessee River. Note: Each arm of the continuous swing span acts as simple spans. The total span over four (4) supports is partially continuous-- the middle panel at the center pier is continuous for bending moments, but discontinuous for shears. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  5. Improving spanning trees by upgrading nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Krumke, S.O.; Noltemeier, H.; Wirth, H.C.

    1997-01-16

    We study budget constrained optimal network upgrading problems. Such problems aim at finding optimal strategies for improving a network under some cost measure subject to certain budget constraints. A general problem in this setting is the following. We are given an edge weighted graph G = (V, E) where nodes represent processors and edges represent bidirectional communication links. The processor at a node v {element_of} V can be upgraded at a cost of c(v). Such an upgrade reduces the delay of each link emanating from v. The goal is to find a minimum cost set of nodes to be upgraded so that the resulting network has the best performance with respect to some measure. We consider the problem under two measures, namely, the weight of a minimum spanning tree and the bottleneck weight of a minimum bottleneck spanning tree. We present approximation and hardness results for the problem. Our results are tight to within constant factors. We also show that these approximation algorithms can be used to construct good approximation algorithms for the dual versions of the problems where there is a budget constraint on the upgrading cost and the objectives are minimum weight spanning tree and minimum bottleneck weight spanning tree respectively.

  6. Eye Movements, Perceptual Span, and Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner, Keith

    1983-01-01

    Research is reviewed on eye movements during reading, on the perceptual span and control of eye movements during normal reading, and on the nature of eye movements in dyslexia. Rather than the cause of dyslexia, eye movements are said to reflect underlying cognitive or neurological problems. (CL)

  7. SPAN - Terminal sterilization process analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Computer program, SPAN, measures the dry heat thermal sterilization process applied to a planetary capsule and calculates the time required for heat application, steady state conditions, and cooling. The program is based on the logarithmic survival of micro-organisms. Temperature profiles must be input on tape.

  8. SPAN C - Terminal sterilization process analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Computer program, SPAN-C, measures the dry heat thermal sterilization process applied to a planetary capsule and calculates the time required for heat application, steady state conditions, and cooling. The program is based on the logarithmic survival of micro-organisms. Temperature profiles must be input on cards.

  9. Sensorimotor Synchronization across the Life Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drewing, Knut; Aschersleben, Gisa; Li, Shu-Chen

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigates the contribution of general processing resources as well as other more specific factors to the life-span development of sensorimotor synchronization and its component processes. Within a synchronization tapping paradigm, a group of 286 participants, 6 to 88 years of age, were asked to synchronize finger taps with…

  10. Computing Minimum Diameter Color-Spanning Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Rudolf; Xu, Xiaoming

    We study the minimum diameter color-spanning set problem which has recently drawn some attention in the database community. We show that the problem can be solved in polynomial time for L 1 and L ∞ metrics, while it is NP-hard for all other L p metrics even in two dimensions. However, we can efficiently compute a constant factor approximation.

  11. Spatial Abilities across the Adult Life Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borella, Erika; Meneghetti, Chiara; Ronconi, Lucia; De Beni, Rossana

    2014-01-01

    The study investigates age-related effects across the adult life span on spatial abilities (testing subabilities based on a distinction between spatial visualization, mental rotation, and perspective taking) and spatial self-assessments. The sample consisted of 454 participants (223 women and 231 men) from 20 to 91 years of age. Results showed…

  12. Incompressible flutter characteristics of representative aircraft wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilts, C H

    1958-01-01

    This report gives the results of a detailed study of the flutter characteristics of four representative aircraft wings. This study was made using the electric-analog computer at the California Institute of Technology. During the course of this investigation eight important parameters of each wing were varied and, in addition, the effects of mass, inertia, pitching spring, and location of a concentrated mass were investigated for all four wings and at several sweepback angles.

  13. Longitudinal view of west channel spans, looking east toward fishers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Longitudinal view of west channel spans, looking east toward fishers island. - Pennsylvania Railroad, Selinsgrove Bridge, Spanning Susquehanna River, south of Cherry Island, Selinsgrove, Snyder County, PA

  14. Interior room within eastern lift span, showing auxiliary electric generator. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior room within eastern lift span, showing auxiliary electric generator. - Arlington Memorial Bridge, Spanning Potomac River between Lincoln Memorial & Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. Interior of lift mechanism area of eastern lift span, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of lift mechanism area of eastern lift span, looking northwest. - Arlington Memorial Bridge, Spanning Potomac River between Lincoln Memorial & Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  16. EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH CENTER SPAN EXTENDING ACROSS WARRIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH CENTER SPAN EXTENDING ACROSS WARRIOR RIVER. - Gulf, Mobile & Ohio Railroad Bridge, Spans Black Warrior River between Northport & Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  17. 2. DETAIL VIEW OF MIDDLE ARCH SPAN, LOOKING NORTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL VIEW OF MIDDLE ARCH SPAN, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Cumberland & Pennsylvania Railroad, Wills Creek Bridge, Spanning Wills Creek 587 feet West of Eckhart Junction, Cumberland, Allegany County, MD

  18. Perspective view of span over French Creek and east abutment, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of span over French Creek and east abutment, looking NW. - Pennsylvania Railroad, French Creek Trestle, Spanning French Creek, north of Paradise Street, Phoenixville, Chester County, PA

  19. Underside of span over Pickering Creek, showing highly skewed piers, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Underside of span over Pickering Creek, showing highly skewed piers, looking south. - Pennsylvania Railroad, Pickering Creek Trestle, Spanning Pickering Creek, south of Buckwalter Road, Pickering, Chester County, PA

  20. 10. Detail, northerly spans, west side, showing deterioration; note spalls, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Detail, northerly spans, west side, showing deterioration; note spalls, cracks, and efflorescence; view to southeast. - Fordway Bridge, Spanning Concord River at Pollard Street, Billerica, Middlesex County, MA

  1. Optimal redesign study of the harm wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, S. C., Jr.; Weynand, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the use of optimization techniques to improve the flutter margins of the HARM AGM-88A wing. The missile has four cruciform wings, located near mid-fuselage, that are actuated in pairs symmetrically and antisymmetrically to provide pitch, yaw, and roll control. The wings have a solid stainless steel forward section and a stainless steel crushed-honeycomb aft section. The wing restraint stiffness is dependent upon wing pitch amplitude and varies from a low value near neutral pitch attitude to a much higher value at off-neutral pitch attitudes, where aerodynamic loads lock out any free play in the control system. The most critical condition for flutter is the low-stiffness condition in which the wings are moved symmetrically. Although a tendency toward limit-cycle flutter is controlled in the current design by controller logic, wing redesign to improve this situation is attractive because it can be accomplished as a retrofit. In view of the exploratory nature of the study, it was decided to apply the optimization to a wing-only model, validated by comparison with results obtained by Texas Instruments (TI). Any wing designs that looked promising were to be evaluated at TI with more complicated models, including body modes. The optimization work was performed by McIntosh Structural Dynamics, Inc. (MSD) under a contract from TI.

  2. High performance forward swept wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, David G. (Inventor); Aoyagi, Kiyoshi (Inventor); Dudley, Michael R. (Inventor); Schmidt, Susan B. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A high performance aircraft capable of subsonic, transonic and supersonic speeds employs a forward swept wing planform and at least one first and second solution ejector located on the inboard section of the wing. A high degree of flow control on the inboard sections of the wing is achieved along with improved maneuverability and control of pitch, roll and yaw. Lift loss is delayed to higher angles of attack than in conventional aircraft. In one embodiment the ejectors may be advantageously positioned spanwise on the wing while the ductwork is kept to a minimum.

  3. The function of resilin in honeybee wings.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun; Ning, Jian Guo; Ren, Hui Lan; Zhang, Peng Fei; Zhao, Hong Yan

    2015-07-01

    The present work aimed to reveal morphological characteristics of worker honeybee (Apis mellifera) wings and demonstrate the function of resilin on camber changes during flapping flight. Detailed morphological investigation of the wings showed that different surface characteristics appear on the dorsal and ventral side of the honeybee wings and the linking structure connecting the forewing and hindwing plays an indispensable role in honeybee flapping flight. Resilin stripes were found on both the dorsal and ventral side of the wings, and resilin patches mostly existed on the ventral side. On the basis of resilin distribution, five flexion lines and three cambered types around the lines of passive deformation of the coupled-wing profile were obtained, which defined the deformation mechanism of the wing along the chord, i.e. concave, flat plate and convex. From a movie obtained using high-speed photography from three orthogonal views of free flight in honeybees, periodic changes of the coupled-wing profile were acquired and further demonstrated that the deformation mechanism is a fundamental property for variable deformed shapes of the wing profile during flapping flight, and, in particular, the flat wing profile achieves a nice transition between downstrokes and upstrokes. PMID:25987733

  4. A magnetic fluid microdevice using insect wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, S.; Tsuyuki, K.; Yano, T.; Takagi, K.

    2008-05-01

    A magnetic fluid microdevice using Diptera insect wings is proposed and constructed. The magnetic fluid device is composed of insect wings, a small permanent magnet, coil, and kerosene-based magnetic fluid. First, the structural properties of insect wings are studied through measurements of certain morphological parameters. Secondly, the novel type of microwind energy converter is constructed. Thirdly, the power generation characteristics of the magnetic fluid microdevice using insect wings are examined. It is found that the output power is roughly proportional to the cube of the airflow velocity.

  5. Subtractive Structural Modification of Morpho Butterfly Wings.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qingchen; He, Jiaqing; Ni, Mengtian; Song, Chengyi; Zhou, Lingye; Hu, Hang; Zhang, Ruoxi; Luo, Zhen; Wang, Ge; Tao, Peng; Deng, Tao; Shang, Wen

    2015-11-11

    Different from studies of butterfly wings through additive modification, this work for the first time studies the property change of butterfly wings through subtractive modification using oxygen plasma etching. The controlled modification of butterfly wings through such subtractive process results in gradual change of the optical properties, and helps the further understanding of structural optimization through natural evolution. The brilliant color of Morpho butterfly wings is originated from the hierarchical nanostructure on the wing scales. Such nanoarchitecture has attracted a lot of research effort, including the study of its optical properties, its potential use in sensing and infrared imaging, and also the use of such structure as template for the fabrication of high-performance photocatalytic materials. The controlled subtractive processes provide a new path to modify such nanoarchitecture and its optical property. Distinct from previous studies on the optical property of the Morpho wing structure, this study provides additional experimental evidence for the origination of the optical property of the natural butterfly wing scales. The study also offers a facile approach to generate new 3D nanostructures using butterfly wings as the templates and may lead to simpler structure models for large-scale man-made structures than those offered by original butterfly wings. PMID:26397977

  6. Veins improve fracture toughness of insect wings.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Jan-Henning; Taylor, David

    2012-01-01

    During the lifetime of a flying insect, its wings are subjected to mechanical forces and deformations for millions of cycles. Defects in the micrometre thin membranes or veins may reduce the insect's flight performance. How do insects prevent crack related material failure in their wings and what role does the characteristic vein pattern play? Fracture toughness is a parameter, which characterises a material's resistance to crack propagation. Our results show that, compared to other body parts, the hind wing membrane of the migratory locust S. gregaria itself is not exceptionally tough (1.04±0.25 MPa√m). However, the cross veins increase the wing's toughness by 50% by acting as barriers to crack propagation. Using fracture mechanics, we show that the morphological spacing of most wing veins matches the critical crack length of the material (1132 µm). This finding directly demonstrates how the biomechanical properties and the morphology of locust wings are functionally correlated in locusts, providing a mechanically 'optimal' solution with high toughness and low weight. The vein pattern found in insect wings thus might inspire the design of more durable and lightweight artificial 'venous' wings for micro-air-vehicles. Using the vein spacing as indicator, our approach might also provide a basis to estimate the wing properties of endangered or extinct insect species. PMID:22927966

  7. The supercritical profile of the supercritical wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, O.

    1981-01-01

    The profile wing design for supercritical structures is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the flow of air surrounding the wing and variations in flow fields are examined. Modifications to the profile for flight below transonic level are presented that increase the uplift pressure and permit the achievement of critical Mach numbers on the order of 0.85. The uplift pressure along the upper side of the profile is compared for a classical and a Peaky profile. A comparison of classical and supercritical wing cross sections indicates a flatter upper side, a large nose radius, and a thicker profile to the supercritical wing.

  8. Lift, Drag, and Pitching Moment of Low-aspect-ratio Wings at Subsonic and Supersonic Speeds : Twisted and Cambered Triangular Wing of Aspect Ratio 2 with NACA 0003-63 Thickness Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Charles F; Heitmeyer, John C

    1951-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation to ascertain the lift, drag, and pitching moment of a wing-body combination having a triangular wing of aspect ratio 2 with NACA 0003-63 thickness distribution in streamwise planes and twisted and cambered for a nearly elliptical span load distribution. Results are shown for Mach numbers from 0.60 to 0.90 and from 1.30 to 1.70 at Reynolds numbers of 3.0 million and 7.5 million.

  9. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an NACA 66,2-216 Low-Drag Wing with Split Flaps of Various Sizes, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muse, Thomas C.; Neely, Robert H.

    1941-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NACA 19-foot pressure wind tunnel of a rectangular wing having NACA 66, 2-216 low-drag airfoil sections and various sizes of simple split flaps. The purpose of the investigation was, primarily, to determine the influence of these flap installations on the aerodynamic characteristics of the wing. Complete lift, drag, and pitching-moment characteristics were determined for a range of test Reynolds numbers from about 2,600,000 to 4,600,000 for each of the installations and for the plain wing. The results of this investigation indicate that values of maximum lift coefficient similar to those of wings with conventional airfoil sections and split flaps can be expected of wings having the NACA 66,2-216 low-drag sections. The increment of maximum lift due to the split flap was found to be practically independent of the Reynolds number over the range investigated. The optimum split flap on the basis of maximum lift appears to have a chord about 20% of the wing chord and a deflection of 60 degrees. The C(sub L) max of the wing with the 0.20c partial-span flap deflected 60 degrees is 2.07 at a Reynolds number of 4,600,000 while with the full-span flap it is approximately 2.53; the increment of the maximum lift coefficient due to the flap is approximately proportional to the flap span. Although the addition of a split flap tends to hasten the stall and to cause it to occur more abruptly, little change in pattern is evidenced by observations of the behavior of wool tufts on the wing.

  10. Projection Moire Interferometry Measurements of Micro Air Vehicle Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Bartram, Scott M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Jenkins, Luther N.

    2001-01-01

    Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) has been used to measure the structural deformation of micro air vehicle (MAV) wings during a series of wind tunnel tests. The MAV wings had a highly flexible wing structure, generically reminiscent of a bat s wing, which resulted in significant changes in wing shape as a function of MAV angle-of-attack and simulated flight speed. This flow-adaptable wing deformation is thought to provide enhanced vehicle stability and wind gust alleviation compared to rigid wing designs. Investigation of the potential aerodynamic benefits of a flexible MAV wing required measurement of the wing shape under aerodynamic loads. PMI was used to quantify the aerodynamically induced changes in wing shape for three MAV wings having different structural designs and stiffness characteristics. This paper describes the PMI technique, its application to MAV testing, and presents a portion of the PMI data acquired for the three different MAV wings tested.

  11. Projection moire interferometry measurements of micro air vehicle wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Bartram, Scott M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Jenkins, Luther N.

    2001-11-01

    Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) has been used to measure the structural deformation of micro air vehicle (MAV) wings during a series of wind tunnel tests. The MAV wings had a highly flexible wing structure, generically reminiscent of a bat's wing, which resulted in significant changes in wing shape as a function of MAV angle-of-attack and simulated flight speed. This flow-adaptable wing deformation is thought to provide enhanced vehicle stability and wind gust alleviation compared to rigid wing designs. Investigation of the potential aerodynamic benefits of a flexible MAV wing required measurement of the wing shape under aerodynamic loads. PMI was used to quantify the aerodynamically induced changes in wing shape for three MAV wings having different structural designs and stiffness characteristics. This paper describes the PMI technique, its application to MAV testing, and presents a portion of the PMI data acquired for the three different MAV wings tested.

  12. Effects of deflected thrust on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a close-coupled wing-canard configuration. [in the Langley V/STOL tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, L. P.; Paulson, J. W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of power on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a close-coupled wing-canard fighter configuration with partial-span rectangular nozzles at the trailing edge of the wing were investigated. Data were obtained on a basic wing-strake configuration for nozzle and flap deflections from 0 deg to 30 deg and for nominal thrust coefficients from 0 to 0.30. The model was tested over an angle-of-attack range from -2 deg to 40 deg at Mach numbers of 0.15 and 0.18. Results show substantial improvements in lift-curve slope, in maximum lift, and in drag-due-to-lift efficiency when the canard and strakes have been added to the basic wing-fuselage (wing-alone) configuration. Addition of power increased both lift-curve slope and maximum lift, improved longitudinal stability, and reduced drag due to lift on both the wing-canard and wing-canard-strake configurations. These beneficial effects are primarily derived from boundary-layer control due to moderate thrust coefficients which delay flow separation on the nozzle and inboard portion of the wing flaps.

  13. Crossflow Stability and Transition Experiments in Swept-Wing Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagenhart, J. Ray; Saric, William S.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental examination of crossflow instability and transition on a 45deg swept wing was conducted in the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel. The stationary-vortex pattern and transition location are visualized by using both sublimating chemical and liquid-crystal coatings. Extensive hot-wire measurements were obtained at several measurement stations across a single vortex track. The mean and travelling wave disturbances were measured simultaneously. Stationary crossflow disturbance profiles were determined by subtracting either a reference or a span-averaged velocity profile from the mean velocity data. Mean, stationary crossflow, and traveling wave velocity data were presented as local boundary layer profiles and contour plots across a single stationary crossflow vortex track. Disturbance mode profiles and growth rates were determined. The experimental data are compared with predictions from linear stability theory.

  14. Aeroacoustic Measurements of a Wing/Slat Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Jeff M.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.

    2002-01-01

    Aeroacoustic evaluations of high-lift devices have been carried out in the Quiet Flow Facility of the NASA Langley Research Center. The present paper deals with detailed flow and acoustic measurements that have been made to understand, and to possibly predict and reduce, the noise from a wing leading edge slat configuration. The acoustic database is obtained by a moveable Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones designed to electronically steer to different portions of models under study. The slat is shown to be a uniform distributed noise source. The data was processed such that spectra and directivity were determined with respect to a one-foot span of slat. The spectra are normalized in various fashions to demonstrate slat noise character. In order to equate portions of the spectra to different slat noise components, trailing edge noise predictions using measured slat boundary layer parameters as inputs are compared to the measured slat noise spectra.

  15. Effects of Mach Number and Reynolds Number on the Maximum Lift Coefficient of a Wing of NACA 230-series Airfoil Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlong, G. Chester; Fitzpatrick, James E.

    1947-01-01

    Wing was tested with full-span, partial-span, or split flaps deflected 60 Degrees and without flaps. Chordwise pressure-distribution measurements were made for all flap configurations.. Peak values of maximum lift coefficient were obtained at relatively low free-stream Mach numbers and, before critical Mach number was reached, were almost entirely dependent on Reynolds Number. Lift coefficient increased by increasing Mach number or deflecting flaps while critical pressure coefficient was reached at lower free-stream Mach numbers.

  16. Rapid State Space Modeling Tool for Rectangular Wing Aeroservoelastic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suh, Peter M.; Conyers, Howard J.; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a modeling and simulation tool for aeroservoelastic analysis of rectangular wings with trailing edge control surfaces. The inputs to the code are planform design parameters such as wing span, aspect ratio and number of control surfaces. A doublet lattice approach is taken to compute generalized forces. A rational function approximation is computed. The output, computed in a few seconds, is a state space aeroservoelastic model which can be used for analysis and control design. The tool is fully parameterized with default information so there is little required interaction with the model developer. Although, all parameters can be easily modified if desired.The focus of this paper is on tool presentation, verification and validation. This process is carried out in stages throughout the paper. The rational function approximation is verified against computed generalized forces for a plate model. A model composed of finite element plates is compared to a modal analysis from commercial software and an independently conducted experimental ground vibration test analysis. Aeroservoelastic analysis is the ultimate goal of this tool. Therefore the flutter speed and frequency for a clamped plate are computed using V-g and V-f analysis. The computational results are compared to a previously published computational analysis and wind tunnel results for the same structure. Finally a case study of a generic wing model with a single control surface is presented. Verification of the state space model is presented in comparison to V-g and V-f analysis. This also includes the analysis of the model in response to a 1-cos gust.

  17. Rapid State Space Modeling Tool for Rectangular Wing Aeroservoelastic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suh, Peter M.; Conyers, Howard J.; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a modeling and simulation tool for aeroservoelastic analysis of rectangular wings with trailing-edge control surfaces. The inputs to the code are planform design parameters such as wing span, aspect ratio, and number of control surfaces. Using this information, the generalized forces are computed using the doublet-lattice method. Using Roger's approximation, a rational function approximation is computed. The output, computed in a few seconds, is a state space aeroservoelastic model which can be used for analysis and control design. The tool is fully parameterized with default information so there is little required interaction with the model developer. All parameters can be easily modified if desired. The focus of this paper is on tool presentation, verification, and validation. These processes are carried out in stages throughout the paper. The rational function approximation is verified against computed generalized forces for a plate model. A model composed of finite element plates is compared to a modal analysis from commercial software and an independently conducted experimental ground vibration test analysis. Aeroservoelastic analysis is the ultimate goal of this tool, therefore, the flutter speed and frequency for a clamped plate are computed using damping-versus-velocity and frequency-versus-velocity analysis. The computational results are compared to a previously published computational analysis and wind-tunnel results for the same structure. A case study of a generic wing model with a single control surface is presented. Verification of the state space model is presented in comparison to damping-versus-velocity and frequency-versus-velocity analysis, including the analysis of the model in response to a 1-cos gust.

  18. Rapid State Space Modeling Tool for Rectangular Wing Aeroservoelastic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suh, Peter M.; Conyers, Howard Jason; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2015-01-01

    This report introduces a modeling and simulation tool for aeroservoelastic analysis of rectangular wings with trailing-edge control surfaces. The inputs to the code are planform design parameters such as wing span, aspect ratio, and number of control surfaces. Using this information, the generalized forces are computed using the doublet-lattice method. Using Roger's approximation, a rational function approximation is computed. The output, computed in a few seconds, is a state space aeroservoelastic model which can be used for analysis and control design. The tool is fully parameterized with default information so there is little required interaction with the model developer. All parameters can be easily modified if desired. The focus of this report is on tool presentation, verification, and validation. These processes are carried out in stages throughout the report. The rational function approximation is verified against computed generalized forces for a plate model. A model composed of finite element plates is compared to a modal analysis from commercial software and an independently conducted experimental ground vibration test analysis. Aeroservoelastic analysis is the ultimate goal of this tool, therefore, the flutter speed and frequency for a clamped plate are computed using damping-versus-velocity and frequency-versus-velocity analysis. The computational results are compared to a previously published computational analysis and wind-tunnel results for the same structure. A case study of a generic wing model with a single control surface is presented. Verification of the state space model is presented in comparison to damping-versus-velocity and frequency-versus-velocity analysis, including the analysis of the model in response to a 1-cos gust.

  19. Full-scale Wind-tunnel Research on Tail Buffeting and Wing-fuselage Interference of a Low-wing Monoplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Manley J; White, James A

    1933-01-01

    Some preliminary results of full scale wind tunnel testing to determine the best means of reducing the tail buffeting and wing-fuselage interference of a low-wing monoplane are given. Data indicating the effects of an engine cowling, fillets, auxiliary airfoils of short span, reflexes trailing edge, propeller slipstream, and various combinations of these features are included. The best all-round results were obtained by the use of fillets together with the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) cowling. This combination reduced the tail buffeting oscillations to one-fourth of their original amplitudes, increased the maximum lift 11 percent, decreased the minimum drag 9 percent, and increased the maximum ratio of lift to drag 19 percent.

  20. On wings and keels (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slooff, J. W.

    1985-05-01

    The physical mechanisms governing the hydrodynamics of sailing yacht keels and the parameters that, through these mechanisms, determine keel performance are discussed. It is concluded that due to the presence of the free water surface optimum keel shapes differ from optimum shapes for aircraft wings. Utilizing computational fluid dynamics analysis and optimization it is found that the performance of conventional keels can be improved significantly by reducing taper or even applying inverse taper (upside-down keel) and that decisive improvements in performance can be realized through keels with winglets.

  1. A numerical study on the effect of sweep angle on flapping-wing flight using fluid-structure interaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Kwan; Lee, Jun-Seong; Han, Jae-Hung

    2009-07-01

    The sweep-back effect of a flexible flapping wing is investigated through fluid-structure interaction analysis. The aeroelastic analysis is carried out by using an efficient fluid-structure interaction analysis tool, which is based on the modified strip theory and the flexible multibody dynamics. To investigate the sweep-back effect, the aeroelastic analysis is performed on various sweep-back wing models defined by sweep-chord ratio and sweep-span ratio, and then the sweep-back effect on the aerodynamic performance is discussed. The aeroelastic results of the sweep-back wing analysis clearly confirm that the sweep-back angle can help a flexible flapping wing to generate greater twisting motion, resulting in the aerodynamic improvement of thrust and input power for all flapping-axis angle regimes. The propulsive efficiency can also be increased by the sweep-back effect. The sweep angle of a flapping wing should be considered as an important design feature for artificial flexible flapping wings.

  2. Wind-tunnel investigation of aerodynamic efficiency of three planar elliptical wings with curvature of quarter-chord line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Vijgen, Paul M. H. W.

    1993-01-01

    Three planar, untwisted wings with the same elliptical chord distribution but with different curvatures of the quarter-chord line were tested in the Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel (8-ft TPT) and the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High-Speed Tunnel (7 x 10 HST). A fourth wing with a rectangular planform and the same projected area and span was also tested. Force and moment measurements from the 8-ft TPT tests are presented for Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.5 and angles of attack from -4 degrees to 7 degrees. Sketches of the oil-flow patterns on the upper surfaces of the wings and some force and moment measurements from the 7 x 10 HST tests are presented at a Mach number of 0.5. Increasing the curvature of the quarter-chord line makes the angle of zero lift more negative but has little effect on the drag coefficient at zero lift. The changes in lift-curve slope and in the Oswald efficiency factor with the change in curvature of the quarter-chord line (wingtip location) indicate that the elliptical wing with the unswept quarter-chord line has the lowest lifting efficiency and the elliptical wing with the unswept trailing edge has the highest lifting efficiency; the crescent-shaped planform wing has an efficiency in between.

  3. Optimal decomposable witnesses without the spanning property

    SciTech Connect

    Augusiak, Remigiusz; Sarbicki, Gniewomir; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2011-11-15

    One of the unsolved problems in the characterization of the optimal entanglement witnesses is the existence of optimal witnesses acting on bipartite Hilbert spaces H{sub m,n}=C{sup m} x C{sup n} such that the product vectors obeying =0 do not span H{sub m,n}. So far, the only known examples of such witnesses were found among indecomposable witnesses, one of them being the witness corresponding to the Choi map. However, it remains an open question whether decomposable witnesses exist without the property of spanning. Here we answer this question affirmatively, providing systematic examples of such witnesses. Then, we generalize some of the recently obtained results on the characterization of 2 x n optimal decomposable witnesses [R. Augusiak et al., J. Phys. A 44, 212001 (2011)] to finite-dimensional Hilbert spaces H{sub m,n} with m,n{>=}3.

  4. Optimal decomposable witnesses without the spanning property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusiak, Remigiusz; Sarbicki, Gniewomir; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2011-11-01

    One of the unsolved problems in the characterization of the optimal entanglement witnesses is the existence of optimal witnesses acting on bipartite Hilbert spaces Hm,n=Cm⊗Cn such that the product vectors obeying =0 do not span Hm,n. So far, the only known examples of such witnesses were found among indecomposable witnesses, one of them being the witness corresponding to the Choi map. However, it remains an open question whether decomposable witnesses exist without the property of spanning. Here we answer this question affirmatively, providing systematic examples of such witnesses. Then, we generalize some of the recently obtained results on the characterization of 2⊗n optimal decomposable witnesses [R. Augusiak , J. Phys. APLRAAN1751-811310.1088/1751-8113/44/21/212001 44, 212001 (2011)] to finite-dimensional Hilbert spaces Hm,n with m,n≥3.

  5. Methionine restriction and life-span control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Cheon; Kaya, Alaattin; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2016-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition is associated with longevity in various organisms. However, it has also been shown that reduced calorie intake is often ineffective in extending life span. Selecting optimal dietary regimens for DR studies is complicated, as the same regimen may lead to different outcomes depending on genotype and environmental factors. Recent studies suggested that interventions such as moderate protein restriction with or without adequate nutrition (e.g., particular amino acids or carbohydrates) may have additional beneficial effects mediated by certain metabolic and hormonal factors implicated in the biology of aging, regardless of total calorie intake. In particular, it was shown that restriction of a single amino acid, methionine, can mimic the effects of DR and extend life span in various model organisms. We discuss the beneficial effects of a methionine-restricted diet, the molecular pathways involved, and the use of this regimen in longevity interventions. PMID:26663138

  6. The Cost of Uncertain Life Span*

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Ryan D.

    2012-01-01

    A considerable amount of uncertainty surrounds the length of human life. The standard deviation in adult life span is about 15 years in the U.S., and theory and evidence suggest it is costly. I calibrate a utility-theoretic model of preferences over length of life and show that one fewer year in standard deviation is worth about half a mean life year. Differences in the standard deviation exacerbate cross-sectional differences in life expectancy between the U.S. and other industrialized countries, between rich and poor countries, and among poor countries. Accounting for the cost of life-span variance also appears to amplify recently discovered patterns of convergence in world average human well-being. This is partly for methodological reasons and partly because unconditional variance in human length of life, primarily the component due to infant mortality, has exhibited even more convergence than life expectancy. PMID:22368324

  7. Attitudes Toward Death Across the Life Span.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiden, Robert; Walker, Gail

    To understand the change and development of people's attitudes toward death over the life span, a 62-item attitude questionnaire on death and dying was administered to 90 adults. Participants included five females and five males in each of nine age categories: 18-20, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-64, and 65 or older. Participants…

  8. Low-speed tests of a high-aspect-ratio, supercritical-wing transport model equipped with a high-lift flap system in the Langley 4- by 7-meter and Ames 12-foot pressure tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, H. L., Jr.; Kjelgaard, S. O.

    1983-01-01

    The Ames 12-Foot Pressure Tunnel was used to determine the effects of Reynolds number on the static longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of an advanced, high-aspect-ratio, supercritical wing transport model equipped with a full span, leading edge slat and part span, double slotted, trailing edge flaps. The model had a wing span of 7.5 ft and was tested through a free stream Reynolds number range from 1.3 to 6.0 x 10 to 6th power per foot at a Mach number of 0.20. Prior to the Ames tests, an investigation was also conducted in the Langley 4 by 7 Meter Tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.3 x 10 to 6th power per foot with the model mounted on an Ames strut support system and on the Langley sting support system to determine strut interference corrections. The data obtained from the Langley tests were also used to compare the aerodynamic charactertistics of the rather stiff, 7.5-ft-span steel wing model tested during this investigation and the larger, and rather flexible, 12-ft-span aluminum-wing model tested during a previous investigation. During the tests in both the Langley and Ames tunnels, the model was tested with six basic wing configurations: (1) cruise; (2) climb (slats only extended); (3) 15 deg take-off flaps; (4) 30 deg take-off flaps; (5) 45 deg landing flaps; and (6) 60 deg landing flaps.

  9. The Aerodynamic Aspect of Wing-fuselage Fillets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muttray, H

    1935-01-01

    Model tests prove the feasibility of enhancing the aerodynamic qualities of wing-fuselage fillets by appropriate design of fuselage and wing roots. Abrupt changes from maximum fuselage height to wing chord must be avoided and every longitudinal section of fuselage and wing roots must be so faired and arranged as to preserve the original lift distribution of the continuous wing. Adapting the fuselage to the curvilinear circulation of the wing affords further improvement. The polars of such arrangements are almost the same as those of the "wing alone," thus voiding the superiority of the high-wing type airplane known with conventional design.

  10. Vision in Flies: Measuring the Attention Span

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Sebastian; Wolf, Reinhard; Heisenberg, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A visual stimulus at a particular location of the visual field may elicit a behavior while at the same time equally salient stimuli in other parts do not. This property of visual systems is known as selective visual attention (SVA). The animal is said to have a focus of attention (FoA) which it has shifted to a particular location. Visual attention normally involves an attention span at the location to which the FoA has been shifted. Here the attention span is measured in Drosophila. The fly is tethered and hence has its eyes fixed in space. It can shift its FoA internally. This shift is revealed using two simultaneous test stimuli with characteristic responses at their particular locations. In tethered flight a wild type fly keeps its FoA at a certain location for up to 4s. Flies with a mutation in the radish gene, that has been suggested to be involved in attention-like mechanisms, display a reduced attention span of only 1s. PMID:26848852

  11. Spanning tree generating functions and Mahler measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttmann, Anthony J.; Rogers, Mathew D.

    2012-12-01

    We define the notion of a spanning tree generating function (STGF) ∑anzn, which gives the spanning tree constant when evaluated at z = 1, and gives the lattice Green function (LGF) when differentiated. By making use of known results for logarithmic Mahler measures of certain Laurent polynomials, and proving new results, we express the STGFs as hypergeometric functions for all regular two and three dimensional lattices (and one higher-dimensional lattice). This gives closed form expressions for the spanning tree constants for all such lattices, which were previously largely unknown in all but one three-dimensional case. We show for all lattices that these can also be represented as Dirichlet L-series. Making the connection between STGFs and LGFs produces integral identities and hypergeometric connections, some of which appear to be new. This article is part of ‘Lattice models and integrability’, a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of F Y Wu's 80th birthday.

  12. Vision in Flies: Measuring the Attention Span.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Sebastian; Wolf, Reinhard; Heisenberg, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A visual stimulus at a particular location of the visual field may elicit a behavior while at the same time equally salient stimuli in other parts do not. This property of visual systems is known as selective visual attention (SVA). The animal is said to have a focus of attention (FoA) which it has shifted to a particular location. Visual attention normally involves an attention span at the location to which the FoA has been shifted. Here the attention span is measured in Drosophila. The fly is tethered and hence has its eyes fixed in space. It can shift its FoA internally. This shift is revealed using two simultaneous test stimuli with characteristic responses at their particular locations. In tethered flight a wild type fly keeps its FoA at a certain location for up to 4s. Flies with a mutation in the radish gene, that has been suggested to be involved in attention-like mechanisms, display a reduced attention span of only 1s. PMID:26848852

  13. Spanning trees and the Eurozone crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, João

    2013-12-01

    The sovereign debt crisis in the euro area has not yet been solved and recent developments in Spain and Italy have further deteriorated the situation. In this paper we develop a new approach to analyze the ongoing Eurozone crisis. Firstly, we use Maximum Spanning Trees to analyze the topological properties of government bond rates’ dynamics. Secondly, we combine the information given by both Maximum and Minimum Spanning Trees to obtain a measure of market dissimilarity or disintegration. Thirdly, we extend this measure to include a convenient distance not limited to the interval [0, 2]. Our empirical results show that Maximum Spanning Tree gives an adequate description of the separation of the euro area into two distinct groups: those countries strongly affected by the crisis and those that have remained resilient during this period. The measures of market dissimilarity also reveal a persistent separation of these two groups and, according to our second measure, this separation strongly increased during the period July 2009-March 2012.

  14. 9. VIEW SHOWING JUNCTION OF CONCRETE EAST APPROACH SPAN WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW SHOWING JUNCTION OF CONCRETE EAST APPROACH SPAN WITH STEEL SPAN, LOOKING NORTH. NOTE ROCKING CAST STEEL SHOE ATTACHED TO PIER TO ALLOW FOR EXPANSION OF STEEL SPAN - Jensen Bridge, Spanning Green River at Town of Jensen, Jensen, Uintah County, UT

  15. 93. View showing erection traveler erecting 190 foot span over ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    93. View showing erection traveler erecting 190 foot span over Southern Pacific Company's main line track. This is the last span of the steel approach to the main bridge spans. - Carquinez Bridge, Spanning Carquinez Strait at Interstate 80, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  16. 4. North portal of Skew Span looking south and leading ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. North portal of Skew Span looking south and leading to Span 1 Main Bridge on the left and Span 1 Hot Metal Bridge on the right. - Monongahela Connecting Railroad Company, Main Bridge, Spanning Monongahela River at mile post 3.1, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  17. Detail of center of swing span rotation. Forty (40) rods ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of center of swing span rotation. Forty (40) rods radiate out from a center cap stand (like spokes on a bicycle) and hold 40 20-inch diameter wheels onto a rim bearing circular track on which they roll when swing span is opened and closed. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  18. Improving Memory Span in Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conners, F. A.; Rosenquist, C. J.; Arnett, L.; Moore, M. S.; Hume, L. E.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Down syndrome (DS) is characterized by impaired memory span, particularly auditory verbal memory span. Memory span is linked developmentally to several language capabilities, and may be a basic capacity that enables language learning. If children with DS had better memory span, they might benefit more from language intervention. The…

  19. Effect of wing flexibility on phasing of tandem wings in forward flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidu, Vishal; Young, John; Lai, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    The dragonfly with two pairs of wings in tandem uses different phases between the wing pairs to suit the needs of the flight. Previous studies to understand the effect of phasing in forward flight are based on rigid wings. This is in contrast to the highly flexible dragonfly wings, with varying spanwise and chordwise flexibility. Here, we study flexible flapping wing simulations using Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) in forward flight, at an advance ratio of 0.3 and Reynolds number of approximately 1300. The FSI simulations are carried out for phase 90° (hindwing leading), 0° (in-phase) and 180° (anti-phase). The performance of flexible wings will be compared with that of the rigid wings and the effect of flexibility will be discussed. PhD Student.

  20. Wing Deployment Sequence #2: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment airc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Wing Deployment Sequence #2: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft's wings continue deploying following separation from its carrier aircraft during a flight conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  1. Wing Deployment Sequence #1: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment airc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Wing Deployment Sequence #1: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft's wings begin deploying following separation from its carrier aircraft during a flight conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  2. Wing Deployment Sequence #3: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment airc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Wing Deployment Sequence #3: The deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment aircraft's wings fully deployed during flight following separation from its carrier aircraft during a flight conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Californiaornia. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  3. Effect of leading edge roundness on a delta wing in wing-rock motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, T. Terry; Malcolm, Gerald N.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of wing leading-edge roundness on wing rock was investigated using flow visualization in a water tunnel. Eighty degree delta wing models were tested on free-to-roll and forced oscillation rigs. The onset of wing rock was delayed by increasing the roundness of the leading edges. The wing rock amplitude and frequency results suggested that damping was increased at lower angles of attack but reduced at higher angles of attack. Vortex lift-off and vortex breakdown, especially during dynamic situations, were strongly affected by the leading edge roundness. Different forms of wing rock motion could be sustained by combinations of vortex breakdown and vortex lift-off. Behaviors of the wing and vortex motions were explained by the influence of leading edge roundness on the separation location, vortex trajectory, and vortex breakdown.

  4. Advanced wing design survivability testing and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, J.; Tobias, M.

    1992-01-01

    Composite wings on current operational aircraft are conservatively designed to account for stress/strain concentrations, and to assure specified damage tolerance. The technology that can lead to improved composite wing structures and associated structural efficiency is to increase design ultimate strain levels beyond their current limit of 3500 to 4000 micro-in/in to 6000 micro-in/in without sacrificing structural integrity, durability, damage tolerance, or survivability. Grumman, under the sponsorship of the Naval Air Development Center (NADC), has developed a high-strain composite wing design for a subsonic aircraft wing using novel and innovative design concepts and manufacturing methods, while maintaining a state-of-the-art fiber/resin system. The current advanced wing design effort addressed a tactical subsonic aircraft wing using previously developed, high-strain wing design concepts in conjunction with newer/emerging fiber and polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials to achieve the same goals, while reducing complexity. Two categories of advanced PMC materials were evaluated: toughened thermosets; and engineered thermoplastics. Advanced PMC materials offer the technological opportunity to take maximum advantage of improved material properties, physical characteristics, and tailorability to increase performance and survivability over current composite structure. Damage tolerance and survivability to various threats, in addition to structural integrity and durability, were key technical issues addressed during this study, and evaluated through test. This paper focuses on the live-fire testing, and the results performed to experimentally evaluate the survivability of the advanced wing design.

  5. Computer Code Aids Design Of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Harry W.; Darden, Christine M.

    1993-01-01

    AERO2S computer code developed to aid design engineers in selection and evaluation of aerodynamically efficient wing/canard and wing/horizontal-tail configurations that includes simple hinged-flap systems. Code rapidly estimates longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of conceptual airplane lifting-surface arrangements. Developed in FORTRAN V on CDC 6000 computer system, and ported to MS-DOS environment.

  6. Biaxial mechanical characterization of bat wing skin.

    PubMed

    Skulborstad, A J; Swartz, S M; Goulbourne, N C

    2015-06-01

    The highly flexible and stretchable wing skin of bats, together with the skeletal structure and musculature, enables large changes in wing shape during flight. Such compliance distinguishes bat wings from those of all other flying animals. Although several studies have investigated the aerodynamics and kinematics of bats, few have examined the complex histology and mechanical response of the wing skin. This work presents the first biaxial characterization of the local deformation, mechanical properties, and fiber kinematics of bat wing skin. Analysis of these data has provided insight into the relationships among the structural morphology, mechanical properties, and functionality of wing skin. Large spatial variations in tissue deformation and non-negligible fiber strains in the cross-fiber direction for both chordwise and spanwise fibers indicate fibers should be modeled as two-dimensional elements. The macroscopic constitutive behavior was anisotropic and nonlinear, with very low spanwise and chordwise stiffness (hundreds of kilopascals) in the toe region of the stress-strain curve. The structural arrangement of the fibers and matrix facilitates a low energy mechanism for wing deployment and extension, and we fabricate examples of skins capturing this mechanism. We propose a comprehensive deformation map for the entire loading regime. The results of this work underscore the importance of biaxial field approaches for soft heterogeneous tissue, and provide a foundation for development of bio-inspired skins to probe the effects of the wing skin properties on aerodynamic performance. PMID:25895436

  7. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wing flaps. 25.457 Section 25.457 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps....

  8. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wing flaps. 25.457 Section 25.457 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps....

  9. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wing flaps. 25.457 Section 25.457 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps....

  10. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wing flaps. 25.457 Section 25.457 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps....

  11. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wing flaps. 25.457 Section 25.457 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps....

  12. Numerical investigation of insect wing fracture behaviour.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, H; Darvizeh, A; Shafiei, A; Taylor, D; Dirks, J-H

    2015-01-01

    The wings of insects are extremely light-weight biological composites with exceptional biomechanical properties. In the recent years, numerical simulations have become a very powerful tool to answer experimentally inaccessible questions on the biomechanics of insect flight. However, many of the presented models require a sophisticated balance of biomechanical material parameters, many of which are not yet available. In this article we show the first numerical simulations of crack propagation in insect wings. We have used a combination of the maximum-principal stress theory, the traction separation law and basic biomechanical properties of cuticle to develop simple yet accurate finite element (FE) models of locust wings. The numerical results of simulated tensile tests on wing samples are in very good qualitative, and interestingly, also in excellent quantitative agreement with previously obtained experimental data. Our study further supports the idea that the cross-veins in insect wings act as barriers against crack propagation and consequently play a dominant role in toughening the whole wing structure. The use of numerical simulations also allowed us to combine experimental data with previously inaccessible data, such as the distribution of the first principal stress through the wing membrane and the veins. A closer look at the stress-distribution within the wings might help to better understand fracture-toughening mechanisms and also to design more durable biomimetic micro-air vehicles. PMID:25468669

  13. Pegasus Rocket Wing and PHYSX Glove Undergoes Stress Loads Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Center, Mountain View, California; Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; and Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Orbital Sciences Corporation, Dulles, Virginia, is the manufacturer of the Pegasus vehicle, while Vandenberg Air Force Base served as a pre-launch assembly facility for the launch that included the PHYSX experiment. NASA used data from Pegasus launches to obtain considerable data on aerodynamics. By conducting experiments in a piggyback mode on Pegasus, some critical and secondary design and development issues were addressed at hypersonic speeds. The vehicle was also used to develop hypersonic flight instrumentation and test techniques. NASA's B-52 carrier-launch vehicle was used to get the Pegasus airborne during six launches from 1990 to 1994. Thereafter, an Orbital Sciences L-1011 aircraft launched the Pegasus. The Pegasus launch vehicle itself has a 400- to 600-pound payload capacity in a 61-cubic-foot payload space at the front of the vehicle. The vehicle is capable of placing a payload into low earth orbit. This vehicle is 49 feet long and 50 inches in diameter. It has a wing span of 22 feet. (There is also a Pegasus XL vehicle that was introduced in 1994. Dryden has never launched one of these vehicles, but they have greater thrust and are 56 feet long.)

  14. Insect-like flapping wing mechanism based on a double spherical Scotch yoke

    PubMed Central

    Galiński, Cezary; Żbikowski, Rafał

    2005-01-01

    We describe the rationale, concept, design and implementation of a fixed-motion (non-adjustable) mechanism for insect-like flapping wing micro air vehicles in hover, inspired by two-winged flies (Diptera). This spatial (as opposed to planar) mechanism is based on the novel idea of a double spherical Scotch yoke. The mechanism was constructed for two main purposes: (i) as a test bed for aeromechanical research on hover in flapping flight, and (ii) as a precursor design for a future flapping wing micro air vehicle. Insects fly by oscillating (plunging) and rotating (pitching) their wings through large angles, while sweeping them forwards and backwards. During this motion the wing tip approximately traces a ‘figure-of-eight’ or a ‘banana’ and the wing changes the angle of attack (pitching) significantly. The kinematic and aerodynamic data from free-flying insects are sparse and uncertain, and it is not clear what aerodynamic consequences different wing motions have. Since acquiring the necessary kinematic and dynamic data from biological experiments remains a challenge, a synthetic, controlled study of insect-like flapping is not only of engineering value, but also of biological relevance. Micro air vehicles are defined as flying vehicles approximately 150 mm in size (hand-held), weighing 50–100 g, and are developed to reconnoitre in confined spaces (inside buildings, tunnels, etc.). For this application, insect-like flapping wings are an attractive solution and hence the need to realize the functionality of insect flight by engineering means. Since the semi-span of the insect wing is constant, the kinematics are spatial; in fact, an approximate figure-of-eight/banana is traced on a sphere. Hence a natural mechanism implementing such kinematics should be (i) spherical and (ii) generate mathematically convenient curves expressing the figure-of-eight/banana shape. The double spherical Scotch yoke design has property (i) by definition and achieves (ii) by

  15. High speed flow past wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norstrud, H.

    1973-01-01

    The analytical solution to the transonic small perturbation equation which describes steady compressible flow past finite wings at subsonic speeds can be expressed as a nonlinear integral equation with the perturbation velocity potential as the unknown function. This known formulation is substituted by a system of nonlinear algebraic equations to which various methods are applicable for its solution. Due to the presence of mathematical discontinuities in the flow solutions, however, a main computational difficulty was to ensure uniqueness of the solutions when local velocities on the wing exceeded the speed of sound. For continuous solutions this was achieved by embedding the algebraic system in an one-parameter operator homotopy in order to apply the method of parametric differentiation. The solution to the initial system of equations appears then as a solution to a Cauchy problem where the initial condition is related to the accompanying incompressible flow solution. In using this technique, however, a continuous dependence of the solution development on the initial data is lost when the solution reaches the minimum bifurcation point. A steepest descent iteration technique was therefore, added to the computational scheme for the calculation of discontinuous flow solutions. Results for purely subsonic flows and supersonic flows with and without compression shocks are given and compared with other available theoretical solutions.

  16. Swept wing ice accretion modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, Mark G.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    1990-01-01

    An effort to develop a three-dimensional modeling method was initiated. This first step towards creation of a complete aircraft icing simulation code builds on previously developed methods for calculating three-dimensional flow fields and particle trajectories combined with a two-dimensional ice accretion calculation along coordinate locations corresponding to streamlines. This work is a demonstration of the types of calculations necessary to predict a three-dimensional ice accretion. Results of calculations using the 3-D method for a MS-317 swept wing geometry are projected onto a 2-D plane normal to the wing leading edge and compared to 2-D results for the same geometry. It is anticipated that many modifications will be made to this approach, however, this effort will lay the groundwork for future modeling efforts. Results indicate that the flow field over the surface and the particle trajectories differed for the two calculations. This led to lower collection efficiencies, convective heat transfer coefficients, freezing fractions, and ultimately ice accumulation for the 3-D calculation.

  17. Digit Span is (mostly) related linearly to general intelligence: Every extra bit of span counts.

    PubMed

    Gignac, Gilles E; Weiss, Lawrence G

    2015-12-01

    Historically, Digit Span has been regarded as a relatively poor indicator of general intellectual functioning (g). In fact, Wechsler (1958) contended that beyond an average level of Digit Span performance, there was little benefit to possessing a greater memory span. Although Wechsler's position does not appear to have ever been tested empirically, it does appear to have become clinical lore. Consequently, the purpose of this investigation was to test Wechsler's contention on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition normative sample (N = 1,800; ages: 16 - 69). Based on linear and nonlinear contrast analyses of means, as well as linear and nonlinear bifactor model analyses, all 3 Digit Span indicators (LDSF, LDSB, and LDSS) were found to exhibit primarily linear associations with FSIQ/g. Thus, the commonly held position that Digit Span performance beyond an average level is not indicative of greater intellectual functioning was not supported. The results are discussed in light of the increasing evidence across multiple domains that memory span plays an important role in intellectual functioning. PMID:25774642

  18. Collective Flow Enhancement by Tandem Flapping Wings.

    PubMed

    Gravish, Nick; Peters, Jacob M; Combes, Stacey A; Wood, Robert J

    2015-10-30

    We examine the fluid-mechanical interactions that occur between arrays of flapping wings when operating in close proximity at a moderate Reynolds number (Re≈100-1000). Pairs of flapping wings are oscillated sinusoidally at frequency f, amplitude θ_{M}, phase offset ϕ, and wing separation distance D^{*}, and outflow speed v^{*} is measured. At a fixed separation distance, v^{*} is sensitive to both f and ϕ, and we observe both constructive and destructive interference in airspeed. v^{*} is maximized at an optimum phase offset, ϕ_{max}, which varies with wing separation distance, D^{*}. We propose a model of collective flow interactions between flapping wings based on vortex advection, which reproduces our experimental data. PMID:26565499

  19. Collective Flow Enhancement by Tandem Flapping Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravish, Nick; Peters, Jacob M.; Combes, Stacey A.; Wood, Robert J.

    2015-10-01

    We examine the fluid-mechanical interactions that occur between arrays of flapping wings when operating in close proximity at a moderate Reynolds number (Re ≈100 - 1000 ). Pairs of flapping wings are oscillated sinusoidally at frequency f , amplitude θM, phase offset ϕ , and wing separation distance D*, and outflow speed v* is measured. At a fixed separation distance, v* is sensitive to both f and ϕ , and we observe both constructive and destructive interference in airspeed. v* is maximized at an optimum phase offset, ϕmax, which varies with wing separation distance, D*. We propose a model of collective flow interactions between flapping wings based on vortex advection, which reproduces our experimental data.

  20. General theory of thin wing sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, Max M

    1923-01-01

    This report contains a new, simple method of calculating the air forces to which thin wings are subjected at small angles of attack, if their curvature is not too great. Two simple integrals are the result. They contain only the coordinates of the wing section. The first integral gives the angle of attack at which the lift of the wing is zero, the second integral gives the moment experienced by the wing when its angle is zero. The two constants thus obtained are sufficient to determine the lift and moment for any other angle of attack. This with the theory of the aerodynamical induction, and with our empirical knowledge of the drag due to friction, the results are valuable for actual wings also. A particular result obtained is the calculation of the elevator effect. (author)

  1. Design of a transonically profiled wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiekebusch, B.

    1978-01-01

    The application of well known design concepts with the combined use of thick transonic profiles to aircraft wing design was investigated. Optimization in terms of weight and operational costs was emphasized. It is shown that the usual design criteria and concepts are too restricted and do not sufficiently represent the physical processes over the wing. Suggestions are made for improving this situation, and a design example given. Compared with a wing design according to previously used criteria, the new design is found to be superior in the most important functions. It is concluded that an isobar concept adjusted to the planform in conjunction with an 'organically' designed wing will lead to the weight optimum solutions of wing profiles.

  2. X-wing potential for Navy applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, Arthur W.; Biggers, James C.

    1987-01-01

    The X-wing provides a VTOL aircraft which has a low disc loading hover capability, similar to a conventional helicopter, combined with a high subsonic cruise speed capability. As a result, it hovers with low fuel flow rates which make extended hover duration missions practical. Its low hover power requirements also permit hovering and low speed flight on only one engine in a high speed twin engine aircraft design. The NASA DARPA Sikorsky RSRA X-wing program developed flightworthy X-wing hardware. All design activity and the majority of its component fabrication is completed. A design study was performed on an X-wing concept demonstrator aircraft which is based on the RSRA X-wing components, combined with two MTE engines and a new fuselage.

  3. Wing rock suppression using forebody vortex control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, T. T.; Ong, L. Y.; Suarez, C. J.; Malcolm, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    Static and free-to-roll tests were conducted in a water tunnel with a configuration that consisted of a highly-slender forebody and 78-deg sweep delta wings. Flow visualization was performed and the roll angle histories were obtained. The fluid mechanisms governing the wing rock of this configuration were identified. Different means of suppressing wing rock by controlling the forebody vortices using small blowing jets were also explored. Steady blowing was found to be capable of suppressing wing rock, but significant vortex asymmetries had to be induced at the same time. On the other hand, alternating pulsed blowing on the left and right sides of the forebody was demonstrated to be potentially an effective means of suppressing wing rock and eliminating large asymmetric moments at high angles of attack.

  4. An Attached Flow Design of a Noninterferring Leading Edge Extension to a Thick Delta Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Ghaffari, Farhad

    1985-01-01

    An analytical procedure for the determination of the shape of a Leading-Edge Extension (LEE) which satisfies design criteria, including especially noninterference at the wing design point, has been developed for thick delta wings. The LEE device best satisfying all criteria is designed to be mounted on a wing along a dividing stream surface associated with an attached flow design lift coefficient (C(sub L,d)) of greater than zero. This device is intended to improve the aerodynamic performance of transonic aircraft at C(sub L) greater than C(sub L,d) system emanating from the LEE leading edge. In order to quantify this process a twisted and cambered thick delta wing was chosen for the initial application of this design procedure. Appropriate computer codes representing potential and vortex flows were employed to determine the dividing stream surface at C(sub L,d) and an optimized LEE planform shape at C(sub L) greater than C(sub L,d), respectively. To aid in the LEE selection, the aerodynamic effectiveness of 36 planforms was investigated at C(sub L) greater than C(sub L,d). This study showed that reducing the span of the candidate LEEs has the most detrimental effect on overall aerodynamic efficiency, regardless of the shape or area. Furthermore, for a fixed area, constant-chord LEE candidates were relatively more efficient than those with sweep less than the wing. At C(sub L,d), the presence of the LEE planform best satisfying the design criteria was found to have no effect on the wing alone aerodynamic performance.

  5. Showing partial side view of swing span in closed position. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Showing partial side view of swing span in closed position. The two (2) arms act as simple spans, a small amount of negative bending is accommodated by the continous top and bottom truss chords due to a continuous condition. Note the inclined end post of each of the simple spans, the operator's house, center/pivot pier and the pivotal pole-line pole placed atop of bridge. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  6. Effect of Horizontal-Tail Span and Vertical Location on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Unswept Tail Assembly in Sideslip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Donald R

    1954-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley stability tunnel on a vertical-tail model with a stub fuselage in combination with various horizontal tails to determine the effect of horizontal-tail span and vertical location of the horizontal tail relative to the vertical tail on the aerodynamic characteristics of an unswept tail assembly in sideslip. The results of the investigation indicated that the induced loading carried by the horizontal tail produced a rolling moment about the point of attachment to the vertical tail which was strongly influenced by horizontal-tail span and vertical locations. The greatest effect of horizontal-tail span on the rolling-moment derivative of the complete tail assembly was obtained for horizontal-tail locations near the top of the vertical tail. Span loadings which were reduced to the static-stability derivatives were calculated for each configuration tested by applying the well-known finite-step method used for wings to the intersecting surfaces of the vertical and horizontal tails. The finite-step method provides a simple and effective means of investigating the span loadings of intersecting surfaces.

  7. Design, fabrication, and characterization of multifunctional wings to harvest solar energy in flapping wing air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Rosado, Ariel; Gehlhar, Rachel D.; Nolen, Savannah; Gupta, Satyandra K.; Bruck, Hugh A.

    2015-06-01

    Currently, flapping wing unmanned aerial vehicles (a.k.a., ornithopters or robotic birds) sustain very short duration flight due to limited on-board energy storage capacity. Therefore, energy harvesting elements, such as flexible solar cells, need to be used as materials in critical components, such as wing structures, to increase operational performance. In this paper, we describe a layered fabrication method that was developed for realizing multifunctional composite wings for a unique robotic bird we developed, known as Robo Raven, by creating compliant wing structure from flexible solar cells. The deformed wing shape and aerodynamic lift/thrust loads were characterized throughout the flapping cycle to understand wing mechanics. A multifunctional performance analysis was developed to understand how integration of solar cells into the wings influences flight performance under two different operating conditions: (1) directly powering wings to increase operation time, and (2) recharging batteries to eliminate need for external charging sources. The experimental data is then used in the analysis to identify a performance index for assessing benefits of multifunctional compliant wing structures. The resulting platform, Robo Raven III, was the first demonstration of a robotic bird that flew using energy harvested from solar cells. We developed three different versions of the wing design to validate the multifunctional performance analysis. It was also determined that residual thrust correlated to shear deformation of the wing induced by torsional twist, while biaxial strain related to change in aerodynamic shape correlated to lift. It was also found that shear deformation of the solar cells induced changes in power output directly correlating to thrust generation associated with torsional deformation. Thus, it was determined that multifunctional solar cell wings may be capable of three functions: (1) lightweight and flexible structure to generate aerodynamic forces, (2

  8. Pressure distribution for the wing of the YAV-8B airplane; with and without pylons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltzman, Edwin J.; Delfrate, John H.; Sabsay, Catherine M.; Yarger, Jill M.

    1992-01-01

    Pressure distribution data have been obtained in flight at four span stations on the wing panel of the YAV-8B airplane. Data obtained for the supercritical profiled wing, with and without pylons installed, ranged from Mach 0.46 to 0.88. The altitude ranged from approximately 20,000 to 40,000 ft and the resultant Reynolds numbers varied from approximately 7.2 million to 28.7 million based on the mean aerodynamic chord. Pressure distribution data and flow visualization results show that the full-scale flight wing performance is compromised because the lower surface cusp region experiences flow separation for some important transonic flight conditions. This condition is aggravated when local shocks occur on the lower surface of the wing (mostly between 20 and 35 percent chord) when the pylons are installed for Mach 0.8 and above. There is evidence that convex fairings, which cover the pylon attachment flanges, cause these local shocks. Pressure coefficients significantly more negative than those for sonic flow also occur farther aft on the lower surface (near 60 percent chord) whether or not the pylons are installed for Mach numbers greater than or equal to 0.8. These negative pressure coefficient peaks and associated local shocks would be expected to cause increasing wave and separation drag at transonic Mach number increases.

  9. Theoretical aerodynamics of upper-surface-blowing jet-wing interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.; Campbell, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    A linear, inviscid subsonic compressible flow theory is formulated to treat the aerodynamic interaction between the wing and an inviscid upper-surface-blowing (USB) thick jet with Mach number nonuniformity. The predicted results show reasonably good agreement with some available lift and induced-drag data. It was also shown that the thin-jet-flap theory is inadequate for the USB configurations with thick jet. Additional theoretical results show that the lift and induced drag were reduced by increasing jet temperature and increased by increasing jet Mach number. Reducing jet aspect ratio, while holding jet area constant, caused reductions in lift, induced drag, and pitching moment at a given angle of attack but with a minimal change in the curve of lift coefficient against induced-drag coefficient. The jet-deflection effect was shown to be beneficial to cruise performance. The aerodynamic center was shifted forward by adding power or jet-deflection angle. Moving the jet away from the wing surface resulted in rapid changes in lift and induced drag. Reducing the wing span of a rectangular wing by half decreased the jet-circulation lift by only 24 percent at a thrust coefficient of 2.

  10. An integrated approach to the optimum design of actively controlled composite wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livne, E.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of interactions among the various disciplines in airplane wing design has been recognized for quite some time. With the introduction of high gain, high authority control systems and the design of thin, flexible, lightweight composite wings, the integrated treatment of control systems, flight mechanics and dynamic aeroelasticity became a necessity. A research program is underway now aimed at extending structural synthesis concepts and methods to the integrated synthesis of lifting surfaces, spanning the disciplines of structures, aerodynamics and control for both analysis and design. Mathematical modeling techniques are carefully selected to be accurate enough for preliminary design purposes of the complicated, built-up lifting surfaces of real aircraft with their multiple design criteria and tight constraints. The presentation opens with some observations on the multidisciplinary nature of wing design. A brief review of some available state of the art practical wing optimization programs and a brief review of current research effort in the field serve to illuminate the motivation and support the direction taken in our research. The goals of this research effort are presented, followed by a description of the analysis and behavior sensitivity techniques used. The presentation concludes with a status report and some forecast of upcoming progress.

  11. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of the Slip-Side Joggle Regions of Wing-Leading Edge Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Phillips, Dawn R.

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter wing comprises of 22 leading edge panels on each side of the wing. These panels are part of the thermal protection system that protects the Orbiter wings from extreme heating that take place on the reentry in to the earth atmosphere. On some panels that experience extreme heating, liberation of silicon carbon (SiC) coating was observed on the slip side regions of the panels. Global structural and local fracture mechanics analyses were performed on these panels as a part of the root cause investigation of this coating liberation anomaly. The wing-leading-edge reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels, Panel 9, T-seal 10, and Panel 10, are shown in Figure 1 and the progression of the stress analysis models is presented in Figure 2. The global structural analyses showed minimal interaction between adjacent panels and the T-seal that bridges the gap between the panels. A bounding uniform temperature is applied to a representative panel and the resulting stress distribution is examined. For this loading condition, the interlaminar normal stresses showed negligible variation in the chord direction and increased values in the vicinity of the slip-side joggle shoulder. As such, a representative span wise slice on the panel can be taken and the cross section can be analyzed using plane strain analysis.

  12. Pressure measurements on a rectangular wing with a NACA0012 airfoil during conventional flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera, Jose A., Jr.; Dansberry, Bryan E.; Durham, Michael H.; Bennett, Robert M.; Silva, Walter A.

    1992-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics Division at NASA LaRC has started a wind tunnel activity referred to as the Benchmark Models Program. The primary objective of the program is to acquire measured dynamic instability and corresponding pressure data that will be useful for developing and evaluating aeroelastic type CFD codes currently in use or under development. The program is a multi-year activity that will involve testing of several different models to investigate various aeroelastic phenomena. The first model consisted of a rigid semispan wing having a rectangular planform and a NACA 0012 airfoil shape which was mounted on a flexible two degree-of-freedom mount system. Two wind-tunnel tests were conducted with the first model. Several dynamic instability boundaries were investigated such as a conventional flutter boundary, a transonic plunge instability region near Mach = 0.90, and stall flutter. In addition, wing surface unsteady pressure data were acquired along two model chords located at the 60 to 95-percent span stations during these instabilities. At this time, only the pressure data for the conventional flutter boundary is presented. The conventional flutter boundary and the wing surface unsteady pressure measurements obtained at the conventional flutter boundary test conditions in pressure coefficient form are presented. Wing surface steady pressure measurements obtained with the model mount system rigidized are also presented. These steady pressure data were acquired at essentially the same dynamic pressure at which conventional flutter had been encountered with the mount system flexible.

  13. Theoretical stability and control characteristics of wings with various amounts of taper and twist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Henry A; Jones, Robert T

    1938-01-01

    Stability derivatives have been computed for twisted wings of different plan forms that include variations in both the wing taper and the aspect ratio. Taper ratios of 1.0, 0,50, and 0.25 are considered for each of three aspect ratios: 6, 10, and 16. The specific derivatives for which results are given are the rolling-moment and the yawing-moment derivatives with respect to (a) rolling velocity, (b) yawing velocity, and (c) angle of sideslip. These results are given in such a form that the effect of any initial symmetrical wing twist (such as may be produced by flaps) on the derivatives may easily be taken into account. In addition to the stability derivatives, results are included for determining the theoretical rolling moment due to aileron deflection and a series of influence lines is given by which the loading across the span may be determined for any angle-of-attack distribution that may occur on the wing plan forms considered. The report also includes incidental references to the application of the results.

  14. Low-Speed Tests of Semispan-Wing Models at Angles of Attack from 0 to 180 degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, David G.

    1959-01-01

    Semispan-wing models were tested at angles of attack from 0 to 180 deg at low subsonic speeds. Eight plan forms were considered, both swept and unswept with aspect ratios ranging from 2 to 6. Except for a delta-wing model of aspect ratio 2. all models had a taper ratio of 0.5 and an NACA 64AO10 airfoil section. The delta-wing model had an NACA 0005 (modified) airfoil section. With two exceptions, the models were tested both with and without a full-span trailing-edge flap deflected 25 deg. The Reynolds numbers based on the mean aerodynamic chord were between 1.5 and 2.2 million. Lift, drag, and pitching-moment coefficients are presented as functions of angle of attack. Approximate corrections for the effects of blockage were applied to the data.

  15. Spin tests of a low-wing monoplane to investigate scale effect in the model test range, May 1941

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donlan, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    Concurrent tests were performed on a 1/16 and a 1/20 scale model (wing spans of 2.64 and 2.11 ft. respectively) of a modern low wing monoplane in the NACA 15 foot free-spinning wind tunnel. Results are presented in the form of charts that afford a direct comparison between the spins of the two models for a number of different conditions. Qualitatively, the same characteristic effects of control disposition, mass distribution, and dimensional modifications were indicated by both models. Quantitatively, the number of turns for recover and the steady spin parameters, with the exception of the inclination of the wing to the horizontal, were usually in good agreement.

  16. Insect Wing Displacement Measurement Using Digital Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, Daniel D.; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Torre I, Manuel H. de la; Caloca Mendez, Cristian I.

    2008-04-15

    Insects in flight have been studied with optical non destructive techniques with the purpose of using meaningful results in aerodynamics. With the availability of high resolution and large dynamic range CCD sensors the so called interferometric digital holographic technique was used to measure the surface displacement of in flight insect wings, such as butterflies. The wings were illuminated with a continuous wave Verdi laser at 532 nm, and observed with a CCD Pixelfly camera that acquire images at a rate of 11.5 frames per second at a resolution of 1392x1024 pixels and 12 Bit dynamic range. At this frame rate digital holograms of the wings were captured and processed in the usual manner, namely, each individual hologram is Fourier processed in order to find the amplitude and phase corresponding to the digital hologram. The wings displacement is obtained when subtraction between two digital holograms is performed for two different wings position, a feature applied to all consecutive frames recorded. The result of subtracting is seen as a wrapped phase fringe pattern directly related to the wing displacement. The experimental data for different butterfly flying conditions and exposure times are shown as wire mesh plots in a movie of the wings displacement.

  17. Periodic and chaotic flapping of insectile wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Kanso, E.

    2015-11-01

    Insects use flight muscles attached at the base of the wings to produce impressive wing flapping frequencies. The maximum power output of these flight muscles is insufficient to maintain such wing oscillations unless there is good elastic storage of energy in the insect flight system. Here, we explore the intrinsic self-oscillatory behavior of an insectile wing model, consisting of two rigid wings connected at their base by an elastic torsional spring. We study the wings behavior as a function of the total energy and spring stiffness. Three types of behavior are identified: end-over-end rotation, chaotic motion, and periodic flapping. Interestingly, the region of periodic flapping decreases as energy increases but is favored as stiffness increases. These findings are consistent with the fact that insect wings and flight muscles are stiff. They further imply that, by adjusting their muscle stiffness to the energy level at which they are operating, insects can maintain periodic flapping mechanically for a range of operating conditions.

  18. Nanostructured Antireflective and Thermoisolative Cicada Wings.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Junko; Ryu, Meguya; Seniutinas, Gediminas; Balčytis, Armandas; Maximova, Ksenia; Wang, Xuewen; Zamengo, Massimiliano; Ivanova, Elena P; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2016-05-10

    Inter-related mechanical, thermal, and optical macroscopic properties of biomaterials are defined at the nanoscale by their constituent structures and patterns, which underpin complex functions of an entire bio-object. Here, the temperature diffusivity of a cicada (Cyclochila australasiae) wing with nanotextured surfaces was measured using two complementary techniques: a direct contact method and IR imaging. The 4-6-μm-thick wing section was shown to have a thermal diffusivity of α⊥ = (0.71 ± 0.15) × 10(-7) m(2)/s, as measured by the contact temperature wave method along the thickness of the wing; it corresponds to the inherent thermal property of the cuticle. The in-plane thermal diffusivity value of the wing was determined by IR imaging and was considerably larger at α∥ = (3.6 ± 0.2) × 10(-7) m(2)/s as a result of heat transport via air. Optical properties of wings covered with nanospikes were numerically simulated using an accurate 3D model of the wing pattern and showed that light is concentrated between spikes where intensity is enhanced by up to 3- to 4-fold. The closely packed pattern of nanospikes reduces the reflectivity of the wing throughout the visible light spectrum and over a wide range of incident angles, hence acting as an antireflection coating. PMID:27101865

  19. Integrated technology wing design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, A. P.; Beck, W. E.; Morita, W. H.; Penrose, B. J.; Skarshaug, R. E.; Wainfan, B. S.

    1984-01-01

    The technology development costs and associated benefits in applying advanced technology associated with the design of a new wing for a new or derivative trijet with a capacity for 350 passengers and maximum range of 8519 km, entering service in 1990 were studied. The areas of technology are: (1) airfoil technology; (2) planform parameters; (3) high lift; (4) pitch active control system; (5) all electric systems; (6) E to 3rd power propulsion; (7) airframe/propulsion integration; (8) graphite/epoxy composites; (9) advanced aluminum alloys; (10) titanium alloys; and (11) silicon carbide/aluminum composites. These technologies were applied to the reference aircraft configuration. Payoffs were determined for block fuel reductions and net value of technology. These technologies are ranked for the ratio of net value of technology (NVT) to technology development costs.

  20. Analytical modeling and experimental evaluation of a passively morphing ornithopter wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissa, Aimy A.

    Ornithopters or flapping wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have potential applications in both civil and military sectors. Amongst all categories of UAVs, ornithopters have a unique ability to fly in low Reynolds number flight regimes and have the agility and maneuverability of rotary wing aircraft. In nature, birds achieve such performance by exploiting various wing kinematics known as gaits. The objective of this work was to improve the steady level flight wing performance of an ornithopter by implementing the Continuous Vortex Gait (CVG) using a novel passive compliant spine. The CVG is a set of bio-inspired kinematics that natural flyers use to produce lift and thrust during steady level flight. A significant contribution of this work was the recognition that the CVG is an avian gait that could be achieved using a passive morphing mechanism. In contrast to rigid-link mechanisms and active approaches, reported by other researchers in the open literature, passive morphing mechanisms require no additional energy expenditure, while introducing minimal weight addition and complexity. During the execution of the CVG, the avian wing wrist is the primary joint responsible for the wing shape changes. Thus a compliant mechanism, called a compliant spine, was fabricated, and integrated in the ornithopter's wing leading edge spar where an avian wrist would normally exist, namely at 37% of the wing half span. Each compliant spine was designed to be flexible in bending during the wing upstroke and stiff in bending during the wing downstroke. Inserting a variable stiffness compliant mechanism in the leading edge (LE) spar of the ornithopter could affect its structural stability. An analytical model was developed to determine the structural stability of the ornithopter LE spar. The model was validated using experimental measurements. The LE spar equations of motion were then reformulated into Mathieu's equation and the LE spar was proven to be structurally stable with a

  1. Novel Control Effectors for Truss Braced Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Edward V.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Joshi, Shiv

    2015-01-01

    At cruise flight conditions very high aspect ratio/low sweep truss braced wings (TBW) may be subject to design requirements that distinguish them from more highly swept cantilevered wings. High aspect ratio, short chord length and relative thinness of the airfoil sections all contribute to relatively low wing torsional stiffness. This may lead to aeroelastic issues such as aileron reversal and low flutter margins. In order to counteract these issues, high aspect ratio/low sweep wings may need to carry additional high speed control effectors to operate when outboard ailerons are in reversal and/or must carry additional structural weight to enhance torsional stiffness. The novel control effector evaluated in this study is a variable sweep raked wing tip with an aileron control surface. Forward sweep of the tip allows the aileron to align closely with the torsional axis of the wing and operate in a conventional fashion. Aft sweep of the tip creates a large moment arm from the aileron to the wing torsional axis greatly enhancing aileron reversal. The novelty comes from using this enhanced and controllable aileron reversal effect to provide roll control authority by acting as a servo tab and providing roll control through intentional twist of the wing. In this case the reduced torsional stiffness of the wing becomes an advantage to be exploited. The study results show that the novel control effector concept does provide roll control as described, but only for a restricted class of TBW aircraft configurations. For the configuration studied (long range, dual aisle, Mach 0.85 cruise) the novel control effector provides significant benefits including up to 12% reduction in fuel burn.

  2. Phonological similarity effect in complex span task.

    PubMed

    Camos, Valérie; Mora, Gérôme; Barrouillet, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to test the hypothesis that two systems are involved in verbal working memory; one is specifically dedicated to the maintenance of phonological representations through verbal rehearsal while the other would maintain multimodal representations through attentional refreshing. This theoretical framework predicts that phonologically related phenomena such as the phonological similarity effect (PSE) should occur when the domain-specific system is involved in maintenance, but should disappear when concurrent articulation hinders its use. Impeding maintenance in the domain-general system by a concurrent attentional demand should impair recall performance without affecting PSE. In three experiments, we manipulated the concurrent articulation and the attentional demand induced by the processing component of complex span tasks in which participants had to maintain lists of either similar or dissimilar words. Confirming our predictions, PSE affected recall performance in complex span tasks. Although both the attentional demand and the articulatory requirement of the concurrent task impaired recall, only the induction of an articulatory suppression during maintenance made the PSE disappear. These results suggest a duality in the systems devoted to verbal maintenance in the short term, constraining models of working memory. PMID:23419012

  3. Effects of anticonvulsant drugs on life span.

    PubMed

    Kornfeld, Kerry; Evason, Kimberley

    2006-04-01

    Aging is characterized by widespread degenerative changes in tissue morphology and function and an increase in the incidence of human diseases such as cancer, stroke, and Alzheimer disease. Findings from recent genetic studies suggest that molecular mechanisms that influence life span are evolutionarily conserved, and interventions that extend the life span of model organisms such as worms and flies are likely to have similar effects on vertebrates such as humans. However, little progress has been made in identifying drugs that delay aging. We identified 3 pharmacologic compounds, ethosuximide, trimethadione, and 3,3-diethyl-2-pyrrolidinone, that extend lifespan and delay age-related degenerative changes in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. All 3 compounds are anticonvulsants that modulate neural activity in vertebrates, and ethosuximide and trimethadione are used to treat absence seizures in humans. We discuss existing evidence that these drugs might also delay vertebrate aging and suggest experiments that could test this hypothesis. Genetic and cell ablation studies conducted with model organisms have demonstrated connections between the nervous system and aging. Our studies provide additional support for the hypothesis that neural activity plays a role in lifespan determination, since ethosuximide and trimethadione regulated neuromuscular activity in nematodes. Our findings suggest that the lifespan extending activity of these compounds is related to the anticonvulsant activity, implicating neural activity in the regulation of aging. We also discuss models that explain how the nervous system influences lifespan. PMID:16606760

  4. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wing flap controls. 23.697 Section 23.697... Systems § 23.697 Wing flap controls. (a) Each wing flap control must be designed so that, when the flap... with § 23.145(b)(3) necessitates wing flap retraction to positions that are not fully retracted,...

  5. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wing flap controls. 23.697 Section 23.697... Systems § 23.697 Wing flap controls. (a) Each wing flap control must be designed so that, when the flap... with § 23.145(b)(3) necessitates wing flap retraction to positions that are not fully retracted,...

  6. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wing flap controls. 23.697 Section 23.697... Systems § 23.697 Wing flap controls. (a) Each wing flap control must be designed so that, when the flap... with § 23.145(b)(3) necessitates wing flap retraction to positions that are not fully retracted,...

  7. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wing flap controls. 23.697 Section 23.697... Systems § 23.697 Wing flap controls. (a) Each wing flap control must be designed so that, when the flap... with § 23.145(b)(3) necessitates wing flap retraction to positions that are not fully retracted,...

  8. Insights into Airframe Aerodynamics and Rotor-on-Wing Interactions from a 0.25-Scale Tiltrotor Wind Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. A.; Lillie, D.; McCluer, M.; Yamauchi, G. K.; Derby, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    A recent experimental investigation into tiltrotor aerodynamics and acoustics has resulted in the acquisition of a set of data related to tiltrotor airframe aerodynamics and rotor and wing interactional aerodynamics. This work was conducted in the National Full-scale Aerodynamics Complex's (NFAC) 40-by-80 Foot Wind Tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, on the Full-Span Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM). The full-span TRAM wind tunnel test stand is nominally based on a quarter-scale representation of the V-22 aircraft. The data acquired will enable the refinement of analytical tools for the prediction of tiltrotor aeromechanics and aeroacoustics.

  9. The plane problem of the flapping wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, Walter

    1954-01-01

    In connection with an earlier report on the lifting vortex sheet which forms the basis of the following investigations this will show how the methods developed there are also suitable for dealing with the air forces for a wing with a circulation variable with time. The theory of a propulsive wing flapping up and down periodically in the manner of a bird's wing is developed. This study shows how the lift and its moment result as a function of the flapping motion, what thrust is attainable, and how high is the degree of efficiency of this flapping propulsion unit if the air friction is disregarded.

  10. Sensitivity Analysis of Wing Aeroelastic Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Issac, Jason Cherian

    1995-01-01

    Design for prevention of aeroelastic instability (that is, the critical speeds leading to aeroelastic instability lie outside the operating range) is an integral part of the wing design process. Availability of the sensitivity derivatives of the various critical speeds with respect to shape parameters of the wing could be very useful to a designer in the initial design phase, when several design changes are made and the shape of the final configuration is not yet frozen. These derivatives are also indispensable for a gradient-based optimization with aeroelastic constraints. In this study, flutter characteristic of a typical section in subsonic compressible flow is examined using a state-space unsteady aerodynamic representation. The sensitivity of the flutter speed of the typical section with respect to its mass and stiffness parameters, namely, mass ratio, static unbalance, radius of gyration, bending frequency, and torsional frequency is calculated analytically. A strip theory formulation is newly developed to represent the unsteady aerodynamic forces on a wing. This is coupled with an equivalent plate structural model and solved as an eigenvalue problem to determine the critical speed of the wing. Flutter analysis of the wing is also carried out using a lifting-surface subsonic kernel function aerodynamic theory (FAST) and an equivalent plate structural model. Finite element modeling of the wing is done using NASTRAN so that wing structures made of spars and ribs and top and bottom wing skins could be analyzed. The free vibration modes of the wing obtained from NASTRAN are input into FAST to compute the flutter speed. An equivalent plate model which incorporates first-order shear deformation theory is then examined so it can be used to model thick wings, where shear deformations are important. The sensitivity of natural frequencies to changes in shape parameters is obtained using ADIFOR. A simple optimization effort is made towards obtaining a minimum weight

  11. Moveable Leading Edge Device for a Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitt, Dale M. (Inventor); Eckstein, Nicholas Stephen (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method and apparatus for managing a flight control surface system. A leading edge section on a wing of an aircraft is extended into a deployed position. A deformable section connects the leading edge section to a trailing section. The deformable section changes from a deformed shape to an original shape when the leading edge section is moved into the deployed position. The leading edge section on the wing is moved from the deployed position to an undeployed position. The deformable section changes to the deformed shape inside of the wing.

  12. A Miniature Controllable Flapping Wing Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabagi, Veaceslav Gheorghe

    The agility and miniature size of nature's flapping wing fliers has long baffled researchers, inspiring biological studies, aerodynamic simulations, and attempts to engineer their robotic replicas. Flapping wing flight is characterized by complex reciprocating wing kinematics, transient aerodynamic effects, and very small body lengths. These characteristics render robotic flapping wing aerial vehicles ideal for surveillance and defense applications, search and rescue missions, and environment monitoring, where their ability to hover and high maneuverability is immensely beneficial. One of the many difficulties in creating flapping wing based miniature robotic aerial vehicles lies in generating a proper wing trajectory that would result in sufficient lift forces for hovering and maneuvering. Since design of a flapping wing system is a balance between overall weight and the number of actuated inputs, we take the approach of having minimal controlled inputs, allowing passive behavior wherever possible. Hence, we propose a completely passive wing pitch reversal design that relies on wing inertial dynamics, an elastic energy storage mechanism, and low Reynolds number aerodynamic effects. Theoretical models, compiling previous research on piezoelectric actuators, four-bar transmissions, and aerodynamics effects, are developed and used as basis for a complete numerical simulation. Limitations of the model are discussed in comparison to experimental results obtained from a working prototype of the proposed passive pitch reversal flapping wing mechanism. Given that the mechanism is under-actuated, methods to control lift force generation by actively varying system parameters are proposed, discussed, and tested experimentally. A dual wing aerial platform is developed based on the passive pitch reversal wing concept. Design considerations are presented, favoring controllability and structural rigidity of the final platform. Finite element analysis and experimental

  13. The effect of asymmetric vortex wake characteristics on a slender delta wing undergoing wing rock motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arena, A. S., Jr.; Nelson, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental investigation into the fluid mechanisms responsible for wing rock on a slender delta wing with 80 deg leading edge sweep has been conducted. Time history and flow visualization data are presented for a wide angle-of-attack range. The use of an air bearing spindle has allowed the motion of the wing to be free from bearing friction or mechanical hysteresis. A bistable static condition has been found in vortex breakdown at an angle of attack of 40 deg which causes an overshoot of the steady state rocking amplitude. Flow visualization experiments also reveal a difference in static and dynamic breakdown locations on the wing. A hysteresis loop in dynamic breakdown location similar to that seen on pitching delta wings was observed as the wing was undergoing the limit cycle oscillation.

  14. Aerodynamic shape optimization of wing and wing-body configurations using control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for wing and wing-body design. In previous studies it was shown that control theory could be used to devise an effective optimization procedure for airfoils and wings in which the shape and the surrounding body-fitted mesh are both generated analytically, and the control is the mapping function. Recently, the method has been implemented for both potential flows and flows governed by the Euler equations using an alternative formulation which employs numerically generated grids, so that it can more easily be extended to treat general configurations. Here results are presented both for the optimization of a swept wing using an analytic mapping, and for the optimization of wing and wing-body configurations using a general mesh.

  15. The effect of over-the-wing nacelles on wing-body aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reubush, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel to further study benefits in climb and cruise performance due to blowing the jet over the wing for a transport-type wing-body configuration. In this investigation a wing-body model/powered-nacelle test rig combination was tested at Mach numbers of 0.5 and 0.8 at angles of attack from -2 to 4 deg and jet total-pressure ratios from jet off to 3 or 4 (depending on Mach number) for a variety of nacelle locations relative to the wing. Results from this investigation show that positioning of the nacelles can have very large effects on the wing-body drag (nacelles were nonmetric). Some positions yielded much higher drag than the baseline wing-body while others yielded drag which was somewhat lower than the baseline.

  16. Aerodynamic characteristics of a small-scale straight and swept-back wing with knee-blown jet flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehouse, G. G.; Eckert, W. T.; Boles, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Two sting-mounted, 50.8 cm (20 in.) span, knee-blown, jet-flap models were tested in a large (2.1- by 2.5-m (7- by 10-ft) subsonic wind tunnel. A straight- and swept-wing model were tested with fixed flap deflection with various combinations of full-span leading-edge slats. The swept-wing model was also tested with wing tip extensions. Data were taken at angles-of-attack between 0 deg and 40 deg, at dynamic pressures between 143.6 N/sq m (3 lb/sq ft) and 239.4 N/sq m (5 lb/sq ft), and at Reynolds numbers (based on wing chord) ranging from 100,000 to 132,000. Jet flap momentum blowing coefficients up to 10 were used. Lift, drag, and pitching-moment coefficients, and exit flow profiles for the flap blowing are presented in graphical form without analysis.

  17. Thin tailored composite wing for civil tiltrotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rais-Rohani, Masoud

    1994-01-01

    The tiltrotor aircraft is a flight vehicle which combines the efficient low speed (i.e., take-off, landing, and hover) characteristics of a helicopter with the efficient cruise speed of a turboprop airplane. A well-known example of such vehicle is the Bell-Boeing V-22 Osprey. The high cruise speed and range constraints placed on the civil tiltrotor require a relatively thin wing to increase the drag-divergence Mach number which translates into lower compressibility drag. It is required to reduce the wing maximum thickness-to-chord ratio t/c from 23% (i.e., V-22 wing) to 18%. While a reduction in wing thickness results in improved aerodynamic efficiency, it has an adverse effect on the wing structure and it tends to reduce structural stiffness. If ignored, the reduction in wing stiffness leads to susceptibility to aeroelastic and dynamic instabilities which may consequently cause a catastrophic failure. By taking advantage of the directional stiffness characteristics of composite materials the wing structure may be tailored to have the necessary stiffness, at a lower thickness, while keeping the weight low. The goal of this study is to design a wing structure for minimum weight subject to structural, dynamic and aeroelastic constraints. The structural constraints are in terms of strength and buckling allowables. The dynamic constraints are in terms of wing natural frequencies in vertical and horizontal bending and torsion. The aeroelastic constraints are in terms of frequency placement of the wing structure relative to those of the rotor system. The wing-rotor-pylon aeroelastic and dynamic interactions are limited in this design study by holding the cruise speed, rotor-pylon system, and wing geometric attributes fixed. To assure that the wing-rotor stability margins are maintained a more rigorous analysis based on a detailed model of the rotor system will need to ensue following the design study. The skin-stringer-rib type architecture is used for the wing

  18. Airfoil section characteristics as applied to the prediction of air forces and their distribution on wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N; Rhode, R V

    1938-01-01

    The results of previous reports dealing with airfoil section characteristics and span load distribution data are coordinated into a method for determining the air forces and their distribution on airplane wings. Formulas are given from which the resultant force distribution may be combined to find the wing aerodynamic center and pitching moment. The force distribution may also be resolved to determine the distribution of chord and beam components. The forces are resolved in such a manner that it is unnecessary to take the induced drag into account. An illustration of the method is given for a monoplane and a biplane for the conditions of steady flight and a sharp-edge gust. The force determination is completed by outlining a procedure for finding the distribution of load along the chord of airfoil sections.

  19. Surface pressure distributions on a delta wing undergoing large amplitude pitching oscillations. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Scott A.

    1989-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were performed on a 70 deg sweep delta wing to determine the effect of a sinusoidal pitching motion on the pressure field on the suction side of the wing. Twelve pressure taps were placed from 35 to 90 percent of the chord, at 60 percent of the local semi-span. Pressure coefficients were measured as a function of Reynolds number and pitch rate. The pressure coefficient was seen to vary at approximately the same frequency as the pitching frequency. The relative pressure variation at each chord location was comparable for each case. The average pressure distribution through each periodic motion was near the static distribution for the average angle of attack. Upon comparing the upstroke and downstroke pressures for a specific angle of attack, the downstroke pressures were slightly larger. Vortex breakdown was seen to have the most significant effect at the 40 to 45 percent chord location, where a decrease in pressure was apparent.

  20. Trim angle of attack of flexible wings using non-linear aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, David Erik

    noticeable difference both in the wing deflection and the span loading when compared to the viscous results. A crude (coarse-grain) parallel methodology was used in some of the calculations in this research. Although the codes were not parallelized, the use of modal super-position made it possible to compute the sensitivity terms on different processors of an IBM SP/2. This resulted in a decrease in wall clock time for these calculations. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)