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Sample records for 124i labeled arg-gly-asp

  1. Replacement of the Lys linker with an Arg linker resulting in improved melanoma uptake and reduced renal uptake of Tc-99m-labeled Arg-Gly-Asp-conjugated alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone hybrid peptide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianquan; Guo, Haixun; Padilla, R Steve; Berwick, Marianne; Miao, Yubin

    2010-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to reduce the non-specific renal uptake of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-conjugated alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) hybrid peptide through structural modification or L-lysine co-injection. The RGD motif {cyclic(Arg-Gly-Asp-DTyr-Asp)} was coupled to [Cys(3,4,10), D-Phe7, Arg11] alpha-MSH3-13 {(Arg11)CCMSH} through the Arg linker (substituting the Lys linker) to generate a novel RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH hybrid peptide. The melanoma targeting and pharmacokinetic properties of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. The effect of L-lysine co-injection on the renal uptake was determined through the co-injection of L-lysine with 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH or 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH. Replacement of the Lys linker with an Arg linker exhibited a profound effect in reducing the non-specific renal uptake of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH, as well as increasing the tumor uptake of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH compared to 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH. 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited high tumor uptake (21.41+/-3.74% ID/g at 2 h post-injection) and prolonged tumor retention (6.81+/-3.71% ID/g at 24 h post-injection) in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing mice. The renal uptake values of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH were 40.14-64.08% of those of 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH (p<0.05) at 0.5, 2, 4 and 24 h post-injection. Co-injection of L-lysine was effective in decreasing the renal uptakes of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH by 27.7% and 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH by 52.1% at 2 h post-injection. Substitution of the Lys linker with an Arg linker dramatically improved the melanoma uptake and reduced the renal uptake of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH, warranting the further evaluation of 188Re-labeled RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH as a novel MC1 receptor-targeting therapeutic peptide for melanoma treatment in the future.

  2. A cell surface receptor complex for collagen type I recognizes the Arg- Gly-Asp sequence

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    To isolate collagen-binding cell surface proteins, detergent extracts of surface-iodinated MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells were chromatographed on affinity matrices of either type I collagen- Sepharose or Sepharose carrying a collagen-like triple-helical peptide. The peptide was designed to be triple helical and to contain the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp, which has been implicated as the cell attachment site of fibronectin, vitronectin, fibrinogen, and von Willebrand factor, and is also present in type I collagen. Three radioactive polypeptides having apparent molecular masses of 250 kD, 70 kD, and 30 kD were distinguishable in that they showed affinity toward the collagen and collagen-like peptide affinity columns, and could be specifically eluted from these columns with a solution of an Arg-Gly- Asp-containing peptide, Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr-Pro. These collagen-binding polypeptides associated with phosphatidylcholine liposomes, and the resulting liposomes bound specifically to type I collagen or the collagen-like peptide but not to fibronectin or vitronectin or heat- denatured collagen. The binding of these liposomes to type I collagen could be inhibited with the peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr-Pro and with EDTA, but not with a variant peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Glu-Ser-Pro. We conclude from these data that these three polypeptides are membrane molecules that behave as a cell surface receptor (or receptor complex) for type I collagen by interacting with it through the Arg-Gly-Asp tripeptide adhesion signal. The lack of binding to denatured collagen suggests that the conformation of the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence is important in the recognition of collagen by the receptor complex. PMID:3469204

  3. Human osteosarcoma cells resistant to detachment by an Arg-Gly-Asp- containing peptide overproduce the fibronectin receptor

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells were selected for attachment and growth in the presence of increasing concentrations of a synthetic peptide containing the cell attachment-promoting Arg-Gly-Asp sequence derived from the cell-binding region of fibronectin. Cells capable of attachment and growth in 5-mM concentrations of a peptide having the sequence Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro overproduce the cell surface receptor for fibronectin. In contrast, these cells show no differences in the numbers of vitronectin receptor they express as compared with the parental MG-63 cells. In agreement with the resistance of the selected cells to detachment by the peptide, 25-fold more Arg-Gly-Asp-containing peptide is required to prevent the attachment of these cells to fibronectin-coated surfaces than is needed to inhibit the attachment of MG-63 cells to the same substrate. However, similar concentrations of this peptide inhibit attachment of both cell lines to vitronectin- coated surfaces. The increase in fibronectin receptor is due to an increase in the levels of mRNA encoding the fibronectin receptor. Because of the nature of the selection process, we reasoned that this increase might be due to amplification of the fibronectin receptor gene, but no increase in gene copy number was detected by Southern blot analysis. The peptide-resistant cells display a very different morphology from that of the MG-63 cells, one that has a greater resemblance to that of osteocytes. The resistant cells also grow much more slowly than the MG-63 cells. The increased fibronectin receptor and altered morphology and growth properties were stable for at least 3 mo in the absence of peptide. The enhanced expression of the fibronectin receptor on the resistant cells indicates that cells are capable of altering the amount of fibronectin receptor on their surface in response to environmental factors and that this may in turn affect the phenotypic properties of the cell. PMID:2443508

  4. [Anti-adhesive and anti-thrombotic effects of integrin-inhibiting tripeptides (Arg-Gly-Asp)].

    PubMed

    Udvardy, M

    1995-10-01

    The RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) motif has a widespread distribution in the cellular adhesive structures on platelets, lymphocytes, some viruses and matrix proteins. RGD sequence seems to confer adhesive properties to macromolecular proteins like fibronectin, vitronectin, von Willebrand factor, fibrinogen and many others. So RGD tripeptide and its analogues really deserve to be regarded as general disintegrin sequence. A concise review is given to analyze the most important achievements by using RGD peptides as antiplatelet agents along with an overview of the potential clinical application of the disintegrin peptides in other fields of medicine.

  5. Analysis of Arg-Gly-Asp mimetics and soluble receptor of tumour necrosis factor as therapeutic modalities for concanavalin A induced hepatitis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Bruck, R; Shirin, H; Hershkoviz, R; Lider, O; Kenet, G; Aeed, H; Matas, Z; Zaidel, L; Halpern, Z

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: It has been shown that synthetic non-peptidic analogues of Arg-Gly-Asp, a major cell adhesive ligand of extracellular matrix, prevented an increase in serum aminotransferase activity, as a manifestation of concanavalin A induced liver damage in mice. This study examined the effects of an Arg-Gly-Asp mimetic on liver histology and cytokine release in response to concanavalin A administration, and the efficacy of soluble receptor of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha in preventing hepatitis in this model of liver injury. METHODS: Mice were pretreated with either the Arg-Gly-Asp mimetic SF-6,5 or recombinant soluble receptor of TNF alpha before their inoculation with 10 mg/kg concanavalin A. Liver enzymes, histology, and the serum values of TNF alpha and interleukin (IL)6 were examined. RESULTS: The histopathological damage in the liver, and the concanavalin A induced release of TNF alpha and IL6 were significantly inhibited by the synthetic Arg-Gly-Asp mimetic (p < 0.001). Liver injury, manifested by the increase in serum aminotransferase and cytokines, as well as by histological manifestations of hepatic damage, was effectively prevented by pretreatment of the mice with the soluble TNF receptor (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms the efficacy of a synthetic Arg-Gly-Asp mimetic and soluble TNF receptor in the prevention of immune mediated liver damage in mice. Images PMID:9155591

  6. Radiolabeling of a cyclic RGD (cyclo Arg-Gly-Asp-d-Tyr-Lys) peptide using sodium hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent.

    PubMed

    Doll, Stephanie; Woolum, Karen; Kumar, Krishan

    2016-09-01

    A simple and rapid nonradioactive iodide labeling/radiolabeling method for peptides, using an inexpensive oxidizing agent such as sodium hypochlorite and a cyclic peptide, cRGDyK (cyclo Arg-Gly-Asp-d-Tyr-Lys), was developed in this work. Labeling reaction was optimized by conducting experiments under variable ratios of the reagents, the reaction times, and the pH. The study demonstrated that radiolabeling of the cyclic peptide was fast and pH independent. Monoiodinated and di-iodinated cRGDyK were formed under all conditions and varied with the ratio of the reagents and the reaction time. Total percent of the iodinated cRGDyK (monoiodinated and di-iodinated cRGDyK) varied between 44 and 100 depending on the reaction conditions. Excess cyclic peptide over equal molar ratio of sodium iodide and sodium hypochlorite yielded in predominant amounts of monoiodinated cRGDyK, ie, >60% under 2:1:1 ratio and ~88% under 5:1:1 ratio of cRGDyK:sodium iodide:sodium hypochlorite.

  7. Growth of endothelial cells on different concentrations of Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp photochemically grafted in polyethylene glycol modified polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y S; Wang, S S; Chung, T W; Wang, Y H; Chiou, S H; Hsu, J J; Chou, N K; Hsieh, K H; Chu, S H

    2001-08-01

    To improve endothelial cell adhesion and growth on the surface of polyethylene glycol modified polyurethane (PU-PEG), cell adhesive peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp (GRGD) was photochemically grafted to the surface. The surface grafted GRGD-N-Succinimidyl-6-[4'-azido-2'-nitrophenylamino]hexanoate (SANPAH) on a PU-PEG surface was performed by adsorption and subsequent ultraviolet irradiation. Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) confirmed the GRGD grafted to form a PU-PEG-GRGD surface. The composition fraction of nitrogen calculated from ESCA analysis for the PU-PEG-GRGD surface was well correlated with the concentration of GRGD to be immobilized. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECs) were well adhered and growing on the PU-PEG-GRGD surface. Moreover, the viability of ECs growing on PU-PEG-GRGD surfaces, analyzed by MTT test, was also well correlated with the GRGD concentrations immobilized on the surface. With photochemical techniques, we could manipulate different contents of GRGD to form multiple regions of PU-PEG-GRGD surface that could enhance the growth of ECs on the surface, and the enhancement efficiency was well correlated with GRGD contents.

  8. Inhibition of tumor implantation at sites of trauma by Arg-Gly-Asp containing proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Murthy, M S; Weiss, B D; Miller, R J; Trueheart, R; Scanlon, E F

    1992-01-01

    We report on the inhibition of wound implantation by TA3Ha mammary carcinoma cells by Arg-Gly-Asp containing proteins and peptides using a hepatic wedge resection model. Intravenously injected TA3Ha cells rarely form tumor in the liver of syngeneic mice, but after hepatic wedge resection, 45% (107/240) of the mice develop tumors in the hepatic wound. Hepatic wound implantation is significantly (P = 0.01) inhibited by pretreating the cells with whole mouse plasma, but not with fibrinogen-depleted plasma or serum. Tumor inhibition is also achieved by pretreatment of cells with fibrinogen (P = 0.05-0.0004), fibronectin (P = 0.007) and laminin, but not by albumin. The active domain appears to be the RGDS sequence since the deca- and tetrapeptides containing RGDS inhibit wound implantation (P less than 0.05). However, the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Glu-Ser has no such activity. None of these agents affects ascites tumor formation by the intraperitoneally injected cells, suggesting that anchorage independent growth of cells is not affected. We propose that proteins and peptides containing RGD occupy the binding sites and prevent the cells from interacting with cell adhesion proteins in healing wounds. Proteins and/or peptides containing RGD may be useful for preventing local recurrence in postsurgical cancer patients.

  9. Crystal structure of the extracellular segment of integrin {alpha}V{beta}3 in complex with an Arg-Gly-Asp ligand.

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, J.-P.; Stehle, T.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Goodman, S.; Arnaout, M. A.; Biosciences Division; Massachusetts General Hospital; Harvard Medical School

    2002-04-05

    The structural basis for the divalent cation-dependent binding of heterodimeric alpha beta integrins to their ligands, which contain the prototypical Arg-Gly-Asp sequence, is unknown. Interaction with ligands triggers tertiary and quaternary structural rearrangements in integrins that are needed for cell signaling. Here we report the crystal structure of the extracellular segment of integrin alpha Vbeta 3 in complex with a cyclic peptide presenting the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence. The ligand binds at the major interface between the alpha V and beta 3 subunits and makes extensive contacts with both. Both tertiary and quaternary changes are observed in the presence of ligand. The tertiary rearrangements take place in beta A, the ligand-binding domain of beta 3; in the complex, beta A acquires two cations, one of which contacts the ligand Asp directly and the other stabilizes the ligand-binding surface. Ligand binding induces small changes in the orientation of alpha V relative to beta 3.

  10. An Arg-Gly-Asp peptide stimulates Ca2+ efflux from osteoclast precursors through a novel mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakawa, K.; Duncan, R.; Hruska, K. A.

    1994-01-01

    We examined the effect of a peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence on 45Ca2+ efflux from osteoclast precursors. 45Ca(2+)-loaded osteoclast precursors were treated with GRGDSP (170 microM) for 10 min after 30 min of basal perfusion with a bicarbonate-containing buffer. GRGDSP significantly increased fractional efflux of Ca2+ from treated cells compared with vehicle-treated cells (P < 0.01) or cells treated with up to 200 micrograms/ml of a control peptide containing GRGESP. The effect of RGD was sustained for 15 min after the peptide was removed from the perfusate, but control levels of Ca2+ efflux returned by 1 h. The Ca2+ efflux effect of GRGDSP was most likely due to activation of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-adenosinetriphosphatase (Ca(2+)-ATPase) pump, as indicated by its inhibition with vanadate and a calmodulin antagonist, N-(4-aminobutyl)-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide, and the absence of an effect of Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibition. An inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases, N-[2-(methylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinoline-sulfonamide (0.1 mM), failed to inhibit GRGDSP-stimulated Ca2+ efflux. However, genistein and herbimycin A, inhibitors of protein-tyrosine kinases, blocked Ca2+ efflux stimulated by GRGDSP. The results indicate that RGD sequences of matrix proteins may stimulate Ca2+ efflux from osteoclasts through activation of protein-tyrosine kinases and suggest that GRGDSP-stimulated Ca2+ efflux is mediated via the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase.

  11. Development of pre-implantation porcine embryos cultured within a three-dimensional alginate hydrogel system either conjugated with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide or supplemented with secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many uterine specific factors have been shown to be increased within the uterine milieu as the porcine embryo initiates elongation. Secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1) is increased during this time and contains an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide sequence that has been shown to bind to cell surface integrins ...

  12. Covalent attachment of cell-adhesive peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp (GRGD) to poly(etheretherketone) surface by tailored silanization layers technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yanyan; Xiong, Chengdong; Li, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Lifang

    2014-11-01

    Poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK) is a rigid semicrystalline polymer that combines excellent mechanical properties, broad chemical resistance and bone-like stiffness and is widely used in biomedical fields. However, PEEK is naturally bioinert, leading to limited biomedical applications, especially when a direct bone-implant osteointegration is desired. In this study, a three-step reaction procedure was employed to immobilize the cell-adhesive peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp (GRGD) on the surface of PEEK sheet by covalent chemical attachment to favor cell adhesion and proliferation. First, hydroxylation-pretreated PEEK surfaces were silanized with 7-Oct-1-enyltrichlorosilane (OETS) in dry cyclohexane, resulting in a silanization layer with terminal ethenyl. Second, the terminal ethylenic double bonds of the silanization layer on PEEK surface were converted to carboxyl groups through acidic potassium manganate oxidation. Finally, GRGD was covalently attached by carbodiimide mediated condensation between the carboxyl on PEEK surface and amine presents in GRGD. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, surface profiler and water contact angle measurements were applied to characterize the modified surfaces. The effect of cells attachment and proliferation on each specimen was investigated. Pre-osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1) attachment, spreading and proliferation were improved effectively on GRGD-modified PEEK surface. PEEK modified with GRGD on its surface has potential use in orthopedic or dental implants.

  13. Repetitive Arg-Gly-Asp peptide as a cell-stimulating agent on electrospun poly(ϵ-caprolactone) scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chaisri, Pacharaporn; Chingsungnoen, Artit; Siri, Sineenat

    2013-11-01

    Electrospun scaffolds derived from poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL), a well known biodegradable material, have an architecture that is suitable for hosting cells. However, their biomedical applications are restricted because these scaffolds lack the bioactivity necessary to stimulate cell responses. In this work, a repetitive Arg-Gly-Asp (rRGD) peptide was produced as a cell-stimulating agent to provide the PCL scaffold with bioactivity. DNA encoding rRGD was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using overlap primers without a DNA template, and cloned into a protein expression vector to produce a His-tag fusion peptide. In an in vitro cell adhesion assay, the purified rRGD peptide, comprising 30 RGD repeats, promoted a 1.5-fold greater cell adhesion than the commercial tripeptide RGD. The rRGD peptide was immobilized onto an electrospun PCL scaffold that had been pretreated with argon plasma and graft-polymerized with acrylic acid. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis indicated that covalently linked rRGD peptide was present on the scaffold. The PCL scaffold with immobilized rRGD showed significantly changed hydrophilic properties and an enhanced adhesion and proliferation of mouse fibroblast cells by 2.3- and 2.9-fold, respectively, compared to the PCL scaffold alone. Through its ability to promote cell adhesion and proliferation, the rRGD peptide has great potential as a stimulant for improving the suboptimal cell-matrix interaction of polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

  14. Synthetic Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser analogues of the cell recognition site of fibronectin that retain antimetastatic and anti-cell adhesive properties.

    PubMed

    Komazawa, H; Saiki, I; Aoki, M; Kitaguchi, H; Satoh, H; Kojima, M; Ono, M; Itoh, I; Azuma, I

    1993-10-01

    Synthetic peptide analogues of the Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) sequence of fibronectin in which the amino acid of Gly was substituted with another one, named X, i.e. Arg-X-Asp-Ser (R-X-DS), and N-terminal modified R-X-DS have been synthesized to examine their antimetastatic effects in murine lung or liver metastasis models, as well as the inhibitory effect on tumor cell invasion, migration and adhesion in vitro. R-X-DS [X = Leu (L) or D-Leu (1)], as well as RGDS at a high dose of 3000 micrograms, significantly reduced the number of lung tumor colonies when they were co-injected with B16-BL6 melanoma. At a dose of 1000 micrograms/mouse, N-terminal modified R-X-DS, i.e. acetyl-D-R-X-DS [AcDR-X-DS: X = G, L or I], showed a more potent inhibitory effect on the lung or liver metastasis of B16-BL6 melanoma or L5178Y-ML25 lymphoma cells, respectively, as compared with RGDS or R-X-DS. AcDRLDS and AcDRIDS prevented the invasion of B16-BL6 cells into Matrigel/fibronectin- and Matrigel/laminin- coated filters, haptotactic migration, and the adhesion of the cells to both fibronectin- and laminin-coated substrates, whereas AcDRGDS inhibited only fibronectin-mediated cell functions. The intermittent i.v. administration of a water soluble vinylpolymer [poly(carboxyethylmethacrylamide), poly(CEMA)] containing R-X-DS (X = L or 1) or RGDS, following the subcutaneous inoculation of B16-BL6 cells, significantly inhibited spontaneous Jung metastasis as compared with multiple administrations of RGDS, R-X-DS or the untreated control.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Inhibition of CD4+ T lymphocyte binding to fibronectin and immune-cell accumulation in inflammatory sites by non-peptidic mimetics of Arg-Gly-Asp.

    PubMed Central

    Hershkoviz, R; Greenspoon, N; Mekori, Y A; Hadari, R; Alon, R; Kapustina, G; Lider, O

    1994-01-01

    The Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) cell adhesion motif has been demonstrated in various studies to play a pivotal role in leucocyte and platelet interactions with plasma and extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins. The recognition of the RGD sequence is mediated by heterodimeric receptors designated integrins of the beta 1 subfamily, expressed on distinct cell types, including T lymphocytes. We have recently shown that flexible non-peptidic mimetics of RGD, in which the two ionic side groups were separated by a linear spacer of 11 atoms, bound specifically to the platelet integrin alpha 11b beta 3, and inhibited T cell-mediated immune responses. The present study was designed to (i) further characterize the structural requirements for RGD interactions with CD4+ T cells, and (ii) examine the mechanisms by which the RGD mimetics interfere with immune cell reactivity in vivo. We now report that freezing the conformational degrees of freedom in the spacer chain, which fixes the relative orientation of the guanidinium and carboxylate side groups in a favourable manner, results in a higher level of inhibition of T cell binding to immobilized fibronectin, an RGD-containing ECM glycoprotein. In vivo, treatment of mice with relatively low doses of the RGD mimetics, but not the RGD peptide, inhibited the elicitation of an adoptively transferred DTH reaction. This inhibition was achieved by direct impairment of the ability of antigen-primed lymph node cells to migrate and accumulate in inflammatory sites. Hence, we suggest that the design and production of non-peptidic mimetics of RGD offers a novel approach to study defined parameters related to the structure-function requirements of small adhesion epitopes. Furthermore, this approach could be used therapeutically to inhibit pathological processes which depend on RGD recognition. PMID:7905794

  16. Modulation of marrow stromal osteoblast adhesion on biomimetic oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] hydrogels modified with Arg-Gly-Asp peptides and a poly(ethyleneglycol) spacer.

    PubMed

    Shin, Heungsoo; Jo, Seongbong; Mikos, Antonios G

    2002-08-01

    Novel oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] (OPF) hydrogels functionalized with cell adhesion peptides were prepared, and the effects of incorporated peptide density and macromolecular structure of hydrogels on attachment and morphology of marrow stromal cells (MSCs) were evaluated. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG; number average molecular weight of 930, 2860, and 6090) was used to synthesize OPF. A model peptide, Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp (GRGD), was incorporated into OPF hydrogels after being coupled to acrylated PEG of molecular weight 3400. The increase of incorporated peptide concentration enhanced MSC attachment to OPF hydrogels of PEG of molecular weight of 930 and 2860. However, the number of attached MSCs to OPF hydrogels of PEG (molecular weight 6090) remained constant regardless of the peptide density. The length of PEG in OPF also influenced cell attachment. When 1 micromole peptide/g hydrogel was incorporated into the OPF hydrogels, the degree of cell attachment at 12 h relative to the initial seeding density was 93.9 +/- 5.9%, 64.7 +/- 8.2%, and 9.3 +/- 6.6% for OPF hydrogels prepared with PEG of molecular weights of 930, 2860, and 6090, respectively. However, the crosslinking density of hydrogels did not significantly affect cell attachment. The interaction was sequence specific, in that MSC attachment to GRGD-modified hydrogels was competitively inhibited when cells were incubated in the presence of 0.5 mM soluble GRGD before cell seeding. These results suggest that we can modulate MSC attachment to OPF hydrogels by altering the peptide density and the molecular structure of OPF hydrogels.

  17. Comparative studies on the discrepant fragmentation mechanisms of the GLy-Asp-Gly-Arg and Arg-Gly-Asp-Gly: evidence for the mobile proton model.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    The fragmentation mechanisms of singly protonated Gly-Asp-Gly-Arg (GDGRI and Arg-Gly-Asp-Gly (RGDGJ were investigated by mass spectrometry and theoretical methods. Both protonated molecules are fragmented mainly at the Asp-Gly amide bond C-terminal to Asp, as supported by quantum chemical calculations. Charge distributions of C and N atoms (Qc + QN) on the amide bonds were collected when the ionizing proton was fixed at different nitrogen atoms along the backbone for each peptide. Compared with the neutral molecules, the total charges of C and N atoms (Qc + QN] for the singly charged peptides tended to be negative when the proton was located at the backbone nitrogen atoms. A relatively larger value of QC + QN corresponds to a higher trend of fragmentation, which is consistent with the experimental relative abundances data that the predominant ions are y2 for [GDGR + H]+ and b3 for [RGDG + H]+. Also, the anhydride mechanism driven by the C-terminal COOH for [RGDG + H]+ was explored by a quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical method. Calculations indicate that the protonated peptide can be cleaved through an unusual charge-directed pathway by forming a salt bridge at the C-termini. The formation of the anhydride linkage is much more feasible since this process needs very little energy and is exother- mic, though the subsequent nucleophilic attack on the Asp carbonyl carbon is more difficult. The combined experimental and theoretical methods substantiate the mobile proton model, which opens a way to analyze quantitatively the discrepant fragmentation of dissociated peptides in peptide/protein identification.

  18. Cyclopropane pipecolic acids as templates for linear and cyclic peptidomimetics: application in the synthesis of an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing peptide as an αvβ3 integrin ligand.

    PubMed

    Sernissi, Lorenzo; Petrović, Martina; Scarpi, Dina; Guarna, Antonio; Trabocchi, Andrea; Bianchini, Francesca; Occhiato, Ernesto G

    2014-08-25

    The synthesis and evaluation of substituted cyclopropane pipecolic acids (CPA) as conformationally restricted templates for linear and cyclic peptidomimetics is reported. A variety of differently substituted (poly)hydroxy- and amino-2-azabicyclo[4.1.0]heptane-1-carboxylic acids were prepared by means of the Pd-catalyzed methoxycarbonylation of suitably functionalized lactam-derived enol phosphates, followed by OH-directed cyclopropanation. CPAs were successfully introduced into a linear peptide sequence to assess the cis/trans isomerism about the pipecolic acid peptide bond, and in a cyclic peptidomimetic that bore the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence, which displayed nanomolar activity as antagonist of the αvβ3 integrin in M21 human melanoma cells. Thus, CPAs appear to be suitable for the generation of novel peptidomimetics for drug discovery.

  19. ImmunoPET Imaging of Renal Cell Carcinoma with 124I- and 89Zr-Labeled Anti-CAIX Monoclonal Antibody cG250 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stillebroer, Alexander B.; Franssen, Gerben M.; Mulders, Peter F.A.; Oyen, Wim J.G.; van Dongen, Guus A.M.S.; Laverman, Peter; Oosterwijk, Egbert

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Monoclonal antibody (mAb) cG250 recognizes carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), overexpressed on clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). 124I-cG250 is currently under clinical investigation for the detection of ccRCC. However, the 124I label is rapidly excreted from the tumor cells after internalization of the radiolabeled mAb. We hypothesized that labeling cG250 with the residualizing positron emitter 89Zr would lead to higher tumor uptake and more sensitive detection of ccRCC lesions. Materials and Methods Nude mice with CAIX-expressing ccRCC xenografts (SK-RC-52 or NU-12) were i.v. injected with 89Zr-cG250 or 124I-cG250. To determine specificity of 89Zr-cG250 uptake in ccRCC, one control group was i.v. injected with 89Zr-MOPC21 (irrelevant mAb). PET images were acquired using a small animal PET camera and the biodistribution of the radiolabeled mAb was determined. Results The ccRCC xenografts were clearly visualized after injection of 89Zr-cG250 and 124I-cG250. Tumor uptake of 89Zr-cG250 was significantly higher compared with 124I-cG250 in the NU-12 tumor model (114.7%±25.2% injected dose per gram (%ID/g) vs. 38.2±18.3%ID/g, p=0.029), but in the SK-RC-52 the difference in tumor uptake was not significant (48.7±15.2%ID/g vs. 32.0±22.9%ID/g, p=0.26). SK-RC-52 tumors were not visualized with 89Zr-MOPC21 (tumor uptake 3.0%ID/g). Intraperitoneal SK-RC-52 lesions as small as 7 mm3 were visualized with 89Zr-cG250 PET. Conclusion ImmunoPET imaging with cG250 visualized s.c. and i.p. ccRCC lesions in murine models. This confirms the potential of cG250 immunoPET in the diagnosis and (re)staging of ccRCC. PET imaging of ccRCC tumors with 89Zr-cG250 could be more sensitive than 124I-cG250-PET. PMID:23697926

  20. Tumor immunolocalization using 124 I-iodine-labeled JAA-F11 antibody to Thomsen-Friedenreich alpha-linked antigen.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Richa; Heimburg, Jamie; Yan, Jun; Koury, Stephen; Sajjad, Munawwar; Abdel-Nabi, Hani H; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate

    2008-03-01

    Clinical immunolocalization has been attempted by others with an anti-Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF-Ag) mAb that bound both alpha- and beta-linked TF-Ag. In this report, 124 I-labeled mAb JAA-F11 specific for alpha-linked TF-Ag showed higher tumor specificity in in vivo micro-positron emission tomography (micro-PET) of the mouse mammary adenocarcinoma line, 4T1, showing no preferential uptake by the kidney. Labeled product remained localized in the tumor for at least 20 days. Glycan array analysis showed structural specificity of the antibody.

  1. Comparison of Cell-Labeling Methods with 124I-FIAU and 64Cu-PTSM for Cell Tracking Using Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cells Expressing HSV1-tk and Firefly Luciferase

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Jun; Son, Jin-Ju; Chun, Kwon-Soo; Song, In-Ho; Park, Yong-Serk; Kim, Kwang-Il; Lee, Yong-Jin; Kang, Joo-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cell-tracking methods with molecular-imaging modality can monitor the biodistribution of cells. In this study, the direct-labeling method with 64Cu-pyruvaldehyde-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (64Cu-PTSM), indirect cell-labeling methods with herpes simplex virus type 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk)-mediated 124I-2′-fluoro-2′-deoxy-1-β-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil (124I-FIAU) were comparatively investigated in vitro and in vivo for tracking of human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells. K562-TL was established by retroviral transduction of the HSV1-tk and firefly luciferase gene in the K562 cell. K562-TL cells were labeled with 64Cu-PTSM or 124I-FIAU. Cell labeling efficiency, viability, and radiolabels retention were compared in vitro. The biodistribution of radiolabeled K562-TL cells with each radiolabel and small-animal positron emission tomography imaging were performed. Additionally, in vivo and ex vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and tissue reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis were used for confirming those results. K562-TL cells were efficiently labeled with both radiolabels. The radiolabel retention (%) of 124I-FIAU (95.2%±1.1%) was fourfold higher than 64Cu-PTSM (23.6%±0.7%) at 24 hours postlabeling. Viability of radiolabeled cells was statistically nonsignificant between 124I-FIAU and 64Cu-PTSM. The radioactivity of each radiolabeled cells was predominantly accumulated in the lungs and liver at 2 hours. Both the radioactivity of 64Cu-PTSM- and 124I-FIAU-labeled cells was highly accumulated in the liver at 24 hours. However, the radioactivity of 124I-FIAU-labeled cells was markedly decreased from the body at 24 hours. The K562-TL cells were dominantly localized in the lungs and liver, which also verified by BLI and RT-PCR analysis at 2 and 24 hours postinjection. The 64Cu-PTSM-labeled cell-tracking method is more efficient than 124I-FIAU-labeled cell tracking, because of markedly decrease of radioactivity and

  2. Measurement of (124)I.

    PubMed

    Sahagia, M; Ioan, M-R; Antohe, A; Luca, A; Ivan, C

    2016-03-01

    The paper describes the measurements performed at IFIN-HH regarding the creation of a Romanian (124)I standard, consisting of: absolute standardization of the solution by the application of the 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence method; Calibration of the CENTRONIC IG12/20A ionization chamber with a standardised solution and comparison with a calculated efficiency; γ-ray spectrometry activity measurement and determination of the impurity levels; Comparison of the results of the three methods.

  3. Multimodal imaging and detection strategy with 124 I-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibody cG250 for accurate localization and confirmation of extent of disease during laparoscopic and open surgical resection of clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Povoski, Stephen P; Hall, Nathan C; Murrey, Douglas A; Sharp, David S; Hitchcock, Charles L; Mojzisik, Cathy M; Bahnson, Eamonn E; Knopp, Michael V; Martin, Edward W; Bahnson, Robert R

    2013-02-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 85% to 90% of all primary kidney malignancies, with clear cell RCC (ccRCC) constituting approximately 70% to 85% of all RCCs. This study describes an innovative multimodal imaging and detection strategy that uses (124)I-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibody G250 ((124)I-cG250) for accurate preoperative and intraoperative localization and confirmation of extent of disease for both laparoscopic and open surgical resection of ccRCC. Two cases presented herein highlight how this technology can potentially guide complete surgical resection and confirm complete removal of all diseased tissues. This innovative (124)I-cG250 (ie, (124)I-girentuximab) multimodal imaging and detection approach, which would be clinically very useful to urologic surgeons, urologic medical oncologists, nuclear medicine physicians, radiologists, and pathologists who are involved in the care of ccRCC patients, holds great potential for improving the diagnostic accuracy, operative planning and approach, verification of disease resection, and monitoring for evidence of disease recurrence in ccRCC patients.

  4. Comparative Positron-Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging and Phototherapeutic Potential of 124I- Labeled Methyl- 3-(1′-iodobenzyloxyethyl) pyropheophorbide-a vs. the Corresponding Glucose- and Galactose-Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Suresh K.; Sajjad, Munawwar; Chen, Yihui; Zheng, Xiang; Yao, Rutao; Missert, Joseph R.; Batt, Carrie; Nabi, Hani A.; Oseroff, Allan R.; Pandey, Ravindra K.

    2009-01-01

    In our present study, 3-(1′-m-iodobenzyloxyethyl) pyropheophorbide-a methyl ester 1, 3-(1′-m-iodobenzyloxyethyl)-172-{(2-deoxy)glucose} pyropheophorbide-a 2, and 3-(1′-m-iodo benzyloxyethyl)-172-{(1-deoxy)galactose} pyropheophorbide-a 3 were synthesized and converted into the corresponding 124I- labeled analogs by reacting the intermediate trimethyltin analogs with Na124I. Photosensitizers 1–3 were evaluated for the PDT efficacy in C3H mice bearing RIF tumors at variable doses and showed a significant long-term tumor cure. Among the compounds investigated, the non-carbohydrate analog 1 was most effective. These results were in contrast to the in vitro data, where compared to the parent analog the corresponding galactose-and glucose derivatives showed enhanced cell kill. Among the corresponding 124I-labeled in analogs, excellent tumor images were obtained from compound 1 both tumor models (RIF and Colon-26) and the best tumor contrast was observed at 72 h post injection. Conjugating a glucose moiety to photosensitizer 1 diminished its tumor uptake, whereas with time the corresponding galactose analog showed improved tumor contrast. PMID:19090663

  5. [124I]-iododeoxyuridine imaging tumor proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Blasberg, R.; Roelcke, U.; Weinreich, R.

    1996-05-01

    Quantitative imaging of tissue proliferation could identify the regions of tumor that are most rapidly dividing, provide spatial information for radiation treatment planning and stereotactic biopsies, and provide an earlier measure of treatment response than CT or MR, or FDG PET. Carrier-free [124I]-labeled sodium iodide was produced at Essen Univ., and [124I]-IUdR was synthesized at PSI by a reaction with 2-deoxyuridine in an iodogen coated reaction vial; radiochemical yield varied from 51-71%. [124I]-IUdR was injected i.v. in 10 patients with primary brain tumors and sequential scans were obtained 0-60 min and at 24 hrs (1 hr scan) with a Siemens ECAT 933/04-16 tomograph. The PET and MR images were registered to each other using the Pellizzari algorithm. The IUdR-DNA incorporation constant (Ki) was calculated from ROI time-activity data and the metabolite corrected blood curve. Tumor proliferation was independently assessed by BUdR immunohistochemistry (labeling index) on tissue samples obtained at surgery. Mean tumor activity 24 hrs after [124I]-IUdR administration ranged from 1.9 - 22.1 nCi/cc and Ki ranged from 3.4 - 28.6 {mu}l/min/g. Normal brain activity ranged from 0.74 - 2.2 nCi/cc and Ki was 2.0 {plus_minus} 1.0 {mu}l/min/g, respectively. The expected relationship between Ki and tumor grade was observed, and a good correlation was observed between Ki and tumor grade was observed, and a good correlation was observed between Ki and labeling index of random surgical tumor specimens in 7 evaluable patients (r=0.86). In higher grade tumors there was marked variation in IUdR activity and Ki, suggesting a wide range of proliferative activity within the tumor. Ki in low grade tumors was low and more uniform. The potential for [124I]-IUdR PET imaging of tumor proliferation was shown to be feasible, despite low injection doses (0.75-1.6 mCi), rapid clearance of [124I]-IUdR from blood, and a low fraction of detectable emission (only 23% of decay is {beta}{sup +}).

  6. Site specific discrete PEGylation of (124)I-labeled mCC49 Fab' fragments improves tumor MicroPET/CT imaging in mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haiming; Carlton, Michelle M; Povoski, Stephen P; Milum, Keisha; Kumar, Krishan; Kothandaraman, Shankaran; Hinkle, George H; Colcher, David; Brody, Rich; Davis, Paul D; Pokora, Alex; Phelps, Mitchell; Martin, Edward W; Tweedle, Michael F

    2013-11-20

    The tumor-associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) antigen is highly overexpressed in various human adenocarcinomas and anti-TAG-72 monoclonal antibodies, and fragments are therefore useful as pharmaceutical targeting vectors. In this study, we investigated the effects of site-specific PEGylation with MW 2-4 kDa discrete, branched PEGylation reagents on mCC49 Fab' (MW 50 kDa) via in vitro TAG72 binding, and in vivo blood clearance kinetics, biodistribution, and mouse tumor microPET/CT imaging. mCC49Fab' (Fab'-NEM) was conjugated at a hinge region cysteine with maleimide-dPEG 12-(dPEG24COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-A), maleimide-dPEG12-(dPEG12COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-B), or maleimide-dPEG12-(m-dPEG24)3 (Mal-dPEG-C), and then radiolabeled with iodine-124 ((124)I) in vitro radioligand binding assays and in vivo studies used TAG-72 expressing LS174T human colon carcinoma cells and xenograft mouse tumors. Conjugation of mCC49Fab' with Mal-dPEG-A (Fab'-A) reduced the binding affinity of the non PEGylated Fab' by 30%; however, in vivo, Fab'-A significantly lengthened the blood retention vs Fab'-NEM (47.5 vs 28.1%/ID at 1 h, 25.1 vs 8.4%/ID at 5 h, p < 0.01), showed excellent tumor to background, better microPET/CT images due to higher tumor accumulation, and increased tumor concentration in excised tissues at 72 h by 130% (5.09 ± 0.83 vs 3.83 ± 1.50%ID/g, p < 0.05). Despite the strong similarity of the three PEGylation reagents, PEGylation with Mal-dPEG-B or -C reduced the in vitro binding affinity of Fab'-NEM by 70%, blood retention, microPET/CT imaging tumor signal intensity, and residual 72 h tumor concentration by 49% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.97 ± 0.29%ID/g, p < 0.05) and 63% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.42 ± 0.35%ID/g, p < 0.05), respectively. We conclude that remarkably subtle changes in the structure of the PEGylation reagent can create significantly altered biologic behavior. Further study is warranted of conjugates of the triple branched, negatively charged Mal-dPEG-A.

  7. Site Specific Discrete PEGylation of 124I-Labeled mCC49 Fab′ Fragments Improves Tumor MicroPET/CT Imaging in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Haiming; Carlton, Michelle M.; Povoski, Stephen P.; Milum, Keisha; Kumar, Krishan; Kothandaraman, Shankaran; Hinkle, George H.; Colcher, David; Brody, Rich; Davis, Paul D.; Pokora, Alex; Phelps, Mitchell; Martin, Edward W.; Tweedle, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    The tumor-associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) antigen is highly overexpressed in various human adenocarcinomas and anti-TAG-72 monoclonal antibodies, and fragments are therefore useful as pharmaceutical targeting vectors. In this study, we investigated the effects of site-specific PEGylation with MW 2–4 kDa discrete, branched PEGylation reagents on mCC49 Fab′ (MW 50 kDa) via in vitro TAG72 binding, and in vivo blood clearance kinetics, biodistribution, and mouse tumor microPET/CT imaging. mCC49Fab′ (Fab′-NEM) was conjugated at a hinge region cysteine with maleimide-dPEG12-(dPEG24COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-A), maleimide-dPEG12-(dPEG12COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-B), or maleimide-dPEG12-(m-dPEG24)3 (Mal-dPEG-C), and then radiolabeled with iodine-124 (124I) in vitro radioligand binding assays and in vivo studies used TAG-72 expressing LS174T human colon carcinoma cells and xenograft mouse tumors. Conjugation of mCC49Fab′ with Mal-dPEG-A (Fab′-A) reduced the binding affinity of the non PEGylated Fab′ by 30%; however, in vivo, Fab′-A significantly lengthened the blood retention vs Fab′-NEM (47.5 vs 28.1%/ID at 1 h, 25.1 vs 8.4%/ID at 5 h, p < 0.01), showed excellent tumor to background, better microPET/CT images due to higher tumor accumulation, and increased tumor concentration in excised tissues at 72 h by 130% (5.09 ± 0.83 vs 3.83 ± 1.50%ID/g, p < 0.05). Despite the strong similarity of the three PEGylation reagents, PEGylation with Mal-dPEG-B or -C reduced the in vitro binding affinity of Fab′-NEM by 70%, blood retention, microPET/CT imaging tumor signal intensity, and residual 72 h tumor concentration by 49% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.97 ± 0.29%ID/g, p < 0.05) and 63% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.42 ± 0.35%ID/g, p < 0.05), respectively. We conclude that remarkably subtle changes in the structure of the PEGylation reagent can create significantly altered biologic behavior. Further study is warranted of conjugates of the triple branched, negatively charged Mal-dPEG-A. PMID

  8. Highly sensitive SERS analysis of the cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp peptide ligands of cells using nanogap antennas.

    PubMed

    Portela, Alejandro; Yano, Taka-Aki; Santschi, Christian; Martin, Olivier J F; Tabata, Hitoshi; Hara, Masahiko

    2017-02-01

    The cyclic RGD (cRGD) peptide ligands of cells have become widely used for treating several cancers. We report a highly sensitive analysis of c(RGDfC) using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) using single dimer nanogap antennas in aqueous environment. Good agreement between characteristic peaks of the SERS and the Raman spectra of bulk c(RGDfC) with its peptide's constituents were observed. The exhibited blinking of the SERS spectra and synchronization of intensity fluctuations, suggest that the SERS spectra acquired from single dimer nanogap antennas was dominated by the spectrum of single to a few molecules. SERS spectra of c(RGDfC) could be used to detect at the nanoscale, the cells' transmembrane proteins binding to its ligand. SERS of cyclic RGD on nanogap antenna.

  9. Quantitative imaging of (124)I with PET/ CT in pretherapy lesion dosimetry. Effects impairing image quantification and their corrections.

    PubMed

    Jentzen, W; Freudenberg, L; Bockisch, A

    2011-02-01

    Iodine-131-labelled agents are successfully used in cancer treatment. In the pretherapy dosimetry approach, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using (124)I provides a modality to estimate absorbed dose to tumours and can be considered as the preferred imaging method for this purpose in (131)I radiopharmaceutical therapies. For accurate dosimetry, serial measurements of activity concentrations (ACs) over an appropriate time period are necessary. Consequently, accurate AC determination is of paramount importance in PET/CT-based lesion dosimetry using (124)I-labelled agents. After presenting an historical overview of (124)I clinical application, this review focuses on factors impairing PET image quantification accuracy and on methods of correcting for these effects. Specifically, the emission of prompt gamma photons in the (124)I decay process that are detected in coincidence with each other and with the annihilation photon, and the low (124)I positron branching ration of only 23% raise concerns regarding image quantification accuracy. This review discusses this prompt gamma effect, its impact and approaches to correct for this phenomenon. In (124)I lesion dosimetry, recovery coefficients (RCs) are commonly used to compensate primarily for partial-volume effect but also, in a simplistic way, for prompt gamma coincidence effect; the main methodological factors affecting the RC-corrected (124)I AC are described. Finally, special issues in image (124)I quantification are reviewed, including coadministration of high therapeutic activities of 131I, shine-through artefact, and transmission-contamination effect occurring in stand-alone PET systems.

  10. Longitudinal monitoring adipose-derived stem cell survival by PET imaging hexadecyl-4-{sup 124}I-iodobenzoate in rat myocardial infarction model

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min Hwan; Woo, Sang-Keun; Lee, Kyo Chul; An, Gwang Il; Pandya, Darpan; Park, Noh Won; Nahm, Sang-Soep; Eom, Ki Dong; Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Tae Sup; Kim, Chan Wha; Kang, Joo Hyun; Yoo, Jeongsoo; Lee, Yong Jin

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • We developed a safe, simple and appropriate stem cell labeling method with {sup 124}I-HIB. • ADSC survival can be monitored with PET in MI model via direct labeling. • Tracking of ADSC labeled with {sup 124}I-HIB was possible for 3 days in MI model using PET. • ADSC viability and differentiation were not affected by {sup 124}I-HIB labeling. • Survival of ADSC in living bodies can be longitudinally tracked with PET imaging. - Abstract: This study aims to monitor how the change of cell survival of transplanted adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) responds to myocardial infarction (MI) via the hexadecyl-4-{sup 124}I-iodobenzoate ({sup 124}I-HIB) mediated direct labeling method in vivo. Stem cells have shown the potential to improve cardiac function after MI. However, monitoring of the fate of transplanted stem cells at target sites is still unclear. Rat ADSCs were labeled with {sup 124}I-HIB, and radiolabeled ADSCs were transplanted into the myocardium of normal and MI model. In the group of {sup 124}I-HIB-labeled ADSC transplantation, in vivo imaging was performed using small-animal positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for 9 days. Twenty-one days post-transplantation, histopathological analysis and apoptosis assay were performed. ADSC viability and differentiation were not affected by {sup 124}I-HIB labeling. In vivo tracking of the {sup 124}I-HIB-labeled ADSCs was possible for 9 and 3 days in normal and MI model, respectively. Apoptosis of transplanted cells increased in the MI model compared than that in normal model. We developed a direct labeling agent, {sup 124}I-HIB, and first tried to longitudinally monitor transplanted stem cell to MI. This approach may provide new insights on the roles of stem cell monitoring in living bodies for stem cell therapy from pre-clinical studies to clinical trials.

  11. Development of pre-implantation porcine embryos cultured within alginate hydrogel systems either supplemented with secreted phosphoprotein 1 or conjugated with arg-gly-asp peptide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although deficiencies in porcine embryo elongation play a significant role on early embryonic mortality and establishment of within–litter developmental variation, the exact mechanisms of elongation are poorly understood. Secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1) is increased within the uterine milieu during...

  12. Development of 124I-Immuno-PET Targeting Tumor Vascular TEM1/Endosialin

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Madhura; Mikitsh, John L.; Hu, Jia; Hou, Catherine; Grasso, Luigi; Nicolaides, Nicholas C.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.; Divgi, Chaitanya R.; Coukos, George

    2014-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 1 (TEM1/endosialin) is a tumor vascular marker highly overexpressed in multiple human cancers with minimal expression in normal adult tissue. In this study, we report the preparation and evaluation of 124I-MORAb-004, a 124I-labeled humanized monoclonal antibody targeting an extracellular epitope of human TEM1 (hTEM1), for its ability to specifically and sensitively detect vascular cells expressing hTEM1 in vivo. Methods MAb MORAb-004 was directly iodinated with 125I and 124I, and in vitro binding and internalization parameters were characterized. The in vivo behavior of radioiodinated-MORAb-004 was characterized in mice bearing subcutaneous ID8 tumors enriched with mouse endothelial cells expressing hTEM1, or control tumors, by biodistribution studies and small animal immuno-PET studies. Results MORAb-004 was radiolabeled with high efficiency and isolated in high purity. In vitro studies demonstrated specific and sensitive binding of MORAb-004 to MS1 mouse endothelial cells expressing hTEM1, with no binding to control MS1 cells. 125I-MORAb-004 and 124I MORAb-004 both had an immunoreactivity of approximately 90%. In vivo biodistribution experiments revealed rapid, highly specific and sensitive uptake of MORAb-004 in MS1-TEM1 tumors at 4 h (153.2 ± 22.2 percent of injected dose per gram [%ID/g]), 24 h (127.1 ± 42.9 %ID/g), 48 h (130.3 ± 32.4 %ID/g), 72 h (160.9 ± 32.1 %ID/g), and 6 d (10.7 ± 1.8 %ID/g). Excellent image contrast was observed with 124I-immuno-PET. MORAb-004 uptake was statistically higher in TEM1-positive tumors versus control tumors, as measured by biodistribution and immuno-PET studies. Binding specificity was confirmed by blocking studies using excess nonlabeled MORAb-004. Conclusion In our preclinical model, with hTEM1 exclusively expressed on engineered murine endothelial cells that integrate into the tumor vasculature, 124I-MORAb-004 displays high tumor–to–background tissue contrast fordetection of hTEM1 in

  13. Simulation of Thermal Responses of 125TeO2 Solid Target to Energetic Proton Bombardment from Cyclotron When Fabricating 124I Nuclear Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peir, Jinn-Jer; Liang, Jenq-Horng; Duh, Ting-Shieh

    With nuclear medicine receiving greater attention due to its unique characteristics in both diagnostics and therapeutics during recent decades, finding a highly controllable fabrication method becomes more urgent. The radioisotope 124I (T1/2=4.18d Eβ+=2.13MeV Iβ+=25%) has gained plentiful interests in the medical usages such as functioning imaging of cell proliferation in brain tumors using [124I]iododeoxyuridine (IUdR), imaging of immunoreactions in tumors using 124I-labelled monoclonal antibodies, the in-vivo imaging of 124I-labelled tyrosine derivatives, and the classical imaging of thyroid diseases with 124I, among others. Furthermore, it is because that thermal response of target during the fabrication process may affect the production of 124I to some extent and needs thorough investigations. Hence, the compact cyclotron located in the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research was employed in this study to generate 20MeV protons to irradiate TeO2 solid targets in which the radioisotopes 124I were produced through the 125Te(p, 2n)124I nuclear reaction. In addition, the widely-used ANSYS computer code was adopted to theoretically analyze thermal responses of TeO2 to irradiation cases with variations in ion beam current and its thermal conductivity. The results indicate that TeO2 temperature is strongly dependent on its thermal conductivity and ion beam current. In particular, TeO2 surface temperature is extremely sensitive to the air-gap size between TeO2 and target holder. Thus the target holder is suggested to be re-designed in order to prevent TeO2 from melting and a high efficiency production of radioisotopes 124I for nuclear medical diagnostics can be successfully achieved.

  14. Pairwise Comparison of 89Zr- and 124I-labeled cG250 Based on Positron Emission Tomography Imaging and Non-Linear Immunokinetic Modeling: In Vivo Carbonic Anhydrase IX Receptor Binding and Internalization in Mouse Xenografts of Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheal, Sarah M.; Punzalan, Blesida; Doran, Michael G.; Evans, Michael J.; Osborne, Joseph R.; Lewis, Jason S.; Zanzonico, Pat; Larson, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The positron-emitting tomography (PET) tracer, 124I-cG250, directed against carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) shows promise for pre-surgical diagnosis of clear renal cell carcinoma (cRCC) [1, 2]. The radiometal zirconium-89 (89Zr), however, may offer advantages as a surrogate PET nuclide over 124I in terms of greater tumor uptake and retention [3]. In the current report, we have developed a non-linear immunokinetic model to facilitate a quantitative comparison of absolute uptake and antibody turnover between 124I-cG250 and 89Zr- cG250 using a human cRCC xenograft tumor model in mice. We believe that his unique model better relates quantitative imaging data to the salient biologic features of tumor antibody-antigen binding and turnover. Methods We conducted experiments with 89Zr-cG250 and 124I-cG250 using a human ccRCC cell line (SK-RC-38) to characterize the binding affinity and internalization kinetics of the two tracers in vitro. Serial-PET imaging was performed in mice bearing sub-cutaneous cRCC tumors to simultaneously detect and quantify time-dependent tumor uptake in vivo. Using the known specific activities of the two tracers, the equilibrium rates of antibody internalization and turnover in the tumor were derived from the PET images using non-linear compartmental modeling. Results The two tracers demonstrate virtually identical tumor-cell binding and internalization but with markedly different retentions in vitro. Superior PET images were obtained using 89Zr-cG250, owing to the more prolonged trapping of the radiolabel in the tumor and simultaneous wash-out from normal tissues. Estimates of cG250-CAIX complex turnover were 1.35–5.51 × 1012 molecules per hour per gram of tumor (20% of receptors internalized per hour), and the ratio of 124I/89Zr atoms released per unit time by tumor was 17.5. Conclusions Pairwise evaluation of 89Zr-cG250 and 124I-cG250 provided the basis for a non-linear immunokinetic model which yielded quantitative information about

  15. TU-F-12A-01: Quantitative Non-Linear Compartment Modeling of 89Zr- and 124I- Labeled J591 Monoclonal Antibody Kinetics Using Serial Non-Invasive Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in a Pre-Clinical Human Prostate Cancer Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, EK; Cheal, SM; Chalasani, S; Fareedy, SB; Punzalan, B; Humm, JL; Osborne, JR; Larson, SM; Zanzonico, PB; Otto, B; Bander, NH

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the binding kinetics of human IgG monoclonal antibody J591 which targets prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in a pre-clinical mouse cancer model using quantitative PET compartmental analysis of two radiolabeled variants. Methods: PSMA is expressed in normal human prostate, and becomes highly upregulated in prostate cancer, making it a promising therapeutic target. Two forms of J591, radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I, were prepared. {sup 89}Zr is a radiometal that becomes trapped in the cell upon internalization by the antigen-antibody complex, while radioiodine leaves the cell. Mice with prostate cancer xenografts underwent non-invasive serial imaging on a Focus 120 microPET up to 144 hours post-injection of J591. A non-linear compartmental model describing the binding and internalization of antibody in tumor xenograft was developed and applied to the PET-derived time-activity curves. The antibody-antigen association rate constant (ka), total amount of antigen per gram tumor (Ag-total), internalization rate of antibody-antigen complex, and efflux rate of radioisotope from tumor were fitted using the model. The surface-bound and the internalized activity were also estimated. Results: Values for ka, Ag-total, and internalization rate were found to be similar regardless of radiolabel payload used. The efflux rate, however, was ∼ 9-fold higher for {sup 124}I-J591 than for {sup 89}Zr-J591. Time-dependent surface-bound and internalized radiotracer activity were similar for both radiolabels at early times post-injection, but clearly differed beyond 24 hours. Conclusion: Binding and internalization of J591 to PSMA-expressing tumor xenografts were similar when radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I payload. The difference in efflux of radioactivity from tumor may be attributable to differential biological fate intracellularly of the radioisotopes. This has great significance for radioimmunotherapy and antibody

  16. Tomographic imaging of the human thyroid using /sup 124/I

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, P.; Townsend, D.; Flattet, A.; De Gautard, R.; Widgren, S.; Jeavons, A.; Christin, A.; Smith, A.; Long, A.; Donath, A.

    1986-10-01

    After receiving between 100 and 300 mu Ci of the positron-emitting radioisotope /sup 124/I (half-life, 4.2 days), 64 patients with a variety of thyroid disorders were imaged with a high resolution positron camera. A 3-dimensional image of the distribution of radi,iodine uptake within the thyroid was obtained from a single 10- to 15-min scan. This image may be viewed as a sequence of 2-mm thick transverse, sagittal, or frontal sections or as a 3-dimensional shaded surface. The functional volume of the thyroid may be estimated by counting the volume elements (voxels) inside the thyroid surface. The precision of the estimate varied from 6-15%, depending on the size and clinical status of the thyroid. The volume estimation procedure was validated with phantoms and with the thyroids of patients who subsequently underwent partial thyroidectomy. This 3-dimensional imaging technique may be useful for diagnosis and management of thyroid diseases.

  17. Determination of impurities in (124)I samples by high resolution gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, M C M; da Silva, R L; Delgado, J U; Poledna, R; de Araújo, M T F; Laranjeira, A S; de Veras, E; Braghirolli, A M S; dos Santos, G R; Lopes, R T

    2016-03-01

    (124)I is a radionuclide used in the diagnosis of tumors. The National Health Agency requires identification and activity measurement of impurities. Using gamma spectrometry with an efficiency calibrated high-purity germanium detector, impurities (125)I and (126)I in an (1)(24)I production sample were identified. Activity ratios of (125)I and (126)I to (124)I were approximately 0.5% and 98%, respectively.

  18. Impact of high 131I-activities on quantitative 124I-PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braad, P. E. N.; Hansen, S. B.; Høilund-Carlsen, P. F.

    2015-07-01

    Peri-therapeutic 124 I-PET/CT is of interest as guidance for radioiodine therapy. Unfortunately, image quality is complicated by dead time effects and increased random coincidence rates from high 131 I-activities. A series of phantom experiments with clinically relevant 124 I/131 I-activities were performed on a clinical PET/CT-system. Noise equivalent count rate (NECR) curves and quantitation accuracy were determined from repeated scans performed over several weeks on a decaying NEMA NU-2 1994 cylinder phantom initially filled with 25 MBq 124 I and 1250 MBq 131 I. Six spherical inserts with diameters 10-37 mm were filled with 124 I (0.45 MBq ml-1 ) and 131 I (22 MBq ml-1 ) and placed inside the background of the NEMA/IEC torso phantom. Contrast recovery, background variability and the accuracy of scatter and attenuation corrections were assessed at sphere-to-background activity ratios of 20, 10 and 5. Results were compared to pure 124 I-acquisitions. The quality of 124 I-PET images in the presence of high 131 I-activities was good and image quantification unaffected except at very high count rates. Quantitation accuracy and contrast recovery were uninfluenced at 131 I-activities below 1000 MBq, whereas image noise was slightly increased. The NECR peaked at 550 MBq of 131 I, where it was 2.8 times lower than without 131 I in the phantom. Quantitative peri-therapeutic 124 I-PET is feasible.

  19. Impact of high (131)I-activities on quantitative (124)I-PET.

    PubMed

    Braad, P E N; Hansen, S B; Høilund-Carlsen, P F

    2015-07-07

    Peri-therapeutic (124)I-PET/CT is of interest as guidance for radioiodine therapy. Unfortunately, image quality is complicated by dead time effects and increased random coincidence rates from high (131)I-activities. A series of phantom experiments with clinically relevant (124)I/(131)I-activities were performed on a clinical PET/CT-system. Noise equivalent count rate (NECR) curves and quantitation accuracy were determined from repeated scans performed over several weeks on a decaying NEMA NU-2 1994 cylinder phantom initially filled with 25 MBq (124)I and 1250 MBq (131)I. Six spherical inserts with diameters 10-37 mm were filled with (124)I (0.45 MBq ml(-1)) and (131)I (22 MBq ml(-1)) and placed inside the background of the NEMA/IEC torso phantom. Contrast recovery, background variability and the accuracy of scatter and attenuation corrections were assessed at sphere-to-background activity ratios of 20, 10 and 5. Results were compared to pure (124)I-acquisitions. The quality of (124)I-PET images in the presence of high (131)I-activities was good and image quantification unaffected except at very high count rates. Quantitation accuracy and contrast recovery were uninfluenced at (131)I-activities below 1000 MBq, whereas image noise was slightly increased. The NECR peaked at 550 MBq of (131)I, where it was 2.8 times lower than without (131)I in the phantom. Quantitative peri-therapeutic (124)I-PET is feasible.

  20. The role of (124)I-PET in diagnosis and treatment of thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lubberink, M; Abdul Fatah, S; Brans, B; Hoekstra, O S; Teule, G J J

    2008-03-01

    Iodine-124 is a positron-emitting iodine isotope, enabling measurement of iodine uptake using positron emission tomography (PET). There is a number of situations where the use of (124)I-PET/computed tomography (CT) can improve the current clinical practice in the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid cancer. Firstly, (124)I-PET/CT can aid in the staging of patients, because of better detection of metastatic disease and measurement of metabolic tumour volume, and thus separate low-risk from high risk patients. Secondly, the much higher sensitivity and spatial resolution of PET compared to gamma scintigraphy can also improve detection of recurrent disease. Furthermore, (124)I-PET can be used for patient-specific radioiodine therapy radiation dosimetry. Simultaneous administration of the therapeutic dose of (131)I and a tracer dose of (124)I allows for accurate measurement of iodine uptake during therapy. The decay scheme of (124)I, with few positrons and many gamma rays emitted per decay, often simultaneously, poses a challenge to quantitative PET imaging. Improved correction methods and the use of last-generation PET/CT scanners with faster electronics and better energy resolution can overcome this.

  1. Development and preclinical evaluation of new (124)I-folate conjugates for PET imaging of folate receptor-positive tumors.

    PubMed

    AlJammaz, I; Al-Otaibi, B; Al-Rumayan, F; Al-Yanbawi, S; Amer, S; Okarvi, S M

    2014-07-01

    In an attempt to develop new folate radiotracers with favorable biochemical properties for detecting folate receptor-positive cancers, we have synthesized [(124)I]-SIB- and [(124)I]-SIP-folate conjugates using a straightforward and two-step simple reactions. Radiochemical yields for [(124)I]-SIB- and [(124)I]-SIP-folate conjugates were greater than 90 and 60% respectively, with total synthesis time of 30-40min. Radiochemical purities were always greater than 98% without HPLC purification. These synthetic approaches hold considerable promise as rapid and simple method for (124)I-folate conjugate preparation with high radiochemical yield in short synthesis time. In vitro tests on KB cell line showed that the significant amounts of the radioconjugates were associated with cell fractions. In vivo characterization in normal Balb/c mice revealed rapid blood clearance of these radioconjugates and favorable biodistribution profile for [(124)I]-SIP-folate conjugate over [(124)I]-SIB-folate conjugate. Biodistribution studies of [(124)I]-SIP-folate conjugate in nude mice bearing human KB cell line xenografts, demonstrated significant tumor uptake. The uptake in the tumors was blocked by excess injection of folic acid, suggesting a receptor-mediated process. These results demonstrate that [(124)I]-SIP-folate conjugate may be useful as a molecular probe for detecting and staging of folate receptor-positive cancers, such as ovarian cancer and their metastasis as well as monitoring tumor response to treatment.

  2. A recommendation for revised dose calibrator measurement procedures for 89Zr and 124I.

    PubMed

    Beattie, Bradley J; Pentlow, Keith S; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Humm, John L

    2014-01-01

    Because of their chemical properties and multiday half lives, iodine-124 and zirconium-89 are being used in a growing number of PET imaging studies. Some aspects of their quantitation, however, still need attention. For (89)Zr the PET images should, in principle, be as quantitatively accurate as similarly reconstructed 18F measurements. We found, however, that images of a 20 cm well calibration phantom containing (89)Zr underestimated the activity by approximately 10% relative to a dose calibrator measurement (Capintec CRC-15R) using a published calibration setting number of 465. PET images of (124)I, in contrast, are complicated by the contribution of decays in cascade that add spurious coincident events to the PET data. When these cascade coincidences are properly accounted for, quantitatively accurate images should be possible. We found, however, that even with this correction we still encountered what appeared to be a large variability in the accuracy of the PET images when compared to dose calibrator measurements made using the calibration setting number, 570, recommended by Capintec. We derive new calibration setting numbers for (89)Zr and (124)I based on their 511 keV photon peaks as measured on an HPGe detector. The peaks were calibrated relative to an 18F standard, the activity level of which was precisely measured in a dose calibrator under well-defined measurement conditions. When measuring (89)Zr on a Capintec CRC-15R we propose the use of calibration setting number 517. And for (124)I, we recommend the use of a copper filter surrounding the sample and the use of calibration setting number 494. The new dose calibrator measurement procedures we propose will result in more consistent and accurate radioactivity measurements of (89)Zr and (124)I. These and other positron emitting radionuclides can be accurately calibrated relative to 18F based on measurements of their 511 keV peaks and knowledge of their relative positron abundances.

  3. A Recommendation for Revised Dose Calibrator Measurement Procedures for 89Zr and 124I

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, Bradley J.; Pentlow, Keith S.; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Humm, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Because of their chemical properties and multiday half lives, iodine-124 and zirconium-89 are being used in a growing number of PET imaging studies. Some aspects of their quantitation, however, still need attention. For 89Zr the PET images should, in principle, be as quantitatively accurate as similarly reconstructed 18F measurements. We found, however, that images of a 20 cm well calibration phantom containing 89Zr underestimated the activity by approximately 10% relative to a dose calibrator measurement (Capintec CRC-15R) using a published calibration setting number of 465. PET images of 124I, in contrast, are complicated by the contribution of decays in cascade that add spurious coincident events to the PET data. When these cascade coincidences are properly accounted for, quantitatively accurate images should be possible. We found, however, that even with this correction we still encountered what appeared to be a large variability in the accuracy of the PET images when compared to dose calibrator measurements made using the calibration setting number, 570, recommended by Capintec. We derive new calibration setting numbers for 89Zr and 124I based on their 511 keV photon peaks as measured on an HPGe detector. The peaks were calibrated relative to an 18F standard, the activity level of which was precisely measured in a dose calibrator under well-defined measurement conditions. When measuring 89Zr on a Capintec CRC-15R we propose the use of calibration setting number 517. And for 124I, we recommend the use of a copper filter surrounding the sample and the use of calibration setting number 494. The new dose calibrator measurement procedures we propose will result in more consistent and accurate radioactivity measurements of 89Zr and 124I. These and other positron emitting radionuclides can be accurately calibrated relative to 18F based on measurements of their 511 keV peaks and knowledge of their relative positron abundances. PMID:25202987

  4. Fibronectin tetrapeptide is target for syphilis spirochete cytadherence

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.D.; Baseman, J.B.; Alderete, J.F.

    1985-11-01

    The syphilis bacterium, Treponema pallidum, parasitizes host cells through recognition of fibronectin (Fn) on cell surfaces. The active site of the Fn molecule has been identified as a four-amino acid sequence, arg-gly-asp-ser (RGDS), located on each monomer of the cell-binding domain. The synthetic heptapeptide gly-arg-gly-asp-ser-pro-cys (GRGDSPC), with the active site sequence RGDS, specifically competed with SVI-labeled cell-binding domain acquisition by T. pallidum. Additionally, the same heptapeptide with the RGDS sequence diminished treponemal attachment to HEp-2 and HT1080 cell monolayers. Related heptapeptides altered in one key amino acid within the RGDS sequence failed to inhibit Fn cell-binding domain acquisition or parasitism of host cells by T. pallidum. The data support the view that T. pallidum cytadherence of host cells is through recognition of the RGDS sequence also important for eukaryotic cell-Fn binding.

  5. Comparison of Imaging Characteristics of (124)I PET for Determination of Optimal Energy Window on the Siemens Inveon PET.

    PubMed

    Yu, A Ram; Kim, Hee-Joung; Lim, Sang Moo; Kim, Jin Su

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. (124)I has a half-life of 4.2 days, which makes it suitable for imaging over several days over its uptake and washout phases. However, it has a low positron branching ratio (23%), because of prompt gamma coincidence due to high-energy γ-photons (602 to 1,691 keV), which are emitted in cascade with positrons. Methods. In this study, we investigated the optimal PET energy window for (124)I PET based on image characteristics of reconstructed PET. Image characteristics such as nonuniformities, recovery coefficients (RCs), and the spillover ratios (SORs) of (124)I were measured as described in NEMA NU 4-2008 standards. Results. The maximum and minimum prompt gamma coincidence fraction (PGF) were 33% and 2% in 350~800 and 400~590 keV, respectively. The difference between best and worst uniformity in the various energy windows was less than 1%. The lowest SORs of (124)I were obtained at 350~750 keV in nonradioactive water compartment. Conclusion. Optimal energy window should be determined based on image characteristics. Our developed correction method would be useful for the correction of high-energy prompt gamma photon in (124)I PET. In terms of the image quality of (124)I PET, our findings indicate that an energy window of 350~750 keV would be optimal.

  6. PET imaging with the non-pure positron emitters: 55Co, 86Y and 124I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braad, P. E. N.; Hansen, S. B.; Thisgaard, H.; Høilund-Carlsen, P. F.

    2015-05-01

    PET/CT with non-pure positron emitters is a highly valuable tool in immuno-PET and for pretherapeutic dosimetry. However, imaging is complicated by prompt gamma coincidences (PGCs) that add an undesired background activity to the images. Time-of-flight (TOF) reconstruction improves lesion detectability in 18F-PET and can potentially also improve the signal-to-noise ratio in images acquired with non-pure positron emitters. Using the GE Discovery 690 PET/CT system, we evaluated the image quality with 55Co, 86Y and 124I, and the effect of PGC-correction and TOF-reconstruction on image quality and quantitation in a series of phantom studies. PET image quality and quantitation for all isotopes were significantly affected by PGCs. The effect was most severe with 86Y, and less, but comparable, with 55Co and 124I. PGC-correction improved the image quality and the quantitation accuracy dramatically for all isotopes, especially when the activity was limited to a few hot lesions in a warm background. In imaging situations, where high levels of activity were present in the background, activity concentrations were overestimated. TOF-reconstruction improved image quality in isolated lesions but worsened the accuracy of quantitation and uniformity in homogeneous activity distributions. Better modelling of PGCs in the scatter correction can potentially improve the situation.

  7. A fibronectin receptor on Candida albicans mediates adherence of the fungus to extracellular matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, S.A.; Smith, R.L. )

    1991-03-01

    Binding of fibronectin, an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, to Candida albicans was measured, and adherence of the fungus to immobilized ECM proteins, fibronectin, laminin, types I and IV collagen, and subendothelial ECM was studied. 125I-labeled fibronectin was inhibited from binding to the fungus by unlabeled human plasma fibronectin and by Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), Gly-Arg-Gly-Glu-Ser-Pro (GRGESP), and Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr-Pro (GRGDTP), but binding was not inhibited by Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. Soluble fibronectin, RGD, GRGESP, and GRGDTP also inhibited fungal adherence to the individual immobilized ECM proteins in a complex pattern, but only soluble fibronectin (10(-7) M) inhibited fungal adherence to subendothelial ECM. Thus, C. albicans possesses at least one type of cell surface receptor for binding soluble fibronectin that can be inhibited with peptides. This receptor apparently is used to bind the fungus to immobilized ECM proteins and to subendothelial ECM and may play a role in the initiation of disseminated disease by bloodborne fungi by providing for adherence of the microorganisms to ECM proteins.

  8. The potential of theragnostic 124I-8H9 convection-enhanced delivery in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma

    PubMed Central

    Luther, Neal; Zhou, Zhiping; Zanzonico, Pat; Cheung, Nai-Kong; Humm, John; Edgar, Mark A.; Souweidane, Mark M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Reasons for failure in prior human glioma convection-enhanced delivery (CED) clinical trials remain unclear. Concentration-dependent volume of distribution (Vd) measurement of CED-infused agents in the human brain is challenging and highlights a potential technical shortcoming. Activity of iodine isotope 124 (124I ) in tissue can be directly measured in vivo with high resolution via PET. With the potential therapeutic utility of radioimmunotherapy, we postulate 124I conjugated to the antiglioma monoclonal antibody 8H9 may serve as a “theragnostic” agent delivered via CED to diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. Methods Fifteen rats underwent CED of 0.1–1.0 mCi of 131I-8H9 to the pons for toxicity evaluation. Six additional rats underwent CED of 10 µCi of 124I-8H9 to the pons for dosimetry, with serial microPET performed for 1 week. Two primates underwent CED of gadolinium-albumin and 1.0 mCi of 124I-8H9 to the pons for safety and dosimetry analysis. Serial postoperative PET, blood, and CSF radioactivity counts were performed. Results One rat (1.0 mCi 131I-8H9 infusion) suffered toxicity necessitating early sacrifice. PET analysis in rats yielded a pontine absorbed dose of 37 Gy/mCi. In primates, no toxicity was observed, and absorbed pontine dose was 3.8 Gy/mCi. Activity decreased 10-fold with 48 h following CED in both animal models. Mean Vd was 0.14 cc3 (volume of infusion [Vi] to Vd ratio = 14) in the rat and 6.2 cc3 (Vd/Vi = 9.5) in primate. Conclusion The safety and feasibility of 124I dosimetry following CED via PET is demonstrated, establishing a preclinical framework for a trial evaluating CED of 124I-8H9 for diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. PMID:24526309

  9. Nuclear magnetic moments of the ground states of sup 124 I, sup 126 I, and sup 130 I

    SciTech Connect

    Ohya, S.; Yamazaki, T.; Harasawa, T.; Katsurayama, M.; Mutsuro, N. ); Muto, S.; Heiguchi, K. )

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic moments of {sup 124}I, {sup 126}I, and {sup 130}I have been measured by the techniques of low-temperature nuclear orientation and nuclear magnetic resonance on oriented nuclei. The magnetic hyperfine splitting frequency {vert bar}{ital g}{mu}{sub {ital N}BHF}/{ital h}{vert bar} for {sup 124}I{ital Fe} was determined to be 630.2(2) MHz from a field-shift analysis of the measured resonances at the external field of 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 T. The resonances for {sup 126}I{ital Fe} and {sup 130}I{ital Fe} were observed in an external magnetic field of 0.2 T at {nu}({sup 126}I{ital Fe})=627.7(2) MHz and {nu}({sup 130}I{ital Fe})=585.7(2) MHz, respectively. Using the recalculated hyperfine field of {ital B}{sub HF}({sup 131}I{ital Fe})=114.50(5) T, the magnetic moments were deduced: {vert bar}{mu}({sup 124}I,2{sup {minus}}){vert bar}=1.444(4){mu}{sub {ital N}}, {vert bar}{mu}({sup 126}I,2{sup {minus}}){vert bar}=1.436(5){mu}{sub {ital N}}, and {vert bar}{mu}({sup 130}I,5{sup +}){vert bar}=3.349(7){mu}{sub {ital N}}. The present value of the magnetic moment of {sup 124}I is very different from the value of 1.14(8){mu}{sub {ital N}} reported previously. The measured values of the magnetic moments are discussed using Lande formula.

  10. Theranostic Radiopharmaceuticals Based on Gold Nanoparticles Labeled with (177)Lu and Conjugated to Peptides.

    PubMed

    Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Ocampo-García, Blanca E; Santos-Cuevas, Clara L; de María Ramírez, Flor; Azorín-Vega, Erika P; Meléndez-Alafort, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been proposed for a variety of medical applications such as localized heat sources for cancer treatment and drug delivery systems. The conjugation of peptides to AuNPs produces stable multimeric systems with target-specific molecular recognition. Lutetium- 177 ((177)Lu) has been successfully used in peptide radionuclide therapy. Recently, (177)Lu-AuNPs conjugated to different peptides have been proposed as a new class of theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. These radioconjugates may function simultaneously as molecular imaging agents, radiotherapy systems and thermal-ablation systems. This article covers advancements in the design, synthesis, physicochemical characterization, molecular recognition assessment and preclinical therapeutic efficacy of gold nanoparticles radiolabeled with (177)Lu and conjugated to RGD (-Arg-Gly-Asp-), Lys(3)-Bombesin and Tat(49-57) peptides.

  11. Performance of a block detector PET scanner in imaging non-pure positron emitters—modelling and experimental validation with 124I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, S.; Julyan, P. J.; Hastings, D. L.; Zweit, J.

    2004-12-01

    The key performance measures of resolution, count rate, sensitivity and scatter fraction are predicted for a dedicated BGO block detector patient PET scanner (GE Advance) in 2D mode for imaging with the non-pure positron-emitting radionuclides 124I, 55Co, 61Cu, 62Cu, 64Cu and 76Br. Model calculations including parameters of the scanner, decay characteristics of the radionuclides and measured parameters in imaging the pure positron-emitter 18F are used to predict performance according to the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 2-1994 criteria. Predictions are tested with measurements made using 124I and show that, in comparison with 18F, resolution degrades by 1.2 mm radially and tangentially throughout the field-of-view (prediction: 1.2 mm), count-rate performance reduces considerably and in close accordance with calculations, sensitivity decreases to 23.4% of that with 18F (prediction: 22.9%) and measured scatter fraction increases from 10.0% to 14.5% (prediction: 14.7%). Model predictions are expected to be equally accurate for other radionuclides and may be extended to similar scanners. Although performance is worse with 124I than 18F, imaging is not precluded in 2D mode. The viability of 124I imaging and performance in a clinical context compared with 18F is illustrated with images of a patient with recurrent thyroid cancer acquired using both [124I]-sodium iodide and [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose.

  12. PET imaging of β-glucuronidase activity by an activity-based 124I-trapping probe for the personalized glucuronide prodrug targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Ta-Chun; Leu, Yu-Ling; Roffler, Steve R; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Chuang, Chih-Hung; Kao, Chien-Han; Chen, Kai-Chuan; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Cheng, Tian-Lu

    2014-12-01

    Beta-glucuronidase (βG) is a potential biomarker for cancer diagnosis and prodrug therapy. The ability to image βG activity in patients would assist in personalized glucuronide prodrug cancer therapy. However, whole-body imaging of βG activity for medical usage is not yet available. Here, we developed a radioactive βG activity-based trapping probe for positron emission tomography (PET). We generated a (124)I-tyramine-conjugated difluoromethylphenol beta-glucuronide probe (TrapG) to form (124)I-TrapG that could be selectively activated by βG for subsequent attachment of (124)I-tyramine to nucleophilic moieties near βG-expressing sites. We estimated the specificity of a fluorescent FITC-TrapG, the cytotoxicity of tyramine-TrapG, and the serum half-life of (124)I-TrapG. βG targeting of (124)I-TrapG in vivo was examined by micro-PET. The biodistribution of (131)I-TrapG was investigated in different organs. Finally, we imaged the endogenous βG activity and assessed its correlation with therapeutic efficacy of 9-aminocamptothecin glucuronide (9ACG) prodrug in native tumors. FITC-TrapG showed specific trapping at βG-expressing CT26 (CT26/mβG) cells but not in CT26 cells. The native TrapG probe possessed low cytotoxicity. (124)I-TrapG preferentially accumulated in CT26/mβG but not CT26 cells. Meanwhile, micro-PET and whole-body autoradiography results demonstrated that (124)I-TrapG signals in CT26/mβG tumors were 141.4-fold greater than in CT26 tumors. Importantly, Colo205 xenografts in nude mice that express elevated endogenous βG can be monitored by using infrared glucuronide trapping probes (NIR-TrapG) and suppressed by 9ACG prodrug treatment. (124)I-TrapG exhibited low cytotoxicity allowing long-term monitoring of βG activity in vivo to aid in the optimization of prodrug targeted therapy.

  13. Practical yields of I-124 from different targets in the {sup 124}Te(d,2n){sup 124}I reaction and an improved recovery of Te-124

    SciTech Connect

    Firouzbakht, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    Iodine-124 is a positron-emitting isotope with a longer half-life (4.2 days) which has been used in preliminary studies for PET. Monoclonal antibodies labelled with this isotope offer promise in using PET to quantitate the biodistribution of a monoclonal. The most practical way to make the I-124 on a medium energy cyclotron is from the {sup 124}Te(d,2n){sup 124}I reaction on enriched Te-124. The {sup 125}Te(d,3n){sup 124}I reaction has been used but has been found to be less desirable due to the lower yields. The extremely high cost of the enriched Te-124 demands that nearly all the target material be recovered. In this light the author has undertaken a study of yield and recovery of Te-124 based on the widely used chemistry for production of I-123 from the {sup 124}Te(p,2n){sup 123}I reaction and the recovery of the Te-124. The target used in this study was a flat plate target. The target material is pressed into a groove in an aluminum plate which is inclined at a 10{degrees} angle to the beam. The author made a direct comparison of the yields of I-124 from a pure tellurium powder target, a tellurium powder target with added aluminum, and a tellurium oxide pellet target. These three target materials give yields which are consistent with the amount of tellurium at low beam currents (i.e. the target which is 10% aluminum gives a yield of 87% of the pure tellurium target) but show deviations at higher beam currents with the aluminum doped target giving better yields. The commonly used methods of separating the 1-124 and recovery of the enriched tellurium were explored and a new method was developed which gives better recovery of tellurium-124.

  14. The helical domain of the EcoR124I motor subunit participates in ATPase activity and dsDNA translocation

    PubMed Central

    Shamayeva, Katsiaryna; Guzanova, Alena; Řeha, David; Csefalvay, Eva; Carey, Jannette; Weiserova, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Type I restriction-modification enzymes are multisubunit, multifunctional molecular machines that recognize specific DNA target sequences, and their multisubunit organization underlies their multifunctionality. EcoR124I is the archetype of Type I restriction-modification family IC and is composed of three subunit types: HsdS, HsdM, and HsdR. DNA cleavage and ATP-dependent DNA translocation activities are housed in the distinct domains of the endonuclease/motor subunit HsdR. Because the multiple functions are integrated in this large subunit of 1,038 residues, a large number of interdomain contacts might be expected. The crystal structure of EcoR124I HsdR reveals a surprisingly sparse number of contacts between helicase domain 2 and the C-terminal helical domain that is thought to be involved in assembly with HsdM. Only two potential hydrogen-bonding contacts are found in a very small contact region. In the present work, the relevance of these two potential hydrogen-bonding interactions for the multiple activities of EcoR124I is evaluated by analysing mutant enzymes using in vivo and in vitro experiments. Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to provide structural interpretation of the functional data. The results indicate that the helical C-terminal domain is involved in the DNA translocation, cleavage, and ATPase activities of HsdR, and a role in controlling those activities is suggested. PMID:28133570

  15. Excitation functions of 125Te(p, xn)-reactions from their respective thresholds up to 100 MeV with special reference to the production of 124I.

    PubMed

    Hohn, A; Nortier, F M; Scholten, B; van der Walt, T N; Coenen, H H; Qaim, S M

    2001-08-01

    Excitation functions of the nuclear reactions 125Te(p, xn) (119,120m, 120g, 121,122,123,124,125)I were measured for the first time from their respective thresholds up to 100 MeV using the stacked-foil technique. Thin samples were prepared by electrolytic deposition of 98.3% enriched 125Te on Ti-backing. In addition to experimental studies, excitation functions were calculated by the modified hybrid model code ALICE-IPPE. The experimental and theoretical data generally showed good agreement. From the measured cross section data, integral yields of (123,124,125)I were calculated. The energy range Ep 21 --> 15 MeV appears to be very suitable for the production of the medically interesting radionuclide 124I (T(1/2) = 4.18 d; I(beta)+ = 25%). The thick target yield of 124I amounts to 81 MBq/microA h and the level of 125I-impurity to 0.9%. The 125Te(p,2n)124I reaction gives 124I yield about four times higher than the commonly used 124Te(p,n)124I and 124Te(d,2n)124I reactions. The proposed production energy range is too high for small cyclotrons but large quantities of 124I can be produced with medium-sized commercial machines.

  16. Monte Carlo Calculation of Radioimmunotherapy with 90Y-, 177Lu-, 131I-, 124I-, and 188Re-Nanoobjects: Choice of the Best Radionuclide for Solid Tumour Treatment by Using TCP and NTCP Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, S.; Feron, O.; Gallez, B.; Masereel, B.; Michiels, C.; Vander Borght, T.

    2015-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy has shown that the use of monoclonal antibodies combined with a radioisotope like 131I or 90Y still remains ineffective for solid and radioresistant tumour treatment. Previous simulations have revealed that an increase in the number of 90Y labelled to each antibody or nanoobject could be a solution to improve treatment output. It now seems important to assess the treatment output and toxicity when radionuclides such as 90Y, 177Lu, 131I, 124I, and 188Re are used. Tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) curves versus the number of radionuclides per nanoobject were computed with MCNPX to evaluate treatment efficacy for solid tumours and to predict the incidence of surrounding side effects. Analyses were carried out for two solid tumour sizes of 0.5 and 1.0 cm radius and for nanoobject (i.e., a radiolabelled antibody) distributed uniformly or nonuniformly throughout a solid tumour (e.g., Non-small-cell-lung cancer (NSCLC)). 90Y and 188Re are the best candidates for solid tumour treatment when only one radionuclide is coupled to one carrier. Furthermore, regardless of the radionuclide properties, high values of TCP can be reached without toxicity if the number of radionuclides per nanoobject increases. PMID:26136812

  17. Monte Carlo Calculation of Radioimmunotherapy with (90)Y-, (177)Lu-, (131)I-, (124)I-, and (188)Re-Nanoobjects: Choice of the Best Radionuclide for Solid Tumour Treatment by Using TCP and NTCP Concepts.

    PubMed

    Lucas, S; Feron, O; Gallez, B; Masereel, B; Michiels, C; Vander Borght, T

    2015-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy has shown that the use of monoclonal antibodies combined with a radioisotope like (131)I or (90)Y still remains ineffective for solid and radioresistant tumour treatment. Previous simulations have revealed that an increase in the number of (90)Y labelled to each antibody or nanoobject could be a solution to improve treatment output. It now seems important to assess the treatment output and toxicity when radionuclides such as (90)Y, (177)Lu, (131)I, (124)I, and (188)Re are used. Tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) curves versus the number of radionuclides per nanoobject were computed with MCNPX to evaluate treatment efficacy for solid tumours and to predict the incidence of surrounding side effects. Analyses were carried out for two solid tumour sizes of 0.5 and 1.0 cm radius and for nanoobject (i.e., a radiolabelled antibody) distributed uniformly or nonuniformly throughout a solid tumour (e.g., Non-small-cell-lung cancer (NSCLC)). (90)Y and (188)Re are the best candidates for solid tumour treatment when only one radionuclide is coupled to one carrier. Furthermore, regardless of the radionuclide properties, high values of TCP can be reached without toxicity if the number of radionuclides per nanoobject increases.

  18. Identification and isolation of a 140 kd cell surface glycoprotein with properties expected of a fibronectin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pytela, R.; Pierschbacher, M.D.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1985-01-01

    Affinity chromatography was used to identify a putative cell surface receptor for fibronectin. A large cell-attachment-promoting fibronectin fragment was used as the affinity matrix, and specific elution was effected by using synthetic peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp, which is derived from the cell recognition sequence in the fibronectin cell attachment site. A 140 kd protein was bound by the affinity matrix from octylglucoside extracts of MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells and specifically eluted with the synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. The 140 kd protein was labeled by cell surface specific radioiodination and became incorporated into liposomes at a high efficiency. Liposomes containing this protein showed specific affinity toward fibronectin-coated surfaces, and this binding could be selectively inhibited by the synthetic cell-attachment peptide but not by inactive peptides. Affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose showed that the 140 kd protein is a glycoprotein and, in combination with the fibronectin fragment chromatography, gave highly enriched preparations of the 140 kd protein. These properties suggest that the 140 kd glycoprotein is a membrane-embedded cell surface protein directly involved in the initial step of cell adhesion to fibronectin substrates.

  19. Effectiveness of [(124)I]-PET/CT and [(18)F]-FDG-PET/CT for localizing recurrence in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jandee; Nah, Kuk Young; Kim, Ra Mi; Oh, Yeon-Ju; An, Young-Sil; Yoon, Joon-Kee; An, Gwang Il; Choi, Tae Hyun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Soh, Euy-Young; Chung, Woong Youn

    2012-09-01

    Although the prognosis of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is generally encouraging, a diagnostic dilemma is posed when an increasing level of serum thyroglobulin (Tg) is noted, without detection of a recurrent tumor using conventional imaging tools such as the iodine-131 whole-body scanning (the [(131)I] scan) or neck ultrasonography (US). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of [(124)I]-PET/CT and [(18)F]-FDG-PET/CT in terms of accurate detection of both iodine- and non-iodine-avid recurrence, compared with that of conventional imaging such as the [(131)I] scan or neck ultrasonography (US). Between July 2009 and June 2010, we prospectively studied 19 DTC patients with elevated thyroglobulin levels but who do not show pathological lesions when conventional imaging modalities are used. All involved patients had undergone total thyroidectomy and radioiodine (RI) treatment, and who had been followed-up for a mean of 13 months (range, 6-21 months) after the last RI session. Combined [(18)F]-FDG-PET/CT and [(124)I]-PET/CT data were evaluated for detecting recurrent DTC lesions in study patients and compared with those of other radiological and/or cytological investigations. Nine of 19 patients (47.4%) showed pathological [(18)F]-FDG (5/19, 26.3%) or [(124)I]-PET (4/19, 21.1%) uptake, and were classed as true-positives. Among such patients, disease management was modified in six (66.7%) and disease was restaged in seven (77.8%). In particular, the use of the described imaging combination optimized planning of surgical resection to deal with locoregional recurrence in 21.1% (4/19) of patients, who were shown to be disease-free during follow-up after surgery. Our results indicate that combination of [(18)F]-FDG-PET/CT and [(124)I]-PET/CT affords a valuable diagnostic method that can be used to make therapeutic decisions in patients with DTC who are tumor-free on conventional imaging studies but who have high Tg levels.

  20. Excitation functions of 124Te(d,xn)124,125I reactions from threshold up to 14 MeV: comparative evaluation of nuclear routes for the production of 124I.

    PubMed

    Bastian, T H; Coenen, H H; Qaim, S M

    2001-09-01

    Excitation functions of the nuclear reactions 124Te(d,xn)124-125I were measured from their respective thresholds up to 14.0 MeV via the stacked-foil technique. Thin samples were prepared by electrolytic deposition of 99.8% enriched 124Te on Ti-backing. The excitation function of the 124Te(d,n)125I reaction was measured for the first time. The present data for the 124Te(d,2n)124I reaction are by an order of magnitude higher than the literature experimental data but are in good agreement with the results of a hybrid model calculation. From the measured cross sections, integral yields of 124,125I were calculated. The energy range Ed = 14 --> 10 MeV appears to be the best compromise between 124I-yield and 1251-impurity. The calculated 124I-yield amounts to 17.5 MBq/microA h and the 125I-impurity to 1.7%. A critical evaluation of the three nuclear routes for the production of 124I, viz. 124Te(d,2n)-, 124Te(p,n)- and 125Te(p,2n)-processes, is given. The reaction studied in this work proved to be least suitable. The 124Te(p,n)-reaction gives 124I of the highest radionuclidic purity, and a small-sized cyclotron is adequate for production purposes. The 125Te(p,2n)-reaction is more suitable at a medium-sized cyclotron: the yield of 124I is four times higher than in the other two reactions but the level of 0.9% 125I-impurity is relatively high.

  1. Monte Carlo simulations of GeoPET experiments: 3D images of tracer distributions (18F, 124I and 58Co) in Opalinus clay, anhydrite and quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhnini, Abdelhamid; Kulenkampff, Johannes; Sauerzapf, Sophie; Pietrzyk, Uwe; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna

    2013-08-01

    Understanding conservative fluid flow and reactive tracer transport in soils and rock formations requires quantitative transport visualization methods in 3D+t. After a decade of research and development we established the GeoPET as a non-destructive method with unrivalled sensitivity and selectivity, with due spatial and temporal resolution by applying Positron Emission Tomography (PET), a nuclear medicine imaging method, to dense rock material. Requirements for reaching the physical limit of image resolution of nearly 1 mm are (a) a high-resolution PET-camera, like our ClearPET scanner (Raytest), and (b) appropriate correction methods for scatter and attenuation of 511 keV—photons in the dense geological material. The latter are by far more significant in dense geological material than in human and small animal body tissue (water). Here we present data from Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) reflecting selected GeoPET experiments. The MCS consider all involved nuclear physical processes of the measurement with the ClearPET-system and allow us to quantify the sensitivity of the method and the scatter fractions in geological media as function of material (quartz, Opalinus clay and anhydrite compared to water), PET isotope (18F, 58Co and 124I), and geometric system parameters. The synthetic data sets obtained by MCS are the basis for detailed performance assessment studies allowing for image quality improvements. A scatter correction method is applied exemplarily by subtracting projections of simulated scattered coincidences from experimental data sets prior to image reconstruction with an iterative reconstruction process.

  2. Method of treating tumors

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally J.; Burke, Patricia A.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Goodman, Simon; Matzku, legal representative, Kerstin; Matzku, Siegfried

    2006-04-18

    A method of treating tumors, such as prostate tumors, breast tumors, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and the like, includes the sequential steps of administering to the patient at least one dose of an antiangiogenic cyclo-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-containing pentapeptide (cRGD pentapeptide); administering to the patient an anti-tumor effective amount of a radioimmunotherapeutic agent (RIT); and then administering to the patient at least one additional dose of cRGD pentapeptide. The cRGD pentapeptide is preferably cyclo-(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-[N-Me]-Val), and the RIT is preferably a radionuclide-labeled chelating agent-ligand complex in which chelating agent is chemically bonded to a tumor-targeting molecule, such as a monoclonal antibody.

  3. [Status and advances of RGD molecular imaging in lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Yue, Ning; Yuan, Shuanghu; Yang, Guoren

    2014-12-01

    Lung cancer has been one of the most common and the highest mortality rates malignant tumors at home and abroad. Sustained angiogenesis was not only the characteristic of malignant tumors, but also the foundation of tumor proliferation, invasion, recurrence and metastasis, it was also one of the hot spots of treatments in lung cancer biology currently. Integrins played an important part in tumor angiogenesis. Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides could combine with integrins specifically, and the application of radionuclide-labeled RGD molecular probes enabled imaging of tumor blood vessels to reflect its changes. The lung cancer imaging of RGD peptides at home and abroad in recent years was reviewed in this article.

  4. Regulation of proliferation of embryonic heart mesenchyme: Role of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and the interstitial matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, M.; Armstrong, M.T.; Armstrong, P.B. )

    1990-10-01

    Proliferation of atrioventricular cushion mesenchyme of the embryonic avian heart maintained in three-dimensional aggregate culture is stimulated by interaction with the interstitial matrix. Chicken serum or transforming growth factor-beta 1, which stimulates proliferation, induces matrix deposition in regions of the aggregate showing high labeling indices with tritiated thymidine. Dispersed heart mesenchyme interstitial matrix introduced into serum-free culture is incorporated into the aggregate and stimulates cellular proliferation similar to serum or transforming growth factor-beta 1. Proliferation is reversibly inhibited by the peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. It is suggested that transforming growth factor-beta 1 stimulates the production of interstitial matrix and that a sufficient stimulus for proliferation in this system is the presence of the matrix, which acts as the adhesive support for cellular anchorage.

  5. Iodine-124 production: excitation function for the 124Te(d,2n) 124I and 124Te(d,3n) 123I reactions from 7 to 24 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzbakht, Mahmoud L.; Schlyer, David J.; Finn, Ronald D.; Laguzzi, Guiseppe; Wolf, Alfred P.

    1993-06-01

    The excitation function for the production of 124I and 123I from deuterons on 124Te has been measured over the energy interval of 7.5 to 23.6 MeV. The target used was a compressed tellurium powder target. The thick target yields for both radioisotopes have been calculated, radiochemical purity was determined and recovery of the isotopically enriched tellurium has been investigated.

  6. Nuclear data relevant to the production of medically important {beta}{sup +} emitting radioisotopes {sup 75}Br, {sup 86}Y, {sup 94m}Tc and {sup 124}I at a small cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Qaim, S.M.; Roesch, F.; Scholten, B.; Stoecklin, G.; Kovacs, Z.; Tarkanyi, F.

    1994-12-31

    Excitation functions were measured for the formation of medically important positron emitting radioisotopes {sup 75}Br, {sup 86}Y, {sup 94m}Tc and {sup 124}I at a small cyclotron. The reactions investigated up to about 20 MeV included {sup 78}Kr(p,{alpha}){sup 75}Br, {sup 74}Se(d,n){sup 75}Br, {sup 86}Sr(p,n){sup 86}Y, {sup 94}Mo(p,n){sup 94m}Tc and {sup 124}Te(p,n){sup 124}I. In each case the well-known stacked-foil (in case of {sup 78}Kr gas stacked-cylinder) technique was used and the target material was isotopically enriched. From the cross section data the optimum production conditions for various radioisotopes were deduced. Whereas {sup 86}Y, {sup 94m}Tc, and {sup 124}I can be produced at a small cyclotron in quantities and purity sufficient for medical applications, the achievable batch yields of {sup 75}Br at such a cyclotron are limited.

  7. On-resin synthesis of an acylated and fluorescence-labeled cyclic integrin ligand for modification of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid).

    PubMed

    Hassert, Rayk; Hoffmeister, Peter-Georg; Pagel, Mareen; Hacker, Michael; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2012-11-01

    Cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides show remarkable affinity and specificity to integrin receptors and mediate important physiological effects in tumor angiogenesis. Additionally, they are one of the keyplayers in improving the biocompatibility of biomaterials. The fully biodegradable polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is frequently used for biomedical implants and can be applied as nanoparticles for drug delivery. The aim of this work was the generation of a lipidated c[RGDfK] peptide including a second functionality for coating of hydrophobic PLGA. Therefore, we established a general and straightforward strategy for the introduction of two different modifications into the same c[RGDfK] peptide. This allowed the generation of a palmitoylated integrin-binding lipopeptide that shows high affinity to PLGA. Additionally, we coupled 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein to the second site for modification to enable sensitive quantification of the immobilized lipopeptide on PLGA. In conclusion, we present a synthesis protocol that enables the preparation of c[RGDfK] lipopeptides with a strong affinity to PLGA and an additional site for modifications. This will provide the opportunity to introduce a variety of effector molecules site-specifically to the c[RGDfK] lipopeptide, which will enable the introduction of multifunctionality into c[RGDfK]-coated PLGA devices or nanoparticles.

  8. Engineering of Radioiodine-Labeled Gold Core-Shell Nanoparticles As Efficient Nuclear Medicine Imaging Agents for Trafficking of Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Bong; Lee, Sang-Woo; Jeong, Shin Young; Yoon, GhilSuk; Cho, Sung Jin; Kim, Sang Kyoon; Lee, In-Kyu; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Lee, Jaetae; Jeon, Yong Hyun

    2017-03-15

    The development of highly sensitive, stable, and biocompatible imaging agents allowing visualization of dendritic cell (DC) migration is one of the essential factors for effective DC-based immunotherapy. Here, we used a novel and efficient synthesis approach to develop radioiodine-124-labeled tannic acid gold core-shell nanoparticles ((124)I-TA-Au@AuNPs) for DC labeling and in vivo tracking of their migration using positron emission tomography (PET). (124)I-TA-Au@AuNPs were produced within 40 min in high yield via straightforward tannic acid-mediated radiolabeling chemistry and incorporation of Au shell, which resulted in high radio-sensitivity and excellent chemical stability of nanoparticles in DCs and living mice. (124)I-TA-Au@AuNPs demonstrated good DC labeling efficiency and did not affect cell biological functions, including proliferation and phenotype marker expression. Importantly, (124)I-TA-Au@AuNPs in an extremely low amount (0.1 mg/kg) were successfully applied to track the migration of DCs to lymphoid organs (draining lymph nodes) in mice.

  9. Iodine-125-labeled cRGD-gold nanoparticles as tumor-targeted radiosensitizer and imaging agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ning; Dang, Yajie; Liang, Guangli; Liu, Guizhi

    2015-04-01

    Research interests on radiosensitive property of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are rapidly raised because of the extensively proved in vitro effectiveness and clinical necessity. However, the issue of targeted accumulation of GNPs in tumor tissues hindered the transference to in vivo applications. In this study, hybrid nano-sized cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp-conjugated GNPs (cRGD-GNPs) integrated with radioactive iodine-125 was fabricated as tumor-targeted radiosensitizer. Therapeutic effects, including acute apoptosis (2 days post treatment) and long-term influence (up to 21 days), were investigated on NCI-H446 tumor-bearing mice via Tc-99 m-Annexin V SPECT and volume measurements, respectively. Apoptosis and volume loss were consistent in showing that tumor growth was effectively suppressed via the treatment of 125I-cRGD-GNP sensitized radiotherapy (RT), a more significantly radiosensitive effect than the treatment of non-targeted GNPs with RT, RT treatment alone, and no treatment. SPECT/CT images showed that the uptake of cRGD-GNPs by tumor tissues reached the peak target/non-target value of 4.76 at around 2 h post injection, and dynamic radioactivity monitoring showed that 125I-cRGD-GNPs maintained about 2.5% of injected dosage at 55 h post injection. For long-term influence, a significant radiosensitized RT-induced volume loss was observed. Hence, cyclic RGD conjugation makes the GNP-based radiosensitizer tumor targeting, offering a new modality for enhancing radiotherapeutic efficacy. Additionally, the introduction of I-125 serves as both a therapeutic factor and a radiotracer for in vivo tracking of GNPs.

  10. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-03: Dosimetric Comparison of the Hypoxia Agent Iodoazomycin Arabinoside (IAZA) Labeled with the Radioisotopes I-123, I-131 and I-124

    SciTech Connect

    Jans, H-S; Stypinski, D; Mcquarrie, S; Kumar, P; Mercer, J; McEwan, S; Wiebe, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the radiation dose to normal organs from the radio-iodinated, hypoxia-binding radiosensitizer iodoazomycin arabinoside (IAZA) for three different isotopes of iodine. Methods: Dosimety studies with normal volunteers had been carried out with [{sup 123}I]IAZA, a drug binding selectively to hypoxic sites. Two other isotopes of iodine, {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I, offer the opportunity to use IAZA as an agent for radioisotope therapy and as an imaging tracer for Positron Emission Tomography. Radioisotope dosimetry for {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I was performed by first deriving from the [{sup 123}I]IAZA studies biological uptake and excretion data. The cumulated activities for {sup 131}I or {sup 124}I where obtained by including their half-lives when integrating the biological data and then extrapolating to infinite time points considering a) physical decay only or b) physical and biological excretion. Doses were calculated using the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema (OLINDA1.1 code, Vanderbilt 2007). Results: Compared to {sup 123}I, organ doses were elevated on average by a factor 6 and 9 for {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I, respectively, if both physical decay and biological excretion were modeled. If only physical decay is considered, doses increase by a factor 18 ({sup 131}I) and 19 ({sup 124}I). Highest organ doses were observed in intestinal walls, urinary bladder and thyroid. Effective doses increased by a factor 11 and 14 for {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I, respectively, if biological and physical decay are present. Purely physical decay yields a 23-fold increase over {sup 123}I for both, {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I. Conclusion: Owing to the significant dose increase, caused by their longer half life and the approximately 10 times larger electronic dose deposited in tissue per nuclear decay, normal tissue doses of IAZA labeled with {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I need to be carefully considered when designing imaging and therapy protocols for clinical

  11. Applications of immunoPET: Using 124I-anti-PSCA A11 minibody for imaging disease progression and response to therapy in mouse xenograft models of prostate cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Knowles, Scott M.; Tavare, Richard; Zettlitz, Kirstin A.; ...

    2014-10-17

    Here, prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is highly expressed in local prostate cancers and prostate cancer bone metastases and its expression correlates with androgen receptor activation and a poor prognosis. Here in this study, we investigate the potential clinical applications of immunoPET with the anti-PSCA A11 minibody, an antibody fragment optimized for use as an imaging agent. We compare A11 minibody immunoPET to 18F-Fluoride PET bone scans for detecting prostate cancer bone tumors and evaluate the ability of the A11 minibody to image tumor response to androgen deprivation. Osteoblastic, PSCA expressing, LAPC-9 intratibial xenografts were imaged with serial 124I-anti-PSCA A11more » minibody immunoPET and 18F-Fluoride bone scans. Mice bearing LAPC-9 subcutaneous xenografts were treated with either vehicle or MDV-3100 and imaged with A11 minibody immunoPET/CT scans pre- and post-treatment. Ex vivo flow cytometry measured the change in PSCA expression in response to androgen deprivation. A11 minibody demonstrated improved sensitivity and specificity over 18F-Fluoride bone scans for detecting LAPC-9 intratibial xenografts at all time points. Finally, LAPC-9 subcutaneous xenografts showed downregulation of PSCA when treated with MDV-3100 which A11 minibody immunoPET was able to detect in vivo.« less

  12. Highly specific PET imaging of prostate tumors in mice with an iodine-124-labeled antibody fragment that targets phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Stafford, Jason H; Hao, Guiyang; Best, Anne M; Sun, Xiankai; Thorpe, Philip E

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an attractive target for imaging agents that identify tumors and assess their response to therapy. PS is absent from the surface of most cell types, but becomes exposed on tumor cells and tumor vasculature in response to oxidative stresses in the tumor microenvironment and increases in response to therapy. To image exposed PS, we used a fully human PS-targeting antibody fragment, PGN635 F(ab')2, that binds to complexes of PS and β2-glycoprotein I. PGN635 F(ab')2 was labeled with the positron-emitting isotope iodine-124 ((124)I) and the resulting probe was injected into nude mice bearing subcutaneous or orthotopic human PC3 prostate tumors. Biodistribution studies showed that (124)I-PGN635 F(ab')2 localized with remarkable specificity to the tumors with little uptake in other organs, including the liver and kidneys. Clear delineation of the tumors was achieved by PET 48 hours after injection. Radiation of the tumors with 15 Gy or systemic treatment of the mice with 10 mg/kg docetaxel increased localization in the tumors. Tumor-to-normal (T/N) ratios were inversely correlated with tumor growth measured over 28 days. These data indicate that (124)I-PGN635 F(ab')2 is a promising new imaging agent for predicting tumor response to therapy.

  13. Food Labeling

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the U.S. have food labels. On every food label you will see Serving size, number of servings, and number of calories per serving Information on the amount of dietary fat, cholesterol, dietary fiber, dietary sodium, carbohydrates, dietary proteins, vitamins, ...

  14. Food Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... the food came from, whether the food is organic, and certain health claims. So who decides what ... make that claim. Foods that are labeled "USDA organic" are required to have at least 95% organic ...

  15. A new fluorescent imaging of renal inflammation with RCP.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kentaro; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2010-12-20

    The objective of this study is to design a fluorescent imaging agent with R-Gel, one of the recombinant polymers (RCP), for renal inflammation. The R-Gel based on human type I collagen has multiple Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motifs which are ligands for some types of integrin receptors on the cell surface. After intravenous administration of R-Gel labeled by Cy7 of a fluorescent dye to three animal models of nephritis mousse, interstitial nephritis (by using UUO model mice), glomerulonephritis (HIGA mice), and ischemia-reperfusion injured kidney (I/R mice), the extent of fluorescent imaging at the renal inflammation was assessed. The Cy7-labeled R-Gel was accumulated in the inflammation site to a significantly greater extent than in the normal one at 24h after administration. The renal pattern of fluorescent imaging was similar to that of administration anti-Mac1 antibody. Taken together, it is conceivable that the R-Gel was targeted to macrophages infiltrated into the inflammation site of kidney.

  16. A beta 1-integrin receptor for fibronectin in human kidney glomeruli.

    PubMed Central

    Kerjaschki, D.; Ojha, P. P.; Susani, M.; Horvat, R.; Binder, S.; Hovorka, A.; Hillemanns, P.; Pytela, R.

    1989-01-01

    The fibronectin receptor (FNR) is a transmembrane heterodimeric glycoprotein which shares a common beta 1-chain with several other members of the integrin family of adhesion receptors. The authors have prepared a membrane fraction of isolated human glomeruli, from which two proteins (apparent molecular weights 120 kd and 140 kd) bound to a fibronectin-column, and were selectively released by the synthetic peptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser. These molecules were labeled in immune overlays by an antibody raised against the FNR from human placenta that recognizes both the FNR-specific a-chain and the group-specific beta 1-integrin chain. In sections of normal human kidneys this antibody labeled predominately the mesangia and the peripheral capillary walls of glomeruli by an immunoperoxidase procedure. Quantitative immunoelectron microscopy, using an indirect immunogold procedure, revealed a preferential localization along the cell membranes of mesangial, epithelial, and endothelial cells that face the mesangial matrix or the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). In kidney biopsies from patients with various glomerular diseases (membranous and other forms of glomerulonephritis, minimal change disease) the distribution was similar to that in normal glomeruli. These findings indicate that a beta 1-integrin-related FNR is present in normal and diseased human glomeruli. Images Figure 1-4 Figure 5 Figure 6-10 Figure 11-16 PMID:2521774

  17. Iodine-124-labeled iodo-azomycin-galactoside imaging of tumor hypoxia in mice with serial microPET scanning.

    PubMed

    Zanzonico, Pat; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Chapman, J Donald; Schneider, Richard; Cai, Shangde; Larson, Steven; Wen, Bixiu; Chen, Yuchun; Finn, Ronald; Ruan, Shutian; Gerweck, Leo; Humm, John; Ling, Clifton

    2004-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia, present in many human cancers, can lead to resistance to radiation and chemotherapy, is associated with a more aggressive tumor phenotype and is an independent prognostic factor of clinical outcome. It is therefore important to identify and localize tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. In the current study, serial microPET imaging was used to evaluate iodine-124-labeled iodo-azomycin-galactoside ((124)I-IAZG) (4.2-day physical half-life) as a hypoxia imaging agent in 17 MCa breast tumors and six FSaII fibrosarcomas implanted in mice. For comparison, another promising hypoxic-cell PET radiotracer, fluorine-18-labeled fluoro-misonidazole ((18)F-FMISO), was also imaged in the same tumor-bearing animals. Twelve animals were also imaged with (18)F-labeled fluoro-deoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). In addition, histological examination was performed, and direct measurement of tumor oxygenation status carried out with the Oxylite probe system. Two size groups were used, relatively well-oxygenated tumors in the range of 80-180 mg were designated as small, and those >300 mg and highly hypoxic, as large. Based on the data from 11 MCa and six FSaII tumors, both (124)I-IAZG and (18)F-FMISO images showed high tracer uptake in the large tumors. In (18)F-FMISO images at 1, 3-4, and 6-8 h post-injection (p.i.), there was considerable whole-body background activity. In contrast, (124)I-IAZG imaging was optimal when performed at 24-48 h p.i., when the whole-body background had dissipated considerably. As a result, the (124)I-IAZG images at 24-48 h p.i. had higher tumor to whole-body activity contrast than the (18)F-FMISO images at 3-6 h p.i. Region-of-interest analysis was performed as a function of time p.i. and indicated a tumor uptake of 5-10% (of total-body activity) for FMISO at 3-6 h p.i., and of ~17% for IAZG at 48 h p.i. This was corroborated by biodistribution data in that the tumor-to-normal tissue (T/N, normal tissues of blood, heart, lung, liver, spleen, kidney

  18. Homing of hemopoietic precursor cells to the embryonic thymus: characterization of an invasive mechanism induced by chemotactic peptides

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    During embryonic development, T cell precursors migrate to the thymus, where immunocompetency is acquired. Our previous studies have shown that avian hemopoietic precursor cells are recruited to the thymus by chemotactic peptides secreted by thymic epithelial cells (Champion, S., B. A. Imhof, P. Savagner, and J. P. Thiery, 1986, Cell, 44:781-790). In this study, we have characterized the homing of these precursor cells to the thymus in vivo by electron and light microscopy. Hemopoietic precursors could be seen to extravasate from blood or lymphatic vessels, migrate in the mesenchyme, traverse the perithymic basement membrane, and finally intercalate into the thymic epithelium. Labeled hemopoietic precursors injected into the blood circulation also followed the same pathway. Migrating hemopoietic precursor cells were found to express the fibronectin receptor complex. In the presence of thymic chemotactic peptides, hemopoietic precursors traverse a human amniotic basement membrane. This invasive process was inhibited by antibodies to laminin or to fibronectin, two major glycoproteins of the amniotic membrane, by monovalent Fab' fragments of antibodies to the fibronectin receptor, and, finally by synthetic peptides that contain the cell-binding sequence Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser of fibronectin. These results indicate that hemopoietic precursors respond to thymic chemotactic peptides by invasive behavior. Direct interactions between basement membrane components and fibronectin receptors appear to be required for this developmentally regulated invasion process. PMID:3793754

  19. Aqueous synthesized near-infrared-emitting quantum dots for RGD-based in vivo active tumour targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yimei; Zhong, Yiling; Wang, Jie; Su, Yuanyuan; Peng, Fei; Zhou, Yanfeng; Jiang, Xiangxu; He, Yao

    2013-04-01

    Over the past two decades, fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) have been highly attractive for a myriad of bioapplications due to their unique optical properties. For bioimaging applications, QD-based in vivo specific tumour targeting is vitally important in the biological and biomedical fields. Aqueous synthesized QDs (aqQDs) exhibit excellent aqueous dispersibility without requiring any post-treatment and have small hydrodynamic diameters (generally <5 nm), which are highly useful for bioimaging applications. We herein present the first example of in vivo active tumour targeting using water-dispersed near-infrared-emitting aqQDs modified with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides. In vitro and in vivo studies (e.g., tumour cell labelling, histological analysis, and active tumour targeting) demonstrate that the prepared RGD-decorated aqQDs exhibit highly bio-specific properties, enabling sensitive and specific targeting of tumour sites in both cells and living animals. Our results suggest that the new class of RGD-decorated aqQDs are highly promising as fluorescent bioprobes for a wide range of biological applications.

  20. Introduction to Pesticide Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide product labels provide critical information about how to safely and legally handle and use pesticide products. Unlike most other types of product labels, pesticide labels are legally enforceable. Learn about pesticide product labels.

  1. Functional comparison of annexin V analogues labeled indirectly and directly with iodine-124.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Bronwen; Keen, Heather; Shaw, David; Disley, Lynn; Hastings, David; Hadfield, John; Reader, Andrew; Allan, Donald; Julyan, Peter; Watson, Alastair; Zweit, Jamal

    2005-05-01

    We are interested in imaging cell death in vivo using annexin V radiolabeled with (124)I. In this study, [(124)I]4IB-annexin V and [(124)I]4IB-ovalbumin were made using [(124)I]N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-iodobenzoate prepared by iododestannylation of N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-(tributylstannyl)benzoate. [(124)I]4IB-annexin V binds to phosphatidylserine-coated microtiter plates and apoptotic Jurkat cells and accumulates in hepatic apoptotic lesions in mice treated with anti-Fas antibody, while [(124)I]4IB-ovalbumin does not. In comparison with (124)I-annexin V, [(124)I]4IB-annexin V has a higher rate of binding to phosphatidylserine in vitro, a higher kidney and urine uptake, a lower thyroid and stomach content uptake, greater plasma stability and a lower rate of plasma clearance. Binding of radioactivity to apoptotic cells relative to normal cells in vitro and in vivo appears to be lower for [(124)I]4IB-annexin V than for (124)I-annexin V.

  2. pHluorin-assisted expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction data analysis of the C-terminal domain of the HsdR subunit of the Escherichia coli type I restriction-modification system EcoR124I.

    PubMed

    Grinkevich, Pavel; Iermak, Iuliia; Luedtke, Nicholas A; Mesters, Jeroen R; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Ludwig, Jost

    2016-09-01

    The HsdR subunit of the type I restriction-modification system EcoR124I is responsible for the translocation as well as the restriction activity of the whole complex consisting of the HsdR, HsdM and HsdS subunits, and while crystal structures are available for the wild type and several mutants, the C-terminal domain comprising approximately 150 residues was not resolved in any of these structures. Here, three fusion constructs with the GFP variant pHluorin developed to overexpress, purify and crystallize the C-terminal domain of HsdR are reported. The shortest of the three encompassed HsdR residues 887-1038 and yielded crystals that belonged to the orthorhombic space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 83.42, b = 176.58, c = 126.03 Å, α = β = γ = 90.00° and two molecules in the asymmetric unit (VM = 2.55 Å(3) Da(-1), solvent content 50.47%). X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.45 Å.

  3. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nossum, R.T.

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  4. Soil Fumigant Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The 2012 updated pesticide labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures. Find labels for each different type of fumigant: chloropicrin, dazomet, dimethyl disulfide, metam sodium/potassium, and methyl bromide.

  5. Electronic Submission of Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide registrants can provide draft and final labels to EPA electronically for our review as part of the pesticide registration process. The electronic submission of labels by registrants is voluntary but strongly encouraged.

  6. Soil Fumigant Labels - Dazomet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures. Find information from the Pesticide Product Labeling System (PPLS) for products such as Basamid G, manufactured by Amvac.

  7. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  8. Pesticide Labeling Questions & Answers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide manufacturers, applicators, state regulatory agencies, and other stakeholders raise questions or issues about pesticide labels. The questions on this page are those that apply to multiple products or address inconsistencies among product labels.

  9. Soil Fumigant Labels - Chloropicrin

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Search by EPA registration number, product name, or company name, and follow the link to the Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) for details on each fumigant. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  10. Radiolabeled biomolecules for early cancer detection and therapy via angiogenesis targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouziotis, P.; Psimadas, D.; Fani, M.; Gourni, E.; Loudos, G.; Xanthopoulos, S.; Archimandritis, S. C.; Varvarigou, A. D.

    2006-12-01

    Tumors cannot grow or metastasize without the formation of new blood vessels, i.e. without angiogenesis. A variety of anti-angiogenic agents leading to angiogenesis inhibition are in the clinical trial phase, among which are: (i) molecules which inhibit the action of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors, VEGF and (ii) molecules which obstruct migration, differentiation and proliferation of endothelial cells, via their binding to receptors of the α νβ 3 integrins. Certain derivatives of the abovementioned categories, labeled with radionuclides, which emit γ-radiation or β-particles or positrons, have been proposed and are being evaluated as possible radiopharmaceuticals, for the detection and/or treatment of primary or metastatic cancer at an early stage. For the study of angiogenesis the following have been described: (a) antibodies targeting VEGF, labeled with radionuclides emitting β- and/or γ-radiation, which can be applied for the diagnosis and, possibly, for the treatment of cancer, (b) peptide derivatives which contain the amino-acid sequence RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) and compete for the α νβ 3 integrins, with the proteins of the stroma. It has been found that these radiolabeled biomolecules localize in tumors and can be used for the visualization and, possibly, for tumor eradication of primary and metastatic cancer. In our laboratory radiolabeling of biomolecules by beta and/or gamma emitters is a principal research goal. In the present work we are presenting our results on the labeling of monoclonal antibodies and peptides with β- and γ-emitting isotopes, as well as on their in vivo evaluation in experimental animal models, by use of specially dedicated imaging devices.

  11. In vivo imaging of insulin receptors by PET: preclinical evaluation of iodine-125 and iodine-124 labelled human insulin.

    PubMed

    Iozzo, P; Osman, S; Glaser, M; Knickmeier, M; Ferrannini, E; Pike, V W; Camici, P G; Law, M P

    2002-01-01

    [A(14)-*I]iodoinsulin was prepared for studies to assess the suitability of labeled iodoinsulin for positron emission tomography (PET). Iodine-125 was used to establish the methods and for preliminary studies in rats. Further studies and PET scanning in rats were carried out using iodine-124. Tissue and plasma radioactivity was measured as the uptake index (UI = [cpm x (g tissue)(-1)]/[cpm injected x (g body weight)(-1)]) at 1 to 40 min after intravenous injection of either [A(14)-(125)I]iodoinsulin or [A(14)-(124)I]iodoinsulin. For both radiotracers, initial clearance of radioactivity from plasma was rapid (T(1/2) approximately 1 min), reaching a plateau (UI = 2.8) at approximately 5 min which was maintained for 35 min. Tissue biodistributions of the two radiotracers were comparable; at 10 min after injection, UI for myocardium was 2.4, liver, 4.0, pancreas, 5.4, brain, 0.17, kidney, 22, lung, 2.3, muscle, 0.54 and fat, 0.28. Predosing rats with unlabelled insulin reduced the UI for myocardium (0.95), liver (1.8), pancreas (1.2) and brain (0.08), increased that for kidney (61) but had no effect on that for lung (2.5), muscle (0.50) or fat (0.34). Analysis of radioactivity in plasma demonstrated a decrease of [(125)I]iodoinsulin associated with the appearance of labeled metabolites; the percentage of plasma radioactivity due to [(125)I]iodoinsulin was 40% at 5 min and 10% at 10 min. The heart, liver and kidneys were visualized using [(124)I]iodoinsulin with PET.

  12. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 22

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about what labels require review.

  13. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 27

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See examples of mandatory and advisory label statements.

  14. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 21

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about types of labels.

  15. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 24

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This page is about which labels require review.

  16. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 17

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See an overview of the importance of labels.

  17. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 23

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Lists types of labels that do not require review.

  18. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 16

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the importance of labels and the role in enforcement.

  19. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 15

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the consequences of improper labeling.

  20. Sample Pesticide Label for Label Review Training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  1. Pesticide Product Label System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) provides a collection of pesticide product labels (Adobe PDF format) that have been approved by EPA under Section 3 of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). New labels were added to PPLS on November 21, 2014. Pesticide product labels provide critical information about how to safely handle and use registered pesticide products. An approved pesticide product label represents the full content of EPAs registration decision regarding that product. Pesticide labels contain detailed information on the use, storage, and handling of a product. This information will be found on EPA stamped-approved labels and, in some cases, in subsequent related correspondence, which is also included in PPLS. You may need to review several PDF files for a single product to determine the complete current terms of registration.

  2. Evidence of ectokinase-mediated phosphorylation of osteopontin and bone sialoprotein by osteoblasts during bone formation in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, X; Luo, C; Ferrier, J M; Sodek, J

    1997-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP) are phosphorylated glycoproteins that, together with osteonectin/secreted protein, acidic, rich in cysteine (SPARC) and osteocalcin, comprise the major non-collagen proteins of bone. Although phosphorylation of OPN and BSP, which is known to influence the biological properties of these proteins, has been shown to occur intracellularly, recent studies have demonstrated ectokinase activity in bone cell populations [Mikuni-Takagaki, Kakai, Satoyoshi, Kawano, Suzuki, Kawase and Saito (1995) J. Bone Miner. Res. 10, 231-241]. To determine whether OPN and BSP are phosphorylated by ectokinase activity we have used [gamma-32P]ATP and [gamma-32P]GTP as cell-impenetrable phosphate donors to analyse for ectokinase activity in osteoblastic UMR106.06 cells and fetal rat calvarial cells (FRCCs). By pulse-labelling confluent cells with radiolabelled nucleotides, the phosphorylation of endogenous and exogenously added OPN and BSP was demonstrated together with the labelling of a number of cell surface proteins. These phosphorylation reactions were inhibited by a cell-impermeable ectokinase inhibitor, K252b, and cell surface phosphorylation was also inhibited by exogenously added OPN and BSP substrates, indicating competition for the ectokinase enzyme. However, phosphorylation of OPN and BSP, both of which can mediate cell attachment through Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motifs, was not inhibited by an RGD peptide, suggesting that binding of OPN and BSP to cell surface integrins is not required. In similar experiments, ectokinase-mediated phosphorylation of OPN and BSP was demonstrated during mineralized tissue formation by FRCCs in vitro. These studies demonstrate that OPN and BSP secreted by bone cells are phosphorylated by a casein kinase II-like ectokinase present on the surface of osteoblastic cells. PMID:9169595

  3. Regulation of fibronectin receptor distribution by transformation, exogenous fibronectin, and synthetic peptides

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that fibronectin and its 140K membrane receptor complex are spatially associated with microfilaments to form cell surface linkage complexes which are thought to mediate adhesive interactions between fibroblasts and their substrata. We examined the regulation of the organization of these cell surface structures in transformed and fibronectin-reconstituted cells as well as in cells treated with a competitive synthetic peptide inhibitor of fibronectin binding to its receptor. Correlative localization experiments with interference reflection microscopy and double-label or triple-label immunofluorescence revealed a concomitant loss of fibronectin, 140K receptor, and alpha-actinin colocalization at cell substratum extracellular matrix contact sites after transformation of chick fibroblasts by wild-type or temperature-sensitive Rous sarcoma viruses (RSV). Western and dot immunoblot analyses established that although similar total quantities of intact 140K molecules were present in the transformed cell cultures, significantly more was released into the culture medium of transformed cells. The 140K molecules on transformed cells were available for interaction with exogenously added fibronectin, which could reconstitute fibronectin-140K linkage complexes. In such fibronectin reconstitution experiments, many cells expressed both fibronectin-140K-actin linkage complexes and RSV pp60src, indicating that the morphological reversion could occur even in the continued presence of RSV transformation. The synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser derived from the sequence of the cell-binding region of fibronectin could also prevent the organization of fibronectin-140K linkage complexes. Our results suggest that fibronectin interaction with cells regulates the organization of fibronectin receptor complexes and cytoskeletal components at the cell surface. PMID:3023389

  4. Endothelial targeting of polymeric nanoparticles stably labeled with the PET imaging radioisotope iodine-124.

    PubMed

    Simone, Eric A; Zern, Blaine J; Chacko, Ann-Marie; Mikitsh, John L; Blankemeyer, Eric R; Muro, Silvia; Stan, Radu V; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2012-07-01

    Targeting of therapeutics or imaging agents to the endothelium has the potential to improve specificity and effectiveness of treatment for many diseases. One strategy to achieve this goal is the use of nanoparticles (NPs) targeted to the endothelium by ligands of protein determinants present on this tissue, including cell adhesion molecules, peptidases, and cell receptors. However, detachment of the radiolabel probes from NPs poses a significant problem. In this study, we devised polymeric NPs directly labeled with radioiodine isotopes including the positron emission tomography (PET) isotope (124)I, and characterized their targeting to specific endothelial determinants. This approach provided sizable, targetable probes for specific detection of endothelial surface determinants non-invasively in live animals. Direct conjugation of radiolabel to NPs allowed for stable longitudinal tracking of tissue distribution without label detachment even in an aggressive proteolytic environment. Further, this approach permits tracking of NP pharmacokinetics in real-time and non-invasive imaging of the lung in mice using micro-PET imaging. The use of this strategy will considerably improve investigation of NP interactions with target cells and PET imaging in small animals, which ultimately can aid in the optimization of targeted drug delivery.

  5. Labeling and Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Mike S.; Robertson, Craig T.; Gray-Ray, Phyllis; Ray, Melvin C.

    2003-01-01

    Index comprised of six contrasting descriptive adjectives was used to measure incarcerated youths' perceived negative labeling from the perspective of parents, teachers, and peers. Results provided partial support for hypothesis that juveniles who choose a greater number of negative labels will report more frequent delinquent involvement. Labeling…

  6. Synthesis of silk fibroin-glycopolypeptide conjugates and their recognition with lectin.

    PubMed

    Das, Soumen; Pati, Debasis; Tiwari, Neha; Nisal, Anuya; Sen Gupta, Sayam

    2012-11-12

    Silk fibroin (SF), the natural fibrous protein created by the Bombyx mori silk worm, is being increasingly explored as a biomaterial for tissue engineering due to its excellent mechanical strength, high oxygen/water permeability, and biocompatibility. It is also well known that surface modification of SF with organic ligands such as the extracellular protein binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides help adhesion and proliferation of cells better-a key requirement for it to function as extracellular matrices. In this work, we have conjugated synthetic glycopolypeptides (GPs) that were synthesized by controlled ring-opening polymerization of α-manno-lys N-carboxyanhydrides (NCAs) onto SF by using Cu catalyzed click reaction to synthesize a new hybrid material (SF-GP), which we believe will have both the mechanical properties of native SF and the molecular recognition property of the carbohydrates in the GP. By controlling the amount of GP grafted onto SF, we have made three SF-GP conjugates that differ in their ability to assemble into films. SF-GP conjugates having a very high content of GP formed completely water-soluble brush-like polymer that displayed very high affinity toward the lectin concanavalin-A (Con-A). Films cast from SF-GP conjugates using lower amounts of grafted GP were more stable in water, and the stability can be modulated by varying the amount of GP grafted. The water-insoluble film SF-GP(25) was also found to bind to fluorescently labeled Con-A, as was seen by confocal microscopy. Such SF-GP hybrid films may be useful as mimics of extracellular matrices for tissue engineering.

  7. The platelet fibrinogen receptor: an immunogold-surface replica study of agonist-induced ligand binding and receptor clustering

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Platelet aggregation requires the binding of fibrinogen to its receptor, a heterodimer consisting of the plasma-membrane glycoproteins (GP) IIb and IIIa. Although the GPIIb-IIIa complex is present on the surface of unstimulated platelets, it binds fibrinogen only after platelet activation. We have used an immunogold-surface replica technique to study the distribution of GPIIb-IIIa and bound fibrinogen over broad areas of surface membranes in unstimulated, as well as thrombin-activated and ADP-activated human platelets. We found that the immunogold-labeled GPIIb-IIIa was monodispersed over the surface of unstimulated platelets, although the cell surface lacked immunoreactive fibrinogen. On thrombin-stimulated platelets, approximately 65% of the GPIIb-IIIa molecules were in clusters within the plane of the membrane. Fibrinogen, which had been released from the alpha-granules of these cells, bound to GPIIb-IIIa on the cell surface and was similarly clustered. To determine whether the receptors clustered before ligand binding, or as a consequence thereof, we studied the surface distribution of GPIIb-IIIa after stimulation with ADP, which causes activation of the fibrinogen receptor function of GPIIb-IIIa without inducing the release of fibrinogen. In the absence of added fibrinogen, the unoccupied, yet binding-competent receptors on ADP-stimulated platelets were monodispersed. The addition of fibrinogen caused the GPIIb-IIIa molecules to cluster on the cell surface. Clustering was also induced by the addition of the GPIIb-IIIa-binding domains of fibrinogen, namely the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser on the alpha-chain or the gamma-chain decapeptide gamma 402-411. These results show that receptor occupancy causes clustering of GPIIb-IIIa in activated platelets. PMID:3584243

  8. [Evaluating thrombolytic efficacy and thrombus targetability of RGDS-liposomes encapsulating subtilisin FS33 in vivo].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengtao; Ji, Baoping; Cao, Yanping; Sun, Baoguo; Liu, Xudong

    2010-04-01

    A novel fibrinolytic enzyme subtilisin FS33, which exhibits much higher activity for decomposing fibrin than urokinase, was purified from Douchi, a traditional soybean-fermented food in China. In order to increase bio-utilization and thrombus targetability of subtilisin FS33 labeled by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), the surface modified liposomes encapsulating subtilisin FS33 and FITC with a synthetic peptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS), being putatively a specific antagonist of fibrinogen receptor on platelet membrane, were prepared and used to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy in a rat model thrombotic carotid artery. The arterial thrombosis was induced by applying two pieces of filter paper (1 x 2 cm) saturated with 10% of ferric chloride (FeCl3). The rats were infused via the jugular vein with either liposomes carrying BSA (control group) or RGDS-liposomes carrying subtilisin FS33 at doses of 2000 and 4000 U/kg. The plasma of the group infused with RGDS-liposomes showed higher antithrombotic and fibrinolytic activity than did the control group within 15-120 min after infusing. The higher the dose was gived, the higher the activity was shown. APTT(activiated partial thromboplastin time), PT (prothrombin time) and TT (thrombin time) were extended remarkably (P < 0.05, P < 0.01), and FDP (fibrinogen degradation products) also increased greatly (P < 0.01), while ELT (euglobulinlysis time) decreased obviously (P < 0.05). FITC content in heart and brain evidently increased (P < 0.05), and results of D-dimer test were all positive. In addition, the venous thrombi in brain and kidney were dissolved totally or partly as observed by patholgical section. All these indicated that subtilisin FS33 enhanced the antithrombotic and fibrinolytic activities in rat, and RGDS-liposomes improved, in a certain degree, the thrombolytic specificity for targeting to thrombus.

  9. Government perspective: food labeling.

    PubMed

    Philipson, Tomas

    2005-07-01

    The Food and Drug Administration acknowledges the severity of the obesity epidemic. The Food and Drug Administration recognizes the importance of food labeling as a vehicle for dietary messages and, thus, enforces stringent guidelines to maintain the integrity of the food label. As food labels await another upgrade to make them more effective and easier to understand, the Food and Drug Administration considers what information will be most useful for consumers to make healthy choices. The causal relationship between food labels and subsequent diet choice is not well understood; more research in this area is needed. The Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration has recently appointed an Obesity Working Group to develop proposals on pertinent topics of obesity, including the role of food labeling as a dietary guide.

  10. Mining Multi-label Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumakas, Grigorios; Katakis, Ioannis; Vlahavas, Ioannis

    A large body of research in supervised learning deals with the analysis of single-label data, where training examples are associated with a single label λ from a set of disjoint labels L. However, training examples in several application domains are often associated with a set of labels Y ⊆ L. Such data are called multi-label.

  11. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 29

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This page is a quiz on Module 1.

  12. Off-Label Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... their drugs for off-label uses. Off-label marketing is very different from off-label use. Why ... Employment Become a Supplier Report Fraud or Abuse Global Health ACS CAN Sign up for Email Policies ...

  13. Soil Fumigant Labels - Methyl Bromide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Search soil fumigant pesticide labels by EPA registration number, product name, or company, and follow the link to The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) for details. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  14. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1983-07-15

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  15. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1985-11-12

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label. 5 figs.

  16. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H. Duane

    1985-01-01

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  17. Figuring Out Food Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... milk dairy products also contribute to cholesterol level. Sodium Sodium, a component of salt, is listed on the Nutrition Facts label in milligrams. Small amounts of sodium are necessary for keeping proper body fluid balance, ...

  18. Label Review Training - Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  19. Like your labels?

    PubMed

    Field, Michele

    2010-01-01

    The descriptive “conventions” used on food labels are always evolving. Today, however, the changes are so complicated (partly driven by legislation requiring disclosures about environmental impacts, health issues, and geographical provenance) that these labels more often baffle buyers than enlighten them. In a light-handed manner, the article points to how sometimes reading label language can be like deciphering runes—and how if we are familiar with the technical terms, we can find a literal meaning, but still not see the implications. The article could be ten times longer because food labels vary according to cultures—but all food-exporting cultures now take advantage of our short attention-span when faced with these texts. The question is whether less is more—and if so, in this contest for our attention, what “contestant” is voted off.

  20. 16 CFR 305.17 - Television labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... manufacturer may include the ENERGY STAR logo on the label as illustrated in Sample Labels 10, 11, and 12 in... labeled may add the ENERGY STAR logo to those labels. (g) Distribution of labels. For each...

  1. A Deceiving Label?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The author reports on the growing debate among educators on whether the umbrella Asian Pacific Islander label conceals disparities among Asian American students or provides political power in numbers. Nationally, experts say that support services aimed at not only Southeast Asians, but all Asian Pacific Islander students, remain scarce in higher…

  2. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 7

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Page 7, Label Training, Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human he

  3. A comparison of the fibrinogen receptor distribution on adherent platelets using both soluble fibrinogen and fibrinogen immobilized on gold beads.

    PubMed

    Estry, D W; Mattson, J C; Mahoney, G J; Oesterle, J R

    1991-04-01

    The distribution of fibrinogen receptors was determined on the surface of adherent platelets using both direct labeling with the ligand fibrinogen which was immobilized on gold particles (Fg-Au) and indirect immunogold (Ig-Au) labeling of bound soluble fibrinogen identified with a rabbit polyclonal anti-fibrinogen antibody. Two distinctly different patterns of labeling were obtained and appeared to depend on whether solid phase fibrinogen (Fg-Au) or soluble phase released fibrinogen were bound to the membrane receptor. The membrane-bound Fg-Au reorganized in patterns that closely mimicked the organization of the underlying cytoskeleton. In approximately 18% of the adherent platelets, Fg-Au was seen in channels or vesicle-like structures lying deep to the platelet surface suggesting internalization into the open canalicular system and/or endocytosis. The labeling pattern obtained when identifying the location of membrane-bound soluble released fibrinogen by Ig-Au was diffuse and lacked the organizational patterns characteristic of Fg-Au. Unlike the Fg-Au probe, early dendritic platelets were heavily labeled by the soluble phase fibrinogen using the Ig-Au technique. Although the label covered the entire exposed platelet membrane in fully spread platelets, labeling over the peripheral web was more dense than that over the intermediate or granulomere zone. The diffuse organization and heavier peripheral distributional pattern of the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (GP IIb-IIIa) receptor in fixed, adherent platelets, was also seen with the GP IIb-IIIa receptor-specific antibody AP-2. The binding of both the Fg-Au and Ig-Au were inhibited using the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) (93% and 98% inhibition, respectively), AP-2 (98% and 97%, respectively) and platelets from patients with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (GT) (99% and 98%, respectively). The data presented provides the first report that receptor reorganization, following binding of fibrinogen, appears to be related to

  4. Decode the Sodium Label Lingo

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Preschooler For Gradeschooler For Teen Decode the Sodium Label Lingo Published January 24, 2013 Print Email Reading food labels can help you slash sodium. Here's how to decipher them. "Sodium free" or " ...

  5. Use the Nutrition Facts Label

    MedlinePlus

    ... Features Spokespeople News Archive eNewsletters Calendar Use the Nutrition Facts Label You can help your family eat ... to some of their favorite foods. Use the Nutrition Facts label found on food packages to make ...

  6. Non-muscle myosin II heavy chain has a cryptic cell-adhesion domain.

    PubMed Central

    Grinnell, F; Ho, C H

    1995-01-01

    We have discovered a cryptic cell-adhesion domain in non-muscle myosin II heavy chain. A 205 kDa cell-adhesion-promoting polypeptide (p205) was extracted from BHK cells by Nonidet P-40 or Dounce homogenization. Adhesion to p205 was specifically inhibited by the peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro, indicating a role for the Arg-Gly-Asp cell-adhesion motif. Purified p205 was identified as non-muscle myosin II heavy chain, based on sequence analysis and on the cross-reactivity of p205 with anti-(bovine trachea myosin) antibodies. Further experiments showed that the heavy chain of purified myosin II has cell-adhesion-promoting activity in a cell-blotting assay, and cross-reacted with anti-p205 antibodies. Finally, the adhesion domain was located in the tail portion of myosin II heavy chain, where an Arg-Gly-Asp-containing sequence can be found. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7626021

  7. Learning with imperfectly labeled patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of learning in pattern recognition using imperfectly labeled patterns is considered. The performance of the Bayes and nearest neighbor classifiers with imperfect labels is discussed using a probabilistic model for the mislabeling of the training patterns. Schemes for training the classifier using both parametric and non parametric techniques are presented. Methods for the correction of imperfect labels were developed. To gain an understanding of the learning process, expressions are derived for success probability as a function of training time for a one dimensional increment error correction classifier with imperfect labels. Feature selection with imperfectly labeled patterns is described.

  8. Supplementing national menu labeling.

    PubMed

    Hodge, James G; White, Lexi C

    2012-12-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration's forthcoming national menu labeling regulations are designed to help curb the national obesity epidemic by requiring calorie counts on restaurants' menus. However, posted calories can be easily ignored or misunderstood by consumers and fail to accurately describe the healthiness of foods. We propose supplemental models that include nutritional information (e.g., fat, salt, sugar) or specific guidance (e.g., "heart-healthy" graphics). The goal is to empower restaurant patrons with better data to make healthier choices, and ultimately to reduce obesity prevalence.

  9. Principles of protein labeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Obermaier, Christian; Griebel, Anja; Westermeier, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Protein labeling methods prior to separation and analysis have become indispensable approaches for proteomic profiling. Basically, three different types of tags are employed: stable isotopes, mass tags, and fluorophores. While proteins labeled with stable isotopes and mass tags are measured and differentiated by mass spectrometry, fluorescent labels are detected with fluorescence imagers. The major purposes for protein labeling are monitoring of biological processes, reliable quantification of compounds and specific detection of protein modifications and isoforms in multiplexed samples, enhancement of detection sensitivity, and simplification of detection workflows. Proteins can be labeled during cell growth by incorporation of amino acids containing different isotopes, or in biological fluids, cells or tissue samples by attaching specific groups to the ε-amino group of lysine, the N-terminus, or the cysteine residues. The principles and the modifications of the different labeling approaches on the protein level are described; benefits and shortcomings of the methods are discussed.

  10. Optimizing connected component labeling algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kesheng; Otoo, Ekow; Shoshani, Arie

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents two new strategies that can be used to greatly improve the speed of connected component labeling algorithms. To assign a label to a new object, most connected component labeling algorithms use a scanning step that examines some of its neighbors. The first strategy exploits the dependencies among them to reduce the number of neighbors examined. When considering 8-connected components in a 2D image, this can reduce the number of neighbors examined from four to one in many cases. The second strategy uses an array to store the equivalence information among the labels. This replaces the pointer based rooted trees used to store the same equivalence information. It reduces the memory required and also produces consecutive final labels. Using an array instead of the pointer based rooted trees speeds up the connected component labeling algorithms by a factor of 5 ~ 100 in our tests on random binary images.

  11. Label Ranking Algorithms: A Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vembu, Shankar; Gärtner, Thomas

    Label ranking is a complex prediction task where the goal is to map instances to a total order over a finite set of predefined labels. An interesting aspect of this problem is that it subsumes several supervised learning problems, such as multiclass prediction, multilabel classification, and hierarchical classification. Unsurprisingly, there exists a plethora of label ranking algorithms in the literature due, in part, to this versatile nature of the problem. In this paper, we survey these algorithms.

  12. GEO label: The General Framework for Labeling and Certification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bye, B. L.; McCallum, I.; Maso, J.

    2012-04-01

    The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is coordinating efforts to build a Global Earth Observation System of Systems, or GEOSS. As part of a strategy to increase the involvement of the science and technology community in GEOSS, both as users and developers of GEOSS itself, GEO decided to develop a GEO label concept related to the scientific relevance, quality, acceptance and societal needs for services and data sets of GEOSS. The development of a GEO label is included in the GEO work plan and several projects address the challenges of developing a GEO label concept. Within the different projects developing the GEO label, various perspectives and approaches are being applied. In order to arrive at a generally accepted GEO label concept, a common understanding and basic knowledge of labeling is necessary. Assessment of quality of internationally standardized Earth observation data products implies possible certification. A general understanding of the framework for international standards and certification will also contribute to a more coherent discussion and more efficient development of a GEO label. We will describe the general labeling and certification framework emphasizing the relation to the three elements of the GEO label: quality, user acceptance and relevance. Based on a survey of international labels done by the EGIDA project, we have analyzed the legal framework and organization of labels and certification. We will discuss the frameworks for certification, user ratings, registration and analysis of user requirements. Quality assessment is a particular focus of the analysis and is based on the work done by the GeoViQua project. A GEO label will function both as a data distribution strategy and as a general management system for data. Through a label users can compare different data sets and get access to more information about the relevant data, including quality. A label will provide traceability of data both in the interest of users as well as data

  13. Labeling conventions in isoelectronic sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Maniak, S.T.; Curtis, L.J. )

    1990-08-01

    The isoelectronic exposition of atomic structure properties involves labeling ambiguities when more than one level of the same total angular momentum and parity is present, and an energy ordered labeling of these levels can lead to apparent isoelectronic discontinuities. For example, in the recent oscillator strength calculations for S-like ions by Saloman and Kim (Phys. Rev. A 38, 577 (1988)), abrupt changes in the rates were sometimes observed between one isoelectronic element and the next. We suggest an alternative labeling scheme that removes these discontinuities and produces a smooth isoelectronic variation. This alternative labeling offers advantages for data exposition and for semiempirical interpolation and extrapolation.

  14. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-03-30

    Novel methods for positron emission tomography or single photon emission spectroscopy using tracer compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)napthyl Y in .beta. configuration is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, The compounds bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  15. 78 FR 66826 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... poultry products inspection regulations to expand the circumstances in which FSIS will generically approve the labels of meat and poultry products. The Agency also is consolidating the regulations that provide for the approval of labels for meat products and poultry products into a new Code of...

  16. 76 FR 75809 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... amend the meat and poultry products inspection regulations to expand the circumstances in which FSIS will generically approve the labels of meat and poultry products. The Agency also is proposing to combine the regulations that provide for the approval of labels for meat products and poultry...

  17. Laser labeling, a safe technology to label produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser labeling of fruits and vegetables is an alternative means to label produce. Low energy CO2 laser beams etch the surface showing the contrasting underlying layer. These etched surfaces can promote water loss and potentially allow for entry of decay organisms. The long-term effects of laser labe...

  18. Laser labeling, a safe technology to label produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Labeling of the produce has gained marked attention in recent years. Laser labeling technology involves the etching of required information on the surface using a low energy CO2 laser beam. The etching forms alphanumerical characters by pinhole dot matrix depressions. These openings can lead to wat...

  19. Nutrition Marketing on Food Labels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colby, Sarah E.; Johnson, LuAnn; Scheett, Angela; Hoverson, Bonita

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This research sought to determine how often nutrition marketing is used on labels of foods that are high in saturated fat, sodium, and/or sugar. Design and Setting: All items packaged with food labels (N = 56,900) in all 6 grocery stores in Grand Forks, ND were surveyed. Main Outcome Measure(s): Marketing strategy, nutrient label…

  20. 16 CFR 1633.12 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the Standard shall bear a permanent, conspicuous, and legible label(s) containing the following... with black text. The label text shall comply with the following format requirements: (1) All... as needed for varying information. The label must be white with black text. The label shall...

  1. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  2. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  3. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  4. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  5. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator must make a label, the label must— (a)...

  6. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator must make a label, the label must— (a)...

  7. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator must make a label, the label must— (a)...

  8. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator must make a label, the label must— (a)...

  9. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the sodium content...

  10. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the sodium content...

  11. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the sodium content...

  12. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the sodium content...

  13. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the sodium content...

  14. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator must make a label, the label must— (a)...

  15. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  16. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  17. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  18. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  19. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-01-26

    Novel compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)naphthyl Y in .beta. configuration is Y.sub.1 or Y.sub.2, where Y.sub.1 is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, and Y.sub.2 is 2-methanesulfonyloxy ethoxy, 3-methanesulfonyloxy propoxy, 4-methanesulfonyloxy butoxy, 2-methanesulfonyloxy cyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-methanesulfonyloxy cyclobutoxy, 1'methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-fluoro, 3'-methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy, 3'-fluoro isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy, or 4'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  20. Synthesis Of Labeled Metabolites

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Atcher, Robert

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, for example, isotopically enriched mustard gas metabolites including: [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1-[[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethyl]sulfonyl]-2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylsulfinyl)]; and, 2,2'-sulfinylbis([1,2-.sup.13 C.sub.2 ]ethanol of the general formula ##STR1## where Q.sup.1 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone (--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), at least one C* is .sup.13 C, X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and deuterium, and Z is selected from the group consisting of hydroxide (--OH), and --Q.sup.2 --R where Q.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone(--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), and R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1 to C.sub.4 lower alkyl, and amino acid moieties, with the proviso that when Z is a hydroxide and Q.sup.1 is a sulfide, then at least one X is deuterium.

  1. Algorithms for Labeling Focus Regions.

    PubMed

    Fink, M; Haunert, Jan-Henrik; Schulz, A; Spoerhase, J; Wolff, A

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of labeling point sites in focus regions of maps or diagrams. This problem occurs, for example, when the user of a mapping service wants to see the names of restaurants or other POIs in a crowded downtown area but keep the overview over a larger area. Our approach is to place the labels at the boundary of the focus region and connect each site with its label by a linear connection, which is called a leader. In this way, we move labels from the focus region to the less valuable context region surrounding it. In order to make the leader layout well readable, we present algorithms that rule out crossings between leaders and optimize other characteristics such as total leader length and distance between labels. This yields a new variant of the boundary labeling problem, which has been studied in the literature. Other than in traditional boundary labeling, where leaders are usually schematized polylines, we focus on leaders that are either straight-line segments or Bezier curves. Further, we present algorithms that, given the sites, find a position of the focus region that optimizes the above characteristics. We also consider a variant of the problem where we have more sites than space for labels. In this situation, we assume that the sites are prioritized by the user. Alternatively, we take a new facility-location perspective which yields a clustering of the sites. We label one representative of each cluster. If the user wishes, we apply our approach to the sites within a cluster, giving details on demand.

  2. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 6

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Page 6, Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment

  3. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 5

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  4. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 8

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human he

  5. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 9

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  6. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 2

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  7. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 4

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  8. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 3

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  9. 49 CFR 172.442 - CORROSIVE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.442 CORROSIVE label. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE label...

  10. 49 CFR 172.442 - CORROSIVE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.442 CORROSIVE label. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE label...

  11. 49 CFR 172.442 - CORROSIVE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.442 CORROSIVE label. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE label...

  12. 40 CFR 94.212 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shall be of a color that contrasts with the background of the label: (1) The label heading: Marine...) to be designated as Blue Sky Series engines must contain the statement on the label: “Blue Sky...

  13. 40 CFR 94.212 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... shall be of a color that contrasts with the background of the label: (1) The label heading: Marine...) to be designated as Blue Sky Series engines must contain the statement on the label: “Blue Sky...

  14. 40 CFR 94.212 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... shall be of a color that contrasts with the background of the label: (1) The label heading: Marine...) to be designated as Blue Sky Series engines must contain the statement on the label: “Blue Sky...

  15. 40 CFR 94.212 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... shall be of a color that contrasts with the background of the label: (1) The label heading: Marine...) to be designated as Blue Sky Series engines must contain the statement on the label: “Blue Sky...

  16. 16 CFR 305.17 - Television labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STAR logo on the label as illustrated in Sample Labels in appendix L. The logo must be 0.375″ wide... Environmental Protection Agency covering the televisions to be labeled may add the ENERGY STAR logo to...

  17. 21 CFR 331.80 - Professional labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN USE ANTACID PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER (OTC) HUMAN USE Labeling § 331.80 Professional labeling..., muscle weakness, and osteomalacia. (b) Professional labeling for an antacid-antiflatulent combination...

  18. 21 CFR 331.80 - Professional labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN USE ANTACID PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER (OTC) HUMAN USE Labeling § 331.80 Professional labeling..., muscle weakness, and osteomalacia. (b) Professional labeling for an antacid-antiflatulent combination...

  19. 21 CFR 331.80 - Professional labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN USE ANTACID PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER (OTC) HUMAN USE Labeling § 331.80 Professional labeling..., muscle weakness, and osteomalacia. (b) Professional labeling for an antacid-antiflatulent combination...

  20. Soil Fumigant Labels - Dimethyl Disulfide (DMDS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Search by EPA registration number, product name, or company and follow the link to the Pesticide Product Labeling System (PPLS) for label details. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  1. Mobile Application for Pesticide Label Matching

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The label matching application will give inspectors the ability to instantly compare pesticide product labels against state and federal label databases via their cell phone, tablet or other mobile device.

  2. Approximation Algorithms for Free-Label Maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Berg, Mark; Gerrits, Dirk H. P.

    Inspired by air traffic control and other applications where moving objects have to be labeled, we consider the following (static) point labeling problem: given a set P of n points in the plane and labels that are unit squares, place a label with each point in P in such a way that the number of free labels (labels not intersecting any other label) is maximized. We develop efficient constant-factor approximation algorithms for this problem, as well as PTASs, for various label-placement models.

  3. New Labeling for Neonicotinoid Pesticides

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These documents, a graphic of the bee advisory box and letters to pesticide registrants, describe steps by EPA to change pesticide labels to better protect pollinators by being clearer and more precise in their directions for pesticide application.

  4. Relaxation labeling using modular operators

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.S.; Frei, W.

    1983-01-01

    Probabilistic relaxation labeling has been shown to be useful in image processing, pattern recognition, and artificial intelligence. The approaches taken to date have been encumbered with computationally extensive summations which generally prevent real-time operation and/or easy hardware implementation. The authors present a new and unique approach to the relaxation labeling problem using modular, VLSI-oriented hierarchical complex operators. One of the fundamental concepts of this work is the representation of the probability distribution of the possible labels for a given object (pixel) as an ellipse, which may be summed with neighboring object's distribution ellipses, resulting in a new, relaxed label space. The mathematical development of the elliptical approach will be presented and compared to more classical approaches, and a hardware block diagram that shows the implementation of the relaxation scheme using vlsi chips will be presented. Finally, results will be shown which illustrate applications of the modular scheme, iteratively, to both edges and lines. 13 references.

  5. "Off-Label" Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Connecticut Attorney General for possible promotion and marketing of the off-label uses of the drug. ... cited improved energy and quality of life. The marketing of these three drugs and the doses used ...

  6. Meat and Poultry Labeling Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Food Safety and Inspection Service and the Agriculture Marketing Service have officially evaluated a meat product for ... refer to these factsheets from the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service: Organic Food Standards and Labels: The Facts ...

  7. How to Read Drug Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Healthy Aging > Drugs and alternative medicine Healthy Aging How to read drug labels Printer-friendly version ... html Connect with other organizations National Institute on Aging, NIH, HHS http://www.nia.nih.gov/ U.S. ...

  8. Locating the Vehicle Emissions Label

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA vehicle emissions label is entitled Vehicle Emission Control Information and contains the name and trademark of the manufacturer and an unconditional statement of compliance with EPA emission regulations.

  9. Electrothermal branding for embryo labeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Beebe, D J; Williams, A R; Easley, K D

    1997-11-01

    A novel embryo labeling technique based on electrothermal branding is developed. Two types of micro branding irons are fabricated and tested. One utilizes 25 microns tungsten wire as the heating element. The other utilizes surface micromachining techniques to fabricate polysilicon branding irons. The thermal behavior of the branding irons and the heat distributions in the embryos are analytically modeled. Micron-scale labels on unfertilized bovine embryos are achieved.

  10. 21 CFR 225.180 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling. 225.180 Section 225.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Labeling § 225.180 Labeling. Labels shall...

  11. 21 CFR 225.180 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling. 225.180 Section 225.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Labeling § 225.180 Labeling. Labels shall...

  12. 21 CFR 225.180 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling. 225.180 Section 225.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Labeling § 225.180 Labeling. Labels shall...

  13. 21 CFR 225.180 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling. 225.180 Section 225.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Labeling § 225.180 Labeling. Labels shall...

  14. 21 CFR 225.180 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling. 225.180 Section 225.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Labeling § 225.180 Labeling. Labels shall...

  15. 21 CFR 895.25 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... eliminated by labeling or a change in labeling, or change in advertising if the device is a restricted device... person(s) responsible for the labeling or advertising of the device specifying: (1) The deception or risk... labeling, or change in advertising if the device is a restricted device, necessary to correct the...

  16. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  17. 40 CFR 156.10 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 156.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS LABELING REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES AND DEVICES General Provisions § 156.10 Labeling requirements. (a) General—(1) Contents of the label. Every pesticide product shall bear a label containing the...

  18. 40 CFR 156.10 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 156.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS LABELING REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES AND DEVICES General Provisions § 156.10 Labeling requirements. (a) General—(1) Contents of the label. Every pesticide product shall bear a label containing the...

  19. 21 CFR 606.121 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... color scheme may be used for differentiating ABO Blood groups: Blood group Color of label O Blue A... CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR BLOOD AND BLOOD COMPONENTS Additional Labeling Standards for Blood and Blood Components § 606.121 Container label. (a) The container label requirements are designed...

  20. 40 CFR 211.104 - Label content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Label content. 211.104 Section 211.104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.104 Label content. The following data and information must be on the label of all products for...

  1. 40 CFR 211.104 - Label content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Label content. 211.104 Section 211.104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.104 Label content. The following data and information must be on the label of all products for...

  2. 40 CFR 211.104 - Label content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Label content. 211.104 Section 211.104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.104 Label content. The following data and information must be on the label of all products for...

  3. 40 CFR 211.104 - Label content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Label content. 211.104 Section 211.104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.104 Label content. The following data and information must be on the label of all products for...

  4. 40 CFR 211.104 - Label content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Label content. 211.104 Section 211.104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.104 Label content. The following data and information must be on the label of all products for...

  5. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... to 2-Year-Old How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) KidsHealth > For Parents > How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) Print A A A en ... nutricionales (video) Most packaged foods come with a Nutrition Facts label. These labels have a lot of ...

  6. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.60 Container label. (a) Full label....

  7. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  8. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  9. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  10. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  11. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  12. Quantitative positron emission tomography imaging of angiogenesis in rats with forelimb ischemia using (68)Ga-NOTA-c(RGDyK).

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong Hyun; Kim, Young-Hwa; Kim, Young Joo; Yang, Bo Yeun; Jeong, Jae Min; Youn, Hyewon; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung

    2013-10-01

    Gallium-68-labeled 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA)-cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Tyr-Lys (c(RGDyK)) was developed for αvβ3 targeting, and is a promising agent for imaging of cancer and disorders related to angiogenesis. In this study, we performed kinetic analysis of (68)Ga-NOTA-c(RGDyK) in rats with surgically induced forelimb ischemia, and immunohistochemical analysis was also performed to assess αvβ3 immuno-staining level. Animal models were created by excision of the left brachial vessels, and a sham operation was performed on the right brachial region under 2 % isoflurane anesthesia. Using an animal positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner, a list mode PET scan (120 min) was started with the injection of (68)Ga-NOTA-c(RGDyK) via the tail vein at 3, 5 and 7 days after ischemic surgery. Volumes of interest were drawn on the left ventricle, sham operation, control, and ischemic regions. Compartmental and two graphical analyses (Logan and RE plots) were performed for kinetic parameter estimation. The immunohistochemical analysis was also performed after the last PET scan, and cell components were scored on a six point scale for quantification of immuno-staining level (0-negative to 5-very high). A 3-compartment model with reversible binding best described the tissue time-activity curves. The distribution volume of the ischemic region was significantly higher than that of the sham operation (P < 10(-6)) and control region (P < 10(-9)). Both the Logan and RE plots showed high correlation with compartmental analysis (R(2) = 0.96 and 0.95 for Logan and RE, respectively). The temporal changes in distribution volume and binding potential were not significant. The immuno-staining level of the ischemic region was significantly higher than that of sham operation (P < 10(-4)) and control region (P < 10(-8)). Kinetic modeling studies with dynamic (68)Ga-NOTA-c(RGDyK) PET scan are feasible based on an image-derived input function in a

  13. Metrics for Labeled Markov Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desharnais, Josee; Jagadeesan, Radha; Gupta, Vineet; Panangaden, Prakash

    1999-01-01

    Partial Labeled Markov Chains are simultaneously generalizations of process algebra and of traditional Markov chains. They provide a foundation for interacting discrete probabilistic systems, the interaction being synchronization on labels as in process algebra. Existing notions of process equivalence are too sensitive to the exact probabilities of various transitions. This paper addresses contextual reasoning principles for reasoning about more robust notions of "approximate" equivalence between concurrent interacting probabilistic systems. The present results indicate that:We develop a family of metrics between partial labeled Markov chains to formalize the notion of distance between processes. We show that processes at distance zero are bisimilar. We describe a decision procedure to compute the distance between two processes. We show that reasoning about approximate equivalence can be done compositionally by showing that process combinators do not increase distance. We introduce an asymptotic metric to capture asymptotic properties of Markov chains; and show that parallel composition does not increase asymptotic distance.

  14. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  15. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  16. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  17. Learning With Auxiliary Less-Noisy Labels.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yunyan; Wu, Ou

    2016-04-06

    Obtaining a sufficient number of accurate labels to form a training set for learning a classifier can be difficult due to the limited access to reliable label resources. Instead, in real-world applications, less-accurate labels, such as labels from nonexpert labelers, are often used. However, learning with less-accurate labels can lead to serious performance deterioration because of the high noise rate. Although several learning methods (e.g., noise-tolerant classifiers) have been advanced to increase classification performance in the presence of label noise, only a few of them take the noise rate into account and utilize both noisy but easily accessible labels and less-noisy labels, a small amount of which can be obtained with an acceptable added time cost and expense. In this brief, we propose a learning method, in which not only noisy labels but also auxiliary less-noisy labels, which are available in a small portion of the training data, are taken into account. Based on a flipping probability noise model and a logistic regression classifier, this method estimates the noise rate parameters, infers ground-truth labels, and learns the classifier simultaneously in a maximum likelihood manner. The proposed method yields three learning algorithms, which correspond to three prior knowledge states regarding the less-noisy labels. The experiments show that the proposed method is tolerant to label noise, and outperforms classifiers that do not explicitly consider the auxiliary less-noisy labels.

  18. Food labeling: gluten-free labeling of foods. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-08-05

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is issuing a final rule to define the term "gluten-free'' for voluntary use in the labeling of foods. The final rule defines the term "gluten-free'' to mean that the food bearing the claim does not contain an ingredient that is a gluten-containing grain (e.g., spelt wheat); an ingredient that is derived from a gluten-containing grain and that has not been processed to remove gluten (e.g., wheat flour); or an ingredient that is derived from a gluten-containing grain and that has been processed to remove gluten (e.g., wheat starch), if the use of that ingredient results in the presence of 20 parts per million (ppm) or more gluten in the food (i.e., 20 milligrams (mg) or more gluten per kilogram (kg) of food); or inherently does not contain gluten; and that any unavoidable presence of gluten in the food is below 20 ppm gluten (i.e., below 20 mg gluten per kg of food). A food that bears the claim "no gluten,'' "free of gluten,'' or "without gluten'' in its labeling and fails to meet the requirements for a "gluten-free'' claim will be deemed to be misbranded. In addition, a food whose labeling includes the term "wheat'' in the ingredient list or in a separate "Contains wheat'' statement as required by a section of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) and also bears the claim "gluten-free'' will be deemed to be misbranded unless its labeling also bears additional language clarifying that the wheat has been processed to allow the food to meet FDA requirements for a "gluten-free'' claim. Establishing a definition of the term "gluten-free'' and uniform conditions for its use in food labeling will help ensure that individuals with celiac disease are not misled and are provided with truthful and accurate information with respect to foods so labeled. We are issuing the final rule under the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004 (FALCPA).

  19. A New Component Labelling And Merging Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochovsky, Amelia F.

    1987-10-01

    Component labelling is an important part of region analysis in image processing. Component labelling consists of assigning labels to pixels in the image such that adjacent pixels are given the same labels. There are various approaches to component labelling. Some require random access to the processed image; some assume special structure of the image such as a quad tree. Algorithms based on sequential scan of the image are attractive to hardware implementation. One method of labelling is based on a fixed size local window which includes the previous line. Due to the fixed size window and the sequential fashion of the labelling process, different branches of the same object may be given different labels and later found to be connected to each other. These labels are con-sidered to be equivalent and must later be collected to correctly represent one single object. This approach can be found in [F,FE,R]. Assume an input binary image of size NxM. Using these labelling algorithms, the number of equivalent pair generated is bounded by O(N*M). The number of distinct labels is also bounded by O(N*M). There is no known algorithm that merge the equivalent label pairs in time linear to the number of pairs, that is in time bounded by O(N*M). We propose a new labelling algorithm which interleaves the labelling with the merging process. The labelling and the merging are combined in one algorithm. Merged label information is kept in an equivalent table which is used to guide the labelling. In general , the algorithm produces fewer equivalent label pairs. The combined labelling and merging algorithm is O(N*M), where NxM is the size of the image. Section II describes the algorithm. Section III gives some examples We discuss implementation issues in section IV and further discussion and conclusion are given in Section V.

  20. How to read food labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... 24 liters) cooked. If you eat 2 cups (0.48 liters) at a meal, you are eating 2 servings. That is 2 times the amount of the calories, fats, and other items listed on the label. Calorie information tells you the number of calories in ...

  1. Revisiting Labels: "Hearing" or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoades, Ellen A.

    2010-01-01

    This position paper briefly presents evidence-based findings pertaining to the language of labels for people with hearing loss that relate to stigma, expectation levels, stereotypes, and self-fulfilling prophecies. These constructs are important for auditory-based practitioners, administrators, policymakers, students, families, and persons with…

  2. When Diagnostic Labels Mask Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foltz, Robert; Dang, Sidney; Daniels, Brian; Doyle, Hillary; McFee, Scott; Quisenberry, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of research shows that many seriously troubled children and adolescents are reacting to adverse life experiences. Yet traditional diagnostic labels are based on checklists of surface symptoms. Distracted by disruptive behavior, the common response is to medicate, punish, or exclude rather than respond to needs of youth who have…

  3. The Labelling Approach to Deviance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rains, Prudence M.; Kitsuse, John L.; Duster, Troy; Freidson, Eliot

    2003-01-01

    This reprint of one chapter from the 1975 text, "Issues in the Classification of Children" by Nicholas Hobbs and others, addresses the theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues involved in the "labeling" approach to the sociology of deviance. It examines the social process of classification, the use of classification in social agencies,…

  4. Food Allergies: Understanding Food Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... These eight foods are: Milk Eggs Peanuts Tree nuts (such as almonds, cashews, walnuts) Fish (such as bass, cod, flounder) Shellfish (such as crab, lobster, shrimp) Soy Wheat U.S. food labels take ... the type of tree nut (almond, walnut) or the type of crustacean shellfish ( ...

  5. Psychological effectiveness of carbon labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, Geoffrey

    2012-04-01

    Despite the decision by supermarket-giant Tesco to delay its plan to add carbon-footprint information onto all of its 70,000 products, carbon labelling, if carefully designed, could yet change consumer behaviour. However, it requires a new type of thinking about consumers and much additional work.

  6. The labeling debate in the United States.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Gary E; Cardineau, Guy A

    2013-01-01

    The mandatory labeling of genetically modified (GM) food has become the predominant policy issue concerning biotechnology in the United States. The controversy over GM labeling is being debated at several different levels and branches of government. At the federal level, the Food and Drug Administration, which has primary jurisdiction over food safety and labeling, has steadfastly refused to require labeling of GM foods since 1992 based on its conclusion that GM foods as a category present no unique or higher risks than other foods. Proposed legislation has been repeatedly introduced in the US. Congress over the years to mandate GM labeling, but has made very little progress. With federal labeling requirements apparently stalled, the main activity has switched to the state level, where numerous individual states are considering mandatory GM labeling, either through legislation or proposition. The debate over GM labeling, at both the federal and state levels, has focused on five issues: (1) public opinion; (2) the legality of labeling requirements; (3) the risks and benefits of GM foods; (4) the costs and burdens of GM labeling; and (5) consumer choice. While the pro-labeling forces argue that all of these factors weigh in favor of mandatory GM labeling, a more careful evaluation of the evidence finds that all five factors weigh decisively against mandatory GM labeling requirements.

  7. Thick tellurium electrodeposition on nickel-coated copper substrate for 124I production.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, M; Dastan, M; Ensaf, M R; Tehrani, A Abaspour; Tenreiro, C; Avila, M

    2008-10-01

    Tellurium electrodeposition on a nickel-coated copper substrate was investigated for production of iodine-124. The electrodeposition experiments were carried out by the alkali plating baths. The optimum conditions of the electrodeposition of tellurium were as follows: 6 g l(-1) tellurium, pH=10, DC current density of ca. 8.55 mA cm(-2) and room temperature.

  8. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  9. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  10. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  11. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  12. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  13. 21 CFR 640.84 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Albumin (Human) § 640.84 Labeling. In addition to the labeling... percent albumin is administered to a patient with marked dehydration; (d) The protein...

  14. 21 CFR 640.84 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Albumin (Human) § 640.84 Labeling. In addition to the labeling... percent albumin is administered to a patient with marked dehydration; (d) The protein...

  15. 21 CFR 640.84 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Albumin (Human) § 640.84 Labeling. In addition to the labeling... percent albumin is administered to a patient with marked dehydration; (d) The protein...

  16. 21 CFR 640.84 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Albumin (Human) § 640.84 Labeling. In addition to the labeling... percent albumin is administered to a patient with marked dehydration; (d) The protein...

  17. 21 CFR 640.84 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Albumin (Human) § 640.84 Labeling. In addition to the labeling... percent albumin is administered to a patient with marked dehydration; (d) The protein...

  18. Soil Fumigant Labels - Metam Sodium/Potassium

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Search by EPA registration number, product name, or company; and follow the link to the Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) for details. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  19. Logos and Graphics on Pesticide Product Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There are several logos that pesticide companies can add to their labels with EPA approval. The requirements and process vary, so review the guidance carefully before applying to add a logo to a product label.

  20. 40 CFR 205.158 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... color that contrasts with the background of the label. (5) The label must contain the following... Califfo CAL Carabela CAR Cimatti CIM Columbia COL E-Z Rider EZR Flying Dutchman FLY Foxi FOI Gadabout...

  1. 40 CFR 205.158 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... color that contrasts with the background of the label. (5) The label must contain the following... Califfo CAL Carabela CAR Cimatti CIM Columbia COL E-Z Rider EZR Flying Dutchman FLY Foxi FOI Gadabout...

  2. 40 CFR 205.158 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... color that contrasts with the background of the label. (5) The label must contain the following... Califfo CAL Carabela CAR Cimatti CIM Columbia COL E-Z Rider EZR Flying Dutchman FLY Foxi FOI Gadabout...

  3. 40 CFR 262.31 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Pre-Transport Requirements § 262.31 Labeling. Before transporting or offering hazardous waste for transportation off-site, a generator must label each package...

  4. 40 CFR 262.31 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Pre-Transport Requirements § 262.31 Labeling. Before transporting or offering hazardous waste for transportation off-site, a generator must label each package...

  5. 40 CFR 262.31 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Pre-Transport Requirements § 262.31 Labeling. Before transporting or offering hazardous waste for transportation off-site, a generator must label each package...

  6. 40 CFR 262.31 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Pre-Transport Requirements § 262.31 Labeling. Before transporting or offering hazardous waste for transportation off-site, a generator must label each package...

  7. 40 CFR 262.31 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Pre-Transport Requirements § 262.31 Labeling. Before transporting or offering hazardous waste for transportation off-site, a generator must label each package...

  8. 99mTc: Labeling Chemistry and Labeled Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberto, R.; Abram, U.

    This chapter reviews the radiopharmaceutical chemistry of technetium related to the synthesis of perfusion agents and to the labeling of receptor-binding biomolecules. To understand the limitations of technetium chemistry imposed by future application of the complexes in nuclear medicine, an introductory section analyzes the compulsory requirements to be considered when facing the incentive of introducing a novel radiopharmaceutical into the market. Requirements from chemistry, routine application, and market are discussed. In a subsequent section, commercially available 99mTc-based radiopharmaceuticals are treated. It covers the complexes in use for imaging the most important target organs such as heart, brain, or kidney. The commercially available radiopharmaceuticals fulfill the requirements outlined earlier and are discussed with this background. In a following section, the properties and perspectives of the different generations of radiopharmaceuticals are described in a general way, covering characteristics for perfusion agents and for receptor-specific molecules. Technetium chemistry for the synthesis of perfusion agents and the different labeling approaches for target-specific biomolecules are summarized. The review comprises a general introduction to the common approaches currently in use, employing the N x S4-x , [3+1] and 2-hydrazino-nicotinicacid (HYNIC) method as well as more recent strategies such as the carbonyl and the TcN approach. Direct labeling without the need of a bifunctional chelator is briefly reviewed as well. More particularly, recent developments in the labeling of concrete targeting molecules, the second generation of radiopharmaceuticals, is then discussed and prominent examples with antibodies/peptides, neuroreceptor targeting small molecules, myocardial imaging agents, vitamins, thymidine, and complexes relevant to multidrug resistance are given. In addition, a new approach toward peptide drug development is described. The section

  9. Fluorescently labelled glycans and their applications.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hongbin; Yalagala, Ravi Shekar; Yan, Fengyang

    2015-11-01

    This review summarises the literature on the synthesis and applications of fluorescently labelled carbohydrates. Due to the sensitivity of fluorescent detection, this approach provides a useful tool to study processes involving glycans. A few general categories of labelling are presented, in situ labelling of carbohydrates with fluorophores, fluorescently labelled glycolipids, fluorogenic glycans, pre-formed fluorescent glycans for intracellular applications, glycan-decorated fluorescent polymers, fluorescent glyconanoparticles, and other functional fluorescent glycans.

  10. White Label Space GLXP Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, A.

    2012-09-01

    This poster presents a lunar surface mission concept and corresponding financing approach developed by the White Label Space team, an official competitor in the Google Lunar X PRIZE. The White Label Space team's origins were in the European Space Agency's ESTEC facility in the Netherlands. Accordingly the team's technical headquarters are located just outside ESTEC in the Space Business Park. The team has active partners in Europe, Japan and Australia. The team's goal is to provide a unique publicity opportunity for global brands to land on the moon and win the prestigious Google Lunar X PRIZE. The poster presents the main steps to achieve this goal, the cost estimates for the mission, describes the benefits to the potential sponsors and supporters, and details the progress achieved to date.

  11. Automated labeling in document images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongwoo; Le, Daniel X.; Thoma, George R.

    2000-12-01

    The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is developing an automated system to produce bibliographic records for its MEDLINER database. This system, named Medical Article Record System (MARS), employs document image analysis and understanding techniques and optical character recognition (OCR). This paper describes a key module in MARS called the Automated Labeling (AL) module, which labels all zones of interest (title, author, affiliation, and abstract) automatically. The AL algorithm is based on 120 rules that are derived from an analysis of journal page layouts and features extracted from OCR output. Experiments carried out on more than 11,000 articles in over 1,000 biomedical journals show the accuracy of this rule-based algorithm to exceed 96%.

  12. Labeling nuclear DNA using DAPI.

    PubMed

    Chazotte, Brad

    2011-01-01

    A number of fluorescent stains are available that label DNA and allow easy visualization of the nucleus in interphase cells and chromosomes in mitotic cells, including Hoechst, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), ethidium bromide, propidium iodide, and acridine orange. Although not as bright as the vital Hoechst stains for DNA, DAPI has greater photostability. It is believed that DAPI associates with the minor groove of double-stranded DNA, with a preference for the adenine-thymine clusters. Cells must be permeabilized and/or fixed for DAPI to enter the cell and to bind DNA. Fluorescence increases approximately 20-fold when DAPI is bound to double-stranded DNA. This protocol describes the use of DAPI to label nuclear DNA of cells grown in culture.

  13. 21 CFR 820.120 - Device labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Device labeling. 820.120 Section 820.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Labeling and Packaging Control § 820.120 Device labeling. Each...

  14. Labeling Nodes Using Three Degrees of Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Mostafavi, Sara; Goldenberg, Anna; Morris, Quaid

    2012-01-01

    The properties (or labels) of nodes in networks can often be predicted based on their proximity and their connections to other labeled nodes. So-called “label propagation algorithms” predict the labels of unlabeled nodes by propagating information about local label density iteratively through the network. These algorithms are fast, simple and scale to large networks but nonetheless regularly perform better than slower and much more complex algorithms on benchmark problems. We show here, however, that these algorithms have an intrinsic limitation that prevents them from adapting to some common patterns of network node labeling; we introduce a new algorithm, 3Prop, that retains all their advantages but is much more adaptive. As we show, 3Prop performs very well on node labeling problems ill-suited to label propagation, including predicting gene function in protein and genetic interaction networks and gender in friendship networks, and also performs slightly better on problems already well-suited to label propagation such as labeling blogs and patents based on their citation networks. 3Prop gains its adaptability by assigning separate weights to label information from different steps of the propagation. Surprisingly, we found that for many networks, the third iteration of label propagation receives a negative weight. Availability The code is available from the authors by request. PMID:23284828

  15. Learning Words from Labeling and Directive Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callanan, Maureen A.; Akhtar, Nameera; Sussman, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Despite the common intuition that labeling may be the best way to teach a new word to a child, systematic testing is needed of the prediction that children learn words better from labeling utterances than from directive utterances. Two experiments compared toddlers' label learning in the context of hearing words used in directive versus labeling…

  16. 21 CFR 660.35 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.35 Labeling. In... or end of the label, oustide of the main panel. (2) If washing the cells is required by the manufacturer, the container label shall include appropriate instructions; if the cells should not be...

  17. 21 CFR 660.35 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.35 Labeling. In... or end of the label, oustide of the main panel. (2) If washing the cells is required by the manufacturer, the container label shall include appropriate instructions; if the cells should not be...

  18. 49 CFR 172.426 - OXIDIZER label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.426 OXIDIZER label. (a) Except for size and color, the OXIDIZER label must be as follows: EC02MR91.027 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on...

  19. 49 CFR 172.426 - OXIDIZER label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.426 OXIDIZER label. (a) Except for size and color, the OXIDIZER label must be as follows: EC02MR91.027 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on...

  20. 49 CFR 172.441 - FISSILE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.441 FISSILE label. (a) Except for size and color, the FISSILE label must be as follows: ER26ja04.000 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on...

  1. 49 CFR 172.426 - OXIDIZER label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.426 OXIDIZER label. (a) Except for size and color, the OXIDIZER label must be as follows: EC02MR91.027 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on...

  2. 49 CFR 172.426 - OXIDIZER label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.426 OXIDIZER label. (a) Except for size and color, the OXIDIZER label must be as follows: EC02MR91.027 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on...

  3. 49 CFR 172.441 - FISSILE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.441 FISSILE label. (a) Except for size and color, the FISSILE label must be as follows: ER26ja04.000 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on...

  4. 49 CFR 172.441 - FISSILE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.441 FISSILE label. (a) Except for size and color, the FISSILE label must be as follows: ER26ja04.000 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on...

  5. 49 CFR 172.441 - FISSILE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.441 FISSILE label. (a) Except for size and color, the FISSILE label must be as follows: ER26ja04.000 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on...

  6. 40 CFR 211.105 - Label format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Label format. 211.105 Section 211.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.105 Label format. (a) Unless specified otherwise in other...

  7. 16 CFR 306.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... All type is centered. The band at the top of the label contains either: (A) The capital letter “B... at the top of the label shall contain the capital letter “B” followed immediately by the numerical... the black band at the top of the label shall contain the phrase “B-100 Biodiesel.” In addition,...

  8. 21 CFR 660.28 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... panel. Blood grouping reagent Color of label paper Anti-A Blue. Anti-B Yellow. Slide and rapid tube test... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.28 Labeling. In... label—(1) Color coding. The final container label of all Blood Grouping Reagents shall be...

  9. 21 CFR 660.28 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... panel. Blood grouping reagent Color of label paper Anti-A Blue. Anti-B Yellow. Slide and rapid tube test... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.28 Labeling. In... label—(1) Color coding. The final container label of all Blood Grouping Reagents shall be...

  10. 21 CFR 660.28 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... panel. Blood grouping reagent Color of label paper Anti-A Blue. Anti-B Yellow. Slide and rapid tube test... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.28 Labeling. In... label—(1) Color coding. The final container label of all Blood Grouping Reagents shall be...

  11. 21 CFR 660.28 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... panel. Blood grouping reagent Color of label paper Anti-A Blue. Anti-B Yellow. Slide and rapid tube test... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.28 Labeling. In... label—(1) Color coding. The final container label of all Blood Grouping Reagents shall be...

  12. 21 CFR 660.28 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... panel. Blood grouping reagent Color of label paper Anti-A Blue. Anti-B Yellow. Slide and rapid tube test... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.28 Labeling. In... label—(1) Color coding. The final container label of all Blood Grouping Reagents shall be...

  13. 75 FR 81943 - Appliance Labeling Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... comment. SUMMARY: The Commission proposes changing the effective date for its new light bulb labeling... the new label for incandescent bulbs (e.g., 75 watt bulbs) that, as of 2013, will not meet federal... current labeling requirements for ``lamps,'' commonly referred to as light bulbs, and alternative...

  14. 76 FR 20233 - Appliance Labeling Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ...). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Commission extends the effective date for its new light bulb labeling... Commission exempts from the new label requirements incandescent bulbs that will not be produced after January... proposing to extend the effective date of new labeling rules for light bulbs to January 1, 2012.\\1\\ The...

  15. 30 CFR 47.43 - Label alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Label alternatives. 47.43 Section 47.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.43 Label alternatives. The operator...

  16. 30 CFR 47.43 - Label alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Label alternatives. 47.43 Section 47.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.43 Label alternatives. The operator...

  17. 30 CFR 47.43 - Label alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Label alternatives. 47.43 Section 47.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.43 Label alternatives. The operator...

  18. 30 CFR 47.43 - Label alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Label alternatives. 47.43 Section 47.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.43 Label alternatives. The operator...

  19. 40 CFR 600.301 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Labeling § 600.301 Labeling... each dealer shall maintain or cause to be maintained on each automobile: (1) A general fuel economy... vehicle for which a specific label is requested which has a combined FTP/HFET-based fuel economy value,...

  20. 21 CFR 1271.250 - Labeling controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling controls. 1271.250 Section 1271.250 Food..., AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.250 Labeling controls. (a) General. You must establish and maintain procedures to control the labeling of HCT/Ps. You must...

  1. 21 CFR 1271.250 - Labeling controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling controls. 1271.250 Section 1271.250 Food..., AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.250 Labeling controls. (a) General. You must establish and maintain procedures to control the labeling of HCT/Ps. You must...

  2. 21 CFR 1271.250 - Labeling controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling controls. 1271.250 Section 1271.250 Food..., AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.250 Labeling controls. (a) General. You must establish and maintain procedures to control the labeling of HCT/Ps. You must...

  3. 16 CFR 305.17 - Television labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... DISCLOSURES REGARDING ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND WATER USE OF CERTAIN HOME APPLIANCES AND OTHER PRODUCTS REQUIRED UNDER THE ENERGY POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT (âAPPLIANCE LABELING RULEâ) Required Disclosures § 305.17... manufacturer may include the ENERGY STAR logo on the label as illustrated in Sample Labels 10, 11, and 12...

  4. Labels and Children's Perceptions of Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Phyllis A.; Seavey, Carol

    1973-01-01

    The relation between type of label and perception of faces was assessed in second- and sixth-grade children. Labels associated with color increased color perception, whereas labels based on expressiveness increased differentiation of expression variations, but not color perception. (ST)

  5. 21 CFR 820.120 - Device labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Device labeling. 820.120 Section 820.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Labeling and Packaging Control § 820.120 Device labeling. Each...

  6. 16 CFR 1633.12 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Rules and Regulations § 1633.12 Labeling. (a) Each mattress set subject to the Standard shall bear a permanent, conspicuous, and legible label(s) containing the...

  7. 16 CFR 1633.12 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Rules and Regulations § 1633.12 Labeling. (a) Each mattress set subject to the Standard shall bear a permanent, conspicuous, and legible label(s) containing the...

  8. 16 CFR 1633.12 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Rules and Regulations § 1633.12 Labeling. (a) Each mattress set subject to the Standard shall bear a permanent, conspicuous, and legible label(s) containing the...

  9. 40 CFR 94.212 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Certification Provisions § 94.212 Labeling. (a) General... new marine engine modified from a base engine by post-manufacture marinizers in accordance with the... shall be of a color that contrasts with the background of the label: (1) The label heading:...

  10. 21 CFR 660.35 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.35 Labeling. In... or end of the label, oustide of the main panel. (2) If washing the cells is required by the manufacturer, the container label shall include appropriate instructions; if the cells should not be...

  11. Do nutrition labels improve dietary outcomes?

    PubMed

    Variyam, Jayachandran N

    2008-06-01

    The disclosure of nutritional characteristics of most packaged foods became mandatory in the United States with the implementation of the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act (NLEA) in 1994. Under the NLEA regulations, a 'Nutrition Facts' panel displays information on nutrients such as calories, total and saturated fats, cholesterol, and sodium in a standardized format. By providing nutrition information in a credible, distinctive, and easy-to-read format, the new label was expected to help consumers choose healthier, more nutritious diets. This paper examines whether the disclosure of nutrition information through the mandatory labels impacted consumer diets. Assessing the dietary effects of labeling is problematic due to the confounding of the label effect with unobserved label user characteristics. This self-selection problem is addressed by exploiting the fact that the NLEA exempts away-from-home foods from mandatory labeling. Difference-in-differences models that account for zero away-from-home intakes suggest that the labels increase fiber and iron intakes of label users compared with label nonusers. In comparison, a model that does not account for self-selection implies significant label effects for all but two of the 13 nutrients that are listed on the label.

  12. 21 CFR 820.120 - Device labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Device labeling. 820.120 Section 820.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... shall establish and maintain procedures to control labeling activities. (a) Label integrity....

  13. 9 CFR 354.73 - Retention labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Retention labels. 354.73 Section 354.73 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 354.73 Retention labels. An inspector may use such labels, devices, and methods as may be approved...

  14. 9 CFR 354.73 - Retention labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Retention labels. 354.73 Section 354.73 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 354.73 Retention labels. An inspector may use such labels, devices, and methods as may be approved...

  15. 21 CFR 1271.250 - Labeling controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling controls. 1271.250 Section 1271.250 Food..., AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.250 Labeling controls. (a) General. You must establish and maintain procedures to control the labeling of HCT/Ps. You must...

  16. Isotope Labeling in Insect Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Krishna; Dutta, Arpana; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Recent years have seen remarkable progress in applying nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to proteins that have traditionally been difficult to study due to issues with folding, posttranslational modification, and expression levels or combinations thereof. In particular, insect cells have proved useful in allowing large quantities of isotope-labeled, functional proteins to be obtained and purified to homogeneity, allowing study of their structures and dynamics by using NMR. Here, we provide protocols that have proven successful in such endeavors. PMID:22167667

  17. CD-ROM Labeling Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-06

    was allowed to dry thoroughly before application to the disc, so that the solvent used would have dispersed. Use of this, or any adhesive is risky if...the chemical composition and solvents used are not known. Some acid based adhesives have been reported to have eaten through the disc’s protective...been specially manufactured with suitable adhesive ( beeswax ) for use with CD-ROM. Both foils can be printed with customer-labeled, generic

  18. 78 FR 24211 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Safety Considerations for Container Labels and Carton Labeling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... Container Labels and Carton Labeling Design To Minimize Medication Errors; Availability AGENCY: Food and... Labels and Carton Labeling Design to Minimize Medication Errors.'' The draft guidance focuses on safety... use of the product to minimize medication errors. DATES: Although you can comment on any guidance...

  19. 40 CFR 60.536 - Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual. 60.536 Section 60.536 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Performance for New Residential Wood Heaters § 60.536 Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual....

  20. 40 CFR 60.536 - Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual. 60.536 Section 60.536 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Performance for New Residential Wood Heaters § 60.536 Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual....

  1. 40 CFR 60.536 - Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual. 60.536 Section 60.536 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Performance for New Residential Wood Heaters § 60.536 Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual....

  2. 40 CFR 60.536 - Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual. 60.536 Section 60.536 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Performance for New Residential Wood Heaters § 60.536 Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual....

  3. 40 CFR 60.536 - Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual. 60.536 Section 60.536 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Performance for New Residential Wood Heaters § 60.536 Permanent label, temporary label, and owner's manual....

  4. Abandoning a label doesn’t make it disappear: The perseverance of labeling effects

    PubMed Central

    Foroni, Francesco; Rothbart, Myron

    2012-01-01

    Labels exert strong influence on perception and judgment. The present experiment examines the possibility that such effects may persist even when labels are abandoned. Participants judged the similarity of pairs of silhouette drawings of female body types, ordered on a continuum from very thin to very heavy, under conditions where category labels were, and were not, superimposed on the ordered stimuli. Consistent with earlier research, labels had strong effects on perceived similarity, with silhouettes sharing the same label judged as more similar than those having different labels. Moreover, when the labels were removed and no longer present, the effect of the labels, although diminished, persisted. It did not make any difference whether the labels were simply abandoned or, in addition, had their validity challenged. The results are important for our understanding of categorization and labeling processes. The potential theoretical and practical implications of these results for social processes are discussed. PMID:23105148

  5. Stigma of a label: educational expectations for high school students labeled with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Shifrer, Dara

    2013-01-01

    Poorer outcomes for youth labeled with learning disabilities (LDs) are often attributed to the student's own deficiencies or cumulative disadvantage; but the more troubling possibility is that special education placement limits rather than expands these students' opportunities. Labeling theory partially attributes the poorer outcomes of labeled persons to stigma related to labels. This study uses data on approximately 11,740 adolescents and their schools from the Education Longitudinal Survey of 2002 to determine if stigma influences teachers' and parents' educational expectations for students labeled with LDs and labeled adolescents' expectations for themselves. Supporting the predictions of labeling theory, teachers and parents are more likely to perceive disabilities in, and hold lower educational expectations for labeled adolescents than for similarly achieving and behaving adolescents not labeled with disabilities. The negative effect of being labeled with LDs on adolescents' educational expectations is partially mechanized through parents' and particularly teachers' lower expectations.

  6. Hemoglobin Labeled by Radioactive Lysine

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; DeLaVergne, L.; Miller, L. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1949-12-08

    This paper reports on the utilization of tagged epsilon carbon of DL-lysine by a dog both anemic and hypoproteinemic due to repeated bleeding plus a diet low in protein. The experiment extended over period of 234 days, a time sufficient to indicate an erythrocyte life span of at least 115 days based upon the rate of replacement of labeled red cell proteins. The proteins of broken down red cells seem not to be used with any great preference for the synthesis of new hemoglobin.

  7. 16 CFR Appendix L to Part 305 - Sample Labels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FORMAT) ER19JY10.019 PROTOTYPE LABEL 7 LIGHTING FACTS LABEL FOR GENERAL SERVICE LAMPS CONTAINING MERCURY... MERCURY ER19JY10.021 SAMPLE LABEL 11 LIGHTING FACTS LABEL FOR GENERAL SERVICE LAMP CONTAINING MERCURY... MERCURY (TALL ORIENTATION) ER19JY10.023 SAMPLE LABEL 13 LIGHTING FACTS LABEL FOR GENERAL SERVICE...

  8. Social determinants of diagnostic labels in depression.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Susan; Armstrong, David

    2006-01-01

    The role of diagnostic labels in medicine is usually that of labelling an illness as a means of communication. Control over labelling processes in medicine is ordinarily imposed via medical schools, textbooks, education or by diagnostic manuals. Diagnostic labels often change following new discoveries in underlying pathology such as 'consumption' being relabelled as 'TB' or 'cancer'. Sub-types of broad diagnostic labels also often emerge from such discoveries e.g. 'lung cancer' or 'throat cancer'. In mental health, underlying pathology is the subject of ongoing debate spanning ideas including the brain as a faulty organ, faulty genetics and environmental problems. With controversy over pathology comes controversy over labels and the idea that labels may be used not just for communication, but as devices of social and professional control, arising out of a social process. This study explores the codification of the diagnostic label 'depression' which emerged in the twentieth-century and has proliferated with numerous sub-types over the last 40 years. The aim is to examine its social determinants and context. Medline is used as a data source for professional label usage. A range of depression sub-type labels in professional use was identified. This exercise revealed many official and 'unofficial' terms in professional use. Citation rate plots by year were then generated for these depression sub-type labels. The rise and fall of different labels are examined in relation to social determinants and context, including publication of diagnostic manuals DSM and ICD, power shifts in psychiatry, the discovery of psychiatric drugs and the shift from inpatient to community care. Exploring the changing use of official and unofficial labels over time in this way provides a novel historical perspective on the concept of depression in the late twentieth-century.

  9. Immobilization of RGD peptide on HA coating through a chemical bonding approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunli; Cheng, Kui; Weng, Wenjian; Yang, Chunyu

    2009-11-01

    In this work, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence containing peptide was immobilized on hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings through a chemical bonding approach in two steps, surface modification with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and RGD immobilization. The results indicate that RGD has been successfully immobilized on HA coatings. Comparing with physical adsorption coatings, the chemically bonded RGD on the coatings shows much better anti-wash-out ability. Since RGD is able to recognize cell-membrane integrins on biointerfaces, the present method will be an effective way to favor interaction of cells with HA coatings.

  10. Chemical kin label in seabirds

    PubMed Central

    Célérier, Aurélie; Bon, Cécile; Malapert, Aurore; Palmas, Pauline; Bonadonna, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Chemical signals yield critical socio-ecological information in many animals, such as species, identity, social status or sex, but have been poorly investigated in birds. Recent results showed that chemical signals are used to recognize their nest and partner by some petrel seabirds whose olfactory anatomy is well developed and which possess a life-history propitious to olfactory-mediated behaviours. Here, we investigate whether blue petrels (Halobaena caerulea) produce some chemical labels potentially involved in kin recognition and inbreeding avoidance. To overcome methodological constraints of chemical analysis and field behavioural experiments, we used an indirect behavioural approach, based on mice olfactory abilities in discriminating odours. We showed that mice (i) can detect odour differences between individual petrels, (ii) perceive a high odour similarity between a chick and its parents, and (iii) perceive this similarity only before fledging but not during the nestling developmental stage. Our results confirm the existence of an individual olfactory signature in blue petrels and show for the first time, to our knowledge, that birds may exhibit an olfactory kin label, which may have strong implications for inbreeding avoidance. PMID:21525047

  11. Label-free molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junqi; Li, Qi; Fu, Rongxin; Wang, Tongzhou; Wang, Ruliang; Huang, Guoliang

    2014-03-01

    Optical microscopy technology has achieved great improvements in the 20th century. The detection limit has reached about twenty nanometers (with near-field optics, STED, PALM and STORM). But in the application areas such as life science, medical science, clinical treatment and especially in vivo dynamic measurement, mutual restrictions still exist between numeric aperture/magnification and working distance, fluorescent dependent, and between resolution and frame rate/field size, etc. This paper explores a hyperspectral scanning super-resolution label free molecules imaging method based on the white light interferometry. The vertical detection resolution was approximate to 1 nm which is the thickness of a single molecular layer and dynamic measuring range of thickness reaches to 10 μm. The spectrum-shifting algorithm is developed for robust restructure of images when the pixels are overlapped. Micro-biochip with protein binding and DNA amplification could be detected by using this spectral scanning super-resolution molecules imaging in label free. This method has several advantages as following: Firstly, the decoding and detecting steps are combined into one step. It makes tests faster and easier. Secondly, we used thickness-coded, minimized chips instead of a large microarray chip to carry the probes. This accelerates the interaction of the biomolecules. Thirdly, since only one kind of probes are attached to our thickness-coded, minimized chip, users can only pick out the probes they are interested in for a test without wasting unnecessary probes and chips.

  12. 16 CFR 309.17 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... is centered. The band at the top of the label contains the name of the fuel. This band should measure 1″ (2.54 cm) deep. Spacing of the fuel name is 1/4″ (.64 cm) from the top of the label and 3/16.... “Helvetica black” type is used throughout. All type is centered. The band at the top of the label...

  13. Fluorescent labeling and tracking of nanoclay.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Carlos A; Xia, Yining; Rubino, Maria; Auras, Rafael; Jayaraman, Krishnamurthy; Hotchkiss, Joseph

    2013-01-07

    We report a methodology developed to detect and track stable fluorescent-labeled nanoclay, in polymer-clay nanocomposite films, and in a contact solvent after migration testing. Fluorescein-5-maleimide (fluorescein) or tetramethylrhodamine-5-maleimide (rhodamine) was covalently bonded to organically modified montmorillonite (o-MMT). Fluorescein- and rhodamine-labeled nanoclay showed good thermal stability up to 220 °C and the rhodamine-labeled nanoclay remained stable at 250 °C. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to confirm the tagging and to detect the fluorescent-labeled nanoclays in various systems.

  14. Component Labeling Algorithm For Video Rate Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Ohta, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Masumi; Shirai, Yoshio

    1987-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a raster scanning algorithm for component labeling, which enables processing under pipeline architecture. In the raster scanning algorithm, labels are provisionally assigned to each pixel of components and, at the same time, the connectivities of labels are detected at first scan. Those labels are classified into groups based on the connectivities. Finally provisional labels are updated using the result of classification and a unique label is assigned to each pixel of components. However, in the conventional algorithm, the classification process needs a vast number of operations. This prevents realizing pipeline processing. We have developed a method of preprocessing to reduce the number of provisional labels, which limits the number of label connectivities. We have also developed a new classification method whose operation is proportionate to only the number of label connectivities itself. We have made experiments with computer simulation to verify this algorithm. The experimental results show that we can process 512 x 512 x 8 bit images at video rate(1/30 sec. per 1 image) when this algorithm is implemented on hardware.

  15. Optimal design of isotope labeling experiments.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Mandy, Dominic E; Libourel, Igor G L

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling experiments (ILE) constitute a powerful methodology for estimating metabolic fluxes. An optimal label design for such an experiment is necessary to maximize the precision with which fluxes can be determined. But often, precision gained in the determination of one flux comes at the expense of the precision of other fluxes, and an appropriate label design therefore foremost depends on the question the investigator wants to address. One could liken ILE to shadows that metabolism casts on products. Optimal label design is the placement of the lamp; creating clear shadows for some parts of metabolism and obscuring others.An optimal isotope label design is influenced by: (1) the network structure; (2) the true flux values; (3) the available label measurements; and, (4) commercially available substrates. The first two aspects are dictated by nature and constrain any optimal design. The second two aspects are suitable design parameters. To create an optimal label design, an explicit optimization criterion needs to be formulated. This usually is a property of the flux covariance matrix, which can be augmented by weighting label substrate cost. An optimal design is found by using such a criterion as an objective function for an optimizer. This chapter uses a simple elementary metabolite units (EMU) representation of the TCA cycle to illustrate the process of experimental design of isotope labeled substrates.

  16. Organic labeling influences food valuation and choice.

    PubMed

    Linder, N S; Uhl, G; Fliessbach, K; Trautner, P; Elger, C E; Weber, B

    2010-10-15

    Everyday we choose between a variety of different food items trying to reach a decision that fits best our needs. These decisions are highly dependent on the context in which the alternatives are presented (e.g. labeling). We investigate the influence of cognition on food evaluation, using an fMRI experiment in which subjects saw and bid on different foods labeled with (or without) a widely known German emblem for organically produced food. Increased activity in the ventral striatum was found for foods labeled "organic" in comparison to conventionally labeled food. Between-subject differences in activity were related to actual everyday consumption behavior of organic food.

  17. Simultaneous Segmentation and Statistical Label Fusion.

    PubMed

    Asman, Andrew J; Landmana, Bennett A

    2012-02-23

    Labeling or segmentation of structures of interest in medical imaging plays an essential role in both clinical and scientific understanding. Two of the common techniques to obtain these labels are through either fully automated segmentation or through multi-atlas based segmentation and label fusion. Fully automated techniques often result in highly accurate segmentations but lack the robustness to be viable in many cases. On the other hand, label fusion techniques are often extremely robust, but lack the accuracy of automated algorithms for specific classes of problems. Herein, we propose to perform simultaneous automated segmentation and statistical label fusion through the reformulation of a generative model to include a linkage structure that explicitly estimates the complex global relationships between labels and intensities. These relationships are inferred from the atlas labels and intensities and applied to the target using a non-parametric approach. The novelty of this approach lies in the combination of previously exclusive techniques and attempts to combine the accuracy benefits of automated segmentation with the robustness of a multi-atlas based approach. The accuracy benefits of this simultaneous approach are assessed using a multi-label multi- atlas whole-brain segmentation experiment and the segmentation of the highly variable thyroid on computed tomography images. The results demonstrate that this technique has major benefits for certain types of problems and has the potential to provide a paradigm shift in which the lines between statistical label fusion and automated segmentation are dramatically blurred.

  18. Labeled nucleotide phosphate (NP) probes

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2009-02-03

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  19. F-18 labeled 3-fluorodiazepam

    SciTech Connect

    Luxen, A.; Barrio, J.R.; Bida, G.T.; Satyamurthy, N.; Phelps, M.E.

    1985-05-01

    3-Fluorodiazepam is a new and potent antianxiety agent with prolonged action. The authors found that molecular fluorine (0.5% in Ne) reacts cleanly with diazepam in freon or chloroform at room temperature to produce 3-fluorodiazepam in good yields. Successful syntheses have employed 2:1 to 5:1 molar ratios diazepam: fluorine to minimize the formation of byproducts. (/sup 18/F) 3-Fluorodiazepam, a potential candidate for PET studies, (specific activity 3-5 Ci/mmol) has been synthesized from /sup 18/F-F/sub 2/ using the same procedure, followed by column chromatographic purification (Silicagel, dichloromethane: ethyl acetate, 5:1) with a radiochemical yield of 12-20% (50% maximum) and a chemical and radiochemical purity >99% as judged by reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography analysis (Ultrasyl octyl column, 10 ..mu.. m, 4.6 x 250 mm i.d., 60% MeOH 40% water; flow rate, 1.0 ml/min; retention time for (/sup 18/F) fluorodiazepam, 11.4 min; for diazepam, 13.5 min; radioactivity and ultraviolet detectors). Lower radiochemical yields (5-7%), and significant formation of by-products were observed when (/sup 18/F)acetylhypofluorite, prepared in the gasphase, was used as the reagent. Readily accessible routes to /sup 18/F-labeled benzodiazepines of higher specific activity were also investigated. Approaches to the synthesis of high specific activity (>200 Ci/mmol) (/sup 18/F)3-fluorodiazepam involve nucleophilic displacement at carbon-3 (e.g. from 3-chlorodiazepam) with (/sup 18/F)fluoride ion. The results presented here demonstrate the synthetic accessibility of /sup 18/F-labeled benzodiazepines for application in neurotransmitter ligand studies with PET.

  20. Label Review Training: Module 2: Parts of the Label, Page 16

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the label review training describes the parts of the front and back panel of the pesticide label. You will learn what kinds of information each part includes, as well as how to organize these parts.

  1. Label Review Training: Module 2: Parts of the Label, Page 2

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the label review training describes the parts of the front and back panel of the pesticide label. You will learn what kinds of information each part includes, as well as how to organize these parts.

  2. Label Review Training: Module 2: Parts of the Label, Page 6

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the label review training describes the parts of the front and back panel of the pesticide label. You will learn what kinds of information each part includes, as well as how to organize these parts.

  3. Label Review Training: Module 2: Parts of the Label, Page 7

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the label review training describes the parts of the front and back panel of the pesticide label. You will learn what kinds of information each part includes, as well as how to organize these parts.

  4. Label Review Training: Module 2: Parts of the Label, Page 11

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the label review training describes the parts of the front and back panel of the pesticide label. You will learn what kinds of information each part includes, as well as how to organize these parts.

  5. Leukemic cell labeling with indium-111-oxine

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, T.; Takagi, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Yui, T.; Ishibashi, T.; Kimura, H.; Kariyone, S.

    1984-01-01

    Leukemic cells were labeled with In-111-oxine in patients with acute leukemia. In vitro labeling studies revealed that labeling efficiency reached maximum 80.8 +- 3.6% (mean +- 1SD) by 2 times washes after 20 minutes incubation time. Cell viability was assessed by trypan blue exclusion test and in vitro culture of leukemic cells, which showed no cellular damage during labeling procedure. Elution of In-111 from the labeled cells was 10.0 +- 1.2% at 12 hours after labeling. For in vivo leukemic cell kinetic studies, more than 10/sup 8/ leukemic cells separated from Ficoll-Hypacque sedimentation were labeled by 30 minutes of In-111-oxine incubation and two times washes at 37/sup 0/C. In vivo studies were performed in 7 patients with acute myeloblastic, lymphoblastic leukemia and blastic crisis of chronic myelocytic leukemia. Labeled leukemic cells disappeared in single exponential fashion with half life of 9.6 to 31.8 hours. Total leukemic cell pool in peripheral circulation was calculated, which correlated well with peripheral leukemic cell counts (r=0.99). No relationship was observed between total leukemic cell pool and leukemic cell turnover rate. Migration patterns of labeled leukemic cells showed that pulmonary uptake was evident within 15 minutes after the infusion and returned to base-line. Splenic and hepatic uptake showed gradual increase up to 24 hours. Bone marrow accumulation was shown only in 2 cases. Presently, there are no suitable radionuclides for leukemic cell labeling. In-111-oxine labeled leukemic cells would overcome this difficulty.

  6. The reappropriation of stigmatizing labels: the reciprocal relationship between power and self-labeling.

    PubMed

    Galinsky, Adam D; Wang, Cynthia S; Whitson, Jennifer A; Anicich, Eric M; Hugenberg, Kurt; Bodenhausen, Galen V

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical model of reappropriation--taking possession of a slur previously used exclusively by dominant groups to reinforce another group's lesser status. Ten experiments tested this model and established a reciprocal relationship between power and self-labeling with a derogatory group term. We first investigated precursors to self-labeling: Group, but not individual, power increased participants' willingness to label themselves with a derogatory term for their group. We then examined the consequences of such self-labeling for both the self and observers. Self-labelers felt more powerful after self-labeling, and observers perceived them and their group as more powerful. Finally, these labels were evaluated less negatively after self-labeling, and this attenuation of stigma was mediated by perceived power. These effects occurred only for derogatory terms (e.g., queer, bitch), and not for descriptive (e.g., woman) or majority-group (e.g., straight) labels. These results suggest that self-labeling with a derogatory label can weaken the label's stigmatizing force.

  7. 21 CFR 1302.04 - Location and size of symbol on label and labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Location and size of symbol on label and labeling. 1302.04 Section 1302.04 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE LABELING AND PACKAGING REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES § 1302.04 Location and size of symbol on...

  8. 21 CFR 1302.04 - Location and size of symbol on label and labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Location and size of symbol on label and labeling. 1302.04 Section 1302.04 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE LABELING AND PACKAGING REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES § 1302.04 Location and size of symbol on...

  9. Portion Size Labeling and Intended Soft Drink Consumption: The Impact of Labeling Format and Size Portfolio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeer, Willemijn M.; Steenhuis, Ingrid H. M.; Leeuwis, Franca H.; Bos, Arjan E. R.; de Boer, Michiel; Seidell, Jacob C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess what portion size labeling "format" is most promising in helping consumers selecting appropriate soft drink sizes, and whether labeling impact depends on the size portfolio. Methods: An experimental study was conducted in fast-food restaurants in which 2 labeling formats (ie, reference portion size and small/medium/large…

  10. 21 CFR 1302.04 - Location and size of symbol on label and labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Location and size of symbol on label and labeling. 1302.04 Section 1302.04 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE LABELING AND PACKAGING REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES § 1302.04 Location and size of symbol on...

  11. 7 CFR 60.300 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Labeling. 60.300 Section 60.300 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... FOR FISH AND SHELLFISH General Provisions Country of Origin Notification § 60.300 Labeling....

  12. 40 CFR 763.171 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ACT ASBESTOS Prohibition of the Manufacture, Importation, Processing, and Distribution in Commerce of Certain Asbestos-Containing Products; Labeling Requirements § 763.171 Labeling requirements. (a) After August 27, 1990, manufacturers, importers, and processors of all asbestos-containing products that...

  13. 16 CFR 1615.5 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling requirements. 1615.5 Section 1615.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CHILDREN'S SLEEPWEAR: SIZES 0 THROUGH 6X (FF 3-71) The Standard § 1615.5 Labeling...

  14. 16 CFR 1616.6 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling requirements. 1616.6 Section 1616.6 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CHILDREN'S SLEEPWEAR: SIZES 7 THROUGH 14 (FF 5-74) The Standard § 1616.6 Labeling...

  15. 78 FR 18272 - Energy Labeling Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... CFR Part 305 Energy Labeling Rule AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission (``FTC'' or ``Commission''). ACTION... in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section below. Write ``Energy Label Ranges, Matter No. R611004'' on... Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) until April 1, 2013. In the NPRM, the Commission proposed to amend the...

  16. 16 CFR 1630.5 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... FLAMMABILITY OF CARPETS AND RUGS (FF 1-70) The Standard § 1630.5 Labeling. If the carpet or rug has had a fire-retardant treatment or is made of fibers which have had a fire-retardant treatment, it shall be labeled...

  17. 16 CFR 1630.5 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FLAMMABILITY OF CARPETS AND RUGS (FF 1-70) The Standard § 1630.5 Labeling. If the carpet or rug has had a fire-retardant treatment or is made of fibers which have had a fire-retardant treatment, it shall be labeled...

  18. 16 CFR 1630.5 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... FLAMMABILITY OF CARPETS AND RUGS (FF 1-70) The Standard § 1630.5 Labeling. If the carpet or rug has had a fire-retardant treatment or is made of fibers which have had a fire-retardant treatment, it shall be labeled...

  19. 47 CFR 15.19 - Labelling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... identification described in § 2.1074 of this chapter and the following logo: (i) If the product is authorized... peripheral device, the text associated with the logo may be placed in a prominent location in the instruction...) and the logo must be displayed on the device. (4) The label shall not be a stick-on, paper label....

  20. 47 CFR 15.19 - Labelling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... identification described in § 2.1074 of this chapter and the following logo: (i) If the product is authorized... peripheral device, the text associated with the logo may be placed in a prominent location in the instruction...) and the logo must be displayed on the device. (4) The label shall not be a stick-on, paper label....

  1. 49 CFR 583.5 - Label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Label requirements. 583.5 Section 583.5 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AUTOMOBILE PARTS CONTENT LABELING § 583.5...

  2. 40 CFR 1033.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... permanently attached to the locomotive. (ii) The label must be lettered in the English language using a color... same engine part. (ii) The label must be lettered in the English language using a color that contrasts... to Tier 0+ line-haul locomotives.” (3) “This locomotive conforms to U.S. EPA regulations...

  3. 40 CFR 1033.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... permanently attached to the locomotive. (ii) The label must be lettered in the English language using a color... same engine part. (ii) The label must be lettered in the English language using a color that contrasts... to Tier 0+ line-haul locomotives.” (3) “This locomotive conforms to U.S. EPA regulations...

  4. 21 CFR 606.121 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... optionally for differentiating ABO Blood groups: Blood group Color of label paper O Blue A Yellow B Pink AB... color scheme may be used for differentiating ABO Blood groups: Blood group Color of label O Blue A... CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR BLOOD AND BLOOD COMPONENTS Finished Product Control §...

  5. 21 CFR 640.70 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.70 Labeling. Link to an amendment published... information shall appear on the label affixed to each container of Source Plasma: (1) The proper name of the... shall follow the proper name in the same size and type of print as the proper name. If the Source...

  6. 27 CFR 20.134 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... exceeds 8-fluid ounces, the label shall also show the information required by paragraph (b) (1) or (2) of... the manufacturer, and the permit number or numbers of the place or places of manufacture. However, in... minimal identifying information (name, address and a phrase such as “distributed by”) on the label of...

  7. 10 CFR 20.1904 - Labeling containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling containers. 20.1904 Section 20.1904 Energy....1904 Labeling containers. (a) The licensee shall ensure that each container of licensed material bears... handling or using the containers, or working in the vicinity of the containers, to take precautions...

  8. 40 CFR 763.171 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... banned the distribution in U.S. commerce of this product under section 6 of the Toxic Substances Control... ACT ASBESTOS Prohibition of the Manufacture, Importation, Processing, and Distribution in Commerce of Certain Asbestos-Containing Products; Labeling Requirements § 763.171 Labeling requirements. (a)...

  9. Linguistic Labels: Conceptual Markers or Object Features?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloutsky, Vladimir M.; Fisher, Anna V.

    2012-01-01

    Linguistic labels affect inductive generalization; however, the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. According to one similarity-based model, SINC (similarity, induction, naming, and categorization), early in development labels are features of objects contributing to the overall similarity of compared entities, with early induction…

  10. 40 CFR 600.301 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Labeling requirements. 600.301 Section 600.301 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Labeling § 600.301...

  11. 40 CFR 600.301 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Labeling requirements. 600.301 Section 600.301 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Labeling § 600.301...

  12. 16 CFR 1631.5 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Labeling requirements. 1631.5 Section 1631.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE SURFACE FLAMMABILITY OF SMALL CARPETS AND RUGS (FF 2-70) The Standard § 1631.5 Labeling requirements....

  13. 16 CFR 1630.5 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling. 1630.5 Section 1630.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE SURFACE FLAMMABILITY OF CARPETS AND RUGS (FF 1-70) The Standard § 1630.5 Labeling. If the carpet or rug has had a...

  14. 16 CFR 1631.5 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling requirements. 1631.5 Section 1631.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE SURFACE FLAMMABILITY OF SMALL CARPETS AND RUGS (FF 2-70) The Standard § 1631.5 Labeling requirements....

  15. 16 CFR 1630.5 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Labeling. 1630.5 Section 1630.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE SURFACE FLAMMABILITY OF CARPETS AND RUGS (FF 1-70) The Standard § 1630.5 Labeling. If the carpet or rug has had a...

  16. 40 CFR 205.158 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... section with the statement; “For Export Only”. (c) Any competition motorcycle as defined in § 205.151(a)(3... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.158 Labeling requirements. (a)(1) The manufacturer of any vehicle subject to this subpart must, at the time of manufacture, affix a label, of...

  17. 16 CFR 1209.9 - Labeling requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard § 1209.9 Labeling requirement. (a) Manufacturers, importers, and private labelers of cellulose insulation shall place on all containers of cellulose... corrosiveness of cellulose insulation. To meet this requirement manufacturers, importers, and private...

  18. 16 CFR 1209.9 - Labeling requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard § 1209.9 Labeling requirement. (a) Manufacturers, importers, and private labelers of cellulose insulation shall place on all containers of cellulose... corrosiveness of cellulose insulation. To meet this requirement manufacturers, importers, and private...

  19. 16 CFR 1209.9 - Labeling requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard § 1209.9 Labeling requirement. (a) Manufacturers, importers, and private labelers of cellulose insulation shall place on all containers of cellulose... corrosiveness of cellulose insulation. To meet this requirement manufacturers, importers, and private...

  20. 16 CFR 1209.9 - Labeling requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard § 1209.9 Labeling requirement. (a) Manufacturers, importers, and private labelers of cellulose insulation shall place on all containers of cellulose... corrosiveness of cellulose insulation. To meet this requirement manufacturers, importers, and private...

  1. 16 CFR 309.17 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND ALTERNATIVE FUELED VEHICLES Requirements for Alternative Fuels Label Specifications... alternative vehicle fuel (other than electricity) labels with disclosure of principal component only. The... the reasons that you want to use it. (2) Non-liquid alternative vehicle fuel (other than...

  2. 16 CFR 309.17 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND ALTERNATIVE FUELED VEHICLES Requirements for Alternative Fuels Label Specifications... alternative vehicle fuel (other than electricity) labels with disclosure of principal component only. The... the reasons that you want to use it. (2) Non-liquid alternative vehicle fuel (other than...

  3. 16 CFR 309.17 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND ALTERNATIVE FUELED VEHICLES Requirements for Alternative Fuels Label Specifications... alternative vehicle fuel (other than electricity) labels with disclosure of principal component only. The... the reasons that you want to use it. (2) Non-liquid alternative vehicle fuel (other than...

  4. 16 CFR 309.17 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND ALTERNATIVE FUELED VEHICLES Requirements for Alternative Fuels Label Specifications... alternative vehicle fuel (other than electricity) labels with disclosure of principal component only. The... the reasons that you want to use it. (2) Non-liquid alternative vehicle fuel (other than...

  5. 24 CFR 3280.11 - Certification label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... approximately 2 in. by 4 in. in size and shall be permanently attached to the manufactured home by means of 4... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS General § 3280.11 Certification label. (a) A permanent label shall be affixed to each transportable section of each manufactured...

  6. Luminogenic "clickable" lanthanide complexes for protein labeling.

    PubMed

    Candelon, Nicolas; Hădade, Niculina D; Matache, Mihaela; Canet, Jean-Louis; Cisnetti, Federico; Funeriu, Daniel P; Nauton, Lionel; Gautier, Arnaud

    2013-10-14

    Development of lanthanide-based luminescent "switch-on" systems via azide-alkyne [3+2] cycloaddition is described. We used these for non-specific protein labeling and as tags for specific and selective activity-based protein labeling.

  7. Reversibility of cell surface label rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Cell surface labeling can cause rearrangements of randomly distributed membrane components. Removal of the label bound to the cell surface allows the membrane components to return to their original random distribution, demonstrating that label is necessary to maintain as well as to induce rearrangements. With scanning electron microscopy, the rearrangement of concanavalin A (con A) and ricin binding sites on LA-9 cells has been followed by means of hemocyanin, a visual label. The removal of con A from its binding sites at the cell surface with alpha- methyl mannoside, and the return of these sites to their original distribution are also followed in this manner. There are labeling differences with con A and ricin. Under some conditions, however, the same rearrangements are seen with both lectins. The disappearance of labeled sites from areas of ruffling activity is a major feature of the rearrangements seen. Both this ruffling activity and the rearrangement of label are sensitive to cytochalasin B, and ruffling activity, perhaps along with other cytochalasin-sensitive structure, may play a role in the rearrangements of labeled sites. PMID:1025154

  8. The anatomy of a laser label

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser labeling of fruits and vegetables is an efficient alternative to adhesive tags. The advantages of this system are numerous. In general the label consists of alphanumerical characters formed by laser generated pinhole depressions that penetrate the produce’s surface creating visible markings. H...

  9. 40 CFR 205.169 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... systems or exhaust system components to be distributed in commerce. (b) The labels or marks shall be... readily visible position when the exhaust system or exhaust system component is installed on all... language in block letters and numerals in a color that contrasts with its background. (e) The label or...

  10. Labels and Children's Perception of Faces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Phyllis A.; Seavey, Carol

    The relation between type of label and perception of faces was assessed. Sixty-four second and sixth grade Ss were randomly assigned to four experimental conditions in which various kinds of labeling training were associated with four purple and green smiling and frowning faces. Ss then judged the similarity of pairs of the faces. Results revealed…

  11. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section 18.55 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each...

  12. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section 18.55 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each...

  13. 16 CFR 306.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... number on octane labels, which is in Franklin gothic type. All type is centered. Spacing of the label is... Helvetica series or equivalent type is used for all numbers and letters with the exception of the octane... set in 10 point Helvetica Bold, all capitals, with letterspace set at 101/2 points. The octane...

  14. 16 CFR 306.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... number on octane labels, which is in Franklin gothic type. All type is centered. Spacing of the label is... Helvetica series or equivalent type is used for all numbers and letters with the exception of the octane... set in 10 point Helvetica Bold, all capitals, with letterspace set at 101/2 points. The octane...

  15. 16 CFR 306.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... number on octane labels, which is in Franklin gothic type. All type is centered. Spacing of the label is... Helvetica series or equivalent type is used for all numbers and letters with the exception of the octane... set in 10 point Helvetica Bold, all capitals, with letterspace set at 101/2 points. The octane...

  16. 21 CFR 701.11 - Identity labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC LABELING Package Form § 701.11 Identity labeling. (a) The principal display panel of a cosmetic in...) Such statement of identity shall be in terms of: (1) The common or usual name of the cosmetic; or...

  17. 21 CFR 701.11 - Identity labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC LABELING Package Form § 701.11 Identity labeling. (a) The principal display panel of a cosmetic in...) Such statement of identity shall be in terms of: (1) The common or usual name of the cosmetic; or...

  18. 21 CFR 701.11 - Identity labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC LABELING Package Form § 701.11 Identity labeling. (a) The principal display panel of a cosmetic in...) Such statement of identity shall be in terms of: (1) The common or usual name of the cosmetic; or...

  19. 21 CFR 701.11 - Identity labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC LABELING Package Form § 701.11 Identity labeling. (a) The principal display panel of a cosmetic in...) Such statement of identity shall be in terms of: (1) The common or usual name of the cosmetic; or...

  20. 21 CFR 701.11 - Identity labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC LABELING Package Form § 701.11 Identity labeling. (a) The principal display panel of a cosmetic in...) Such statement of identity shall be in terms of: (1) The common or usual name of the cosmetic; or...

  1. 9 CFR 412.1 - Label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Label approval. 412.1 Section 412.1 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE FEDERAL MEAT INSPECTION ACT AND THE POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT LABEL APPROVAL...

  2. Influence of Food Labels on Adolescent Diet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misra, Ranjita

    2002-01-01

    Provides information on food nutrition labels and discusses the benefits of adolescents' using them to plan healthy diets. Suggests that teachers and educators should encourage appropriate label reading education for adolescents to promote healthy eating practices. Provides definitions of nutrient content claims. (SG)

  3. 40 CFR 92.212 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Certification Provisions § 92.212 Labeling. (a) General requirements. Each new locomotive and new locomotive engine, subject to the emission standards of this part and... readily visible after installation of the engine in the locomotive. (ii) The label shall be attached to...

  4. 49 CFR 583.5 - Label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Label requirements. 583.5 Section 583.5 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AUTOMOBILE PARTS CONTENT LABELING § 583.5...

  5. 49 CFR 583.5 - Label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Label requirements. 583.5 Section 583.5 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AUTOMOBILE PARTS CONTENT LABELING § 583.5...

  6. 49 CFR 583.5 - Label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Label requirements. 583.5 Section 583.5 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AUTOMOBILE PARTS CONTENT LABELING § 583.5...

  7. 49 CFR 583.5 - Label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Label requirements. 583.5 Section 583.5 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AUTOMOBILE PARTS CONTENT LABELING § 583.5...

  8. 16 CFR 1209.9 - Labeling requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard § 1209.9 Labeling requirement. (a) Manufacturers, importers, and private labelers of cellulose insulation shall place on all containers of cellulose... corrosiveness of cellulose insulation. To meet this requirement manufacturers, importers, and private...

  9. 40 CFR 1033.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... number and permanently affix, engrave, or stamp the number on the locomotive and engine in a legible way... 0 and Tier 1 locomotives, the label may be made up of more than one piece, as long as all pieces are.... The label may be made up of more than one piece, as long as all pieces are permanently attached to...

  10. 47 CFR 95.1017 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Labeling requirements. 95.1017 Section 95.1017 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1017 Labeling requirements. (a) Each...

  11. 47 CFR 95.1017 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Labeling requirements. 95.1017 Section 95.1017 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1017 Labeling requirements. (a) Each...

  12. 47 CFR 95.1017 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Labeling requirements. 95.1017 Section 95.1017 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1017 Labeling requirements. (a) Each...

  13. 47 CFR 95.1017 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Labeling requirements. 95.1017 Section 95.1017 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1017 Labeling requirements. (a) Each...

  14. 47 CFR 95.1017 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Labeling requirements. 95.1017 Section 95.1017 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1017 Labeling requirements. (a) Each...

  15. 75 FR 49818 - APPLIANCE LABELING RULE

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 305 APPLIANCE LABELING RULE AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission. ACTION: Final rule; correction... Notice contains a technical correction to Sample Label 13 in Appendix L in 16 CFR Part 305 published...

  16. Robust and Discriminative Labeling for Multi-Label Active Learning Based on Maximum Correntropy Criterion.

    PubMed

    Du, Bo; Wang, Zengmao; Zhang, Lefei; Zhang, Liangpei; Tao, Dacheng

    2017-04-01

    Multi-label learning draws great interests in many real world applications. It is a highly costly task to assign many labels by the oracle for one instance. Meanwhile, it is also hard to build a good model without diagnosing discriminative labels. Can we reduce the label costs and improve the ability to train a good model for multi-label learning simultaneously? Active learning addresses the less training samples problem by querying the most valuable samples to achieve a better performance with little costs. In multi-label active learning, some researches have been done for querying the relevant labels with less training samples or querying all labels without diagnosing the discriminative information. They all cannot effectively handle the outlier labels for the measurement of uncertainty. Since maximum correntropy criterion (MCC) provides a robust analysis for outliers in many machine learning and data mining algorithms, in this paper, we derive a robust multi-label active learning algorithm based on an MCC by merging uncertainty and representativeness, and propose an efficient alternating optimization method to solve it. With MCC, our method can eliminate the influence of outlier labels that are not discriminative to measure the uncertainty. To make further improvement on the ability of information measurement, we merge uncertainty and representativeness with the prediction labels of unknown data. It cannot only enhance the uncertainty but also improve the similarity measurement of multi-label data with labels information. Experiments on benchmark multi-label data sets have shown a superior performance than the state-of-the-art methods.

  17. Simplified labeling process for medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingchen; Huang, Junzhou; Huang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Shaoting; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2012-01-01

    Image segmentation plays a crucial role in many medical imaging applications by automatically locating the regions of interest. Typically supervised learning based segmentation methods require a large set of accurately labeled training data. However, thel labeling process is tedious, time consuming and sometimes not necessary. We propose a robust logistic regression algorithm to handle label outliers such that doctors do not need to waste time on precisely labeling images for training set. To validate its effectiveness and efficiency, we conduct carefully designed experiments on cervigram image segmentation while there exist label outliers. Experimental results show that the proposed robust logistic regression algorithms achieve superior performance compared to previous methods, which validates the benefits of the proposed algorithms.

  18. A region labeling algorithm based on block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing

    2009-10-01

    The time performance of region labeling algorithm is important for image process. However, common region labeling algorithms cannot meet the requirements of real-time image processing. In this paper, a technique using block to record the connective area is proposed. By this technique, connective closure and information related to the target can be computed during a one-time image scan. It records the edge pixel's coordinate, including outer side edges and inner side edges, as well as the label, and then it can calculate connecting area's shape center, area and gray. Compared to others, this block based region labeling algorithm is more efficient. It can well meet the time requirements of real-time processing. Experiment results also validate the correctness and efficiency of the algorithm. Experiment results show that it can detect any connecting areas in binary images, which contains various complex and quaint patterns. The block labeling algorithm is used in a real-time image processing program now.

  19. Recent developments in blood cell labeling research

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.; Meinken, G.E.

    1988-09-07

    A number of recent developments in research on blood cell labeling techniques are presented. The discussion relates to three specific areas: (1) a new in vitro method for red blood cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc; (2) a method for labeling leukocytes and platelets with /sup 99m/Tc; and (3) the use of monoclonal antibody technique for platelet labeling. The advantages and the pitfalls of these techniques are examined in the light of available mechanistic information. Problems that remain to be resolved are reviewed. An assessment is made of the progress as well as prospects in blood cell labeling methodology including that using the monoclonal antibody approach. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  20. 9 CFR 317.5 - Generically approved labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... section), or guarantees, or which is not a domestic product labeled in a foreign language; (2) Labeling... not a domestic product labeled with a foreign language; (3) Labeling for containers of products sold... necessary the application of labeling not otherwise required); (v) A change in the language or...

  1. 21 CFR 201.25 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bar code label requirements. 201.25 Section 201.25...: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.25 Bar code label requirements. (a) Who is subject to these bar code requirements? Manufacturers, repackers, relabelers, and private label distributors of...

  2. 16 CFR 300.30 - Deceptive labeling in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Deceptive labeling in general. 300.30... RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE WOOL PRODUCTS LABELING ACT OF 1939 Labeling § 300.30 Deceptive labeling... stamp, tag, label, mark or representation which is false, misleading or deceptive in any...

  3. 16 CFR 300.30 - Deceptive labeling in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Deceptive labeling in general. 300.30... RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE WOOL PRODUCTS LABELING ACT OF 1939 Labeling § 300.30 Deceptive labeling... stamp, tag, label, mark or representation which is false, misleading or deceptive in any...

  4. 16 CFR 300.30 - Deceptive labeling in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Deceptive labeling in general. 300.30... RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE WOOL PRODUCTS LABELING ACT OF 1939 Labeling § 300.30 Deceptive labeling... stamp, tag, label, mark or representation which is false, misleading or deceptive in any...

  5. 16 CFR 300.30 - Deceptive labeling in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Deceptive labeling in general. 300.30... RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE WOOL PRODUCTS LABELING ACT OF 1939 Labeling § 300.30 Deceptive labeling... stamp, tag, label, mark or representation which is false, misleading or deceptive in any...

  6. 75 FR 82011 - Web-Distributed Labeling of Pesticides

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ...EPA is considering an initiative to make portions of pesticide labeling for certain products available electronically. Web-distributed labeling would allow users to download streamlined labeling specific to the use and state in which the application will occur. More concise labeling should increase users' comprehension and compliance with pesticide labeling, thereby improving protection of......

  7. 21 CFR 500.51 - Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. 500.51... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS GENERAL Animal Drug Labeling Requirements § 500.51 Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. (a) Among the representations on the label or labeling of an...

  8. 21 CFR 500.51 - Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. 500.51... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS GENERAL Animal Drug Labeling Requirements § 500.51 Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. (a) Among the representations on the label or labeling of an...

  9. 21 CFR 500.51 - Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. 500.51... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS GENERAL Animal Drug Labeling Requirements § 500.51 Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. (a) Among the representations on the label or labeling of an...

  10. 21 CFR 500.51 - Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. 500.51... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS GENERAL Animal Drug Labeling Requirements § 500.51 Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. (a) Among the representations on the label or labeling of an...

  11. 21 CFR 500.51 - Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. 500.51... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS GENERAL Animal Drug Labeling Requirements § 500.51 Labeling of animal drugs; misbranding. (a) Among the representations on the label or labeling of an...

  12. 21 CFR 101.36 - Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements. 101.36... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Specific Nutrition Labeling Requirements and Guidelines § 101.36 Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements. (a) The label of a dietary supplement that...

  13. 21 CFR 101.36 - Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements. 101.36... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Specific Nutrition Labeling Requirements and Guidelines § 101.36 Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements. (a) The label of a dietary supplement that...

  14. 21 CFR 101.36 - Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements. 101.36... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Specific Nutrition Labeling Requirements and Guidelines § 101.36 Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements. (a) The label of a dietary supplement that...

  15. 21 CFR 101.36 - Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements. 101.36... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Specific Nutrition Labeling Requirements and Guidelines § 101.36 Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements. (a) The label of a dietary supplement that...

  16. Radiosynthesis of the iodine-124 labeled Hsp90 inhibitor PU-H71.

    PubMed

    Taldone, Tony; Zatorska, Danuta; Ochiana, Stefan O; Smith-Jones, Peter; Koziorowski, Jacek; Dunphy, Mark P; Zanzonico, Pat; Bolaender, Alexander; Lewis, Jason S; Larson, Steven M; Chiosis, Gabriela; Pillarsetty, Naga Vara Kishore

    2016-03-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an ATP dependent molecular chaperone protein whose function is critical for maintaining several key proteins involved in survival and proliferation of cancer cells. PU-H71 (1), is a potent purine-scaffold based ATP pocket binding Hsp90 inhibitor which has been shown to have potent activity in a broad range of in vivo cancer models and is currently in Phase I clinical trials in patients with advanced solid malignancies, lymphomas, and myeloproliferative neoplasms. In this report, we describe the radiosynthesis of [(124)I]-PU-H71(5); this was synthesized from the corresponding Boc-protected stannane precursor 3 by iododestannylation with [(124)I]-NaI using chloramine-T as an oxidant for 2 min, followed by Boc deprotection with 6 N HCl at 50 °C for 30 min to yield the final compound. The final product 5 was purified using HPLC and was isolated with an overall yield of 55 ± 6% (n = 6, isolated) from 3, and >98% purity and an average specific activity of 980 mCi/µmol. Our report sets the stage for the introduction of [(124)I]-PU-H71 as a potential non-invasive probe for understanding biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of PU-H71 in living subjects using positron emission tomography imaging.

  17. A run-based two-scan labeling algorithm.

    PubMed

    He, Lifeng; Chao, Yuyan; Suzuki, Kenji

    2008-05-01

    We present an efficient run-based two-scan algorithm for labeling connected components in a binary image. Unlike conventional label-equivalence-based algorithms, which resolve label equivalences between provisional labels, our algorithm resolves label equivalences between provisional label sets. At any time, all provisional labels that are assigned to a connected component are combined in a set, and the smallest label is used as the representative label. The corresponding relation of a provisional label and its representative label is recorded in a table. Whenever different connected components are found to be connected, all provisional label sets concerned with these connected components are merged together, and the smallest provisional label is taken as the representative label. When the first scan is finished, all provisional labels that were assigned to each connected component in the given image will have a unique representative label. During the second scan, we need only to replace each provisional label by its representative label. Experimental results on various types of images demonstrate that our algorithm outperforms all conventional labeling algorithms.

  18. A test of different menu labeling presentations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peggy J; Roberto, Christina A; Liu, Linda J; Brownell, Kelly D

    2012-12-01

    Chain restaurants will soon need to disclose calorie information on menus, but research on the impact of calorie labels on food choices is mixed. This study tested whether calorie information presented in different formats influenced calories ordered and perceived restaurant healthfulness. Participants in an online survey were randomly assigned to a menu with either (1) no calorie labels (No Calories); (2) calorie labels (Calories); (3) calorie labels ordered from low to high calories (Rank-Ordered Calories); or (4) calorie labels ordered from low to high calories that also had red/green circles indicating higher and lower calorie choices (Colored Calories). Participants ordered items for dinner, estimated calories ordered, and rated restaurant healthfulness. Participants in the Rank-Ordered Calories condition and those in the Colored Calories condition ordered fewer calories than the No Calories group. There was no significant difference in calories ordered between the Calories and No Calories groups. Participants in each calorie label condition were significantly more accurate in estimating calories ordered compared to the No Calories group. Those in the Colored Calories group perceived the restaurant as healthier. The results suggest that presenting calorie information in the modified Rank-Ordered or Colored Calories formats may increase menu labeling effectiveness.

  19. Robust statistical fusion of image labels.

    PubMed

    Landman, Bennett A; Asman, Andrew J; Scoggins, Andrew G; Bogovic, John A; Xing, Fangxu; Prince, Jerry L

    2012-02-01

    Image labeling and parcellation (i.e., assigning structure to a collection of voxels) are critical tasks for the assessment of volumetric and morphometric features in medical imaging data. The process of image labeling is inherently error prone as images are corrupted by noise and artifacts. Even expert interpretations are subject to subjectivity and the precision of the individual raters. Hence, all labels must be considered imperfect with some degree of inherent variability. One may seek multiple independent assessments to both reduce this variability and quantify the degree of uncertainty. Existing techniques have exploited maximum a posteriori statistics to combine data from multiple raters and simultaneously estimate rater reliabilities. Although quite successful, wide-scale application has been hampered by unstable estimation with practical datasets, for example, with label sets with small or thin objects to be labeled or with partial or limited datasets. As well, these approaches have required each rater to generate a complete dataset, which is often impossible given both human foibles and the typical turnover rate of raters in a research or clinical environment. Herein, we propose a robust approach to improve estimation performance with small anatomical structures, allow for missing data, account for repeated label sets, and utilize training/catch trial data. With this approach, numerous raters can label small, overlapping portions of a large dataset, and rater heterogeneity can be robustly controlled while simultaneously estimating a single, reliable label set and characterizing uncertainty. The proposed approach enables many individuals to collaborate in the construction of large datasets for labeling tasks (e.g., human parallel processing) and reduces the otherwise detrimental impact of rater unavailability.

  20. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 37

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  1. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 16

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  2. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 29

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  3. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 24

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  4. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 34

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  5. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 25

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  6. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 35

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  7. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 40

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  8. 21 CFR 1230.13 - Labeling of “poison”.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Labeling § 1230.13 Labeling of “poison”. The following are styles of...-point size are required on a label in stating the word “poison” they must not be smaller than...

  9. 21 CFR 1230.13 - Labeling of “poison”.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Labeling § 1230.13 Labeling of “poison”. The following are styles of...-point size are required on a label in stating the word “poison” they must not be smaller than...

  10. 21 CFR 1230.13 - Labeling of “poison”.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Labeling § 1230.13 Labeling of “poison”. The following are styles of...-point size are required on a label in stating the word “poison” they must not be smaller than...

  11. 21 CFR 1230.13 - Labeling of “poison”.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Labeling § 1230.13 Labeling of “poison”. The following are styles of...-point size are required on a label in stating the word “poison” they must not be smaller than...

  12. 21 CFR 1230.13 - Labeling of “poison”.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Labeling § 1230.13 Labeling of “poison”. The following are styles of...-point size are required on a label in stating the word “poison” they must not be smaller than...

  13. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 20

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  14. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 13

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  15. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 11

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  16. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 43

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  17. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 23

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  18. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 27

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  19. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 15

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  20. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 2

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  1. 16 CFR 301.28 - Labels to be avoided.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.28 Labels to be avoided. Labels which are insecurely or inconspicuously attached, or which in the course of offering the fur product for sale,...

  2. 16 CFR 301.28 - Labels to be avoided.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.28 Labels to be avoided. Labels which are insecurely or inconspicuously attached, or which in the course of offering the fur product for sale,...

  3. 16 CFR 301.27 - Label and method of affixing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.27 Label and method of affixing. At all times during the marketing of a fur product the required label shall have a minimum dimension...

  4. 16 CFR 301.28 - Labels to be avoided.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.28 Labels to be avoided. Labels which are insecurely or inconspicuously attached, or which in the course of offering the fur product for sale,...

  5. 16 CFR 301.27 - Label and method of affixing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.27 Label and method of affixing. At all times during the marketing of a fur product the required label shall have a minimum dimension...

  6. 16 CFR 301.28 - Labels to be avoided.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.28 Labels to be avoided. Labels which are insecurely or inconspicuously attached, or which in the course of offering the fur product for sale,...

  7. 16 CFR 301.28 - Labels to be avoided.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.28 Labels to be avoided. Labels which are insecurely or inconspicuously attached, or which in the course of offering the fur product for sale,...

  8. 49 CFR 172.423 - DANGEROUS WHEN WET label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... background color on the DANGEROUS WHEN WET label must be blue. [Amdt. 172-123, 56 FR 66257, Dec. 20, 1991] ... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.423 DANGEROUS WHEN WET label. (a) Except for size and color, the...

  9. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 41

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  10. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 5

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  11. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 3

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  12. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 33

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  13. How to Understand and Use the Nutrition Facts Label

    MedlinePlus

    ... Labeling & Nutrition How to Understand and Use the Nutrition Facts Label Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... FDA has issued final changes to update the Nutrition Facts label for packaged foods. For more information, ...

  14. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 8

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  15. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 17

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  16. 27 CFR 5.55 - Certificates of label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF DISTILLED SPIRITS Requirements for Approval of... certificates of label approval and certificates of exemption from label approval, as well as appeal...

  17. 27 CFR 4.50 - Certificates of label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF WINE Requirements for Approval of Labels of... of exemption from label approval, as well as appeal procedures, see part 13 of this chapter....

  18. 27 CFR 5.55 - Certificates of label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF DISTILLED SPIRITS Requirements for Approval of... certificates of label approval and certificates of exemption from label approval, as well as appeal...

  19. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 9

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  20. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 32

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  1. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 26

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  2. Label Review Training: Module 3: Special Issues, Page 39

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module further describes and provides strategies for reviewing some of the label parts introduced in Module 2 of the pesticide label training, such as precautionary statements, directions for use, worker protection labeling, and more.

  3. A high-resolution tungstate membrane label

    SciTech Connect

    Hainfeld, J.F.; Quaite, F.E. ); Lipka, J.J. )

    1990-01-01

    A new class of membrane labels was synthesized which contain a tungstate cluster (having 11 tungsten atoms) and an aliphatic organo-tin moiety with various chain lengths (C{sub 4}, C{sub 8}, C{sub 12}, C{sub 18}, C{sub 22}). These molecules were found to insert into synthetic phospholipid vesicles and biological membranes (human red blood cell membranes). The tungstate clusters can be individually visualized in the high resolution STEM or seen en mass in thin-sectioned labeled membranes in the CTEM. These new labels should provide a means for direct high-resolution imaging of lipid-phase systems.

  4. Preparation of astatine-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Milesz, S.; Norseev, Yu.V.; Szucs, Z. |

    1995-07-01

    In the cationic state astatine forms a stable complex with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Thanks to this complex, astatine can be bound to monoclonal antibodies of the RYa{sub 1} type. The most favorable conditions for preparing astatine-labeled antibodies are established. The chromatographic analysis and electromigration experiments showed that astatine is firmly linked to a biomolecule in vitro and it did not escape from labeled monoclonal antibodies even under treatment with such highly effective astatine-complexing agent as thiourea. The immune activity of astatine-labeled antibodies did not change even after 20 h.

  5. Nanomaterial Labels in Electrochemical Immunosensors and Immunoassays

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-12-15

    This article reviews recent advances in nanomaterial labels in electrochemical immunosensors and immunoassays. Various nanomaterial labels are discussed, including colloidal gold/silver, semiconductor nanoparticles, and markers loaded nanocarriers (carbon nanotubes, apoferritin, silica nanoparticles, and liposome beads). The enormous signal enhancement associated with the use of nanomaterial labels and with the formation of nanomaterial–antibody-antigen assemblies provides the basis for ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of disease-related protein biomarkers, biothreat agents, or infectious agents. In general, all endeavors cited here are geared to achieve one or more of the following goals: signal amplification by several orders of magnitude, lower detection limits, and detecting multiple targets.

  6. SAIL--stereo-array isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Kainosho, Masatsune; Güntert, Peter

    2009-11-01

    Optimal stereospecific and regiospecific labeling of proteins with stable isotopes enhances the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for the determination of the three-dimensional protein structures in solution. Stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL) offers sharpened lines, spectral simplification without loss of information and the ability to rapidly collect and automatically evaluate the structural restraints required to solve a high-quality solution structure for proteins up to twice as large as before. This review gives an overview of stable isotope labeling methods for NMR spectroscopy with proteins and provides an in-depth treatment of the SAIL technology.

  7. Nanomaterial Labels in Electrochemical Immunosensors and Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in nanomaterial labels in electrochemical immunosensors and immunoassays. Various nanomaterial labels are discussed, including colloidal gold/silver, semiconductor nanoparticles, and markers loaded nanocarriers (carbon nanotubes, apoferritin, silica nanoparticles, and liposome beads). The enormous signal enhancement associated with the use of nanomaterial labels and with the formation of nanomaterial–antibody-antigen assemblies provides the basis for ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of disease-related protein biomarkers, biothreat agents, or infectious agents. In general, all endeavors cited here are geared to achieve one or more of the following goals: signal amplification by several orders of magnitude, lower detection limits, and detecting multiple targets. PMID:18371644

  8. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  9. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  10. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  11. 101 Labeled Brain Images and a Consistent Human Cortical Labeling Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Arno; Tourville, Jason

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the Mindboggle-101 dataset, the largest and most complete set of free, publicly accessible, manually labeled human brain images. To manually label the macroscopic anatomy in magnetic resonance images of 101 healthy participants, we created a new cortical labeling protocol that relies on robust anatomical landmarks and minimal manual edits after initialization with automated labels. The “Desikan–Killiany–Tourville” (DKT) protocol is intended to improve the ease, consistency, and accuracy of labeling human cortical areas. Given how difficult it is to label brains, the Mindboggle-101 dataset is intended to serve as brain atlases for use in labeling other brains, as a normative dataset to establish morphometric variation in a healthy population for comparison against clinical populations, and contribute to the development, training, testing, and evaluation of automated registration and labeling algorithms. To this end, we also introduce benchmarks for the evaluation of such algorithms by comparing our manual labels with labels automatically generated by probabilistic and multi-atlas registration-based approaches. All data and related software and updated information are available on the http://mindboggle.info/data website. PMID:23227001

  12. 49 CFR 172.432 - INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TABLE, SPECIAL PROVISIONS, HAZARDOUS MATERIALS COMMUNICATIONS, EMERGENCY RESPONSE INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.432 INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE label. (a) Except for size and...

  13. 49 CFR 172.432 - INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... TABLE, SPECIAL PROVISIONS, HAZARDOUS MATERIALS COMMUNICATIONS, EMERGENCY RESPONSE INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.432 INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE label. (a) Except for size and...

  14. 49 CFR 172.432 - INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... TABLE, SPECIAL PROVISIONS, HAZARDOUS MATERIALS COMMUNICATIONS, EMERGENCY RESPONSE INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.432 INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE label. (a) Except for size and...

  15. 49 CFR 172.432 - INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TABLE, SPECIAL PROVISIONS, HAZARDOUS MATERIALS COMMUNICATIONS, EMERGENCY RESPONSE INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.432 INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE label. (a) Except for size and...

  16. 40 CFR 763.95 - Warning labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools § 763.95 Warning labels. (a) The local education agency shall...: ASBESTOS. HAZARDOUS. DO NOT DISTURB WITHOUT PROPER TRAINING AND EQUIPMENT....

  17. 40 CFR 763.95 - Warning labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools § 763.95 Warning labels. (a) The local education agency shall...: ASBESTOS. HAZARDOUS. DO NOT DISTURB WITHOUT PROPER TRAINING AND EQUIPMENT....

  18. 40 CFR 763.95 - Warning labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools § 763.95 Warning labels. (a) The local education agency shall...: ASBESTOS. HAZARDOUS. DO NOT DISTURB WITHOUT PROPER TRAINING AND EQUIPMENT....

  19. 40 CFR 763.95 - Warning labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools § 763.95 Warning labels. (a) The local education agency shall...: ASBESTOS. HAZARDOUS. DO NOT DISTURB WITHOUT PROPER TRAINING AND EQUIPMENT....

  20. 40 CFR 763.95 - Warning labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools § 763.95 Warning labels. (a) The local education agency shall...: ASBESTOS. HAZARDOUS. DO NOT DISTURB WITHOUT PROPER TRAINING AND EQUIPMENT....

  1. Stem cell labeling for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Himmelreich, Uwe; Hoehn, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    In vivo applications of cells for the monitoring of their cell dynamics increasingly use non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging. This imaging modality allows in particular to follow the migrational activity of stem cells intended for cell therapy strategies. All these approaches require the prior labeling of the cells under investigation for excellent contrast against the host tissue background in the imaging modality. The present review discusses the various routes of cell labeling and describes the potential to observe both cell localization and their cell-specific function in vivo. Possibilities for labeling strategies, pros and cons of various contrast agents are pointed out while potential ambiguities or problems of labeling strategies are emphasized.

  2. Synthesis of exemestane labelled with (13)C.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Erminia; Pignatti, Alberto; Giribone, Danilo; Di Salle, Enrico

    2008-08-01

    The synthesis of exemestane Aromasin, an irreversible steroidal aromatase inhibitor, specifically labelled with (13)C is reported. The preparation of [(13)C(3)]exemestane was achieved according to an eight-step procedure starting from the commercially available testosterone.

  3. 40 CFR 204.55-4 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... information hereinafter provided, to all such compressors to be distributed in commerce. (2) The label shall... Conforms to U.S. E.P.A. Regulations for Noise Emissions Applicable to Portable Air Compressors....

  4. 9 CFR 112.3 - Diluent labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PACKAGING AND LABELING § 112.3 Diluent... organisms or viruses, the notice, “Burn this container and all unused contents,” except that, in the case...

  5. 9 CFR 112.3 - Diluent labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PACKAGING AND LABELING § 112.3 Diluent... organisms or viruses, the notice, “Burn this container and all unused contents,” except that, in the case...

  6. 9 CFR 112.3 - Diluent labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PACKAGING AND LABELING § 112.3 Diluent... organisms or viruses, the notice, “Burn this container and all unused contents,” except that, in the case...

  7. 27 CFR 19.604 - Caution label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Containers and Marks Marks § 19.604 Caution label... the following statement “Caution—contains poisonous ingredients.” The name and address of...

  8. 21 CFR 530.12 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... is dispensed by a pharmacy on the order of a veterinarian, the labeling shall include the name of the prescribing veterinarian and the name and address of the dispensing pharmacy, and may include the address...

  9. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding ... Food Allergies, What Should I Look for When Reading Food Labels? Healthy Eating Kids and Food: 10 ...

  10. 40 CFR 205.158 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... distributed in commerce. (2) The label must be plastic or metal and be welded, riveted, or otherwise... Califfo CAL Carabela CAR Cimatti CIM Columbia COL E-Z Rider EZR Flying Dutchman FLY Foxi FOI Gadabout...

  11. Figuring Out Food Labels (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in your class to have one cookie each. Math comes in handy with food labels! Calories and ... The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  12. Radionuclide labeled lymphocytes for therapeutic use

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Fawwaz, Rashid A.; Richards, Powell

    1985-01-01

    Lymphocytes labelled with .beta.-emitting radionuclides are therapeutically useful, particularly for lymphoid ablation. They are prepared by incubation of the lymphocytes with the selected radionuclide-oxine complex.

  13. 76 FR 13550 - Fur Products Labeling Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... less without a fur-content label. B. TFLA On December 18, 2010, the President signed TFLA into law... concerning consumer perception of the fur names required by the Name Guide. Does this evidence indicate...

  14. Label Review Training - Table of Contents

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  15. 75 FR 67615 - Appliance Labeling Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... hour rating'' as the current Rule indicates. List of Subjects in 16 CFR Part 305 Advertising, Energy.... * * * * * (f) Any manufacturer, distributor, retailer, or private labeler who advertises a covered product...

  16. 7 CFR 65.400 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Country of Origin Notification § 65.400 Labeling. (a) Country of... agricultural commodities, peanuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, and ginseng may use State, regional, or...

  17. 7 CFR 65.400 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Country of Origin Notification § 65.400 Labeling. (a) Country of... agricultural commodities, peanuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, and ginseng may use State, regional, or...

  18. 7 CFR 65.400 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Country of Origin Notification § 65.400 Labeling. (a) Country of... agricultural commodities, peanuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, and ginseng may use State, regional, or...

  19. 7 CFR 65.400 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Country of Origin Notification § 65.400 Labeling. (a) Country of... agricultural commodities, peanuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, and ginseng may use State, regional, or...

  20. Radionuclide labeled lymphocytes for therapeutic use

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Richards, P.

    1983-05-03

    Lymphocytes labelled with ..beta..-emitting radionuclides are therapeutically useful, particularly for lymphoid ablation. They are prepared by incubation of the lymphocytes with the selected radionuclide-oxine complex.