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Sample records for 125-mm lbimduga likeketaste

  1. Variability of repeated coronary artery calcium measurements by 1.25-mm- and 2.5-mm-thickness images on prospective electrocardiograph-triggered 64-slice CT.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Jun; Matsuura, Noriaki; Yamamoto, Hideya; Hirai, Nobuhiko; Kiguchi, Masao; Fujioka, Chikako; Kitagawa, Toshiro; Kohno, Nobuoki; Ito, Katsuhide

    2008-02-01

    High reproducibility on coronary artery calcium scoring is a key requirement in monitoring the progression of coronary atherosclerosis. The purpose of this prospective study is to assess the reproducibility of 1.25-mm- and 2.5-mm-thickness images on prospective electrocardiograph-triggered 64-slice CT with respect to 2.5-mm-thickness images on spiral overlapping reconstruction. One hundred patients suspected of coronary artery disease were scanned twice repeatedly, both on prospective electrocardiograph-triggered step-and-shoot and retrospective electrocardiograph-gated spiral scans. Using 1.25-mm-thickness collimation, 1.25-mm- and 2.5-mm-thickness image sets on prospective scans and 2.5-mm-thickness image sets with 1.25-mm increment (overlapping) on retrospective scans were obtained. Coronary artery calcium scores, interscan variability and interobserver variability were evaluated. The mean interscan variability in coronary artery calcium measurement on 1.25-mm prospective/2.5-mm prospective/2.5-mm overlapping retrospective scans were Agatston: 10%/18%/12%, volume: 10%/12%/10% and mass: 8%/13%/11% for observer 1 and Agatston: 8%/14%/10%, volume: 7%/9%/10% and mass: 7%/10%/9% for observer 2, respectively. The mean interobserver variability was 5% to 14%. In conclusion, prospective electrocardiograph-triggered 64-slice CT using the 1.25-mm prospective scan shows the lowest variability. The 2.5-mm prospective scan on volume or mass scoring shows variability of around 10%, comparable to 2.5-mm-thickness spiral overlapping reconstruction images.

  2. MAMBO 1.25 mm observations of 3CR quasars at z ~ 1.5: on the debate of the unified schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, M.; Chini, R.; Müller, S. A. H.; Bertoldi, F.; Albrecht, M.

    2006-01-01

    In order to explore the nature of the 850 μm flux difference between powerful radio galaxies and steep radio-spectrum quasars at z˜ 1.5 reported by Willott et al. (2002), we have observed 9 sources from their sample of 11 quasars at 1.25 mm. For 7 sources the 1.25 mm fluxes are much brighter than one would expect from a purely thermal dust model fitted to the submm data, providing evidence for the synchrotron nature of the observed 1.25 mm radiation. If we extrapolate a power-law synchrotron spectrum to shorter wavelengths, then for 6 of the 9 sources also the 850 μm fluxes are dominated by synchrotron radiation. We discuss how far the (sub)-millimetre data can be interpreted in accordance with the orientation-dependent unified schemes for powerful radio galaxies and quasars. In this case the results challenge the reported evidence for the receding torus model and for the evolutionary trend of a declining dust luminosity with increasing projected size of the radio lobes.

  3. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN REAL-TIME AND TIME-INTEGRATED COARSE (2.5-10MM), INTERMEDIATE (1-2.5MM), AND FINE (<2.5MM) PARTICULATE MATTER IN THE LOS ANGELES BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Population exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) has received considerable attention due to the association between ambient particulate concentrations and mortality. Current toxicological and epidemiological studies and controlled human and animal exposures suggest that a...

  4. Parameter comparison of white matter diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    MO, Yin; CHAO, Fang; SONG, Ming; LIU, Ci-Rong; LIU, Hui-Lang; QIAN, Xi-Ying; ZHAO, Xu-Dong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) results of brain white matter in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) with four different parameter settings and found that the sequence A (b=1 000 s/mm2, spatial resolution=1.25 mm×1.25 mm× 1.25 mm, numbers of direction=33, NSA=3) and B (b=800 s/mm2, spatial resolution=1.25 mm×1.25 mm×1.25 mm, numbers of direction=33, NSA=3) could accurately track coarse fibers. The fractional anisotropy (FA) derived from sequence C (b=1 000s/mm2, spatial resolution=0.55 mm×0.55 mm×2.5 mm, direction number=33, NSA=3) was too fuzzy to be used in tracking white matter fibers. By comparison, the high resolution and the FA with high contrast of gray matter and white matter derived from sequence D (b=800 s/mm2, spatial resolution=1.0 mm×1.0 mm ×1.0 mm, numbers of direction=33, NSA=3) qualified in its application in tracking both thick and thin fibers, making it an optimal DTI setting for rhesus macaques. PMID:24866488

  5. The effects of metamaterial on electromagnetic fields absorption characteristics of human eye tissues.

    PubMed

    Gasmelseed, Akram; Yunus, Jasmy

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of a dipole antenna with a human eye model in the presence of a metamaterial is investigated in this paper. The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method with convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML) formulation have been used. A three-dimensional anatomical model of the human eye with resolution of 1.25 mm × 1.25 mm × 1.25 mm was used in this study. The dipole antenna was driven by modulated Gaussian pulse and the numerical study is performed with dipole operating at 900 MHz. The analysis has been done by varying the size and value of electric permittivity of the metamaterial. By normalizing the peak SAR (1 g and 10 g) to 1 W for all examined cases, we observed how the SAR values are not affected by the different permittivity values with the size of the metamaterial kept fixed.

  6. High Efficiency, Low Cost Solar Cells Manufactured Using 'Silicon Ink' on Thin Crystalline Silicon Wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniadis, H.

    2011-03-01

    Reported are the development and demonstration of a 17% efficient 25mm x 25mm crystalline Silicon solar cell and a 16% efficient 125mm x 125mm crystalline Silicon solar cell, both produced by Ink-jet printing Silicon Ink on a thin crystalline Silicon wafer. To achieve these objectives, processing approaches were developed to print the Silicon Ink in a predetermined pattern to form a high efficiency selective emitter, remove the solvents in the Silicon Ink and fuse the deposited particle Silicon films. Additionally, standard solar cell manufacturing equipment with slightly modified processes were used to complete the fabrication of the Silicon Ink high efficiency solar cells. Also reported are the development and demonstration of a 18.5% efficient 125mm x 125mm monocrystalline Silicon cell, and a 17% efficient 125mm x 125mm multicrystalline Silicon cell, by utilizing high throughput Ink-jet and screen printing technologies. To achieve these objectives, Innovalight developed new high throughput processing tools to print and fuse both p and n type particle Silicon Inks in a predetermined pat-tern applied either on the front or the back of the cell. Additionally, a customized Ink-jet and screen printing systems, coupled with customized substrate handling solution, customized printing algorithms, and a customized ink drying process, in combination with a purchased turn-key line, were used to complete the high efficiency solar cells. This development work delivered a process capable of high volume producing 18.5% efficient crystalline Silicon solar cells and enabled the Innovalight to commercialize its technology by the summer of 2010.

  7. Five degree-of-freedom control of an ultra-precision magnetically-suspended linear bearing. Ph.D. Thesis - MIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trumper, David L.; Slocum, A. H.

    1991-01-01

    The authors constructed a high precision linear bearing. A 10.7 kg platen measuring 125 mm by 125 mm by 350 mm is suspended and controlled in five degrees of freedom by seven electromagnets. The position of the platen is measured by five capacitive probes which have nanometer resolution. The suspension acts as a linear bearing, allowing linear travel of 50 mm in the sixth degree of freedom. In the laboratory, this bearing system has demonstrated position stability of 5 nm peak-to-peak. This is believed to be the highest position stability yet demonstrated in a magnetic suspension system. Performance at this level confirms that magnetic suspensions can address motion control requirements at the nanometer level. The experimental effort associated with this linear bearing system is described. Major topics are the development of models for the suspension, implementation of control algorithms, and measurement of the actual bearing performance. Suggestions for the future improvement of the bearing system are given.

  8. Effect of copper addition at a rate of 4% weight on the machininability of ZA-21A1 cast alloy by CNC milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqawabah, S. M. A.; Zaid, A. I. O.

    2014-06-01

    Little work is published on the effect of copper addition to zinc-aluminium ZA-21Al alloy on its surface quality machined by milling. In this paper, the effect of copper addition at a rate 4 % weight to the ZA-21Al alloy on its hardness and surface quality is investigated. It was found that the addition of 4% Cu resulted in 18.3% enhancement in microhardness whereas the mechanical characteristics were reduced (softening) about 14.5% at 0.2% strain. It was found that the best surface finish for this alloy before copper addition ZA21 was achieved at a feed rate of 100 mm/min and 1.25 mm depth of cut whereas the best surface finish for ZA21-4% Cu was achieved at feed rate 250 mm/min, 1600 rpm cutting velocity and 1.25 mm depth of cut.

  9. High temperature lubricant screening and systems studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    Four candidate lubricants for next generation aircraft gas turbine application were tested under open atmosphere conditions in a rig simulating an advanced engine 125 mm bore mainshaft thrust bearing position. Testing was conducted at speeds to 24,000 rpm (3,000,000 bearing DN), bearing ring temperature of 500 F, and with 1200 F air and 100 psi differential pressure across the seals installed in a dual tandem arrangement. Test bearing was a 125 mm bore split inner ring, outer race riding angular contact ball bearing under a 3280 lb. thrust load. One lubricant, a type 2 ester, performed extremely well. The mainshaft seal limited the performance. Numerous design improvements for this seal were indicated.

  10. Subcutaneous or intramuscular insulin injections.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C P; Sargent, M A; Wilson, B P; Price, D A

    1991-01-01

    To find out whether diabetic children may inject their insulin intramuscularly rather than subcutaneously, a random sample of 32 patients aged 4.3-17.9 (median 11.3) years was studied. Distance from skin to muscle fascia was measured by ultrasonography at standard injection sites on the outer arm, anterior and lateral thigh, abdomen, buttock, and calf. Distances were greater in girls (n = 15) than in boys (n = 17). Whereas in most boys the distances were less than the length of the needle (12.5 mm) at all sites except the buttock, in most girls, the distances were greater than 12.5 mm except over the calf. Over the fascial plane just lateral to the rectus muscle the distance from skin to peritoneum was less than 12.5 mm in 14 of the 17 boys and one of the 15 girls. Twenty five of the 32 children injected at an angle of 90 degrees, and 24 children raised a skinfold before injecting. By raising a skinfold over the anterior thigh, the distance from skin to muscle fascia was increased by 19% (range 0-38%). We conclude that most boys and some girls who use the perpendicular injection technique may often inject insulin into muscle, and perhaps on occasions into the peritoneal cavity. PMID:1863105

  11. Core size effect on the dry and saturated ultrasonic pulse velocity of limestone samples.

    PubMed

    Ercikdi, Bayram; Karaman, Kadir; Cihangir, Ferdi; Yılmaz, Tekin; Aliyazıcıoğlu, Şener; Kesimal, Ayhan

    2016-12-01

    This study presents the effect of core length on the saturated (UPVsat) and dry (UPVdry) P-wave velocities of four different biomicritic limestone samples, namely light grey (BL-LG), dark grey (BL-DG), reddish (BL-R) and yellow (BL-Y), using core samples having different lengths (25-125mm) at a constant diameter (54.7mm). The saturated P-wave velocity (UPVsat) of all core samples generally decreased with increasing the sample length. However, the dry P-wave velocity (UPVdry) of samples obtained from BL-LG and BL-Y limestones increased with increasing the sample length. In contrast to the literature, the dry P-wave velocity (UPVdry) values of core samples having a length of 75, 100 and 125mm were consistently higher (2.8-46.2%) than those of saturated (UPVsat). Chemical and mineralogical analyses have shown that the P wave velocity is very sensitive to the calcite and clay minerals potentially leading to the weakening/disintegration of rock samples in the presence of water. Severe fluctuations in UPV values were observed to occur between 25 and 75mm sample lengths, thereafter, a trend of stabilization was observed. The maximum variation of UPV values between the sample length of 75mm and 125mm was only 7.3%. Therefore, the threshold core sample length was interpreted as 75mm for UPV measurement in biomicritic limestone samples used in this study.

  12. Development of a 3D CT scanner using cone beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masahiro; Kamagata, Nozomu; Sato, Kazumasa; Hattori, Yuichi; Kobayashi, Shigeo; Mizuno, Shinichi; Jimbo, Masao; Kusakabe, Masahiro

    1995-05-01

    In order to acquire 3D data of high contrast objects such as bone, lung and vessels enhanced by contrast media for use in 3D image processing, we have developed a 3D CT-scanner using cone beam x ray. The 3D CT-scanner consists of a gantry and a patient couch. The gantry consists of an x-ray tube designed for cone beam CT and a large area two-dimensional detector mounted on a single frame and rotated around an object in 12 seconds. The large area detector consists of a fluorescent plate and a charge coupled device video camera. The size of detection area was 600 mm X 450 mm capable of covering the total chest. While an x-ray tube was rotated around an object, pulsed x ray was exposed 30 times a second and 360 projected images were collected in a 12 second scan. A 256 X 256 X 256 matrix image (1.25 mm X 1.25 mm X 1.25 mm voxel) was reconstructed by a high-speed reconstruction engine. Reconstruction time was approximately 6 minutes. Cylindrical water phantoms, anesthetized rabbits with or without contrast media, and a Japanese macaque were scanned with the 3D CT-scanner. The results seem promising because they show high spatial resolution in three directions, though there existed several point to be improved. Possible improvements are discussed.

  13. Core size effect on the dry and saturated ultrasonic pulse velocity of limestone samples.

    PubMed

    Ercikdi, Bayram; Karaman, Kadir; Cihangir, Ferdi; Yılmaz, Tekin; Aliyazıcıoğlu, Şener; Kesimal, Ayhan

    2016-12-01

    This study presents the effect of core length on the saturated (UPVsat) and dry (UPVdry) P-wave velocities of four different biomicritic limestone samples, namely light grey (BL-LG), dark grey (BL-DG), reddish (BL-R) and yellow (BL-Y), using core samples having different lengths (25-125mm) at a constant diameter (54.7mm). The saturated P-wave velocity (UPVsat) of all core samples generally decreased with increasing the sample length. However, the dry P-wave velocity (UPVdry) of samples obtained from BL-LG and BL-Y limestones increased with increasing the sample length. In contrast to the literature, the dry P-wave velocity (UPVdry) values of core samples having a length of 75, 100 and 125mm were consistently higher (2.8-46.2%) than those of saturated (UPVsat). Chemical and mineralogical analyses have shown that the P wave velocity is very sensitive to the calcite and clay minerals potentially leading to the weakening/disintegration of rock samples in the presence of water. Severe fluctuations in UPV values were observed to occur between 25 and 75mm sample lengths, thereafter, a trend of stabilization was observed. The maximum variation of UPV values between the sample length of 75mm and 125mm was only 7.3%. Therefore, the threshold core sample length was interpreted as 75mm for UPV measurement in biomicritic limestone samples used in this study. PMID:27529138

  14. Four- and Eight-Channel Aortoiliac CT Angiography: A Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Karcaaltincaba, Musturay Foley, Dennis

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. To compare performance parameters, contrast material load and radiation dose in a patient cohort having aortoiliac CT angiography using 4- and 8-channel multidetector CT (MDCT) systems. Methods. Eighteen patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms underwent initial 4-channel and follow-up 8-channel MDCT angiography. Both the 4- and 8-channel MDCT systems utilized a matrix detector of 16 x 1.25 mm rows. Scan coverage included the abdominal aorta and iliac arteries to the level of the proximal femoral arteries. For 4-channel MDCT, nominal slice thickness and beam pitch were 1.25 mm and 1.5, respectively, and for 8-channel MDCT they were 1.25 mm and 1.35 or 1.65 respectively. Scan duration, iodinated contrast material load and mean aortoiliac attenuation were compared retrospectively. Comparative radiation dose measurements for 4- and 8-channel MDCT were obtained using a multiple scan average dose technique on an abdominal phantom. Results. Compared with 4-channel MDCT, 8-channel MDCT aortoiliac angiography was performed with equivalent collimation, decreased contrast load (mean 45% decrease: 144 ml versus 83 ml of 300 mg iodine/ml contrast material) and decreased acquisition time (mean 51% shorter: 34.4 sec versus 16.9 sec) without a significant change in mean aortic enhancement (299 HU versus 300 HU, p > 0.05). Radiation dose was 2 rad for the 4-channel system and 2/1.5 rad for the 8-channel system at 1.35/1.65 pitch respectively. Conclusion. Compared with 4-channel MDCT, aortoiliac CT angiography with 8-channel MDCT produces equivalent z-axis resolution with decreased contrast load and acquisition time without increased radiation exposure.

  15. Astrometry of STF 2448 on the Mount Wilson 1.5 m Telescope with a Novel Video Eyepiece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Reed; Ramos, Rafael; Wasson, Rick; Carro, Joseph; Kenney, John; Estrada, Chris; Hollman, Cassie; Wallen, Vera; Tassell, Noah; Genet, Russell

    2015-07-01

    The Mt. Wilson Double Star Workshop was organized to provide a hands-on educational and research opportunity for students and amateur astronomers to learn and carry out astrometric eyepiece measurements of double stars. Due to the unique operating characteristics of the Mt Wilson 1.5 meter telescope and the limited time available for observations, a Bell & Howell DNV16HDZ high definition video camera was adapted to a Celestron 12.5mm astronomic eyepiece to record the position and separation of double star STF2448. This paper records the results of the team's observations and their techniques used to record and analyze the data.

  16. Utilization of recycled glass as aggregate in controlled low-strength material (CLSM)

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlheiser, T.R.

    1998-10-01

    Incoming glass from curbside recycling programs is successfully being utilized as aggregate replacements. The colored glass that can not be used by local bottle manufacturers is crushed to a {1/2} in. (12.5 mm) material and used in various construction projects. The most successful use of processed glass aggregate (PGA) to date, has been in replacing up to 100% of the aggregate in controlled low-strength material (CLSM). It has proven to be successful and has gained acceptance by contractors in the Boulder, Colorado area.

  17. Impact of Nanotopography and/or Functional Groups on Periodontal Ligament Cell Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şaşmazel, Hilal Türkoğlu; Manolache, S.; Gümüşderelİoğlu, M.

    The main purpose of this contribution was to obtain COOH functionalities and/or nanotopographic changes on the surface of 3D, non-woven polyester fabric (NWPF) discs (12.5 mm in diameter) by using low pressure water/O2 plasma assisted treatments. The prepared discs were characterized by various methods after the plasma treatment. Periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts were used in cell culture studies. The cell culture results showed that plasma treated 3D NWPF discs are favorable for PDL cell spreading, growth and viability due to the presence of functional groups and/or the nanotopography of their surfaces.

  18. Rail accelerators for space transportation: An experimental investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zana, L. M.; Kerslake, W. R.; Sturman, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted at the Lewis Research Center with the objective of investigating the technical feasibility of rail accelerators for propulsion applications. Single-stage, plasma driven rail accelerators of small (4 by 6 mm) and medium (12.5 by 12.5 mm) bores were tested at peak accelerating currents of 50 to 450 kA. Streak-camera photography was used to provide a qualitative description of plasma armature acceleration. The effects of plasma blowby and varying bore pressure on the behavior of plasma armatures were studied.

  19. Effect of pre-strain on ratcheting behavior of A668 Class D steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, S.; Mondal, A. K.; Dutta, K.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this investigation is to study the effect pre-strain (0%, 2%, 4% and 8%) on ratcheting behavior of ASTM A668 Class D steel in different heat treatment conditions (normalized and hardened-tempered). Ratcheting tests were carried out at room temperature on cylindrical specimens having 12.5 mm gauge length and 6 mm gauge diameter. The results include reduced strain accumulation with increasing prestrain level due to work hardening of the pre-strained samples. Further, cyclic hardening takes place during ratcheting deformation.

  20. Variation of quantitative emphysema measurements from CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Barr, R. Graham; Yankelevitz, David F.

    2008-03-01

    Emphysema is a lung disease characterized by destruction of the alveolar air sacs and is associated with long-term respiratory dysfunction. CT scans allow for imaging of the anatomical basis of emphysema, and several measures have been introduced for the quantification of the extent of disease. In this paper we compare these measures for repeatability over time. The measures of interest in this study are emphysema index, mean lung density, histogram percentile, and the fractal dimension. To allow for direct comparisons, the measures were normalized to a 0-100 scale. These measures have been computed for a set of 2,027 scan pairs in which the mean interval between scans was 1.15 years (σ: 93 days). These independent pairs were considered with respect to three different scanning conditions (a) 223 pairs where both were scanned with a 5 mm slice thickness protocol, (b) 695 with the first scanned with the 5 mm protocol and the second with a 1.25 mm protocol, and (c) 1109 pairs scanned both times using a 1.25 mm protocol. We found that average normalized emphysema index and histogram percentiles scores increased by 5.9 and 11 points respectively, while the fractal dimension showed stability with a mean difference of 1.2. We also found, a 7 point bias introduced for emphysema index under condition (b), and that the fractal dimension measure is least affected by scanner parameter changes.

  1. Thin Single Crystal Silicon Solar Cells on Ceramic Substrates: November 2009 - November 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Ravi, K. V.

    2011-06-01

    In this program we have been developing a technology for fabricating thin (< 50 micrometres) single crystal silicon wafers on foreign substrates. We reverse the conventional approach of depositing or forming silicon on foreign substrates by depositing or forming thick (200 to 400 micrometres) ceramic materials on high quality single crystal silicon films ~ 50 micrometres thick. Our key innovation is the fabrication of thin, refractory, and self-adhering 'handling layers or substrates' on thin epitaxial silicon films in-situ, from powder precursors obtained from low cost raw materials. This 'handling layer' has sufficient strength for device and module processing and fabrication. Successful production of full sized (125 mm X 125 mm) silicon on ceramic wafers with 50 micrometre thick single crystal silicon has been achieved and device process flow developed for solar cell fabrication. Impurity transfer from the ceramic to the silicon during the elevated temperature consolidation process has resulted in very low minority carrier lifetimes and resulting low cell efficiencies. Detailed analysis of minority carrier lifetime, metals analysis and device characterization have been done. A full sized solar cell efficiency of 8% has been demonstrated.

  2. Physiological selectivity and activity reduction of insecticides by rainfall to predatory wasps of Tuta absoluta.

    PubMed

    Barros, Emerson C; Bacci, Leandro; Picanco, Marcelo C; Martins, Júlio C; Rosado, Jander F; Silva, Gerson A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we carried out three bioassays with nine used insecticides in tomato crops to identify their efficiency against tomato leaf miner Tuta absoluta, the physiological selectivity and the activity reduction of insecticides by three rain regimes to predatory wasps Protonectarina sylveirae and Polybia scutellaris. We assessed the mortality caused by the recommended doses of abamectin, beta-cyfluthrin, cartap, chlorfenapyr, etofenprox, methamidophos, permethrin, phenthoate and spinosad to T. absoluta and wasps at the moment of application. In addition, we evaluated the wasp mortality due to the insecticides for 30 days on plants that did not receive rain and on plants that received 4 or 125 mm of rain. Spinosad, cartap, chlorfenapyr, phenthoate, abamectin and methamidophos caused mortality higher than 90% to T. absoluta, whereas the pyrethroids beta-cyfluthrin, etofenprox and permethrin caused mortality between 8.5% and 46.25%. At the moment of application, all the insecticides were highly toxic to the wasps, causing mortality higher than 80%. In the absence of rain, all the insecticides continued to cause high mortality to the wasps for 30 days after the application. The toxicity of spinosad and methamidophos on both wasp species; beta-cyfluthrin on P. sylveirae and chlorfenapyr and abamectin on P. scutellaris, decreased when the plants received 4 mm of rain. In contrast, the other insecticides only showed reduced toxicity on the wasps when the plants received 125 mm of rain.

  3. Incidence of and Factors Associated with Sinus Membrane Perforation During Maxillary Sinus Augmentation Using the Reamer Drilling Approach: A Double-Center Case Series.

    PubMed

    Monje, Alberto; Monje-Gil, Florencio; Burgueño, Miguel; Gonzalez-Garcia, Raúl; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2016-01-01

    Maxillary sinus membrane perforation has been reported as the most common intraoperative complication during sinus augmentation, potentially leading to postoperative infection and consequent loss of graft or even implant failure. Numerous anatomical factors have been demonstrated to affect membrane tearing. However, careful use of proper instrumentation, such as a reamer, seems to play an important role in minimizing the incidence of these complications. Hence, the aim of the present study was to (1) investigate the reliability of reamer drilling for lateral window preparation; (2) examine the incidence of membrane perforation; and (3) study the factors that might influence membrane perforation. Results from this study showed the safety and effectiveness of using a reamer to perform lateral window approach sinus augmentation. The sinus membrane perforation rate was found to be 12.5%. A slightly higher perforation rate was noted in thinner maxillary lateral walls (< 1.25 mm). The authors concluded that reamer drilling is a safe and effective alternate technique for opening the lateral window wall when the lateral wall thickness is ≥ 1.25mm.

  4. Effects of dose reduction on the detectability of standardized radiolucent lesions in digital panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Dula, K; Sanderink, G; van der Stelt, P F; Mini, R; Buser, D

    1998-08-01

    Dose reduction in digital panoramic radiography was studied. Intentional underexposure was performed with the Orthophos DS while six different human mandibles were radiographed. Exposure settings were 69 kV/15 mA (standard), 64 kV/16 mA, and 60 kV/16 mA. Standardized spherical defects, each either 1 or 1.25 mm in diameter, were simulated in 288 of 432 images, and seven observers decided whether defects were present or not. Areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves were calculated. They showed no significant differences in the detectability of the 1-mm defect at 69, 64, or 60 kV. For the 1.25-mm defect, no difference was found between the 69 and 60 kV images, but a statistically significant different detectability was found for 64 kV images in comparison with both 69 and 60 kV images. A dose reduction of up to 43% was ascertained with a Pedo-RT-Humanoid phantom when panoramic radiography was performed at 60 kV/16 mA. The conclusion is that with the Orthophos DS, it seems possible to reduce the dose rate of x-rays without loss of diagnostic quality in the case of radiolucent changes. PMID:9720100

  5. Optimization of selective emitter fabrication method for solar cells using a laser grooving.

    PubMed

    Jung, W W; Kim, S C; Jung, S W; Moon, I Y; Kumar, K; Lee, Y W; Kim, S Y; Ju, M K; Han, S K; Yi, J

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, screen-printing laser grooved buried contact (LGBC) method was applied, which is compatible with the existing screen-printed solar cell equipment and facilities. Experiments were performed in order to optimize short circuit current (I(sc)), open circuit voltage (V(oc)) and fill factor of high efficiency solar cells. To enhance I(sc), V(oc) and efficiency, heavy doping was performed at low sheet resistance in the laser grooved region of the cell. In contrast, light doping was carried out at a high sheet resistance in the non-laser grooved region. To increase fill factor, porous silicon found on the wafer after dipping in an HF solution to remove SiN(x), was cleared. The fabricated screen-printing LGBC solar cell using a 125 mm x 125 mm single crystalline silicon wafer exhibited an efficiency of 17.2%. The results show that screen-printing LGBC method can be applied for high efficiency solar cells.

  6. Effects of dose reduction on the detectability of standardized radiolucent lesions in digital panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Dula, K; Sanderink, G; van der Stelt, P F; Mini, R; Buser, D

    1998-08-01

    Dose reduction in digital panoramic radiography was studied. Intentional underexposure was performed with the Orthophos DS while six different human mandibles were radiographed. Exposure settings were 69 kV/15 mA (standard), 64 kV/16 mA, and 60 kV/16 mA. Standardized spherical defects, each either 1 or 1.25 mm in diameter, were simulated in 288 of 432 images, and seven observers decided whether defects were present or not. Areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves were calculated. They showed no significant differences in the detectability of the 1-mm defect at 69, 64, or 60 kV. For the 1.25-mm defect, no difference was found between the 69 and 60 kV images, but a statistically significant different detectability was found for 64 kV images in comparison with both 69 and 60 kV images. A dose reduction of up to 43% was ascertained with a Pedo-RT-Humanoid phantom when panoramic radiography was performed at 60 kV/16 mA. The conclusion is that with the Orthophos DS, it seems possible to reduce the dose rate of x-rays without loss of diagnostic quality in the case of radiolucent changes.

  7. Physiological selectivity and activity reduction of insecticides by rainfall to predatory wasps of Tuta absoluta.

    PubMed

    Barros, Emerson C; Bacci, Leandro; Picanco, Marcelo C; Martins, Júlio C; Rosado, Jander F; Silva, Gerson A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we carried out three bioassays with nine used insecticides in tomato crops to identify their efficiency against tomato leaf miner Tuta absoluta, the physiological selectivity and the activity reduction of insecticides by three rain regimes to predatory wasps Protonectarina sylveirae and Polybia scutellaris. We assessed the mortality caused by the recommended doses of abamectin, beta-cyfluthrin, cartap, chlorfenapyr, etofenprox, methamidophos, permethrin, phenthoate and spinosad to T. absoluta and wasps at the moment of application. In addition, we evaluated the wasp mortality due to the insecticides for 30 days on plants that did not receive rain and on plants that received 4 or 125 mm of rain. Spinosad, cartap, chlorfenapyr, phenthoate, abamectin and methamidophos caused mortality higher than 90% to T. absoluta, whereas the pyrethroids beta-cyfluthrin, etofenprox and permethrin caused mortality between 8.5% and 46.25%. At the moment of application, all the insecticides were highly toxic to the wasps, causing mortality higher than 80%. In the absence of rain, all the insecticides continued to cause high mortality to the wasps for 30 days after the application. The toxicity of spinosad and methamidophos on both wasp species; beta-cyfluthrin on P. sylveirae and chlorfenapyr and abamectin on P. scutellaris, decreased when the plants received 4 mm of rain. In contrast, the other insecticides only showed reduced toxicity on the wasps when the plants received 125 mm of rain. PMID:25421627

  8. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, S; Wang, Y; Weng, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle.

  9. Incidence of and Factors Associated with Sinus Membrane Perforation During Maxillary Sinus Augmentation Using the Reamer Drilling Approach: A Double-Center Case Series.

    PubMed

    Monje, Alberto; Monje-Gil, Florencio; Burgueño, Miguel; Gonzalez-Garcia, Raúl; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2016-01-01

    Maxillary sinus membrane perforation has been reported as the most common intraoperative complication during sinus augmentation, potentially leading to postoperative infection and consequent loss of graft or even implant failure. Numerous anatomical factors have been demonstrated to affect membrane tearing. However, careful use of proper instrumentation, such as a reamer, seems to play an important role in minimizing the incidence of these complications. Hence, the aim of the present study was to (1) investigate the reliability of reamer drilling for lateral window preparation; (2) examine the incidence of membrane perforation; and (3) study the factors that might influence membrane perforation. Results from this study showed the safety and effectiveness of using a reamer to perform lateral window approach sinus augmentation. The sinus membrane perforation rate was found to be 12.5%. A slightly higher perforation rate was noted in thinner maxillary lateral walls (< 1.25 mm). The authors concluded that reamer drilling is a safe and effective alternate technique for opening the lateral window wall when the lateral wall thickness is ≥ 1.25mm. PMID:27333013

  10. Uncoupling of the baroreflex by N(N)-cholinergic blockade in dissecting the components of cardiovascular regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. R.; Jordan, J.; Black, B. K.; Costa, F.; Robertson, D.

    1998-01-01

    Systemic administration of adrenergic agonists and nitric oxide donors is used extensively to determine cardiovascular receptor sensitivity. Conclusions regarding receptor sensitivity in the presence of the baroreflex may be misleading. In 8 normal volunteers, we determined the heart rate and blood pressure changes after incremental bolus doses of isoproterenol, phenylephrine, and sodium nitroprusside before and during neuronal nicotinic cholinergic (N(N)-cholinergic) blockade with trimethaphan. Results are given as median (25th/75th percentile). With trimethaphan, the baroreflex slope (as determined by bolus doses of nitroprusside and phenylephrine) decreased from 24 (22/26) to 0.00 (0.00/0.09) ms/mm Hg (P<0.01). The dose of isoproterenol that decreased systolic blood pressure (SBP) 12.5 mm Hg changed from 0.61 (0.51/5.3) to 0.17 (0.12/0.21) microg (P<0.01); the dose required to increase heart rate 12.5 bpm changed from 0.22 (0.17/0.41) to 0.74 (0.33/2.3) microg (P<0.01). The dose of nitroprusside required to decrease SBP 12.5 mm Hg changed from 2.3 (1.3/3.4) to 0.18 (0.14/0.24) microg/kg (P<0.01). The dose of phenylephrine required to increase SBP 12.5 mm Hg changed from 135 (110/200) to 16 (10/30) microg (P<0.01). We conclude that the efferent arc of the baroreflex can be completely interrupted with N(N)-cholinergic blockade. Estimation of adrenoreceptor sensitivity and sensitivity to nitric oxide donors by systemic administration of agonists is severely confounded by baroreflexes. Uncoupling of the baroreflex by N(N)-cholinergic blockade may be a useful method to obtain an integrated measure of adrenergic receptor sensitivity and sensitivity to nitric oxide donors in humans. This approach would permit the comparison of normal and abnormal physiological states without the "noise" of baroreflex buffering.

  11. Effectiveness of dust control methods for crystalline silica and respirable suspended particulate matter exposure during manual concrete surface grinding.

    PubMed

    Akbar-Khanzadeh, Farhang; Milz, Sheryl A; Wagner, Cynthia D; Bisesi, Michael S; Ames, April L; Khuder, Sadik; Susi, Pam; Akbar-Khanzadeh, Mahboubeh

    2010-12-01

    Concrete grinding exposes workers to unacceptable levels of crystalline silica dust, known to cause diseases such as silicosis and possibly lung cancer. This study examined the influence of major factors of exposure and effectiveness of existing dust control methods by simulating field concrete grinding in an enclosed workplace laboratory. Air was monitored during 201 concrete grinding sessions while using a variety of grinders, accessories, and existing dust control methods, including general ventilation (GV), local exhaust ventilation (LEV), and wet grinding. Task-specific geometric mean (GM) of respirable crystalline silica dust concentrations (mg/m³ for LEV:HEPA-, LEV:Shop-vac-, wet-, and uncontrolled-grinding, while GV was off/on, were 0.17/0.09, 0.57/0.13, 1.11/0.44, and 23.1/6.80, respectively. Silica dust concentrations (mg/m³ using 100-125 mm (4-5 inch) and 180 mm (7 inch) grinding cups were 0.53/0.22 and 2.43/0.56, respectively. GM concentrations of silica dust were significantly lower for (1) GV on (66.0%) vs. off, and (2) LEV:HEPA- (99.0%), LEV:Shop-vac- (98.1%) or wet- (94.4%) vs. uncontrolled-grinding. Task-specific GM of respirable suspended particulate matter (RSP) concentrations (mg/m³ for LEV:HEPA-, LEV:Shop-vac-, wet-, and uncontrolled grinding, while GV was off/on, were 1.58/0.63, 7.20/1.15, 9.52/4.13, and 152/47.8, respectively. GM concentrations of RSP using 100-125 mm and 180 mm grinding cups were 4.78/1.62 and 22.2/5.06, respectively. GM concentrations of RSP were significantly lower for (1) GV on (70.2%) vs. off, and (2) LEV:HEPA- (98.9%), LEV:Shop-vac- (96.9%) or wet- (92.6%) vs. uncontrolled grinding. Silica dust and RSP were not significantly affected by (1) orientation of grinding surfaces (vertical vs. inclined); (2) water flow rates for wet grinding; (3) length of task-specific sampling time; or, (4) among cup sizes of 100, 115 or 125 mm. No combination of factors or control methods reduced an 8-hr exposure level to below the

  12. Rapid estimation of lives of deficient superpave mixes and laboratory-based accelerated mix testing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manandhar, Chandra Bahadur

    The engineers from the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT) often have to decide whether or not to accept non-conforming Superpave mixtures during construction. The first part of this study focused on estimating lives of deficient Superpave pavements incorporating nonconforming Superpave mixtures. These criteria were based on the Hamburg Wheel-Tracking Device (HWTD) test results and analysis. The second part of this study focused on developing accelerated mix testing models to considerably reduce test duration. To accomplish the first objective, nine fine-graded Superpave mixes of 12.5-mm nominal maximum aggregate size (NMAS) with asphalt grade PG 64-22 from six administrative districts of KDOT were selected. Specimens were prepared at three different target air void levels Ndesign gyrations and four target simulated in-place density levels with the Superpave gyratory compactor. Average number of wheel passes to 20-mm rut depth, creep slope, stripping slope, and stripping inflection point in HWTD tests were recorded and then used in the statistical analysis. Results showed that, in general, higher simulated in-place density up to a certain limit of 91% to 93%, results in a higher number of wheel passes until 20-mm rut depth in HWTD tests. A Superpave mixture with very low air voids Ndesign (2%) level performed very poorly in the HWTD test. HWTD tests were also performed on six 12.5-mm NMAS mixtures with air voids Ndesign of 4% for six projects, simulated in-place density of 93%, two temperature levels and five load levels with binder grades of PG 64-22, PG 64-28, and PG 70-22. Field cores of 150-mm in diameter from three projects in three KDOT districts with 12.5-mm NMAS and asphalt grade of PG 64-22 were also obtained and tested in HWTD for model evaluation. HWTD test results indicated as expected. Statistical analysis was performed and accelerated mix testing models were developed to determine the effect of increased temperature and load on the duration of the HWTD test. Good consistency between predicted and observed test results was obtained when higher temperature and standard load level were used. Test duration of the HWTD can thus be reduced to two hours or less using accelerated mix testing (statistical) models.

  13. SU-C-210-04: Considerable Pancreatic Tumor Motion During Breath-Hold Measured Using Intratumoral Fiducials On Fluoroscopic Movies

    SciTech Connect

    Lens, E; Horst, A van der; Versteijne, E; Tienhoven, G van; Bel, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Using a breath hold (BH) technique during radiotherapy of pancreatic tumors is expected to reduce intra-fractional motion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tumor motion during BH. Methods: In this pilot study, we included 8 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients. All had 2– 4 intratumoral gold fiducials. Patients were asked to perform 3 consecutive 30-second end-inhale BHs on day 5, 10 and 15 of their three-week treatment. During BH, airflow through a mouthpiece was measured using a spirometer. Any inadvertent flow of air during BH was monitored for all patients. We measured tumor motion on lateral fluoroscopic movies (57 in total) made during BH. In each movie the fiducials as a group were tracked over time in superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) direction using 2-D image correlation between consecutive frames. We determined for each patient the range of intra-BH motion over all movies; we also determined the absolute means and standard deviations (SDs) for the entire patient group. Additionally, we investigated the relation between inadvertent airflow during BH and the intra-BH motion. Results: We found intra-BH tumor motion of up to 12.5 mm (range, 1.0–12.5 mm) in SI direction and up to 8.0 mm (range, 1.0–8.0 mm) in AP direction. The absolute mean motion over the patient population was 4.7 (SD: 3.0) mm and 2.8 (SD: 1.2) mm in the SI and AP direction, respectively. Patients were able to perform stable consecutive BHs; during only 20% of the movies we found very small airflows (≤ 65 ml). These were mostly stepwise in nature and could not explain the continuous tumor motions we observed. Conclusion: We found substantial (up to 12.5 mm) pancreatic tumor motion during BHs. We found minimal inadvertent airflow, seen only during a minority of BHs, and this did not explain the obtained results. This work was supported by the foundation Bergh in het Zadel through the Dutch Cancer Society (KWF Kankerbestrijding) project No. UVA 2011-5271.

  14. Fourier transform-limited optical frequency-modulated continuous-wave interferometry over several tens of laser coherence lengths.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weilin; Zhou, Qian; Bretenaker, Fabien; Xia, Zongyang; Shi, Hongxiao; Qin, Jie; Dong, Yi; Hu, Weisheng

    2016-07-01

    We report on a versatile optical frequency-modulated continuous-wave interferometry technique that exploits wideband phase locking for generating highly coherent linear laser frequency chirps. This technique is based on an ultra-short delay-unbalanced interferometer, which leads to a large bandwidth, short lock time, and robust operation even in the absence of any isolation from environmental perturbations. In combination with a digital delay-matched phase error compensation, this permits the achievement of a range window about 60 times larger than the intrinsic laser coherence length with a 1.25 mm Fourier transform-limited spatial resolution. The demonstrated configuration can be easily applied to virtually any semiconductor laser. PMID:27367076

  15. Spectral induced polarization and the hydraulic properties of New Zealand sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, S.; Ingham, M.

    2014-12-01

    Laboratory measurements of spectral induced polarization (SIP) and permeability have been made on unconsolidated samples representative of shallow coastal aquifers in New Zealand. The samples consisted of sands sieved into different fractions ranging from a mean grain size of 1.0 mm to 0.125 mm. Although the occurrence in New Zealand natural sands of titomagnetite means that the magnitude of the SIP phase response is significantly greater than is generally found for "clean" sands, the peak in SIP phase shows a clear dependence on grain size. The SIP spectra have been represented in terms of a Cole-Cole model and the relaxation times derived from this show a strong linear correlation with the measured values of permeability. The SIP and permeability measurements are then extended to mixtures of sieved sands, sand with varying amount of clay, samples with varying amount of magnetic minerals and also natural samples from various locations in New Zealand.

  16. Photoacoustic imaging of carotid artery atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruizinga, Pieter; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; de Jong, Nico; Springeling, Geert; Robertus, Jan Lukas; van der Lugt, Aad; van Soest, Gijs

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a method for photoacoustic imaging of the carotid artery, tailored toward detection of lipid-rich atherosclerotic lesions. A common human carotid artery was obtained at autopsy, embedded in a neck mimicking phantom and imaged with a multimodality imaging system using interstitial illumination. Light was delivered through a 1.25-mm-diameter optical probe that can be placed in the pharynx, allowing the carotid artery to be illuminated from within the body. Ultrasound imaging and photoacoustic signal detection is achieved by an external 8-MHz linear array coupled to an ultrasound imaging system. Spectroscopic analysis of photoacoustic images obtained in the wavelength range from 1130 to 1250 nm revealed plaque-specific lipid accumulation in the collagen structure of the artery wall. These spectroscopic findings were confirmed by histology.

  17. Cladding technique for development of Ag In Cd decoupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teshigawara, M.; Harada, M.; Saito, S.; Kikuchi, K.; Kogawa, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Kawai, M.; Kurishita, H.; Konashi, K.

    2005-08-01

    To develop a Ag (silver)-In (indium)-Cd (cadmium) alloy decoupler, a method is needed to bond the decoupler between two plates of the Al alloy (A6061-T6). We found that a better HIP condition was temperature, pressure and holding time at 803 K, 100 MPa and 1 h, respectively, for small test pieces ( ϕ 22 mm in diam. × 5 mm in height). Especially, a sandwich case (a Ag-In plate with thickness of 0.5 mm between two Ag-Cd plates with thickness of 1.25 mm) gave easier (or better) bonding results. Though a hardened layer is found in the bonding layer, the rupture strength of the bonding layer is more than 30 MPa, which is higher than the design stress in our application.

  18. High-Speed Laser Scanner Maps a Surface in Three Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Joseph; Schuet, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    A scanning optoelectronic instrument generates the digital equivalent of a threedimensional (X,Y,Z) map of a surface that spans an area with resolution on the order of 0.005 in. ( 0.125mm). Originally intended for characterizing surface flaws (e.g., pits) on space-shuttle thermal-insulation tiles, the instrument could just as well be used for similar purposes in other settings in which there are requirements to inspect the surfaces of many objects. While many commercial instruments can perform this surface-inspection function, the present instrument offers a unique combination of capabilities not available in commercial instruments. This instrument utilizes a laser triangulation method that has been described previously in NASA Tech Briefs in connection with simpler related instruments used for different purposes. The instrument includes a sensor head comprising a monochrome electronic camera and two lasers. The camera is a high-resolution

  19. Investigation of the magnetic properties of Li0.8Na0.2FePO4 by using the Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Byung Ug; Kouh, Taejoon; Kim, Chul Sung; Sur, Jung Chul

    2016-08-01

    We have investigated Li0.8Na0.2FePO4, a cathode material for secondary battery applications, by using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The crystal structure is found to be orthorhombic with lattice parameters of a 0 = 10.333 Å, b 0 = 6.011 Å and c 0 = 4.700 Å. From the temperature dependence of both the magnetization and the Mössbauer spectra, the Néel temperature is found to be T N = 51 K and the spin reorientation temperature to be T S = 20 K. The magnetic hyperfine field ( H hf ), electric quadrupole splitting (Δ E Q ) and isomer shift ( δ) at 4.2 K are found to be H hf = 130.50 kOe, Δ E Q = 2.63 mm/s and δ = 1.25 mm/s.

  20. Laser cooling of cesium atoms below 3 microkelvins

    SciTech Connect

    Salomon, C.; Dalibard, J.; Phillips, W.D. , Departement de Physique de l ENS, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 ); Clairon, A. ); Guellati, S. )

    1991-08-05

    We have measured the temperature of cesium atoms released from optical molasses. For a wide range of laser intensity and detuning from resonance, the temperature depends only on the intensity to detuning ratio. The lowest temperature achieved is 2.5{plus minus}0.6 {mu}K, which corresponds to an rms velocity of 12.5 mm/s or 3.6 times the single-photon recoil velocity. This is, to our knowledge, the coldest kinetic temperature ever measured for three dimensional (3D) cooling. We then discuss the possibility of using such a cold sample of atoms for realizing a high performance atomic clock in a fountain geometry. In particular, a method for launching the atoms upwards, while maintaining the very cold temperature, is demonstrated.

  1. Composite germanium monochromators - Results for the TriCS single-crystal diffractometer at SINQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schefer, J.; Fischer, S.; Böhm, M.; Keller, L.; Horisberger, M.; Medarde, M.; Fischer, P.

    Composite germanium monochromators are foremost in application in neutron diffraction due to their good scattering properties, low absorption values and the diamond structure which avoids second-order contamination when using hhk reflections (all odd). Our slices for the monochromator are built from 24 wafers, each 0.4 mm thick. The alignment of the wafers within the final composite wafer package has been improved by adding tin for the soldering process with a sputtering method instead of foils. Nine slices, each 12.5 mm high, are mounted on separate miniature goniometer heads to the focusing monochromator. The focusing angle is controlled by only one motor/digitizer by using a sophisticated mechanism. Turning the monochromator by 9° around overlineω allow access of the 311 (primary) and 511 (secondary) reflection. We also show the importance of permanent quality control with neutrons. The monochromator will be used on the single-crystal diffractometer TriCS at SINQ.

  2. Recovery Act: Novel Kerf-Free PV Wafering that provides a low-cost approach to generate wafers from 150um to 50um in thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, Theodore E.

    2013-05-06

    The technical paper summarizes the project work conducted in the development of Kerf-Free silicon wafering equipment for silicon solar wafering. This new PolyMax technology uses a two step process of implantation and cleaving to exfoliate 50um to 120um wafers with thicknesses ranging from 50um to 120um from a 125mm or 156mm pseudo-squared silicon ingot. No kerf is generated using this method of wafering. This method of wafering contrasts with the current method of making silicon solar wafers using the industry standard wire saw equipment. The report summarizes the activity conducted by Silicon Genesis Corporation in working to develop this technology further and to define the roadmap specifications for the first commercial proto-type equipment for high volume solar wafer manufacturing using the PolyMax technology.

  3. Physical characterization of neurocatheter performance in a brain phantom gelatin with nanoscale porosity: steady-state and oscillatory flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauman, M. A.; Gillies, G. T.; Raghavan, R.; Brady, M. L.; Pedain, C.

    2004-01-01

    An agarose gelatin having nanoscale transport properties similar to those of in vivo mammalian brain was employed as a surrogate for living brain tissue in the evaluation of infusion therapy protocols and neurocatheters to be used in the treatment of brain tumours. The catheters under study were a polyimide tube of 950 µm outer diameter (OD) and 750 µm inner diameter (ID), and a silicone tube of 2.5 mm OD and 1.25 mm ID. From the pressure profiles that were measured during infusions of a solution of Bromphenol Blue dye into this gel, we infer that forces on the order of 0.1 fN were driving the solute molecules through the {\\approx } 200 nm intramatrix voids in the gel at rates of {\\approx } 10\

  4. Rail accelerator technology and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zana, L. M.; Kerslake, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    Rail accelerators offer a viable means of launching ton-size payloads from the Earth's surface to space. The results of two mission studies which indicate that an Earth-to-Space Rail Launcher (ESRL) system is not only technically feasible but also economically beneficial, particularly when large amounts of bulk cago are to be delivered to space are given. An in-house experimental program at the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) was conducted in parallel with the mission studies with the objective of examining technical feasibility issues. A 1 m long - 12.5 by 12.5 mm bore rail accelerator as designed with clear polycarbonate sidewalls to visually observe the plasma armature acceleration. The general character of plasma/projectile dynamics is described for a typical test firing.

  5. Diet of double-crested cormorants wintering in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campo, J.J.; Thompson, B.C.; Barron, J.C.; Telfair II, R. C.; Durocher, P.; Gutreuter, S.

    1993-01-01

    The diets of 420 Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) were studied during November 1986-March 1987 on eight public reservoirs in Texas. Prey included 29 fish species and the mean live weight of fish per bird was 122 g. Fishes a??415 mm long were ingested, but those a??125 mm accounted for 90% of cormorant food contents by number. Shad (Dorosoma spp.) and sunfishes (Lepomis spp.) accounted for 90% of the total food items by number. Consumption of fishes (percent by weight) was different for male vs. female and adult vs. juvenile cormorants. Total consumption of fish by weight was consistent throughout the period; however, fewer but much larger fish were consumed after 15 February. Cormorants ate fishes that were most abundant in reservoirs. Sport fishes made up a substantial portion of cormorant food by weight, but not by number on some reservoirs. Cormorants ate very few large sport fish, however.

  6. Millimeter Resolved Observations of the HD 181327 Debris Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Amy

    2016-01-01

    The presence of debris disks around young main sequence stars hints at the structure of hidden planetary systems, with any deviations from axisymmetry pointing toward interactions among planetesimals. HD 181327 is a ~24 Myr old F5.5 member of the Beta Pic Moving Group that hosts an extremely bright debris disk (L_IR/L_\\star = 0.25%) of dust continuously generated through the collisional erosion of a circumstellar ring of planetesimals at 90 AU. An HST STIS observation of the HD 181327 disk provided tentative evidence for the recent collisional destruction of a Pluto mass object. Spatially resolved millimeter wavelength observations are crucial to investigate this scenario, characterize the structure of the dust disk, and characterize the gravitationally interacting grains. We present ALMA observations at ~1 arcsec resolution and investigate the azimuthal variations in the HD 181327 debris disk at 1.25 mm.

  7. Experimental Investigation and 3D Finite Element Prediction of Temperature Distribution during Travelling Heat Sourced from Oxyacetylene Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar Alkali, Adam; Lenggo Ginta, Turnad; Majdi Abdul-Rani, Ahmad

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a 3D transient finite element modelling of the workpiece temperature field produced during the travelling heat sourced from oxyacetylene flame. The proposed model was given in terms of preheat-only test applicable during thermally enhanced machining using the oxyacetylene flame as a heat source. The FEA model as well as the experimental test investigated the surface temperature distribution on 316L stainless steel at scanning speed of 100mm/min, 125mm/min 160mm/min, 200mm/min and 250mm/min. The parametric properties of the heat source maintained constant are; lead distance Ld =10mm, focus height Fh=7.5mm, oxygen gas pressure Poxy=15psi and acetylene gas pressure Pacty=25psi. An experimental validation of the temperature field induced on type 316L stainless steel reveal that temperature distribution increases when the travelling speed decreases.

  8. Temperature compensation of NdFeB permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Doose, C.

    1997-08-01

    Permanent magnet blocks of NdFeB have a relatively high maximum energy product. Because of its relatively low Curie temperature, however, NdFeB has a large temperature coefficient for its residual induction. The temperature coefficients of the relative magnetic fields ({Delta}B/B)/{Delta}T in the air gap of NdFeB dipole magnets were reduced from {minus}1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}/c to less than 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}/{degree}C under operating temperatures of {+-} 6 C. This was achieved passively by using 1.25-mm-thick strips of 30%-Ni-Fe alloy as flux shunts for the NdFeB blocks. The magnets with soft-steel poles and flux-return yokes were assembled and measured in a temperature-controlled environment.

  9. Dose enhancement close to platinum implants for the 4, 6, and 10 MV stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Joel Y.C.; Ng, Ben K.P.; Yu, K.N.

    2004-10-01

    Three photon interaction processes, namely, the photoelectric effect, Compton effect, and pair production, can occur when materials with high atomic numbers are irradiated by the high- and low-energy bremsstrahlung photons from a linear accelerator. A dose enhancement, due to the photoelectric effect and pair production, near targets with platinum implants (with a high atomic number) in radiosurgery cannot be predicted by the XKnife{sup reg} radiosurgery treatment planning system. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations using PRESTA EGS4 were employed to investigate the resulting dose enhancements from 4, 6, and 10 MV energies commonly used in the stereotactic radiosurgery system. Dose enhancements from 32% to 68% were observed close to the platinum implant for the above energies when using a 12.5 mm collimator. Comparatively higher dose enhancements were observed when using smaller collimators. It was found that this dose enhancement increased with beam energy but decreased as beam size increased.

  10. Performance of a lead radiator, gas tube calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, L.; Arenton, M.; Chen, T.Y.; Conetti, S.; Cox, B.; Delchamps, S.W.; Etemadi, B.; Fortney, L.; Guffey, K.; Haire, M.

    1989-03-13

    Design and performance of a 4.2 radiation length lead-sandwich, gas tube hodoscope are discussed. The device, measuring 1 /times/ 2 m/sup 2/ in area and 12 cm in depth, was employed in Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory experiment 705. Multiple samplings of anode wires situated within three-walled aluminum tubes were used to generate an X coordinate; similarly, capacitively coupled copper-clad strips were ganged together to yield a Y coordinate. The results reviewed are based on an analysis of electron calibration data taken during a recent six-month running period. In particular, position resolution (in millimeters) is seen to be 0.8 + 3.3/..sqrt..E + 31/E for the 9.92 mm spaced wires and 0.6 + 3.2/..sqrt..E + 32/E for the 12.5 mm strips, where E represents the electron beam energy in GeV. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  11. [POSSIBILITIES OF VACUUM THERAPY APPLICATION IN DISORDERS OF VENOUS OUTFLOW IN ISLET GRAFTS].

    PubMed

    Badyul, P O; Samoylenko, G E; Nor, N M; Slesarenko, K S

    2015-07-01

    The experience of "distressed" (problematic) flaps application in 33 patients with soft tissue defects over 2010-2014 years were analysed. It was proposed to use the local negative pressure for the prevention and treatment of complications associated with venous insufficiency or trombosis in using of plastics with vascularised complexes of tissues. Vacuum-therapy was conducted with the help of negative pressure apparatus "AGATE-Dnepr" (Ukraine) by attaching silver-containing polyurethane sponge on the operating zone, covering the flap with the surrounding skin netting band "Grassolind". The recommended standard of negative pressure of 75-125 mm Hg, both in impulse and in continuous mode was used. The high efficiency of vacuum-therapy for survival of grafts has been demonstrated. Thus, it might be considered as an effective element of prevention and treatment of complications associated with venous insufficiency or trombosis using of vascularised tissue complex plastics of defects.

  12. Distributed Non-evaporable Getter pumps for the storage ring of the APS

    SciTech Connect

    Dortwegt, R.; Benaroya, R.

    1993-07-01

    A pair of distributed Non-evaporable Getter (NeG) strip assemblies is installed in each of 236 aluminum vacuum chambers of the 1104-m storage ring of the Advanced Photon Source. Distributed pumping is provided to remove most of the gas resulting from photon-stimulated desorption occurring along the outer walls of the chambers. This is an efficient way of pumping because conductance is limited along the beam axis. The St-707 NeG strips are conditioned at 450{degree}C for 45 min. with 42 A. Base pressures obtained are also as low as 4 {times} 10{sup 11} Torr. The NeG strip assemblies are supported by a series of electrically isolated, 125-mm-long, interlocking stainless steel carriers. These unique interlocking carrier elements provide flexibility along the vacuum chamber curvature (r=38.96 m) and permit removal and installation of assemblies with as little as 150 mm external clearance between adjacent chambers.

  13. PIT Tagging Anurans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCreary, Brome

    2008-01-01

    The following video demonstrates a procedure to insert a passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag under the skin of an anuran (frog or toad) for research and monitoring purposes. Typically, a 12.5 mm tag (0.5 in.) is used to uniquely identify individual anurans as smal as 40 mm (1.6 in.) in length from snout to vent. Smaller tags are also available and allow smaller anurans to be tagged. The procedure does not differ for other sizes of tages or other sizes of anurans. Anyone using this procedure should ensure that the tag is small enough to fit easily behind the sacral hump of the anuran, as shown in this video.

  14. Effect of heat treatment on stress corrosion of Alloy 718 in pressurized-water-reactor primary water

    SciTech Connect

    Miglin, M.T.; Monter, J.V.; Wade, C.S.; Nelson, J.L.

    1992-12-31

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were conducted in 360{degrees}C pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) primary water using alloy 718 in various heat treatment conditions. Alloy X-750 in the HTH condition and an experimental heat of an alloy 718 variation, Hicoroy, were also tested for comparison. Fatigue-precracked, 12.5-mm-thick compact fracture specimens were subjected to a constant extension rate of 1.3 x 10{sup {minus}9} m/s. Crack growth rate was measured during testing using a reversing DC potential drop technique. Results in the form of SCC crack growth rate versus applied stress intensity demonstrate that the SCC resistance of alloy 718 in the PWR primary-side environment can be improved by changes in heat treatment.

  15. Pressurized subsampling system for pressured gas-hydrate-bearing sediment: Microscale imaging using X-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Yusuke Konno, Yoshihiro; Nagao, Jiro

    2014-09-01

    A pressurized subsampling system was developed for pressured gas hydrate (GH)-bearing sediments, which have been stored under pressure. The system subsamples small amounts of GH sediments from cores (approximately 50 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height) without pressure release to atmospheric conditions. The maximum size of the subsamples is 12.5 mm in diameter and 20 mm in height. Moreover, our system transfers the subsample into a pressure vessel, and seals the pressure vessel by screwing in a plug under hydraulic pressure conditions. In this study, we demonstrated pressurized subsampling from artificial xenon-hydrate sediments and nondestructive microscale imaging of the subsample, using a microfocus X-ray computed tomography (CT) system. In addition, we estimated porosity and hydrate saturation from two-dimensional X-ray CT images of the subsamples.

  16. Percutaneous Management of a Coronary Bifurcation Aneurysm with Mesh-Covered Stents and the Simultaneous Kissing Stent Technique.

    PubMed

    Crimi, Gabriele; Bartolini, Davide; Bellotti, Sandro; Iannone, Alessandro; Rubartelli, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    A 63-year-old man was admitted with a clinical diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (non-ST-segment elevation), characterized by regional hypokinesia of the left ventricular posterior and lateral walls and by positive cardiac biomarkers. The coronary angiogram showed a 12.5-mm-diameter aneurysm with a mural thrombus and possible distal embolism to the bifurcation of the left circumflex coronary artery and the 2nd marginal branch. The aneurysm was managed percutaneously by implanting 2 mesh-covered stents in accordance with the "simultaneous kissing stent" technique. Follow-up angiography and optical coherence tomography at 5 postprocedural months documented complete sealing of the aneurysm and diffuse in-stent restenosis. No sign of ischemia occurred during the subsequent follow-up.

  17. Landfill mining: Case study of a successful metals recovery project.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Travis P; Raymond, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Worldwide, the generation of municipal solid waste (MSW) is increasing and landfills continue to be the dominant method for managing solid waste. Because of inadequate diversion of reusable and recoverable materials, MSW landfills continue to receive significant quantities of recyclable materials, especially metals. The economic value of landfilled metals is significant, fostering interest worldwide in recovering the landfilled metals through mining. However, economically viable landfill mining for metals has been elusive due to multiple barriers including technological challenges and high costs of processing waste. The objective of this article is to present a case study of an economically successful landfill mining operation specifically to recover metals. The mining operation was at an ashfill, which serves a MSW waste-to-energy facility. Landfill mining operations began in November 2011. Between December 2011 and March 2015, 34,352 Mt of ferrous and non-ferrous metals were recovered and shipped for recycling, which consisted of metals >125 mm (5.2%), 50-125 mm (85.9%), <50mm (3.4%), zorba (4.6%), and mixed products (0.8%). The conservative estimated value of the recovered metal was $7.42 million. Mining also increased the landfill's airspace by 10,194 m(3) extending the life of the ashfill with an estimated economic value of $267,000. The estimated per-Mt cost for the extraction of metal was $158. This case study demonstrates that ashfills can be profitably mined for metals without financial support from government. Although there are comparatively few ashfills, the results and experience obtained from this case study can help foster further research into the potential recovery of metals from raw, landfilled MSW.

  18. Treatment of hardware infection after osteosynthesis of lower leg using negative pressure wound therapy and transforming powder dressing.

    PubMed

    Marinović, Marin; Ivandcić, Aldo; Spanjol, Josip; Pina, Maja; Bakota, Bore; Bandalović, Ante; Cukeljs, Fabijan

    2014-12-01

    Fractures of the distal part of the lower leg are more common in everyday practice and traumatology. In young and active patients these injuries are mainly caused by high energy trauma. They are treated with external fixator in first step, and in second step, after sanation of the soft tissue, with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). It is very safe and effective method of treatment. Treatment of the infections that occur in the early postoperative period after open reduction and internal fixation represents a great problem and challenge for surgeons. It is widely accepted that the presence of deep infection can't be cured in the presence of hardware. However, removal of hardware in the presence of unhealed fractures significantly complicates sanation of infection and fracture itself We have decided to present a 35-years-old patient with a hardware infection with present chronic wound with hardware exposed eight months after the first operation and six months after second operation. The wound measured one centimeter in diameter with cell detritus and bad granulations tissue inside the wound. Hardwre was exposed in the depth of the wound.The secretion was minimal. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) was applicated after debridemet and lavage performed in ambulatory conditions. The starting therapy was continuously -125 mm Hg of vacuum. After five days of NPWT the defect was partially filled with granula- tion tissue. For another five days we continue with NPWT with the same values of-125 mm Hg pressure but in the inter- mitent mode. After that period we used transforming powder dressing for covering and protection of the wound with was filled with granulation tissue. Five days later, wound was completely healed with epithelisation. After four months of patient follow-up, we found the wound is completely repaired. The patient denies pain and has continued orderly flow of fracture healing, with no signs of infection. PMID:25842766

  19. Endothelial function in normotensive and high-normal hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Plavnik, F L; Ajzen, S A; Christofalo, D M J; Barbosa, C S P; Kohlmann, O

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of a mild increment in blood pressure level on endothelial function, we evaluated 61 healthy volunteers (24 women, 37 men, and aged 35-50 years). All subjects underwent a blood chemistry panel to exclude any metabolic abnormalities and were submitted to a Doppler ultrasound of the brachial artery to assess endothelial function. We assessed the endothelial response to reactive hyperaemia and exogenous nitric oxide administration considering an increase in systolic blood pressure (SBP) at each 10-mm Hg interval. Our study population was divided as follows: SBP <115 mm Hg (SG1, n=13), SBP > or =115 mm Hg and <125 mm Hg (SG2, n=20), SBP > or = 125 mm Hg and <135 mm Hg (SG3, n=13) and SBP > or = 135 mm Hg and < 140 mm Hg (SG4, n=15). We found a significant difference in flow-mediated dilation among SG2, SG3 and SG4, 16.2+/-5.6, 13.4+/-5.2 and 11.5+/-3.6%, P<0.05, respectively). After nitrate administration, we observed a nonsignificant decrease in brachial artery dilation among groups, P=0.217. Our data showed in a healthy normotensive population, without any risk factor for atherosclerotic disease that small increases in SBP but not in diastolic blood pressure may impair endothelial function even in subjects considered as high-normal, meaning that this population deserves more attention than usually ascribed to intervene and prevent complications, as endothelial dysfunction may represent an early change in those who develop hypertension later in life. PMID:17287837

  20. Unenhanced MDCT in Suspected Urolithiasis: Improved Stone Detection and Density Measurements Using Coronal Maximum-Intensity-Projection Images

    PubMed Central

    Corwin, Michael T.; Hsu, Margaret; McGahan, John P.; Wilson, Machelle; Lamba, Ramit

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to determine whether coronal maximum-intensity-projection (MIP) reformations improve urinary tract stone detection and density measurements compared with routine axial and coronal images. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty-five consecutive patients who underwent MDCT for suspected urolithiasis were included. Two radiologists independently determined the number of stones on 5-, 3-, and 1.25-mm axial, 5- and 3-mm coronal, and 5-mm coronal MIP images. The reference standard was obtained by consensus review using all six datasets. Stone density was determined for all calculi 4 mm or larger on all datasets. RESULTS There were a total of 115 stones. Reader 1 identified 111 (96.5%), 112 (97.4%), 97 (84.3%), 102 (88.7%), 99 (86.1%), and 85 (73.9%) stones and reader 2 identified 105 (91.3%), 102 (88.7%), 85 (73.9%), 89 (77.4%), 89 (77.4%), and 76 (66.1%) stones on the MIP, 1.25-mm axial, 3-mm axial, 3-mm coronal, 5-mm coronal, and 5-mm axial images, respectively. Both readers identified more stones on the MIP images than on the 3- or 5-mm axial or coronal images (p < 0.0001). The mean difference in stone attenuation compared with the thin axial images was significantly less for the MIP images (44.6 HU) compared with 3-mm axial (235 HU), 3-mm coronal (309 HU), and 5-mm coronal (329.6 HU) or axial images (347.8 HU) (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION Coronal MIP reformations allow more accurate identification and density measurements of urinary tract stones compared with routine axial and coronal reformations. PMID:24147474

  1. Participation in multilateral effort to develop high performance integrated CPC evacuated collectors. [Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, R.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

    1992-05-31

    The University of Chicago Solar Energy Group has had a continuing program and commitment to develop an advanced evacuated solar collector integrating nonimaging concentration into its design. During the period from 1985--1987, some of our efforts were directed toward designing and prototyping a manufacturable version of an Integrated Compound Parabolic Concentrator (ICPC) evacuated collector tube as part of an international cooperative effort involving six organizations in four different countries. This multilateral'' project made considerable progress towards a commercially practical collector. One of two basic designs considered employed a heat pipe and an internal metal reflector CPC. We fabricated and tested two large diameter (125mm) borosilicate glass collector tubes to explore this concept. The other design also used a large diameter (125mm) glass tube but with a specially configured internal shaped mirror CPC coupled to a U-tube absorber. Performance projections in a variety of systems applications using the computer design tools developed by the International Energy Agency (IEA) task on evacuated collectors were used to optimize the optical and thermal design. The long-term goal of this work continues to be the development of a high efficiency, low cost solar collector to supply solar thermal energy at temperatures up to 250{degree}C. Some experience and perspectives based on our work are presented and reviewed. Despite substantial progress, the stability of research support and the market for commercial solar thermal collectors were such that the project could not be continued. A cooperative path involving university, government and industrial collaboration remains the most attractive near term option for developing a commercial ICPC.

  2. Participation in multilateral effort to develop high performance integrated CPC evacuated collectors. Final report, July 1, 1986--May 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, R.; O`Gallagher, J.J.

    1992-05-31

    The University of Chicago Solar Energy Group has had a continuing program and commitment to develop an advanced evacuated solar collector integrating nonimaging concentration into its design. During the period from 1985--1987, some of our efforts were directed toward designing and prototyping a manufacturable version of an Integrated Compound Parabolic Concentrator (ICPC) evacuated collector tube as part of an international cooperative effort involving six organizations in four different countries. This ``multilateral`` project made considerable progress towards a commercially practical collector. One of two basic designs considered employed a heat pipe and an internal metal reflector CPC. We fabricated and tested two large diameter (125mm) borosilicate glass collector tubes to explore this concept. The other design also used a large diameter (125mm) glass tube but with a specially configured internal shaped mirror CPC coupled to a U-tube absorber. Performance projections in a variety of systems applications using the computer design tools developed by the International Energy Agency (IEA) task on evacuated collectors were used to optimize the optical and thermal design. The long-term goal of this work continues to be the development of a high efficiency, low cost solar collector to supply solar thermal energy at temperatures up to 250{degree}C. Some experience and perspectives based on our work are presented and reviewed. Despite substantial progress, the stability of research support and the market for commercial solar thermal collectors were such that the project could not be continued. A cooperative path involving university, government and industrial collaboration remains the most attractive near term option for developing a commercial ICPC.

  3. Effects of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Mesenchymal Stem Cells Proliferation and Osteogenic Differentiation in a Fibrin Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jin; Yu, Aixi; Qi, Baiwen; Li, Zonghuan; Hu, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been proven to be an effective therapeutic method for the treatment of recalcitrant wounds. However, its role in bone healing remains to be unclear. Here, we investigated the effects of NPWT on rat periosteum-derived mesenchymal stem cells (P-MSCs) proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation in a 3D fibrin matrix. P-MSCs underwent primary culture for three passages before being used to construct cell clots. The fibrin clots were incubated with NPWT under continuous suction at −125 mmHg in a subatmospheric perfusion bioreactor. Clots exposed to atmospheric pressure served as the static control. Compared to the control group, cell proliferation significantly increased in NPWT group after incubation for 3 days. There was no statistical difference in apoptosis rate between two groups. The ALP activity and mineralization of P-MSCs all increased under continuous suction. The expressions of collagen type 1 and transcription factor Cbfa-1 were higher at the 1-, 3-, and 7-day timepoints and the expressions of osteocalcin and integrin β5 were higher at the 3-, and 7-day timepoints in the NPWT group. These results indicate that a short time treatment with NPWT, applied with continuous suction at −125 mmHg, can enhance cellular proliferation of P-MSCs and induce the differentiation toward an osteogenic phenotype. The mechanotransduction molecule integrin β5 was found to be highly expressed after NPWT treatment, which indicates that NPWT may play a positive role in fracture healing through enhance bone formation and decrease bone resorption. PMID:25216182

  4. TU-A-12A-07: CT-Based Biomarkers to Characterize Lung Lesion: Effects of CT Dose, Slice Thickness and Reconstruction Algorithm Based Upon a Phantom Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, B; Tan, Y; Tsai, W; Lu, L; Schwartz, L; So, J; Goldman, J; Lu, Z

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiogenomics promises the ability to study cancer tumor genotype from the phenotype obtained through radiographic imaging. However, little attention has been paid to the sensitivity of image features, the image-based biomarkers, to imaging acquisition techniques. This study explores the impact of CT dose, slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm on measuring image features using a thorax phantom. Methods: Twentyfour phantom lesions of known volume (1 and 2mm), shape (spherical, elliptical, lobular and spicular) and density (-630, -10 and +100 HU) were scanned on a GE VCT at four doses (25, 50, 100, and 200 mAs). For each scan, six image series were reconstructed at three slice thicknesses of 5, 2.5 and 1.25mm with continuous intervals, using the lung and standard reconstruction algorithms. The lesions were segmented with an in-house 3D algorithm. Fifty (50) image features representing lesion size, shape, edge, and density distribution/texture were computed. Regression method was employed to analyze the effect of CT dose, slice of thickness and reconstruction algorithm on these features adjusting 3 confounding factors (size, density and shape of phantom lesions). Results: The coefficients of CT dose, slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm are presented in Table 1 in the supplementary material. No significant difference was found between the image features calculated on low dose CT scans (25mAs and 50mAs). About 50% texture features were found statistically different between low doses and high doses (100 and 200mAs). Significant differences were found for almost all features when calculated on 1.25mm, 2.5mm, and 5mm slice thickness images. Reconstruction algorithms significantly affected all density-based image features, but not morphological features. Conclusions: There is a great need to standardize the CT imaging protocols for radiogenomics study because CT dose, slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm impact quantitative image features to various degrees as our study has shown.

  5. Using Mid-Upper Arm Circumference to End Treatment of Severe Acute Malnutrition Leads to Higher Weight Gains in the Most Malnourished Children

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Nancy M.; Myatt, Mark; Prudhon, Claudine; Briend, André

    2013-01-01

    Objective The World Health Organization recommends discharging children admitted to nutrition programs treating severe acute malnutrition, with a low mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC <115 mm) when weight gain is >15%. When this recommendation is followed, the most severely malnourished children receive a shorter treatment compared to children that are less severely malnourished. This study assesses whether using MUAC >125 mm as discharge criteria eliminates this effect. Methods and Findings Data from 753 children cured from a Médecins Sans Frontières outpatient nutrition program in Gedaref, North Sudan were analyzed. MUAC >125 mm was used as discharge criteria. Length of stay and percent weight gain of children were compared in relation to nutritional status on admission. Children with low MUAC on admission had a longer duration of treatment (p = 0.000) and also a higher percent weight gain (p = 0.000) than children with higher MUAC. Similar results with weight-for-height z-scores categories were shown with both duration of treatment (p = 0.000) and percent weight gain (p = 0.000). Conclusion This study shows that using MUAC as the discharge criteria eliminates the effect of shorter treatment in most severely malnourished children compared to least severely malnourished, as is observed with percent weight gain. The findings directly address the main concern that has been identified with the current WHO recommendation of using percent weight gain. MUAC could be used as discharge criteria, instead of percent weight gain, as having a longer duration of treatment and a higher percent weight gain for the most malnourished is highly desirable. PMID:23418442

  6. Commissioning and validation of BrainLAB cones for 6X FFF and 10X FFF beams on a Varian TrueBeam STx.

    PubMed

    Wiant, David B; Terrell, Jonathon A; Maurer, Jacqueline M; Yount, Caroline L; Sintay, Benjamin J

    2013-11-04

    Small field dosimetry is a challenging task. The difficulties of small field measurements, particularly stereotactic field size measurements, are highlighted by the large interinstitution variability that can be observed for circular cone collimator commissioning measurements. We believe the best way to improve the consistency of small field measurements is to clearly document and share the results of small field measurements. In this work we report on the commissioning and validation of a BrainLAB cone system for 6 MV and 10 MV flattening filter-free (FFF) beams on a Varian TrueBeam STx. Commissioning measurements consisted of output factors, percent depth dose, and off-axis factor measurements with a diode. Validation measurements were made in a polystyrene slab phantom at depths of 5 cm, 10 cm, and 15 cm using radiochromic film. Output factors for the 6xFFF cones are 0.689, 0.790, 0.830, 0.871, 0.890, and 0.901 for 4 mm, 6 mm, 7.5 mm, 10 mm, 12.5 mm, and the 15 mm cones, respectively. Output factors for the 10xFFF cones are 0.566, 0.699, 0.756, 0.826, 0.864, and 0.888 for 4 mm, 6 mm, 7.5 mm, 10 mm, 12.5 mm, and the 15 mm cones, respectively. The full width half maximum values of the off-axis factors agreed with the nominal cone size to within 0.5 mm. Validation measurements showed an agreement of absolute dose between calculation and plan of < 3.6%, and an agreement of field sizes of ≤ 0.3 mm in all cases. Radiochromic film validation measurements show reasonable agreement with beam models for circular collimators based on diode commissioning measurements.

  7. Effects of negative pressures on epithelial tight junctions and migration in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Chin; Tsai, Wen-Chung; Chen, Carl Pai-Chu; Lu, Yun-Mei; Wang, Jong-Shyan

    2010-08-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy has recently gained popularity in chronic wound care. This study attempted to explore effects of different negative pressures on epithelial migration in the wound-healing process. The electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) technique was used to create a 5 x 10(-4) cm(2) wound in the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) and human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells. The wounded cells were cultured in a negative pressure incubator at ambient pressure (AP) and negative pressures of 75 mmHg (NP(75)), 125 mmHg (NP(125)), and 175 mmHg (NP(175)). The effective time (ET), complete wound healing time (T(max)), healing rate (R(heal)), cell diameter, and wound area over time at different pressures were evaluated. Traditional wound-healing assays were prepared for fluorescent staining of cells viability, cell junction proteins, including ZO-1 and E-cadherin, and actins. Amount of cell junction proteins at AP and NP(125) was also quantified. In MDCK cells, the ET (1.25 +/- 0.27 h), T(max) (1.76 +/- 0.32 h), and R(heal) (2.94 +/- 0.62 x 10(-4) cm(2)/h) at NP(125) were significantly (P < 0.01) different from those at three other pressure conditions. In HaCaT cells, the T(max) (7.34 +/- 0.29 h) and R(heal) (6.82 +/- 0.26 x 10(-5) cm(2)/h) at NP(125) were significantly (P < 0.01) different from those at NP(75). Prominent cell migration features were identified in cells at the specific negative pressure. Cell migration activities at different pressures can be documented with the real-time wound-healing measurement system. Negative pressure of 125 mmHg can help disassemble the cell junction to enhance epithelial migration and subsequently result in quick wound closure.

  8. Landfill mining: Case study of a successful metals recovery project.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Travis P; Raymond, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Worldwide, the generation of municipal solid waste (MSW) is increasing and landfills continue to be the dominant method for managing solid waste. Because of inadequate diversion of reusable and recoverable materials, MSW landfills continue to receive significant quantities of recyclable materials, especially metals. The economic value of landfilled metals is significant, fostering interest worldwide in recovering the landfilled metals through mining. However, economically viable landfill mining for metals has been elusive due to multiple barriers including technological challenges and high costs of processing waste. The objective of this article is to present a case study of an economically successful landfill mining operation specifically to recover metals. The mining operation was at an ashfill, which serves a MSW waste-to-energy facility. Landfill mining operations began in November 2011. Between December 2011 and March 2015, 34,352 Mt of ferrous and non-ferrous metals were recovered and shipped for recycling, which consisted of metals >125 mm (5.2%), 50-125 mm (85.9%), <50mm (3.4%), zorba (4.6%), and mixed products (0.8%). The conservative estimated value of the recovered metal was $7.42 million. Mining also increased the landfill's airspace by 10,194 m(3) extending the life of the ashfill with an estimated economic value of $267,000. The estimated per-Mt cost for the extraction of metal was $158. This case study demonstrates that ashfills can be profitably mined for metals without financial support from government. Although there are comparatively few ashfills, the results and experience obtained from this case study can help foster further research into the potential recovery of metals from raw, landfilled MSW. PMID:26152366

  9. ED 03-2 HOME BLOOD PRESSURE MONITORING IS BETTER THAN OFFICE BP AND AMBULATORY BP: UPDATE.

    PubMed

    Kario, Kazuomi

    2016-09-01

    Out-of-office blood pressure (BP) measured by home BP monitoring (HBPM) or ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) was demonstrated to be superior to office BP for the prediction of cardiovascular events. The ABPM is superior to HBPM for detecting the all the BP-related risks throughout 24-hr, and the self-measured HBPM underestimates the risk of daytime stress hypertension and nocturnal hypertension. However, ABPM cannot always be provided in clinical practice, and home BP monitoring can be superior to ABPM as part of a home BP-guided antihypertension strategy in clinical practice. In clinical practice, we should use both ABPM and HBPM considering these device properties. We have developed the new ABPM device which is alternatively used as self-measure HBPM (Kario. Prog Cardiovasc Dis 2016, in press).The importance of on-treatment HBPM for the cardiovascular prognosis of hypertensive individuals was recently revealed in the largest real-world prospective study held to date, the Home blood pressure measurement with Olmesartan Naive patients to Establish Standard Target blood pressure (HONEST) study. That study of more than 21 000 hypertensive patients used HBPM, and the results demonstrated that when morning home systolic BP was well-controlled during the 2-year follow-up at < 125 mmHg, there was no increase in cardiovascular events even among the patients whose office systolic BP was ≥150 mmHg, compared with those with office systolic BP < 130 mmHg and morning home systolic BP < 125 mmHg. On the other hand, even when the office systolic BP of the HONEST study's hypertensive patients was well controlled at < 130 mmHg, the hazard ratio of cardiovascular events was 2.5 in the masked uncontrolled hypertension patients with morning systolic BP ≥145 mmHg compared with the well-controlled patients with morning systolic BP < 125 mmHg (Kario, et al. Hypertension 2014;64:989-996). The threshold of on-treatment morning BP for a significant increase in

  10. Determination of analgesic drug efficacies by modification of the Randall and Selitto rat yeast paw test.

    PubMed

    Chipkin, R E; Latranyi, M B; Iorio, L C; Barnett, A

    1983-11-01

    This report describes a modified Randall and Selitto (1957) rat yeast paw test that can evaluate differences in efficacy of different analgesics. The modifications consist of a decrease in the rate of acceleration of the noxious stimulus (mechanical pressure) on the inflamed paw from 20 to 12.5 mmHg/sec and an extension of the cut-off time from 15 to 60 sec. All the narcoticlike drugs tested (morphine, codeine, and pentazocine) increased the response latencies of the inflamed paws to the cut-off time. The nonsteroidal antiinflammatory-like drugs tested (acetylsalicylic acid, acetaminophen, indomethacin, phenylbutazone, and proquazone) showed plateaus in their analgesic effects (i.e., increasing the dose failed to produce significantly greater increases in the response latencies compared to the next lower dose). Zomepirac (80-240 mg/kg p.o.) did not show this plateau effect, but was unable to increase response latencies to greater than 30 sec because of the toxicity of higher doses (320 mg/kg p.o.). Flunixin NMG (the meglumine salt of flunixin), a nonnarcotic analgesic, did not display a plateau effect and increased response latencies to maximum values. The methodology was therefore able to discriminate analgesics active against mild to severe clinical pain (narcoticlike) from those only useful against mild to moderate pain (nonnarcotic-like).

  11. Hydrogen attack - Influence of hydrogen sulfide. [on carbon steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eliezer, D.; Nelson, H. G.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study is conducted on 12.5-mm-thick SAE 1020 steel (plain carbon steel) plate to assess hydrogen attack at room temperature after specimen exposure at 525 C to hydrogen and a blend of hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen at a pressure of 3.5 MN/sq m for exposure times up to 240 hr. The results are discussed in terms of tensile properties, fissure formation, and surface scales. It is shown that hydrogen attack from a high-purity hydrogen environment is severe, with the formation of numerous methane fissures and bubbles along with a significant reduction in the room-temperature tensile yield and ultimate strengths. However, no hydrogen attack is observed in the hydrogen/hydrogen sulfide blend environment, i.e. no fissure or bubble formation occurred and the room-temperature tensile properties remained unchanged. It is suggested that the observed porous discontinuous scale of FeS acts as a barrier to hydrogen entry, thus reducing its effective equilibrium solubility in the iron lattice. Therefore, hydrogen attack should not occur in pressure-vessel steels used in many coal gasification processes.

  12. The effect of negative pressure wound therapy with periodic instillation using antimicrobial solutions on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm on porcine skin explants.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Priscilla L; Yang, Qingping; Schultz, Gregory S

    2013-12-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWTi) is increasingly used as an adjunct therapy for a wide variety of infected wounds. However, the effect of NPWTi on mature biofilm in wounds has not been determined. This study assessed the effects of NPWTi using saline or various antimicrobial solutions on mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm using an ex vivo porcine skin explant biofilm model. Treatment consisted of six cycles with 10-minute exposure to instillation solution followed by 4 hours of negative pressure at -125 mm Hg over a 24-hour period. NPWTi using saline reduced bacterial levels by 1-log (logarithmic) of 7-log total colony-forming units (CFUs). In contrast, instillation of 1% povidone iodine (2-log), L-solution (3-log), 0·05% chlorhexidine gluconate (3-log), 0·1% polyhexamethylene biguanide (4-log), 0·2% polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (4-log) and 10% povidone iodine (5-log), all significantly reduced (P < 0·001) total CFUs. Scanning electron micrographs showed disrupted exopolymeric matrix of biofilms and damaged bacterial cells that correlated with CFU levels. Compared with previous studies assessing microbicidal effects of topical antimicrobial dressings on biofilms cultured on porcine skin explants, these ex vivo model data suggest that NPWTi with delivery of active antimicrobial agents enhances the reduction of CFUs by increasing destruction and removal of biofilm bacteria. These results must be confirmed in human studies.

  13. The effect of chemical agents on the turnover of the bound phosphate associated with the sodium-and-potassium ion-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase in ox brain microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Rodnight, R.

    1970-01-01

    1. The effect of chemical agents on the turnover of the Na+-dependent bound phosphate and the simultaneous Na+-dependent hydrolysis of ATP by a membrane preparation from ox brain was studied at an ATP/protein ratio of 12.5pmol/μg. 2. The agents were added immediately after phosphorylation of the preparation in a medium containing 50mm-sodium chloride and 2.5μm-[γ-32P]ATP. 3. Concentrations of sodium chloride above 150mm, calcium chloride to 20mm and suramin to 1.4mm inhibited both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation and concomitantly slowed ATP hydrolysis. At 125mm-sodium chloride dephosphorylation and hydrolysis were slightly slowed without affecting phosphorylation. 4. Ethanol to 1.6m concentration inhibited dephosphorylation without affecting phosphorylation; the bound phosphate was increased and ATP hydrolysis slowed. 5. Ouabain to 4mm concentration partially inhibited ATP hydrolysis and caused a transient (1–2s) rise in bound phosphate followed by a rapid fall to a lower plateau value, which eventually declined to zero by the time ATP hydrolysis was complete. 6. Of the detergents examined Lubrol W, Triton X-100 and sodium deoxycholate had no significant effect on turnover. Sodium dodecyl sulphate and sodium decyl sulphate to 3.5mm and 20mm respectively completely inhibited turnover and ATP hydrolysis and stabilized the bound phosphate. PMID:4250238

  14. Human motion energy harvesting: numerical analysis of electromagnetic swing-excited structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ylli, K.; Hoffmann, D.; Willmann, A.; Folkmer, B.; Manoli, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Energy harvesting from human motion has constantly attracted scientific interest over recent years. A location where a harvesting device can easily and unobtrusively be integrated is the shoe sole, which also protects the device from exterior influences. In this work a numerical system model is developed, which can be used to simulate different inductive harvester geometries and predict their power output. Real world acceleration data is used as a model input. The model is implemented in Matlab/Simulink and subdivided into a mechanical and an electromagnetic model. The key features including the motion model and the calculation of the electromagnetic coupling coefficient are explained in detail and the model is briefly evaluated experimentally. A total of six inductive architectures, i.e. different cylindrical and rectangular magnet-coil arrangements, are then investigated in detail. The geometrical parameters are optimized for each architecture to find the best geometry within the size of 71 mm × 37.5 mm × 12.5 mm, which can be integrated into the sole. With the best overall design an average power output of 42.7 mW is simulated across an ohmic load of 41 Ohms. In addition to the respective best designs, the (dis-)advantages of each architecture are explained.

  15. Optimization of typical diffuse herbicide pollution control by soil amendment configurations under four levels of rainfall intensities.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Wei; Huang, Weijia; Wei, Peng; Hao, Fanghua; Yu, Yongyong

    2016-06-15

    Herbicides are a main source of agricultural diffuse pollution due to their wide application in tillage practices. The aim of this study is to optimize the control efficiency of the herbicide atrazine with the aid of modified soil amendments. The soil amendments were composed of a combination of biochar and gravel. The biochar was created from corn straw with a catalytic pyrolysis of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate. The leaching experiments under four rainfall conditions were measured for the following designs: raw soil, soil amended with gravel, biochar individually and together with gravel. The control efficiency of each design was also identified. With the designed equipment, the atrazine content in the contaminant load layer, gravel substrate layer, biochar amendment layer and soil layer was measured under four types of rainfall intensities (1.25 mm/h, 2.50 mm/h, 5.00 mm/h and 10.00 mm/h). Furthermore, the vertical distribution of atrazine in the soil sections was also monitored. The results showed that the herbicide leaching load increased under the highest rainfall intensity in all designs. The soil with the combination of gravel and biochar provided the highest control efficiency of 87.85% on atrazine when the additional proportion of biochar was 3.0%. The performance assessment under the four kinds of rainfall intensity conditions provided the guideline for the soil amendment configuration. The combination of gravel and biochar is recommended as an efficient method for controlling diffuse herbicide pollution.

  16. A femtosecond electron diffraction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Baosheng; Zhang, Jie; Tian, Jinshou; Wang, Junfeng; Wu, Jianjun; Liu, Yunquan; Liu, Hulin

    2007-01-01

    The femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) is a unique method for the study of the changes of complex molecular structures, and has been specifically applied in the investigations of transient-optics, opto-physics, crystallography, and other fields. The FED system designed by the present group, consists of a 35nm Ag photocathode evaporated on an ultraviolet glass, an anode with a 0.1mm aperture, two pairs of deflection plate for the deflection of electron beams in X and Y directions, and the Y deflection plate can be used as a scanning plate while measuring the pulse width of electron beams, the double MCPs detector for the enhancing and detecting of electron image. The magnetic lens was used for the focusing of the electron beams, and the focal length is 125mm. The distance between the object(the photocathode) and the image(the sample) is 503mm, and the size of electron beams is smaller than 17microns after focusing, the convergence angle is of -0.075~0.075°, and the temporal resolution is better than 350fs.

  17. Autotransplantation and replantation of tooth germs in monkeys. Effect of damage to the dental follicle and position of transplant in the alveolus.

    PubMed

    Kristerson, L; Andreasen, J O

    1984-08-01

    The effect of damage to the follicle and of superficial positioning of tooth germs after replantation or autotransplantation was studied in green Vervet monkeys. Radiographs were taken immediately after surgery and 3, 6 and 9 months postoperatively, whereafter the animals were sacrificed. The tissue blocks were sectioned in step serial sections along a frontal plane and histologic and radiographic evaluation was made. Tooth germs whose follicle was either damaged or removed showed no sign of eruption, while tooth germs which were replanted with an intact follicle were fully erupted within 3 months. Non-operated control teeth were fully erupted within 6 months. Histologic examination revealed that roots of replanted teeth were only slightly shorter than the non-operated control teeth. Transplantation of tooth germs in different positions in relation to the alveolar crest showed that teeth placed in their original position attained an average tooth length of 12.5 mm, whereas teeth placed in a semi-erupted position achieved an average length of only 9.7 mm. A control group of non-operated incisors demonstrated an average tooth length of 13.7 mm. This study indicates that damage to the follicle at the time of replantation of tooth germs is of major importance for tooth eruption and that placing tooth germs in a semi-erupted position adversely influences later root development.

  18. Rigidity and retention of ceramic root canal posts.

    PubMed

    Purton, D G; Love, R M; Chandler, N P

    2000-01-01

    Ceramic root-canal posts offer potential advantages over other types with respect to aesthetics and biocompatibility. Any post must be sufficiently rigid and retentive to withstand functional forces. Ceraposts (1.2 mm coronal diameter, ceramic, tapering, smooth posts) and Paraposts (1.25 mm, stainless-steel, parallel, serrated posts) were tested for rigidity by means of a three-point bending test. To test retention in roots, ceramic posts were cemented using one of three protocols: (1) glass-ionomer cement, (2) silane coupling agent and resin cement, or (3) sandblasted post surface, silane coupling agent, and resin cement. Stainless-steel posts were cemented with resin. The tensile force required to dislodge the posts, following four weeks of storage in water, was recorded. Data were compared using Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney U analysis. Ceraposts were significantly more rigid than Paraposts (p < 0.001). Paraposts cemented with resin were significantly more strongly retained than Ceraposts following any cementation protocol (p < 0.001). Retention of the ceramic posts was significantly greater with a silane coupling agent and resin cement than with glass-ionomer cement (p < 0.001). Sandblasting the ceramic posts produced variable results and needs further investigation before it could be recommended.

  19. A laboratory evaluation of tagging-related mortality and tag loss in juvenile humpback chub

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, David L.; Persons, William R.; Young, Kirk; Stone, Dennis M.; Van Haverbeke, Randy; Knight, William R.

    2015-01-01

    We quantified tag retention, survival, and growth in juvenile, captive-reared Humpback Chub Gila cypha marked with three different tag types: (1) Biomark 12.5-mm, 134.2-kHz, full duplex PIT tags injected into the body cavity with a 12-gauge needle; (2) Biomark 8.4-mm, 134.2-kHz, full duplex PIT tags injected with a 16-gauge needle; and (3) Northwest Marine Technology visible implant elastomer (VIE) tags injected under the skin with a 29-gauge needle. Estimates of tag loss, tagging-induced mortality, and growth were evaluated for 60 d with each tag type for four different size-groups of fish: 40–49 mm, 50–59 mm, 60–69 mm, and 70–79 mm TL. Total length was a significant predictor of the probability of PIT tag retention and mortality for both 8-mm and 12-mm PIT tags, and the smallest fish had the highest rates of tag loss (12.5–30.0%) and mortality (7.5–20.0%). Humpback Chub of sizes 40–49 mm TL and tagged with VIE tags had no mortality but did have a 17.5% tag loss. Growth rates of all tagged fish were similar to controls. Our data indicate Humpback Chub can be effectively tagged using either 8-mm or 12-mm PIT tags with little tag loss or mortality at sizes as low as 65 mm TL.

  20. Post-irradiation Examination of the AGR-1 Experiment: Plans and Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Demkowicz

    2001-10-01

    Abstract – The AGR-1 irradiation experiment contains seventy-two individual cylindrical fuel compacts (25 mm long x 12.5 mm diameter) each containing approximately 4100 TRISO-coated uranium oxycarbide fuel particles. The experiment accumulated 620 effective full power days in the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory with peak burnups exceeding 19% FIMA. An extensive post-irradiation examination campaign will be performed on the AGR-1 fuel in order to characterize the irradiated fuel properties, assess the in-pile fuel performance in terms of coating integrity and fission metals release, and determine the fission product retention behavior during high temperature accident testing. PIE experiments will include dimensional measurements of fuel and irradiated graphite, burnup measurements, assessment of fission metals release during irradiation, evaluation of coating integrity using the leach-burn-leach technique, microscopic examination of kernel and coating microstructures, and accident testing of the fuel in helium at temperatures up to 1800°C. Activities completed to date include opening of the irradiated capsules, measurement of fuel dimensions, and gamma spectrometry of selected fuel compacts.

  1. Lesions of nucleus tractus solitarii globally impair cerebrovascular autoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ishitsuka, T.; Iadecola, C.; Underwood, M.D.; Reis, D.J.

    1986-08-01

    The authors studied the effects of acute bilateral electrolytic lesions of the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and its autoregulation in rats anesthetized, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated. rCBF or regional cerebral glucose utilization (rCGU) was measured 30 min after NTS lesions, by the UC-iodoantipyrine technique or 2-deoxyglucose method, respectively. Cerebrovascular autoregulation was assessed in groups of 4-5 rats at three levels of arterial pressure (AP):90, 125, and 140 mmHg. AP was lowered by hemorrhage or elevated by intravenous infusion of phenylephrine. NTS lesions did not alter rCBF at 125 mmHg but resulted in loss of autoregulation. In contrast, lesions of the cuneate nucleus or transection of the baroreceptor afferents did not alter autoregulation. NTS lesions did not affect the reactivity of the cerebrovascular bed to hypercarbia or hypocarbia nor the rCGU in any brain regions. They conclude that lesions of the NTS impair cerebrovascular autoregulation. The effect is not due to changes in metabolism, nonspecific effects of the lesions, vasoparalysis, or interruption of the baroreceptor reflex arch. Neural pathways originating in or passing through the NTS can regulate the cerebrovascular autoregulation of the entire brain.

  2. Compact turnkey focussing neutron guide system for inelastic scattering investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandl, G.; Georgii, R.; Dunsiger, S. R.; Tsurkan, V.; Loidl, A.; Adams, T.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the performance of a compact neutron guide module which boosts the intensity in inelastic neutron scattering experiments by approximately a factor of 40. The module consists of two housings containing truly curved elliptic focussing guide elements, positioned before and after the sample. The advantage of the module lies in the ease with which it may be reproducibly mounted on a spectrometer within a few hours, on the same timescale as conventional sample environments. It is particularly well suited for samples with a volume of a few mm3, thus enabling the investigation of materials which to date would have been considered prohibitively small or samples exposed to extreme environments, where there are space constraints. We benchmark the excellent performance of the module by measurements of the structural and magnetic excitations in single crystals of model systems. In particular, we report the phonon dispersion in the simple element lead. We also determine the magnon dispersion in the spinel ZnCr2Se4 (V = 12.5 mm3), where strong magnetic diffuse scattering at low temperatures evolves into distinct helical order.

  3. Recycling of construction and demolition waste materials: a chemical-mineralogical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, G; Marrocchino, E; Tassinari, R; Vaccaro, C

    2005-01-01

    Building activity is currently demanding remarkable amounts of inert materials (such as gravel and sand) that are usually provided by alluvial sediments. The EU directives and Italian Legislation are encouraging the re-use of construction and demolition waste provided by continuous urban redevelopment. The re-utilisation of building waste is a relatively new issue for Italy: unfortunately the employment of recycled inert materials is still limited to general bulk and drainage fills, while a more complete re-evaluation is generally hampered by the lack of suitable recycling plants. In this paper, chemical-mineralogical characterization of recycled inert materials was carried out after preliminary crushing and grain-size sorting. XRF and XRD analysis of the different grain-size classes allowed us to recognise particular granulometric classes that can be re-utilised as first-order material in the building activity. Specifically, the presented chemical-mineralogical appraisal indicates that the recycled grain-size fraction 0.6-0.125 mm could be directly re-employed in the preparation of new mortar and concrete, while finer fractions could be considered as components for industrial processing in the preparation of cements and bricks/tiles. PMID:15737712

  4. Studying gas-sheared liquid film in horizontal rectangular duct with laser-induced fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherdantsev, Andrey; Hann, David; Azzopardi, Barry

    2013-11-01

    High-speed LIF-technique is applied to study gas-sheared liquid film in horizontal rectangular duct with 161 mm width. Instantaneous distributions of film thickness resolved in both longitudinal and transverse coordinates were obtained with a frequency of 10 kHz and spatial resolution from 0.125 mm to 0.04 mm. Processes of generation of fast and slow ripples by disturbance waves are the same as described in literature for downwards annular pipe flow. Disturbance waves are often localized by transverse coordinate and may have curved or slanted fronts. Fast ripples, covering disturbance waves, are typically horseshoe-shaped and placed in staggered order. Their characteristic transverse size is of order 1 cm and it decreases with gas velocity. Entrainment of liquid from film surface can also be visualized. Mechanisms of ripple disruption, known as ``bag break-up'' and ``ligament break-up,'' were observed. Both mechanisms may occur on the same disturbance waves. Various scenarios of droplet deposition on the liquid film are observed, including the impact, slow sinking and bouncing, characterized by different outcome of secondary droplets or entrapped bubbles. Number and size of bubbles increase greatly inside the disturbance waves. Both quantities increase with gas and liquid flow rates. EPSRC Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1), and Roll-Royce UTC (Nottingham, for access to flow facility).

  5. Single active finger IPMC microgripper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Stefan; Macias, Gary; Lumia, Ron

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a new design for a single active finger ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) microgripper. This design has one stationary finger and one actuating finger. The gripper is tested in comparison with a two fingered gripper (2FG) on its ability to perform pick and place operations. The grippers each use IPMC strips in three widths: 1.25 mm, 2.5 mm and 5.0 mm. The single fingered gripper shows success rates of 86.2%, 89.2%, and 75% respectively versus 78.5%, 93.9% and 75% for a 2FG. The single fingered gripper performance is nearly equivalent to that of a 2FG. Even though a single finger produces half the force, its ability to carry objects is as good as or better than a 2FG. In addition, the stationary finger is considerably stiffer than an active IPMC finger, which helps in positional accuracy. Using half the IPMC, the single fingered gripper is the economical choice.

  6. Intensification of hemicellulose hot-water extraction from spruce wood in a batch extractor--effects of wood particle size.

    PubMed

    Krogell, Jens; Korotkova, Ekaterina; Eränen, Kari; Pranovich, Andrey; Salmi, Tapio; Murzin, Dmitry; Willför, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    The effect of five different wood particle size fractions between 0.5 and 12.5 mm on hot-water extraction of acetylated water-soluble hemicelluloses from spruce wood with a batch extraction setup at 170 °C was investigated. Extraction kinetics, with regard to particle size, was also studied. The purpose was to intensify the hemicellulose extraction for high molar mass hemicelluloses at high yield and purity. About 30% of the wood was dissolved and basically all the hemicelluloses could be extracted. The average molar masses of the extracted hemicelluloses decreased rapidly during the first 10 min of the extraction, but were not much affected by the difference in wood particle sizes. Smaller particles resulted in higher extraction rates. The reaction order was established to be of pseudo-first order for particles above 2mm and 1.5st order for particles smaller than 2mm. The effective diffusion coefficient was determined to be 9.11×10(-10) m(2)/s.

  7. Confocal Endomicroscopy: Instrumentation and Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Joey M.; Saldua, Meagan A.; Bixler, Joel N.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in fiber optic technology and miniaturized optics and mechanics have propelled confocal endomicroscopy into the clinical realm. This high resolution, non-invasive imaging technology provides the ability to microscopically evaluate cellular and sub-cellular features in tissue in vivo by optical sectioning. Because many cancers originate in epithelial tissues accessible by endoscopes, confocal endomicroscopy has been explored to detect regions of possible neoplasia at an earlier stage by imaging morphological features in vivo that are significant in histopathologic evaluation. This technique allows real-time assessment of tissue which may improve diagnostic yield by guiding biopsy. Research and development continues to reduce the overall size of the imaging probe, increase the image acquisition speed, and improve resolution and field of view of confocal endomicroscopes. Technical advances will continue to enable application to less accessible organs and more complex systems in the body. Lateral and axial resolutions down to 0.5 μm and 3 μm, respectively, field of view as large as 800×450 μm, and objective lens and total probe outer diameters down to 350 μm and 1.25 mm, respectively, have been achieved. We provide a review of the historical developments of confocal imaging in vivo, the evolution of endomicroscope instrumentation, and the medical applications of confocal endomicroscopy. PMID:21994069

  8. Propagation of Axially Symmetric Detonation Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Druce, R L; Roeske, F; Souers, P C; Tarver, C M; Chow, C T S; Lee, R S; McGuire, E M; Overturf, G E; Vitello, P A

    2002-06-26

    We have studied the non-ideal propagation of detonation waves in LX-10 and in the insensitive explosive TATB. Explosively-driven, 5.8-mm-diameter, 0.125-mm-thick aluminum flyer plates were used to initiate 38-mm-diameter, hemispherical samples of LX-10 pressed to a density of 1.86 g/cm{sup 3} and of TATB at a density of 1.80 g/cm{sup 3}. The TATB powder was a grade called ultrafine (UFTATB), having an arithmetic mean particle diameter of about 8-10 {micro}m and a specific surface area of about 4.5 m{sup 2}/g. Using PMMA as a transducer, output pressure was measured at 5 discrete points on the booster using a Fabry-Perot velocimeter. Breakout time was measured on a line across the booster with a streak camera. Each of the experimental geometries was calculated using the Ignition and Growth Reactive Flow Model, the JWL++ Model and the Programmed Burn Model. Boosters at both ambient and cold (-20 C and -54 C) temperatures have been experimentally and computationally studied. A comparison of experimental and modeling results is presented.

  9. Behavior of turbulent gas jets in an axisymmetric confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Ahmed, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    The understanding of the mixing of confined turbulent jets of different densities with air is of great importance to many industrial applications, such as gas turbine and Ramjet combustors. Although there have been numerous studies on the characteristics of free gas jets, little is known of the behavior of gas jets in a confinement. The jet, with a diameter of 8.73 mm, is aligned concentrically in a tube of 125 mm diameter, thus giving a confinement ratio of approximately 205. The arrangement forms part of the test section of an open-jet wind tunnel. Experiments are carried out with carbon dioxide, air and helium/air jets at different jet velocities. Mean velocity and turbulence measurements are made with a one-color, one-component laser Doppler velocimeter operating in the forward scatter mode. Measurements show that the jets are highly dissipative. Consequently, equilibrium jet characteristics similar to those found in free air jets are observed in the first two diameters downstream of the jet. These results are independent of the fluid densities and velocities. Decay of the jet, on the other hand, is a function of both the jet fluid density and momentum. In all the cases studied, the jet is found to be completely dissipated in approximately 30 jet diameters, thus giving rise to a uniform flow with a very high but constant turbulence field across the confinement.

  10. Active imaging lens with real-time variable resolution and constant field of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parent, Jocelyn; Thibault, Simon

    2010-08-01

    We present a lens with a constant total field of view and real-time variable resolution in certain zones of interest. This smart imaging lens uses an active optical element to modify as desired the local distortion. This way, while keeping the total field of view constant, the resolution can be increased in a zone of interest, at the expense of decreasing it somewhere in the remaining part of the field of view. We first present the concept of this lens, using a deformable mirror as the active surface. Computer simulations are done with Zemax in which a magnifying power of 2 in a zone of interest representing 10% of the full field of view is achieved, using a f=12.5 mm lens and a F/# of 18. Different combinations of theses parameters would allow different performances and results. We then present experimental results of this lens with a prototype built using a ferrofluidic deformable mirror as the active element. Experimental results of a zone of increased resolution with a magnification of 1.32 and a zone of decreased resolution with a magnification of 0.80 are obtained.

  11. Design and Construction of a Gamma Reaction History Diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R M; Evans, S C; Frogget, B C; Herrmann, H W; Kaufman, M I; Kim, Y H; Mack, J M; McGillivray, K D; Palagi, M; Stoeffl, W; Tibbitts, A; Tunnell, T W; Young, C S

    2009-10-22

    Gas Cherenkov detectors have been used to convert fusion gammas into photons to record gamma reaction history measurements. These gas detectors include a converter, pressurized gas volume, relay collection optics, and a photon detector. A novel design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using 90° off-axis parabolic mirrors efficiently collects signal from fusion gammas with 8-ps time dispersion. Fusion gammas are converted to Compton electrons, which generate broadband Cherenkov light (response is from 250 to 700 nm) in a pressurized gas cell. This light is relayed into a high-speed detector using three parabolic mirrors. The relay optics collect light from a 125-mm-diameter by 600-mm-long interchangeable gas (CO2 or SF6) volume. The parabolic mirrors were electroformed instead of diamond turned to reduce scattering of the UV light. All mirrors are bare aluminum coated for maximum reflectivity. This design incorporates a 4.2-ns time delay that allows the detector to recover from prompt radiation before it records the gamma signal. At NIF, a cluster of four channels will allow for increased dynamic range, as well as different gamma energy thresholds.

  12. Implementation of a Comprehensive On-Line Closed-Loop Diagnostic System for Roll-to-Roll Amorphous Silicon Solar Cell Production: Annual Report, Year Two; 1 September 2003--31 August 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, T.

    2005-02-01

    Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) has developed and built 7 generations of roll-to-roll amorphous silicon PV production equipment. In the ECD/United Solar Ovonic production process, we deposit about a 1-mm-thick, 12-layer coating consisting of a metal/oxide backreflector, a - layer a-Si/a-SiGe alloy triple-junction solar cell, and a top transparent conductive oxide coating onto 125-mm-thick, 35.5-cm-wide stainless steel webs in a series of three roll-to-roll deposition machines. ECD has now completed the Phase II work for this program. In the following report, we summarize the Phase II work in each of these tasks. We have involved United Solar production personnel in each of these Tasks. This is important for two reasons: Firstly, the collaboration of ECD and United Solar personnel keeps the projects responsive to the developing needs at United Solar. Secondly, most of the tasks affect operations and consequently need the support of United Solar production and QA/QC managers. In the process, we have developed a good working relationship between the production personnel and good balance between optimizing production, while also ''adiabatically'' improving the manufacturing equipment.

  13. Experimental investigation on chill-down process of cryogenic flow line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Lingxue; Park, Changgi; Cho, Hyokjin; Lee, Cheonkyu; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the cryogenic chill-down experiments that are conducted on a 12.7 mm outer diameter, 1.25 mm wall thickness and 7 m long stainless steel horizontal pipe with liquid nitrogen (LN2). The pipe is vacuum insulated during the experiment to minimize the heat leak from room temperature and to enable one to numerically simulate the process easily. The temperature and the pressure profiles of the chill-down line are obtained at the location which is 5.5 m in a distance from the pipe inlet. The mass flux range is approximately from 19 kg/m2 s to 49 kg/m2 s, which corresponds to the Reynolds numbers range from 1469 to 5240. The transient histories of temperature, pressure and mass flow rate during the line chill-down process are monitored, and the heat transfer coefficient and the heat flux are computed by an inverse problem solving method. The amplitude of the pressure oscillation and the oscillating period become larger and longer at higher pressure conditions. In the low mass flux conditions, the critical heat flux in horizontal pipes is not sensitive to mass flux, and is higher than that in vertical pipes. Kutateladze's correlation with the constant coefficient, B = 0.029 , well matches the experimental data in the current work. In nucleate flow boiling regime, heat transfer coefficient, h , is proportional to (q″)n , and n is equal to 0.7.

  14. The effect of CT scanner parameters and 3D volume rendering techniques on the accuracy of linear, angular, and volumetric measurements of the mandible

    PubMed Central

    Whyms, B.J.; Vorperian, H.K.; Gentry, L.R.; Schimek, E.M.; Bersu, E.T.; Chung, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study investigates the effect of scanning parameters on the accuracy of measurements from three-dimensional multi-detector computed tomography (3D-CT) mandible renderings. A broader range of acceptable parameters can increase the availability of CT studies for retrospective analysis. Study Design Three human mandibles and a phantom object were scanned using 18 combinations of slice thickness, field of view, and reconstruction algorithm and three different threshold-based segmentations. Measurements of 3D-CT models and specimens were compared. Results Linear and angular measurements were accurate, irrespective of scanner parameters or rendering technique. Volume measurements were accurate with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm, but not 2.5 mm. Surface area measurements were consistently inflated. Conclusions Linear, angular and volumetric measurements of mandible 3D-CT models can be confidently obtained from a range of parameters and rendering techniques. Slice thickness is the primary factor affecting volume measurements. These findings should also apply to 3D rendering using cone-beam-CT. PMID:23601224

  15. Enhanced biomethane potential from wheat straw by low temperature alkaline calcium hydroxide pre-treatment.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Matthew; Dinsdale, Richard; Guwy, Alan

    2015-08-01

    A factorially designed experiment to examine the effectiveness of Ca(OH)2 pre-treatment, enzyme addition and particle size, on the mesophilic (35 °C) anaerobic digestion of wheat straw was conducted. Experiments used a 48 h pre-treatment with Ca(OH)2 7.4% (w/w), addition of Accellerase®-1500, with four particle sizes of wheat straw (1.25, 2, 3 and 10mm) and three digestion time periods (5, 15 and 30 days). By combining particle size reduction and Ca(OH)2 pre-treatment, the average methane potential was increased by 315% (from 48 NmL-CH4 g-VS(-1) to 202 NmL-CH4 g-VS(-1)) after 5 days of anaerobic digestion compared to the control. Enzyme addition or Ca(OH)2 pre-treatment with 3, 2 and 1.25 mm particle sizes had 30-day batch yields of between 301 and 335 NmL-CH4 g-VS(-1). Alkali pre-treatment of 3mm straw was shown to have the most potential as a cost effective pre-treatment and achieved 290 NmL-CH4 g-VS(-1), after only 15 days of digestion. PMID:25898087

  16. An Efficient Method for Calculating the Characteristics of the Integrated Lens Antennas on the Basis of the Geometrical and Physical Optics Approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozharovskiy, A. V.; Artemenko, A. A.; Mal'tsev, A. A.; Maslennikov, R. O.; Sevast'yanov, A. G.; Ssorin, V. N.

    2015-11-01

    We develop a combined method for calculating the characteristics of the integrated lens antennas for millimeter-wave wireless local radio-communication systems on the basis of the geometrical and physical optics approximations. The method is based on the concepts of geometrical optics for calculating the electromagnetic-field distribution on the lens surface (with allowance for multiple internal re-reflections) and physical optics for determining the antenna-radiated fields in the Fraunhofer zone. Using the developed combined method, we study various integrated lens antennas on the basis of the data on the used-lens shape and material and the primary-feed radiation model, which is specified analytically or by computer simulation. Optimal values of the cylindrical-extension length, which ensure the maximum antenna directivity equal to 19.1 and 23.8 dBi for the greater and smaller lenses, respectively, are obtained for the hemispherical quartz-glass lenses having the cylindrical extensions with radii of 7.5 and 12.5 mm. In this case, the scanning-angle range of the considered antennas is greater than ±20° for an admissible 2-dB decrease in the directivity of the deflected beam. The calculation results obtained using the developed method are confirmed by the experimental studies performed for the prototypes of the integrated quartz-glass lens antennas within the framework of this research.

  17. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy With Instillation and Dwell Time Used to Treat Infected Orthopedic Implants: A 4-patient Case Series.

    PubMed

    Dettmers, Robert; Brekelmans, Wouter; Leijnen, Michiel; van der Burg, Boudewijn; Ritchie, Ewan

    2016-09-01

    Infection following orthopedic implants for bone fixation or joint replacement is always serious and may require removal of the osteosynthetic material. Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation and dwell time (NPWTi-d) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of complex wounds, including infected wounds with osteosynthetic material. The purpose of this case study was to evaluate the outcomes of 4 patients (1 man, 3 women; age range 49 to 71 years) with a postoperative wound infection (POWI) following fracture repair and internal fixation. All patients were at high risk for surgical complications, including infections. Standard infection treatments (antibiotics) had been unsuccessful. Based on the available literature, a NPWTi-d protocol was developed. Following surgical debridement, wounds were instilled with polyhexanide biguanide with a set dwell time of 15 minutes, followed by continuous NPWTi-d of -125 mm Hg for 4 hours. The system was changed every 3 to 4 days until sufficient granulation tissue was evident and negative pressure without instillation could be used. Systemic antibiotics were continued in all patients. Granulation tissue was found to be sufficient in 12 to 35 days in the 4 cases, no recurrence of infection was noted, and the osteosynthesis material remained in place. No adverse events were observed. Research is needed to compare the safety and effectiveness of this adjunct treatment in the management of challenging wounds to other patient and wound management approaches. PMID:27668478

  18. Thermal fatigue and oxidation data of superalloys including directionally solidified eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, V. L.; Humphreys, V. E.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal fatigue and oxidation data were obtained on 61 specimens, representing 15 discrete alloy compositions or fabricating techniques and three coating systems. Conventionally fabricated alloys included V57, MM 200, Rene 77, Rene 125, MM 246, MM 509, IN-738, IN-792 + Hf, and MM 200 + Hf. The directionally solidified alloys were MM 200, MM 200 single crystal, MM 200 bicrystal, cellular gamma/gamma' - delta) and lamellar gamma/gamma' - delta. The coatings systems included NiCrAlY on IN-738, In-792 + Hf, MM 200 DS, MM 200 DS single crystal, and cellular gamma/gamma' - delta and NiCrAlY/Pt on lamellar gamma/gamma' - delta. Crack initiation survival rates were recorded for all alloys, with and without coatings. All uncoated alloys, except MM 509, exhibited significant oxidation weight loss in 75,000 to 15,000 cycles. MM 509 specimens had weight losses only slightly higher than coated specimens through 7,500 cycles. All coated specimens had low weight loss.

  19. LC method for the analysis of Oxiconazole in pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Milano, Julie; Morsch, Lisoni M; Cardoso, Simone Gonçalves

    2002-09-01

    A LC method has been developed for the quantitative determination of Oxiconazole (Ox) in bulk form, lotion and cream pharmaceutical formulations. The method validation yielded good results including the range, linearity, precision, accuracy, recovery, specificity, robustness, limit of quantitation and limit of detection. The LC separation was carried by reversed phase chromatography using a LiChrocart C(8) column (125 mm x 4.0 mm i.d., 5 microm particle size). The mobile phase was composed of methanol-0.02 M ammonium acetate buffer (85:15 v/v), pumped isocratically at flow rate 1 ml min(-1). The detection was carried out on UV detector at 254 nm. The calibration curve for Ox was linear from 40.0-140.0 microg ml(-1) range. The precision of this method, calculated as the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was 1.57% for lotion and 0.71% for cream. The R.S.D. values for intra- and inter-day precision studies were 0.57 and 1.34%, respectively. The recovery of the drug ranged between 98.84-102.2% (lotion) and 100.54-101.59% (cream). The stability indicating capability of the assays was proved using forced degradation. Chromatograms showed Ox well resolved from the degradation product.

  20. Efficient and sensitive detection of residues of nine coccidiostats in egg and muscle by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dubois, M; Pierret, G; Delahaut, Ph

    2004-12-25

    We present a method based on electrospray liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for determining in muscle and eggs the following nine coccidiostats: halofuginone, diclazuril, dinitrocarbanilide (the main metabolite of nicarbazin), robenidine, monensin, lasalocid, narasin, salinomycin, and maduramicin. Dinitrocarbanilide-d8, nigericin, and diclazuril-bis were used as internal standards. The method uses extraction in acetonitrile followed by a clean-up on an SiOH solid-phase extraction column. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation was performed on a Purospher C(18) column (125 mm x 3 mm i.d.) protected by a guard column, the mobile phase being a water-acetonitrile gradient (each gradient component containing 0.1% formic acid) at a flow rate of 1 ml min(-1). For unequivocal identification of each analyte, two ions were detected and chosen for multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Validation was carried out on spiked muscle and egg samples. The method described meets all the criteria of Decision 2002/657/EC and is easy to use in routine analysis. Validation results are presented with the measured CCalpha and CCbeta values. This whole method allows extraction and analysis of up to 24 samples per day.

  1. Optimizing probe design for an implantable perfusion and oxygenation sensor

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Tony J.; Long, Ruiqi; McShane, Michael J.; Ericson, M. Nance; Wilson, Mark A.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to develop an implantable optical perfusion and oxygenation sensor, based on multiwavelength reflectance pulse oximetry, we investigate the effect of source–detector separation and other source-detector characteristics to optimize the sensor’s signal to background ratio using Monte Carlo (MC) based simulations and in vitro phantom studies. Separations in the range 0.45 to 1.25 mm were found to be optimal in the case of a point source. The numerical aperture (NA) of the source had no effect on the collected signal while the widening of the source spatial profile caused a shift in the optimal source-detector separation. Specifically, for a 4.5 mm flat beam and a 2.4 mm × 2.5 mm photodetector, the optimal performance was found to be when the source and detector are adjacent to each other. These modeling results were confirmed by data collected from in vitro experiments on a liver phantom perfused with dye solutions mimicking the absorption properties of hemoglobin for different oxygenation states. PMID:21833350

  2. Silicone-coated non-woven polyester dressing enhances reepithelialisation in a sheep model of dermal wounds.

    PubMed

    Losi, Paola; Briganti, Enrica; Costa, Manolo; Sanguinetti, Elena; Soldani, Giorgio

    2012-09-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) also known as V.A.C. (Vacuum-assisted closure), is widely used to manage various type of wounds and accelerate healing. NPWT has so far been delivered mainly via open-cell polyurethane (PU) foam or medical gauze. In this study an experimental setup of sheep wound model was used to evaluate, under NPWT conditions, the performance of a silicone-coated non-woven polyester (N-WPE) compared with PU foam and cotton hydrophilic gauze, used as reference materials. Animals were anesthetized with spontaneous breathing to create three 3 × 3 cm skin defects bilaterally; each animal received three different samples on each side (n = 6 in each experimental group) and was subjected to negative and continuous 125 mmHg pressure up to 16 days. Wound conditions after 1, 8 and 16 days of treatment with the wound dressings were evaluated based on gross and histological appearances. Skin defects treated with the silicone-coated N-WPE showed a significant decrease in wound size, an increase of re-epithelialization, collagen deposition and wound neovascularisation, and a minimal stickiness to the wound tissue, in comparison with gauze and PU foam. Taken all together these findings indicate that the silicone-coated N-WPE dressing enhances wound healing since stimulates higher granulation tissue formation and causes minor tissue trauma during dressing changes.

  3. The design of Cu-doped ZnO thermoelectric module (simulation study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi, Syamsul; Suratwan, Agus; Kurniawan, Agus; Budiana, Eko Prasetya; Suyitno

    2016-03-01

    The p-type semiconductor of Cu-doped ZnO-based thermoelectric material has already been synthesized and studied as an energy harvester. The next challenge is manufacturing the thermoelectric module in the development of thermoelectric as an eco-friendly material in the future. This research aims to investigate the effect of thermoelectric geometric design on the electrical output power and voltage and to recommend the most appropriate thermoelectric geometric design. The design of thermoelectric generator (TEG) includes the determinations of dimension (width, length, and height), number of modules, and semiconductor materials. The simulation used the coupled-field analysis of ANSYS APDL 14.5 in the steady state condition. The p- and n- type thermoelectric material used Cu-doped ZnO and Al-doped ZnO, respectively. The width of element and the number of thermoelectric module were varied to obtain a thermoelectric design, which produces the largest current, power, and voltage. The result of research shows that the t hermoelectric generator with the element widths of 0.94 mm, 1.125 mm, 1.05 mm, and 1.2 mm generates the largest power output and voltage, namely: 0.32 W and 0.89 V, 0.38 W and 0.98 V, 0.45 W and 1.06 V, and 0.52 W and 1.13 V, respectively.

  4. An Intrinsic Fiber-Optic Single Loop Micro-Displacement Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Rios, Alejandro; Monzon-Hernandez, David; Torres-Gomez, Ismael; Salceda-Delgado, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    A micro-displacement sensor consisting of a fiber-loop made with a tapered fiber is reported. The sensor operation is based on the interaction between the fundamental cladding mode propagating through the taper waist and higher order cladding modes excited when the taper is deformed to form a loop. As a result, a transmission spectrum with several notches is observed, where the notch wavelength resonances shift as a function of the loop diameter. The loop diameter is varied by the spatial displacement of one end of the fiber-loop attached to a linear translation stage. In a displacement range of 3.125 mm the maximum wavelength shift is 360.93 nm, with 0.116 nm/μm sensitivity. By using a 1,280 nm broadband low-power LED source and a single Ge-photodetector in a power transmission sensor setup, a sensitivity in the order of 2.7 nW/μm is obtained in ∼1 mm range. The proposed sensor is easy to implement and has a plenty of room to improve its performance. PMID:22368477

  5. Optical properties of neonatal skin measured in vivo as a function of age and skin pigmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Mentink, Rosaline; Kok, Joke H.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.

    2011-09-01

    Knowledge of the optical properties of neonatal skin is invaluable when developing new, or improving existing optical techniques for use at the neonatal intensive care. In this article, we present in vivo measurements of the absorption μa and reduced scattering coefficient μs' of neonatal skin between 450 and 600 nm and assess the influence of age and skin pigmentation on the optical properties. The optical properties were measured using a spatially resolved, steady state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy setup, combined with a modified spatially resolved diffusion model. The method was validated on phantoms with known values for the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient. Values of μa and μs' were obtained from the skin at four different body locations (forehead, sternum, hand, and foot) of 60 neonates with varying gestational age, postnatal age, and skin pigmentation. We found that μa ranged from 0.02 to 1.25 mm-1 and μs' was in the range of 1 to 2.8 mm-1 (5th to 95th percentile of the patient population), independent of body location. In contrast to previous studies, no to very weak correlation was observed between the optical properties and gestational maturity, but a strong dependency of the absorption coefficient on postnatal age was found for dark skinned patients.

  6. Growth patterns in the orbital region: a morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Farkas, L G; Posnick, J C; Hreczko, T M; Pron, G E

    1992-07-01

    Data for analysis of age-related changes in growth in the intercanthal (en-en) and biocular (ex-ex) widths were obtained from 1,594 healthy North American Caucasians in age groups from 1 to 18 years, divided equally between males and females. At 1 year, the degree of development of the intercanthal width reached 84.1%, and that of the biocular width 85.9% of adults in both sexes. The levels of growth achieved by 5 years of age rose to 93.3% in the intercanthal width and 88.1% in the biocular width, in both sexes. The average total growth increments achieved between ages 1 and 18 years were 5.2 mm in the intercanthal width and 12.5 mm in the biocular. The intercanthal width showed very little growth after 1 year of age; in contrast, the biocular width showed significantly greater growth increments both before and after 5 years of age. Rapid growth was observed between 3 and 4 years in the intercanthal width of both sexes. The age-related growth observed in the biocular width was small but continuous up to maturation time. The intercanthal width reached full maturation at 8 years in females and 11 years in males, and the biocular width at 13 years in females and 15 years in males. PMID:1643059

  7. Pushing spatial and temporal resolution for functional and diffusion MRI in the Human Connectome Project

    PubMed Central

    Uğurbil, Kamil; Xu, Junqian; Auerbach, Edward J.; Moeller, Steen; Vu, An; Duarte-Carvajalino, Julio M.; Lenglet, Christophe; Wu, Xiaoping; Schmitter, Sebastian; Van de Moortele, Pierre Francois; Strupp, John; Sapiro, Guillermo; De Martino, Federico; Wang, Dingxin; Harel, Noam; Garwood, Michael; Chen, Liyong; Feinberg, David A.; Smith, Stephen M.; Miller, Karla L.; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Jbabdi, Saad; Andersson, Jesper L; Behrens, Timothy EJ; Glasser, Matthew F.; Van Essen, David; Yacoub, Essa

    2013-01-01

    The human connectome project (HCP) relies primarily on three complementary magnetic resonance (MR) methods. These are: 1) resting state functional MR imaging (rfMRI) which uses correlations in the temporal fluctuations in an fMRI time series to deduce ‘functional connectivity’; 2) diffusion imaging (dMRI), which provides the input for tractography algorithms used for the reconstruction of the complex axonal fiber architecture; and 3) task based fMRI (tfMRI), which is employed to identify functional parcellation in the human brain in order to assist analyses of data obtained with the first two methods. We describe technical improvements and optimization of these methods as well as instrumental choices that impact speed of acquisition of fMRI and dMRI images at 3 Tesla, leading to whole brain coverage with 2 mm isotropic resolution in 0.7 second for fMRI, and 1.25 mm isotropic resolution dMRI data for tractography analysis with three-fold reduction in total data acquisition time. Ongoing technical developments and optimization for acquisition of similar data at 7 Tesla magnetic field are also presented, targeting higher resolution, specificity of functional imaging signals, mitigation of the inhomogeneous radio frequency (RF) fields and power deposition. Results demonstrate that overall, these approaches represent a significant advance in MR imaging of the human brain to investigate brain function and structure. PMID:23702417

  8. Strong upstream flow characteristics in the formation of rivulets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lye, Jonathan Kok Keung; Neild, Adrian; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2011-02-01

    In a fully formed rivulet, the flow profile across the total cross section is downward, as would be intuitively expected. However, prior to this stage being reached, a strong backflow capable of carrying particles up to 125 mm up the incline back to the source is shown to occur. Two phases are described prior to a fully formed rivulet being established. First, a forming rivulet, in which a bulbous drop head slides down a slope with a flow occurring in the wetted trail behind it. In this stage, a linear increase in backflow height is observed over time. Subsequently, a transient rivulet occurs, with the transition happening once the end of the inclined solid surface is reached. The backflow decreases through this phase in a stepwise manner, coinciding with fluid dripping off the surface. The findings here strongly challenge common assumptions made regarding cleaning, whereby fluid will transport particulate matter downhill, and has significant implications on irrigation applied to remove bacterial biofilms in clinical medicine.

  9. Carbohydrates Stimulate Ethylene Production in Tobacco Leaf Discs 1

    PubMed Central

    Philosoph-Hadas, Sonia; Meir, Shimon; Aharoni, Nehemia

    1985-01-01

    Galactose, sucrose, and glucose (50 millimolar) applied to tobacco leaf discs (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv `Xanthi') during a prolonged incubation (5-6 d) markedly stimulated ethylene production which, in turn, could be inhibited by aminoethoxyvinylglycine (2-amino-4-(2′-aminoethoxy)-trans-3-butenoic acid) (AVG) or Co2+ ions. These three tested sugars also stimulated the conversion of l-[3,4-14C]methionine to [14C]1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and to [14C]ethylene, thus indicating that the carbohydrates-stimulated ethylene production proceeds from methionine via the ACC pathway. Sucrose concentrations above 25 mm considerably enhanced ACC-dependent ethylene production, and this enhancement was related to the increased respiratory carbon dioxide. However, sucrose by itself could directly promote the step of ACC conversion to ethylene, since low sucrose concentrations (1-25 mm) enhanced ACC-dependent ethylene production also in the presence of 15% CO2. The data suggest that the stimulation of ethylene production by sugars in tobacco leaf discs results from enhancement of ACC formation as well as from the conversion of ACC to ethylene, when both steps could be involved in regulation of ethylene biosynthesis. PMID:16664186

  10. Role of the buffer at the interface of intrinsic a-Si:H and p-type a-Si:H on amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanying; Shen, Leilei; Shi, Jianhua; Zhang, Liping; Liu, Jinning; Liu, Yucheng; Liu, Zhengxin

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the influence of the different buffer at the interface between the intrinsic a-Si:H and p-type a-Si:H layers on amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells performance. It is demonstrated that the ultrathin buffer at interface of intrinsic a-Si:H and p-type a-Si:H, obtained by H-rich plasma treatment on the initial intrinsic a-Si:H passivation layer, can significantly enhance the minority carrier lifetime and decrease the emitter saturation current density. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses indicate that the initial intrinsic a-Si:H films become dense and less defected as a result of the relaxation and reconstruction when they are treated during the H-rich plasma environment. Based on this finding combined with the optimization of surface texturization of the silicon wafer, this work allows us to reach very high Voc values over 730 mV without losses on fill factor, the 100 μm, 125 × 125 mm2 SHJ solar cells were fabricated with industry-compatible process, yielding the efficiency up to 22.5%.

  11. CRADA final report for CRADA number C/Y-1203-0211, gelcasting of soft ferrite parts

    SciTech Connect

    Omatete, O.O.; Van Dillen, G.L., Jr.

    1996-03-01

    Soft ferrite parts utilized in areas such as high-energy physics have been successfully gelcast from powders supplied by the industrial partner. To achieve this, several modifications were necessary. First, the as-received ferrite powder was heated to 300, 500 or 800{degrees}C. X-ray analysis showed no changes in the crystal structure of the heat-treated powder even at 800{degrees}C, and particle size distribution and surface area analyses indicated that powders heat treated at 300 and 500{degrees} had mean size and surface area similar to those of the as-received powder. Second, to prevent the parts from shattering during the combined binder burn-off and sintering cycle, the solids loading of the gelcasting slurry was adjusted from 42 vol % to at least 50 vol % and the sintering schedule was modified slightly. These modifications resulted in the production of fired gelcast soft ferrite parts (50 mm {times} 13 mm pucks, {approximately} 125 mm OD {times} 100 mm ID {times} 25 mm rings) which sintered to {approximately}98% of the theoretical density. The partner was satisfied with the parts it received and has discussed pursuing follow-up activities in order to gelcast more complex shapes and large toroids.

  12. Effect of negative pressure on growth, secretion and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Li, Tongtong; Wang, Guoqi; Yin, Peng; Li, Zhirui; Zhang, Licheng; Liu, Jianheng; Li, Ming; Zhang, Lihai; Han, Li; Tang, Peifu

    2015-10-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has gained popularity in the management of contaminated wounds as an effective physical therapy, although its influence on the bacteria in the wounds remains unclear. In this study, we attempted to explore the effect of negative pressure conditions on Staphylococcus aureus, the most frequently isolated pathogen during wound infection. S. aureus was cultured in Luria-Bertani medium at subatmospheric pressure of -125 mmHg for 24 h, with the bacteria grown at ambient pressure as the control. The application of negative pressure was found to slow down the growth rate and inhibit biofilm development of S. aureus, which was confirmed by static biofilm assays. Furthermore, decreases in the total amount of virulence factors and biofilm components were observed, including α-hemolysin, extracellular adherence protein, polysaccharide intercellular adhesin and extracellular DNA. With quantitative RT-PCR analysis, we also revealed a significant inhibition in the transcription of virulence and regulatory genes related to wound infections and bacterial biofilms. Together, these findings indicated that negative pressure could inhibit the growth, virulence and biofilm formation of S. aureus. A topical subatmospheric pressure condition, such as NPWT, may be a potential antivirulence and antibiofilm strategy in the field of wound care. PMID:26272011

  13. A Mathematical Model of Oxygen Transport in Skeletal Muscle During Hindlimb Unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Causey, Laura; Lewandowski, Beth E.; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2014-01-01

    During hindlimb unloading (HU) dramatic fluid shifts occur within minutes of the suspension, leading to a less precise matching of blood flow to O2 demands of skeletal muscle. Vascular resistance directs blood away from certain muscles, such as the soleus (SOL). The muscle volume gradually reduces in these muscles so that eventually the relative blood flow returns to normal. It is generally believed that muscle volume change is not due to O2 depletion, but a consequence of disuse. However, the volume of the unloaded rat muscle declines over the course of weeks, whereas the redistribution of blood flow occurs immediately. Using a Krogh Cylinder Model, the distribution of O2 was predicted in two skeletal muscles: SOL and gastrocnemius (GAS). Effects of the muscle blood flow, volume, capillary density, and O2 uptake, are included to calculate the pO2 at rest and after 10 min and 15 days of unloading. The model predicts that 32 percent of the SOL muscle tissue has a pO2 1.25 mm Hg within 10 min, whereas the GAS maintains normal O2 levels, and that equilibrium is reached only as the SOL muscle cells degenerate. The results provide evidence that there is an inadequate O2 supply to the mitochondria in the SOL muscle after 10 min HU.

  14. Electro-Mechanical Simulation of a Large Aperture MOEMS Fabry-Perot Tunable Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Jonathan L.; Barclay, Richard B.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Mott, D. Brent; Satyapal, Shobita; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We are developing a micro-machined electrostatically actuated Fabry-Perot tunable filter with a large clear aperture for application in high through-put wide-field imaging spectroscopy and lidar systems. In the first phase of this effort, we are developing key components based on coupled electro-mechanical simulations. In particular, the movable etalon plate design leverages high coating stresses to yield a flat surface in drum-head tension over a large diameter (12.5 mm). In this approach, the cylindrical silicon movable plate is back etched, resulting in an optically coated membrane that is suspended from a thick silicon support ring. Understanding the interaction between the support ring, suspended membrane, and coating is critical to developing surfaces that are flat to within stringent etalon requirements. In this work, we present the simulations used to develop the movable plate, spring suspension system, and electrostatic actuation mechanism. We also present results from tests of fabricated proof of concept components.

  15. Genetic investigations in immigration cases and frequencies of DNA fragments of the VNTR systems D2S44, D5S43, D7S21, D7S22, and D12S11 in Turks.

    PubMed

    Hansen, H E; Morling, N

    1993-06-01

    We have included investigations of the DNA polymorphism of variable numbers of tandem repeat (VNTR) regions with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in the genetic evaluations in immigrant cases. HinfI-digested DNA was separated by electrophoresis in agarose gels and hybridized with radiolabelled probes detecting the VNTR systems D2S44 (YNH24), D5S43 (MS8), D7S21 (MS31), D7S22 (g3), and D12S11 (MS43a). We used the matching criterion for paternity testing for the parent/child comparisons, i.e. non-match if the intra gel difference exceeded 1.25 mm. A total of 43 immigration cases involving mainly Turks were investigated with DNA technique in parallel with investigations of 10-15 conventional systems. One man was excluded from paternity by both conventional and DNA investigations. Non-exclusion was observed with both conventional and DNA systems in 97 putative mother/child pairs and in 96 putative father/child pairs. In a putative father/child combination with non-exclusion in 18 genetic systems, a single genetic inconsistency ('exclusion') in D7S21 (MS31) was observed. The frequency distributions of HinfI digested DNA fragments of the five VNTR systems in 105 Turks are presented.

  16. Changes in Microbial Extracellular Enzyme Activity Associated with Decreasing Organic Matter Particle Size in a Louisiana Cypress Swamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallaire, S.; Jackson, C. R.

    2005-05-01

    Microbial extracellular enzymes are vital to the decomposition of fine particulate organic matter (FPOM) in aquatic systems. However, little is known about variations in the activity of these enzymes with decreasing FPOM size, and even less is known about the importance of these enzymes in the decomposition of FPOM in wetland sediments. Three sediment samples were collected from a Louisiana cypress swamp and sieved into five size ranges, consisting of course particulate organic matter (>1 mm), and four different sizes of FPOM: 0.5-1mm, 0.25-0.5mm, 0.125-0.25mm, and 0.063-0.125mm. For each size range, we assayed the activities of six enzymes involved in lignocellulose decomposition. Activities of beta-glucosidase, beta-xylosidase, cellobiohydrolase, and beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase were strongly correlated with each other, and the activities of all four hydrolytic enzymes began to decrease in activity on FPOM less than 0.5mm. Peroxidase activity was generally low, but peaked on 0.125-0.25mm particles. Phenol oxidase activity was not detected in any samples, regardless of particle size. These results show that changes in microbial enzyme activity occur as FPOM decreases in size, particularly on particles below a 0.25-0.5mm threshold. These changes may reflect differences in both the microbial community and the nature of the FPOM.

  17. Determination of glycine and threonine in topical dermatological preparations.

    PubMed

    Marrubini, G; Caccialanza, G; Massolini, G

    2008-08-01

    In the present study, a single HPLC method was developed for the determination of glycine and threonine in cicatrizants. Two different preparations of a cream and an ointment, and the corresponding bandages, onto which the formulations were applied, were studied. The method involved matrix solubilisation with dichloromethane, liquid-liquid isolation of gly and thr with aqueous 1N NaOH, and derivatization with phenylisothiocyanate. Reversed-phase HPLC separation was carried out by gradient elution with 20mM aqueous NaClO4 and acetonitrile (from 90% to 30% aqueous NaClO4 in 10 min) on a LiChrospher 100 RP-18 cartridge (125 mm x 4.6 mm). Analytes were determined with a UV detector set at 245 nm. Quantitation was accomplished by internal standardization with methionine. Linearity was studied in the range 60-120% of the concentrations expected for gly and thr (viz. for gly from 200 to 400 microgml(-1), and for thr from 100 to 200 microgml(-1)). In reference aqueous samples, linear correlation (r) was better than 0.99 for gly and thr, while in spiked matrix samples r ranged from 0.97 to 0.98. Recoveries were in the 95-105% interval, and precision (CV%, N=6) was better than 5% for both analytes either in cream, ointment or bandages. The method was successfully used for the quality control of topical dermatological preparations.

  18. Widespread potential for microbial MTBE degradation in surface-water sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Landmeyer, J.E.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2001-01-01

    Microorganisms indigenous to stream and lake bed sediments, collected from 11 sites throughout the United States, demonstrated significant mineralization of the fuel oxygenate, methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE). Mineralization of [U-14C]MTBE to 14CO2 ranged from 15 to 66% over 50 days and did not differ significantly between sediments collected from MTBE contaminated sites and from sites with no history of MTBE exposure. This result suggests that even the microbial communities indigenous to newly contaminated surface water systems will exhibit some innate ability to attenuate MTBE under aerobic conditions. The magnitude of MTBE mineralization was related to the sediment grain size distribution. A pronounced, inverse correlation (p < 0.001; r2 = 0.73) was observed between the final recovery of 14CO2 and the percentage content of silt and clay sized grains (grain diameter < 0.125 mm). The results of this study indicate that the microorganisms that inhabit the bed sediments of streams and lakes can degrade MTBE efficiently and that this capability is widespread in the environment. Thus aerobic bed sediment microbial processes may provide a significant environmental sink for MTBE in surface water systems throughout the United States and may contribute to the reported transience of MTBE in some surface waters.

  19. Studies into Using Manure in a Biorefinery Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shulin; Wen, Zhiyou; Liao, Wei; Liu, Chuanbin; Kincaid, R. L.; Harrison, J. H.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Brown, Michael D.; Stevens, Don J.

    2005-03-01

    Animal manure is an underutilized biomass resource containing a large amount of organic carbon that is often wasted in the existing manure disposal practices. A research project funded by the US Department of Energy explored the feasibility of using manure via the sugar platform in a biorefinery. The results showed that fiber, the major component of dry manure, constituted approximately 50%, 40%, and 36% of the dry dairy, swine, and poultry manure materials, respectively. The highest fiber contents were in dairy manure of which more than 75% of the dry matter was in the particles greater than 0.125 mm. Manure can be used for substrate to produce cellulase on site. The hemicellulose component in the manure fiber could be readily converted to sugar through acid hydrolysis. Concentrated acid treatment was most effective in manure cellulose decrystallization. The effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis was limited without concentrated acid pretreatment. The high protein content in manure had negative affects on acid hydrolysis. Purification and separation is necessary for further chemical conversion of the sugar to value-added chemicals through hydrogenation.

  20. Involvement of nitric oxide in the wound bed microcirculatory change during negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Sano, Hitomi; Ichioka, Shigeru

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the mechanism of blood flow increase in the wound bed during negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). We developed an improved experimental model that allowed visualisation of the wound bed microcirculation under NPWT. Wounds were created on the mouse ear, taking care to preserve the subdermal vascular plexus, because the wound bed microcirculation was visualised using an intravital microscope system. We investigated whether application of a NO synthase inhibitor (N(G) -nitro-l-arginine methyl ester: L-NAME) might diminish the effect of the NPWT in increasing the wound blood flow. The experimental animals were divided into a negative pressure group (negative pressure of -125 mmHg applied to the wound for 5 minutes; n = 8), and a negative pressure plus L-NAME group (administration of L-NAME prior to application of the negative pressure; n = 8). In the negative pressure group, significant increase of blood flow was observed at 1 minute after the negative pressure application, which was sustained until 5 minutes. On the contrary, in the negative pressure plus L-NAME group, no significant changes were observed throughout the period of observation. These findings suggest that NO synthesis is involved in the wound bed microcirculatory change induced by NPWT.

  1. ANTHROPOMORPHIC PHANTOMS FOR ASSESSMENT OF STRAIN IMAGING METHODS INVOLVING SALINE-INFUSED SONOHYSTEROGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, Maritza A.; Madsen, Ernest L.; Frank, Gary R.; Jiang, Jingfeng; Shi, Hairong; Hall, Timothy J.; Varghese, Tomy

    2008-01-01

    Two anthropomorphic uterine phantoms were developed which allow assessment and comparison of strain imaging systems adapted for use with saline-infused sonohysterography (SIS). Tissue-mimicking (TM) materials consist of dispersions of safflower oil in gelatin. TM fibroids are stiffer than the TM myometrium/cervix and TM polyps are softer. The first uterine phantom has 3-mm diameter TM fibroids randomly distributed in TM myometrium. The second uterine phantom has a 5-mm and an 8-mm spherical TM fibroid in addition to a 5-mm spherical and a 12.5-mm long (medicine-capsule-shaped) TM endometrial polyp protruding into the endometrial cavity; also, a 10-mm spherical TM fibroid projects from the serosal surface. Strain images using the first phantom show the stiffer 3-mm TM fibroids in the myometrium. Results from the second uterine phantom show that, as expected, parts of inclusions projecting into the uterine cavity will appear very stiff, whether they are stiff or soft. Results from both phantoms show that even though there is a five-fold difference in the Young’s moduli values, there is not a significant difference in the strain in the transition from the TM myometrium to the TM fat. These phantoms allow for realistic comparison and evolution of SIS strain imaging techniques and can aid clinical personnel to develop skills for SIS strain imaging. PMID:18514999

  2. Exposure to sulfosulfuron in agricultural drainage ditches: field monitoring and scenario-based modelling.

    PubMed

    Brown, Colin D; Dubus, Igor G; Fogg, Paul; Spirlet, Marie; Gustin, Christophe

    2004-08-01

    Field monitoring and scenario-based modelling were used to assess exposure of small ditches in the UK to the herbicide sulfosulfuron following transport via field drains. A site in central England on a high pH, clay soil was treated with sulfosulfuron, and concentrations were monitored in the single drain outfall and in the receiving ditch 1 km downstream. Drainflow in the nine months following application totalled 283 mm. Pesticide lost in the first 12.5 mm of flow was 99% of the total loading to drains (0.5% of applied). Significant dilution was observed in the receiving ditch and quantifiable residues were only detected in one sample (0.06 microg litre(-1)). The MACRO model was evaluated against the field data with minimal calibration. The parameterisation over-estimated the importance of macropore flow at the site. As a consequence, the maximum concentration in drainflow (2.3 microg litre(-1)) and the total loading to drains (0.76 g) were over-estimated by factors of 2.4 and 5, respectively. MACRO was then used to simulate long-term fate of the herbicide for each of 20 environmental scenarios. Resulting estimates for concentrations of sulfosulfuron in a receiving ditch were weighted according to the prevalence of each scenario to produce a probability distribution of daily exposure. PMID:15307668

  3. Long-term Results from Cyclocryotherapy Applied to the 3O'clock and 9O'clock Positions in Blind Refractory Glaucoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byoung Seon; Kim, Young Jun; Seo, Seong Wook; Yoo, Ji Myong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the long-term follow-up results after cyclocryotherapy, applied to the 3-o'clock and 9-o'clock positions in blind refractory glaucoma patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 19 blind patients, and a total of 20 eyes with refractory glaucoma who were treated with cyclocryotherapy. Cyclocryotherapy treatments were performed using a retinal cryoprobe. The temperature of each cyclocryotherapy spot was -80℃ and each spot was maintained in place for 60 seconds. Six cyclocryotherapy spots were placed in each quadrant, including the 3-o'clock and 9-o'clock positions. Results The mean baseline pretreatment intraocular pressure (IOP) in all eyes was 50.9 ± 12.5 mmHg, which significantly decreased to a mean IOP at last follow-up of 14.1 ± 7.1 mmHg (p < 0.001). The mean number of antiglaucoma medications that patients were still taking at last follow-up was 0.3 ± 0.6. Devastating post-procedure phthisis occurred in only one eye. Conclusions Cyclocryotherapy, performed at each quadrant and at the 3-o'clock and 9-o'clock position, is an effective way to lower IOP and, thus, is a reasonable treatment option for refractory glaucoma patients who experience with ocular pain and headaches. PMID:25646060

  4. Investigation of MMOD Impact on STS-115 Shuttle Payload Bay Door Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, J.; Christiansen, E.; Lear, D.; Kerr, J.; Lyons, F.; Yasensky, J.

    2007-01-01

    The Orbiter radiator system consists of eight individual 4.6 m x 3.2 m panels located with four on each payload bay door. Forward panels #1 and #2 are 2.3 cm thick while the aft panels #3 and #4 have a smaller overall thickness of 1.3 cm. The honeycomb radiator panels consist of 0.028 cm thick Aluminum 2024-T81 facesheets and Al5056-H39 cores. The face-sheets are topped with 0.005 in. (0.127 mm) silver-Teflon tape. The radiators are located on the inside of the shuttle payload bay doors, which are closed during ascent and reentry, limiting damage to the on-orbit portion of the mission. Post-flight inspections at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) following the STS-115 mission revealed a large micrometeoroid/orbital debris (MMOD) impact near the hinge line on the #4 starboard payload bay door radiator panel. The features of this impact make it the largest ever recorded on an orbiter payload bay door radiator. The general location of the damage site and the adjacent radiator panels can be seen in Figure 2. Initial measurements of the defect indicated that the hole in the facesheet was 0.108 in. (2.74 mm) in diameter. Figure 3 shows an image of the front side damage. Subsequent observations revealed exit damage on the rear facesheet. Impact damage features on the rear facesheet included a 0.03 in. diameter hole (0.76 mm), a approx.0.05 in. tall bulge (approx.1.3 mm), and a larger approx.0.2 in. tall bulge (approx.5.1 mm) that exhibited a crack over 0.27 in. (6.8 mm) long. A large approx.1 in. (25 mm) diameter region of the honeycomb core was also damaged. Refer to Figure 4 for an image of the backside damage to the panel. No damage was found on thermal blankets or payload bay door structure under the radiator panel. Figure 5 shows the front facesheet with the thermal tape removed. Ultrasound examination indicated a maximum facesheet debond extent of approximately 1 in. (25 mm) from the entry hole. X-ray examinations revealed damage to an estimated 31 honeycomb cells with an extent of 0.85 in. x 1.1 in. (21.6 x 27.9 mm). Pieces of the radiator at and surrounding the impact site were recovered during the repair procedures at KSC. They included the thermal tape, front facesheet, honeycomb core, and rear facesheet. These articles were examined at JSC using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) with an energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (EDS). Figure 6 shows SEM images of the entry hole in the facesheet. The asymmetric height of the lip may be attributed to projectile shape and impact angle. Numerous instances of a glass-fiber organic matrix composite were observed in the facesheet tape sample. The fibers were approximately 10 micrometers in diameter and variable lengths. EDS analysis indicated a composition of Mg, Ca, Al, Si, and O. Figures 7 and 8 present images of the fiber bundles, which were believed to be circuit board material based on similarity in fiber diameter, orientation, consistency, and composition. A test program was initiated in an attempt to simulate the observed damage to the radiator facesheet and honeycomb. Twelve test shots were performed using projectiles cut from a 1.6 mm thick fiberglass circuit board substrate panel. Results from test HITF07017, shown in figures 9 and 10, correlates with the observed impact features reasonably well. The test was performed at 4.14 km/sec with an impact angle of 45 degrees using a cylindrical projectile with a diameter and length of 1.25 mm. The fiberglass circuit board material had a density of 1.65 g/cu cm, giving a projectile mass of 2.53 mg. An analysis was performed using the Bumper code to estimate the probability of impact to the shuttle from a 1.25 mm diameter particle. Table 1 shows a 1.6% chance (impact odds = 1 in 62) of a 1.25 mm or larger MMOD impact on the radiators of the vehicle during a typical ISS mission. There is a 0.4% chance (impact odds = 1 in 260) that a 1.25 mm or larger MMOD particle would impact the RCC wing leading edge and nose cap during a typical miion. Figure 11 illustrates the vulnerable areas of the wing leading edge reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC), an area of the vehicle that is very sensitive to impact damage. The highlighted red, orange, yellow, and light green areas would be expected to experience critical damage if impacted by an OD particle such as the one that hit the RH4 radiator panel on STS-115.

  5. Measurement of enhanced heat transfer coefficient with perforated twisted tape inserts during condensation of R-245fa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatua, A. K.; Kumar, P.; Singh, H. N.; Kumar, R.

    2016-04-01

    The experimental conductive heat transfer results for flow through inserted perforated twisted tapes in a horizontal tube during condensation of pure R-245fa vapor. The test section consisting of two separate coaxial double pipes assembled in series, acted like a counter flow heat exchanger, where the refrigerant condensed inside the inner tube by rejecting heat to the cooling water flowing inside the outer tube in reversed direction. Data for three perforated twisted tapes having constant twist ratio of 7.1 mm and pitch of perforation as 12.5, 25.0 and 37.5 mm, inserted one by one in full length of test condenser by varying refrigerant mass flux from 100 to 200 kg/m2 s in steps of 50 kg/m2 s for the range of vapor quality from 0.1 to 0.9, were collected together with flow and without insert (plain tube). It has been found that the perforated twisted tape insert having pitch of perforation equal to in order of 12.5 mm gives the highest value of average heat transfer coefficient and is of the order of 37.5 % more than that of the plain one and the correlation predicts the experimental data within an error band of ±15 %.

  6. Lightweight photovoltaic module development for unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Nowlan, M.J.; Maglitta, J.C.; Lamp, T.R.

    1998-07-01

    Lightweight photovoltaic modules are being developed for powering high altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Terrestrial crystalline silicon solar cell and module technologies are being applied to minimize module cost, with modifications to improve module specific power (W/kg) and power density (W/m{sup 2}). New module processes are being developed for assembling standard thickness (320 mm) and thin (125 mm) solar cells, thin (50 to 100 mm) encapsulant films, and thin (25 mm) cover films. In comparison, typical terrestrial modules use 300 to 400 mm thick solar cells, 460 mm thick encapsulants, and 3.2 mm thick glass covers. The use of thin, lightweight materials allows the fabrication of modules with specific powers ranging from 120 to 200 W/kg, depending on cell thickness and efficiency, compared to 15 W/kg or less for conventional terrestrial modules. High efficiency designs based on ultra-thin (5 mm) GaAs cells have also been developed, with the potential for achieving substantially higher specific powers. Initial design, development, and module assembly work is completed. Prototype modules were fabricated in sizes up to 45 cm x 99 cm. Module materials and processes are being evaluated through accelerated environmental testing, including thermal cycling, humidity-freeze cycling, mechanical cycling, and exposure to UV and visible light.

  7. Effects of maximum aggregate size on UPV of brick aggregate concrete.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Tarek Uddin; Mahmood, Aziz Hasan

    2016-07-01

    Investigation was carried out to study the effects of maximum aggregate size (MAS) (12.5mm, 19.0mm, 25.0mm, 37.5mm, and 50.0mm) on ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) of concrete. For investigation, first class bricks were collected and broken to make coarse aggregate. The aggregates were tested for specific gravity, absorption capacity, unit weight, and abrasion resistance. Cylindrical concrete specimens were made with different sand to aggregate volume ratio (s/a) (0.40 and 0.45), W/C ratio (0.45, 0.50, and 0.55), and cement content (375kg/m(3) and 400kg/m(3)). The specimens were tested for compressive strength and Young's modulus. UPV through wet specimen was measured using Portable Ultrasonic Non-destructive Digital Indicating Tester (PUNDIT). Results indicate that the pulse velocity through concrete increases with an increase in MAS. Relationships between UPV and compressive strength; and UPV and Young's modulus of concrete are proposed for different maximum sizes of brick aggregate. PMID:27085110

  8. Recycling of construction and demolition waste materials: a chemical-mineralogical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, G; Marrocchino, E; Tassinari, R; Vaccaro, C

    2005-01-01

    Building activity is currently demanding remarkable amounts of inert materials (such as gravel and sand) that are usually provided by alluvial sediments. The EU directives and Italian Legislation are encouraging the re-use of construction and demolition waste provided by continuous urban redevelopment. The re-utilisation of building waste is a relatively new issue for Italy: unfortunately the employment of recycled inert materials is still limited to general bulk and drainage fills, while a more complete re-evaluation is generally hampered by the lack of suitable recycling plants. In this paper, chemical-mineralogical characterization of recycled inert materials was carried out after preliminary crushing and grain-size sorting. XRF and XRD analysis of the different grain-size classes allowed us to recognise particular granulometric classes that can be re-utilised as first-order material in the building activity. Specifically, the presented chemical-mineralogical appraisal indicates that the recycled grain-size fraction 0.6-0.125 mm could be directly re-employed in the preparation of new mortar and concrete, while finer fractions could be considered as components for industrial processing in the preparation of cements and bricks/tiles.

  9. Development of a Compact Rectenna for Wireless Powering of a Head-Mountable Deep Brain Stimulation Device.

    PubMed

    Hosain, M D Kamal; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Tye, Susannah J; Abulseoud, Osama A; Amiet, Andrew; Galehdar, Amir; Kaynak, Akif; Berk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Design of a rectangular spiral planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) at 915 MHz for wireless power transmission applications is proposed. The antenna and rectifying circuitry form a rectenna, which can produce dc power from a distant radio frequency energy transmitter. The generated dc power is used to operate a low-power deep brain stimulation pulse generator. The proposed antenna has the dimensions of 10 mm [Formula: see text]12.5 mm [Formula: see text]1.5 mm and resonance frequency of 915 MHz with a measured bandwidth of 15 MHz at return loss of [Formula: see text]. A dielectric substrate of FR-4 of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] with thickness of 1.5 mm is used for both antenna and rectifier circuit simulation and fabrication because of its availability and low cost. An L-section impedance matching circuit is used between the PIFA and voltage doubler rectifier. The impedance matching circuit also works as a low-pass filter for elimination of higher order harmonics. Maximum dc voltage at the rectenna output is 7.5 V in free space and this rectenna can drive a deep brain stimulation pulse generator at a distance of 30 cm from a radio frequency energy transmitter, which transmits power of 26.77 dBm. PMID:27170863

  10. Rigidity and retention of ceramic root canal posts.

    PubMed

    Purton, D G; Love, R M; Chandler, N P

    2000-01-01

    Ceramic root-canal posts offer potential advantages over other types with respect to aesthetics and biocompatibility. Any post must be sufficiently rigid and retentive to withstand functional forces. Ceraposts (1.2 mm coronal diameter, ceramic, tapering, smooth posts) and Paraposts (1.25 mm, stainless-steel, parallel, serrated posts) were tested for rigidity by means of a three-point bending test. To test retention in roots, ceramic posts were cemented using one of three protocols: (1) glass-ionomer cement, (2) silane coupling agent and resin cement, or (3) sandblasted post surface, silane coupling agent, and resin cement. Stainless-steel posts were cemented with resin. The tensile force required to dislodge the posts, following four weeks of storage in water, was recorded. Data were compared using Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney U analysis. Ceraposts were significantly more rigid than Paraposts (p < 0.001). Paraposts cemented with resin were significantly more strongly retained than Ceraposts following any cementation protocol (p < 0.001). Retention of the ceramic posts was significantly greater with a silane coupling agent and resin cement than with glass-ionomer cement (p < 0.001). Sandblasting the ceramic posts produced variable results and needs further investigation before it could be recommended. PMID:11203820

  11. The effect of serrations on carbon fibre posts-retention within the root canal, core retention, and post rigidity.

    PubMed

    Love, R M; Purton, D G

    1996-01-01

    The retention in root canals of serrated carbon fibre Composiposts and stainless steel Paraposts was tested under tensile load. Twenty unrestored human roots were endodontically prepared and root filled. Two groups of 10 roots received 1.4-mm Composiposts or 1.25-mm Paraposts luted with a resin cement. The specimens were then embedded in acrylic resin and mounted in an Instron machine. The tensile force (kg) required to dislodge the posts was recorded and analysed with Student's test. The results revealed that there was no significant difference in the retention of either post (P > .05). The rigidty of 10 1.4-mm serrated Composiposts was tested in a three-point bend test in an Instron machine, and the retention of composite cores to 10 of these posts under tensile force was also tested. The results from these tests were compared to previous data from the authors' laboratory and revealed that the serrations significantly reduced the rigidity of the post (P < .001) and increased the retention of a core material (P < .001). PMID:9108751

  12. Simplified stereo-optical ultrasound plane calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoßbach, Martin; Noll, Matthias; Wesarg, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Image guided therapy is a natural concept and commonly used in medicine. In anesthesia, a common task is the injection of an anesthetic close to a nerve under freehand ultrasound guidance. Several guidance systems exist using electromagnetic tracking of the ultrasound probe as well as the needle, providing the physician with a precise projection of the needle into the ultrasound image. This, however, requires additional expensive devices. We suggest using optical tracking with miniature cameras attached to a 2D ultrasound probe to achieve a higher acceptance among physicians. The purpose of this paper is to present an intuitive method to calibrate freehand ultrasound needle guidance systems employing a rigid stereo camera system. State of the art methods are based on a complex series of error prone coordinate system transformations which makes them susceptible to error accumulation. By reducing the amount of calibration steps to a single calibration procedure we provide a calibration method that is equivalent, yet not prone to error accumulation. It requires a linear calibration object and is validated on three datasets utilizing di erent calibration objects: a 6mm metal bar and a 1:25mm biopsy needle were used for experiments. Compared to existing calibration methods for freehand ultrasound needle guidance systems, we are able to achieve higher accuracy results while additionally reducing the overall calibration complexity. Ke

  13. GEM-type detectors using LIGA and etchable glass technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, S.K.; Kim, J.G.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Chang, S.; Jackson, K.H.; Kadyk, J.A.; Wenzel, W.A.; Cho, G.

    2001-11-02

    Gas electron multipliers (GEMS) have been made by a deep X-ray lithography technique (LIGA process) using synchrotron radiation on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and by UV processes using a UV etchable glass. Gain, stability and rate capability for these detectors are described.The LIGA detectors described consist of PMMA sheets of various thicknesses, 125mm to 350mm, and have 150mm x 150mm square holes spaced with a pitch of 300mm. Thin copper electrodes are plated on the top and bottom surfaces using a Damascene method, followed by electroless plating of the copper onto a palladium-tin base layer. For various thicknesses of PMMA measurements have been made of absolute gain vs. voltage, time stability of gain, and rate capability. The operating gas mixture was usually Ar/CO2 (70/30) gas, but some tests were also done using P10 gas. We also made GEM-like detectors using the UV etchable glass called Foturan, patterned by exposure to UV light and subsequent etching. A few measurements using these detectors will be reported, including avalanche gain and time stability.

  14. A probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter.

    PubMed

    van Baarsen, K M; Kleinnijenhuis, M; Jbabdi, S; Sotiropoulos, S N; Grotenhuis, J A; van Cappellen van Walsum, A M

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei and their connectivity are gaining attraction, due to the important role the cerebellum plays in cognition and motor control. Atlases of the cerebellar cortex and nuclei are used to locate regions of interest in clinical and neuroscience studies. However, the white matter that connects these relay stations is of at least similar functional importance. Damage to these cerebellar white matter tracts may lead to serious language, cognitive and emotional disturbances, although the pathophysiological mechanism behind it is still debated. Differences in white matter integrity between patients and controls might shed light on structure-function correlations. A probabilistic parcellation atlas of the cerebellar white matter would help these studies by facilitating automatic segmentation of the cerebellar peduncles, the localization of lesions and the comparison of white matter integrity between patients and controls. In this work a digital three-dimensional probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter is presented, based on high quality 3T, 1.25mm resolution diffusion MRI data from 90 subjects participating in the Human Connectome Project. The white matter tracts were estimated using probabilistic tractography. Results over 90 subjects were symmetrical and trajectories of superior, middle and inferior cerebellar peduncles resembled the anatomy as known from anatomical studies. This atlas will contribute to a better understanding of cerebellar white matter architecture. It may eventually aid in defining structure-function correlations in patients with cerebellar disorders.

  15. Analysis of passivated A-286 stainless steel surfaces for mass spectrometer inlet systems by Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Ajo, Henry; Blankenship, Donnie; Clark, Elliot

    2014-07-25

    In this study, various commercially available surface treatments are being explored for use on stainless steel components in mass spectrometer inlet systems. Type A-286 stainless steel coupons, approximately 12.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were passivated with one of five different surface treatments; an untreated coupon served as a control. The surface and near-surface microstructure and chemistry of the coupons were investigated using sputter depth profiling using Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the surface treatments studied appeared to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks onmore » the treated samples in SEM images. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7–0.9 nm thick), as well as to the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E’s silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.« less

  16. Stem length and canal filling in uncemented custom-made total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sakai, T; Sugano, N; Nishii, T; Haraguchi, K; Ochi, T; Ohzono, K

    1999-01-01

    We reviewed 60 custom-made femoral components of two different lengths : 125 mm (group A) and 100 mm (group B), in order to investigate the relationship between stem length and canal filling in uncemented custom-made total hip arthroplasty. There were no statistical differences between the two groups in age, gender, height, body weight, canal flare index, or bowing angle of the femur. Postoperatively there was no statistical difference between the two groups in the proximal canal filling, but significant difference in the distal canal filling (75.5% vs 85.8% on the anteroposterior view and 76.0% vs 82.5% in the lateral view, P<0.001). The distal canal filling inversely correlated with the ratio of the proximal portion and the distal portion of the stem curvature on the lateral view (lateral curve ratio of the stem, P=0.002). We conclude that superior filling at both the proximal and the distal levels can be obtained by using 100-mm custom made components with a small lateral curve ratio. PMID:10591939

  17. Computational micromechanical analysis of the representative volume element of bituminous composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Hasan; Ghauch, Ziad G.; Dhasmana, Heena; Al-Qadi, Imad L.

    2016-08-01

    Micromechanical computational modeling is used in this study to determine the smallest domain, or Representative Volume Element (RVE), that can be used to characterize the effective properties of composite materials such as Asphalt Concrete (AC). Computational Finite Element (FE) micromechanical modeling was coupled with digital image analysis of surface scans of AC specimens. Three mixtures with varying Nominal Maximum Aggregate Size (NMAS) of 4.75 mm, 12.5 mm, and 25 mm, were prepared for digital image analysis and computational micromechanical modeling. The effects of window size and phase modulus mismatch on the apparent viscoelastic response of the composite were numerically examined. A good agreement was observed in the RVE size predictions based on micromechanical computational modeling and image analysis. Micromechanical results indicated that a degradation in the matrix stiffness increases the corresponding RVE size. Statistical homogeneity was observed for window sizes equal to two to three times the NMAS. A model was presented for relating the degree of statistical homogeneity associated with each window size for materials with varying inclusion dimensions.

  18. In vivo high-resolution diffusion tensor imaging of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Xu, Jiadi; McMahon, Michael T; van Zijl, Peter C M; Mori, Susumu; Northington, Frances J; Zhang, Jiangyang

    2013-12-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the laboratory mouse brain provides important macroscopic information for anatomical characterization of mouse models in basic research. Currently, in vivo DTI of the mouse brain is often limited by the available resolution. In this study, we demonstrate in vivo high-resolution DTI of the mouse brain using a cryogenic probe and a modified diffusion-weighted gradient and spin echo (GRASE) imaging sequence at 11.7 T. Three-dimensional (3D) DTI of the entire mouse brain at 0.125 mm isotropic resolution could be obtained in approximately 2 h. The high spatial resolution, which was previously only available with ex vivo imaging, enabled non-invasive examination of small structures in the adult and neonatal mouse brains. Based on data acquired from eight adult mice, a group-averaged DTI atlas of the in vivo adult mouse brain with 60 structure segmentations was developed. Comparisons between in vivo and ex vivo mouse brain DTI data showed significant differences in brain morphology and tissue contrasts, which indicate the importance of the in vivo DTI-based mouse brain atlas.

  19. Comparison of objects detection capabilities in LWIR and THz ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Marcin; Kastek, Mariusz; Szustakowski, Mieczyslaw

    2015-10-01

    Multispectral systems for detection of concealed dangerous objects are becoming more popular because of their higher effectiveness compared to mono-spectral systems. So far, the problem of detecting objects hidden under clothing was considered only in the case of airports but it is becoming more important for public places like metro stations, and government buildings. Exploration of new spectral bands as well as development of technology result in introduction of new solutions - both mono and multispectral. It has been proved that objects hidden under clothing can be detected and visualized using terahertz (THz) cameras. However, passive THz cameras still offer too low image resolution for objects recognition. Limited range is another issue of passive imagers. On the other hand new infrared cameras offer sufficient parameters to detect objects covered with fabrics in some conditions, as well as high image quality and big pixel resolutions. The purpose of the studies is to investigate and compare the possibilities of using passive cameras operating in long wavelength infrared (LWIR) and THz spectral ranges for detection of concealed objects. For the purpose of investigations, commercial imagers operating in 6.5-11.7 μm and 250GHz (1.25mm) were used. In the article, we present the measurement setup and the results of measurements in various operating conditions. Theoretical studies of both spectral bands focused on detection of objects with passive imagers are also presented.

  20. Optimal egg size in a suboptimal environment: reproductive ecology of female Sonora mud turtles (Kinosternon sonoriense) in central Arizona, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Madrak, Sheila V.; Drost, Charles A.; Monatesti, Anthony J.; Casper, Dennis; Znari, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    We studied the reproductive ecology of female Sonora mud turtles (Kinosternon sonoriense) at Montezuma Well, a chemically-challenging natural wetland in central Arizona, USA. Females matured between 115.5 and 125 mm carapace length (CL) and 36-54% produced eggs each year. Eggs were detected in X-radiographs from 23 April-28 September (2007-2008) and the highest proportion (56%) of adult females with eggs occurred in June and July. Clutch frequency was rarely more than once per year. Clutch size was weakly correlated with body size, ranged from 1-8 (mean = 4.96) and did not differ significantly between years. X-ray egg width ranged from 17.8-21.7 mm (mean 19.4 mm) and varied more among clutches than within. Mean X-ray egg width of a clutch did not vary significantly with CL of females, although X-ray pelvic aperture width increased with CL. We observed no evidence of a morphological constraint on egg width. In addition, greater variation in clutch size, relative to egg width, suggests that egg size is optimized in this hydrologically stable but chemically-challenging habitat. We suggest that the diversity of architectures exhibited by the turtle pelvis, and their associated lack of correspondence to taxonomic or behavioral groupings, explains some of the variation observed in egg size of turtles.

  1. Quantifying the transport of energetic materials in unsaturated sediments from cracked unexploded ordnance.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jeffrey; Martel, Richard; Trépanier, Luc; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Dissolved explosive species have been found in the groundwater under military training areas. These explosives are thought to originate from munitions although the mechanism of transport to the groundwater is poorly understood. This study was conducted to determine whether ruptured unexploded ordnance may be a viable source term for these explosives. The rupturing effect of one 81 mm-mortar exploding in close proximity to another 81-mm mortar was observed and the resulting contaminants were collected. These contaminants were then subjected to leaching experiments on repacked, jack drill compacted unsaturated sediment columns in a climate controlled laboratory. The mortars which were exposed to nearby explosions were shown to be susceptible to rupturing rather than sympathetically detonating under certain conditions. The ruptured mortars released up to 166+/-2 g of pulverized explosive residues (largely Composition B) and the results from the subsequent leaching tests showed that this explosive residue is highly mobile in unsaturated sandy soil. Up to 4.45+/-1.00 g of dissolved explosive contamination was transported through the unsaturated soil columns during the first year of infiltration. The results indicate the mass of transported explosive residue dissolved in the leachate was primarily caused by the preferential dissolution of explosive contaminants having a grain size under 0.125 mm. Surface or near-surface unexploded ordnance (UXO) on live fire ranges may therefore be significant sources of explosive environmental contamination after they have been exposed to other rounds which explode nearby.

  2. Table-top transient collisional excitation x-ray laser research at LLNL: Status June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J., LLNL

    1997-07-01

    This is a status report of transient collisional excitation x-ray laser experiments at LLNL during June 1997 that have the advantage of being conducted on a table-top. Two laser drivers with modest energy {approximately}6 J are used in the scheme: a long {approximately}1 ns pulse to preform and ionize the plasma followed by a short {approximately}1 ps pulse to produce the excitation and population inversion. The beams are co-propagated and focused using a combination of a cylindrical lens and paraboloid to a line of {approximately}70 {micro}m x 12.5 mm dimensions. High repetition rates approaching 1 shot/3 min. allow typically in excess of 50 target shots in a day. Various slab targets have been irradiated and we report preliminary results for x-ray laser gain in 3p-3s J=0-1 Ne-like Ti and Fe transitions where gains as high as 24 cm{sup -1} and gL products of {approximately}15 have been observed.

  3. Numerical dosimetry for cells under millimetre-wave irradiation using Petri dish exposure set-ups.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J X

    2005-07-21

    We carried out a numerical dosimetry study for in vitro experiments on millimetre-wave (MMW) biological effects on cells. The cell layers are cultured in 35 mm Petri dishes placed in the far-field region of a rectangular horn irradiator generating a 50.0 GHz continuous sinusoidal MMW. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and the second-order approximation of the absorbing boundary conditions (ABCs) are applied in calculating the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the cells. The 0.125 mm and 0.25 mm voxel models of the Petri dish are used. The permittivity and the conductivity of the cells and those of the culture medium are obtained with Debye's dispersion equation. We measured the power pattern of the irradiator using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method, and developed a program module to calculate the FDTD-compatible incident field from the irradiator, whose position and orientation are adjustable. The MMW multiple reflection between the Petri dish and the irradiator is evaluated before being neglected. For the single-dish, double-dish and quadruple-dish exposure set-ups, the SAR intensity and the SAR uniformity are analysed and compared. The meniscus effect on the SAR distribution over the cell layer is evaluated for the single-dish set-up. The influence of the Petri dish interaction on the SAR distribution is examined for the double-dish and quadruple-dish set-ups.

  4. Size characteristics of stones ingested by common loons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Hansen, S.P.; Pokras, M.A.; Miconi, R.

    2001-01-01

    Common Loon (Gavia immer) carcasses recovered in New England had more stones of greater combined mass in their stomachs than loons from the southeastern United States. Stones retained in sieves with mesh sizes between 4.75 and 8.00 mm accounted for the greatest percentage (by mass) of grit in loon stomachs. The median longest dimension of the largest single stone in each stomach was 12.5 mm in loons from New England and 10.7 mm in loons from the southeast (maximum = 23.1 mm and 16.8 mm, respectively). A recent national proposal to restrict the use of certain fishing weights in the United States called for a ban on lead fishing sinkers of 25.4 mm or less in any dimension. Our findings suggest it is unlikely that Common Loons would ingest lead fishing weights greater than 25.4 mm in any dimension, if such ingestion was solely the result of their search for replacement stones for their stomachs. However, this does not preclude the possibility that loons may ingest larger fishing weights under other circumstances, such as the consumption of fish with attached sinkers.

  5. Cryogenic Testing of Different Seam Concepts for Multilayer Insulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Fesmire, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Recent testing in a cylindrical, comparative cryostat at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory has focused on various seam concepts for multilayer insulation systems. Three main types of seams were investigated: straight overlap, fold-over, and roll wrapped. Each blanket was comprised of 40 layer pairs of reflector and spacer materials. The total thickness was approximately 12.5-mm, giving an average layer density of 32 layers per centimeter. The blankets were tested at high vacuum, soft vacuum, and no vacuum using liquid nitrogen to maintain the cold boundary temperature at 77 K. Test results show that all three seam concepts are all close in thermal performance; however the fold-over method provides the lowest heat flux. For the first series of tests, seams were located 120 degrees around the circumference of the cryostat from the previous seam. This technique appears to have lessened the degradation of the blanket due to the seams. In a follow-on test, a 20 layer blanket was tested in a roll wrapped configuration and then cut down the side of the cylinder, taped together, and re-tested. This test result shows the thermal performance impact of having the seams all in one location versus having the seams clocked around the vessel. This experimental investigation indicates that the method of joining the seams in multilayer insulation systems is not as critical as the quality of the installation process.

  6. Growth patterns in the orbital region: a morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Farkas, L G; Posnick, J C; Hreczko, T M; Pron, G E

    1992-07-01

    Data for analysis of age-related changes in growth in the intercanthal (en-en) and biocular (ex-ex) widths were obtained from 1,594 healthy North American Caucasians in age groups from 1 to 18 years, divided equally between males and females. At 1 year, the degree of development of the intercanthal width reached 84.1%, and that of the biocular width 85.9% of adults in both sexes. The levels of growth achieved by 5 years of age rose to 93.3% in the intercanthal width and 88.1% in the biocular width, in both sexes. The average total growth increments achieved between ages 1 and 18 years were 5.2 mm in the intercanthal width and 12.5 mm in the biocular. The intercanthal width showed very little growth after 1 year of age; in contrast, the biocular width showed significantly greater growth increments both before and after 5 years of age. Rapid growth was observed between 3 and 4 years in the intercanthal width of both sexes. The age-related growth observed in the biocular width was small but continuous up to maturation time. The intercanthal width reached full maturation at 8 years in females and 11 years in males, and the biocular width at 13 years in females and 15 years in males.

  7. A contact-lens-shaped IC chip technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ching-Yu; Yang, Frank; Teng, Chih-Chiao; Fan, Long-Sheng

    2014-04-01

    We report on novel contact-lens-shaped silicon integrated circuit chip technology for applications such as forming a conforming retinal prosthesis. This is achieved by means of patterning thin films of high residual stress on top of a shaped thin silicon substrate. Several strategies are employed to achieve curvatures of various amounts. Firstly, high residual stress on a thin film makes a thin chip deform into a designed three-dimensional shape. Also, a series of patterned stress films and ‘petal-shaped’ chips were fabricated and analyzed. Large curvatures can also be formed and maintained by the packaging process of bonding the chips to constraining elements such as thin-film polymer ring structures. As a demonstration, a complementary metal oxide semiconductor transistor (CMOS) image-sensing retina chip is made into a contact-lens shape conforming to a human eyeball 12.5 mm in radius. This non-planar and flexible chip technology provides a desirable device surface interface to soft tissues or non-planar bio surfaces and opens up many other possibilities for biomedical applications.

  8. Femtosecond laser induced nanostructuring for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messaoudi, H.; Das, S. K.; Lange, J.; Heinrich, F.; Schrader, S.; Frohme, M.; Grunwald, R.

    2014-03-01

    The formation of periodical nanostructures with femtosecond laser pulses was used to create highly efficient substrates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). We report about the structuring of silver and copper substrates and their application to the SERS of DNA (herring sperm) and protein molecules (egg albumen). The maximum enhancement factors were found on Ag substrates processed with the second harmonic generation (SHG) of a 1-kHz Ti:sapphire laser and structure periods near the SHG wavelength. In the case of copper, however, the highest enhancement was obtained with long-period ripples induced with at fundamental wavelength. This is explained by an additional significant influence of nanoparticles on the surface. Nanostructured areas in the range of 1.25 mm2 were obtained in 10 s. The surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fast Fourier Transform and Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, the role of the chemical modification of the metal structures is addressed. Thin oxide layers resulting from working in atmosphere which improve the biocompatibility were indicated by vibration spectra. It is expected that the detailed study of the mechanisms of laser-induced nanostructure formation will stimulate further applications of functionalized surfaces like photocatalysis, selective chemistry and nano-biology.

  9. Optimizing probe design for an implantable perfusion and oxygenation sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Akl, Tony; Long, Ruiqi; McShane, Michael J.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Wilson, Mark A.; Cote, Gerard L.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to develop an implantable optical perfusion and oxygenation sensor, based on multiwavelength reflectance pulse oximetry, we investigate the effect of source detector separation and other source-detector characteristics to optimize the sensor s signal to background ratio using Monte Carlo (MC) based simulations and in vitro phantom studies. Separations in the range 0.45 to 1.25 mm were found to be optimal in the case of a point source. The numerical aperture (NA) of the source had no effect on the collected signal while the widening of the source spatial profile caused a shift in the optimal source-detector separation. Specifically, for a 4.5 mm flat beam and a 2.4 mm 2.5 mm photodetector, the optimal performance was found to be when the source and detector are adjacent to each other. These modeling results were confirmed by data collected from in vitro experiments on a liver phantom perfused with dye solutions mimicking the absorption properties of hemoglobin for different oxygenation states.

  10. Effect of Layer Thickness and Printing Orientation on Mechanical Properties and Dimensional Accuracy of 3D Printed Porous Samples for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Farzadi, Arghavan; Solati-Hashjin, Mehran; Asadi-Eydivand, Mitra; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2014-01-01

    Powder-based inkjet 3D printing method is one of the most attractive solid free form techniques. It involves a sequential layering process through which 3D porous scaffolds can be directly produced from computer-generated models. 3D printed products' quality are controlled by the optimal build parameters. In this study, Calcium Sulfate based powders were used for porous scaffolds fabrication. The printed scaffolds of 0.8 mm pore size, with different layer thickness and printing orientation, were subjected to the depowdering step. The effects of four layer thicknesses and printing orientations, (parallel to X, Y and Z), on the physical and mechanical properties of printed scaffolds were investigated. It was observed that the compressive strength, toughness and Young's modulus of samples with 0.1125 and 0.125 mm layer thickness were more than others. Furthermore, the results of SEM and μCT analyses showed that samples with 0.1125 mm layer thickness printed in X direction have more dimensional accuracy and significantly close to CAD software based designs with predefined pore size, porosity and pore interconnectivity. PMID:25233468

  11. 3D finite element analysis of immediate loading of single wide versus double implants for replacing mandibular molar

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Shrikar R.; Karthikeyan, I.; Gaddale, Reetika

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this finite element study was to compare the stresses, strains, and displacements of double versus single implant in immediate loading for replacing mandibular molar. Materials and Methods: Two 3D FEM (finite element method) models were made to simulate implant designs. The first model used 5-mm-wide diameter implant to support a single molar crown. The second model used 3.75-3.75 double implant design. Anisotropic properties were assigned to bone model. Each model was analyzed with single force magnitude (100 N) in vertical axis. Results: This FEM study suggested that micromotion can be controlled better for double implants compared to single wide-diameter implants. The Von Mises stress for double implant showed 74.44% stress reduction compared to that of 5-mm implant. The Von Mises elastic strain was reduced by 61% for double implant compared to 5-mm implant. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, when the mesiodistal space for artificial tooth is more than 12.5 mm, under immediate loading, the double implant support should be considered. PMID:24554890

  12. Effects of maximum aggregate size on UPV of brick aggregate concrete.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Tarek Uddin; Mahmood, Aziz Hasan

    2016-07-01

    Investigation was carried out to study the effects of maximum aggregate size (MAS) (12.5mm, 19.0mm, 25.0mm, 37.5mm, and 50.0mm) on ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) of concrete. For investigation, first class bricks were collected and broken to make coarse aggregate. The aggregates were tested for specific gravity, absorption capacity, unit weight, and abrasion resistance. Cylindrical concrete specimens were made with different sand to aggregate volume ratio (s/a) (0.40 and 0.45), W/C ratio (0.45, 0.50, and 0.55), and cement content (375kg/m(3) and 400kg/m(3)). The specimens were tested for compressive strength and Young's modulus. UPV through wet specimen was measured using Portable Ultrasonic Non-destructive Digital Indicating Tester (PUNDIT). Results indicate that the pulse velocity through concrete increases with an increase in MAS. Relationships between UPV and compressive strength; and UPV and Young's modulus of concrete are proposed for different maximum sizes of brick aggregate.

  13. Wide-band, high-resolution soft x-ray spectrometer for the Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Widmann, K.

    1999-01-01

    We have constructed two wide-band, high-resolution vacuum flat crystal spectrometers and implemented them on the Electron Beam Ion Trap located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Working in unison, these spectrometers can measure an x-ray bandwidth {le}9 {Angstrom} in the soft x-ray region below 21 {Angstrom}. In order to achieve this large bandwidth each spectrometer houses either two 125 mm {times} 13 mm {times} 2 mm RAP (rubidium acid phthalate, 2d=26.121 {Angstrom}), two 114 mm {times} 13 mm {times} 2 mm TlAP (thallium acid phthalate, 2d=25.75 {Angstrom}) crystals, or some combination thereof, for dispersion and two position sensitive proportional counters for detection of x rays. The spectrometers are used to measure wavelengths and relative intensities of the L-shell line emission from FethinspXVII{endash}XXIV for comparison with spectra obtained from astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. The wide wavelength coverage attainable by these spectrometers makes it possible to measure all the L-shell emission from a given iron ion species simultaneously. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Linear Dimensional Stability of Irreversible Hydrocolloid Materials Over Time.

    PubMed

    Garrofé, Analía B; Ferrari, Beatriz A; Picca, Mariana; Kaplan, Andrea E

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the linear dimensional stability of different irreversible hydrocolloid materials over time. A metal mold was designed with custom trays made of thermoplastic sheets (Sabilex, sheets 0.125 mm thick). Perforations were made in order to improve retention of the material. Five impressions were taken with each of the following: Kromopan 100 (LASCOD) [AlKr], which has dimensional stability of 100 hours, and Phase Plus (ZHERMACK) [AlPh], which has dimensional stability of 48 hours. Standardized digital photographs were taken at different time intervals (0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 120 minutes; 12, 24 and 96 hours), using an "ad-hoc" device. The images were analyzed with software (UTHSCSA Image Tool) by measuring the distance between intersection of the lines previously made at the top of the mold. The results were analyzed by ANOVA for repeated measures. Initial and final values were (mean and standard deviation): AlKr: 16.44 (0.22) and 16.34 (0.11), AlPh: 16.40 (0.06) and 16.18 (0.06). Statistical evaluation showed significant effect of material and time factors. Under the conditions in this study, time significantly affects the linear dimensional stability of irreversible hydrocolloid materials. PMID:27095627

  15. Negative pressure wound therapy in the management of late deep infections after open reconstruction of achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Mosser, Philipp; Kelm, Jens; Anagnostakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Infection is a major complication after open reconstruction of Achilles tendon ruptures. We report on the use of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in the treatment of late deep infections after open Achilles tendon reconstruction. Six patients (5 males [83.33%], 1 female [16.67%]; mean age, 52.8 [range 37 to 66] years) were been treated using an identical protocol. Surgical management consisted of debridement, lavage, and necrectomy of infected tendon parts. The VAC therapy was used for local wound preconditioning and infection management. A continuous negative pressure of 125 mm Hg was applied on each wound. For final wound closure, a split-thickness skin graft was performed. The skin graft healing process was also supported by VAC therapy during the first 5 days. The VAC dressings were changed a mean average of 3 (range 1 to 4) times until split-thickness skin grafting could be performed. The mean total duration of the VAC therapy was 13.6 ± 5.9 days. The mean hospital stay was 31.2 ± 15.9 days. No complications with regard to bleeding, seroma, or hematoma formation beneath the skin graft were observed. At a mean follow-up duration of 29.9 (range 4 to 65) months, no re-infection or infection persistence was observed. The VAC device seems to be a valuable tool in the treatment of infected tendons. The generalization of these conclusions should await the results of future studies with larger patient series.

  16. Alternative method to treat oroantral communication and fistula with autogenous bone graft and platelet rich firbin

    PubMed Central

    Niedzielska, Iwona; Borgiel-Marek, Halina; Różanowski, Bartosz

    2016-01-01

    Background Removing a tooth from the jaw results in the occurrence of oroantral communication in beneficial anatomic conditions or in the case of a iatrogenic effect. Popularized treatments of the oroantral communication have numerous faults. Large bone defect eliminates the chance to introduce an implant. Purpose of this work was assessment of the usefulness of autogenous bone graft and PRF in normal bone regeneration in the site of oroantral communication. Material and Methods Bone regeneration in the site of oroantral communication was assessed in 20 patients. Bone defects were supplemented autogenous bone graft from mental protuberance in 14 cases and from oblique line in 6 cases. The graft was covered with a PRF membrane. Results In the study group in all cases closure of the oroantral communication was observed. The average width of the alveolar was 13 mm and the average height was 12.5 mm. In 3 patients an average increase of alveolar height of 1.5 mm was observed. Conclusions This method may be the best option to prepare alveolar for new implant and prosthetic solutions. Key words:Oroantral communication, oroantral fistula, autogenous bone graft, bone regeneration, platelet rich fibrin. PMID:27475687

  17. [Evalution of activity of acid aspartic proteinase in Candida strains isolated from oral cavity of patients with increased risk of mycosis].

    PubMed

    Rózga, A; Kurnatowska, A J; Raczyńsak-Witońska, G; Loga, G

    2001-01-01

    We have evaluated the activity of acid aspartic protease in 195 strains of Candida isolated from the oral cavity of three groups of patients. The first group comprised patients with cancer of the larynx qualified for surgery, the second- patients with neoplastic disease ( Hodgkin s disease, lymphoma, acute granulocytic leukaemia, lymphatic leukaemia, lung cancer, multiple myeloma, stomach cancer, breast cancer) who were not treated, the third group- patients with neoplastic diseases treated by chemotherapy. The strains of fungi were differentiated using API 20C and Api 20C AUX tests according to the protocol adopted at the Department of Medical Parasitology and Biology, Medical University of Lódz. The activity of acid protease was studied by Staib method in Rózga modification. Almost all strains showed high and very high proteolytic activity. The rang of proteolysis zone of Candida strains from the three groups of patients varied from 2,5 to 12,5 mm. We have found the mean proteolytic zones of strains isolated from groups I and III differed statistically significantly (p<0,001). Similarly, statisticall sihnificant difference was seen between these parameters for groups II and III (p<0,05), while there was no difference between strains from group I and II.

  18. Effects of surface roughness and chrome plating of punch tips on the sticking tendencies of model ibuprofen formulations.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Matthew; Ford, James L; MacLeod, Graeme S; Fell, John T; Smith, George W; Rowe, Philip H

    2003-09-01

    The sticking of three model ibuprofen-lactose formulations with respect to compaction force and the surface quality of the upper punch were assessed. Compaction was performed at 10, 25 or 40 kN using an instrumented single-punch tablet press. Two sets of 12.5-mm flat-faced punches were used to evaluate the influence of surface quality. A third set of chrome-plated tooling was also used. Surface profiles (Taylor Hobson Talysurf 120) of the normal tooling upper punches indicated a large difference in quality. The punches were subsequently classified as old (Ra = 0.33 microm) or new (Ra = 0.04 microm) where Ra is the mean of all positive deviations from zero. Surface profiles of sample tablets were also obtained. Following compaction, ibuprofen attached to the face was quantified by spectroscopy. Punch surface roughness, compaction force and the blend composition were all significant factors contributing to sticking. Chrome plating of punch faces increased sticking at a low compaction force but decreased sticking at higher forces. Surface roughness of the tablets did not correlate with the corresponding data for sticking, indicating that this is not a suitable method of quantifying sticking.

  19. Effect of punch tip geometry and embossment on the punch tip adherence of a model ibuprofen formulation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Matthew; Ford, James L; MacLeod, Graeme S; Fell, John T; Smith, George W; Rowe, Philip H; Dyas, A Mark

    2004-07-01

    The sticking of a model ibuprofen-lactose formulation with respect to compaction force, punch tip geometry and punch tip embossment was assessed. Compaction was performed at 10, 25 or 40 kN using an instrumented single-punch tablet press. Three sets of 'normal' concave punches were used to evaluate the influence of punch curvature and diameter. The punches were 10, 11 and 12 mm in diameter, respectively. The 10-mm punch was embossed with a letter 'A' logo to assess the influence of an embossment on sticking. Flat-faced punches (12.5 mm) were used for comparison with the concave tooling. Surface profiles (Taylor Hobson Talysurf 120) of the upper punch faces were obtained to evaluate the surface quality of the tooling used. Following compaction, ibuprofen attached to the upper punch face was quantified by spectroscopy. Increasing punch curvature from flat-faced punches to concave decreased sticking. Altering punch diameter of the concave punches had no effect on sticking when expressed as microg mm(-2). The embossed letter 'A' logo increased sticking considerably owing to the probable concentration of shear stresses at the lateral faces of the embossed logo.

  20. Discriminating between unresolved point sources and `negative' Sunyaev-Zel'dovich clusters in cosmic microwave background maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2003-10-01

    Clusters of galaxies produce negative features at wavelengths λ > 1.25 mm in cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps by means of the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, while point radio sources produce positive peaks. This fact implies that a distribution of unresolved SZ clusters could be detected using the negative asymmetry introduced in the odd moments of the brightness map (skewness and higher), or in the probability distribution function for the fluctuations, once the map has been filtered in order to remove the contribution from primordial CMB fluctuations from large scales. This property provides a consistency check on the recent detections from CBI and BIMA experiments of an excess of power at small angular scales, in order to confirm that they are produced by a distribution of unresolved SZ clusters. However, it will require at least 1.5-2 times more observing time than detection of the corresponding power signal. This approach could also be used with the data of the planned SZ experiments (e.g. ACT, AMI, AMIBA, APEX, 8-m South Pole Telescope).

  1. Sound propagation through internal gravity wave fields in a laboratory tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Likun; Swinney, Harry L.; Lin, Ying-Tsing

    2014-11-01

    We conduct laboratory experiments and numerical simulations for sound propagation through an internal gravity wave field. The goal is to improve the understanding of the effect of internal gravity waves on acoustic propagation in the oceans. The laboratory tank is filled with a fluid whose density decreases linearly from the bottom to the top of the tank; the resultant buoyancy frequency is 0.15 Hz. A 1 MHz sound wave is generated and received by 12.5 mm diameter transducers, which are positioned 0.2 m apart on a horizontal acoustic axis that is perpendicular to the internal wave beam. The fluid velocity field, measured by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), agrees well with results from simulations made using a Navier-Stokes spectral code. The sound intensity at the receiver is computed numerically for different measured and simulated frozen density fields. Fluctuations in the sound speed and intensity are determined as a function of the location of the receiver and the frequency and phase of the internal waves. Supported by ONR MURI Grant N000141110701 (WHOI). Also, L.Z. is supported by the 2013-14 ASA F. V. Hunt Postdoctoral Research Fellowship.

  2. Connexin43 mimetic peptide is neuroprotective and improves function following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    O'Carroll, Simon J; Gorrie, Catherine A; Velamoor, Sailakshmi; Green, Colin R; Nicholson, Louise F B

    2013-03-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43) is a gap junction protein up-regulated after spinal cord injury and is involved in the on-going spread of secondary tissue damage. To test whether a connexin43 mimetic peptide (Peptide5) reduces inflammation and tissue damage and improves function in an in vivo model of spinal cord injury, rats were subjected to a 10g, 12.5mm weight drop injury at the vertebral level T10 using a MASCIS impactor. Vehicle or connexin43 mimetic peptide was delivered directly to the lesion via intrathecal catheter and osmotic mini-pump for up to 24h after injury. Treatment with Peptide5 led to significant improvements in hindlimb function as assessed using the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan scale. Peptide5 caused a reduction in Cx43 protein, increased Cx43 phosphorylation and decreased levels of TNF-α and IL-1β as assessed by Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry of tissue sections 5 weeks after injury showed reductions in astrocytosis and activated microglia as well as an increase in motor neuron survival. These results show that administration of a connexin mimetic peptide reduces secondary tissue damage after spinal cord injury by reducing gliosis and cytokine release and indicate the clinical potential for mimetic peptides in the treatment of spinal cord patients. PMID:23403365

  3. Effects of enriched housing on functional recovery after spinal cord contusive injury in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Lankhorst, A J; ter Laak, M P; van Laar, T J; van Meeteren, N L; de Groot, J C; Schrama, L H; Hamers, F P; Gispen, W H

    2001-02-01

    To date, most research performed in the area of spinal cord injury focuses on treatments designed to either prevent spreading lesion (secondary injury) or to enhance outgrowth of long descending and ascending fiber tracts around or through the lesion. In the last decade, however, several authors have shown that it is possible to enhance locomotor function after spinal cord injury in both animals and patients using specific training paradigms. As a first step towards combining such training paradigms with pharmacotherapy, we evaluated recovery of function in adult rats sustaining a spinal cord contusion injury (MASCIS device, 12.5 mm at T8), either housed in an enriched environment or in standard cages (n = 15 in both groups). The animals in the enriched environment were stimulated to increase their locomotor activity by placing water and food on opposite sides of the cage. As extra stimuli, a running wheel and several other objects were added to the cage. We show that exposure to the enriched environment improves gross and fine locomotor recovery as measured by the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale, the BBB subscale, the Gridwalk, and the Thoracolumbar height test. However, no group differences were found on our electrophysiological parameters nor on the amount of spared white matter. These data justify further studies on enriched housing and more controlled exercise training, with their use as potential additive to pharmacological intervention. PMID:11229712

  4. Effect of negative pressure on growth, secretion and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Li, Tongtong; Wang, Guoqi; Yin, Peng; Li, Zhirui; Zhang, Licheng; Liu, Jianheng; Li, Ming; Zhang, Lihai; Han, Li; Tang, Peifu

    2015-10-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has gained popularity in the management of contaminated wounds as an effective physical therapy, although its influence on the bacteria in the wounds remains unclear. In this study, we attempted to explore the effect of negative pressure conditions on Staphylococcus aureus, the most frequently isolated pathogen during wound infection. S. aureus was cultured in Luria-Bertani medium at subatmospheric pressure of -125 mmHg for 24 h, with the bacteria grown at ambient pressure as the control. The application of negative pressure was found to slow down the growth rate and inhibit biofilm development of S. aureus, which was confirmed by static biofilm assays. Furthermore, decreases in the total amount of virulence factors and biofilm components were observed, including α-hemolysin, extracellular adherence protein, polysaccharide intercellular adhesin and extracellular DNA. With quantitative RT-PCR analysis, we also revealed a significant inhibition in the transcription of virulence and regulatory genes related to wound infections and bacterial biofilms. Together, these findings indicated that negative pressure could inhibit the growth, virulence and biofilm formation of S. aureus. A topical subatmospheric pressure condition, such as NPWT, may be a potential antivirulence and antibiofilm strategy in the field of wound care.

  5. Quarry blasts assessment and their environmental impacts on the nearby oil pipelines, southeast of Helwan City, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Adel M. E.; Mohamed, Abuo El-Ela A.

    2013-06-01

    Ground vibrations induced by blasting in the cement quarries are one of the fundamental problems in the quarrying industry and may cause severe damage to the nearby utilities and pipelines. Therefore, a vibration control study plays an important role in the minimization of environmental effects of blasting in quarries. The current paper presents the influence of the quarry blasts at the National Cement Company (NCC) on the two oil pipelines of SUMED Company southeast of Helwan City, by measuring the ground vibrations in terms of Peak Particle Velocity (PPV). The seismic refraction for compressional waves deduced from the shallow seismic survey and the shear wave velocity obtained from the Multi channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) technique are used to evaluate the closest site of the two pipelines to the quarry blasts. The results demonstrate that, the closest site of the two pipelines is of class B, according to the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP) classification and the safe distance to avoid any environmental effects is 650 m, following the deduced Peak Particle Velocity (PPV) and scaled distance (SD) relationship (PPV = 700.08 × SD-1.225) in mm/s and the Air over Pressure (air blast) formula (air blast = 170.23 × SD-0.071) in dB. In the light of prediction analysis, the maximum allowable charge weight per delay was found to be 591 kg with damage criterion of 12.5 mm/s at the closest site of the SUMED pipelines.

  6. Experimental investigation of flow-boiling heat transfer under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, R. K.; Kawaji, M.; Ogushi, T.

    An experimental apparatus has been constructed and used to investigate one-component flow-boiling heat transfer under microgravity conditions. Freon-113 was injected at a constant rate between 35 cu cm/s and 75 cu cm/s into a cylindrical stainless steel test section (L 914.4 mm, O.D. 12.5 mm, I.D. 12.0 mm). The horizontal test section was heated externally up to 30 kW/sq m by a flexible strip heater. The subcooled freon was boiled within the length of the test section to produce two-phase flow. Thermocouples attached to the outer surface of the test section measured the steady tube wall temperature profiles. The resulting two-phase flow was then condensed and cooled before being recirculated in the flow loop. Experiments under microgravity were performed aboard NASA's KC-135 aircraft. Preliminary tests have indicated satisfactory operation of the experimental apparatus. Limited data showed that gravity has a small effect on subcooled boiling heat transfer at high mass velocities (G = 685 km/sq m.s). On the other hand, heat transfer coefficients increased slightly (5%) during microgravity for lower mass velocities (G = 468 kg/sq m.s.). Further experiments aboard the KC-135 are planned for June, 1992.

  7. Antibacterial activity of endemic Satureja Khuzistanica Jamzad essential oil against oral pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Seghatoleslami, Sogol; Samadi, Nasrin; Salehnia, Ali; Azimi, Shahram

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To assess the antibacterial effects of an Iranian endemic essential oil, Satureja Khuzistanica Jamzad (SKJ) when used as an intracanal antiseptic and interappointment medicament. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Antimicrobial activity and minimum inhibition concentrations (MICs) of SKJ essential oil with and without calcium hydroxide (CH) against eleven aerobic, microaerophilic and anaerobic bacteria were assessed. The evaluation was carried out by agar dilution and well diffusion methods. The results were measured and recorded by an independent observer. Data were analyzed statistically using student t-test. RESULTS: The MIC for eight species was recorded in 0.31 mg/mL of essential oil. Pseudomonas aeruginosa with a MIC value of 1.25 mg/mL appeared to be the most resistant bacterium; while only 0.16 mg/mL of essential oil was sufficient to inhibit the growth of Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. The inhibition zone of the antiseptic oil (at 0.31 mg/mL) with E. faecalis in the well diffusion method was 13 mm; this was comparable with 12.5 mm inhibition zone value of the tetracycline disc (30 µg). No synergistic effect was found in combination of essential oil and CH powder. CONCLUSION: SKJ essential oil with the concentration of 0.31 mg/mL is effective against most of oral pathogens including E. faecalis. PMID:23864870

  8. Effect of irrigation and fertilizer on ammonia volatilization in managed Pacific Northwest landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, D. A.; Holcomb, J.

    2011-12-01

    Urea is the leading nitrogen (N) fertilizer used in the US. It possesses a high percent of N (46%) and hydrolysis lends it to high N volatilization loss. Incorporation limits volatilization. Mechanical incorporation is not always feasible,incorporation with irrigation water substitutes. Limited field research on irrigation rates needed to limit N volatilization exists. Fertilizer choice also influenced volatilization. Ammonia volatilization for urea was monitored at 6 irrigation rates; 0.0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 inches. Limited irrigation treatments had Agrotain and NSN. These trials were on a sandy soil in winter wheat following potatoes. The N loss as ammonia 25 days after application was 60.06, 53.91, 38.73, 17.31, 5.55, 2.80 % N applied for the 0.0, 25, 63, 127, 190, and 250 mm of irrigation respectively. Every irrigation rate experienced immediate N loss. Volatilization rates increased through 7 days following application where volatilization rate began to decrease. 9 days after application treatments showed little to no volatilization. Total N volatilization was greatest at the 0.0 and 63 mm irrigation rates and losses were significantly decreased at rates greater than 125 mm irrigation. Fertilizer type also influences volatilization loss with losses from urea and NSN the greatest. Agrotain consistently had the lowest volatilization with ammonium sulfate following.

  9. Methanol Droplet Extinction in Carbon-Dioxide-Enriched Environments in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Nayagam, Vedha; Williams, Forman A.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusive extinction of methanol droplets with initial diameters between 1.25 mm and 1.72 mm, burning in a quiescent microgravity environment at one atmosphere pressure, was obtained experimentally for varying levels of ambient carbon-dioxide concentrations with a fixed oxygen concentration of 21% and a balance of nitrogen. These experiments serve as precursors to those which are beginning to be performed on the International Space Station and are motivated by the need to understand the effectiveness of carbon-dioxide as a fire suppressant in low-gravity environments. In these experiments, the flame standoff distance, droplet diameter, and flame radiation are measured as functions of time. The results show that the droplet extinction diameter depends on both the initial droplet diameter and the ambient concentration of carbon dioxide. Increasing the initial droplet diameter leads to an increased extinction diameter, while increasing the carbon-dioxide concentration leads to a slight decrease in the extinction diameter. These results are interpreted using a critical Damk hler number for extinction as predicted by an earlier theory, which is extended here to be applicable in the presence of effects of heat conduction along the droplet support fibers and of the volume occupied by the support beads

  10. Ultrasonic imaging of damages in CRFT-laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillger, Wolfgang

    High performance materials such as carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) are attractive materials for aircraft and aerospace components. Their application to primary aircraft structures requires the knowledge of damage incured after fabrication or in service. CFRP laminates are inhomogeneous and anisotropic materials, a 2 mm laminate consists of 16 layers of fibers, each with a thickness of 0.125 mm. The sequence of stacking is determined by design requirements. Therefore ultrasonic attenuation in composites is relatively high. The scattering by the fibers reduces the signal to noise ratio. The time of flight of a 2 mm thick laminate is only 1.3 microseconds, therefore a high axial resolution of the flaw detector is required. The thickness of CFRP-components may vary from 2 to 40 mm, the one-shot dynamic range of a through-transmission measurement easily reaches more than 60 dB. For these components of CFRP and other new materials a new ultrasonic inspection system has been developed. This paper describes the system and its capability of imaging damages in CRFP-laminates.

  11. Real-Time Measurement of Vehicle Exhaust Gas Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.E.; Hylton, J.O.; Joy, R.D.; McKnight, T.E.

    1999-06-28

    A flow measurement system was developed to measure, in real-time, the exhaust gas flow from vehicies. This new system was based on the vortex shedding principle using ultrasonic detectors for sensing the shed vortices. The flow meter was designed to measure flow over a range of 1 to 366 Ips with an inaccuracy of ~1o/0 of reading. Additionally, the meter was engineered to cause minimal pressure drop (less than 125mm of water), to function in a high temperature environment (up to 650oC) with thermal transients of 15 oC/s, and to have a response time of 0.1 seconds for a 10% to 90!40 step change. The flow meter was also configured to measure hi-directional flow. Several flow meter prototypes were fabricated, tested, and calibrated in air, simulated exhaust gas, and actual exhaust gas. Testing included gas temperatures to 600oC, step response experiments, and flow rates from O to 360 lps in air and exhaust gas. Two prototypes have been tested extensively at NIST and two additional meters have been installed in exhaust gas flow lines for over one year. This new flow meter design has shown to be accurate, durabIe, fast responding, and to have a wide rangeabi~ity.

  12. Analysis of passivated A-286 stainless steel surfaces for mass spectrometer inlet systems by Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ajo, Henry; Blankenship, Donnie; Clark, Elliot

    2014-07-25

    In this study, various commercially available surface treatments are being explored for use on stainless steel components in mass spectrometer inlet systems. Type A-286 stainless steel coupons, approximately 12.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were passivated with one of five different surface treatments; an untreated coupon served as a control. The surface and near-surface microstructure and chemistry of the coupons were investigated using sputter depth profiling using Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the surface treatments studied appeared to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks on the treated samples in SEM images. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7–0.9 nm thick), as well as to the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E’s silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.

  13. Aerogel-Based Insulation for High-Temperature Industrial Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Owen Evans

    2011-10-13

    Under this program, Aspen Aerogels has developed an industrial insulation called Pyrogel HT, which is 4-5 times more thermally efficient than current non-aerogel technology. Derived from nanoporous silica aerogels, Pyrogel HT was specifically developed to address a high temperature capability gap not currently met with Aspen Aerogels{trademark} flagship product, Pyrogel XT. Pyrogel XT, which was originally developed on a separate DOE contract (DE-FG36-06GO16056), was primarily optimized for use in industrial steam processing systems, where application temperatures typically do not exceed 400 C. At the time, further improvements in thermal performance above 400 C could not be reasonably achieved for Pyrogel XT without significantly affecting other key material properties using the current technology. Cumulative sales of Pyrogel HT into domestic power plants should reach $125MM through 2030, eventually reaching about 10% of the total insulation market share in that space. Global energy savings would be expected to scale similarly. Over the same period, these sales would reduce domestic energy consumption by more than 65 TBtu. Upon branching out into all industrial processes in the 400 C-650 C regime, Pyrogel HT would reach annual sales levels of $150MM, with two-thirds of that being exported.

  14. Linear Dimensional Stability of Irreversible Hydrocolloid Materials Over Time.

    PubMed

    Garrofé, Analía B; Ferrari, Beatriz A; Picca, Mariana; Kaplan, Andrea E

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the linear dimensional stability of different irreversible hydrocolloid materials over time. A metal mold was designed with custom trays made of thermoplastic sheets (Sabilex, sheets 0.125 mm thick). Perforations were made in order to improve retention of the material. Five impressions were taken with each of the following: Kromopan 100 (LASCOD) [AlKr], which has dimensional stability of 100 hours, and Phase Plus (ZHERMACK) [AlPh], which has dimensional stability of 48 hours. Standardized digital photographs were taken at different time intervals (0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 120 minutes; 12, 24 and 96 hours), using an "ad-hoc" device. The images were analyzed with software (UTHSCSA Image Tool) by measuring the distance between intersection of the lines previously made at the top of the mold. The results were analyzed by ANOVA for repeated measures. Initial and final values were (mean and standard deviation): AlKr: 16.44 (0.22) and 16.34 (0.11), AlPh: 16.40 (0.06) and 16.18 (0.06). Statistical evaluation showed significant effect of material and time factors. Under the conditions in this study, time significantly affects the linear dimensional stability of irreversible hydrocolloid materials.

  15. High-performance liquid chromatography and derivative spectrophotometry for simultaneous determination of pravastatin and fenofibrate in the dosage form.

    PubMed

    Hefnawy, Mohamed M; Mohamed, Mostafa S; Abounassif, Mohammed A; Alanazi, Amer M; Mostafa, Gamal A E

    2014-12-01

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and second-order derivative spectrophotometry have been used for simultaneous determination of pravastatin (PS) and fenofibrate (FF) in pharmaceutical formulations. HPLC separation was performed on a phenyl HYPERSIL C18 column (125 mm × 4.6 mm i.d., 5 μm particle diameter) in the isocratic mode using a mobile phase acetonitrile/0.1 % diethyl amine (50:50, V/V, pH 4.5) pumped at a flow rate of 1.0 mL min-1. Measurement was made at 240 nm. Both drugs were well resolved on the stationary phase, with retention times of 2.15 and 5.79 min for PS and FF, respectively. Calibration curves were linear (R = 0.999 for PS and 0.996 for FF) in the concentration range of 5-50 and 20-200 µg mL-1 for PS and FF, respectively. Pravastatin and fenofibrate were quantitated in combined preparations also using the second-order derivative response at 237.6 and 295.1 nm for PS and FF, respectively. Calibration curves were linear, with the correlation coefficient R = 0.999 for pravastatin and fenofibrate, in the concentration range of 5-20 and 3-20 µg mL-1 for PS and FF, respectively. Both methods were fully validated and compared, the results confirmed that they were highly suitable for their intended purpose.

  16. Current challenges in antihypertensive treatment in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Imprialos, Konstantinos P; Boutari, Chrysoula; Stavropoulos, Konstantinos; Doumas, Michael; Athyros, Vasilios G; Karagiannis, Asterios I

    2016-08-25

    Arterial hypertension affects more than 25% of the global population, and its prevalence is increasing with age. Arterial stiffening occurs with aging and results in a pattern of increased systolic and decreased diastolic blood pressure (BP). In the elderly population, elevated BP has been related with increased cardiovascular risk. Trials on this population have shown great benefits for morbidity and mortality from reducing systolic BP (SBP) levels to less than 150 mmHg. Most guidelines for the management of elderly hypertensive patients agree on BP reduction to less than 150/90 mmHg. However, there is still uncertainty whether further BP reduction could provide beneficial results. The recently published SPRINT trial demonstrated that reducing SBP to between 120 and 125 mmHg in patients over the age of 75 years is related with increased survival and is expected to affect future recommendations. On the contrary, the limited data that are available for octogenarians and frail nursing home patients create concerns for more aggressive BP strategies in these subgroups, and thus they should be treated more conservatively. Among the various antihypertensive classes of drugs, diuretics, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers were proved beneficial in the elderly and are favored as first choices for the management of elderly hypertensive individuals. Given the common coexistence of other comorbidities and polypharmacy, physicians should be careful when initiating or uptitrating treatments to avoid potential adverse events or interaction with other drugs or diseases. PMID:27578222

  17. The prevalence and type of glaucoma in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Peräsalo, R; Raitta, C

    1992-06-01

    A group of 100 institutionalized geriatric patients aged 69-94 years (mean 81.2 years) was studied at Koskela Helsinki Municipal Hospital. The selection of the patients was randomized by taking 100 patients having a birth-date divisible by five. Glaucoma occurred in 15% of the patients (14 women and one man). Six patients had bilateral primary open-angle glaucoma. One patient had capsular glaucoma in one eye and secondary glaucoma in the other eye. Eight patients had glaucoma only in one eye; three narrow-angle glaucoma, three primary open-angle glaucoma and two secondary glaucoma. Exfoliation occurred in 21 patients (26%, 21/80). Ten patients had bilateral exfoliation and 11 exfoliation only in one eye. IOP was measured in 75 patients, 150 eyes, with applanation tonometry, averaging 12.5 mmHg (SD 5.0), and in 22 patients, 44 eyes, with Schiötz tonometry, averaging 16.3 mmHg (SD 5.6). Visual acuity for long distance and also the reading acuity were greater than 0.3 in 66% (54/82).

  18. Debris cloud characterization at impact velocities of 5 to 11 km/s

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Boslough, M.B.; Reinhart, W.D.; Hall, C.A.

    1993-08-01

    A series of experiments has been performed on the Sandia HyperVelocity Launcher to impact a 1.25-mm thick aluminum bumper by an aluminum flier plate 17-mm diameter by 0.92-mm thick over the velocity range of 5 km/s to 11 km/s. Radiographic techniques were employed to record the debris cloud generated upon impact. The shape of the debris cloud is found to depend on the flier plate tilt. Generally -- the data indicate a central core of higher density surrounded by a diffused layer. These experiments allow measurements of debris cloud expansion velocities as the material undergoes a phase change from solid fragments at impact velocities of 5 km/s to a mixture of liquid and vapor phase at higher impact velocities. The expansion velocity of the debris cloud increases with increasing impact velocity, with the high-density leading edge traveling faster than the impact velocity. There is a difference between the X-ray and photographic measurements of expansion velocities at higher impact velocities. This is believed to be due to the presence of very low-density vapor in the photographic records that are not detecting using X-ray techniques.

  19. Debris cloud characterization in the liquid-vapor phase

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Boslough, M.B.; Reinhart, W.D.; Hall, C.A.

    1993-10-01

    A series of experiments has been performed on the Sandia Hypervelocity Launcher to impact a 1.25-mm thick aluminum bumper by an aluminum flier plate 17-mm diameter by 0.92-mm thick over the velocity range of 5 km/s to 11 km/s. Radiographic techniques were employed to record the debris cloud generated upon impact. The shape of the debris cloud is found to depend on the flier plate tilt. Generally the data indicate a central core of higher density surrounded by a diffused layer. These experiments allow measurements of debris cloud expansion velocities as the material undergoes a phase change from solid fragments at impact velocities of 5 km/s to a mixture of liquid and vapor phase at higher impact velocities. The expansion velocity of the debris cloud increases with increasing impact velocity, with the high-density leading edge traveling faster than the impact velocity. There is a difference between the X-ray and photographic measurements of expansion velocities at higher impact velocities. This is believed to be due to the presence of very low- density vapor in the photographic records that are not detected using X-ray techniques.

  20. The use of simulated rainfall to study the discharge process and the influence factors of urban surface runoff pollution loads.

    PubMed

    Qinqin, Li; Qiao, Chen; Jiancai, Deng; Weiping, Hu

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of the characteristics of pollutants on impervious surfaces is essential to estimate pollution loads and to design methods to minimize the impacts of pollutants on the environment. In this study, simulated rainfall equipment was constructed to investigate the pollutant discharge process and the influence factors of urban surface runoff (USR). The results indicated that concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) appeared to be higher in the early period and then decreased gradually with rainfall duration until finally stabilized. The capacity and particle size of surface dust, rainfall intensity and urban surface slopes affected runoff pollution loads to a variable extent. The loads of TP, TN and COD showed a positive relationship with the surface dust capacity, whereas the maximum TSS load appeared when the surface dust was 0.0317 g·cm⁻². Smaller particle sizes (<0.125 mm) of surface dust generated high TN, TP and COD loads. Increases in rainfall intensity and surface slope enhanced the pollution carrying capacity of runoff, leading to higher pollution loads. Knowledge of the influence factors could assist in the management of USR pollution loads.

  1. Field and laboratory studies of Ophryoglena sp. (Ciliata: Ophryoglenidae) infection in zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha (Bivalvia: Dreissenidae).

    PubMed

    Karatayev, Alexander Y; Burlakova, Lyubov E; Molloy, Daniel P; Volkova, Lyudmila K; Volosyuk, Vladimir V

    2002-02-01

    This study, conducted in the Dnieper-Bug Canal in Belarus, is the first to monitor the seasonal (June-November) dynamics of infection with the parasitic ciliate Ophryoglena sp. in a zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) population. Mean population prevalence and intensity of infection varied, respectively, from 11 to 62% and from 0.9 to 24.1 ciliates/mussel. Mean prevalence was highly correlated with mussel length in mussels <20 mm (R(2)=0.97) and was lower in larger mussels. Mean infection intensity in mussels 1-25 mm long was similarly correlated with their size (R=0.98), reached a maximum in the 20-25 mm size-class, and then sharply decreased, thus providing evidence, albeit limited, that high intensity of infection might be lethal. Transinfection of zebra mussels by Ophryoglena sp. was achieved in the laboratory-a first for a protozoan parasite of D. polymorpha; from an initial complete lack of infection, mean prevalence and intensity rose, respectively, to 86.7% and 8.3 ciliates/mussel.

  2. Suture Forces in Undersized Mitral Annuloplasty: Novel Device and Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Siefert, Andrew; Pierce, Eric; Lee, Madonna; Jensen, Morten; Aoki, Chikashi; Takebayashi, Satoshi; Gorman, Robert; Gorman, Joseph; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Demonstrate the first use of a novel technology for quantifying suture forces on annuloplasty rings to better understand the mechanisms of ring dehiscence. Description: Force transducers were developed, attached to a size 24 Physio™ ring, and implanted in the mitral annulus of an ovine animal. Ring suture forces were measured after implantation and for cardiac cycles reaching peak left ventricular pressures (LVP) of 100, 125, and 150 mmHg. Evaluation: After implanting the undersized ring to the flaccid annulus, the mean suture force was 2.0±0.6 N. During cyclic contraction, anterior ring suture forces were greater than posterior ring suture forces at peak LVPs of 100 mmHg (4.9±2.0 N vs. 2.1±1.1 N), 125 mmHg (5.4±2.3 N vs. 2.3±1.2 N), and 150 mmHg (5.7±2.4 N vs. 2.4±1.1 N). The largest force was 7.4 N at 150 mmHg. Conclusions: Preliminary results demonstrate trends in annuloplasty suture forces and their variation with location and LVP. Future studies will significantly contribute to clinical knowledge by elucidating the mechanisms of ring dehiscence while improving annuloplasty ring design and surgical repair techniques. PMID:24996707

  3. A Fisheries Evaluation of the Dryden Fish Screening Facility : Annual Report 1994.

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Robert P.; Abernethy, C.Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.

    1995-04-01

    Effectivness was evaluated of the Dryden Fish Screening Facility in the Wenatchee Reclamation District Canal near Dryden in north central Washington State. In situ tests were conducted by releasing groups of hatchery reared salmonids of different ages and sizes. Spring chinook salmon smolts (110-165 mm) were not injured or descaled in passing through the canal forebay. Smolts were not delayed as they migrated in the canal. Most fish released at the canal headworks exited the screening facility in <4 h, with >99% of the test fish captured in the fish bypass in <24 h. Steelhead subyearlings 65-125 mm were not injured or descaled in traveling through the bypass flume and fish return pipe. Average time for steelhead subyearlings to travel through thebypass structure was 70 seconds. Small rainbow trout fry 23-27mm could pass through the 0.125-in. profile bar screen openings and were entrained in the irrigation canal; about 38% was lost to the canal within 48 h of release. Some fry stayed in the forebay and did not migrate during the tests. Wild chinook fry 36-42mm were also entrained. Estimated 34% of emergent wild chinook salmon fry passed through the profile bar screens and were entrained in the canal. Approach velocity at the Dryden screens was {ge}0.4 ft/s; low velocities through the first two screen panels indicated that vertical louvers installed behind each screen panel to balance flow were not totally effective.

  4. The Solanum lycopersicum Zinc Finger2 Cysteine-2/Histidine-2 Repressor-Like Transcription Factor Regulates Development and Tolerance to Salinity in Tomato and Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Hichri, Imène; Muhovski, Yordan; Žižková, Eva; Dobrev, Petre I.; Franco-Zorrilla, Jose Manuel; Solano, Roberto; Lopez-Vidriero, Irene; Motyka, Vaclav; Lutts, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    The zinc finger superfamily includes transcription factors that regulate multiple aspects of plant development and were recently shown to regulate abiotic stress tolerance. Cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Zinc Finger2 [SIZF2]) is a cysteine-2/histidine-2-type zinc finger transcription factor bearing an ERF-associated amphiphilic repression domain and binding to the ACGTCAGTG sequence containing two AGT core motifs. SlZF2 is ubiquitously expressed during plant development, and is rapidly induced by sodium chloride, drought, and potassium chloride treatments. Its ectopic expression in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tomato impaired development and influenced leaf and flower shape, while causing a general stress visible by anthocyanin and malonyldialdehyde accumulation. SlZF2 enhanced salt sensitivity in Arabidopsis, whereas SlZF2 delayed senescence and improved tomato salt tolerance, particularly by maintaining photosynthesis and increasing polyamine biosynthesis, in salt-treated hydroponic cultures (125 mm sodium chloride, 20 d). SlZF2 may be involved in abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis/signaling, because SlZF2 is rapidly induced by ABA treatment and 35S::SlZF2 tomatoes accumulate more ABA than wild-type plants. Transcriptome analysis of 35S::SlZF2 revealed that SlZF2 both increased and reduced expression of a comparable number of genes involved in various physiological processes such as photosynthesis, polyamine biosynthesis, and hormone (notably ABA) biosynthesis/signaling. Involvement of these different metabolic pathways in salt stress tolerance is discussed. PMID:24567191

  5. Value of digital volume tomography in patients with conductive hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Dalchow, C V; Weber, A L; Bien, S; Yanagihara, N; Werner, J A

    2006-02-01

    Digital volume tomography (DVT) is an extension of panoramic tomography. With this diagnostic technique, characterized by high resolution, a narrow section width (0.125 mm) and three-dimensional display, small pathological processes can be well visualized. Twenty-five patients with the history of a progressive hearing loss were examined with DVT (Accu-I-tomo, Morita, Japan). The results were compared with pre- and intraoperative findings to evaluate the diagnostic value of DVT in cases of erosion of the ossicular chain. With high resolution and artifact-free demonstration of the middle ear and the ossicular chain, it was possible to define its continuity preoperatively by DVT in all 25 cases. An intact ossicular chain was found by DVT in 13 cases and was later confirmed by surgery. The predicted erosion of the ossicles was verified in 12 patients, and a tympanoplasty type III was performed. Digital volume tomography is an excellent technique to examine the middle ear cleft and inner ear, and expands the application of diagnostic possibilities in the lateral skull base. Therefore, improvement in preoperative diagnosis is achieved along with more accurate planning of the surgical procedure. Digital volume tomography delivers a small radiation dose with a high resolution and a low purchase price for the equipment. PMID:16163510

  6. The possibility of E-glass woven roving as reinforcement of GFRP composite sheet roof

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyanto, Djoko

    2016-03-01

    The 1.25 mm thickness of opaque glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite sheet roof that is produced by an Indonesia company at Tangerang, consists of two layers of 300 g/m2 E-glass chopped strand mat as reinforcement and unsaturated polyester resin as matrix. A layer of 300 g/m2 E-glass chopped strand mat is replaced by a layer of 400 g/m2 E-glass woven roving as reinforcement to study the possibility use as sheet roof material. The properties of the two samples of GFRP composite materials were compared. Barcol hardness and flexure strength of the two samples relatively not significance change. Tensile strength and elastic modulus of the new sample which contains a layer of woven roving reinforcement is greater than the other one. On the other hand the waviness of the new sample is greater, but cheaper. In general, a layer of E-glass woven roving and a layer of E-glass chopped strand mat can be considered as an alternative reinforcement of two layers reinforcement of GFRP composite material of sheet roof.

  7. Measurement of tear production using phenol red thread and standardized endodontic absorbent paper points in European pond turtles (Emys orbicularis).

    PubMed

    Rajaei, Seyed Mehdi; Mood, Maneli Ansari; Ghaffari, Masoud Selk; Williams, David L

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the aqueous fraction of the tear film using the phenol red thread test (PRTT) and paper point tear test (PPTT) in healthy adult European pond turtles (Emys orbicularis). Twenty-four healthy adult European pond turtles were studied. Measurement of tear secretion was performed using the PRTT and standardized endodontic absorbent PPTT. Horizontal palpebral fissure length (HPFL) was measured using digital calipers and was correlated with the weight of the animal. The mean ± SD PRTT, PPTT, and HPFL values for the left and right eyes were 5.12 ± 1.54 mm/15 sec and 4.62 ± 1.76 mm/15 sec; 4.50 ± 1.25 mm/1 min and 4.20 ± 1.53 mm/1 min; and 8.4 ± 0.6 mm and 8.3 ± 0.6 mm, respectively. No significant differences were detected between right and left eyes of individual turtles or between males and females in all tests. This study represents reference values of tear production in European pond turtles obtained from PRTT and PPTT methods and forms an important baseline study in defining the healthy chelonian ocular surface.

  8. Quantifying the transport of energetic materials in unsaturated sediments from cracked unexploded ordnance.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jeffrey; Martel, Richard; Trépanier, Luc; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Dissolved explosive species have been found in the groundwater under military training areas. These explosives are thought to originate from munitions although the mechanism of transport to the groundwater is poorly understood. This study was conducted to determine whether ruptured unexploded ordnance may be a viable source term for these explosives. The rupturing effect of one 81 mm-mortar exploding in close proximity to another 81-mm mortar was observed and the resulting contaminants were collected. These contaminants were then subjected to leaching experiments on repacked, jack drill compacted unsaturated sediment columns in a climate controlled laboratory. The mortars which were exposed to nearby explosions were shown to be susceptible to rupturing rather than sympathetically detonating under certain conditions. The ruptured mortars released up to 166+/-2 g of pulverized explosive residues (largely Composition B) and the results from the subsequent leaching tests showed that this explosive residue is highly mobile in unsaturated sandy soil. Up to 4.45+/-1.00 g of dissolved explosive contamination was transported through the unsaturated soil columns during the first year of infiltration. The results indicate the mass of transported explosive residue dissolved in the leachate was primarily caused by the preferential dissolution of explosive contaminants having a grain size under 0.125 mm. Surface or near-surface unexploded ordnance (UXO) on live fire ranges may therefore be significant sources of explosive environmental contamination after they have been exposed to other rounds which explode nearby. PMID:19875778

  9. Repetitively pulsed Nd-glass slab lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, B. I.; Kir'ianov, A. V.; Maliutin, A. A.; Kertesz, I.; Kroo, N.

    1989-09-01

    The possibility of obtaining high laser output energies at 1.32 micron using thin LiNdLa phosphate glass slabs with a high Nd(3+) concentration is discussed. Comparison data for 1.054 micron are also given. In the experiments, 3 x 14 x 125-mm slabs were prepared from LiNdLa phosphate glass with Nd concentration 1.2 x 10 to the 21st/cu cm. The uncoated slab facets were tested in a silver-coated quartz tube reflector pumped by 450-microsec flash-lamp pulses. The light passing through the slab returns to it after reflection from the tube surface. Most of the radiation falls on the wider side of the slab at large angles of incidence, thus maximizing its path inside the slab. The 150-mm laser resonator was formed by two flat mirrors. At 1.32 microns an output mirror of reflectivity r = 95 percent was used (with r less than 10 percent at 1.054 micron), while at 1.054 micron, r(output) = 50 percent was chosen. The pump-energy dependence of the output energy was measured.

  10. A mechanism for the hydrogen uptake process in zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, B.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen uptake data for thin Zircaloy-2 specimens in steam at 300-400°C have been analysed to show that there is a decrease in the rate of uptake with respect to the rate of oxidation when the terminal solid solubility (TSS) of hydrogen in the metal is exceeded. In order for TSS to be reached during pre-transition oxidation a very thin 0.125 mm Zircaloy sheet was used. The specimens had been pickled initially removing all Zr 2(Fe/Ni) particles from the initial surfaces, yet the initial hydrogen uptake rates were still much higher than for Zircaloy-4 or a binary Zr/Fe alloy that did not contain phases that dissolve readily during pickling. Cathodic polarisation at room temperature in CuSO 4 solution showed that small cracks or pores formed the cathodic sites in pre-transition oxide films. Some were at pits resulting from the initial dissolution of the Zr 2(Fe/Ni) phase; others were not; none were at the remaining intermetallics in the original surface. These small cracks are thought to provide the ingress routes for hydrogen. A microscopic steam starvation process at the bottoms of these small cracks or pores, leading to the accumulation of hydrogen adjacent to the oxide/metal interface, and causing breakdown of the passive oxide forming at the bottom of the flaw, is thought to provide the mechanism for the hydrogen uptake process during both pre-transition and post-transition oxidation.

  11. Effect of Different Coarse Aggregate Sizes on the Strength Characteristics of Laterized Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salau, M. A.; Busari, A. O.

    2015-11-01

    The high cost of conventional concrete materials is a major factor affecting housing delivery in developing countries such as Nigeria. Since Nigeria is blessed with abundant locally available materials like laterite, researchers have conducted comprehensive studies on the use of laterite to replace river sand partially or fully in the concrete. However, the works did not consider the optimum use of coarse aggregate to possibly improve the strength of the laterized concrete, since it is normally lower than that of normal concrete. The results of the tests showed that workability, density and compressive strength at constant water-cement ratio increase with the increase in the coarse aggregate particle size and also with curing age. As the percentage of laterite increases, there was a reduction in all these characteristics even with the particle size of coarse aggregate reduction due to loss from the aggregate-paste interface zone. Also, when sand was replaced by 25% of laterite, the 19.5mm and 12.5mm coarse aggregate particle sizes gave satisfactory results in terms of workability and compressive strength respectively at 28 days of curing age, compared to normal concrete. However, in case of 50% up to 100% laterite contents, the workability and compressive strength values were very low.

  12. Hypertension and nephrotoxicity in the rate of decline in kidney function in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Aubia, J; Hojman, L; Chine, M; Lloveras, J; Masramon, J; Llorach, I; Cuevas, X; Puig, J M

    1987-01-01

    Serum creatinine levels were determined prospectively every 2 to 3 months in 40 patients with diabetic nephropathy for a global observation period of 864 months. The monthly creatinine increasing rate was significantly lower in normotensive periods, mean arterial pressure (MAP) less than 115 mmHg, when compared with hypertensive periods, MAP greater than 125 mmHg. No significant difference was shown in periods with borderline hypertension (MAP between 115-124 mmHg). The mean creatinine increases were of 0.036 mg/dl/month, 0.3 mg/dl/month and 0.046 mg/dl/month respectively. Normotension was associated with a slowing down of the rate of decline in renal function in this group of moderate kidney failure with an initial mean serum creatinine of 2.26 mg/dl. The exposure of patients to nephrotoxics (aminoglycosides, and possibly anesthesia) significantly accelerated the decline in renal function: 0.39 mg/dl/month and 0.17 mg/dl/month respectively according to the concomitance or not of toxics and hypertension. The reported protective effect of diabetes against aminoglycosides nephrotoxicity in experimental conditions was not reflected in our clinical results. On the contrary, we suggest a possible enhanced sensibility of the diabetic patient with diabetic nephropathy to aminoglycosides leading to an acceleration of the progression of renal failure.

  13. Surface oxidation of porous ZrB2-SiC ceramic composites by continuous-wave ytterbium fibre laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmod, Dayang Salyani Abang; Glandut, Nicolas; Khan, Amir Azam; Labbe, Jean-Claude

    2015-12-01

    Surface treatment of ceramic substrates by a laser beam can allow to incorporate interesting properties to these ceramics. In the present work, surface oxidation of ca. 30% porous ZrB2-SiC ceramic composites by using an ytterbium fibre laser was conducted. Oxidation of ceramic substrates through this process under ambient conditions has certain advantages compared to the classical oxidation method. A particular spiral laser pattern was created in order to produce an oxidized structure on ZrB2-SiC porous substrates. The laser parameters were as follows i.e., laser power of 50, 60 and 70 W, a beam diameter of 1.25 mm, velocity of 2 mm/s, acceleration and deceleration of 1 mm/s2. The microstructural and morphological changes in the laser-treated region was examined using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. At laser power of 70 W, the sample exhibits uniform oxidation. It revealed that the very porous bulk beneath remained unaffected and unoxidized because this laser-formed oxide scale protects the substrate from oxidation. The presence of oxidized and unaffected regions indicated a high degree of heat localization. The dense glassy SiO2-rich layer prevents the inward oxygen diffusion into the inner bulk hence enhances the oxidation resistance.

  14. Effect of layer thickness and printing orientation on mechanical properties and dimensional accuracy of 3D printed porous samples for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Farzadi, Arghavan; Solati-Hashjin, Mehran; Asadi-Eydivand, Mitra; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2014-01-01

    Powder-based inkjet 3D printing method is one of the most attractive solid free form techniques. It involves a sequential layering process through which 3D porous scaffolds can be directly produced from computer-generated models. 3D printed products' quality are controlled by the optimal build parameters. In this study, Calcium Sulfate based powders were used for porous scaffolds fabrication. The printed scaffolds of 0.8 mm pore size, with different layer thickness and printing orientation, were subjected to the depowdering step. The effects of four layer thicknesses and printing orientations, (parallel to X, Y and Z), on the physical and mechanical properties of printed scaffolds were investigated. It was observed that the compressive strength, toughness and Young's modulus of samples with 0.1125 and 0.125 mm layer thickness were more than others. Furthermore, the results of SEM and μCT analyses showed that samples with 0.1125 mm layer thickness printed in X direction have more dimensional accuracy and significantly close to CAD software based designs with predefined pore size, porosity and pore interconnectivity.

  15. Photoablation of ocular melanoma with a high-powered argon endolaser.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, G J; Mieler, W F; Burke, J M; Williams, G A

    1989-01-01

    We studied the use of a 15-W argon blue-green laser in the treatment of choroidal melanoma in a rabbit model. Greene melanoma cells were used to produce 2- to 4-mm thick tumors posteriorly in the suprachoroidal space in pigmented rabbits. Endophotocoagulation delivered through a 600-micron fiberoptic probe was performed to ablate the tumor tissue and a surrounding margin of normal tissue. A vitreous cutter was used simultaneously to remove liberated necrotic debris. The effect of the laser on tumor and normal ocular tissue was evaluated by light microscopy and the extent of the proliferative response by tritiated thymidine radioautography. Application of 100 to 400 pulses of laser energy using treatment parameters of 12 to 14 W of power and 0.1-s pulses resulted in complete ablation of melanoma tissue, overlying retina, and choroid. There was no substantial intraoperative or postoperative hemorrhage. Material liberated during the laser treatment was found to be nonviable. The effect of the laser on tissue appeared localized to within approximately 1.25 mm of the margin of the central lesion. The high-energy argon laser seems to offer a means of effectively ablating melanoma tissue via an internal resection approach. PMID:2910269

  16. Impact ejecta in upper Eocene deposits at Massignano, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, Billy P.; Liu, Shaobin; Montanari, Alessandro

    2004-04-01

    Previous workers have shown that an impact ejecta layer at Massignano, Italy contains a positive Ir anomaly, flattened spheroids (pancake spherules), Ni-rich spinel crystals, and shocked quartz with multiple sets of planar deformation features. Because of sample sizes and work by different investigators, it was not clear if the shocked quartz is associated with the Ir anomaly and pancake spherules or if it belongs to a separate impact event. To address this problem, we carried out a high-resolution stratigraphic study of this ejecta layer. The ejecta layer was sampled continuously at 1 cm intervals in two adjacent columns. The carbonate was removed with dilute HCl, and the noncarbonate fraction was gently sieved. Pancake spherules were recovered from the 250-500 mm size fraction and counted. At the peak abundance, the number of pancake spherules in the 250-500 mm size fraction is about 6-7/g of sample. The pancake spherules removed from the 250-500 mm size fraction are mostly translucent to opaque pale green, but some have a grey color or dark opaque patches due to a coating of Ni- and Cr-rich spinel crystals. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and X-ray diffraction data indicate that the green spherules are composed of iron-rich smectite, probably nontronite. Black opaque spinel stringers (dark spinel-rich pancake spherules), usually <200 mm across, can be seen in a polished section of a block that includes the ejecta layer. None of the dark spinel-rich pancake spherules were recovered from the sieved non-carbonate fraction due to their fragile nature, but we believe that they are from the same impact event as the green pancake spherules. The <250 mm size fractions from both columns were disaggregated using ultrasonics and re-sieved. The 63-125 mm size fractions were then searched for shocked quartz using a petrographic microscope. At the peak-abundance level, the number of shocked quartz grains in the 63-125 mm size fraction is about 7/g of sample. Some of the

  17. Hunting for millimeter flares from magnetic reconnection in pre-main sequence spectroscopic binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kóspál, Á.; Salter, D. M.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Moór, A.; Blake, G. A.

    2011-03-01

    Context. Recent observations of the low-mass pre-main sequence (PMS), eccentric spectroscopic binaries DQ Tau and V773 Tau A reveal that their millimeter spectrum is occasionally dominated by flares from non-thermal emission processes. The transient activity is believed to be synchrotron in nature, resulting from powerful magnetic reconnection events when the separate magnetic structures of the binary components are briefly capable of interacting and forced to reorganize, typically near periastron. Aims: We conducted the first systematic study of the millimeter variability toward a sample of 12 PMS spectroscopic binaries with the aim to characterize the proliferation of flares amongst sources likely to experience similar interbinary reconnection events. The source sample consists entirely of short-period, close-separation binaries that possess either a high orbital eccentricity (e > 0.1) or a circular orbit (e ≈ 0). Methods: Using the MAMBO2 array on the IRAM 30 m telescope, we carried out continuous monitoring at 1.25 mm (240 GHz) over a 4-night period during which all of the high-eccentricity binaries approached periastron. We also obtained simultaneous optical VRI measurements, since a strong link is often observed between stellar reconnection events (traced via X-rays) and optical brightenings. Results: UZ Tau E is the only source to be detected at millimeter wavelengths, and it exhibited significant variation (F1.25mm = 87-179 mJy); it is also the only source to undergo strong simultaneous optical variability (ΔR ≈ 0.9 mag). The binary possesses the largest orbital eccentricity in the current sample, a predicted factor in star-star magnetic interaction events. With orbital parameters and variable accretion activity similar to DQ Tau, the millimeter behavior of UZ Tau E draws many parallels to the DQ Tau model for colliding magnetospheres. However, on the basis of our observations alone, we cannot determine whether the variability is repetitive, or if it could also be due to variable free-free emission in an ionized wind. Conclusions: UZ Tau E brings the number of known millimeter-varying PMS sources to 3 out of a total of 14 monitored binaries now in the literature. Important factors in the non-detection of the rest of our targets are the coarse time-sampling and limited millimeter sensitivity of our survey. We recommend that future studies concentrate on close-by targets, and obtain millimeter and optical data points with better temporal resolution. Based on observations with the IRAM 30 m telescope at Pico Veleta (Spain). IRAM is funded by the INSU/CNRS (France), the MPG (Germany) and the IGN (Spain).Appendix is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. TH-E-17A-04: Geometric Validation of K-Space Self-Gated 4D-MRI Vs. 4D-CT Using A Respiratory Motion Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Y; Fan, Z; Yang, W; Pang, J; McKenzie, E; Deng, Z; Tuli, R; Sandler, H; Li, D; Fraass, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: 4D-CT is often limited by motion artifacts, low temporal resolution, and poor phase-based target definition. We recently developed a novel k-space self-gated 4D-MRI technique with high spatial and temporal resolution. The goal here is to geometrically validate 4D-MRI using a MRI-CT compatible respiratory motion phantom and comparison to 4D-CT. Methods: 4D-MRI was acquired using 3T spoiled gradient echo-based 3D projection sequences. Respiratory phases were resolved using self-gated k-space lines as the motion surrogate. Images were reconstructed into 10 temporal bins with 1.56×1.56×1.56mm3. A MRI-CT compatible phantom was designed with a 23mm diameter ball target filled with highconcentration gadolinium(Gd) gel embedded in a 35×40×63mm3 plastic box stabilized with low-concentration Gd gel. The whole phantom was driven by an air pump. Human respiratory motion was mimicked using the controller from a commercial dynamic phantom (RSD). Four breathing settings (rates/depths: 10s/20mm, 6s/15mm, 4s/10mm, 3s/7mm) were scanned with 4D-MRI and 4D-CT (slice thickness 1.25mm). Motion ground-truth was obtained from input signals and real-time video recordings. Reconstructed images were imported into Eclipse(Varian) for target contouring. Volumes and target positions were compared with ground-truth. Initial human study was investigated on a liver patient. Results: 4D-MRI and 4D-CT scans for the different breathing cycles were reconstructed with 10 phases. Target volume in each phase was measured for both 4D-CT and 4D-MRI. Volume percentage difference for the 6.37ml target ranged from 6.67±5.33 to 11.63±5.57 for 4D-CT and from 1.47±0.52 to 2.12±1.60 for 4D-MRI. The Mann-Whitney U-test shows the 4D-MRI is significantly superior to 4D-CT (p=0.021) for phase-based target definition. Centroid motion error ranges were 1.35–1.25mm (4D-CT), and 0.31–0.12mm (4D-MRI). Conclusion: The k-space self-gated 4D-MRI we recently developed can accurately determine phase-based target volume while avoiding typical motion artifacts found in 4D-CT, and is being further studied for use in GI targeting and motion management. This work supported in part by grant 1R03CA173273-01.

  19. Weight Estimation Tool for Children Aged 6 to 59 Months in Limited-Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    .33%); proportion of estimates accurate to within ± 25% of true weight was 97.36% (95% CI 97.40%, 97.46%); and Bland-Altman bias and 95% limits of agreement were 0.05 kg and (-2.15 kg; 2.24 kg). The height model fitted for MUAC classes was accurate and precise. For MUAC < 115 mm, the proportion of estimates accurate to within ± 25% of true weight was 97.15% (95% CI 96.90%, 97.42%) and the Bland-Altman bias and 95% limits of agreement were 0.08 kg and (-1.21 kg; 1.37 kg). For MUAC between 115 and 125 mm, the proportion of estimates accurate to within ± 25% of true weight was 98.93% (95% CI 98.82%, 99.03%) and Bland-Altman bias and 95% limits of agreement were 0.05 kg and (-1.15 kg; 1.24 kg). For MUAC > 125 mm, the proportion of estimates accurate to within ± 25% of true weight was 98.33% (95% CI 98.29%, 98.37%) and Bland-Altman bias and 95% limits of agreement were 0.05 kg and (-2.08 kg; 2.19 kg). Conclusions and Relevance Models estimating weight from height alone and height with MUAC class in children aged 6–59 months in a database from low-to-middle income countries were more accurate and precise than previous weight estimation tools. A height-based weight estimation tape stratified according to MUAC classes is proposed for children aged 6–59 months in limited-resource settings. PMID:27529816

  20. The advantages of small-size focus in ultrasound surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehui, Li; Guofeng, Shen; Jinfeng, Bai; Yazhu, Chen

    2012-10-01

    The near-field heating which easily occurs in ultrasound surgery is mainly due to the long axial intensity distribution, -6dB intensity length of which is larger than 10 mm. In this paper, we investigated the advantages of a small-size focus with -6dB intensity dimensions of 1 (transverse)×4.5(axial) mm. First, the near-field safety and treatment efficiency were shown to be improved. A 5×5×5 mm3 target was simulated using this small-size focus with 1 mm focal spacing. The consecutive sonications were applied without cooling intervals, and duration of each spot was 2 s under ultrasonic intensity of 200 W/cm2. The lesion was well conformed to simulated target with 89.6% coverage index and 11.8% external volume index, and peak temperature in the plane (1 cm before focal plane) was 40.5°C, showing it was safe. Meanwhile the treatment time was decreased due to continuous sonication. Another advantage of small-size focus is that it can reduce the possibility of bone burning at the far field. Assumed that the muscle-bone interface located 1 cm after the focal plane, the specific absorption rate at the bone interface were 0.25 and 1.28 times the that of focal plane for the small-size focus and commonsize focus (-6dB intensity axial width of 12.5 mm), respectively. So the small-size focus shows superiority in ultrasound surgery.

  1. Strain rate effects on the mechanical behavior of two Dual Phase steels in tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, E.; Singh, N. K.; Forni, D.; Singha, M. K.; Gupta, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the strain rate sensitivity of Dual Phase steel 1200 (DP1200) and Dual Phase steel 1400 (DP1400) under uni-axial tensile loads in the strain rate range from 0.001 s-1 to 600 s-1. These materials are advanced high strength steels (AHSS) having high strength, high capacity to dissipate crash energy and high formability. Flat sheet specimens of the materials having gauge length 10 mm, width 4 mm and thickness 2 mm (DP1200) and 1.25 mm (DP1400), are tested at room temperature (20∘C) on electromechanical universal testing machine to obtain their stress-strain relation under quasi-static condition (0.001 s-1), and on Hydro-Pneumatic machine and modified Hopkinson bar to study their mechanical behavior at medium (3 s-1, and 18 s-1) and high strain rates (200 s-1, 400 s-1, and 600 s-1) respectively. Tests under quasi-static condition are performed at high temperature (200∘C) also, and found that tensile flow stress is a increasing function of temperature. The stress-strain data has been analysed to determine the material parameters of the Cowper-Symonds and the Johnson-Cook models. A simple modification of the Johnson-Cook model has been proposed in order to obtain a better fit of tests at high temperatures. Finally, the fractographs of the broken specimens are taken by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to understand the fracture mechanism of these advanced high strength steels at different strain rates.

  2. Estimating movement and survival rates of a small saltwater fish using autonomous antenna receiver arrays and passive integrated transponder tags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudershausen, Paul J.; Buckel, Jeffery A.; Dubreuil, Todd; O'Donnell, Matthew J.; Hightower, Joseph E.; Poland, Steven J.; Letcher, Benjamin H.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of small (12.5 mm long) passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and custom detection antennas for obtaining fine-scale movement and demographic data of mummichog Fundulus heteroclitus in a salt marsh creek. Apparent survival and detection probability were estimated using a Cormack Jolly Seber (CJS) model fitted to detection data collected by an array of 3 vertical antennas from November 2010 to March 2011 and by a single horizontal antenna from April to August 2011. Movement of mummichogs was monitored during the period when the array of vertical antennas was used. Antenna performance was examined in situ using tags placed in wooden dowels (drones) and in live mummichogs. Of the 44 tagged fish, 42 were resighted over the 9 mo monitoring period. The in situ detection probabilities of the drone and live mummichogs were high (~80-100%) when the ambient water depth was less than ~0.8 m. Upstream and downstream movement of mummichogs was related to hourly water depth and direction of tidal current in a way that maximized time periods over which mummichogs utilized the intertidal vegetated marsh. Apparent survival was lower during periods of colder water temperatures in December 2010 and early January 2011 (median estimate of daily apparent survival = 0.979) than during other periods of the study (median estimate of daily apparent survival = 0.992). During late fall and winter, temperature had a positive effect on the CJS detection probability of a tagged mummichog, likely due to greater fish activity over warmer periods. During the spring and summer, this pattern reversed possibly due to mummichogs having reduced activity during the hottest periods. This study demonstrates the utility of PIT tags and continuously operating autonomous detection systems for tracking fish at fine temporal scales, and improving estimates of demographic parameters in salt marsh creeks that are difficult or impractical to sample with active fishing gear.

  3. Scanning pupil approach to aspheric surface slope error tolerancing in head-up display optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivokon, V. P.

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel approach to tolerancing slope errors of aspheric surfaces in relay optics of typical avionics head-up displays (HUD). In these systems, a beamlet entering the pilot eye occupies only a tiny fraction of HUD entrance pupil/eyebox with a typical diameter of 125mm. Consequently the beam footprint on any HUD optical surface is a small fraction of its clear aperture. This presents challenges to HUD tolerancing which is typically based on parallax (angular difference in line of sight between left and right eyes) analysis. Aspheric surfaces manufactured by sub-aperture grinding/polishing techniques add another source of error - surface slope error. This type of error not only degrades image quality of observed HUD symbology but also leads to its "waviness" and "floating" especially noticeable when a pilot moves his head within the HUD eyebox. The suggested approach allows aspheric surface slope error tolerancing that ensures an acceptable level of symbology "waviness". A narrow beamlet is traced from a pilot eye position backwards through the HUD optics until it hits the light source. Due to the small beamlet size, slope error of the aspheric surface acts primarily as an overall tilt/wedge that deviates the beam and causes it to shift. The slope error is acceptable when this shift is not resolved by a pilot eye. The beamlet is scanned over entire eyebox and field of view and the slope error tolerance is established for several zones in the aspheric surface clear aperture. The procedure is then repeated for each aspheric surface.

  4. Design and Construction of a Gamma Reaction History Diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    R.M. Malone, B.C. Cox, B.C. Frogget, M.I. Kaufman, T.W. Tunnell; H.W. Herrmann, S.C. Evans, J.M. Mack, C.S. Young; W. Stoeffl

    2009-06-05

    Gas Cherenkov detectors have been used to convert fusion gammas into photons to achieve gamma reaction history (GRH) measurements. These gas detectors include a converter, pressurized gas volume, relay optics, and a photon detector. A novel design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using 90º Off-Axis Parabolic mirrors efficiently collects signal from fusion gammas with 8-ps time dispersion.1 Fusion gammas are converted to Compton electrons, which generate broadband Cherenkov light (our response is from 250 to 700 nm) in a pressurized gas cell. This light is relayed into a high-speed detector using three parabolic mirrors. The detector optics collect light from a 125-mm-diameter by 600-mm-long interchangeable gas (CO2 or SF6) volume. Because light is collected from source locations throughout the gas volume, the detector is positioned at the stop position rather than at an image position. The stop diameter and its position are independent of the light-generation locations along the gas cell. This design incorporates a fixed time delay that allows the detector to recover from prompt radiation. Optical ray tracings demonstrate how light can be collected from different angled trajectories of the Compton electrons as they traverse the gas volume. A Monte Carlo model of the conversion process from gammas to Cherenkov photons is used to generate photon trajectories. The collection efficiencies for different gamma energies are evaluated. At NIF, a cluster of four channels will allow for increased dynamic range, as well as different gamma energy thresholds. This GRH design is compared to a gas Cherenkov detector that utilizes a Cassegrain reflector now used at the OMEGA laser facility. 1. R. M. Malone, H. W. Herrmann, W. Stoeffl, J. M. Mack, C. S. Young, “Gamma bang time/reaction history diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility using 90º off-axis parabolic mirrors,” Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 10E532 (2008).

  5. Cine and tagged cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in normal rat at 1.5 T: a rest and stress study

    PubMed Central

    Daire, Jean-Luc; Jacob, Jean-Pascal; Hyacinthe, Jean-Noel; Croisille, Pierre; Montet-Abou, Karin; Richter, Sophie; Botsikas, Diomidis; Lepetit-Coiffé, Matthieu; Morel, Denis; Vallée, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to measure regional contractile function in the normal rat using cardiac cine and tagged cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) during incremental low doses of dobutamine and at rest. Methods Five rats were investigated for invasive left ventricle pressure measurements and five additional rats were imaged on a clinical 1.5 T MR system using a cine sequence (11–20 phases per cycle, 0.28/0.28/2 mm) and a C-SPAMM tag sequence (18–25 phases per cycle, 0.63/1.79/3 mm, tag spacing 1.25 mm). For each slice, wall thickening (WT) and circumferential strains (CS) were calculated at rest and at stress (2.5, 5 and 10 μg/min/kg of dobutamine). Results Good cine and tagged images were obtained in all the rats even at higher heart rate (300–440 bpm). Ejection fraction and left ventricular (LV) end-systolic volume showed significant changes after each dobutamine perfusion dose (p < 0.001). Tagged CMR had the capacity to resolve the CS transmural gradient and showed a significant increase of both WT and CS at stress compared to rest. Intra and interobserver study showed less variability for the tagged technique. In rats in which a LV catheter was placed, dobutamine produced a significant increase of heart rate, LV dP/dtmax and LV pressure significantly already at the lowest infusion dose. Conclusion Robust cardiac cine and tagging CMR measurements can be obtained in the rat under incremental dobutamine stress using a clinical 1.5 T MR scanner. PMID:18980685

  6. Optoacoustic tomography of breast cancer with arc-array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Valeri G.; Karabutov, Alexander A.; Solomatin, Sergey V.; Savateeva, Elena V.; Aleinikov, Vadim; Zhulina, Yulia V.; Fleming, R. Declan; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2000-05-01

    The second generation of the laser optoacoustic imaging system for breast cancer detection, localization and characterization using a 32-element arc-shaped transducer array was developed and tested. Each acoustic transducer was made of 110-micrometers thick SOLEF PVDF film with dimensions of 1mm X 12.5mm. The frequency band of transducer array provided 0.4-mm axial in-depth resolution. Cylindrical shape of this 10-cm long transducer array provided an improved lateral resolution of 1.0 mm. Original and compact design of low noise preamplifiers and wide band amplifiers was employed. The system sensitivity was optimized by choosing limited bandwidth of ultrasonic detection 20-kHz to 2-MHz. Signal processing was significantly improved and optimized resulting in reduced data collection time of 13 sec. The computer code for digital signal processing employed auto- gain control, high-pass filtering and denoising. An automatic recognition of the opto-acoustic signal detected from the irradiated surface was implemented in order to visualize the breast surface and improve the accuracy of tumor locations. Radial back-projection algorithm was used for image reconstruction. Optimal filtering of image was employed to reduce low and high frequency noise. The advantages and limitations of various contrast-enhancing filters applied to the entire image matrix were studied and discussed. Time necessary for image reconstruction was reduced to 32 sec. The system performance was evaluated initially via acquisition of 2D opto-acoustic images of small absorbing spheres in breast-tissue-like phantoms. Clinical ex-vivo studies of mastectomy specimen were also performed and compared with x-ray radiography and ultrasound.

  7. Automated quantification of pulmonary emphysema from computed tomography scans: comparison of variation and correlation of common measures in a large cohort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to retrospectively investigate the variation of standard indices of pulmonary emphysema from helical computed tomographic (CT) scans as related to inspiration differences over a 1 year interval and determine the strength of the relationship between these measures in a large cohort. 626 patients that had 2 scans taken at an interval of 9 months to 15 months (μ: 381 days, σ: 31 days) were selected for this work. All scans were acquired at a 1.25mm slice thickness using a low dose protocol. For each scan, the emphysema index (EI), fractal dimension (FD), mean lung density (MLD), and 15th percentile of the histogram (HIST) were computed. The absolute and relative changes for each measure were computed and the empirical 95% confidence interval was reported both in non-normalized and normalized scales. Spearman correlation coefficients are computed between the relative change in each measure and relative change in inspiration between each scan-pair, as well as between each pair-wise combination of the four measures. EI varied on a range of -10.5 to 10.5 on a non-normalized scale and -15 to 15 on a normalized scale, with FD and MLD showing slightly larger but comparable spreads, and HIST having a much larger variation. MLD was found to show the strongest correlation to inspiration change (r=0.85, p<0.001), and EI, FD, and HIST to have moderately strong correlation (r = 0.61-0.74, p<0.001). Finally, HIST showed very strong correlation to EI (r = 0.92, p<0.001), while FD showed the least strong relationship to EI (r = 0.82, p<0.001). This work shows that emphysema index and fractal dimension have the least variability overall of the commonly used measures of emphysema and that they offer the most unique quantification of emphysema relative to each other.

  8. Novel Approach for Selective Emitter Formation and Front Side Metallization of Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Baomin

    2010-07-26

    In this project we will explore the possibility of forming the front side metallization and selective emitter layer for the crystalline silicon solar cells through using selective laser ablation to create contact openings on the front surface and a screen printer to make connections with conductive paste. Using this novel approach we expect to reduce the specific contact resistance of the silver gridlines by about one order of magnitude compared to the state-of-art industrial crystalline silicon solar cells to below 1 mΩ∙cm2, and use lightly doped n+ emitter layer with sheet resistance of not smaller than 100 Ω. This represents an enabling improvement on crystalline silicon solar cell performance and can increase the absolute efficiency of the solar cell by about 1%. In this scientific report we first present our result on the selective laser ablation of the nitride layer to make contact openings. Then we report our work on the solar cell fabrication by using the laser ablated contact openings with self-doping paste. Through various electrical property characterization and SIMS analysis, the factors limiting the cell performance have been discussed. While through this proof-of-concept project we could not reach the target on cell efficiency improvement, the process to fabricate 125mm full-sized silicon solar cells using laser ablation and self-doping paste has been developed, and a much better understanding of technical challenges has been achieved. Future direction to realize the potential of the new technology has been clearly defined.

  9. Does length of prostate biopsy cores have an impact on diagnosis of prostate cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Ergün, Müslüm; İslamoğlu, Ekrem; Yalçınkaya, Soner; Tokgöz, Hüsnü; Savaş, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether core length is a significant biopsy parameter in the detection of prostate cancer. Material and methods We retrospectively analyzed pathology reports of the specimens of 188 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer who had undergone initial transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy, and compared biopsy core lengths of the patients with, and without prostate cancer. The biopsy specimens of prostate cancer patients were divided into 3 groups according to core length, and the data obtained were compared (Group 1; total core length <10 mm, Group 2; total core length 10 mm–19 mm, and Group 3; total core length >20 mm). Biopsy core lengths of the patients diagnosed as prostate cancer, and benign prostatic hyperplasia were compared, and a certain cut-off value for core length with optimal diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for prostate cancer was calculated. Results Mean age, PSA and total length of cores were 65.08±7.41 years, 9.82±6.34 ng/mL and 11.2±0.2 mm, respectively. Assessment of biopsy core lengths showed that cores with cancer (n=993, median length 12.5 mm) were significantly longer than benign cores (n=1185, median length=11.3 mm) (p<0.001). Core length analysis yielded 12 mm cores have an optimal sensitivity (41.9%) and specificity (62%) for detection of cancer (odds ratio: 1.08). Conclusion Biopsy core length is one of the most important parameter that determines the quality of biopsy and detection of prostate cancer. A median sample length of 12 mm is ideal lower limit for cancer detection, and biopsy procedures which yield shorter biopsy cores should be repeated. PMID:27635285

  10. Urban sediment contamination in a former Hg mining district, Idrija, Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Bavec, Spela; Biester, Harald; Gosar, Mateja

    2014-06-01

    Road sediments from gully pots of the drainage system and stream sediments from local streams were investigated for the first time in the urban area of Idrija town, the central part of the second largest and strongly contaminated Hg mining district in the world. Hg concentrations in road sediments were lower than in stream sediments. They ranged from 16 to 110 mg/kg (Md = 29 mg/kg) for <0.125 mm particles and from 7 to 125 mg/kg (Md = 35 mg/kg) for <0.04 mm particles, while Hg concentrations in stream sediments ranged from 10 to 610 mg/kg (Md = 95 mg/kg) for <0.125 particles and from 10 to 440 mg/kg (Md = 105 mg/kg) for <0.04 mm particles. High Hg loadings in stream sediments were successfully linked with identified mercury sources (rocks containing mercury ore, areas of former ore roasting sites, ore residue dumps), because they are located in the drainage areas of streams, from which the sediments were collected. Links between Hg loadings in road sediments and identified mercury sources were not recognized. Solid phases of Hg were determined by thermo-desorption technique and are similar for both types of sediments. Results show the occurrence of three different forms: elemental mercury, mercury bound to matrix components and cinnabar. Approximately 50 % of Hg in samples consist of non-cinnabar fractions. This is important, since they are potentially bioavailable. An interesting new discovery according to previous research of environmental media from Idrija area by solid-phase Hg thermo-desorption technique is that elemental mercury was determined in almost all investigated sediments in minor amounts (Md = 3 %).

  11. Effects of estrogen on functional and neurological recovery after spinal cord injury: An experimental study with rats

    PubMed Central

    Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa; Ferreira, Ricardo; dos Santos, Gustavo Bispo; da Rocha, Ivan Dias; Marcon, Raphael Martus

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the functional and histological effects of estrogen as a neuroprotective agent after a standard experimentally induced spinal cord lesion. METHODS: In this experimental study, 20 male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: one group with rats undergoing spinal cord injury (SCI) at T10 and receiving estrogen therapy with 17-beta estradiol (4mg/kg) immediately following the injury and after the placement of skin sutures and a control group with rats only subjected to SCI. A moderate standard experimentally induced SCI was produced using a computerized device that dropped a weight on the rat's spine from a height of 12.5 mm. Functional recovery was verified with the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scale on the 2nd, 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th, 35th and 42nd days after injury and by quantifying the motor-evoked potential on the 42nd day after injury. Histopathological evaluation of the SCI area was performed after euthanasia on the 42nd day. RESULTS: The experimental group showed a significantly greater functional improvement from the 28th to the 42nd day of observation compared to the control group. The experimental group showed statistically significant improvements in the motor-evoked potential compared with the control group. The results of pathological histomorphometry evaluations showed a better neurological recovery in the experimental group, with respect to the proportion and diameter of the quantified nerve fibers. CONCLUSIONS: Estrogen administration provided benefits in neurological and functional motor recovery in rats with SCI beginning at the 28th day after injury. PMID:26598084

  12. Comparison of Blepharoptosis Correction Using Müller-aponeurosis Composite Flap Advancement and Frontalis Muscle Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ramadhan, Anwar; Han, Dong Gil; Shim, Jeong Su; Lee, Yong Jig; Ha, Won Ho; Lee, Byung Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Background: Treatments for severe blepharoptosis are well documented and include the most common operations for restoring upper eyelid ptosis, which are levator surgery and frontal muscle transfers; however, the choice of treatment is still controversial. There are different approaches to the restoration of upper eyelid ptosis, and the choice will be based on ptosis severity and the surgeon’s skill and experience. Methods: Two hundred and fourteen patients presenting with a levator function of between 2 and 4 mm received ptosis correction between 1991 and 2010 at our clinic. Of these, 71 patients underwent Müller aponeurosis composite flap advancement for correction of 89 eyelids, and frontalis muscle transfer was performed on 143 patients (217 eyelids). Postoperative results were evaluated with an average follow-up period of 23 months. Results: The preoperative average for marginal reflex distance (MRD1) in the Müller aponeurosis composite flap advancement group was 1.25 mm, and in the frontal muscle transfer group, it was 0.59 mm. The area of corneal exposure (ACE) was 57.2% in the Müller aponeurosis composite flap advancement group and 53.6% in the frontal muscle transfer group. The postoperative average distance was not significantly different for the 2 techniques. In the Müller aponeurosis composite flap advancement group, MRD1 was 2.7 mm and ACE was improved to 73.5%. In the frontal muscle transfer group, MRD1 was 2.3 mm and ACE was 71.2%. Undercorrection and eyelid asymmetry were the most frequently observed postoperative complications for both techniques. Conclusions: In our study, we confirmed that Müller aponeurosis composite flap advancement and the frontalis transfer technique are both effective in the correction of severe blepharoptosis; our results showed no significant differences between the 2 techniques. PMID:25426383

  13. Implementation of a Comprehensive On-Line Closed-Loop Diagnostic System for Roll-to-Roll Amorphous Silicon Solar Cell Production: Phase I Annual Report, 23 April 2003--31 August 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, T.

    2004-08-01

    This subcontract report describes how Energy Conversion Devices, Inc., has developed and built 7 generations of roll-to-roll amorphous silicon PV production equipment. In the ECD/United Solar production process, we deposit about a 1-mm-thick, 12-layer coating consisting of a metal/oxide backreflector, a 9-layer a-Si/a-SiGe alloy triple-junction solar cell, and top transparent conductive oxide coating onto 125-mm-thick, 35.5-cm-wide stainless-steel webs in a series of three roll-to-roll deposition machines. In the PV Manufacturing R&D 6 program, ECD is building upon these accomplishments to enhance the operation of the present production machine, and lay the foundation for improvements in the next-generation machine. ECD has completed the Phase I work for the first two Tasks, and will complete the Phase I work for the second two tasks within the next two months. In the following report, we summarize the Phase I work in each of these tasks. We have involved United Solar production personnel in each of these Tasks. This is important for two reasons: First, the collaboration of ECD and United Solar personnel keeps the projects responsive to the developing needs at United Solar; and most of the tasks affect operations and consequently need the support of United Solar production and QA/QC managers. In the process we have developed a good working relationship between the production personnel, whose mantra is''change nothing,'' and the R&D personnel, who mantra is''change everything.''

  14. Potential renovascular hypertension, space missions, and the role of magnesium.

    PubMed

    Rowe, William J

    2009-01-01

    Space flight (SF) and dust inhalation in habitats cause hypertension whereas in SF (alone) there is no consistent hypertension but reduced diurnal blood pressure (BP) variation instead. Current pharmaceutical subcutaneous delivery systems are inadequate and there is impairment in the absorption, metabolism, excretion, and deterioration of some pharmaceuticals. Data obtained from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration through the Freedom of Information Act shows that Irwin returned from his 12-day Apollo 15 mission in 1971 and was administered a bicycle stress test. With just three minutes of exercise, his BP was >275/125 mm Hg (heart rate of only 130 beats per minute). There was no acute renal insult. Irwin's apparent spontaneous remission is suggested to be related to the increase of a protective vasodilator, and his atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) reduced with SF because of reduced plasma volume. With invariable malabsorption and loss of bone/muscle storage sites, there are significant (P < 0.0001) reductions of magnesium (Mg) required for ANP synthesis and release. Reductions of Mg and ANP can trigger pronounced angiotensin (200%), endothelin, and catecholamine elevations (clearly shown in recent years) and vicious cycles between the latter and Mg deficits. There is proteinuria, elevated creatinine, and reduced renal concentrating ability with the potential for progressive inflammatory and oxidative stress-induced renal disease and hypertension with vicious cycles. After SF, animals show myocardial endothelial injuries and increased vascular resistance of extremities in humans. Even without dust, hypertension might eventually develop from renovascular hypertension during very long missions. Without sufficient endothelial protection from pharmaceuticals, a comprehensive gene research program should begin now. PMID:21694921

  15. Effects of Heat Treatment on the Ballistic Impact Properties of Inconel 718 for Jet Engine Fan Containment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of heat treating Inconel 718 on the ballistic impact response and failure mechanisms were studied. Two different annealing conditions and an aged condition were considered. Large differences in the static properties were found between the annealed and the aged material, with the annealed condition having lower strength and hardness and greater elongation than the aged. High strain rate tests show similar results. Correspondingly large differences were found in the velocity required to penetrate material in the two conditions in impact tests involving 12.5 mm diameter, 25.4 mm long cylindrical Ti-6-4 projectiles impacting flat plates at velocities in the range of 150 to 300 m/sec. The annealed material was able to absorb over 25 percent more energy than the aged. This is contrary to results observed for ballistic impact response for higher velocity impacts typically encountered in military applications where it has been shown that there exists a correlation between target hardness and ballistic impact strength. Metallographic examination of impacted plates showed strong indication of failure due to adiabatic shear. In both materials localized bands of large shear deformation were apparent, and microhardness measurements indicated an increase in hardness in these bands compared to the surrounding material. These bands were more localized in the aged material than in the annealed material. In addition the annealed material underwent significantly greater overall deformation before failure. The results indicate that lower elongation and reduced strain hardening behavior lead to a transition from shear to adiabatic shear failure, while high elongation and better strain hardening capabilities reduce the tendency for shear to localize and result in an unstable adiabatic shear failure. This supports empirical containment design methods that relate containment thickness to the static toughness.

  16. Effects of Heat Treatment on the Ballistic Impact Properties of Inconel 718 for Jet Engine Fan Containment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Lerch, Bradley A.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of heat treating Inconel 718 on the ballistic impact response and failure mechanisms were studied. Two different annealing conditions and an aged condition were considered. Large differences in the static properties were found between the annealed and the aged material, with the annealed condition having lower strength and hardness and greater elongation than the aged. High strain rate tests show similar results. Correspondingly large differences were found in the velocity required to penetrate material in the two conditions in impact tests involving 12.5 mm diameter, 25.4 mm long cylindrical Ti-6-4 projectiles impacting flat plates at velocities in the range of 150 to 300 m/sec. The annealed material was able to absorb over 25 percent more energy than the aged. This is contrary to results observed for ballistic impact response for higher velocity impacts typically encountered in military applications where it has been shown that there exists a correlation between target hardness and ballistic impact strength. Metallographic examination of impacted plates showed strong indication of failure due to adiabatic shear. In both materials localized bands of large shear deformation were apparent, and microhardness measurements indicated an increase in hardness in these bands compared to the surrounding material. These bands were more localized in the aged material than in the annealed material. In addition the annealed material underwent significantly greater overall deformation before failure. The results indicate that lower elongation and reduced strain hardening behavior lead to a transition from shear to adiabatic shear failure, while high elongation and better strain hardening capabilities reduce the tendency for shear to localize and result in an unstable adiabatic shear failure. This supports empirical containment design methods that relate containment thickness to the static toughness.

  17. Accuracy of virtual models in the assessment of maxillary defects

    PubMed Central

    Kurşun, Şebnem; Kılıç, Cenk; Özen, Tuncer

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to assess the reliability of measurements performed on three-dimensional (3D) virtual models of maxillary defects obtained using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 3D optical scanning. Materials and Methods Mechanical cavities simulating maxillary defects were prepared on the hard palate of nine cadavers. Images were obtained using a CBCT unit at three different fields-of-views (FOVs) and voxel sizes: 1) 60×60 mm FOV, 0.125 mm3 (FOV60); 2) 80×80 mm FOV, 0.160 mm3 (FOV80); and 3) 100×100 mm FOV, 0.250 mm3 (FOV100). Superimposition of the images was performed using software called VRMesh Design. Automated volume measurements were conducted, and differences between surfaces were demonstrated. Silicon impressions obtained from the defects were also scanned with a 3D optical scanner. Virtual models obtained using VRMesh Design were compared with impressions obtained by scanning silicon models. Gold standard volumes of the impression models were then compared with CBCT and 3D scanner measurements. Further, the general linear model was used, and the significance was set to p=0.05. Results A comparison of the results obtained by the observers and methods revealed the p values to be smaller than 0.05, suggesting that the measurement variations were caused by both methods and observers along with the different cadaver specimens used. Further, the 3D scanner measurements were closer to the gold standard measurements when compared to the CBCT measurements. Conclusion In the assessment of artificially created maxillary defects, the 3D scanner measurements were more accurate than the CBCT measurements. PMID:25793180

  18. Nigerian Population Research on Environment, Gene and Health (NIPREGH) – objectives and protocol

    PubMed Central

    Odili, Augustine N.; Ogedengbe, John O.; Nwegbu, Maxwell; Anumah, Felicia O.; Asala, Samuel; Staessen, Jan A

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Sub-Saharan Africa is currently undergoing an epidemiological transition from a disease burden largely attributable to communicable diseases to that resulting from a combination of both communicable and chronic non-communicable diseases. Data on chronic disease incidence, lifestyle, environmental and genetic risk factors are sparse in this region. This report aimed at providing relevant information in respect to risk factors that increase blood pressure and lead to development of intermediate cardiovascular phenotypes. We presented the rationale, objectives and key methodological features of the Nigerian Population Research on Environment, Gene and Health (NIPREGH) study. The challenges encountered in carrying out population study in this part of the world and the approaches at surmounting them were also presented. The preliminary data as at 20 November 2013 showed that out of the 205 individuals invited starting from early April 2013, 160 (72 women) consented and were enrolled; giving a response rate of 78%. Participants' age ranged from 18 to 80 years, with a mean (SD) of 39.8 (12.4) years and they were of 34 different ethnic groups spread over 24 states out of the 36 states that constitute Nigeria. The mean (SD) of office and home blood pressures were 113.0 (15.2) mm Hg systolic, 73.5 (12.5) mm Hg diastolic and 117.3 (15.0) mm Hg systolic, and 76.0 (9.6) mm Hg diastolic, respectively. Forty-three (26.8%) participants were hypertensive and 8 (5.0%) were diabetic. In addition to having the unique potential of recruiting a cohort that is a true representative of the entire Nigerian population, NIPREGH is feasible and the objectives realisable. PMID:25332707

  19. Comparing Operative Exposures of the Le Fort I Osteotomy and the Expanded Endoscopic Endonasal Approach to the Clivus

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Christopher I. Sanders; Kurbanov, Almaz; Zimmer, Lee A.; Keller, Jeffrey T.; Theodosopoulos, Philip V.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We compare surgical exposures to the clivus by Le Fort I osteotomy (LFO) and the expanded endoscopic endonasal approach (EEEA). Methods Ten cadaveric specimens were imaged with 1.25-mm computed tomography. After stereotactic navigation, EEEA was performed followed by LFO. Clival measurements included lateral and vertical limits to the midline lower extent of exposure (t test). Results For EEFA and LFO, respectively, maximal lateral exposure in millimeters (mean ± standard deviation) was 24.5 ± 3.7 and 24.5 ±  − 3.8 (p = 0.99) at the opticocarotid recess (OCR) and 25.1 ±  − 4.1 and 24.1 ±  − 3.0 (p = 0.53) at the foramen lacerum level; lateral reach at the hypoglossal canals was 39.0 ±  − 5.88 and 56.1 ±   − 5.3 (p = 0.0004); and vertical extension was 56.0 ±  − 4.1 and 56.3 ±  − 3.4 (p = 0.78). Conclusions For clival exposures, LFO and EEEA were similar craniocaudally and laterally at the levels of the OCR and foramen lacerum. LFO achieved greater exposure at the level of the hypoglossal canal. PMID:25685646

  20. Versatile use of vacuum-assisted healing in fifty patients

    PubMed Central

    Al Fadhli, Ahmad; Alexander, George; Kanjoor, James Roy

    2009-01-01

    Context: Wound management can often be a challenging experience, especially in the presence of diabetes mellitus, vascular or immunological compromise. While no single technique can be considered by itself to be ideal, vacuum-assisted healing, which is a recent innovation, is fast becoming a necessary addition as adjuvant therapy to hasten wound healing. Aims: To determine the efficacy of vacuum-assisted healing. Settings and Design: Plastic surgery centre. Ministry of Health Hospital, Kuwait. Materials and Methods: Patients from Kuwait in a wide variety of clinical situations were chosen for study: Patients (n=50) were classified by diagnosis: Group 1: pressure sore- sacral (n= 3), trochanteric (n=6), ischial (n= 2); Group 2: ulcers (n= 11); Group 3: traumatic soft tissue wounds (n =15); Group 4: extensive tissue loss from the abdominal wall perineum, thigh and axilla (n =5); Group 5: sternal dehiscence wounds (n =4) and Group 6: wounds from flap necrosis (n =4). All wounds were subjected to vacuum by wall unit or portable unit, using pressure of 100-125 mm - continuous or intermittent. Closure of wounds, significant reduction in size and refusal by patient for continuation of vacuum-assisted closure therapy were end points of vacuum application. Results: Sixteen per cent of patients showed complete healing of the wound. Seventy per cent of patients showed 20-78% reduction in wound size. In 14% of patients treatment had to be discontinued. All patients showed improvement in granulation tissue and reduction in bacterial isolates and tissue oedema. Conclusions: The application of subatmospheric pressure or negative pressure promotes healing in a wide range of clinical settings and is an advanced wound healing therapy that can optimize patient care, promote rapid wound healing and help manage costs. It may be used in most instances in both hospital and community settings. PMID:20368850

  1. Morphodynamics of a Bifurcation on the Wax Lake Delta, LA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slingerland, R. L.; Best, J.; Parsons, D. R.; Edmonds, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    To better predict the dynamical behavior of fine-grained deltaic distributary networks, we collected integrated morphological, flow, and sediment transport data from a third-order bifurcation (BIF) on the Wax Lake Delta, LA, during July 15-20, 2009. Theory and numerical modeling predicts that over a range of channel aspect ratios, friction factors, and Shields numbers, three functions exist that relate the discharge ratio of the bifurcate arms at equilibrium conditions to the Shields number. One function predicts symmetrical configurations, while the other two predict asymmetrical discharges. To test the theoretical predictions we employed high-resolution multibeam echo sounding (MBES) and acoustic Doppler velocity profiling to map the bifurcation. The arms of the BIF are asymmetric in planform, depth (west arm/east arm = 4.2/3.1 m), discharge (335/140 cumecs), and bedload transport, with two-thirds of the dunes revealed on the MBES survey entering the western bifurcate channel. The bed consists of fine sand (D50 = 0.125 mm) sculpted into dunes, which in these 4 m water depths average 7 meters long and 0.52 m high and provide a form friction factor of about 0.028. Measured cross-sectional mean velocity of the main channel during the survey was ~ 0.23 m/s, which for sand-bed systems yields a low Shields number of θ = 0.093. For this θ theory predicts a stable equilibrium bifurcate discharge ratio of 4.5, which compares unfavorably with the observed value of 2.4. As there is no indication from 30 years of aerial photography that this BIF is morphologically unstable, either the bifurcation is maintained by the higher discharges of the spring flood or the theoretical envelope of stable bifurcation configurations requires re-evaluation.

  2. MAMBO observations at 240GHz of optically obscured Spitzer sources: source clumps and radio activity at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreani, P.; Magliocchetti, M.; de Zotti, G.

    2010-01-01

    Optically very faint (R > 25.5) sources detected by the Spitzer Space Telescope at 24μm represent a very interesting population at redshift z ~ (1.5-3). They exhibit strong clustering properties, implying that they are hosted by very massive haloes, and their mid-infrared emission could be powered by either dust-enshrouded star formation and/or by an obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN). We report observations carried out with the Max Planck Millimetre Bolometer (MAMBO) array at the IRAM 30-m antenna on Pico Veleta of a candidate protocluster with five optically obscured sources selected from the 24-μm Spitzer sample of the First-Look Survey. Interestingly, these sources appear to lie on a high-density filament aligned with the two radio jets of an AGN. Four out of five of the observed sources were detected. We combine these measurements with optical, infrared and radio observations to probe the nature of the candidate protocluster members. Our preliminary conclusions can be summarized as follows: the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of all sources include both AGN and starburst contributions; the AGN contribution to the bolometric luminosities ranges between 14 and 26 per cent of the total. Such a contribution is enough for the AGN to dominate the emission at 5.8, 8 and 24μm, while the stellar component, inferred from SED fitting, prevails at 1.25mm and at λ < 4.5μm. The present analysis suggests a coherent interplay at high z between extended radio activity and the development of filamentary large-scale structures.

  3. Effects of Prostate-Rectum Separation on Rectal Dose From External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Susil, Robert C.; McNutt, Todd R.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Song, Danny

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy for prostate cancer, the rectum is the major dose-limiting structure. Physically separating the rectum from the prostate (e.g., by injecting a spacer) can reduce the rectal radiation dose. Despite pilot clinical studies, no careful analysis has been done of the risks, benefits, and dosimetric effects of this practice. Methods and Materials: Using cadaveric specimens, 20 mL of a hydrogel was injected between the prostate and rectum using a transperineal approach. Imaging was performed before and after spacer placement, and the cadavers were subsequently dissected. Ten intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were generated (five before and five after separation), allowing for characterization of the rectal dose reduction. To quantify the amount of prostate-rectum separation needed for effective rectal dose reduction, simulations were performed using nine clinically generated intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. Results: In the cadaveric studies, an average of 12.5 mm of prostate-rectum separation was generated with the 20-mL hydrogel injections (the seminal vesicles were also separated from the rectum). The average rectal volume receiving 70 Gy decreased from 19.9% to 4.5% (p < .05). In the simulation studies, a prostate-rectum separation of 10 mm was sufficient to reduce the mean rectal volume receiving 70 Gy by 83.1% (p <.05). No additional reduction in the average rectal volume receiving 70 Gy was noted after 15 mm of separation. In addition, spacer placement allowed for increased planning target volume margins without exceeding the rectal dose tolerance. Conclusion: Prostate-rectum spacers can allow for reduced rectal toxicity rates, treatment intensification, and/or reduced dependence on complex planning and treatment delivery techniques.

  4. Manual discrimination of force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Xiao-Dong; Tan, HONG-Z.; Durlach, Nathaniel I.

    1991-01-01

    Optimal design of human-machine interfaces for teleoperators and virtual-environment systems which involve the tactual and kinesthetic modalities requires knowledge of the human's resolving power in these modalities. The resolution of the interface should be appropriately matched to that of the human operator. We report some preliminary results on the ability of the human hand to distinguish small differences in force under a variety of conditions. Experiments were conducted on force discrimination with the thumb pushing an interface that exerts a constant force over the pushing distance and the index finger pressing against a fixed support. The dependence of the sensitivity index d' on force increment can be fit by a straight line through the origin and the just-noticeable difference (JND) in force can thus be described by the inverse of the slope of this line. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was measured by varying the a priori probabilities of the two alternatives, reference force and reference force plus an increment, in one-interval, two-alternative, forced-choice experiments. When plotted on normal deviate coordinates, the ROC's were roughly straight lines of unit slope, thus supporting the assumption of equal-variance normal distributions and the use of the conventional d' measure. The JND was roughly 6-8 percent for reference force ranging from 2.5 to 10 newtons, pushing distance from 5 to 30 mm, and initial finger-span from 45 to 125 mm. Also, the JND remained the same when the subjects were instructed to change the average speed of pushing from 23 to 153 mm/sec. The pushing was terminated by reaching either a wall or a well, and the JND's were essentially the same in both cases.

  5. A wind-driving disc model for the mm-wavelength polarization structure of HL Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsakos, Titos; Tzeferacos, Petros; Königl, Arieh

    2016-08-01

    The recent advent of spatially resolved mm- and cm-wavelength polarimetry in protostellar accretion discs could help clarify the role of magnetic fields in the angular momentum transport in these systems. The best case to date is that of HL Tau, where the inability to produce a good fit to the 1.25-mm data with a combination of vertical and azimuthal magnetic field components was interpreted as implying that centrifugally driven winds (CDWs) are probably not a significant transport mechanism on the ˜102 au scale probed by the observations. Using synthetic polarization maps of heuristic single-field-component discs and of a post-processed simulation of a wind-driving disc, we demonstrate that a much better fit to the data can be obtained if the radial field component, a hallmark of the CDW mechanism, dominates in the polarized emission region. A similar inference was previously made in modelling the far-infrared polarization map of the pc-scale dust ring in the Galactic centre. To reconcile this interpretation with theoretical models of protostellar discs, which indicate that the wind is launched from a comparatively high elevation above the mid-plane, we propose that most of the polarized emission originates - with a high (≳ 10%) intrinsic degree of polarization - in small (≲ 0.1 mm) grains that remain suspended above the mid-plane, and that the bulk of the mm-wavelength emission is produced - with low intrinsic polarization - by larger grains that have settled to the mid-plane.

  6. Tumour control probability derived from dose distribution in homogeneous and heterogeneous models: assuming similar pharmacokinetics, 125Sn-177Lu is superior to 90Y-177Lu in peptide receptor radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walrand, Stephan; Hanin, François-Xavier; Pauwels, Stanislas; Jamar, François

    2012-07-01

    Clinical trials on 177Lu-90Y therapy used empirical activity ratios. Radionuclides (RN) with larger beta maximal range could favourably replace 90Y. Our aim is to provide RN dose-deposition kernels and to compare the tumour control probability (TCP) of RN combinations. Dose kernels were derived by integration of the mono-energetic beta-ray dose distributions (computed using Monte Carlo) weighted by their respective beta spectrum. Nine homogeneous spherical tumours (1-25 mm in diameter) and four spherical tumours including a lattice of cold, but alive, spheres (1, 3, 5, 7 mm in diameter) were modelled. The TCP for 93Y, 90Y and 125Sn in combination with 177Lu in variable proportions (that kept constant the renal cortex biological effective dose) were derived by 3D dose kernel convolution. For a mean tumour-absorbed dose of 180 Gy, 2 mm homogeneous tumours and tumours including 3 mm diameter cold alive spheres were both well controlled (TCP > 0.9) using a 75-25% combination of 177Lu and 90Y activity. However, 125Sn-177Lu achieved a significantly better result by controlling 1 mm-homogeneous tumour simultaneously with tumours including 5 mm diameter cold alive spheres. Clinical trials using RN combinations should use RN proportions tuned to the patient dosimetry. 125Sn production and its coupling to somatostatin analogue appear feasible. Assuming similar pharmacokinetics 125Sn is the best RN for combination with 177Lu in peptide receptor radiotherapy justifying pharmacokinetics studies in rodent of 125Sn-labelled somatostatin analogues.

  7. Initial Experience Using Closed Incision Negative Pressure Therapy after Immediate Postmastectomy Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Allen; Sigalove, Steven R; Maxwell, G Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Although immediate postmastectomy breast reconstruction is favored over delayed reconstruction, it remains associated with high complication rates. Potential complications include seroma formation, dehiscence, infection, and tissue necrosis along incision edges. Closed incision negative pressure therapy (ciNPT; Prevena Incision Management System, KCI, an Acelity company, San Antonio, Tex.) has been reported to help hold incision edges together, protect incisions from external contamination, and remove fluid and infectious material. We investigated outcomes of applying ciNPT with a customizable dressing over closed incisions in 13 patients (25 breasts) who received immediate postmastectomy reconstruction as part of 2-stage expander/implant breast reconstruction. Nipple-sparing mastectomy was performed on 14 breasts, reduction-pattern mastectomy on 6 breasts, and skin-sparing mastectomy on 5 breasts. All breasts had ciNPT with a customizable dressing applied over the entire clean closed incision immediately after surgery at -125 mmHg for an average of 4.3 days. At 3-month follow-up, 24 of the 25 (96%) breasts had achieved healing. Delayed hematoma occurred on postoperative day 13 in 1 breast in the nipple-sparing mastectomy group and resolved. In the reduction-pattern mastectomy group, superficial dehiscence occurred on 3 breasts and resolved with local wound care. One breast in that group developed flap necrosis requiring surgical revision. Less drainage was observed in attached closed-suction drains, so time to drain removal was reduced from an estimated average of 12-14 days to 8.2 days. Based on the initial experience in this study, larger studies are warranted to evaluate the use of ciNPT with customizable or peel-and-place dressings after immediate postmastectomy breast reconstruction. PMID:27536498

  8. Reducing the Use of Pesticides with Site-Specific Application: The Chemical Control of Rhizoctonia solani as a Case of Study for the Management of Soil-Borne Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Le Cointe, Ronan; Simon, Thomas E.; Delarue, Patrick; Hervé, Maxime; Leclerc, Melen; Poggi, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Reducing our reliance on pesticides is an essential step towards the sustainability of agricultural production. One approach involves the rational use of pesticides combined with innovative crop management. Most control strategies currently focus on the temporal aspect of epidemics, e.g. determining the optimal date for spraying, regardless of the spatial mechanics and ecology of disease spread. Designing innovative pest management strategies incorporating the spatial aspect of epidemics involves thorough knowledge on how disease control affects the life-history traits of the pathogen. In this study, using Rhizoctonia solani/Raphanus sativus as an example of a soil-borne pathosystem, we investigated the effects of a chemical control currently used by growers, Monceren® L, on key epidemiological components (saprotrophic spread and infectivity). We tested the potential “shield effect” of Monceren® L on pathogenic spread in a site-specific application context, i.e. the efficiency of this chemical to contain the spread of the fungus from an infected host when application is spatially localized, in our case, a strip placed between the infected host and a recipient bait. Our results showed that Monceren® L mainly inhibits the saprotrophic spread of the fungus in soil and may prevent the fungus from reaching its host plant. However, perhaps surprisingly we did not detect any significant effect of the fungicide on the pathogen infectivity. Finally, highly localized application of the fungicide—a narrow strip of soil (12.5 mm wide) sprayed with Monceren® L—significantly decreased local transmission of the pathogen, suggesting lowered risk of occurrence of invasive epidemics. Our results highlight that detailed knowledge on epidemiological processes could contribute to the design of innovative management strategies based on precision agriculture tools to improve the efficacy of disease control and reduce pesticide use. PMID:27668731

  9. Microwave pretreatment can enhance tolerance of wheat seedlings to CdCl2 stress.

    PubMed

    Qiu, ZongBo; Li, JinTing; Zhang, YaJie; Bi, ZhenZhen; Wei, HuiFang

    2011-05-01

    In order to determine the role of microwave in cadmium stress tolerance of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), seeds were exposed to microwave radiation for 0, 5, 10 and 15 s (wavelength 125 mm, power density 126 mW cm(-2), 2450 MHz), and when the seedlings were 7 d old (with one fully expanded leaves), they were treated with 150 μM CdCl(2) solution for 10 d. Changes in a number of physiological and biochemical characteristics were measured and used as indicators of the protective capacity of microwave radiation in this experiment. Our results showed that 150 μM CdCl(2) treatment reduced plant height, root length, dry weight, AsA and GSH concentration and the activities of SOD, POD, CAT and APX, enhanced the concentration of MDA, H(2)O(2) and the production rate of O(2)- when compared with the control. However, seeds with microwave pretreatment 5 or 10 s conferred tolerance to cadmium stress in wheat seedlings by decreasing the concentration of MDA and H(2)O(2), the production rate of O(2)- and increasing the activities of SOD, POD, CAT, APX and AsA and GSH concentration. Therefore, antioxidative enzymes and antioxidative compounds may participate in tolerance of wheat seedlings to cadmium stress. The results also showed that the microwave radiation had a positive physiological effect on the growth and development of cadmium stressed seedlings. This is the first investigation reporting the use of microwave pretreatment to enhance cadmium stress tolerance of wheat.

  10. Caffeine improves performance in double poling during acute exposure to 2,000-m altitude.

    PubMed

    Stadheim, H K; Nossum, E M; Olsen, R; Spencer, M; Jensen, J

    2015-12-15

    There is limited research on the physiological effects of caffeine (CAF) ingestion on exercise performance during acute hypoxia. The aim of the present study was therefore to test the effect of placebo (PLA) and CAF (4.5 mg/kg) on double poling (DP) performance during acute hypoxia. Thirteen male subelite cross-country skiers (V̇o2max 72.6 ± 5.68 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) were included. Performance was assessed as 1) an 8-km cross-country DP time-trial (C-PT), and 2) time until task failure at a set workload equal to ∼90% of DP V̇o2max. Testing was carried out in a hypobaric chamber, at 800 mbar (Pio2: ∼125 mmHg) corresponding to ∼2,000 m above sea level in a randomized double-blinded, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. CAF improved time to task failure from 6.10 ± 1.40 to 7.22 ± 1.30 min (P < 0.05) and velocity the first 4 km (P < 0.05) but not overall time usage for the 8-km C-PT. During submaximal exercise subjects reported lower pain in arms and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) following CAF ingestion. Throughout C-PTs similar RPE and pain was shown between treatments. However, higher heart rate was observed during the CAF 8 km (187 ± 7 vs. 185 ± 7; P < 0.05) and 90% C-PT (185 ± 7 vs. 181 ± 9) associated with increased ventilation, blood lactate, glucose, adrenaline, decreased pH, and bicarbonate. The present study demonstrates for the first time that CAF ingestion improves DP time to task failure although not consistently time trial performance during acute exposure to altitude. Mechanisms underpinning improvements seem related to reduced pain RPE and increased heart rate during CAF C-PTs.

  11. Assessment of the Anterior Loop of the Mental Nerve Using Cone Beam Computerized Tomography Scan.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chun-I; Won, John; Al-Ardah, Aladdin; Santana, Ruben; Rice, Dwight; Lozada, Jaime

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to use cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) scans with oblique-transverse reconstruction modality to measure and compare the anterior loop length (AnLL) of the mental nerve between gender and age groups and to compare the difference between the right and left sides. Sixty-one female and 61 male CBCT scans were randomly selected for each age group: 21-40, 41-60, and 61-80 years. Both right- and left-side AnLLs were measured in each subject using i-CATVision software to measure AnLLs on the oblique transverse plane using multiplanar reconstruction. The anterior loop was identified in 85.2% of cases, with the mean AnLL of the 366 subjects (732 hemimandibles) being 1.46 ± 1.25 mm with no statistically significant difference between right and left sides or between different gender groups. However, the mean AnLL in the 21-40 year group (1.89 ± 1.35 mm) was larger than the AnLL in the 41-60 year group (1.35 ± 1.19 mm) and the 61-80 year group (1.13 ± 1.08 mm). In conclusion, when placing implants in close proximity to mental foramina, caution is recommended to avoid injury to the inferior alveolar nerve. No fixed distance anteriorly from the mental foramen should be considered safe. Using CBCT scans with the oblique-transverse method to accurately identify and measure the AnLL is of utmost importance in avoiding and protecting its integrity. PMID:24552176

  12. Effects of Lightpipe Proximity on Si Wafer Temperature in Rapid Thermal Processing Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreider, K. G.; Chen, D. H.; DeWitt, D. P.; Kimes, W. A.; Tsai, B. K.

    2003-09-01

    Lightpipe radiation thermometers (LPRTs) are used as temperature monitoring sensors in most rapid thermal processing (RTP) tools for semiconductor fabrication. These tools are used for dopant anneal, gate oxide formation, and other high temperature processing. In order to assure uniform wafer temperatures during processing these RTP tools generally have highly reflecting chamber walls to promote a uniform heat flux on the wafer. Therefore, only minimal disturbances in the chamber reflectivity are permitted for the sensors, and the small 2 mm diameter sapphire lightpipe is generally the temperature sensor of choice. This study was undertaken to measure and model the effect of LPRT proximity on the wafer temperature. Our experiments were performed in the NIST RTP test bed using a NIST thin-film thermocouple (TFTC) calibration wafer. We measured the spectral radiance temperature with the center lightpipe and compared these with the TFTC junctions and with the three LPRTs at the mid-radius of the wafer. We measured LPRT outputs from a position flush with the reflecting plate to within 2 mm of the stationary wafer under steady-state conditions with wafer-to-cold plate separation distances of 6 mm, 10 mm and 12.5 mm. Depressions in the wafer temperature up to 25 °C were observed. A finite-element radiation model of the wafer-chamber-lightpipe was developed to predict the temperature depression as a function of proximity distance and separation distance. The experimental results were compared with those from a model that accounts for lightpipe geometry and radiative properties, wafer emissivity and chamber cold plate reflectivity.

  13. Development of a three-layer phoswich alpha-beta-gamma imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ishibashi, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    For radiation monitoring at the sites of such nuclear power plant accidents as Fukushima Daiichi, radiation detectors are needed not only for gamma photons but also for alpha and beta particles because some nuclear fission products emit beta particles and gamma photons and some nuclear fuels contain plutonium that emits alpha particles. In some applications, imaging detectors are required to detect the distribution of plutonium particles that emit alpha particles and radiocesium in foods that emits beta particles and gamma photons. To solve these requirements, we developed an imaging detector that can measure the distribution of alpha and beta particles as well as gamma photons. The imaging detector consists of three-layer scintillators optically coupled to each other and to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The first layer, which is made of a thin plastic scintillator (decay time: ~5 ns), detects alpha particles. The second layer, which is made of a thin Gd2SiO5 (GSO) scintillator with 1.5 mol% Ce (decay time: 35 ns), detects beta particles. The third layer made of a thin GSO scintillator with 0.4 mol% Ce (decay time: 70 ns) detects gamma photons. Using pulse shape discrimination, the images of these layers can be separated. The position information is calculated by the Anger principle from 8×8 anode signals from the PSPMT. The images for the alpha and beta particles and the gamma photons are individually formed by the pulse shape discriminations for each layer. We detected alpha particle images in the first layer and beta particle images in the second layer. Gamma photon images were detected in the second and third layers. The spatial resolution for the alpha and beta particles was ~1.25 mm FWHM and less than 2 mm FWHM for the gamma photons. We conclude that our developed alpha-beta-gamma imaging detector is promising for imaging applications not only for the environmental monitoring of radionuclides but also for medical and molecular imaging.

  14. Feasibility of CT-based 3D anatomic mapping with a scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagowski, Jordan M.; Tomkowiak, Michael T.; Dunkerley, David A. P.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of obtaining CT-derived 3D surfaces from data provided by the scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) system. Simulated SBDX short-scan acquisitions of a Shepp-Logan and a thorax phantom containing a high contrast spherical volume were generated. 3D reconstructions were performed using a penalized weighted least squares method with total variation regularization (PWLS-TV), as well as a more efficient variant employing gridding of projection data to parallel rays (gPWLS-TV). Voxel noise, edge blurring, and surface accuracy were compared to gridded filtered back projection (gFBP). PWLS reconstruction of a noise-free reduced-size Shepp-Logan phantom had 1.4% rRMSE. In noisy gPWLS-TV reconstructions of a reduced-size thorax phantom, 99% of points on the segmented sphere perimeter were within 0.33, 0.47, and 0.70 mm of the ground truth, respectively, for fluences comparable to imaging through 18.0, 27.2, and 34.6 cm acrylic. Surface accuracies of gFBP and gPWLS-TV were similar at high fluences, while gPWLS-TV offered improvement at the lowest fluence. The gPWLS-TV voxel noise was reduced by 60% relative to gFBP, on average. High-contrast linespread functions measured 1.25 mm and 0.96 mm (FWHM) for gPWLS-TV and gFBP. In a simulation of gated and truncated projection data from a full-sized thorax, gPWLS-TV reconstruction yielded segmented surface points which were within 1.41 mm of ground truth. Results support the feasibility of 3D surface segmentation with SBDX. Further investigation of artifacts caused by data truncation and patient motion is warranted.

  15. [Preparation and release mechanism of gestodene reservoir-type intravaginal rings].

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Yan-Kun; Ning, Mei-Ying

    2014-03-01

    This study taking gestodene (GEST) as a model, investigated the factors affecting reservoir-type intravaginal ring (IVR)'s drug release. This paper reported a gestodene intravaginal ring of reservoir design, comprising a gestodene silicone elastomer core encased in a non-medicated silicone sheath, separately manufactured by reaction injection moulding at 80 degrees C and heating vulcanization at 130 degrees C is reported. The test investigated the factors affecting drug release through a single variable method, taking the drug release rates of 21 days as standards. When changing the thickness of the controlling sheath outside, the ratio of the first day of drug release and mean daily release (MDR), named the relatively burst effect, is closing to 1 with the thickness of controlling sheath increasing, while the 1.25 mm sheath corresponding to 1.04 controlled the burst release effectively; a positive correlation (r = 0.992 2) existed between the average drug release (Q/t) and drug loading (A) within a certain range. The C6-165 controlling sheath with high solubility of GEST is easier to achieve controlled release of the drug; GEST crystalline power is more effective to implement controlled release of drugs among difficent states of the drug. A 1/4 fractional segment core gives a relatively burst effect of 1.76, while the 1/1 and 1/2 are 1.93 and 1.87 separately, at the same drug loading, concluding that use of a fractional segment core would allow development of a suitable GEST reservoir IVR. In summary, GEST reservoir-type IVR could be adjusted by the thickness of controlling sheath, the loading of drug, the material properties of controlling sheath, the dispersion state of drug, the additive composition and structure of intravaginal ring, to control the drug release behavior and achieve the desired drug release rate. PMID:24961114

  16. On the importance of continental lithospheric roots in plume-continent interaction: implication for India motions over the last 130 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibrant, A.; Davaille, A.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last 130 Ma, the India plate migration varied in velocity and direction. The oceanic magnetic anomalies indicates that the India-Asia convergence rate increase at ~ 90 Ma and at ~ 67 Ma. These episodes of acceleration correspond to the emplacement of Morondava and Deccan large igneous provinces, respectively. They therefore may be generated by the arrival of a mantle plume in the vicinity of India. We carried out laboratory experiments to examine and quantify the possible links between plume head impact and the acceleration of a continental plate. The latter is modelled by a buoyant raft, floating on the surface of a plexiglas tank containing Sugar Syrup, a temperature-dependent viscosity fluid. Plumes are generated by heating from below. The initial distance between the plume impact and the raft, as well as the raft size and density were systematically varied. The latter allows to evaluate the influence of a cratonic keel on the plate migration. Experimental results suggest that: (1) a continent can migrate under the influence of a plume head only if the thickness ratio between the keel and the plume head impact is greater than a critical value; (2) the maximum velocity achieved by the raft depends on the distance between the raft and the plume centre and (3) the direction taken by the raft is directly related to the position of the plume impact compared to the keel's. Given the Deccan Traps plume characteristics, the scaling laws derived from the experiments suggest that India could migrate after the plume impact with a velocity ranging between 61 and 125 mm/yr. This estimated range is fully coherent with the India plate velocity calculated from the oceanic magnetic anomalies, but it put strong constraints on the existence and position of cratonic keels under India. Moreover, India migration during the last 130 Ma can be quantitavely related to the successive impacts of three mantle plumes.

  17. SU-E-T-574: Fessiblity of Using the Calypso System for HDR Interstitial Catheter Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J S; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is always a challenge to reconstruct the interstitial catheter for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy on patient CT or MR images. This work aims to investigate the feasibility of using the Calypso system (Varian Medical, CA) for HDR catheter reconstruction utilizing its accuracy on tracking the electromagnetic transponder location. Methods: Experiment was done with a phantom that has a HDR interstitial catheter embedded inside. CT scan with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm was taken for this phantom with two Calypso beacon transponders in the catheter. The two transponders were connected with a wire. The Calypso system was used to record the beacon transponders’ location in real time when they were gently pulled out with the wire. The initial locations of the beacon transponders were used for registration with the CT image and the detected transponder locations were used for the catheter path reconstruction. The reconstructed catheter path was validated on the CT image. Results: The HDR interstitial catheter was successfully reconstructed based on the transponders’ coordinates recorded by the Calypso system in real time when the transponders were pulled in the catheter. After registration with the CT image, the shape and location of the reconstructed catheter are evaluated against the CT image and the result shows an accuracy of 2 mm anywhere in the Calypso detectable region which is within a 10 cm X 10 cm X 10 cm cubic box for the current system. Conclusion: It is feasible to use the Calypso system for HDR interstitial catheter reconstruction. The obstacle for its clinical usage is the size of the beacon transponder whose diameter is bigger than most of the interstitial catheters used in clinic. Developing smaller transponders and supporting software and hardware for this application is necessary before it can be adopted for clinical use.

  18. Surface dose measurement using TLD powder extrapolation

    SciTech Connect

    Rapley, P. . E-mail: rapleyp@tbh.net

    2006-10-01

    Surface/near-surface dose measurements in therapeutic x-ray beams are important in determining the dose to the dermal and epidermal skin layers during radiation treatment. Accurate determination of the surface dose is a difficult but important task for proper treatment of patients. A new method of measuring surface dose in phantom through extrapolation of readings from various thicknesses of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) powder has been developed and investigated. A device was designed, built, and tested that provides TLD powder thickness variation to a minimum thickness of 0.125 mm. Variations of the technique have been evaluated to optimize precision with consideration of procedural ease. Results of this study indicate that dose measurements (relative to D{sub max}) in regions of steep dose gradient in the beam axis direction are possible with a precision (2 standard deviations [SDs]) as good as {+-} 1.2% using the technique. The dosimeter was developed and evaluated using variation to the experimental method. A clinically practical procedure was determined, resulting in measured surface dose of 20.4 {+-} 2% of the D{sub max} dose for a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, 80-cm source-to-surface distance (SSD), Theratron 780 Cobalt-60 ({sup 60}C) beam. Results obtained with TLD powder extrapolation compare favorably to other methods presented in the literature. The TLD powder extrapolation tool has been used clinically at the Northwestern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre (NWORCC) to measure surface dose effects under a number of conditions. Results from these measurements are reported. The method appears to be a simple and economical tool for surface dose measurement, particularly for facilities with TLD powder measurement capabilities.

  19. SU-E-J-72: Geant4 Simulations of Spot-Scanned Proton Beam Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kanehira, T; Sutherland, K; Matsuura, T; Umegaki, K; Shirato, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate density inhomogeneities which can effect dose distributions for real-time image gated spot-scanning proton therapy (RGPT), a dose calculation system, using treatment planning system VQA (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo) spot position data, was developed based on Geant4. Methods: A Geant4 application was developed to simulate spot-scanned proton beams at Hokkaido University Hospital. A CT scan (0.98 × 0.98 × 1.25 mm) was performed for prostate cancer treatment with three or four inserted gold markers (diameter 1.5 mm, volume 1.77 mm3) in or near the target tumor. The CT data was read into VQA. A spot scanning plan was generated and exported to text files, specifying the beam energy and position of each spot. The text files were converted and read into our Geant4-based software. The spot position was converted into steering magnet field strength (in Tesla) for our beam nozzle. Individual protons were tracked from the vacuum chamber, through the helium chamber, steering magnets, dose monitors, etc., in a straight, horizontal line. The patient CT data was converted into materials with variable density and placed in a parametrized volume at the isocenter. Gold fiducial markers were represented in the CT data by two adjacent voxels (volume 2.38 mm3). 600,000 proton histories were tracked for each target spot. As one beam contained about 1,000 spots, approximately 600 million histories were recorded for each beam on a blade server. Two plans were considered: two beam horizontal opposed (90 and 270 degree) and three beam (0, 90 and 270 degree). Results: We are able to convert spot scanning plans from VQA and simulate them with our Geant4-based code. Our system can be used to evaluate the effect of dose reduction caused by gold markers used for RGPT. Conclusion: Our Geant4 application is able to calculate dose distributions for spot scanned proton therapy.

  20. A Point-of-Care Immunosensor for Human Chorionic Gonadotropin in Clinical Urine Samples Using a Cuneated Polysilicon Nanogap Lab-on-Chip.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, S R; Hashim, U; Gopinath, Subash C B; Poopalan, P; Ramayya, H R; Iqbal Omar, M; Haarindraprasad, R; Veeradasan, P

    2015-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a glycoprotein hormone secreted from the placenta, is a key molecule that indicates pregnancy. Here, we have designed a cost-effective, label-free, in situ point-of-care (POC) immunosensor to estimate hCG using a cuneated 25 nm polysilicon nanogap electrode. A tiny chip with the dimensions of 20.5 × 12.5 mm was fabricated using conventional lithography and size expansion techniques. Furthermore, the sensing surface was functionalized by (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane and quantitatively measured the variations in hCG levels from clinically obtained human urine samples. The dielectric properties of the present sensor are shown with a capacitance above 40 nF for samples from pregnant women; it was lower with samples from non-pregnant women. Furthermore, it has been proven that our sensor has a wide linear range of detection, as a sensitivity of 835.88 μA mIU(-1) ml(-2) cm(-2) was attained, and the detection limit was 0.28 mIU/ml (27.78 pg/ml). The dissociation constant Kd of the specific antigen binding to the anti-hCG was calculated as 2.23 ± 0.66 mIU, and the maximum number of binding sites per antigen was Bmax = 22.54 ± 1.46 mIU. The sensing system shown here, with a narrow nanogap, is suitable for high-throughput POC diagnosis, and a single injection can obtain triplicate data or parallel analyses of different targets. PMID:26368287

  1. Anterior Segment Dysgenesis and Early-Onset Glaucoma in nee Mice with Mutation of Sh3pxd2b

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Mao; Hedberg-Buenz, Adam; Koehn, Demelza; John, Simon W. M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Mutations in SH3PXD2B cause Frank-Ter Haar syndrome, a rare condition characterized by congenital glaucoma, as well as craniofacial, skeletal, and cardiac anomalies. The nee strain of mice carries a spontaneously arising mutation in Sh3pxd2b. The purpose of this study was to test whether nee mice develop glaucoma. Methods. Eyes of nee mutants and strain-matched controls were comparatively analyzed at multiple ages by slit lamp examination, intraocular pressure recording, and histologic analysis. Cross sections of the optic nerve were analyzed to confirm glaucomatous progression. Results. Slit lamp examination showed that, from an early age, nee mice uniformly exhibited severe iridocorneal adhesions around the entire circumference of the eye. Presumably as a consequence of aqueous humor outflow blockage, they rapidly developed multiple indices of glaucoma. By 3 to 4 months of age, they exhibited high intraocular pressure (30.8 ± 12.5 mm Hg; mean ± SD), corneal opacity, and enlarged anterior chambers. Although histologic analyses at P17 did not reveal any indices of damage, similar analysis at 3 to 4 months of age revealed a course of progressive retinal ganglion cell loss, optic nerve head excavation, and axon loss. Conclusions. Eyes of nee mice exhibit anterior segment dysgenesis and early-onset glaucoma. Because SH3PXD2B is predicted to be a podosome adaptor protein, these findings implicate podosomes in normal development of the iridocorneal angle and the genes influencing podosomes as candidates in glaucoma. Because of the early-onset, high-penetrance glaucoma, nee mice offer many potential advantages as a new mouse model of the disease. PMID:21282566

  2. Positive corona discharge in N_2 + CH_4 mixture at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, G.; Skalny, J. D.; Mason, N. J.; Zahoran, M.; Orszagh, J.

    2008-07-01

    Titan is considered as one of the few places in Solar system, where atmospheric and surface conditions could have produced organic molecules as precursors of higher hydrocarbons, nitriles or amino acids. Most of laboratory simulations of Titan's atmosphere were carried out at lower pressures presenting stratospheric conditions but there is poor knowledge about simulated reactions of Titan's troposphere. In our work an experimental investigation of products in positive coaxial corona discharge fed by mixture of N_2 and CH_4 with ratio of N_2:CH_4=98:2 in stationary regime has been made using UV spectroscopy. The measurements have been carried out at pressure of 1 bar and ambient temperature. The discharge reactor used for the treatment of the gas mixture consisted of a brass cylinder with diameter of 16 mm and length of 70 mm. A stainless steel and tungsten wires of diameter of 0.125 mm was centred inside the metal cylinder and was connected to the high voltage power supply. Coaxial corona discharge was generated by a Glassman high voltage power supply. The mixing ratio of methane and nitrogen was regulated by a MKS flow controllers. The reactor was placed in a Shimadzu VUV spectrometer for the in-situ measurements of absorbance of synthesized compounds. The measurements were focused on the UV analysis of time evolution of C_2H_2 and C_2H_4 concentrations and EMS study of deposited compounds on discharge electrodes (Figure 1). After a certain time a yellow- orange layer was formed on the active discharge electrode causing sparks and forming a dense rose-like spots on the covered electrode surface (Figure 2). Figure 1: EMS study of electrode surface. Figure 2: EMS picture of a treated electrode.

  3. Pulmonary airways tree segmentation from CT examinations using adaptive volume of interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Cheol; Kim, Won Pil; Zheng, Bin; Leader, Joseph K.; Pu, Jiantao; Tan, Jun; Gur, David

    2009-02-01

    Airways tree segmentation is an important step in quantitatively assessing the severity of and changes in several lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and cystic fibrosis. It can also be used in guiding bronchoscopy. The purpose of this study is to develop an automated scheme for segmenting the airways tree structure depicted on chest CT examinations. After lung volume segmentation, the scheme defines the first cylinder-like volume of interest (VOI) using a series of images depicting the trachea. The scheme then iteratively defines and adds subsequent VOIs using a region growing algorithm combined with adaptively determined thresholds in order to trace possible sections of airways located inside the combined VOI in question. The airway tree segmentation process is automatically terminated after the scheme assesses all defined VOIs in the iteratively assembled VOI list. In this preliminary study, ten CT examinations with 1.25mm section thickness and two different CT image reconstruction kernels ("bone" and "standard") were selected and used to test the proposed airways tree segmentation scheme. The experiment results showed that (1) adopting this approach affectively prevented the scheme from infiltrating into the parenchyma, (2) the proposed method reasonably accurately segmented the airways trees with lower false positive identification rate as compared with other previously reported schemes that are based on 2-D image segmentation and data analyses, and (3) the proposed adaptive, iterative threshold selection method for the region growing step in each identified VOI enables the scheme to segment the airways trees reliably to the 4th generation in this limited dataset with successful segmentation up to the 5th generation in a fraction of the airways tree branches.

  4. The Ahmed Glaucoma Valve in Neovascular Glaucoma (An AOS Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Netland, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of Ahmed glaucoma valve surgery in neovascular glaucoma and control patients. Methods: In this retrospective comparative study, we reviewed 76 eyes of 76 patients, comparing the surgical outcomes in control patients (N=38) to matched neovascular glaucoma patients (N=38). Success was defined as intraocular pressure (IOP) ≥6 mm Hg and ≤21 mm Hg, without further glaucoma surgery, and without loss of light perception. Results: Average follow-up for control and neovascular glaucoma patients was 18.4 and 17.4 months, respectively (P = .550). At last follow-up, mean IOP was 16.2 ± 5.2 mm Hg and 15.5 ± 12.5 mm Hg (P = .115) in control and neovascular glaucoma patients, respectively. Life-table analysis showed a significantly lower success for neovascular glaucoma patients compared with controls (P = .0096), with success at 1 year of 89.2% and 73.1%, at 2 years of 81.8% and 61.9%, and at 5 years of 81.8% and 20.6% for control and neovascular glaucoma eyes, respectively. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed neovascular glaucoma as a risk factor for surgical failure (odds ratio, 5.384, 95% CI, 1.22–23.84, P = .027). Although IOP control and complications were comparable between the two groups, visual outcomes were worse in neovascular glaucoma patients, with 9 eyes (23.7%) with neovascular glaucoma compared with no controls losing light perception vision (P = .002). The majority with loss of vision (5 of 9) had successful control of IOP during the postoperative period. Conclusion: Neovascular glaucoma patients have greater risk of surgical failure after Ahmed glaucoma valve surgery compared with controls. Despite improved mean IOP with drainage implants, visual outcomes may be poor, possibly due to progression of underlying disease. PMID:20126506

  5. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Machek, Pavel; Froeba, Michael; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brueggmann, Ulf; Draeger, Guenter

    2007-01-19

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 {mu}m thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5x1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  6. Fluorinated methacrylamide chitosan hydrogel systems as adaptable oxygen carriers for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Wijekoon, Asanka; Fountas-Davis, Natalie; Leipzig, Nic D

    2013-03-01

    In this study a series of novel, biocompatible hydrogels able to repeatedly takeup and deliver oxygen at beneficial levels have been developed by conjugating various perfluorocarbon (PFC) chains to methacrylamide chitosan via Schiff base nucleophilic substitution, followed by photopolymerization to form hydrogels. The synthesized fluorinated methacrylamide chitosan (MACF) hydrogels were confirmed by high resolution (19)F NMR. Synthesized MACF hydrogels were tested for their ability to takeup and then release oxygen for future use in dermal wound healing. Depending on the PFC substitution type maximum O(2) uptake was observed within 2-6h, followed by complete release to the surrounding environment (5% CO(2)) within 12-120h at oxygen partial pressures of 1-25mm Hg h(-1), providing outstanding system tuning for wound healing and regenerative medicine. MACFs with the most fluorines per substitution showed the greatest uptake and release of oxygen. Interestingly, adding PFC chains with a fluorinated aromatic group considerably enhanced oxygen uptake and extended release compared with a linear PFC chain with the same number of fluorine molecules. MACF hydrogels proved to be readily reloaded with oxygen once release was complete, and regeneration could be performed as long as the hydrogel was intact. Fibroblasts were cultured on MACFs and assays confirmed that materials containing more fluorines per substitution supported the most cells with the greatest metabolic activity. This result was true, even without oxygenation, suggesting PFC-facilitated oxygen diffusion from the culture medium. Finally, MACF gradient hydrogels were created, demonstrating that these materials can control oxygen levels on a spatial scale of millimeters and greatly enhance cellular proliferative and metabolic responses.

  7. Computer-assisted, Le Fort-based, face–jaw–teeth transplantation: a pilot study on system feasiblity and translational assessment

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Ryan J.; Gordon, Chad R.; Basafa, Ehsan; Liacouras, Peter; Grant, Gerald T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Le Fort-based face–jaw–teeth transplantation (FJTT) attempts to marry bone and teeth geometry of size-mismatched face–jaw–teeth segments to restore function and form due to severe mid-facial trauma. Recent development of a computer-assisted planning and execution (CAPE) system for Le Fort-based FJTT in a pre-clinical swine model offers preoperative planning, and intraoperative navigation. This paper addresses the translation of the CAPE system to human anatomy and presents accuracy results. Methods Single-jaw, Le Fort-based FJTTs were performed on plastic models, one swine and one human, and on a human cadaver. Preoperative planning defined the goal placement of the donor’s Le Fort-based FJTT segment on the recipient. Patient-specific navigated cutting guides helped achieve planned osteotomies. Intraoperative cutting guide and donor fragment placement were compared with postoperative computed tomography (CT) data and the preoperative plan. Results Intraoperative measurement error with respect to postoperative CT was less than 1.25 mm for both mock transplants and 3.59 mm for the human cadaver scenario. Donor fragment placement (as compared to the planned position) was less accurate for the human model test case (2.91 mm) compared with the swine test (2.25 mm) and human cadaver (2.26 mm). Conclusion The results indicate the viability of the CAPE system for assisting with Le Fort-based FJTT and demonstrate the potential in human surgery. This system offers a new path forward to achieving improved outcomes in Le Fort-based FJTT and can be modified to assist with a variety of other surgeries involving the head, neck, face, jaws and teeth. PMID:25230895

  8. Antioxidant activity via DPPH, gram-positive and gram-negative antimicrobial potential in edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nisar; Mahmood, Fazal; Khalil, Shahid Akbar; Zamir, Roshan; Fazal, Hina; Abbasi, Bilal Haider

    2014-10-01

    Edible mushrooms (EMs) are nutritionally rich source of proteins and essential amino acids. In the present study, the antioxidant activity via 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and antimicrobial potential in EMs (Pleurotus ostreatus, Morchella esculenta, P. ostreatus (Black), P. ostreatus (Yellow) and Pleurotus sajor-caju) were investigated. The DPPH radical scavenging activity revealed that the significantly higher activity (66.47%) was observed in Morchella esculenta at a maximum concentration. Similarly, the dose-dependent concentrations (200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000 µg) were also used for other four EMs. Pleurotus ostreatus exhibited 36.13% activity, P. ostreatus (Black (B)) exhibited 30.64%, P. ostreatus (Yellow (Y)) exhibited 40.75% and Pleurotus sajor-caju exhibited 47.39% activity at higher concentrations. Furthermore, the antimicrobial potential were investigated for its toxicity against gram-negative bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella pneumonia, Erwinia carotovora and Agrobacterium tumifaciens), gram-positive bacterial strains (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus atrophaeus and Staphylococcus aureus) and a fungal strain (Candida albicans) in comparison with standard antibiotics. Antimicrobial screening revealed that the ethanol extract of P. ostreatus was active against all microorganism tested except E. coli. Maximum zone of inhibition (13 mm) was observed against fungus and A. tumifaciens. P. sajor-caju showed best activities (12.5 mm) against B. subtilis, B. atrophaeus and K. pneumonia. P. ostreatus (Y) showed best activities against P. aeroginosa (21.83 mm), B. atrophaeus (20 mm) and C. albicans (21 mm). P. ostreatus (B) exhibited best activities against C. albicans (16 mm) and slightly lower activities against all other microbes except S. typhi. M. esculenta possess maximum activities in terms of inhibition zone against all microorganisms tested except S. typhi.

  9. Endovascular Stenting for Unsuccessful Angioplasty of the Aorta in Aortoarteritis

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, Sanjay; Kaul, Upkar A.; Arora, Ramesh

    1999-11-15

    Purpose: The efficacy and safety of endovascular stent implantation to correct dissection or a suboptimal result after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) was evaluated in patients suffering from aortic stenosis due to aortoarteritis. Methods: Twelve children and young adults [aged (mean {+-} SD) 18.2 {+-} 8.7 years] underwent stent implantation after PTA of the aorta, seven for obstructive dissection, four for ineffective balloon dilatation, and one for recurrent restenosis. Nine patients underwent implantation of self-expandable stents and three received balloon-expandable Palmaz stents. Results: Stent implantation could be successfully performed in all 12 patients. After stent implantation, the peak systolic pressure gradient decreased from 91 {+-} 33.5 mmHg to 12.4 {+-} 12.5 mmHg (p < 0.001). The diameter of the stenosed segment increased from 4.6 {+-} 0.8 mm to 11.1 {+-} 1.9 mm (p < 0.001). The dissection was completely covered in all seven patients with dissection. Except for epigastric pain with vomiting in one patient, there was no complication. On follow-up, over 12-57 months (mean 26.8 {+-} 10.8 months), 11 patients (91.6%) had marked improvement in their blood pressure. Patients with congestive heart failure and claudication also showed improvement. Repeat catheterization in five patients, between 6-30 months (mean 16.8 {+-} 9.1 months) after stent implantation, showed sustained improvement in four and a fusiform, long segment, intrastent restenosis after 30 months in one child. The stenosis was safely redilated. Conclusion: Endovascular aortic stent implantation is safe and provides good immediate relief in patients with unsatisfactory results after balloon angioplasty. Improvement is sustained in most patients on intermediate-term follow-up.

  10. Caffeine improves performance in double poling during acute exposure to 2,000-m altitude.

    PubMed

    Stadheim, H K; Nossum, E M; Olsen, R; Spencer, M; Jensen, J

    2015-12-15

    There is limited research on the physiological effects of caffeine (CAF) ingestion on exercise performance during acute hypoxia. The aim of the present study was therefore to test the effect of placebo (PLA) and CAF (4.5 mg/kg) on double poling (DP) performance during acute hypoxia. Thirteen male subelite cross-country skiers (V̇o2max 72.6 ± 5.68 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) were included. Performance was assessed as 1) an 8-km cross-country DP time-trial (C-PT), and 2) time until task failure at a set workload equal to ∼90% of DP V̇o2max. Testing was carried out in a hypobaric chamber, at 800 mbar (Pio2: ∼125 mmHg) corresponding to ∼2,000 m above sea level in a randomized double-blinded, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. CAF improved time to task failure from 6.10 ± 1.40 to 7.22 ± 1.30 min (P < 0.05) and velocity the first 4 km (P < 0.05) but not overall time usage for the 8-km C-PT. During submaximal exercise subjects reported lower pain in arms and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) following CAF ingestion. Throughout C-PTs similar RPE and pain was shown between treatments. However, higher heart rate was observed during the CAF 8 km (187 ± 7 vs. 185 ± 7; P < 0.05) and 90% C-PT (185 ± 7 vs. 181 ± 9) associated with increased ventilation, blood lactate, glucose, adrenaline, decreased pH, and bicarbonate. The present study demonstrates for the first time that CAF ingestion improves DP time to task failure although not consistently time trial performance during acute exposure to altitude. Mechanisms underpinning improvements seem related to reduced pain RPE and increased heart rate during CAF C-PTs. PMID:26494444

  11. Coherence-gated Doppler: a fiber sensor for precise localization of blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chia-Pin; Wu, Yalun; Schmitt, Joe; Bigeleisen, Paul E.; Slavin, Justin; Jafri, M. Samir; Tang, Cha-Min; Chen, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Miniature optical sensors that can detect blood vessels in front of advancing instruments will significantly benefit many interventional procedures. Towards this end, we developed a thin and flexible coherence-gated Doppler (CGD) fiber probe (O.D. = 0.125 mm) that can be integrated with minimally-invasive tools to provide real-time audio feedback of blood flow at precise locations in front of the probe. Coherence-gated Doppler (CGD) is a hybrid technology with features of laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT). Because of its confocal optical design and coherence-gating capabilities, CGD provides higher spatial resolution than LDF. And compared to DOCT imaging systems, CGD is simpler and less costly to produce. In vivo studies of rat femoral vessels using CGD demonstrate its ability to distinguish between artery, vein and bulk movement of the surrounding soft tissue. Finally, by placing the CGD probe inside a 30-gauge needle and advancing it into the brain of an anesthetized sheep, we demonstrate that it is capable of detecting vessels in front of advancing probes during simulated stereotactic neurosurgical procedures. Using simultaneous ultrasound (US) monitoring from the surface of the brain we show that CGD can detect at-risk blood vessels up to 3 mm in front of the advancing probe. The improved spatial resolution afforded by coherence gating combined with the simplicity, minute size and robustness of the CGD probe suggest it may benefit many minimally invasive procedures and enable it to be embedded into a variety of surgical instruments. PMID:23667791

  12. The rise flank trails left by migrating offsets of the equatorial East Pacific Rise axis

    SciTech Connect

    Lonsdale, P. )

    1989-01-10

    Sea Beam and magnetic surveys of the young (<1 Ma) rise flank around nontransform rise crest offsets at 5.5{degree}N, 4.9{degree}N, 3.4{degree}, 2.0{degree}N, and 2.8{degree}S mapped distinctive trails of obliquely lineated, highly magnetic crust that spreads from the characteristically curving overlapping rift zones. A Deep Tow survey around the small (1.5 km) 3.9{degree}N offset and the large (27 km) 2.0{degree}N offset provided more detailed infromation on the formation of crust in the offset trails, and of the structure of tectoniclly modified crust at interrift rise crest sites. Patches of interrift crust, which forms deep overlap basins at medium size offsets and basins and plateaus of rotated abyssal hills at large offsets, are periodically shed from the axial zone, together with abandoned portions of overlapped rift zone, to become important elements of the rise flank trails. The oblique aximuths of the paired 'fracture zone' trails that diverge from the rise crest offsets show that most have migrated along the rise crest at average speeds of 25-125 mm/yr. Net movement of the 27-km 2.8{degree}S offset has been slower, with alternating periods of rapid northward and southward migration. Information on the migration history of the surveyed offsets was supplemented by inferring the migration direction of another eight offsets on the equatorial East Pacific Rise (EPR) whose trails were less throughly mapped. Most offsets of the southern Pacific-Cocos boundary have migrated south, and most on the northern Pacific-Nazca boundary have migrated south, and most on the northern Pacific-Nazca boundary have migrated north; the patterns are not readily explained by the inferred distribution of mantle upwellings along the EPR axis.

  13. SHERLOC: Scanning Habitable Environments With Raman & Luminescence for Organics & Chemicals, an Investigation for 2020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beegle, L. W.; Bhartia, R.; DeFlores, L. P.; Asher, S. A.; Burton, A. S.; Clegg, S. M.; Conrad, P. G.; Edgett, K. S.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Langenhorst, F.; Fries, M.; Nealson, K. H.; Popp, J.; Sobron, P.; Steele, A.; Wiens, R. C.; Williford, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman & Luminescence for Organics & Chemicals SHERLOC investigation was recently selected for the Mars 2020 integrated payload. SHERLOC enables non-contact, spatially resolved, and highly sensitivity detection and characterization of organics and minerals in the Martian surface and near subsurface. SHERLOC is an arm-mounted, Deep UV (DUV) resonance Raman and fluorescence spectrometer utilizing a 248.6-nm DUV laser and 50 micron spot size. The laser is integrated to an autofocusing/scanning optical system, and co-boresighted to a context imager with a spatial resolution of 30 μm. SHERLOC operates over a 7 × 7 mm area through use of an internal scanning mirror. The 500 micron depth of view in conjunction with the MAHLI heritage autofocus mechanisms enables arm placements from 48 ±12.5 mm above natural or abraded surfaces without the need for rover arm repositioning/movement. Additionally, borehole interiors to a depth of ~25 mm, at angles from normal incidence to ±20 degrees, can be analyzed. Deep UV induced native fluorescence is very sensitive to condensed carbon and aromatic organics, enabling detection at or below 10-6 w/w (1 ppm) at <100 µm spatial scales. SHERLOC's deep UV resonance Raman enables detection and classification of aromatic and aliphatic organics with sensitivities of 10-2 to below 10-4 w/w at <50 µm spatial scales. In addition to organics, the deep UV Raman enables detection and classification of minerals relevant to aqueous chemistry with grain sizes below 20 µm grains. The instrument goals are to assess past aqueous history, detect the presence and preservation of potential biosignatures, and to support selection of return samples. To do this, SHERLOC will measure CHNOPS-containing mineralogy, measure the distribution and type of organics preserved at the surface, and correlate them to textural features.

  14. Summer habitat use by Columbia River redband trout in the Kootenai River drainage, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Bennett, David H.

    2001-01-01

    The reported decline in the abundance, distribution, and genetic diversity of Columbia River redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri (a rainbow trout subspecies) has prompted fisheries managers to investigate their habitat requirements, identify critical habitat, and develop effective conservation and recovery programs. We analyzed the microhabitat, mesohabitat, and macrohabitat use and distribution of Columbia River redband trout by means of snorkel surveys in two watersheds in the Kootenai River drainage, Montana and Idaho, during the summers of 1997 and 1998. Juvenile (36–125 mm total length, TL) and adult (>=126 mm TL) fish preferred deep microhabitats (>=0.4 m) with low to moderate velocities (<=0.5 m/s) adjacent to the thalweg. Conversely, age-0 (<=35 mm) fish selected slow water (<=0.1 m/s) and shallow depths (<=0.2 m) located in lateral areas of the channel. Age-0, juvenile, and adult fish strongly selected pool mesohabitats and avoided riffles; juveniles and adults generally used runs in proportion to their availability. At the macrohabitat scale, density of Columbia River redband trout (35 mm) was positively related to the abundance of pools and negatively related to stream gradient. The pool: riffle ratio, gradient, and stream size combined accounted for 80% of the variation in density among 23 stream reaches in five streams. Our results demonstrate that low-gradient, medium-elevation reaches with an abundance of complex pools are critical areas for the production of Columbia River redband trout. These data will be useful in assessing the impacts of land-use practices on the remaining populations and may assist with habitat restoration or enhancement efforts.

  15. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machek, Pavel; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brüggmann, Ulf; Dräger, Günter; Fröba, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 μm thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5×1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  16. Net irrigation requirements for maize (Zea mays L.) in Bocono-Masparro interfluvium area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farias Ramirez, Asdrubal Jesus; Moreno Pizani, Maria Alejandra

    2013-04-01

    Irrigated agriculture is one of the largest consumers of fresh water. In situations where water resources are limited, the irrigation for crops has led to water use conflicts because of human, hydroelectric and industrial demands. Thus, achieving precise information about water availability and water needs of crops becomes safety factors to guarantee sustainable development of irrigated crops in the future. In Bocono-Masparro interfluvium area located within Barinas and Portuguesa states in Venezuela, there has been a significant increase in intensive farming with maize (Zea mays L.) which made essential to determine the availability of irrigation water to meet the crop requirement and improve the management based on planning designs. Due to the lack of irrigation requirements data for the study area, a methodology was developed to estimate the net irrigation requirements (NIR). Therefore, the available information of this region related to climate, soil and irrigation was used to estimate NIR for maize through CROPWAT 8.0 model. There were established different crop-climate-soil combinations that allowed estimating NIR. It was found that NIR did not exceed the value of 125 mm/month in all of the combinations. Based on these results, a NIR spatial distribution map was obtained through the use of ArcView 3.2 ®. The results showed that the highest NIR were located in the northeast sector of the study area which was associated to the influence of the Weather Station named San Hipolito. Additionally, the estimated availability of groundwater was found to be higher than the surface water, and both combined exceeded the demands of the study area. The model CROPWAT 8.0 provided necessary information for irrigation planning in large scale. A NIR map developed through the proposed methodology represents a useful tool to integrate water balance factors.

  17. Potential renovascular hypertension, space missions, and the role of magnesium.

    PubMed

    Rowe, William J

    2009-01-01

    Space flight (SF) and dust inhalation in habitats cause hypertension whereas in SF (alone) there is no consistent hypertension but reduced diurnal blood pressure (BP) variation instead. Current pharmaceutical subcutaneous delivery systems are inadequate and there is impairment in the absorption, metabolism, excretion, and deterioration of some pharmaceuticals. Data obtained from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration through the Freedom of Information Act shows that Irwin returned from his 12-day Apollo 15 mission in 1971 and was administered a bicycle stress test. With just three minutes of exercise, his BP was >275/125 mm Hg (heart rate of only 130 beats per minute). There was no acute renal insult. Irwin's apparent spontaneous remission is suggested to be related to the increase of a protective vasodilator, and his atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) reduced with SF because of reduced plasma volume. With invariable malabsorption and loss of bone/muscle storage sites, there are significant (P < 0.0001) reductions of magnesium (Mg) required for ANP synthesis and release. Reductions of Mg and ANP can trigger pronounced angiotensin (200%), endothelin, and catecholamine elevations (clearly shown in recent years) and vicious cycles between the latter and Mg deficits. There is proteinuria, elevated creatinine, and reduced renal concentrating ability with the potential for progressive inflammatory and oxidative stress-induced renal disease and hypertension with vicious cycles. After SF, animals show myocardial endothelial injuries and increased vascular resistance of extremities in humans. Even without dust, hypertension might eventually develop from renovascular hypertension during very long missions. Without sufficient endothelial protection from pharmaceuticals, a comprehensive gene research program should begin now.

  18. SU-E-I-18: CT Scanner QA Using Normalized CTDI Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Randazzo, M; Tambasco, M; Russell, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To create a ratio of weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) data normalized to in-air measurements (CTDIair) as a function of beam quality to create a look-up table for frequent, rapid quality assurance (QA) checks of CTDI. Methods: The CTDIw values were measured according to TG-63 protocol using a pencil ionization chamber (Unfors Xi CT detector) and head and body Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms (16 and 32 cm diameter, respectively). Single scan dose profiles were measured at each clinically available energy (80,100,120,140 kVp) on three different CT scanners (two Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash and one GE Optima), using a tube current of 400 mA, a one second rotation time, and the widest available beam width (32 × 0.6 mm and 16 × 1.25 mm, respectively). These values were normalized to CTDIair measurements using the same conditions as CTDIw. The ratios (expressed in cGy/R) were assessed for each scanner as a function of each energy's half value layer (HVL) paired with the phantom's appropriate bow tie filter measured in mmAl. Results: Normalized CTDI values vary linearly with HVL for both the head and body phantoms. The ratios for the two Siemens machines are very similar at each energy. Compared to the GE scanner, these values vary between 10–20% for each kVp setting. Differences in CTDIair contribute most to the deviation of the ratios across machines. Ratios are independent of both mAs and collimation. Conclusion: Look-up tables constructed of normalized CTDI values as a function of HVL can be used to derive CTDIw data from only three in-air measurements (one for CTDIair and two with added filtration for HVL) to allow for simple, frequent QA checks without CT phantom setup. Future investigations will involve comparing results with Monte Carlo simulations for validation.

  19. Water Dynamics in Fogera and the Upper Blue Nile - Farmers perspectives and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemin, Yann; Desalegn, Mengistu; Curnow, Jayne; Johnston, Robyn

    2015-04-01

    This research work is about finding the connection between farmers perspectives on changes of water conditions in their socio-agricultural environment and satellite remote sensing analysis. Key informant surveys were conducted to investigate localised views on water scarcity as a counterpoint to the physical measurement of water availability. Does a numerical or mapped image identifying water scarcity always equate to a dearth of water for agriculture? To push the limits of the relationship between human and physical data we sought to ground-truth GIS results with the practical experience and knowledge of people living in the area. We data-mined public domain satellite data with FOSS (GDAL, GRASS GIS) and produced water-related spatio-temporal domains for our study area and the larger Upper Nile Basin. Accumulated remote sensing information was then cross-referenced with informant's accounts of water availability for the same space and time. During the survey fieldwork the team also took photographs electronically stamped with GPS coordinates to compare and contrast the views of informants and the remote sensing information with high resolution images of the landscape. We found that farmers perspective on the Spring maize crop sensibility to variability of rainfall can be quantified in space and time by remote sensing cumulative transpiration. A crop transpiration gap of 1-2.5 mm/day for about 20 days is to be overcome, a full amount of 20 to 50 mm, depending on the type of year deficit. Such gap can be overcome, even by temporary supplemental irrigation practices, however, the economical and cultural set up is already developed in another way, as per sesonal renting of higher soil profile water retention capacity fields.

  20. Prospective Trial of High-Dose Reirradiation Using Daily Image Guidance With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Recurrent and Second Primary Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Cheng, Suzan; Donald, Paul J.; Purdy, James A.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To report a single-institutional experience using intensity-modulated radiotherapy with daily image-guided radiotherapy for the reirradiation of recurrent and second cancers of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one consecutive patients were prospectively treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy from February 2006 to March 2009 to a median dose of 66 Gy (range, 60-70 Gy). None of these patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Daily helical megavoltage CT scans were obtained before each fraction as part of an image-guided radiotherapy registration protocol for patient alignment. Results: The 1- and 2-year estimates of in-field control were 72% and 65%, respectively. A total of 651 daily megavoltage CT scans were obtained. The mean systematic shift to account for interfraction motion was 1.38 {+-} 1.25 mm, 1.79 {+-} 1.45 mm, and 1.98 {+-} 1.75 mm for the medial-lateral, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. Pretreatment shifts of >3 mm occurred in 19% of setups in the medial-lateral, 27% in the superior-inferior, and 33% in the anterior-posterior directions, respectively. There were no treatment-related fatalities or hospitalizations. Complications included skin desquamation, odynophagia, otitis externa, keratitis, naso-lacrimal duct stenosis, and brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with daily image guidance results in effective disease control with relatively low morbidity and should be considered for selected patients with recurrent and second primary cancers of the head and neck.

  1. Initial Experience Using Closed Incision Negative Pressure Therapy after Immediate Postmastectomy Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sigalove, Steven R.; Maxwell, G. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Although immediate postmastectomy breast reconstruction is favored over delayed reconstruction, it remains associated with high complication rates. Potential complications include seroma formation, dehiscence, infection, and tissue necrosis along incision edges. Closed incision negative pressure therapy (ciNPT; Prevena Incision Management System, KCI, an Acelity company, San Antonio, Tex.) has been reported to help hold incision edges together, protect incisions from external contamination, and remove fluid and infectious material. We investigated outcomes of applying ciNPT with a customizable dressing over closed incisions in 13 patients (25 breasts) who received immediate postmastectomy reconstruction as part of 2-stage expander/implant breast reconstruction. Nipple-sparing mastectomy was performed on 14 breasts, reduction-pattern mastectomy on 6 breasts, and skin-sparing mastectomy on 5 breasts. All breasts had ciNPT with a customizable dressing applied over the entire clean closed incision immediately after surgery at −125 mmHg for an average of 4.3 days. At 3-month follow-up, 24 of the 25 (96%) breasts had achieved healing. Delayed hematoma occurred on postoperative day 13 in 1 breast in the nipple-sparing mastectomy group and resolved. In the reduction-pattern mastectomy group, superficial dehiscence occurred on 3 breasts and resolved with local wound care. One breast in that group developed flap necrosis requiring surgical revision. Less drainage was observed in attached closed-suction drains, so time to drain removal was reduced from an estimated average of 12–14 days to 8.2 days. Based on the initial experience in this study, larger studies are warranted to evaluate the use of ciNPT with customizable or peel-and-place dressings after immediate postmastectomy breast reconstruction. PMID:27536498

  2. Late Quaternary slip history of the Mill Creek strand of the San Andreas fault in San Gorgonio Pass, southern California: The role of a subsidiary left-lateral fault in strand switching

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kendrick, Katherine J.; Matti, Jonathan; Mahan, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    The fault history of the Mill Creek strand of the San Andreas fault (SAF) in the San Gorgonio Pass region, along with the reconstructed geomorphology surrounding this fault strand, reveals the important role of the left-lateral Pinto Mountain fault in the regional fault strand switching. The Mill Creek strand has 7.1–8.7 km total slip. Following this displacement, the Pinto Mountain fault offset the Mill Creek strand 1–1.25 km, as SAF slip transferred to the San Bernardino, Banning, and Garnet Hill strands. An alluvial complex within the Mission Creek watershed can be linked to palinspastic reconstruction of drainage segments to constrain slip history of the Mill Creek strand. We investigated surface remnants through detailed geologic mapping, morphometric and stratigraphic analysis, geochronology, and pedogenic analysis. The degree of soil development constrains the duration of surface stability when correlated to other regional, independently dated pedons. This correlation indicates that the oldest surfaces are significantly older than 500 ka. Luminescence dates of 106 ka and 95 ka from (respectively) 5 and 4 m beneath a younger fan surface are consistent with age estimates based on soil-profile development. Offset of the Mill Creek strand by the Pinto Mountain fault suggests a short-term slip rate of ∼10–12.5 mm/yr for the Pinto Mountain fault, and a lower long-term slip rate. Uplift of the Yucaipa Ridge block during the period of Mill Creek strand activity is consistent with thermochronologic modeled uplift estimates.

  3. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE DEBRIS DISK AROUND THE YOUNG SOLAR ANALOG HD 107146

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, L.; Carpenter, J. M.; Fu, B.; Hughes, A. M.; Corder, S.; Isella, A.

    2015-01-10

    We present the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) continuum observations at a wavelength of 1.25 mm of the debris disk surrounding the ∼100 Myr old solar analog HD 107146. The continuum emission extends from about 30 to 150 AU from the central star with a decrease in the surface brightness at intermediate radii. We analyze the ALMA interferometric visibilities using debris disk models with radial profiles for the dust surface density parameterized as (1) a single power law, (2) a single power law with a gap, and (3) a double power law. We find that models with a gap of radial width ∼8 AU at a distance of ∼80 AU from the central star, as well as double power-law models with a dip in the dust surface density at ∼70 AU provide significantly better fits to the ALMA data than single power-law models. We discuss possible scenarios for the origin of the HD 107146 debris disk using models of planetesimal belts in which the formation of Pluto-sized objects trigger disruptive collisions of large bodies, as well as models that consider the interaction of a planetary system with a planetesimal belt and spatial variation of the dust opacity across the disk. If future observations with higher angular resolution and sensitivity confirm the fully depleted gap structure discussed here, a planet with a mass of approximately a few Earth masses in a nearly circular orbit at ∼80 AU from the central star would be a possible explanation for the presence of the gap.

  4. Pre-construction of giant steerable science mirror for TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fei; Zhao, Hongchao; Guo, Peng; An, Qichang; Jiang, Haibo

    2015-09-01

    The Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics (CIOMP) team is developing the Giant Steerable Science Mirror (GSSM) for Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) which will get into the preliminary design phase in 2016. To develop the passive support structure system for the largest elliptic-plan flat mirror and smoothest tracking mechanism for the gravity-invariant condition, CIOMP is designing and building a 1/4 scale, functionally accurate version of the GSSM prototype. The prototype will incorporate the same optical-mechanical system and electric control system as the GSSM. The size of the prototype mirror is 898.5mm×634mm×12.5mm with elliptic-plan figure and will be supported by 18 points whiffletree on axial and 12 points whiffletree on lateral. The mirror surface figure will be evaluated by SlopeRMS which is the final evaluation method used in the actual GSSM. The prototype allows the mirror point to and be tested in five specified gravity orientations and meet the requirements of SlopeRMS. The prototype testing platform will have the interfaces with direct drive systems. The jitter testing will be implemented on the prototype system to verify the bearing, the encoder, the servo control algorithm in the low speed up to 5 arcsecond per second. The total prototype system configured mirror surface figure will be better than 1 micro radian SlopeRMS in each tested orientation. The positioner jitter will be less than 0.1 arcsecond RMS for tilt and rotator axis respectively and will be analyzed with frequency domain to meet the requirements of the TMT adaptive optics system. The pre-construction will be completed at the beginning of 2016 and provide the technical support to the preliminary design of GSSM.

  5. Optical spectroscopy with a near-single-mode fiber-feed and adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; Angel, J. Roger P.; Shelton, J. Christopher

    1998-07-01

    We report on first astronomical results with a cross-dispersed optical echelle spectrograph fed by a near single-mode fiber. We also present on a novel design of a new adaptive optics (AO) optimized fiber-fed cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph. The spectrograph is designed to match with AO corrected images in the optical bands provided by such as the Mt. Wilson 100 inch, Starfire Optical Range 3.5 m AO telescopes. Ultimately, it will be installed at the 6.5 m MMT, when this has high resolution AO correcting the optical spectrum. The spectrograph, fed by a 10 micron fused silica fiber, is unique in that the entire spectrum from 0.4 micron to 1.0 micron will be almost completely covered at resolution 200,000 in one exposure. The detector is a 2k X 4k AR coated back illuminated CCD with 15 micron pixel size. The close order spacing allowed by the sharp AO image makes the full cover possible. A 250 X 125 mm(superscript 2) Milton Roy R2 echelle grating with 23.2 grooves mm(superscript -1) and a blaze angle of 63.5 deg provides main dispersion. A double pass BK7 prism with 21 deg wedge angle provides cross dispersion, covering the spectrum from order 193 to 77. The spectrograph is used in the quasi- Littrow configuration with an off-axis Maksutov collimator/camera. The fiber feeds the AO corrected beams from the telescope Cassegrain focus to the spectrograph, which is set up on an optical bench. The spectrograph will be used mainly to study line profiles of solar type stars, to explore problems of indirect detection of planets and also study interstellar medium, circumstellar medium and metal abundance and isotopic ratios of extremely metal-poor stars.

  6. Distinct development of the cerebral cortex in platypus and echidna.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Hardman, Craig D

    2012-01-01

    Both lineages of the modern monotremes have distinctive features in the cerebral cortex, but the developmental mechanisms that produce such different adult cortical architecture remain unknown. Similarly, nothing is known about the differences and/or similarities between monotreme and therian cortical development. We have used material from the Hill embryological collection to try to answer key questions concerning cortical development in monotremes. Our findings indicate that gyrencephaly begins to emerge in the echidna brain shortly before birth (crown-rump length 12.5 mm), whereas the cortex of the platypus remains lissencephalic throughout development. The cortices of both monotremes are very immature at the time of hatching, much like that seen in marsupials, and both have a subventricular zone (SubV) within both the striatum and pallium during post-hatching development. It is particularly striking that in the platypus, this region has an extension from the palliostriatal angle beneath the developing trigeminoreceptive part of the somatosensory cortex of the lateral cortex. The putative SubV beneath the trigeminal part of S1 appears to accommodate at least two distinct types of cell and many mitotic figures and (particularly in the platypus) appears to be traversed by large numbers of thalamocortical axons as these grow in. The association with putative thalamocortical fibres suggests that this region may also serve functions similar to the subplate zone of Eutheria. These findings suggest that cortical development in each monotreme follows distinct paths from at least the time of birth, consistent with a long period of independent and divergent cortical evolution. PMID:22143038

  7. Thermomechanical responses of concrete members strengthened with cfrp sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqurashi, Abdulaziz

    Strengthening structural members means to be able to carry additional loads. Since, 1990s, a lot of materials and techniques have been established to not only increasing the capacity of member but also facing deterioration. Deterioration has become one of the worst highly maintenance cost. According to The ASCE, 27.1% of all bridges in the United States are not effectual. This is because the high traffic reflects negatively to structural members and cause deterioration of these members. This problem has been cost a lot of money. In addition, FRP has approved that it can increase the capacity of member and overcome some disadvantages such as deterioration. Therefore, CFRP sheet has become widely used. However, high temperatures affect the performance of externally bonded CFRP sheet negatively. Investigation should be carried out on relaxation and flexural performance of members under different temperatures. Therefore, this thesis focus on analyzing and investigating the performance of strengthened members exposed to elevated temperatures (25 to 175 °C). The experimental program was divided to two main parts. First, 144 strengthen concrete blocks 100mm X 150mm X 75mm has been exposed to elevated temperatures. These blocks have two main categories, which are different CFRP sheet width, and different CFRP sheet length. Different CFRP width has three types, which are type 0.25B (25mm x 100mm), type 0.5B (50mm x 100mm) and type 0.75B (75mm x 100mm). Also, Different CFRP length has three types, which are type L e (bonded area of 50 mm by 90mm), 1.25 Le (area of 50mm by 125mm) and type 1.5Le (50mm by 137 mm). Second, studying the performance of RC beams exposed to elevated temperatures.

  8. [Vascular effects of adenosine-triphosphate].

    PubMed

    Colson, P; Saussine, M; Gaba, S; Sequin, J; Chaptal, P A; Roquefeuil, B

    1991-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) on systemic vascular resistances during the hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass phase of cardiac surgery. Twenty patients scheduled for cardiac surgery were randomly divided into an ATP group (n = 10), and a placebo group (n = 10). Anaesthesia was similar for all the patients (diazepam, fentanyl and pancuronium). During the heart arrest phase, and as soon as the arterial pressure, the level in the venous return reservoir, and the pump flow rate had all been in steady state for 5 min, ATP or placebo was injected into the venous line of the oxygenator. Injection speed was doubled every three minutes, twice. The following ATP doses were administered: 0.012, 0.025 and 0.05 mg.kg-1.min-1. The level in the venous return reservoir was kept constant. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pump flow rate (DP) were assessed every half minute. Systemic vascular resistances were calculated with the relationship MAP/DP. Changes in vascular capacitance were directly proportional to changes in DP as the heart had been excluded, and all the blood returned to the pump, the blood volume being kept constant. MAP and DP remained unchanged in the placebo group. In the opposite ATP induced a dose-related systemic vasodilation: MAP decreased from 82.8 +/- 12.5 mmHg (control) to 66.0 +/- 14.8 mmHg, 59.8 +/- 10.6 mmHg, and 49.0 +/- 4.7 mmHg with 0.012, 0.025 and 0.05 mg.kg-1.min-1 ATP respectively. The MAP returned to preinfusion control levels when the ATP infusion was discontinued (90.0 +/- 17.8 mmHg). The DP, and therefore venous return, did not change, neither during ATP infusion, nor after its discontinuation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1854051

  9. Potential renovascular hypertension, space missions, and the role of magnesium

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, William J

    2009-01-01

    Space flight (SF) and dust inhalation in habitats cause hypertension whereas in SF (alone) there is no consistent hypertension but reduced diurnal blood pressure (BP) variation instead. Current pharmaceutical subcutaneous delivery systems are inadequate and there is impairment in the absorption, metabolism, excretion, and deterioration of some pharmaceuticals. Data obtained from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration through the Freedom of Information Act shows that Irwin returned from his 12-day Apollo 15 mission in 1971 and was administered a bicycle stress test. With just three minutes of exercise, his BP was >275/125 mm Hg (heart rate of only 130 beats per minute). There was no acute renal insult. Irwin’s apparent spontaneous remission is suggested to be related to the increase of a protective vasodilator, and his atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) reduced with SF because of reduced plasma volume. With invariable malabsorption and loss of bone/muscle storage sites, there are significant (P < 0.0001) reductions of magnesium (Mg) required for ANP synthesis and release. Reductions of Mg and ANP can trigger pronounced angiotensin (200%), endothelin, and catecholamine elevations (clearly shown in recent years) and vicious cycles between the latter and Mg deficits. There is proteinuria, elevated creatinine, and reduced renal concentrating ability with the potential for progressive inflammatory and oxidative stress-induced renal disease and hypertension with vicious cycles. After SF, animals show myocardial endothelial injuries and increased vascular resistance of extremities in humans. Even without dust, hypertension might eventually develop from renovascular hypertension during very long missions. Without sufficient endothelial protection from pharmaceuticals, a comprehensive gene research program should begin now. PMID:21694921

  10. Pilot trials of the microbial degradation of Christos-Bitas water in oil emulsion (chocolate mousse) and BP llandarcy gas oil using venturi aeration

    SciTech Connect

    Berwick, P.G.

    1985-01-01

    Oil residues arising from the Christos-Bitas spillage were found to contain 28% of oil extractable by carbon tetrachloride; the remainder consisted of water and undefined solids. Christos-Bitas mousse was added to 1.18 m/sup 3/ liquor inoculated with oil-contaminated marine mud, and aerated with a 1.5-hp vortex pump and venturi nozzle (12.5 mm) in a cylindrical tank. After 70 days, oil degradation reached 7 mg oil/L/h. About 98% of the solvent extractable oil added was degraded over 83 days. Analysis of oil residues harvested at the end of this experiment showed that there was a decreasing trend in percent degradation in the following order: aromatics > saturates > heterocyclics > asphalts. No less than 94% of any fraction analyzed was degraded. In the second pilot trial, oil degradation was carried out in a cylindrical jacket tank containing 6.82 m/sup 3/ liquor inoculated with oil-contaminated marine mud from Penarth, South Wales, UK, together with pure cultures derived from the same source, and aerated with a 7.5-hp vortex pump and venturi nozzle (18 mm diameter). Mixing of the oil was inhomogeneous for the first 100-110 days. The overall degree of substrate dispersion and total oil balance was determined by sampling at different depths. Degradation by the mixed culture was achieved at the rate of 164 mg oil/L/h. After 224 days, this was equivalent to 9.6 x 10/sup 3//kg/sup -1//yr; (214 kg/wk) for 6.82 m/sup 3/ of liquor.

  11. Comparing the Effect of Different Voxel Resolutions for Assessment of Vertical Root Fracture of Permanent Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Uzun, Ismail; Gunduz, Kaan; Celenk, Peruze; Avsever, Hakan; Orhan, Kaan; Canitezer, Gozde; Ozmen, Bilal; Cicek, Ersan; Egrioglu, Erol

    2015-01-01

    Background: The teeth with undiagnosed vertical root fractures (VRFs) are likely to receive endodontic treatment or retreatment, leading to frustration and inappropriate endodontic therapies. Moreover, many cases of VRFs cannot be diagnosed definitively until the extraction of tooth. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the use of different voxel resolutions of two different cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) units in the detection VRFs in vitro. Materials and Methods: The study material comprised 74 extracted human mandibular single rooted premolar teeth without root fractures that had not undergone any root-canal treatment. Images were obtained by two different CBCT units. Four image sets were obtained as follows: 1) 3D Accuitomo 170, 4 × 4 cm field of view (FOV) (0.080 mm3); 2) 3D Accuitomo 170. 6 × 6 cm FOV (0.125 mm3); 3) NewTom 3G, 6˝ (0.16 mm3) and 4) NewTom 3G, 9˝ FOV (0.25 mm3). Kappa coefficients were calculated to assess both intra- and inter-observer agreements for each image set. Results: No significant differences were found among observers or voxel sizes, with high average Z (Az) results being reported for all groups. Both intra- and inter-observer agreement values were relatively better for 3D Accuitomo 170 images than the images from NewTom 3G. The highest Az and kappa values were obtained with 3D Accuitomo 170, 4 × 4 cm FOV (0.080 mm3) images. Conclusion: No significant differences were found among observers or voxel sizes, with high Az results reported for all groups. PMID:26557279

  12. Effect of lubricant type and concentration on the punch tip adherence of model ibuprofen formulations.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Matthew; Ford, James L; MacLeod, Graeme S; Fell, John T; Smith, George W; Rowe, Philip H; Dyas, A Mark

    2004-03-01

    A model formulation, comprising ibuprofen and direct compression lactose (Tablettose 80) was used to assess the influence of two lubricants, magnesium stearate and stearic acid, on punch tip adherence. Lubricant concentrations were varied from 0.25% to 2% w/w. Formulations in the presence and absence of 0.5% w/w colloidal silica (Aerosil 200) were examined, to assess the influence of the glidant on the anti-adherent effects of the lubricants. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to examine the effect of the lubricants on the melting temperature of ibuprofen. Tablets were compacted using a single punch tablet press at 10 kN using hard chrome-plated punches or at 40 kN using uncoated steel punches, tooling was 12.5-mm diameter in each case. The upper punch faces were characterized by obtaining Taylor Hobson Talysurf surface profiles. Following compaction, ibuprofen attached to the face was quantified by spectroscopy. At low concentrations of each lubricant, the levels of sticking observed were similar. Whilst sticking increased at magnesium stearate concentrations above 1%, sticking with stearic acid remained relatively constant at all concentrations. DSC revealed that the melting temperature of ibuprofen was lowered by the formation of eutectic mixtures with both lubricants. However, the onset temperature of melting and melting point were lowered to a greater extent with magnesium stearate compared with stearic acid. When using uncoated tooling at 40 kN, the deleterious effects of magnesium stearate on the tensile strength of the tablets also contributed to sticking. When using chrome-plated punches at 10 kN, the tensile strength reduction by the presence of magnesium stearate was less pronounced, as was the level of sticking.

  13. A re-assessment of minocycline as a neuroprotective agent in a rat spinal cord contusion model.

    PubMed

    Pinzon, Alberto; Marcillo, Alexander; Quintana, Ada; Stamler, Sarah; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Bramlett, Helen M; Dietrich, W Dalton

    2008-12-01

    This study was initiated due to an NIH "Facilities of Research--Spinal Cord Injury" contract to support independent replication of published studies that could be considered for a clinical trial in time. Minocycline has been shown to have neuroprotective effects in models of central nervous system injury, including in a contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) model at the thoracic level. Beneficial effects of minocycline treatment included a significant improvement in locomotor behavior and reduced histopathological changes [Lee, S.M., Yune, T.Y., Kim, S.J., Park, D.O.W., Lee, Y.K., Kim, Y.C., Oh, Y.J., Markelonis, G.J., Oh, T.H., 2003. Minocycline reduces cell death and improves functional recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury in the rat. J Neurotrauma. 20, 1017-1027.] To verify these important observations, we repeated this study in our laboratory. The NYU (MASCIS) Impactor was used to produce a moderate cord lesion at the vertebral level T9-T10 (height 12.5 mm, weight 10 g), (n=45), followed by administration of minocycline, 90 mg/kg (group 1: minocycline IP, n=15; group 2: minocycline IV, n=15; group 3: vehicle IP, n=8; group 4: vehicle IV, n=7) immediately after surgery and followed by two more doses of 45 mg/kg/IP at 12 h and 24 h. Open field locomotion (BBB) and subscores were examined up to 6 weeks after SCI and cords were processed for quantitative histopathological analysis. Administration of minocycline after SCI did not lead to significant behavioral or histopathological improvement. Although positive effects with minocycline have been reported in several animal models of injury with different drug administration schemes, the use of minocycline following contusive SCI requires further investigation before clinical trials are implemented. PMID:18838063

  14. Tamoxifen and Src kinase inhibitors as neuroprotective/neuroregenerative drugs after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Iris K.; Torrado, Aranza I.; Santiago, Jose M.; Miranda, Jorge D.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition that produces significant changes in the lifestyle of patients. Many molecular and cellular events are triggered after the initial physical impact to the cord. Two major phases have been described in the field of SCI: an acute phase and late phase. Most of the therapeutic strategies are focused on the late phase because this provides an opportunity to target cellular events like apoptosis, demyelination, scar formation and axonal outgrowth. In this mini-review, we will focus on two agents (tamoxifen and a Src kinase family inhibitor known as PP2) that have been shown in our laboratory to produce neuroprotective (increase cell survival) and/or regenerative (axonal outgrowth) actions. The animal model used in our laboratory is adult female rat (~250 g) with a moderate contusion (12.5 mm) to the spinal cord at the T10 level, using the MASCIS impactor device. Tamoxifen or PP2 was administered by implantation of a 15 mg pellet (Innovative Research of America, Sarasota, FL, USA) or by intraperitoneal injections (1.5 mg/kg, every 3 days), respectively, to produce a long-term effect (28 days). Tamoxifen and the Src kinase inhibitor, PP2, are drugs that in rats with a moderate spinal cord injury promote functional locomotor recovery, increase spared white matter tissue, and stimulate axonal outgrowth. Moreover, tamoxifen reduces the formation of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, these drugs are possible therapeutic agents that have a neuroprotective/regenerative activity in vertebrates with SCI. PMID:25878585

  15. Novel combination strategies to repair the injured mammalian spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Bunge, Mary Bartlett

    2008-01-01

    Due to the varied and numerous changes in spinal cord tissue following injury, successful treatment for repair may involve strategies combining neuroprotection (pharmacological prevention of some of the damaging intracellular cascades that lead to secondary tissue loss), axonal regeneration promotion (cell transplantation, genetic engineering to increase growth factors, neutralization of inhibitory factors, reduction in scar formation), and rehabilitation. Our goal has been to find effective combination strategies to improve outcome after injury to the adult rat thoracic spinal cord. Combination interventions tested have been implantation of Schwann cells (SCs) plus neuroprotective agents and growth factors administered in various ways, olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) implantation, chondroitinase addition, or elevation of cyclic AMP. The most efficacious strategy in our hands for the acute complete transection/SC bridge model, including improvement in locomotion [Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan Scale (BBB)], is the combination of SCs, OECs, and chondroitinase administration (BBB 2.1 vs 6.6, 3 times more myelinated axons in the SC bridge, increased serotonergic axons in the bridge and beyond, and significant correlation between the number of bridge myelinated axons and functional improvement). We found the most successful combination strategy for a subacute spinal cord contusion injury (12.5-mm, 10-g weight, MASCIS impactor) to be SCs and elevation of cyclic AMP (BBB 10.4 vs 15, significant increases in white matter sparing, in myelinated axons in the implant, and in responding reticular formation and red and raphe nuclei, and a significant correlation between the number of serotonergic fibers and improvement in locomotion). Thus, in two injury paradigms, these combination strategies as well as others studied in our laboratory have been found to be more effective than SCs alone and suggest ways in which clinical application may be developed. PMID:18795474

  16. A Reassessment of P2X7 Receptor Inhibition as a Neuroprotective Strategy in Rat Models of Contusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Marcillo, Alexander; Frydel, Beata; Bramlett, Helen M.; Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2011-01-01

    These experiments were completed as part of an NIH “Facilities of Research Excellence in Spinal Cord Injury” contract to support independent replication of published studies that could be considered for eventual clinical testing. Recent studies have reported that selective inhibition of the P2X7 receptor improves both the functional and histopathological consequences of a contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. We repeated two published studies reporting the beneficial effects of pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2′-4′-disulphonic acid (PPADS) or Brilliant blue G (BBG) treatment after SCI (Wang et al., 2004 and Peng et al., 2009). Mild thoracic SCI was first produced in Experiment 1 by means of the MASCIS impactor at T10 (height 6.25 mm, weight 10 gm) followed by intraspinal administration of a P2X7 antagonist (2 μl/10mM) after injury. Treatment with PPADS or another highly selective P2X7R antagonist Brilliant Blue G (BBG) (2 μl/02mM) did not improve locomotive (BBB rating scale) over a 7 week period compared to vehicle treated rats. Also, secondary histopathological changes in terms of overall lesion and cavity volume were not significantly different between the PPADS, BBG, and vehicle treated animals. In the second experiment, the systemic administration of BBG (10 or 50 mg/kg, iv) 15 min, 24 and 72 hours after moderate (12.5 mm) SCI failed to significantly improve motor recovery or histopathological outcome over the 6 week observational period. Although we cannot conclude that there will be no long-term beneficial effects in other spinal cord injury models using selective P2X7 receptor antagonists at different doses or treatment durations, we caution researchers that this potentially exciting therapy requires further preclinical investigations before the implementation of clinical trials targeting severe SCI patients. PMID:22078760

  17. Endothelial cell loss is not a major cause of neuronal and glial cell death following contusion injury of the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Casella, Gizelda T B; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Wood, Patrick M

    2006-11-01

    Contusion of the spinal cord causes an immediate local loss of neurons and disruption of vasculature; additional loss continues thereafter. To explore the possibility of a causal link between delayed endothelial cell (EC) death and secondary neural cell loss, we evaluated neural and endothelial cell survival, and measured inflammatory cell infiltration, at times up to 48 h after contusion injury to the adult rat thoracic spinal cord. Female Fischer rats (200 g), subjected to moderate (10 g x 12.5 mm) weight drop injuries by the MASCIS (NYU) impactor, were analyzed at 15 min and at 1, 8, 24 and 48 h. ECs, neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neutrophils and activated macrophages/microglia were counted in transverse sections. At the injury site, 90% of all neurons died within 48 h of injury; no medium-large diameter neurons survived beyond 48 h. EC death occurred with kinetics similar to glial cell death. Because, in the injury site, most cell death occurred before 8 h, it preceded inflammatory cell infiltration. Three millimeters rostral and caudal to the injury epicenter neuronal numbers were stable for 8 h, and a sharp decrease in neuronal numbers beginning at 8 h strongly correlated with the onset of inflammatory cell infiltration. Glial and blood vessel numbers remained relatively stable in these areas up to 48 h. These results suggest that the loss of ECs during the first 48 h after a contusion injury is not a major cause of neuronal and glial cell death and, in tissue adjacent to the epicenter, inflammatory cell infiltration leads to neuronal loss. PMID:16872600

  18. Tamoxifen and Src kinase inhibitors as neuroprotective/neuroregenerative drugs after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Iris K; Torrado, Aranza I; Santiago, Jose M; Miranda, Jorge D

    2015-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition that produces significant changes in the lifestyle of patients. Many molecular and cellular events are triggered after the initial physical impact to the cord. Two major phases have been described in the field of SCI: an acute phase and late phase. Most of the therapeutic strategies are focused on the late phase because this provides an opportunity to target cellular events like apoptosis, demyelination, scar formation and axonal outgrowth. In this mini-review, we will focus on two agents (tamoxifen and a Src kinase family inhibitor known as PP2) that have been shown in our laboratory to produce neuroprotective (increase cell survival) and/or regenerative (axonal outgrowth) actions. The animal model used in our laboratory is adult female rat (~250 g) with a moderate contusion (12.5 mm) to the spinal cord at the T10 level, using the MASCIS impactor device. Tamoxifen or PP2 was administered by implantation of a 15 mg pellet (Innovative Research of America, Sarasota, FL, USA) or by intraperitoneal injections (1.5 mg/kg, every 3 days), respectively, to produce a long-term effect (28 days). Tamoxifen and the Src kinase inhibitor, PP2, are drugs that in rats with a moderate spinal cord injury promote functional locomotor recovery, increase spared white matter tissue, and stimulate axonal outgrowth. Moreover, tamoxifen reduces the formation of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, these drugs are possible therapeutic agents that have a neuroprotective/regenerative activity in vertebrates with SCI. PMID:25878585

  19. Behavioral and histological characterization of unilateral cervical spinal cord contusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Gensel, John C; Tovar, C Amy; Hamers, Frank P T; Deibert, Rochelle J; Beattie, Michael S; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C

    2006-01-01

    Most experimental studies of spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats damage the thoracic cord, with the consequent functional loss being due to interruption of long tracts connecting the caudal spinal cord to the rostral nervous system. Less work has been done evaluating injury to the cervical cord, even though it is the most common level of human SCI. In addition to the long tracts, the cervical spinal cord contains the sensory and motor neurons responsible for upper extremity function. The purpose of this study was to further develop a rat model of cervical spinal cord contusion injury using a modified NYU/MASCIS weight drop device. Mild (6.25 mm) and moderate (12.5 mm) C5 unilateral injuries were produced. Behavioral recovery was examined using a grooming test, a paw preference test, a walkway test (The Catwalk), and a horizontal ladder test. Histological outcome measures included sparing at the lesion epicenter, sparing throughout the extent of the lesion, quantification of myelin loss rostral and caudal to the lesion, and motor neuron counts. Compared to controls, animals receiving SCI exhibited injury severity-specific deficits in forelimb, locomotor, and hindlimb function persisting for 6-weeks post-SCI. Histological analysis revealed ipsilateral containment of the injury, and differentiation between groups on all measures except motor neuron counts. This model has many advantages: (1) minimal animal care requirements post-SCI, (2) within subject controls, (3) functional loss involves primarily the ipsilateral forelimb, and (4) it is a behavioral and histological model for both gray and white matter damage caused by contusive SCI. PMID:16430371

  20. A reassessment of P2X7 receptor inhibition as a neuroprotective strategy in rat models of contusion injury.

    PubMed

    Marcillo, Alexander; Frydel, Beata; Bramlett, Helen M; Dietrich, W Dalton

    2012-02-01

    These experiments were completed as part of an NIH "Facilities of Research Excellence in Spinal Cord Injury" contract to support independent replication of published studies that could be considered for eventual clinical testing. Recent studies have reported that selective inhibition of the P2X7 receptor improves both the functional and histopathological consequences of a contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. We repeated two published studies reporting the beneficial effects of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2'-4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS) or Brilliant blue G (BBG) treatment after SCI (Wang et al., 2004 and Peng et al., 2009). Mild thoracic SCI was first produced in Experiment 1 by means of the MASCIS impactor at T10 (height 6.25 mm, weight 10 g) followed by intraspinal administration of a P2X7 antagonist (2 μl/10 mM) after injury. Treatment with PPADS or another highly selective P2X7R antagonist Brilliant Blue G (BBG) (2 μl/02 mM) did not improve locomotive (BBB rating scale) over a 7 week period compared to vehicle treated rats. Also, secondary histopathological changes in terms of overall lesion and cavity volume were not significantly different between the PPADS, BBG, and vehicle treated animals. In the second experiment, the systemic administration of BBG (10 or 50 mg/kg, iv) 15 min, 24 and 72 h after moderate (12.5 mm) SCI failed to significantly improve motor recovery or histopathological outcome over the 6 week observational period. Although we cannot conclude that there will be no long-term beneficial effects in other spinal cord injury models using selective P2X7 receptor antagonists at different doses or treatment durations, we caution researchers that this potentially exciting therapy requires further preclinical investigations before the implementation of clinical trials targeting severe SCI patients. PMID:22078760

  1. Physiological and Functional Evaluation of the Transposed Human Pylorus as a Distal Sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Gupta, Vishal; Jauhari, Ramendra; Srivastava, Rajendra N; Misra, Asha; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Manoj

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Studies evaluating the human pylorus as a sphincter are scanty and contradictory. Recently, we have shown technical feasibility of transposing the human pylorus for end-stage fecal incontinence. This unique cohort of patients provided us an opportunity to study the sphincter properties of the pylorus in its ectopic position. Methods Antro-pylorus transposition on end sigmoid colostomies (n = 3) and in the perineum (n = 15) was performed for various indications. Antro-pylorus was assessed functionally (digital examination, high resolution spatiotemporal manometry, barium retention studies and colonoscopy) and by imaging (doppler ultrasound, MRI and CT angiography) in its ectopic position. Results The median resting pressure of pylorus on colostomy was 30 mmHg (range 28-38). In benign group, median resting pressure in perineum was 12.5 mmHg (range 6-44) that increased to 21.5 mmHg (range 12-29) (P = 0.481) and 31 mmHg (range 16-77) (P = 0.034) on first and second follow-up, respectively. In malignant group, median post-operative pressures were 20 mmHg (range 14-36) and 21 mmHg (range 18-44) on first and second follow-up, respectively. A definite tone and gripping sensation were felt in all the patients on digital examination. On distal loopogram, performed through the diverting colostomies, barium was retained proximal to the neo-pyloric valve. Both perineal ultrasound and MRI showed viable transposed graft. CT angiography and color doppler studies confirmed vascular flow in the transposed position. Conclusions The human pyloric valve can function as a tonic sphincter when removed from the gastroduodenal continuity. PMID:22837874

  2. Clinical accuracy of ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerly, T.; Lancaster, C. M.; Geso, M.; Roxby, K. J.

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: In this paper, the authors assess the accuracy of the Brainlab ExacTrac system for frameless intracranial stereotactic treatments in clinical practice. Methods: They recorded couch angle and image fusion results (comprising lateral, longitudinal, and vertical shifts, and rotation corrections about these axes) for 109 stereotactic radiosurgery and 166 stereotactic radiotherapy patient treatments. Frameless stereotactic treatments involve iterative 6D image fusion corrections applied until the results conform to customizable pass criteria, theirs being 0.7 mm and 0.5 deg. for each axis. The planning CT slice thickness was 1.25 mm. It has been reported in the literature that the CT slices' thickness impacts the accuracy of localization to bony anatomy. The principle of invariance with respect to patient orientation was used to determine spatial accuracy. Results: The data for radiosurgery comprised 927 image pairs, of which 532 passed (pass ratio of 57.4%). The data for radiotherapy comprised 15983 image pairs, of which 10 050 passed (pass ratio of 62.9%). For stereotactic radiotherapy, the combined uncertainty of ExacTrac calibration, image fusion, and intrafraction motion was (95% confidence interval) 0.290-0.302 and 0.306-0.319 mm in the longitudinal and lateral axes, respectively. The combined uncertainty of image fusion and intrafraction motion in the anterior-posterior coordinates was 0.174-0.182 mm. For stereotactic radiosurgery, the equivalent ranges are 0.323-0.393, 0.337-0.409, and 0.231-0.281 mm. The overall spatial accuracy was 1.24 mm for stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and 1.35 mm for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Conclusions: The ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system spatial accuracy is adequate for clinical practice, and with the same pass criteria, SRT is more accurate than SRS. They now use frameless stereotaxy exclusively at their center.

  3. Use of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of neonatal and pediatric wounds: a retrospective examination of clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Baharestani, Mona Mylene

    2007-06-01

    The clinical effectiveness of negative pressure wound therapy for the management of acute and chronic wounds is well documented in the adult population but information regarding its use in the pediatric population is limited. A retrospective, descriptive study was conducted to examine the clinical outcomes of using negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of pediatric wounds. The medical records of 24 consecutive pediatric patients receiving negative pressure wound therapy were reviewed. Demographic data, wound etiology, time to closure, closure method, duration of negative pressure wound therapy, complications, dressing change frequency, dressing type used, and pressure settings were analyzed. All categorical variables in the dataset were summarized using frequency (count and percentages) and all continuous variables were summarized using median (minimum, maximum). The 24 pediatric patients (mean age 8.5 years [range 14 days to 18 years old]) had 24 wounds - 12 (50%) were infected at baseline. Sixteen patients had hypoalbuminemia and six had exposed hardware and bone in their wounds. Twenty-two wounds reached full closure in a median time of 10 days (range 2 to 45) following negative pressure wound therapy and flap closure (11), split-thickness skin graft (three), secondary (four), and primary (four) closure. Pressures used in this population ranged from 50 to 125 mm Hg and most wounds were covered with reticulated polyurethane foam. One patient developed a fistula during the course of negative pressure wound therapy. When coupled with appropriate systemic antibiotics, surgical debridement, and medical and nutritional optimization, in this population negative pressure wound therapy resulted in rapid granulation tissue and 92% successful wound closure. Future neonatal and pediatric negative pressure wound therapy usage registries and prospective studies are needed to provide a strong evidence base from which treatment decisions can be made in the management

  4. Flooding after fire: Impacts of the 2013 Colorado Front Range floods on the High Park Fire burn scar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, S. K.; Schmeer, S.; MacDonald, L. H.; Brogan, D. J.; Nelson, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    In June 2012, the High Park Fire west of Fort Collins, CO burned 350 km2 of steep forested terrain, leading to elevated runoff and erosion in watersheds draining the burned area. Under the auspices of a NSF RAPID grant we began monitoring precipitation, hillslope-scale sediment production, stream stage, and channel geomorphic change in Skin Gulch and Hill Gulch, two 15 km2 watersheds within the High Park Fire. Short-duration summer thunderstorms are typically the dominant cause of post-fire runoff and erosion in the central and southern Rocky Mountains, but in September 2013 an extreme, long duration storm dropped more than 200 mm of rain in 48 hours. This storm provided a unique opportunity to compare the hydrologic and geomorphic effects of smaller summer thunderstorms to those of the long duration, high magnitude September event. Mean June-August 2013 precipitation in these watersheds was 125 mm, less than half the total for the September 2013 event, but this summer precipitation led to a mean sediment yield of 8 Mg ha-1, about double the mean sediment yield of the much larger September storm. Hillslope sediment production was highest during summer storms that were shorter duration but had higher 5-15 minute precipitation intensities than the September storm. These localized summer 2013 storms led to flashy pulses of flow in the channel network that caused relatively small amounts of channel aggradation or incision. In contrast, the September 2013 event produced sustained high flows that led to substantial geomorphic change throughout the channel network, with more than 2 m of aggradation at the outlet of Skin Gulch. These results indicate that the high intensity summer thunderstorms were most effective at mobilizing sediment from hillslopes, but the more spatially uniform rainfall during the September event produced much more dramatic downstream channel geomorphic change.

  5. Influence of water repellents on the moisture contents of precipitates (filter cakes)

    SciTech Connect

    Barbin, M.B.; Tkachev, Yu.D.; Barbin, N.M.

    1982-02-20

    The influence of water-repellent treatment of galenite with xanthates was studied in experiments on particles in the size range between 189 and 122 ..mu..m. To a suspension of 30 g of galenite in distilled water a definite amount of the given xanthate was added in solution form. After 3 min of stirring with the solution, the suspension was transferred to a filter funnel and experiments were conducted by the method described in previous reports under reduced pressure (66.6 kPa). The experimental final moisture content was calculated from the weight of water after 5 min of suction, and the calculated value was obtained. The dry and moist galenite was weighed on an analytical balance. The results of experiments on removal of water after 5 min of suction from galenite cakes (height approx. 12.5 mm) in presence and absence of xanthates are presented graphically. An equation for the relationship between the moisture contents of filter cakes and the cosine of the contact angle has been derived. This equation was verified by experiments on galenite suspensions containing various amounts of potassium ethyl, butyl, isoamyl, and octyl xanthates, taken as typical water repellents. In the range of xanthate contents from 0 to 1000 g/ton the calculated moisture contents of filter cakes are almost identical with experimental values. The maximum lowering of moisture contents of the cakes is achieved only at the optimal concentrations of water repellents; this effect becomes more pronounced with shortening of the hydrocarbon chain in the xanthate molecule.

  6. Thermal Stir Welding Development at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Solid state welding processes have become the focus of welding process development at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike fusion weld processes such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA), electron beam (EB), etc., solid state welding processes do not melt the material during welding. The resultant microstructure can be characterized as a dynamically recrystallized morphology much different than the casted, dentritic structure typical of fusion weld processes. The primary benefits of solid state processes over fusion weld processes include superior mechanic properties and the elimination of thermal distortion and residual stresses. These solid state processes attributes have profoundly influenced the direction of advanced welding research and development within the NASA agency. Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) is a new solid state welding process being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the weld process can be decoupled for independent control. An induction coil induces energy into a workpiece to attain a desired plastic temperature. An independently controlled stir rod, captured within non-rotating containment plates, then stirs the plasticized material followed by forging plates/rollers that work the stirred weld joint. The independent control (decoupling) of heating, stirring and forging allows, theoretically, for the precision control of microstructure morphology. The TSW process is being used to evaluate the solid state joining of Haynes 230 for ARES J-2X applications. It is also being developed for 500-in (12.5 mm) thick commercially pure grade 2 titanium for navy applications. Other interests include Inconel 718 and stainless steel. This presentation will provide metallurgical and mechanical property data for these high melting temperature alloys.

  7. Variation of the extinction law in the Trifid nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambrésy, L.; Rho, J.; Marshall, D. J.; Reach, W. T.

    2011-03-01

    Context. In the past few years, the extinction law has been measured in the infrared wavelengths for various molecular clouds and different laws have been obtained. Aims: In this paper we seek variations of the extinction law within the Trifid nebula region. Such variations would demonstrate local dust evolution linked to variation of the environment parameters such as the density or the interstellar radiation field. Methods: The extinction values, Aλ/AV, are obtained using the 2MASS, UKIDSS and Spitzer/GLIMPSE surveys. The technique is to inter-calibrate color-excess maps from different wavelengths to derive the extinction law and to map the extinction in the Trifid region. Results: We measured the extinction law at 3.6, 4.5, and 5.8 μm and we found a transition at AV ≈ 20 mag. Below this threshold the extinction law is as expected from models for RV = 5.5 whereas above 20 mag of visual extinction, it is flatter. Using these results the color-excess maps are converted into a composite extinction map of the Trifid nebula at a spatial resolution of 1 arcmin. A tridimensional analysis along the line-of-sight allowed us to estimate a distance of 2.7 ± 0.5 kpc for the Trifid. The comparison of the extinction with the 1.25 mm emission suggests the millimeter emissivity is enhanced in the dense condensations of the cloud. Conclusions: Our results suggest a dust transition at large extinction which has not been reported so far as well as dust emissivity variations.

  8. Multimodal system for in vivo tumor imaging in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autiero, Maddalena; Celentano, Luigi; Cozzolino, Rosanna; Laccetti, Paolo; Marotta, Marcello; Mettivier, Giovanni; Montesi, Maria Cristina; Riccio, Patrizia; Roberti, Giuseppe; Russo, Paolo

    2006-04-01

    We devised a multimodal planar imaging system for in vivo mouse imaging, employing four modalities: optical imaging, green and red fluorescence reflectance imaging, radionuclide imaging and X-ray radiography. We are testing separately, and then in a combined way, each detection mode, via in vivo mouse imaging, with the final purpose of identifying small implanted tumor masses, of providing early tumor detection and following metastatic dissemination. We describe the multimodal system and summarize its main performance, as assessed in our research work in the various stages of the development, in fluorescence and radionuclide tests on healthy or tumor bearing mice. For gamma-ray detection we used a semiconductor pixel detector (Medipix1 or Medipix2) that works in single photon counting. Laser-induced fluorescence reflectance imaging was performed in vivo using a pulsed light source to excite the fluorescence emission of injected hematoporphyrin (HP) compound, a CCD camera, a low pass filter and a commercial image analysis system. The bimodal system was used for the acquisition of combined images of the tumor area (fluorescence: animal top view; radionuclide: bottom view). It was shown that the tumor area can be imaged in a few minutes, with a few millimeter resolution (1 mm pinhole diameter), radioactively ( 99mTc radiotracer), and with the fluorescence system and that, in one case, only one of the two modalities is able to recognize the tumor. A phantom study for thyroid imaging with 125I source embedded in a simulated tissue indicated a spatial resolution of 1.25 mm FWHM with a 1 mm pinhole.

  9. A digital volumetric tomography (DVT) study in the mandibular molar region for miniscrew placement during mixed dentition

    PubMed Central

    Bhattad, Mayur S.; Baliga, Sudhindra; Vibhute, Pavan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess bone thickness for miniscrew placement in the mandible during mixed dentition by using digital volumetric tomograph (DVT). MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 15 healthy patients aged 8-10 years old, with early exfoliated mandibular second deciduous molar, were included. DVT images of one quadrant of the mandible were obtained using Kodak extraoral imaging systems and analyzed by Kodak dental imaging software. The error of the method (EM) was calculated using Dahlberg's formula. Mean and standard deviation were calculated at 6 and 8 mm from the cementoenamel junction (CEJ).Paired t-test was used to analyze the measurements. RESULTS: Buccal cortical bone thickness, mesiodistal width and buccolingual bone depth at 6 mm were found to be 1.73 + 0.41, 2.15 + 0.49 and 13.18 + 1.22 mm, respectively; while at 8 mm measurements were 2.42 + 0.34, 2.48 + 0.33 and 13.65 + 1.25 mm, respectively. EM for buccal cortical bone thickness, mesiodistal width and buccolingual bone depth was 0.58, 0.40 and 0.48, respectively. The difference in measurement at 6 and 8 mm for buccal cortical plate thickness (P < 0.05) and buccolingual bone thickness (P < 0.05) was found to be significant, whereas for mesiodistal width it was insignificant (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Bone thickness measurement has shown promising evidence for safe placement of miniscrews in the mandible during mixed dentition. The use of miniscrew is the best alternative, even in younger patients. PMID:25992988

  10. Effects of Heat Treatment on the Ballistic Impact Properties of Inconel 718 for Jet Engine Fan Containment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of heat treating Inconel 718 on the ballistic impact response and failure mechanisms were studied. Two different annealing conditions and an aged condition were considered. Large differences in the static properties were found between the annealed and the aged material, with the annealed condition having lower strength and hardness and greater elongation than the aged. Correspondingly large differences were found in the velocity required to penetrate material in the two conditions in impact tests involving 12.5 mm diameter, 25.4 mm long cylindrical Ti-6-4 projectiles impacting flat plates at velocities in the range of 150 to 300 m/sec. The annealed material was able to absorb over 25 percent more energy than the aged. This is contrary to results observed for ballistic impact response for higher velocity impacts typically encountered in military applications where it has been shown that there exists a correlation between target hardness and ballistic impact strength. Metallographic examination of impacted plates showed strong indication of failure due to adiabatic shear. In both materials localized bands of large shear deformation were apparent, and microhardness measurements indicated an increase in hardness in these bands compared to the surrounding material. These bands were more localized in the aged material than in the annealed material. In addition the annealed material underwent significantly greater overall deformation before failure. The results indicate that high elongation and better strain hardening capabilities reduce the tendency for shear to localize and result in an unstable adiabatic shear failure. This supports empirical containment design methods that relate containment thickness to the static toughness.

  11. Effects of shielding gas hydrogen content on the arc behavior in gas tungsten arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Onsoien, M.I.; Olson, D.L.; Liu, S.

    1994-12-31

    The primary role of the shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is to protect the weld pool and tungsten electrode from the oxygen and nitrogen in the surrounding atmosphere. Traditionally inert gases such as argon and helium have been used, either as pure gases or mixed with each other. However, additions of small amounts of hydrogen have been reported to improve weld bead penetration and enable higher welding speeds to be used. The present work was performed to investigate the effect of small hydrogen additions on the arc behavior in GTAW, and to further the fundamental understanding of the effect of shielding gas on arc characteristics. GTAW bead-on-plate welds were made on 12.5 mm x 150 mm x 75 mm Type 304 stainless steel test coupons. The welding current, voltage, and their variations were continuously monitored during welding. After welding, each test coupon was sectioned and prepared using standard metallographic techniques and etched in Vilella`s etch for macroexamination of the weld bead cross section. Bead width, depth, and cross-sectional area were measured using a LECO image analysator system. The influence of hydrogen content in an argon has tungsten arc was characterized. The electrical behavior of the arc, including the arc resistance, was measured as a function of current and hydrogen content. A better fundamental understanding of arc behavior and energy transfer was achieved using these experimental gas mixes. The results allow the following conclusions to be drawn: (1) Small additions of hydrogen in the argon based shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding significantly change the weld bead geometry due to changes in the arc column. (2) Selection of the right argon, hydrogen shielding gas mixture to give the optimum arc column characteristics for a given condition can improve weld quality and increase productivity. (3) The resistance of the arc column was found to be an adequate parameter to describe the arc column behavior.

  12. A Point-of-Care Immunosensor for Human Chorionic Gonadotropin in Clinical Urine Samples Using a Cuneated Polysilicon Nanogap Lab-on-Chip

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, S. R.; Hashim, U.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Poopalan, P.; Ramayya, H. R.; Iqbal Omar, M.; Haarindraprasad, R.; Veeradasan, P.

    2015-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a glycoprotein hormone secreted from the placenta, is a key molecule that indicates pregnancy. Here, we have designed a cost-effective, label-free, in situ point-of-care (POC) immunosensor to estimate hCG using a cuneated 25 nm polysilicon nanogap electrode. A tiny chip with the dimensions of 20.5 × 12.5 mm was fabricated using conventional lithography and size expansion techniques. Furthermore, the sensing surface was functionalized by (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane and quantitatively measured the variations in hCG levels from clinically obtained human urine samples. The dielectric properties of the present sensor are shown with a capacitance above 40 nF for samples from pregnant women; it was lower with samples from non-pregnant women. Furthermore, it has been proven that our sensor has a wide linear range of detection, as a sensitivity of 835.88 μA mIU-1 ml-2 cm-2 was attained, and the detection limit was 0.28 mIU/ml (27.78 pg/ml). The dissociation constant Kd of the specific antigen binding to the anti-hCG was calculated as 2.23 ± 0.66 mIU, and the maximum number of binding sites per antigen was Bmax = 22.54 ± 1.46 mIU. The sensing system shown here, with a narrow nanogap, is suitable for high-throughput POC diagnosis, and a single injection can obtain triplicate data or parallel analyses of different targets. PMID:26368287

  13. Novel nanocomposite stent coating releasing resveratrol and quercetin reduces neointimal hyperplasia and promotes re-endothelialization.

    PubMed

    Kleinedler, James J; Foley, John D; Orchard, Elysse A; Dugas, Tammy R

    2012-04-10

    Late-term thrombosis associated with drug-eluting stents may be due to the non-selective actions of antimitogenic drugs on endothelial cells, leading to delayed vascular healing after stenting angioplasty. Currently, there is a need for stent-based therapies that can both attenuate neointimal hyperplasia and promote re-endothelialization. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a resveratrol (R)- and quercetin (Q)-eluting stent with that of a bare metal stent (BMS) on neointimal hyperplasia and re-endothelialization in a rat model of arterial angioplasty and stenting. Miniature stents (2.5×1.25mm) were sprayed with nanocomposite coatings containing two concentrations of R:Q (50:25μg/cm(2) (RQ1) or 150:75μg/cm(2) (RQ2)). The stents were deployed into the common carotid artery of rats and their impact on vascular remodeling was compared to that of BMS. Luminal stenosis in arteries stented with RQ2-eluting stents was reduced by 64.6% (p<0.05) compared to arteries stented with BMS. Accompanying this effect was a 59.8% reduction in macrophage infiltration (p<0.05). There were no differences found between RQ1 and BMS. Finally, the RQ2-coated stent accelerated re-endothelialization by 50% compared with BMS (p<0.05). Thus, compared with BMS, local delivery of R and Q from a stent platform significantly reduced in-stent stenosis, while promoting re-endothelialization. These data suggest that R and Q may be favorable candidates for novel stent coatings, potentially reducing the risk of late thrombosis associated with drug-eluting stents.

  14. Final test results for the Schott HCE on a LS-2 collector.

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Timothy A.; Brosseau, Douglas A.

    2005-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has completed thermal performance testing on the Schott parabolic trough receiver using the LS-2 collector on the Sandia rotating platform at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM. This testing was funded as part of the US DOE Sun-Lab USA-Trough program. The receiver tested was a new Schott receiver, known as Heat Collector Elements (HCEs). Schott is a new manufacturer of trough HCEs. The Schott HCEs are 4m long; therefore, two were joined and mounted on the LS-2 collector module for the test. The Schott HCE design consists of a 70mm diameter high solar absorptance coated stainless steel (SS) tube encapsulated within a 125mm diameter Pyrex{reg_sign} glass tube with vacuum in the annulus formed between the SS and glass tube to minimize convection heat losses. The Schott HCE design is unique in two regards. First, the bellows used to compensate for the difference in thermal expansion between the metal and glass tube are inside the glass envelope rather than outside. Second, the composition of materials at the glass-to-metal seal has very similar thermal expansion coefficients making the joint less prone to breakage from thermal shock. Sandia National Laboratories provided both the azimuth and elevation collector module tracking systems used during the tests. The test results showed the efficiency of the Schott HCE to be very similar to current HCEs being manufactured by Solel. This testing provided performance verification for the use of Schott tubes with Solargenix trough collector assemblies at currently planned trough power plant projects in Arizona and Nevada.

  15. Bench-scale experimental determination of the thermal diffusivity of crushed tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Ryder, E.E.; Finley, R.E.; George, J.T.; Ho, C.K.; Longenbaugh, R.S.; Connolly, J.R.

    1996-06-01

    A bench-scale experiment was designed and constructed to determine the effective thermal diffusivity of crushed tuff. Crushed tuff particles ranging from 12.5 mm to 37.5 mm (0.5 in. to 1.5 in.) were used to fill a cylindrical volume of 1.58 m{sup 3} at an effective porosity of 0.48. Two iterations of the experiment were completed; the first spanning approximately 502 hours and the second 237 hours. Temperatures near the axial heater reached 700 degrees C, with a significant volume of the test bed exceeding 100 degrees C. Three post-test analysis techniques were used to estimate the thermal diffusivity of the crushed tuff. The first approach used nonlinear parameter estimation linked to a one dimensional radial conduction model to estimate thermal diffusivity from the first 6 hours of test data. The second method used the multiphase TOUGH2 code in conjunction with the first 20 hours of test data not only to estimate the crushed tuffs thermal diffusivity, but also to explore convective behavior within the test bed. Finally, the nonlinear conduction code COYOTE-II was used to determine thermal properties based on 111 hours of cool-down data. The post-test thermal diffusivity estimates of 5.0 x 10-7 m{sup 2}/s to 6.6 x 10-7 m{sup 2}/s were converted to effective thermal conductivities and compared to estimates obtained from published porosity-based relationships. No obvious match between the experimental data and published relationships was found to exist; however, additional data for other particle sizes and porosities are needed.

  16. Reduction of aneurysm pressure and wall stress after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Marston, W A; Criado, E; Baird, C A; Keagy, B A

    1996-03-01

    A canine model was designed to evaluate the changes in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) pressure and wall stress after endovascular repair. Eight canines underwent laparotomy and creation of an AAA. The aneurysm was then excluded with a transluminally placed endovascular graft (TPEG) inserted through the right femoral artery and deployed across the AAA to exclude the infrarenal aortic branches from aortic perfusion. Blood pressure and flow data were recorded for 6 hours. The AAA blood pressure decreased from 135 +/- 9.3 mm Hg before exclusion to 45 +/- 17.6 mm Hg at 10 minutes after exclusion (p < 0.001). At 6 hours, AAA blood pressure had declined further to 26 +/- 12.5 mm Hg. Blood flow in the excluded iliac artery decreased from a baseline of 242 +/- 58 ml/min to 41 +/- 29 ml/min 10 minutes after TPEG placement (p < 0.001). At 6 hours, flow was reduced to 12 +/- 3.5 ml/min (p < 0.05 compared with that at 10 minutes). Aortic wall stress was significantly reduced by TPEG placement but was only slightly lower than baseline aortic wall stress before AAA creation. The lumbar arteries were patent with retrograde flow in all cases and were found to be the major contributors to postexclusion aneurysm pressure. Endovascular AAA exclusion results in an immediate decrease in blood pressure and wall stress within the excluded aneurysm, but the aneurysm remains perfused by retrograde flow through the lumbar arteries, which resulted in near-baseline levels of aneurysm wall stress in this canine model. Embolization of patient lumbar vessels at prosthesis placement may further reduce the risk of late rupture. PMID:8733869

  17. Negative pressure induces p120-catenin-dependent adherens junction disassembly in keratinocytes during wound healing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Hui; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Chen, Carl Pai-Chu; Chow, Shu-Er; Wang, Jong-Shyan; Shyu, Yu-Chiau; Lu, Mu-Jie

    2016-09-01

    A negative-pressure of 125mmHg (NP) has been widely used to treat chronic wounds in modern medicine. Keratinocytes under NP treatment have shown accelerated cell movement and decreased E-cadherin expression. However, the molecular mechanism of E-cadherin regulation under NP remains incompletely understood. Therefore, we investigated the E-cadherin regulation in keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) under NP. HaCaT cells were treated at ambient pressure (AP) and NP for 12h. Cell movement was measured by traditional and electric wound healing assays at the 2 different pressures. Mutants with overexpression of p120-catenin (p120(ctn)) were used to observe the effect of NP on p120(ctn) and E-cadherin expression during wound healing. Cell fractionation and immunoblotting data showed that NP increased Y228-phosphorylated p120(ctn) level and resulted in the translocation of p120(ctn) from the plasma membrane to cytoplasm. Immunofluorescence images revealed that NP decreased the co-localization of p120(ctn) and E-cadherin on the plasma membrane. Knockdown of p120(ctn) reduced E-cadherin expression and accelerated cell movement under AP. Overexpression of the Y228-phosphorylation-mimic p120(ctn) decreased E-cadherin membrane expression under both AP and NP. Phosphorylation-deficient mutants conferred restored adherens junctions (AJs) under NP. The Src inhibitor blocked the phosphorylation of p120(ctn) and impeded cell migration under NP. In conclusion, Src-dependent phosphorylation of p120(ctn) can respond rapidly to NP and contribute to E-cadherin downregulation. The NP-induced disassembly of the AJ further accelerates wound healing.

  18. Compressive Strength and Water Absorption of Pervious Concrete that Using the Fragments of Ceramics and Roof Tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahara, E.; Meilani

    2014-03-01

    Pervious concrete was introduced in America in 2003, popularized by Dan Brown and used as a rigid pavement in the open parking lot. Rigid pavement using pervious concrete can absorb water in the surface to go straight through the concrete to the ground below.This water flow is one of the benefit of using the pervious concrete. Using of wastes such as broken roof and ceramics tiles are not commonly used in Indonesia. Utilization these kind of wastes is predicted lower the compressive strength of pervious concrete as they are used as a substitute for coarse aggregate.In this research, pervious concrete is made using a mixture of the fragment of ceramics and roof tiles.This research using broken ceramics and roof tiles with a grain size that loose from 38 mm sieve, retained on 19 mm sieve and the coarse aggregate from crushed stone that loose 12.5 mm sieve, retained on 9.5 mm sieve. The water cement ratio is 0.3 and to assist the mixing process, the addition of addictive in pervious concrete is used.The size of coarse aggregate used in the mixture affects the strength of pervious concrete. The larger the size of aggregate, the obtained compressive strength becomes smaller. It also affects the density of pervious concrete. The using of mixture of ceramics and roof tiles only reduce 2 MPa of pervious concrete compressive strength so this mixture can be used as a substitute for coarse aggregate with a maximum portion of 30 %. The high porosity of the specimens causes the reduction of pervious concrete density that affect the compressive strength. This high level of porosity can be seen from the high level of water absorption that exceed the required limit of water infiltration.

  19. Hyoid bone development: An assessment of optimal CT scanner parameters and 3D volume rendering techniques

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Meghan M.; Whyms, Brian J.; Kelly, Michael P.; Doherty, Benjamin M.; Gentry, Lindell R.; Bersu, Edward T.; Vorperian, Houri K.

    2015-01-01

    The hyoid bone anchors and supports the vocal tract. Its complex shape is best studied in three dimensions, but it is difficult to capture on computed tomography (CT) images and three-dimensional volume renderings. The goal of this study was to determine the optimal CT scanning and rendering parameters to accurately measure the growth and developmental anatomy of the hyoid and to determine whether it is feasible and necessary to use these parameters in the measurement of hyoids from in vivo CT scans. Direct linear and volumetric measurements of skeletonized hyoid bone specimens were compared to corresponding CT images to determine the most accurate scanning parameters and three-dimensional rendering techniques. A pilot study was undertaken using in vivo scans from a retrospective CT database to determine feasibility of quantifying hyoid growth. Scanning parameters and rendering technique affected accuracy of measurements. Most linear CT measurements were within 10% of direct measurements; however, volume was overestimated when CT scans were acquired with a slice thickness greater than 1.25 mm. Slice-by-slice thresholding of hyoid images decreased volume overestimation. The pilot study revealed that the linear measurements tested correlate with age. A fine-tuned rendering approach applied to small slice thickness CT scans produces the most accurate measurements of hyoid bones. However, linear measurements can be accurately assessed from in vivo CT scans at a larger slice thickness. Such findings imply that investigation into the growth and development of the hyoid bone, and the vocal tract as a whole, can now be performed using these techniques. PMID:25810349

  20. Comparative micromorphological study of wild and micropropagated Dioscorea bulbifera Linn.

    PubMed Central

    Sonibare, Mubo A.; Adeniran, Adedapo A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the leaf epidermis of wild and micropropagated Dioscorea bulbifera Linn. (D. bulbifera) in order to document useful diagnostic features that may be employed for correct crude drug identification and to clear any taxonomic uncertainties in the micropropagated medicinal plant. Methods Growth responses of micropropagated D. bulbifera were observed on Murashige Skoog medium supplemented with 6-benzylamino purine (1.0 mg/L)+α-naphthaleneacetic acid (0.2 mg/L)+cysteine (20 mg/L) using nodal segments as explants. Leaves of the wild and micropropagated plants were studied microscopically. Results More than 80% shoot regeneration and formation of 10%-30% whitish-brown callus were observed within 3 weeks. The highest root proliferation was obtained from Murashige Skoog medium of 6-benzylamino purine (0.05 mg/L) and α-naphthaleneacetic acid (0.01 mg/L) with mean root length of (27.00±1.25) mm and elongated single shoot of mean length (38.00±11.09) mm. Leaf epidermal features that revealed similarities between the wild and micropropagated plants included amphistomatic condition, presence of mucilage, glandular unicellular trichome with multicellular head, polygonal cells with smooth walls, stomata type and shape. Slight variations included thick cuticular wall with closed stomata in wild plant compared to thin walled opened stomata in the in vitro plant. Opening of stomata accounted for larger average stomata sizes of (7.68±0.38) µm and (6.14±0.46) µm on the adaxial and abaxial surfaces, respectively of the micropropagated plant compared to the wild. Conclusions The diagnostic features obtained in the study could serve as a basis for proper identification for quality control for standardization of the medicinal plant. PMID:25182434

  1. SEALING ABILITY OF CASTOR OIL POLYMER AS A ROOT-END FILLING MATERIAL

    PubMed Central

    de Martins, Giovana Ribeiro; Carvalho, Claudio Antonio Talge; Valera, Marcia Carneiro; de Oliveira, Luciane Dias; Buso, Leonardo; Carvalho, Alessandra Sverberi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sealing ability of castor oil polymer (COP), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and glass ionomer cement (GIC) as root-end filling materials. Forty-five single-rooted human teeth were cleaned and prepared using a step-back technique. The apical third of each root was resected perpendicularly to the long axis direction. All teeth were obturated with gutta-percha and an endodontic sealer. After, a root-end cavity with 1.25-mm depth was prepared using a diamond bur. The specimens were randomly divided into three experimental groups (n=15), according to the root-end filling material used: G1) COP; G2) MTA; G3) GIC. The external surfaces of the specimens were covered with epoxy adhesive, except the root-end filling. The teeth were immersed in rhodamine B dye for 24 hours. Then, the roots were sectioned longitudinally and the linear dye penetration at the dentin/material interface was determined using a stereomicroscope. ANOVA and Tukey's tests were used to compare the three groups. The G1 group (COP) presented smaller dye penetration, statistically different than the G2 (MTA) and G3 (GIC) groups (p<0.05). No statistically significant difference in microleakage was observed between G2 and G3 groups (p>0.05). The results of this study indicate that the COP presented efficient sealing ability when used as a root-end filling material showing results significantly better than MTA and GIC. PMID:19466255

  2. Pool boiling enhancement through bubble induced convective liquid flow in feeder microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaikumar, A.; Kandlikar, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    Bubbles departing from the nucleation sites induce a liquid flow from the bulk to the heated surface during pool boiling. Alternating the nucleating regions with non-nucleating regions facilitates separate liquid-vapor pathways for departing vapor bubbles and returning liquid. We explored an additional enhancement through liquid feeder channels on the heater surface directing the returning liquid towards the nucleating region. The nucleating bubbles were confined to the nucleating region as the returning liquid flow induced strong convective currents over the non-nucleating regions. In the best performing configuration, the nucleating regions were 0.5 mm wide, separated by non-nucleating regions of width 2.125 mm, which corresponded to the bubble departure diameter. The non-nucleating regions contained 0.5 mm wide feeder channels directing liquid towards the nucleating region. High speed images indicated distinct vapor columns over the nucleating regions with liquid channeled through the feeder channels. At higher heat fluxes, the strong liquid currents established over the feeder channels suppressed any undesirable nucleation in them keeping the separated vapor-liquid pathways functional. This enhancement technique resulted in a critical heat flux of 394 W/cm2 at a wall superheat of 5.5 °C which translated to a heat transfer coefficient of 713 kW/m2 °C. The additional surface area and high heat transfer coefficient due to microchannel flow in feeder channels, and the unobstructed surface available for the bubbles to expand over the prime heat transfer surface area before departing were seen to be responsible for their superior performance.

  3. Roles of transmembrane domain 2 and the first intracellular loop in human noradrenaline transporter function: pharmacological and SCAM analysis.

    PubMed

    Sucic, Sonja; Bryan-Lluka, Lesley J

    2005-09-01

    The aim was to investigate the roles of transmembrane domain 2 and the adjacent region of the first intracellular loop in determining human noradrenaline transporter (hNET) function by pharmacological and substituted-cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) analyses. It was first necessary to establish a suitable background NET for SCAM. Alanine mutants of endogenous hNET cysteines, hC86A, hC131A and hC339A, were examined and showed no marked effects on expression or function. hNET and the mutants were also resistant to methanethiosulfonate (MTS), ethylammonium (MTSEA) and MTStrimethylammonium (MTSET). Hence, wild-type hNET is an appropriate background for production of cysteine mutants for SCAM. Pharmacological investigation showed that all mutants except hT99C and hL109C showed reduced cell-surface expression, while all except hM107C showed a reduction in functional activity. The mutations did not markedly affect the apparent affinities of substrates, but apparent affinities of cocaine were decreased 7-fold for hP97C and 10-fold for hF101C and increased 12-fold for hY98C. [3H]Nisoxetine binding affinities were decreased 13-fold for hP97C and 5-fold for hF101C. SCAM analysis revealed that only hL102C was sensitive to 1.25 mm MTSEA, and this sensitivity was protected by noradrenaline, nisoxetine and cocaine. The results suggest that this region of hNET is important for interactions with antidepressants and cocaine, but it is probably not involved in substrate translocation mechanisms.

  4. Analysis of phenolic compounds and radical scavenging activity of Echinacea spp.

    PubMed

    Pellati, Federica; Benvenuti, Stefania; Magro, Lara; Melegari, Michele; Soragni, Fabrizia

    2004-04-16

    The aim of this study was to set up and validate an RP-LC method with DAD-detection to quantify caffeic acid derivatives in various Echinacea spp. Samples were extracted with 80% methanol. The analyses were carried out on a Lichrospher RP-18 column (125 mm x 4 mm i.d., 5 microm), with a mobile phase gradient, which increases the acetonitrile level in a phosphoric acid solution (0.1%). The flow rate was 1.5 ml/min. Detection was set at 330 nm. This method allowed the identification and quantification of caftaric acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, cynarin, echinacoside and cichoric acid in Echinacea roots and derivatives. The total phenolic content was 10.49 mg/g for E. angustifolia, 17.83 mg/g for E. pallida and 23.23 mg/g for E. purpurea. Among Echinacea commercial herbal medicines, a certain variability in the concentrations of phenolic compounds was observed. The radical scavenging activity of Echinacea methanolic extracts was evaluated in vitro with a spectrophotometric method based on the reduction of an alcoholic 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH*) radical solution at 517 nm in the presence of a hydrogen donating antioxidant. As for pure compounds, echinacoside had the highest capacity to quench DPPH* radicals (EC50 = 6.6 microM), while caftaric acid had the lowest (EC50 = 20.5 microM). The average EC50 values for E. purpurea, E. pallida and E. angustifolia were 134, 167 and 231 microg/ml, respectively. The radical scavenging activity of Echinacea root extracts reflected their phenolic composition. The results indicate that Echinacea roots and derivatives are a good source of natural antioxidants and could be used to prevent free-radical-induced deleterious effects.

  5. Vertical deformation along the Indio Hills, San Andreas Fault, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharer, K. M.; Blisniuk, K.; Sharp, W. D.; Williams, P. L.; Johnson, K.

    2014-12-01

    Halfway between the Salton Sea and San Gorgonio Pass, the southernmost San Andreas Fault (SAF) bifurcates into the Mission Creek and Banning strands. These strands bound the Indio Hills (IH), and mark the first of a series of left-stepping branches that define the transpressional, southern Big Bend of the SAF. Between the fault strands, the Quaternary Ocotillo Formation is deformed with fold axis orientations consistent with dextral shear; structurally the IH are synclinal in the east, transitioning to a complex antiform with increased uplift suggested by exhumation of Tertiary units in the west. We report new long- and short-term erosion rates across the IH and uplift rates on the Banning strand, and we evaluate these measurements in terms of slip rates across the fault system and structural deformation within the IH. Two methods of catchment-averaged erosion rates provide minimum rates yield similar results, (0.08 to 0.34 mm/yr) across 6 catchments. The long-term rates are calculated from eroded volumes estimated from a 10-m DEM surface enveloping the Indio Hills and assume that all folding and uplift initiated ca. 500ka (the 750 ka Bishop ash is uplifted and warped within the IH). The short-term rates, determined from 10Be dating of alluvial sediments, increase gradually to the northwest. Similarity of the rates suggests steady state uplift over the history of the fold; ongoing structural analysis and dating needed to constrain the maximum rates will test this possibility. The new uplift rate for the Banning strand at the east end of the IH is determined from a 60 pts/m^2 DEM produced by structure from motion photogrammetry and U-series ages and cosmogenic dates that provide an age range of 20-76ka for a fan vertically offset by ~2.5 m. The resulting uplift rate on the fault (0.03-0.125 mm/yr) overlaps with the short-term catchment-averaged erosion rate for this location (0.08 mm/yr). Consequently, we interpret that vertical strain is partitioned onto both the

  6. Petrographic and anatomical characteristics of plant material from two peat deposits of Holocene and Miocene age, Kalimantan, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, T.A.; Hilbert, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    Samples from two peat-forming environments of Holocene and Miocene age in Kalimantan (Borneo), Indonesia, were studied petrographically using nearly identical sample preparation and microscopic methodologies. Both deposits consist of two basic types of organic material: plant organs/tissues and fine-grained matrix. There are seven predominant types of plant organs and tissues: roots possessing only primary growth, stems possessing only primary growth, leaves, stems/roots with secondary growth, secondary xylem fragments, fragments of cork cells, and macerated tissue of undetermined origin. The fine-grained matrix consists of fragments of cell walls and cell fillings, fungal remains, spores and pollen grains, and resin. Some of the matrix material does not have distinct grain boundaries (at ??500) and this material is designated amorphous matrix. The major difference between the Holocene peat and Miocene lignite in reflected light, oil immersion is a loss of red coloration in the cell walls of tissue in the lignite, presumably due to loss of cellulosic compounds. In addition, cortex and phloem tissue (hence primary roots and stems) are difficult to recognize in the lignite, probably because these large, thin-walled tissues are more susceptible to microbial degradation and compaction. Particle size in both peat and lignite samples display a bimodal distribution when measurements are transformed to a - log2 or phi (??), scale. Most plant parts have modes of 2-3?? (0.25 - 0.125 mm), whereas the finer-grained particulate matrix has modes of 7-9?? (0.008-0.002 mm). This similarity suggest certain degradative processes. The 2-3?? range may be a "stable" size for plant parts (regardless of origin) because this is a characteristics of a substrate which is most suitable for plant growth in peat. The finer-grained matrix material (7-9??) probably results from fungal decay which causes plant material to weaken and with slight physical pressure to shatter into its component

  7. Negative pressure wound therapy using gauze and foam: histological, immunohistochemical and ultrasonography morphological analysis of the granulation tissue and scar tissue. Preliminary report of a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Fraccalvieri, Marco; Zingarelli, Enrico; Ruka, Erind; Antoniotti, Umberto; Coda, Renato; Sarno, Antonino; Bocchiotti, Maria Alessandra; Bruschi, Stefano

    2011-08-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is becoming routine for the preparation of wounds prior to grafting for wound closure. We have been using both foam- and gauze-based NPWT to prepare wounds for closure prior to skin grafting and have obtained similar proportions of closed wounds; 7/7 for wounds treated with gauze-based NPWT and 11/11 for wounds treated with foam-based NPWT. In our follow-up consultations we observed that skin grafts on the foam-treated patients were less pliable than those on the gauze-treated patients. To assess what the mechanism of this effect might be, we compared the specific details of the treatments of both 11 foam and 7 gauze patients, including depth, location, patients' age and co-morbidity; biopsies of granulation and scar tissue were taken and stained with haematoxylin-eosin and by Masson's trichrome staining and conducted ultrasound analysis of the closed wounds, to see if there were features which explained those effects. All foam patients were treated at -125 mm Hg for an average of 25·9 days before skin grafts were applied. All gauze patients were treated at -80 mm Hg for an average of 24·7 days before skin grafts were applied. Biopsies of granulation tissue prior to skin grafting from five foam and four gauze-based NPWT patients did not reveal any obvious histological differences between the treatments. Ultrasound analysis of the skin-grafted wounds showed an average depth of scar tissue of 18 mm in the wound beds of the foam-treated wounds and 7 mm in the gauze-treated ones. Biopsies taken on the scar tissue after treatment with the gauze showed a minor tissue thickness and disorganisation and less sclerotic components. The findings of this preliminary analysis suggest that foam-based NPWT may induce a thicker layer of scar tissue beneath skin grafts than gauze-based NPWT which might explain a reduced pliability of the reconstructed bed. At present it is unclear which mechanism might be responsible for the difference in

  8. Solvent removal during synthetic and Nephila fiber spinning.

    PubMed

    Kojic, Nikola; Kojic, Milos; Gudlavalleti, Sauri; McKinley, Gareth

    2004-01-01

    The process by which spiders make their mechanically superior fiber involves removal of solvent (water) from a concentrated protein solution while the solution flows through a progressively narrowing spinning canal. Our aim was to determine a possible mechanism of spider water removal by using a computational model. To develop appropriate computational techniques for modeling of solvent removal during fiber spinning, a study was first performed using a synthetic solution. In particular, the effect of solvent removal during elongational flow (also exhibited in the spinning canal of the spider) on fiber mechanical properties was examined. The study establishes a model for solvent removal during dry spinning of synthetic fibers, assuming that internal diffusion governs solvent removal and that convective resistance is small. A variable internal solvent diffusion coefficient, dependent on solvent concentration, is also taken into account in the model. An experimental setup for dry (air) spinning was used to make fibers whose diameter was on the order of those made by spiders (approximately 1 microm). Two fibers of different thickness, corresponding to different spinning conditions, were numerically modeled for solvent removal and then mechanically tested. These tests showed that the thinner fiber, which lost more solvent under elongational flow, had 5-fold better mechanical properties (elastic modulus of 100 MPa and toughness of 15 MJ/m3) than the thicker fiber. Even though the mechanical properties were far from those of dragline spider silk (modulus of 10 GPa and toughness of 150 MJ/m3), the experimental methodology and numerical principles developed for the synthetic case proved to be valuable when establishing a model for the Nephila spinning process. In this model, an assumption of rapid convective water removal at the spinning canal wall was made, with internal diffusion of water through the fiber as the governing process. Then the diffusion coefficient of water through the initial spinning solution, obtained ex vivo from the Nephila clavipes major ampullate gland, was determined and incorporated into the numerical procedure, along with the wall boundary conditions and canal geometry. Also, a typical fiber reeling speed during web making, as well as the assumption of a dry exiting fiber, were included in the model. The results show that a cross-section of spinning solution (dope), which is initially 70% water, spends 19 s in the spinning canal in order to emerge dry. While the dope cross-section traverses the canal, its velocity increases from 0.37 mm/s at the entrance to 12.5 mm/s at the canal exit. The obtained results thus indicate that simple diffusion, along with the dry wall boundary condition, is a viable mechanism for water removal during typical Nephila fiber spinning.

  9. Role of Matrix Metalloproteinases 2 in Spinal Cord Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Miranpuri, Gurwattan S; Schomberg, Dominic T; Alrfaei, Bahauddeen; King, Kevin C; Rynearson, Bryan; Wesley, Vishwas S; Khan, Nayab; Obiakor, Kristen; Wesley, Umadevi V; Resnick, Daniel K

    2016-03-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) affects approximately 4 million people in the United States with spinal cord injury (SCI) being a common cause. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an integral role in mediating inflammatory responses, cellular signaling, cell migration, extracellular matrix degradation and tissue remodeling and repair. As such, they are major components in the pathogenesis of secondary injury within the central nervous system. Other gene regulatory pathways, specifically MAPK/extracellular signaling-regulated kinase (ERK) and Wnt/β-catenin, are also believed to participate in secondary injury likely intersect. The study aims to examine the MMP-2 signaling pathway associated with ERK and Wnt/β-catenin activity during contusion SCI (cSCI)-induced NP in a rat model. This is an experimental study investigating the implication of MMP-2 in SCI-induced NP and its association with the cellular and molecular changes in the interactions between extracellular signaling kinase and β-catenin. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats received cSCI injury by NYU impactor by dropping 10 g weight from a height of 12.5 mm. Locomotor functional recovery of injured rats was measured on post cSCI day 1, and weekly thereafter for 6 weeks using Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores. Thermal hyperalgesia (TH) testing was performed on days 21, 28, 35 and 42 post cSCI. The expression and/or activity of MMP-2, β-catenin and ERK were studied following harvest of spinal cord tissues between 3 and 6 weeks post cSCI. All experiments were funded by the department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Wisconsin, School of Medicine and Public Health having no conflict of interest. MMP-2 and β-catenin expression were elevated and gradually increased from days 21 to 42 compared to sham-operated rats and injured rats that did not exhibit TH. The expression of phosphorylated ERK (phospho-ERK) increased on day 21 but returned to baseline levels on day 42 whereas total ERK levels remained relatively unchanged and constant. Chronic NP is associated with changes in the expression of MMP-2, β-catenin and ERK. Our data suggest that the transient upregulation of phospho-ERK is involved in the initial upregulation of both β-catenin and MMP-2 following cSCI-induced NP states. PMID:27536019

  10. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy With Instillation: Review of Evidence and Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Paul J; Attinger, Christopher E; Olawoye, Olayinka; Crist, Brett D; Gabriel, Allen; Galiano, Robert D; Gupta, Subhas; Lantis Ii, John C; Lavery, Lawrence; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Teot, Luc

    2015-12-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWTi) and dwell time is an adjunctive treatment modality for selected complex wounds. Because of the greater amount of research now available, a multidisciplinary expert panel comprising the fields of podiatry, plastic and general surgery, burn treatment, infectious diseases, and orthopedics was convened on July 11, 2015, to produce a summary of the data and recommendations on the use of NPWTi. The panel members each reviewed available published literature on NPWTi in the PubMed, Cochrane, and Google Scholar databases from 1 January 2012 up until 20 July 2015 using the string search term negative pressure wound therapy instillation provided by the panel moderator; there were no restrictions on the language or type of publication. Panel members discussed their experiences and worked to reach consensus on several predefined topics. NPWTi was found to be most appropriate for properly selected complex hosts or wounds such as patients with multiple comorbidities, patients with an American Society of Anesthesiology Classification ≥ 2, severe traumatic wounds, diabetic foot infections, and wounds complicated by invasive infection or extensive biofilm. NPWTi should not be used routinely to treat simple wounds or hosts without comorbidities.There is evidence that when NPWTi is added to standard of care in properly selected cases it provides better overall clinical outcomes than standard of care alone, even when including NPWT. Based on published evidence and panel member experience, the Panel recommends a dwell time - fluid briefly instilled into the wound and allowed to diffuse for a user-specified time - of 10-20 minutes followed by 2-4 hours of negative pressure at -125 mmHg, although larger wounds may need times of up to 6 hours. Normal saline (0.9%) is the preferred solution for NPWTi, except in special situations. NPWTi with dwell time is an adjunct to other standard principles of appropriate wound assessment and

  11. Clinical Evaluation of a Robotic 6-Degree of Freedom Treatment Couch for Frameless Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Gevaert, Thierry; Verellen, Dirk; Engels, Benedikt; Depuydt, Tom; Heuninckx, Karina; Tournel, Koen; Duchateau, Michael; Reynders, Truus; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the added value of 6-degree of freedom (DOF) patient positioning with a robotic couch compared with 4DOF positioning for intracranial lesions and to estimate the immobilization characteristics of the BrainLAB frameless mask (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany), more specifically, the setup errors and intrafraction motion. Methods and Materials: We enrolled 40 patients with 66 brain metastases treated with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery and a 6DOF robotic couch. Patient positioning was performed with the BrainLAB ExacTrac stereoscopic X-ray system. Positioning results were collected before and after treatment to assess patient setup error and intrafraction motion. Existing treatment planning data were loaded and simulated for 4DOF positioning and compared with the 6DOF positioning. The clinical relevance was analyzed by means of the Paddick conformity index and the ratio of prescribed isodose volume covered with 4DOF to that obtained with the 6DOF positioning. Results: The mean three-dimensional setup error before 6DOF correction was 1.91 mm (SD, 1.25 mm). The rotational errors were larger in the longitudinal (mean, 0.23 Degree-Sign ; SD, 0.82 Degree-Sign ) direction compared with the lateral (mean, -0.09 Degree-Sign ; SD, 0.72 Degree-Sign ) and vertical (mean, -0.10 Degree-Sign ; SD, 1.03 Degree-Sign ) directions (p < 0.05). The mean three-dimensional intrafraction shift was 0.58 mm (SD, 0.42 mm). The mean intrafractional rotational errors were comparable for the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions: 0.01 Degree-Sign (SD, 0.35 Degree-Sign ), 0.03 Degree-Sign (SD, 0.31 Degree-Sign ), and -0.03 Degree-Sign (SD, 0.33 Degree-Sign ), respectively. The mean conformity index decreased from 0.68 (SD, 0.08) (6DOF) to 0.59 (SD, 0.12) (4DOF) (p < 0.05). A loss of prescribed isodose coverage of 5% (SD, 0.08) was found with the 4DOF positioning (p < 0.05). Half a degree for longitudinal and lateral rotations can be identified as a threshold for coverage loss. Conclusions: With a mask immobilization, patient setup error and intrafraction motions need to be evaluated and corrected for. The 6DOF patient positioning with a 6DOF robotic couch to correct translational and rotational setup errors improves target positioning with respect to treatment isocenter, which is in direct relation with the clinical outcome, compared with the 4DOF positioning.

  12. Frequency-shifted interferometry for fiber-optic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Fei

    This thesis studies frequency-shifted interferometry (FSI), a useful and versatile technique for fiber-optic sensing. I first present FSI theory by describing practical FSI configurations and discussing the parameters that affect system performance. Then, I demonstrate the capabilities of FSI in fiber-optic sensor multiplexing and high sensitivity chemical analysis. We implemented a cryogenic liquid level sensing system in which an array of 3 fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based sensors was interrogated by FSI. Despite sensors' spectral overlap, FSI is able to separate sensor signals according to their spatial locations and to measure their spectra, from which whether a sensor is in liquid or air can be unambiguously determined. I showed that a broadband source paired with a fast tunable filter can be used in FSI systems as the light source. An array of 9 spectrally overlapping FBGs was successfully measured by such a system, indicating the potential of system cost reduction as well as measurement speed improvement. I invented the the FSI-CRD technique, a highly sensitive FSI-based fiber cavity ring-down (CRD) method capable of deducing minuscule loss change in a fiber cavity from the intensity decay rate of continuous-wave light circulating in the cavity. As a proof-of-principle experiment, I successfully measured the fiber bend loss introduced in the fiber cavity with FSI-CRD, which was found to be 0.172 dB/m at a bend radius of 12.5 mm. We then applied FSI-CRD to evanescent-field sensing. We incorporated fiber tapers as the sensor head in the system and measured the concentration of 1-octyne solutions. A minimum detectable 1-octyne concentration of 0.29% was achieved with measurement sensitivity of 0.0094 dB/% 1-octyne. The same system also accurately detected the concentration change of sodium chloride (NaCl) and glucose solutions. Refractive index sensitivity of 1 dB/RIU with a measurement error of 1x10-4 dB was attined for NaCl solutions. Finally, I proposed a theoretical model to study the polarization effects in FSI systems. Preliminary results show that the model can already explain the experimental observations. It not only provides insight into how to improve system performance but also suggests potential new applications of the technique.

  13. SU-E-T-150: End to End Tests On the First Clinical EDGETM

    SciTech Connect

    Scheib, S; Schmelzer, P; Vieira, S; Greco, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the sub millimeter overall accuracy of EDGETM, the dedicated linac based SRS/SABR treatment platform from Varian, using a novel End-to-End (E2E) test phantom. Methods: The new E2E test phantom developed by Varian consists of a cube with an outer dimension of 15x15x15 cm3. The phantom is equipped with an exchangable inner cube (7×7×7 cm3) to hold radiochromic films or a tungsten ball (diameter = 5 mm) for Winston-Lutz tests. 16 ceramic balls (diameter = 5 mm) are embedded in the outer cube. Three embedded Calypso transponders allow for Calypso based monitoring. The outer surface of the phantom is tracked using the Optical Surface Monitoring System (OSMS). The phantom is positioned using kV, MV and CBCT images. A simCT of the phantom was acquired and SRS/SABR plans were treated using the new phantom on the first clinical installed EDGETM. As a first step a series of EPID based Winston-Lutz tests have been performed. As a second step the calculated dose distribution applied to the phantom was verified with radiochromic films in orthogonal planes. The measured dose distribution is compared with the calculated (Eclipse) one based on the known isocenter on both dose distributions. The geometrical shift needed to match both dose distributions is the overall accuracy and is determined using dose profiles, isodose lines or gamma pass rates (3%, 1 mm). Results: Winston-Lutz tests using the central tungsten BB demonstrated a targeting accuracy of 0.44±0.18mm for jaw (2cm × 2cm) defined 0.39±0.19mm for MLC (2cm × 2cm) defined and 0.37±0.15mm for cone (12.5 mm) defined fields. A treated patient plan (spinal metastases lesion with integrated boost) showed a dosimetric dose localization accuracy of 0.6mm. Conclusion: Geometric and dosimetric E2E tests on EDGETM, show sub-millimeter E2E targeting and dose localisation accuracy.

  14. Jaw expansive lesions: population incidence and CT dentalscan role

    PubMed Central

    FIASCHETTI, V.; FANUCCI, E.; RASCIONI, M.; OTTRIA, L.; BARLATTANI, A.; SIMONETTI, G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Aim The aim of the study is to evaluate the incidence of different expansive lesions and the advantages of the clinical employment of Dentalscan to study bones lesions and to establish a common diagnostic path. Materials and methods Since January 2005 to November 2009, 3200 patients, not selected for sex or age, have undergone a CT “Dentalscan” in the department of Diagnostic Imaging, Tor Vergata University Hospital (PTV), a suspect bone pathology was found in 704 of them through the XR-orthopantomograpy (OPT). CT images were obtained with General Electric CT Light Speed multislice. Images were saved in the Advantage Workstation (GE) supported by the “Dentascan” dedicated software and by the 3D software (3D SSD). The protocol was : Slice thickness 1,25 mm, gap 0, matrix 512 × 512, 140 KV and 70 mA. All the lesions were also studied with the dedicated three-dimensional reconstructor 3D SSD. Biopsy for diagnosis was performed on all the lesions, except one (false positive with digital OPT). The technique sensitivity was assessed for two important classes: benign and malignant lesions. Results Through CT Dentascan a detailed evaluation of the jaws lesions and their extension was obtained. 656 patients (93.1 %) out of 704 examined for a suspicious lesion on the orthopantomography had a benign lesion: (127 follicular cysts (18.2 %), 181 radicular cysts (25.1%), 93 non odontogenic cysts (13.2%), 29 fibroma (4.2%), 198 odontomes (28.2%), 24 ameloblastoma (3.6%), 4 brown tumors (0.7%), 47 (6.9%) had malignant lesions: (12 carcinoma (1.7%), 29 metastasis (4.3%), 6 sarcoma (0.8%), 1 Dentascan CT resulted to be negative (1 false positive of digital OPT). The sensitivity of the technique for both groups was 99% for benign lesions and 98% for malign lesions. Conclusions CT Dentascan characteristics suggest to consider these techniques as the gold standard for the evaluation of jaw expansive lesions and the support of surgical planning. PMID:23285385

  15. Renal toxicity mediated by continuous infusion of recombinant interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Ponce, P; Cruz, J; Travassos, J; Moreira, P; Oliveira, J; Melo-Gomes, E; Gouveia, J

    1993-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2), a potent lymphokine with antitumoral activity, was used in continuous intravenous infusion for 5 days (18,000,000 IU/m2/day) in 9 treatment cycles in 5 patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma. During the infusion, patients received aggressive fluid replacement titrated by invasive hemodynamic monitoring, aiming at a stable central volemia. Body weight went up an average of 4.5 kg in 5 days, mean arterial blood pressure dropped slightly from day 1 to day 5 (105.4 +/- 11.6 to 86.1 +/- 12.5 mm Hg, p < 0.05), systemic vascular resistance decreased from 1304.7 +/- 242.1 to 871.7 +/- 237.2 dyn/s/cm-5 (p < 0.05), with stable pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, cardiac output and central venous pressure. The urinary output significantly dropped from 1.9 +/- 1.2 to 0.2 +/- 0.1 ml/min (p < 0.05) with very significant rises in serum creatinine from 76.0 +/- 28.3 to 242.2 +/- 144.9 mumol/l (0.86 +/- 0.32 to 2.47 +/- 1.64 mg/dl) and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase urinary activity from 4.97 +/- 5.0 to 23.0 +/- 12.1 U/l, and significant decrement of creatinine clearance (1.86 +/- 0.65 to 0.29 +/- 0.27 ml/s or 111.5 +/- 38.9 to 17.1 +/- 16.6 ml/min) and urinary sodium (113.8 +/- 78.3 to 9.0 +/- 6.7 mmol/l). Urine sediment evolved from normal at day 1 to 9.0 +/- 3.7 epithelial cells/mm3 and 6.9 +/- 3.6 brown casts/mm3 (p = 0.001). We concluded that cancer treatment with IL-2 in continuous infusion, even with stable hemodynamics, induces an acute renal failure in most patients treated.

  16. Development of a Compact Rectenna for Wireless Powering of a Head-Mountable Deep Brain Stimulation Device

    PubMed Central

    Kouzani, Abbas Z.; Tye, Susannah J.; Abulseoud, Osama A.; Amiet, Andrew; Galehdar, Amir; Kaynak, Akif; Berk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Design of a rectangular spiral planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) at 915 MHz for wireless power transmission applications is proposed. The antenna and rectifying circuitry form a rectenna, which can produce dc power from a distant radio frequency energy transmitter. The generated dc power is used to operate a low-power deep brain stimulation pulse generator. The proposed antenna has the dimensions of 10 mm \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\times\\,$ \\end{document}12.5 mm \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\times\\,$ \\end{document}1.5 mm and resonance frequency of 915 MHz with a measured bandwidth of 15 MHz at return loss of \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}${-}{\\rm 10}~{\\rm dB}$ \\end{document}. A dielectric substrate of FR-4 of \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\varepsilon _{r}=4.8$ \\end{document} and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\delta=0.015$ \\end{document} with thickness of 1.5 mm is used for both antenna and rectifier circuit simulation and fabrication because of its availability and low cost. An L-section impedance matching circuit is used between the PIFA and voltage doubler rectifier. The impedance matching circuit also works as a low-pass filter for elimination of higher order harmonics. Maximum dc voltage at the rectenna output is 7.5 V in free space and this rectenna can drive a deep brain stimulation pulse generator at a distance of 30 cm from a radio frequency energy transmitter, which transmits power of 26.77 dBm. PMID:27170863

  17. Evaluation of bond strength of silorane and methacrylate based restorative systems to dentin using different cavity models

    PubMed Central

    ISAAC, Stephano Zerlottini; BERGAMIN, Ana Claudia Pietrobom; TURSSI, Cecília Pedroso; do AMARAL, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; BASTING, Roberta Tarkany; FRANÇA, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) to dentin of two different restorative systems: silorane-based (P90), and methacrylate-based (P60), using two cavity models. Material and Methods Occlusal enamel of 40 human third molars was removed to expose flat dentin surface. Class I cavities with 4 mm mesial-distal width, 3 mm buccal-lingual width and 3 mm depth (C-factor=4.5) were prepared in 20 teeth, which were divided into two groups (n=10) restored with P60 and P90, bulk-filled after dentin treatment according to manufacturer's instructions. Flat buccal dentin surfaces were prepared in the 20 remaining teeth (C-factor=0.2) and restored with resin blocks measuring 4x3x3 mm using the two restorative systems (n=10). The teeth were sectioned into samples with area between 0.85 and 1.25 mm2 that were submitted to µTBS testing, using a universal testing machine (EMIC) at speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fractured specimens were analyzed under stereomicroscope and categorized according to fracture pattern. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey Kramer tests. Results For flat surfaces, P60 obtained higher bond strength values compared with P90. However, for Class I cavities, P60 showed significant reduction in bond strength (p<0.05). No statistical difference between restorative systems was shown for Class I cavity model (p>0.05), or between Class I Cavity and Flat Surface group, considering P90 restorative system (p>0.05). Regarding fracture pattern, there was no statistical difference among groups (p=0.0713) and 56.3% of the fractures were adhesive. Conclusion It was concluded that methacrylate-based composite µTBS was influenced by cavity models, and the use of silorane-based composite led to similar bond strength values compared to the methacrylate-based composite in cavities with high C-factor. PMID:24212992

  18. High-Speed Transport of Fluid Drops and Solid Particles via Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Lih, Shyh-shiuh

    2012-01-01

    A compact sampling tool mechanism that can operate at various temperatures, and transport and sieve particle sizes of powdered cuttings and soil grains with no moving parts, has been created using traveling surface acoustic waves (SAWs) that are emitted by an inter-digital transducer (IDT). The generated waves are driven at about 10 MHz, and it causes powder to move towards the IDT at high speed with different speeds for different sizes of particles, which enables these particles to be sieved. This design is based on the use of SAWs and their propelling effect on powder particles and fluids along the path of the waves. Generally, SAWs are elastic waves propagating in a shallow layer of about one wavelength beneath the surface of a solid substrate. To generate SAWs, a piezoelectric plate is used that is made of LiNbO3 crystal cut along the x-axis with rotation of 127.8 along the y-axis. On this plate are printed pairs of fingerlike electrodes in the form of a grating that are activated by subjecting the gap between the electrodes to electric field. This configuration of a surface wave transmitter is called IDT. The IDT that was used consists of 20 pairs of fingers with 0.4-mm spacing, a total length of 12.5 mm. The surface wave is produced by the nature of piezoelectric material to contract or expand when subjected to an electric field. Driving the IDT to generate wave at high amplitudes provides an actuation mechanism where the surface particles move elliptically, pulling powder particles on the surface toward the wavesource and pushing liquids in the opposite direction. This behavior allows the innovation to separate large particles and fluids that are mixed. Fluids are removed at speed (7.5 to 15 cm/s), enabling this innovation of acting as a bladeless wiper for raindrops. For the windshield design, the electrodes could be made transparent so that they do not disturb the driver or pilot. Multiple IDTs can be synchronized to transport water or powder over larger distances. To demonstrate the transporting action, a video camera was used to record the movement. The speed of particles was measured from the video images.

  19. SU-C-BRF-01: Correlation of DIBH Breath Hold Amplitude with Dosimetric Sparing of Heart and Left Anterior Descending Artery in Left Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taeho; Reardon, Kelli; Sukovich, Kaitlyn; Crandley, Edwin; Read, Paul; Krishni, Wijesooriya

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A 7.4% increase in major coronary events per 1 Gy increase in mean heart dose has been reported from the population-based analysis of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity following treatment of left sided breast cancer. Deep inhalation breath-hold (DIBH) is clinically utilized to reduce radiation dose to heart and left anterior descending artery (LAD). We investigated the correlation of dose sparing in heart and LAD with internal DIBH amplitude to develop a quantitative predictive model for expected dose to heart and LAD based on internal breath hold amplitude. Methods: A treatment planning study (Prescription Dose = 50 Gy) was performed on 50 left breast cancer patients underwent DIBH whole breast radiotherapy. Two CT datasets, free breathing (FB) and DIBH, were utilized for treatment planning and for determination of the internal anatomy DIBH amplitude (difference between sternum position at FB and DIBH). The heart and LAD dose between FB and DIBH plans was compared and dose to the heart and LAD as a function of breath hold amplitude was determined. Results: Average DIBH amplitude using internal anatomy was 13.9±4.2 mm. The DIBH amplitude-mean dose reduction correlation is 20%/5mm (0.3 Gy/5mm) for the heart and 18%/5mm (1.1 Gy/5mm) for LAD. The correlation with max dose reduction is 12%/5mm (3.8 Gy/5mm) for the heart and 16%/5mm (3.2 Gy/5mm) for LAD. We found that average dose reductions to LAD from 6.0±6.5 Gy to 2.0±1.6 Gy with DIBH (4.0 Gy reduction: -67%, p < 0.001) and average dose reduction to the heart from 1.3±0.7 Gy to 0.7±0.2 Gy with DIBH (0.6 Gy reduction: -46%, p < 0.001). That suggests using DIBH may reduce the risk of the major coronary event for left sided breast cancer patients. Conclusion: The correlation between breath hold amplitude and dosimetric sparing suggests that dose sparing linearly increases with internal DIBH amplitude.

  20. Emphasizing Conformal Avoidance Versus Target Definition for IMRT Planning in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harari, Paul M.; Song Shiyu; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To describe a method for streamlining the process of elective nodal volume definition for head-and-neck (H and N) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning. Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients who had undergone curative-intent RT for H and N cancer underwent comprehensive treatment planning using three distinct, plan design techniques: conventional three-field design, target-defined IMRT (TD-IMRT), and conformal avoidance IMRT (CA-IMRT). For each patient, the conventional three-field design was created first, thereby providing the 'outermost boundaries' for subsequent IMRT design. In brief, TD-IMRT involved physician contouring of the gross tumor volume, high- and low-risk clinical target volume, and normal tissue avoidance structures on consecutive 1.25-mm computed tomography images. CA-IMRT involved physician contouring of the gross tumor volume and normal tissue avoidance structures only. The overall physician time for each approach was monitored, and the resultant plans were rigorously compared. Results: The average physician working time for the design of the respective H and N treatment contours was 0.3 hour for the conventional three-field design plan, 2.7 hours for TD-IMRT, and 0.9 hour for CA-IMRT. Dosimetric analysis confirmed that the largest volume of tissue treated to an intermediate (50 Gy) and high (70 Gy) dose occurred with the conventional three-field design followed by CA-IMRT and then TD-IMRT. However, for the two IMRT approaches, comparable results were found in terms of salivary gland and spinal cord protection. Conclusion: CA-IMRT for H and N treatment offers an alternative to TD-IMRT. The overall time for physician contouring was substantially reduced (approximately threefold), yielding a more standardized elective nodal volume. Because of the complexity of H and N IMRT target design, CA-IMRT might ultimately prove a safer and more reliable method to export to general radiation oncology practitioners, particularly those with limited H and N caseload experience.

  1. Dose variations caused by setup errors in intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: A PRESAGE study

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Kieyin; Gagliardi, Frank; Alqathami, Mamdooh; Ackerly, Trevor; Geso, Moshi

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) requires tight margins around the tumor, thus producing a steep dose gradient between the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissue. Any setup errors might become clinically significant. To date, no study has been performed to evaluate the dosimetric variations caused by setup errors with a 3-dimensional dosimeter, the PRESAGE. This research aimed to evaluate the potential effect that setup errors have on the dose distribution of intracranial SRT. Computed tomography (CT) simulation of a CIRS radiosurgery head phantom was performed with 1.25-mm slice thickness. An ideal treatment plan was generated using Brainlab iPlan. A PRESAGE was made for every treatment with and without errors. A prescan using the optical CT scanner was carried out. Before treatment, the phantom was imaged using Brainlab ExacTrac. Actual radiotherapy treatments with and without errors were carried out with the Novalis treatment machine. Postscan was performed with an optical CT scanner to analyze the dose irradiation. The dose variation between treatments with and without errors was determined using a 3-dimensional gamma analysis. Errors are clinically insignificant when the passing ratio of the gamma analysis is 95% and above. Errors were clinically significant when the setup errors exceeded a 0.7-mm translation and a 0.5° rotation. The results showed that a 3-mm translation shift in the superior-inferior (SI), right-left (RL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions and 2° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 53.1%. Translational and rotational errors of 1.5 mm and 1°, respectively, generated a passing ratio of 62.2%. Translation shift of 0.7 mm in the directions of SI, RL, and AP and a 0.5° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 96.2%. Preventing the occurrences of setup errors in intracranial SRT treatment is extremely important as errors greater than 0.7 mm and 0.5° alter the dose distribution. The geometrical displacements affect dose delivery to the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues.

  2. Key biogeochemical factors affecting soil carbon storage in Posidonia meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Oscar; Ricart, Aurora M.; Lavery, Paul S.; Mateo, Miguel Angel; Arias-Ortiz, Ariane; Masque, Pere; Rozaimi, Mohammad; Steven, Andy; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2016-08-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors influence the accumulation of organic carbon (Corg) in seagrass ecosystems. We surveyed Posidonia sinuosa meadows growing in different water depths to assess the variability in the sources, stocks and accumulation rates of Corg. We show that over the last 500 years, P. sinuosa meadows closer to the upper limit of distribution (at 2-4 m depth) accumulated 3- to 4-fold higher Corg stocks (averaging 6.3 kg Corg m-2) at 3- to 4-fold higher rates (12.8 g Corg m-2 yr-1) compared to meadows closer to the deep limits of distribution (at 6-8 m depth; 1.8 kg Corg m-2 and 3.6 g Corg m-2 yr-1). In shallower meadows, Corg stocks were mostly derived from seagrass detritus (88 % in average) compared to meadows closer to the deep limit of distribution (45 % on average). In addition, soil accumulation rates and fine-grained sediment content (< 0.125 mm) in shallower meadows (2.0 mm yr-1 and 9 %, respectively) were approximately 2-fold higher than in deeper meadows (1.2 mm yr-1 and 5 %, respectively). The Corg stocks and accumulation rates accumulated over the last 500 years in bare sediments (0.6 kg Corg m-2 and 1.2 g Corg m-2 yr-1) were 3- to 11-fold lower than in P. sinuosa meadows, while fine-grained sediment content (1 %) and seagrass detritus contribution to the Corg pool (20 %) were 8- and 3-fold lower than in Posidonia meadows, respectively. The patterns found support the hypothesis that Corg storage in seagrass soils is influenced by interactions of biological (e.g., meadow productivity, cover and density), chemical (e.g., recalcitrance of Corg stocks) and physical (e.g., hydrodynamic energy and soil accumulation rates) factors within the meadow. We conclude that there is a need to improve global estimates of seagrass carbon storage accounting for biogeochemical factors driving variability within habitats.

  3. Perindopril: first-line treatment for hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zanchetti, A; Desche, P

    1989-01-01

    The antihypertensive efficacy and acceptability of perindopril (P) were compared to those of captopril (C), atenolol (A) and a diuretic, hydrochlorothiazide + amiloride (D), in 3 double-blind parallel multicenter studies involving 165, 173, and 165 patients, respectively. Patients with essential hypertension and a supine DBP between 95 and 125 mmHg (mean 103.9, 106.2, and 105.2 mmHg, respectively) after a 1-month placebo period were randomized to P 4 mg once daily (o.d.) and either C 25 mg twice daily, or A 50 mg o.d. or D (hydrochlorothiazide 50 mg + amiloride 5 mg o.d.) and treated for 3 months, with visits at monthly intervals. If necessary, treatment was adjusted at each visit to control BP (supine DBP less than or equal to 90 mm Hg): firstly by doubling the dose and secondly, one month later, by the addition of a second drug, a diuretic in the studies versus C or A, a beta-blocker in the study versus D. At 3 months, BP control on monotherapy in the three studies was achieved in the following proportion of patients: 49% with P vs 49% with C; 55% with P vs 48% with A; 72% with P vs 72% with D. Most of the patients controlled by P received 4 mg, about 15% were controlled with 8 mg. A further percentage of patients was controlled with combination therapy, the combination with a diuretic being more effective with P than with C (26 vs 8%) or A (23 vs 10%) and the combination with a beta-blocker being less effective with P than with D (5 vs 13%). The total percentage of patients controlled was greater with P than with C (75 vs 57%, p = 0.016) or A (78 vs 58%, p = 0.006) and there was no significant difference between P and D (78 vs 84%). The drop-out rate due to side-effects was up to 6% with P, similar to that observed with C (4%), A (5%) and D (5%). Most of the complaints reported with P were minor and non-specific, their incidence being similar to that observed with the other drugs. Cough was reported with both P (1%) and C (2%) as well as with A (1%) and D (1

  4. Innovations in adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy: OSIRIS, galaxy surveys, and galaxy mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barczys, Matthew Michael

    This thesis presents the design, construction, and installation of two instruments designed for use with the Keck Telescopes' Adaptive Optics (AO) Systems. It also presents the results of a near-infrared AO survey to measure the pair fraction in faint field galaxies. The instrumentation portion of the thesis concentrates on two main projects, OSIRIS, a near-infrared integral- field spectrograph, and SHARC, a near-infrared camera. OSIRIS is a facility- class instrument at the Keck Observatory, and offers a relatively new spectroscopic capability of simultaneously acquiring infrared spectra ( R ~ 3900) at up to 3000 contiguous locations in an AO-corrected focal plane. SHARC is a camera developed for the Keck AO Team to use with AO-related engineering tasks, including testing and commissioning of the Next-Generation Wavefront Controller. SHARC images a field of up to [Special characters omitted.] on a side, at a spatial resolution of [Special characters omitted.] per pixel throughout the near-infrared (1-2.5 mm). Both instruments were developed in the Infrared Laboratory of the UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy. The remainder of the thesis describes two near-infrared AO galaxy surveys carried out during the construction of OSIRIS using another instrument partially developed by UCLA. The Keck Observatory Near-Infrared AO Camera (NIRC2) was used to image nearly 700 faint field galaxies (mostly at z ~ 0.5-1.5), with the goal of measuring the near-infrared galaxy pair fraction. This is the first time that AO has been used to measure the pair fraction in field galaxies, and provides a unique opportunity to probe close companions (less than 1 '' ) in the near-infrared. Our measured pair fraction is 0.13 ± 0.04 in both the H - and K ' -bands (1.63mm and 2.12mm) and provides an independent check of optical pair fraction measurements made using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). While most pairs are observed to have comparable brightness in optical imaging ( dm < 2 mag), pairs appear to span a much wider range ( dm < 5-6 mag) in the infrared. Since infrared brightness is more indicative of the actual stellar mass in galaxies, the number of major mergers is probably significantly over- estimated by studies relying solely on optical data.

  5. Risk assessment of physiological effects of atmospheric composition and pressure in Constellation vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuring, Richard; Conkin, Johnny; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    Introduction: To limit the risk of fire and reduce denitrogenation time to prevent decompression sickness to support frequent extravehicular activities on the Moon, a hypobaric (PB=414mmHg) and mildly hypoxic ( ppO2=132mmHg, 32% O2-68%N2) living environment is considered for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). With acute change in ppO2 from 145-178mmHg at standard vehicular operating pressure to less than 125mmHg at desired lunar surface vehicular operating pressures, there is the possibility that some crewmembers may develop symptoms of Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS). The signs and symptoms of AMS (headache plus nausea, dizziness, fatigue, or sleeplessness) could impact crew health and performance on lunar surface missions. Methods: We performed a literature review on the topic of the physiological effects of reduced ppO2 and absolute pressure. The results of nine studies were evaluated. Results: There is evidence for an absolute pressure effect per se on AMS, so the higher the altitude for a given hypoxic alveolar oxygen (O2) partial pressure (PAO2), the greater the AMS response is. Between 7% and 25% of adults may experience mild AMS near 2000 m altitude following a rapid ascent from sea level while breathing air (6500 ft, acute PAO2=75mmHg). The operational experience with the Shuttle staged denitrogenation protocol at 528mmHg (3048 m) while breathing 26.5% O2 (acute PAO2=85mmHg) in astronauts adapting to microgravity suggests a similar likely experience in the proposed CEV environment. Conclusions: We believe the risk of mild AMS is greater given a PAO2 of 77mmHg at 4876 m altitude while breathing 32% O2 than at 1828 m altitude while breathing 21% O2. Only susceptible astronauts would develop mild and transient AMS with prolonged exposure to 414 mmHg (4876 m) while breathing 32% O2 (acute PAO2=77mmHg). So the following may be employed for operational risk reduction: (1) develop procedures to increase PB as needed in the

  6. Increased anal basal pressure in chronic anal fissures may be caused by overreaction of the anal-external sphincter continence reflex.

    PubMed

    van Meegdenburg, Maxime M; Trzpis, Monika; Heineman, Erik; Broens, Paul M A

    2016-09-01

    Chronic anal fissure is a painful disorder caused by linear ulcers in the distal anal mucosa. Even though it counts as one of the most common benign anorectal disorders, its precise etiology and pathophysiology remains unclear. Current thinking is that anal fissures are caused by anal trauma and pain, which leads to internal anal sphincter hypertonia. Increased anal basal pressure leads to diminished anodermal blood flow and local ischemia, which delays healing and leads to chronic anal fissure. The current treatment of choice for chronic anal fissure is either lateral internal sphincterotomy or botulinum toxin injections. In contrast to current thinking, we hypothesize that the external, rather than the internal, anal sphincter is responsible for increased anal basal pressure in patients suffering from chronic anal fissure. We think that damage to the anal mucosa leads to hypersensitivity of the contact receptors of the anal-external sphincter continence reflex, resulting in overreaction of the reflex. Overreaction causes spasm of the external anal sphincter. This in turn leads to increased anal basal pressure, diminished anodermal blood flow, and ischemia. Ischemia, finally, prevents the anal fissure from healing. Our hypothesis is supported by two findings. The first concerned a chronic anal fissure patient with increased anal basal pressure (170mmHg) who had undergone lateral sphincterotomy. Directly after the operation, while the submucosal anesthetic was still active, basal anal pressure decreased to 80mmHg. Seven hours after the operation, when the anesthetic had completely worn off, basal anal pressure increased again to 125mmHg, even though the internal anal sphincter could no longer be responsible for the increase. Second, in contrast to previous studies, recent studies demonstrated that botulinum toxin influences external anal sphincter activity and, because it is a striated muscle relaxant, it seems reasonable to presume that it affects the striated

  7. Failure of dual radius hydroxyapatite-coated acetabular cups

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, Fabio; Molina, Mauro; Riva, Giacomo; Zatti, Giovanni; Cherubino, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Many kind of hydroxyapatite-coated cups were used, with favorable results in short term studies; it was supposed that its use could improve osteointegration of the cup, enhancing thus stability and survivorship. The purpose of this study is to analyze the long term behavior of the hemispheric HA coated, Dual Radius Osteonics cup and to discuss the way of failure through the exam of the revised components and of both periacetabular and osteolysis tissue. Materials and Methods Between 1994 and 1997, at the Department of Orthopedic Sciences of the Insubria University, using the posterolateral approach, were implanted 276 Dual Radius Osteonics® in 256 patients, with mean age of 63 years. Results At a mean follow-up of 10 years (range 8–12 years), 183 cups in 165 patients, were available for clinical and radiographical evaluation. 22 Cups among the 183 were revised (11%). The cause of revision was aseptic loosening in 17 cases, septic loosening in one case, periprosthetic fracture in another case, osteolysis and polyethylene wear in two cases and, finally, recurrent dislocations in the last one. In the remaining patients, mean HHS increased from a preoperative value of 50,15 to a postoperative value of 92,69. The mean polyethylene wear was 1,25 mm (min. 0,08, max. 3,9 mm), with a mean annual wear of 0,17 mm. The mean acetabular migration on the two axis was 1,6 mm and 1,8 mm. Peri-acetabular osteolysis were recorded in 89% of the implants (163 cases). The cumulative survivorship (revision as endpoint) at the time was 88,9%. Conclusion Our study confirms the bad behavior of this type of cup probably related to the design, to the method of HA fixation. The observations carried out on the revised cup confirm these hypotheses but did not clarify if the third body wear could be a further problem. Another interesting aspect is the high incidence of osteolysis, which are often asymptomatic becoming a problem for the surgeon as the patient refuses the possibility of a revision. PMID:18687141

  8. Key biogeochemical factors affecting soil carbon storage in Posidonia meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, O.; Ricart, A. M.; Lavery, P. S.; Mateo, M. A.; Arias-Ortiz, A.; Masque, P.; Steven, A.; Duarte, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors influence the accumulation of organic carbon (Corg) in seagrass ecosystems. We surveyed Posidonia sinuosa meadows growing in different water depths to assess the variability in the sources, stocks and accumulation rates of Corg. We show that over the last 500 years, P. sinuosa meadows closer to the upper limit of distribution (at 2-4 m depth) accumulated 3 to 4-fold higher Corg stocks (averaging 6.3 kg Corg m-2) at 3 to 4-fold higher rates (12.8 g Corg m-2 yr-1) compared to meadows closer to the deep limits of distribution (at 6-8 m depth; 1.8 kg Corg m-2 and 3.6 g Corg m-2 yr-1). In shallower meadows, Corg stores were mostly derived from seagrass detritus (88 % in average) compared to meadows closer to the deep limit of distribution (45 % on average). Also, sediment accumulation rates and fine-grained sediment content (< 0.125 mm) in shallower meadows (2.0 mm yr-1 and 9 %, respectively) were approximately 2-fold higher than in deeper meadows (1.2 mm yr-1 and 5 %, respectively). The Corg stocks and accumulation rates accumulated over the last 500 years in bare sediments (0.6 kg Corg m-2 and 1.2 g Corg m-2 yr-1) were 3 to 11-fold lower than in P. sinuosa meadows, while fine-grained sediment content (1 %) and seagrass detritus contribution to the Corg pool (20 %) were 8 and 3-fold lower than in Posidonia meadows, respectively. The patterns found support the hypotheses that Corg storage in seagrass soils is influenced by interactions of biological (e.g. meadow productivity, cover and density), chemical (e.g. recalcitrance of Corg stocks) and physical (e.g. hydrodynamic energy and sediment accumulation rates) factors within the meadow. We conclude that there is a need to improve global estimates of seagrass carbon storage accounting for biogeochemical factors driving variability within habitats.

  9. Preliminary Results from a Late Pleistocene to Holocene Paleoclimate Study of the Lake Sediment Cores, Northern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedillo, D. N.; Brister, A. R.; LoPresti, C. A.; Maldonado, M.; Pitrucha, R. M.; West, C.; Martinez, E.; Lineline, J.; Petronis, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    We present the preliminary results from an integrated, paleoclimatic study of sediment cores collected from the Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge (LVNWR) and surrounding region that bear on the late Pleistocene to Holocene paleoclimatic variations in northeastern NM. We collected sedimentologic, midge fossil, and rock magnetic data from sediment cores to characterize the materials, identify stratigraphic changes, document shifting lake levels, assess temperature changes, and infer paleoclimate conditions. Data from McAllister and Wallace Lake are encouraging and reveal depth dependent changes in fossil assemblages, grain size, and rock magnetic properties that we interpret to reflect climatic driven variations impacting the depositional system. We recognize three different types of chironomid subfamilies (Chironomini, Tanypodinae, and Orthocladiinae). Based on the fossil results, the water has been warm in the most recent years. Grain size distribution from the lower to upper core levels reveal that the amount of fine sand-sized sediment (0.125 mm diameter) increases while the amount of medium (0.25) to coarse (0.50) sand-sized sediment decreases implying that there may have been a reduction in stream energy and hence precipitation over the time period represented by the core. Bulk low-field magnetic susceptibility decreases by an order of magnitude from the surface to the base of the measured core suggesting a change in detrital magnetic influx into the lacustrian system. Curie point estimates indicate that the dominant magnetic mineral in all samples is cubic, low-Ti titanomagnetite phase. We postulate that concurrent with alpine glacial activity during the Pleistocene, the LVNWR and the transitional Great Plains region to the northeast was an expansive single lake or interconnected lake system, analogous to the Pleistocene lakes of the Estancia Basin (Lake Estancia) and the Tularosa Basin (Lake Otero) of central and southern NM. Following the end of glacial

  10. RAINBOWS and CERAMBOWS: The Technologies of Pre-Stressed Piezo Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haertling, Gene H.

    1996-01-01

    Amplified mechanical displacement effects, similar to those observed in the recently reported Rainbow actuators, have also been found to exist in prestressed ceramic/metal composite structures coined as CERAMBOW's - an acronym for CERamic And Metal Biased Oxide Wafer. Mimicking the Rainbows in many ways, the intentionally created internal compressive and tensile stresses within the Cerambows are used to amplify their displacement properties via the combined effects of piezoelectric d31 strain and domain reorientation. They are fabricated from ferroelectric, piezoelectric or electrostrictive materials and metal substrates of significantly different thermal expansions which are largely responsible for the creation of the stress. Typical ceramics used in Cerambows are PZT, PLZT, PBZT, PSZT and PMN and some typical metal substrates are Al, Ag, Ni, brass, steel and Be/Cu foil. Shapes can vary from round disks to square plates and rectangular bars. Formed at an elevated temperature of approximately 250 C, the stresses on cooling to room temperature are generally sufficient to produce displacements as large as 0.125mm (5 mils) when activated unipolar and 0.25mm (10 mils) when operated bipolar at 450 volts in a dome mode. Comparing equal structures of a Cerambow with a Rainbow, the Cerambow was found to achieve approximately 70% of the displacement that would normally be obtained with a Rainbow. Although this difference in displacement is sufficient to prefer a Rainbow for many applications, there are some advantages for the Cerambow. Among these are (1) the processing temperatures are lower, (2) high lead-containing ceramics are not required and (3) in some instances the metal substrate is more convenient to interface with other elements of a device. However, the disadvantages include (1) lower displacement in the dome mode of operation, (2) the higher displacement saddle mode has not yet been demonstrated with a Cerambow and (3) the ceramic/metal bond interface is a

  11. Dynamics of deposited fly-ash and fine grained magnetite in sandy material of different porosity (column experiments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapicka, Ales; Kodesova, Radka; Petrovsky, Eduard; Grison, Hana

    2010-05-01

    Several studies confirm that soil magnetometry can serve as proxy of industrial immisions as well as heavy-metal contamination. The important assumption for magnetic mapping of contaminated soils is that atmospherically deposited particulate matter, including the ferrimagnetic phase, accumulates in the top soil horizons and remains there over long period. Only if this is true, large areas can be reliably mapped using soil magnetometry, and, moreover, this method can be used also for long-term monitoring. However, in soil types such as sandy soils with different porosity or soils with substantial variability of water regime, translocation of the deposited anthropogenic particles may result in biased (underestimated) values of the measured topsoil magnetic susceptibility. From the physical point of view, this process may be considered as colloid transport through porous medium. In our column experiments in laboratory we used three technical sands with different particle sizes (0,63 - 1.25mm, 0,315-0,80mm, 0,10-0,63mm). Sands in cylinders were contaminated on the surface by fly-ashes from coal-burning power plant (mean grain size 10μm) and fine grained Fe3O4 (grain size < 20 μm). Soil moisture sensors were used to monitor water regime within the sand columns after controlled rain simulation and temperature distribution in sand column was measured as well. Vertical migration of ferrimagnetic particles-tracers presented in the fly-ash was measured by SM 400 Kappameter. By means of magnetic susceptibility distribution we studied two parameters: gradual shift of peak concentration of contaminants (relative to surface layer) and maximum penetration depth. Results indicated that after rain simulation (pulls infiltration of defined water volume) the positions of peak values moved downwards compared to the initial state and gradual decrease of susceptibility peak values were detected in all studied sand formations. Fly-ash migrated more or less freely in coarse sand material. In medium and fine sand the contaminants moved only to the depths of several cm due to the pore-space blocking and water flow decrease. Fine-grained magnetite shows different behavior. Position of peaks value is more or less stable and maximum depth of penetration is only a few cm in all cases. Higher grain size value is probably reason for higher stability of magnetite. Moreover, magnetic interaction between grains increase "effective" grain size value and restricts transport in material with given porosity. This research is supported by the Grant Agency ASCR under grant IAA300120701

  12. Modern spectral transmissometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgerson, Mark J.; Bartz, Robert; Zaneveld, J. Ronald V.; Kitchen, James C.

    1990-09-01

    We have evaluated a number of spectral attenuation meter designs based on constraints related to power consumption, spectral bandwidth, sampling time, accuracy and stability . Our fmal instrument design employs a unique optical bridge deve1oped1r Sea Tech with ONR support, a tungsten light source and a holographic grating monochromatorThe instrument design is summarized as follows: White light from a 10-Watt tungsten lamp with a 1mm2 filament is collected by a condensing lens and then spatially filtered by a 1mm diameter pinhole which is placed at the entrance port of a monochromator. The monochromator has a 45°, 1200 lines/mm, holographic grating 37 mm in diameter with a 91 mm focal length. The grating is rotated about its vertical axis with a sine arm driven by a stepping motor, allowing wavelength to be selected from 400 to 800 nm. At the exit port of the monochromator we use a 1mm diameter pinhole which spectrally filters the output light, resulting in a spectral bandwidth of 9. 1 nm. This nearly monochromatic light is then measured by a unique reference detector with a 0.5mm diameter pinhole at its center, allowing light to be transmitted through the center of the detector. The transmitted light has a bandwidth of 4.5 nm. The monochromatic light is then collimated by a 50mm focal length achromatic lens and stopped down to a beam 1 cm in diameter. This light then enters the sample chamber. After passing through the sample the light is received by a 61mm focal length achromatic lens and is focused onto a signal detector with a diameter of 1.25mm. Digitized ratios ofreference detector to signal detector voltages allow transmission to be measured with an accuracy of 0.05% and a resolution of 0.01%. By monitoring temperature we were able to temperature compensate the instrument to within 0.05% transmission from 00 C to 25° C. Based on these results it is now possible to construct a spectral attenuation meter with the required sensitivity and accuracy to measure beam attenuation in water as clean as oligotrophic ocean waters.

  13. Metal content in street dust as a reflection of atmospheric dust emissions from coal power plants, metal smelters, and traffic.

    PubMed

    Žibret, Gorazd; Van Tonder, Danel; Žibret, Lea

    2013-07-01

    Resuspended street dust is a source of inhalable particles in urban environments. Despite contaminated street dust being a possible health risk factor for local population, little is known about the contribution of atmospheric dust emissions and other factors to the content of toxic metals in street dust. The impact of smelting, traffic, and power plants on metal contaminates in street dust is the focus of street dust sampling at 46 locations in the Witbank area (Republic of South Africa). This area is characterized by numerous open-pit coal mines in the Karoo coal basin, which provides a cheap source of energy to numerous metallurgical smelters and ironworks and supplies coal to the coal-fired power plants located nearby. Street dust was collected on asphalt or concrete surfaces with hard plastic brushes, avoiding collecting of possible sand, soil, or plant particles. Chemical analysis was done on the <0.125 mm fraction using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry subsequent to total digestion. Exceptionally high concentrations of metals were detected with concentrations of Fe reaching 17.7%, Cr 4.3%, Mn 2%, Ni 366 mg/kg, and V 4,410 mg/kg. Factor analysis indicates three sources for the pollution. Road traffic which contributes to the high concentrations of Cu, Pb, Sb, and Sn, with the highest impacts detected in the town of Witbank. The second source is associated with the metal smelting industry, contributing to Fe, Co, Mn, and V emissions. The highest factor scores were observed around four metallurgical smelter operations, located in the Ferrobank, Highveld, and Clewer industrial areas. Impact of vanadium smelter to street dust composition could still be detected some 20 km away from the sources. Exceptionally high concentrations of Cr were observed in four samples collected next to the Ferrobank industrial area, despite Cr not being loaded in factor 2. The last source of the pollution is most probably fly ash associated with the coal-fired power plants

  14. Near-Surface Geophysical Mapping of the Hydrological Response to an Intense Rainfall Event at the Field Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, G.; Vanderlinden, K.; Giraldez, J. V.; Espejo, A. J.; Muriel, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    Soil moisture plays an important role in a wide variety of biogeochemical fluxes in the soil-plant-atmosphere system and governs the (eco)hydrological response of a catchment to an external forcing such as rainfall. Near-surface electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors that measure the soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) provide a fast and non-invasive means for characterizing this response at the field or catchment scale through high-resolution time-lapse mapping. Here we show how ECa maps, obtained before and after an intense rainfall event of 125 mm h-1, elucidate differences in soil moisture patterns and hydrologic response of an experimental field as a consequence of differed soil management. The dryland field (Vertisol) was located in SW Spain and cropped with a typical wheat-sunflower-legume rotation. Both, near-surface and subsurface ECa (ECas and ECad, respectively), were measured using the EM38-DD EMI sensor in a mobile configuration. Raw ECa measurements and Mean Relative Differences (MRD) provided information on soil moisture patterns while time-lapse maps were used to evaluate the hydrologic response of the field. ECa maps of the field, measured before and after the rainfall event showed similar patterns. The field depressions where most of water and sediments accumulated had the highest ECa and MRD values. The SE-oriented soil, which was deeper and more exposed to sun and wind, showed the lowest ECa and MRD. The largest differences raised in the central part of the field where a high ECa and MRD area appeared after the rainfall event as a consequence of the smaller soil depth and a possible subsurface flux concentration. Time-lapse maps of both ECa and MRD were also similar. The direct drill plots showed higher increments of ECa and MRD as a result of the smaller runoff production. Time-lapse ECa increments showed a bimodal distribution differentiating clearly the direct drill from the conventional and minimum tillage plots. However this kind

  15. Determination of degradation rates of organic substances in the unsaturated soil zone depending on the grain size fractions of various soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Thomas; Stefan, Catalin; Goersmeyer, Nora

    2015-04-01

    Rate and extent of the biological degradation of organic substances during transport through the unsaturated soil zone is decisively influenced by the chemical and physical properties of the pollutants such as water solubility, toxicity and molecular structure. Furthermore microbial degradation processes are also influenced by soil-specific properties. An important parameter is the soil grain size distribution on which the pore volume and the pore size depends. Changes lead to changes in air and water circulation as well as preferred flow paths. Transport capacity of water inclusive nutrients is lower in existing bad-drainable fine pores in soils with small grain size fractions than in well-drainable coarse pores in a soil with bigger grain size fractions. Because fine pores are saturated with water for a longer time than the coarse pores and oxygen diffusion in water is ten thousand times slower than in air, oxygen is replenished much slower in soils with small grain size fractions. As a result life and growth conditions of the microorganisms are negatively affected. This leads to less biological activity, restricted degradation/mineralization of pollutants or altered microbial processes. The aim of conducted laboratory column experiments was to study the correlation between the grain size fractions respectively pore sizes, the oxygen content and the biodegradation rate of infiltrated organic substances. Therefore two columns (active + sterile control) were filled with different grain size fractions (0,063-0,125 mm, 0,2-0,63 mm and 1-2 mm) of soils. The sterile soil was inoculated with a defined amount of a special bacteria culture (sphingobium yanoikuae). A solution with organic substances glucose, oxalic acid, sinaphylic alcohol and nutrients was infiltrated from the top in intervals. The degradation of organic substances was controlled by the measurement of dissolved organic carbon in the in- and outflow of the column. The control of different pore volumes

  16. The 3D distribution of cordierite and biotite in hornfels from the Bugaboo contact aureole (British Columbia, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidies, Fred; Petley-Ragan, Arianne; Pattison, David

    2016-04-01

    The size, abundance, shape and spatial distribution of metamorphic minerals bears important information on the rates and mechanisms of fundamental processes that take place during metamorphic crystallization. X-ray computed tomography (XR-CT) has become the method of choice to study the three-dimensional (3D) disposition of minerals in rocks as it allows investigation of relatively large sample volumes at sufficiently high resolution required for statistically meaningful analyses, and as its non-destructive fashion permits further studies such as mineral chemical, isotopic or crystallographic analyses of select grains identified through XR-CT. We present results obtained through the quantification of the 3D disposition of cordierite and biotite crystals in a hornfels from the contact aureole of the Bugaboo Batholith (British Columbia, Canada) using XR-CT and global as well as scale-dependent pattern statistics (Petley-Ragan et al., 2016). The results demonstrate a random distribution of cordierite and biotite crystal sizes for all scales across the entire rock volume studied indicative of interface-controlled prograde metamorphic reaction kinetics. We show that the common approach to approximate the shape of crystals as spherical underestimates the influence of the Strauss hard-core process on rock texture which may be misinterpreted to reflect ordering of crystal sizes by inhibition of nucleation and growth commonly associated with diffusion-controlled reaction kinetics. According to our findings, Strauss hard-core ordering develops at length scales equal to and less than the average major axis of the crystal population. This is significantly larger than what is obtained if a spherical crystal geometry would be assumed, and increases with deviation from sphericity. For the cordierite and biotite populations investigated in this research, Strauss hard-core ordering developed at length scales of up to ˜2.2 and 1.25 mm, respectively, which is almost 1 mm longer than the scales that would be obtained if a spherical geometry would have been assumed. Our results highlight the importance of a critical assessment of the geometrical model assumptions commonly applied in the 3D analysis of crystal size distributions, and underline the need for a quantitative understanding of interface processes in order to appreciate their role in the kinetics of contact metamorphic reactions and rock texture formation. References: Petley-Ragan A, Gaidies F, Pattison DRM (2016) A statistical analysis of the distribution of cordierite and biotite in hornfels from the Bugaboo contact aureole: implications for the kinetics of porphyroblast crystallization. Journal of Metamorphic Geology 34:85-101

  17. Small Specimen Data from a High Temperature HFIR Irradiation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; McDuffee, Joel Lee; Thoms, Kenneth R

    2014-01-01

    The HTV capsule is a High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) target-rod capsule designed to operate at very high temperatures. The graphite containing section of the capsule (in core) is approximately 18 inches (457.2 mm) long and is separated into eight temperature zones. The specimen diameters within each zone are set to achieve the desired gas gap and hence design temperature (900 C, 1200 C or 1500 C). The capsule has five zones containing 0.400 inch (10.16 mm) diameter specimens, two zones containing 0.350 inch (8.89 mm) diameter specimens and one zone containing 0.300 inch (7.62 mm) diameter specimens. The zones have been distributed within the experiment to optimize the gamma heating from the HFIR core as well as minimize the axial heat flow in the capsule. Consequently, there are two 900 C zones, three 1200 C zones, and three 1500 C zones within the HTV capsule. Each zone contains nine specimens 0.210 0.002 inches (5.334 mm) in length. The capsule will be irradiated to a peak dose of 3.17 displacements per atom. The HTV specimens include samples of the following graphite grades: SGL Carbon s NBG-17 and NBG-18, GrafTech s PCEA, Toyo Tanso s IG-110, Mersen s 2114 and the reference grade H-451 (SGL Carbon). As part of the pre-irradiation program the specimens were characterized using ASTM Standards C559 for bulk density, and ASTM C769 for approximate Young s modulus from the sonic velocity. The probe frequency used for the determination of time of flight of the ultrasonic signal was 2.25 MHz. Marked volume (specimen diameter) effects were noted for both bulk density (increased with increasing specimen volume or diameter) and Dynamic Young s modulus (decreased with increasing specimen volume or diameter). These trends are extended by adding the property vs. diameter data for unirradiated AGC-1 creep specimens (nominally 12.5 mm-diameter x 25.4 mm-length). The relatively large reduction in Dynamic Young s Modulus was surprising given the trend for increasing density with increasing volume. The graphite-filler particle size was noted to be influential in the volume dependency data, with finer grained graphites showing the least specimen volume/diameter effect. Here the volume dependency trends are discussed in terms of the graphite s filler-particle size and texture.

  18. SU-E-J-172: A Quantitative Assessment of Lung Tumor Motion Using 4DCT Imaging Under Conditions of Controlled Breathing in the Management of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Using Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Mohatt, D; Gomez, J; Singh, A; Malhotra, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study breathing related tumor motion amplitudes by lung lobe location under controlled breathing conditions used in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for NSCLC. Methods: Sixty-five NSCLC SBRT patients since 2009 were investigated. Patients were categorized based on tumor anatomic location (RUL-17, RML-7, RLL-18, LUL-14, LLL-9). A 16-slice CT scanner [GE RT16 Pro] along with Varian Realtime Position Management (RPM) software was used to acquire the 4DCT data set using 1.25 mm slice width. Images were binned in 10 phases, T00 being at maximum inspiration ' T50 at maximum expiration phase. Tumor volume was segmented in T50 using the CT-lung window and its displacement were measured from phase to phase in all three axes; superiorinferior, anterior-posterior ' medial-lateral at the centroid level of the tumor. Results: The median tumor movement in each lobe was as follows: RUL= 3.8±2.0 mm (mean ITV: 9.5 cm{sup 3}), RML= 4.7±2.8 mm (mean ITV: 9.2 cm{sup 3}), RLL=6.6±2.6 mm (mean ITV: 12.3 cm{sup 3}), LUL=3.8±2.4 mm (mean ITV: 18.5 cm{sup 3}), ' LLL=4.7±2.5 mm (mean ITV: 11.9 cm{sup 3}). The median respiratory cycle for all patients was found to be 3.81 ± 1.08 seconds [minimum 2.50 seconds, maximum 7.07 seconds]. The tumor mobility incorporating breathing cycle was RUL = 0.95±0.49 mm/s, RML = 1.35±0.62 mm/s, RLL = 1.83±0.71 mm/s, LUL = 0.98 ±0.50 mm/s, and LLL = 1.15 ±0.53 mm/s. Conclusion: Our results show that tumor displacement is location dependent. The range of motion and mobility increases as the location of the tumor nears the diaphragm. Under abdominal compression, the magnitude of tumor motion is reduced by as much as a factor of 2 in comparison to reported tumor magnitudes under conventional free breathing conditions. This study demonstrates the utility of abdominal compression in reducing the tumor motion leading to reduced ITV and planning tumor volumes (PTV)

  19. [Optical Design of Miniature Infrared Gratings Spectrometer Based on Planar Waveguide].

    PubMed

    Li, Yang-yu; Fang, Yong-hua; Li, Da-cheng; Liu, Yang

    2015-03-01

    infrared planar waveguide spectrometer is designed using this method. The operation wavelength range is 8 - 12 μm, the numerical aperture is 0.22, and the linear array detector contains 64 elements. By using Zemax software, the design is optimized and analyzed. The results indicate that the size of the optical system is 130 mm x 125 mm x 20 mm and the spectral resolution of spectrometer is 80 nm, which satisfy the requirements of design index. Thus it is this method that can be used for designing a miniature spectrometer without movable parts and sizes in the range of several cubic centimeters.

  20. Retention and Treatment Outcomes of an Undernutrition Program for HIV patients involving Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food at Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Dawson, Angela; Elnour, Asim Ahmed; Shehab, Abdulla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite global efforts to eradicate poverty and hunger, under-nutrition is still a major health problem, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa, where HIV/AIDS prevalence is also a serious burden. Aim To assess the retention and outcomes of under-nutrition treatment program in Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted in HIV positive children and adults participating in the Ready-to-use Therapeutic Food (RUTF) treatment program at Gondar University Hospital ART clinic for one year from November 2012 to November 2013. Materials and Methods Six hundred and thirty six patient records were followed-up for one year. Outcome variables were Mid-Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC) values measured as severe, moderate acute malnutrition, normal after treatment, non-respondent, relapsed and lost to follow-up using the hospital records of HIV positive children and adults eligible for the program. Statistical Analysis: Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to compute Crude Odds Ratio (COR) and Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR). Statistical significance was set at p-value<0.05. Results Among 636 clients, 44.2% achieved MUAC measures ≥ 125 mm for children and ≥ 21 cm for adults at 4 and 6 months. 70.1% of those were children while 29.9% of the 281 were adults. Moreover, a more positive initial response to ready-to-use therapeutic food was found among children as there was significant increase (p<0.05) in MUAC value after the second month of initiating treatment while adults achieved a significant (p<0.05, p<0.01) in MUAC at the 4th and 6th month respectively. There was a significant association between age, nutrition status and treatment outcome, while sex, HIV status, education and residency were not associated with treatment outcome. Conclusion Recovery and weight gain rates were below 50%. Defaulter rates were higher than the Sphere standards and recovery was better in children than adults. Integrated RUTF and

  1. Introduction of a new laser-scalpel for partial kidney resection based on 1.94 micrometer fiber laser system: initial in vivo-data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedsen, Sönke; Theisen-Kunde, Dirk; Doehn, Christian; Kausch, Ingo; Jocham, Dieter

    2009-02-01

    The technique of nephron sparing surgery has matured significantly over the past decade and is emerging as an oncologically sound procedure for the management of renal tumors. Methods of tumor excision as well as parenchymal reconstruction in a hemostaticallly controlled field have evolved to make this procedure safer. In an attempt to find an improoved hemostatic cutting instrument we developed a 1.94 micrometer Laser-Scalpel system in a porcine model. We evaluated data for partial porcine kidney resection performed by a 1.94 micrometer Laser-Scalpel and compared the data to those of a standard HF- (High- Frequency) dissection device. In 12 pigs general anesthesia and a median laparotomy was performed to expose both kidneys. In each pig one kidney was partially resected with the Laser-Scalpel and the other side with the HF-dissection device. The first 6 pigs were euthanized immediately after the procedure. The following 6 pigs were allowed to recover and underwent 2-3 weeks later euthanasia. The final evaluation data included total resection time, blood loss, mass of dissected tissue, total ischemic time and histological examination. Mean resected kidney tissue mass was 4.75 g with the laser system and 5.57 g for the HF-dissector, respectively. Mean estimated blood loss was 22 ml for the Laser- Scalpel and 78.2 ml for the HF-dissection device. Resection time was 9.45 min for the Laser-scalpel compared to 10.16 min. No complications, specifically no postoperative bleeding, occured in any of the animals. Histological evaluation with H&E staining showed a carbonized zone of about 0.57 mm directly at the dissected edge followed by a thermal damaged zone of about 1.25 mm in width. Thereafter healthy tissue was found in all histological samples. Partial kidney resection was easily and fast performed by the use of a 1.94 micrometer Laser-Scalpel system. Hemostasis was highly sufficient, so blood loss was minimal compared to conventional HF-dissection device. Therefore the 1.94 micrometer Laser-Scalpel system is a very promising dissection device for urological surgery.

  2. Flow pattern, pressure drop and void fraction of two-phase gas-liquid flow in an inclined narrow annular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Wongwises, Somchai; Pipathattakul, Manop

    2006-03-01

    Two-phase flow pattern, pressure drop and void fraction in horizontal and inclined upward air-water two-phase flow in a mini-gap annular channel are experimentally studied. A concentric annular test section at the length of 880mm with an outer diameter of 12.5mm and inner diameter of 8mm is used in the experiments. The flow phenomena, which are plug flow, slug flow, annular flow, annular/slug flow, bubbly/plug flow, bubbly/slug-plug flow, churn flow, dispersed bubbly flow and slug/bubbly flow, are observed and recorded by high-speed camera. A slug flow pattern is found only in the horizontal channel while slug/bubbly flow patterns are observed only in inclined channels. When the inclination angle is increased, the onset of transition from the plug flow region to the slug flow region (for the horizontal channel) and from the plug flow region to slug/bubbly flow region (for inclined channels) shift to a lower value of superficial air velocity. Small shifts are found for the transition line between the dispersed bubbly flow and the bubbly/plug flow, the bubbly/plug flow and the bubbly/slug-plug flow, and the bubbly/plug flow and the plug flow. The rest of the transition lines shift to a higher value of superficial air velocity. Considering the effect of flow pattern on the pressure drop in the horizontal tube at low liquid velocity, the occurrence of slug flow stops the rise of pressure drop for a short while, before rising again after the air velocity has increased. However, the pressure does not rise abruptly in the tubes with {theta}=30{sup o} and 60{sup o} when the slug/bubbly flow occurs. At low gas and liquid velocity, the pressure drop increases, when the inclination angles changes from horizontal to 30{sup o} and 60{sup o}. Void fraction increases with increasing gas velocity and decreases with increasing liquid velocity. After increasing the inclination angle from horizontal to {theta}=30{sup o} and 60{sup o}, the void fraction appears to be similar, with a decreasing trend when the inclination angle increases. (author)

  3. Comparative analysis of different measurement techniques for characterizing soil surface roughness in agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Agirre, Alex; Álvarez-Mozos, Jesús; Valle, José Manuel; Rodríguez, Álvaro; Giménez, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Soil surface roughness can be defined as the variation in soil surface elevations, and as such, it is a key element in hydrology and soil erosion processes. In agricultural soils, roughness is mainly an anthropic factor determined by the type of tillage and management. Roughness is also a property with a high spatial variability, since the same type of tillage can result in surfaces with different roughness depending on the physical characteristics of the soil and atmospheric conditions. In order to quantify roughness and to parameterize its role in different processes, different measurement techniques have been used and several parameters have been proposed in the literature. The objective of this work is to evaluate different measurement techniques and assess their accuracy and suitability for quantifying surface roughness in agricultural soils. With this aim, a comparative analysis of three roughness measurement techniques has been carried out; (1) laser profilometer, (2) convergent photogrammetry and (3) terrestrial laser scanner. Roughness measurements were done in 3 experimental plots (5x5 meters) with different tillage treatments (representing different roughness conditions) obtained with typical agricultural tools. The laser profilometer registered vertically the distance from a reference bar down to the surface. It had a vertical accuracy of 1.25 mm, a sampling interval of 5 mm and a total length profile of 5 m. Eight profiles were taken per plot, four in parallel to tillage direction and four in perpendicular. Convergent photogrammetry consisted of 20-30 images taken per plot from a height of 5-10 m above ground (using an elevation platform), leading to point clouds of ~25 million points per plot. Terrestrial laser scanner measurements were taken from the four sides of each plot at a measurement height of ~1.75 m above ground. After orientating and corregistering the four scans, point clouds of ~60 million points were obtained per plot. The comparative analysis was threefold: (1) comparison of raw data (point clouds), (2) comparison of interpolated DEMs considering different resolutions (2.5mm, 5mm and 10mm) and (3) comparison of roughness parameters. In all cases the profilometer was used as a reference because of its vertical accuracy and nadiral viewing geometry. Thus point clouds and interpolated DEMs were compared to the height profiles. The results showed that in most cases surface height discrepancies were below 10 mm for raw data and increased slightly when increasing the pixel size of DEMs. Finally, a thorough analysis of different roughness parameters proposed in the literature was carried out to find the most appropriate technique and parameter for the characterization of roughness in each case. Although still preliminary, results offer practical recommendations on the usefulness of each technique.

  4. NIKOS II--a system for noninvasive coronary angiography with synchrotron radiation (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dix, W.-R.; Graeff, W.; Heuer, J.; Engelke, K.; Jabs, H.; Kupper, W.; Stellmaschek, K. H.

    1989-07-01

    During the last years attempts have been underway at several synchrotron radiation laboratories1-4 to employ the abrupt change of absorption at the iodine K edge (33.17 keV) to the imaging of coronary arteries. The subtraction of two images taken with photon energies just above and below the edge strongly surpresses background contrast like bone and soft tissue and allows for amplification of iodinated structure contrast. At HASYLAB, for these studies, a beamline at a bending magnet was only available until 1987. At this beamline the system NIKOS I was tested to obtain information on its essential components like monochromator and detector by in-vivo investigations of dogs. The basic feature which differs from the approaches in other laboratoriesis simultaneous registration of two stationary beams in a two-line detector without any beam switching. Based on the experience with this system during the last year all its components have been improved and changed to dimensions capable of taking a 12-cm-wide image of the human heart. At present the new system NIKOS II is under testing at the new wiggler beamline HARWI. The new monochromator comprises two pairs of a thin Si Laue case crystal and a Ge Bragg crystal, each, with inherent focussing of the beam to a horizontal line focus of about 0.5 mm height and 12 cm width. The advantage of the Laue crystals which are optimized in thickness (30 μm) for maximum reflectivity, is the low heat absorption and the full use of the white beam in the production of two monochromatic beams. The crystals are cooled in a stream of helium. Compared to the NIKOS I version5 the detector was changed in the following points: The two detection lines are enlarged to 125 mm width and the phosphor at the entrance is exchangeable to be either made of powderlike Gd2O2S:Tb or of single crystals like CdWO4 or CaF2:Eu separated by thin walls for optimum spatial resolution. The numerical aperture of the glass fiber optics guiding the light via image

  5. Purinergic control of vascular tone in the retina.

    PubMed

    Kur, Joanna; Newman, Eric A

    2014-02-01

    Purinergic control of vascular tone in the CNS has been largely unexplored. This study examines the contribution of endogenous extracellular ATP, acting on vascular smooth muscle cells, in controlling vascular tone in the in vivo rat retina. Retinal vessels were labelled by i.v. injection of a fluorescent dye and imaged with scanning laser confocal microscopy. The diameters of primary arterioles were monitored under control conditions and following intravitreal injection of pharmacological agents. Apyrase (500 units ml(-1)), an ATP hydrolysing enzyme, dilated retinal arterioles by 40.4 ± 2.8%, while AOPCP (12.5 mm), an ecto-5'-nucleotidase inhibitor that increases extracellular ATP levels, constricted arterioles by 58.0 ± 3.8% (P < 0.001 for both), demonstrating the importance of ATP in the control of basal vascular tone. Suramin (500 μm), a broad-spectrum P2 receptor antagonist, dilated retinal arterioles by 50.9 ± 3.7% (P < 0.001). IsoPPADS (300 μm) and TNP-ATP (50 μm), more selective P2X antagonists, dilated arterioles by 41.0 ± 5.3% and 55.2 ± 6.1% respectively (P < 0.001 for both). NF023 (50 μm), a potent antagonist of P2X1 receptors, dilated retinal arterioles by 32.1 ± 2.6% (P < 0.001). A438079 (500 μm) and AZ10606120 (50 μm), P2X7 antagonists, had no effect on basal vascular tone (P = 0.99 and P = 1.00 respectively). In the ex vivo retina, the P2X1 receptor agonist α,β-methylene ATP (300 nm) evoked sustained vasoconstrictions of 18.7 ± 3.2% (P < 0.05). In vivo vitreal injection of the gliotoxin fluorocitrate (150 μm) dilated retinal vessels by 52.3 ± 1.1% (P < 0.001) and inhibited the vasodilatory response to NF023 (50 μm, 7.9 ± 2.0%; P < 0.01). These findings suggest that vascular tone in rat retinal arterioles is maintained by tonic release of ATP from the retina. ATP acts on P2X1 receptors, although contributions from other P2X and P2Y receptors cannot be ruled out. Retinal glial cells are a possible source of the vasoconstricting ATP.

  6. Experimental demonstration of passive acoustic imaging in the human skull cavity using CT-based aberration corrections

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ryan M.; O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Experimentally verify a previously described technique for performing passive acoustic imaging through an intact human skull using noninvasive, computed tomography (CT)-based aberration corrections Jones et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 4981–5005 (2013)]. Methods: A sparse hemispherical receiver array (30 cm diameter) consisting of 128 piezoceramic discs (2.5 mm diameter, 612 kHz center frequency) was used to passively listen through ex vivo human skullcaps (n = 4) to acoustic emissions from a narrow-band fixed source (1 mm diameter, 516 kHz center frequency) and from ultrasound-stimulated (5 cycle bursts, 1 Hz pulse repetition frequency, estimated in situ peak negative pressure 0.11–0.33 MPa, 306 kHz driving frequency) Definity™ microbubbles flowing through a thin-walled tube phantom. Initial in vivo feasibility testing of the method was performed. The performance of the method was assessed through comparisons to images generated without skull corrections, with invasive source-based corrections, and with water-path control images. Results: For source locations at least 25 mm from the inner skull surface, the modified reconstruction algorithm successfully restored a single focus within the skull cavity at a location within 1.25 mm from the true position of the narrow-band source. The results obtained from imaging single bubbles are in good agreement with numerical simulations of point source emitters and the authors’ previous experimental measurements using source-based skull corrections O’Reilly et al. [IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 61, 1285–1294 (2014)]. In a rat model, microbubble activity was mapped through an intact human skull at pressure levels below and above the threshold for focused ultrasound-induced blood–brain barrier opening. During bursts that led to coherent bubble activity, the location of maximum intensity in images generated with CT-based skull corrections was found to deviate by less than 1 mm, on average, from the position obtained using source-based corrections. Conclusions: Taken together, these results demonstrate the feasibility of using the method to guide bubble-mediated ultrasound therapies in the brain. The technique may also have application in ultrasound-based cerebral angiography. PMID:26133635

  7. Destruction of a Holothuria scabra population by overfishing at Abu Rhamada Island in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mohamed Hamza

    2005-10-01

    males) to 155 mm for females and 125 mm for males in January 2003. There was a positive relationship between fecundity and size. And oocyte/female was highest in 1999 (0.73-1.7 million) and 2000 (0.75-1.72 million), decreased during 2001 (0.2-0.85 million) to reach its minimum at 2002 (0.28-0.29 million).

  8. Composite-to-metal tubular lap joints: Strength and fatigue resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedy, E. D., Jr.; Guess, T. R.

    1993-10-01

    The axial strength and fatigue resistance of thick-walled, adhesively bonded E-glass composite-to-aluminum tubular lap joints have been measured for tensile and compressive loadings. The joint specimen bonds a 63 mm OD aluminum tube within each end of a 300 mm long, 6 mm thick E-glass/epoxy tube. Untapered, 12.5 mm thick aluminum adherends were used in all but four of the joint specimens. The aluminum adherends in the remaining four specimens were tapered to a thickness of 1 mm at the inner bond end (the bond end where the aluminum adherend terminates). For all loadings, joint failure initiates at the inner bond end as a crack grows in the adhesive adjacent to the interface. Test results for a tension-tension fatigue loading indicate that fatigue can severely degrade joint performance. Interestingly, measured tensile strength and fatigue resistance for joints with untapered adherends is substantially greater than compressive strength and fatigue resistance. The joint specimen has been analyzed in two different ways: one approach models the adhesive as an uncracked, elastic-perfectly plastic material, while the other approach uses a linear elastic fracture mechanics methodology. Results for the uncracked, elastic-plastic adhesive model indicate that observed bond failure occurs in the region of highest calculated stresses, extensive bond yielding occurs at load levels well below that required to fail the joint, and a tensile peel stress is generated by a compressive joint loading when the aluminum adherends are untapered. This latter result is consistent with the observed joint tensile-compressive strength differential. Results of the linear elastic fracture mechanics analysis of a joint with untapered aluminum adherends are also consistent with the observed differential strength effect since a mode 1 crack loading is predicted for a compressive joint loading. Calculations and a limited number of tests suggest that it may be possible to selectively control the differential strength effect by tapering the aluminum adherends. The effect of adherend material and thickness on fracture mechanics parameters is also investigated. The paper concludes by examining the applicability of linear elastic fracture mechanics to the joints tested.

  9. Thermophysical properties of BKC 44306 and BKC 44307 PMDI urethane solid and foams

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Flint, Gregory Mark; Urquhart, Alexander; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2014-02-01

    Accurate knowledge of thermophysical properties of urethane foam is considered extremely important for meaningful models and analyses to be developed of scenarios wherein the foam is heated. Its performance at temperature requires a solid understanding of the foam material properties at temperature. Also, foam properties vary with density/porosity. An experimental program to determine the thermal properties of the two foams and their parent solid urethane was developed in order to support development of a predictive model relating density and thermal properties from first principles. Thermal properties (thermal conductivity, diffusivity, and specific heat) of the foam were found to vary with temperatures from 26°C to 90°C. Thermal conductivity generally increases with increasing temperature for a given initial density and ranges from .0433 W/mK at 26°C to .0811 W/mK at 90°C; thermal diffusivity generally decreases with increasing temperature for a given initial density and ranges from .4101 mm2/s at 26°C to .1263 mm2/s at 90°C; and specific heat generally increases with increasing temperature for a given initial density and ranges from .1078 MJ/m3K at 26°C to .6323 MJ/m3K at 90°C. Thermal properties of the solid urethane were also found to vary with temperatures from 26°C to 90°C. Average thermal conductivity generally increases with increasing temperature for a given initial density and ranges from 0.126 to 0.131 W/mK at 26°C to 0.153 to 0.157 W/mK at 90°C; average thermal diffusivity generally decreases with increasing temperature for a given initial density and ranges from 0.142 to 0.147 mm2/s at 26°C to 0.124 to 0.125 mm2/s at 90°C; and average specific heat generally increases with increasing temperature for a given initial density and ranges from 0.889 to 0.899 MJ/m3K to 1.229 to 1.274 MJ/m3K at 90°C. The density of both foam and solid urethane decreased

  10. Little ice age and global warming trends recorded in the late Holocene stalagmite from the Yongcheon lava tube cave in Jeju Island, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, K.; Jo, K.; Li, H.; Luo, S.; Wan, N.; Suk, B.; Park, B.

    2007-05-01

    Yongcheon Cave is located on Jeju Island, the southernmost part of Korea. The island is under the strong influence of East Asian monsoon climate. The Yongcheon cave which contains numerous carbonate speleothems was the typical lava tube cave that probably formed between 0.2~0.4 Ma ago. A 11cm-long stalagmite, YC-1, was collected in its growth position in 2005. The 210Pb dating results show that the top 0.9cm of YC-1 is less than 100 years old with a growth rate of 0.033mm/yr. Assuming the constant growth rate of the stalagmite with this growth rate, it is estimated that the stalagmite is about 3,300 years old. Currently, about 100 samples were analyzed for 18O and 13C compositions in the upper 1.25cm part with a sampling interval of 0.125mm. The 18O ranges from -7.4 to -5.8 (PDB), and the 13C varies from -8.0 to -1.7 (PDB). Both 18O and 13C values have decreasing trends during the last 60 years, with the decreases of 1.2 and 4 for 18O and 13C, respectively. Carbon isotopic compositions are more enriched in SGL (Zone of spaced growth laminae; ca -2.5, PDB) than DGL (Zone of dense growth laminae; ca -7.5). This indicates that the carbon in SGL was mostly supplied from the overlying carbonate sediments. Also, more depleted carbon isotopic values in DGL should reflect more influence by organic carbon within the overlying vegetation cover and soil. Elemental results show that there are anti-phase correlations between Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca, and between Ba/Ca and P/Ca. The strong increase in Al/Ca ratio in the upper a few mm indicates that significant change occurred in the overlying sediments above the cave during the past 50 years. These preliminary results imply that the stalagmite of the Yongcheon Cave may have been affected by groundwater residence time related to variation of regional precipitation and carbonate dissolution rate. Oxygen isotopic variation of YC-1 in particular, clearly shows the period of the Little Ice Age and coincides with the instrumental records of

  11. Paleoenvironmental records since 1300 years AD from the calcite stalagmite in the Yongcheon Cave, Jeju Island, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, K.; Jo, K.; Li, H.; Luo, S.; Wan, N.; Tsai, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Yongcheon Cave is located on Jeju Island, the southernmost part of Korea. It is a typical lava tube cave that formed between 0.2~0.4 Ma ago, and includes numerous carbonate speleothems. A 11cm-long stalagmite (YC-1) was collected from its growth position in 2005. The 210Pb dating results show that the top 0.9cm of YC-1 is less than 100 years old with the constant growth rate of 0.033mm/yr. 230Th/234U and 14C dating results show that the stalagmite is about 1,600 years old. Textural and stable isotopic analyses were carried out to infer the paleoclimatic variation during its growth. We have analyzed oxygen and carbon isotopes for 200 samples from the 2.5cm-long, uppermost part with a sampling interval of 0.125mm and for 100 samples from the lower 2.5cm-long part with a sampling interval of 0.250mm. δ18O and δ13C values range from -8.1‰ to -5.8‰ and from -8.1‰ to -1.5‰ (PDB), respectively. Both isotope values show the decreasing trends past 60 years due to global warming (depletion of δ18O= 1.2‰ and δ13C=4‰). Carbon isotopic compositions are more enriched in SGL (zone of Spaced Growth Laminae; δ13C=ca -2.5‰, PDB) than DGL (Zone of Dense Growth Laminae; δ13C=ca -7.5‰). This indicates that the overlying carbonates played relatively more significant role to supply carbon for SGL than DGL. Also more depleted carbon isotopic values in DGL should reflect more influence by organic carbon from overlying soil layers. Carbon isotopic variation also clearly shows the period of the Little Ice Age and coincides with the instrumental records of Northern Hemisphere temperature variation during the last 700 years. This preliminary result implies that the carbon isotopic signals have been affected by groundwater residence time which was related to the intensity of regional precipitation and buffering with overlying carbonates. Further analysis of this stalagmite may promise a great potential for the reconstruction of climate and environmental changes during the

  12. Pliocene-Quaternary syn-collision volcanism of the Javakheti Ridge, NW Armenia: impact on models of magma generation in the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliksetian, Kh.; Neill, I.; Allen, M. B.; Navarsardyan, G.; Karapetyan, S.

    2012-04-01

    The Armenian Highlands and Southern Caucasus formed during convergence and collision between the Arabian and Eurasian margins from the Late Mesozoic to the present. These events culminate in the growth of the present-day Turkish-Iranian high plateau. Pliocene-Quaternary magmatism followed plateau building, and is a key feature of the entire region. However, petrogenetic models are sparse, particularly for outcrops in the Armenia sector. Mantle-derived magmatism in Turkey has been linked to Tethyan slab break-off and/or lithospheric delamination following the Arabia-Eurasia collision. In this study we consider preliminary petrographic and geochemical results from the Javakheti ridge and surrounding areas, in NW Armenia, and their relationship to the orogenic plateau as a whole. The N-S trending Javakheti ridge is the southerly extension of the Samsari ridge in Georgia, and is one of several Pliocene-Quaternary volcanic uplands in Armenia and the Lesser Caucasus (e.g. Gegham, Vardenis and Syunik). The basement consists of the Sevan-Akera suture between the South Armenian Block, of Gondwanaland origin, and the Eurasian active margin and associated Mesozoic island arc of the Lesser Caucasus. Arc-continent collision and obduction occurred in the Late Cretaceous or Paleocene-Eocene. The first Pliocene-Quaternary magmatism in the area is represented by valley-filling fissure-fed basaltic flows, examples of which have been dated to ~2.7-2.0 Ma in Georgia and Armenia. The ridge itself consists of eroded intermediate to felsic flows forming a central volcanic complex. Recently published Ar-Ar dating of ash layers related to the complex reveal ages of ~1.8-1.9 Ma. The flows are cut by numerous Quaternary cinder cones. Volcanism on the ridge complex appears to young towards the north, and the ridge remains tectonically active, undergoing extension at 1.25 mm/yr, according to GPS data. Preliminary geochemical results indicate the valley-filling flows, the ridge, and cinder cones, are petrogenetically related, and form a continuum from silica under-saturated to over-saturated, indicating crustal assimilation during differentiation of mantle-derived magmas. The more primitive compositions strongly resemble those of the well-known centre Mt. Ararat, suggesting that similar petrogenetic circumstances and degrees of partial melting apply at both localities, despite their differing distance to the Arabia-Eurasia suture zone.

  13. 18S rRNA gene sequencing identifies a novel species of Henneguya parasitizing the gills of the channel catfish (Ictaluridae).

    PubMed

    Rosser, Thomas G; Griffin, Matt J; Quiniou, Sylvie M A; Khoo, Lester H; Pote, Linda M

    2014-12-01

    In the southeastern USA, the channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus is a host to at least eight different species of myxozoan parasites belonging to the genus Henneguya, four of which have been characterized molecularly using sequencing of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene. However, only two of these have confirmed life cycles that involve the oligochaete Dero digitata as the definitive host. During a health screening of farm-raised channel catfish, several fish presented with deformed primary lamellae. Lamellae harbored large, nodular, white pseudocysts 1.25 mm in diameter, and upon rupturing, these pseudocysts released Henneguya myxospores, with a typical lanceolate-shaped spore body, measuring 17.1 ± 1.0 μm (mean ± SD; range = 15.0-19.3 μm) in length and 4.8 ± 0.4 μm (3.7-5.6 μm) in width. Pyriform-shaped polar capsules were 5.8 ± 0.3 μm in length (5.1-6.4 μm) and 1.7 ± 0.1 μm (1.4-1.9 μm) in width. The two caudal processes were 40.0 ± 5.1 μm in length (29.5-50.0 μm) with a spore length of 57.2 ± 4.7 (46.8-66.8 μm). The contiguous SSU rRNA gene sequence obtained from myxospores of five excised cysts did not match any Henneguya sp. in GenBank. The greatest sequence homology (91% over 1,900 bp) was with Henneguya pellis, associated with blister-like lesions on the skin of blue catfish Ictalurus furcatus. Based on the unique combination of pseudocyst and myxospore morphology, tissue location, host, and SSU rRNA gene sequence data, we report this isolate to be a previously unreported species, Henneguya bulbosus sp. nov.

  14. Preventing runoff and soil loss and increasing water use efficiency under irrigation with a moving sprinkler system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Hur, M.; Lado, M.

    2009-04-01

    Irrigation with a moving sprinkler irrigation system (MSIS) has become increasingly popular in recent years in arid and semiarid regions. However, high amounts of runoff and soil loss were measured from fields during irrigation with this system. The objectives of this presentation are (i) to determine the main factors that lead to high runoff and soil loss during irrigation with MSIS; (ii) to study the effects of surface runoff on water distribution and crop yields in an irrigated field; (iii) to present means that prevent runoff and soil loss. Under MSIS irrigation, the impact energy of the irrigation water drops broke down the aggregates at the soil surface and formed a seal with a resultant decrease in infiltration rate and an increase in runoff and soil loss. The average runoff and soil loss from a 5.5-m2 plot in a clay soil irrigated with MSIS with weekly events of 50 mm were 12.5 mm and 64.6 g/m2, respectively. In contrast, under the same irrigation management but after microbasins were tilled along furrows, retaining runoff and favoring the infiltration of water into the soil, the average runoff and soil loss where 3.3 mm and 13 g/m2, respectively. In an experimental peanut field with a silt loam soil (300 by 120 m size and 3% slope) irrigated with MSIS, microbasins increased the uniformity of soil water content along the slope. In this treatment, the pod and canopy yields were fairly uniform along the slope, with coefficients of variance of 1.3 and 2.8%, respectively. In contrast, in control plots, where runoff was allowed to move downhill, soil water content was higher downhill than uphill because of the high runoff amount, and the pod and canopy yields increased from uphill towards downhill, with coefficients of variance of 8.6 and 15.5%, respectively. Spraying 40 kg/ha of a low-molecular-weight, nonionic, synthetic polymer on the soil surface of a potato field reduced surface runoff by 62-75% compared with the untreated soil treatment under MSIS irrigation. The irrigation efficiency (the ratio between crop yield and total water application) of the MSIS with various emitters was 31-56 kg/mm in untreated soil treatment and 49-66 kg/mm under polymer treatment.

  15. Impact of Node Negative Target Volume Delineation on Contralateral Parotid Gland Dose Sparing Using IMRT in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, William J; Urban, Erich; Bayliss, R Adam; Harari, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    There is considerable practice variation in treatment of the node negative (N0) contralateral neck in patients with head and neck cancer. In this study, we examined the impact of N0 neck target delineation volume on radiation dose to the contralateral parotid gland. Following institutional review board approval, 12 patients with head and neck cancer were studied. All had indications for treatment of the N0 neck, such as midline base of tongue or soft palate extension or advanced ipsilateral nodal disease. The N0 neck volumes were created using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group head and neck contouring atlas. The physician-drawn N0 neck clinical target volume (CTV) was expanded by 25% to 200% to generate volume variation, followed by a 3-mm planning target volume (PTV) expansion. Surrounding organs at risk were contoured and complete intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans were generated for each N0 volume expansion. The median N0 target volume drawn by the radiation oncologist measured 93 cm(3) (range 71-145). Volumetric expansion of the N0 CTV by 25% to 200% increased the resultant mean dose to the contralateral parotid gland by 1.4 to 8.5 Gray (Gy). For example, a 4.1-mm increase in the N0 neck CTV translated to a 2.0-Gy dose increase to the parotid, 7.4 mm to a 4.5 Gy dose increase, and 12.5 mm to an 8.5 Gy dose increase, respectively. The treatment volume designated for the N0 neck has profound impact on resultant dose to the contralateral parotid gland. Variations of up to 15 mm are routine across physicians in target contouring, reflecting individual preference and training expertise. Depending on the availability of immobilization and image guidance techniques, experts commonly recommend 3 to 10 mm margin expansions to generate the PTV. Careful attention to the original volume of the N0 neck CTV, as well as expansion margins, is important in achieving effective contralateral gland sparing to reduce the resultant xerostomia and dysguesia that may ensue after radiotherapy.

  16. Design and performance evaluation of a 20-aperture multipinhole collimator for myocardial perfusion imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Jason D.; Huang, Qiu; Ellin, Justin R.; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Shrestha, Uttam; Gullberg, Grant T.; Seo, Youngho

    2013-10-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging remains a critical tool in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. However, after more than three decades of use, photon detection efficiency remains poor and unchanged. This is due to the continued reliance on parallel-hole collimators first introduced in 1964. These collimators possess poor geometric efficiency. Here we present the performance evaluation results of a newly designed multipinhole collimator with 20 pinhole apertures (PH20) for commercial SPECT systems. Computer simulations and numerical observer studies were used to assess the noise, bias and diagnostic imaging performance of a PH20 collimator in comparison with those of a low energy high resolution (LEHR) parallel-hole collimator. Ray-driven projector/backprojector pairs were used to model SPECT imaging acquisitions, including simulation of noiseless projection data and performing MLEM/OSEM image reconstructions. Poisson noise was added to noiseless projections for realistic projection data. Noise and bias performance were investigated for five mathematical cardiac and torso (MCAT) phantom anatomies imaged at two gantry orbit positions (19.5 and 25.0 cm). PH20 and LEHR images were reconstructed with 300 MLEM iterations and 30 OSEM iterations (ten subsets), respectively. Diagnostic imaging performance was assessed by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis performed on a single MCAT phantom; however, in this case PH20 images were reconstructed with 75 pixel-based OSEM iterations (four subsets). Four PH20 projection views from two positions of a dual-head camera acquisition and 60 LEHR projections were simulated for all studies. At uniformly-imposed resolution of 12.5 mm, significant improvements in SNR and diagnostic sensitivity (represented by the area under the ROC curve, or AUC) were realized when PH20 collimators are substituted for LEHR parallel-hole collimators. SNR improves by factors of 1.94-2.34 for the five patient anatomies and two orbital positions studied. For the ROC analysis the PH20 AUC is larger than the LEHR AUC with a p-value of 0.0067. Bias performance, however, decreases with the use of PH20 collimators. Systematic analyses showed PH20 collimators present improved diagnostic imaging performance over LEHR collimators, requiring only collimator exchange on existing SPECT cameras for their use.

  17. Quantitative determination of lysophosphatidic acids (LPAs) in human saliva and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Bathena, S P; Huang, J; Nunn, M E; Miyamoto, T; Parrish, L C; Lang, M S; McVaney, T P; Toews, M L; Cerutis, D R; Alnouti, Y

    2011-09-10

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a phospholipid mediator that plays multiple cellular functions by acting through G protein-coupled LPA receptors. LPAs are known to be key mediators in inflammation, and several lines of evidence suggest a role for LPAs in inflammatory periodontal diseases. A simple and sensitive liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method has been developed and validated to quantify LPA species (LPA 18:0, LPA 16:0, LPA 18:1 and LPA 20:4) in human saliva and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). LPA 17:0 was used as an internal standard and the LPA species were extracted from saliva by liquid-liquid extraction using butanol. Chromatography was performed using a Macherey-Nagel NUCLEODUR® C8 Gravity Column (125 mm × 2.0 mm ID) with a mixture of methanol/water: 75/25 (v/v) containing 0.5% formic acid and 5 mM ammonium formate (mobile phase A) and methanol/water: 99/0.5 (v/v) containing 0.5% formic acid and 5mM ammonium formate (mobile phase B) at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. LPAs were detected by a linear ion trap-triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with a total run time of 8.5 min. The limit of quantification (LOQ) in saliva was 1 ng/mL for all LPA species and the method was validated over the range of 1-200 ng/mL. The method was validated in GCF over the ranges of 10-500 ng/mL for LPA 18:0 and LPA 16:0, and 5-500 ng/mL for LPA 18:1 and LPA 20:4. This sensitive LC-MS/MS assay was successfully applied to obtain quantitative data of individual LPA levels from control subjects and patients with various periodontal diseases. All four LPA species were consistently elevated in samples obtained from periodontal diseases, which supports a role of LPAs in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases.

  18. Star formation in the Trifid Nebula. Cores and filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Pardo, J. R.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: We aim to characterize the properties of the prestellar and protostellar condensations to understand the star formation processes at work in a young HII region Methods: We have obtained maps of the 1.25 mm thermal dust emission and the molecular gas emission over a region of 20' × 10' around the Trifid Nebula (M 20), with the IRAM 30 m and the CSO telescopes as well as in the mid-infrared wavelength with ISO and SPITZER. Our survey is sensitive to features down to N (H2) ~ 1022 cm-2 in column density. Results: The cloud material is distributed in fragmented dense gas filaments (n (H2) of a few 103 cm-3) with sizes ranging from 1 to 10 pc. A massive filament, WF, with properties typical of Infra Red Dark Clouds, connects M 20 to the W28 supernova remnant. We find that these filaments pre-exist the formation of the Trifid and were originally self-gravitating. The fragments produced are very massive (typically 100M_⊙ or more) and are the progenitors of the cometary globules observed at the border of the HII region. We could identify 33 cores, 16 of which are currently forming stars. Most of the starless cores have typical H2 densities of a few 104 cm-3. They are usually gravitationally unbound and have low masses of a few M_⊙. The densest starless cores (several 105 cm-3) are located in condensation TC0, currently hit by the ionization front, and may be the site for the next generation of stars. The physical gas and dust properties of the cometary globules have been studied in detail and have been found very similar. They all are forming stars. Several intermediate-mass protostars have been detected in the cometary globules and in the deeply embedded cores. Evidence of clustering has been found in the shocked massive cores TC3-TC4-TC5. Conclusions: M 20 is a good example of massive-star forming region in a turbulent, filamentary molecular cloud. Photoionization appears to play a minor role in the formation of the cores. The observed fragmentation is well explained by MHD-driven instabilities and is usually not related to M 20. We propose that the nearby supernova remnant W28 could have triggered the formation of protostellar clusters in nearby dense cores of the Trifid. Table 5 and Appendices A-C are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Battery-operated, argon-hydrogen microplasma on hybrid, postage stamp-sized plastic-quartz chips for elemental analysis of liquid microsamples using a portable optical emission spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Weagant, Scott; Chen, Vivian; Karanassios, Vassili

    2011-11-01

    A battery-operated, atmospheric pressure, self-igniting, planar geometry Ar-H(2) microplasma for elemental analysis of liquid microsamples is described. The inexpensive microplasma device (MPD) fabricated for this work was a hybrid plastic-quartz structure that was formed on chips with an area (roughly) equal to that of a small-sized postage stamp (MPD footprint, 12.5-mm width by 38-mm length). Plastic substrates were chosen due to their low cost, for rapid prototyping purposes, and for a speedy microplasma device evaluation. To enhance portability, the microplasma was operated from an 18-V rechargeable battery. To facilitate portability even further, it was demonstrated that the battery can be recharged by a portable solar panel. The battery-supplied dc voltage was converted to a high-voltage ac. The ~750-μm (diameter) and 12-mm (long) Ar-H(2) (3% H(2)) microplasma was formed by applying the high-voltage ac between two needle electrodes. Spectral interference from the electrode materials or from the plastic substrate was not observed. Operating conditions were found to be key to igniting and sustaining a microplasma that was simply "warm" to the touch (thus alleviating the need for cooling or other thermal management) and that had a stable background emission. A small-sized (900 μL internal volume) electrothermal vaporization system (40-W max power) was used for microsample introduction. Microplasma background emission in the spectral region between 200 and 850 nm obtained using a portable fiber-optic spectrometer is reported and the effect of the operating conditions is described. Analyte emission from microliter volumes of dilute single-element standard solutions of Cd, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Pb, and Zn is documented. The majority of spectral lines observed for the elements tested were from neutral atoms. The relative lack of emission from ion lines simplified the spectra, thus facilitating the use of a portable spectrometer. Despite the relative spectral simplicity, some spectral interference effects were noted when running a multi-element solution. An example of how interference in the spectral domain can be resolved in the time domain using selective thermal vaporization is provided. Analytical utility and performance characteristics are reported; for example, K concentrations in diluted (~30 times) bottled water were determined to be 4.1 ± 1.0 μg/mL (4 μg/mL was the stated concentration), precision was about 25%, and the estimated detection limits were in the picogram range (or in nanograms per milliliter in relative units). PMID:21909664

  20. Battery-operated, argon-hydrogen microplasma on hybrid, postage stamp-sized plastic-quartz chips for elemental analysis of liquid microsamples using a portable optical emission spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Weagant, Scott; Chen, Vivian; Karanassios, Vassili

    2011-11-01

    A battery-operated, atmospheric pressure, self-igniting, planar geometry Ar-H(2) microplasma for elemental analysis of liquid microsamples is described. The inexpensive microplasma device (MPD) fabricated for this work was a hybrid plastic-quartz structure that was formed on chips with an area (roughly) equal to that of a small-sized postage stamp (MPD footprint, 12.5-mm width by 38-mm length). Plastic substrates were chosen due to their low cost, for rapid prototyping purposes, and for a speedy microplasma device evaluation. To enhance portability, the microplasma was operated from an 18-V rechargeable battery. To facilitate portability even further, it was demonstrated that the battery can be recharged by a portable solar panel. The battery-supplied dc voltage was converted to a high-voltage ac. The ~750-μm (diameter) and 12-mm (long) Ar-H(2) (3% H(2)) microplasma was formed by applying the high-voltage ac between two needle electrodes. Spectral interference from the electrode materials or from the plastic substrate was not observed. Operating conditions were found to be key to igniting and sustaining a microplasma that was simply "warm" to the touch (thus alleviating the need for cooling or other thermal management) and that had a stable background emission. A small-sized (900 μL internal volume) electrothermal vaporization system (40-W max power) was used for microsample introduction. Microplasma background emission in the spectral region between 200 and 850 nm obtained using a portable fiber-optic spectrometer is reported and the effect of the operating conditions is described. Analyte emission from microliter volumes of dilute single-element standard solutions of Cd, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Pb, and Zn is documented. The majority of spectral lines observed for the elements tested were from neutral atoms. The relative lack of emission from ion lines simplified the spectra, thus facilitating the use of a portable spectrometer. Despite the relative spectral simplicity, some spectral interference effects were noted when running a multi-element solution. An example of how interference in the spectral domain can be resolved in the time domain using selective thermal vaporization is provided. Analytical utility and performance characteristics are reported; for example, K concentrations in diluted (~30 times) bottled water were determined to be 4.1 ± 1.0 μg/mL (4 μg/mL was the stated concentration), precision was about 25%, and the estimated detection limits were in the picogram range (or in nanograms per milliliter in relative units).

  1. Antihypertensive and metabolic effects of whole Maitake mushroom powder and its fractions in two rat strains.

    PubMed

    Talpur, Nadeem A; Echard, Bobby W; Fan, Arthur Yin; Jaffari, Omeed; Bagchi, Debasis; Preuss, Harry G

    2002-08-01

    Maitake mushroom has been reported to favorably influence hypertension and diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of whole Maitake mushroom powder and two extracts designated as ether soluble (ES) and water soluble (WS) on Zucker fatty rats (ZFR), a model of insulin resistance, and on spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), a model of genetic hypertension. In the initial study, we followed four groups of eight ZFR and SHR receiving special diets: a baseline diet (BD), BD + whole Maitake mushroom powder (20% w/w), BD + fraction ES (0.10% w/w), and BD + WS (0.22% w/w). Different effects of these dietary regimens on the 2 rat strains were found. At 35 days, only consumption of the ES diet significantly decreased systolic BP (SBP) in SHR (average 197 vs. 176 mm Hg, p < 0.001), while in ZFR only the groups consuming the whole Maitake and WS diets showed significantly decreased SBP (138 vs. 120-125 mm Hg, p < 0.001). A challenge test with losartan (an angiotensin II receptor blocker) indicates that angiotensin II does not play a major role in SBP regulation of ZFR, but does in SHR where consumption of ES relative to other groups significantly lowered activity of this system. In SHR, glucose, cholesterol, circulating insulin and HbA1C were virtually similar among all dietary groups; but whole Maitake (-22%), ES (-120%) and WS (-80%) diets were associated with decreased triglycerides, and the ES diet with lowered serum creatinine (-29%). In ZFR, circulating insulin and HbA1C were significantly decreased in the whole Maitake powder and ES groups, and tended to be lower in the WS group compared to control. In the ensuing studies, we gavaged ZFR once daily with water (control), 44 mg fraction WS, or 44 mg fraction WS plus 100 microg niacin-bound chromium (NBC). Oral gavage of WS clearly lowered SBP and circulating glucose concentrations, more so with the addition of chromium. We conclude that the examined forms of Maitake mushroom have

  2. Role of Matrix Metalloproteinases 2 in Spinal Cord Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Miranpuri, Gurwattan S.; Schomberg, Dominic T.; Alrfaei, Bahauddeen; King, Kevin C.; Rynearson, Bryan; Wesley, Vishwas S.; Khan, Nayab; Obiakor, Kristen; Wesley, Umadevi V.; Resnick, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) affects approximately 4 million people in the United States with spinal cord injury (SCI) being a common cause. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an integral role in mediating inflammatory responses, cellular signaling, cell migration, extracellular matrix degradation and tissue remodeling and repair. As such, they are major components in the pathogenesis of secondary injury within the central nervous system. Other gene regulatory pathways, specifically MAPK/extracellular signaling-regulated kinase (ERK) and Wnt/β-catenin, are also believed to participate in secondary injury likely intersect. The study aims to examine the MMP-2 signaling pathway associated with ERK and Wnt/β-catenin activity during contusion SCI (cSCI)-induced NP in a rat model. This is an experimental study investigating the implication of MMP-2 in SCI-induced NP and its association with the cellular and molecular changes in the interactions between extracellular signaling kinase and β-catenin. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats received cSCI injury by NYU impactor by dropping 10 g weight from a height of 12.5 mm. Locomotor functional recovery of injured rats was measured on post cSCI day 1, and weekly thereafter for 6 weeks using Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores. Thermal hyperalgesia (TH) testing was performed on days 21, 28, 35 and 42 post cSCI. The expression and/or activity of MMP-2, β-catenin and ERK were studied following harvest of spinal cord tissues between 3 and 6 weeks post cSCI. All experiments were funded by the department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Wisconsin, School of Medicine and Public Health having no conflict of interest. MMP-2 and β-catenin expression were elevated and gradually increased from days 21 to 42 compared to sham-operated rats and injured rats that did not exhibit TH. The expression of phosphorylated ERK (phospho-ERK) increased on day 21 but returned to baseline levels on day 42 whereas total ERK levels remained relatively unchanged and constant. Chronic NP is associated with changes in the expression of MMP-2, β-catenin and ERK. Our data suggest that the transient upregulation of phospho-ERK is involved in the initial upregulation of both β-catenin and MMP-2 following cSCI-induced NP states. PMID:27536019

  3. A Climatology and Synoptic-Dynamic Basis for Distinguishing Cool-Season Precipitation Events at St. John's, Newfoundland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milrad, Shawn M.

    For St. John's, Newfoundland, at the confluence of several North American storm tracks, we identify synoptic-scale characteristics and precursors of various classes of cool-season precipitation events. Such events, based upon a climatology for 1979-2005, are separated into three categories based on precipitation amount. We find that the storm systems responsible for extreme precipitation events originate farther south and east than corresponding features in moderate and light events. A wind climatology shows that extreme precipitation events at St. John's are characterized almost exclusively by easterly surface and 925 hPa geostrophic winds, and that both the surface and 925 hPa geostrophic winds rotate clockwise with decreasing precipitation amount. Focusing on extreme events, we utilize two methods of manual synoptic typing to further partition events. The first method uses backward air parcel trajectories to separate events by air parcel source region. One subset of events ("west") is characterized by strong upper-level dynamics and high precipitable water values in the central United States, which helps to produce a strong cyclone upon reaching the Atlantic Ocean; this is not seen for "west" events outside the extreme category. The second method of synoptic typing utilizes time series of three ascent-forcing quasi-geostrophic (QG) variables. While most events are characterized by a strong upstream sea-level cyclone originating from the Gulf of Mexico ("cyclone"), a subset are dominated by strong low-level frontogenesis, in the absence of a substantial upstream cyclone ("frontal"). Finally, a dynamic and thermodynamic analysis, and forecast model evaluation is completed for consecutive extreme events in December 2008, which produced over 125 mm of precipitation over six days. The first event is a "cyclone", and is marked by strong QG forcing for ascent in the presence of low static stability and high values of subtropical moisture. The second event is a "frontal

  4. Late Quaternary denudation of the Alps, valley and lake fillings and modern river loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinderer, Matthias

    Erosional denudation of the Alps and their role as sediment source underwent major changes throughout the Quaternary, by repeated glaciation and deglaciation. The sediment fluxes of 16 major Alpine drainage basins were quantified by determining the sediment volumes which have been trapped in valleys and lake basins. These became sedimentologically closed after the last glacier retreat around 17 000 cal. BP. The sediment volumes distributed over their provenance areas yield mean mechanical denudation rates between 250 to 1060 mm ka -1. In contrast, modern denudation rates, derived from river loads and delta surveys, range from 30 to 360 mm ka -1. Relief, such as mean elevation and slope, turned out to be the primary control of both modern and Late Glacial mechanical denudation. Rock types seem to be responsible for some scatter of the data, but their role is masked by other factors. Modern denudation rates increase with higher proportions of bare rocks and glaciated area, but decrease with forest cover. An area-weighted extrapolation of the studied drainage basins to the entire Alps on the basis of major morphotectonic zones yields a mean denudation rate of 620 mm ka -1 over the last 17 000 years. This rate clearly exceeds the modern rate of 125 mm ka -1. Lake sediments and palaeoclimatic reconstructions confirm that the sediment yield of the Alps reached a maximum during deglaciation when large masses of unconsolidated materials were available, vegetation was scarse, and transport capacities were high. During the early Holocene sediment yield declined to a minimum before some climate deterioration and human activities again accelerated erosional processes. Assuming a denudation rate in the early Holocene half of the modern one, the Late Glacial denudation rates must have been in the order of 1100 to 2900 mm ka -1. Consequently, denudation rates during a glacial/interglacial cycle probably varied by a factor of 14, which lies well within the range of other studies

  5. Geometric validation of self-gating k-space-sorted 4D-MRI vs 4D-CT using a respiratory motion phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Yong Yang, Wensha; McKenzie, Elizabeth; Tuli, Richard; Wallace, Robert; Fraass, Benedick; Fan, Zhaoyang; Pang, Jianing; Deng, Zixin; Li, Debiao

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: MRI is increasingly being used for radiotherapy planning, simulation, and in-treatment-room motion monitoring. To provide more detailed temporal and spatial MR data for these tasks, we have recently developed a novel self-gated (SG) MRI technique with advantage of k-space phase sorting, high isotropic spatial resolution, and high temporal resolution. The current work describes the validation of this 4D-MRI technique using a MRI- and CT-compatible respiratory motion phantom and comparison to 4D-CT. Methods: The 4D-MRI sequence is based on a spoiled gradient echo-based 3D projection reconstruction sequence with self-gating for 4D-MRI at 3 T. Respiratory phase is resolved by using SG k-space lines as the motion surrogate. 4D-MRI images are reconstructed into ten temporal bins with spatial resolution 1.56 × 1.56 × 1.56 mm{sup 3}. A MRI-CT compatible phantom was designed to validate the performance of the 4D-MRI sequence and 4D-CT imaging. A spherical target (diameter 23 mm, volume 6.37 ml) filled with high-concentration gadolinium (Gd) gel is embedded into a plastic box (35 × 40 × 63 mm{sup 3}) and stabilized with low-concentration Gd gel. The phantom, driven by an air pump, is able to produce human-type breathing patterns between 4 and 30 respiratory cycles/min. 4D-CT of the phantom has been acquired in cine mode, and reconstructed into ten phases with slice thickness 1.25 mm. The 4D images sets were imported into a treatment planning software for target contouring. The geometrical accuracy of the 4D MRI and CT images has been quantified using target volume, flattening, and eccentricity. The target motion was measured by tracking the centroids of the spheres in each individual phase. Motion ground-truth was obtained from input signals and real-time video recordings. Results: The dynamic phantom has been operated in four respiratory rate (RR) settings, 6, 10, 15, and 20/min, and was scanned with 4D-MRI and 4D-CT. 4D-CT images have target-stretching, partial-missing, and other motion artifacts in various phases, whereas the 4D-MRI images are visually free of those artifacts. Volume percentage difference for the 6.37 ml target ranged from 5.3% ± 4.3% to 10.3% ± 5.9% for 4D-CT, and 1.47 ± 0.52 to 2.12 ± 1.60 for 4D-MRI. With an increase of respiratory rate, the target volumetric and geometric deviations increase for 4D-CT images while remaining stable for the 4D-MRI images. Target motion amplitude errors at different RRs were measured with a range of 0.66–1.25 mm for 4D-CT and 0.2–0.42 mm for 4D-MRI. The results of Mann–Whitney tests indicated that 4D-MRI significantly outperforms 4D-CT in phase-based target volumetric (p = 0.027) and geometric (p < 0.001) measures. Both modalities achieve equivalent accuracy in measuring motion amplitude (p = 0.828). Conclusions: The k-space self-gated 4D-MRI technique provides a robust method for accurately imaging phase-based target motion and geometry. Compared to 4D-CT, the current 4D-MRI technique demonstrates superior spatiotemporal resolution, and robust resistance to motion artifacts caused by fast target motion and irregular breathing patterns. The technique can be used extensively in abdominal targeting, motion gating, and toward implementing MRI-based adaptive radiotherapy.

  6. WABASH RIVER IMPPCCT, INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Doug Strickland

    2001-09-28

    In a joint effort with the U.S. Department of Energy, working under a Cooperative Agreement Award from the ''Early Entrance Coproduction Plant'' (EECP) initiative, the Gasification Engineering Corporation and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the application of synthesis gas from the E-GAS{trademark} technology to a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, financial, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals Inc., The Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility Study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility and for fence-line commercial plants operated at The Dow Chemical Company or Dow Corning Corporation chemical plant locations (i.e. the Commercial Embodiment Plant or CEP) (2) Research, development, and testing to address any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Ltd., plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. During the reporting period work was furthered to support the development of capital and operating cost estimates associated with the installation of liquid or gas phase methanol synthesis technology in a Commercial Embodiment Plant (CEP) utilizing the six cases previously defined. In addition, continued development of the plant economic model was accomplished by providing combined cycle performance data. Performance and emission estimates for gas turbine combined cycles was based on revised methanol purge gas information. The economic model was used to evaluate project returns with various market conditions and plant configurations and was refined to correct earlier flaws. Updated power price projections were obtained and incorporated in the model. Sensitivity studies show that break-even methanol prices which provide a 12% return are 47-54 cents/gallon for plant scenarios using $1.25/MM Btu coal, and about 40 cents/gallon for most of the scenarios with $0.50/MM Btu petroleum coke as the fuel source. One exception is a high power price and production case which could be economically attractive at 30 cents/gallon methanol. This case was explored in more detail, but includes power costs predicated on natural gas prices at the 95th percentile of expected price distributions. In this case, the breakeven methanol price is highly sensitive to the required project return rate, payback period, and plant on-line time. These sensitivities result mainly from the high capital investment required for the CEP facility ({approx}$500MM for a single train IGCC-methanol synthesis plant). Finally, during the reporting period the Defense Contractor Audit Agency successfully executed an accounting audit of Global Energy Inc. for data accumulated over the first year of the IMPPCCT project under the Cooperative Agreement.

  7. Investigating the low-dose limits of multidetector CT in lung nodule surveillance.

    PubMed

    Paul, N S; Siewerdsen, J H; Patsios, D; Chung, T B

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the factors limiting nodule detection in thoracic computed tomography (CT) and to determine whether prior knowledge of nodule size and attenuation, available from a baseline CT study, influences the minimum radiation dose at which nodule surveillance CT scans can be performed while maintaining current levels of nodule detectability. Multiple nodules varying in attenuation (-509 to + 110 HU) and diameter (1.6 to 9.5 mm) were layered in random and ordered sequences within 2 lung cylinders made of Rando lung material and suspended within a custom-built CT phantom. Multiple CT scans were performed at varying kVp (120, 100, and 80), mA (200, 150, 100, 50, 20, and 10), and beam collimation (5, 2.5, and 1.25 mm) on a four-row multidetector scanner (Lightspeed, General Electric, Milwaukee, WI) using 0.8 s gantry rotation. The corresponding range of radiation dose over which images were acquired was 0.3-26.4 mGy. Nine observers independently performed three specific tasks, namely: (1) To detect a 3.2 mm nodule of 23 HU; (2) To detect 3.2 mm nodules of varying attenuation (-509 to -154 HU); and (3) To detect nodules varying in size (1.6-9 mm) and attenuation (-509 to 110 HU). A two-alternative forced-choice test was used in order to determine the limits of nodule detection in terms of the proportion of correct responses (Pcorr, related to the area under the ROC curve) as a summary metric of observer performance. The radiation dose levels for detection of 99% of nodules in each task were as follows: Task 1 (1 mGy); Task 2 (5 mGy); and Task 3 (7 mGy). The corresponding interobserver confidence limits were 1, 5, and 10 mGy for Tasks 1, 2, and 3, respectively. There was a fivefold increase in the radiation dose required for detection of lower-density nodules (Tasks 1 to 2). Absence of prior knowledge of the nodule size and density (Task 3) corresponds to a significant increase in the minimum required radiation dose. Significant image degradation and reduction in observer performance for all tasks occur at a dose of < or = 1 mGy. It is concluded that the size and attenuation of a nodule strongly influence the radiation dose required for confident evaluation with a minimum threshold value of 1-2 mGy (minimum dose CT). A prior knowledge of nodule size and attenuation is available from the baseline CT scan and is an important consideration in minimizing the radiation exposure required for nodule detection with surveillance CT.

  8. Modeling a Hypothetical {sup 170}Tm Source for Brachytherapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Enger, Shirin A.; D'Amours, Michel; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To perform absorbed dose calculations based on Monte Carlo simulations for a hypothetical {sup 170}Tm source and to investigate the influence of encapsulating material on the energy spectrum of the emitted electrons and photons. Methods: GEANT4 Monte Carlo code version 9.2 patch 2 was used to simulate the decay process of {sup 170}Tm and to calculate the absorbed dose distribution using the GEANT4 Penelope physics models. A hypothetical {sup 170}Tm source based on the Flexisource brachytherapy design with the active core set as a pure thulium cylinder (length 3.5 mm and diameter 0.6 mm) and different cylindrical source encapsulations (length 5 mm and thickness 0.125 mm) constructed of titanium, stainless-steel, gold, or platinum were simulated. The radial dose function for the line source approximation was calculated following the TG-43U1 formalism for the stainless-steel encapsulation. Results: For the titanium and stainless-steel encapsulation, 94% of the total bremsstrahlung is produced inside the core, 4.8 and 5.5% in titanium and stainless-steel capsules, respectively, and less than 1% in water. For the gold capsule, 85% is produced inside the core, 14.2% inside the gold capsule, and a negligible amount (<1%) in water. Platinum encapsulation resulted in bremsstrahlung effects similar to those with the gold encapsulation. The range of the beta particles decreases by 1.1 mm with the stainless-steel encapsulation compared to the bare source but the tissue will still receive dose from the beta particles several millimeters from the source capsule. The gold and platinum capsules not only absorb most of the electrons but also attenuate low energy photons. The mean energy of the photons escaping the core and the stainless-steel capsule is 113 keV while for the gold and platinum the mean energy is 160 keV and 165 keV, respectively. Conclusions: A {sup 170}Tm source is primarily a bremsstrahlung source, with the majority of bremsstrahlung photons being

  9. Root architecture impacts on root decomposition rates in switchgrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaff, M.; Schadt, C.; Garten, C. T.; Jastrow, J. D.; Phillips, J.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2010-12-01

    Roots strongly contribute to soil organic carbon accrual, but the rate of soil carbon input via root litter decomposition is still uncertain. Root systems are built up of roots with a variety of different diameter size classes, ranging from very fine to very coarse roots. Since fine roots have low C:N ratios and coarse roots have high C:N ratios, root systems are heterogeneous in quality, spanning a range of different C:N ratios. Litter decomposition rates are generally well predicted by litter C:N ratios, thus decomposition of roots may be controlled by the relative abundance of fine versus coarse roots. With this study we asked how root architecture (i.e. the relative abundance of fine versus coarse roots) affects the decomposition of roots systems in the biofuels crop switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.). To understand how root architecture affects root decomposition rates, we collected roots from eight switchgrass cultivars (Alamo, Kanlow, Carthage, Cave-in-Rock, Forestburg, Southlow, Sunburst, Blackwell), grown at FermiLab (IL), by taking 4.8-cm diameter soil cores from on top of the crown and directly next to the crown of individual plants. Roots were carefully excised from the cores by washing and analyzed for root diameter size class distribution using WinRhizo. Subsequently, root systems of each of the plants (4 replicates per cultivar) were separated in 'fine' (0-0.5 mm), 'medium' (0.5-1 mm) and 'coarse' roots (1-2.5 mm), dried, cut into 0.5 cm (medium and coarse roots) and 2 mm pieces (fine roots), and incubated for 90 days. For each of the cultivars we established five root-treatments: 20g of soil was amended with 0.2g of (1) fine roots, (2) medium roots, (3) coarse roots, (4) a 1:1:1 mixture of fine, medium and coarse roots, and (5) a mixture combining fine, medium and coarse roots in realistic proportions. We measured CO2 respiration at days 1, 3, 7, 15, 30, 60 and 90 during the experiment. The 13C signature of the soil was -26‰, and the 13C signature of plants was -12‰, enabling us to differentiate between root-derived C and native SOM-C respiration. We found that the relative abundance of fine, medium and coarse roots were significantly different among cultivars. Root systems of Alamo, Kanlow and Cave-in-Rock were characterized by a large abundance of coarse-, relative to fine roots, whereas Carthage, Forestburg and Blackwell had a large abundance of fine, relative to coarse roots. Fine roots had a 28% lower C:N ratio than medium and coarse roots. These differences led to different root decomposition rates. We conclude that root architecture should be taken into account when predicting root decomposition rates; enhanced understanding of the mechanisms of root decomposition will improve model predictions of C input to soil organic matter.

  10. Reconstructing an extreme flood from boulder transport and rainfall-runoff modelling: Wadi Isla, South Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehew, Alan E.; Milewski, Adam; Soliman, Farouk

    2010-02-01

    response to renewed uplift of the mountain front and/or climate change. A calibrated rainfall-runoff model was developed using SWAT to estimate modern flood discharges in Wadi Isla. The magnitude of discharge from 1998-2006 did not exceed 500 m 3 s - 1 . Artificial precipitation amounts (90 and 150 mm) were used to extrapolate from recent rainfall amounts to the amount of rainfall needed to produce a discharge range of 1320 m 3 s - 1 to 1660 m 3 s - 1 . Results show that rainfall must range between ˜ 102 mm and 125 mm to produce this discharge.

  11. An electrical network model of intracranial arteriovenous malformations: analysis of variations in hemodynamic and biophysical parameters.

    PubMed

    Hademenos, G J; Massoud, T F

    1996-12-01

    The propensity of intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) to hemorrhage is correlated significantly with their hemodynamic features. Biomathematical models offer a theoretical approach to analyse complex AVM hemodynamics, which otherwise are difficult to quantify, particularly within or in close proximity to the nidus. Our purpose was to investigate a newly developed biomathematical AVM model based on electrical network analysis in which morphological, biophysical, and hemodynamic characteristics of intracranial AVMs were replicated accurately. Several factors implemented into the model were altered systematically to study the effects of a possible wide range of normal variations in AVM hemodynamic and biophysical parameters on the behavior of this model and its fidelity to physiological reality. The model represented a complex, noncompartmentalized AVM with four arterial feeders, two draining veins, and a nidus consisting of 28 interconnected plexiform and fistulous components. Various clinically-determined experimentally-observed, or hypothetically-assumed values for the nidus vessel radii (plexiform: 0.01 cm-0.1 cm; fistulous: 0.1 cm-0.2 cm), mean systemic arterial pressure (71 mm Hg-125 mm Hg), mean arterial feeder pressures (21 mm Hg-80 mm Hg), mean draining vein pressures (5 mm Hg-23 mm Hg), wall thickness of nidus vessels (20 microns-70 microns), and elastic modulus of nidus vessels (1 x 10(4) dyn/cm2 to 1 x 10(5) dyn/cm2) were used as normal or realistic ranges of parameters implemented in the model. Using an electrical analogy of Ohm's law, flow was determined based on Poiseuille's law given the aforementioned pressures and resistance of each nidus vessel. Circuit analysis of the AVM vasculature based on the conservation of flow and voltage revealed the flow rate through each vessel in the AVM network. An expression for the risk of AVM nidus rupture was derived based on the functional distribution of the critical radii of component vessels. The two

  12. Sex-structure, depth distribution, intermoult period and reproductive pattern of the deep-sea red crab Chaceon affinis (Brachyura, Geryonidae) in two populations in the north-eastern Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biscoito, Manuel; Freitas, Mafalda; Pajuelo, José G.; Triay-Portella, Raül; Santana, José I.; Costa, Ana L.; Delgado, João; González, José A.

    2015-01-01

    This work investigated the biology of Chaceon affinis in two isolated populations of the Atlantic Ocean, including depth distribution, sexual structure, reproductive patterns and intermoult period. Males were larger and heavier than females. Mean size decreased with depth for both males and females. The highest abundance was found at 600-799 m of depth for males and at 800-999 m depth stratum for females. The highest abundance of ovigerous females was found at the 800-999 m depth stratum. Of the different ovaries' colour or colour shades recorded, only six categories were histologically characterized. The presence of spermatophores in the spermatheca of females in carapace stages II and III suggests that spermatophores are viable and used during the intermoult period. The size at sexual maturity in females was estimated at 104.4-104.7 mm carapace width (CW) in Madeira, and 109.3-110.5 mm CW in the Canary Islands. Only three categories of testes were identified. Mature testes consisted in a large mass, with highly coiled vasa deferentia visible to the naked eye. The size at sexual maturity in males was estimated at 113.8 mm CW in Madeira and 118.9 mm CW in the Canaries. The relative growth of males showed significant changes along the ontogeny and size at which allometric growth changes, as an indicator of morphometric maturity, occurred between 103.2 and 103.6 mm CW in Madeira and between 111.4 and 113.1 mm CW in the Canaries. In females, size at which allometric growth changes was found for maximum width of fifth abdominal somite (AS5W) at 98.2 mm CW in Madeira and 103.0 mm CW in the Canaries. The size at maturity obtained for C. affinis indicates that the minimum landing size (MLS) should not be set smaller than 125 mm CW in Madeira and 130 mm CW in the Canaries. This conservative MLS, higher than length at functional maturity, would safeguard immature individuals until they reach the size at which they can contribute to the reproductive capacity of the

  13. In normal rat, intraventricularly administered insulin-like growth factor-1 is rapidly cleared from CSF with limited distribution into brain

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, Tavarekere N; Patel, Padma; Gorski, Martin; Gorevic, Peter D; Patlak, Clifford S; Fenstermacher, Joseph D

    2005-01-01

    Background Putatively active drugs are often intraventricularly administered to gain direct access to brain and circumvent the blood-brain barrier. A few studies on the normal central nervous system (CNS) have shown, however, that the distribution of materials after intraventricular injections is much more limited than presumed and their exit from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is more rapid than generally believed. In this study, we report the intracranial distribution and the clearance from CSF and adjacent CNS tissue of radiolabeled insulin-like growth factor-1 after injection into one lateral ventricle of the normal rat brain. Methods Under barbiturate anesthesia, 125I-labeled insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was injected into one lateral ventricle of normal Sprague-Dawley rats. The subsequent distribution of IGF-1 through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) system and into brain, cerebral blood vessels, and systemic blood was measured over time by gamma counting and quantitative autoradiography (QAR). Results Within 5 min of infusion, IGF-1 had spread from the infused lateral ventricle into and through the third and fourth ventricles. At this time, 25% of the infused IGF-1 had disappeared from the CSF-brain-meningeal system; the half time of this loss was 12 min. The plasma concentration of cleared IGF-1 was, however, very low from 2 to 9 min and only began to rise markedly after 20 min. This delay between loss and gain plus the lack of radiotracer in the cortical subarachnoid space suggested that much of the IGF-1 was cleared into blood via the cranial and/or spinal nerve roots and their associated lymphatic systems rather than periventricular tissue and arachnoid villi. Less than 10% of the injected radioactivity remained in the CSF-brain system after 180 min. The CSF and arteries and arterioles within the subarachnoid cisterns were labeled with IGF-1 within 10 min. Between 60 and 180 min, most of the radioactivity within the cranium was retained within and around these blood vessels and by periaqueductal gray matter. Tissue profiles at two sites next to ventricular CSF showed that IGF-1 penetrated less than 1.25 mm into brain tissue and appreciable 125I-activity remained at the tissue-ventricular CSF interface after 180 min. Conclusion Our findings suggest that entry of IGF-1 into normal brain parenchyma after lateral ventricle administration is limited by rapid clearance from CSF and brain and slow movement, apparently by diffusion, into the periventricular tissue. Various growth factors and other neuroactive agents have been reported to be neuroprotective within the injured brain after intraventricular administration. It is postulated that the delivery of such factors to neurons and glia in the injured brain may be facilitated by abnormal CSF flow. These several observations suggest that the flow of CSF and entrained solutes may differ considerably between normal and abnormal brain and even among various neuropathologies. PMID:16045806

  14. Evolution of the Foucault-Secretan reflecting telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, William

    2016-08-01

    his cousin Georges Secretan. Production of silvered-glass reflectors and other scientific instruments languished, and focal ratios slowed. Production appears to have revived after R. Mailhat became Director of the company's workshops and then founded his own firm. In 1903 the Secretan Company offered a simplified 125-mm reflector designed specially for members of the Société Astronomique de France, perhaps promoted by Georges' son Paul. Foucault-style reflecting telescopes were offered by other makers too, including Jules Duboscq, Édouard Lutz and Albert Bardou. Following Georges' death in 1906 the Company was operated by Paul before being sold to Charles Épry in 1906 who associated with Gustave Jacquelin in 1913. Only 125- to 200-mm amateur reflectors were offered in their 1924 and 1942 catalogues. Non-specific advertisements for reflectors continued beyond amalgamation with the Morin Company in 1963, but disappeared after a subsequent merger with the Société de Recherches et de Perfectionnements Industriels c.1967.

  15. Understanding sediment sources in a peri-urban Mediterranean catchment using geochemical tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Carla; Walsh, Rory; Kikuchi, Ryunosuke; Blake, Will

    2016-04-01

    different particle size fractions (0.125-2.000mm, 0.063-0.125mm and <0.063mm). Seventeen stream sites were sampled plus a sample of sediment from a road surface immediately it entered the stream network. The elemental composition (40 elements) of each size fraction was assessed using a Niton X-ray fluorescence elemental analyser. Results show that rock type has a profound influence on the geochemical properties of bed-sediments. Catchment outlet sediment collected after the summer and a storm of high rainfall intensity following dry weather displayed geochemical properties closer to those of sediment from sandstone sub-catchments, and in particularly sediment from the enterprise park under construction. After the storm that followed very wet weather, however, limestone areas became of much greater significance as sediment sources, probably because of the high soil saturation. At limestone stream sites receiving runoff from the newly constructed road, fine bed-sediment geochemistry was found to be similar to that of road sediment, indicating a high contribution of this source. These results are supported by spatio-temporal differences in streamflow and suspended sediment concentrations at instrumented monitoring stations. It is concluded that this methodology represents a potentially useful tool to enable river managers to detect and assess sediment sources in urbanized and partly urbanized catchments, and to supporting them in designing and implementing effective land-use mosaics and site-specific measures to mitigate erosion.

  16. Nucleation and growth of rolling contact failure of 440C bearing steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, V.; Bastias, P. C.; Hahn, G. T.; Rubin, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    A 'two-body' elasto-plastic finite element model of 2-dimensional rolling and rolling-plus-sliding was developed to treat the effect of surface irregularities. The model consists of a smooth cylinder in contact with a semi-infinite half-space that is either smooth or fitted with one of 0.4 microns deep or 7 microns deep groove, or a 0.4 microns high ridge-like asperity. The model incorporates elastic-linear-kinematic hardening-plastic (ELKP) and non-linear-kinematic hardening-plastic (NLKP) material constitutive relations appropriate for hardened bearing steel and the 440C grade. The calculated contact pressure distribution is Hertzian for smooth body contact, and it displays intense, stationary, pressure spikes superposed on the Hertzian pressure for contact with the grooved and ridged surface. The results obtained for the 0.4 microns deep groove compare well with those reported by Elsharkawy and Hamrock for an EHD lubricated contact. The effect of translating the counterface on the half space as opposed to indenting the half space with the counter face with no translation is studied. The stress and strain values near the surface are found to be similar for the two cases, whereas they are significantly different in the subsurface. It is seen that when tiny shoulders are introduced at the edge of the groove in the finite element model, the incremental plasticity and residual stresses are significantly higher in the vicinity of the right shoulder (rolling direction is from left to right) than at the left shoulder. This may explain the experimental observation that the spall nucleation occurs at the exit end of the artificially planted indents. Pure rolling calculations are compared with rolling + sliding calculations. For a coefficient of friction, mu = 0.1, the effect of friction is found to be small. Efforts were made to identify the material constitutive relations which best describe the deformation characteristics of the bearing steels in the initial few cycles. Elastic-linear-kinematic hardening-plastic (ELKP) material constitutive relations produce less net plastic deformation in the initial stages for a given stress, than seen in experiments. A new set of constitutive relations: non-linear-kinematic hardening-plastic (NLKP) was used. This material model produces more plasticity than the ELKP model and shows promise for treating the net distortions in the early stages. Techniques for performing experimental measurements that can be compared with the finite element calculations were devised. The measurements are being performed on 9mm-diameter, 440C steel cylindrical rolling elements in contact with 12.5 mm-diameter, 52100 steel balls in a 3-ball-rod fatigue test machine operating at 3600 RPM. Artificial, 7 microns deep, indents were inserted on the running track of the cylindrical rolling elements and profilometer measurements of these indents made, before and after the rolling. These preliminary measurements show that the indents are substantially deformed plastically in the process of rolling. The deformations of the groove calculated with the finite element model are comparable to those measured experimentally.

  17. Growth of Megaspherulites In a Rhyolitic Vitrophyre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert K.; Tremallo, Robin L.; Lofgren, Gary E.

    2000-01-01

    Megaspherulites occur in the middle zone of a thick sequence of rhyolitic vitrophyre that occupies a small, late Eocene to early Oligocene volcanic-tectonic basin near Silver Cliff, Custer County, Colorado. Diameters of the megaspherulites range from 0.3 m to over 3.66 m, including a clay envelope. The megaspherulites are compound spherulites. consisting of an extremely large number (3.8 x 10(exp 9) to 9.9 x 10(exp 9)) of individual growth cones averaging 3 mm long by 1.25 mm wide at their termination. They are holocrystalline, very fine- to fine-grained, composed of disordered to ordered sanidine (orthoclase) and quartz, and surrounded by a thin K-feldspar, quartz rich rind, an inner clay layer with mordenite, and an outer clay layer composed wholly of 15 A montmorillonite. Whole rock analyses of the megaspherulites show a restricted composition from their core to their outer edge, with an average analyses of 76.3% SiO2, 0.34% CaO, 2.17% Na2O, 6.92% K2O, 0.83% H2O+ compared to the rhyolitic vitrophyre from which they crystallize with 71.07% SiO2, 0.57% CaO, 4.06% Na2O,4.l0% K2O, and 6.40% H2O+. The remaining oxides of Fe2O3 (total Fe), A12O3, MnO,MgO, TiO2, P2O5, Cr2O3, and trace elements show uniform distribution between the megaspherulites and the rhyolitic vitrophyre. Megaspherulite crystallization began soon after the rhyolitic lava ceased to flow as the result of sparse heterogeneous nucleation, under nonequilibrium conditions, due to a high degree of undercooling, delta T. The crystals grow with a fibrous habit which is favored by a large delta T ranging between 245 C and 295 C, despite lowered viscosity, and enhanced diffusion due to the high H2O content, ranging between 5% and 7%. Therefore, megaspherulite growth proceeded in a diffusion controlled manner, where the diffusion, rate lags behind the crystal growth rate at the crystal-liquid interface, restricting fibril lengths and diameters to the 10 micron to 15 micron and 3 micron and 8 micron ranges respectively. Once diffusion reestablishes itself at the crystallization front, a new nucleation event occurs at the terminated tips of the fibril cones and a new cone begins to develop with a similar orientation (small angle branching) to the earlier cones. During crystallization, these fibril cones impinge upon each other, resulting in fibril cone-free areas. These cone-free areas consist of coarser, fine-grained phases, dominated by quartz, which crystallized from the melt as it accumulated between the crystallizing K-feldspar fibrils of the cones. The anhydrous nature of the disordered to ordered sanidine (orthoclase) and quartz, suggests that water in the vitrophyre moved ahead of the crystallization front, resulting in a water rich fluid being enriched in Si, K, Na, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, and Y. The clay layers associated with the megaspherulites are therefore, the result of the deuteric alteration between the fractionated water and the vitrophyre, as indicated by the presence of the minerals mordenite and montmorillonite. This silica rich fluid also resulted in the total silicification of the megaspherulites within the upper 3 m of the vitrophyre.

  18. Recurring features of extreme rainfall events close to Veneto coast during autumn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monai, M.; Barbi, A.; Racca, R.

    2010-09-01

    warm air coming from Adriatic sea, that is still warm (sea surface temperature above 20°C) in September; - previous weather conditions (7-10 days) with anticyclonic situation (frequently a ridge from north-Africa) with temperatures higher than usual. During most intense phases, recurring features were evidenced: - convective rains with significant thunderstorm activity; such systems are often associated to regeneration of cells, in the same coastal area; - convergence lines at low levels associated with winds coming from SE (from the sea) on the coast, and from NE (from the plane) immediately inland. It is particularly important to underline that rainfall values on short periods were extremely high if compared with mean annual amount: during last four episodes , rainfall amounts between 130 and 320 mm were recorded in 12 hours, i.e. during half a day something like 1/8 and 1/3 of total mean annual amount has fallen. Remarkable also intensity of rainfall : values like 90 mm in half an hour, or 125 mm in 1 hour were recorded. The final goal of this study was to better understand meteorological conditions associated with such events to improve forecasting and nowcasting skill. This is a crucial benefit for a Regional Met Service that must alert and support civil defence system properly, as is the case for Meteorological Centre of ARPAV in Veneto. Furthermore it is important to underline the fact that coastal area of Veneto is densely populated and it is one of the most important areas of Italian tourism, including the city of Venice and several seaside resorts with more than twenty millions of presences per year.

  19. Assessment of individual organ doses in a realistic human phantom from neutron and gamma stimulated spectroscopy of the breast and liver

    PubMed Central

    Belley, Matthew D.; Segars, William Paul; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the radiation dose to a patient is essential when considering the use of an ionizing diagnostic imaging test for clinical diagnosis and screening. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors estimated the three-dimensional organ-dose distribution from neutron and gamma irradiation of the male liver, female liver, and female breasts for neutron- and gamma-stimulated spectroscopic imaging. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were developed using the Geant4 GATE application and a voxelized XCAT human phantom. A male and a female whole body XCAT phantom was voxelized into 256 × 256 × 600 voxels (3.125 × 3.125 × 3.125 mm3). A monoenergetic rectangular beam of 5.0 MeV neutrons or 7.0 MeV photons was made incident on a 2 cm thick slice of the phantom. The beam was rotated at eight different angles around the phantom ranging from 0° to 180°. Absorbed dose was calculated for each individual organ in the body and dose volume histograms were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each organ. Results: The neutron irradiations of the liver showed the highest organ dose absorption in the liver, with appreciably lower doses in other proximal organs. The dose distribution within the irradiated slice exhibited substantial attenuation with increasing depth along the beam path, attenuating to ∼15% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. The gamma irradiation of the liver imparted the highest organ dose to the stomach wall. The dose distribution from the gammas showed a region of dose buildup at the beam entrance, followed by a relatively uniform dose distribution to all of the deep tissue structures, attenuating to ∼75% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. For the breast scans, both the neutron and gamma irradiation registered maximum organ doses in the breasts, with all other organs receiving less than 1% of the breast dose. Effective doses ranged from 0.22 to 0.37 mSv for the neutron scans and 41 to 66 mSv for the gamma scans

  20. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott; Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W.; Sloan, Andrew

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system—MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was “printed” using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm). A passing rate of 99% was measured in areas of above 40% of the prescription dose. The final inverse treatment plan was comprised of 43 beams ranging from 5 to 12.5 mm in diameter (2.5 mm size increments are available up to 15 mm in diameter collimation). Using the Xsight Spine Tracking module, the CyberKnife system could not reliably identify and track the tiny mouse spine; however, the CyberKnife system could identify and track the fiducial markers on the 3D mold.In vivo positional accuracy analysis using the 3D mold generated a mean error of 1.41 mm ± 0.73 mm when fiducial markers were used for position tracking. Analysis of the dissected brain confirmed the ability to target the correct brain volume. Conclusions: With the use of a stereotactic body mold with fiducial markers, microCT imaging, and resolution down-sampling, the CyberKnife system can successfully perform small-animal radiotherapy studies.

  1. Comparative Analysis of Continuous Acoustic Emission (AE) Data, Acquired from 12 and 16 Bit Streaming Systems during Rock Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, J.; Goodfellow, S. D.; Nasseri, M. H.; Reyes-Montes, J. M.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    A comparative analysis of continuous acoustic emission (AE) data acquired during a triaxial compression test, using a 12-bit and a 16-bit acquisition system, is presented. A cylindrical sample (diameter 50.1 mm and length 125 mm) of Berea sandstone was triaxally deformed at a confining pressure of 15 MPa and a strain rate of 1.6E-06 s-1. The sample was loaded differentially until failure occurred at approximately σ1 = 160 MPa. AE activity was monitored for the duration of the experiment by an array of 8 broadband piezoelectric transducers coupled to the rock sample. Raw signals were amplified by 40 dB using pre-amplifiers equipped with filter modules with a frequency passband of 100 kHz to 1 MHz. The amplifiers had a split output enabling the measured signal to be fed into a 12-bit and a 16-bit acquisition system. AE waveforms were continuously recorded at 10 MS/s on 8 data acquisition channels per system. Approximately 4,500 events were harvested and source located from the continuous data for each system. P-wave arrivals were automatically picked and event locations calculated using the downhill Simplex method and a time-varying transverse isotropic velocity model based on periodical surveys across the sample. Events detected on the 12-bit and 16-bit systems were compared both in terms of their P-wave picks and their source locations. In the early stages of AE activity, there appeared to be little difference between P-wave picks and hypocenter locations from both data sets. As the experiment progressed into the post-peak stress regime, which was accompanied by an increase in AE rate and amplitude, fewer events could be harvested from the 12-bit data compared to the 16-bit data. This is linked to the observation of a higher signal-to-noise ratio on AE waveforms harvested from the 16-bit stream compared to those from the 12-bit stream, which results in an easier identification of P-wave onsets. Similarly a higher confidence in source location is expected. Analysis

  2. A deformable phantom for 4D radiotherapy verification: Design and image registration evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Serban, Monica; Heath, Emily; Stroian, Gabriela; Collins, D. Louis; Seuntjens, Jan

    2008-03-15

    Motion of thoracic tumors with respiration presents a challenge for three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy treatment. Validation of techniques aimed at measuring and minimizing the effects of respiratory motion requires a realistic deformable phantom for use as a gold standard. The purpose of this study was to develop and study the characteristics of a reproducible, tissue equivalent, deformable lung phantom. The phantom consists of a Lucite cylinder filled with water containing a latex balloon stuffed with dampened natural sponges. The balloon is attached to a piston that mimics the human diaphragm. Nylon wires and Lucite beads, emulating vascular and bronchial bifurcations, were uniformly glued at various locations throughout the sponges. The phantom is capable of simulating programmed irregular breathing patterns with varying periods and amplitudes. A tissue equivalent tumor, suitable for holding radiochromic film for dose measurements was embedded in the sponge. To assess phantom motion, eight 3D computed tomography data sets of the static phantom were acquired for eight equally spaced positions of the piston. The 3D trajectories of 12 manually chosen point landmarks and the tumor center-of-mass were studied. Motion reproducibility tests of the deformed phantom were established on seven repeat scans of three different states of compression. Deformable image registration (DIR) of the extreme breathing phases was performed. The accuracy of the DIR was evaluated by visual inspection of image overlays and quantified by the distance-to-agreement (DTA) of manually chosen point landmarks and triangulated surfaces obtained from 3D contoured structures. In initial tests of the phantom, a 20-mm excursion of the piston resulted in deformations of the balloon of 20 mm superior-inferior, 4 mm anterior-posterior, and 5 mm left-right. The change in the phantom mean lung density ranged from 0.24 (0.12 SD) g/cm{sup 3} at peak exhale to 0.19 (0.12 SD) g/cm{sup 3} at peak inhale. The SI displacement of the landmarks varied between 94% and 3% of the piston excursion for positions closer and farther away from the piston, respectively. The reproducibility of the phantom deformation was within the image resolution (0.7x0.7x1.25 mm{sup 3}). Vector average registration accuracy based on point landmarks was found to be 0.5 (0.4 SD) mm. The tumor and lung mean 3D DTA obtained from triangulated surfaces were 0.4 (0.1 SD) mm and 1.0 (0.8 SD) mm, respectively. This phantom is capable of reproducibly emulating the physically realistic lung features and deformations and has a wide range of potential applications, including four-dimensional (4D) imaging, evaluation of deformable registration accuracy, 4D planning and dose delivery.

  3. Understanding catchment scale sediment sources using geochemical tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Carla S. S.; Walsh, Rory P. D.; Shakesby, Richard A.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.; Ferreira, António J. D.; Coelho, Celeste O. A.

    2013-04-01

    It is well-established that urbanization leads to increased erosion (at least locally) as well as enhanced overland flow and streamflow peaks. Less is known about how the spatial distribution of erosion sources and scale of increases in erosion vary with the nature of urbanization in different climatic and socio-economic settings. This is important in order to prevent or reduce adverse impacts of erosion on downstream sedimentation, channel siltation and shifting, and river pollution. This paper adopts a sediment fingerprinting approach to assess the impact of partial urbanization and associated land-use change on sediment sources within a peri-urban catchment (6 km2), Ribeira dos Covões on the outskirts of the city of Coimbra in central Portugal. Urban land-use has increased from just 6% in 1958 to 30% in 2009. The urban pattern includes some well-defined urban residential centres, but also areas of discontinuous urban sprawl, including educational, health and small industrial facilities, numerous new roads and an enterprise park is under construction on the upper part of the catchment. The catchment has a wet Mediterranean climate and the lithology comprises sandstone in the west and limestone in the east. Soil depth is generally >40cm. The average slope angle is 8° (maximum 47°). Altitude ranges from 30m to 205m. A sediment fingerprinting approach was adopted to help establish the relative importance of sediment inputs from different urban areas. During September 2012 current bed-sediment samples (0-3 cm depth) were collected from 11 channel sites along the main stream and in different tributaries. At sites where bed-sediment was deeper, additional samples were taken at 3cm intervals to a maximum depth of around 42cm. In addition, overbank sediment samples (0-3cm depth) were collected at 11 locations around the catchment. All samples were oven-dried (at 38°C) and different particle size fractions (0.125-2mm, 0.063-0.125mm and <0.063mm) obtained, where the <0

  4. Risk Assessment of Physiological Effects of Atmospheric Composition and Pressure in Constellation Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Conkin, Johnny; Jones, J. A.; Gernhardt, M.

    2007-01-01

    To limit the risk of fire and reduce denitrogenation time to prevent decompression sickness to support frequent extravehicular activities on the Moon, a hypobaric (PB = 414 mmHg) and mildly hypoxic (ppO2 = 132 mmHg, 32% O2 - 68% N2) living environment is considered for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). With acute change in ppO2 from 145-178 mmHg at standard vehicular operating pressure to less than 125 mmHg at desired lunar surface vehicular operating pressures, there is the possibility that some crewmembers may develop symptoms of Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS). The signs and symptoms of AMS (headache plus nausea, dizziness, fatigue, or sleeplessness), could impact crew health and performance on lunar surface missions. An exhaustive literature review on the topic of the physiological effects of reduced ppO2 and absolute pressure as may contribute to the development of altitude symptoms or AMS was performed. The results of the nine most rigorous studies were collated, analyzed and contents on AMS and hypoxia symptoms summarized. There is evidence for an absolute pressure effect per se on AMS, so the higher the altitude for a given hypoxic alveolar O2 partial pressure (PAO2), the greater the AMS response. About 25% of adults are likely to experience mild AMS near 2,000 m altitude following a rapid ascent from sea level while breathing air (6,500 feet, acute PAO2 = 75 mmHg). The operational experience with the Shuttle staged denitrogenation protocol at 528 mmHg (3,048 m) while breathing 26.5% O2 (acute PAO2 = 85 mmHg) in astronauts adapting to microgravity suggests a similar likely experience in the proposed CEV environment. We believe the risk of mild AMS is greater given a PAO2 of 77 mmHg at 4,876 m altitude while breathing 32% O2 than at 1,828 m altitude while breathing 21% O2. Only susceptible astronauts would develop mild and transient AMS with prolonged exposure to 414 mmHg (4,876 m) while breathing 32% O2 (acute PAO2

  5. FGDC Digital Cartographic Standard for Geologic Map Symbolization (PostScript Implementation)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    standard, provided that it is clearly explained on the map and in the database. In addition, modifying the size, color, and (or) lineweight of an existing symbol to suit the needs of a particular map or output device also is permitted, provided that the modified symbol's appearance is not too similar to another symbol on the map. Be aware, however, that reducing lineweights below .125 mm (.005 inch) may cause symbols to plot incorrectly if output at higher resolutions (1800 dpi or higher). For guidelines on symbol usage, as well as on color design and map labeling, please refer to the standard's introductory text. Also found there are informational sections covering concepts of geologic mapping and some definitions of geologic map features, as well as sections on the newly defined concepts and terminology for the scientific confidence and locational accuracy of geologic map features. More information on both the past development and the future maintenance of the FGDC Digital Cartographic Standard for Geologic Map Symbolization can be found at the FGDC Geologic Data Subcommittee website (http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/fgdc_gds/). Earlier Versions of the Standard

  6. Blood pressure, edema and proteinuria in pregnancy. 7. Edema-plus-proteinuria relationships.

    PubMed

    Sellmann, A H

    1976-01-01

    1. A total of 488 pregnancies had the combination of two-plus or more proteinuria and edema of the hands and face. Of these, 208 were white and 280 were black gravidas. In the white gravidas, 8 fetal and neonatal deaths occurred with a perinatal mortality of 38.5 per 1,000. There were 13 perinatal deaths in the black subgroup with a perinatal mortality rate of 46.4 per 1,000. The overall perinatal mortality rate was 43.0 per 1,000, which could be compared to the overall perinatal mortality rate of 32.8 per 1,000 for the segment of the study population without edema or proteinuria. This underscored the implication of increased hazard to fetal outcome of these clinical signs in combination. 2. The analysis of the matrix data showed scattered rates throughout gestation in white median-age nulliparas. Their black counterparts had comparable increased mortality rates. In the white multiparas of ages 20 to 34 years, the highest rates were found at relatively low blood pressure levels. The black median-age multiparas had rates associated with higher pressure readings, especially at or above 125/75. In teenage mulliparas with edema and proteinuria, perinatal mortality rates were similar for both subgroups and were found in somewhat lower blood pressures. 3. The incremental analysis was remarkable in that rates were scattered widely in the white subgroups, but tightly clustered in the black subgroups. The black median-age nulliparas had perinatal mortality concentrated about 115 to 134 mm. Hg systolic and 65 to 84 mm. Hg diastolic. The overall mortality rates of this subgroup were the highest of the subgroups studied. The black 20 to 34 year old multiparas had highest coassociated deaths in the 134-154 mm. Hg systolic levels throughout pregnancy. The clustering effect was most pronounced in black teenage nulliparas in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure groups at much lower levels. 4. The use of a critical cut-off blood pressure level of 125 mm. Hg systolic and 75 mm

  7. Polwarth and Texel ewe parturition duration and its association with lamb birth asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Dutra, F; Banchero, G

    2011-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that parturition duration is related to birth asphyxia in lambs and that asphyxia affects newborn lamb viability and vigor. Two sire and dam genotypes (Texel: TX; Polwarth: PW) and their crosses were represented in the study. Eighty lambs (25 PW sire × PW dam, 13 TX × TX, 25 TX × PW, and 17 PW × TX) born to 69 grazing ewes were used. At birth, the log₁₀ length of the second stage of parturition, birth weight, placental weight, and several body measurements were recorded on all lambs, and jugular blood samples were analyzed with the i-Stat Portable Clinical Analyzer (Abbott, Montevideo, Uruguay). A modified Apgar viability score at birth and lamb behavior during their first hour of life were recorded. Brain weight, muscle:bone ratio, and bone density were recorded in 20 male lambs (5 from each breed group) that were euthanized and dissected 24 h after birth. Data were analyzed by linear regression, least squares ANOVA, and ordinal and binary logistic regressions. Mean blood gas and acid-base variables were 7.21 ± 0.09 for pH, 18.4 ± 9.8 mmHg for partial pressure of oxygen, 53 ± 12.5 mmHg for partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and -4 ± 5.1 mmol/L for extracellular fluid base excess. Parturition duration increased with birth weight (P < 0.001) and was shorter in TX ewes (P < 0.001), female lambs (P < 0.05), twins (P < 0.09), and twin females (sex × litter size interaction, P < 0.02). Twenty-six (32.9%) lambs were born asphyxiated (pO₂ < 10 mmHg or pH <7.1). Parturition duration increased the risk of asphyxia (P < 0.001), decreased the viability score (P < 0.001), and increased the latency to suckle the udder (P < 0.05). Twin-born lambs presented at birth a 16-fold greater risk of asphyxia (P < 0.01) and reduced placental efficiency (P < 0.05). Texel-sired lambs appeared immature at birth, with less bone density (P < 0.05), smaller brain (P < 0.05), shorter forelimbs (P < 0.05), greater anterior (P < 0.001) and posterior (P < 0.05) neck circumference, and greater muscle:bone ratio (P < 0.05). Immaturity may explain greater TX biotype survival. Together these results demonstrate that a relationship exists between parturition duration, neonatal viability and behavior, and acid-base balance values in single- and twin-born lambs, suggesting that birth asphyxia is an important risk factor in perinatal lamb mortality.

  8. Quantifying moisture transport in cementitious materials using neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero, Catherine L.

    A portion of the concrete pavements in the US have recently been observed to have premature joint deterioration. This damage is caused in part by the ingress of fluids, like water, salt water, or deicing salts. The ingress of these fluids can damage concrete when they freeze and expand or can react with the cementitious matrix causing damage. To determine the quality of concrete for assessing potential service life it is often necessary to measure the rate of fluid ingress, or sorptivity. Neutron imaging is a powerful method for quantifying fluid penetration since it can describe where water has penetrated, how quickly it has penetrated and the volume of water in the concrete or mortar. Neutrons are sensitive to light atoms such as hydrogen and thus clearly detect water at high spatial and temporal resolution. It can be used to detect small changes in moisture content and is ideal for monitoring wetting and drying in mortar exposed to various fluids. This study aimed at developing a method to accurately estimate moisture content in mortar. The common practice is to image the material dry as a reference before exposing to fluid and normalizing subsequent images to the reference. The volume of water can then be computed using the Beer-Lambert law. This method can be limiting because it requires exact image alignment between the reference image and all subsequent images. A model of neutron attenuation in a multi-phase cementitious composite was developed to be used in cases where a reference image is not available. The attenuation coefficients for water, un-hydrated cement, and sand were directly calculated from the neutron images. The attenuation coefficient for the hydration products was then back-calculated. The model can estimate the degree of saturation in a mortar with known mixture proportions without using a reference image for calculation. Absorption in mortars exposed to various fluids (i.e., deionized water and calcium chloride solutions) were investigated. It has been found through this study that small pores, namely voids created by chemical shrinkage, gel pores, and capillary pores, ranging from 0.5 nm to 50 microm, fill quickly through capillary action. However, large entrapped and entrained air voids ranging from 0.05 to 1.25 mm remain empty during the initial filling process. In mortar exposed to calcium chloride solution, a decrease in sorptivity was observed due to an increase in viscosity and surface tension of the solution as proposed by Spragg et al 2011. This work however also noted a decrease in the rate of absorption due to a reaction between the salt and matrix which results in the filling of the pores in the concrete. The results from neutron imaging can help in the interpretation of standard absorption tests. ASTM C1585 test results can be further analyzed in several ways that could give an accurate indication of the durability of the concrete. Results can be reported in depth of penetration versus the square root of time rather than mm3 of fluid per mm2 of exposed surface area. Since a known fraction of pores are initially filling before reaching the edge of the sample, the actual depth of penetration can be calculated. This work is compared with an 'intrinsic sorptivity' that can be used to interpret mass measurements. Furthermore, the influence of shrinkage reducing admixtures (SRAs) on drying was studied. Neutron radiographs showed that systems saturated in water remain "wetter" than systems saturated in 5% SRA solution. The SRA in the system reduces the moisture diffusion coefficient due an increase in viscosity and decrease in surface tension. Neutron radiography provided spatial information of the drying front that cannot be achieved using other methods.

  9. Assessment of individual organ doses in a realistic human phantom from neutron and gamma stimulated spectroscopy of the breast and liver

    SciTech Connect

    Belley, Matthew D.; Segars, William Paul; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Understanding the radiation dose to a patient is essential when considering the use of an ionizing diagnostic imaging test for clinical diagnosis and screening. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors estimated the three-dimensional organ-dose distribution from neutron and gamma irradiation of the male liver, female liver, and female breasts for neutron- and gamma-stimulated spectroscopic imaging. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were developed using the Geant4 GATE application and a voxelized XCAT human phantom. A male and a female whole body XCAT phantom was voxelized into 256 × 256 × 600 voxels (3.125 × 3.125 × 3.125 mm{sup 3}). A monoenergetic rectangular beam of 5.0 MeV neutrons or 7.0 MeV photons was made incident on a 2 cm thick slice of the phantom. The beam was rotated at eight different angles around the phantom ranging from 0° to 180°. Absorbed dose was calculated for each individual organ in the body and dose volume histograms were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each organ. Results: The neutron irradiations of the liver showed the highest organ dose absorption in the liver, with appreciably lower doses in other proximal organs. The dose distribution within the irradiated slice exhibited substantial attenuation with increasing depth along the beam path, attenuating to ∼15% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. The gamma irradiation of the liver imparted the highest organ dose to the stomach wall. The dose distribution from the gammas showed a region of dose buildup at the beam entrance, followed by a relatively uniform dose distribution to all of the deep tissue structures, attenuating to ∼75% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. For the breast scans, both the neutron and gamma irradiation registered maximum organ doses in the breasts, with all other organs receiving less than 1% of the breast dose. Effective doses ranged from 0.22 to 0.37 mSv for the neutron scans and 41 to 66 mSv for the gamma

  10. Multi-Segment Radius Measurement Using an Absolute Distance Meter Through a Null Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merle, Cormic; Wick, Eric; Hayden, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This system was one of the test methods considered for measuring the radius of curvature of one or more of the 18 segmented mirrors that form the 6.5 m diameter primary mirror (PM) of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The assembled telescope will be tested at cryogenic temperatures in a 17-m diameter by 27-m high vacuum chamber at the Johnson Space Center. This system uses a Leica Absolute Distance Meter (ADM), at a wavelength of 780 nm, combined with beam-steering and beam-shaping optics to make a differential distance measurement between a ring mirror on the reflective null assembly and individual PM segments. The ADM is located inside the same Pressure-Tight Enclosure (PTE) that houses the test interferometer. The PTE maintains the ADM and interferometer at ambient temperature and pressure so that they are not directly exposed to the telescope s harsh cryogenic and vacuum environment. This system takes advantage of the existing achromatic objective and reflective null assembly used by the test interferometer to direct four ADM beamlets to four PM segments through an optical path that is coincident with the interferometer beam. A mask, positioned on a linear slide, contains an array of 1.25 mm diameter circular subapertures that map to each of the 18 PM segments as well as six positions around the ring mirror. A down-collimated 4 mm ADM beam simultaneously covers 4 adjacent PM segment beamlets and one ring mirror beamlet. The radius, or spacing, of all 18 segments can be measured with the addition of two orthogonally-oriented scanning pentaprisms used to steer the ADM beam to any one of six different sub-aperture configurations at the plane of the ring mirror. The interferometer beam, at a wavelength of 687 nm, and the ADM beamlets, at a wavelength of 780 nm, pass through the objective and null so that the rays are normally incident on the parabolic PM surface. After reflecting off the PM, both the ADM and interferometer beams return to their respective instruments on nearly the same path. A fifth beamlet, acting as a differential reference, reflects off a ring mirror attached to the objective and null and returns to the ADM. The spacings between the ring mirror, objective, and null are known through manufacturing tolerances as well as through an in situ null wavefront alignment of the interferometer test beam with a reflective hologram located near the caustic of the null. Since total path length between the ring mirror and PM segments is highly deterministic, any ADM-measured departures from the predicted path length can be attributed to either spacing error or radius error in the PM. It is estimated that the path length measurement between the ring mirror and a PM segment is accurate to better than 100 m. The unique features of this invention include the differential distance measuring capability and its integration into an existing cryogenic and vacuum compatible interferometric optical test.

  11. Risk Assessment of Physiological Effects of Atmospheric Composition and Pressure in Constellation Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Conkin, Johnny; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    To reduce denitrogenation time to prevent decompression sickness to support frequent extravehicular activities on the Moon, and to limit the risk of fire, a hypobaric (P(sub B) = 414 mmHg) and mildly hypoxic (ppO2 = 132 mmHg, 32% O2 - 68% N2) living environment is being considered during lunar missions for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). If the vehicular ppO2 is acutely changed from 145-178 mmHg at standard vehicular operating pressure to less than 125 mmHg at desired lunar surface outpost operating pressures, there is the possibility that some crewmembers may develop symptoms of Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS). The signs and symptoms of AMS (headache plus nausea, dizziness, fatigue, or sleeplessness), could impact crew health and performance on lunar surface missions. Methods: An exhaustive literature review on the topic of the physiological effects of reduced ppO2 and absolute pressure as may contribute to the development of hypoxia and altitude symptoms or AMS. The results of the nine most rigorous studies were collated, analyzed and contents on the physiological concerns associated with hypobaric operations, AMS and hypoxia symptoms summarized. Results: Although space vehicles have operated in hypobaric conditions previously, they have not operated in a mildly hypoxic ppO2. There is evidence for an absolute pressure effect per se on AMS, such that the higher the altitude for a given hypoxic alveolar O2 partial pressure (P(sub A)O2), the greater the likelihood of an AMS response. About 25% of adults are likely to experience mild AMS near 2,000 m (xxx mmHg) altitude following a rapid ascent from sea level while breathing air (6,500 feet, acute (P(sub A)O2) = 75 mmHg). The operational experience with the Shuttle staged denitrogenation protocol at 528 mmHg (3,048 m) while breathing 26.5% O2 (acute (P(sub A)O2) = 85 mmHg) in astronauts adapting to microgravity suggests a similar likely experience in the proposed CEV

  12. Impact of motion velocity on four-dimensional target volumes: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Narita, Yuichiro; Sawada, Akira; Matsugi, Kiyotomo; Nakata, Manabu; Matsuo, Yukinori; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2009-05-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of motion velocity that may cause motion artifacts on target volumes (TVs) using a one-dimensional moving phantom. A 20 mm diameter spherical object embedded in a QUASAR phantom sinusoidally moved with approximately 5.0 or 10.0 mm amplitude (A) along the longitudinal axis of the computed tomography (CT) couch. The motion period was manually set in the range of 2.0-10.0 s at approximately 2.0 s interval. Four-dimensional (4D) CT images were acquired by a four-slice CT scanner (LightSpeed RT; General Electric Medical Systems, Waukesha, WI) with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm in axial cine mode. The minimum gantry rotation of 1.0 s was employed to achieve the maximum in-slice temporal resolution. Projection data over a full gantry rotation (1.0 s) were used for image reconstruction. Reflective marker position was recorded by the real-time positioning management system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). ADVANTAGE 4D software exported ten respiratory phase volumes and the maximum intensity volume generated from all reconstructed data (MIV). The threshold to obtain static object volume (V0, 4.19 ml) was used to automatically segment TVs on CT images, and then the union of TVs on 4D CT images (TV(4D)) was constructed. TVs on MIV (TV(MIV)) were also segmented by the threshold that can determine the area occupied within the central slice of TV(MIV). The maximum motion velocity for each phase bin was calculated using the actual averaged motion period displayed on ADVANTAGE 4D software (T), the range of phases used to construct the target phase bin (phase range), and a mathematical model of sinusoidal function. Each volume size and the motion range of TV in the cranial-caudal (CC) direction were measured. Subsequently, cross-correlation coefficients between TV size and motion velocity as well as phase range were calculated. Both misalignment and motion-blurring artifacts were caused by high motion velocity, Less than 6% phase range was needed to construct the 4D CT data set, except for T of 2.0 s. While the positional differences between the TV and ideal centroid in the CC direction were within the voxel size for T > or = 6.0 s, the differences were up to 2.43 and 4.15 mm for (A,T) = (5.0 mm, 2.0 s) and (10.0 mm, 2.0 s), respectively. The maximum volumetric deviations between TV sizes and V0 were 43.68% and 91.41% for A of 5.0 and 10.0 mm, respectively. TV(MIV) sizes were slightly larger than TV(4D) sizes. Volumetric deviation between TV size and V0 had a stronger correlation with motion velocity rather than phase range. This phantom study demonstrated that motion artifacts were substantially reduced when the phantom moved longitudinally at low motion velocity during 4D CT image acquisition; therefore, geometrical uncertainties due to motion artifacts should be recognized when determining TVs, especially with a fast period.

  13. Automatic tracking of arbitrarily shaped implanted markers in kilovoltage projection images: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Regmi, Rajesh; Lovelock, D. Michael; Hunt, Margie; Zhang, Pengpeng; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jianping; Yorke, Ellen D.; Mageras, Gig S.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Rimner, Andreas; Mostafavi, Hassan

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Certain types of commonly used fiducial markers take on irregular shapes upon implantation in soft tissue. This poses a challenge for methods that assume a predefined shape of markers when automatically tracking such markers in kilovoltage (kV) radiographs. The authors have developed a method of automatically tracking regularly and irregularly shaped markers using kV projection images and assessed its potential for detecting intrafractional target motion during rotational treatment. Methods: Template-based matching used a normalized cross-correlation with simplex minimization. Templates were created from computed tomography (CT) images for phantom studies and from end-expiration breath-hold planning CT for patient studies. The kV images were processed using a Sobel filter to enhance marker visibility. To correct for changes in intermarker relative positions between simulation and treatment that can introduce errors in automatic matching, marker offsets in three dimensions were manually determined from an approximately orthogonal pair of kV images. Two studies in anthropomorphic phantom were carried out, one using a gold cylindrical marker representing regular shape, another using a Visicoil marker representing irregular shape. Automatic matching of templates to cone beam CT (CBCT) projection images was performed to known marker positions in phantom. In patient data, automatic matching was compared to manual matching as an approximate ground truth. Positional discrepancy between automatic and manual matching of less than 2 mm was assumed as the criterion for successful tracking. Tracking success rates were examined in kV projection images from 22 CBCT scans of four pancreas, six gastroesophageal junction, and one lung cancer patients. Each patient had at least one irregularly shaped radiopaque marker implanted in or near the tumor. In addition, automatic tracking was tested in intrafraction kV images of three lung cancer patients with irregularly shaped markers during 11 volumetric modulated arc treatments. Purpose-built software developed at our institution was used to create marker templates and track the markers embedded in kV images. Results: Phantom studies showed mean ± standard deviation measurement uncertainty of automatic registration to be 0.14 ± 0.07 mm and 0.17 ± 0.08 mm for Visicoil and gold cylindrical markers, respectively. The mean success rate of automatic tracking with CBCT projections (11 frames per second, fps) of pancreas, gastroesophageal junction, and lung cancer patients was 100%, 99.1% (range 98%–100%), and 100%, respectively. With intrafraction images (approx. 0.2 fps) of lung cancer patients, the success rate was 98.2% (range 97%–100%), and 94.3% (range 93%–97%) using templates from 1.25 mm and 2.5 mm slice spacing CT scans, respectively. Correction of intermarker relative position was found to improve the success rate in two out of eight patients analyzed. Conclusions: The proposed method can track arbitrary marker shapes in kV images using templates generated from a breath-hold CT acquired at simulation. The studies indicate its feasibility for tracking tumor motion during rotational treatment. Investigation of the causes of misregistration suggests that its rate of incidence can be reduced with higher frequency of image acquisition, templates made from smaller CT slice spacing, and correction of changes in intermarker relative positions when they occur.

  14. Understanding sediment sources in a peri-urban Mediterranean catchment using geochemical tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Carla; Walsh, Rory; Kikuchi, Ryunosuke; Blake, Will

    2016-04-01

    different particle size fractions (0.125-2.000mm, 0.063-0.125mm and <0.063mm). Seventeen stream sites were sampled plus a sample of sediment from a road surface immediately it entered the stream network. The elemental composition (40 elements) of each size fraction was assessed using a Niton X-ray fluorescence elemental analyser. Results show that rock type has a profound influence on the geochemical properties of bed-sediments. Catchment outlet sediment collected after the summer and a storm of high rainfall intensity following dry weather displayed geochemical properties closer to those of sediment from sandstone sub-catchments, and in particularly sediment from the enterprise park under construction. After the storm that followed very wet weather, however, limestone areas became of much greater significance as sediment sources, probably because of the high soil saturation. At limestone stream sites receiving runoff from the newly constructed road, fine bed-sediment geochemistry was found to be similar to that of road sediment, indicating a high contribution of this source. These results are supported by spatio-temporal differences in streamflow and suspended sediment concentrations at instrumented monitoring stations. It is concluded that this methodology represents a potentially useful tool to enable river managers to detect and assess sediment sources in urbanized and partly urbanized catchments, and to supporting them in designing and implementing effective land-use mosaics and site-specific measures to mitigate erosion.

  15. DB 01-3 TREATMENT TARGET OF SYSTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE IN DIABETES MAY DIFFER ACCORDING TO ETHNICITY (PRO).

    PubMed

    Kario, Kazuomi

    2016-09-01

    patients with diabetes or albuminuria. For these guidelines, we collected evidence from both Asian and Western studies, taking Asian characteristics into special consideration. In addition, the JSH2014 guidelines recommend that hypertensive patients with diabetes achieve home systolic BP values <125 mmHg. In our recent analysis of HONEST study, morning home systolic BP until 110 mmHg did not exhibit J-curve with both stroke and coronary artery disease in Japanese hypertensive patients including diabetic patients (Kario, et al. Hypertension 2014;64:989-996; J Am Coll Cardiol 2016;67:1519-1527).In this debate, I would like to stress the importance of ethnic differences, and the needs of Asian specific guidelines with the lower threshold of target systolic BP in Asian countries (Kario. Ann Glob Health 2016;82:254-273). PMID:27643091

  16. SU-E-T-450: Dosimetric Impact of Rotational Error On Multiple-Target Intensity-Modulated Radiosurgery (IMRS) with Single-Isocenter

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, S; Huq, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluating the dosimetric-impact on multiple-targets placed away from the isocenter-target with varying rotational-error introduced by initial setup uncertainty and/or intrafractional-movement Methods: CyberKnife-Phantom was scanned with the Intracranial SRS-protocol of 1.25mm slice-thickness and the multiple-targets(GTV) of 1mm and 10mm in diameter were contoured on the Eclipse. PTV for distal-target only was drawn with 1mm expansion around the GTV to find out how much margin is needed to compensate for the rotational-error. The separation between the isocenter-target and distal-target was varied from 3cm to 7cm. RapidArc-based IMRS plans of 16Gy single-fraction were generated with five non-coplanar arcs by using Varian TrueBeam-STx equipped with high resolution MLC leaves of 2.5mm at center and with dose-rate of 1400MU/min at 6MV for flatteringfilter- free(FFF). An identical CT image with intentionally introduced 1° rotational-error was registered with the planning CT image, and the isodose distribution and Dose-Volume-Histogram(DVH) were compared with the original plans. Additionally, the dosimetric-impact of rotational error was evaluated with that of 6X photon energy which was generated with the same target-coverage. Results: For the 1mm-target with 6X-FFF, PTV-coverage(D100) of the distal-target with 1° rotational-error decreased from 1.00 to 0.35 as the separation between isocenter-target and distal-target increased from 3cm to 7cm. However, GTV-coverage(D100) was 1.0 except that of 7cm-separation(0.55), which resulted from the 1mm-margin around the distal-target. For 6X photon, GTV-coverage remained at 1.0 regardless of the separation of targets, showing that the dosimetric-impact of rotational error depends on the degree of rotational-error, separation of targets, and dose distribution around targets. For 10mm-target, PTV-coverage of distaltarget located 3cm-away was better than that of 1mm-target(0.93 versus 0.7) and GTV-coverage was 1.0 regardless of 6X-FFF/6X photon beams. Conclusion: RapidArc-based Multiple-target IMRS may Resultin a compromised outcome due to the setup-error for distal-targets. With 1mm-margin, GTV-coverage of distal-target was 1.0 although the separation of targets was up to 5cm.

  17. The aggregation efficiency of very fine volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bello, E.; Taddeucci, J.; Scarlato, P.

    2013-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions can discharge large amounts of very small sized pyroclasts (under 0.090 mm) into the atmosphere that may cause problems to people, infrastructures and environment. The transport and deposition of fine ash are ruled by aggregation that causes premature settling of fine ash and, as consequence, significantly reduces the concentration of airborne material over long distances. Parameterizing the aggregation potential of fine ash is then needed to provide accurate modelling of ash transport and deposition from volcanic plumes. Here we present the first results of laboratory experiments investigating the aggregation efficiency of very fine volcanic particles. Previous laboratory experiments have shown that collision kinetic and relative humidity provide the strongest effect on aggregation behaviour but were only limited to particles with size > 0.125 mm. In our work, we focus on natural volcanic ash at ambient humidity with particles size < 0.090 mm, by taking into account the effect of grain size distribution on aggregation potential. Two types of ash were used in our experiments: fresh ash, collected during fall-out from a recent plume-forming eruption at Sakurajima (Japan -July 2013) and old ash, collected from fall-out tephra deposits at Campi Flegrei (Italy, ca. 10 ka), to account for the different chemical composition and morphoscopic effects of altered ash on aggregation efficiency. Total samples were hand sieved to obtain three classes with unimodal grain size distributions (<0.090 mm, <0.063 mm, <0.032 mm). Bimodal grain size distributions were also obtained by mixing the three classes in different proportions. During each experiments, particles were sieved from the top of a transparent tank where a fan, placed at the bottom, allows turbulent dispersion of particles. Collision and sticking of particles on a vertical glass slide were filmed with a high speed cameras at 6000 fps. Our lenses arrangement provide high image resolution

  18. Fibre optic extensometer for high radiation and high temperature nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cheymol, G.; Gusarov, A.; Brichard, B.

    2011-07-01

    In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory (LCI), gathering resources from SCK-CEN (Belgium) and CEA (France), we are developing an optical sensor in order to accurately measure radiation-induced elongation of material placed in the core of a Material Testing Reactor (MTR). This extensometer displays common advantages of Fibre Optic (FO) sensors: high resolution, easy remote sensing and multiplexing, and also compact size which is of particular interest for in pile experiments with little room available. In addition, light weight reduces gamma heating hence limiting the thermal effect. In accordance with the specifications, the sensor has preferably two fixing points defining a gauge length of 10 to 15 mm (as a minimum). The diameter is less than 2 mm. Intense gamma and neutron irradiation as well as high temperatures are the most difficult environment conditions to withstand. Reactor radiation produces huge losses in common optical fibre. The losses can be limited by selecting the fibres (mainly with high purity silica core), the wavelength range (800-1200 nm), and a measurement based on interferometry (largely insensitive to losses in the fibre thanks to the wavelength encoding of the useful signal). Heavy neutron - mainly - and gamma flux such as in MTR, also produce compaction of silica, resulting in a significant drift and preventing the use of commercial FO sensors in such environment. Knowing this issue we revised the basic scheme of Extrinsic Fabry Perot Interferometer (EFPI) in order to limit the effects of compaction. A first sensor prototype fixed on a stainless steel support was tested in the Smirnof test facility in the BR2 MTR in Mol (Belgium). The support was subject to a constant mechanical and thermal stress, and his dimensions were not supposed to vary. This test showed a very low drift of the revisited EPFI design under high irradiation field in comparison with a commercial EFPI. This result has to be confirmed with second generation sensors with an increased robustness. The other difficulty to face is high temperature. Fibre optics with metal coating allows safe operation under temperatures up to 400 deg.C and even higher. But differential dilatation between silica and typical metallic material produces differential elongation in the range of 0.5 10{sup -2} i.e 5000{mu}{epsilon} for an increase in temperature of 300-400 deg. C. Such large elongation has to be considered carefully in the sensor design and its fixing on the sample. Laboratory tests with a second generation of adapted sensors demonstrated their good accuracy: less than 1% error over a displacement of 100{mu}m (< 1 {mu}m error), at room temperature. The displacement measured can reach 250{mu}m (20000{mu}{epsilon} with a gauge length of 12.5 mm) or more. We are currently implementing metal-coated fibre and we are preparing the next in pile irradiation on the BR2 reactor scheduled for mid-2011. Other applications of the sensor can be considered. (authors)

  19. Evaluation of hybrid depth scanning for carbon-ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Inaniwa, Taku; Furukawa, Takuji; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Mori, Shinichiro; Mizushima, Kota; Sato, Shinji; Toshito, Toshiyuki; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy with a scanned carbon-ion beam, its Bragg peak is shifted along the depth direction either by inserting the range shifter plates or by changing the beam-extraction energy of a synchrotron. In the former technique (range shifter scanning: RS), the range shifter plates broaden the beam size and produce secondary fragments through nuclear reactions. In the latter technique (active-energy scanning: ES), it may take several seconds to change the beam energy depending on the synchrotron operation cycle, leading to a long treatment time. The authors propose a hybrid depth scan technique (hybrid scanning: HS), where several beam energies are used in conjunction with the range shifter plates for finer range shift. In this study, HS is evaluated from the viewpoints of dose distribution and treatment time. Methods: Assuming realistic accelerator and beam-delivery systems, the authors performed computer simulations using GEANT4 Monte Carlo code for beam modeling and a treatment planning system to evaluate HS. Three target volumes with the same dimensions of 60 x 60 x 60 mm{sup 3} were generated at depths of 45, 85, and 125 mm in water phantom, and uniform clinical dose was planned for these targets. The sizes of lateral dose falloff and the peak to plateau ratio defined as the ratio of the clinical dose averaged over the target to the clinical dose at the entrance as well as the treatment time were compared among the three depth scan techniques. Results: The sizes of lateral dose falloffs at the center of SOBP are 11.4, 8.5, and 5.9 mm for the three targets in RS, while they are 5.7, 4.8, and 4.6 mm in ES and 6.6, 5.7, and 5.0 mm in HS, respectively. The peak to plateau ratios are 1.39, 1.96, and 2.15 in RS, while they are 1.48, 2.04, and 2.19 in ES and 1.47, 2.03, and 2.18 in HS, respectively. The treatment times are 128.7, 128.6, and 128.6 s in ES, while they are 61.2, 54.6, and 47.8 s in RS and 43.2, 44.1, and 44.7 s in HS, respectively. The

  20. The LITA Drill and Sample Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, G.; Yoon, S.; Zacny, K.; Wettergreeng, D.; Cabrol, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Life in the Atacama (LITA) project has a goal of demonstrating autonomous roving, sample acquisition, delivery and analysis operations in Atacama, Chile. To enable the sample handling requirement, Honeybee Robotics developed a rover-deployed, rotary-percussive, autonomous drill, called the LITA Drill, capable of penetrating to ~80 cm in various formations, capturing and delivering subsurface samples to a 20 cup carousel. The carousel has a built-in capability to press the samples within each cup, and position target cups underneath instruments for analysis. The drill and sample delivery system had to have mass and power requirements consistent with a flight system. The drill weighs 12 kg and uses less than 100 watt of power to penetrate ~80 cm. The LITA Drill auger has been designed with two distinct stages. The lower part has deep and gently sloping flutes for retaining powdered sample, while the upper section has shallow and steep flutes for preventing borehole collapse and for efficient movement of cuttings and fall back material out of the hole. The drill uses the so called 'bite-sampling' approach that is samples are taken in short, 5-10 cm bites. To take the first bite, the drill is lowered onto the ground and upon drilling of the first bite it is then retracted into an auger tube. The auger with the auger tube are then lifted off the ground and positioned next to the carousel. To deposit the sample, the auger is rotated and retracted above the auger tube. The cuttings retained on the flutes are either gravity fed or are brushed off by a passive side brush into the cup. After the sample from the first bite has been deposited, the drill is lowered back into the same hole to take the next bite. This process is repeated until a target depth is reached. The bite sampling is analogous to peck drilling in the machining process where a bit is periodically retracted to clear chips. If there is some fall back into the hole once the auger has cleared the hole, this fall back material will be augered out during auger re-insertion. The next bite will be taken only once the auger has reached the true bottom. In the bite sampling approach the stratigraphy is somewhat preserved since every time the sample is taken, it more or less represents the depth interval in the hole. There is going to be some level of cross contamination due to smearing of cuttings on the flutes against the borehole as the auger is being pulled out, or when formation is very porous and unstable. The goal of the first drill campaign in Atacama in May of 2012 was to demonstrate successful operation of the bite sampling method and to learn about diversity of soils and rocks in the Atacama. In 2013, the sampling system has been integrated onto the CMU Zoe rover and autonomously deployed in Atacama. The drill penetrated various formations and delivered samples to a carousel. When soil was very porous, poor sample recovery was observed. When the soil was dense and cohesive, sample recovery was 100% with little cross contamination. To enable greater sample recovery in loose and unstable formations, the auger diameter will be increased from the current 12.5 mm to 19 mm. Acknowledgements: The project has been funded by the NASA ASTEP program.

  1. Automatic tracking of arbitrarily shaped implanted markers in kilovoltage projection images: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Regmi, Rajesh; Lovelock, D. Michael; Hunt, Margie; Zhang, Pengpeng; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jianping; Yorke, Ellen D.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Rimner, Andreas; Mostafavi, Hassan; Mageras, Gig S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Certain types of commonly used fiducial markers take on irregular shapes upon implantation in soft tissue. This poses a challenge for methods that assume a predefined shape of markers when automatically tracking such markers in kilovoltage (kV) radiographs. The authors have developed a method of automatically tracking regularly and irregularly shaped markers using kV projection images and assessed its potential for detecting intrafractional target motion during rotational treatment. Methods: Template-based matching used a normalized cross-correlation with simplex minimization. Templates were created from computed tomography (CT) images for phantom studies and from end-expiration breath-hold planning CT for patient studies. The kV images were processed using a Sobel filter to enhance marker visibility. To correct for changes in intermarker relative positions between simulation and treatment that can introduce errors in automatic matching, marker offsets in three dimensions were manually determined from an approximately orthogonal pair of kV images. Two studies in anthropomorphic phantom were carried out, one using a gold cylindrical marker representing regular shape, another using a Visicoil marker representing irregular shape. Automatic matching of templates to cone beam CT (CBCT) projection images was performed to known marker positions in phantom. In patient data, automatic matching was compared to manual matching as an approximate ground truth. Positional discrepancy between automatic and manual matching of less than 2 mm was assumed as the criterion for successful tracking. Tracking success rates were examined in kV projection images from 22 CBCT scans of four pancreas, six gastroesophageal junction, and one lung cancer patients. Each patient had at least one irregularly shaped radiopaque marker implanted in or near the tumor. In addition, automatic tracking was tested in intrafraction kV images of three lung cancer patients with irregularly shaped markers during 11 volumetric modulated arc treatments. Purpose-built software developed at our institution was used to create marker templates and track the markers embedded in kV images. Results: Phantom studies showed mean ± standard deviation measurement uncertainty of automatic registration to be 0.14 ± 0.07 mm and 0.17 ± 0.08 mm for Visicoil and gold cylindrical markers, respectively. The mean success rate of automatic tracking with CBCT projections (11 frames per second, fps) of pancreas, gastroesophageal junction, and lung cancer patients was 100%, 99.1% (range 98%–100%), and 100%, respectively. With intrafraction images (approx. 0.2 fps) of lung cancer patients, the success rate was 98.2% (range 97%–100%), and 94.3% (range 93%–97%) using templates from 1.25 mm and 2.5 mm slice spacing CT scans, respectively. Correction of intermarker relative position was found to improve the success rate in two out of eight patients analyzed. Conclusions: The proposed method can track arbitrary marker shapes in kV images using templates generated from a breath-hold CT acquired at simulation. The studies indicate its feasibility for tracking tumor motion during rotational treatment. Investigation of the causes of misregistration suggests that its rate of incidence can be reduced with higher frequency of image acquisition, templates made from smaller CT slice spacing, and correction of changes in intermarker relative positions when they occur. PMID:24989384

  2. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 42 (HARDELMSTR0042) on Elm Street, crossing Cooper Brook, Hardwick, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HARDELMSTR0042 on Elm Street crossing Cooper Brook, Hardwick, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in north-central Vermont. The 16.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the overbanks are primarily grass covered with some brush along the immediate channel banks except the upstream right bank and overbank which is forested and the downstream left overbank which has a lumberyard. In the study area, Cooper Brook has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.005 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 50 ft and an average channel depth of 6 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are sand and gravel with a median grain size (D50) of 1.25 mm (0.00409 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 24, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Elm Street crossing of Cooper Brook is a 39-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 37-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 17, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 40 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 45 degrees. On August 17, 1995 the site was revisited to investigate the effect of the August 4-5, 1995 flood on the structure. Channel features such as scour holes and point bars were shifted by the high flow event. Details of these changes can be found in the Level I data form in Appendix E. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and G. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 3.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge which was less than the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 7.1 to 10.4 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  3. On the output factor measurements of the CyberKnife iris collimator small fields: Experimental determination of the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors for microchamber and diode detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Pantelis, E.; Moutsatsos, A.; Zourari, K.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Sakelliou, L.; Kilby, W.; Antypas, C.; Papagiannis, P.; Karaiskos, P.; Georgiou, E.; Seimenis, I.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To measure the output factors (OFs) of the small fields formed by the variable aperture collimator system (iris) of a CyberKnife (CK) robotic radiosurgery system, and determine the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors for a microchamber and four diode detectors. Methods: OF measurements were performed using a PTW PinPoint 31014 microchamber, four diode detectors (PTW-60017, -60012, -60008, and the SunNuclear EDGE detector), TLD-100 microcubes, alanine dosimeters, EBT films, and polymer gels for the 5 mm, 7.5 mm, 10 mm, 12.5 mm, and 15 mm iris collimators at 650 mm, 800 mm, and 1000 mm source to detector distance (SDD). The alanine OF measurements were corrected for volume averaging effects using the 3D dose distributions registered in polymer gel dosimeters. k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors for the PinPoint microchamber and the diode dosimeters were calculated through comparison against corresponding polymer gel, EBT, alanine, and TLD results. Results: Experimental OF results are presented for the array of dosimetric systems used. The PinPoint microchamber was found to underestimate small field OFs, and a k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factor ranging from 1.127 {+-} 0.022 (for the 5 mm iris collimator) to 1.004 {+-} 0.010 (for the 15 mm iris collimator) was determined at the reference SDD of 800 mm. The PinPoint k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factor was also found to increase with decreasing SDD; k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} values equal to 1.220 {+-} 0.028 and 1.077 {+-} 0.016 were obtained for the 5 mm iris collimator at 650 mm and 1000 mm SDD, respectively. On the contrary, diode detectors were found to overestimate small field OFs and a correction factor equal to 0.973 {+-} 0.006, 0.954 {+-} 0.006, 0.937 {+-} 0.007, and 0.964 {+-} 0.006 was measured for the PTW-60017, -60012, -60008 and the EDGE diode detectors, respectively, for the 5 mm iris collimator at 800 mm SDD. The corresponding correction factors for the 15 mm iris collimator were found equal to 0.997 {+-} 0.010, 0.994 {+-} 0.009, 0.988 {+-} 0.010, and 0.986 {+-} 0.010, respectively. No correlation of the diode k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors with SDD was observed. Conclusions: This work demonstrates an experimental procedure for the determination of the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors required to obtain small field OF results of increased accuracy.

  4. Fractal analysis of the hydraulic conductivity on a sandy porous media reproduced in a laboratory facility.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bartolo, S.; Fallico, C.; Straface, S.; Troisi, S.; Veltri, M.

    2009-04-01

    The complexity characterization of the porous media structure, in terms of the "pore" phase and the "solid" phase, can be carried out by means of the fractal geometry which is able to put in relationship the soil structural properties and the water content. It is particularly complicated to describe analytically the hydraulic conductivity for the irregularity of the porous media structure. However these can be described by many fractal models considering the soil structure as the distribution of particles dimensions, the distribution of the solid aggregates, the surface of the pore-solid interface and the fractal mass of the "pore" and "solid" phases. In this paper the fractal model of Yu and Cheng (2002) and Yu and Liu (2004), for a saturated bidispersed porous media, was considered. This model, using the Sierpinsky-type gasket scheme, doesn't contain empiric constants and furnishes a well accord with the experimental data. For this study an unconfined aquifer was reproduced by means of a tank with a volume of 10 Ã- 7 Ã- 3 m3, filled with a homogeneous sand (95% of SiO2), with a high percentage (86.4%) of grains between 0.063mm and 0.125mm and a medium-high permeability. From the hydraulic point of view, 17 boreholes, a pumping well and a drainage ring around its edge were placed. The permeability was measured utilizing three different methods, consisting respectively in pumping test, slug test and laboratory analysis of an undisturbed soil cores, each of that involving in the measurement a different support volume. The temporal series of the drawdown obtained by the pumping test were analyzed by the Neuman-type Curve method (1972), because the saturated part above the bottom of the facility represents an unconfined aquifer. The data analysis of the slug test were performed by the Bouwer & Rice (1976) method and the laboratory analysis were performed on undisturbed saturated soil samples utilizing a falling head permeameter. The obtained values either of the

  5. ME 01-2 ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT OF MORNING HYPERTENSION: UPDATE.

    PubMed

    Kario, Kazuomi

    2016-09-01

    hypertension" was defined as the average of morning BPs >135 mmHg for systolic BP, or >85mmHg for diastolic BP, regardless of office BPs with the definition of morning BP >135/85 mmHg regardless office BP in Clinician's Manual on Early Morning Risk Management in Hypertension in 2004 (Science Press, London, UK, 2004). "Masked morning hypertension" may be used for morning hypertension with office BP <140/90 mmHg. Morning BP could be measured by both ABPM (2 hour-average of ambulatory BPs after arsing) and home BP monitoring (the average of 2 measurements in the morning during 3 or more days). Morning hypertension could be diagnosed not only by home BP monitoring, but also by ABPM (ambulatory morning hypertension). When information on the time of arising is not available, the highest 1 hour moving average of consecutive systolic BPs between 6am and 10am could be calculate as the "Moving peak morning systolic BP" (Kario. Essential manual of 24 hour blood pressure management. Wiley, UK, pp.1-158.2015). The risk of morning BP surge may be underestimated by BP monitoring device with intermittent measurements. The innovation of wearable "surge" BP monitoring which could measure BP continuously will clarify the risk of morning BP surge (Kario. Prog Cardiovasc Dis 2016, in press).We are now proposing a three-step strategy for the morning BP-guided management of hypertension using home BP monitoring as follows. Step 1: Morning systolic BP <145 mmHg should be achieved by treatment; Step 2: The guideline level of 135 mmHg morning systolic BP should then be reached, and Step 3: Approx. 125 mmHg or less, which presents the lowest risk of cardiovascular events, should be achieved and maintained (Kario. Essential manual of 24 hour blood pressure management. Wiley, UK, pp.1-158.,2015). Non-specific medication for controlling morning hypertension includes long-acting drugs. Once-daily dosing antihypertensive agents, now widely used as conventional antihypertensive medication, has decreased the

  6. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, M.; Johnson, Robert; McKinstry, C.

    2006-03-01

    four transducers generally were swimming north, parallel to the face of the dam. However, the distribution of swimming directions for fish detected by the transducer immediately to the north of the lights was bimodal, with some fish swimming south toward the lighted region. This behavior was similar to that seen at night when the lights were on. Fourth, kokanee, rainbow trout, and walleye were detected near the strobe lights. Data were obtained from three sources: fish size from the hydroacoustic sensors and fish species from gill netting and video recording. Fish ranging in length from 30 to 600 mm (averaging 125 mm) were detected by the splitbeam transducers. There was little difference in target strength for fish detected above 25 m depth with respect to time of day or light treatment. Below 25 m and closer to the strobe lights, larger fish were present when the lights were on during the night, and smaller fish were present during the day.

  7. Liquid Metal Droplet and Micro Corrugated Diaphragm RF-MEMS for reconfigurable RF filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irshad, Wasim

    Widely Tunable RF Filters that are small, cost-effective and offer ultra low power consumption are extremely desirable. Indeed, such filters would allow drastic simplification of RF front-ends in countless applications from cell phones to satellites in space by replacing switched-array of static acoustic filters and YIG filters respectively. Switched array of acoustic filters are de facto means of channel selection in mobile applications such as cell phones. SAW and BAW filters satisfy most criteria needed by mobile applications such as low cost, size and power consumption. However, the trade-off is a significant loss of 3-4 dB in modern cell phone RF front-end. This leads to need for power-hungry amplifiers and short battery life. It is a necessary trade-off since there are no better alternatives. These devices are in mm scale and consume mW. YIG filters dominate applications where size or power is not a constraint but demand excellent RF performance like low loss and high tuning ratio. These devices are measured in inches and require several watts to operate. Clearly, a tunable RF filter technology that would combine the cost, size and power consumption benefits of acoustic filters with excellent RF performance of YIG filters would be extremely desirable and imminently useful. The objective of this dissertation is to develop such a technology based upon RF-MEMS Evanescent-mode cavity filter. Two highly novel RF-MEMS devices have been developed over the course of this PhD to address the unique MEMS needs of this technology. The first part of the dissertation is dedicated to introducing the fundamental concepts of tunable cavity resonators and filters. This includes the physics behind it, key performance metrics and what they depend on and requirements of the MEMS tuners. Initial gap control and MEMS attachment method are identified as potential hurdles towards achieving very high RF performance. Simple and elegant solutions to both these issues are discussed in detail and have proved pivotal to this work. The second part of the dissertation focuses on the Liquid Metal Droplet RF-MEMS. A novel tunable RF MEMS resonator that is based upon electrostatic control over the morphology of a liquid metal droplet (LMD) is conceived. We demonstrate an LMD evanescent-mode cavity resonator that simultaneously achieves wide analog tuning from 12 to 18 GHz with a measured quality factor of 1400-1840. A droplet of 250-mum diameter is utilized and the applied bias is limited to 100 V. This device operates on a principle called Electro-Wetting On Dielectric (EWOD). The liquid metal employed is a non-toxic eutectic alloy of Gallium, Indium and Tin known as Galinstan. This device also exploits interfacial surface energy and viscous body forces that dominate at nanoliter scale. We then apply our Liquid Metal Droplet (LMD) RF-MEMS architecture to demonstrate a continuously tunable electrostatic Ku-Band Filter. A 2-pole bandpass filter with measured insertion loss of less than 0.4dB and 3dB FBW of 3.4% is achieved using a Galinstan droplet of 250mum diameter and bias limited to 100V. We demonstrate that the LMD is insensitive to gravity by performing inversion and tilt experiments. In addition, we study its thermal tolerance by subjecting the LMD up to 150° C. The third part of the dissertation is dedicated to the Micro-Corrugated Diaphragm (MCD) RF-MEMS. We present an evanescent-mode cavity bandpass filter with state-of-the-art RF performance metrics like 4:1 tuning ratio from 5 to 20 GHz with less than 2dB insertion loss and 2-6% 3dB bandwidth. Micro-Corrugated Diaphragm (MCD) is a novel electrostatic MEMS design specifically engineered to provide large-scale analog deflections necessary for such continuous and wide tunable filtering with very high quality factor. We demonstrate a 1.25mm radius and 2mum thick Gold MCD which provides 30mum total deflection with nearly 60% analog range. We also present a detailed and systematic MCD design methodology for relevant applications. To further demonstrate MCD versatility, we implement a bandstop MCD filter that cascades nine separate resonators to achieve a 6-24 GHz continuous tuning. The disseration concludes with a Galinstan Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump and summary of my doctoral work. Although presented at the very end of this dissertation, the MHD micropump was indeed the very starting point for all my doctoral research efforts. The invaluable lessons learned here paved the way for development of both LMD and MCD RF-MEMS.