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Sample records for 125iodine seed implantation

  1. [Implantation of 125 iodine seeds in the dog vocal cord. An experimental morphologic study].

    PubMed

    Zöllner, C; Strutz, J; Bruggmoser, G; Knüfermann, H; Schaefer, H E

    1988-09-01

    Following the first positive therapeutic results of T1a vocal chord cancer with 125iodine seeds in man (brachytherapy), we were concerned with the effects of this low-energy photon source on healthy laryngeal tissue. In the larynx, changes in the area of the vocal chord and the cartilaginous laryngeal structures were investigated in particular. These experimental studies were performed on the larynx of the dog. Through direct laryngoscopy, two 125iodine seeds were implanted in the anterior third of each vocal chord in 8 dogs; the resulting prick canals were sealed with fibrin glue. During survival the correct position of the seeds was radiologically monitored. After survival periods of 1, 3, 6, and 12 months the larynges were fixed by perfusion, removed, imbedded in paraplast, and stained with H. E., Azan, and E. v. G. After this protracted irradiation with 125iodine seeds only slight and for the most part reversible pathological changes had occurred. One month after implantation, only a perivascular infection was found in the vocal chord. After three months an inhibition of the fibrin organization around the seeds was observed as well as a localized dyschylia with broadening of the gland ducts. Additionally, a circumscribed dysplasia of the squamous epithelium, swelling of the capillary endothelium, atrophy of muscular fibres around the seeds, and telangiectasia of blood vessels were discernable. 6 and 12 months after implantation, only the muscular atrophy and the telangiectasia of the blood vessels remained detectable, in addition to a reduced inhibition of the fibrin organisation by connective tissue.

  2. /sup 125/Iodine implants as an adjuvant to surgery and external beam radiotherapy in the management of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Goffinet, D.R.; Fee, W.; Goode, R.; Cox, R.S.

    1983-03-15

    /sup 125/Iodine seeds either individually placed or inserted into absorbable Vicryl suture carriers were utilized in conjunction with surgery and external beam radiotherapy in an attempt to increase local control rates in patients with (1) advanced oropharyngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancers (T3-T4, N2-N3), (2) massive cervical lymphadenopathy (N3) and an unknown primary site and (3) locally recurrent head and neck cancers. Forty-eight patients were treated with 55 implants. The carotid artery was implanted in 15 patients, while seven patients had seeds inserted into the base of the skull region, and another three patients had implants near cranial nerves. Eighteen of the 48 patients were treated for cure. The actuarial survival at five years in this subgroup was 50%. The overall local control in the head and neck area was 58%. In this group no patients to date have had a local failure in the implanted volume. Seventeen patients with comparable stage of disease treated prior to 1974 with curative intent without /sup 125/I implants were analyzed retrospectively for comparison with the implanted patients. The actuarial survival of these patients was 18% and the overall head and neck control was 21%. These differences are statistically significant at a P value of 0.01 and 0.007, respectively. Seventeen patients received implants for local recurrence. The local control in the head and neck area was 50%; however, the 2.5 year actuarial survival was only 17%. The complication rate was 11% (six of 55 implants). The improved survival, the high local control, and the minimal complication rates in this series makes the intraoperative implantation of /sup 125/I seeds and effective adjunctive treatment to surgery and external beam irradiation.

  3. Permanent Breast Seed Implant Dosimetry Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Brian M.; Ravi, Ananth; Sankreacha, Raxa; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A permanent breast seed implant is a novel method of accelerated partial breast irradiation for women with early-stage breast cancer. This article presents pre- and post-implant dosimetric data, relates these data to clinical outcomes, and makes recommendations for those interested in starting a program. Methods and Materials: A total of 95 consecutive patients were accrued into one of three clinical trials after breast-conserving surgery: a Phase I/II trial (67 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma); a Phase II registry trial (25 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma); or a multi-center Phase II trial for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (3 patients). Contouring of the planning target volume (PTV) was done on a Pinnacle workstation and dosimetry calculations, including dose-volume histograms, were done using a Variseed planning computer. Results: The mean pre-implant PTV coverage for the V{sub 90}, V{sub 100}, V{sub 150}, and V{sub 200} were as follows: 98.8% {+-} 1.2% (range, 94.5-100%); 97.3% {+-} 2.1% (range, 90.3-99.9%), 68.8% {+-} 14.3% (range, 32.7-91.5%); and 27.8% {+-} 8.6% (range, 15.1-62.3%). The effect of seed motion was characterized by post-implant dosimetry performed immediately after the implantation (same day) and at 2 months after the implantation. The mean V{sub 100} changed from 85.6% to 88.4% (p = 0.004) and the mean V{sub 200} changed from 36.2% to 48.3% (p < 0.001). Skin toxicity was associated with maximum skin dose (p = 0.014). Conclusions: Preplanning dosimetry should aim for a V{sub 90} of approximately 100%, a V{sub 100} between 95% and 100%, and a V{sub 200} between 20% and 30%, as these numbers are associated with no local recurrences to date and good patient tolerance. In general, the target volume coverage improved over the duration of the seed therapy. The maximum skin dose, defined as the average dose over the hottest 1 Multiplication-Sign 1-cm{sup 2} surface area, should be limited to 90% of the

  4. Prescription dose in permanent {sup 131}Cs seed prostate implants

    SciTech Connect

    Yue Ning; Heron, Dwight E.; Komanduri, Krishna; Huq, M. Saiful

    2005-08-15

    Recently, {sup 131}Cs seeds have been introduced for prostate permanent seed implants. This type of seed has a relatively short half-life of 9.7 days and has its most prominent emitted photon energy peaks in the 29-34 keV region. Traditionally, 145 and 125 Gy have been prescribed for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seed prostate implants, respectively. Since both the half-life and dosimetry characteristics of {sup 131}Cs seed are quite different from those of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd, the appropriate prescription dose for {sup 131}Cs seed prostate implant may well be different. This study was designed to use a linear quadratic radiobiological model to determine an appropriate dose prescription scheme for permanent {sup 131}Cs seed prostate implants. In this model, prostate edema was taken into consideration. Calculations were also performed for tumors of different doubling times and for other related radiobiological parameters of different values. As expected, the derived prescription dose values were dependent on type of tumors and types of edema. However, for prostate cancers in which tumor cells are relatively slow growing and are reported to have a mean potential doubling time of around 40 days, the appropriate prescription dose for permanent {sup 131}Cs seed prostate implants was determined to be: 127{sub -12}{sup +5}Gy if the experiences of {sup 125}I seed implants were followed and 121{sub -3}{sup +0}Gy if the experiences of {sup 103}Pd seed implants were followed.

  5. Online gamma-camera imaging of 103Pd seeds (OGIPS) for permanent breast seed implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, Ananth; Caldwell, Curtis B.; Keller, Brian M.; Reznik, Alla; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Permanent brachytherapy seed implantation is being investigated as a mode of accelerated partial breast irradiation for early stage breast cancer patients. Currently, the seeds are poorly visualized during the procedure making it difficult to perform a real-time correction of the implantation if required. The objective was to determine if a customized gamma-camera can accurately localize the seeds during implantation. Monte Carlo simulations of a CZT based gamma-camera were used to assess whether images of suitable quality could be derived by detecting the 21 keV photons emitted from 74 MBq 103Pd brachytherapy seeds. A hexagonal parallel hole collimator with a hole length of 38 mm, hole diameter of 1.2 mm and 0.2 mm septa, was modeled. The design of the gamma-camera was evaluated on a realistic model of the breast and three layers of the seed distribution (55 seeds) based on a pre-implantation CT treatment plan. The Monte Carlo simulations showed that the gamma-camera was able to localize the seeds with a maximum error of 2.0 mm, using only two views and 20 s of imaging. A gamma-camera can potentially be used as an intra-procedural image guidance system for quality assurance for permanent breast seed implantation.

  6. A novel curvilinear approach for prostate seed implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Podder, Tarun K.; Dicker, Adam P.; Hutapea, Parsaoran; Darvish, Kurosh; Yu Yan

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: A new technique called ''curvilinear approach'' for prostate seed implantation has been proposed. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric benefit of curvilinear distribution of seeds for low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Twenty LDR prostate brachytherapy cases planned intraoperatively with VariSeed planning system and I-125 seeds were randomly selected as reference rectilinear cases. All the cases were replanned by using curved-needle approach keeping the same individual source strength and the volume receiving 100% of prescribed dose 145 Gy (V{sub 100}). Parameters such as number of needles, seeds, and the dose coverage of the prostate (D{sub 90}, V{sub 150}, V{sub 200}), urethra (D{sub 30}, D{sub 10}) and rectum (D{sub 5}, V{sub 100}) were compared for the rectilinear and the curvilinear methods. Statistical significance was assessed using two-tailed student's t-test. Results: Reduction of the required number of needles and seeds in curvilinear method were 30.5% (p < 0.001) and 11.8% (p < 0.49), respectively. Dose to the urethra was reduced significantly; D{sub 30} reduced by 10.1% (p < 0.01) and D{sub 10} reduced by 9.9% (p < 0.02). Reduction in rectum dose D{sub 5} was 18.5% (p < 0.03) and V{sub 100} was also reduced from 0.93 cc in rectilinear to 0.21 cc in curvilinear (p < 0.001). Also the V{sub 150} and V{sub 200} coverage of prostate reduced by 18.8% (p < 0.01) and 33.9% (p < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: Significant improvement in the relevant dosimetric parameters was observed in curvilinear needle approach. Prostate dose homogeneity (V{sub 150}, V{sub 200}) improved while urethral dose was reduced, which might potentially result in better treatment outcome. Reduction in rectal dose could potentially reduce rectal toxicity and complications. Reduction in number of needles would minimize edema and thereby could improve postimplant urinary incontinence. This study indicates that the curvilinear implantation

  7. Comparison of template-matching and singular-spectrum-analysis methods for imaging implanted brachytherapy seeds.

    PubMed

    Alam, S Kaisar; Mamou, Jonathan; Feleppa, Ernest J; Kalisz, Andrew; Ramachandran, Sarayu

    2011-11-01

    Brachytherapy using small implanted radioactive seeds is becoming an increasingly popular method for treating prostate cancer, in which a radiation oncologist implants seeds in the prostate transperineally under ultrasound guidance. Dosimetry software determines the optimal placement of seeds for achieving the prescribed dose based on ultrasonic determination of the gland boundaries. However, because of prostate movement and distortion during the implantation procedure, some seeds may not be placed in the desired locations; this causes the delivered dose to differ from the prescribed dose. Current ultrasonic imaging methods generally cannot depict the implanted seeds accurately. We are investigating new ultrasonic imaging methods that show promise for enhancing the visibility of seeds and thereby enabling real-time detection and correction of seed-placement errors during the implantation procedure. Real-time correction of seed-placement errors will improve the therapeutic radiation dose delivered to target tissues. In this work, we compare the potential performance of a template-matching method and a previously published method based on singular spectrum analysis for imaging seeds. In particular, we evaluated how changes in seed angle and position relative to the ultrasound beam affect seed detection. The conclusion of the present study is that singular spectrum analysis has better sensitivity but template matching is more resistant to false positives; both perform well enough to make seed detection clinically feasible over a relevant range of angles and positions. Combining the information provided by the two methods may further reduce ambiguities in determining where seeds are located.

  8. Prostate implant nomograms for the North American scientific {sup 103}Pd seed

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jay J.; Stevens, Ritchie N

    2003-09-30

    Palladium-103-({sup 103}Pd) seed has been increasingly used in prostate implantation as either definitive or boost therapy because of its shorter half-life and higher initial dose rate. Because a growing number of radiation oncologists prefer real-time implantation in the operating room, it will be helpful if the total activity of the seeds can be determined based on the gland size before the patient is taken to the operating room. Based on our clinic data, nomograms have therefore been developed for one of the widely used {sup 103}Pd seeds, the MED3633 seed, which is produced by North American Scientific, Inc. (NASI). The total activities for implant volume ranging from 15 cc to 55 cc are provided for both seed 'monotherapy' and seed boost.

  9. Ultrasonically guided percutaneous implantation of iodine-125 seeds in pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, F.; Burcharth, F.; Holm, H.H.; Stroyer, I. )

    1990-10-01

    Cancer of the pancreas is most often not diagnosed before it has reached unresectable stages. The development of effective palliative treatment for these patients and for those with recurrence after resection is clearly needed. The present study reports the results of ultrasonically guided percutaneous implantation of {sup 125}I seeds in 19 patients with cancer of the pancreas. Twelve patients had further adjuvant external radiation. Despite satisfactory seed placement and delivery of the planned radiation dose in most cases, clinical improvement was lacking or only slight and short-lived. No difference in survival or palliation was observed between patients treated with seeds alone compared with patients treated with seeds and external radiation. Survival after seed implantation was short (median 140 days, range 7-401 days). Ultrasonically guided percutaneous implantation of {sup 125}I seeds cannot be recommended in the treatment of unresectable carcinoma of the pancreas.

  10. Versatile permanent planar implant technique utilizing Iodine-125 seeds imbedded in gelfoam

    SciTech Connect

    Marchese, M.J.; Nori, D.; Anderson, L.L.; Hilaris, B.S.

    1984-05-01

    Tumors attached or adjacent to critical structures can often not be completely resected or resected with adequate surgical margins. Sites involving major blood vessels, the vertebral column or the brain with small residual tumors or suspicious margins often present technical difficulties for standard I-125 or Ir-192 implants. A relatively simple, accurate and inexpensive implant method is decribed using I-125 seeds imbedded in gelfoam to implant permanently into small residual tumors or suspicious margins where standard implant techniques may be unsatisfactory. A method for planning the treatment dose for such an implant is described. Cases involving paraspinal and brain tumors are reported to illustrate the technique.

  11. Automated localization of implanted seeds in 3D TRUS images used for prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Zhouping; Gardi, Lori; Downey, Donal B.; Fenster, Aaron

    2006-07-15

    An algorithm has been developed in this paper to localize implanted radioactive seeds in 3D ultrasound images for a dynamic intraoperative brachytherapy procedure. Segmentation of the seeds is difficult, due to their small size in relatively low quality of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images. In this paper, intraoperative seed segmentation in 3D TRUS images is achieved by performing a subtraction of the image before the needle has been inserted, and the image after the seeds have been implanted. The seeds are searched in a 'local' space determined by the needle position and orientation information, which are obtained from a needle segmentation algorithm. To test this approach, 3D TRUS images of the agar and chicken tissue phantoms were obtained. Within these phantoms, dummy seeds were implanted. The seed locations determined by the seed segmentation algorithm were compared with those obtained from a volumetric cone-beam flat-panel micro-CT scanner and human observers. Evaluation of the algorithm showed that the rms error in determining the seed locations using the seed segmentation algorithm was 0.98 mm in agar phantoms and 1.02 mm in chicken phantoms.

  12. Effect of implanted brachytherapy seeds on optical fluence distribution: preliminary ex vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetzel, Fred W.; Chen, Qun; Ding, Meisong; Newman, Francis; Dole, Kenneth C.; Huang, Zheng; Blanc, Dominique

    2007-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has gradually found its place in the treatment of malignant and non-malignant human diseases. Currently, interstitial PDT is being explored as an alternative modality for newly diagnosed and recurrent organ-confined prostate cancer. The interstitial PDT for the treatment of prostate cancer might be considered to treat prostates with permanent radioactive seeds implantation. However, the effect of implanted brachytherapy seeds on the optical fluence distribution of PDT light has not been studied before. This study investigated, for the first time, the effect of brachytherapy seed on the optical fluence distribution of 760 nm light in ex vivo models (meat and canine prostate).

  13. An automated, fast and accurate registration method to link stranded seeds in permanent prostate implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westendorp, Hendrik; Nuver, Tonnis T.; Moerland, Marinus A.; Minken, André W.

    2015-10-01

    The geometry of a permanent prostate implant varies over time. Seeds can migrate and edema of the prostate affects the position of seeds. Seed movements directly influence dosimetry which relates to treatment quality. We present a method that tracks all individual seeds over time allowing quantification of seed movements. This linking procedure was tested on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) datasets of 699 patients. These datasets were acquired intraoperatively during a dynamic implantation procedure, that combines both imaging modalities. The procedure was subdivided in four automatic linking steps. (I) The Hungarian Algorithm was applied to initially link seeds in CBCT and the corresponding TRUS datasets. (II) Strands were identified and optimized based on curvature and linefits: non optimal links were removed. (III) The positions of unlinked seeds were reviewed and were linked to incomplete strands if within curvature- and distance-thresholds. (IV) Finally, seeds close to strands were linked, also if the curvature-threshold was violated. After linking the seeds an affine transformation was applied. The procedure was repeated until the results were stable or the 6th iteration ended. All results were visually reviewed for mismatches and uncertainties. Eleven implants showed a mismatch and in 12 cases an uncertainty was identified. On average the linking procedure took 42 ms per case. This accurate and fast method has the potential to be used for other time spans, like Day 30, and other imaging modalities. It can potentially be used during a dynamic implantation procedure to faster and better evaluate the quality of the permanent prostate implant.

  14. External beam radiotherapy boosts to reduce the impact caused by edema in prostate permanent seed implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Ning; Mori, Jonathan; Nath, Ravinder; Heron, Dwight E.; Saiful Huq, M.

    2006-05-01

    In prostate permanent seed implants, it has been shown that edema caused by the surgical procedure decreases dose coverage and hence may reduce treatment efficacy. This reduction in treatment efficacy has been characterized by an increase in tumour cell survival, and biomathematical models have been developed to calculate the tumour cell survival increases in seed implanted prostates of different edema magnitudes and durations. External beam boosts can be utilized to neutralize the negative impact of edema so that originally desired treatment efficacy can be achieved. In this study, a linear quadratic model is used to determine fractionation sizes of the external beam boosts for both 125I and 103Pd seed implants. Calculations were performed for prostates of different edema magnitudes and durations, and for tumour cells of different repair rates and repopulation rates.

  15. Transcatheter embolization of advanced renal cell carcinoma with radioactive seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, E.K.; deKernion, J.B.

    1981-11-01

    Advanced renal cell carcinoma was treated by transcatheter embolization with radioactive seeds. There were 14 patients with nonresectable or metastatic disease (stage IV) and 8 with stage II tumors treated. In 8 patients the tumor was implanted with radon seeds, complemented by 2,500 rad of external beam therapy, and 10 were treated by embolization with 125iodine seeds. The total dose delivered ranged form 1,600 to 14,000 rad. Several patients also had intra-arterial chemotherapy. Survival was improved over previously reported studies: 13 of 22 (59 per cent) at risk for 2 years and 5 of 15 (33 per cent) for 5 years. Distant metastases did not resolve but significant local palliation was achieved. Tumor size decreased in all patients, 8 of whom subsequently underwent nephrectomy. Other local effects included pain control (10 per cent), weight gain (75 per cent) and control of hemorrhage (88 per cent). Toxicity was minimal and consisted of mild nausea or pain. This approach, using a low energy emitter, allows selective high dose radiation of the tumor, while sparing the adjacent normal tissues. In contrast to renal artery occlusion with inert embolic material, subsequent nephrectomy in patients with disseminated disease is not necessary. Transcatheter embolization with radioactive seeds should be considered a reasonable palliative procedure in patients with nonresectable primary renal cell carcinoma.

  16. Survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer after iodine125 seeds implantation brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Quanli; Deng, Muhong; Lv, Yao; Dai, Guanghai

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Brachytherapy with iodine125-labeled seeds (125I-seeds) implantation is increasingly being used to treat tumors because of its positional precision, minimal invasion, least damage to noncancerous tissue due to slow and continuous release of radioactivity and facilitation with modern medical imaging technologies. This study evaluates the survival and pain relief outcomes of the 125I-seeds implantation brachytherapy in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Methods: Literature search was carried out in multiple electronic databases (Google Scholar, Embase, Medline/PubMed, and Ovid SP) and studies reporting I125 seeds implantation brachytherapy in pancreatic cancer patients with unresectable tumor were selected by following predetermined eligibility criteria. Random effects meta-analysis was performed to achieve inverse variance weighted effect size of the overall survival rate after the intervention. Sensitivity and subgroups analyses were also carried out. Results: Twenty-three studies (824 patients’ data) were included in the meta-analysis. 125I-seeds implantation brachytherapy alone was associated with 8.98 [95% confidence interval (CI): 6.94, 11.03] months (P < 0.00001) overall survival with 1-year survival of 25.7 ± 9.3% (mean ± standard deviation; SD) and 2-year survival was 17.9 ± 8.6% (mean ± SD). In stage IV pancreatic cancer patients, overall survival was 7.13 [95% CI: 4.75, 9.51] months (P < 0.00001). In patients treated with 125I-seeds implantation along with 1 or more therapies, overall survival was 11.75 [95% CI: 9.84, 13.65] months (P < 0.00001) with 1-year survival of 47.4 ± 22.75% (mean ± SD) and 2-year survival was 16.97 ± 3.1% (mean ± SD). 125I-seeds brachytherapy was associated with relief of pain in 79.7 ± 9.9% (mean ± SD) of the patients. Conclusions: Survival of pancreatic cancer patients after 125I-seeds implantation brachytherapy is found to be 9 months

  17. The use of iodine-125 seeds as a substitute for iridium-192 seeds in temporary interstitial breast implants

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, F.; White, J.; Gustafson, G.; Matter, R.C.; Edmundson, G.; Martinez, A.; Clarke, D.H.

    1993-10-20

    We have previously reported that the use of iodine-125 seeds in temporary plastic tube interstitial implants may be more advantageous than iridium-192 seeds due to less patient and personnel radiation exposure, reduced shielding requirements, and significant dosimetric advantages. The impact of this isotope on the rate of local control and cosmetic outcome in patients with early stage breast cancer treated with interstitial implants for their irradiation {open_quotes}boost{close_quotes} remains to be defined. We reviewed the treatment outcome of 402 consecutive cases of Stage I and II breast cancer undergoing breast conserving therapy between 1/1/80 and 12/31/87. All patients underwent excisional biopsy and received 45-50 Gy to the entire breast followed by a boost to the tumor bed using either electrons (104 patients), photons (15 patients), or an interstitial implant with either iridium-192 (197 patients) or iodine-125 (86 patients) to at least 60 Gy. Iodine-125 implants were primarily performed in patients with significant risk factors for local recurrence (71%) or in patients with large breasts (17%). Local tumor control and cosmetic outcome were assessed and contrasted between patients boosted with each modality. We conclude that patients with State I and II breast cancer undergoing breast conserving therapy and judged to be candidates for boosts with interstitial implants can be effectively treated with iodine-125 seeds. Use of the isotope results in less patient and personnel irradiation exposure and a better dose distribution than iridium-192, since dose optimization can be routinely employed. Overall, local control and cosmetic outcome have been excellent and are similar to either iridium-192, electrons, or photons. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  18. Adjuvant stereotactic permanent seed breast implant: A boost series in view of partial breast irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Nicolas . E-mail: nicolas.jansen@chu.ulg.ac.be; Deneufbourg, Jean-Marie; Nickers, Philippe

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to use permanent seed implants in the breast and describe our experience with 15 cases, using iodine seed implants as a tumor bed boost. Methods and Materials: Breasts were fixed with a thermoplastic sheet, a template bridge applied, the thorax scanned and the images rotated to be perpendicular to the implant axis. Skin, heart, and lung were delineated. A preplan was made, prescribing 50 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV), consisting in this boost series of nearly a quadrant. Iodine (125) seeds were stereotactically implanted through the template, and results were checked with a postplan computed tomographic (CT) scan. Results: The breast was immobilized reproducibly. Simulation, scanning, and implant were performed without difficulties. Preplan CTV D90% (the dose delivered to 90% of the CTV) was 66 Gy, and postoperative fluoroscopic or CT scan checks were satisfactory. Pre- and postplan dose-volume histogram showed good organ sparing: mean postplan skin, heart, and lung V30 Gy (the organ volume receiving a dose of 30 Gy) of 2 {+-} 2.2 mL, 0.24 {+-} 0.34 mL, and 3.5 {+-} 5 mL, respectively. No short-term toxicity above Grade 1 was noted, except for transient Grade 3 neuropathy in 1 patient. Conclusions: Seeds remained in the right place, as assessed by fluoroscopy, absence of significant pre- to postplan dose-volume histogram change for critical organs, and total irradiated breast volume. The method could be proposed as a boost when high dosimetric selectivity is required (young patients after cardiotoxic chemotherapy for left-sided cancer). This boost series was a preliminary step before testing partial breast irradiation by permanent seed implant in a prospective trial.

  19. Conventional Versus Automated Implantation of Loose Seeds in Prostate Brachytherapy: Analysis of Dosimetric and Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Genebes, Caroline; Filleron, Thomas; Graff, Pierre; Jonca, Frédéric; Huyghe, Eric; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Soulie, Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Aziza, Richard; Brun, Thomas; Delannes, Martine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To review the clinical outcome of I-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and to compare 2 techniques of loose-seed implantation. Methods and Materials: 574 consecutive patients underwent I-125 PPB for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2000 and 2008. Two successive techniques were used: conventional implantation from 2000 to 2004 and automated implantation (Nucletron, FIRST system) from 2004 to 2008. Dosimetric and biochemical recurrence-free (bNED) survival results were reported and compared for the 2 techniques. Univariate and multivariate analysis researched independent predictors for bNED survival. Results: 419 (73%) and 155 (27%) patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease, respectively, were treated (median follow-up time, 69.3 months). The 60-month bNED survival rates were 95.2% and 85.7%, respectively, for patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease (P=.04). In univariate analysis, patients treated with automated implantation had worse bNED survival rates than did those treated with conventional implantation (P<.0001). By day 30, patients treated with automated implantation showed lower values of dose delivered to 90% of prostate volume (D90) and volume of prostate receiving 100% of prescribed dose (V100). In multivariate analysis, implantation technique, Gleason score, and V100 on day 30 were independent predictors of recurrence-free status. Grade 3 urethritis and urinary incontinence were observed in 2.6% and 1.6% of the cohort, respectively, with no significant differences between the 2 techniques. No grade 3 proctitis was observed. Conclusion: Satisfactory 60-month bNED survival rates (93.1%) and acceptable toxicity (grade 3 urethritis <3%) were achieved by loose-seed implantation. Automated implantation was associated with worse dosimetric and bNED survival outcomes.

  20. Planning of Ir-192 seed implants for boost irradiation to the breast

    SciTech Connect

    Zwicker, R.D.; Schmidt-Ullrich, R.; Schiller, B.

    1985-12-01

    The conservative management of early stage breast cancer with tumor excision and irradiation of the breast is becoming increasingly accepted as an alternative to modified radical mastectomy. The radiotherapy typically consists of 45 to 50 Gy delivered with external beam irradiation, followed by boost irradiation of 15 to 20 Gy to the tumor bed using electron beams or interstitial implantation. Pathological evaluation of the excised tumor, clinical assessment, and mammography are used to determine the tissue volume potentially containing a residual tumor burden and therefore requiring boost irradiation. In this paper we describe planning and implantation procedures for Quimby-type breast implants using Ir-192 seeds encapsulated in nylon tubing. This system deviates in several important respects from the requirements of the standard brachytherapy systems. For double-plane implants, optimized values of the interplanar spacing are given for a range of implant sizes, along with the corresponding target dose rates for 1.0 mCi seeds. We also describe a modification of the angiocatheter implantation technique, which allows the radioactive sources to be secured in place by a magnetic cap and washer, thus greatly facilitating the removal of the sources at the end of treatment.

  1. Prostate brachytherapy postimplant dosimetry: Seed orientation and the impact of dosimetric anisotropy in stranded implants

    SciTech Connect

    Chng, Nicholas; Spadinger, Ingrid; Rasoda, Rosey; Morris, W. James; Salcudean, Septimiu

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: In postimplant dosimetry for prostate brachytherapy, dose is commonly calculated using the TG-43 1D formalism, because seed orientations are difficult to determine from CT images, the current standard for the procedure. However, the orientation of stranded seeds soon after implantation is predictable, as these seeds tend to maintain their relative spacing, and orient themselves along the implant trajectory. The aim of this study was to develop a method for determining seed orientations from reconstructed strand trajectories, and to use this information to investigate the dosimetric impact of applying the TG-43 2D formalism to clinical postimplant analysis. Methods: Using in-house software, the preplan to postimplant seed correspondence was determined for a cohort of 30 patients during routine day-0 CT-based postimplant dosimetry. All patients were implanted with stranded-seed trains. Spline curves were fit to each set of seeds composing a strand, with the requirement that the distance along the spline between seeds be equal to the seed spacing within the strand. The orientations of the seeds were estimated by the tangents to the spline at each seed centroid. Dose distributions were then determined using the 1D and 2D TG-43 formalisms. These were compared using the TG-137 recommended dose metrics for the prostate, prostatic urethra, and rectum. Results: Seven hundred and sixty one strands were analyzed in total. Defining the z-axis to be cranial-positive and the x-axis to be left-lateral positive in the CT coordinate system, the average seed had an inclination of 21 deg. {+-} 10 deg. and an azimuth of -81 deg. {+-} 57 deg. These values correspond to the average strand rising anteriorly from apex to base, approximately parallel to the midsagittal plane. Clinically minor but statistically significant differences in dose metrics were noted. Compared to the 2D calculation, the 1D calculation underestimated prostate V100 by 1.1% and D90 by 2.3 Gy, while

  2. Biological effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Jatropha curcas L. seed germination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Wang, Xiao-teng; Gan, Cai-ling; Fang, Yan-qiong; Zhang, Meng

    2012-09-01

    To explore the biological effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed, a beam of N+ with energy of 25 keV was applied to treat the dry seed at six different doses. N+ beam implantation greatly decreased germination rate and seedling survival rate. The doses within the range of 12 × 1016 to 15 × 1016 ions cm-2 severely damaged the seeds: total antioxidant capacity (TAC), germination rate, seedling survival rate, reduced ascorbate acid (HAsA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents, and most of the tested antioxidases activity (i.e. catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) reached their lowest levels. At a dose of 18 × 1016 ion cm-2, biological repair took place: moderate increases were found in TAC, germination rate, seedling survival rate, HAsA and GSH contents, and some antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e. CAT, APX, SOD and GPX). The dose of 18 × 1016 ions cm-2 may be the optimum dose for use in dry J. curcas seed mutation breeding. CAT, HAsA and GSH contributed to the increase of TAC, but CAT was the most important. POD performed its important role as seed was severely damaged. The main role of the HAsA-GSH cycle appeared to be for regeneration of HAsA.

  3. SU-E-T-123: Anomalous Altitude Effect in Permanent Implant Brachytherapy Seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Watt, E; Spencer, DP; Meyer, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Permanent seed implant brachytherapy procedures require the measurement of the air kerma strength of seeds prior to implant. This is typically accomplished using a well-type ionization chamber. Previous measurements (Griffin et al., 2005; Bohm et al., 2005) of several low-energy seeds using the air-communicating HDR 1000 Plus chamber have demonstrated that the standard temperature-pressure correction factor, P{sub TP}, may overcompensate for air density changes induced by altitude variations by up to 18%. The purpose of this work is to present empirical correction factors for two clinically-used seeds (IsoAid ADVANTAGE™ {sup 103}Pd and Nucletron selectSeed {sup 125}I) for which empirical altitude correction factors do not yet exist in the literature when measured with the HDR 1000 Plus chamber. Methods: An in-house constructed pressure vessel containing the HDR 1000 Plus well chamber and a digital barometer/thermometer was pumped or evacuated, as appropriate, to a variety of pressures from 725 to 1075 mbar. Current measurements, corrected with P{sub TP}, were acquired for each seed at these pressures and normalized to the reading at ‘standard’ pressure (1013.25 mbar). Results: Measurements in this study have shown that utilization of P{sub TP} can overcompensate in the corrected current reading by up to 20% and 17% for the IsoAid Pd-103 and the Nucletron I-125 seed respectively. Compared to literature correction factors for other seed models, the correction factors in this study diverge by up to 2.6% and 3.0% for iodine (with silver) and palladium respectively, indicating the need for seed-specific factors. Conclusion: The use of seed specific altitude correction factors can reduce uncertainty in the determination of air kerma strength. The empirical correction factors determined in this work can be applied in clinical quality assurance measurements of air kerma strength for two previously unpublished seed designs (IsoAid ADVANTAGE™ {sup 103}Pd and

  4. 125I Seed Permanent Implantation as a Palliative Treatment for Stage III and IV Hypopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Yang, Jie; Li, Xiaojiang; Wang, Xiaoli; Ren, Yanxin; Fei, Jimin; Xi, Yan; Sun, Ruimei; Ma, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of percutaneous 125I seed permanent implantation for advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma from toxicity, tumor response, and short-term outcome. Methods. 125I seeds implant procedures were performed under computed tomography for 34 patients with advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma. We observed the local control rate, overall survival, and acute or late toxicity rate. Results. In the 34 patients (stage III, n=6; stage IV, n=28), the sites of origin were pyriform sinus (n=29) and postcricoid area (n=5). All patients also received one to four cycles of chemotherapy after seed implantation. The post-plan showed that the actuarial D90 of 125I seeds ranged from 90 to 158 Gy (median, 127 Gy). The mean follow-up was 12.3 months (range, 3.4 to 43.2 months). The local control was 2.1–31.0 months with a median of 17.7 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.4 to 22.0 months). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year local controls were 65.3%, 28.6%, and 9.5% respectively. Twelve patients (35%) died of local recurrence, fourteen patients (41%) died of distant metastases, and three patients (9%) died of recurrence and metastases at the same time. Five patients (15%) still survived to follow-up. At the time of analysis, the median survival time was 12.5 months (95% CI, 9.5 to 15.4 months). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall survival rates were 55.2%, 20.3%, and 10.9%, respectively. Five patients (15%) experienced grade 3 toxic events and nine patients (26%) have experienced grade 2 toxic events. Conclusion. This review shows relatively low toxicity for interstitial 125I seed implantation in the patients with advanced stage hypopharyngeal cancer. The high local control results suggest that 125I seed brachytherapy implant as a salvage or palliative treatment for advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma merit further investigation. PMID:27440132

  5. Potential impact of prostate edema on the dosimetry of permanent seed implants using the new {sup 131}Cs (model CS-1) seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhe; Deng Jun; Roberts, Kenneth; Nath, Ravinder

    2006-04-15

    Our aim in this work was to study the potential dosimetric effect of prostate edema on the accuracy of conventional pre- and post-implant dosimetry for prostate seed implants using the newly introduced {sup 131}Cs seed, whose radioactive decay half-life ({approx}9.7 days) is directly comparable to the average edema resolution half-life ({approx}10 days) observed previously by Waterman et al. for {sup 125}I implants [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41, 1069-1077 (1998)]. A systematic calculation of the relative dosimetry effect of prostate edema on the {sup 131}Cs implant was performed by using an analytic solution obtained previously [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 47, 1405-1419 (2000)]. It was found that conventional preimplant dosimetry always overestimates the true delivered dose as it ignores the temporary increase of the interseed distance caused by edema. The overestimation for {sup 131}Cs implants ranged from 1.2% (for a small edema with a magnitude of 10% and a half-life of 2 days) to approximately 45% (for larger degree edema with a magnitude of 100% and a half-life of 25 days). The magnitude of pre- and post-implant dosimetry error for {sup 131}Cs implants was found to be similar to that of {sup 103}Pd implants for typical edema characteristics (magnitude <100%, and half-life <25 days); both of which are worse compared to {sup 125}I implants. The preimplant dosimetry error for {sup 131}Cs implants cannot be compensated effectively without knowing the edema characteristics before the seed implantation. On the other hand, the error resulted from a conventional post-implant dosimetry can be minimized (to within {+-}6%) for {sup 131}Cs implants if the post-implant dosimetry is performed at 10{+-}2 days post seed implantation. This 'optimum' post-implant dosimetry time is shorter than those determined previously for the {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I implants at 16{+-}4 days and 6{+-}1 weeks, respectively.

  6. Monte Carlo study of LDR seed dosimetry with an application in a clinical brachytherapy breast implant

    SciTech Connect

    Furstoss, C.; Reniers, B.; Bertrand, M. J.; Poon, E.; Carrier, J.-F.; Keller, B. M.; Pignol, J. P.; Beaulieu, L.; Verhaegen, F.

    2009-05-15

    A Monte Carlo (MC) study was carried out to evaluate the effects of the interseed attenuation and the tissue composition for two models of {sup 125}I low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seeds (Medi-Physics 6711, IBt InterSource) in a permanent breast implant. The effect of the tissue composition was investigated because the breast localization presents heterogeneities such as glandular and adipose tissue surrounded by air, lungs, and ribs. The absolute MC dose calculations were benchmarked by comparison to the absolute dose obtained from experimental results. Before modeling a clinical case of an implant in heterogeneous breast, the effects of the tissue composition and the interseed attenuation were studied in homogeneous phantoms. To investigate the tissue composition effect, the dose along the transverse axis of the two seed models were calculated and compared in different materials. For each seed model, three seeds sharing the same transverse axis were simulated to evaluate the interseed effect in water as a function of the distance from the seed. A clinical study of a permanent breast {sup 125}I implant for a single patient was carried out using four dose calculation techniques: (1) A TG-43 based calculation, (2) a full MC simulation with realistic tissues and seed models, (3) a MC simulation in water and modeled seeds, and (4) a MC simulation without modeling the seed geometry but with realistic tissues. In the latter, a phase space file corresponding to the particles emitted from the external surface of the seed is used at each seed location. The results were compared by calculating the relevant clinical metrics V{sub 85}, V{sub 100}, and V{sub 200} for this kind of treatment in the target. D{sub 90} and D{sub 50} were also determined to evaluate the differences in dose and compare the results to the studies published for permanent prostate seed implants in literature. The experimental results are in agreement with the MC absolute doses (within 5% for EBT

  7. SLM produced porous titanium implant improvements for enhanced vascularization and osteoblast seeding.

    PubMed

    Matena, Julia; Petersen, Svea; Gieseke, Matthias; Kampmann, Andreas; Teske, Michael; Beyerbach, Martin; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Haferkamp, Heinz; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Nolte, Ingo

    2015-04-02

    To improve well-known titanium implants, pores can be used for increasing bone formation and close bone-implant interface. Selective Laser Melting (SLM) enables the production of any geometry and was used for implant production with 250-µm pore size. The used pore size supports vessel ingrowth, as bone formation is strongly dependent on fast vascularization. Additionally, proangiogenic factors promote implant vascularization. To functionalize the titanium with proangiogenic factors, polycaprolactone (PCL) coating can be used. The following proangiogenic factors were examined: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12). As different surfaces lead to different cell reactions, titanium and PCL coating were compared. The growing into the porous titanium structure of primary osteoblasts was examined by cross sections. Primary osteoblasts seeded on the different surfaces were compared using Live Cell Imaging (LCI). Cross sections showed cells had proliferated, but not migrated after seven days. Although the cell count was lower on titanium PCL implants in LCI, the cell count and cell spreading area development showed promising results for titanium PCL implants. HMGB1 showed the highest migration capacity for stimulating the endothelial cell line. Future perspective would be the incorporation of HMGB1 into PCL polymer for the realization of a slow factor release.

  8. SLM Produced Porous Titanium Implant Improvements for Enhanced Vascularization and Osteoblast Seeding

    PubMed Central

    Matena, Julia; Petersen, Svea; Gieseke, Matthias; Kampmann, Andreas; Teske, Michael; Beyerbach, Martin; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Haferkamp, Heinz; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Nolte, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    To improve well-known titanium implants, pores can be used for increasing bone formation and close bone-implant interface. Selective Laser Melting (SLM) enables the production of any geometry and was used for implant production with 250-µm pore size. The used pore size supports vessel ingrowth, as bone formation is strongly dependent on fast vascularization. Additionally, proangiogenic factors promote implant vascularization. To functionalize the titanium with proangiogenic factors, polycaprolactone (PCL) coating can be used. The following proangiogenic factors were examined: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12). As different surfaces lead to different cell reactions, titanium and PCL coating were compared. The growing into the porous titanium structure of primary osteoblasts was examined by cross sections. Primary osteoblasts seeded on the different surfaces were compared using Live Cell Imaging (LCI). Cross sections showed cells had proliferated, but not migrated after seven days. Although the cell count was lower on titanium PCL implants in LCI, the cell count and cell spreading area development showed promising results for titanium PCL implants. HMGB1 showed the highest migration capacity for stimulating the endothelial cell line. Future perspective would be the incorporation of HMGB1 into PCL polymer for the realization of a slow factor release. PMID:25849656

  9. SU-E-T-378: Evaluation of An Analytical Model for the Inter-Seed Attenuation Effect in 103-Pd Multi-Seed Implant Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Safigholi, H; Soliman, A; Song, W; Meigooni, A Soleimani; Han, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy treatment planning systems based on TG-43 protocol calculate the dose in water and neglects the heterogeneity effect of seeds in multi-seed implant brachytherapy. In this research, the accuracy of a novel analytical model that we propose for the inter-seed attenuation effect (ISA) for 103-Pd seed model is evaluated. Methods: In the analytical model, dose perturbation due to the ISA effect for each seed in an LDR multi-seed implant for 103-Pd is calculated by assuming that the seed of interest is active and the other surrounding seeds are inactive. The cumulative dosimetric effect of all seeds is then summed using the superposition principle. The model is based on pre Monte Carlo (MC) simulated 3D kernels of the dose perturbations caused by the ISA effect. The cumulative ISA effect due to multiple surrounding seeds is obtained by a simple multiplication of the individual ISA effect by each seed, the effect of which is determined by the distance from the seed of interest. This novel algorithm is then compared with full MC water-based simulations (FMCW). Results: The results show that the dose perturbation model we propose is in excellent agreement with the FMCW values for a case with three seeds separated by 1 cm. The average difference of the model and the FMCW simulations was less than 8%±2%. Conclusion: Using the proposed novel analytical ISA effect model, one could expedite the corrections due to the ISA dose perturbation effects during permanent seed 103-Pd brachytherapy planning with minimal increase in time since the model is based on multiplications and superposition. This model can be applied, in principle, to any other brachytherapy seeds. Further work is necessary to validate this model on a more complicated geometry as well.

  10. Optimization of permanent breast seed implant dosimetry incorporating tissue heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashouf, Shahram

    Seed brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose around brachytherapy sources is based on the AAPM TG43 formalism, which generates the dose in homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM task group no. 186 (TG186) emphasized the importance of accounting for heterogeneities. In this work we introduce an analytical dose calculation algorithm in heterogeneous media using CT images. The advantages over other methods are computational efficiency and the ease of integration into clinical use. An Inhomogeneity Correction Factor (ICF) is introduced as the ratio of absorbed dose in tissue to that in water medium. ICF is a function of tissue properties and independent of the source structure. The ICF is extracted using CT images and the absorbed dose in tissue can then be calculated by multiplying the dose as calculated by the TG43 formalism times ICF. To evaluate the methodology, we compared our results with Monte Carlo simulations as well as experiments in phantoms with known density and atomic compositions. The dose distributions obtained through applying ICF to TG43 protocol agreed very well with those of Monte Carlo simulations and experiments in all phantoms. In all cases, the mean relative error was reduced by at least a factor of two when ICF correction factor was applied to the TG43 protocol. In conclusion we have developed a new analytical dose calculation method, which enables personalized dose calculations in heterogeneous media using CT images. The methodology offers several advantages including the use of standard TG43 formalism, fast calculation time and extraction of the ICF parameters directly from Hounsfield Units. The methodology was implemented into our clinical treatment planning system where a cohort of 140 patients were processed to study the clinical benefits of a heterogeneity corrected dose.

  11. Antiurolithiatic activity of Abelmoschus moschatus seed extracts against zinc disc implantation-induced urolithiasis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Anil T.; Vyawahare, Niraj S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The commonly used techniques for removing renal calculi are associated with the risk of acute renal injury and increase in stone recurrence which indicates an urgent need for alternate therapy. Objectives: The aim was to evaluate the antiurolithiatic activity of Abelmoschus moschatus seed extracts in rats. Materials and Methods: Urolithiasis was induced by surgical implantations of zinc disc in the urinary bladders of rats. Upon postsurgical recovery, different doses of chloroform (CAM) and methanolic (MAM) extracts of A. moschatus seeds (viz., 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight) were administered to disc implanted rats for the period of 7 days by the oral route. Antiurolithiatic activity was evaluated by measuring various dimensions of stones and estimating levels of various biomarkers in serum and urine samples. Results: A significant decrease in urinary output was observed in disc implanted animals, which was prevented by the treatment with extracts. Supplementation with extracts caused significant improvement in glomerular filtration rate and urinary total protein excretion. The elevated levels of serum creatinine, uric acid, and blood urea nitrogen were also prevented by the extracts. The extracts significantly reduced deposition of calculi deposition around the implanted disc. This antiurolithiatic potential is observed at all doses (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) of MAM, whereas only higher dose (400 mg/kg) of CAM showed significant antiurolithiatic potential. Conclusion: The extracts of A. moschatus seeds possessed significant antiurolithiatic activity. The possible mechanism underlying this effect is mediated collectively through diuretic, antioxidant, and free-radical scavenging effects of the plant. PMID:27057124

  12. CT-Guided Radioactive {sup 125}I Seed Implantation Therapy of Symptomatic Retroperitoneal Lymph Node Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhongmin; Lu, Jian; Gong, Ju; Zhang, Liyun; Xu, Yingjia; Song, Shaoli; Chen, Kemin; Liu, Fenju; Gang, Huang

    2013-04-12

    PurposeThis study explored the clinical efficacy of CT-guided radioactive {sup 125}I seed implantation in treating patients with symptomatic retroperitoneal lymph node metastases.MethodsTwenty-five patients with pathologically confirmed malignant tumors received CT-guided radioactive {sup 125}I seed implantation to treat metastatic lymph nodes. The diameter of the metastatic lymph nodes ranged from 1.5 to 4.5 cm. Treatment planning system (TPS) was used to reconstruct the three-dimensional image of the tumor and then calculate the corresponding quantity and distribution of {sup 125}I seeds.ResultsFollow-up period for this group of patients was 2–30 months, and median time was 16 months. Symptoms of refractory pain were significantly resolved postimplantation (P < 0.05), and Karnofsky score rose dramatically (P < 0.05). Most patients reported pain relief 2–5 days after treatment. Follow-up imaging studies were performed 2 months later, which revealed CR in 7 patients, PR in 13 patients, SD in 3 patients, and PD in 2 patients. The overall effective rate (CR + PR) was 80 %. Median survival time was 25.5 months. Seven patients died of recurrent tumor; 16 patients died of multiorgan failure or other metastases. Two patients survived after 30 months follow-up. Two patients reported localized skin erythema 1 week postimplantation, which disappeared after topical treatment.ConclusionsCT-guided radioactive {sup 125}I seed implantation, which showed good palliative pain relief with acceptable short-term effects, has proved in our study to be a new, safe, effective, and relatively uncomplicated treatment option for symptomatic retroperitoneal metastatic lymph nodes.

  13. SU-F-19A-11: Retrospective Evaluation of Thermal Coverage by Thermobrachytherapy Seed Arrangements of Clinical LDR Prostate Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Warrell, G; Shvydka, D; Chen, C; Parsai, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The superiority of a properly-administered combination of radiation therapy and hyperthermia over radiation alone in treatment of human cancers has been demonstrated in multiple studies examining radiobiology, local control, and survival. Unfortunately, hyperthermia is not yet a common modality in oncology practice, due in part to the technical difficulty of heating a deep-seated target volume to sufficient temperature. To address this problem, our group has invented a thermobrachytherapy (TB) seed based on a commonly-used low dose-rate permanent brachytherapy seed for implant in solid tumors. Instead of the tungsten radiographic marker of the standard seed, the TB seed contains one of a self-regulating ferromagnetic alloy. Placement of a patient implanted with such seeds in an oscillating magnetic field generates heat via induction of eddy currents. We present the results of studies of the capability of clinically-realistic TB seed arrangements to adequately heat defined target volumes. Methods: Seed distributions for several past LDR prostate permanent implant brachytherapy patients were reproduced in the finite element analysis software package COMSOL Multiphysics 4.4, with the difference that TB seeds were modelled, rather than the radiation-only seeds actually used for their treatments. The implant geometries were mainly of the modified peripheral loading type; a range of prostatic volumes and blood perfusion rates likely to be seen in a clinical setting were examined. Results: According to the simulations, when distributed to optimize radiation dose, TB seeds also produce sufficient heat to provide thermal coverage of the target given proper selection of the magnetic field strength. However, the thermal distributions may be improved by additional use of hyperthermia-only seeds. Conclusion: A dual-modality seed intended as an alternative to and using the same implantation apparatus and technique as the standard LDR permanent implant seed has been

  14. Seed Implant Retention Score Predicts the Risk of Prolonged Urinary Retention After Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hoon K.; Adams, Marc T.; Shi, Qiuhu; Basillote, Jay; LaMonica, Joanne; Miranda, Luis; Motta, Joseph

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To risk-stratify patients for urinary retention after prostate brachytherapy according to a novel seed implant retention score (SIRS). Patients and Methods: A total of 835 patients underwent transperineal prostate seed implant from March 1993 to January 2007; 197 patients had {sup 125}I and 638 patients had {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy. Four hundred ninety-four patients had supplemental external-beam radiation. The final downsized prostate volume was used for the 424 patients who had neoadjuvant hormone therapy. Retention was defined as reinsertion of a Foley catheter after the implant. Results: Retention developed in 7.4% of patients, with an average duration of 6.7 weeks. On univariate analysis, implant without supplemental external-beam radiation (10% vs. 5.6%; p = 0.02), neoadjuvant hormone therapy (9.4% vs. 5.4%; p = 0.02), baseline alpha-blocker use (12.5% vs. 6.3%; p = 0.008), and increased prostate volume (13.4% vs. 6.9% vs. 2.9%, >45 cm{sup 3}, 25-45 cm{sup 3}, <25 cm{sup 3}; p = 0.0008) were significantly correlated with increased rates of retention. On multivariate analysis, implant without supplemental external-beam radiation, neoadjuvant hormone therapy, baseline alpha-blocker use, and increased prostate volume were correlated with retention. A novel SIRS was modeled as the combined score of these factors, ranging from 0 to 5. There was a significant correlation between the SIRS and retention (p < 0.0001). The rates of retention were 0, 4%, 5.6%, 9%, 20.9%, and 36.4% for SIRS of 0 to 5, respectively. Conclusions: The SIRS may identify patients who are at high risk for prolonged retention after prostate brachytherapy. A prospective validation study of the SIRS is planned.

  15. Preventive effects of 125I seeds on benign restenosis following esophageal stent implantation in a dog model

    PubMed Central

    GAN, ZHEN; JING, JIAN; ZHU, GUANGYU; QIN, YONGLIN; TENG, GAOJUN; GUO, JINHE

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of iodine-125 (125I) seeds on the proliferation of primary esophageal fibroblasts in dogs, and to assess the safety and preventive efficacy of 125I seed-pre-loaded esophageal stents in benign restenosis following implantation. Primary fibroblasts were cultured with various 125I seed activities, which were then evaluated using cell proliferation and apoptosis assays as well as cell cycle analysis using Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining and PI staining. Prior to sacrification, animals were submitted to esophageal radiography under digital subtraction angiography. Esophageal tissues were collected and examined for macroscopic, microscopic and pathological alterations. The results demonstrated a significant and dose-dependent inhibition of fibroblast proliferation and increased apoptosis following exposure to 125I seeds. G0/G1 fibroblast populations increased in a dose-dependent manner following treatment with 125I seeds, in contrast to cells in S phase. Four weeks following implantation, α-smooth muscle actin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression levels in the experimental group were significantly lower compared with those in the control group; in addition, eight weeks following implantation, esophageal inner diameters were increased in the experimental group. 125I seeds inhibited proliferation of dog esophageal fibroblasts via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In conclusion, 125I seed-pre-loaded esophageal stents inhibited benign hyperplasia in the upper edge of the stent to a certain extent, which relieved benign restenosis following implantation with a good safety profile. PMID:25543838

  16. CT image artifacts from brachytherapy seed implants: A postprocessing 3D adaptive median filter

    SciTech Connect

    Basran, Parminder S.; Robertson, Andrew; Wells, Derek

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To design a postprocessing 3D adaptive median filter that minimizes streak artifacts and improves soft-tissue contrast in postoperative CT images of brachytherapy seed implantations. Methods: The filter works by identifying voxels that are likely streaks and estimating more reflective voxel intensity by using voxel intensities in adjacent CT slices and applying a median filter over voxels not identified as seeds. Median values are computed over a 5x5x5 mm region of interest (ROI) within the CT volume. An acrylic phantom simulating a clinical seed implant arrangement and containing nonradioactive seeds was created. Low contrast subvolumes of tissuelike material were also embedded in the phantom. Pre- and postprocessed image quality metrics were compared using the standard deviation of ROIs between the seeds, the CT numbers of low contrast ROIs embedded within the phantom, the signal to noise ratio (SNR), and the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of the low contrast ROIs. The method was demonstrated with a clinical postimplant CT dataset. Results: After the filter was applied, the standard deviation of CT values in streak artifact regions was significantly reduced from 76.5 to 7.2 HU. Within the observable low contrast plugs, the mean of all ROI standard deviations was significantly reduced from 60.5 to 3.9 HU, SNR significantly increased from 2.3 to 22.4, and CNR significantly increased from 0.2 to 4.1 (all P<0.01). The mean CT in the low contrast plugs remained within 5 HU of the original values. Conclusion: An efficient postprocessing filter that does not require access to projection data, which can be applied irrespective of CT scan parameters has been developed, provided the slice thickness and spacing is 3 mm or less.

  17. Cell Seeding Densities in Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation Techniques for Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Gomoll, Andreas H; Lind, Martin; Spector, Myron

    2012-04-01

    Cartilage repair techniques have been among the most intensively investigated treatments in orthopedics for the past decade, and several different treatment modalities are currently available. Despite the extensive research effort within this field, the generation of hyaline cartilage remains a considerable challenge. There are many parameters attendant to each of the cartilage repair techniques that can affect the amount and types of reparative tissue generated in the cartilage defect, and some of the most fundamental of these parameters have yet to be fully investigated. For procedures in which in vitro-cultured autologous chondrocytes are implanted under a periosteal or synthetic membrane cover, or seeded onto a porous membrane or scaffold, little is known about how the number of cells affects the clinical outcome. Few published clinical studies address the cell seeding density that was employed. The principal objective of this review is to provide an overview of the cell seeding densities used in cell-based treatments currently available in the clinic for cartilage repair. Select preclinical studies that have informed the use of specific cell seeding densities in the clinic are also discussed.

  18. WE-A-17A-11: Implanted Brachytherapy Seed Movement Due to Transrectal Ultrasound Probe-Induced Prostate Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D; Usmani, N; Sloboda, R; Meyer, T; Husain, S; Angyalfi, S; Kay, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the movement of implanted brachytherapy seeds due to transrectal ultrasound probe-induced prostate deformation and to estimate the effects on prostate dosimetry. Methods: Implanted probe-in and probe-removed seed distributions were reconstructed for 10 patients using C-arm fluoroscopy imaging. The prostate was delineated on ultrasound and registered to the fluoroscopy seeds using a visible subset of seeds and residual needle tracks. A linear tensor and shearing model correlated the seed movement with position. The seed movement model was used to infer the underlying prostate deformation and to simulate the prostate contour without probe compression. Changes in prostate and surrogate urethra dosimetry were calculated. Results: Seed movement patterns reflecting elastic decompression, lateral shearing, and rectal bending were observed. Elastic decompression was characterized by anterior-posterior expansion and superior-inferior and lateral contractions. For lateral shearing, anterior movement up to 6 mm was observed for extraprostatic seeds in the lateral peripheral region. The average intra-prostatic seed movement was 1.3 mm, and the residual after linear modeling was 0.6 mm. Prostate D90 increased by 4 Gy on average (8 Gy max) and was correlated with elastic decompression. For selected patients, lateral shearing resulted in differential change in D90 of 7 Gy between anterior and posterior quadrants, and increase in whole prostate D90 of 4 Gy. Urethra D10 increased by 4 Gy. Conclusion: Seed movement upon probe removal was characterized. The proposed model captured the linear correlation between seed movement and position. Whole prostate dose coverage increased slightly, due to the small but systematic seed movement associated with elastic decompression. Lateral shearing movement increased dose coverage in the anterior-lateral region, at the expense of the posterior-lateral region. The effect on whole prostate D90 was smaller due to the subset

  19. Bypassing the learning curve in permanent seed implants using state-of-the-art technology

    SciTech Connect

    Beaulieu, Luc . E-mail: beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca; Evans, Dee-Ann Radford; Aubin, Sylviane; Angyalfi, Steven; Husain, Siraj; Kay, Ian; Martin, Andre-Guy; Varfalvy, Nicolas; Vigneault, Eric; Dunscombe, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to demonstrate, based on clinical postplan dose distributions, that technology can be used efficiently to eliminate the learning curve associated with permanent seed implant planning and delivery. Methods and Materials: Dose distributions evaluated 30 days after the implant of the initial 22 consecutive patients treated with permanent seed implants at two institutions were studied. Institution 1 (I1) consisted of a new team, whereas institution 2 (I2) had performed more than 740 preplanned implantations over a 9-year period before the study. Both teams had adopted similar integrated systems based on three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasonography, intraoperative dosimetry, and an automated seed delivery and needle retraction system (FIRST, Nucletron). Procedure time and dose volume histogram parameters such as D90, V100, V150, V200, and others were collected in the operating room and at 30 days postplan. Results: The average target coverage from the intraoperative plan (V100) was 99.4% for I1 and 99.9% for I2. D90, V150, and V200 were 191.4 Gy (196.3 Gy), 75.3% (73.0%), and 37.5% (34.1%) for I1 (I2) respectively. None of these parameters shows a significant difference between institutions. The postplan D90 was 151.2 Gy for I1 and 167.3 Gy for I2, well above the 140 Gy from the Stock et al. analysis, taking into account differences at planning, results in a p value of 0.0676. The procedure time required on average 174.4 min for I1 and 89 min for I2. The time was found to decrease with the increasing number of patients. Conclusion: State-of-the-art technology enables a new brachytherapy team to obtain excellent postplan dose distributions, similar to those achieved by an experienced team with proven long-term clinical results. The cost for bypassing the usual dosimetry learning curve is time, with increasing team experience resulting in shorter treatment times.

  20. Acute urinary morbidity after a permanent 125I implantation for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohga, Saiji; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Sasaki, Tomonari; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Asai, Kaori; Hirata, Hideki; Naito, Seiji; Honda, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated the predictive factors of acute urinary morbidity (AUM) after prostate brachytherapy. From November 2005 to January 2007, 62 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated using brachytherapy. The (125)Iodine ((125)I) seed-delivering method was a modified peripheral pattern. The prescribed dose was 144 Gy. Urinary morbidity was scored at 3 months after implantation. The clinical and treatment parameters were analysed for correlation with AUM. In particular, in this study, Du90 (the minimal dose received by 90% of the urethra), Dup90 (the minimal dose received by 90% of the proximal half of the urethra on the bladder side) and Dud90 (the minimal dose received by 90% of the distal half of the urethra on the penile side) were analysed. We found that 43 patients (69.4%) experienced acute urinary symptoms at 3 months after implantation. Of them, 40 patients had Grade 1 AUM, one patient had Grade 2 pain, and two patients had Grade 2 urinary frequency. None of the patients had ≥Grade 3. Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that Du90 and Dup90 were significantly correlated with AUM. In this study, Du90 and Dup90 were the most significant predictors of AUM after prostate brachytherapy.

  1. Photon counting readout pixel array in 0.18-μm CMOS technology for on-line gamma-ray imaging of 103palladium seeds for permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldan, A. H.; Karim, K. S.; Reznik, A.; Caldwell, C. B.; Rowlands, J. A.

    2008-03-01

    Permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) brachytherapy technique was recently introduced as an alternative to high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and involves the permanent implantation of radioactive 103Palladium seeds into the surgical cavity of the breast for cancer treatment. To enable accurate seed implantation, this research introduces a gamma camera based on a hybrid amorphous selenium detector and CMOS readout pixel architecture for real-time imaging of 103Palladium seeds during the PBSI procedure. A prototype chip was designed and fabricated in 0.18-μm n-well CMOS process. We present the experimental results obtained from this integrated photon counting readout pixel.

  2. Inverse planning optimization for hybrid prostate permanent-seed implant brachytherapy plans using two source strengths.

    PubMed

    Cunha, J Adam M; Pickett, Barby; Pouliot, Jean

    2010-06-03

    The purpose is to demonstrate the ability to generate clinically acceptable prostate permanent seed implant plans using two seed types which are identical except for their activity. The IPSA inverse planning algorithms were modified to include multiple dose matrices for the calculation of dose from different sources, and a selection algorithm was implemented to allow for the swapping of source type at any given source position. Five previously treated patients with a range of prostate volumes from 20-48 cm3 were re-optimized under two hybrid scenarios: (1) using 0.32 and 0.51 mGy m2 / h 125I, and (2) using 0.64 and 0.76 mGy m2 / h 125I. Isodose lines were generated and dosimetric indices , V150Prostate, D90Prostate, V150Urethra, V125Urethra, V120Urethra,V100Urethra, and D10Urethra were calculated. The algorithm allows for the generation of single-isotope, multi-activity hybrid brachytherapy plans. By dealing with only one radionuclide, but of different activity, the biology is unchanged from a standard plan. All V100Prostate were within 2.3 percentage points for every plan and always above the clinically desirable 95%. All V150Urethra were identically zero, and V120Urethra is always below the clinically acceptable value of 1.0 cm3. Clinical optimization times for the hybrid plans are still under one minute, for most cases. It is possible to generate clinically advantageous brachytherapy plans (i.e. obtain the same quality dose distribution as a standard single-activity plan) while incorporating leftover seeds from a previous patient treatment. This method will allow a clinic to continue to provide excellent patient care, but at a reduced cost. Multi-activity hybrid plans were equal in quality (as measured by the standard dosimetric indices) to plans with seeds of a single activity. Despite the expanded search space, optimization times for these studies were still under two minutes on a modern day laptop and can be reduced to below one minute in a clinical setting

  3. A comparative study of seed localization and dose calculation on pre- and post-implantation ultrasound and CT images for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Imad; Algan, Ozer; Thompson, Spencer; Sindhwani, Puneet; Herman, Terence; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2009-09-01

    This work investigates variation in the volume of the prostate measured at different stages through the prostate brachytherapy procedure for 30 patients treated with I-125 radioactive seeds. The implanted seeds were localized on post-implantation ultrasound (US) images and the effect of prostate enlargement due to edema on dose coverage for 15 patients was studied. The volume of the prostate was measured at four stages as follows: (a) 2-3 weeks prior to implantation using US imaging, (b) then at the start of the intra-operative prostate brachytherapy procedure on the day of the implant, (c) immediately post-implantation using US imaging in the operating room and (d) finally by CT imaging at nearly 4 weeks post-implantation. Comparative prostate volume studies were performed using US imaging stepper and twister modes. For the purpose of this study, the implanted seeds were localized successfully on post-implant ultrasound twister images, retrospectively. The plans using post-implant US imaging were compared with intra-operative plans on US and plans created on CT images. The prostate volume increases about 10 cm3 on average due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed loading during implantation. The visibility of the implanted seeds on US twister images acquired post-implantation is as good as those on CT images and can be localized and used for dose calculation. The dose coverage represented by parameters such as D90 (dose covering 90% of the volume) and V100 (volume covered by 100% dose) is poorer on plans performed on post-implantation twister US studies than on the intra-operative live plan or the CT scan performed 4 weeks post-operatively. For example, the mean D90 difference on post-implantation US is lower by more than 15% than that on pre-implantation US. The volume enlargement of the prostate due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed placement has a significant effect on the quality of dosimetric coverage in brachytherapy prostate seed

  4. Influence of Prostatic Edema on {sup 131}CS Permanent Prostate Seed Implants: A Dosimetric and Radiobiological Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kehwar, Than S.; Jones, Heather A.; Huq, M. Saiful; Smith, Ryan P.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To study the influence of prostatic edema on postimplant physical and radiobiological parameters using {sup 131}Cs permanent prostate seed implants. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients with early prostate cancer who underwent {sup 131}Cs permanent seed implantation were evaluated. Dose-volume histograms were generated for each set of prostate volumes obtained at preimplantation and postimplantion days 0, 14, and 28 to compute quality indices (QIs) and fractional doses at level x (FD{sub x}). A set of equations for QI, FD{sub x}, and biologically effective doses at dose level D{sub x} (BED{sub x}) were defined to account for edema changes with time after implant. Results: There were statistically significant differences found between QIs of pre- and postimplant plans at day 0, except for the overdose index (ODI). QIs correlated with postimplant time, and FD{sub x} was found to increase with increasing postimplant time. With the effect of edema, BED at different dose levels showed less improvement due to the short half-life of {sup 131}Cs, which delivers about 85% of the prescribed dose before the prostate reaches its original volume due to dissipation of edema. Conclusions: Results of the study show that QIs, FD{sub x}, and BEDs at the level of D{sub x} changed from preneedle plans to postimplant plans and have statistically significant differences (p < 0.05), except for the ODI (p = 0.106), which suggests that at the time of {sup 131}C seed implantation, the effect of edema must be accounted for when defining the seed positions, to avoid the possibility of poor dosimetric and radiobiologic results for {sup 131}Cs seed implants.

  5. SU-E-T-12: A Comparative Dosimetric Study of Pre and Post Prostate Iodine-125 Permanent Seed Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X; Rahimian, J; Goy, B; Cosmatos, H; Qian, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Post-implant dosimetry has become the gold standard for prostate implant evaluation. The goal of this research is to compare the dosimetry between pre-plan and post-plan in permanent prostate seed implant brachytherapy. Methods: A retrospective study of 91 patients treated with Iodine-125 prostate seed implant between year 2012∼2014 were performed. All plans were created using a VariSeed 8.0 planning system. Pre-plan ultrasound images were acquired using 0.5 cm slice thickness. Post-plan CT images acquired about 1–4 weeks after implant, fused with the preplan ultrasound images. The prostate and urethra contours were generated using the fusion of ultrasound and CT images. Iodine-125 seed source activities varied between 0.382 to 0.414 mCi per seed. The loading patterns varied slightly between patients depending on the prostate size. Statistical analysis of pre and post plans for prostate and urethra volumes, V100%, V150% and D90, and urethra D10 were performed and reported. Results: The pre and post implant average prostate size was 36.90cc vs. 38.58cc; V100% was 98.33% vs. 96.89%; V150% was 47.09% vs. 56.95%; D90 was 116.35Gy vs. 116.12Gy, urethra volume was 1.72cc vs. 1.85cc, urethra D10% was 122.0% vs. 135.35%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the pre and post-plan values for D90(p-value=0.43). However, there are significant differences between other parameters most likely due to post surgical edema; prostate size (p-value= 0.00015); V100% (p-value=3.7803E-07); V150% (p-value=1.49E-09); urethra volume (p-value= 2.77E-06); Urethra D10 (p-value=7.37E-11). Conclusion: The post-plan dosimetry using CT image set showed similar D90 dose coverage to the pre-plan using the ultrasound image dataset. The study showed that our prostate seed implants have consistently delivered adequate therapeutic dose to the prostate while sparing urethra. Future studies to correlate dose versus biochemical response using patients’ PSA

  6. Implanting iodine-125 seeds into rat dorsal root ganglion for neuropathic pain: neuronal microdamage without impacting hind limb motion.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Ling; Zhang, Tengda; Wang, Huixing; Zhang, Wenyi; Fan, Saijun; Huo, Xiaodong; Zheng, Baosen; Ma, Wenting

    2014-06-15

    The use of iodine-125 ((125)I) in cancer treatment has been shown to relieve patients' pain. Considering dorsal root ganglia are critical for neural transmission between the peripheral and central nervous systems, we assumed that (125)I could be implanted into rat dorsal root ganglia to provide relief for neuropathic pain. (125)I seeds with different radioactivity (0, 14.8, 29.6 MBq) were implanted separately through L4-5 and L5-6 intervertebral foramen into the vicinity of the L5 dorsal root ganglion. von Frey hair results demonstrated the mechanical pain threshold was elevated after implanting (125)I seeds from the high radioactivity group. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that nuclear membrane shrinkage, nucleolar margination, widespread mitochondrial swelling, partial vacuolization, lysosome increase, and partial endoplasmic reticulum dilation were visible at 1,440 hours in the low radioactivity group and at 336 hours in the high radioactivity group. Abundant nuclear membrane shrinkage, partial fuzzy nuclear membrane and endoplasmic reticulum necrosis were observed at 1,440 hours in the high radioactivity group. No significant difference in combined behavioral scores was detected between preoperation and postoperation in the low and high radioactivity groups. These results suggested that the mechanical pain threshold was elevated after implanting (125)I seeds without influencing motor functions of the hind limb, although cell injury was present.

  7. Poster — Thur Eve — 77: Implanted Brachythearpy Seed Movement due to Transrectal Ultrasound Probe-Induced Prostate Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D; Usmani, N; Sloboda, R; Meyer, T; Husain, S; Angyalfi, S; Kay, I

    2014-08-15

    The study investigated the movement of implanted brachytherapy seeds upon transrectal US probe removal, providing insight into the underlying prostate deformation and an estimate of the impact on prostate dosimetry. Implanted seed distributions, one obtained with the prostate under probe compression and another with the probe removed, were reconstructed using C-arm fluoroscopy imaging. The prostate, delineated on ultrasound images, was registered to the fluoroscopy images using seeds and needle tracks identified on ultrasound. A deformation tensor and shearing model was developed to correlate probe-induced seed movement with position. Changes in prostate TG-43 dosimetry were calculated. The model was used to infer the underlying prostate deformation and to estimate the location of the prostate surface in the absence of probe compression. Seed movement patterns upon probe removal reflected elastic decompression, lateral shearing, and rectal bending. Elastic decompression was characterized by expansion in the anterior-posterior direction and contraction in the superior-inferior and lateral directions. Lateral shearing resulted in large anterior movement for extra-prostatic seeds in the lateral peripheral region. Whole prostate D90 increased up to 8 Gy, mainly due to the small but systematic seed movement associated with elastic decompression. For selected patients, lateral shearing movement increased prostate D90 by 4 Gy, due to increased dose coverage in the anterior-lateral region at the expense of the posterior-lateral region. The effect of shearing movement on whole prostate D90 was small compared to elastic decompression due to the subset of peripheral seeds involved, but is expected to have greater consequences for local dose coverage.

  8. [Relief effect of CT-guided (125)I seed implantation on patients with spinal and paraspinal osteolytic metastatic tumors].

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Li, F S; Wang, L; Du, Z G; Xu, S N

    2017-03-23

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of computed tomography (CT)-guided (125)I seed implantation in the treatment of patients with spinal and/or paraspinal osteolytic metastatic tumors. Methods: The radiation dose distribution was planned for 27 patients with 35 spinal and paraspinal osteolytic metastatic tumors by a treatment planning system (TPS). CT-guided (125)I seed implantation was carried out in the patients, and the quality of treatment was evaluated based on CT-imaging follow-up. Results: All the 27 patients underwent CT-guided (125)I seed implantation successfully. 12 to 50 (125)I seeds were injected into each spinal or paraspinal metastatic tumor, 39.15 on average, and the specific radioactive activity of the particles ranged from 0.60 to 0.80 mCi, 0.73 mCi on average. The minimal percentage of the dose received by 90% of the target volume (D(90)) of the spinal and paraspinal metastatic tumors ranged from 90 to 165 Gy, 115.03 Gy on average. Among the 27 patients, 21 (77.8%) had partial remission (PR) and 6(22.2%)had stable disease (SD). The Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) scores before implantation and at postoperative 3 and 6 months were 7.81±0.74, 2.04±1.10 and 1.81±0.79, respectively, (P<0.05). The assessment of pain intensity before (125)I seed implantation and at 3 postoperative months showed obvious improvements in the patients evaluated according to the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale: 12 (44.4%) patients with ASIA grade C were changed to grade D, 3 (11.1%) from grade C to grade E, 8 (29.6%) from grade D to grade E, 3 (11.1%) with a stable grade D, and 1 (3.7%)with a stablegrade C. The Karnovsky performance scale (KPS) scores before treatment and at 3 months and 6 months postoperatively were 66.30±6.88, 85.93±9.31 and 87.91±8.56, respectively (P<0.05). Their local control rate (LCR) at 3 months, 6 months and 1 year postoperatively were 100%, 92.6% and 51.9%, respectively, and the overall survival rates(OSR) were

  9. Dosimetry of a thyroid uptake detected in seed migration survey following a patient's iodine-125 prostate implant and in vitro measurements of intentional seed leakages

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qinsheng; Russell, John L. Jr.; Macklis, Roger R.; Weinhous, Martin S.; Blair, Henry F.

    2006-07-15

    As a quality control procedure, a post-implant seed migration survey has been accomplished on 340 prostate cancer patients since November 2001. Pulmonary seed embolization and intracardiac seed embolization have been detected. A case of thyroid uptake due to leaking iodine-125 (I-125) sources was also seized. In order to determine the dose to the thyroid, a dosimetry method was developed to link in vivo measurements and the cumulated dose to the thyroid. The calculated source leakage half-life in the case was approximately 15 days based on the measurements and the estimated cumulated dose to thyroid was 204 cGy. It is concluded that one seed was leaking. In order to verify the in vivo measurements, intentional in vitro seed leakage tests were performed. A seed was cut open and placed in a sealed glass container filled with a given volume of saline. The I-125 concentration in the saline was subsequently measured over a period of six months. Consistent in vivo and in vitro results were obtained. Recent incidents of seed leaks reported from other centers have drawn practitioners' attention to this problem. In order to make the measurements more useful, the seed leakage tests were expanded to include I-125 seeds from six other vendors. The results show that the leakage half-lives of those seeds varied from nine days to a half-year. Two seed models demonstrated least leakage. Since the measurements lasted for six months, the escape of iodine resulted from oxidation of iodide in the saline was a concern for the measurement accuracy. As a reference, another set of leakage tests were performed by adding sodium thiosulfate salt (Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O) to the saline. Sodium thiosulfate is a reducing agent that prevents the conversion of iodide to iodate so as to minimize I-125 evaporation. As a result, significantly shortened leakage half-lives were observed in this group. Seed agitation was also performed and no significant deviations of the

  10. Computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial permanent implantation of (125)I seeds for refractory chest wall metastasis or recurrence.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ping; Liu, Chen; Wang, Junjie; Yang, Ruijie; Jiang, Yuliang; Tian, Suqing

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of 125I seeds implantation for refractory chest wall (CW) metastasis or recurrence under CT guidance. In addition we assessed initial data obtained on the therapeutic response for refractory CW metastasis or recurrence. Twenty consecutive patients underwent permanent implantation of 125I seeds (from Jul. 2004 to Jan. 2011) under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Postoperative dosimetry was routinely performed for all patients. The actuarial D90 of the implanted 125I seeds ranged from 100 Gy to 160 Gy (median: 130 Gy). The activity of 125I seeds ranged from 0.5 mCi to 0.78 mCi (median: 0.71 mCi). The total number of seeds implanted ranged from 8 to 269 (median: 53). The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 54 months (median: 11.5 months). The survival and local control probabilities were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Among all the 20 patients, 3 patients had complete remission CR (15%), 12 patients had partial remission PR (60%), 5 patients had stable disease SD. The 1-, 2-, 3- and 4-year tumor control rates were all 88.7% respectively. The 1- and 2-, 3-, 4-year cancer specific survival rates were 56.5% and 47.1%, 47.1%, 47.1% respectively. The 1- and 2-, 3-, 4-year overall survival rates were 53.3% and 35.6%, 35.6%, 35.6% respectively, with a median survival of 15 months (95% CI, 7.0-22.9). Mild brachial plexus injury was seen in one patient; grade 1 or 2 skin reactions were seen in 6 patients (30%) who had received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) before. No grade 3 and 4 skin side effects were found. Rib fracture, ulceration, pneumothorax or hemopneumothorax were not seen. Interstitial permanent implantation of 125I seeds under CT guidance is feasible, efficacious and safe for refractory CW metastasis or recurrence.

  11. Automated matching of corresponding seed images of three simulator radiographs to allow 3D triangulation of implanted seeds.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, M D; Kassaee, A

    1997-02-01

    To match corresponding seed images in different radiographs so that the 3D seed locations can be triangulated automatically and without ambiguity requires (at least) three radiographs taken from different perspectives, and an algorithm that finds the proper permutations of the seed-image indices. Matching corresponding images in only two radiographs introduces inherent ambiguities which can be resolved only with the use of non-positional information obtained with intensive human effort. Matching images in three or more radiographs is an 'NP (Non-determinant in Polynomial time)-complete' problem. Although the matching problem is fundamental, current methods for three-radiograph seed-image matching use 'local' (seed-by-seed) methods that may lead to incorrect matchings. We describe a permutation-sampling method which not only gives good 'global' (full permutation) matches for the NP-complete three-radiograph seed-matching problem, but also determines the reliability of the radiographic data themselves, namely, whether the patient moved in the interval between radiographic perspectives.

  12. CT-guided 125I seed implantation for inoperable retroperitoneal sarcoma: A technique for delivery of local tumor brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Biao; Guo, Wen-Hao; Lan, Ting; Yuan, Fang; Liu, Guan-Jian; Zan, Rui-Yu; You, Xin; Tan, Qiao-Yue; Liao, Zheng-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Radical surgery is currently the first treatment of choice for retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma (RSTS). However, the prognosis of RSTS remains poor due to ineffective local control and a high incidence of metastasis after surgical resection. Brachytherapy has been shown to safely provide local radiotherapy for numerous types of cancer when used alone or in combination with surgical resection, but has not been well characterized in the management of RSTS. The aim of this study was to evaluate CT-guided 125I seed implantation for local control and pain relief in the treatment of inoperable RSTS. A total of 23 patients with RSTS were treated with 125I implantation. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Other endpoints were evaluated via computed tomography scan or phone call/e-mail records. The occurrence of complications was assessed preoperatively (baseline) and during postoperatively follow-up or until patient succumbed. All patients were successfully treated with 125I implantation. A mean number of 70.87 radioactive seeds were applied in each patient. During the follow-up, two patients were unaccounted for, local recurrence occurred in three patients, five succumbed and complications were observed in sixteen. The patient's VAS score changed from 7.4 preoperatively to 7.6, 2.3, 2.0, 1.2, 1.5, 1.4 and 2.5 at 24 h, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after the procedure, respectively. Good local control and significant pain relief after 125I seed implantation was observed in patients with inoperable RSTS. Thus, the present results suggest that this method could be an effective treatment option for patients with inoperable RSTS. PMID:28101168

  13. Effect of pedicle fixation combined with 125I seed implantation for metastatic thoracolumbar tumors

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jiale; Bao, Zhaohua; Zou, Jun; Yang, Huilin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of pedicle fixation combined with 125I brachytherapy in treating metastatic thoracolumbar tumors. Patients and methods A retrospective analysis of the clinical data of seven metastatic thoracolumbar tumor patients who received pedicle fixation combined with radioactive 125I seed implantation brachytherapy in our department between January 2009 and December 2013 was performed. The visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and the Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score before the operation and 1, 6, and 12 months after the operation were observed and recorded. The changes in the scores at each time point were compared. Results All the patients underwent a successful operation, without any complications during their hospitalization. All the patients received postoperative follow-up, and the duration of follow-up was 15–50 months, with an average of 32.2 months. One pancreatic cancer patient died of liver failure and hypoproteinemia 28 months post surgery. The VAS scores of patients before the operation and 1, 6, and 12 months after the operation were 7.43±0.98, 2.71±0.49, 3.00±0.82, and 4.29±0.98, respectively; the KPS scores were 52.9±9.5, 84.3±5.3, 75.7±5.3, and 72.9±4.9, respectively. These results suggest that the VAS score at each time point was significantly decreased compared with that before the operation, while the KPS score was significantly increased compared with that before the operation. Both differences had statistical significance (P<0.05). Conclusion As a therapy for advanced malignant tumors with thoracolumbar metastasis, pedicle fixation combined with 125I brachytherapy can effectively relieve short-term pain and improve patient’s quality of life. PMID:27274307

  14. SU-E-T-301: Dosimetric Comparison Between Adaptive and Rectilinear Template-Based Prostate Seed Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Sugar, E Neubauer; Buzurovic, I; O’Farrell, D; Hansen, J; Devlin, P; Cormack, R; Nguyen, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetry of a standard rectilinear and an adaptive technique used in I125 prostate seed implants. Methods: To achieve favorable dosimetry in prostate implants we used adaptive needle updates to match actual positions in real-time. The seed locations were optimized based on actual needle locations. The seeds were delivered automatically with a robotic device seedSelectron™ (Elekta Brachytherapy). In this study, we evaluated the former approach against the standard rectilinear technique in which the needles have a parallel distribution. The treatment plans for 10 patients were analyzed. For comparison, the actual treatment plans were revised so each needle was repositioned to its original parallel location through the template. The analysis was performed by comparing the target coverage and dose to the organs at risk. The comparison was done using the following planning goals: the target D90> 90%, V100% > 90%, V50% <70% and V200% <30%; the urethra V125% < 1cm3 and V150%= 0cm3; and the Rectum V100%<1cm3 and V69% < 8cm3. The prescription dose to the target was 145Gy. Results: The average target volume and number of seeds were 44.39cm3(SD=11.14) and 74(SD=12), respectively. The D90 for adaptive and rectilinear plans was 159.9Gy(SD=2.99) and 155.53Gy(SD=4.04) resulting in a 2.74% difference for the average target coverage. A similar difference (1.75%) was noticed in the target V100[%]. No significant difference was noticed in the dose to the urethra and rectum. All planning goals were met with both the adaptive and rectilinear approach for each plan. Conclusion: The study reveals enhanced coverage of the target when using the adaptive needle adjustments as compared to the rectilinear approach for the analyzed cases. However, the differences in dosimetry did not translate to meaningful clinical outcomes.

  15. Sequential Comparison of Seed Loss and Prostate Dosimetry of Stranded Seeds With Loose Seeds in {sup 125}I Permanent Implant for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Saibishkumar, Elantholi P.; Borg, Jette; Yeung, Ivan; Cummins-Holder, Cheryl; Landon, Angela; Crook, Juanita

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To compare stranded seeds (SSs) with loose seeds (LSs) in terms of prostate edema, dosimetry, and seed loss after {sup 125}I brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts of 20 men participated in an institutional review board-approved protocols to study postimplant prostate edema and its effect on dosimetry. The LS cohort underwent brachytherapy between September 2002 and July 2003 and the SS cohort between April 2006 and January 2007. Both cohorts were evaluated sequentially using computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging fusion-based dosimetry on Days 0, 7, and 30. No hormonal therapy or supplemental beam radiotherapy was used. Results: Prostate edema was less in the SS cohort at all points (p = NS). On Day 0, all the prostate dosimetric factors were greater in the LS group than in the SS group (p = 0.003). However, by Days 7 and 30, the dosimetry was similar between the two cohorts. No seeds migrated to the lung in the SS cohort compared with a total of five seeds in 4 patients in the LS cohort. However, the overall seed loss was greater in the SS cohort (24 seeds in 6 patients; 1.1% of total vs. 0.6% for LSs), with most seeds lost through urine (22 seeds in 5 patients). Conclusion: Despite elimination of venous seed migration, greater seed loss was observed with SSs compared with LSs, with the primary site of loss being the urinary tract. Modification of the technique might be necessary to minimize this. Prostate dosimetry on Days 7 and 30 was similar between the SS and LS cohorts.

  16. Influence of breast composition and interseed attenuation in dose calculations for post-implant assessment of permanent breast 103Pd seed implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsharpour, Hossein; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Carrier, Jean-François; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2010-08-01

    The impact of tissue heterogeneity and interseed attenuation is studied in post-implant evaluation of five clinical permanent breast 103Pd seed implants using the Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation method. Dose metrics for the target (PTV) as well as an organ at risk (skin) are used to visualize the differences between a TG43-like MC method and more accurate MC methods capable of considering the breast tissue heterogeneity as well as the interseed attenuation. PTV dose is reduced when using a breast tissue model instead of water in MC calculations while the dose to the skin is increased. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of varying the glandular/adipose proportion of the breast tissue on dose distributions. The dose to the PTV (skin) decreases (increases) with the increasing adipose proportion inside the breast. In a complete geometry and compared to a TG43-like situation, the average PTV D90 reduction varies from 3.9% in a glandular breast to 35.5% when the breast consists entirely of adipose. The skin D10 increases by 28.2% in an entirely adipose breast. The results of this work show the importance of an accurate and patient-dependent breast tissue model to be used in the dosimetry for this kind of low energy implant.

  17. Comparison of permanent 125I seeds implants with two different techniques in 500 cases of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ricós, Jose Vicente; Tortajada, Maria Isabel; Santos, Miguel Angel; Casanova, Juan; Clemente, Jose; Samper, Josefa; Santamaría, Paula; Arribas, Leoncio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To perform a comparative study of 500 consecutive 125I seeds implants for intracapsular prostate carcinoma with two techniques differing in terms of both strand implantation and planning. Material and methods From 2002 to 2007 we performed 250 implants with fixed stranded seeds (RapidStrand™) and a preplanning system and from 2007 to 2010, 250 with real-time and ProLink™ system. Mean age was 68 and 66, respectively, median PSA (prostate-specific antigen) 7.3 and 7.2, stage T1-T2a in 98% and 94%, and Gleason ≤ 6 in 96% and 86%. Low risk cases were 81% and 71%. The prescribed dose was 145 Gy to the prostate volume, or 108 Gy plus EBRT 46 Gy in some intermediate risk cases. Hormonal treatment was given to 42% and 28%. Results Median follow-up was 48 and 47 months, respectively, 14 patients in the first group and 7 patients in the second developed biochemical failure (BF). Actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) at 5 years increased from 90.2% to 97.2% (low risk from 91.3% to 97.2%, intermediate risk from 84.2% to 97.1%). Biochemical failure was independent of hormone treatment. Rectal complications were G1-2 in 1.2% and 5.2%, respectively. A urinary catheter was necessary in 6.9% and 9.6%, and urethral resection in 1.9% and 4.4%. Genitourinary toxicity was G1-2 in 4.6% and 12%, G3-4 in 1.9% and 4.8%. An assessment of mean D90 in a sample of patients showed that the dosimetry in postoperative planning based on CT improved from a mean D90 of 143 Gy to 157 Gy. Conclusions The outcome of patients with low risk prostate carcinoma treated with 125I seed is very good with low complications rate. The real-time approach in our hands achieved a more precise seed implantation, better dosimetry, and a statistically non-significant better biochemical control. We have made this our standard technique. PMID:26622228

  18. A Radiation Badge Survey for Family Members Living With Patients Treated With a {sup 103}Pd Permanent Breast Seed Implant

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Brian M. Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Rakovitch, Eileen; Sankreacha, Raxa; O'Brien, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Sixty-seven patients with early-stage breast cancer were treated in a Phase I/II clinical trial using a {sup 103}Pd permanent breast seed implant as adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. We report the dose received by family members living with these patients and compare measured doses with theoretical worst-case scenario estimates. Methods and Materials: Exposure-rate measurements were taken at 1 m from the patient by using a calibrated low-energy survey meter. Landauer (Landauer Inc., Glenwood, IL) Luxel badges, with sensitivity of 0.01 mSv, were given to family members to wear after the implantation. Badge readings for 33 spouses and 28 other family members were used to estimate effective doses, and these were compared with theory. Results: Average preimplantation planning target volume from computed tomography was 50.3 ml (range, 18.0-96.7 ml), and average preimplantation distance between the skin and the most anterior planning target volume margin was 0.57 cm. The average maximum exposure rate was measured to be 2.4 {+-} 1.1 mR/h, and average measured dose to a spouse was 0.99 {+-} 1.0 mSv. The calculated exposure rates and spousal doses using preimplantation computed tomography scan data overestimated those measured. Average measured family member dose (excluding spouses) was 0.20 {+-} 0.58 mSv. Conclusions: Based on measured and calculated spousal doses, a permanent breast seed implant using {sup 103}Pd is safe for the public. However, it is recommended that extra precautions in the way of a breast patch be used when patients with an implant will be in the vicinity of toddlers or pregnant women.

  19. [Dosimetry verification of radioactive seed implantation with 3D printing template and CT guidance for paravertebral/retroperitoneal malignant tumor].

    PubMed

    Ji, Z; Jiang, Y L; Guo, F X; Peng, R; Sun, H T; Fan, J H; Wang, J J

    2017-04-04

    Objective: To compare the dose distributions of postoperative plans with preoperative plans for seeds implantations of paravertebral/retroperitoneal tumors assisted by 3D printing guide template and CT guidance, explore the effects of the technology for seeds implantations in dosimetry level and provide data support for the optimization and standardization in seeds implantation. Methods: Between December 2015 and July 2016, a total of 10 patients with paravertebral/retroperitoneal tumors (12 lesions) received 3D printing template assist radioactive seeds implantations in department of radiation oncology of Peking University Third Hospital, and included in the study. The diseases included cervical cancer, kidney cancer, abdominal stromal tumor, leiomyosarcoma of kidney, esophageal cancer and carcinoma of ureter. The prescribed doses was 110-150 Gy. All patients received preoperative planning design, individual template design and production, and the dose distribution of postoperative plan was compared with preoperative plan. Dose parameters including D(90), MPD, V(100), V(150,)conformal index(CI), EI of target volume and D(2cc) of organs at risk (spinal cord, aorta, kidney). Statistical software was SPSS 19.0 and statistical method was non-parameters Wilcoxon symbols test. Results: A total of 10 3D printing templates were designed and produced which were including 12 treatment areas.The mean D(90) of postoperative target area (GTV) was 131.1 (97.8-167.4 Gy) Gy. The actual seeds number of post operation increased by 3 to 12 in 5 cases (42.0%). The needle was well distributed. For postoperative plans, the mean D(90,)MPD, V(100,)V(150) was 131.1 Gy, 69.3 Gy, 90.2% and 65.2%, respectively, and which was 140.2 Gy, 65.6 Gy, 91.7% and 26.8%, respectively, in preoperative plans. This meant that the actual dose of target volume was slightly lower than preplanned dose, and the high dose area of target volume was larger than preplanned range, but there was no statistical

  20. Moving Toward Focal Therapy in Prostate Cancer: Dual-Isotope Permanent Seed Implants as a Possible Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Todor, Dorin A.; Barani, Igor J.; Lin, Peck-Sun; Anscher, Mitchell S.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the ability of single- and dual-isotope prostate seed implants to escalate biologically effective dose (BED) to foci of disease while reducing prescription dose to the prostate. Methods and Materials: Nine plans, using {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs alone and in combination were created retrospectively for 2 patients. Ultrasound and MRI/MRS datasets were used for treatment planning. Voxel-by-voxel BED was calculated for single- and dual-isotope plans. Equivalent uniform BED (EUBED) was used to compare plans. The MRS-positive planning target volumes (PTV{sub i}) were delineated along with PTV (prostate + 5 mm), rectum, and urethra. Single-isotope implants, prescribed to conventional doses, were generated to achieve good PTV coverage. The PTV{sub i} were prospectively used to generate implants using mixtures of isotopes. For mixed-radioisotope implants, we also explored the impact on EUBED of lowering prescription doses by 15%. Results: The EUBED of PTV{sub i} in the setting of primary {sup 125}I implant increased 20-66% when {sup 103}Pd and {sup 131}Cs were used compared with {sup 125}I boost. Decreasing prescription dose by 15% in mixed-isotope implants results in a potential 10% reduction in urethral EUBED with preservation of PTV coverage while still boosting PTV{sub i} (up to 80%). When radiobiologic parameters corresponding to more-aggressive disease are assigned to foci, faster-decaying isotopes used in mixed implants have the potential to preserve the equivalent biological effect of mono-isotope implants considering less-aggressive disease distributed in the entire prostate. Conclusions: This is a hypothesis-generating study proposing a treatment paradigm that could be the middle ground between whole-gland irradiation and focal-only treatment. The use of two isotopes concurrent with decreasing the minimal peripheral dose is shown to increase EUBED of selected subvolumes while preserving the therapeutic effect at the level of the

  1. Disease-related effects of perioperative blood transfusions associated with sup 125 I seed implantation for prostate carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, J.P.; Schellhammer, P.F.; el-Mahdi, A.M. )

    1990-08-01

    In some retrospective studies perioperative transfusions during oncologic surgery have been shown to decrease the time interval between surgery and local and/or distant recurrence of cancer. This study examines the disease-related effect, if any, of perioperative blood transfusions among 108 patients with localized carcinoma of the prostate treated by radioactive iodine-125 seed implantation of the prostate and lymphadenectomy. When all subjects were analyzed, there was no statistical difference of local and distant failure between the transfused and nontransfused groups. Patients with well-differentiated tumors had statistically fewer local recurrences (0% vs 22%, p = 0.036) if they were transfused perioperatively. However, the difference in distant metastases (0% vs 11%) was not statistically significant (p = 0.21). In contrast, patients with moderately and poorly differentiated disease receiving transfusions had more local recurrences and metastases, though this was not statistically significant. Our data suggest that there is no obvious evidence that perioperative blood transfusions have an adverse effect on local recurrence or distant metastases for iodine-125 seed implantation of carcinoma of the prostate.

  2. Permanent prostate implant using high activity seeds and inverse planning with fast simulated annealing algorithm: A 12-year Canadian experience

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Andre-Guy; Roy, Jean; Beaulieu, Luc; Pouliot, Jean; Harel, Francois; Vigneault, Eric . E-mail: Eric.Vigneault@chuq.qc.ca

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes and toxicity of the first Canadian permanent prostate implant program. Methods and Materials: 396 consecutive patients (Gleason {<=}6, initial prostate specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10 and stage T1-T2a disease) were implanted between June 1994 and December 2001. The median follow-up is of 60 months (maximum, 136 months). All patients were planned with fast-simulated annealing inverse planning algorithm with high activity seeds ([gt] 0.76 U). Acute and late toxicity is reported for the first 213 patients using a modified RTOG toxicity scale. The Kaplan-Meier biochemical failure-free survival (bFFS) is reported according to the ASTRO and Houston definitions. Results: The bFFS at 60 months was of 88.5% (90.5%) according to the ASTRO (Houston) definition and, of 91.4% (94.6%) in the low risk group (initial PSA {<=}10 and Gleason {<=}6 and Stage {<=}T2a). Risk factors statistically associated with bFFS were: initial PSA >10, a Gleason score of 7-8, and stage T2b-T3. The mean D90 was of 151 {+-} 36.1 Gy. The mean V100 was of 85.4 {+-} 8.5% with a mean V150 of 60.1 {+-} 12.3%. Overall, the implants were well tolerated. In the first 6 months, 31.5% of the patients were free of genitourinary symptoms (GUs), 12.7% had Grade 3 GUs; 91.6% were free of gastrointestinal symptoms (GIs). After 6 months, 54.0% were GUs free, 1.4% had Grade 3 GUs; 95.8% were GIs free. Conclusion: The inverse planning with fast simulated annealing and high activity seeds gives a 5-year bFFS, which is comparable with the best published series with a low toxicity profile.

  3. SU-E-T-602: Beryllium Seeds Implant for Photo-Neutron Yield Using External Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Koren, S; Veltchev, I; Furhang, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the Neutron yield obtained during prostate external beam irradiation. Methods: Neutrons, that are commonly a radiation safety concern for photon beams with energy above 10 MV, are induced inside a PTV from Beryllium implemented seeds. A high megavoltage photon beam delivered to a prostate will yield neutrons via the reaction Be-9(γ,n)2?. Beryllium was chosen for its low gamma,n reaction cross-section threshold (1.67 MeV) to be combined with a high feasible 25 MV photon beam. This beam spectra has a most probable photon energy of 2.5 to 3.0 MeV and an average photon energy of about 5.8 MeV. For this feasibility study we simulated a Beryllium-made common seed dimension (0.1 cm diameter and 0.5 cm height) without taking into account encapsulation. We created a 0.5 cm grid loading pattern excluding the Urethra, using Variseed (Varian inc.) A total of 156 seeds were exported to a 4cm diameter prostate sphere, created in Fluka, a particle transport Monte Carlo Code. Two opposed 25 MV beams were simulated. The evaluation of the neutron dose was done by adjusting the simulated photon dose to a common prostate delivery (e.g. 7560 cGy in 42 fractions) and finding the corresponding neutron dose yield from the simulation. A variance reduction technique was conducted for the neutrons yield and transported. Results: An effective dose of 3.65 cGy due to neutrons was found in the prostate volume. The dose to central areas of the prostate was found to be about 10 cGy. Conclusion: The neutron dose yielded does not justify a clinical implant of Beryllium seeds. Nevertheless, one should investigate the Neutron dose obtained when a larger Beryllium loading is combined with commercially available 40 MeV Linacs.

  4. The gold button technique for intraoral interstitial implants with iridium-192 seeds.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P P; Henschke, U K

    1977-03-01

    The higher the radiation dose, the better is tumor control. High tumor doses are feasible only by interstitial irradiation. To achieve uniform dose distribution throughout the area or volume of implant, one has to use established distribution rules. In straight tube technique we have to use heavy endloading to compensate for uncrossed ends. In implants for intraoral lesions, heavy endloading gives a high dose to the opposing normal mucosa. The new gold button technique considerably reduces the dose to the normal mucosa, thus minimizing the morbidity.

  5. Five years' experience with the gold button technique for intraoral interstitial implants with iridium-192 seeds.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P P; Henschke, U K

    1977-07-01

    To simulate crossing of the ends in standard removable interstitial implants, we used the loop technique for intraoral tumors when treating them with afterloading interstitial removable implants. Because of technical problems, we changed to a straight tube method with heavy end-loading to compensate for the uncrossed ends. High doses to the normal mucosa close to heavy end-loading is reduced 2.5 times by the use of gold buttons in place of standard stainless steel buttons, thus decreasing unnecessary mucosal reactions and morbidity.

  6. SU-E-J-166: Sensitivity of Clinically Relevant Dosimetric Parameters to Contouring Uncertainty During Post Implant Dosimetry of Prostate Permanent Seed Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Mashouf, S; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: There is a strong evidence relating post-implant dosimetry for permanent seed prostate brachytherpy to local control rates. The delineation of the prostate on CT images, however, represents a challenge as it is difficult to confidently identify the prostate borders from soft tissue surrounding it. This study aims at quantifying the sensitivity of clinically relevant dosimetric parameters to prostate contouring uncertainty. Methods: The post-implant CT images and plans for a cohort of 43 patients, who have received I–125 permanent prostate seed implant in our centre, were exported to MIM Symphony LDR brachytherapy treatment planning system (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH). The prostate contours in post-implant CT images were expanded/contracted uniformly for margins of ±1.00mm, ±2.00mm, ±3.00mm, ±4.00mm and ±5.00mm (±0.01mm). The values for V100 and D90 were extracted from Dose Volume Histograms for each contour and compared. Results: The mean value of V100 and D90 was obtained as 92.3±8.4% and 108.4±12.3% respectively (Rx=145Gy). V100 was reduced by −3.2±1.5%, −7.2±3.0%, −12.8±4.0%, −19.0±4.8%, − 25.5±5.4% for expanded contours of prostate with margins of +1mm, +2mm, +3mm, +4mm, and +5mm, respectively, while it was increased by 1.6±1.2%, 2.4±2.4%, 2.7±3.2%, 2.9±4.2%, 2.9±5.1% for the contracted contours. D90 was reduced by −6.9±3.5%, −14.5±6.1%, −23.8±7.1%, − 33.6±8.5%, −40.6±8.7% and increased by 4.1±2.6%, 6.1±5.0%, 7.2±5.7%, 8.1±7.3% and 8.1±7.3% for the same set of contours. Conclusion: Systematic expansion errors of more than 1mm may likely render a plan sub-optimal. Conversely contraction errors may Result in labeling a plan likely as optimal. The use of MRI images to contour the prostate should results in better delineation of prostate organ which increases the predictive value of post-op plans. Since observers tend to overestimate the prostate volume on CT, compared with MRI, the impact of the

  7. Tolerance and Acceptance Results of a Palladium-103 Permanent Breast Seed Implant Phase I/II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pignol, Jean-Philippe Rakovitch, Eileen; Keller, Brian M.; Sankreacha, Raxa; Chartier, Carole

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To test, in a prospective Phase I/II trial, a partial breast irradiation technique using a {sup 103}Pd permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) realized in a single 1-h procedure under sedation and local freezing. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had infiltrating ductal carcinoma {<=}3 cm in diameter, surgical margin {>=}2 mm, no extensive intraductal component, no lymphovascular invasion, and negative lymph nodes. Patients received a permanent seed implant, and a minimal peripheral dose of 90 Gy was prescribed to the clinical target volume, with a margin of 1.5 cm. Results: From May 2004 to April 2007, 67 patients received the PBSI treatment. The procedure was well tolerated, with 17% of patients having significant pain after the procedure. Only 1 patient (1.5%) had an acute skin reaction (Grade 3 according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria). The rates of acute moist desquamation, erythema, and indurations were 10.4%, 42%, and 27%, respectively. At 1 year the rate of Grade 1 telangiectasia was 14%. The rate of skin reaction decreased from 65% to 28% when skin received less than the 85% isodose. According to a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group questionnaire, 80-90% of patients were very satisfied with their treatment, and the remainder were satisfied. One patient (1.5%) developed an abscess, which resolved after the use of antibiotics. There was no recurrence after a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 11-49 months). Conclusions: The feasibility, safety, and tolerability of PBSI compares favorably with that of external beam and other partial breast irradiation techniques.

  8. Portal Vein Stenting Combined with Iodine-125 Seeds Endovascular Implantation Followed by Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tanyang; Zhu, Tongyin; Zhang, Yuelin; Nie, Chunhui; Ai, Jing; Zhou, Guanhui; Zhang, Aibin; Dong, Meng-Jie; Wang, Wei-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Aim was to assess the therapeutic value of portal vein stenting (PVS) combined with iodine-125 seed (125I seed) strand endovascular implantation followed by transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for treating patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). This was a retrospective study of 34 patients aged 29–81 years, diagnosed HCC with PVTT, and treated with PVS combined with 125I seed strand endovascular implantation followed by TACE between January 2012 and August 2014. Survival, stent patency, technical success rate, complications related to the procedure, and adverse events were recorded. The technical success rate was 100%. No serious procedure-related adverse event was recorded. The median survival was 147 days. The cumulative survival rates and stent patency rates at 90, 180, and 360 days were 94.1%, 61.8%, and 32.4% and 97.1% (33/34), 76.9% (24/34), and 29.4% (10/34), respectively. PVS combined with 125I seed strand endovascular implantation followed by TACE is feasible for patients with HCC and PVTT. It resulted in appropriate survival and stent patency, with no procedure-related adverse effects. PMID:27999793

  9. Two-stage implantation of the skin and bone integrated pylon (SBIP) seeded with autologous fibroblasts induced into osteoblast differentiation for direct skeletal attachment of limb prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Shevtsov, Maxim A.; Galibin, Oleg V.; Yudintceva, Nataliya M.; Blinova, Miralda I.; Pinaev, Grigoriy P.; Ivanova, Anna A.; Savchenko, Olga N.; Suslov, Dmitriy N.; Potokin, Igor L.; Pitkin, Emil; Raykhtsaum, Grigory; Pitkin, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Angio- and osteogenesis following the two-stage implantation of the Skin and Bone Integrated Pylon (SBIP) seeded with autologous fibroblasts was evaluated. Two consecutive animal substudies were undertaken: intramedullary subcutaneous implantation (fifteen rabbits) and a two-stage transcutaneous implantation (twelve rabbits). We observed enhanced osseointegrative properties of the intramedullary porous component seeded with fibroblasts induced into osteoblast differentiation, as compared to the untreated porous titanium pylon. The three-phase scintigraphy and subsequent histological analysis showed that the level of osteogenesis was 1.5-fold higher than in the control group, and significantly so (P<0.05). The biocompatibility was further proved by the absence of inflammatory response or encapsulation and sequestration on the histology assay. Treatment of the transcutaneous component with autologous fibroblasts was associated with nearly a 2-fold decrease in the period required for the ingrowth of dermal and subdermal soft tissues into the implant surface, as compared to the untreated porous titanium component. Direct dermal attachment to the transcutaneous implant prevented superficial and deep periprosthetic infections in rabbits in vivo. PMID:24115308

  10. Consequences of dose heterogeneity on the biological efficiency of ¹⁰³Pd permanent breast seed implants.

    PubMed

    Afsharpour, Hossein; Reniers, Brigitte; Landry, Guillaume; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian M; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-02-07

    Brachytherapy is associated with highly heterogeneous spatial dose distributions. This heterogeneity is usually ignored when estimating the biological effective dose (BED). In addition, the heterogeneities of the medium including the tissue heterogeneity (TH) and the interseed attenuation (ISA) are also contributing to the heterogeneity of the dose distribution, but they are both ignored in Task Group 43 (TG43)-based protocols. This study investigates the effect of dose heterogeneity, TH and ISA on metrics that are commonly used to quantify biological efficiency in brachytherapy. The special case of 29 breast cancer patients treated with permanent (103)Pd seed implant is considered here. BED is compared to equivalent uniform BED (EUBED) capable of considering the spatial heterogeneity of the dose distribution. The effects of TH and ISA on biological efficiency of treatments are taken into account by comparing TG43 with Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for each patient. The effect of clonogenic repopulation is also considered. The analysis is performed for different sets of (α/β, α) ratios of (2, 0.3), (4, 0.27) and (10, 0.3) [Gy, Gy(-1)] covering the whole range of reported α/β values in the literature. BED is sometimes larger and sometimes smaller than EUBED(TG43) indicating that the effect of the dose heterogeneity is not similar among patients. The effect of the dose heterogeneity can be characterized by using the D(99) dose metric. For each set of the radiobiological parameters considered, a D(99) threshold is found over which dose heterogeneity will cause an overestimation of the biological efficiencies while the inverse happens for smaller D(99) values. EUBED(MC) is always larger than EUBED(TG43) indicating that by neglecting TH and ISA in TG43-based dosimetry algorithms, the biological efficiencies may be underestimated by about 10 Gy. Overall, by going from BED to the more accurate EUBED(MC) there is a gain of about 9.6 to 13 Gy on the biological

  11. [CT guidance (125)I seed implantation for pelvic recurrent rectal cancer assisted by 3D printing individual non-coplanar template].

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wang, J J; Jiang, Y L; Tian, S Q; Ji, Z; Guo, F X; Sun, H T; Fan, J H; Xu, Y P

    2016-12-20

    Objective: To analyze the difference of dosimetric parameters between pre-plan and post-plan of (125)I radioactive seed implantation assisted by 3D printing individual non-coplanar template (3D printing template) for locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Methods: From February 2016 to April 2016, a total of 10 patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer received (125)I seeds implantation under CT guidance assisted by 3D printing template in Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University Third Hospital.Each patient underwent CT simulation, three-dimentional treatment planning pre-implantation, 3D printing template design, radioactive seed implantation assisted by 3D printing template and dosimetric verification post implantation. The median activity of seed was 0.63 mCi (0.58 to 0.7 mCi) (2.15- 2.59×10(7) Bq), and the median number of seeds was 80 (19 to 192). D90, D100, V100, V150, CI, EI, HI, D5cc, D2cc of bladder and bowel of pre-plan and post-plan were calculated, respectively.Paired t test was used to evaluate the difference of dosimetric parameters between pre-plan and post-plan. Results: The median D90 of pre-plan and post-plan were 13 761.0 and 12 798.8 cGy, respectively.The median D100 of pre-plan and post-plan were 5 293.6 and 5 397.9 cGy, respectively.The median V100 of pre-plan and post-plan were 90.0% and 90.0%, respectively.The median V150 of pre-plan and post-plan were 63.8% and 62.4%, respectively.The median CI of pre-plan and post-plan were 0.73 and 0.67.The median EI of pre-plan and post-plan were 0.22 and 0.30, respectively. The median HI of pre-plan and post-plan were 0.29 and 0.31.The median bladder D2cc of pre-plan and post-plan were 3 088.8 and 4 240.4 cGy, respectively.The median bowel D2cc of pre-plan and post-plan were 7 051.6 and 7 903.9 cGy, respectively. Conclusions: 3D printing template might be helpful for locally recurrent rectal cancer patients who received (125)I radioactive seed implantation assisted by 3D printing

  12. SU-E-J-215: Towards MR-Only Image Guided Identification of Calcifications and Brachytherapy Seeds: Application to Prostate and Breast LDR Implant Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Elzibak, A; Fatemi-Ardekani, A; Soliman, A; Mashouf, S; Safigholi, H; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, WY; Han, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify and analyze the appearance of calcifications and brachytherapy seeds on magnitude and phase MRI images and to investigate whether they can be distinguished from each other on corrected phase images for application to prostate and breast low dose rate (LDR) implant dosimetry. Methods: An agar-based gel phantom containing two LDR brachytherapy seeds (Advantage Pd-103, IsoAid, 0.8mm diameter, 4.5mm length) and two spherical calcifications (large: 7mm diameter and small: 4mm diameter) was constructed and imaged on a 3T Philips MR scanner using a 16-channel head coil and a susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) sequence (2mm slices, 320mm FOV, TR/ TE= 26.5/5.3ms, 15 degree flip angle). The phase images were unwrapped and corrected using a 32×32, 2D Hanning high pass filter to remove background phase noise. Appearance of the seeds and calcifications was assessed visually and quantitatively using Osirix (http://www.osirix-viewer.com/). Results: As expected, calcifications and brachytherapy seeds appeared dark (hypointense) relative to the surrounding gel on the magnitude MRI images. The diameter of each seed without the surrounding artifact was measured to be 0.1 cm on the magnitude image, while diameters of 0.79 and 0.37 cm were measured for the larger and smaller calcifications, respectively. On the corrected phase images, the brachytherapy seeds and the calcifications appeared bright (hyperintense). The diameter of the seeds was larger on the phase images (0.17 cm) likely due to the dipole effect. Conclusion: MRI has the best soft tissue contrast for accurate organ delineation leading to most accurate implant dosimetry. This work demonstrated that phase images can potentially be useful in identifying brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate and breast due to their bright appearance, which helps in their visualization and quantification for accurate dosimetry using MR-only. Future work includes optimizing phase filters to best identify

  13. First report of a permanent breast {sup 103}Pd seed implant as adjuvant radiation treatment for early-stage breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pignol, Jean-Philippe . E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca; Keller, Brian; Rakovitch, Eileen; Sankreacha, Raxa; Easton, Harry; Que, William

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: A new technique of adjuvant partial breast irradiation using {sup 103}Pd permanent breast seed implants (PBSI) is presented. The procedure is performed in a single 1-hour session under local anesthesia. Methods and Materials: Patients referred to a single institution for adjuvant radiotherapy after lumpectomy for an infiltrating ductal carcinoma {<=}3 cm in diameter, surgical margin {>=}2 mm, no extensive in situ carcinoma, no lymphovascular invasion, and minimal or negative lymph node involvement were offered a PBSI. Results: Between May and December 2004, 31 eligible patients underwent CT scan and ultrasound simulations assessing PBSI feasibility. Fifteen were excluded because of feasibility issues, and 16 received PBSI. A minimal peripheral dose of 90 Gy was prescribed to the planning target volume corresponding to the clinical target volume identified on the CT scan plus a margin of 1 cm. The procedure was well tolerated; 56% of the patients reported no pain during the procedure, and 46% of the patients developed National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 1 acute reaction. None experienced toxicity Grade 2 or 3. Conclusions: Permanent breast seed implantation seems feasible and well tolerated on these preliminary clinical data and represents an ultimate step in the reduction of treatment fraction for partial breast irradiation.

  14. Relationship between isotope half-life and prostatic edema for optimal prostate dose coverage in permanent seed implants

    SciTech Connect

    Villeneuve, Maxime; Leclerc, Ghyslain; Lessard, Etienne; Pouliot, Jean; Beaulieu, Luc

    2008-05-15

    The robustness of treatment planning to prostatic edema for three different isotopes ({sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs) is explored using dynamical dose calculations on 25 different clinical prostate cases. The treatment plans were made using the inverse planning by simulated annealing (IPSA) algorithm. The prescription was 144, 127, and 125 Gy for {sup 125}I, {sup 131}Cs, and {sup 103}Pd, respectively. For each isotope, three dose distribution schemes were used to impose different protection levels to the urethra: V{sub 120}=0%, V{sub 150}=0%, and V{sub 150}=30%. Eleven initial edema values were considered ranging from 1.0 (no edema) to 2.0 (100%). The edema was assumed to resolve exponentially with time. The prostate volume, seed positions, and seed activity were dynamically tracked to produce the final dose distribution. Edema decay half-lives of 10, 30, and 50 days were used. A total of 675 dynamical calculations were performed for each initial edema value. For the {sup 125}I isotope, limiting the urethra V{sub 120} to 0% leads to a prostate D{sub 90} under 140 Gy for initial edema values above 1.5. Planning with urethra V{sub 150} at 0% provides a good response to the edema; the prostate D{sub 90} remains higher than 140 Gy for edema values up to 1.8 and a half-life of 30 days or less. For {sup 103}Pd, the prostate D{sub 90} is under 97% of the prescription dose for approximately 66%, 40%, and 30% of edema values for urethra V{sub 120}=0%, V{sub 150}=0%, and V{sub 150}=30%, respectively. Similar behavior is seen for {sup 131}Cs and the center of the prostate becomes 'cold' for almost all edema scenarios. The magnitude of the edema following prostate brachytherapy, as well as the half-life of the isotope used and that of the edema resorption, all have important impacts on the dose distribution. The {sup 125}I isotope with its longer half-life is more robust to prostatic edema. Setting up good planning objectives can provide an adequate compromise

  15. A permanent breast seed implant as partial breast radiation therapy for early-stage patients: A comparison of palladium-103 and iodine-125 isotopes based on radiation safety considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Brian; Sankreacha, Raxa; Rakovitch, Eileen; O'Brien, Peter; Pignol, Jean-Philippe . E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: A permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) technique has been developed as a new form of partial adjuvant radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer. This study compares iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) and palladium-103 ({sup 103}Pd) isotopes by examining the exposure and effective dose (ED) to a patient's partner.Methods and Materials: A low-energy survey meter was used to measure exposure rates as a function of bolus thickness placed over {sup 103}Pd or {sup 125}I seeds. A general mathematical expression for the initial exposure rate at 1 m (x{sub o,1m}) from the skin surface as a function of the implant size, R, and the distance between the skin surface and the implant, d, was derived. Also, a second general equation is proposed to calculate the ED to the patient's partner.Results: The initial exposure rate at 1 meter and the ED are calculated as follows: x{sub o,1m} = (3{alpha})/2R{sup 3}{center_dot}{beta}{sup 3} [e{sup -{beta}}{sup (2R+d)}({beta}R + 1) + e{sup -{beta}}{sup {center_dot}}{sup d}({beta}R - 1)], and ED = aR{sup b} {center_dot} [e{sup -c(2R+d)} {center_dot} (cR + 1) + e{sup -cd} -bar (cR - 1)]. For {sup 125}I, the parameters are: {alpha} = 0.154409, {beta} = 0.388460, a = 197, b = -0.95, and c = 0.38846. For {sup 103}Pd, they are: {alpha} = 0.06877, {beta} = 0.421098, a = 18.6, b -0.78, and c = 0.421098. For implant diameters varying from 2 to 6 cm and skin-to-implant distances varying from 0.7 to 4 cm, the ED is consistently below 2.6 mSv using the {sup 103}Pd isotope, but more than 5 mSv in many instances and possibly up to 20 mSv using {sup 125}I.Conclusions: PBSI using {sup 103}Pd seeds appears safe because the patient's partner ED is consistently below 5 mSv. The{sup 125}I isotope is not recommended for PBSI.

  16. WE-A-17A-09: Exploiting Electromagnetic Technologies for Real-Time Seed Drop Position Validation in Permanent Implant Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Racine, E; Hautvast, G; Binnekamp, D; Beaulieu, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To report on preliminary results validating the performance of a specially designed LDR brachytherapy needle prototype possessing both electromagnetic (EM) tracking and seed drop detection abilities. Methods: An EM hollow needle prototype has been designed and constructed in collaboration with research partner Philips Healthcare. The needle possesses conventional 3D tracking capabilities, along with a novel seed drop detection mechanism exploiting local changes of electromagnetic properties generated by the passage of seeds in the needle's embedded sensor coils. These two capabilities are exploited by proprietary engineering and signal processing techniques to generate seed drop position estimates in real-time treatment delivery. The electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) used for the experiment is the NDI Aurora Planar Field Generator. The experiment consisted of dropping a total of 35 seeds in a prismatic agarose phantom, and comparing the 3D seed drop positions of the EMTS to those obtained by an image analysis of subsequent micro-CT scans. Drop position error computations and statistical analysis were performed after a 3D registration of the two seed distributions. Results: Of the 35 seeds dropped in the phantom, 32 were properly detected by the needle prototype. Absolute drop position errors among the detected seeds ranged from 0.5 to 4.8 mm with mean and standard deviation values of 1.6 and 0.9 mm, respectively. Error measurements also include undesirable and uncontrollable effects such as seed motion upon deposition. The true accuracy performance of the needle prototype is therefore underestimated. Conclusion: This preliminary study demonstrates the potential benefits of EM technologies in detecting the passage of seeds in a hollow needle as a means of generating drop position estimates in real-time treatment delivery. Such tools could therefore represent a potentially interesting addition to existing brachytherapy protocols for rapid dosimetry

  17. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 02: Evaluation of Dosimetric Variations in Partial Breast Seed Implant (PBSI) due to Patient Arm Position (Up vs. Down)

    SciTech Connect

    Watt, E; Long, K; Husain, S; Meyer, T

    2014-08-15

    The planning for PBSI is done with the patient's ipsilateral arm raised, however, anatomical changes and variations are unavoidable as the patient resumes her daily activities, potentially resulting in significant deviations in implant geometry from the treatment plan. This study aims to quantify the impact of the ipsilateral arm position on the geometry and dosimetry of the implant at eight weeks, evaluated on post-plans using the MIM Symphony™ software (MIM Software, Cleveland, OH). The average dose metrics for the three patients treated at the TBCC thus far using rigid fusion and contour transfer for the arms up position were 76% for the CTV V100, 61% for the PTV V100, and 37% for the PTV V200; and for the arms down position 81% for the CTV V100, 64% for the PTV V100, and 42% for the PTV V200. Qualitative analysis of the post-implant CT for one of the three patients showed poor agreement between the seroma contour transferred from the pre-implant CT and the seroma visible on the post-implant CT. To obtain a clinically accurate plan for that patient, contour modifications were used, yielding improved dose metric averages for the arms-up position for all three patients of 87% for the CTV V100, 68% for the PTV V100, and 39% for the PTV V200. Overall, the data available shows that dosimetric parameters increase with the patient's arm down, both in terms of coverage and in terms of the hot spot, and accrual of more patients may confirm this in a larger population.

  18. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  19. Surface coating for prevention of metallic seed migration in tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyunseok; Park, Jong In; Lee, Won Seok; Park, Min; Son, Kwang-Jae; Bang, Young-bong; Choy, Young Bin E-mail: sye@snu.ac.kr; Ye, Sung-Joon E-mail: sye@snu.ac.kr

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, metallic implants often detach from their deposited sites and migrate to other locations. This undesirable migration could cause inadequate dose coverage for permanent brachytherapy and difficulties in image-guided radiation delivery for patients. To prevent migration of implanted seeds, the authors propose a potential strategy to use a biocompatible and tissue-adhesive material called polydopamine. Methods: In this study, nonradioactive dummy seeds that have the same geometry and composition as commercial I-125 seeds were coated in polydopamine. Using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the surface of the polydopamine-coated and noncoated seeds was characterized. The detachment stress between the two types of seeds and the tissue was measured. The efficacy of polydopamine-coated seed was investigated through in vitro migration tests by tracing the seed location after tissue implantation and shaking for given times. The cytotoxicity of the polydopamine coating was also evaluated. Results: The results of the coating characterization have shown that polydopamine was successfully coated on the surface of the seeds. In the adhesion test, the polydopamine-coated seeds had 2.1-fold greater detachment stress than noncoated seeds. From the in vitro test, it was determined that the polydopamine-coated seed migrated shorter distances than the noncoated seed. This difference was increased with a greater length of time after implantation. Conclusions: The authors suggest that polydopamine coating is an effective technique to prevent migration of implanted seeds, especially for permanent prostate brachytherapy.

  20. I-125 seed calibration using the SeedSelectron® afterloader: a practical solution to fulfill AAPM-ESTRO recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Richart, Jose; Guirado, Damián; Pérez-García, Jordi; Rodríguez, Silvia; Santos, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose SeedSelectron® v1.26b (Nucletron BV, The Netherlands) is an afterloader system used in prostate interstitial permanent brachytherapy with I-125 selectSeed seeds. It contains a diode array to assay all implanted seeds. Only one or two seeds can be extracted during the surgical procedure and assayed using a well chamber to check the manufacturer air-kerma strength (SK) and to calibrate the diode array. Therefore, it is not feasible to assay 5–10% seeds as required by the AAPM-ESTRO. In this study, we present a practical solution of the SeedSelectron® users to fulfill the AAPM- ESTRO recommendations. Material and methods The method is based on: a) the SourceCheck® well ionization chamber (PTW, Germany) provided with a PTW insert; b) n = 10 selectSeed from the same batch and class as the seeds for the implant; c) the Nucletron insert to accommodate the n = 10 seeds on the SourceCheck® and to measure their averaged SK. Results for 56 implants have been studied comparing the SK value from the manufacturer with the one obtained with the n = 10 seeds using the Nucletron insert prior to the implant and with the SK of just one seed measured with the PTW insert during the implant. Results We are faced with SK deviation for individual seeds up to 7.8%. However, in the majority of cases SK is in agreement with the manufacturer value. With the method proposed using the Nucletron insert, the large deviations of SK are reduced and for 56 implants studied no deviation outside the range of the class were found. Conclusions The new Nucletron insert and the proposed procedure allow to evaluate the SK of the n = 10 seeds prior to the implant, fulfilling the AAPM-ESTRO recommendations. It has been adopted by Nucletron to be extended to seedSelectron® users under request. PMID:23346136

  1. Seed Germination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Initiation of seed germination is a critical decision for plants. It is important for seed populations under natural conditions to spread the timing of germination of individual seeds to maximize the probability of species survival. Therefore, seeds have evolved the multiple layers of mechanisms tha...

  2. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  3. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIDCD A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense ... are better able to hear, comprehend sound and music, and speak than their peers who receive implants ...

  4. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... antenna. This part of the implant receives the sound, converts the sound into an electrical signal, and sends it to ... implants allow deaf people to receive and process sounds and speech. However, these devices do not restore ...

  5. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications. PMID:27879873

  6. Endodontic implants

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rakesh K.; Tikku, A. P.; Chandra, Anil; Wadhwani, K. K.; Ashutosh kr; Singh, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic implants were introduced back in 1960. Endodontic implants enjoyed few successes and many failures. Various reasons for failures include improper case selection, improper use of materials and sealers and poor preparation for implants. Proper case selection had given remarkable long-term success. Two different cases are being presented here, which have been treated successfully with endodontic implants and mineral trioxide aggregate Fillapex (Andreaus, Brazil), an MTA based sealer. We suggest that carefully selected cases can give a higher success rate and this method should be considered as one of the treatment modalities. PMID:25298723

  7. Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... sale in the United States: saline-filled and silicone gel-filled. Both types have a silicone outer shell. They vary in size, shell thickness, ... implant them. Provide information on saline-filled and silicone gel-filled breast implants, including data supporting a ...

  8. Mutation breeding by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zengliang; Deng, Jianguo; He, Jianjun; Huo, Yuping; Wu, Yuejin; Wang, Xuedong; Lui, Guifu

    1991-07-01

    Ion implantation as a new mutagenic method has been used in the rice breeding program since 1986, and for mutation breeding of other crops later. It has been shown, in principle and in practice, that this method has many outstanding advantages: lower damage rate; higher mutation rate and wider mutational spectrum. Many new lines of rice with higher yield rate; broader disease resistance; shorter growing period but higher quality have been bred from ion beam induced mutants. Some of these lines have been utilized for the intersubspecies hybridization. Several new lines of cotton, wheat and other crops are now in breeding. Some biophysical effects of ion implantation for crop seeds have been studied.

  9. Radiobiological evaluation of low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaup, Courtney James

    Low dose-rate brachytherapy is a radiation therapy treatment for men with prostate cancer. While this treatment is common, the use of isotopes with varying dosimetric characteristics means that the prescription level and normal organ tolerances vary. Additionally, factors such as prostate edema, seed loss and seed migration may alter the dose distribution within the prostate. The goal of this work is to develop a radiobiological response tool based on spatial dose information which may be used to aid in treatment planning, post-implant evaluation and determination of the effects of prostate edema and seed migration. Aim 1: Evaluation of post-implant prostate edema and its dosimetric and biological effects. Aim 2: Incorporation of biological response to simplify post-implant evaluation. Aim 3: Incorporation of biological response to simplify treatment plan comparison. Aim 4: Radiobiologically based comparison of single and dual-isotope implants. Aim 5: Determine the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of seed disappearance and migration.

  10. Evaluation of an automated seed loader for seed calibration in prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Wan, Shuying; Joshi, Chandra P; Carnes, Greg; Schreiner, L John

    2006-01-01

    Automated seed loaders for permanent prostate implants are now commercially available. Besides improved radiation safety, these systems offer seed assay capability and ease of needle loading, making preplanned as well as intra-operative implant procedures more time-efficient. The Isoloader (Mentor Corp., CA) uses individual I125 seeds (SL-125 ProstaSeed) loaded in up to 199 chambers inside a shielded cartridge. The unit performs seed counting and calibration using a builtin solid-state detector. In order to evaluate the reproducibility and accuracy of the calibration process, two test cartridges were measured with the Isoloader itself and compared with a well-type ionization chamber (HDR-1000Plus, Standard Imaging). The air kerma strength measurements for all seeds using the Isoloader had a standard deviation of about 2.7%. For the eight seeds assayed more intensively using both the Isoloader and well chamber, the standard deviations of the measurements for each seed were in the range of 0.8% to 2.8% and 0.6% to 1.3%, respectively. The variation in the Isoloader calibration is attributed to small detector solid angle and bead geometry within seed capsules (verified by radiographs). The reproducibility of the air kerma strength measured by the Isoloader was comparable to that from the well chamber and was clinically acceptable. Seed strength measured with the Isoloader was on average 1% 2% larger than that measured with the well chamber, indicating that the accuracy of the Isoloader was clinically acceptable.

  11. Histrelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... implant (Supprelin LA) is used to treat central precocious puberty (CPP; a condition causing children to enter puberty too soon, resulting in faster than normal bone growth and development of sexual characteristics) in girls ...

  12. Penile Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... placed inside the penis to allow men with erectile dysfunction (ED) to get an erection. Penile implants are ... complications and follow-up care. For most men, erectile dysfunction can be successfully treated with medications or use ...

  13. Cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Connell, Sarah S; Balkany, Thomas J

    2006-08-01

    Cochlear implants are cost-effective auditory prostheses that safely provide a high-quality sensation of hearing to adults who are severely or profoundly deaf. In the past 5 years, progress has been made in hardware and software design, candidate selection, surgical techniques, device programming, education and rehabilitation,and, most importantly, outcomes. Cochlear implantation in the elderly is well tolerated and provides marked improvement in auditory performance and psychosocial functioning.

  14. Contraceptive implants.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding.

  15. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  16. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neha; Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-09-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration.

  17. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration. PMID:27790598

  18. Project SEED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Reports on Project SEED (Summer Educational Experience for the Disadvantaged) a project in which high school students from low-income families work in summer jobs in a variety of academic, industrial, and government research labs. The program introduces the students to career possibilities in chemistry and to the advantages of higher education.…

  19. Dental Implant Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Dental implant surgery Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Dental implant surgery is a procedure that replaces tooth roots with ... look and function much like real ones. Dental implant surgery can offer a welcome alternative to dentures ...

  20. Hip Implant Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Devices Products and Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants Hip Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... devices available with different bearing surfaces. These are: Metal-on-Polyethylene: The ball is made of metal ...

  1. Method of electroplating a conversion electron emitting source on implant

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C [Setauket, NY; Gonzales, Gilbert R [New York, NY; Adzic, Radoslav [East Setauket, NY; Meinken, George E [Middle Island, NY

    2012-02-14

    Methods for preparing an implant coated with a conversion electron emitting source (CEES) are disclosed. The typical method includes cleaning the surface of the implant; placing the implant in an activating solution comprising hydrochloric acid to activate the surface; reducing the surface by H.sub.2 evolution in H.sub.2SO.sub.4 solution; and placing the implant in an electroplating solution that includes ions of the CEES, HCl, H.sub.2SO.sub.4, and resorcinol, gelatin, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, before tin plating, a seed layer is formed on the surface. The electroplated CEES coating can be further protected and stabilized by annealing in a heated oven, by passivation, or by being covered with a protective film. The invention also relates to a holding device for holding an implant, wherein the device selectively prevents electrodeposition on the portions of the implant contacting the device.

  2. Seed Treatment. Bulletin 760.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowery, Harvey C.

    This manual gives a definition of seed treatment, the types of seeds normally treated, diseases and insects commonly associated with seeds, fungicides and insecticides used, types of equipment used for seed treatment, and information on labeling and coloring of treated seed, pesticide carriers, binders, stickers, and safety precautions. (BB)

  3. Seed Treatment. Manual 92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    This training manual provides information needed to meet minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in the seed treatment category. The text discusses pests commonly associated with seeds; seed treatment pesticides; labels; chemicals and seed treatment equipment; requirements of federal and state seed laws;…

  4. [Bilateral cochlear implantation].

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Jona; Migirov, Lela; Taitelbaum-Swead, Rikey; Hildesheimer, Minka

    2010-06-01

    Cochlear implant surgery became the standard of care in hearing rehabilitation of patients with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. This procedure may alter the lives of children and adults enabling them to integrate with the hearing population. In the past, implantation was performed only in one ear, despite the fact that binaural hearing is superior to unilateral, especially in noisy conditions. Cochlear implantation may be performed sequentially or simultaneously. The "sensitive period" of time between hearing loss and implantation and between the two implantations, when performed sequentially, significantly influences the results. Shorter time spans between implantations improve the hearing results after implantation. Hearing success after implantation is highly dependent on the rehabilitation process which includes mapping, implant adjustments and hearing training. Bilateral cochlear implantation in children is recommended as the proposed procedure in spite of the additional financial burden.

  5. [Research progress in peri-implant soft tissue engineering augmentation method].

    PubMed

    Pei, Tingting; Yu, Hongqiang; Wen, Chaoju; Guo, Tianqi; Zhou, Yanmin; Peng, Huimin

    2016-05-01

    The sufficiency of hard and soft tissue at the implant site is the guarantee of long-term function, health and the appearance of implant denture. Problem of soft tissue recession at the implant site has always been bothering dentists. Traditional methods for augmentation of soft tissue such as gingival transplantation have disadvantages of instability of the increased soft-tissue and more trauma. Lately the methods that base on tissue engineering to increase the soft tissue of peri-implant sites have drawn great attention. This review focuses on the current methods of peri-implant restoration through tissue engineering, seed cells, biological scaffolds and cytokines.

  6. Investigating the dosimetric and tumor control consequences of prostate seed loss and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Knaup, Courtney; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Esquivel, Carlos; Stathakis, Sotirios; Swanson, Gregory; Baltas, Dimos; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Low dose-rate brachytherapy is commonly used to treat prostate cancer. However, once implanted, the seeds are vulnerable to loss and movement. The goal of this work is to investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of the types of seed loss and migration commonly seen in prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Five patients were used in this study. For each patient three treatment plans were created using Iodine-125, Palladium-103, and Cesium-131 seeds. The three seeds that were closest to the urethra were identified and modeled as the seeds lost through the urethra. The three seeds closest to the exterior of prostatic capsule were identified and modeled as those lost from the prostate periphery. The seed locations and organ contours were exported from Prowess and used by in-house software to perform the dosimetric and radiobiological evaluation. Seed loss was simulated by simultaneously removing 1, 2, or 3 seeds near the urethra 0, 2, or 4 days after the implant or removing seeds near the exterior of the prostate 14, 21, or 28 days after the implant. Results: Loss of one, two or three seeds through the urethra results in a D{sub 90} reduction of 2%, 5%, and 7% loss, respectively. Due to delayed loss of peripheral seeds, the dosimetric effects are less severe than for loss through the urethra. However, while the dose reduction is modest for multiple lost seeds, the reduction in tumor control probability was minimal. Conclusions: The goal of this work was to investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of the types of seed loss and migration commonly seen in prostate brachytherapy. The results presented show that loss of multiple seeds can cause a substantial reduction of D{sub 90} coverage. However, for the patients in this study the dose reduction was not seen to reduce tumor control probability.

  7. [Biomaterials in cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Stöver, T; Lenarz, T

    2009-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) represent the "gold standard" for the treatment of congenitally deaf children and postlingually deafened adults. Thus, cochlear implantation is a success story of new bionic prosthesis development. Owing to routine application of cochlear implants in adults but also in very young children (below the age of one), high demands are placed on the implants. This is especially true for biocompatibility aspects of surface materials of implant parts which are in contact with the human body. In addition, there are various mechanical requirements which certain components of the implants must fulfil, such as flexibility of the electrode array and mechanical resistance of the implant housing. Due to the close contact of the implant to the middle ear mucosa and because the electrode array is positioned in the perilymphatic space via cochleostomy, there is a potential risk of bacterial transferral along the electrode array into the cochlea. Various requirements that have to be fulfilled by cochlear implants, such as biocompatibility, electrode micromechanics, and although a very high level of technical standards has been carried out there is still demand for the improvement of implants as well as of the materials used for manufacturing, ultimately leading to increased implant performance. General considerations of material aspects related to cochlear implants as well as potential future perspectives of implant development will be discussed.

  8. Breast Implants: Saline vs. Silicone

    MedlinePlus

    ... to women of any age for breast reconstruction. Silicone breast implants Silicone implants are pre-filled with ... likely be inserted at the same time. Ruptured silicone implant If a silicone breast implant ruptures, you ...

  9. Implants for lucky few

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, David

    2011-08-01

    In his article "Vision of beauty" (May pp22-27), Richard Taylor points the way to fractal design for retinal implants and makes an enthusiastic case for incorporating such features into the next generation of such implants.

  10. Equivalent Biochemical Control and Improved Prostate-Specific Antigen Nadir After Permanent Prostate Seed Implant Brachytherapy Versus High-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and High-Dose Conformal Proton Beam Radiotherapy Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbari, Siavash; Weinberg, Vivian K.; Shinohara, Katsuto; Speight, Joycelyn L.; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Hsu, I.-C.; Pickett, Barby; McLaughlin, Patrick W.; Sandler, Howard M.; Roach, Mack

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Permanent prostate implant brachytherapy (PPI), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and conformal proton beam radiotherapy (CPBRT) are used in the treatment of localized prostate cancer, although no head-to-head trials have compared these modalities. We studied the biochemical control (biochemical no evidence of disease [bNED]) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir achieved with contemporary PPI, and evaluated it against 3D-CRT and CPBRT. Patients and Methods: A total of 249 patients were treated with PPI at the University of California, San Francisco, and the outcomes were compared with those from a 3D-CRT cohort and the published results of a high-dose CPBRT boost (CPBRTB) trial. For each comparison, subsets of the PPI cohort were selected with patient and disease criteria similar to those of the reference group. Results: With a median follow-up of 5.3 years, the bNED rate at 5 and 7 years achieved with PPI was 92% and 86%, respectively, using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition, and 93% using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. Using the ASTRO definition, a 5-year bNED rate of 78% was achieved for the 3D-CRT patients compared with 94% for a comparable PPI subset and 93% vs. 92%, respectively, using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. The median PSA nadir for patients treated with PPI and 3D-CRT was 0.10 and 0.40 ng/mL, respectively (p < .0001). For the CPBRT comparison, the 5-year bNED rate after a CPBRTB was 91% using the ASTRO definition vs. 93% for a similar group of PPI patients. A greater proportion of PPI patients achieved a lower PSA nadir compared with those achieved in the CPBRTB trial (PSA nadir <=0.5 ng/mL, 91% vs. 59%, respectively). Conclusion: We have demonstrated excellent outcomes in low- to intermediate-risk patients treated with PPI, suggesting at least equivalent 5-year bNED rates and a greater proportion of men achieving lower PSA nadirs compared with 3D-CRT or

  11. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  12. Evaluation of the dose distribution for prostate implants using various {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources

    SciTech Connect

    Meigooni, Ali S.; Luerman, Christine M.; Sowards, Keith T.

    2009-04-15

    Recently, several different models of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy sources have been introduced in order to meet the increasing demand for prostate seed implants. These sources have different internal structures; hence, their TG-43 dosimetric parameters are not the same. In this study, the effects of the dosimetric differences among the sources on their clinical applications were evaluated. The quantitative and qualitative evaluations were performed by comparisons of dose distributions and dose volume histograms of prostate implants calculated for various designs of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources. These comparisons were made for an identical implant scheme with the same number of seeds for each source. The results were compared with the Amersham model 6711 seed for {sup 125}I and the Theragenics model 200 seed for {sup 103}Pd using the same implant scheme.

  13. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management. PMID:15247993

  14. Repair of Avascular Meniscus Tears with Electrospun Collagen Scaffolds Seeded with Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jihye; Sovani, Sujata; Glembotski, Nicholas E; Du, Jiang; Jin, Sungho; Grogan, Shawn P; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2016-03-01

    The self-healing capacity of an injured meniscus is limited to the vascularized regions and is especially challenging in the inner avascular regions. As such, we investigated the use of human meniscus cell-seeded electrospun (ES) collagen type I scaffolds to produce meniscal tissue and explored whether these cell-seeded scaffolds can be implanted to repair defects created in meniscal avascular tissue explants. Human meniscal cells (derived from vascular and avascular meniscal tissue) were seeded on ES scaffolds and cultured. Constructs were evaluated for cell viability, gene expression, and mechanical properties. To determine potential for repair of meniscal defects, human meniscus avascular cells were seeded and cultured on aligned ES collagen scaffolds for 4 weeks before implantation. Surgical defects resembling "longitudinal tears" were created in the avascular zone of bovine meniscus and implanted with cell-seeded collagen scaffolds and cultured for 3 weeks. Tissue regeneration and integration were evaluated by histology, immunohistochemistry, mechanical testing, and magentic resonance imaging. Ex vivo implantation with cell-seeded collagen scaffolds resulted in neotissue that was significantly better integrated with the native tissue than acellular collagen scaffolds or untreated defects. Human meniscal cell-seeded ES collagen scaffolds may therefore be useful in facilitating meniscal repair of avascular meniscus tears.

  15. 7 CFR 201.18 - Other agricultural seeds (crop seeds).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Other agricultural seeds (crop seeds). 201.18 Section... SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.18 Other agricultural seeds...

  16. Seed Treatment. Sale Publication 4076.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamsley, Mary Ann, Ed.; Vermeire, Donna M., Ed.

    This guide gives information about types of seeds that may require chemical protection against pests, seed treatment pesticide formulations, seed treatment methods, labeling treated seed, and safety and environmental precautions. (Author/BB)

  17. Preservation of recalcitrant seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recalcitrant and intermediate seeds are not included in seed banks because of misperceptions that these efforts would be futile. Between 20 and 25% of the Earth’s angiosperm species are estimated to produce recalcitrant or intermediate seeds. These species are more prevalent in the tropics and sub...

  18. Seed Development and Germination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed is the fertilized and matured ovule of angiosperms and gymnosperms and represents a crucial stage in the life cycle of plants. Seeds of diverse plant species may display differences in size, shape and color. Despite apparent morphological variations, most mature seeds consist of three major com...

  19. Seed Proteomics"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteomic analysis of seeds encounters some specific problems that do not impinge on analyses of other plant cells, tissues, or organs. There are anatomic considerations. Seeds comprise the seed coat, the storage organ(s), and the embryonic axis. Are these to be studied individually or as a compo...

  20. Going to Seed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Richard R.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a unit on seeds designed to introduce students to their scientific and nutritional uses. Unit activities are easily done, employ a variety of process skills, and can be used at various grade levels. Suggests field trips to gather seeds, seed sprouting, and making cookies out of various whole grains. (JM)

  1. Needs of Seeds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2011-01-01

    The "Needs of Seeds" formative assessment probe can be used to find out whether students recognize that seeds have needs both similar to and different from plants and other living organisms (Keeley, Eberle, and Tugel 2007). The probe reveals whether students overgeneralize the needs of seeds by assuming they have the same needs as the adult plants…

  2. [Cochlear implant in adults].

    PubMed

    Bouccara, D; Mosnier, I; Bernardeschi, D; Ferrary, E; Sterkers, O

    2012-03-01

    Cochlear implant in adults is a procedure, dedicated to rehabilitate severe to profound hearing loss. Because of technological progresses and their applications for signal strategies, new devices can improve hearing, even in noise conditions. Binaural stimulation, cochlear implant and hearing aid or bilateral cochlear implants are the best opportunities to access to better level of comprehension in all conditions and space localisation. By now minimally invasive surgery is possible to preserve residual hearing and use a double stimulation modality for the same ear: electrical for high frequencies and acoustic for low frequencies. In several conditions, cochlear implant is not possible due to cochlear nerve tumour or major malformations of the inner ear. In these cases, a brainstem implantation can be considered. Clinical data demonstrate that improvement in daily communication, for both cochlear and brainstem implants, is correlated with cerebral activation of auditory cortex.

  3. Implant treatment planning considerations.

    PubMed

    Kao, Richard T

    2008-04-01

    As dental implants become a more accepted treatment modality, there is a need for all parties involved with implant dentistry to be familiar with various treatment planning issues. Though the success can be highly rewarding, failure to forecast treatment planning issues can result in an increase of surgical needs, surgical cost, and even case failure. In this issue, the focus is on implant treatment planning considerations.

  4. Osseointegrated implant prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Rogoff, G S

    1992-06-01

    This review covers recent literature on prosthodontic aspects of osseointegrated implants. Long-term prognosis, diagnosis and treatment planning, and clinical impression techniques and fabrication technology are discussed.

  5. The seed nuclear proteome.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Ombretta; Rogniaux, Hélène; Larré, Colette; Thompson, Richard; Gallardo, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory networks coordinating seed development will help to manipulate seed traits, such as protein content and seed weight, in order to increase yield and seed nutritional value of important food crops, such as legumes. Because of the cardinal role of the nucleus in gene expression, sub-proteome analyses of nuclei from developing seeds were conducted, taking advantage of the sequences available for model species. In this review, we discuss the strategies used to separate and identify the nuclear proteins at a stage when the seed is preparing for reserve accumulation. We present how these data provide an insight into the complexity and distinctive features of the seed nuclear proteome. We discuss the presence of chromatin-modifying enzymes and proteins that have roles in RNA-directed DNA methylation and which may be involved in modifying genome architecture in preparation for seed filling. Specific features of the seed nuclei at the transition between the stage of cell divisions and that of cell expansion and reserve deposition are described here which may help to manipulate seed quality traits, such as seed weight.

  6. Characterization and optimization of cell seeding in scaffolds by factorial design: quality by design approach for skeletal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yantian; Bloemen, Veerle; Impens, Saartje; Moesen, Maarten; Luyten, Frank P; Schrooten, Jan

    2011-12-01

    Cell seeding into scaffolds plays a crucial role in the development of efficient bone tissue engineering constructs. Hence, it becomes imperative to identify the key factors that quantitatively predict reproducible and efficient seeding protocols. In this study, the optimization of a cell seeding process was investigated using design of experiments (DOE) statistical methods. Five seeding factors (cell type, scaffold type, seeding volume, seeding density, and seeding time) were selected and investigated by means of two response parameters, critically related to the cell seeding process: cell seeding efficiency (CSE) and cell-specific viability (CSV). In addition, cell spatial distribution (CSD) was analyzed by Live/Dead staining assays. Analysis identified a number of statistically significant main factor effects and interactions. Among the five seeding factors, only seeding volume and seeding time significantly affected CSE and CSV. Also, cell and scaffold type were involved in the interactions with other seeding factors. Within the investigated ranges, optimal conditions in terms of CSV and CSD were obtained when seeding cells in a regular scaffold with an excess of medium. The results of this case study contribute to a better understanding and definition of optimal process parameters for cell seeding. A DOE strategy can identify and optimize critical process variables to reduce the variability and assists in determining which variables should be carefully controlled during good manufacturing practice production to enable a clinically relevant implant.

  7. [Intraoperative and post-implant dosimetry in patients treated with permanent prostate implant brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Herein, András; Ágoston, Péter; Szabó, Zoltán; Jorgo, Kliton; Markgruber, Balázs; Pesznyák, Csilla; Polgár, Csaba; Major, Tibor

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of our work was to compare intraoperative and four-week post-implant dosimetry for loose and stranded seed implants for permanent prostate implant brachytherapy. In our institute low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy is performed with encapsulated I-125 isotopes (seeds) using transrectal ultrasound guidance and metal needles. The SPOT PRO 3.1 (Elekta, Sweden) system is used for treatment planning. In this study the first 79 patients were treated with loose seed (LS) technique, the consecutive patients were treated with stranded seed (SS) technique. During intraoperative planning the dose constraints were the same for both techniques. All LSs were placed inside the prostate capsule, while with SS a 2 mm margin around the prostate was allowed for seed positioning. The prescribed dose for the prostate was 145 Gy. This study investigated prostate dose coverage in 30-30 randomly selected patients with LS and SS. Four weeks after the implantation native CT and MRI were done and CT/MRI image fusion was performed. The target was contoured on MRI and the plan was prepared on CT data. To assess the treatment plan dose-volume histograms were used. For the target coverage V100, V90, D90, D100, for the dose inhomogeneity V150, V200, and the dose-homogeneity index (DHI), for dose conformality the conformal index (COIN) were calculated. Intraoperative and postimplant plans were compared. The mean V100 values decreased at four-week plan for SS (97% vs. 84%) and for LS (96% vs. 80%) technique, as well. Decrease was observed for all parameters except for the DHI value. The DHI increased for SS (0.38 vs. 0.41) and for LS (0.38 vs. 0.47) technique, as well. The COIN decreased for both techniques at four-week plan (SS: 0.63 vs. 0.57; LS: 0.67 vs. 0.50). All differences were significant except for the DHI value at SS technique. The percentage changes were not significant, except the COIN value. The dose coverage of the target decreased significantly at four-week plans

  8. Localization of linked {sup 125}I seeds in postimplant TRUS images for prostate brachytherapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Jinyu . E-mail: Jinyu.Xue@mail.tju.edu; Waterman, Frank; Handler, Jay; Gressen, Eric

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that {sup 125}I seeds can be localized in transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images obtained with a high-resolution probe when the implant is performed with linked seeds and spacers. Adequate seed localization is essential to the implementation of TRUS-based intraoperative dosimetry for prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirteen preplanned peripherally loaded prostate implants were performed using {sup 125}I seeds and spacers linked together in linear arrays that prevent seed migration and maintain precise seed spacing. A set of two-dimensional transverse images spaced at 0.50-cm intervals were obtained with a high-resolution TRUS probe at the conclusion of the procedure with the patient still under anesthesia. The image set extended from 1.0 cm superior to the base to 1.0 cm inferior to the apex. The visible echoes along each needle track were first localized and then compared with the known construction of the implanted array. The first step was to define the distal and proximal ends of each array. The visible echoes were then identified as seeds or spacers from the known sequence of the array. The locations of the seeds that did not produce a visible echo were interpolated from their known position in the array. A CT scan was obtained after implantation for comparison with the TRUS images. Results: On average, 93% (range, 86-99%) of the seeds were visible in the TRUS images. However, it was possible to localize 100% of the seeds in each case, because the locations of the missing seeds could be determined from the known construction of the arrays. Two factors complicated the interpretation of the TRUS images. One was that the spacers also produced echoes. Although weak and diffuse, these echoes could be mistaken for seeds. The other was that the number of echoes along a needle track sometimes exceeded the number of seeds and spacers implanted. This was attributed to the overall length of the array, which was approximately 0.5 cm

  9. Fast radioactive seed localization in intraoperative cone beam CT for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yu-chi; Xiong, Jian-ping; Cohan, Gilad; Zaider, Marco; Mageras, Gig; Zelefsky, Michael

    2013-03-01

    A fast knowledge-based radioactive seed localization method for brachytherapy was developed to automatically localize radioactive seeds in an intraoperative volumetric cone beam CT (CBCT) so that corrections, if needed, can be made during prostate implant surgery. A transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) scan is acquired for intraoperative treatment planning. Planned seed positions are transferred to intraoperative CBCT following TRUS-to-CBCT registration using a reference CBCT scan of the TRUS probe as a template, in which the probe and its external fiducial markers are pre-segmented and their positions in TRUS are known. The transferred planned seeds and probe serve as an atlas to reduce the search space in CBCT. Candidate seed voxels are identified based on image intensity. Regions are grown from candidate voxels and overlay regions are merged. Region volume and intensity variance is checked against known seed volume and intensity profile. Regions meeting the above criteria are flagged as detected seeds; otherwise they are flagged as likely seeds and sorted by a score that is based on volume, intensity profile and distance to the closest planned seed. A graphical interface allows users to review and accept or reject likely seeds. Likely seeds with approximately twice the seed volume are automatically split. Five clinical cases are tested. Without any manual correction in seed detection, the method performed the localization in 5 seconds (excluding registration time) for a CBCT scan with 512×512×192 voxels. The average precision rate per case is 99% and the recall rate is 96% for a total of 416 seeds. All false negative seeds are found with 15 in likely seeds and 1 included in a detected seed. With the new method, updating of calculations of dose distribution during the procedure is possible and thus facilitating evaluation and improvement of treatment quality.

  10. Teeth and implants.

    PubMed

    Palmer, R

    1999-08-28

    An osseointegrated implant restoration may closely resemble a natural tooth. However, the absence of a periodontal ligament and connective tissue attachment via cementum, results in fundamental differences in the adaptation of the implant to occlusal forces, and the structure of the gingival cuff.

  11. A no bleed implant.

    PubMed

    Ersek, R A; Navarro, J A; Nemeth, D Z; Sas, G

    1993-01-01

    Breast implants have evolved from the original saline-filled, smooth-surfaced silicone rubber bag to silicone gel-filled smooth-walled sacs to a combination of a silicone gel-filled bag within a saline-filled sac, and, most recently, a reversed, double-lumen implant with a saline bag inside of a gel-filled bag. Texture-surfaced implants were first used in 1970 when the standard silicone gel-filled implant was covered with a polyurethane foam. Because of concerns about the degradation products of this foam, they were removed from the market in 1991. In 1975 double-lumen silicone textured implants were developed, followed by silicone gel-filled textured implants. In 1990 a new radiolucent, biocompatible gel was produced that reduced the problem of radioopacity of silicone implants. Because of the gel's sufficiently low coefficient of friction, leakage caused by fold flaw fracture may also be decreased. We present a case where this new biocompatible gel implant was repositioned after four months. The resulting scar capsule in this soft breast was thin [< 0.002 cm (0.008 in.)] and evenly textured as a mirror image of the textured silicone surface. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray defraction spectrophotometry revealed no silicone bleed.

  12. Smoking and dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kasat, V.; Ladda, R.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is a prevalent behaviour in the population. The aim of this review is to bring to light the effects of smoking on dental implants. These facts will assist dental professionals when implants are planned in tobacco users. A search of “PubMed” was made with the key words “dental implant,” “nicotine,” “smoking,” “tobacco,” and “osseointegration.” Also, publications on tobacco control by the Government of India were considered. For review, only those articles published from 1988 onward in English language were selected. Smoking has its influence on general as well as oral health of an individual. Tobacco negatively affects the outcome of almost all therapeutic procedures performed in the oral cavity. The failure rate of implant osseointegration is considerably higher among smokers, and maintenance of oral hygiene around the implants and the risk of peri-implantitis are adversely affected by smoking. To increase implant survival in smokers, various protocols have been recommended. Although osseointegrated dental implants have become the state of the art for tooth replacement, they are not without limitations or complications. In this litigious era, it is extremely important that the practitioner clearly understands and is able and willing to convey the spectrum of possible complications and their frequency to the patients. PMID:24478965

  13. Batteryless implanted echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    Miniature ultrasonic echosonometer implanted within laboratory animals obtains energy from RF power oscillator that is electronically transduced via induction loop to power receiving loop located just under animal's skin. Method of powering device offers significant advantages over those in which battery is part of implanted package.

  14. Implantable CMOS Biomedical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Jun; Tokuda, Takashi; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Noda, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    The results of recent research on our implantable CMOS biomedical devices are reviewed. Topics include retinal prosthesis devices and deep-brain implantation devices for small animals. Fundamental device structures and characteristics as well as in vivo experiments are presented. PMID:22291554

  15. Implantable, Ingestible Electronic Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard

    1987-01-01

    Small quartz-crystal-controlled oscillator swallowed or surgically implanted provides continuous monitoring of patient's internal temperature. Receiver placed near patient measures oscillator frequency, and temperature inferred from previously determined variation of frequency with temperature. Frequency of crystal-controlled oscillator varies with temperature. Circuit made very small and implanted or ingested to measure internal body temperature.

  16. Percutaneous and skeletal biocarbon implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, V.

    1977-01-01

    Review of carbon implants developed by NASA discussed four different types of implants and subsequent improvements. Improvements could be of specific interest to rehabilitation centers and similar organizations.

  17. Graphene for Biomedical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas; Podila, Ramakrishna; Alexis, Frank; Rao, Apparao; Clemson Bioengineering Team; Clemson Physics Team

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we used graphene, a one-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms, to modify the surfaces of existing implant materials to enhance both bio- and hemo-compatibility. This novel effort meets all functional criteria for a biomedical implant coating as it is chemically inert, atomically smooth and highly durable, with the potential for greatly enhancing the effectiveness of such implants. Specifically, graphene coatings on nitinol, a widely used implant and stent material, showed that graphene coated nitinol (Gr-NiTi) supports excellent smooth muscle and endothelial cell growth leading to better cell proliferation. We further determined that the serum albumin adsorption on Gr-NiTi is greater than that of fibrinogen, an important and well understood criterion for promoting a lower thrombosis rate. These hemo-and biocompatible properties and associated charge transfer mechanisms, along with high strength, chemical inertness and durability give graphene an edge over most antithrombogenic coatings for biomedical implants and devices.

  18. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds with transurethral light delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel approach to photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds utilizing an existing urinary catheter for transurethral light delivery. Two canine prostates were surgically implanted with brachyther- apy seeds under transrectal ultrasound guidance. One prostate was excised shortly after euthanasia and fixed in gelatin. The second prostate was imaged in the native tissue environment shortly after euthanasia. A urinary catheter was inserted in the urethra of each prostate. A 1-mm core diameter optical fiber coupled to a 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser was inserted into the urinary catheter. Light from the fiber was either directed mostly parallel to the fiber axis (i.e. end-fire fire) or mostly 90° to the fiber axis (i.e. side-fire fiber). An Ultrasonix SonixTouch scanner, transrectal ultrasound probe with curvilinear (BPC8-4) and linear (BPL9-5) arrays, and DAQ unit were utilized for synchronized laser light emission and photoacoustic signal acquisition. The implanted brachytherapy seeds were visualized at radial distances of 6-16 mm from the catheter. Multiple brachytherapy seeds were si- multaneously visualized with each array of the transrectal probe using both delay-and-sum (DAS) and short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamforming. This work is the first to demonstrate the feasibility of photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds using a transurethral light delivery method.

  19. Multi-institutional retrospective analysis of learning curves on dosimetry and operation time before and after introduction of intraoperatively built custom-linked seeds in prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Satoh, Takefumi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Saito, Shiro; Kataoka, Masaaki; Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Nakamura, Ryuji; Tanji, Susumu; Masui, Koji; Okihara, Koji; Ohashi, Toshio; Momma, Tetsuo; Aoki, Manabu; Miki, Kenta; Kato, Masako; Morita, Masashi; Katayama, Norihisa; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kawanaka, Takashi; Fukumori, Tomoharu; Ito, Fumitaka; Shiroki, Ryoichi; Baba, Yuji; Inadome, Akito; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Takayama, Hitoshi; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2016-01-01

    This multi-institutional retrospective analysis examined learning curves for dosimetric parameters and operation time after introduction of intraoperatively built custom-linked (IBCL) seeds. Data from consecutive patients treated with seed implantation before and after introduction of IBCL seeds (loose seed, n = 428; IBCL seed, n = 426) were collected from 13 centers. Dose-volume histogram parameters, operation times, and seed migration rates were compared before and after introduction of IBCL seeds. At the 1-month CT analysis, no significant differences were seen in dose to 90% of prostate volume between before and after IBCL seed introduction. No learning curve for dosimetry was seen. Prostate and rectal volume receiving at least 150% of prescription dose (V150 and RV150) were higher in the loose-seed group than in the IBCL-seed group. Operation time was extended by up to 10 min when IBCL seeds were used, although there was a short learning curve of about five patients. The percentage of patients with seed migration in the IBCL-seed group was one-tenth that in the loose-seed group. Our study revealed no dosimetric demerits, no learning curve for dosimetry, and a slightly extended operation time for IBCL seeds. A significant reduction in the rate of seed migration was identified in the IBCL-seed group.

  20. A role for seed storage proteins in Arabidopsis seed longevity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thu-Phuong; Cueff, Gwendal; Hegedus, Dwayne D; Rajjou, Loïc; Bentsink, Leónie

    2015-10-01

    Proteomics approaches have been a useful tool for determining the biological roles and functions of individual proteins and identifying the molecular mechanisms that govern seed germination, vigour and viability in response to ageing. In this work the dry seed proteome of four Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes, that carry introgression fragments at the position of seed longevity quantitative trait loci and as a result display different levels of seed longevity, was investigated. Seeds at two physiological states, after-ripened seeds that had the full germination ability and aged (stored) seeds of which the germination ability was severely reduced, were compared. Aged dry seed proteomes were markedly different from the after-ripened and reflected the seed longevity level of the four genotypes, despite the fact that dry seeds are metabolically quiescent. Results confirmed the role of antioxidant systems, notably vitamin E, and indicated that protection and maintenance of the translation machinery and energy pathways are essential for seed longevity. Moreover, a new role for seed storage proteins (SSPs) was identified in dry seeds during ageing. Cruciferins (CRUs) are the most abundant SSPs in Arabidopsis and seeds of a triple mutant for three CRU isoforms (crua crub cruc) were more sensitive to artificial ageing and their seed proteins were highly oxidized compared with wild-type seeds. These results confirm that oxidation is involved in seed deterioration and that SSPs buffer the seed from oxidative stress, thus protecting important proteins required for seed germination and seedling formation.

  1. A role for seed storage proteins in Arabidopsis seed longevity

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thu-Phuong; Cueff, Gwendal; Hegedus, Dwayne D; Rajjou, Loïc; Bentsink, Leónie

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics approaches have been a useful tool for determining the biological roles and functions of individual proteins and identifying the molecular mechanisms that govern seed germination, vigour and viability in response to ageing. In this work the dry seed proteome of four Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes, that carry introgression fragments at the position of seed longevity quantitative trait loci and as a result display different levels of seed longevity, was investigated. Seeds at two physiological states, after-ripened seeds that had the full germination ability and aged (stored) seeds of which the germination ability was severely reduced, were compared. Aged dry seed proteomes were markedly different from the after-ripened and reflected the seed longevity level of the four genotypes, despite the fact that dry seeds are metabolically quiescent. Results confirmed the role of antioxidant systems, notably vitamin E, and indicated that protection and maintenance of the translation machinery and energy pathways are essential for seed longevity. Moreover, a new role for seed storage proteins (SSPs) was identified in dry seeds during ageing. Cruciferins (CRUs) are the most abundant SSPs in Arabidopsis and seeds of a triple mutant for three CRU isoforms (crua crub cruc) were more sensitive to artificial ageing and their seed proteins were highly oxidized compared with wild-type seeds. These results confirm that oxidation is involved in seed deterioration and that SSPs buffer the seed from oxidative stress, thus protecting important proteins required for seed germination and seedling formation. PMID:26184996

  2. Crystallization on prestructured seeds.

    PubMed

    Jungblut, Swetlana; Dellago, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The crystallization transition of an undercooled monodisperse Lennard-Jones fluid in the presence of small prestructured seeds is studied with transition path sampling combined with molecular dynamics simulations. Compared to the homogeneous crystallization, clusters of a few particles arranged into a face- and body-centered cubic structure enhance the crystallization, while icosahedrally ordered seeds do not change the reaction rate. We identify two distinct nucleation regimes-close to the seed and in the bulk. Crystallites form close to the face- and body-centered structures and tend to stay away from the icosahedrally ordered seeds.

  3. Single implant tooth replacement.

    PubMed

    Briley, T F

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that direct bone anchorage of dental implants will provide long-term predictability for single tooth implants and multi-unit implants. The function of implant-supported restoration is now routinely achieved. The real challenge facing the restorative dentist and laboratory technician is to achieve optimal aesthetics. The learning objective of this article is to review the prosthodontic procedures essential to maximizing natural aesthetics in implant supported restorations. It will provide a review of master impression techniques, prepable titanium abutments and designing the cement on restoration. Particular emphasis is directed to the soft tissue model from which a series of sequenced techniques can be followed to achieve optimal aesthetics. Analysis of the implant alignment with regard to the neighboring teeth will result in having to make a choice of which prepable abutment will maximize the aesthetic result. The following case outlines how to replace a single missing tooth using an externally hexed implant system and a prefabricated titanium abutment on a 26-year-old male patient.

  4. Boron implanted strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. J. M.

    Single crystals of strontium titanate implanted with boron were found to have highly conductive surface layers. The effects of varying dose from 10 to the 16th power to 10 to the 17th power ions/sq cm, implantation voltage from 50 to 175 keV and annealing conditions on the room temperature surface resistance and Hall mobility are presented. Variation of the implantation voltage did not have a major effect on the sheet resistances obtained by boron implantation of strontium titanate, while dose and annealing conditions have major effects. Doses of 5 x 10 to the 16th power ions/sq cm required annealing on the order of one hour at 500 K for maximum reduction of the room temperature resistance in the implanted layer. Samples implanted with a dose of 1 x 10 to the 17th power ions/sq cm required slightly higher temperatures (approximately 575 K) to obtain a minimum resistance at room temperature. Long term (several weeks) room temperature annealing was found to occur in high dose samples. After one to two months at room temperature followed by an anneal to 575 K, the surface resistances were found to be lower than those produced by the annealing of a freshly implanted sample to 575 K.

  5. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  6. Accomplishments of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Seed Money program

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1986-09-01

    In 1974, a modest program for funding new, innovative research was initiated at ORNL. It was called the "Seed Money" program and has become part of a larger program, called Exploratory R and D, which is being carried out at all DOE national laboratories. This report highlights 12 accomplishments of the Seed Money Program: nickel aluminide, ion implantation, laser annealing, burn meter, Legionnaires' disease, whole-body radiation counter, the ANFLOW system, genetics and molecular biology, high-voltage equipment, microcalorimeter, positron probe, and atom science. (DLC)

  7. Accomplishments of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Seed Money program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    In 1974, a modest program for funding new, innovative research was initiated at ORNL. It was called the ''Seed Money'' program and has become part of a larger program, called Exploratory R and D, which is being carried out at all DOE national laboratories. This report highlights 12 accomplishments of the Seed Money Program: nickel aluminide, ion implantation, laser annealing, burn meter, Legionnaires' disease, whole-body radiation counter, the ANFLOW system, genetics and molecular biology, high-voltage equipment, microcalorimeter, positron probe, and atom science. (DLC)

  8. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  9. Biomedical implantable microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Meindl, J D

    1980-10-17

    Innovative applications of microelectronics in new biomedical implantable instruments offer a singular opportunity for advances in medical research and practice because of two salient factors: (i) beyond all other types of biomedical instruments, implants exploit fully the inherent technical advantages--complex functional capability, high reliability, lower power drain, small size and weight-of microelectronics, and (ii) implants bring microelectronics into intimate association with biological systems. The combination of these two factors enables otherwise impossible new experiments to be conducted and new paostheses developed that will improve the quality of human life.

  10. In vivo evaluation of bone deposition in macroporous titanium implants loaded with mesenchymal stem cells and strontium-enriched hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Lovati, Arianna B; Lopa, Silvia; Talò, Giuseppe; Previdi, Sara; Recordati, Camilla; Mercuri, David; Segatti, Francesco; Zagra, Luigi; Moretti, Matteo

    2015-02-01

    Bone-implant integration represents a major requirement to grant implant stability and reduce the risk of implant loosening. This study investigates the effect of progenitor cells and strontium-enriched hydrogel on the osseointegration of titanium implants. To mimic implant-bone interaction, an ectopic model was developed grafting Trabecular Titanium(™) (TT) implants into decellularized bone seeded with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). TT was loaded or not with strontium-enriched amidated carboxymethylcellulose (CMCA) hydrogel and/or hBMSCs. Constructs were implanted subcutaneously in athymic mice and osteodeposition was investigated with microcomputed tomography (micro-CT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and pull-out test at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Fluorescence imaging was performed at 8 and 12 weeks, histology at 4 and 8 weeks. Micro-CT demonstrated the homogeneity of the engineered bone in all groups, supporting the reproducibility of the ectopic model. Fluorescence imaging, histology, SEM and pull-out mechanical testing showed superior tissue ingrowth in TT implants loaded with both strontium-enriched CMCA and hBMSCs. In our model, the synergic action of the bioactive hydrogel and hBMSCs increased both the bone deposition and TT integration. Thus, we suggest that using orthopedic prosthetic implant preloaded with strontium-enriched CMCA and seeded with BMSCs could represent a valid single-step surgical strategy to improve implant osseointegration.

  11. A quick SEED tutorial

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, Adam; Evans, John R.

    2015-01-01

    A number of different government-funded seismic data centers offer free open-access data (e.g., U.S. Geological Survey, National Earthquake Information Center, the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS), and Data Management System), which can be freely downloaded and shared among different members of the community (Lay, 2009). To efficiently share data, it is important that different data providers follow a common format. The Standard for the Exchange of Earthquake Data (SEED) provides one such format for storing seismic and other geophysical data. The SEED format is widely used in earthquake seismology; however, SEED and its structure can be difficult for many first-time users (ourselves included). Below is a quick tutorial that outlines the basic structure of SEED format. This write-up is in no way intended to replace the comprehensive SEED manual (Ahern et al., 2009), and instead of going into the details of any specific part of the SEED format we refer the reader to the manual for additional details. The goal of this write-up is to succinctly explain the basic structure of SEED format as well as the associated jargon, as most commonly used now, in a colloquial way so that novice users of SEED can become more familiar with the format and its application quickly. Our goal is to give the reader the necessary background so that when problems or questions about SEED format arise they will have some understanding of where they should look for more details or from where the problem might be stemming. As a secondary goal, we hope to help the reader become familiar with the SEED manual (Ahern et al., 2009), which contains detailed information about all aspects of the SEED format.

  12. Needle track seeding after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma: prevalence, impact, and management challenge

    PubMed Central

    Francica, Giampiero

    2017-01-01

    Neoplastic seeding may arise after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A low risk of seeding after RFA (0–1.1%) has been reported, which may rise up to 2.5% if ablation followed diagnostic biopsy. Needle track seeding presents with one or multiple rounded nodules along the needle track located within the peritoneum, along the abdominal muscles, which were penetrated by the needle, pleural surface, or in the subcutaneous and cutaneous tissues. The most widely used method for the assessment of seeding nodules is ultrasound (US), which usually displays hypoechoic nodules with intralesional vascularization. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of the nodule suspicious for malignant implant is mandatory to confirm the diagnosis and plan therapy. Wide surgical excision is the treatment of choice for neoplastic seeding. Thanks to early diagnosis and prompt treatment, development of needle track seeding is not likely to affect the long-term survival of patients. PMID:28176952

  13. Novel Silicone-Coated 125I Seeds for the Treatment of Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lizhou; Guo, Lili; Zhang, Weixing; Cai, Xiaobo; Chen, Dafan; Wan, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    125I seeds coated with titanium are considered a safe and effective interstitial brachytherapy for tumors, while the cost of 125I seeds is a major problem for the patients implanting lots of seeds. The aim of this paper was to develop a novel silicone coating for 125I seeds with a lower cost. In order to show the radionuclide utilization ratio, the silicone was coated onto the seeds using the electro-spinning method and the radioactivity was evaluated, then the anti-tumor efficacy of silicone 125I seeds was compared with titanium 125I seeds. The seeds were divided into four groups: A (control), B (pure silicone), C (silicone 125I), D (titanium 125I) at 2 Gy or 4 Gy. Their anti-tumour activity and mechanism were assessed in vitro and in vivo using a human extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell line FRH-0201 and tumor-bearing BALB/c nude mice. The silicone 125I seeds showed higher radioactivity; the rate of cell apoptosis in vitro and the histopathology in vivo demonstrated that the silicone 125I seeds shared similar anti-tumor efficacy with the titanium 125I seeds for the treatment of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, while they have a much lower cost.

  14. Novel Silicone-Coated 125I Seeds for the Treatment of Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weixing; Cai, Xiaobo; Chen, Dafan; Wan, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    125I seeds coated with titanium are considered a safe and effective interstitial brachytherapy for tumors, while the cost of 125I seeds is a major problem for the patients implanting lots of seeds. The aim of this paper was to develop a novel silicone coating for 125I seeds with a lower cost. In order to show the radionuclide utilization ratio, the silicone was coated onto the seeds using the electro-spinning method and the radioactivity was evaluated, then the anti-tumor efficacy of silicone 125I seeds was compared with titanium 125I seeds. The seeds were divided into four groups: A (control), B (pure silicone), C (silicone 125I), D (titanium 125I) at 2 Gy or 4 Gy. Their anti-tumour activity and mechanism were assessed in vitro and in vivo using a human extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell line FRH-0201 and tumor-bearing BALB/c nude mice. The silicone 125I seeds showed higher radioactivity; the rate of cell apoptosis in vitro and the histopathology in vivo demonstrated that the silicone 125I seeds shared similar anti-tumor efficacy with the titanium 125I seeds for the treatment of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, while they have a much lower cost. PMID:26840346

  15. Examining Children's Models of Seed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewell, Natalie

    2002-01-01

    Reports research that examines children's models of seed. Explores the conceptions held by children (N=75) of germination and seed formation. Concludes that children hold a restricted meaning for the term 'seed'. (DDR)

  16. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator

    MedlinePlus

    ... ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23265327 . Swerdlow CD, Wang PJ, Zipes DP. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. ... and lifestyle Controlling your high blood pressure Dietary fats explained Fast food tips Heart attack - discharge Heart ...

  17. Biocompatibility of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaelble, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Method of selecting biocompatible materials for surgical implants uses fracture mechanic relationships and surface energies of candidate materials in presence of blood plasma. Technique has been used to characterize 190 materials by parameters that reflect their biocompatibility.

  18. Risks of Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... has traveled to other parts of the body. Connective Tissue Disease The FDA has not detected any association between silicone gel-filled breast implants and connective tissue disease, breast cancer, or reproductive problems. In order ...

  19. Breast Reconstruction with Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... removes your breast to treat or prevent breast cancer. One type of breast reconstruction uses breast implants — silicone devices filled with silicone gel or salt water (saline) — to reshape your breasts. Breast reconstruction ...

  20. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    Intrinsic sphincter deficiency repair; ISD repair; Injectable bulking agents for stress urinary incontinence ... Urine leakage that gets worse Pain where the injection was done Allergic reaction to the material Implant ...

  1. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... cosmetic surgery after breast cancer can improve your sense of well-being and your quality of life. Alternative Names Breast implants surgery References Roehl KR, Wilhelmi BJ, Phillips LG. Breast reconstruction. ...

  2. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  3. GROWING SEEDS, TEACHER'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elementary Science Study, Newton, MA.

    THIS TEACHER'S GUIDE IS DESIGNED FOR USE WITH AN ELEMENTARY SCIENCE STUDY UNIT, "GROWING SEEDS," IN WHICH SUCH BASIC SCIENCE SKILLS AND PROCESSES AS MEASUREMENT, OBSERVATION, AND HYPOTHESIS FORMATION ARE INTRODUCED THROUGH STUDENT ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SEEDS, GERMINATION, AND SEEDLING GROWTH. THE MATERIALS WERE DEVELOPED FOR USE IN…

  4. [Quality classification criteria of Paeonia suffruticosa seeds].

    PubMed

    Cao, Ya-yue; Zhu, Zai-biao; Guo, Qiao-sheng; Liu, Li; Wang, Chang-lin

    2015-02-01

    In order to establish the quality classification criteria of Paeonia suffruticosa seeds, thirty-one batches of P. suffruticosa seeds from different provenances were selected. The seed rooting rate, seed germination rate, seed purity, seed viability, 1,000-seed weight and moisture content were determined and analyzed through SPSS 20.0 software. Seed rooting rate, seed germination rate and seed purity were selected as the main index for classification, while 1,000-seed weight, seed viability and moisture content could be used as important references. The seed quality grading of P. suffruticosa was set as three grades. The seed quality of each grade should meet following requirements: For the first grade seeds, seed rooting rate ≥ 80%, seed germination rate ≥ 80%, seed purity ≥ 90%, seed viability ≥ 80%, 1,000-seed weight ≥ 250 g, moisture content, ≤ 10. For the second grade seeds, seed rooting rate ≥ 50%, seed germination rate ≥ 60%, seed purity ≥ 70%, seed viability ≥ 75%, 1,000-seed weight ≥ 225 g, moisture content ≤ 10. For the third grade seeds, seed rooting rate ≥ 20%, seed germination rate ≥ 45%, seed purity ≥ 60%, seed viability ≥ 45%, 1,000-seed weight ≥ 205 g, moisture content ≤ 10. The quality classification criteria of P. suffruticosa seeds have been initially established.

  5. Seed germination and vigor.

    PubMed

    Rajjou, Loïc; Duval, Manuel; Gallardo, Karine; Catusse, Julie; Bally, Julia; Job, Claudette; Job, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Germination vigor is driven by the ability of the plant embryo, embedded within the seed, to resume its metabolic activity in a coordinated and sequential manner. Studies using "-omics" approaches support the finding that a main contributor of seed germination success is the quality of the messenger RNAs stored during embryo maturation on the mother plant. In addition, proteostasis and DNA integrity play a major role in the germination phenotype. Because of its pivotal role in cell metabolism and its close relationships with hormone signaling pathways regulating seed germination, the sulfur amino acid metabolism pathway represents a key biochemical determinant of the commitment of the seed to initiate its development toward germination. This review highlights that germination vigor depends on multiple biochemical and molecular variables. Their characterization is expected to deliver new markers of seed quality that can be used in breeding programs and/or in biotechnological approaches to improve crop yields.

  6. The earliest seeds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillespie, W.H.; Rothwell, G.W.; Scheckler, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    Lagenostomalean-type seeds in bifurcating cupule systems have been discovered in the late Devonian Hampshire Formation of Randolph County, West Virginia, USA (Fig. 1). The associated megaflora, plants from coal balls, and vertebrate and invertebrate faunas demonstrate that the material is Famennian; the microflora indicates a more specific Fa2c age. Consequently, these seeds predate Archaeosperma arnoldii1 from the Fa2d of northeastern Pennsylvania, the oldest previously reported seed. By applying precision fracture, transfer, de??gagement, and thin-section techniques to selected cupules from the more than 100 specimens on hand, we have determined the three-dimensional morphology and histology of the seeds (Fig. 2a-h, k) and cupule systems. A comparison with known late Devonian to early Carboniferous seeds reveals that ours are more primitively organized than all except Genomosperma2,3. ?? 1981 Nature Publishing Group.

  7. Simple Implant Augmentation Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Anh H.; Bartlett, Erica L.; Kania, Katarzyna; Bae, Sang Mo

    2015-01-01

    Augmentation rhinoplasty among Asian patients is often performed to improve the height of the nasal dorsum. As the use of autogenous tissues poses certain limitations, alloplastic materials are a viable alternative with a long history of use in Asia. The superiority of one implant prosthesis over another for augmentation rhinoplasty is a matter of debate, with each material representing varying strengths and weaknesses, indications for use, and precautions to consider in nasal implant placement. An implant prosthesis should be used on a case-by-case basis. Augmentation rhinoplasty requires the consideration of specific anatomical preoperative factors, including the external nose, nasal length, nasofrontal angle, humps, and facial proportions. It is equally important to consider several operative guidelines to appropriately shape implants to minimize the occurrence of adverse effects and postoperative complications. The most common postoperative complications include infection, nasal height change, movement of implant prosthesis, and silicone implant protrusion. In addition, the surgeon should consider the current standards of Asian beauty aesthetics to better understand the patient's desired outcome. PMID:26648804

  8. Biomaterials in cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The cochlear implant (CI) represents, for almost 25 years now, the gold standard in the treatment of children born deaf and for postlingually deafened adults. These devices thus constitute the greatest success story in the field of ‘neurobionic’ prostheses. Their (now routine) fitting in adults, and especially in young children and even babies, places exacting demands on these implants, particularly with regard to the biocompatibility of a CI’s surface components. Furthermore, certain parts of the implant face considerable mechanical challenges, such as the need for the electrode array to be flexible and resistant to breakage, and for the implant casing to be able to withstand external forces. As these implants are in the immediate vicinity of the middle-ear mucosa and of the junction to the perilymph of the cochlea, the risk exists – at least in principle – that bacteria may spread along the electrode array into the cochlea. The wide-ranging requirements made of the CI in terms of biocompatibility and the electrode mechanism mean that there is still further scope – despite the fact that CIs are already technically highly sophisticated – for ongoing improvements to the properties of these implants and their constituent materials, thus enhancing the effectiveness of these devices. This paper will therefore discuss fundamental material aspects of CIs as well as the potential for their future development. PMID:22073103

  9. Contraceptive implants and lactation.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Soledad

    2002-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of four contraceptive implants, plant, Implanon, Nestorone and Elcometrine, have been evaluated during use in the postpartum period by lactating women. These implants provide highly effective contraceptive protection with no negative effect on breastfeeding or infant growth and development. Breastfeeding women initiating Norplant use in the second postpartum month experience significantly longer periods of amenorrhea than do untreated women or intrauterine device users. After weaning, the bleeding pattern is similar to that observed in non-nursing women. Norplant use does not affect bone turnover and density during lactation. Norplant and Implanon release orally active progestins while Nestorone and Elcometrine implants release an orally inactive progestin, which represents an advantage since the infant should be free of steroidal effects. The infant's daily intake of steroids (estimated from concentrations in maternal milk during the first month of use) range from 90 to 100 ng of levonorgestrel (Norplant), 75-120 ng of etonogestrel (Implanon), and 50 ng and 110 ng of Nestorone (Nestorone and Elcometrine implants, respectively). Nursing women needing contraception may use progestin-only implants when nonhormonal methods are not available or acceptable. Implants that deliver orally active steroids should only be used after 6 weeks postpartum to avoid transferring of steroids to the newborn.

  10. Biocompatible implant surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Bikash; Pawar, Sudhir; Pattanaik, Seema

    2012-01-01

    Surface plays a crucial role in biological interactions. Surface treatments have been applied to metallic biomaterials in order to improve their wear properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. A systematic review was performed on studies investigating the effects of implant surface treatments on biocompatibility. We searched the literature using PubMed, electronic databases from 1990 to 2009. Key words such as implant surface topography, surface roughness, surface treatment, surface characteristics, and surface coatings were used. The search was restricted to English language articles published from 1990 to December 2009. Additionally, a manual search in the major dental implant journals was performed. When considering studies, clinical studies were preferred followed by histological human studies, animal studies, and in vitro studies. A total of 115 articles were selected after elimination: clinical studies, 24; human histomorphometric studies, 11; animal histomorphometric studies, 46; in vitro studies, 34. The following observations were made in this review: · The focus has shifted from surface roughness to surface chemistry and a combination of chemical manipulations on the porous structure. More investigations are done regarding surface coatings. · Bone response to almost all the surface treatments was favorable. · Future trend is focused on the development of osteogenic implant surfaces. Limitation of this study is that we tried to give a broader overview related to implant surface treatments. It does not give any conclusion regarding the best biocompatible implant surface treatment investigated till date. Unfortunately, the eventually selected studies were too heterogeneous for inference of data.

  11. [Larynx: implants and stents].

    PubMed

    Sittel, C

    2009-05-01

    There is a wide variety of devices and materials to be implanted into the human larynx. Some are intended to remain only for a period of time, like laryngeal stents. If removal is not intended the device meets the definition for a medical implant. The majority of implants is used for the treatment of unilateral vocal fold immobility. There a 2 types of implants serving this purpose: Implants in a stricter sense are devices of solid material, which are brought into the paraglottic space through a window in the laryngeal framework (medialization thyroplasty). Several different products are presented in this review. In contrast, there are different substances available for endoscopic injection into the paralyzed vocal fold (injection laryngoplasty). Since some of these substances show a corpuscular consistency and a high viscosity they need to be deposited into the lateral paraglottic space. Therefore, the term "injectable implants" has been coined for these materials. The different substances available are discussed in detail in this review. Laryngeal stents are primarily used in the early postoperative phase after open reconstruction of the larynx. The different devices available on the market are described with their specific characteristics and intended use.

  12. Automatic segmentation of radiographic fiducial and seeds from X-ray images in prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Nathanael; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny Y; Burdette, Everette C; Prince, Jerry L; Lee, Junghoon

    2012-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy guided by transrectal ultrasound is a common treatment option for early stage prostate cancer. Prostate cancer accounts for 28% of cancer cases and 11% of cancer deaths in men with 217,730 estimated new cases and 32,050 estimated deaths in 2010 in the United States alone. The major current limitation is the inability to reliably localize implanted radiation seeds spatially in relation to the prostate. Multimodality approaches that incorporate X-ray for seed localization have been proposed, but they require both accurate tracking of the imaging device and segmentation of the seeds. Some use image-based radiographic fiducials to track the X-ray device, but manual intervention is needed to select proper regions of interest for segmenting both the tracking fiducial and the seeds, to evaluate the segmentation results, and to correct the segmentations in the case of segmentation failure, thus requiring a significant amount of extra time in the operating room. In this paper, we present an automatic segmentation algorithm that simultaneously segments the tracking fiducial and brachytherapy seeds, thereby minimizing the need for manual intervention. In addition, through the innovative use of image processing techniques such as mathematical morphology, Hough transforms, and RANSAC, our method can detect and separate overlapping seeds that are common in brachytherapy implant images. Our algorithm was validated on 55 phantom and 206 patient images, successfully segmenting both the fiducial and seeds with a mean seed segmentation rate of 96% and sub-millimeter accuracy.

  13. Automatic segmentation of radiographic fiducial and seeds from X-ray images in prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Nathanael; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny Y.; Burdette, Everette C.; Prince, Jerry L.; Lee, Junghoon

    2011-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy guided by transrectal ultrasound is a common treatment option for early stage prostate cancer. Prostate cancer accounts for 28% of cancer cases and 11% of cancer deaths in men with 217,730 estimated new cases and 32,050 estimated deaths in 2010 in the United States alone. The major current limitation is the inability to reliably localize implanted radiation seeds spatially in relation to the prostate. Multimodality approaches that incorporate X-ray for seed localization have been proposed, but they require both accurate tracking of the imaging device and segmentation of the seeds. Some use image-based radiographic fiducials to track the X-ray device, but manual intervention is needed to select proper regions of interest for segmenting both the tracking fiducial and the seeds, to evaluate the segmentation results, and to correct the segmentations in the case of segmentation failure, thus requiring a significant amount of extra time in the operating room. In this paper, we present an automatic segmentation algorithm that simultaneously segments the tracking fiducial and brachytherapy seeds, thereby minimizing the need for manual intervention. In addition, through the innovative use of image processing techniques such as mathematical morphology, Hough transforms, and RANSAC, our method can detect and separate overlapping seeds that are common in brachytherapy implant images. Our algorithm was validated on 55 phantom and 206 patient images, successfully segmenting both the fiducial and seeds with a mean seed segmentation rate of 96% and sub-millimeter accuracy. PMID:21802975

  14. Point-of-care seeding of nitinol stents with blood-derived endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jantzen, Alexandra E; Noviani, Maria; Mills, James S; Baker, Katherine M; Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Truskey, George A; Achneck, Hardean E

    2016-11-01

    Nitinol-based vascular devices, for example, peripheral and intracranial stents, are limited by thrombosis and restenosis. To ameliorate these complications, we developed a technology to promote vessel healing by rapidly seeding (QuickSeeding) autologous blood-derived endothelial cells (ECs) onto modified self-expanding nitinol stent delivery systems immediately before implantation. Several thousand micropores were laser-drilled into a delivery system sheath surrounding a commercial nitinol stent to allow for exit of an infused cell suspension. As suspension medium flowed outward through the micropores, ECs flowed through the delivery system attaching to the stent surface. The QuickSeeded ECs adhered to and spread on the stent surface following 24-h in vitro culture under static or flow conditions. Further, QuickSeeded ECs on stents that were deployed into porcine carotid arteries spread to endothelialize stent struts within 48 h (n = 4). The QuickSeeded stent struts produced significantly more nitric oxide in ex vivo flow circuits after 24 h, as compared to static conditions (n = 5). In conclusion, ECs QuickSeeded onto commercial nitinol stents within minutes of implantation spread to form a functional layer in vitro and in vivo, providing proof of concept that the novel QuickSeeding method with modified delivery systems can be used to seed functional autologous endothelium at the point of care. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1658-1665, 2016.

  15. Automatic coregistration of volumetric images based on implanted fiducial markers.

    PubMed

    Koch, Martin; Maltz, Jonathan S; Belongie, Serge J; Gangadharan, Bijumon; Bose, Supratik; Shukla, Himanshu; Bani-Hashemi, Ali R

    2008-10-01

    The accurate delivery of external beam radiation therapy is often facilitated through the implantation of radio-opaque fiducial markers (gold seeds). Before the delivery of each treatment fraction, seed positions can be determined via low dose volumetric imaging. By registering these seed locations with the corresponding locations in the previously acquired treatment planning computed tomographic (CT) scan, it is possible to adjust the patient position so that seed displacement is accommodated. The authors present an unsupervised automatic algorithm that identifies seeds in both planning and pretreatment images and subsequently determines a rigid geometric transformation between the two sets. The algorithm is applied to the imaging series of ten prostate cancer patients. Each test series is comprised of a single multislice planning CT and multiple megavoltage conebeam (MVCB) images. Each MVCB dataset is obtained immediately prior to a subsequent treatment session. Seed locations were determined to within 1 mm with an accuracy of 97 +/- 6.1% for datasets obtained by application of a mean imaging dose of 3.5 cGy per study. False positives occurred in three separate instances, but only when datasets were obtained at imaging doses too low to enable fiducial resolution by a human operator, or when the prostate gland had undergone large displacement or significant deformation. The registration procedure requires under nine seconds of computation time on a typical contemporary computer workstation.

  16. A Stem Cell-Seeded Nanofibrous Scaffold for Auditory Nerve Replacement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0492 TITLE: A Stem Cell -Seeded Nanofibrous Scaffold for Auditory Nerve Replacement PRINCIPAL...COVERED 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Stem Cell -Seeded Nanofibrous Scaffold for Auditory Nerve Replacement 5b...objectives aiming to push human stem cells toward an auditory neural fate, embed the cells on a functionalized scaffold, and implant the device in a deafened

  17. Implantation of Inferior Vena Cava Interposition Graft in Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Ung; Yi, Tai; Tara, Shuhei; Lee, Avione Y.; Hibino, Narutoshi; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable scaffolds seeded with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) are often used for reconstructive surgery to treat congenital cardiac anomalies. The long-term clinical results showed excellent patency rates, however, with significant incidence of stenosis. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of vascular neotissue formation and prevent stenosis development in tissue engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs), we developed a mouse model of the graft with approximately 1 mm internal diameter. First, the TEVGs were assembled from biodegradable tubular scaffolds fabricated from a polyglycolic acid nonwoven felt mesh coated with ε-caprolactone and L-lactide copolymer. The scaffolds were then placed in a lyophilizer, vacuumed for 24 hr, and stored in a desiccator until cell seeding. Second, bone marrow was collected from donor mice and mononuclear cells were isolated by density gradient centrifugation. Third, approximately one million cells were seeded on a scaffold and incubated O/N. Finally, the seeded scaffolds were then implanted as infrarenal vena cava interposition grafts in C57BL/6 mice. The implanted grafts demonstrated excellent patency (>90%) without evidence of thromboembolic complications or aneurysmal formation. This murine model will aid us in understanding and quantifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms of neotissue formation in the TEVG. PMID:24961688

  18. Magnetic stimulation of marigold seed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, I.; Mukhtar, K.; Qasim, M.; Basra, S. M. A.; Shahid, M.; Haq, Z.

    2012-10-01

    The effects of magnetic field treatments of French marigold seeds on germination, early seedling growth and biochemical changes of seedlings were studied under controlled conditions. For this purpose, seeds were exposed to five different magnetic seed treatments for 3 min each. Most of seed treatments resulted in improved germination speed and spread, root and shoot length, seed soluble sugars and a-amylase activity. Magnetic seed treatment with 100 mT maximally improved germination, seedling vigour and starch metabolism as compared to control and other seed treatments. In emergence experiment, higher emergence percentage (4-fold), emergence index (5-fold) and vigorous seedling growth were obtained in seeds treated with 100 mT. Overall, the enhancement of marigold seeds by magnetic seed treatment with 100 mT could be related to enhanced starch metabolism. The results suggest that magnetic field treatments of French marigold seeds have the potential to enhance germination, early growth and biochemical parameters of seedlings.

  19. Dose reduction in LDR brachytherapy by implanted prostate gold fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Lutgens, Ludy; Murrer, Lars; Afsharpour, Hossein; Haas-Kock, Danielle de; Visser, Peter; Gils, Francis van; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric impact of gold fiducial markers (FM) implanted prior to external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer on low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seed implants performed in the context of combined therapy was investigated. Methods: A virtual water phantom was designed containing a single FM. Single and multi source scenarios were investigated by performing Monte Carlo dose calculations, along with the influence of varying orientation and distance of the FM with respect to the sources. Three prostate cancer patients treated with LDR brachytherapy for a recurrence following external beam radiotherapy with implanted FM were studied as surrogate cases to combined therapy. FM and brachytherapy seeds were identified on post implant CT scans and Monte Carlo dose calculations were performed with and without FM. The dosimetric impact of the FM was evaluated by quantifying the amplitude of dose shadows and the volume of cold spots. D{sub 90} was reported based on the post implant CT prostate contour. Results: Large shadows are observed in the single source-FM scenarios. As expected from geometric considerations, the shadows are dependent on source-FM distance and orientation. Large dose reductions are observed at the distal side of FM, while at the proximal side a dose enhancement is observed. In multisource scenarios, the importance of shadows appears mitigated, although FM at the periphery of the seed distribution caused underdosage (seed implant dose distributions. Therefore, reduced tumor control could be expected from FM implanted in tumors, although

  20. Interactive tool for visualization and segmentation of permanent radioactive seeds in postoperative prostate brachytherapy CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Sayan D.; Stoknes, Kevin; Grimm, Peter D.; Estlund, Jacque; Chalana, Vikram; Kim, Yongmin

    1999-05-01

    Implantation of radioactive isotopes within the prostate for the treatment of early stage localized prostate cancer is becoming a popular treatment option. Postoperative calculation of the dose delivered to the prostate requires accurate verification of the number and location of seeds within the prostate. Current post operative dosimetry technique requires the dosimetrist to manually count and record the position of each seed from x-ray computed tomography (CT) images. This procedure is operator-dependent and time-consuming, thus limiting the ability of different brachytherapy centers to compare results and create a standard methodology. Seed identification is performed by thresholding the CT images interactively, using a graphical user interface, followed by mathematical morphology to remove noise. Segmented seeds are grouped into regions via connected-component analysis. Regions are then classified into seeds using a prior knowledge of the seed dimensions and their relative positions in the consecutive CT images. Unresolved regions, which can indicate the presence of more than one seed, are corrected manually. The efficiency of this tool was evaluated by comparing the time to manually count the seeds to the time required to do the same task using the automated program. For 15 sets of images from 15 patients, the average time for manually counting the seeds was 45 minutes per patient versus 6.4 minutes on average per patients, the average time for manually counting the seeds was 45 minutes per patient versus 6.4 minutes on average per patient when the software was used to perform the same task. Using the interactive visualization and segmentation algorithm, the time required to count the seeds during post- implant dosimetry has been reduced by a factor of 7 compared to the existing manual technique.

  1. Surface stiffening and enhanced photoluminescence of ion implanted cellulose - polyvinyl alcohol - silica composite.

    PubMed

    Shanthini, G M; Sakthivel, N; Menon, Ranjini; Nabhiraj, P Y; Gómez-Tejedor, J A; Meseguer-Dueñas, J M; Gómez Ribelles, J L; Krishna, J B M; Kalkura, S Narayana

    2016-11-20

    Novel Cellulose (Cel) reinforced polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-Silica (Si) composite which has good stability and in vitro degradation was prepared by lyophilization technique and implanted using N(3+) ions of energy 24keV in the fluences of 1×10(15), 5×10(15) and 1×10(16)ions/cm(2). SEM analysis revealed the formation of microstructures, and improved the surface roughness on ion implantation. In addition to these structural changes, the implantation significantly modified the luminescent, thermal and mechanical properties of the samples. The elastic modulus of the implanted samples has increased by about 50 times compared to the pristine which confirms that the stiffness of the sample surface has increased remarkably on ion implantation. The photoluminescence of the native cellulose has improved greatly due to defect site, dangling bonds and hydrogen passivation. Electric conductivity of the ion implanted samples was improved by about 25%. Hence, low energy ion implantation tunes the mechanical property, surface roughness and further induces the formation of nano structures. MG63 cells seeded onto the scaffolds reveals that with the increase in implantation fluence, the cell attachment, viability and proliferation have improved greatly compared to pristine. The enhancement of cell growth of about 59% was observed in the implanted samples compared to pristine. These properties will enable the scaffolds to be ideal for bone tissue engineering and imaging applications.

  2. Extraoral prostheses using extraoral implants.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, G; Tuna, S H; Oghan, F

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate extraoral prostheses and the use of extraoral implants in patients with facial defects. 10 cases were treated utilizing maxillofacial prostheses employing extraoral implants in five cases. 16 extraoral implants were installed. Seven implants were placed in irradiated sites in the orbital regions. Six implants were placed in mastoid regions and three in a zygoma region that was irradiated. Two implants failed before initial integration was achieved in irradiated areas. Using 14 extraoral implants as anchors, five extraoral prostheses were set. The other five cases were treated with extraoral prostheses without using extraoral implants due to cost and patient-related factors. The data included age, sex, primary disease, implant length, implant failure, prosthetic attachment, radiation therapy, and peri-implant skin reactions. The use of extraoral implants for the retention of extraoral prostheses has simplified the placement, removal, and cleaning of the prosthesis by the patient. The stability of the prostheses was improved by anchors. Clinical and technical problems are presented with the techniques used for their resolution. Using extraoral implants resulted in a high rate of success in retaining facial prostheses and gave good stability and aesthetic satisfaction.

  3. Seeds in Flight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Willard K.

    1978-01-01

    Discussed are the seed dispersal mechanisms of six different plants: big-leaf maple, pincushion tree, tree of heaven, squirting cucumber, digger pine, and bull thistle. Elaborate color and black-and-white drawings illustrate the text. (MA)

  4. Tomato seeds for LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Tomato seeds are prepared for their launch aboard the Langley's Long Duration Exposure Facility. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (page 119), by James Schultz.

  5. Fishing for Seeds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes a method to collect seeds that are dispersed from weeds while avoiding some outdoor hazards such as rough terrain or animals. Describes a plan for creating a weed fishing pole and includes a materials list. (SAH)

  6. Towards biodegradable wireless implants.

    PubMed

    Boutry, Clémentine M; Chandrahalim, Hengky; Streit, Patrick; Schinhammer, Michael; Hänzi, Anja C; Hierold, Christofer

    2012-05-28

    A new generation of partially or even fully biodegradable implants is emerging. The idea of using temporary devices is to avoid a second surgery to remove the implant after its period of use, thereby improving considerably the patient's comfort and safety. This paper provides a state-of-the-art overview and an experimental section that describes the key technological challenges for making biodegradable devices. The general considerations for the design and synthesis of biodegradable components are illustrated with radiofrequency-driven resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) resonators made of biodegradable metals (Mg, Mg alloy, Fe, Fe alloys) and biodegradable conductive polymer composites (polycaprolactone-polypyrrole, polylactide-polypyrrole). Two concepts for partially/fully biodegradable wireless implants are discussed, the ultimate goal being to obtain a fully biodegradable sensor for in vivo sensing.

  7. Experimental and theoretical studies of implant assisted magnetic drug targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles, Misael O.

    One way to achieve drug targeting in the body is to incorporate magnetic nanoparticles into drug carriers and then retain them at the site using an externally applied magnetic field. This process is referred to as magnetic drug targeting (MDT). However, the main limitation of MDT is that an externally applied magnetic field alone may not be able to retain a sufficient number of magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) to justify its use. Such a limitation might not exist when high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) principles are applied to assist MDT by means of ferromagnetic implants. It was hypothesized that an Implant Assisted -- MDT (IA-MDT) system would increase the retention of the MDCPs at a target site where an implant had been previously located, since the magnetic forces are produced internally. With this in mind, the overall objective of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of an IA-MDT system through mathematical modeling and in vitro experimentation. The mathematical models were developed and used to demonstrate the behavior and limitations of IA-MDT, and the in vitro experiments were designed and used to validate the models and to further elucidate the important parameters that affect the performance of the system. IA-MDT was studied with three plausible implants, ferromagnetic stents, seed particles, and wires. All implants were studied theoretically and experimentally using flow through systems with polymer particles containing magnetite nanoparticles as MDCPs. In the stent studies, a wire coil or mesh was simply placed in a flow field and the capture of the MDCPs was studied. In the other cases, a porous polymer matrix was used as a surrogate capillary tissue scaffold to study the capture of the MDCPs using wires or particle seeds as the implant, with the seeds either fixed within the polymer matrix or captured prior to capturing the MDCPs. An in vitro heart tissue perfusion model was also used to study the use of stents. In general, all

  8. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Medrad utilized NASA's Apollo technology to develop a new device called the AID implantable automatic pulse generator which monitors the heart continuously, recognizes the onset of ventricular fibrillation and delivers a corrective electrical shock. AID pulse generator is, in effect, a miniaturized version of the defibrillator used by emergency squads and hospitals to restore rhythmic heartbeat after fibrillation, but has the unique advantage of being permanently available to the patient at risk. Once implanted, it needs no specially trained personnel or additional equipment. AID system consists of a microcomputer, a power source and two electrodes which sense heart activity.

  9. Hydroxylapatite Otologic Implants

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, A.D.; Lauf, R.J.; Beale, B.; Johnson, R.

    2000-01-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMER) and Smith and Nephew Richards Inc. of Bartlett, TN, was initiated in March 1997. The original completion date for the Agreement was March 25, 1998. The purpose of this work is to develop and commercialize net shape forming methods for directly creating dense hydroxylapatite (HA) ceramic otologic implants. The project includes three tasks: (1) modification of existing gelcasting formulations to accommodate HA slurries; (2) demonstration of gelcasting to fabricate green HA ceramic components of a size and shape appropriate to otologic implants: and (3) sintering and evaluation of the HA components.

  10. Seed dispersal in fens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, B.; Van Diggelen, R.; Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and reducing genetic exchange. Species in fragmented wetlands may have lower reproductive success, which can lead to biodiversity loss. While fens may have always been relatively isolated from each other, they have become increasingly fragmented in modern times within agricultural and urban landscapes in both Europe and North America. Dispersal by water, animals and wind has been hampered by changes related to development in landscapes surrounding fens. Because the seeds of certain species are long-lived in the seed bank, frequent episodes of dispersal are not always necessary to maintain the biodiversity of fens. However, of particular concern to restoration is that some dominant species, such as the tussock sedge Carex stricta, may not disperse readily between fens. Conclusions: Knowledge of seed dispersal can be used to maintain and restore the biodiversity of fens in fragmented landscapes. Given that development has fragmented landscapes and that this situation is not likely to change, the dispersal of seeds might be enhanced by moving hay or cattle from fens to damaged sites, or by reestablishing lost hydrological connections. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  11. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  12. Seed coat color and seed weight contribute differential responses of targeted metabolites in soybean seeds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwook; Hwang, Young-Sun; Kim, Sun Tae; Yoon, Won-Byong; Han, Won Young; Kang, In-Kyu; Choung, Myoung-Gun

    2017-01-01

    The distribution and variation of targeted metabolites in soybean seeds are affected by genetic and environmental factors. In this study, we used 192 soybean germplasm accessions collected from two provinces of Korea to elucidate the effects of seed coat color and seeds dry weight on the metabolic variation and responses of targeted metabolites. The effects of seed coat color and seeds dry weight were present in sucrose, total oligosaccharides, total carbohydrates and all measured fatty acids. The targeted metabolites were clustered within three groups. These metabolites were not only differently related to seeds dry weight, but also responded differentially to seed coat color. The inter-relationship between the targeted metabolites was highly present in the result of correlation analysis. Overall, results revealed that the targeted metabolites were diverged in relation to seed coat color and seeds dry weight within locally collected soybean seed germplasm accessions.

  13. The Effects of Metallic Implants on Electroporation Therapies: Feasibility of Irreversible Electroporation for Brachytherapy Salvage

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, Robert E.; Smith, Ryan L.; Kavnoudias, Helen; Rosenfeldt, Franklin Ou, Ruchong; Mclean, Catriona A.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Thomson, Kenneth R.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Electroporation-based therapies deliver brief electric pulses into a targeted volume to destabilize cellular membranes. Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (IRE) provides focal ablation with effects dependent on the electric field distribution, which changes in heterogeneous environments. It should be determined if highly conductive metallic implants in targeted regions, such as radiotherapy brachytherapy seeds in prostate tissue, will alter treatment outcomes. Theoretical and experimental models determine the impact of prostate brachytherapy seeds on IRE treatments. Materials and Methods: This study delivered IRE pulses in nonanimal, as well as in ex vivo and in vivo tissue, with and in the absence of expired radiotherapy seeds. Electrical current was measured and lesion dimensions were examined macroscopically and with magnetic resonance imaging. Finite-element treatment simulations predicted the effects of brachytherapy seeds in the targeted region on electrical current, electric field, and temperature distributions. Results: There was no significant difference in electrical behavior in tissue containing a grid of expired radiotherapy seeds relative to those without seeds for nonanimal, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments (all p > 0.1). Numerical simulations predict no significant alteration of electric field or thermal effects (all p > 0.1). Histology showed cellular necrosis in the region near the electrodes and seeds within the ablation region; however, there were no seeds beyond the ablation margins. Conclusion: This study suggests that electroporation therapies can be implemented in regions containing small metallic implants without significant changes to electrical and thermal effects relative to use in tissue without the implants. This supports the ability to use IRE as a salvage therapy option for brachytherapy.

  14. The silicone breast implant controversy.

    PubMed

    Guerette, P H

    1995-02-01

    Feminists call it objectification. Consumer advocates call it victimization. Medical personnel call it augmentation. Women, implantation. Whatever the term, media hype and the increasing number of lawsuits against U.S. manufacturers of silicone breast implants has caused widespread concern among women and raised serious questions about the long term health risks and safety of breast implant devices.

  15. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at 7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at 6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing `only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around 2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  16. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  17. Cochlear Implantation in Neurobrucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Bajin, Münir Demir; Savaş, Özden; Aslan, Filiz; Sennaroğlu, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurobrucellosis is a disease consisting of a wide spectrum of complications such as peripheral neuropathy, cranial nerve involvement, ataxia, meningeal irritation, paraplegia, seizures, coma, and even death. The vestibulocochlear nerve seems to be the most commonly affected cranial nerve (10%). We present a patient with neurobrucellosis whose auditory perception and speech intelligibility skill performances improved after cochlear implantation. Case Report: A 35 year-old woman was admitted to another hospital 2 years ago with the symptoms of headache, nausea, and altered consciousness, who was finally diagnosed with neurobrucellosis. She developed bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss during the following 6 months. There was no benefit of using hearing aids. After successful treatment of her illness, she was found to be suitable for cochlear implantation. After the operation, her auditory perception skills improved significantly with a Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) score of 5. According to clinical observations and her family members’ statements, her Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) score was 3. Her speech intelligibility skills are still improving. Conclusion: Our case report represents the second case of hearing rehabilitation with cochlear implantation after neurobrucellosis. Cochlear implantation is a cost-effective and time-proven successful intervention in post-lingual adult patients with sensorineural hearing loss. Early timing of the surgery after appropriate treatment of meningitis helps the patient to achieve better postoperative results. PMID:26966626

  18. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  19. Implantable Drug Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs such as insulin are injected as needed directly into bloodstream by compact implantable dispensing unit. Two vapor cavities produce opposing forces on drug-chamber diaphragm. Heaters in cavities allow control of direction and rate of motion of bellows. Dispensing capsule fitted with coil so batteries can be recharged by induction.

  20. Practicing implant dentistry profitably.

    PubMed

    Stump, G; Adams, M; Alwan, M

    1997-03-01

    The success of dental implants has opened up countless treatment possibilities for restorative dentists to offer to their patients. Just as our clinical paradigms have had to change because of this new technology, so too must our paradigms concerning the way we communicate with our patients change if we are to get them to say "yes" to treatment that we know that they need. Success in clinical treatment using implants requires a systematic approach. A systematic approach to communicating with your patients will allow you to have the same high degree of success with treatment acceptance that is possible with dental implants. The key to the systems we have discussed is Relationship Centered Care. A relationship is fostered and enhanced through a Comprehensive Examination Process, a structured Consultation Process utilizing the influencing process and Financial Arrangements that allow the patient to receive what they want while the office maintains the profitability that it needs. A system for calculating rational fees can be utilized that allows the practice to have control over an area that traditionally was controlled by anecdotal factors. The Pride Institute has developed this material and is presenting it to the profession so that restorative dentists can truly practice implant dentistry profitably.

  1. Seed Transmission of Pseudoperonospora cubensis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Yigal; Rubin, Avia E.; Galperin, Mariana; Ploch, Sebastian; Runge, Fabian; Thines, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Pseudoperonospora cubensis, an obligate biotrophic oomycete causing devastating foliar disease in species of the Cucurbitaceae family, was never reported in seeds or transmitted by seeds. We now show that P. cubensis occurs in fruits and seeds of downy mildew-infected plants but not in fruits or seeds of healthy plants. About 6.7% of the fruits collected during 2012–2014 have developed downy mildew when homogenized and inoculated onto detached leaves and 0.9% of the seeds collected developed downy mildew when grown to the seedling stage. This is the first report showing that P. cubensis has become seed-transmitted in cucurbits. Species-specific PCR assays showed that P. cubensis occurs in ovaries, fruit seed cavity and seed embryos of cucurbits. We propose that international trade of fruits or seeds of cucurbits might be associated with the recent global change in the population structure of P. cubensis. PMID:25329308

  2. Seeds in space experiment results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Jim A.

    1991-01-01

    Two million seeds of 120 different varieties representing 106 species, 97 genera, and 55 plant families were flown aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The seeds were housed on the space exposed experiment developed for students (SEEDS) tray in sealed canister number six and in two small vented canisters. The tray was in the F-2 position. The seeds were germinated and the germination rates and development of the resulting plants compared to the control seed that stayed in Park Seed's seed storage facility. The initial results are presented. There was a better survival rate in the sealed canister in space than in the storage facility at Park Seed. At least some of the seeds in each of the vented canisters survived the exposure to vacuum for almost six years. The number of observed apparent mutations was very low.

  3. Source strength assay of iodine-125 seeds sealed within sterile packaging.

    PubMed

    Otani, Yuki; Yamada, Takahiro; Kato, Shingo; Shikama, Naoto; Funakoshi, Kazuto; Kuroda, Isao; Numasaki, Hodaka; Nose, Takayuki; Dokiya, Takushi; Oguchi, Masahiko

    2013-03-04

    Early-stage prostate cancer is widely treated by iodine-125 (I-125) seed implantation. While quality assurance methods are in place to assure consistency in I-125 seed source strength, current methods involve the breaking of the sterilization package, raising issues concerning sterility and time limitations. The purpose of this study was to develop a method of characterizing the total source strength of I-125 seeds within a cartridge that has been sealed within a sterilization package and to evaluate the probability of detecting an out-of-calibration seed (aberrant seed). We defined a protocol to determine the ability of a well-type ionization chamber to detect aberrant I-125 seeds within a cartridge sealed in the sterilization package. A novel jig for a well-type ionization chamber was designed to accommodate the sterilization package. One seed was chosen randomly from two cartridges containing five or 15 seeds (0.544 U source strength) and was exchanged with aberrant seeds of six different source strengths. The source strength was measured at each position within the cartridge. The results indicated that the response of the well chamber was sensitive to changes in the aberrant seed position within the cartridge and the source strength of the aberrant seed. The correlation coefficient between single seed and batch assay results was high (0.998). A novel jig and a measurement method using a well ionization chamber were developed, which allowed for a batch assay characterization of the total source strength of I-125 seeds within a cartridge sealed within sterilization package. This method is simple, time-saving, and offers greater practical application.

  4. Automated seed manipulation and planting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Ray; Herrera, Javier; Holcomb, Scott; Kelly, Paul; Myers, Scott; Rosendo, Manny; Sivitz, Herbert; Wolsefer, Dave

    1988-01-01

    The Mechanical Division fabricated three seed separators utilizing pressure gradients to move and separate wheat seeds. These separators are called minnow buckets and use air, water, or a combination of both to generate the pressure gradient. Electrostatic fields were employed in the seed separator constructed by the Electrical Division. This separator operates by forcing a temporary electric dipole on the wheat seeds and using charged electrodes to attract and move the seeds. Seed delivery to the hydroponic growth tray is accomplished by the seed cassette. The cassette is compatible with all the seed separators, and it consists of a plastic tube threaded with millipore filter paper. During planting operations, the seeds are placed in an empty cassette. The loaded cassette is then placed in the growth tray and nutrient solution provided. The solution wets the filter paper and capillary action draws the nutrients up to feed the seeds. These seeding systems were tested and showed encouraging results. Seeds were effectively separated and the cassette can support the growth of wheat plants. Problems remaining to be investigated include improving the success of delivering the seeds to the cassette and providing adequate spacing between seeds for the electric separator.

  5. Permanent Iodine-125 Interstitial Planar Seed Brachytherapy for Close or Positive Margins for Thoracic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Mutyala, Subhakar; Stewart, Alexandra; Khan, Atif J.; Cormack, Robert A.; O'Farrell, Desmond; Sugarbaker, David; Devlin, Phillip M.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To assess toxicity and outcome following permanent iodine-125 seed implant as an adjunct to surgical resection in cases of advanced thoracic malignancy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved retrospective review was performed. Fifty-nine patients were identified as having undergone thoracic brachytherapy seed implantation between September 1999 and December 2006. Data for patient demographics, tumor details, and morbidity and mortality were recorded. Results: Fifty-nine patients received 64 implants. At a median follow-up of 17 months, 1-year and 2-year Kaplan-Meier rates of estimated overall survival were 94.1% and 82.0%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year local control rates were 80.1% and 67.4%, respectively. The median time to develop local recurrence was 11 months. Grades 3 and 4 toxicity rates were 12% at 1 year. Conclusions: This review shows relatively low toxicity for interstitial planar seed implantation after thoracic surgical resection. The high local control results suggest that an incomplete oncologic surgery plus a brachytherapy implant for treating advanced thoracic malignancy merit further investigation.

  6. Effect of implant design on initial stability of tapered implants.

    PubMed

    Chong, Linus; Khocht, Ahmed; Suzuki, Jon B; Gaughan, John

    2009-01-01

    Implant design is one of the parameters for achieving successful primary stability. This study aims to examine the effect of a self-tapping blades implant design on initial stability in tapered implants. Polyurethane blocks of different densities were used to simulate different bone densities. The two different implant designs included one with self-tapping blades and one without self-tapping blades. Implants were placed at 3 different depths: apical third, middle third, and fully inserted at 3 different densities of polyurethane blocks. A resonance frequency (RF) analyzer was then used to measure stability of the implants. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to examine the effect of implant design, insertion depth, and block density on RF. Analysis of covariance was used to examine the strength of association between RF and the aforementioned factors. In both medium-density (P = .017) and high-density (P = .002) blocks, fully inserted non-self-tapping implants showed higher initial stability than self-tapping implants. No differences were noted between the 2 implant designs that were not fully inserted. The highest strength of association was with insertion depth (standardized beta [std beta] = -0.60, P = .0001), followed by block density (std beta = -0.15, P = .0002). Implant design showed a weak association (std beta = -0.07, P = .09). In conclusion, fully inserted implants without self-tapping blades have higher initial stability than implants with self-tapping blades. However, the association strength between implant design and initial stability is less relevant than other factors, such as insertion depth and block density. Thus, if bone quality and quantity are optimal, they may compensate for design inadequacy.

  7. [Allergic reactions to implant materials].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P

    2003-01-01

    The extent of the immune response upon implantation of metallic devices depends on the individual reactivity and on material characteristics. If specific T-cellular sensitization occurs or an allergy to metal preexists, hypersensitive reactions to implant components may develop. They include eczema, impaired wound healing, and sterile osteomyelitis. The existence of allergy-induced implant loosening is still an open question. Further improvement of clinical allergological diagnostics, better understanding of peri-implantar immune reactions, and interdisciplinary collection of epidemiological data concerning allergy to implants will contribute to a better knowledge about tolerance of implant material in humans.

  8. Prosthodontic management of implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Ghadeer; Bryington, Matthew; De Kok, Ingeborg J; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2014-01-01

    Implant-supported dental restorations can be screw-retained, cement-retained, or a combination of both, whereby a metal superstructure is screwed to the implants and crowns are individually cemented to the metal frame. Each treatment modality has advantages and disadvantages. The use of computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture technologies for the manufacture of implant superstructures has proved to be advantageous in the quality of materials, precision of the milled superstructures, and passive fit. Maintenance and recall evaluations are an essential component of implant therapy. The longevity of implant restorations is limited by their biological and prosthetic maintenance requirements.

  9. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Ying, T.Y.; Chin, C.J.; Lu, S.C.; Yiacoumi, S.

    1997-10-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration consists of two steps: heterogeneous particle flocculation of magnetic and nonmagnetic particles in a stirred tank and high-gradient magnetic filtration (HGMF). The effects of various parameters affecting magnetic-seeding filtration (HGMF). The effects of various parameters affecting magnetic seeding filtration are theoretically and experimentally investigated. A trajectory model that includes hydrodynamic resistance, van der Waals, and electrostatic forces is developed to calculate the flocculation frequency in a turbulent-shear regime. Fractal dimension is introduced to simulate the open structure of aggregates. A magnetic-filtration model that consists of trajectory analysis, a particle build-up model, a breakthrough model, and a bivariate population-balance model is developed to predict the breakthrough curve of magnetic-seeding filtration. A good agreement between modeling results and experimental data is obtained. The results show that the model developed in this study can be used to predict the performance of magnetic-seeding filtration without using empirical coefficients or fitting parameters. 35 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Impression techniques for implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Chee, W; Jivraj, S

    2006-10-07

    The object of making an impression in implant dentistry is to accurately relate an analogue of the implant or implant abutment to the other structures in the dental arch. This is affected by use of an impression coping which is attached to the implant or implant abutment. This impression coping is incorporated in an impression - much as a metal framework is 'picked up' in a remount impression for fixed prosthodontics. With implant copings the coping is usually attached to the implant or abutment with screws. The impression material used is usually an elastomeric impression material; the two types most widely used and shown to be the most appropriate are polyether and polyvinyl siloxane impression materials.

  11. Engineered porous metals for implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vamsi Krishna, B.; Xue, Weichang; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2008-05-01

    Interest is significant in patient-specific implants with the possibility of guided tissue regeneration, particularly for load-bearing implants. For such implants to succeed, novel design approaches and fabrication technologies that can achieve balanced mechanical and functional performance in the implants are necessary. This article is focused on porous load-bearing implants with tailored micro-as well as macrostructures using laser-engineered net shaping (LENS™), a solid freeform fabrication or rapid prototyping technique that can be used to manufacture patient-specific implants. This review provides an insight into LENS, some properties of porous metals, and the potential applications of this process to fabricate unitized structures which can eliminate longstanding challenges in load-bearing implants to increase their in-vivo lifetime, such as in a total hip prosthesis.

  12. Soybean seed proteome rebalancing

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Eliot M.

    2014-01-01

    The soybean seed’s protein content and composition are regulated by both genetics and physiology. Overt seed protein content is specified by the genotype’s genetic framework and is selectable as a breeding trait. Within the genotype-specified protein content phenotype soybeans have the capacity to rebalance protein composition to create differing proteomes. Soybeans possess a relatively standardized proteome, but mutation or targeted engineering can induce large-scale proteome rebalancing. Proteome rebalancing shows that the output traits of seed content and composition result from two major types of regulation: genotype and post-transcriptional control of the proteome composition. Understanding the underlying mechanisms that specifies the seed proteome can enable engineering new phenotypes for the production of a high-quality plant protein source for food, feed, and industrial proteins. PMID:25232359

  13. Detection of changes in DNA methylation induced by low-energy ion implantation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haichan; Zhao, Jin; Xu, Jing; Li, Xiaoqu; Zhang, Fengshou; Wang, Yugang; Carr, Christopher; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Genfa

    2011-05-01

    This study evaluated changes in DNA methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown from seeds implanted with low-energy N(+) and Ar(+) ions. Methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) testing revealed altered DNA methylation patterns after ion implantation at doses of 1 × 10(14) to 1 × 10(16) ions/cm(2). Comparison of the MSAP electrophoretic profiles revealed nine types of polymorphisms in ion-implanted seedlings relative to control seedlings, among which four represented methylation events, three represented demethylation events, and the methylation status of two was uncertain. The diversity of plant DNA methylation was increased by low-energy ion implantation. At the same time, total genomic DNA methylation levels at CCGG sites were unchanged by ion implantation. Moreover, a comparison of polymorphisms seen in N(+) ion-implanted, Ar(+) ion-implanted, and control DNA demonstrated that the species of incident ion influenced the resulting DNA methylation pattern. Sequencing of eight isolated fragments that showed different changing patterns in implanted plants allowed their mapping onto variable regions on one or more of the five Arabidopsis chromosomes; these segments included protein-coding genes, transposon and repeat DNA sequence. A further sodium bisulfite sequencing of three fragments also displayed alterations in methylation among either different types or doses of incident ions. Possible causes for the changes in methylation are discussed.

  14. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Depaoli, D.

    1996-10-01

    This task will investigate the capabilities of magnetic-seeding filtration for the enhanced removal of magnetic and nonmagnetic particulates from liquids. This technology appies to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatant. Magnetic-seeding filtration can be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal-size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes.

  15. Evaluation of dosimetry and excess seeds in permanent brachytherapy using a modified hybrid method: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kana; Okihara, Koji; Iwata, Tsuyoshi; Aibe, Norihiro; Kodani, Naohiro; Tsubokura, Takuji; Kamoi, Kazumi; Miki, Tsuneharu; Yamazaki, Hideya

    2013-05-01

    Permanent prostate brachytherapy is frequently performed worldwide, and many studies have demonstrated its favorable outcomes. Implant seeds used in this procedure contain a precise amount of radionuclide and are completely sealed. Because these seeds are not manufactured in Japan, they are expensive (6300 yen per seed) and therefore need careful management as a radioisotope. The proper implantation technique requires considerable procedure time, good dosimetric outcomes and simple radioactive isotope management. To evaluate the modified hybrid interactive technique based on these considerations, we assessed 313 patients who underwent hybrid interactive brachytherapy without additional external beam radiotherapy. We evaluated the duration of the procedure, dosimetric factors and the total number of excess seeds. The dosimetric results from computed tomography on Day 30 of follow-up were: 172 Gy (range 130-194 Gy) for pD90, 97.8% (83.5-100%) for pV100, 54.6% (27.5-82.4%) for pV150, 164 Gy (120-220 Gy) for uD90, 194 Gy (126-245 Gy) for uD30, 210 Gy (156-290 Gy) for uD5, 0.02 ml (0-1.2 ml) for rV100 and 0 ml (0-0.2 ml) for rV150. The number of excess seeds was determined by subtracting the number of implanted seeds from the expected number of seeds calculated from previously proposed nomograms. As per our method, nine excess seeds were used for two patients, whereas using the nomograms, the number of excess seeds was approximately eight per patient. Our modified hybrid interactive technique reduced the number of excess seeds while maintaining treatment quality.

  16. Fiber and seed loss from seed cotton cleaning machinery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fiber and seed loss from seed cotton cleaning equipment in cotton gins occurs, but the quantity of material lost, factors affecting fiber and seed loss, and the mechanisms that cause material loss are not well understood. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of different factors on...

  17. Multiple seeds sensitivity using a single seed with threshold.

    PubMed

    Egidi, Lavinia; Manzini, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    Spaced seeds are a fundamental tool for similarity search in biosequences. The best sensitivity/selectivity trade-offs are obtained using many seeds simultaneously: This is known as the multiple seed approach. Unfortunately, spaced seeds use a large amount of memory and the available RAM is a practical limit to the number of seeds one can use simultaneously. Inspired by some recent results on lossless seeds, we revisit the approach of using a single spaced seed and considering two regions homologous if the seed hits in at least t sufficiently close positions. We show that by choosing the locations of the don't care symbols in the seed using quadratic residues modulo a prime number, we derive single seeds that when used with a threshold t > 1 have competitive sensitivity/selectivity trade-offs, indeed close to the best multiple seeds known in the literature. In addition, the choice of the threshold t can be adjusted to modify sensitivity and selectivity a posteriori, thus enabling a more accurate search in the specific instance at issue. The seeds we propose also exhibit robustness and allow flexibility in usage.

  18. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Stübinger, Stefan; Stricker, Andres; Berg, Britt-Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. PMID:26635486

  19. Practical considerations for maximizing heat production in a novel thermobrachytherapy seed prototype

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Bhoj; Warrell, Gregory; Shvydka, Diana; Subramanian, Manny; Ishmael Parsai, E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A combination of hyperthermia and radiation in the treatment of cancer has been proven to provide better tumor control than radiation administered as a monomodality, without an increase in complications or serious toxicities. Moreover, concurrent administration of hyperthermia and radiation displays synergistic enhancement, resulting in greater tumor cell killing than hyperthermia and radiation delivered separately. The authors have designed a new thermobrachytherapy (TB) seed, which serves as a source of both radiation and heat for concurrent brachytherapy and hyperthermia treatments when implanted in solid tumors. This innovative seed, similar in size and geometry to conventional seeds, will have self-regulating thermal properties. Methods: The new seed's geometry is based on the standard BEST Model 2301 125I seed, resulting in very similar dosimetric properties. The TB seed generates heat when placed in an oscillating magnetic field via induction heating of a ferromagnetic Ni–Cu alloy core that replaces the tungsten radiographic marker of the standard Model 2301. The alloy composition is selected to undergo a Curie transition near 50 °C, drastically decreasing power production at higher temperatures and providing for temperature self-regulation. Here, the authors present experimental studies of the magnetic properties of Ni–Cu alloy material, the visibility of TB seeds in radiographic imaging, and the ability of seed prototypes to uniformly heat tissue to a desirable temperature. Moreover, analyses are presented of magnetic shielding and thermal expansion of the TB seed, as well as matching of radiation dose to temperature distributions for a short interseed distance in a given treatment volume. Results: Annealing the Ni–Cu alloy has a significant effect on its magnetization properties, increasing the sharpness of the Curie transition. The TB seed preserves the radiographic properties of the BEST 2301 seed in both plain x rays and CT images

  20. Practical considerations for maximizing heat production in a novel thermobrachytherapy seed prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Gautam, Bhoj; Warrell, Gregory; Shvydka, Diana; Ishmael Parsai, E.; Subramanian, Manny

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: A combination of hyperthermia and radiation in the treatment of cancer has been proven to provide better tumor control than radiation administered as a monomodality, without an increase in complications or serious toxicities. Moreover, concurrent administration of hyperthermia and radiation displays synergistic enhancement, resulting in greater tumor cell killing than hyperthermia and radiation delivered separately. The authors have designed a new thermobrachytherapy (TB) seed, which serves as a source of both radiation and heat for concurrent brachytherapy and hyperthermia treatments when implanted in solid tumors. This innovative seed, similar in size and geometry to conventional seeds, will have self-regulating thermal properties. Methods: The new seed's geometry is based on the standard BEST Model 2301{sup 125}I seed, resulting in very similar dosimetric properties. The TB seed generates heat when placed in an oscillating magnetic field via induction heating of a ferromagnetic Ni–Cu alloy core that replaces the tungsten radiographic marker of the standard Model 2301. The alloy composition is selected to undergo a Curie transition near 50 °C, drastically decreasing power production at higher temperatures and providing for temperature self-regulation. Here, the authors present experimental studies of the magnetic properties of Ni–Cu alloy material, the visibility of TB seeds in radiographic imaging, and the ability of seed prototypes to uniformly heat tissue to a desirable temperature. Moreover, analyses are presented of magnetic shielding and thermal expansion of the TB seed, as well as matching of radiation dose to temperature distributions for a short interseed distance in a given treatment volume. Results: Annealing the Ni–Cu alloy has a significant effect on its magnetization properties, increasing the sharpness of the Curie transition. The TB seed preserves the radiographic properties of the BEST 2301 seed in both plain x rays and CT

  1. Physical View of Cloud Seeding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tribus, Myron

    1970-01-01

    Reviews experimental data on various aspects of climate control. Includes a discussion of (1) the physics of cloud seeding, (2) the applications of cloud seeding, and (3) the role of statistics in the field of weather modification. Bibliography. (LC)

  2. The breast implant controversy.

    PubMed

    Cook, R R; Harrison, M C; LeVier, R R

    1994-02-01

    The breast implant issue is a "bad news/good news" story. For many women with implants, the controversy has caused a fair degree of anxiety which may or may not be resolved as further information becomes available. It has also taken its toll on Dow Corning. Whole lines of medical products have been eliminated or are being phase out. The development of new medical applications has been terminated. As a consequence, employees have lost their jobs. What the effect will be on the biomedical industry as a whole remains to be seen (11). While silicones have been an important component in various medical devices, it is likely that other materials can be used as replacements. However, suppliers of non-silicone materials are also reevaluating their role in this market. For example, Du Pont, the nation's largest chemical company, has determined that the unpredictable and excessive costs of doing business with manufacturers of implantable medical devices no longer justifies the unrestricted sale of standard raw materials into this industry. Other companies are quietly following suit. On the up side, it is possible that the research being driven by this controversy will result in a greater understanding of the immunologic implications of xenobiotics, of the importance of nonbiased observations, of the need for ready access to valid data sets, and of the opportunity for valid scientific information to guide legal decisions. Only time will tell.

  3. [Neurotology and cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Merchán, Miguel A

    2015-05-01

    In this review we analyse cochlear implantation in terms of the fundamental aspects of the functioning of the auditory system. Concepts concerning neuronal plasticity applied to electrical stimulation in perinatal and adult deep hypoacusis are reviewed, and the latest scientific bases that justify early implantation following screening for congenital deafness are discussed. Finally, this review aims to serve as an example of the importance of fostering the sub-specialty of neurotology in our milieu, with the aim of bridging some of the gaps between specialties and thus improving both the knowledge in the field of research on auditory pathologies and in the screening of patients. The objectives of this review, targeted above all towards specialists in the field of otorhinolaryngology, are to analyse some significant neurological foundations in order to reach a better understanding of the clinical events that condition the indications and the rehabilitation of patients with cochlear implants, as well as to use this means to foster the growth of the sub-specialty of neurotology.

  4. Electronic retinal implant surgery.

    PubMed

    MacLaren, R E

    2017-02-01

    Blindness due to outer retinal degeneration still remains largely untreatable. Photoreceptor loss removes light sensitivity, but the remaining inner retinal layers, the optic nerve, and indeed the physical structure of the eye itself may be unaffected by the degenerative processes. This provides the opportunity to restore some degree of vision with an electronic device in the subretinal space. In this lecture I will provide an overview of our experiences with the first-generation retinal implant Alpha IMS, developed by Retina Implant AG and based on the technology developed by Eberhart Zrenner as part of a multicentre clinical trial (NCT01024803). We are currently in the process of running a second NIHR-funded clinical trial to assess the next-generation device. The positive results from both studies to date indicate that the retinal implant should be included as a potential treatment for patients who are completely blind from retinitis pigmentosa. Evolution of the technology in future may provide further opportunities for earlier intervention or for other diseases.

  5. Tubo-uterine implantation.

    PubMed

    Green-armytage, V G

    1957-02-01

    After characterizing 2 types of patients presenting with tubal infertility (1 that is "as a rule overweight (the uterus is fixed (and there is easily palpable tubo-uterine pathology," and 1 that is "slim, young, intelligent and often beautiful", 12 1-sentence suggestions are made to increase the success of tubo-uterine implantations in the second type of presenting patient (because the first group has, in the author's mind, disappointing prognosis). Figures are the bulk of the document, with 3 figures demonstrating the type of operation, 3 showing the scheme of the operation, 1 figure showing a posterior view of the implanted tube in utero with a polyethylene prosthesis in situ down to the cervix, and 1 figure showing the instruments used in the operation. A few points of experience the author shares are: 1) operate immediately after a menstrual period; 2) give antibiotics prophylactically and after the procedure; 3) use a Bonney Myomectomy Clamp to elevate the uterus; 4) never use a knife or bistoury at the cornua; 5) use polyethylene rods, when available; and 6) caesarean section is the indicated delivery route after tubo-uterine implantation. Out of 38 patients with the requisite history and findings who have been operated on by this author, 14 have gone to full-term, i.e., 36.1%; 2 have aborted, giving a pregnancy rate of 42.2%, and there was 1 ectopic pregnancy.

  6. Bone Substitutes for Peri-Implant Defects of Postextraction Implants

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Pâmela Letícia; Gulinelli, Jéssica Lemos; Telles, Cristino da Silva; Betoni Júnior, Walter; Chiacchio Buchignani, Vivian; Queiroz, Thallita Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Placement of implants in fresh sockets is an alternative to try to reduce physiological resorption of alveolar ridge after tooth extraction. This surgery can be used to preserve the bone architecture and also accelerate the restorative procedure. However, the diastasis observed between bone and implant may influence osseointegration. So, autogenous bone graft and/or biomaterials have been used to fill this gap. Considering the importance of bone repair for treatment with implants placed immediately after tooth extraction, this study aimed to present a literature review about biomaterials surrounding immediate dental implants. The search included 56 articles published from 1969 to 2012. The results were based on data analysis and discussion. It was observed that implant fixation immediately after extraction is a reliable alternative to reduce the treatment length of prosthetic restoration. In general, the biomaterial should be used to increase bone/implant contact and enhance osseointegration. PMID:24454377

  7. Corridors cause differential seed predation.

    SciTech Connect

    Orrock, John L.; Damschen, Ellen I.

    2005-06-01

    Orrock, John, L., and Ellen I. Damschen. 2005. Corridors cause differential seed predation. Ecol. Apps. 15(3):793-798. Abstract. Corridors that connect disjunct populations are heavily debated in conservation, largely because the effects of corridors have rarely been evaluated by replicated, large-scale studies. Using large-scale experimental landscapes, we found that, in addition to documented positive effects, corridors also have negative impacts on bird-dispersed plants by affecting seed predation, and that overall predation is a function of the seeds primary consumer (rodents or arthropods). Both large-seeded Prunus serotina and small-seeded Rubus allegheniensis experienced greater predation in connected patches. However, P. serotina experienced significantly less seed predation compared to R. allegheniensis in unconnected patches, due to decreased impacts of rodent seed predators on this large-seeded species. Viewed in light of previous evidence that corridors have beneficial impacts by increasing pollination and seed dispersal, this work demonstrates that corridors may have both positive and negative effects for the same plant species at different life stages. Moreover, these effects may differentially affect plant species within the same community: seeds primarily consumed by rodents suffer less predation in unconnected patches. By shifting the impact of rodent and arthropod seed predators, corridors constructed for plant conservation could lead to shifts in the seed bank.

  8. Seeds: A Celebration of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Bob

    The Space Exposed Experiment Developed for Students (SEEDS) Project offered science classes at the 5-12 and college levels the opportunity to conduct experiments involving tomato seeds that had been space-exposed over long periods of time. SEEDS kits were complete packages obtained from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for…

  9. The SEED Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teich, Carolyn R.

    2011-01-01

    Committed to fulfilling the promise of the green economy, the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) launched the Sustainability Education and Economic Development (SEED) initiative (www.theseedcenter.org) in October 2010. The project advances sustainability and clean energy workforce development practices at community colleges by…

  10. The Seeds of Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viola, Herman J.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses "Seeds of Change," a Columbian quincentenary exhibition at the Smithsonian Institution. Describes the rapid transformation of the Americas after contact with the Europeans. Reports that the exhibit explores the destruction of the native population by disease, war, slavery, the ongoing decimation of the rain forest, and the…

  11. Seed cotton unloading systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this article was to review the literature and describe the current technology used by U.S. cotton gins for seed cotton unloading. Unloading systems supply the gin with raw material. Their essential functions are 1) to remove non-cotton materials such as protective covers used duri...

  12. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    SciTech Connect

    DePaoli, D.W.; Tsouris, C.; Yiacoumi, Sotira

    1997-10-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration is a technology under development for the enhanced removal of magnetic and non-magnetic particulates from liquids. This process involves the addition of a small amount of magnetic seed particles (such as naturally occurring iron oxide) to a waste suspension, followed by treatment with a magnetic filter. Non-magnetic and weakly magnetic particles are made to undergo nonhomogeneous flocculation with the seed particles, forming flocs of high magnetic susceptibility that are readily removed by a conventional high-gradient magnetic filter. This technology is applicable to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatants. Magnetic-seeding filtration may be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes. Waste stream characteristics for which the technology may be applicable include (1) particle sizes ranging from relatively coarse (several microns) to colloidal particles, (2) high or low radiation levels, (3) broad-ranging flow rates, (4) low to moderate solids concentration, (5) cases requiring high decontamination factors, and (6) aqueous or non-aqueous liquids. At this point, the technology is at the bench-scale stage of development; laboratory studies and fundamental modeling are currently being employed to determine the capabilities of the process.

  13. Study on the growth and the photosynthetic characteristics of low energy C(+) ion implantation on peanut.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuguo; Xu, Lei; Yang, Peiling; Ren, Shumei

    2013-01-01

    Employing the Nonghua 5 peanut as experimental material, the effects of low energy C(+) ion implantation on caulis height, root length, dry weight, photosynthetic characteristics and leaf water use efficiency (WUE) of Peanut Ml Generation were studied. Four fluences were observed in the experiment. The results showed that ion implantation harmed the peanut seeds because caulis height, root length and dry weight all were lower in the treatments than in CK, and the harm was aggravated with the increase of ion fluence. Both Pn and Tr show a saddle-shape curve due to midday depression of photosynthesis. Low fluence of low energy C(+) ion implantation could increase the diurnal average Pn of peanut. The diurnal variation of Tr did not change as significantly as Pn. The light saturation point (LSP) was restrained by the ions. After low energy C(+) ion implantation, WUE was enhanced. When the fluence increased to a certain level, the WUE began to decrease.

  14. Tree Seed Technology Training Course: Student Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonner, F. T.; And Others

    This manual is intended primarily to train seed collectors, seed-plant managers, seed analysts, and nursery managers, but can serve as a resource for any training course in forest regeneration. It includes both temperate and tropical tree species of all intended uses and covers the following topics: seed biology, seed collection, seed handling,…

  15. 7 CFR 201.15 - Weed seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Weed seeds. 201.15 Section 201.15 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.15 Weed seeds. The percentage of weed seeds shall include seeds of plants considered weeds in the State into which the seed is offered for transportation...

  16. 7 CFR 201.15 - Weed seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Weed seeds. 201.15 Section 201.15 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.15 Weed seeds. The percentage of weed seeds shall include seeds of plants considered weeds in the State into which the seed is offered for transportation...

  17. 7 CFR 201.15 - Weed seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Weed seeds. 201.15 Section 201.15 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.15 Weed seeds. The percentage of weed seeds shall include seeds of plants considered weeds in the State into which the seed is offered for transportation...

  18. 7 CFR 201.15 - Weed seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Weed seeds. 201.15 Section 201.15 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.15 Weed seeds. The percentage of weed seeds shall include seeds of plants considered weeds in the State into which the seed is offered for transportation...

  19. 7 CFR 201.15 - Weed seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weed seeds. 201.15 Section 201.15 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.15 Weed seeds. The percentage of weed seeds shall include seeds of plants considered weeds in the State into which the seed is offered for transportation...

  20. 7 CFR 201.30 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hard seed. 201.30 Section 201.30 Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Vegetable Seeds § 201.30 Hard seed. The label shall show the percentage of hard seed,...

  1. Dose calculation for permanent prostate implants incorporating spatially anisotropic linearly time-resolving edema

    SciTech Connect

    Monajemi, T. T.; Clements, Charles M.; Sloboda, Ron S.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were (i) to develop a dose calculation method for permanent prostate implants that incorporates a clinically motivated model for edema and (ii) to illustrate the use of the method by calculating the preimplant dosimetry error for a reference configuration of {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 137}Cs seeds subject to edema-induced motions corresponding to a variety of model parameters. Methods: A model for spatially anisotropic edema that resolves linearly with time was developed based on serial magnetic resonance imaging measurements made previously at our center to characterize the edema for a group of n=40 prostate implant patients [R. S. Sloboda et al., ''Time course of prostatic edema post permanent seed implant determined by magnetic resonance imaging,'' Brachytherapy 9, 354-361 (2010)]. Model parameters consisted of edema magnitude, {Delta}, and period, T. The TG-43 dose calculation formalism for a point source was extended to incorporate the edema model, thus enabling calculation via numerical integration of the cumulative dose around an individual seed in the presence of edema. Using an even power piecewise-continuous polynomial representation for the radial dose function, the cumulative dose was also expressed in closed analytical form. Application of the method was illustrated by calculating the preimplant dosimetry error, RE{sub preplan}, in a 5x5x5 cm{sup 3} volume for {sup 125}I (Oncura 6711), {sup 103}Pd (Theragenics 200), and {sup 131}Cs (IsoRay CS-1) seeds arranged in the Radiological Physics Center test case 2 configuration for a range of edema relative magnitudes ({Delta}=[0.1,0.2,0.4,0.6,1.0]) and periods (T=[28,56,84] d). Results were compared to preimplant dosimetry errors calculated using a variation of the isotropic edema model developed by Chen et al. [''Dosimetric effects of edema in permanent prostate seed implants: A rigorous solution,'' Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol., Phys. 47, 1405-1419 (2000

  2. An implantable electrical bioreactor for enhancement of cell viability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Lee, Tae Hyung; Song, Yun Mi; Kim, In Sook; Cho, Tae Hyung; Hwang, Sune Jung; Kim, Sung June

    2011-01-01

    Low survival of injected cells which are prepared by ex-vivo culture is main obstacle in cell-based tissue regeneration. To elevate cell adaptation, we designed an implantable electrical bioreactor where human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) can be cultured and stimulated electrically. Bioreactor was composed of biocompatible cylindrical Teflon body containing a flexible polyimide electrode and implantable stimulator. The Teflon body has about 300 holes with a diameter of 300 um for effective nutrients supply inside the bioreactor and has a length of 17 mm and a diameter of 8mm for implantation. After hMSCs seeded on the collagen sponge that serves as scaffold to form a bone tissue graft, they are cultured in the bioreactor with biphasic electric current (BEC) stimulation. BEC stimulation with amplitude of 20/40 uA, duration of 100 us and a frequency of 100 Hz was applied for one week in the early stage of cultivation. Subsequently, after hMSCS were cultured for another week without electrical stimulation, cell response such as cell proliferation, cell attachment and gene expression are evaluated. In vitro and In vivo culture of hMSCs showed 19% and 22% increase in cell proliferation at stimulated groups, compared to unstimulated control. The expression of type I collagen increased significantly at stimulated group. These results suggest that the usage of implantable electrical bioreactor can be a good strategy to enhance the efficiency of stem cell-based tissue engineering.

  3. Seed priming to alleviate salinity stress in germinating seeds.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Ehab A

    2016-03-15

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses that affect crop production in arid and semiarid areas. Seed germination and seedling growth are the stages most sensitive to salinity. Salt stress causes adverse physiological and biochemical changes in germinating seeds. It can affect the seed germination and stand establishment through osmotic stress, ion-specific effects and oxidative stress. The salinity delays or prevents the seed germination through various factors, such as a reduction in water availability, changes in the mobilization of stored reserves and affecting the structural organization of proteins. Various techniques can improve emergence and stand establishment under salt conditions. One of the most frequently utilized is seed priming. The process of seed priming involves prior exposure to an abiotic stress, making a seed more resistant to future exposure. Seed priming stimulates the pre-germination metabolic processes and makes the seed ready for radicle protrusion. It increases the antioxidant system activity and the repair of membranes. These changes promote seed vigor during germination and emergence under salinity stress. The aim of this paper is to review the recent literature on the response of plants to seed priming under salinity stress. The mechanism of the effect of salinity on seed germination is discussed and the seed priming process is summarized. Physiological, biochemical and molecular changes induced by priming that lead to seed enhancement are covered. Plants' responses to some priming agents under salinity stress are reported based on the best available data. For a great number of crops, little information exists and further research is needed.

  4. A simple ion implanter for material modifications in agriculture and gemmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singkarat, S.; Wijaikhum, A.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Intarasiri, S.; Bootkul, D.; Phanchaisri, B.; Techarung, J.; Rhodes, M. W.; Suwankosum, R.; Rattanarin, S.; Yu, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    In our efforts in developing ion beam technology for novel applications in biology and gemmology, an economic simple compact ion implanter especially for the purpose was constructed. The designing of the machine was aimed at providing our users with a simple, economic, user friendly, convenient and easily operateable ion implanter for ion implantation of biological living materials and gemstones for biotechnological applications and modification of gemstones, which would eventually contribute to the national agriculture, biomedicine and gem-industry developments. The machine was in a vertical setup so that the samples could be placed horizontally and even without fixing; in a non-mass-analyzing ion implanter style using mixed molecular and atomic nitrogen (N) ions so that material modifications could be more effective; equipped with a focusing/defocusing lens and an X-Y beam scanner so that a broad beam could be possible; and also equipped with a relatively small target chamber so that living biological samples could survive from the vacuum period during ion implantation. To save equipment materials and costs, most of the components of the machine were taken from decommissioned ion beam facilities. The maximum accelerating voltage of the accelerator was 100 kV, ideally necessary for crop mutation induction and gem modification by ion beams from our experience. N-ion implantation of local rice seeds and cut gemstones was carried out. Various phenotype changes of grown rice from the ion-implanted seeds and improvements in gemmological quality of the ion-bombarded gemstones were observed. The success in development of such a low-cost and simple-structured ion implanter provides developing countries with a model of utilizing our limited resources to develop novel accelerator-based technologies and applications.

  5. Investigation of the Effect of Cell Seeding on Neotissue Formation in a Tissue Engineered Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Elizabeth S.; Best, Cameron; Onwuka, Ekene; Sugiura, Tadahisa; Mahler, Nathan; Bolon, Brad; Niehaus, Andrew; James, Iyore; Hibino, Narutoshi; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Johnson, Jed; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical management of long segment tracheal disease is limited by a paucity of donor tissue and poor performance of synthetic materials. A potential solution is the development of a tissue-engineered tracheal graft (TETG), which promises an autologous airway conduit with growth capacity. Methods We created a TETG by vacuum seeding bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) on a polymeric nanofiber scaffold. First, we evaluated the role of scaffold porosity on cell seeding efficiency in vitro. We then determined the effect of cell seeding on graft performance in vivo using an ovine model. Results Seeding efficiency of normal porosity (NP) grafts was significantly increased when compared to high porosity (HP) grafts (NP: 360.3 ± 69.19 ×103 cells/mm2; HP: 133.7 ± 22.73 ×103 cells/mm2; p<0.004). Lambs received unseeded (n=2) or seeded (n=3) NP scaffolds as tracheal interposition grafts for 6 weeks. Three animals were terminated early due to respiratory complications (n=2 unseeded, n=1 seeded). Seeded TETG explants demonstrated wound healing, epithelial migration, and delayed stenosis when compared to their unseeded counterparts. Conclusion Vacuum seeding BM-MNCs on nanofiber scaffolds for immediate implantation as tracheal interposition grafts is a viable approach to generate TETGs, but further preclinical research is warranted before advocating this technology for clinical application. PMID:26552897

  6. Crop protection by seed coating.

    PubMed

    Ehsanfar, S; Modarres-Sanavy, S A M

    2005-01-01

    Providence of sufficient and healthy food for increasing human population clears the importance of notice to increasing crop production in company with environmental loss reduction. Growth and yield of every plant with sexual reproduction, depends on germination & emergence of sown seeds. Seed is a small alive plant that its biological function is protection and nutrition of embryo. Biological, chemical and physiological characteristics of seed, affect on plant performance & its resistance to undesirable environmental conditions, and even on its total yield. So attention to seed and try to increase its performance is so important. One of the factors that cause reduction in germination percentage and seedling establishment, is seed disease. It's possible to control these diseases by treating the seed before planting it. Coating the seed with pesticides, is one of the ways to gain this goal. Seed coating is a technique in which several material as fertilizers, nutritional elements, moisture attractive or repulsive agents, plant growth regulators, rhizobium inocolum, chemical & pesticide etc, add to seed by adhesive agents and cause to increase seed performance and germination. Seed coating, leads to increase benefits in seed industry, because seeds can use all of their genetic vigor. This technique is used for seeds of many garden plants, valuable crops (such as corn, sunflower, canola, alfalfa,...) and some of the grasses. In this technique that was first used in coating cereal seeds in 1930, a thin and permeable layer of pesticide is stuck on seed surface and prevent damage of seedborn pathogens. This layer is melted or splited after absorption of moisture and suitable temperature by seed, and let the radical to exit the seed. In this approach materials are used accurately with seed, evaporation & leakage of pesticide and also adverse effects of some pesticides on seeds are diminished, and these factors cause to increase the accuracy and performance of pesticide

  7. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation

    PubMed Central

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate. PMID:21124725

  8. Implant biomaterials: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Monika; Singh, Yashpal; Arora, Pooja; Arora, Vipin; Jain, Krati

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate selection of the implant biomaterial is a key factor for long term success of implants. The biologic environment does not accept completely any material so to optimize biologic performance, implants should be selected to reduce the negative biologic response while maintaining adequate function. Every clinician should always gain a thorough knowledge about the different biomaterials used for the dental implants. This article makes an effort to summarize various dental bio-materials which were used in the past and as well as the latest material used now. PMID:25610850

  9. 7 CFR 201.33 - Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.33 Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing. (a) In the case of seed in bulk, the information required...

  10. Deformable registration of x-ray to MRI for post-implant dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seyoun; Song, Danny Y.; Lee, Junghoon

    2016-03-01

    Post-implant dosimetric assessment in prostate brachytherapy is typically performed using CT as the standard imaging modality. However, poor soft tissue contrast in CT causes significant variability in target contouring, resulting in incorrect dose calculations for organs of interest. CT-MR fusion-based approach has been advocated taking advantage of the complementary capabilities of CT (seed identification) and MRI (soft tissue visibility), and has proved to provide more accurate dosimetry calculations. However, seed segmentation in CT requires manual review, and the accuracy is limited by the reconstructed voxel resolution. In addition, CT deposits considerable amount of radiation to the patient. In this paper, we propose an X-ray and MRI based post-implant dosimetry approach. Implanted seeds are localized using three X-ray images by solving a combinatorial optimization problem, and the identified seeds are registered to MR images by an intensity-based points-to-volume registration. We pre-process the MR images using geometric and Gaussian filtering. To accommodate potential soft tissue deformation, our registration is performed in two steps, an initial affine transformation and local deformable registration. An evolutionary optimizer in conjunction with a points-to-volume similarity metric is used for the affine registration. Local prostate deformation and seed migration are then adjusted by the deformable registration step with external and internal force constraints. We tested our algorithm on six patient data sets, achieving registration error of (1.2+/-0.8) mm in < 30 sec. Our proposed approach has the potential to be a fast and cost-effective solution for post-implant dosimetry with equivalent accuracy as the CT-MR fusion-based approach.

  11. Re-endothelialization of rat lung scaffolds through passive, gravity-driven seeding of segment-specific pulmonary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Scarritt, Michelle E; Pashos, Nicholas C; Motherwell, Jessica M; Eagle, Zachary R; Burkett, Brian J; Gregory, Ashley N; Mostany, Ricardo; Weiss, Daniel J; Alvarez, Diego F; Bunnell, Bruce A

    2016-12-12

    Effective re-endothelialization is critical for the use of decellularized scaffolds for ex vivo lung engineering. Current approaches yield insufficiently re-endothelialized scaffolds that hemorrhage and become thrombogenic upon implantation. Herein, gravity-driven seeding coupled with bioreactor culture facilitated widespread distribution and engraftment of endothelial cells throughout rat lung scaffolds. Initially, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were seeded into the pulmonary artery by either gravity-driven, variable flow perfusion seeding or pump-driven, pulsatile flow perfusion seeding. Gravity seeding evenly distributed cells and supported cell survival and re-lining of the vascular walls while perfusion pump-driven seeding led to increased cell fragmentation and death. Using gravity seeding, rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) and rat pulmonary vein endothelial cells (PVECs) attached in intermediate and large vessels, while rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) deposited mostly in microvessels. Combination seeding of PAECs, PVECs, and MVECs led to positive VE-cadherin staining. In addition, combination seeding improved barrier function as assessed by serum albumin extravasation; however, leakage was observed in the distal portions of the re-endothelialized tissue suggesting that recellularization of the alveoli is necessary to complete barrier function of the capillary-alveolar network. Overall, these data indicate that vascular recellularization of rat lung scaffolds is achieved through gravity seeding. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Implantable medical sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2001-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  13. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  14. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  15. Age at implantation and auditory memory in cochlear implanted children.

    PubMed

    Mikic, B; Miric, D; Nikolic-Mikic, M; Ostojic, S; Asanovic, M

    2014-05-01

    Early cochlear implantation, before the age of 3 years, provides the best outcome regarding listening, speech, cognition an memory due to maximal central nervous system plasticity. Intensive postoperative training improves not only auditory performance and language, but affects auditory memory as well. The aim of this study was to discover if the age at implantation affects auditory memory function in cochlear implanted children. A total of 50 cochlear implanted children aged 4 to 8 years were enrolled in this study: early implanted (1-3y) n = 27 and late implanted (4-6y) n = 23. Two types of memory tests were used: Immediate Verbal Memory Test and Forward and Backward Digit Span Test. Early implanted children performed better on both verbal and numeric tasks of auditory memory. The difference was statistically significant, especially on the complex tasks. Early cochlear implantation, before the age of 3 years, significantly improve auditory memory and contribute to better cognitive and education outcomes.

  16. Empty seeds are not always bad: simultaneous effect of seed emptiness and masting on animal seed predation.

    PubMed

    Perea, Ramón; Venturas, Martin; Gil, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Seed masting and production of empty seeds have often been considered independently as different strategies to reduce seed predation by animals. Here, we integrate both phenomena within the whole assemblage of seed predators (both pre and post-dispersal) and in two contrasting microsites (open vs. sheltered) to improve our understanding of the factors controlling seed predation in a wind-dispersed tree (Ulmus laevis). In years with larger crop sizes more avian seed predators were attracted with an increase in the proportion of full seeds predated on the ground. However, for abundant crops, the presence of empty seeds decreased the proportion of full seeds predated. Empty seeds remained for a very long period in the tree, making location of full seeds more difficult for pre-dispersal predators and expanding the overall seed drop period at a very low cost (in dry biomass and allocation of C, N and P). Parthenocarpy (non-fertilized seeds) was the main cause of seed emptiness whereas seed abortion was produced in low quantity. These aborted seeds fell prematurely and, thus, could not work as deceptive seeds. A proportion of 50% empty seeds significantly reduced ground seed predation by 26%. However, a high rate of parthenocarpy (beyond 50% empty seeds) did not significantly reduce seed predation in comparison to 50% empty seeds. We also found a high variability and unpredictability in the production of empty seeds, both at tree and population level, making predator deception more effective. Open areas were especially important to facilitate seed survival since rodents (the main post-dispersal predators) consumed seeds mostly under shrub cover. In elm trees parthenocarpy is a common event that might work as an adaptive strategy to reduce seed predation. Masting per se did not apparently reduce the overall proportion of seeds predated in this wind-dispersed tree, but kept great numbers of seeds unconsumed.

  17. Empty Seeds Are Not Always Bad: Simultaneous Effect of Seed Emptiness and Masting on Animal Seed Predation

    PubMed Central

    Perea, Ramón; Venturas, Martin; Gil, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Seed masting and production of empty seeds have often been considered independently as different strategies to reduce seed predation by animals. Here, we integrate both phenomena within the whole assemblage of seed predators (both pre and post-dispersal) and in two contrasting microsites (open vs. sheltered) to improve our understanding of the factors controlling seed predation in a wind-dispersed tree (Ulmus laevis). In years with larger crop sizes more avian seed predators were attracted with an increase in the proportion of full seeds predated on the ground. However, for abundant crops, the presence of empty seeds decreased the proportion of full seeds predated. Empty seeds remained for a very long period in the tree, making location of full seeds more difficult for pre-dispersal predators and expanding the overall seed drop period at a very low cost (in dry biomass and allocation of C, N and P). Parthenocarpy (non-fertilized seeds) was the main cause of seed emptiness whereas seed abortion was produced in low quantity. These aborted seeds fell prematurely and, thus, could not work as deceptive seeds. A proportion of 50% empty seeds significantly reduced ground seed predation by 26%. However, a high rate of parthenocarpy (beyond 50% empty seeds) did not significantly reduce seed predation in comparison to 50% empty seeds. We also found a high variability and unpredictability in the production of empty seeds, both at tree and population level, making predator deception more effective. Open areas were especially important to facilitate seed survival since rodents (the main post-dispersal predators) consumed seeds mostly under shrub cover. In elm trees parthenocarpy is a common event that might work as an adaptive strategy to reduce seed predation. Masting per se did not apparently reduce the overall proportion of seeds predated in this wind-dispersed tree, but kept great numbers of seeds unconsumed. PMID:23776503

  18. Laser Sintered Porous Ti-6Al-4V Implants Stimulate Vertical Bone Growth.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Alice; Cohen, David J; Kahn, Adrian; Clohessy, Ryan M; Sahingur, Kaan; Newton, Joseph B; Hyzy, Sharon L; Boyan, Barbara D; Schwartz, Zvi

    2017-04-13

    The objective of this study was to examine the ability of 3D implants with trabecular-bone-inspired porosity and micro-/nano-rough surfaces to enhance vertical bone ingrowth. Porous Ti-6Al-4V constructs were fabricated via laser-sintering and processed to obtain micro-/nano-rough surfaces. Male and female human osteoblasts were seeded on constructs to analyze cell morphology and response. Implants were then placed on rat calvaria for 10 weeks to assess vertical bone ingrowth, mechanical stability and osseointegration. All osteoblasts showed higher levels of osteocalcin, osteoprotegerin, vascular endothelial growth factor and bone morphogenetic protein 2 on porous constructs compared to solid laser-sintered controls. Porous implants placed in vivo resulted in an average of 3.1 ± 0.6 mm(3) vertical bone growth and osseointegration within implant pores and had significantly higher pull-out strength values than solid implants. New bone formation and pull-out strength was not improved with the addition of demineralized bone matrix putty. Scanning electron images and histological results corroborated vertical bone growth. This study indicates that Ti-6Al-4V implants fabricated by additive manufacturing to have porosity based on trabecular bone and post-build processing to have micro-/nano-surface roughness can support vertical bone growth in vivo, and suggests that these implants may be used clinically to increase osseointegration in challenging patient cases.

  19. The effect of microstructured surfaces and laminin-derived peptide coatings on soft tissue interactions with titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Werner, Sandra; Huck, Olivier; Frisch, Benoît; Vautier, Dominique; Elkaim, René; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Brunel, Gérard; Tenenbaum, Henri

    2009-04-01

    In the present study, we investigated the dental implant protection from peri-implant inflammation by improving the soft tissue adhesion on the titanium surface. Porous titanium was used to create, at the level of the transmucosal part of the implants (the "neck"), a microstructured 3-dimensional surface that would tightly seal the interface between the implant and soft tissue. Cell-specific adhesion properties were induced via an adhesion peptide derived from laminin-5 coupled to native or cross-linked PLL/PGA multilayered polyelectrolyte films (MPFs), which are used for biomedical device coatings. Porous titanium exhibited good cell-adhesion properties, but the colonisation of the material was further improved by a coating with laminin-5 functionalised MPFs and especially with (PLL/PGA)(6,5)-PGA-peptide film. Focal contact formation was observed on cross-linked architectures, reflecting cell anchorage on these surfaces. In contrast, when seeded on laminin-5-functionalised native films, epithelial cells formed only very diffuse focal contacts, but adhered via hemidesmosome formation. In vivo experiments confirmed that the porous titanium was colonised by cells of soft tissue. Altogether, the results indicate that the microstructure of the implant neck combined with a specific bioactive coating could constitute efficient routes to improve the integration of soft tissue on titanium dental implants, which could significantly protect implants from peri-implant inflammation and enhance long-term implant stabilisation.

  20. [Implant rehabilitation of distal mandibular atrophy using a blade implant].

    PubMed

    Veron, C; Chanavaz, M

    1997-11-01

    After a brief revision of the anatomy of the posterior mandible and its natural resorption pattern, the ramus plate-form implant would be the implant of choice for the rehabilitation of this region. This "site specific" implant is inserted on the top of the crest and superficially impacted within the residual alveolar bone at the distal segment of the horizontal branch and guided to climb parallel to the anterior aspect of the ascending ramus. Its form and specific dimensions are perfectly compatible with the frequently limited quantity of available bone above the nerve canal in patients with advanced atrophy of the posterior mandible. It provides a predictable abutment for the implant-supported or dento-implant-supported prostheses of the posterior mandible.

  1. Small computer algorithms for comparing therapeutic performances of single-plane iridium implants.

    PubMed

    Murphy, D J; Doss, L L

    1984-01-01

    We present a uniform method for selecting an optimum implant geometry by presenting techniques for evaluating the therapeutically significant maximum dose rate (herein referred to as the "maximum dose rate"), the reference isodose (85% of the maximum dose rate), and the area enclosed by the reference isodose contour. The therapeutic performances of planar iridium implants may be compared by evaluating their respective maximum dose rates, reference isodoses , and areas within the reference isodose contours. Because these parameters are mathematically defined, they reproducibly describe each implant geometry. We chose a small microcomputer to develop these comparison algorithms so that the radiotherapist need not have large, expensive computer facilities available to conduct his own studies. The development of these algorithms led to some significant conclusions and recommendations regarding the placement of interstitial implants. Using seeds that are centrally located in the array to evaluate the maximum dose contour avoids underestimating the array's maximum dose rate. This could occur if edge or corner seeds were used. Underestimating the maximum dose rate (and hence the reference isodose contour area) may have a serious therapeutic outcome, because the actual total treatment dosage may be excessive. As ribbon spacing is increased, there is a point beyond which the reference isodose contours become decoupled. At this point, a single relatively uniform reference isodose contour separates into several contours. This effect not only complicates the planimetry calculations, but it also adversely affects the therapeutic efficacy of the implant by producing therapeutically "cold" regions.

  2. Seed-to-seed-to-seed growth and development of Arabidopsis in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Link, Bruce M; Busse, James S; Stankovic, Bratislav

    2014-10-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana was grown from seed to seed wholly in microgravity on the International Space Station. Arabidopsis plants were germinated, grown, and maintained inside a growth chamber prior to returning to Earth. Some of these seeds were used in a subsequent experiment to successfully produce a second (back-to-back) generation of microgravity-grown Arabidopsis. In general, plant growth and development in microgravity proceeded similarly to those of the ground controls, which were grown in an identical chamber. Morphologically, the most striking feature of space-grown Arabidopsis was that the secondary inflorescence branches and siliques formed nearly perpendicular angles to the inflorescence stems. The branches grew out perpendicularly to the main inflorescence stem, indicating that gravity was the key determinant of branch and silique angle and that light had either no role or a secondary role in Arabidopsis branch and silique orientation. Seed protein bodies were 55% smaller in space seed than in controls, but protein assays showed only a 9% reduction in seed protein content. Germination rates for space-produced seed were 92%, indicating that the seeds developed in microgravity were healthy and viable. Gravity is not necessary for seed-to-seed growth of plants, though it plays a direct role in plant form and may influence seed reserves.

  3. Seed-to-Seed-to-Seed Growth and Development of Arabidopsis in Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Link, Bruce M.; Busse, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Arabidopsis thaliana was grown from seed to seed wholly in microgravity on the International Space Station. Arabidopsis plants were germinated, grown, and maintained inside a growth chamber prior to returning to Earth. Some of these seeds were used in a subsequent experiment to successfully produce a second (back-to-back) generation of microgravity-grown Arabidopsis. In general, plant growth and development in microgravity proceeded similarly to those of the ground controls, which were grown in an identical chamber. Morphologically, the most striking feature of space-grown Arabidopsis was that the secondary inflorescence branches and siliques formed nearly perpendicular angles to the inflorescence stems. The branches grew out perpendicularly to the main inflorescence stem, indicating that gravity was the key determinant of branch and silique angle and that light had either no role or a secondary role in Arabidopsis branch and silique orientation. Seed protein bodies were 55% smaller in space seed than in controls, but protein assays showed only a 9% reduction in seed protein content. Germination rates for space-produced seed were 92%, indicating that the seeds developed in microgravity were healthy and viable. Gravity is not necessary for seed-to-seed growth of plants, though it plays a direct role in plant form and may influence seed reserves. Key Words: Arabidopsis—Branch—Inflorescence—Microgravity—Morphology—Seed—Space. Astrobiology 14, 866–875. PMID:25317938

  4. Dosimetry of IRIDIUM-192 and CESIUM-137 Seed Sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomason, Cynthia

    The use of ^{192}Ir in brachytherapy implants both alone and in conjunction with other modalities for the treatment of various types of cancer has greatly increased in recent years. This increased usage has led to a greater need for detailed information concerning the dose distribution surrounding commerically available ^{192} Ir seed sources. This is especially truce since improvements in computer technology along with their increased availability and utilization have enabled more precise calculation of dose distributions. The radiation does distribution in water was measured using LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters for an ^{192}Ir seed source with platinum encapsulation, for an ^{192}Ir seed source with stainless steel encapsulation and for a ^{137}Cs seed source intended as a substitute for ^{192 }Ir. The Electron-Gamma-Shower (EGS) computer code, which is a package for doing Monte Carlo simulation of the transport of photons and electrons in any medium or geometry specified by the user, also was used to study the dose distribution around these seed sources. In addition, the exposure rate constant, exposure rate at 1 meter, transmission through the source capsule, f-factor, and energy distribution exiting the source capsule were evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation of these three sources. Good agreement was seen between the measured data and the Monte Carlo generated data. In addition to producing valuable dosimetric data, this study has demonstrated that Monte Carlo modeling of ^{192} Ir and ^{137}Cs seed sources using the EGS Monte Carlo code can provide an accurate means of evaluating these data.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell seeding promotes reendothelialization of the endovascular stent.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xue; Wang, Guixue; Tang, Chaojun; Zhang, Dechuan; Li, Zhenggong; Du, Dingyuan; Zhang, Zhengcai

    2011-09-01

    This study is designed to make a novel cell seeding stent and to evaluate reendothelialization and anti-restenosis after the stent implantation. In comparison with cell seeding stents utilized in previous studies, Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have advantages on promoting of issue repair. Thus it was employed to improve the reendothelialization effects of endovascular stent in present work. MSCs were isolated by density gradient centrifugation and determined as CD29(+) CD44(+) CD34(-) cells by immunofluorescence and immunocytochemistry; gluten and polylysine coated stents were prepared by ultrasonic atomization spray, and MSCs seeded stents were made through rotation culture according to the optimized conditions that were determined in previous studies. The results from animal experiments, in which male New Zealand white rabbits were used, show that the reendothelialization of MSCs coated stents can be completed within one month; in comparison with 316L stainless steel stents (316L SS stents) and gluten and polylysine coated stents, the intimal hyperplasia and in-stent restenosis are significantly inhibited by MSCs coated stents. Endovascular stent seeded with MSCs promotes reendothelialization and inhibits the intimal hyperplasia and in-stent restenosis compared with the 316L SS stents and the gluten and polylysine coated stents.

  6. Implant Maintenance: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Govila, Vivek; Anand, Vishal; Anand, Bhargavi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The differences in the supporting structure of the implant make them more susceptible to inflammation and bone loss when plaque accumulates as compared to the teeth. Therefore, a comprehensive maintenance protocol should be followed to ensure the longevity of the implant. Material and Method. A research to provide scientific evidence supporting the feasibility of various implant care methods was carried out using various online resources to retrieve relevant studies published since 1985. Results. The electronic search yielded 708 titles, out of which a total of 42 articles were considered appropriate and finally included for the preparation of this review article. Discussion. A typical maintenance visit for patients with dental implants should last 1 hour and should be scheduled every 3 months to evaluate any changes in their oral and general history. It is essential to have a proper instrument selection to prevent damage to the implant surface and trauma to the peri-implant tissues. Conclusion. As the number of patients opting for dental implants is increasing, it becomes increasingly essential to know the differences between natural teeth and implant care and accept the challenges of maintaining these restorations. PMID:27437506

  7. Influence of endothelial cell seeding on platelet deposition and patency in small-diameter Dacron arterial grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.T.; Long, J.A.; Clark, R.E.; Sicard, G.A.; Hopkins, K.T.; Welch, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Serial platelet deposition, surface topography, and patency were evaluated in control (N . 28) and endothelial cell-seeded (N . 28) small-diameter (4 mm inner diameter) USCI Dacron grafts implanted in the carotid and femoral arteries of dogs. All dogs received aspirin (325 mg) daily for 2 weeks starting 24 hours prior to graft implantation. Endothelial cell seeding was performed by mixing suspensions of autologous endothelial cells that had been enzymatically harvested from segments of external jugular vein with blood that was used to preclot the prostheses. The platelet deposition on each graft was quantitated by means of indium 111-labeled platelets and technetium 99m-labeled red cells in a dual-isotope platelet-imaging technique. Platelet deposition on seeded grafts 24 hours after implantation was significantly higher than on the controls (p less than 0.05). Two weeks after implantation platelet deposition on seeded prostheses had decreased to a level significantly lower than that on the controls and continued to decline on serial studies up to 7 months. In contrast to seeded grafts, platelet accumulation on control grafts dramatically increased after the withdrawal of aspirin therapy and was associated with a sharp rise in control graft thromboses. Cumulative 7-month patency for seeded prostheses was significantly higher than for the controls (96% and 29%, respectively; p less than 0.001). We conclude that endothelial cell seeding in combination with short-term aspirin therapy is a simple, reliable diameter Dacron prostheses. Abrupt withdrawal of aspirin therapy may be contraindicated in nonseeded control grafts because it results in increased platelet deposition and thrombosis.

  8. Penile urethra replacement with autologous cell-seeded tubularized collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    De Filippo, Roger E; Kornitzer, Benjamin S; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Acellular collagen matrices have been used as an onlay material for urethral reconstruction. However, cell-seeded matrices have been recommended for tubularized urethral repairs. In this study we investigated whether long segmental penile urethral replacement using autologous cell-seeded tubularized collagen-based matrix is feasible. Autologous bladder epithelial and smooth muscle cells from nine male rabbits were grown and seeded onto preconfigured tubular matrices constructed from decellularized bladder matrices obtained from lamina propria. The entire anterior penile urethra was resected in 15 rabbits. Urethroplasties were performed with tubularized matrices seeded with cells in nine animals, and with matrices without cells in six. Serial urethrograms were performed at 1, 3 and 6 months. Retrieved urethral tissues were analysed using histo- and immunohistochemistry, western blot analyses and organ bath studies. The urethrograms showed that animals implanted with cell-seeded matrices maintained a wide urethral calibre without strictures. In contrast, the urethras with unseeded scaffolds collapsed and developed strictures. Histologically, a transitional cell layer surrounded by muscle was observed in the cell-seeded constructs. The epithelial and smooth muscle phenotypes were confirmed with AE1/AE3 and α-actin antibodies. Organ bath studies of the neourethras confirmed both physiological contractility and the presence of neurotransmitters. Tubularized collagen matrices seeded with autologous cells can be used successfully for long segmental penile urethra replacement, while implantation of tubularized collagen matrices without cells leads to poor tissue development and stricture formation. The cell-seeded collagen matrices are able to form new tissue, which is histologically similar to native urethra.

  9. Regenerative Surgical Treatment of Peri-implantitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Failure of Dental Implant Due to Infection; Infection; Inflammation; Peri-implantitis; Bacterial Infections; Bleeding of Subgingival Space; Molecular Sequence Variation; Periodontal Diseases; Mouth Diseases

  10. Progestin implants for female contraception.

    PubMed

    Croxatt, Horacio B

    2002-01-01

    Four different implants, in the form of capsules or covered rods, that release one of the synthetic progestins levonorgestrel, etonogestrel, Nestorone, or Elcometrine and nomegestrol acetate were reviewed. Biocompatible polymers or copolymers of polydimethyl/polymethylvinyl-siloxanes or ethylvinylacetate are used to hold the steroid crystals and to control the rate of release. Once inserted under the skin, these implants release the corresponding steroid continuously over prolonged periods, a process that can be readily interrupted by implant removal. During long-term use of the implant, the released steroid circulates in blood at a fairly stable level. The physical characteristics of the implants, including drug contents and rate of release, serum levels of the progestin during use, and the duration of their effective life are described. Total steroid loads vary in the range of 50 mg to 216 mg; average release rates are in the range of 30-100 ug/day, and effective lives from 6 months to 7 years.

  11. Bimodal fitting or bilateral implantation?

    PubMed

    Ching, Teresa Y C; Massie, Robyn; Van Wanrooy, Emma; Rushbrooke, Emma; Psarros, Colleen

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarises findings from studies that evaluated the benefits of bimodal fitting (combining a hearing aid and a cochlear implant in opposite ears) or bilateral cochlear implantation, relative to unilateral implantation, for children (Ching et al., 2007). On average, the size of binaural speech intelligibility advantages due to redundancy and head shadow was similar for the two bilateral conditions. An added advantage of bimodal fitting was that the low-frequency cues provided by acoustic hearing complemented the high-frequency cues conveyed by electric hearing in perception of voice and music. Some children with bilateral cochlear implants were able to use spatial separation between speech and noise to improve speech perception in noise. This is possibly a combined effect of the directional microphones in their implant systems and their ability to use spatial cues. The evidence to date supports the provision of hearing in two ears as the standard of care.

  12. Cochlear implantation following cerebellar surgery.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Shahad; Mawman, Deborah; Green, Kevin

    2011-08-01

    Cochlear implantation in patients with known central nervous system conditions can result in wide-ranging outcomes. The aim of this study is to report two cases of cochlear implantation outcomes in patients with acquired cerebellar ataxia following cerebellar surgery. The first is a female implanted with the Nucleus 24 implant in September 2000 and the second is a male implanted with a MED-EL Sonata Flexsoft electro-acoustic stimulation in July 2009. Programming these patients resulted in significant non-auditory stimulation which resulted in less than optimum map fittings. The patients did not gain any open set speech perception benefit although both of them gained an awareness of sound with the device. However, patient 2 elected to become a non-user because of the limited benefit.

  13. Impact of interseed attenuation and tissue composition for permanent prostate implants

    SciTech Connect

    Carrier, Jean-Francois; Beaulieu, Luc; Therriault-Proulx, Francois; Roy, Rene

    2006-03-15

    The purpose is to evaluate the impact of interseed attenuation and prostate composition for prostate treatment plans with {sup 125}I permanent seed implants using the Monte Carlo (MC) method. The effect of seed density (number of seeds per prostate unit volume) is specifically investigated. The study focuses on treatment plans that were generated for clinical cases. For each plan, four different dose calculation techniques are compared: TG-43 based calculation, superposition MC, full MC with water prostate, and full MC with realistic prostate tissue. The prostate tissue description is from the ICRP report 23 (W. S. Snyer, M. J. Cook, E. S. Nasset, L. R. Karkhausen, G. P. Howells, and I. H. Tipton, ''Report of the task group on reference man,'' Technical Report 23, International Commission on Radiological Protection, 1974). According to the comparisons, the seed density has an influence on interseed attenuation. A plan with a typical low seed density (42 0.6 mCi seeds in a 26 cm{sup 3} prostate) suffers a 1.2% drop in the CTV D{sub 90} value due to interseed attenuation. A drop of 3.0% is calculated for a higher seed density (75 0.3 mCi seeds, same prostate). The influence of the prostate composition is similar for all seed densities and prostate sizes. The difference between MC simulations in water and MC simulations in prostate tissue is between 4.4% and 4.8% for the D{sub 90} parameter. Overall, the effect on D{sub 90} is ranging from 5.8% to 12.8% when comparing clinically approved TG-43 and MC simulations in prostate tissue. The impact varies from one patient to the other and depends on the prostate size and the number of seeds. This effect can reach a significant level when reporting correlations between clinical effect and deposited dose.

  14. Hydrogen Implants for Layer Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherekdjian, S.; Couillard, J. G.; Wilcox, C.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers at Corning Incorporated have developed a process whereby single crystal silicon thin films are transferred onto a flat panel display glass substrate using hydrogen ion implantation. The energy of the implant controls the effective exfoliation thickness, agreeing well with SRIM calculations, while the hydrogen ion dose controls the size of the platelets formed. The ion dose was found to influence the final void defect count in exfoliated films. Finally, the ion beam and ion implant end-station cooling characteristics were investigated. These parameters control the effective implant heat load generated during ion beam processing. The temperature at which exfoliation occurs during an exfoliation heat cycle was found to be inversely proportional to the hydrogen ion dose when the temperature during ion implantation is <100 °C. The most sensitive exfoliation temperature to ion dose dependence was observed for cooler implants, i.e. <35 °C. Data indicates that at the minimum exfoliation dose the exfoliation temperature is reduced significantly by increasing the implant heat generated during ion beam processing. Higher hydrogen doses than the minimum required for exfoliation exhibit only a small exfoliation temperature variation with ion dose. By optimizing the implant heat load generated during ion beam processing it is observed that the efficiency of the exfoliation process is also enhanced. Implant temperatures of 150 to 160 °C were found to further reduce the minimum implant dose required for exfoliation by an additional 5%, as verified by calorimetric measurements. These results enable us to further conclude that hydrogen out-diffusion is not significant in this process.

  15. Seed size selection by olive baboons.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Britta Kerstin; Linsenmair, Karl Eduard

    2008-10-01

    Seed size is an important plant fitness trait that can influence several steps between fruiting and the establishment of a plant's offspring. Seed size varies considerably within many plant species, yet the relevance of the trait for intra-specific fruit choice by primates has received little attention. Primates may select certain seed sizes within a species for a number of reasons, e.g. to decrease indigestible seed load or increase pulp intake per fruit. Olive baboons (Papio anubis, Cercopithecidae) are known to select seed size in unripe and mature pods of Parkia biglobosa (Mimosaceae) differentially, so that pods with small seeds, and an intermediate seed number, contribute most to dispersal by baboons. We tested whether olive baboons likewise select for smaller ripe seeds within each of nine additional fruit species whose fruit pulp baboons commonly consume, and for larger seeds in one species in which baboons feed on the seeds. Species differed in fruit type and seed number per fruit. For five of these species, baboons dispersed seeds that were significantly smaller than seeds extracted manually from randomly collected fresh fruits. In contrast, for three species, baboons swallowed seeds that were significantly longer and/or wider than seeds from fresh fruits. In two species, sizes of ingested seeds and seeds from fresh fruits did not differ significantly. Baboons frequently spat out seeds of Drypetes floribunda (Euphorbiaceae) but not those of other plant species having seeds of equal size. Oral processing of D. floribunda seeds depended on seed size: seeds that were spat out were significantly larger and swallowed seeds smaller, than seeds from randomly collected fresh fruits. We argue that seed size selection in baboons is influenced, among other traits, by the amount of pulp rewarded per fruit relative to seed load, which is likely to vary with fruit and seed shape.

  16. Tribological properties of nitrogen implanted and boron implanted steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, K.T.; Walter, K.C.; Griffin, A.J. Jr.; Kung, H.; Lu, Y.; Nastasi, M.; Tesmer, J.R.; Fayeulle, S.

    1996-06-01

    Samples of a steel with high chrome content was implanted separately with 75 keV nitrogen ions and with 75 keV boron ions. Implanted doses of each ion species were 2-, 4-, and 8 {times} 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}. Retained doses were measured using resonant non-Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. Tribological properties were determined using a pin-on-disk test with a 6-mm diameter ruby pin with a velocity of 0.94 m/min. Testing was done at 10% humidity with a load of 377 g. Wear rate and coefficient of friction were determined from these tests. While reduction in the wear rate for nitrogen implanted materials was observed, greater reduction (more than an order of magnitude) was observed for boron implanted materials. In addition, reduction in the coefficient of friction for high-dose boron implanted materials was observed. Nano-indentation revealed a hardened layer near the surface of the material. Results from grazing incidence x-ray diffraction suggest the formation of Fe{sub 2}N and Fe{sub 3}N in the nitrogen implanted materials and Fe{sub 3}B in the boron implanted materials. Results from transmission electron microscopy will be presented.

  17. Comparison of Intraoperatively Built Custom Linked Seeds Versus Loose Seed Gun Applicator Technique Using Real-Time Intraoperative Planning for Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zauls, A. Jason; Ashenafi, Michael S.; Onicescu, Georgiana; Clarke, Harry S.; Marshall, David T.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report our dosimetric results using a novel push-button seed delivery system that constructs custom links of seeds intraoperatively. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2007, 43 patients underwent implantation using a gun applicator (GA), and from 2007 to 2008, 48 patientsunderwent implantation with a novel technique allowing creation of intraoperatively built custom links of seeds (IBCL). Specific endpoint analyses were prostate D90% (pD90%), rV100% > 1.3 cc, and overall time under anesthesia. Results: Final analyses included 91 patients, 43 GA and 48 IBCL. Absolute change in pD90% ({Delta}pD90%) between intraoperative and postoperative plans was evaluated. Using GA method, the {Delta}pD90% was -8.1Gy and -12.8Gy for I-125 and Pd-103 implants, respectively. Similarly, the IBCL technique resulted in a {Delta}pD90% of -8.7Gy and -9.8Gy for I-125 and Pd-103 implants, respectively. No statistically significant difference in {Delta}pD90% was found comparing methods. The GA method had two intraoperative and 10 postoperative rV100% >1.3 cc. For IBCL, five intraoperative and eight postoperative plans had rV100% >1.3 cc. For GA, the mean time under anesthesia was 75 min and 87 min for Pd-103 and I-125 implants, respectively. For IBCL, the mean time was 86 and 98 min for Pd-103 and I-125. There was a statistical difference between the methods when comparing mean time under anesthesia. Conclusions: Dosimetrically relevant endpoints were equivalent between the two methods. Currently, time under anesthesia is longer using the IBCL technique but has decreased over time. IBCL is a straightforward brachytherapy technique that can be implemented into clinical practice as an alternative to gun applicators.

  18. Double valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Stassano, Paolo; Mannacio, Vito; Musumeci, Antonino; Golino, Alessandro; Maida, Piero; Ferrigno, Vincenzo; Buonocore, Gaetano; Spampinato, Nicola

    1991-01-01

    From January 1976 through December 1987, 194 patients with a mean age of 43.3 ± 13.7 years (range, 11 to 74 years) underwent double (mitral and aortic) replacement of native valves with 8 types of bioprostheses: Carpentier-Edwards, 127 valves; Hancock, 76 valves; Liotta-Bioimplant, 57 valves; Ionescu-Shiley, 53 valves; Vascor, 27 valves; Carpentier-Edwards Pericardial, 22 valves; Angell-Shiley, 20 valves; and Implamedic, 6 valves. Concomitant cardiac procedures were performed in 25 patients (12.8%). There were 18 operative deaths (9.27%). Our retrospective analysis was restricted to 352 bioprostheses implanted in the 176 patients who survived surgery and were considered at risk for valve tissue failure. The overall cumulative duration of follow-up was 1,174.1 patient-years (range, 1 to 13 years). The durations of follow-up for specific valves were: Carpentier-Edwards, 920.2 valve-years; Hancock, 383.8 valve-years; Liotta-Bioimplant, 310.2 valve-years; Ionescu-Shiley, 357.7 valve-years; Vascor, 131.2 valve-years; Carpentier-Edwards Pericardial, 52.0 valve-years; Angell-Shiley, 167.0 valve-years; and Implamedic, 31.0 valve-years. Thirty patients had thromboembolic accidents, for a linearized incidence of 2.5% per patient-year. At 13 years, the actuarial freedom from thromboembolic accidents was 85.8% ± 10.7%. Nine patients had endocarditis, for a linearized incidence of 0.7% per patient-year. At 13 years, the actuarial freedom from endocarditis was 92.0% ± 1.5%. Twenty-four patients had valve tissue failure, for a cumulative linearized incidence of 1.87% per valve-year. The cumulative actuarial probability of freedom from valve tissue failure was 78.6% ± 3.7% at 10 years and 51.2% ± 10.7% at 13 years. The 24 patients with valve tissue failure all underwent reoperation: 20 of these had double valve replacement, 3 had aortic valve replacement alone, and 1 had mitral valve replacement alone. The mean interval between initial valve implantation and reoperation was

  19. Commercial Seed Lots Exhibit Reduced Seed Dormancy in Comparison to Wild Seed Lots of Echinacea purpurea

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Luping; Wang, Xiping; Chen, Ying; Scalzo, Richard; Widrlechner, Mark P.; Davis, Jeanine M.; Hancock, James F.

    2005-01-01

    Seed germination patterns were studied in E. purpurea (L.) Moench grouped by seed source, one group of seven lots from commercially cultivated populations and a second group of nine lots regenerated from ex situ conserved wild populations. Germination tests were conducted in a growth chamber in light (40 μmol·m−2·s−1) or darkness at 25 °C for 20 days after soaking the seeds in water for 10 minutes. Except for two seed lots from wild populations, better germination was observed for commercially cultivated populations in light (90% mean among seed lots, ranging from 82% to 95%) and in darkness (88% mean among seed lots, ranging from 82% to 97%) than for wild populations in light (56% mean among seed lots, ranging from 9% to 92%) or in darkness (37% mean among seed lots, ranging from 4% to 78%). No germination difference was measured between treatments in light and darkness in the commercially cultivated populations, but significant differences were noted for treatments among wild populations. These results suggest that repeated cycles of sowing seeds during cultivation without treatments for dormancy release resulted in reduced seed dormancy in E. purpurea. PMID:16429595

  20. Surface Properties and Osteoblastic Cytocompatibility of Two Blasted and Acid-Etched Titanium Implant Systems with Distinct Microtopography

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Pedro; Gomes, Pedro de Sousa; Sampaio, Paula; Juodzbalys, Gintaras; Afonso, Américo

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The aim of this study is to compare two commercially available screw-type sandblasted and acid-etched (SLA) Ti implant systems from Eckermann Laboratorium S.L., with similar geometry and distinct microtopography, regarding surface properties and osteoblastic cytocompatibility. Material and Methods Implant I (referred as a conventional SLA system) and Implant II (a system patented as Eckcyte®) were characterized for macro and microtopograpphy, surface roughness and chemical composition. For the cytocompatibility studies, human bone marrow osteoblastic cells were seeded over the implants' surface, and the cell response was assessed for cell adhesion and proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and matrix mineralization. Results Implant I presented a rough surface with irregularly shaped and sized cavities among flatter-appearing areas, whereas Implant II exhibited a homogeneous rough microporous surface. Compared to Implant I, Implant II presented higher Ra values (0.8 [SD 0.008] μm and 1.21 [SD 0.15] μm, respectively, P < 0.05) and also increased values of Rz, Rt and Rsm, a more negative value of Rsk, and similar RKu values. XPS showed the expected presence of Ti, O, C and N; Al, Si, F, P and Ca were detected in low concentrations. Implant II exhibited significantly lower Al levels. Both implants supported the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic cells. Implant II showed a thicker fibrilar cell layer and an earlier onset and more abundant matrix mineralization. Conclusions The homogeneous rough and microporous surface of Implant II is most probably a main contributor for its improved cell response. PMID:24422006

  1. The mechanical defence advantage of small seeds.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Evan C; Wright, S Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Seed size and toughness affect seed predators, and size-dependent investment in mechanical defence could affect relationships between seed size and predation. We tested how seed toughness and mechanical defence traits (tissue density and protective tissue content) are related to seed size among tropical forest species. Absolute toughness increased with seed size. However, smaller seeds had higher specific toughness both within and among species, with the smallest seeds requiring over 2000 times more energy per gram to break than the largest seeds. Investment in mechanical defence traits varied widely but independently of the toughness-mass allometry. Instead, a physical scaling relationship confers a toughness advantage on small seeds independent of selection on defence traits and without a direct cost. This scaling relationship may contribute to seed size diversity by decreasing fitness differences among large and small seeds. Allometric scaling of toughness reconciles predictions and conflicting empirical relationships between seed size and predation.

  2. Management of fluocinolone implant dissociation during implant exchange.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Steven; Cebulla, Colleen M; Witherspoon, S Robert; Emerson, Geoffrey G; Emerson, M Vaughn; Suhler, Eric B; Albini, Thomas A; Flaxel, Christina J

    2009-09-01

    Three patients with chronic, noninfectious uveitis requiring immunosuppressive therapy underwent fluocinolone acetonide (FA) implant exchange complicated by dissociation of the medication reservoir from its anchoring strut. In 2 patients, the medication reservoir descended into the vitreous cavity and required pars plana vitrectomy with intraocular foreign body removal techniques for its retrieval. The use of viscoelastic or perfluorocarbon to elevate the device was helpful in the safe removal of the FA implant device. Surgeons performing FA implant exchange should be aware of this potential complication and anticipate the possible need for vitreoretinal instrumentation and personnel. Patients undergoing FA explantation or exchange should be counseled regarding this potential complication prior to surgery.

  3. The Seed Scene: An Outdoor Teaching Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1976-01-01

    The study of seeds and their dispersal is an excellent way to help students understand basic concepts which will help them in their adult decision-making activities regarding environmental problems. This article discusses the purpose of seeds, aspects of seeds, and collecting seeds. Classroom and outdoor activities with seeds are listed. (NQ)

  4. 7 CFR 201.21 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hard seed. 201.21 Section 201.21 Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.21 Hard seed. The label shall show the percentage of hard...

  5. Implantable, multifunctional, bioresorbable optics

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hu; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Siebert, Sean M.; Pritchard, Eleanor M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Panilaitis, Bruce J. B.; Brenckle, Mark A.; Amsden, Jason J.; Levitt, Jonathan; Fantini, Sergio; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in personalized medicine are symbiotic with the development of novel technologies for biomedical devices. We present an approach that combines enhanced imaging of malignancies, therapeutics, and feedback about therapeutics in a single implantable, biocompatible, and resorbable device. This confluence of form and function is accomplished by capitalizing on the unique properties of silk proteins as a mechanically robust, biocompatible, optically clear biomaterial matrix that can house, stabilize, and retain the function of therapeutic components. By developing a form of high-quality microstructured optical elements, improved imaging of malignancies and of treatment monitoring can be achieved. The results demonstrate a unique family of devices for in vitro and in vivo use that provide functional biomaterials with built-in optical signal and contrast enhancement, demonstrated here with simultaneous drug delivery and feedback about drug delivery with no adverse biological effects, all while slowly degrading to regenerate native tissue. PMID:23150544

  6. [Seed aging and survival mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Grappin, Philippe; Bourdais, Gildas; Collet, Boris; Godin, Béatrice; Job, Dominique; Ogé, Laurent; Jullien, Marc; Rajjou, Loïc

    2008-01-01

    Aging and death are universal to living systems. In temperate climate latitudes the mature seeds of higher plants are exposed to aging and have developed resistance mechanisms allowing survival and plant propagation. In addition to the physicochemical properties of the seed that confer stress resistance, the protein metabolism contributes importantly to longevity mechanisms. Recently, genetic studies have demonstrated the occurrence of the Protein L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase repair enzyme in controlling age-related protein damages and seed survival. These protective mechanisms by protein repair are widespread in all kingdoms, so that the use of seeds as models to study these controlling processes offers the prospect of understanding longevity mechanisms better.

  7. Metal deposition using seed layers

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

    2013-11-12

    Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

  8. Detection and correction of patient movement in prostate brachytherapy seed reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Steve T.; Cho, Paul S.; Marks, Robert J., II; Narayanan, Sreeram

    2005-05-01

    Intraoperative dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy can help optimize the dose distribution and potentially improve clinical outcome. Evaluation of dose distribution during the seed implant procedure requires the knowledge of 3D seed coordinates. Fluoroscopy-based seed localization is a viable option. From three x-ray projections obtained at different gantry angles, 3D seed positions can be determined. However, when local anaesthesia is used for prostate brachytherapy, the patient movement during fluoroscopy image capture becomes a practical problem. If uncorrected, the errors introduced by patient motion between image captures would cause seed mismatches. Subsequently, the seed reconstruction algorithm would either fail to reconstruct or yield erroneous results. We have developed an algorithm that permits detection and correction of patient movement that may occur between fluoroscopy image captures. The patient movement is decomposed into translational shifts along the tabletop and rotation about an axis perpendicular to the tabletop. The property of spatial invariance of the co-planar imaging geometry is used for lateral movement correction. Cranio-caudal movement is corrected by analysing the perspective invariance along the x-ray axis. Rotation is estimated by an iterative method. The method can detect and correct for the range of patient movement commonly seen in the clinical environment. The algorithm has been implemented for routine clinical use as the preprocessing step for seed reconstruction.

  9. An experimental palladium-103 seed (OptiSeed{sup exp}) in a biocompatible polymer without a gold marker: Characterization of dosimetric parameters including the interseed effect

    SciTech Connect

    Abboud, F.; Scalliet, P.; Vynckier, S.

    2008-12-15

    Permanent implantation of {sup 125}I (iodine) or {sup 103}Pd (palladium) sources is a popular treatment option in the management of early stage prostate cancer. New sources are being developed, some of which are being marketed for different clinical applications. A new technique of adjuvant stereotactic permanent seed breast implant, similar to that used in the treatment of prostate cancer, has been proposed by [N. Jansen et al., Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 67, 1052-1058 (2007)] with encouraging results. The presence of artifacts from the metallic seeds, however, can disturb follow-up imaging. The development of plastic seeds has reduced these artifacts. This paper presents a feasibility study of the advantages of palladium-103 seeds, encapsulated with a biocompatible polymer, for future clinical applications, and on the effect of the gold marker on the dosimetric characteristics of such seeds. Experimental palladium seeds, OptiSeed{sup exp}, were manufactured by International Brachytherapy (IBt), Seneffe, Belgium, from a biocompatible polymer, including the marker. Apart from the absence of a gold marker, the studied seed has an identical design to the OptiSeed{sup 103}[Phys. Med. Biol. 50, 1493-1504 (2005)]; [Appl. Radiat. Isot. 63, 311-321 (2005)]. Polymer encapsulation was preferred by IBt in order to reduce the quantity of radioactive material needed for a given dose rate and to reduce the anisotropy of the radiation field around the seed. In addition, this design is intended to decrease the interseed effects that can occur as a result of the marker and the encapsulation. Dosimetric measurements were performed using LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (1 mm{sup 3}) in solid water phantoms (WT1). Measured data were compared to Monte Carlo simulated data in solid water using the MCNP code, version 4C. Updated cross sections [Med. Phys. 30, 701-711 (2003)] were used. As the measured and calculated data were in agreement, Monte Carlo calculations were then

  10. Patient-Specific Orthopaedic Implants.

    PubMed

    Haglin, Jack M; Eltorai, Adam E M; Gil, Joseph A; Marcaccio, Stephen E; Botero-Hincapie, Juliana; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-11-01

    Patient-specific orthopaedic implants are emerging as a clinically promising treatment option for a growing number of conditions to better match an individual's anatomy. Patient-specific implant (PSI) technology aims to reduce overall procedural costs, minimize surgical time, and maximize patient outcomes by achieving better biomechanical implant fit. With this commercially-available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used in conjunction with specialized computer programs to create preoperative patient-specific surgical plans and to develop custom cutting guides from 3-D reconstructed images of patient anatomy. Surgeons can then place these temporary guides or "jigs" during the procedure, allowing them to better recreate the exact resections of the computer-generated surgical plan. Over the past decade, patient-specific implants have seen increased use in orthopaedics and they have been widely indicated in total knee arthroplasty, total hip arthroplasty, and corrective osteotomies. Patient-specific implants have also been explored for use in total shoulder arthroplasty and spinal surgery. Despite their increasing popularity, significant support for PSI use in orthopaedics has been lacking in the literature and it is currently uncertain whether the theoretical biomechanical advantages of patient-specific orthopaedic implants carry true advantages in surgical outcomes when compared to standard procedures. The purpose of this review was to assess the current status of patient-specific orthopaedic implants, to explore their future direction, and to summarize any comparative published studies that measure definitive surgical characteristics of patient-specific orthopaedic implant use such as patient outcomes, biomechanical implant alignment, surgical cost, patient blood loss, or patient recovery.

  11. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  12. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize... Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification as seed potatoes under subheading 0701.10.00, as seed corn (maize) under subheading...

  13. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize... Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification as seed potatoes under subheading 0701.10.00, as seed corn (maize) under subheading...

  14. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize... Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification as seed potatoes under subheading 0701.10.00, as seed corn (maize) under subheading...

  15. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize... Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification as seed potatoes under subheading 0701.10.00, as seed corn (maize) under subheading...

  16. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize... Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification as seed potatoes under subheading 0701.10.00, as seed corn (maize) under subheading...

  17. Seed to Seed, The Secret Life of Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a book review of "Seed to Seed, The Secret Life of Plants", by Nicholas Harberd. The book is a diary of ruminations/introspections about plant development and about the main research topic of Nick Harberd’s laboratory. His intended audience is initially nonscientists; many of the explanation...

  18. Male chest enhancement: pectoral implants.

    PubMed

    Benito-Ruiz, J; Raigosa, J M; Manzano-Surroca, M; Salvador, L

    2008-01-01

    The authors present their experience with the pectoral muscle implant for male chest enhancement in 21 patients. The markings and technique are thoroughly described. The implants used were manufactured and custom made. The candidates for implants comprised three groups: group 1 (18 patients seeking chest enhancement), group 2 (1 patient with muscular atrophy), and group 3 (2 patients with muscular injuries). Because of the satisfying results obtained, including significant enhancement of the chest contour and no major complications, this technique is used for an increasing number of male cosmetic surgeries.

  19. [Considerations for optimizing joint implants].

    PubMed

    Tensi, H M; Orloff, S; Gese, H; Hooputra, H

    1994-09-01

    Despite the increasing use of orthopaedic implants, there is still a lack of adequate testing procedures and legal guidelines. Examples of the consequences of this neglect are given. Modern techniques for the calculation of stresses (finite element method [FEM]) and the prediction of life cycle duration are presented. Such methods, applied in the development and manufacturing phases of standard and special implants, may ensure an adequate prosthetic life cycle, with particular emphasis being placed on the biomedical optimization of the implant/bone interface and surrounding bone.

  20. Effect of Ar Ion Beam Implantation on Morphological and Physiological Characteristics of Liquorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch) Under Short-Term Artificial Drought Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangsheng; Wu, Lijun; Yu, Lixiang; Wei, Shenglin; Liu, Jingnan; Yu, Zengliang

    2007-04-01

    Ar+ ion beam with low energy of 30 keV was implanted into liquorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch) seeds at the doses of 0, 600, 900 and 1200 × (2.6 × 1013) ions/cm2, respectively. The seeds were sowed in pots and after one month the plants were subjected to different drought conditions for two months. Then the plants' morphological and physiological characteristics, anti-oxidation enzymes and levels of endogenous hormones were investigated. The results showed that ion implantation at a proper dose can greatly enhance the liquorice seedlings' resistance against drought stress.

  1. Accidental Implant Screwdriver Ingestion: A Rare Complication during Implant Placement

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anshul; Baliga, Shridhar D

    2014-01-01

    One of the complications during a routine dental implant placement is accidental ingestion of the implant instruments, which can happen when proper precautions are not taken. Appropriate radiographs should be taken to locate the correct position of foreign body; usually the foreign body passes asymptomatically from gastrointestinal tract but sometimes it may lead to intestinal obstruction, perforations and impactions. The aim of this article is to report accidental ingestion of 19 mm long screw driver by a senile patient. PMID:25628702

  2. Occlusion on oral implants: current clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Koyano, K; Esaki, D

    2015-02-01

    Proper implant occlusion is essential for adequate oral function and the prevention of adverse consequences, such as implant overloading. Dental implants are thought to be more prone to occlusal overloading than natural teeth because of the loss of the periodontal ligament, which provides shock absorption and periodontal mechanoreceptors, which provide tactile sensitivity and proprioceptive motion feedback. Although many guidelines and theories on implant occlusion have been proposed, few have provided strong supportive evidence. Thus, we performed a narrative literature review to ascertain the influence of implant occlusion on the occurrence of complications of implant treatment and discuss the clinical considerations focused on the overloading factors at present. The search terms were 'dental implant', 'dental implantation', 'dental occlusion' and 'dental prosthesis'. The inclusion criteria were literature published in English up to September 2013. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), prospective cohort studies and case-control studies with at least 20 cases and 12 months follow-up interval were included. Based on the selected literature, this review explores factors related to the implant prosthesis (cantilever, crown/implant ratio, premature contact, occlusal scheme, implant-abutment connection, splinting implants and tooth-implant connection) and other considerations, such as the number, diameter, length and angulation of implants. Over 700 abstracts were reviewed, from which more than 30 manuscripts were included. We found insufficient evidence to establish firm clinical guidelines for implant occlusion. To discuss the ideal occlusion for implants, further well-designed RCTs are required in the future.

  3. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells as a Tool for Dental Implant Osseointegration: an Experimental Study in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Eriberto; Botticelli, Daniele; Sivolella, Stefano; Bengazi, Franco; Guazzo, Riccardo; Sbricoli, Luca; Ricci, Sara; Ferroni, Letizia; Gardin, Chiara; Velez, Joaquin Urbizo; Zavan, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The biological interaction between the jaw bones and dental implant is fundamental for the long-term success of dental implant placement. Nevertheless, the insufficient bone volume remains a major clinical problem, especially in case of immediate dental implant. Using a canine model, the present study proves the regenerative potential of adipose- derived stem cells (ADSCs) to repair peri-implant bone defects occurring in immediate dental implant placement. In six labradors, all mandibular premolars and the first molars were extracted bilaterally and three months later dental implants were installed with a marginal gap. The marginal defects were filled with hydroxyapatite (HA)-based scaffolds previously seeded with ADSCs. After one month of healing, specimens were prepared for histological and histomorphometric evaluations. Histological analyses of ground sections show that ADSCs significantly increase bone regeneration. Several new vessels, osteoblasts and new bone matrix were detected. By contrast, no inflammatory cells have been revealed. ADSCs could be used to accelerate bone healing in peri- implant defects in case of immediate dental implant placement. PMID:27014644

  4. A guide to forest seed handling

    SciTech Connect

    Willan, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    This guide to forest seed handling focuses on seed quality, i.e., the physiological viability and vigor of the seeds. Seed and fruit development, germination, and dormancy and the fundamentals of planning seed collections are covered. The guide includes discussions on seed collection of fallen fruits or seeds from the forest floor from the crowns of felled trees, and from standing trees with access from the ground and with other means of access. Also considered are precautions to be followed during fruit and seed handling between collection and processing. The different stages in seed processing are detailed, including extraction, depulping, drying, tumbling and threshing, dewinging, cleaning, grading, and mixing. Factors affecting seed longevity in storage and the choice of storage methods are reviewed. Different forms of seed pretreatment and seed testing methods are described.

  5. Rehabilitation of malpositioned implants with a CAD/CAM milled implant overdenture: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Mauricio S; Duff, Renee E; Razzoog, Michael E

    2011-03-01

    Dentists may be faced with the challenge of restoring unfavorably placed implants. In some instances, previously integrated implants may be from different manufacturers. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of a patient with a maxillary CAD/CAM implant bar-supported overdenture that presented with malpositioned implants, from different manufacturers, including one from a discontinued implant system.

  6. Broad-beam, high current, metal ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Dickinson, M.R.; Galvin, J.E.; Godechot, X.; MacGill, R.A.

    1990-07-01

    We have developed a high current metal ion implantation facility with which high current beams of virtually all the solid metals of the Periodic Table can be produced. The facility makes use of a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source which is operated in a pulsed mode, with pulse width 0.25 ms and repetition rate up to 100 pps. Beam extraction voltage is up to 100 kV, corresponding to an ion energy of up to several hundred keV because of the ion charge state multiplicity; beam current is up to several Amperes peak and around 10 mA time averaged delivered onto target. Implantation is done in a broad-beam mode, with a direct line-of-sight from ion source to target. Here we describe the facility and some of the implants that have been carried out using it, including the seeding' of silicon wafers prior to CVD with titanium, palladium or tungsten, the formation of buried iridium silicide layers, and actinide (uranium and thorium) doping of III-V compounds. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Miniscrew implant applications in contemporary orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hong-Po; Tseng, Yu-Chuan

    2014-03-01

    The need for orthodontic treatment modalities that provide maximal anchorage control but with minimal patient compliance requirements has led to the development of implant-assisted orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics. Skeletal anchorage with miniscrew implants has no patient compliance requirements and has been widely incorporated in orthodontic practice. Miniscrew implants are now routinely used as anchorage devices in orthodontic treatment. This review summarizes recent data regarding the interpretation of bone data (i.e., bone quantity and quality) obtained by preoperative diagnostic computed tomography (CT) or by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) prior to miniscrew implant placement. Such data are essential when selecting appropriate sites for miniscrew implant placement. Bone characteristics that are indications and contraindications for treatment with miniscrew implants are discussed. Additionally, bicortical orthodontic skeletal anchorage, risks associated with miniscrew implant failure, and miniscrew implants for nonsurgical correction of occlusal cant or vertical excess are reviewed. Finally, implant stability is compared between titanium alloy and stainless steel miniscrew implants.

  8. Class solution for inversely planned permanent prostate implants to mimic an experienced dosimetrist

    SciTech Connect

    Lessard, Etienne; Kwa, Stefan L. S.; Pickett, Barby; Roach, Mach III; Pouliot, Jean

    2006-08-15

    The purpose of this paper is to present a method for the selection of inverse planning parameters and to establish a set of inverse planning parameters (class solution) for the inverse planning included in a commercial permanent prostate implant treatment planning system. The manual planning of more than 750 patients since 1996 led to the establishment of general treatment planning rules. A class solution is tuned to fulfill the treatment planning rules and generate equivalent implants. For ten patients, the inverse planning is compared with manual planning performed by our experienced physicist. The prostate volumes ranged from 17 to 51 cc and are implanted with low activity I-125 seeds. Dosimetric indices are calculated for comparison. The inverse planning needed about 15 s for each optimization (400 000 iterations on a 2.5 GHz PC). In comparison, the physicist needed about 20 min to perform each manual plan. A class solution is found that consistently produces dosimetric indices equivalent or better than the manual planning. Moreover, even with strict seed placement rules, the inverse planning can produce adequate prostate dose coverage and organ at risk protection. The inverse planning avoids implant with seeds outside of the prostate and too close to the urethra. It also avoids needles with only one seed and needles with three consecutive seeds. This reduces the risk of complication due to seed misplacement and edema. The inverse planning also uses a smaller number of needles, reducing the cause of trauma. The quality of the treatment plans is independent of the gland size and shape. A class solution is established that consistently and rapidly produces equivalent dosimetric indices as manual planning while respecting severe seed placement rules. The class solution can be used as a starting point for every patient, dramatically reducing the time needed to plan individual patient treatments. The class solution works with inverse preplanning, intraoperative

  9. Differential predation of forage seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent field experiments we observed that the main invertebrate seed predators of overseeded tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) or Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) seed in unimproved pastures were harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex sp.) and common field crickets (Gryllus sp.) To determ...

  10. Insecticide seed treatments for sugarbeet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pest feeding and vectoring of viruses cause serious problems in sugarbeet production worldwide. In order to ameliorate pest and disease problems on sugarbeet, two seed treatments, Poncho Beta (60 g a.i. clothianidin + 8 g a.i. beta-cyfluthrin/100,000 seed) and Cruiser Tef (60 g a.i. thiamethoxam + 8...

  11. Chapter 3: Seed and Varieties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed is one of the most important factors in sugarbeet production. Seed selection is one of the most important decisions a grower can make. Without a uniform plant population of a sugarbeet variety adapted to the growing region, the producer will have difficulty achieving economical crop production....

  12. Automated seed manipulation and planting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Ray; Herrera, Javier; Holcomb, Scott; Kelly, Paul; Myers, Scott; Rosendo, Manny; Sivitz, Herbert; Wolsefer, Dave

    1988-01-01

    Activities for the Fall Semester, 1987 focused on investigating the mechanical/electrical properties of wheat seeds and forming various Seed Planting System (SPS) concepts based on those properties. The Electrical Division of the design group was formed to devise an SPS using electrostatic charge fields for seeding operations. Experiments concerning seed separation using electrical induction (rearranging of the charges within the seed) were conducted with promising results. The seeds, when exposed to the high voltage and low current field produced by a Van de Graff generator, were observed to move back and forth between two electrodes. An SPS concept has been developed based on this phenomena, and will be developed throughout the Spring Semester, 1988. The Mechanical Division centered on SPS concepts involving valves, pumps, and fluids to separate and deliver seeds. An SPS idea utilizing the pressure difference caused by air as it rushes out of holes drilled in the wall of a closed container has been formulated and will be considered for future development. Also, a system of seed separation and delivery employing a combination of centrifugal force, friction, and air flow was considered.

  13. Seed dormancy in alpine species

    PubMed Central

    Schwienbacher, Erich; Navarro-Cano, Jose Antonio; Neuner, Gilbert; Erschbamer, Brigitta

    2011-01-01

    In alpine species the classification of the various mechanisms underlying seed dormancy has been rather questionable and controversial. Thus, we investigated 28 alpine species to evaluate the prevailing types of dormancy. Embryo type and water impermeability of seed coats gave an indication of the potential seed dormancy class. To ascertain the actual dormancy class and level, we performed germination experiments comparing the behavior of seeds without storage, after cold-dry storage, after cold-wet storage, and scarification. We also tested the light requirement for germination in some species. Germination behavior was characterized using the final germination percentage and the mean germination time. Considering the effects of the pretreatments, a refined classification of the prevailing dormancy types was constructed based on the results of our pretreatments. Only two out of the 28 species that we evaluated had predominantly non-dormant seeds. Physiological dormancy was prevalent in 20 species, with deep physiological dormancy being the most abundant, followed by non-deep and intermediate physiological dormancy. Seeds of four species with underdeveloped embryos were assigned to the morphophysiologial dormancy class. An impermeable seed coat was identified in two species, with no additional physiological germination block. We defined these species as having physical dormancy. Light promoted the germination of seeds without storage in all but one species with physiological dormancy. In species with physical dormancy, light responses were of minor importance. We discuss our new classification in the context of former germination studies and draw implications for the timing of germination in the field. PMID:24415831

  14. Seed dormancy in Mexican teosinte

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed dormancy in wild Zea species may affect fitness and relate to ecological adaptation. The primary objective of this study was to characterize the variation in seed germination of the wild species of the genus Zea that currently grow in Mexico, and to relate this variation to their ecological zon...

  15. Microwave drying of seed cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A small lab dryer was designed for use in drying seed cotton with components of a microwave generator mounted thereon. The magnetron emitted radiation directly into the seed cotton and a fan directed air cross-flow to the radiation direction. The microwave components were a 1.1 kW magnetron, trans...

  16. Training for Certification: Seed Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Univ., State College. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This Cooperative Extension Service publication from Mississippi State University is a training guide for commercial pesticide applicators. Focusing specifically on the treatment of seeds with pesticides, this publication is meant to prepare one to take the written examination for Environmental Protection Agency Seed Treatment certification.…

  17. Advances in lens implant technology

    PubMed Central

    Kampik, Anselm; Dexl, Alois K.; Zimmermann, Nicole; Glasser, Adrian; Baumeister, Martin; Kohnen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Cataract surgery is one of the oldest and the most frequent outpatient clinic operations in medicine performed worldwide. The clouded human crystalline lens is replaced by an artificial intraocular lens implanted into the capsular bag. During the last six decades, cataract surgery has undergone rapid development from a traumatic, manual surgical procedure with implantation of a simple lens to a minimally invasive intervention increasingly assisted by high technology and a broad variety of implants customized for each patient’s individual requirements. This review discusses the major advances in this field and focuses on the main challenge remaining – the treatment of presbyopia. The demand for correction of presbyopia is increasing, reflecting the global growth of the ageing population. Pearls and pitfalls of currently applied methods to correct presbyopia and different approaches under investigation, both in lens implant technology and in surgical technology, are discussed. PMID:23413369

  18. Implants for draining neovascular glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Molteno, A C; Van Rooyen, M M; Bartholomew, R S

    1977-01-01

    The implant design, surgical technique, and pharmacological methods of controlling bleb fibrosis, used to treat neovascular glaucoma, are described, together with the results of 14 operations performed on 12 eyes. Images PMID:843508

  19. Evaluation of inductively heated ferromagnetic alloy implants for therapeutic interstitial hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Paulus, J A; Richardson, J S; Tucker, R D; Park, J B

    1996-04-01

    Ferromagnetic alloys heated by magnetic induction have been investigated as interstitial hyperthermia delivery implants for over a decade, utilizing low Curie temperatures to provide thermal self-regulation. The minimally invasive method is attractive for fractionated thermal treatment of tumors which are not easily heated by focused microwave or ultrasound techniques. Past analyses of ferromagnetic seeds by other authors depict poor experimental correlation with theoretical heating predictions. Improvements in computer hardware and commercially available finite element analysis software have simplified the analysis of inductively heated thermal seeds considerably. This manuscript examines end effects of finite length implants and nonlinear magnetic material properties to account for previous inconsistencies. Two alloys, Ni-28 wt% Cu (NiCu) and Pd-6.15 wt% Co (PdCo), were used for comparison of theoretical and experimental calorimetric results. Length to diameter (L/d) ratios of over 20 for cylindrical seeds are necessary for minimization of end effects. Magnetic properties tested for alloys of NiCu and PdCo illustrate considerable nonlinearity of these materials in field strength ranges used for induction heating. Field strength dependent magnetic permeabilities and calorimetric data illustrate that more detailed material information must be included to accurately estimate induction power loss for these implants.

  20. Surgical Tooth Implants, Combat and Field.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-15

    and identify by block number) --- This Annual Report summarizes progress to date on a long-term implant study of a serrated ceramic dental implant...upper two parts of the implant, post and core and crown, are conventional metaT materials. A series of graded dental implants have been produced to...throughout the experimental period. Periodic radio- graphic analyses of dental implants verify this observation. Gross and microscopic patho- logic analyses

  1. Surgical Tooth Implants, Combat and Field.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-15

    development of dental implantology must not be overlooked. The early stages of this project clearly defined that rigid fixation of an implant device...block number) .-... This report summarizes progress on a long-ter implant study of a serrated ceramic dental implant designed for fresh extraction...implant, post and core and crown, are conventional metal materials, A series of graded dental implants have been produced to provide an interference fit

  2. [Guidelines for nursing methodology implantation].

    PubMed

    Alberdi Castell, Rosamaría; Artigas Lelong, Berta; Cuxart Ainaud, Núria; Agüera Ponce, Ana

    2003-09-01

    The authors introduce three guidelines as part of the process to implant the nursing methodology based on the Virginia Henderson Conceptual Model; they propose to help nurses adopt the aforementioned method in their daily practice. These three guidelines shall be published in successive articles: Guidelines to identify attitudes and aptitudes related to the nursing profession; Guidelines to implant the nursing methodology based on the Virginia Henderson Conceptual Model; and Guidelines to plan areas for improvement.

  3. Effect of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell in peri-implant bone defect after immediate implant: an experiment study in beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Peng-Jie; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Xu, Quan-Chen; Xu, Sheng; Li, Zhuo-Ri; Yang, Pi-Shan; Liu, Zhong-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Background: For the sake of reducing post extraction resorption, getting optimal positioning of the implant and shortening treatment time, immediate implant placement following tooth extraction has been proposed as a treatment option. However, the large bone defect peri-implant has a negative influence on the process of bone healing. In this study, umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs) were transplanted into the bone defect peri-implant inbeagle dogs and the effect of UCMSCs on bone regeneration in peri-implant were assessed. Methods: The mandibular second, third and fourth premolars of 8 beagle dogs were extracted bilaterally. The defects in one side were filled with platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) and then UCMSCs were injected into the defect area, while the defects in the other side were filled with PRF only as control group. The titanium implant was placed into the distal root socket of each extracted tooth. The animals were sacrificed at week 2, 4 and 8 post operative. The bone defects adjacent to the implant which are 4 mm in height, 4 mm in the mesio-distal direction and 3.5 mm in the bucco-lingual direction were made after immediate implant. Histomorphometric analysis was performed using methylene blue-fuchsin acid staining and hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining to evaluate bone regeneration. Results: The direct bone-to-implant contact (BIC) in the experiment after 4 and 8 weeks was 56.47±1.18% and 76.23±2.08%; and in the control group was40.79±0.65% and 61.17±2.79%, respectively. The percentage of newly formed bone after 2, 4 and 8 weeks was 17.60±1.5%, 49.82±4.02% and 67.16±2.1% in experiment group; and in control group 14.30±1.25%, 37.04±2.29% and 58.83±3.36%, respectively. These results represented significant differences statistically. Conclusion: Intra-bone marrow injection of UCMSCs can promote new bone formation. UCMSCs can be used to as excellent seed cells to repair the large defect peri-implant after immediate implant. PMID

  4. Effect of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell in peri-implant bone defect after immediate implant: an experiment study in beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Peng-Jie; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Xu, Quan-Chen; Xu, Sheng; Li, Zhuo-Ri; Yang, Pi-Shan; Liu, Zhong-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Background: For the sake of reducing post extraction resorption, getting optimal positioning of the implant and shortening treatment time, immediate implant placement following tooth extraction has been proposed as a treatment option. However, the large bone defect peri-implant has a negative influence on the process of bone healing. In this study, umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs) were transplanted into the bone defect peri-implant in beagle dogs and the effect of UCMSCs on bone regeneration in peri-implant were assessed. Methods: The mandibular second, third and fourth premolars of 8 beagle dogs were extracted bilaterally. The defects in one side were filled with platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) and then UCMSCs were injected into the defect area, while the defects in the other side were filled with PRF only as control group. The titanium implant was placed into the distal root socket of each extracted tooth. The animals were sacrificed at week 2, 4 and 8 post operation. The bone defects adjacent to the implant which are 4 mm in height, 4 mm in the mesio-distal direction and 3.5 mm in the bucco-lingual direction were made after immediate implant. Histomorphometric analysis was performed using methylene blue-fuchsin acid staining and hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining to evaluate bone regeneration. Results: The direct bone-to-implant contact (BIC) in the experiment after 4 and 8 weeks was 56.47 ± 1.18% and 76.23 ± 2.08%; and in the control group was40.79 ± 0.65% and 61.17 ± 2.79%, respectively. The percentage of newly formed bone after 2, 4 and 8 weeks was 17.60 ± 1.5%, 49.82 ± 4.02% and 67.16 ± 2.1% in experiment group; and in control group 14.30 ± 1.25%, 37.04 ± 2.29% and 58.83 ± 3.36%, respectively. These results represented significant differences statistically. Conclusion: Intra-bone marrow injection of UCMSCs can promote new bone formation. UCMSCs can be used to as excellent seed cells to repair the large defect peri-implant after immediate

  5. Auditory Midbrain Implant: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hubert H.; Lenarz, Minoo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The auditory midbrain implant (AMI) is a new hearing prosthesis designed for stimulation of the inferior colliculus in deaf patients who cannot sufficiently benefit from cochlear implants. The authors have begun clinical trials in which five patients have been implanted with a single shank AMI array (20 electrodes). The goal of this review is to summarize the development and research that has led to the translation of the AMI from a concept into the first patients. This study presents the rationale and design concept for the AMI as well a summary of the animal safety and feasibility studies that were required for clinical approval. The authors also present the initial surgical, psychophysical, and speech results from the first three implanted patients. Overall, the results have been encouraging in terms of the safety and functionality of the implant. All patients obtain improvements in hearing capabilities on a daily basis. However, performance varies dramatically across patients depending on the implant location within the midbrain with the best performer still not able to achieve open set speech perception without lip-reading cues. Stimulation of the auditory midbrain provides a wide range of level, spectral, and temporal cues, all of which are important for speech understanding, but they do not appear to sufficiently fuse together to enable open set speech perception with the currently used stimulation strategies. Finally, several issues and hypotheses for why current patients obtain limited speech perception along with several feasible solutions for improving AMI implementation are presented. PMID:19762428

  6. Biomechanics of Corneal Ring Implants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biomechanics of corneal ring implants by providing a related mathematical theory and biomechanical model for the treatment of myopia and keratoconus. Methods: The spherical dome model considers the inhomogeneity of the tunica of the eye, dimensions of the cornea, lamellar structure of the corneal stroma, and asphericity of the cornea. It is used in this study for calculating a strengthening factor sf for the characterization of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs. The strengthening factor is a measure of the amount of strengthening of the cornea induced by the implant. Results: For ring segments and incomplete rings, sf = 1.0, which indicates that these implants are not able to strengthen the cornea. The intracorneal continuous complete ring (MyoRing) has a strengthening factor of up to sf = 3.2. The MyoRing is, therefore, able to strengthen the cornea significantly. Conclusions: The result of the presented biomechanical analysis of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs can explain the different postoperative clinical results of different implant types in myopia and keratoconus. PMID:26312619

  7. Retinal implants: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Alice T; Margo, Curtis E; Greenberg, Paul B

    2014-07-01

    Retinal implants present an innovative way of restoring sight in degenerative retinal diseases. Previous reviews of research progress were written by groups developing their own devices. This systematic review objectively compares selected models by examining publications describing five representative retinal prostheses: Argus II, Boston Retinal Implant Project, Epi-Ret 3, Intelligent Medical Implants (IMI) and Alpha-IMS (Retina Implant AG). Publications were analysed using three criteria for interim success: clinical availability, vision restoration potential and long-term biocompatibility. Clinical availability: Argus II is the only device with FDA approval. Argus II and Alpha-IMS have both received the European CE Marking. All others are in clinical trials, except the Boston Retinal Implant, which is in animal studies. Vision restoration: resolution theoretically correlates with electrode number. Among devices with external cameras, the Boston Retinal Implant leads with 100 electrodes, followed by Argus II with 60 electrodes and visual acuity of 20/1262. Instead of an external camera, Alpha-IMS uses a photodiode system dependent on natural eye movements and can deliver visual acuity up to 20/546. Long-term compatibility: IMI offers iterative learning; Epi-Ret 3 is a fully intraocular device; Alpha-IMS uses intraocular photosensitive elements. Merging the results of these three criteria, Alpha-IMS is the most likely to achieve long-term success decades later, beyond current clinical availability.

  8. Ion implanted dielectric elastomer circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Rosset, Samuel; Anderson, Iain A.; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-06-01

    Starfish and octopuses control their infinite degree-of-freedom arms with panache—capabilities typical of nature where the distribution of reflex-like intelligence throughout soft muscular networks greatly outperforms anything hard, heavy, and man-made. Dielectric elastomer actuators show great promise for soft artificial muscle networks. One way to make them smart is with piezo-resistive Dielectric Elastomer Switches (DES) that can be combined with artificial muscles to create arbitrary digital logic circuits. Unfortunately there are currently no reliable materials or fabrication process. Thus devices typically fail within a few thousand cycles. As a first step in the search for better materials we present a preliminary exploration of piezo-resistors made with filtered cathodic vacuum arc metal ion implantation. DES were formed on polydimethylsiloxane silicone membranes out of ion implanted gold nano-clusters. We propose that there are four distinct regimes (high dose, above percolation, on percolation, low dose) in which gold ion implanted piezo-resistors can operate and present experimental results on implanted piezo-resistors switching high voltages as well as a simple artificial muscle inverter. While gold ion implanted DES are limited by high hysteresis and low sensitivity, they already show promise for a range of applications including hysteretic oscillators and soft generators. With improvements to implanter process control the promise of artificial muscle circuitry for soft smart actuator networks could become a reality.

  9. Therapy using implanted organic bioelectronics

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Amanda; Song, Zhiyang; Nilsson, David; Meyerson, Björn A.; Simon, Daniel T.; Linderoth, Bengt; Berggren, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Many drugs provide their therapeutic action only at specific sites in the body, but are administered in ways that cause the drug’s spread throughout the organism. This can lead to serious side effects. Local delivery from an implanted device may avoid these issues, especially if the delivery rate can be tuned according to the need of the patient. We turned to electronically and ionically conducting polymers to design a device that could be implanted and used for local electrically controlled delivery of therapeutics. The conducting polymers in our device allow electronic pulses to be transduced into biological signals, in the form of ionic and molecular fluxes, which provide a way of interfacing biology with electronics. Devices based on conducting polymers and polyelectrolytes have been demonstrated in controlled substance delivery to neural tissue, biosensing, and neural recording and stimulation. While providing proof of principle of bioelectronic integration, such demonstrations have been performed in vitro or in anesthetized animals. Here, we demonstrate the efficacy of an implantable organic electronic delivery device for the treatment of neuropathic pain in an animal model. Devices were implanted onto the spinal cord of rats, and 2 days after implantation, local delivery of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was initiated. Highly localized delivery resulted in a significant decrease in pain response with low dosage and no observable side effects. This demonstration of organic bioelectronics-based therapy in awake animals illustrates a viable alternative to existing pain treatments, paving the way for future implantable bioelectronic therapeutics. PMID:26601181

  10. /sup 125/I implants as an adjuvant to surgery and external beam radiotherapy in the management of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Goffinet, D.R.; Fee, W.; Goode, R.; Cox, R.S.

    1983-03-15

    /sup 125/I seeds either individually placed or inserted into absorbable Vicryl suture carriers were utilized in conjunction with surgery and external beam radiotherapy in an attempt to increase local control rates in patients with advanced oropharyngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancers (T3-T4, N2-N3), massive cervical lymphadenopathy (N3) and an unknown primary site and locally recurrent head and neck cancers. Forty-eight patients were treated with 55 implants. The carotid artery was implanted in 15 patients, while seven patients had seeds inserted into the base of the skull region, and another three patients had implants near cranial nerves. Eighteen of the 48 patients were treated for cure. The actuarial survival at five years in this subgroup was 50%. The overall local control in the head and neck area was 58%. In this group no patients to date have had a local failure in the implanted volume. Seventeen patients with comparable stage of disease treated prior to 1974 with curative intent without /sup 125/I implants were analyzed retrospectively for comparison with the implanted patients. The actuarial survival of these patients was 18% and the overall head and neck control was 21%. These differences are statistically significant at a P value of 0.01 and 0.007, respectively. Seventeen patients received implants for local recurrence. The local control in the head and neck area was 50%; however, the 2.5 year actuarial survival was only 17%. The complication rate was 11% (six of 55 implants). The improved survival, the high local control, and the minimal complication rates in this series makes the intraoperative implantation of /sup 125/I seeds and effective adjunctive treatment to surgery and external beam irradiation.

  11. Seed coat thickness data clarifies seed size-seed persistence tradeoffs in Abutilon theophrasti (Malvaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Theoretical models predict that seed size and seedbank persistence evolve interdependently such that strong selection for one trait corresponds with weak selection for the other. This framework is supported by empirical data but conclusive evidence is lacking. In this study, we expand the seed size-...

  12. Why are mini-implants lost: the value of the implantation technique!

    PubMed

    Romano, Fabio Lourenço; Consolaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of mini-implants have made a major contribution to orthodontic treatment. Demand has aroused scientific curiosity about implant placement procedures and techniques. However, the reasons for instability have not yet been made totally clear. The aim of this article is to establish a relationship between implant placement technique and mini-implant success rates by means of examining the following hypotheses: 1) Sites of poor alveolar bone and little space between roots lead to inadequate implant placement; 2) Different sites require mini-implants of different sizes! Implant size should respect alveolar bone diameter; 3) Properly determining mini-implant placement site provides ease for implant placement and contributes to stability; 4) The more precise the lancing procedures, the better the implant placement technique; 5) Self-drilling does not mean higher pressures; 6) Knowing where implant placement should end decreases the risk of complications and mini-implant loss.

  13. Why are mini-implants lost: The value of the implantation technique!

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Fabio Lourenço; Consolaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of mini-implants have made a major contribution to orthodontic treatment. Demand has aroused scientific curiosity about implant placement procedures and techniques. However, the reasons for instability have not yet been made totally clear. The aim of this article is to establish a relationship between implant placement technique and mini-implant success rates by means of examining the following hypotheses: 1) Sites of poor alveolar bone and little space between roots lead to inadequate implant placement; 2) Different sites require mini-implants of different sizes! Implant size should respect alveolar bone diameter; 3) Properly determining mini-implant placement site provides ease for implant placement and contributes to stability; 4) The more precise the lancing procedures, the better the implant placement technique; 5) Self-drilling does not mean higher pressures; 6) Knowing where implant placement should end decreases the risk of complications and mini-implant loss. PMID:25741821

  14. Imaging of common breast implants and implant-related complications: A pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amisha T; Jankharia, Bijal B

    2016-01-01

    The number of women undergoing breast implant procedures is increasing exponentially. It is, therefore, imperative for a radiologist to be familiar with the normal and abnormal imaging appearances of common breast implants. Diagnostic imaging studies such as mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging are used to evaluate implant integrity, detect abnormalities of the implant and its surrounding capsule, and detect breast conditions unrelated to implants. Magnetic resonance imaging of silicone breast implants, with its high sensitivity and specificity for detecting implant rupture, is the most reliable modality to asses implant integrity. Whichever imaging modality is used, the overall aim of imaging breast implants is to provide the pertinent information about implant integrity, detect implant failures, and to detect breast conditions unrelated to the implants, such as cancer.

  15. Seed storage oil mobilization.

    PubMed

    Graham, Ian A

    2008-01-01

    Storage oil mobilization starts with the onset of seed germination. Oil bodies packed with triacylglycerol (TAG) exist in close proximity with glyoxysomes, the single membrane-bound organelles that house most of the biochemical machinery required to convert fatty acids derived from TAG to 4-carbon compounds. The 4-carbon compounds in turn are converted to soluble sugars that are used to fuel seedling growth. Biochemical analysis over the last 50 years has identified the main pathways involved in this process, including beta-oxidation, the glyoxylate cycle, and gluconeogenesis. In the last few years molecular genetic dissection of the overall process in the model oilseed species Arabidopsis has provided new insight into its complexity, particularly with respect to the specific role played by individual enzymatic steps and the subcellular compartmentalization of the glyoxylate cycle. Both abscisic acid (ABA) and sugars inhibit storage oil mobilization and a substantial degree of the control appears to operate at the transcriptional level.

  16. Reasons for failures of oral implants.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, B R; Albrektsson, T; Wennerberg, A

    2014-06-01

    This study reviews the literature regarding the factors contributing to failures of dental implants. An electronic search was undertaken including papers from 2004 onwards. The titles and abstracts from these results were read to identify studies within the selection criteria. All reference lists of the selected studies were then hand-searched, this time without time restrictions. A narrative review discussed some findings from the first two parts where separate data from non-comparative studies may have indicated conclusions different from those possible to draw in the systematic analysis. It may be suggested that the following situations are correlated to increase the implant failure rate: a low insertion torque of implants that are planned to be immediately or early loaded, inexperienced surgeons inserting the implants, implant insertion in the maxilla, implant insertion in the posterior region of the jaws, implants in heavy smokers, implant insertion in bone qualities type III and IV, implant insertion in places with small bone volumes, use of shorter length implants, greater number of implants placed per patient, lack of initial implant stability, use of cylindrical (non-threaded) implants and prosthetic rehabilitation with implant-supported overdentures. Moreover, it may be suggested that the following situations may be correlated with an increase in the implant failure rate: use of the non-submerged technique, immediate loading, implant insertion in fresh extraction sockets, smaller diameter implants. Some recently published studies suggest that modern, moderately rough implants may present with similar results irrespective if placed in maxillas, in smoking patients or using only short implants.

  17. Feasibility of vibro-acoustography with a quasi-2D ultrasound array transducer for detection and localizing of permanent prostate brachytherapy seeds: A pilot ex vivo study

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Kinnick, Randall R.; Fatemi, Mostafa; Alizad, Azra; Davis, Brian J.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Effective permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) requires precise placement of radioactive seeds in and around the prostate. The impetus for this research is to examine a new ultrasound-based imaging modality, vibro-acoustography (VA), which may serve to provide a high rate of PPB seed detection while also effecting enhanced prostate imaging. The authors investigate the ability of VA, implemented on a clinical ultrasound (US) scanner and equipped with a quasi-2D (Q2D) array US transducer, to detect and localize PPB seeds in excised prostate specimens. Methods: Nonradioactive brachytherapy seeds were implanted into four excised cadaver prostates. A clinical US scanner equipped with a Q2D array US transducer was customized to acquire both US and C-scan VA images at various depths. The VA images were then used to detect and localize the implanted seeds in prostate tissue. To validate the VA results, computed tomography (CT) images of the same tissue samples were obtained to serve as the reference by which to evaluate the performance of VA in PPB seed detection. Results: The results indicate that VA is capable of accurately identifying the presence and distribution of PPB seeds with a high imaging contrast. Moreover, a large ratio of the PPB seeds implanted into prostate tissue samples could be detected through acquired VA images. Using CT-based seed identification as the standard, VA was capable of detecting 74%–92% of the implanted seeds. Additionally, the angular independency of VA in detecting PPB seeds was demonstrated through a well-controlled phantom experiment. Conclusions: Q2DVA detected a substantial portion of the seeds by using a 2D array US transducer in excised prostate tissue specimens. While VA has inherent advantages associated with conventional US imaging, it has the additional advantage of permitting detection of PPB seeds independent of their orientation. These results suggest the potential of VA as a method for PPB imaging that

  18. Implant maintenance treatment and peri-implant health.

    PubMed

    Howe, Mark-Steven

    2017-03-01

    Data sourcesMedline (PubMed), Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register databases and a manual search of the Journal of Dental Research, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, Journal of Periodontology and the International Journal of Periodontics and Restorative Dentistry from January 2014 to February 2015.Study selectionProspective, retrospective, randomised or not, case-controlled or case series trials showing the incidence or recurrence of peri-implant disease plus or minus PIMT over more than six months.Data extraction and synthesisThree reviewers independently selected studies and abstracted data with two reviewers assessing study quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). A multivariate binomial regression was used to examine the data.ResultsThirteen studies were included with ten contributing to the meta-analysis. The average quality assessment score (NOS) was 5.3 out of a possible nine, only one paper achieved eight. At patient level mucositis ranged from 18.5-74.2% and peri-implantitis from 8-28%, with significant effects being seen for treatment (z= -14.36, p<0.001). Mucositis was affected by history of periodontitis and mean PIMT at implant and patient levels, respectively. For peri-implantitis there were also significant effects of treatment (z = -16.63, p<0.001). Increased peri-implantitis was observed for patients with a history of periodontal disease. (z=3.76, p<0.001). Implants under PIMT have 0.958 the incident event compared to those with no PIMT.ConclusionsWithin the limitations of the present systematic review it can be concluded that implant therapy must not be limited to placement and restoration of dental implants, but to the implementation of PIMT to potentially prevent biological complications and heighten the long-term success rate. Although it must be tailored to a patients risk profiling, our findings suggest reason to claim a minimum recall PIMT interval of five to six

  19. Brassinosteroid functions in Arabidopsis seed development

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wen-Bo; Lin, Wen-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Seed development of flowering plant is a complicated process controlled by a signal network. Double fertilization generates 2 zygotic products (embryo and endosperm). Embryo gives rise to a daughter plant while endosperm provides nutrients for embryo during embryogenesis and germination. Seed coat differentiates from maternally derived integument and encloses embryo and endosperm. Seed size/mass and number comprise final seed yield, and seed shape also contributes to seed development and weight. Seed size is coordinated by communication among endosperm, embryo, and integument. Seed number determination is more complex to investigate and shows differencies between monocot and eudicot. Total seed number depends on sillique number and seed number per sillique in Arabidopsis. Seed comes from fertilized ovule, hence the ovule number per flower determines the maximal seed number per sillique. Early studies reported that engineering BR levels increased the yield of ovule and seed; however the molecular mechanism of BR regulation in seed development still remained unclear. Our recent studies demonstrated that BR regulated seed size, shape, and number by transcriptionally modulating specific seed developmental pathways. This review summarizes roles of BR in Arabidopsis seed development and gives clues for future application of BR in agricultural production. PMID:24270689

  20. 3D MR-Spectroscopic Imaging Assessment of Metabolic Activity in the Prostate During the PSA 'Bounce' Following {sup 125}Iodine Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kirilova, Anna; Damyanovich, Andrei; Crook, Juanita; Jezioranski, John; Wallace, Kris; Pintilie, Melania

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: A temporary increase in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values is observed in 30%-40% of men following {sup 125} I brachytherapy (BT) for prostate cancer. We present the results of a study to characterize prostate metabolic activity during the PSA 'bounce' and to correlate metabolic changes with PSA levels using three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (3D-MRSI). Methods and Materials: 3D-MRSI was performed in 24 patients during the PSA bounce. Eight of these had also had a baseline 3D-MRSI scan before BT for the purpose of tumor mapping. The 3D-MRSI was repeated at 6- and 12-month intervals, and PSA levels were monitored every 3 months. Twenty-one of the patients had favorable-risk prostate cancer, and 3 had intermediate risk. Results: The choline+creatine signal intensity, although markedly reduced, was observable following BT. Diffuse activity not corresponding to original biopsy-positive sites was observed in 22 cases, and 2 cases were documented to have local recurrence. No statistically significant correlation between metabolic activity and PSA levels at each interval was found. Conclusion: Post-BT prostate 3D-MRSI shows evidence of diffuse metabolic activity unrelated to residual malignancy. This supports the benign nature of the PSA bounce and suggests an inflammatory etiology. In the situation of a rising PSA, observation of focal activity on MRI/3D-MRSI could be a useful adjunct to suggest local recurrence at an earlier interval after brachytherapy when prostate biopsies would still be unhelpful. Longer follow-up is necessary to confirm the complex relationship between metabolic activity and PSA levels.

  1. Effects of different batches of /sup 125/iodine on properties of /sup 125/I-hFSH and characteristics of radioligand-receptor assays

    SciTech Connect

    Melson, B.E.; Sluss, P.M.; Reichert, L.E. Jr.

    1987-02-01

    Radioiodination of highly purified human follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH) (4000 IU/mg) was performed every other week for 23 weeks using 2 mCI carrier free Na/sup 125/I (Amersham Corp., 15 mCi/micrograms I2) in the presence of lactoperoxidase. Incorporation of /sup 125/I into hFSH was determined by the method of R. C. Greenwood, W. M. Hunter, and J. S. Grover (1963) Biochem. J. 89, 114). Hormone binding was studied in vitro under steady-state conditions (16 h, 20 degrees C) using different calf testis membrane preparations having similar receptor characteristics. Each /sup 125/I-hFSH preparation was characterized for maximum bindability, specific activity of bindable radioligand as determined by self-displacement analysis, and by determination of Ka and Rt. Incorporation of /sup 125/I into FSH was relatively constant over the large number of experiments (62.4 +/- 6.4 microCi/micrograms; n = 23). By comparison, however, specific radioactivity of the receptor bindable fraction of /sup 125/I-hFSH was related to the lot of /sup 125/I utilized, and was significantly (P less than or equal to 0.01) lower and more variable (28.7 +/- 10.5 microCi/micrograms). Maximum bindability of /sup 125/I-hFSH was not correlated to specific activity (r = 0.06) but was negatively correlated to hFSH /sup 125/I incorporation (r = -0.47; P less than or equal to 0.05). These observations demonstrate the need to assess the quality of each batch of radioligand before undertaking radioligand-receptor assays and suggest that differences in Na/sup 125/I lots affect specific radioactivity of the radioligand and its receptor binding characteristics.

  2. Genomic dissection of the seed

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Michael G.; Hsu, Ssu-Wei; Harada, John J.; Belmonte, Mark F.

    2014-01-01

    Seeds play an integral role in the global food supply and account for more than 70% of the calories that we consume on a daily basis. To meet the demands of an increasing population, scientists are turning to seed genomics research to find new and innovative ways to increase food production. Seed genomics is evolving rapidly, and the information produced from seed genomics research has exploded over the past two decades. Advances in modern sequencing strategies that profile every molecule in every cell, tissue, and organ and the emergence of new model systems have provided the tools necessary to unravel many of the biological processes underlying seed development. Despite these advances, the analyses and mining of existing seed genomics data remain a monumental task for plant biologists. This review summarizes seed region and subregion genomic data that are currently available for existing and emerging oilseed models. We provide insight into the development of tools on how to analyze large-scale datasets. PMID:25309563

  3. [Metabolic control of seed germination].

    PubMed

    Catusse, Julie; Strub, Jean-Marc; Job, Claudette; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Job, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    We have used proteomics to better characterize germination and early seedling vigor in sugarbeet. Our strategy includes (1) construction of proteome reference maps for dry and germinating seeds of a high-vigor reference seed lot; (2) investigation of the specific tissue accumulation of proteins (root, cotyledon, perisperm); (3) investigation of changes in protein expression profiles detected in the reference seed lot subjected to different vigor-modifying treatments, e.g. aging and/or priming. More than 1 000 sugarbeet seed proteins have been identified by LC/MS-MS mass spectrometry (albumins, globulins and glutelins have been analyzed separately). Due to the conservation of protein sequences and the quality of MS sequencing (more than 10 000 peptide sequences have been obtained), the success rate of protein identification was on the average of 80%. This is to our knowledge the best detailed proteome analysis ever carried out in seeds. The data allowed us to build a detailed metabolic chart of the sugarbeet seed, generating new insights into the molecular mechanisms determining the development of a new seedling. Also, the proteome of a seed-storage tissue as the perisperm is described for the first time.

  4. Induction of cartilage integration by a chondrocyte/collagen-scaffold implant.

    PubMed

    Pabbruwe, Moreica B; Esfandiari, Ehsanollah; Kafienah, Wael; Tarlton, John F; Hollander, Anthony P

    2009-09-01

    The integration of implanted cartilage is a major challenge for the success of tissue engineering protocols. We hypothesize that in order for effective cartilage integration to take place, matrix-free chondrocytes must be induced to migrate between the two tissue surfaces. A chondrocyte/collagen-scaffold implant system was developed as a method of delivering dividing cells at the interface between two cartilage surfaces. Chondrocytes were isolated from bovine nasal septum and seeded onto both surfaces of a collagen membrane to create the chondrocyte/collagen-scaffold implant. A model of two cartilage discs and the chondrocyte/collagen-scaffold sandwiched in between was used to effect integration in vitro. The resulting tissue was analysed histologically and biomechanically. The cartilage-implant-cartilage sandwich appeared macroscopically as one continuous piece of tissue at the end of 40 day cultures. Histological analysis showed tissue continuum across the cartilage-scaffold interface. The integration was dependent on both cells and scaffold. Fluorescent labeling of implanted chondrocytes demonstrated that these cells invade the surrounding mature tissue and drive a remodelling of the extracellular matrix. Using cell-free scaffolds we also demonstrated that some chondrocytes migrated from the natural cartilage into the collagen scaffold. Quantification of integration levels using a histomorphometric repair index showed that the chondrocyte/collagen-scaffold implant achieved the highest repair index compared to controls, reflected functionally through increased tensile strength. In conclusion, cartilage integration can be achieved using a chondrocyte/collagen-scaffold implant that permits controlled delivery of chondrocytes to both host and graft mature cartilage tissues. This approach has the potential to be used therapeutically for implantation of engineered tissue.

  5. Acute urinary morbidity following I-125 interstitial implantation of the prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Desai, J; Stock, R G; Stone, N N; Iannuzzi, C; DeWyngaert, J K

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to evaluate the acute urinary morbidity associated with I-125 interstitial implantation of the prostate gland. From 1991-1995, 117 patients underwent ultrasound (U/S)-guided implantation of the prostate gland. Median dose to 90% of the gland (d90) was 14.68 Gy (range = 1.65-21.75 Gy). The patients' urinary symptoms were recorded pre-implantation and at regular intervals after implantation using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), a self-assessment questionnaire in which patients scored 7 symptoms: incomplete emptying, frequency, intermittency, urgency, weak stream, straining, and nocturia. Median follow-up was 12 months. The natural history of implant-related urinary symptoms was assessed in this manner. In addition, dosimetric factors including U/S prostate volume, total activity, activity per seed, dose volume histogram (DVH) values for dose to gland, and dose area histogram (DAH) values for dose to urethra and bladder were examined for correlation to the severity of each symptom as well as to total IPSS (sum of the individual symptom scores). Total IPSS peaked at 1 month post-implant and gradually returned to approximately baseline at 24 months. Total IPSS directly correlated with total activity and DVH for the prostate. Total IPSS, however, did not correlate with bladder or urethral DAH. With the exception of frequency, individual symptoms did not correlate with dose to gland, bladder, or urethra. Frequency scores did, however, correlate not only with dose to prostate gland but also dose to urethra. The acute urinary side effects of I-125 prostate implantation are transient and peak at 1 month post-implant. The severity of the urinary irritative symptoms developed are closely related to total dose to the gland. Urethral dose appears to affect frequency most significantly. Urinary symptoms, therefore, may be a limiting factor when considering dose escalation with I-125.

  6. Magnetite seeded precipitation of phosphate.

    PubMed

    Karapinar, Nuray; Hoffmann, Erhard; Hahn, Hermann H

    2004-07-01

    Seeded precipitation of Ca phosphate on magnetite mineral (Fe3O4) surfaces was investigated using a Jar Test system in supersaturated solutions at 20 degrees C and ionic strength 0.01 mol l(-1) with relative super saturation, 12.0-20.0 for HAP. pH of the solution, initial phosphorus concentration and molar Ca/P ratio were investigated as the main parameters, which effect the seeded precipitation of Ca phosphate. Results showed that there is no pronounced effect of magnetite seed, neither positive nor negative on the amount of calcium phosphate precipitation. pH was found to be the main parameter that determines the phosphate precipitated onto the seed surface. Increasing of the pH of precipitation reaction was resulted in the decrease in percentage amount of phosphate precipitated onto seed surfaces to total precipitation (magnetite seeded precipitation efficiency). It was concluded that the pH dependence of magnetite-seeded precipitation should be considered in the light of its effect on the supersaturated conditions of solution. Saturation index (SI) of solution with respect to the precipitate phase was considered the driving force for the precipitation. A simulation programme PHREEQC (Version 2) was employed to calculate the Saturation-index with respect to hydroxyapatite (HAP) of the chemically defined precipitation system. It was found a good relationship between SI of solution with respect to HAP and the magnetite seeded precipitation efficiency, a second order polynomial function. Results showed that more favorable solution conditions for precipitation (higher SI values of solution) causes homogenous nucleation whereas heterogeneous nucleation led to a higher magnetite seeded precipitation efficiency.

  7. Deuterium implantation in magnetic garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Wilts, C.H.; Urai, A.

    1988-11-01

    The magnetic effects of deuterium implantation and subsequent annealing were measured in Gd, Tm, and Ga-substituted yttrium iron garnet films for comparison with measurements made earlier with hydrogen implantation. Implantation energy was 60 keV and the dose ranged from 0.5 to 3 x 10/sup 16/ ions/cm/sup 2/ for D/sup +//sub 2/ ions, as compared to an energy of 120 keV and a dose from 0.3 to 4 x 10/sup 16/ ions/cm/sup 2/ for H/sup +//sub 2/ in the earlier study. Measurements made included x-ray rocking curves and ferromagnetic resonance spectra measured at 9.5 GHz. For all doses the implanted layer remained crystalline. Implanted layer thickness was about 4200 A and peak strain occured at a depth of 2600 A. Peak strain increased monotonically, but departed from a linear relation with dose. For the highest dose, the peak strain was 2.5%. Relaxation of strain with annealing was intermediate between that found earlier for hydrogen and neon implantation. As compared to all other implant elements, both deuterium and hydrogen show a large anomalous magnetic anisotropy which can exceed 10 000 Oe for either ion. The absence of this effect for He, Ne, and other ions supports the conjecture that the effect is chemical and related to electronic bonding rather than strain or disorder. The anomalous anisotropy for deuterium decreases and shifts location with annealing. It has largely disappeared at temperatures of 300--350 /sup 0/C. The shape of the profile is consistent with the hypothesis that the shift in anisotropy is associated with diffusion of the deuterium atoms to the surface of the garnet film. At the highest dose, crystalline damage in the region of highest strain is sufficient to radically alter magnetic properties and in particular reduces even the excess anisotropy so that a two-peak profile results until modified by annealing.

  8. Multicomponent Implant Releasing Dexamethasone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Several inflammatory conditions are usually treated with corticosteroids. There are various problems like side effects with traditional applications of steroids, e.g. topical, or systemic routes. Local drug delivery systems have been studied and developed to gain more efficient administration with fewer side effects. Earlier, we reported on developing Dexamethasone (DX) releasing biodegradable fibers. However, their drug release properties were not satisfactory in terms of onset of drug release. Thus, we assessed the development of multicomponent (MC) implant to enhance earlier drug release from such biodegradable fibers. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and 2 wt-% and 8 wt-% DX were compounded and extruded with twin-screw extruder to form of fibers. Some of the fibers were sterilized to obtain a change in drug release properties. Four different fiber classes were studied: 2 wt-%, 8 wt-%, sterilized 2 wt-%, and sterilized 8 wt-%. 3×4 different DX-releasing fibers were then heat-pressed to form one multicomponent rod. Half of the rods where sterilized. Drug release was measured from initial fibers and multicomponent rods using a UV/VIS spectrometer. Shear strength and changes in viscosity were also measured. Drug release studies showed that drug release commenced earlier from multicomponent rods than from component fibers. Drug release from multicomponent rods lasted from day 30 to day 70. The release period of sterilized rods extended from day 23 to day 57. When compared to the original component fibers, the drug release from MC rods commenced earlier. The initial shear strength of MC rods was 135 MPa and decreased to 105 MPa during four weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer solution. Accordingly, heat pressing has a positive effect on drug release. After four weeks in hydrolysis, no disintegration was observed.

  9. Real-time photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds using a clinical ultrasound system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Nathanael; Kang, Hyun Jae; Song, Danny Y.; Kang, Jin U.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2012-06-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is a popular prostate cancer treatment option that involves the permanent implantation of radioactive seeds into the prostate. However, contemporary brachytherapy procedure is limited by the lack of an imaging system that can provide real-time seed-position feedback. While many other imaging systems have been proposed, photoacoustic imaging has emerged as a potential ideal modality to address this need, since it could easily be incorporated into the current ultrasound system used in the operating room. We present such a photoacoustic imaging system built around a clinical ultrasound system to achieve the task of visualizing and localizing seeds. We performed several experiments to analyze the effects of various parameters on the appearance of brachytherapy seeds in photoacoustic images. We also imaged multiple seeds in an ex vivo dog prostate phantom to demonstrate the possibility of using this system in a clinical setting. Although still in its infancy, these initial results of a photoacoustic imaging system for the application of prostate brachytherapy seed localization are highly promising.

  10. Medical implants and methods of making medical implants

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, Wendy J; Yonker, Clement R; Fulton, John L; Tarasevich, Barbara J; McClain, James B; Taylor, Doug

    2014-09-16

    A medical implant device having a substrate with an oxidized surface and a silane derivative coating covalently bonded to the oxidized surface. A bioactive agent is covalently bonded to the silane derivative coating. An implantable stent device including a stent core having an oxidized surface with a layer of silane derivative covalently bonded thereto. A spacer layer comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) is covalently bonded to the layer of silane derivative and a protein is covalently bonded to the PEG. A method of making a medical implant device including providing a substrate having a surface, oxidizing the surface and reacting with derivitized silane to form a silane coating covalently bonded to the surface. A bioactive agent is then covalently bonded to the silane coating. In particular instances, an additional coating of bio-absorbable polymer and/or pharmaceutical agent is deposited over the bioactive agent.

  11. In vivo evaluation of a neural stem cell-seeded prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, E. K.; Seymour, J. P.; Yandamuri, S.; Kipke, D. R.

    2009-04-01

    Neural prosthetics capable of recording or stimulating neuronal activity may restore function for patients with motor and sensory deficits resulting from injury or degenerative disease. However, overcoming inconsistent recording quality and stability in chronic applications remains a significant challenge. A likely reason for this is the reactive tissue response to the devices following implantation into the brain, which is characterized by neuronal loss and glial encapsulation. We have developed a neural stem cell-seeded probe to facilitate integration of a synthetic prosthesis with the surrounding brain tissue. We fabricated parylene devices that include an open well seeded with neural stem cells encapsulated in an alginate hydrogel scaffold. Quantitative and qualitative data describing the distribution of neuronal, glial, and progenitor cells surrounding seeded and control devices are reported over four time points spanning 3 months. Neuronal loss and glial encapsulation associated with cell-seeded probes were mitigated during the initial week of implantation and exacerbated by 6 weeks post-insertion compared to control conditions. We hypothesize that graft cells secrete neuroprotective and neurotrophic factors that effect the desired healing response early in the study, with subsequent cell death and scaffold degradation accounting for a reversal of these results later. Applications of this biohybrid technology include future long-term neural recording and sensing studies.

  12. In vivo evaluation of a neural stem cell-seeded prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, EK; Seymour, JP; Yandamuri, S; Kipke, DR

    2009-01-01

    Neural prosthetics capable of recording or stimulating neuronal activity may restore function for patients with motor and sensory deficits resulting from injury or degenerative disease. However, overcoming inconsistent recording quality and stability in chronic applications remains a significant challenge. A likely reason for this is the reactive tissue response to the devices following implantation into the brain, which is characterized by neuronal loss and glial encapsulation. We have developed a neural stem cell-seeded probe to facilitate integration of a synthetic prosthesis with the surrounding brain tissue. We fabricated parylene devices that include an open well seeded with neural stem cells encapsulated in an alginate hydrogel scaffold. Quantitative and qualitative data describing the distribution of neuronal, glial, and progenitor cells surrounding seeded and control devices is reported over four time points spanning three months. Neuronal loss and glial encapsulation associated with cell-seeded probes were mitigated during the initial week of implantation and exacerbated by six weeks post-insertion compared to control conditions. We hypothesize that graft cells secrete neuroprotective and neurotrophic factors that effect the desired healing response early in the study, with subsequent cell death and scaffold degradation accounting for a reversal of these results later. Applications of this biohybrid technology include future long-term neural recording and sensing studies. PMID:19287078

  13. Feasibility of an implanted microphone for cochlear implant listening.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Jean-Marc; Demanez, Laurent; Salmon, Caroline; Vanpoucke, Filiep; Walraevens, Joris; Plasmans, Anke; De Siati, Daniele; Lefèbvre, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the feasibility of an implanted microphone for cochlear implants (CI) by comparison of hearing outcomes, sound quality and patient satisfaction of a subcutaneous microphone to a standard external microphone of a behind-the-ear sound processor. In this prospective feasibility study with a within-subject repeated measures design comparing the microphone modalities, ten experienced adult unilateral CI users received an implantable contralateral subcutaneous microphone attached to a percutaneous plug. The signal was pre-processed and fed into their CI sound processor. Subjects compared listening modes at home for a period of up to 4 months. At the end of the study the microphone was explanted. Aided audiometric thresholds, speech understanding in quiet, and sound quality questionnaires were assessed. On average thresholds (250, 500, 750, 1k, 2k, 3k, 4k and 6 kHz) with the subcutaneous microphone were 44.9 dB, compared to 36.4 dB for the external mode. Speech understanding on sentences in quiet was high, within approximately 90% of performance levels compared to hearing with an external microphone. Body sounds were audible but not annoying to almost all subjects. This feasibility study with a research device shows significantly better results than previous studies with implanted microphones. This is attributed to technology enhancements and careful fitting. Listening effort was somewhat increased with an implanted microphone. Under good sound conditions, speech performance is nearly similar to that of external microphones demonstrating that an implanted microphone is feasible in a range of normal listening conditions.

  14. Implantable biomedical devices on bioresorbable substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, John A; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan; Huang, Yonggang; Amsden, Jason

    2014-03-04

    Provided herein are implantable biomedical devices, methods of administering implantable biomedical devices, methods of making implantable biomedical devices, and methods of using implantable biomedical devices to actuate a target tissue or sense a parameter associated with the target tissue in a biological environment. Each implantable biomedical device comprises a bioresorbable substrate, an electronic device having a plurality of inorganic semiconductor components supported by the bioresorbable substrate, and a barrier layer encapsulating at least a portion of the inorganic semiconductor components. Upon contact with a biological environment the bioresorbable substrate is at least partially resorbed, thereby establishing conformal contact between the implantable biomedical device and the target tissue in the biological environment.

  15. Nasal dorsal augmentation with silicone implants.

    PubMed

    Erlich, Mark A; Parhiscar, Afshin

    2003-11-01

    Silicone rubber has been used safely and effectively for facial augmentation for nearly 5 decades in eastern Asia. We have used silicone rubber nasal implants in primary ethnic rhinoplasty and have found consistent and long-lasting results with low complication rates. Silicone dorsal nasal augmentation in primary rhinoplasty avoids donor site morbidity and implant resorption as seen with autogenous implants. Silicone nasal implants have a low extrusion and infection rate. In the appropriate patient with proper placement, silicone nasal implant is nearly the ideal implant material.

  16. Implantable drug-delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Blackshear, P J

    1979-12-01

    Implantable drug-delivery systems are being developed to release drugs to the bloodstream continuously as well as free patients from being hospitalized to receive intravenous infusions or frequent injections. One technique is implantation of a pellet in the subcutaneous tissue so the pellet may be released by erosion. Drugs are also diffused through silicone rubber capsules but only polyacrylamide is able to release large molecules. Contraceptive rings containing progesterone and placed in the uterus or vagina and implanted silicone-rubber capsules use these principles. Disadvantages to the subcutaneous delivery of drugs include: 1) release of the drug in subcutaneous tissue rather than in the bloodstream directly; 2) entry into the circulatory system is controlled by surrounding blood supplies which vary with fat; 3) diffusion may be difficult due to dense layers of fibrous tissue; and 4) drug amounts cannot be readily regulated. The Ommaya reservoir uses a container with a self-sealing membrane implanted in the scalp and connected to a cerebral ventricle to treat forms of leukemia and fungal meningitis. Another development is an implantable disk-shaped infusion pump with 2 compartments, the outer one containing a propellant and the inner chamber containing the drug, holds 45 milliliters and releases about 1 milliliter/day. In the future these systems may release drugs in response to biochemical feedback or deliver a drug to 1 specific area.

  17. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A.; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging. PMID:27660602

  18. SURFACE CHEMISTRY INFLUENCE IMPLANT BIOCOMPATIBILITY

    PubMed Central

    Thevenot, Paul; Hu, Wenjing; Tang, Liping

    2011-01-01

    Implantable medical devices are increasingly important in the practice of modern medicine. Unfortunately, almost all medical devices suffer to a different extent from adverse reactions, including inflammation, fibrosis, thrombosis and infection. To improve the safety and function of many types of medical implants, a major need exists for development of materials that evoked desired tissue responses. Because implant-associated protein adsorption and conformational changes thereafter have been shown to promote immune reactions, rigorous research efforts have been emphasized on the engineering of surface property (physical and chemical characteristics) to reduce protein adsorption and cell interactions and subsequently improve implant biocompatibility. This brief review is aimed to summarize the past efforts and our recent knowledge about the influence of surface functionality on protein:cell:biomaterial interactions. It is our belief that detailed understandings of bioactivity of surface functionality provide an easy, economic, and specific approach for the future rational design of implantable medical devices with desired tissue reactivity and, hopefully, wound healing capability. PMID:18393890

  19. Programmed cell death in seeds of angiosperms.

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Maldonado, Sara

    2015-12-01

    During the diversification of angiosperms, seeds have evolved structural, chemical, molecular and physiologically developing changes that specially affect the nucellus and endosperm. All through seed evolution, programmed cell death (PCD) has played a fundamental role. However, examples of PCD during seed development are limited. The present review examines PCD in integuments, nucellus, suspensor and endosperm in those representative examples of seeds studied to date.

  20. 7 CFR 948.6 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 948.6 Section 948.6 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.6 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes or seed means any...

  1. 7 CFR 948.6 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 948.6 Section 948.6 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.6 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes or seed means any...

  2. 7 CFR 948.6 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 948.6 Section 948.6 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.6 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes or seed means any...

  3. 7 CFR 948.6 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 948.6 Section 948.6 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.6 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes or seed means any...

  4. 7 CFR 948.6 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 948.6 Section 948.6 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.6 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes or seed means any...

  5. Evaluation of Lettuce Genotypes for Seed Thermotolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermoinhibition of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seed germination is a common problem associated with lettuce production. Depending on lettuce cultivars, seed germination may be inhibited when temperatures exceed 28oC. The delay or inhibition of seed germination at high temperatures may reduce seedli...

  6. INTESPECIIC DIFFERENCES IN GRASS SEED IMBIBITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seeds from 12 grass species were studied relative to mode of wetting and time of exposure to water to document interspecific differences in imbibition characteristics. Imbibition causes seeds to become wet, and wet seeds are more detectable to consumers than dry seeds. Thus, ge...

  7. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.57 Hard seeds. Seeds which remain hard at..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at...

  8. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.57 Hard seeds. Seeds which remain hard at..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at...

  9. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.57 Hard seeds. Seeds which remain hard at..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at...

  10. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.57 Hard seeds. Seeds which remain hard at..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at...

  11. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.57 Hard seeds. Seeds which remain hard at..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at...

  12. Changes in Chenopodium rubrum seeds with aging.

    PubMed

    Mitrović, Aleksandra; Ducić, Tanja; Liric-Rajlić, Ivana; Radotić, Ksenija; Zivanović, Branka

    2005-06-01

    We studied antioxidative system, germination, growth, and flowering in vitro in Chenopodium rubrum seeds of different ages. Peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activity, as well as glutathione status, were determined in 2.5-h imbibed seeds. Germination was tested under controlled conditions. Growth and flowering of plants were tested in vitro. The enzyme activities and glutathione content were higher in younger seeds. Germination declines with seed age. Plants derived from older seeds were smaller, and flowering percentage was lower compared to plants derived from younger seeds. Gibberellic acid reduced the difference in growth and flowering between plants derived from seeds different in age.

  13. Healthy food trends -- chia seeds

    MedlinePlus

    ... they come into contact with water. This gel adds bulk to your stool, which keeps bowel movements ... almost anything. There is no preparation needed. To add chia seeds to your diet: Add them to ...

  14. Seeding for pervasively overlapping communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Conrad; Reid, Fergal; McDaid, Aaron; Hurley, Neil

    2011-06-01

    In some social and biological networks, the majority of nodes belong to multiple communities. It has recently been shown that a number of the algorithms specifically designed to detect overlapping communities do not perform well in such highly overlapping settings. Here, we consider one class of these algorithms, those which optimize a local fitness measure, typically by using a greedy heuristic to expand a seed into a community. We perform synthetic benchmarks which indicate that an appropriate seeding strategy becomes more important as the extent of community overlap increases. We find that distinct cliques provide the best seeds. We find further support for this seeding strategy with benchmarks on a Facebook network and the yeast interactome.

  15. Diamond Synthesis Employing Nanoparticle Seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uppireddi, Kishore (Inventor); Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Weiner, Brad R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Iron nanoparticles were employed to induce the synthesis of diamond on molybdenum, silicon, and quartz substrates. Diamond films were grown using conventional conditions for diamond synthesis by hot filament chemical vapor deposition, except that dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles replaced the seeding. This approach to diamond induction can be combined with dip pen nanolithography for the selective deposition of diamond and diamond patterning while avoiding surface damage associated to diamond-seeding methods.

  16. Implant rehabilitation in bruxism patient

    PubMed Central

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Sonego, Mariana Vilela; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas

    2014-01-01

    A white female patient presented to the university clinic to obtain implant retained prostheses. She had an edentulous maxillary jaw and presented three teeth with poor prognosis (33, 34 and 43). The alveolar bone and the surrounding tissues were healthy. The patient did not report any relevant medical history contraindicating routine dental treatment or implant surgery, but self-reported a dental history of asymptomatic nocturnal bruxism. The treatment plan was set and two Branemark protocols supported by six implants in each arch were installed after a 6-month healing period. A soft occlusal splint was made due to the patient's history of bruxism, and the lack of its use by the patient resulted in an acrylic fracture. The prosthesis was repaired and the importance of using the occlusal splint was restated. In the 4-year follow-up no fractures were reported. PMID:24907215

  17. Implant rehabilitation in bruxism patient.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Sonego, Mariana Vilela; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas

    2014-06-06

    A white female patient presented to the university clinic to obtain implant retained prostheses. She had an edentulous maxillary jaw and presented three teeth with poor prognosis (33, 34 and 43). The alveolar bone and the surrounding tissues were healthy. The patient did not report any relevant medical history contraindicating routine dental treatment or implant surgery, but self-reported a dental history of asymptomatic nocturnal bruxism. The treatment plan was set and two Branemark protocols supported by six implants in each arch were installed after a 6-month healing period. A soft occlusal splint was made due to the patient's history of bruxism, and the lack of its use by the patient resulted in an acrylic fracture. The prosthesis was repaired and the importance of using the occlusal splint was restated. In the 4-year follow-up no fractures were reported.

  18. Oral Implant Imaging: A Review

    PubMed Central

    GUPTA, Sarika; PATIL, Neelkant; SOLANKI, Jitender; SINGH, Ravinder; LALLER, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Selecting an appropriate implant imaging technique has become a challenging task since the advent of advanced imaging modalities, and many of these are used for implant imaging. On imaging, the modality should not only consider the anatomy but should also provide dimensional accuracy. Many dentists use the conventional method, mostly orthopantograph (OPG), in their routine practice of implant placement. However, because of the drawbacks associated with OPG, higher technologies, such as computed tomography (CT) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), are better accepted. These help improve image sharpness and reduce distortion. These techniques are not used widely due to the cost effect. Therefore, to decide on the type of imaging technique, all associated advantages and disadvantages should be considered, which will be broadly discussed in this review. PMID:26715891

  19. Poppy seeds: implications of consumption.

    PubMed

    Lo, D S; Chua, T H

    1992-10-01

    Three white poppy seed samples of Papaver somniferum L were found to contain total morphine (free and bound) in the range 58.4 to 62.2 micrograms/g seeds and total codeine (free and bound) in the range 28.4 to 54.1 micrograms/g seeds. Soaking seeds in water was found to remove 45.6 per cent of the free morphine and 48.4 per cent of the free codeine. In ingesting a curry meal or two containing various amounts of washed seeds (morphine intake: 200.4 to 1002 micrograms; codeine intake: 95.9 to 479.5 micrograms), the urinary morphine levels were found to be in the range 0.12 to 1.27 micrograms/ml urine and urinary codeine levels in the range 0.04 to 0.73 micrograms/ml urine. In any large scale screening for abuse of opiate drugs, the possibility of urinary alkaloids arising from consuming food containing poppy seeds must be considered and, if possible, eliminated.

  20. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA) to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p < 10−8) and 0.8 mm at 41.6% vs. 19.5% (p < 10−4), respectively. The review focuses on carbon fiber properties that increased PBA for enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration. PMID:26966555

  1. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Richard

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA) to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p < 10(-8)) and 0.8 mm at 41.6% vs. 19.5% (p < 10(-4)), respectively. The review focuses on carbon fiber properties that increased PBA for enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration.

  2. A Percutaneously Implantable Fetal Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Vest, Adriana N.; Chmait, Ramen H.; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv; Pruetz, Jay; Silka, Michael; Zheng, Kaihui; Peck, Ray; Loeb, Gerald E.

    2015-01-01

    A miniaturized, self-contained pacemaker that could be implanted with a minimally invasive technique would dramatically improve the survival rate for fetuses that develop hydrops fetalis as a result of congenital heart block. We are currently validating a device that we developed to address this bradyarrhythmia. Preclinical studies in a fetal sheep model are underway to demonstrate that the device can be implanted via a minimally invasive approach, can mechanically withstand the harsh bodily environment, can induce effective contractions of the heart muscle with an adequate safety factor, and can successfully operate for the required device lifetime of three months using the previously-developed closed loop transcutaneous recharging system. PMID:25570982

  3. A reconnectable multiway implantable connector.

    PubMed

    Rushton, D N; Tromans, A M; Donaldson, N de N

    2002-12-01

    A well-tried plug-and-socket connector system designed for connecting multichannel implanted cables was adapted so as to allow disconnection and reconnection during surgery. Five different sealing techniques were tested in vitro, and it was found that only one of them had the required qualities of high leakage path impedance (taken as more than one megaohm for the worst sample) after three months of saline soak, together with demountability under surgical conditions. The system has subsequently been successfully implemented in a patient in whom reconnection was required two years after implantation.

  4. Optimum harvest maturity for Leymus chinensis seed

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jixiang; Wang, Yingnan; Qi, Mingming; Li, Xiaoyu; Yang, Chunxue; Wang, Yongcui

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Timely harvest is critical to achieve maximum seed viability and vigour in agricultural production. However, little information exists concerning how to reap the best quality seeds of Leymus chinensis, which is the dominant and most promising grass species in the Songnen Grassland of Northern China. The objective of this study was to investigate and evaluate possible quality indices of the seeds at different days after peak anthesis. Seed quality at different development stages was assessed by the colours of the seed and lemmas, seed weight, moisture content, electrical conductivity of seed leachate and germination indices. Two consecutive years of experimental results showed that the maximum seed quality was recorded at 39 days after peak anthesis. At this date, the colours of the seed and lemmas reached heavy brown and yellow, respectively. The seed weight was highest and the moisture content and the electrical conductivity of seed leachate were lowest. In addition, the seed also reached its maximum germination percentage and energy at this stage, determined using a standard germination test (SGT) and accelerated ageing test (AAT). Thus, Leymus chinensis can be harvested at 39 days after peak anthesis based on the changes in parameters. Colour identification can be used as an additional indicator to provide a more rapid and reliable measure of optimum seed maturity; approximately 10 days after the colour of the lemmas reached yellow and the colour of the seed reached heavy brown, the seed of this species was suitable for harvest. PMID:27170257

  5. Microporous Dermal-Mimetic Electrospun Scaffolds Pre-Seeded with Fibroblasts Promote Tissue Regeneration in Full-Thickness Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Bonvallet, Paul P.; Schultz, Matthew J.; Mitchell, Elizabeth H.; Bain, Jennifer L.; Culpepper, Bonnie K.; Thomas, Steven J.; Bellis, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun scaffolds serve as promising substrates for tissue repair due to their nanofibrous architecture and amenability to tailoring of chemical composition. In this study, the regenerative potential of a microporous electrospun scaffold pre-seeded with dermal fibroblasts was evaluated. Previously we reported that a 70% collagen I and 30% poly(Ɛ-caprolactone) electrospun scaffold (70:30 col/PCL) containing 160 μm diameter pores had favorable mechanical properties, supported fibroblast infiltration and subsequent cell-mediated deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM), and promoted more rapid and effective in vivo skin regeneration when compared to scaffolds lacking micropores. In the current study we tested the hypothesis that the efficacy of the 70:30 col/PCL microporous scaffolds could be further enhanced by seeding scaffolds with dermal fibroblasts prior to implantation into skin wounds. To address this hypothesis, a Fischer 344 (F344) rat syngeneic model was employed. In vitro studies showed that dermal fibroblasts isolated from F344 rat skin were able to adhere and proliferate on 70:30 col/PCL microporous scaffolds, and the cells also filled the 160 μm pores with native ECM proteins such as collagen I and fibronectin. Additionally, scaffolds seeded with F344 fibroblasts exhibited a low rate of contraction (~14%) over a 21 day time frame. To assess regenerative potential, scaffolds with or without seeded F344 dermal fibroblasts were implanted into full thickness, critical size defects created in F344 hosts. Specifically, we compared: microporous scaffolds containing fibroblasts seeded for 4 days; scaffolds containing fibroblasts seeded for only 1 day; acellular microporous scaffolds; and a sham wound (no scaffold). Scaffolds containing fibroblasts seeded for 4 days had the best response of all treatment groups with respect to accelerated wound healing, a more normal-appearing dermal matrix structure, and hair follicle regeneration. Collectively these

  6. Implants and Ethnocide: Learning from the Cochlear Implant Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparrow, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses the fictional case of the "Babel fish" to explore and illustrate the issues involved in the controversy about the use of cochlear implants in prelinguistically deaf children. Analysis of this controversy suggests that the development of genetic tests for deafness poses a serious threat to the continued flourishing of Deaf…

  7. Educational Challenges for Children with Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chute, Patricia M.; Nevins, Mary Ellen

    2003-01-01

    This article addresses educational challenges for children with severe to profound hearing loss who receive cochlear implants. Despite the implants, these children face acoustic challenges, academic challenges, attention challenges, associative challenges, and adjustment challenges. (Contains references.) (Author/DB)

  8. Scientists Design Heat-Activated Penis Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... implant, Le used a heat-activated exoskeleton of nitinol, a metal known for its elasticity. A urologist could do a simplified operation to insert the nitinol implant, which would remain flaccid at body temperature ...

  9. Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... systems Will have to be careful of static electricity. Static electricity may temporarily or permanently damage a cochlear implant. ... more details regarding how to deal with static electricity, contact the manufacturer or implant center. Have less ...

  10. Physiological and molecular determinants of embryo implantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuang; Lin, Haiyan; Kong, Shuangbo; Wang, Shumin; Wang, Hongmei; Wang, Haibin; Armant, D. Randall

    2014-01-01

    Embryo implantation involves the intimate interaction between an implantation-competent blastocyst and a receptive uterus, which occurs in a limited time period known as the window of implantation. Emerging evidence shows that defects originating during embryo implantation induce ripple effects with adverse consequences on later gestation events, highlighting the significance of this event for pregnancy success. Although a multitude of cellular events and molecular pathways involved in embryo-uterine crosstalk during implantation have been identified through gene expression studies and genetically engineered mouse models, a comprehensive understanding of the nature of embryo implantation is still missing. This review focuses on recent progress with particular attention to physiological and molecular determinants of blastocyst activation, uterine receptivity, blastocyst attachment and uterine decidualization. A better understanding of underlying mechanisms governing embryo implantation should generate new strategies to rectify implantation failure and improve pregnancy rates in women. PMID:23290997

  11. Prostate implant reconstruction from C-arm images with motion-compensated tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghan, Ehsan; Moradi, Mehdi; Wen, Xu; French, Danny; Lobo, Julio; Morris, W. James; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Accurate localization of prostate implants from several C-arm images is necessary for ultrasound-fluoroscopy fusion and intraoperative dosimetry. The authors propose a computational motion compensation method for tomosynthesis-based reconstruction that enables 3D localization of prostate implants from C-arm images despite C-arm oscillation and sagging. Methods: Five C-arm images are captured by rotating the C-arm around its primary axis, while measuring its rotation angle using a protractor or the C-arm joint encoder. The C-arm images are processed to obtain binary seed-only images from which a volume of interest is reconstructed. The motion compensation algorithm, iteratively, compensates for 2D translational motion of the C-arm by maximizing the number of voxels that project on a seed projection in all of the images. This obviates the need for C-arm full pose tracking traditionally implemented using radio-opaque fiducials or external trackers. The proposed reconstruction method is tested in simulations, in a phantom study and on ten patient data sets. Results: In a phantom implanted with 136 dummy seeds, the seed detection rate was 100% with a localization error of 0.86 {+-} 0.44 mm (Mean {+-} STD) compared to CT. For patient data sets, a detection rate of 99.5% was achieved in approximately 1 min per patient. The reconstruction results for patient data sets were compared against an available matching-based reconstruction method and showed relative localization difference of 0.5 {+-} 0.4 mm. Conclusions: The motion compensation method can successfully compensate for large C-arm motion without using radio-opaque fiducial or external trackers. Considering the efficacy of the algorithm, its successful reconstruction rate and low computational burden, the algorithm is feasible for clinical use.

  12. Monte Carlo calculated doses to treatment volumes and organs at risk for permanent implant lung brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Furutani, K. M.; Thomson, R. M.

    2013-10-01

    Iodine-125 (125I) and Caesium-131 (131Cs) brachytherapy have been used with sublobar resection to treat stage I non-small cell lung cancer and other radionuclides, 169Yb and 103Pd, are considered for these treatments. This work investigates the dosimetry of permanent implant lung brachytherapy for a range of source energies and various implant sites in the lung. Monte Carlo calculated doses are calculated in a patient CT-derived computational phantom using the EGsnrc user-code BrachyDose. Calculations are performed for 103Pd, 125I, 131Cs seeds and 50 and 100 keV point sources for 17 implant positions. Doses to treatment volumes, ipsilateral lung, aorta, and heart are determined and compared to those determined using the TG-43 approach. Considerable variation with source energy and differences between model-based and TG-43 doses are found for both treatment volumes and organs. Doses to the heart and aorta generally increase with increasing source energy. TG-43 underestimates the dose to the heart and aorta for all implants except those nearest to these organs where the dose is overestimated. Results suggest that model-based dose calculations are crucial for selecting prescription doses, comparing clinical endpoints, and studying radiobiological effects for permanent implant lung brachytherapy.

  13. The Recent Revolution in the Design and Manufacture of Cranial Implants: Modern Advancements and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Bonda, David J.; Manjila, Sunil; Selman, Warren R.; Dean, David

    2015-01-01

    Large format (i.e., > 25 cm2) cranioplasty is a challenging procedure not only from a cosmesis standpoint, but also in terms of ensuring that the patient's brain will be well-protected from direct trauma. Until recently, when a patient's own cranial flap was unavailable, these goals were unattainable. Recent advances in implant Computer Aided Design and 3-D printing are leveraging other advances in regenerative medicine. It is now possible to 3-D-print patient-specific implants from a variety of polymer, ceramic, or metal components. A skull template may be used to design the external shape of an implant that will become well integrated in the skull, while also providing beneficial distribution of mechanical force distribution in the event of trauma. Furthermore, an internal pore geometry can be utilized to facilitate the seeding of banked allograft cells. Implants may be cultured in a bioreactor along with recombinant growth factors to produce implants coated with bone progenitor cells and extracellular matrix that appear to the body as a graft, albeit a tissue-engineered graft. The growth factors would be left behind in the bioreactor and the graft would resorb as new host bone invades the space and is remodeled into strong bone. As we describe in this review, such advancements will lead to optimal replacement of cranial defects that are both patient-specific and regenerative. PMID:26171578

  14. Dosimetric study of Cs-131, I-125, and Pd-103 seeds for permanent prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruijie; Wang, Junjie; Zhang, Hongzhi

    2009-12-01

    As a well-established single-modality approach for early-stage prostate cancer, transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy (TIPPB) has gained increasing popularity due to its favorable clinical results. Currently, three isotopes, namely Cs-131, I-125, and Pd-103, are commercially available for TIPPB. This is the first study to systematically explore the dosimetric difference of these three isotopes for TIPPB. In total, 25 patients with T1-T2c prostate cancer previously implanted with I-125 seeds were randomly selected and replanned with Cs-131, I-125, and Pd-103 seeds to the prescription doses of 115, 145, and 125 Gy, respectively. The planning goals attempted were prostate V(p)100 approximately 95%, D(p)90 >or= 100%, and prostatic urethra D(u)10 seeds and needles required, were analyzed and compared. The mean homogeneity index (HI) was 0.59, 0.56, and 0.46 for Cs-131, I-125, and Pd-103 plans, respectively. The average D(u)10 was 124.6%, 125.7%, and 129.7%, respectively. The average rectum V(r)100 was 0.19, 0.22, and 0.31 cc, respectively. In addition, the average number of seeds was 57.9, 63.0, and 63.7, and the average number of needles required was 31.6, 32.9, and 33.6 for Cs-131, I-125, and Pd-103 seeds, respectively. This study demonstrates that TIPPB, utilizing Cs-131 seeds, allows for better dose homogeneity, while providing comparable prostate coverage and sparing of the urethra and rectum, with a comparable number of, or fewer, seeds and needles required, compared to I-125 or Pd-103 seeds. Further biological and clinical studies associated with Cs-131 are warranted.

  15. Phenolics in the seed coat of wild soybean (Glycine soja) and their significance for seed hardness and seed germination.

    PubMed

    Zhou, San; Sekizaki, Haruo; Yang, Zhihong; Sawa, Satoko; Pan, Jun

    2010-10-27

    Hardseededness in annual wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. Et Zucc.) is a valuable trait that affects the germination, viability, and quality of stored seeds. Two G. soja ecotypes native to Shandong Province of China have been used to identify the phenolics in the seed coat that correlate with the seed hardness and seed germination. Three major phenolics from the seed coat were isolated and identified as epicatechin, cyanidin 3-O-glucoside, and delphinidin 3-O-glucoside. Of the three phenolics, only the change of epicatechin exhibited a significant positive correlation with the change of hard seed percentages both under different water conditions during seed development and under different gas conditions during seed storage. Epicatechin also reveals a hormesis-like effect on the seed germination of G. soja. Epicatechin is suggested to be functionally related to coat-imposed hardseededness in G. soja.

  16. A simplified impression technique for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Robert E

    2002-03-01

    Dental implants have been considered an acceptable form of dental treatment since the early 1980s. A number of studies have been published describing impression techniques for dental implants. Many of the techniques described are so complex that they may seem daunting to the average restorative dentist. Most general practitioners do not wish to attempt to restore dental implants. This article describes a very simple, yet extremely accurate, technique for making impressions of dental implant fixtures.

  17. Surgical Tooth Implants, Combat and Field.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-15

    The upper two parts of the implant (post and core and crown) are conventional dental materials, usually gold. EX) 1473 MrION Of" I POV GS IS O&SOLETE...10 Clinical Examples of Baboon Dental Implants . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Histologic Analysis of the Bone-Implant Interface . . . . . . . . 16...Aluminum Oxide Dental Implant . . . . . . . . . . 2 Figure 2. Clinical Photograph of A29 and A30 in Baboon 469 at Necropsy

  18. Corrosion and fatigue of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.

    1975-01-01

    Implants for the treatment of femoral fractures, mechanisms leading to the failure or degradation of such structures, and current perspectives on surgical implants are discussed. Under the first heading, general usage, materials and procedures, environmental conditions, and laboratory analyses of implants after service are considered. Corrosion, crevice corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, intergranular corrosion, pitting corrosion, fatigue, and corrosion fatigue are the principal degradation mechanisms described. The need for improvement in the reliability of implants is emphasized.

  19. Positron annihilation study of P implanted Si

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka-Kumar, P.; Au, H.L.; Lynn, K.G. ); Sferlazzo, P. . SED Division)

    1992-01-01

    High-energy ion implantation (above 200 keV) is now commonly used in a variety of VLSI processes. The high energy required for these implants is often achieved by implanting multiply charged ions, which inevitably brings in the problem of low-energy ion contamination. The low-energy contamination is difficult to diagnose and detect. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is used to examine the defect distributions in these high energy implants with varying degrees of contamination.

  20. Positron annihilation study of P implanted Si

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka-Kumar, P.; Au, H.L.; Lynn, K.G.; Sferlazzo, P.

    1992-12-01

    High-energy ion implantation (above 200 keV) is now commonly used in a variety of VLSI processes. The high energy required for these implants is often achieved by implanting multiply charged ions, which inevitably brings in the problem of low-energy ion contamination. The low-energy contamination is difficult to diagnose and detect. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is used to examine the defect distributions in these high energy implants with varying degrees of contamination.

  1. Assaying multiple 125I seeds with the well-ionization chamber SourceCheck4π 33005 and a new insert

    PubMed Central

    Ballester, Facundo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Vijande, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide a practical solution that can be adopted in clinical routine to fulfill the AAPM-ESTRO recommendations regarding quality assurance of seeds used in prostate permanent brachytherapy. The aim is to design a new insert for the well-ionization chamber SourceCheck4π 33005 (PTW, Germany) that allows evaluating the mean air-kerma strength of up to ten 125I seeds with one single measurement instead of measuring each seed individually. Material and methods The material required is: a) the SourceCheck4π 33005 well-ionization chamber provided with a PTW insert to measure the air-kerma strength S K of one single seed at a time; b) a newly designed insert that accommodates ten seeds in one column, which allows measuring the mean S K of the ten seeds in one single measurement; and c) a container with ten seeds from the same batch and class of the seeds used for the patient implant, and a set of nine non-radioactive seeds. The new insert is characterized by determining its calibration coefficient, used to convert the reading of the well-chamber when ten seeds are measured to their mean S K. The proposed method is validated by comparing the mean S K of the ten seeds obtained from the new insert with the individual measurement of S K of each seed, evaluated with the PTW insert. Results The ratio between the calibration coefficient of the new insert and the calibration coefficient of the PTW insert for the SourceCheck4π 33005 is 1.135 ± 0.007 (k = 1). The mean S K of a set of ten seeds evaluated with this new system is in agreement with the mean value obtained from measuring independently the S K of each seed. Conclusions The new insert and procedure allow evaluating the mean S K of ten seeds prior to the implant in a single measurement. The method is faster and more efficient from radiation protection point of view than measuring the individual S K of each seed. PMID:26816507

  2. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7 milligrams of melatonin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053923 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of...

  3. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7 milligrams of melatonin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053923 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of...

  4. Rescuing failed oral implants via Wnt activation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xing; Li, Jingtao; Chen, Tao; Mouraret, Sylvain; Dhamdhere, Girija; Brunski, John B.; Zou, Shujuan; Helms, Jill A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim Implant osseointegration is not always guaranteed and once fibrous encapsulation occurs clinicians have few options other than implant removal. Our goal was to test whether a WNT protein therapeutic could rescue such failed implants. Material and Methods Titanium implants were placed in over-sized murine oral osteotomies. A lack of primary stability was verified by mechanical testing. Interfacial strains were estimated by finite element modelling and histology coupled with histomorphometry confirmed the lack of peri-implant bone. After fibrous encapsulation was established peri-implant injections of a liposomal formulation of WNT3A protein (L-WNT3A) or liposomal PBS (L-PBS) were then initiated. Quantitative assays were employed to analyse the effects of L-WNT3A treatment. Results Implants in gap-type interfaces exhibited high interfacial strains and no primary stability. After verification of implant failure, L-WNT3A or L-PBS injections were initiated. L-WNT3A induced a rapid, significant increase in Wnt responsiveness in the peri-implant environment, cell proliferation and osteogenic protein expression. The amount of peri-implant bone and bone in contact with the implant were significantly higher in L-WNT3A cases. Conclusions These data demonstrate L-WNT3A can induce peri-implant bone formation even in cases where fibrous encapsulation predominates. PMID:26718012

  5. Using Aerospace Technology To Design Orthopedic Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Technology originally developed to optimize designs of composite-material aerospace structural components used to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants. Development effort focused on designing knee implants, long-term goal to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants in general.

  6. Penile prosthesis implantation: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Simmons, M; Montague, D K

    2008-01-01

    Penile prosthesis implantation is the oldest effective treatment for erectile dysfunction. This review examines the past, present and future of penile prosthesis implantation. Advances in prosthetic design and implantation techniques have resulted today in devices that produce nearly normal flaccid and erect states, and have remarkable freedom from mechanical failure. The future of prosthetic design holds promises for even more improvements.

  7. [The elementary discussion on digital implant dentistry].

    PubMed

    Su, Y C

    2016-04-09

    It is a digital age today. Exposed to all kinds of digital products in many fields. Certainly, implant dentistry is not exception. Digitalization could improve the outcomes and could decrease the complications of implant dentistry. This paper introduces the concepts, definitions, advantages, disadvantages, limitations and errors of digital implant dentistry.

  8. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7 milligrams of melatonin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053923 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of...

  9. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7 milligrams of melatonin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053923 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of...

  10. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7 milligrams of melatonin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053923 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of...

  11. Pre-dispersal predation effect on seed packaging strategies and seed viability.

    PubMed

    DeSoto, Lucía; Tutor, David; Torices, Rubén; Rodríguez-Echeverría, Susana; Nabais, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    An increased understanding of intraspecific seed packaging (i.e. seed size/number strategy) variation across different environments may improve current knowledge of the ecological forces that drive seed evolution in plants. In particular, pre-dispersal seed predation may influence seed packaging strategies, triggering a reduction of the resources allocated to undamaged seeds within the preyed fruits. Assessing plant reactions to pre-dispersal seed predation is crucial to a better understanding of predation effects, but the response of plants to arthropod attacks remains unexplored. We have assessed the effect of cone predation on the size and viability of undamaged seeds in populations of Juniperus thurifera with contrasting seed packaging strategies, namely, North African populations with single-large-seeded cones and South European populations with multi-small-seeded cones. Our results show that the incidence of predation was lower on the single-large-seeded African cones than on the multi-small-seeded European ones. Seeds from non-preyed cones were also larger and had a higher germination success than uneaten seeds from preyed cones, but only in populations with multi-seeded cones and in cones attacked by Trisetacus sp., suggesting a differential plastic response to predation. It is possible that pre-dispersal seed predation has been a strong selective pressure in European populations with high cone predation rates, being a process which maintains multi-small-seeded cones and empty seeds as a strategy to save some seeds from predation. Conversely, pre-dispersal predation might not have a strong effect in the African populations with single-large-seeded cones characterized by seed germination and filling rates higher than those in the European populations. Our results indicate that differences in pre-dispersal seed predators and predation levels may affect both selection on and intraspecific variation in seed packaging.

  12. Induction of cartilage integration by a chondrocyte/collagen-scaffold implant

    PubMed Central

    Pabbruwe, Moreica B.; Esfandiari, Ehsanollah; Kafienah, Wael; Tarlton, John F.; Hollander, Anthony P.

    2009-01-01

    The integration of implanted cartilage is a major challenge for the success of tissue engineering protocols. We hypothesize that in order for effective cartilage integration to take place, matrix-free chondrocytes must be induced to migrate between the two tissue surfaces. A chondrocyte/collagen-scaffold implant system was developed as a method of delivering dividing cells at the interface between two cartilage surfaces. Chondrocytes were isolated from bovine nasal septum and seeded onto both surfaces of a collagen membrane to create the chondrocyte/collagen-scaffold implant. A model of two cartilage discs and the chondrocyte/collagen-scaffold sandwiched in between was used to effect integration in vitro. The resulting tissue was analysed histologically and biomechanically. The cartilage–implant–cartilage sandwich appeared macroscopically as one continuous piece of tissue at the end of 40 day cultures. Histological analysis showed tissue continuum across the cartilage–scaffold interface. The integration was dependent on both cells and scaffold. Fluorescent labeling of implanted chondrocytes demonstrated that these cells invade the surrounding mature tissue and drive a remodelling of the extracellular matrix. Using cell-free scaffolds we also demonstrated that some chondrocytes migrated from the natural cartilage into the collagen scaffold. Quantification of integration levels using a histomorphometric repair index showed that the chondrocyte/collagen-scaffold implant achieved the highest repair index compared to controls, reflected functionally through increased tensile strength. In conclusion, cartilage integration can be achieved using a chondrocyte/collagen-scaffold implant that permits controlled delivery of chondrocytes to both host and graft mature cartilage tissues. This approach has the potential to be used therapeutically for implantation of engineered tissue. PMID:19539365

  13. Complete arch implant impression technique.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junping; Rubenstein, Jeffrey E

    2012-06-01

    When making a definitive impression for an arch containing multiple implants, there are many reported techniques for splinting impression copings. This article introduces a splint technique that uses the shim method, which has been demonstrated to reduce laboratory and patient chair time, the number of impression copings and laboratory analogs needed, and the ultimate cost.

  14. Orthodontic palatal implants: clinical technique.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, D; O'Dwyer, J J; Benson, P E; Doyle, P T; Sandler, J

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to familiarize the readers with some of the clinical considerations necessary to ensure successful use of mid-palatal implants. Both surgical and technical aspects will be discussed along with a description of impression techniques used.

  15. A totally implantable electrical heart.

    PubMed

    Jufer, M

    1985-01-01

    A totally implantable artificial heart, electrically actuated by magnetical energy transmission was developed in Switzerland. The pusher-plates and roller-screw model was used for the pump. The main advantages of such a mechanical heart are discussed, in particular, the motor that transforms electrical energy into mechanical energy, and allows accurate control of the output and pressures of the artificial ventricles. The system includes the heart, the electronic control of the power supply, the microprocessor for the control of the mechanical heart's performance, a buffer battery, a rectifier and the secondary of the energy transmission. All these elements are implanted. Outside of the body are the main battery, the chopper and the primary of the energy transmission. At present, a left ventricle device for external assistance and a totally artificial heart have both been developed and implanted in calves. An optimized totally artificial heart is in construction, its size being compatible for human implantation; its volume is 500 mL and its total weight is 450 g.

  16. Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology

    PubMed Central

    McAlpine, David

    2015-01-01

    This special issue contains a collection of 13 papers highlighting the collaborative research and engineering project entitled Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology—ABCIT—as well as research spin-offs from the project. In this introductory editorial, a brief history of the project is provided, alongside an overview of the studies. PMID:26721929

  17. Bioceramic Coatings for Orthopaedic Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Allison A.

    2003-11-02

    During the past century, man-made materials and devices have been developed to the point at which they have been used successfully to replace and/or restore function to diseased or damaged tissues. In the field of orthopaedics, the use of metal implants has significantly improved the quality of life for countless individuals. Critical factors for implant success include proper design, material selection, and biocompatibility. While early research focused on the understanding biomechanical properties of the metal device, recent work has turned toward improving the biological properties of these devices. This has lead to the introduction of calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramics as a bioactive interface between the bulk metal impart and the surrounding tissue. The first calcium phosphate coatings where produced via vapor phase routes but more recently, there has been the emergence of solution based and biomimetic methods. While each approach has its own intrinsic materials and biological properties, in general CaP coatings have the promise to improve implant biocompatibility and ultimately implant longevity.

  18. Will Retinal Implants Restore Vision?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrenner, Eberhart

    2002-02-01

    A number of research groups are developing electrical implants that can be attached directly to the retina in an attempt to restore vision to patients suffering from retinal degeneration. However, despite promising results in animal experiments, there are still several major obstacles to overcome before retinal prostheses can be used clinically.

  19. Cortical Plasticity after Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, B.; Gjedde, A.; Wallentin, M.; Vuust, P.

    2013-01-01

    The most dramatic progress in the restoration of hearing takes place in the first months after cochlear implantation. To map the brain activity underlying this process, we used positron emission tomography at three time points: within 14 days, three months, and six months after switch-on. Fifteen recently implanted adult implant recipients listened to running speech or speech-like noise in four sequential PET sessions at each milestone. CI listeners with postlingual hearing loss showed differential activation of left superior temporal gyrus during speech and speech-like stimuli, unlike CI listeners with prelingual hearing loss. Furthermore, Broca's area was activated as an effect of time, but only in CI listeners with postlingual hearing loss. The study demonstrates that adaptation to the cochlear implant is highly related to the history of hearing loss. Speech processing in patients whose hearing loss occurred after the acquisition of language involves brain areas associated with speech comprehension, which is not the case for patients whose hearing loss occurred before the acquisition of language. Finally, the findings confirm the key role of Broca's area in restoration of speech perception, but only in individuals in whom Broca's area has been active prior to the loss of hearing. PMID:24377050

  20. Cochlear implant optimized noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Stefan J; Arora, Komal; Dawson, Pam W

    2012-12-01

    Noise-reduction methods have provided significant improvements in speech perception for cochlear implant recipients, where only quality improvements have been found in hearing aid recipients. Recent psychoacoustic studies have suggested changes to noise-reduction techniques specifically for cochlear implants, due to differences between hearing aid recipient and cochlear implant recipient hearing. An optimized noise-reduction method was developed with significantly increased temporal smoothing of the signal-to-noise ratio estimate and a more aggressive gain function compared to current noise-reduction methods. This optimized noise-reduction algorithm was tested with 12 cochlear implant recipients over four test sessions. Speech perception was assessed through speech in noise tests with three noise types; speech-weighted noise, 20-talker babble and 4-talker babble. A significant speech perception improvement using optimized noise reduction over standard processing was found in babble noise and speech-weighted noise and over a current noise-reduction method in speech-weighted noise. Speech perception in quiet was not degraded. Listening quality testing for noise annoyance and overall preference found significant improvements over the standard processing and over a current noise-reduction method in speech-weighted and babble noise types. This optimized method has shown significant speech perception and quality improvements compared to the standard processing and a current noise-reduction method.

  1. Cell-Seeded Tubularized Scaffolds for Reconstruction of Long Urethral Defects: A Preclinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Orabi, Hazem; AbouShwareb, Tamer; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yoo, James J.; Atala, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Background The treatment options for patients requiring repair of a long segment of the urethra are limited by the availability of autologous tissues. We previously reported that acellular collagen-based tubularized constructs seeded with cells are able to repair small urethral defects in a rabbit model. Objective We explored the feasibility of engineering clinically relevant long urethras for surgical reconstruction in a canine preclinical model. Design, setting, and participants Autologous bladder epithelial and smooth muscle cells from 15 male dogs were grown and seeded onto preconfigured collagen-based tubular matrices (6 cm in length). The perineal urethral segment was removed in 21 male dogs. Urethroplasties were performed with tubularized collagen scaffolds seeded with cells in 15 animals. Tubularized constructs without cells were implanted in six animals. Serial urethrography and three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) scans were performed pre- and postoperatively at 1, 3, 6, and 12 mo. The animals were euthanized at their predetermined time points (three animals at 1 mo, and four at 3, 6, and 12 mo) for analyses. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis Statistical analysis of CT imaging and histology was not needed. Results and limitations CT urethrograms showed wide-caliber urethras without strictures in animals implanted with cell-seeded matrices. The urethral segments replaced with acellular scaffolds collapsed. Gross examination of the urethral implants seeded with cells showed normal-appearing tissue without evidence of fibrosis. Histologically, an epithelial cell layer surrounded by muscle fiber bundles was observed on the cell-seeded constructs, and cellular organization increased over time. The epithelial and smooth muscle phenotypes were confirmed using antibodies to pancytokeratins AE1/AE3 and smooth muscle–specific desmin. Formation of an epithelial cell layer occurred in the unseeded constructs, but few muscle fibers formed

  2. Continuous Low-dose-rate Irradiation of Iodine-125 Seeds Inhibiting Perineural Invasion in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zheng; Dong, Teng-Hui; Si, Pei-Ren; Shen, Wei; Bi, Yi-Liang; Min, Min; Chen, Xin; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Perineural invasion (PNI) is a histopathological characteristic of pancreatic cancer (PanCa). The aim of this study was to observe the treatment effect of continuous low-dose-rate (CLDR) irradiation to PNI and assess the PNI-related pain relief caused by iodine-125 (125I) seed implantation. Methods: The in vitro PNI model established by co-culture with dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and cancer cells was interfered under 2 and 4 Gy of 125I seeds CLDR irradiation. The orthotopic models of PNI were established, and 125I seeds were implanted in tumor. The PNI-related molecules were analyzed. In 30 patients with panCa, the pain relief was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Pain intensity was measured before and 1 week, 2 weeks, and 1, 3, and 6 months after 125I seed implantation. Results: The co-culture of DRG and PanCa cells could promote the growth of PanCa cells and DRG neurites. In co-culture groups, the increased number of DRG neurites and pancreatic cells in radiation group was significantly less. In orthotopic models, the PNI-positive rate in radiation and control group was 3/11 and 7/11; meanwhile, the degrees of PNI between radiation and control groups was significant difference (P < 0.05). At week 2, the mean VAS pain score in patients decreased by 50% and significantly improved than the score at baseline (P < 0.05). The pain scores were lower in all patients, and the pain-relieving effect was retained about 3 months. Conclusions: The CLDR irradiation could inhibit PNI of PanCa with the value of further study. The CLDR irradiation could do great favor in preventing local recurrence and alleviating pain. PMID:27748339

  3. Effect of cell-seeded hydroxyapatite scaffolds on rabbit radius bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rathbone, C R; Guda, T; Singleton, B M; Oh, D S; Appleford, M R; Ong, J L; Wenke, J C

    2014-05-01

    Highly porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds were developed as bone graft substitutes using a template coating process, characterized, and seeded with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). To test the hypothesis that cell-seeded HA scaffolds improve bone regeneration, HA scaffolds without cell seeding (HA-empty), HA scaffolds with 1.5 × 10(4) BMSCs (HA-low), and HA scaffolds with 1.5 × 10(6) BMSCs (HA-high) were implanted in a 10-mm rabbit radius segmental defect model for 4 and 8 weeks. Three different fluorochromes were administered at 2, 4, and 6 weeks after implantation to identify differences in temporal bone growth patterns. It was observed from fluorescence histomorphometry analyses that an increased rate of bone infiltration occurred from 0 to 2 weeks (p < 0.05) of implantation for the HA-high group (2.9 ± 0.5 mm) as compared with HA-empty (1.8 ± 0.8 mm) and HA-low (1.3 ± 0.2 mm) groups. No significant differences in bone formation within the scaffold or callus formation was observed between all groups after 4 weeks, with a significant increase in bone regenerated for all groups from 4 to 8 weeks (28.4% across groups). Although there was no difference in bone formation within scaffolds, callus formation was significantly higher in HA-empty scaffolds (100.9 ± 14.1 mm(3) ) when compared with HA-low (57.8 ± 7.3 mm(3) ; p ≤ 0.003) and HA-high (69.2 ± 10.4 mm(3) ; p ≤ 0.02) after 8 weeks. These data highlight the need for a better understanding of the parameters critical to the success of cell-seeded HA scaffolds for bone regeneration.

  4. Optimized Cell Survival and Seeding Efficiency for Craniofacial Tissue Engineering Using Clinical Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Archana; Eubanks, Emily; Edwards, Sean; Aronovich, Sharon; Travan, Suncica; Rudek, Ivan; Wang, Feng; Lanis, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic injuries involving the face are very common, yet the clinical management of the resulting craniofacial deficiencies is challenging. These injuries are commonly associated with missing teeth, for which replacement is compromised due to inadequate jawbone support. Using cell therapy, we report the upper jaw reconstruction of a patient who lost teeth and 75% of the supporting jawbone following injury. A mixed population of bone marrow-derived autologous stem and progenitor cells was seeded onto β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), which served as a scaffold to deliver cells directly to the defect. Conditions (temperature, incubation time) to achieve the highest cell survival and seeding efficiency were optimized. Four months after cell therapy, cone beam computed tomography and a bone biopsy were performed, and oral implants were placed to support an engineered dental prosthesis. Cell seeding efficiency (>81%) of the β-TCP and survival during the seeding process (94%) were highest when cells were incubated with β-TCP for 30 minutes, regardless of incubation temperature; however, at 1 hour, cell survival was highest when incubated at 4°C. Clinical, radiographic, and histological analyses confirmed that by 4 months, the cell therapy regenerated 80% of the original jawbone deficiency with vascularized, mineralized bone sufficient to stably place oral implants. Functional and aesthetic rehabilitation of the patient was successfully completed with installation of a dental prosthesis 6 months following implant placement. This proof-of-concept clinical report used an evidence-based approach for the cell transplantation protocol used and is the first to describe a cell therapy for craniofacial trauma reconstruction. PMID:25378653

  5. Histrelin Hydrogel Implant--Valera: Histrelin implant, LHRH-Hydrogel implant, RL 0903, SPD 424.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    Valera Pharmaceuticals, formerly Hydro Med Sciences, is developing a once-yearly Histrelin Hydrogel Implant [Histrelin implant, LHRH-Hydrogel implant, RL 0903, SPD 424, Vantas], a subcutaneous (s.c.) reservoir device capable of long-term delivery of histrelin at constant release rates for the treatment of prostate cancer. Histrelin is a luteinising hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRH). A different formulation of the LHRH implant is currently in development for the treatment of central precocious puberty (CPP). On 4 September 2003, Hydro Med Sciences announced that it had changed its name to Valera Pharmaceuticals. Shire Pharmaceuticals had an option to market and distribute the histrelin implant outside the US, but in a realigned agreement announced in January 2002, Shire stated that HydroMed (now Valera) would be responsible for concluding the phase III studies, filing for regulatory approval and producing the implant, while also gaining marketing rights in the US. Shire has no further involvement in development, but retains an option to market and distribute the product outside the US. The product is available for rest-of-the-world licensing through Valera Pharmaceuticals' business development division. Paladin Labs has received the exclusive rights for the sale and marketing of histrelin hydrogel implant in Canada. Valera Pharmaceuticals will have the responsibility for manufacturing and completing development of the product. In July 2004, Paladin announced it had filed for regulatory approval with Health Canada for the treatment of prostate cancer. Phase III trials have been conducted and initially involved two open-labelled, randomised, parallel studies that compared the hydrogel implant with the active comparators, leuprorelin acetate 22.5 mg depot (TAP Pharmaceutical's Lupron Depot) and a 3-month implant of goserelin acetate (Astra Zeneca's Zoladex). However, because of financial constraints, HydroMed discontinued recruitment in a phase II European study

  6. Simplifying fixed implant dental prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Tischler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Through following the FPPD protocol for multiple adjacent implants, and delivering final abutments, picking up the metal framework, and delivering provisionals, many benefits are gained. The benefits of following the FPPD protocol are as follows: The restorative dentist is trying-in and delivering the final abutments in one visit as opposed to removing them and placing them multiple times. This requires less chair time and time for the patient. It also reduces the mechanical stress on the abutment screw and implant body due to the elimination of multiple try-in appointments. When the metal framework is tried-in and verified for fit, the restorative dentist has the opportunity check the retention, check the margins, and make any corrections that might be needed. The abutments will be staying in the mouth when the framework is picked up. This metal try-in allows for a verification of the bite to be given to the dental lab. The delivery of provisionals manufactured by the dental laboratory offers many advantages in the FPPD technique. The patient has a form of tooth much earlier in the traditional appointment sequence. The patient can now offer feedback to the doctor and laboratory for fabrication of the permanent prosthesis with regards to shape and color. The laboratory-fabricated provisionals offer progressive loading to the implants through having a reduced occlusion yet allowing food to stimulate the implants. Overall, the FPPD technique offers shorter appointment times, more rapid delivery of fixed supported teeth, improved doctor-technician communication, and less mechanical wear on the implant parts.

  7. Effects of implant diameter, drug loading and end-capping on praziquantel release from PCL implants.

    PubMed

    Li, Changyan; Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Yaqiong; Guo, Shengrong; Wu, Weiping

    2010-02-15

    Praziquantel (PZQ)-loaded poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) cylindrical implants were fabricated and characterized. Implant diameter (3, 4 and 8mm), drug loading (25% and 50%), and the end-capping were investigated to evaluate their effects on drug release. The evolution of implants with release time was conducted in terms of implant microstructure, crystallinity, drug content and molecular weight of PCL. The results showed that drug release was fastest for the implant with a diameter of 3mm and slowest for the implant with a diameter of 8mm; drug release from the implant with a drug content of 50% was faster than that from the implant with a drug content of 25%; the release of PZQ from the end-capped implants was slightly slower than that from the corresponding end-uncapped implants. The effect of drug loadings on PZQ release was related with diameter of the implants and the effect was weakened as diameter of the implants increased. The drug release data for all the implants were best fitted with Ritger-Peppas model, therefore Fickian diffusion was the predominant release mechanism. The evolution of implants with release time verified that PZQ was gradually released from the exterior to the interior of the implants.

  8. The biomechanics of seed germination.

    PubMed

    Steinbrecher, Tina; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2016-12-07

    From a biomechanical perspective, the completion of seed (and fruit) germination depends on the balance of two opposing forces: the growth potential of the embryonic axis (radicle-hypocotyl growth zone) and the restraint of the seed-covering layers (endosperm, testa, and pericarp). The diverse seed tissues are composite materials which differ in their dynamic properties based on their distinct cell wall composition and water uptake capacities. The biomechanics of embryo cell growth during seed germination depend on irreversible cell wall loosening followed by water uptake due to the decreasing turgor, and this leads to embryo elongation and eventually radicle emergence. Endosperm weakening as a prerequisite for radicle emergence is a widespread phenomenon among angiosperms. Research into the biochemistry and biomechanics of endosperm weakening has demonstrated that the reduction in puncture force of a seed's micropylar endosperm is environmentally and hormonally regulated and involves tissue-specific expression of cell wall remodelling proteins such as expansins, diverse hydrolases, and the production of directly acting apoplastic reactive oxygen. The endosperm-weakening biomechanics and its underlying cell wall biochemistry differ between the micropylar (ME) and chalazal (CE) endosperm domains. In the ME, they involve cell wall loosening, cell separation, and programmed cell death to provide decreased and localized ME tissue resistance, autolysis, and finally the formation of an ME hole required for radicle emergence. Future work will further unravel the molecular mechanisms, environmental regulation, and evolution of the diverse biomechanical cell wall changes underpinning the control of germination by endosperm weakening.

  9. Detection algorithm for multiple rice seeds images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, F.; Ying, Y. B.

    2006-10-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a digital image analysis algorithm for detection of multiple rice seeds images. The rice seeds used for this study involved a hybrid rice seed variety. Images of multiple rice seeds were acquired with a machine vision system for quality inspection of bulk rice seeds, which is designed to inspect rice seeds on a rotating disk with a CCD camera. Combining morphological operations and parallel processing gave improvements in accuracy, and a reduction in computation time. Using image features selected based on classification ability; a highly acceptable defects classification was achieved when the algorithm was implemented for all the samples to test the adaptability.

  10. Laser Phase Errors in Seeded FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, D.; Fry, A.; Stupakov, G.; White, W.; /SLAC

    2012-03-28

    Harmonic seeding of free electron lasers has attracted significant attention from the promise of transform-limited pulses in the soft X-ray region. Harmonic multiplication schemes extend seeding to shorter wavelengths, but also amplify the spectral phase errors of the initial seed laser, and may degrade the pulse quality. In this paper we consider the effect of seed laser phase errors in high gain harmonic generation and echo-enabled harmonic generation. We use simulations to confirm analytical results for the case of linearly chirped seed lasers, and extend the results for arbitrary seed laser envelope and phase.

  11. Choice of a dental implant system.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Peter R; Gartner, Judith L; Norkin, Frederic J

    2005-04-01

    Many dentists are bewildered by the intricacies and complexities of dental implants. They are constantly besieged by product advertisements and can find it difficult to choose which systems to work with. Some dentists are so intimidated by the subject that they choose to avoid getting involved with implants and instead stick to traditional tooth replacement systems. By breaking implants down into 4 main components, the body, collar, connection, and restorative post, it is easier to understand the structure and function of dental implants. Each portion should be designed to achieve certain objectives. Once these structural components are understood, it is easier to compare and contrast differing implant systems.

  12. SU-F-BRA-03: Integrating Novel Electromagnetic Tracking Hollow Needle Assistance in Permanent Implant Brachytherapy Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Racine, E; Hautvast, G; Binnekamp, D; Beaulieu, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To report on the results of a complete permanent implant brachytherapy procedure assisted by an electromagnetic (EM) hollow needle possessing both 3D tracking and seed drop detection abilities. Methods: End-to-end in-phantom EM-assisted LDR procedures were conducted. The novel system consisted of an EM tracking apparatus (NDI Aurora V2, Planar Field Generator), a 3D US scanner (Philips CX50), a hollow needle prototype allowing 3D tracking and seed drop detection and a specially designed treatment planning software (Philips Healthcare). A tungsten-doped 30 cc spherical agarose prostate immersed in gelatin was used for the treatment. A cylindrical shape of 0.8 cc was carved along its diameter to mimic the urethra. An initial plan of 26 needles and 47 seeds was established with the system. The plan was delivered with the EM-tracked hollow needle, and individual seed drop locations were recorded on the fly. The phantom was subsequently imaged with a CT scanner from which seed positions and contour definitions were obtained. The DVHs were then independently recomputed and compared with those produced by the planning system, both before and after the treatment. Results: Of the 47 seeds, 45 (96%) were detected by the EM technology embedded in the hollow needle design. The executed plan (from CT analysis) differed from the initial plan by 2%, 14% and 8% respectively in terms of V100, D90 and V150 for the prostate, and by 8%, 7% and 10% respectively in terms of D5, V100 and V120 for the urethra. Conclusion: The average DVH deviations between initial and executed plans were within a 5% tolerance imposed for this proof-of-concept assessment. This relatively good concordance demonstrates the feasibility and potential benefits of combining EM tracking and seed drop detection for real-time dosimetry validation and assistance in permanent implant brachytherapy procedures. This project has been entirely funded by Philips Healthcare.

  13. Tissue engineering osteochondral implants for temporomandibular joint repair.

    PubMed

    Schek, R M; Taboas, J M; Hollister, S J; Krebsbach, P H

    2005-11-01

    Tissue engineering has provided an alternative to traditional strategies to repair and regenerate temporomandibular joints (TMJ). A successful strategy to engineer osteochondral tissue, such as that found in the TMJ, will produce tissue that is both biologically and mechanically functional. Image-based design (IBD) and solid free-form (SFF) fabrication can be used to generate scaffolds that are load bearing and match patient and defect site geometry. The objective of this study was to demonstrate how scaffold design, materials, and biological factors can be used in an integrated approach to regenerate a multi-tissue interface. IBD and SFF were first used to create biomimetic scaffolds with appropriate bulk geometry and microarchitecture. Biphasic composite scaffolds were then manufactured with the same techniques and used to simultaneously generate bone and cartilage in discrete regions and provide for the development of a stable interface between cartilage and subchondral bone. Poly-l-lactic acid/hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds were differentially seeded with fibroblasts transduced with an adenovirus expressing bone morphogenetic protein-7 in the ceramic phase and fully differentiated chondrocytes in the polymeric phase, and were subcutaneously implanted into mice. Following implantation in the ectopic site, the biphasic scaffolds promoted the simultaneous growth of bone, cartilage, and a mineralized interface tissue. Within the ceramic phase, the pockets of tissue generated included blood vessels, marrow stroma, and adipose tissue. This combination of IBD and SFF-fabricated biphasic scaffolds with gene and cell therapy is a promising approach to regenerate osteochondral defects and, ultimately, the TMJ.

  14. Epidemiology of silicone-gel breast implants.

    PubMed

    Brown, S Lori

    2002-05-01

    Silicone breast implants have been marketed in the United States since 1963. Questions remain unanswered on the safety of these medical devices despite their popularity and availability. In 1992, the Food and Drug Administration restricted the availability of silicone-gel breast implants to women requiring them for reconstruction after breast cancer or for other medical indications. Inflatable saline breast implants have remained available for either reconstruction or for cosmetic augmentation while manufacturers completed studies addressing issues of safety and effectiveness. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has less concern today regarding a putative association between breast implants and autoimmune disease because of epidemiologic studies that have indicated that there is not a large increase in risk for connective tissue disease in women with breast implants. These studies have not ruled out a small increase in risk of connective tissue disease to these women nor have they addressed the issue of an atypical syndrome related to silicone. The FDA has continuing concerns over local complications that are related to breast implants. The current review provides a brief discussion of the regulatory history of silicone implants and of FDA concerns over breast implants, implant prevalence, studies of systemic and local complications related to breast implants, and a brief description of the FDA study of silicone-gel breast implant rupture.

  15. Accurate and efficient detection of pulmonary seed embolization in prostate iodine-125 permanent brachytherapy with a collimated gamma scintillation survey meter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qin-Sheng; Blair, Henry F

    2003-05-01

    Pulmonary seed embolization is frequently observed in permanent prostate brachytherapy. Postoperative chest radiographic examination does not always detect seed embolization. To overcome this deficiency, a low energy gamma scintillation survey meter was converted to a seed-migration detector by adding a cone-shaped single-hole collimation cap to the window end of the scintillation probe. The response functions of the seed-migration detector to iodine-125 (I-125) for different source-to-detector distances in air and in water were measured. The spatial discrimination power of the survey meter, represented by the full width at half maximum measured in water, is typically improved from more than 7 cm to about 3 cm. Seventy-nine patients with I-125 implantation were scanned with the seed-migration detector at the patients' 30-day postevaluation visit. Fifteen patients showed single-seed embolization to the chest region and four patients displayed two-seed embolization. In other words, 24% of the patients present with embolized seeds. The detection accuracy of each patient was validated by a comprehensive investigation procedure. The comprehensive investigation consists of reviewing the patient's treatment history, orally questioning the patient for possible seed loss via the urethra route outside the hospital, examining all available chest radiographs before and after the seed implantation, and counting the seeds on the postevaluation CT scans. In comparison, examinations relying only on the analysis of postoperative chest radiographs yielded a false-positive detection in four patients and a false-negative detection in two patients. Another advantage of the seed-migration detector is that multiple seed-migration scans can be performed without exposing the patient to any additional radiation, for this device is a passive detector. Our clinical implementation also demonstrated that the seed-migration detector is a convenient and cost-effective method. As a result of this

  16. NOTE: Optimal needle arrangement for intraoperative planning in permanent I-125 prostate implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. A.; Fung, A. Y. C.; Zaider, M.

    2002-08-01

    One limitation of intraoperative planning of permanent prostate implants is that needles must already be in the gland before planning images are acquired. Improperly placed needles often restrict the capability of generating optimal seed placement. We developed guiding principles for the proper layout of needles within the treatment volume. The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center planning system employs a genetic algorithm to find the optimal seed implantation pattern consistent with pre-assigned constraints (needle geometry, uniformity, conformity and the avoidance of high doses to urethra and rectum). Ultrasound volumes for twelve patients with I-125 implants were used to generate six plans per patient (total 72 plans) with different needle arrangements. The plans were evaluated in terms of V100 (percentage prostate volume receiving at least the prescription dose), U135 (percentage urethra volume receiving at least 135% of prescription dose), and CI (conformity index, the ratio of treatment volume to prescription dose volume.) The method termed POSTCTR, in which needles were placed on the periphery of the largest ultrasound slice and posterior central needles were placed as needed, consistently gave superior results for all prostate sizes. Another arrangement, labelled POSTLAT, where the needles were placed peripherally with additional needles in the posterior lateral lobes, also gave satisfactory results. We advocate two needle arrangements, POSTCTR and POSTLAT, with the former giving better results.

  17. Smoke signals and seed dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Mark T; Nelson, David C

    2011-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana F-box protein MAX2 has been discovered in four separate genetic screens, indicating that it has roles in leaf senescence, seedling photosensitivity, shoot outgrowth and seed germination. Both strigolactones and karrikins can regulate A. thaliana seed germination and seedling photomorphogenesis in a MAX2-dependent manner, but only strigolactones inhibit shoot branching. How MAX2 mediates specific responses to both classes of structurally-related signals, and the origin of its dual role remains unknown. The moss Physcomitrella patens utilizes strigolactones and MAX2 orthologs are present across the land plants, suggesting that this signaling system could have an ancient origin. The seed of parasitic Orobanchaceae species germinate preferentially in response to strigolactones over karrikins, and putative Orobanchaceae MAX2 orthologs form a sub-clade distinct from those of other dicots. These observations suggest that lineage-specific evolution of MAX2 may have given rise to specialized responses to these signaling molecules. PMID:22019642

  18. Salmonella in sesame seed products.

    PubMed

    Brockmann, Stefan O; Piechotowski, Isolde; Kimmig, Peter

    2004-01-01

    In the context of an international outbreak of multiresistant Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 that was correlated to the consumption of halvah ("helva," an Asian candy made from sesame seed), we examined several sesame seed products for the occurrence of Salmonella. Of 117 ready-to-eat food items containing sesame, we isolated salmonellae from 11 (9.4%) samples. In addition to finding Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 in the halvah involved in the outbreak, we also isolated different Salmonella Typhimurium strains out of halvah from other manufacturers and countries of origin, as well as Salmonella Offa, Salmonella Tennessee, and Salmonella Poona from sesame paste (tahini) and sesame seed, which is sold for raw consumption in cereals.

  19. Early History and Challenges of Implantable Electronics

    PubMed Central

    KO, WEN H.

    2013-01-01

    Implantable systems for biomedical research and clinical care are now a flourishing field of activities in academia as well as industrial institutions. The broad field includes experimental explorations in electronics, mechanical, chemical, and biological components and systems, and the combination of all these. Today virtually all implants involve both electronic circuits and micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS). This article offers a very brief glance back at the early history of implant electronics in the period from the 1950s to the 1970s, by employing selected examples from the author’s research. This short review also discusses the challenges of implantable electronics at present, and suggests some potentially important trends in the future research and development of implantable microsystems. It is aimed as an introduction of implantable/attached electronic systems to research engineers that are interested in implantable systems as a section of Biomedical Instrumentations. PMID:24791159

  20. Implant fractures: Rare but not exceptional

    PubMed Central

    Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Moogla, Srinivas; Kuntcham, Rupa Sruthi; Kolaparthy, Lakshmi Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication of dentures aided with implants has become a preferred treatment option for rehabilitation of completely and partially edentulous patients when durability is concerned. Simulation to natural teeth in terms of esthetics and to a greater extent in function can be considered as key elements in the raise of implant dentistry worldwide. Despite its high success rate, therapy with osseointegrated dental implants is not free of complications. Implant failure can occur for other reasons, with implant fracture being one of the major reasons for late failure. Although the incidence of implant fractures may be low, it invariably effects the patient and also clinician. Thus, sound evidence based knowledge of cause of fracture is mandatory for that careful treatment that can reduce the incidence of fracture helping in a better treatment plan. The aim of this review is to enlighten the various causes of implant fracture. PMID:27041830

  1. Surface modification of implants in long bone.

    PubMed

    Förster, Yvonne; Rentsch, Claudia; Schneiders, Wolfgang; Bernhardt, Ricardo; Simon, Jan C; Worch, Hartmut; Rammelt, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Coatings of orthopedic implants are investigated to improve the osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties of the implant surfaces and thus to enhance periimplant bone formation. By applying coatings that mimic the extracellular matrix a favorable environment for osteoblasts, osteoclasts and their progenitor cells is provided to promote early and strong fixation of implants. It is known that the early bone ongrowth increases primary implant fixation and reduces the risk of implant failure. This review presents an overview of coating titanium and hydroxyapatite implants with components of the extracellular matrix like collagen type I, chondroitin sulfate and RGD peptide in different small and large animal models. The influence of these components on cells, the inflammation process, new bone formation and bone/implant contact is summarized.

  2. [Mammary implant selection or chest implants fabrication with computer help].

    PubMed

    Chavoin, J-P; André, A; Bozonnet, E; Teisseyre, A; Arrue, J; Moreno, B; Gangloff, D; Grolleau, J-L; Garrido, I

    2010-10-01

    Authors present their personal and original experience in the use of computer to enhance the precision in the good choice of volumes and shapes in the field of mammary reconstruction and aesthetic augmentation (800 cases). Concerning funnel chest (163 cases) and Poland syndrome (12 cases), they use computer-assisted conception and custom-made implants, much more precise than traditional plaster cast.

  3. [Nutritional value of sesame seeds].

    PubMed

    Martinchik, A N

    2011-01-01

    Literature data on the nutritional value of sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum L.), their use in feeding the world population and food production are presented. Sesame seeds contain up to 55% oil and 20% protein. Sesame proteins are limited by lysine but rich in tryptophan and methionine. Sesame oil is rich in linoleic and oleic acids, the predominance of gamma-tocopherol over the other isomers of vitamin E and high content of fat-soluble lignans (sesamin and sesamolin). Thanks to recent sesame oil has a phytoestrogen activity; it has a cholesterol-lowering effect.

  4. SEEDS: A Celebration of Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Bob

    1991-01-01

    The major goal of the project of Space Exposed Experiment Developed for Students (SEEDS) was to stimulate interest in science through the active involvement of all participants. Youthful investigators utilized the basic and integrated science process skills as they conducted the research necessary to complete the data reports used in the compilation of this document. Participants described many unique activities designed to promote critical thinking and problem solving. Seeds made a significant impact toward enhancing the teaching, learning, and enjoyment of science for students worldwide.

  5. SEEDS Moving Group Status Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElwain, Michael

    2011-01-01

    I will summarize the current status of the SEEDS Moving Group category and describe the importance of this sub-sample for the entire SEEDS survey. This presentation will include analysis of the sensitivity for the Moving Groups with general a comparison to other the other sub-categories. I will discuss the future impact of the Subaru SCExAO system for these targets and the advantage of using a specialized integral field spectrograph. Finally, I will present the impact of a pupil grid mask in order to produce fiducial spots in the focal plane that can be used for both photometry and astrometry.

  6. Successful rehabilitation of partial edentulous maxilla and mandible with new type of implants: molecular precision implants.

    PubMed

    Danza, Matteo; Lauritano, Dorina; Carinci, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The extraction of teeth results in rapid bone resorption both vertically and horizontally in the first month. The loss of alveolar ridge reduces the chance of implant rehabilitation. Atraumatic extraction, implant placement in extraction socket, and an immediate prosthesis have been proposed as alternative therapies to maintain the volume and contours tissue and reduce time and cost of treatment. The immediate load of implants is a universally practiced procedure; nevertheless a successful procedure requires expertise in both the clinical and the reconstructive stages using a solid implant system. Excellent primary stability and high bone-implant contact are only minimal requirements for any type of implant procedure. In this paper we present a case report using a new type of implants. The new type of implants, due to its sophisticated control system of production, provides to the implantologist a safe and reliable implant, with a macromorphology designed to ensure a close contact with the surrounding bone.

  7. Successful Rehabilitation of Partial Edentulous Maxilla and Mandible with New Type of Implants: Molecular Precision Implants

    PubMed Central

    Danza, Matteo; Carinci, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The extraction of teeth results in rapid bone resorption both vertically and horizontally in the first month. The loss of alveolar ridge reduces the chance of implant rehabilitation. Atraumatic extraction, implant placement in extraction socket, and an immediate prosthesis have been proposed as alternative therapies to maintain the volume and contours tissue and reduce time and cost of treatment. The immediate load of implants is a universally practiced procedure; nevertheless a successful procedure requires expertise in both the clinical and the reconstructive stages using a solid implant system. Excellent primary stability and high bone-implant contact are only minimal requirements for any type of implant procedure. In this paper we present a case report using a new type of implants. The new type of implants, due to its sophisticated control system of production, provides to the implantologist a safe and reliable implant, with a macromorphology designed to ensure a close contact with the surrounding bone. PMID:25525437

  8. Decontamination of dental implant surface in peri-implantitis treatment: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago-Vera, Pedro; Solá-Ruiz, María F.; Ferrer-García, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    Etiological treatment of peri-implantitis aims to reduce the bacterial load within the peri-implant pocket and decontaminate the implant surface in order to promote osseointegration. The aim of this literature review was to evaluate the efficacy of different methods of implant surface decontamination. A search was conducted using the PubMed (Medline) database, which identified 36 articles including in vivo and in vitro studies, and reviews of different decontamination systems (chemical, mechanical, laser and photodynamic therapies). There is sufficient consensus that, for the treatment of peri-implant infections, the mechanical removal of biofilm from the implant surface should be supplemented by chemical decontamination with surgical access. However, more long-term research is needed to confirm this and to establish treatment protocols responding to different implant characterics. Key words:Peri-implantitis, treatment, decontamination, implant surface, laser. PMID:23986023

  9. ['Which breast implant do I have?'; the importance of the Dutch Breast Implant Registry].

    PubMed

    Hommes, Juliëtte; Mureau, Marc A M; Harmsen, Manuel; Rakhorst, Hinne

    2015-01-01

    About 1 in 300 women in the Netherlands has a breast implant but many patients do not know what type of implant was inserted. The quality of breast implants is currently monitored by the implant manufacturers. Sufficient incidents have occurred to show that an independent registry is required to measure the quality of breast implants and to facilitate a national recall, if necessary. Good national and international collaboration with the government, the manufacturers and other specialist associations is crucial for setting up an implant registry. Since April 2015, data about patients and their implants have been collected, independently and prospectively, in the Dutch Breast Implant Registry to increase patient safety in cases of breast implant surgery in the Netherlands.

  10. Assessment of Stability of Craniofacial Implants by Resonant Frequency Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ivanjac, Filip; Konstantinović, Vitomir S; Lazić, Vojkan; Dordević, Igor; Ihde, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Implant stability is a principal precondition for the success of implant therapy. Extraoral implants (EO) are mainly used for anchoring of maxillofacial epithesis. However, assessment of implant stability is mostly based on principles derived from oral implants. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical stability of EO craniofacial disk implants (single, double, and triple) by resonance frequency analysis at different stages of the bone's healing. Twenty patients with orbital (11), nasal (5), and auricular (4) defects with 50 EO implants placed for epithesis anchorage were included. Implant stability was measured 3 times; after implant placement, at 3 months and at least after 6 months. A significant increase in implant stability values was noted between all of the measurements, except for triple-disk implants between third and sixth months, and screw implants between 0 and third months. Disk implants showed lower implant stability quotient (ISQ) values compared with screw implants. Triple-disk implants showed better stability compared with single and double-disk implants. Based on resonance frequency analysis values, disk implants could be safely loaded when their ISQ values are 38 (single disks), 47 (double disks), and 48 (triple disks). According to resonance frequency analysis, disk implant stability increased over time, which showed good osseointegration and increasing mineralization. Although EO screw implants showed higher ISQ values than disk implants, disk-type implants can be safely loaded even if lower values of stability are measured.

  11. Does the number of implants have any relation with peri-implant disease?

    PubMed Central

    PASSONI, Bernardo Born; DALAGO, Haline Renata; SCHULDT FILHO, Guenther; OLIVEIRA DE SOUZA, João Gustavo; BENFATTI, César Augusto Magalhães; MAGINI, Ricardo de Souza; BIANCHINI, Marco Aurélio

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the number of pillar implants of implant-supported fixed prostheses and the prevalence of periimplant disease. Material and Methods Clinical and radiographic data were obtained for the evaluation. The sample consisted of 32 patients with implant-supported fixed prostheses in function for at least one year. A total of 161 implants were evaluated. Two groups were formed according to the number of implants: G1) ≤5 implants and G2) >5 implants. Data collection included modified plaque index (MPi), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), width of keratinized mucosa (KM) and radiographic bone loss (BL). Clinical and radiographic data were grouped for each implant in order to conduct the diagnosis of mucositis or peri-implantitis. Results Clinical parameters were compared between groups using Student's t test for numeric variables (KM, PD and BL) and Mann-Whitney test for categorical variables (MPi and BOP). KM and BL showed statistically significant differences between both groups (p<0.001). Implants from G1 – 19 (20.43%) – compared with G2 – 26 (38.24%) – showed statistically significant differences regarding the prevalence of peri-implantitis (p=0.0210). Conclusion It seems that more than 5 implants in total fixed rehabilitations increase bone loss and consequently the prevalence of implants with periimplantitis. Notwithstanding, the number of implants does not have any influence on the prevalence of mucositis. PMID:25466474

  12. Radioactive seed localization with 125I for nonpalpable lesions prior to breast lumpectomy and/or excisional biopsy: methodology, safety, and experience of initial year.

    PubMed

    Dauer, Lawrence T; Thornton, Cynthia; Miodownik, Daniel; Boylan, Daniel; Holahan, Brian; King, Valencia; Brogi, Edi; Morrow, Monica; Morris, Elizabeth A; St Germain, Jean

    2013-10-01

    The use of radioactive seed localization (RSL) as an alternative to wire localizations (WL) for nonpalpable breast lesions is rapidly gaining acceptance because of its advantages for both the patient and the surgical staff. This paper examines the initial experience with over 1,200 patients seen at a comprehensive cancer center. Radiation safety procedures for radiology, surgery, and pathology were implemented, and radioactive material inventory control was maintained using an intranet-based program. Surgical probes allowed for discrimination between 125I seed photon energies from 99mTc administered for sentinel node testing. A total of 1,127 patients (median age of 57.2 y) underwent RSL procedures with 1,223 seeds implanted. Implanted seed depth ranged from 10.3-107.8 mm. The median length of time from RSL implant to surgical excision was 2 d. The median 125I activity at time of implant was 3.1 MBq (1.9 to 4.6). The median dose rate from patients with a single seed was 9.5 µSv h-1 and 0.5 µSv h-1 at contact and 1 m, respectively. The maximum contact dose rate was 187 µSv h-1 from a superficially placed seed. RSL performed greater than 1 d before surgery is a viable alternative to WL, allowing flexibility in scheduling, minimizing day of surgery procedures, and improving workflow in breast imaging and surgery. RSL has been shown to be a safe and effective procedure for preoperative localization under mammographic and ultrasound guidance, which can be managed with the use of customized radiation protection controls.

  13. Updated Methods for Seed Shape Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes, Emilio; Martín, José Javier; Saadaoui, Ezzeddine

    2016-01-01

    Morphological variation in seed characters includes differences in seed size and shape. Seed shape is an important trait in plant identification and classification. In addition it has agronomic importance because it reflects genetic, physiological, and ecological components and affects yield, quality, and market price. The use of digital technologies, together with development of quantification and modeling methods, allows a better description of seed shape. Image processing systems are used in the automatic determination of seed size and shape, becoming a basic tool in the study of diversity. Seed shape is determined by a variety of indexes (circularity, roundness, and J index). The comparison of the seed images to a geometrical figure (circle, cardioid, ellipse, ellipsoid, etc.) provides a precise quantification of shape. The methods of shape quantification based on these models are useful for an accurate description allowing to compare between genotypes or along developmental phases as well as to establish the level of variation in different sets of seeds. PMID:27190684

  14. 7 CFR 201.21 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., if any is present, for any seed required to be labeled as to the percentage of germination, and the percentage of hard seed shall not be included as part of the germination percentage. [24 FR 3953, May...

  15. 7 CFR 201.21 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., if any is present, for any seed required to be labeled as to the percentage of germination, and the percentage of hard seed shall not be included as part of the germination percentage. [24 FR 3953, May...

  16. 7 CFR 201.30 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... any is present, for any seed required to be labeled as to the percentage of germination, and the percentage of hard seed shall not be included as part of the germination percentage. [32 FR 12779, Sept....

  17. 7 CFR 201.30 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... any is present, for any seed required to be labeled as to the percentage of germination, and the percentage of hard seed shall not be included as part of the germination percentage. [32 FR 12779, Sept....

  18. Chemical, corrosion and topographical analysis of stainless steel implants after different implantation periods.

    PubMed

    Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Armitage, David Andrew; Knowles, Jonathan Campbell; Szade, Jacek; Korlacki, Wojciech; Marciniak, Jan

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this work is to examine the corrosion properties, chemical composition, and material-implant interaction after different periods of implantation of plates used to correct funnel chest. The implants are made of 316L stainless steel. Examinations are carried out on three implants: new (nonimplanted) and two implanted for 29 and 35 months. The corrosion study reveals that in the potential range that could occur in the physiological condition the new bar has the lowest current density and the highest corrosion potential. This indicates that the new plate has the highest corrosion resistance and the corrosion resistance could be reduced during implantation by the instruments used during the operation. XPS analysis reveals changes in the surface chemistry. The longer the implantation time the more carbon and oxygen are observed and only trace of elements such as Cr, Mo are detected indicating that surface is covered by an organic layer. On some parts of the implants whitish tissue is observed: the thickness of which increased with the time of implantation. This tissue was identified as an organic layer; mainly attached to the surface on the areas close to where the implant was bent to attain anatomical fit and thus where the implant has higher surface roughness. The study indicates that the chest plates are impaired by the implantation procedure and contact with biological environment. The organic layer on the surface shows that the implant did not stay passive but some reactions at the tissue-implant interface occurred. These reactions should be seen as positive, as it indicates that the implants were accepted by the tissues. Nevertheless, if the implants react, they may continue to release chromium, nickel, and other harmful ions long term as indicated by lower corrosion resistance of the implants following implantation.

  19. Dental implants with versus without peri-implant bone defects treated with guided bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Peñarrocha-Diago, Maria; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background The guided bone regeneration (GBR) technique is highly successful for the treatment of peri-implant bone defects. The aim was to determine whether or not implants associated with GBR due to peri-implant defects show the same survival and success rates as implants placed in native bone without defects. Material and Methods Patients with a minimum of two submerged dental implants: one suffering a dehiscence or fenestration defect during placement and undergoing simultaneous guided bone regeneration (test group), versus the other entirely surrounded by bone (control group) were treated and monitored annually for three years. Complications with the healing procedure, implant survival, implant success and peri-implant marginal bone loss were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed with non-parametric tests setting an alpha value of 0.05. Results Seventy-two patients and 326 implants were included (142 test, 184 control). One hundred and twenty-five dehiscences (average height 1.92±1.11) and 18 fenestrations (average height 3.34±2.16) were treated. At 3 years post-loading, implant survival rates were 95.7% (test) and 97.3% (control) and implant success rates were 93.6% and 96.2%, respectively. Mean marginal bone loss was 0.54 (SD 0.26 mm) for the test group and 0.43 (SD 0.22 mm) for the control group. No statistically significant differences between both groups were found. Conclusions Within the limits of this study, implants with peri-implant defects treated with guided bone regeneration exhibited similar survival and success rates and peri-implant marginal bone loss to implants without those defects. Large-scale randomized controlled studies with longer follow-ups involving the assessment of esthetic parameters and hard and soft peri-implant tissue stability are needed. Key words:Guided bone regeneration, peri-implant defects, dental implants, marginal bone level, success rate, survival rate. PMID:26330931

  20. Diffusion of polymer gel implants.

    PubMed

    Davis, B K

    1974-08-01

    Crosslinked polyacrylamide and polyvinylpyrrolidone gels have been used to subcutaneously implant (125)I-labeled immunoglobulin, (125)I-labeled luteinizing hormone, (125)I-labeled bovine serum albumin, (125)I-labeled insulin, [(3)H]prostaglandin F(2alpha), and Na(125)I into hamsters. From the rates of absorption of the solutes, their diffusion coefficients were determined. The diffusion coefficients showed a logarithmic dependence on implant polymer concentration and solute molecular weight. Release of the solutes from gel preparations incubated 10 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at 37 degrees revealed a similar relationship between solute diffusion coefficient, molecular weight, and the concentration of polymer. A general equation was derived that gives the expected diffusion coefficient of a substance in a polymer gel from its molecular weight, diffusion coefficient in solvent, and polymer concentration of the gel.

  1. Microsystem technologies for ophtalmological implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokwa, Wilfried

    2003-01-01

    Due to the low power consumption CMOS electronics is ideal for the use in implanted systems. This paper presents two projects working on ophthalmological implants. Both systems are powered by an external RF-field. One system has been developed to measure the intraocular pressure continuously which is important for the therapy of glaucoma patients. The system consists of a micro coil and an integrated pressure transponder chip built into an artificial soft lens. A second example is a very complex system for epiretinal stimulation of the nerve cells of the retina. With such a system it might be possible to give blind people that are suffering from retinitis pigmentosa some visual contact to their surrounding.

  2. Imaging in cochlear implant patients

    PubMed Central

    Aschendorff, Antje

    2012-01-01

    Imaging procedures are a mainstream tool in the daily ENT workflow. Cochlear Implant patients are representing a special population with specific demands for imaging. There are different imaging techniques available for pre-operative evaluation, surgery and postoperative controls with different indications and consequences. High-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are mainly used in the evaluation process. New procedures, as digital volume tomography, are increasingly used intra- and postoperatively. Especially the intracochlear positioning in malformations of the inner ear, eventually added with radiological assisted navigation, can be considered a standard of modern cochlear implant surgery. In addition, digital volume tomography may serve as a quality control tool focusing on the evaluation of the intracochlear electrode position. The range of applications, indications and current results are illustrated. PMID:22558057

  3. Low-Noise Implantable Electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, G. F.

    1982-01-01

    New implantable electrocardiogram electrode much less sensitive than previous designs to spurious biological potentials. Designed in novel "pocket" configuration, new electrode is intended as sensor for radiotelemetry of biological parameters in experiments on unrestrained subjects. Electrode is esentially squashed cylinder that admits body fluid into interior. Cylinder and electrical lead are made of stainless steel. Spot welding and crimping are used for assembly, rather than soldering.

  4. Implantable telemetry for small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A series of totally implantable telemetry devices for use in measuring deep body parameters in small animals were developed. Under a collaborative agreement with NASA, several of these systems; the continuous wave Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter, the multichannel telemetry system, and the inductively-powered dual channel cardiac pacer were evaluated in a series of ten mongrel dogs (15 to 20 kg.). These systems were used to measure ascending aortic and coronary blood flow, aortic pressure, and subcutaneous EKG.

  5. Implantable telemetry for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-03-01

    A series of totally implantable telemetry devices for use in measuring deep body parameters in small animals were developed. Under a collaborative agreement with NASA, several of these systems; the continuous wave Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter, the multichannel telemetry system, and the inductively-powered dual channel cardiac pacer were evaluated in a series of ten mongrel dogs (15 to 20 kg.). These systems were used to measure ascending aortic and coronary blood flow, aortic pressure, and subcutaneous EKG.

  6. Implantable Neural Interfaces for Sharks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    neural codes from peripheral nerve using electrode arrays; Use simple chemical stimuli & multiple locations Completed Amino acid – evoked...rosette · Odorant perfusion across the olfactory rosette (amino acids : histidine, glutamate, cysteine) Implantable Neural Interfaces for Sharks...methane sulphonate ) at 100 mg/L on spontaneous activity recorded in the olfactory lobe. Rate histograms in 5 sec bins as a function of time. The

  7. Action against contraceptive implant threatened.

    PubMed

    Dyer, C

    1995-08-19

    Norplant provides contraception over a five-year period through the gradual subcutaneous release of the progestogen levonorgestrel. It has been on the US market since 1991 and available in Great Britain since 1993. Already the subject of group legal actions in several US states, Norplant may soon be the target of lawyers in Britain for litigation. The lawyers allege that insertion of the implant under the skin of the upper arm by untrained doctors has led to painful and difficult removals and left women with scarred arms. Moreover, insufficient warning has been given about possible side effects such as mood swings and continuous vaginal bleeding. Hoechst Roussel, marketer of the implant in Britain, however, argues that only doctors trained in Norplant insertion and removal should attempt either procedure. Removal will be problematic only if preceded by a problem insertion. Hoechst Roussel recently advised gynecologists, in writing, not to attempt to extract the implant unless they are trained in the removal technique. By British law, the application of a drug product once approved for general release to general practitioners and family planning doctors cannot be restricted by a pharmaceutical company.

  8. Additively manufactured porous tantalum implants.

    PubMed

    Wauthle, Ruben; van der Stok, Johan; Amin Yavari, Saber; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Mulier, Michiel; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The medical device industry's interest in open porous, metallic biomaterials has increased in response to additive manufacturing techniques enabling the production of complex shapes that cannot be produced with conventional techniques. Tantalum is an important metal for medical devices because of its good biocompatibility. In this study selective laser melting technology was used for the first time to manufacture highly porous pure tantalum implants with fully interconnected open pores. The architecture of the porous structure in combination with the material properties of tantalum result in mechanical properties close to those of human bone and allow for bone ingrowth. The bone regeneration performance of the porous tantalum was evaluated in vivo using an orthotopic load-bearing bone defect model in the rat femur. After 12 weeks, substantial bone ingrowth, good quality of the regenerated bone and a strong, functional implant-bone interface connection were observed. Compared to identical porous Ti-6Al-4V structures, laser-melted tantalum shows excellent osteoconductive properties, has a higher normalized fatigue strength and allows for more plastic deformation due to its high ductility. It is therefore concluded that this is a first step towards a new generation of open porous tantalum implants manufactured using selective laser melting.

  9. Tissue response to peritoneal implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picha, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    Peritoneal implants were fabricated from poly 2-OH, ethyl methacrylate (HEMA), polyetherurethane (polytetramethylene glycol 1000 MW, 1,4 methylene disocynate, and ethyl diamine), and untreated and sputter treated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The sputter treated PTFE implants were produced by an 8 cm diameter argon ion source. The treated samples consisted of ion beam sputter polished samples, sputter etched samples (to produce a microscopic surface cone texture) and surface pitted samples (produced by ion beam sputtering to result in 50 microns wide by 100 microns deep square pits). These materials were implanted in rats for periods ranging from 30 minutes to 14 days. The results were evaluated with regard to cell type and attachment kinetics onto the different materials. Scanning electron microscopy and histological sections were also evaluated. In general the smooth hydrophobic surfaces attracted less cells than the ion etched PTFE or the HEMA samples. The ion etching was observed to enhance cell attachment, multinucleated giant cell (MNGC) formation, cell to cell contact, and fibrous capsule formation. The cell responsed in the case of ion etched PTFE to an altered surface morphology. However, equally interesting was the similar attachment kinetics of HEMA verses the ion etched PTFE. However, HEMA resulted in a markedly different response with no MNGC's formation, minimal to no capsule formation, and sample coverage by a uniform cell layer.

  10. Miniaturized neural interfaces and implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, Thomas; Boretius, Tim; Ordonez, Juan; Hassler, Christina; Henle, Christian; Meier, Wolfgang; Plachta, Dennis T. T.; Schuettler, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Neural prostheses are technical systems that interface nerves to treat the symptoms of neurological diseases and to restore sensory of motor functions of the body. Success stories have been written with the cochlear implant to restore hearing, with spinal cord stimulators to treat chronic pain as well as urge incontinence, and with deep brain stimulators in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Highly complex neural implants for novel medical applications can be miniaturized either by means of precision mechanics technologies using known and established materials for electrodes, cables, and hermetic packages or by applying microsystems technologies. Examples for both approaches will be introduced and discussed. Electrode arrays for recording of electrocorticograms during presurgical epilepsy diagnosis have been manufactured using approved materials and a marking laser to achieve an integration density that is adequate in the context of brain machine interfaces, e.g. on the motor cortex. Microtechnologies have to be used for further miniaturization to develop polymer-based flexible and light weighted electrode arrays to interface the peripheral and central nervous system. Polyimide as substrate and insulation material will be discussed as well as several application examples for nerve interfaces like cuffs, filament like electrodes and large arrays for subdural implantation.

  11. Short dental implants: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Annibali, S; Cristalli, M P; Dell'Aquila, D; Bignozzi, I; La Monaca, G; Pilloni, A

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence has suggested the utility of short dental implants for oral reconstructive procedures in clinical situations of limited vertical bone height. The aim of this review was to systematically evaluate clinical studies of implants < 10 mm in length, to determine short implant-supported prosthesis success in the atrophic jaw. Implant survival, incidence of biological and biomechanical complications, and radiographic peri-implant marginal bone loss were evaluated. Screening of eligible studies, quality assessment, and data extraction were conducted by two reviewers independently. Meta-analyses were performed by the pooling of survival data by implant surface, surgical technique, implant location, type of edentulism, and prosthetic restoration. Two randomized controlled trials and 14 observational studies were selected and analyzed for data extraction. In total, 6193 short-implants were investigated from 3848 participants. The observational period was 3.2 ± 1.7 yrs (mean ± SD). The cumulative survival rate (CSR) was 99.1% (95%CI: 98.8-99.4). The biological success rate was 98.8% (95%CI: 97.8-99.8), and the biomechanical success rate was 99.9% (95%CI: 99.4-100.0). A higher CSR was reported for rough-surfaced implants. The provision of short implant-supported prostheses in patients with atrophic alveolar ridges appears to be a successful treatment option in the short term; however, more scientific evidence is needed for the long term.

  12. Combining dissimilar metals in orthopaedic implants: revisited.

    PubMed

    Zartman, Kevin C; Berlet, Gregory C; Hyer, Christopher F; Woodard, Joseph R

    2011-10-01

    The use of metals as implant materials has become common practice in the field of orthopaedics. A wide variety of conditions are treated with metallic implants, and designers have used an assortment of materials to meet the unique mechanical demands of each application. The majority of implants used today, whether pins, plates, screws, or total joints, are made of cobalt-chrome alloy, stainless steel, or titanium. Common metallurgic wisdom cautions against bonding dissimilar metals in a biologically active environment. Surgeons have therefore shied away from combining dissimilar metal implants because of the fear of inciting corrosion that could potentially compromise the implants and lead to aseptic loosening, implant failure, or adverse biological reaction in host tissue. As surgical reconstruction and arthroplasty options expand with the advent of newer implants and expanded operative techniques, the orthopaedic surgeon will increasingly be faced with weighing the risks and benefits of combining implants made of dissimilar metals in a patient. Here, the authors examine the origins of the concern over using mixed metals, discuss mechanisms of corrosion as they relate to surgical implants, and review both in vitro and in vivo studies concerning the most common combinations of dissimilar metals in order to guide the surgeon in choosing implants.

  13. Computerized implant-dentistry: Advances toward automation

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Anand, Vishal; Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Jain, Nikil; Gupta, Shilpi

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in the field of implantology such as three-dimensional imaging, implant-planning software, computer-aided-design/computer-aided-manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology, computer-guided, and navigated implant surgery have led to the computerization of implant-dentistry. This three-dimensional computer-generated implant-planning and surgery has not only enabled accurate preoperative evaluation of the anatomic limitations but has also facilitated preoperative planning of implant positions along with virtual implant placement and subsequently transferring the virtual treatment plans onto the surgical phase via static (guided) or dynamic (navigated) systems aided by CAD/CAM technology. Computerized-implant-dentistry being highly predictable and minimally invasive in nature has also allowed implant placement in patients with medical comorbidities (e.g. radiation therapy, blood dyscrasias), in patients with complex problems following a significant alteration of the bony anatomy as a result of benign or malignant pathology of the jaws or trauma and in patients with other physical and emotional problems. With significant achievements accomplished in the field of computerized implant-dentistry, attempts are now been made toward complete automation of implant-dentistry. PMID:25810585

  14. 7 CFR 947.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 947.12 Section 947.12 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND... Definitions § 947.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes officially certified...

  15. 7 CFR 946.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 946.12 Section 946.12 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes...

  16. 7 CFR 947.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 947.12 Section 947.12 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND... Definitions § 947.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes officially certified...

  17. 7 CFR 947.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 947.12 Section 947.12 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND... Definitions § 947.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes officially certified...

  18. 7 CFR 946.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 946.12 Section 946.12 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes...

  19. 7 CFR 946.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 946.12 Section 946.12 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes...

  20. 7 CFR 947.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 947.12 Section 947.12 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND... Definitions § 947.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes officially certified...

  1. 7 CFR 946.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 946.12 Section 946.12 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes...

  2. 7 CFR 946.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 946.12 Section 946.12 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes...

  3. 7 CFR 947.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 947.12 Section 947.12 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND... Definitions § 947.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes officially certified...

  4. Cryopreservation of orthodox and recalcitrant seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter in Plant Cell Culture, Development and Biotechnology describes student laboratory exercises for cryopreservation of plant seeds in liquid nitrogen. It includes two exercises involving step by step protocols for use with the two major types of seeds. A standard technique for small seed...

  5. 9 CFR 101.7 - Seed organisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seed organisms. 101.7 Section 101.7..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.7 Seed organisms. When used in conjunction with or in reference to seed organisms, the following shall mean: (a) Master...

  6. Forward genetics studies of seed phytic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both the chemical composition and total amount of seed phosphorus (P) are important to the end-use quality of cereal and legume seed crops. The chemistry of seed total P largely revolves around the synthesis and storage of phytic acid (myo-inositol hexaphosphate). Forward genetics research, beginnin...

  7. Seed coat darkening in Cowpea bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed coat of cowpea bean (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) slowly browns to a darker color during storage. High temperature and humidity during storage might contribute to this color change. Variation in browning rate among seeds in a lot leads to a mixture of seed colors creating an unacceptable product...

  8. Transesterification in situ of sunflower seed oil

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, K.J.; D'Arch-Evans, C.

    1985-06-01

    Transesterification of sunflower seed oil in situ has produced methyl and ethyl esters in yields greater than 40% of the dry seed weight. This figure compares with a typical yield of ca. 30% when the esters were prepared in the conventional manner from preextracted seed oil. 14 references.

  9. The Seed Is the Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antone, Eileen M.

    2005-01-01

    Since humanities arise from a specific place and from the people of that place, this article will focus on Peacemaker's revolutionary teachings about the seed of law. Long before the people from across the ocean arrived here on Turtle Island (North America) there was much warfare happening. According to John Mohawk (2001, para. 1), an Iroquoian…

  10. Reversible Seeding in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    We propose to generate steady-state microbunching in a storage ring with a reversible seeding scheme. High gain harmonic generation (HGHG) and echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) are two promising methods for microbunching linac electron beams. Because both schemes increase the energy spread of the seeded beam, they cannot drive a coherent radiator turn-by-turn in a storage ring. However, reversing the seeding process following the radiator minimizes the impact on the electron beam and may allow coherent radiation at or near the storage ring repetition rate. In this paper we describe the general idea and outline a proof-of-principle experiment. Electron storage rings can drive high average power light sources, and free-electron lasers (FELs) are now producing coherent light sources of unprecedented peak brightness While there is active research towards high repetition rate FELs (for example, using energy recovery linacs), at present there are still no convenient accelerator-based sources of high repetition rate, coherent radiation. As an alternative avenue, we recently proposed to establish steady-state microbunching (SSMB) in a storage ring. By maintaining steady-state coherent microbunching at one point in the storage ring, the beam generates coherent radiation at or close to the repetition rate of the storage ring. In this paper, we propose a method of generating a microbunched beam in a storage ring by using reversible versions of linac seeding schemes.

  11. Subgingival microbiome in patients with healthy and ailing dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Xu, Lixin; Wang, Zicheng; Li, Lianshuo; Zhang, Jieni; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Ting; Lin, Jiuxiang; Chen, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants are commonly used to replace missing teeth. However, the dysbiotic polymicrobial communities of peri-implant sites are responsible for peri-implant diseases, such as peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. In this study, we analyzed the microbial characteristics of oral plaque from peri-implant pockets or sulci of healthy implants (n = 10), peri-implant mucositis (n = 8) and peri-implantitis (n = 6) sites using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. An increase in microbial diversity was observed in subgingival sites of ailing implants, compared with healthy implants. Microbial co-occurrence analysis revealed that periodontal pathogens, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia, were clustered into modules in the peri-implant mucositis network. Putative pathogens associated with peri-implantitis were present at a moderate relative abundance in peri-implant mucositis, suggesting that peri-implant mucositis an important early transitional phase during the development of peri-implantitis. Furthermore, the relative abundance of Eubacterium was increased at peri-implantitis locations, and co-occurrence analysis revealed that Eubacterium minutum was correlated with Prevotella intermedia in peri-implantitis sites, which suggests the association of Eubacterium with peri-implantitis. This study indicates that periodontal pathogens may play important roles in the shifting of healthy implant status to peri-implant disease. PMID:26077225

  12. Brachytherapy seed and applicator localization via iterative forward projection matching algorithm using digital X-ray projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Damodar

    Interstitial and intracavitary brachytherapy plays an essential role in management of several malignancies. However, the achievable accuracy of brachytherapy treatment for prostate and cervical cancer is limited due to the lack of intraoperative planning and adaptive replanning. A major problem in implementing TRUS-based intraoperative planning is an inability of TRUS to accurately localize individual seed poses (positions and orientations) relative to the prostate volume during or after the implantation. For the locally advanced cervical cancer patient, manual drawing of the source positions on orthogonal films can not localize the full 3D intracavitary brachytherapy (ICB) applicator geometry. A new iterative forward projection matching (IFPM) algorithm can explicitly localize each individual seed/applicator by iteratively matching computed projections of the post-implant patient with the measured projections. This thesis describes adaptation and implementation of a novel IFPM algorithm that addresses hitherto unsolved problems in localization of brachytherapy seeds and applicators. The prototype implementation of 3-parameter point-seed IFPM algorithm was experimentally validated using a set of a few cone-beam CT (CBCT) projections of both the phantom and post-implant patient's datasets. Geometric uncertainty due to gantry angle inaccuracy was incorporated. After this, IFPM algorithm was extended to 5-parameter elongated line-seed model which automatically reconstructs individual seed orientation as well as position. The accuracy of this algorithm was tested using both the synthetic-measured projections of clinically-realistic Model-6711 125I seed arrangements and measured projections of an in-house precision-machined prostate implant phantom that allows the orientations and locations of up to 100 seeds to be set to known values. The seed reconstruction error for simulation was less than 0.6 mm/3o. For the physical phantom experiments, IFPM absolute accuracy for

  13. Is Graphene a Promising Nano-Material for Promoting Surface Modification of Implants or Scaffold Materials in Bone Tissue Engineering?

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ming; Liu, Yunsong; Chen, Tong; Du, Feng; Zhao, Xianghui; Xiong, Chunyang

    2014-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering promises to restore bone defects that are caused by severe trauma, congenital malformations, tumors, and nonunion fractures. How to effectively promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or seed cells has become a hot topic in this field. Many researchers are studying the ways of conferring a pro-osteodifferentiation or osteoinductive capability on implants or scaffold materials, where osteogenesis of seed cells is promoted. Graphene (G) provides a new kind of coating material that may confer the pro-osteodifferentiation capability on implants and scaffold materials by surface modification. Here, we review recent studies on the effects of graphene on surface modifications of implants or scaffold materials. The ability of graphene to improve the mechanical and biological properties of implants or scaffold materials, such as nitinol and carbon nanotubes, and its ability to promote the adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs or osteoblasts have been demonstrated in several studies. Most previous studies were performed in vitro, but further studies will explore the mechanisms of graphene's effects on bone regeneration, its in vivo biocompatibility, its ability to promote osteodifferentiation, and its potential applications in bone tissue engineering. PMID:24447041

  14. Co-precipitation of tobramycin into biomimetically coated orthopedic fixation pins employing submicron-thin seed layers of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Sörensen, Jan H; Lilja, Mirjam; Åstrand, Maria; Sörensen, Torben C; Procter, Philip; Strømme, Maria; Steckel, Hartwig

    2014-01-01

    The migration, loosening and cut-out of implants and nosocomial infections are current problems associated with implant surgery. New innovative strategies to overcome these issues are emphasized in today's research. The current work presents a novel strategy involving co-precipitation of tobramycin with biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) formation to produce implant coatings that control local drug delivery to prevent early bacterial colonization of the implant. A submicron- thin HA layer served as seed layer for the co-precipitation process and allowed for incorporation of tobramycin in the coating from a stock solution of antibiotic concentrations as high as 20 mg/ml. Concentrations from 0.5 to 20 mg/ml tobramycin and process temperatures of 37 °C and 60 °C were tested to assess the optimal parameters for a thin tobramycin- delivering HA coating on discs and orthopedic fixation pins. The morphology and thickness of the coating and the drug-release profile were evaluated via scanning electron microscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. The coatings delivered pharmaceutically relevant amounts of tobramycin over a period of 12 days. To the best of our knowledge, this is the longest release period ever observed for a fast-loaded biomimetic implant coating. The presented approach could form the foundation for development of combination device/antibiotic delivery vehicles tailored to meet well-defined clinical needs while combating infections and ensuring fast implant in-growth.

  15. 7 CFR 201.24a - Inoculated seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inoculated seed. 201.24a Section 201.24a Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.24a Inoculated seed. Seed claimed to be inoculated shall...

  16. 7 CFR 201.69 - Classes of certified seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classes of certified seed. 201.69 Section 201.69..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Certified Seed § 201.69 Classes of certified seed. (a) Classes of certified seed are as...

  17. A Murine Model of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Peri-Implant Mucositis and Peri-Implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Pirih, Flavia Q.; Hiyari, Sarah; Leung, Ho-Yin; Barroso, Ana D. V.; Jorge, Adrian C. A.; Perussolo, Jeniffer; Atti, Elisa; Lin, Yi-Ling; Tetradis, Sotirios; Camargo, Paulo M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dental implants are a vastly used treatment option for tooth replacement. Dental implants are however susceptible to inflammatory diseases such as peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, which are highly prevalent and may lead to implant loss. Unfortunately, the understanding of the pathogenesis of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis is fragmented and incomplete. Therefore, the availability of a reproducible animal model to study these inflammatory diseases would facilitate the dissection of their pathogenic mechanisms. The objective of this study is to propose a murine model of experimental peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. Materials and Methods Screw-shaped titanium implants were placed in the upper healed edentulous alveolar ridges of C57BL/6J mice eight weeks after tooth extraction. Following four weeks of osseointegration, Porphyromonas gingivalis-lipolysaccharide (LPS) injections were delivered to the peri-implant soft tissues for six weeks. No-injections and vehicle injections were utilized as controls. Peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis were assessed clinically, radiographically (micro-CT) and histologically following LPS-treatment. Results LPS-injections resulted in a significant increase in soft tissue edema around the head of the implants as compared to the control groups. Micro-CT analysis revealed significantly greater bone loss in the LPS-treated implants. Histological analysis of the specimens demonstrated that the LPS-group had increased soft tissue vascularity, which harbored a dense mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate, and the bone exhibited noticeable osteoclast activity. Conclusion The induction of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis in mice via localized delivery of bacterial LPS has been demonstrated. We anticipate that this model will contribute to the development of more effective preventive and therapeutic approaches for these two conditions. PMID:24967609

  18. Treatment concepts for the posterior maxilla and mandible: short implants versus long implants in augmented bone.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Daniel Stefan; Cha, Jae-Kook; Jung, Ui-Won

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this narrative review is to describe treatment options for the posterior regions of the mandible and the maxilla, comparing short implants vs. longer implants in an augmented bone. The dental literature was screened for treatment options enabling the placement of dental implants in posterior sites with a reduced vertical bone height in the maxilla and the mandible. Short dental implants have been increasingly used recently, providing a number of advantages including reduced patient morbidity, shorter treatment time, and lower costs. In the posterior maxilla, sinus elevation procedures were for long considered to be the gold standard using various bone substitute materials and rendering high implant survival rates. More recently, implants were even placed without any further use of bone substitute materials, but the long-term outcomes have yet to be documented. Vertical bone augmentation procedures in the mandible require a relatively high level of surgical skill and allow the placement of standard-length dental implants by the use of autogenous bone blocks. Both treatment options, short dental implants, and standard-length implants in combination with vertical bone augmentation procedures, appear to result in predictable outcomes in terms of implant survival rates. According to recent clinical studies comparing the therapeutic options of short implants vs. long implants in augmented bone, the use of short dental implants leads to a number of advantages for the patients and the clinician.

  19. Impact of implant number, distribution and prosthesis material on loading on implants supporting fixed prostheses.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, T; Dhaliwal, S; Naert, I; Mine, A; Kronstrom, M; Sasaki, K; Duyck, Joke

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate axial forces and bending moments (BMs) on implants supporting a complete arch fixed implant supported prosthesis with respect to number and distribution of the implants and type of prosthesis material. Seven oral Brånemark implants with a diameter of 3.75 mm and a length of 13 and 7 mm (short distal implant) were placed in an edentulous composite mandible used as the experimental model. One all-acrylic, one fibre-reinforced acrylic, and one milled titanium framework prosthesis were made. A 50 N vertical load was applied on the extension 10 mm distal from the most posterior implant. Axial forces and BMs were measured by calculating signals from three strain gauges attached to each of the abutments. The load was measured using three different models with varying numbers of supporting implants (3, 4 and 5), three models with different implant distribution conditions (small, medium and large) and three models with different prosthesis materials (titanium, acrylic and fibre-reinforced acrylic). Maximum BMs were highest when prostheses were supported by three implants compared to four and five implants (P < 0.001). The BMs were significantly influenced by the implant distribution, in that the smallest distribution induced the highest BMs (P < 0.001). Maximum BMs were lowest with the titanium prosthesis (P < 0.01). The resultant forces on implants were significantly associated with the implant number and distribution and the prosthesis material.

  20. Treatment concepts for the posterior maxilla and mandible: short implants versus long implants in augmented bone

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this narrative review is to describe treatment options for the posterior regions of the mandible and the maxilla, comparing short implants vs. longer implants in an augmented bone. The dental literature was screened for treatment options enabling the placement of dental implants in posterior sites with a reduced vertical bone height in the maxilla and the mandible. Short dental implants have been increasingly used recently, providing a number of advantages including reduced patient morbidity, shorter treatment time, and lower costs. In the posterior maxilla, sinus elevation procedures were for long considered to be the gold standard using various bone substitute materials and rendering high implant survival rates. More recently, implants were even placed without any further use of bone substitute materials, but the long-term outcomes have yet to be documented. Vertical bone augmentation procedures in the mandible require a relatively high level of surgical skill and allow the placement of standard-length dental implants by the use of autogenous bone blocks. Both treatment options, short dental implants, and standard-length implants in combination with vertical bone augmentation procedures, appear to result in predictable outcomes in terms of implant survival rates. According to recent clinical studies comparing the therapeutic options of short implants vs. long implants in augmented bone, the use of short dental implants leads to a number of advantages for the patients and the clinician. PMID:28261519