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Sample records for 125iodine seeds implantation

  1. [Implantation of 125 iodine seeds in the dog vocal cord. An experimental morphologic study].

    PubMed

    Zöllner, C; Strutz, J; Bruggmoser, G; Knüfermann, H; Schaefer, H E

    1988-09-01

    Following the first positive therapeutic results of T1a vocal chord cancer with 125iodine seeds in man (brachytherapy), we were concerned with the effects of this low-energy photon source on healthy laryngeal tissue. In the larynx, changes in the area of the vocal chord and the cartilaginous laryngeal structures were investigated in particular. These experimental studies were performed on the larynx of the dog. Through direct laryngoscopy, two 125iodine seeds were implanted in the anterior third of each vocal chord in 8 dogs; the resulting prick canals were sealed with fibrin glue. During survival the correct position of the seeds was radiologically monitored. After survival periods of 1, 3, 6, and 12 months the larynges were fixed by perfusion, removed, imbedded in paraplast, and stained with H. E., Azan, and E. v. G. After this protracted irradiation with 125iodine seeds only slight and for the most part reversible pathological changes had occurred. One month after implantation, only a perivascular infection was found in the vocal chord. After three months an inhibition of the fibrin organization around the seeds was observed as well as a localized dyschylia with broadening of the gland ducts. Additionally, a circumscribed dysplasia of the squamous epithelium, swelling of the capillary endothelium, atrophy of muscular fibres around the seeds, and telangiectasia of blood vessels were discernable. 6 and 12 months after implantation, only the muscular atrophy and the telangiectasia of the blood vessels remained detectable, in addition to a reduced inhibition of the fibrin organisation by connective tissue.

  2. Dosimetric study of the new Intersource125 iodine seed.

    PubMed

    Reniers, B; Vynckier, S; Scalliet, P

    2001-11-01

    The use of low energy photon emitters for brachytherapy applications, as in the treatment of the prostate or of eye tumors, has significantly increased these last few years. New seed models for 125I have been recently introduced. The aim of this study is to determine the dosimetric parameters as recommended by the AAPM in the TG43 formalism for a new iodine seed design: the InterSource125 (Furnished by IBt, Seneffe, Belgium). Measurements are made with LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (size of 1 mm3) in solid water phantoms to obtain the dose constant, the radial dose function, and the anisotropy function. The TLDs were calibrated at 6 MV and an energy correction factor of 1.41 has been applied. The same dose parameters are also obtained by Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP4B) in solid water and in liquid water. The radial function was measured at 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 cm and calculated between 0.3 and 7 cm. The anisotropy functions were measured at 2, 3, and 5 cm and calculated between 0.3 and 7 cm. The calculated and the measured TG43 functions for solid water are in excellent agreement. We have then calculated these functions in liquid water to obtain the dosimetric information for clinical applications as per TG43 recommendations. In WTI, the calculated dose rate constant is 0.98+/-1% and the measured value is 1.03 +/- 7 %. The calculated value for water is 1.02+/- 1 %. In conclusion, the dosimetric functions for the new iodine seed InterSource125 have been determined. They are quite different from the data of the well-known model 6711 from Amersham due to the absence of silver in the new seed. The characteristics are very similar to those of model 6702.

  3. [Physical and technical quality assurance and radiation protection in transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy with 125-iodine seeds].

    PubMed

    Kaulich, Theodor W; Lamprecht, Ulf; Paulsen, Frank; Lorenz, Joachim; Maurer, Uwe; Loeser, Wolfgang; Bichler, Karl-Horst; Nüsslin, Fridtjof; Bamberg, Michael

    2002-12-01

    Early stage prostate cancer can be treated successfully by interstitial brachytherapy with 125-iodine seeds. A quality-assurance programme is presented that was designed for this purpose for internal clinical use. Furthermore the requirements of the new German Ordinance Governing Radiation Protection (StrlSchV) that came into force on August 1, 2001, are taken into account. For the 125-iodine monotherapy of the prostate we used RAPID STRANDS (Amersham Health, Braunschweig, Germany). According to the guidelines of the new Ordinance Governing Radiation Protection, the determination of the body dose of the staff is made to rely on the new measurement quantities H(p) (10) and H(p) (0.07). The nominal air kerma rate of the seeds is measured with a calibrated well-chamber of the type HDR 1000 Plus and an electrometer of the type MAX 4000 (Standard Imaging Inc., USA). The ultrasound images of the prostate are produced by an ultrasound device of the type Falcon 2101 (B-K Medical, Denmark). For treatment planning the programme VariSeed (Varian, Darmstadt, Germany) was employed. Correct loading of the needles is controlled by autoradiography before implantation. After the implantation radiation-protection measurements in the operating room are carried out. As regards the personnel, for the depth personal dose equivalent Hp(10) and relating to two applications each, measurement values between 0 microSv and 14 microSv resulted. The control of the radiation exposure of the hands revealed superficial personal dose values H(p) (0.07) of up to 1 mSv. The nominal air kerma rates of the RAPID STRANDS were all lying within the 95% confidence interval guaranteed by the producer. The autoradiographs documented -- except for one case -- the correct loading of the needles. The interstitial transperineal prostate implantation of the 125-iodine seeds succeeded as planned with all patients. Until now no contamination of the operating room was detected by the radiation

  4. /sup 125/Iodine implants as an adjuvant to surgery and external beam radiotherapy in the management of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Goffinet, D.R.; Fee, W.; Goode, R.; Cox, R.S.

    1983-03-15

    /sup 125/Iodine seeds either individually placed or inserted into absorbable Vicryl suture carriers were utilized in conjunction with surgery and external beam radiotherapy in an attempt to increase local control rates in patients with (1) advanced oropharyngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancers (T3-T4, N2-N3), (2) massive cervical lymphadenopathy (N3) and an unknown primary site and (3) locally recurrent head and neck cancers. Forty-eight patients were treated with 55 implants. The carotid artery was implanted in 15 patients, while seven patients had seeds inserted into the base of the skull region, and another three patients had implants near cranial nerves. Eighteen of the 48 patients were treated for cure. The actuarial survival at five years in this subgroup was 50%. The overall local control in the head and neck area was 58%. In this group no patients to date have had a local failure in the implanted volume. Seventeen patients with comparable stage of disease treated prior to 1974 with curative intent without /sup 125/I implants were analyzed retrospectively for comparison with the implanted patients. The actuarial survival of these patients was 18% and the overall head and neck control was 21%. These differences are statistically significant at a P value of 0.01 and 0.007, respectively. Seventeen patients received implants for local recurrence. The local control in the head and neck area was 50%; however, the 2.5 year actuarial survival was only 17%. The complication rate was 11% (six of 55 implants). The improved survival, the high local control, and the minimal complication rates in this series makes the intraoperative implantation of /sup 125/I seeds and effective adjunctive treatment to surgery and external beam irradiation.

  5. Permanent Breast Seed Implant Dosimetry Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Brian M.; Ravi, Ananth; Sankreacha, Raxa; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A permanent breast seed implant is a novel method of accelerated partial breast irradiation for women with early-stage breast cancer. This article presents pre- and post-implant dosimetric data, relates these data to clinical outcomes, and makes recommendations for those interested in starting a program. Methods and Materials: A total of 95 consecutive patients were accrued into one of three clinical trials after breast-conserving surgery: a Phase I/II trial (67 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma); a Phase II registry trial (25 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma); or a multi-center Phase II trial for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (3 patients). Contouring of the planning target volume (PTV) was done on a Pinnacle workstation and dosimetry calculations, including dose-volume histograms, were done using a Variseed planning computer. Results: The mean pre-implant PTV coverage for the V{sub 90}, V{sub 100}, V{sub 150}, and V{sub 200} were as follows: 98.8% {+-} 1.2% (range, 94.5-100%); 97.3% {+-} 2.1% (range, 90.3-99.9%), 68.8% {+-} 14.3% (range, 32.7-91.5%); and 27.8% {+-} 8.6% (range, 15.1-62.3%). The effect of seed motion was characterized by post-implant dosimetry performed immediately after the implantation (same day) and at 2 months after the implantation. The mean V{sub 100} changed from 85.6% to 88.4% (p = 0.004) and the mean V{sub 200} changed from 36.2% to 48.3% (p < 0.001). Skin toxicity was associated with maximum skin dose (p = 0.014). Conclusions: Preplanning dosimetry should aim for a V{sub 90} of approximately 100%, a V{sub 100} between 95% and 100%, and a V{sub 200} between 20% and 30%, as these numbers are associated with no local recurrences to date and good patient tolerance. In general, the target volume coverage improved over the duration of the seed therapy. The maximum skin dose, defined as the average dose over the hottest 1 Multiplication-Sign 1-cm{sup 2} surface area, should be limited to 90% of the

  6. Prescription dose in permanent {sup 131}Cs seed prostate implants

    SciTech Connect

    Yue Ning; Heron, Dwight E.; Komanduri, Krishna; Huq, M. Saiful

    2005-08-15

    Recently, {sup 131}Cs seeds have been introduced for prostate permanent seed implants. This type of seed has a relatively short half-life of 9.7 days and has its most prominent emitted photon energy peaks in the 29-34 keV region. Traditionally, 145 and 125 Gy have been prescribed for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seed prostate implants, respectively. Since both the half-life and dosimetry characteristics of {sup 131}Cs seed are quite different from those of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd, the appropriate prescription dose for {sup 131}Cs seed prostate implant may well be different. This study was designed to use a linear quadratic radiobiological model to determine an appropriate dose prescription scheme for permanent {sup 131}Cs seed prostate implants. In this model, prostate edema was taken into consideration. Calculations were also performed for tumors of different doubling times and for other related radiobiological parameters of different values. As expected, the derived prescription dose values were dependent on type of tumors and types of edema. However, for prostate cancers in which tumor cells are relatively slow growing and are reported to have a mean potential doubling time of around 40 days, the appropriate prescription dose for permanent {sup 131}Cs seed prostate implants was determined to be: 127{sub -12}{sup +5}Gy if the experiences of {sup 125}I seed implants were followed and 121{sub -3}{sup +0}Gy if the experiences of {sup 103}Pd seed implants were followed.

  7. CT, MR, and ultrasound image artifacts from prostate brachytherapy seed implants: The impact of seed size

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Andrew K. H.; Basran, Parminder S.; Thomas, Steven D.; Wells, Derek

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of brachytherapy seed size on the quality of x-ray computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US), and magnetic resonance (MR) images and seed localization through comparison of the 6711 and 9011 {sup 125}I sources. Methods: For CT images, an acrylic phantom mimicking a clinical implantation plan and embedded with low contrast regions of interest (ROIs) was designed for both the 0.774 mm diameter 6711 (standard) and the 0.508 mm diameter 9011 (thin) seed models (Oncura, Inc., and GE Healthcare, Arlington Heights, IL). Image quality metrics were assessed using the standard deviation of ROIs between the seeds and the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) within the low contrast ROIs. For US images, water phantoms with both single and multiseed arrangements were constructed for both seed sizes. For MR images, both seeds were implanted into a porcine gel and imaged with pelvic imaging protocols. The standard deviation of ROIs and CNR values were used as metrics of artifact quantification. Seed localization within the CT images was assessed using the automated seed finder in a commercial brachytherapy treatment planning system. The number of erroneous seed placements and the average and maximum error in seed placements were recorded as metrics of the localization accuracy. Results: With the thin seeds, CT image noise was reduced from 48.5 {+-} 0.2 to 32.0 {+-} 0.2 HU and CNR improved by a median value of 74% when compared with the standard seeds. Ultrasound image noise was measured at 50.3 {+-} 17.1 dB for the thin seed images and 50.0 {+-} 19.8 dB for the standard seed images, and artifacts directly behind the seeds were smaller and less prominent with the thin seed model. For MR images, CNR of the standard seeds reduced on average 17% when using the thin seeds for all different imaging sequences and seed orientations, but these differences are not appreciable. Automated seed localization required an average ({+-}SD) of 7.0 {+-} 3.5 manual

  8. Online gamma-camera imaging of 103Pd seeds (OGIPS) for permanent breast seed implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, Ananth; Caldwell, Curtis B.; Keller, Brian M.; Reznik, Alla; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Permanent brachytherapy seed implantation is being investigated as a mode of accelerated partial breast irradiation for early stage breast cancer patients. Currently, the seeds are poorly visualized during the procedure making it difficult to perform a real-time correction of the implantation if required. The objective was to determine if a customized gamma-camera can accurately localize the seeds during implantation. Monte Carlo simulations of a CZT based gamma-camera were used to assess whether images of suitable quality could be derived by detecting the 21 keV photons emitted from 74 MBq 103Pd brachytherapy seeds. A hexagonal parallel hole collimator with a hole length of 38 mm, hole diameter of 1.2 mm and 0.2 mm septa, was modeled. The design of the gamma-camera was evaluated on a realistic model of the breast and three layers of the seed distribution (55 seeds) based on a pre-implantation CT treatment plan. The Monte Carlo simulations showed that the gamma-camera was able to localize the seeds with a maximum error of 2.0 mm, using only two views and 20 s of imaging. A gamma-camera can potentially be used as an intra-procedural image guidance system for quality assurance for permanent breast seed implantation.

  9. [Study on effect of seed vigor and agronomic characters of Cassia seeds implanted with low energy nitrogen ion beans].

    PubMed

    Song, Mei; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2012-07-01

    To study the effect of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on seed germination and agronomic characters. Different doses of low energy nitrogen ion implantation were implanted into fresh Cassia seed embryos. Seed germination, seedling growth and field agronomic characters were observed. The seeds after ion implantation showed significant reduction in germination energy, germination percentage and germination index, besides the significant decreasement in root length, fresh weight and vigor index of seedling. Plant height decreased despite the increase in grain size and grain weight. The low energy nitrogen ion implantation have significant effect on Cassia seeds, and being of great significance on Cassia artificial cultivation.

  10. Studies on gonococcus infection. VIII. 125Iodine labeling of gonococci and studies on their in vitro interactions with eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, J; King, G; Zeligs, B

    1975-01-01

    Intact gonococci (GC) have been labeled with 125iodine by the lactoperoxidase plus hydrogen peroxide procedure. The specific activities of types 2, 4, and 4 GC have been determined and are found to show small differences as follows: T4 greater than T2 greater than T4. 125I-labeled GC have been studied for their associations with both leukocytes and tissue culture cells. 125I-labeled GCshow the following relative order of association with the leukocytes: T2 equals T4* greater than T4. This contrasts with the relative degree of interaction between the GC and tissue culture cells, which follows the relative order: T2 greater than T4 equals T4*. Trypsin pretreatment of GC markedly reduces the association of all three types (T2, T4 AND T4*) with leukocytes but does not alter the level of attachment of any of the gonococcal types with tissue culture cells. PMID:803927

  11. Use of novel thermobrachytherapy seeds for realistic prostate seed implant treatments.

    PubMed

    Warrell, Gregory; Shvydka, Diana; Parsai, E Ishmael

    2016-11-01

    A practical means of delivering both therapeutic radiation and hyperthermia to a deep-seated target has been identified in the literature as highly desirable, provided it is capable of generating sufficient temperatures over the defined target volume. The authors present continued development of a dual-modality thermobrachytherapy (TB) seed, investigating its capabilities in delivering prescribed hyperthermia to realistic deep-seated targets. The TB seed is based on the ubiquitous low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy permanent implant. Heat is generated by incorporating a ferromagnetic core within the seed and placing the patient in an oscillating external magnetic field, producing eddy currents within the core and hence Joule heating. A strategically selected Curie temperature results in thermal self-regulation. The magnetic and thermal properties of the TB seed were studied experimentally by means of seed prototypes placed in a tissue-mimicking phantom and heated with an industrial induction heater, as well as computationally in the finite element analysis solver COMSOL Multiphysics. Patient-specific seed distributions derived from LDR permanent prostate implants previously conducted at their institution were modeled in COMSOL to evaluate their ability to adequately cover a defined target volume and to overcome the loss of heat due to blood perfusion within tissue. The calculated temperature distributions were analyzed by generating temperature-volume histograms, which were used to quantify coverage and temperature homogeneity for varied blood perfusion rates, seed Curie temperatures, and thermal power production rates. Use of additional hyperthermia-only (HT-only) seeds in unused spots within the implantation needles was investigated, as was an increase in these seeds' core size to increase their power. The impact of the interseed attenuation and scatter (ISA) effect on radiation dose distributions of this seed was also quantified by Monte Carlo studies in the

  12. Dosimetry of I-125 seeds implanted on the surface of a cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, S.C.; Bassano, D.A.; Fear, P.I.; King, G.A. )

    1990-12-01

    Dosimetry of a new implant technique to treat brain tumors is presented. High grade gliomas or astrocytomas are surgically removed, and radioactive I-125 seeds are implanted on the surface of the cavity. A computational model is presented to determine the number of seeds and the activity of the seeds for a given dose and cavity size.

  13. a Study of the Dosimetry of IODINE-125 Seed Interstitial Implants Using Monte Carlo Simulation Methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Gregory Scott

    Monte Carlo simulation methods were used to investigate the absorbed dose distribution around several preliminary source configurations and the 3M Company models 6701, 6702, and 6711 I-125 seeds in water. Simulations for the preliminary sources, all of which were structurally simpler than the seeds, were conducted to demonstrate correct behavior of the computer software. The relative dose distributions of the three seed models were found to be anisotropic, and distinct. Observed differences in the relative dose distributions of the three models are attributable to differences in seed design and photon emission spectrum. Variations in end weld thicknesses and radioactivity distributions within the seeds were found to have substantial influence on the relative dose distributions. Dosimetry estimates along the longitudinal axis of the seeds are particularly uncertain due to such variations. Finally, perturbations of the single seed dose distribution created by neighboring seeds within the implant were determined. Such perturbations are strongly dependent on the seed model used and on the separation between seeds. Simple superposition of single seed dose distributions in multiple seed implants causes overestimation of dose within seed planes. Errors may be quite large for single plane implants with small seed separations. The results of this study provide a means to reduce errors in iodine seed implant dosimetry through the use of seed design-specific two-dimensional dosimetry data, and through improved understanding of the causes of uncertainties in iodine seed relative dose distributions.

  14. A novel curvilinear approach for prostate seed implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Podder, Tarun K.; Dicker, Adam P.; Hutapea, Parsaoran; Darvish, Kurosh; Yu Yan

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: A new technique called ''curvilinear approach'' for prostate seed implantation has been proposed. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric benefit of curvilinear distribution of seeds for low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Twenty LDR prostate brachytherapy cases planned intraoperatively with VariSeed planning system and I-125 seeds were randomly selected as reference rectilinear cases. All the cases were replanned by using curved-needle approach keeping the same individual source strength and the volume receiving 100% of prescribed dose 145 Gy (V{sub 100}). Parameters such as number of needles, seeds, and the dose coverage of the prostate (D{sub 90}, V{sub 150}, V{sub 200}), urethra (D{sub 30}, D{sub 10}) and rectum (D{sub 5}, V{sub 100}) were compared for the rectilinear and the curvilinear methods. Statistical significance was assessed using two-tailed student's t-test. Results: Reduction of the required number of needles and seeds in curvilinear method were 30.5% (p < 0.001) and 11.8% (p < 0.49), respectively. Dose to the urethra was reduced significantly; D{sub 30} reduced by 10.1% (p < 0.01) and D{sub 10} reduced by 9.9% (p < 0.02). Reduction in rectum dose D{sub 5} was 18.5% (p < 0.03) and V{sub 100} was also reduced from 0.93 cc in rectilinear to 0.21 cc in curvilinear (p < 0.001). Also the V{sub 150} and V{sub 200} coverage of prostate reduced by 18.8% (p < 0.01) and 33.9% (p < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: Significant improvement in the relevant dosimetric parameters was observed in curvilinear needle approach. Prostate dose homogeneity (V{sub 150}, V{sub 200}) improved while urethral dose was reduced, which might potentially result in better treatment outcome. Reduction in rectal dose could potentially reduce rectal toxicity and complications. Reduction in number of needles would minimize edema and thereby could improve postimplant urinary incontinence. This study indicates that the curvilinear implantation

  15. Comparison of template-matching and singular-spectrum-analysis methods for imaging implanted brachytherapy seeds.

    PubMed

    Alam, S Kaisar; Mamou, Jonathan; Feleppa, Ernest J; Kalisz, Andrew; Ramachandran, Sarayu

    2011-11-01

    Brachytherapy using small implanted radioactive seeds is becoming an increasingly popular method for treating prostate cancer, in which a radiation oncologist implants seeds in the prostate transperineally under ultrasound guidance. Dosimetry software determines the optimal placement of seeds for achieving the prescribed dose based on ultrasonic determination of the gland boundaries. However, because of prostate movement and distortion during the implantation procedure, some seeds may not be placed in the desired locations; this causes the delivered dose to differ from the prescribed dose. Current ultrasonic imaging methods generally cannot depict the implanted seeds accurately. We are investigating new ultrasonic imaging methods that show promise for enhancing the visibility of seeds and thereby enabling real-time detection and correction of seed-placement errors during the implantation procedure. Real-time correction of seed-placement errors will improve the therapeutic radiation dose delivered to target tissues. In this work, we compare the potential performance of a template-matching method and a previously published method based on singular spectrum analysis for imaging seeds. In particular, we evaluated how changes in seed angle and position relative to the ultrasound beam affect seed detection. The conclusion of the present study is that singular spectrum analysis has better sensitivity but template matching is more resistant to false positives; both perform well enough to make seed detection clinically feasible over a relevant range of angles and positions. Combining the information provided by the two methods may further reduce ambiguities in determining where seeds are located.

  16. The accuracy of single-seed dose superposition for I-125 implants.

    PubMed

    Burns, G S; Raeside, D E

    1989-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method was used to study perturbations of single I-125 seed dose distributions created by the presence of one or three neighboring seeds for the case of seeds immersed in a water phantom. Perturbation factors were determined within the geometric shadow of neighboring seeds for two-seed designs, four-seed spacings, and several choices of dose point. The results were compared to dose estimates obtained by the simple superposition of single-seed data for one- and two-plane implants. Some significant differences were found.

  17. Prostate implant nomograms for the North American scientific {sup 103}Pd seed

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jay J.; Stevens, Ritchie N

    2003-09-30

    Palladium-103-({sup 103}Pd) seed has been increasingly used in prostate implantation as either definitive or boost therapy because of its shorter half-life and higher initial dose rate. Because a growing number of radiation oncologists prefer real-time implantation in the operating room, it will be helpful if the total activity of the seeds can be determined based on the gland size before the patient is taken to the operating room. Based on our clinic data, nomograms have therefore been developed for one of the widely used {sup 103}Pd seeds, the MED3633 seed, which is produced by North American Scientific, Inc. (NASI). The total activities for implant volume ranging from 15 cc to 55 cc are provided for both seed 'monotherapy' and seed boost.

  18. Ultrasonically guided percutaneous implantation of iodine-125 seeds in pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, F.; Burcharth, F.; Holm, H.H.; Stroyer, I. )

    1990-10-01

    Cancer of the pancreas is most often not diagnosed before it has reached unresectable stages. The development of effective palliative treatment for these patients and for those with recurrence after resection is clearly needed. The present study reports the results of ultrasonically guided percutaneous implantation of {sup 125}I seeds in 19 patients with cancer of the pancreas. Twelve patients had further adjuvant external radiation. Despite satisfactory seed placement and delivery of the planned radiation dose in most cases, clinical improvement was lacking or only slight and short-lived. No difference in survival or palliation was observed between patients treated with seeds alone compared with patients treated with seeds and external radiation. Survival after seed implantation was short (median 140 days, range 7-401 days). Ultrasonically guided percutaneous implantation of {sup 125}I seeds cannot be recommended in the treatment of unresectable carcinoma of the pancreas.

  19. Automated localization of implanted seeds in 3D TRUS images used for prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Zhouping; Gardi, Lori; Downey, Donal B.; Fenster, Aaron

    2006-07-15

    An algorithm has been developed in this paper to localize implanted radioactive seeds in 3D ultrasound images for a dynamic intraoperative brachytherapy procedure. Segmentation of the seeds is difficult, due to their small size in relatively low quality of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images. In this paper, intraoperative seed segmentation in 3D TRUS images is achieved by performing a subtraction of the image before the needle has been inserted, and the image after the seeds have been implanted. The seeds are searched in a 'local' space determined by the needle position and orientation information, which are obtained from a needle segmentation algorithm. To test this approach, 3D TRUS images of the agar and chicken tissue phantoms were obtained. Within these phantoms, dummy seeds were implanted. The seed locations determined by the seed segmentation algorithm were compared with those obtained from a volumetric cone-beam flat-panel micro-CT scanner and human observers. Evaluation of the algorithm showed that the rms error in determining the seed locations using the seed segmentation algorithm was 0.98 mm in agar phantoms and 1.02 mm in chicken phantoms.

  20. Versatile permanent planar implant technique utilizing Iodine-125 seeds imbedded in gelfoam

    SciTech Connect

    Marchese, M.J.; Nori, D.; Anderson, L.L.; Hilaris, B.S.

    1984-05-01

    Tumors attached or adjacent to critical structures can often not be completely resected or resected with adequate surgical margins. Sites involving major blood vessels, the vertebral column or the brain with small residual tumors or suspicious margins often present technical difficulties for standard I-125 or Ir-192 implants. A relatively simple, accurate and inexpensive implant method is decribed using I-125 seeds imbedded in gelfoam to implant permanently into small residual tumors or suspicious margins where standard implant techniques may be unsatisfactory. A method for planning the treatment dose for such an implant is described. Cases involving paraspinal and brain tumors are reported to illustrate the technique.

  1. Effect of implanted brachytherapy seeds on optical fluence distribution: preliminary ex vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetzel, Fred W.; Chen, Qun; Ding, Meisong; Newman, Francis; Dole, Kenneth C.; Huang, Zheng; Blanc, Dominique

    2007-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has gradually found its place in the treatment of malignant and non-malignant human diseases. Currently, interstitial PDT is being explored as an alternative modality for newly diagnosed and recurrent organ-confined prostate cancer. The interstitial PDT for the treatment of prostate cancer might be considered to treat prostates with permanent radioactive seeds implantation. However, the effect of implanted brachytherapy seeds on the optical fluence distribution of PDT light has not been studied before. This study investigated, for the first time, the effect of brachytherapy seed on the optical fluence distribution of 760 nm light in ex vivo models (meat and canine prostate).

  2. BrachyView: multiple seed position reconstruction and comparison with CT post-implant dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnaghy, S.; Loo, K. J.; Cutajar, D. L.; Jalayer, M.; Tenconi, C.; Favoino, M.; Rietti, R.; Tartaglia, M.; Carriero, F.; Safavi-Naeini, M.; Bucci, J.; Jakubek, J.; Pospisil, S.; Zaider, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Petasecca, M.

    2016-05-01

    BrachyView is a novel in-body imaging system utilising high-resolution pixelated silicon detectors (Timepix) and a pinhole collimator for brachytherapy source localisation. Recent studies have investigated various options for real-time intraoperative dynamic dose treatment planning to increase the quality of implants. In a previous proof-of-concept study, the justification of the pinhole concept was shown, allowing for the next step whereby multiple active seeds are implanted into a PMMA phantom to simulate a more realistic clinical scenario. In this study, 20 seeds were implanted and imaged using a lead pinhole of 400 μ m diameter. BrachyView was able to resolve the seed positions within 1-2 mm of expected positions, which was verified by co-registering with a full clinical post-implant CT scan.

  3. Biodegradable seeds of holmium don't change neurological function after implant in brain of rats.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Mirla Fiuza; Ferreira, Diogo Milioli; de Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Pedrosa, Maria Lucia; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; de Almeida Araujo, Stanley; Sampaio, Kinulpe Honorato; de Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro; Siqueira, Savio Lana

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the surgical procedure and parenchymal abnormalities related to implantation of ceramic seeds with holmium-165 in rats' brain. An effective method of cancer treatment is brachytherapy in which radioactive seeds are implanted in the tumor, generating a high local dose of ionizing radiation that can eliminate tumor cells while protecting the surrounding healthy tissue. Biodegradable Ho(166)-ceramic-seeds have been addressed recently. The experiments in this study were approved by the Ethics Committee on Animal Use at the Federal University of Ouro Preto, protocol number 2012/034. Twenty-one adult Fischer rats were divided into Naive Group, Sham Group and Group for seed implants (ISH). Surgical procedures for implantation of biodegradable seeds were done and 30 days after the implant radiographic examination and biopsy of the brain were performed. Neurological assays were also accomplished to exclude any injury resulting from either surgery or implantation of the seeds. Radiographic examination confirmed the location of the seeds in the brain. Neurological assays showed animals with regular spontaneous activity. The histological analysis showed an increase of inflammatory cells in the brain of the ISH group. Electron microscopy evidenced cytoplasmic organelles to be unchanged. Biochemical analyzes indicate there was neither oxidative stress nor oxidative damage in the ISH brain. CAT activity showed no difference between the groups as well as lipid peroxidation measured by TBARS. The analysis of the data pointed out that the performed procedure is safe as no animal showed alterations of the neurological parameters and the seeds did not promote histological architectural changes in the brain tissue.

  4. An automated, fast and accurate registration method to link stranded seeds in permanent prostate implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westendorp, Hendrik; Nuver, Tonnis T.; Moerland, Marinus A.; Minken, André W.

    2015-10-01

    The geometry of a permanent prostate implant varies over time. Seeds can migrate and edema of the prostate affects the position of seeds. Seed movements directly influence dosimetry which relates to treatment quality. We present a method that tracks all individual seeds over time allowing quantification of seed movements. This linking procedure was tested on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) datasets of 699 patients. These datasets were acquired intraoperatively during a dynamic implantation procedure, that combines both imaging modalities. The procedure was subdivided in four automatic linking steps. (I) The Hungarian Algorithm was applied to initially link seeds in CBCT and the corresponding TRUS datasets. (II) Strands were identified and optimized based on curvature and linefits: non optimal links were removed. (III) The positions of unlinked seeds were reviewed and were linked to incomplete strands if within curvature- and distance-thresholds. (IV) Finally, seeds close to strands were linked, also if the curvature-threshold was violated. After linking the seeds an affine transformation was applied. The procedure was repeated until the results were stable or the 6th iteration ended. All results were visually reviewed for mismatches and uncertainties. Eleven implants showed a mismatch and in 12 cases an uncertainty was identified. On average the linking procedure took 42 ms per case. This accurate and fast method has the potential to be used for other time spans, like Day 30, and other imaging modalities. It can potentially be used during a dynamic implantation procedure to faster and better evaluate the quality of the permanent prostate implant.

  5. Transcatheter embolization of advanced renal cell carcinoma with radioactive seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, E.K.; deKernion, J.B.

    1981-11-01

    Advanced renal cell carcinoma was treated by transcatheter embolization with radioactive seeds. There were 14 patients with nonresectable or metastatic disease (stage IV) and 8 with stage II tumors treated. In 8 patients the tumor was implanted with radon seeds, complemented by 2,500 rad of external beam therapy, and 10 were treated by embolization with 125iodine seeds. The total dose delivered ranged form 1,600 to 14,000 rad. Several patients also had intra-arterial chemotherapy. Survival was improved over previously reported studies: 13 of 22 (59 per cent) at risk for 2 years and 5 of 15 (33 per cent) for 5 years. Distant metastases did not resolve but significant local palliation was achieved. Tumor size decreased in all patients, 8 of whom subsequently underwent nephrectomy. Other local effects included pain control (10 per cent), weight gain (75 per cent) and control of hemorrhage (88 per cent). Toxicity was minimal and consisted of mild nausea or pain. This approach, using a low energy emitter, allows selective high dose radiation of the tumor, while sparing the adjacent normal tissues. In contrast to renal artery occlusion with inert embolic material, subsequent nephrectomy in patients with disseminated disease is not necessary. Transcatheter embolization with radioactive seeds should be considered a reasonable palliative procedure in patients with nonresectable primary renal cell carcinoma.

  6. Intraoperative I-125 seed implantation for extensive recurrent head and neck carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.J.; Liberman, F.Z.; Park, R.I.; Zinreich, E.S. )

    1991-03-01

    From 1978 to 1988, 41 patients with extensive recurrent carcinomas of the head and neck were treated with surgical resection plus intraoperative iodine-125 seed implantation. Surgery was performed to resect the tumors and to expose the tumor beds for implantation. I-125 seeds were implanted intraoperatively, with a spacing of 0.75-1 cm between adjacent seeds, either into the soft tissue in the tumor bed or onto small patches of gelatin sponges to cover the bone, nerve, or blood vessel involved with disease. Reconstructive flaps were used in 18 patients. The average I-125 dose delivered by the implanted seeds was 8,263 cGy. The determinate 5-year actuarial survival rate for the entire group was 40%. The 5-year local disease control rate was 44%. Major complications were transient wound infection (32%), flap necrosis (24%), fistula formation (10%), and carotid blowout (5%). These results indicate that surgical resection plus I-125 seed implantation provides a potentially curative treatment for patients with extensive recurrent head and neck carcinomas that would be considered traditionally unresectable and that would be treated only with palliative therapy.

  7. Dosimetric intercomparison of permanent Ho-166 seed's implants and HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    de Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro; Nogueira, Luciana Batista; Trindade, Bruno; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    To provide a comparative dosimetric analysis of permanent implants of Ho(166)-seeds and temporary HDR Ir(192)-brachytherapy through computational simulation. Brachytherapy with Ir(192)-HDR or LDR based on temporary wires or permanent radioactive seed implants can be used as dose reinforcement for breast radiation therapy. Permanent breast implants have not been a practical clinical routine; although, I(125) and Pd(103)-seeds have already been reported. Biodegradable Ho(166)-ceramic-seeds have been addressed recently. Simulations of implants of nine Ho(166)-seeds and equivalent with HDR Ir(192)-brachytherapy were elaborated in MCNP5, shaped in a computational multivoxel simulator which reproduced a female thorax phantom. Spatial dose rate distributions and dose-volume histograms were generated. Protocol's analysis involving exposure time, seed's activities and dose were performed. Permanent Ho(166)-seed implants presented a maximum dose rate per unit of contained activity (MDR) of 1.1601 μGy h(-1) Bq(-1); and, a normalized MDR in standard points (8 mm, equidistant to 03-seeds - SP1, 10 mm - SP2) of 1.0% (SP1) and 0.5% (SP2), respectively. Ir(192)-brachytherapy presented MDR of 4.3945 × 10(-3) μGy h(-1) Bq(-1); and, 30% (SP1), and 20% (SP2). Therefore, seed's implant activities of 333 MBq (Ho(166)) and 259 GBq (Ir(192)) produced prescribed doses of 58 Gy (SP1; 5d) and 56 Gy (SP1, 5 fractions, 6 min), respectively. Breast Ho(166)-implants of 37-111 MBq are attractive due to the high dose rate near 6-10 mm from seeds, equivalent to Ir(192)-brachytherapy of 259 GBq (3 fractions, 6 min) providing similar dose in standard points at a week; however, with spatial dose distribution better confined. The seed positioning can be adjusted for controlling the breast tumor, in stages I and II, in flat and deep tumors, without any breast volumetric limitation.

  8. Radioactive seed implantation combined with prosthesis denture in treatment of oral and maxillofacial malignancy.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jian; Meng, Qing-fei; Gu, Qian-ping; Si, Ya-meng; Zheng, Hao; Zhang, Jie; Li, Zhi-ping; Zhuang, Qian-wei

    2013-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the effect of (125)I radioactive seed implantation combined with prosthesis denture on the treatment of oral and maxillofacial malignancy. For this purpose, 10 patients with glandule palatine malignancy were selected and subjected to the treatment plan of radioactive seed implantation during CT examination. All patients were treated as follow. The tumor tissues were extracted first. After 2 weeks, radioactive seeds were implanted in the palatine tissue and the prosthesis denture was made and worn for the tissue defect. Several radioactive seeds were still embedded in the tissue surface of the prosthesis at the same time; 24-36 seeds (average: 28) were used for each patient. All patients were followed up for 3-16 months and the results were evaluated. We found no tumor recurrence or metastasis around the target area in all patients. Significant improvement was shown in terms of speech, mastication, and facial appearance in all cases. Therefore, we concluded that in patients with glandule palatine malignancy, tumorectomy followed by radioactive seed implantation and prosthesis denture are effective for preventing the recurrence and metastasis of malignancy and improving the quality of life.

  9. External beam radiotherapy boosts to reduce the impact caused by edema in prostate permanent seed implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Ning; Mori, Jonathan; Nath, Ravinder; Heron, Dwight E.; Saiful Huq, M.

    2006-05-01

    In prostate permanent seed implants, it has been shown that edema caused by the surgical procedure decreases dose coverage and hence may reduce treatment efficacy. This reduction in treatment efficacy has been characterized by an increase in tumour cell survival, and biomathematical models have been developed to calculate the tumour cell survival increases in seed implanted prostates of different edema magnitudes and durations. External beam boosts can be utilized to neutralize the negative impact of edema so that originally desired treatment efficacy can be achieved. In this study, a linear quadratic model is used to determine fractionation sizes of the external beam boosts for both 125I and 103Pd seed implants. Calculations were performed for prostates of different edema magnitudes and durations, and for tumour cells of different repair rates and repopulation rates.

  10. [Experience of brachytherapy using I-125 seed permanent implants for localized prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Toya, Kazuhito; Yorozu, Atsunori; Ohashi, Toshio; Okada, Masahiro; Itoh, Reiko; Monma, Tetsuo; Saito, Shiro; Fukada, Junichi; Sugawara, Akitomo; Dokiya, Takushi

    2005-10-01

    We report here our experience of brachytherapy using I-125 seeds for localized prostate cancer in 100 patients. We carried out brachytherapy with I-125 seed permanent implants in 100 patients with localized prostate cancer between September 2003 and October 2004. Preplanning dosimetry was done using transrectal ultrasonic images obtained three or four weeks prior to treatment. Using transrectal ultrasound, we inserted I-125 seeds in the prostate through needles according to the preplanning diagram. We then examined the results on prostate CT performed one month later. It was necessary to describe transrectal ultrasonic image such as preplanning. There were several cases in which the source arrangement of the schedule was corrected immediately before the operation. In the examination after one month, the numerical value at the start of treatment initially was not satisfactory, but we eventually obtained a result that could to be evaluated. We carried out permanent implant brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer using I-125 seeds and reported our experience.

  11. Survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer after iodine125 seeds implantation brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Quanli; Deng, Muhong; Lv, Yao; Dai, Guanghai

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Brachytherapy with iodine125-labeled seeds (125I-seeds) implantation is increasingly being used to treat tumors because of its positional precision, minimal invasion, least damage to noncancerous tissue due to slow and continuous release of radioactivity and facilitation with modern medical imaging technologies. This study evaluates the survival and pain relief outcomes of the 125I-seeds implantation brachytherapy in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Methods: Literature search was carried out in multiple electronic databases (Google Scholar, Embase, Medline/PubMed, and Ovid SP) and studies reporting I125 seeds implantation brachytherapy in pancreatic cancer patients with unresectable tumor were selected by following predetermined eligibility criteria. Random effects meta-analysis was performed to achieve inverse variance weighted effect size of the overall survival rate after the intervention. Sensitivity and subgroups analyses were also carried out. Results: Twenty-three studies (824 patients’ data) were included in the meta-analysis. 125I-seeds implantation brachytherapy alone was associated with 8.98 [95% confidence interval (CI): 6.94, 11.03] months (P < 0.00001) overall survival with 1-year survival of 25.7 ± 9.3% (mean ± standard deviation; SD) and 2-year survival was 17.9 ± 8.6% (mean ± SD). In stage IV pancreatic cancer patients, overall survival was 7.13 [95% CI: 4.75, 9.51] months (P < 0.00001). In patients treated with 125I-seeds implantation along with 1 or more therapies, overall survival was 11.75 [95% CI: 9.84, 13.65] months (P < 0.00001) with 1-year survival of 47.4 ± 22.75% (mean ± SD) and 2-year survival was 16.97 ± 3.1% (mean ± SD). 125I-seeds brachytherapy was associated with relief of pain in 79.7 ± 9.9% (mean ± SD) of the patients. Conclusions: Survival of pancreatic cancer patients after 125I-seeds implantation brachytherapy is found to be 9 months

  12. The use of iodine-125 seeds as a substitute for iridium-192 seeds in temporary interstitial breast implants

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, F.; White, J.; Gustafson, G.; Matter, R.C.; Edmundson, G.; Martinez, A.; Clarke, D.H.

    1993-10-20

    We have previously reported that the use of iodine-125 seeds in temporary plastic tube interstitial implants may be more advantageous than iridium-192 seeds due to less patient and personnel radiation exposure, reduced shielding requirements, and significant dosimetric advantages. The impact of this isotope on the rate of local control and cosmetic outcome in patients with early stage breast cancer treated with interstitial implants for their irradiation {open_quotes}boost{close_quotes} remains to be defined. We reviewed the treatment outcome of 402 consecutive cases of Stage I and II breast cancer undergoing breast conserving therapy between 1/1/80 and 12/31/87. All patients underwent excisional biopsy and received 45-50 Gy to the entire breast followed by a boost to the tumor bed using either electrons (104 patients), photons (15 patients), or an interstitial implant with either iridium-192 (197 patients) or iodine-125 (86 patients) to at least 60 Gy. Iodine-125 implants were primarily performed in patients with significant risk factors for local recurrence (71%) or in patients with large breasts (17%). Local tumor control and cosmetic outcome were assessed and contrasted between patients boosted with each modality. We conclude that patients with State I and II breast cancer undergoing breast conserving therapy and judged to be candidates for boosts with interstitial implants can be effectively treated with iodine-125 seeds. Use of the isotope results in less patient and personnel irradiation exposure and a better dose distribution than iridium-192, since dose optimization can be routinely employed. Overall, local control and cosmetic outcome have been excellent and are similar to either iridium-192, electrons, or photons. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  13. Adjuvant stereotactic permanent seed breast implant: A boost series in view of partial breast irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Nicolas . E-mail: nicolas.jansen@chu.ulg.ac.be; Deneufbourg, Jean-Marie; Nickers, Philippe

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to use permanent seed implants in the breast and describe our experience with 15 cases, using iodine seed implants as a tumor bed boost. Methods and Materials: Breasts were fixed with a thermoplastic sheet, a template bridge applied, the thorax scanned and the images rotated to be perpendicular to the implant axis. Skin, heart, and lung were delineated. A preplan was made, prescribing 50 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV), consisting in this boost series of nearly a quadrant. Iodine (125) seeds were stereotactically implanted through the template, and results were checked with a postplan computed tomographic (CT) scan. Results: The breast was immobilized reproducibly. Simulation, scanning, and implant were performed without difficulties. Preplan CTV D90% (the dose delivered to 90% of the CTV) was 66 Gy, and postoperative fluoroscopic or CT scan checks were satisfactory. Pre- and postplan dose-volume histogram showed good organ sparing: mean postplan skin, heart, and lung V30 Gy (the organ volume receiving a dose of 30 Gy) of 2 {+-} 2.2 mL, 0.24 {+-} 0.34 mL, and 3.5 {+-} 5 mL, respectively. No short-term toxicity above Grade 1 was noted, except for transient Grade 3 neuropathy in 1 patient. Conclusions: Seeds remained in the right place, as assessed by fluoroscopy, absence of significant pre- to postplan dose-volume histogram change for critical organs, and total irradiated breast volume. The method could be proposed as a boost when high dosimetric selectivity is required (young patients after cardiotoxic chemotherapy for left-sided cancer). This boost series was a preliminary step before testing partial breast irradiation by permanent seed implant in a prospective trial.

  14. Measurement uncertainty analysis of low-dose-rate prostate seed brachytherapy: post-implant dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Kent J; Pattison, John E; Bibbo, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The minimal dose covering 90 % of the prostate volume--D 90--is arguably the most important dosimetric parameter in low-dose-rate prostate seed brachytherapy. In this study an analysis of the measurement uncertainties in D 90 from low-dose-rate prostate seed brachytherapy was conducted for two common treatment procedures with two different post-implant dosimetry methods. The analysis was undertaken in order to determine the magnitude of D 90 uncertainty, how the magnitude of the uncertainty varied when D 90 was calculated using different dosimetry methods, and which factors were the major contributors to the uncertainty. The analysis considered the prostate as being homogeneous and tissue equivalent and made use of published data, as well as original data collected specifically for this analysis, and was performed according to the Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM). It was found that when prostate imaging and seed implantation were conducted in two separate sessions using only CT images for post-implant analysis, the expanded uncertainty in D 90 values were about 25 % at the 95 % confidence interval. When prostate imaging and seed implantation were conducted during a single session using CT and ultrasound images for post-implant analysis, the expanded uncertainty in D 90 values were about 33 %. Methods for reducing these uncertainty levels are discussed. It was found that variations in contouring the target tissue made the largest contribution to D 90 uncertainty, while the uncertainty in seed source strength made only a small contribution. It is important that clinicians appreciate the overall magnitude of D 90 uncertainty and understand the factors that affect it so that clinical decisions are soundly based, and resources are appropriately allocated.

  15. Planning of Ir-192 seed implants for boost irradiation to the breast

    SciTech Connect

    Zwicker, R.D.; Schmidt-Ullrich, R.; Schiller, B.

    1985-12-01

    The conservative management of early stage breast cancer with tumor excision and irradiation of the breast is becoming increasingly accepted as an alternative to modified radical mastectomy. The radiotherapy typically consists of 45 to 50 Gy delivered with external beam irradiation, followed by boost irradiation of 15 to 20 Gy to the tumor bed using electron beams or interstitial implantation. Pathological evaluation of the excised tumor, clinical assessment, and mammography are used to determine the tissue volume potentially containing a residual tumor burden and therefore requiring boost irradiation. In this paper we describe planning and implantation procedures for Quimby-type breast implants using Ir-192 seeds encapsulated in nylon tubing. This system deviates in several important respects from the requirements of the standard brachytherapy systems. For double-plane implants, optimized values of the interplanar spacing are given for a range of implant sizes, along with the corresponding target dose rates for 1.0 mCi seeds. We also describe a modification of the angiocatheter implantation technique, which allows the radioactive sources to be secured in place by a magnetic cap and washer, thus greatly facilitating the removal of the sources at the end of treatment.

  16. Conventional Versus Automated Implantation of Loose Seeds in Prostate Brachytherapy: Analysis of Dosimetric and Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Genebes, Caroline; Filleron, Thomas; Graff, Pierre; Jonca, Frédéric; Huyghe, Eric; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Soulie, Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Aziza, Richard; Brun, Thomas; Delannes, Martine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To review the clinical outcome of I-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and to compare 2 techniques of loose-seed implantation. Methods and Materials: 574 consecutive patients underwent I-125 PPB for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2000 and 2008. Two successive techniques were used: conventional implantation from 2000 to 2004 and automated implantation (Nucletron, FIRST system) from 2004 to 2008. Dosimetric and biochemical recurrence-free (bNED) survival results were reported and compared for the 2 techniques. Univariate and multivariate analysis researched independent predictors for bNED survival. Results: 419 (73%) and 155 (27%) patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease, respectively, were treated (median follow-up time, 69.3 months). The 60-month bNED survival rates were 95.2% and 85.7%, respectively, for patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease (P=.04). In univariate analysis, patients treated with automated implantation had worse bNED survival rates than did those treated with conventional implantation (P<.0001). By day 30, patients treated with automated implantation showed lower values of dose delivered to 90% of prostate volume (D90) and volume of prostate receiving 100% of prescribed dose (V100). In multivariate analysis, implantation technique, Gleason score, and V100 on day 30 were independent predictors of recurrence-free status. Grade 3 urethritis and urinary incontinence were observed in 2.6% and 1.6% of the cohort, respectively, with no significant differences between the 2 techniques. No grade 3 proctitis was observed. Conclusion: Satisfactory 60-month bNED survival rates (93.1%) and acceptable toxicity (grade 3 urethritis <3%) were achieved by loose-seed implantation. Automated implantation was associated with worse dosimetric and bNED survival outcomes.

  17. Prostate brachytherapy postimplant dosimetry: Seed orientation and the impact of dosimetric anisotropy in stranded implants

    SciTech Connect

    Chng, Nicholas; Spadinger, Ingrid; Rasoda, Rosey; Morris, W. James; Salcudean, Septimiu

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: In postimplant dosimetry for prostate brachytherapy, dose is commonly calculated using the TG-43 1D formalism, because seed orientations are difficult to determine from CT images, the current standard for the procedure. However, the orientation of stranded seeds soon after implantation is predictable, as these seeds tend to maintain their relative spacing, and orient themselves along the implant trajectory. The aim of this study was to develop a method for determining seed orientations from reconstructed strand trajectories, and to use this information to investigate the dosimetric impact of applying the TG-43 2D formalism to clinical postimplant analysis. Methods: Using in-house software, the preplan to postimplant seed correspondence was determined for a cohort of 30 patients during routine day-0 CT-based postimplant dosimetry. All patients were implanted with stranded-seed trains. Spline curves were fit to each set of seeds composing a strand, with the requirement that the distance along the spline between seeds be equal to the seed spacing within the strand. The orientations of the seeds were estimated by the tangents to the spline at each seed centroid. Dose distributions were then determined using the 1D and 2D TG-43 formalisms. These were compared using the TG-137 recommended dose metrics for the prostate, prostatic urethra, and rectum. Results: Seven hundred and sixty one strands were analyzed in total. Defining the z-axis to be cranial-positive and the x-axis to be left-lateral positive in the CT coordinate system, the average seed had an inclination of 21 deg. {+-} 10 deg. and an azimuth of -81 deg. {+-} 57 deg. These values correspond to the average strand rising anteriorly from apex to base, approximately parallel to the midsagittal plane. Clinically minor but statistically significant differences in dose metrics were noted. Compared to the 2D calculation, the 1D calculation underestimated prostate V100 by 1.1% and D90 by 2.3 Gy, while

  18. Antiurolithiatic activity of Abelmoschus moschatus seed extracts against zinc disc implantation-induced urolithiasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Anil T; Vyawahare, Niraj S

    2016-03-01

    The commonly used techniques for removing renal calculi are associated with the risk of acute renal injury and increase in stone recurrence which indicates an urgent need for alternate therapy. The aim was to evaluate the antiurolithiatic activity of Abelmoschus moschatus seed extracts in rats. Urolithiasis was induced by surgical implantations of zinc disc in the urinary bladders of rats. Upon postsurgical recovery, different doses of chloroform (CAM) and methanolic (MAM) extracts of A. moschatus seeds (viz., 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight) were administered to disc implanted rats for the period of 7 days by the oral route. Antiurolithiatic activity was evaluated by measuring various dimensions of stones and estimating levels of various biomarkers in serum and urine samples. A significant decrease in urinary output was observed in disc implanted animals, which was prevented by the treatment with extracts. Supplementation with extracts caused significant improvement in glomerular filtration rate and urinary total protein excretion. The elevated levels of serum creatinine, uric acid, and blood urea nitrogen were also prevented by the extracts. The extracts significantly reduced deposition of calculi deposition around the implanted disc. This antiurolithiatic potential is observed at all doses (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) of MAM, whereas only higher dose (400 mg/kg) of CAM showed significant antiurolithiatic potential. The extracts of A. moschatus seeds possessed significant antiurolithiatic activity. The possible mechanism underlying this effect is mediated collectively through diuretic, antioxidant, and free-radical scavenging effects of the plant.

  19. Real-Time Intraoperative CT Assessment of Quality of Permanent Interstitial Seed Implantation for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zelefsky, Michael J; Worman, Mick; Cohen, Gilad N.; Pei, Xin; Kollmeier, Marisa; Yamada, Josh; Cox, Brett; Zhang, Zhigang; Bieniek, Eva; Dauer, Lawrence; Zaider, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Evaluate real-time kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) during prostate brachytherapy for intraoperative dosimetric assessment and correcting deficient dose regions. Methods Twenty patients were evaluated intraoperatively with a mobile CBCT unit immediately after implantation while still anesthetized. The source-detector system is enclosed into a circular CT-like geometry with a bore that accommodates patients in the lithotomy position. After seed deposition, CBCT scans were obtained, Dosimetry was evaluated and compared to standard postimplantation CT-based assessment. In eight patients deposited seeds were localized in the intraoperative CBCT frame of reference and registered to the intraoperative transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images. With this information, a second intraoperative plan was generated to ascertain if additional seeds were needed to achieve the planned prescription dose. Final dosimetry was compared with postimplantation scan assessment. Results Mean differences between dosimetric parameters from the intraoperative CBCT and post-implant CT scans were <0.5% for V100, D90, and V150 target values. Mean percentage differences for average urethral doses were not significantly different. Differences for D5 (maximum dose) of the urethra were <4%. The dose to 2 cc of the rectum differed by 10% on average. After fusion of implanted seed coordinates from the intraoperative CBCT scans onto the intraoperative TRUS images, dosimetric outcomes were similar to postimplantation CT dosimetric results. Conclusions Intraoperative CT-based dosimetric evaluation of prostate permanent seed implantation prior to anesthesia reversal is feasible and may avert misadministration of dose delivery. Dosimetric measurements based on the intraoperative CBCT scans are dependable and correlate well with postimplant diagnostic CT evaluation. PMID:20430423

  20. 125I Seed Implant Brachytherapy for Painful Bone Metastases After Failure of External Beam Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shi; Wang, Li; Xiao, Zhang; Maharjan, Rakesh; Chuanxing, Li; Fujun, Zhang; Jinhua, Huang; Peihong, Wu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and therapeutic efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided 125I seed implant brachytherapy in patients with painful metastatic bone lesions after failure of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). From August 2012 to July 2014, 26 patients with painful bone metastases after failure of EBRT were treated with CT-guided 125I seed implant brachytherapy. Patient pain and analgesic use were measured using the Brief Pain Inventory before treatment, weekly for 4 weeks, and every 4 weeks thereafter for a total of 24 weeks. Opioid analgesic medications and complications were monitored at the same follow-up intervals. Before 125I seed implantation, the mean score for worst pain in a 24-hour period was 7.3 out of 10. Following treatment, at weeks 1, 4, 8, 12, and 24, worst pain decreased to 5.0 (P < 0.0001), 3.0 (P < 0.0001), 2.8 (P < 0.0001), 2.6 (P < 0.0001), and 2.0 (P = 0.0001), respectively. Opioid usage significantly decreased at weeks 4, 8, and 12. Overall response rates of osseous metastases after 125I seed implantation at 1, 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks were 58%, 79%, 81%, 82%, and 80%, respectively. Adverse events were seen in 4 patients, including Grade 1 myelosuppression and Grade 1 late skin toxicity. 125I seed brachytherapy is a safe and effective treatment for patients with painful bone metastases after failure of EBRT. PMID:26252288

  1. SU-E-T-123: Anomalous Altitude Effect in Permanent Implant Brachytherapy Seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Watt, E; Spencer, DP; Meyer, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Permanent seed implant brachytherapy procedures require the measurement of the air kerma strength of seeds prior to implant. This is typically accomplished using a well-type ionization chamber. Previous measurements (Griffin et al., 2005; Bohm et al., 2005) of several low-energy seeds using the air-communicating HDR 1000 Plus chamber have demonstrated that the standard temperature-pressure correction factor, P{sub TP}, may overcompensate for air density changes induced by altitude variations by up to 18%. The purpose of this work is to present empirical correction factors for two clinically-used seeds (IsoAid ADVANTAGE™ {sup 103}Pd and Nucletron selectSeed {sup 125}I) for which empirical altitude correction factors do not yet exist in the literature when measured with the HDR 1000 Plus chamber. Methods: An in-house constructed pressure vessel containing the HDR 1000 Plus well chamber and a digital barometer/thermometer was pumped or evacuated, as appropriate, to a variety of pressures from 725 to 1075 mbar. Current measurements, corrected with P{sub TP}, were acquired for each seed at these pressures and normalized to the reading at ‘standard’ pressure (1013.25 mbar). Results: Measurements in this study have shown that utilization of P{sub TP} can overcompensate in the corrected current reading by up to 20% and 17% for the IsoAid Pd-103 and the Nucletron I-125 seed respectively. Compared to literature correction factors for other seed models, the correction factors in this study diverge by up to 2.6% and 3.0% for iodine (with silver) and palladium respectively, indicating the need for seed-specific factors. Conclusion: The use of seed specific altitude correction factors can reduce uncertainty in the determination of air kerma strength. The empirical correction factors determined in this work can be applied in clinical quality assurance measurements of air kerma strength for two previously unpublished seed designs (IsoAid ADVANTAGE™ {sup 103}Pd and

  2. Biological effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Jatropha curcas L. seed germination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Wang, Xiao-teng; Gan, Cai-ling; Fang, Yan-qiong; Zhang, Meng

    2012-09-01

    To explore the biological effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed, a beam of N+ with energy of 25 keV was applied to treat the dry seed at six different doses. N+ beam implantation greatly decreased germination rate and seedling survival rate. The doses within the range of 12 × 1016 to 15 × 1016 ions cm-2 severely damaged the seeds: total antioxidant capacity (TAC), germination rate, seedling survival rate, reduced ascorbate acid (HAsA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents, and most of the tested antioxidases activity (i.e. catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) reached their lowest levels. At a dose of 18 × 1016 ion cm-2, biological repair took place: moderate increases were found in TAC, germination rate, seedling survival rate, HAsA and GSH contents, and some antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e. CAT, APX, SOD and GPX). The dose of 18 × 1016 ions cm-2 may be the optimum dose for use in dry J. curcas seed mutation breeding. CAT, HAsA and GSH contributed to the increase of TAC, but CAT was the most important. POD performed its important role as seed was severely damaged. The main role of the HAsA-GSH cycle appeared to be for regeneration of HAsA.

  3. Verification of air-kerma strength of 125I seed for permanent prostate implants in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Iori; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Akino, Yuichi; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Konishi, Koji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Inoue, Takehiro

    2009-12-01

    To assure the physical quality of brachytherapy, we investigated the difference between measured and manufacturer's stated source strengths in a single model SourceTech Medical (STM)1251 (125)I seed. A well-type ionization chamber with a single-seed holder was used to measure the source strength of 2412 (125)I seeds before implant in 34 patients. The air-kerma strength was 0.450 U for all cases. The mean source strength for each patient was measured and compared with the manufacturer's stated value. The deviation from the measured value was compared with the tolerance range of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) TG-56 report's recommendation. The measured source strength was higher than the manufacturer's stated value, with a median difference of 1% (range, 2% to 5%). Sixteen of the total of 2412 seeds (0.7%) were more than 5% different from the manufacturer's stated value. The median SD from the mean value was 2.2% (range, 1.1% to 2.5%) for all patients. This is the first report of a single-seed assay performed for the model STM1251 (125)I seed. In this study the manufacturer's stated strength agreed well with the measured value. Nevertheless, the advisability of performing a single-seed assay at every institution should be considered, by referring to the appropriate regulations; for example, those used in the United States.

  4. SU-E-T-378: Evaluation of An Analytical Model for the Inter-Seed Attenuation Effect in 103-Pd Multi-Seed Implant Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Safigholi, H; Soliman, A; Song, W; Meigooni, A Soleimani; Han, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy treatment planning systems based on TG-43 protocol calculate the dose in water and neglects the heterogeneity effect of seeds in multi-seed implant brachytherapy. In this research, the accuracy of a novel analytical model that we propose for the inter-seed attenuation effect (ISA) for 103-Pd seed model is evaluated. Methods: In the analytical model, dose perturbation due to the ISA effect for each seed in an LDR multi-seed implant for 103-Pd is calculated by assuming that the seed of interest is active and the other surrounding seeds are inactive. The cumulative dosimetric effect of all seeds is then summed using the superposition principle. The model is based on pre Monte Carlo (MC) simulated 3D kernels of the dose perturbations caused by the ISA effect. The cumulative ISA effect due to multiple surrounding seeds is obtained by a simple multiplication of the individual ISA effect by each seed, the effect of which is determined by the distance from the seed of interest. This novel algorithm is then compared with full MC water-based simulations (FMCW). Results: The results show that the dose perturbation model we propose is in excellent agreement with the FMCW values for a case with three seeds separated by 1 cm. The average difference of the model and the FMCW simulations was less than 8%±2%. Conclusion: Using the proposed novel analytical ISA effect model, one could expedite the corrections due to the ISA dose perturbation effects during permanent seed 103-Pd brachytherapy planning with minimal increase in time since the model is based on multiplications and superposition. This model can be applied, in principle, to any other brachytherapy seeds. Further work is necessary to validate this model on a more complicated geometry as well.

  5. Potential impact of prostate edema on the dosimetry of permanent seed implants using the new {sup 131}Cs (model CS-1) seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhe; Deng Jun; Roberts, Kenneth; Nath, Ravinder

    2006-04-15

    Our aim in this work was to study the potential dosimetric effect of prostate edema on the accuracy of conventional pre- and post-implant dosimetry for prostate seed implants using the newly introduced {sup 131}Cs seed, whose radioactive decay half-life ({approx}9.7 days) is directly comparable to the average edema resolution half-life ({approx}10 days) observed previously by Waterman et al. for {sup 125}I implants [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41, 1069-1077 (1998)]. A systematic calculation of the relative dosimetry effect of prostate edema on the {sup 131}Cs implant was performed by using an analytic solution obtained previously [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 47, 1405-1419 (2000)]. It was found that conventional preimplant dosimetry always overestimates the true delivered dose as it ignores the temporary increase of the interseed distance caused by edema. The overestimation for {sup 131}Cs implants ranged from 1.2% (for a small edema with a magnitude of 10% and a half-life of 2 days) to approximately 45% (for larger degree edema with a magnitude of 100% and a half-life of 25 days). The magnitude of pre- and post-implant dosimetry error for {sup 131}Cs implants was found to be similar to that of {sup 103}Pd implants for typical edema characteristics (magnitude <100%, and half-life <25 days); both of which are worse compared to {sup 125}I implants. The preimplant dosimetry error for {sup 131}Cs implants cannot be compensated effectively without knowing the edema characteristics before the seed implantation. On the other hand, the error resulted from a conventional post-implant dosimetry can be minimized (to within {+-}6%) for {sup 131}Cs implants if the post-implant dosimetry is performed at 10{+-}2 days post seed implantation. This 'optimum' post-implant dosimetry time is shorter than those determined previously for the {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I implants at 16{+-}4 days and 6{+-}1 weeks, respectively.

  6. 125I Seed Permanent Implantation as a Palliative Treatment for Stage III and IV Hypopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Yang, Jie; Li, Xiaojiang; Wang, Xiaoli; Ren, Yanxin; Fei, Jimin; Xi, Yan; Sun, Ruimei; Ma, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of percutaneous 125I seed permanent implantation for advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma from toxicity, tumor response, and short-term outcome. Methods. 125I seeds implant procedures were performed under computed tomography for 34 patients with advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma. We observed the local control rate, overall survival, and acute or late toxicity rate. Results. In the 34 patients (stage III, n=6; stage IV, n=28), the sites of origin were pyriform sinus (n=29) and postcricoid area (n=5). All patients also received one to four cycles of chemotherapy after seed implantation. The post-plan showed that the actuarial D90 of 125I seeds ranged from 90 to 158 Gy (median, 127 Gy). The mean follow-up was 12.3 months (range, 3.4 to 43.2 months). The local control was 2.1–31.0 months with a median of 17.7 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.4 to 22.0 months). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year local controls were 65.3%, 28.6%, and 9.5% respectively. Twelve patients (35%) died of local recurrence, fourteen patients (41%) died of distant metastases, and three patients (9%) died of recurrence and metastases at the same time. Five patients (15%) still survived to follow-up. At the time of analysis, the median survival time was 12.5 months (95% CI, 9.5 to 15.4 months). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall survival rates were 55.2%, 20.3%, and 10.9%, respectively. Five patients (15%) experienced grade 3 toxic events and nine patients (26%) have experienced grade 2 toxic events. Conclusion. This review shows relatively low toxicity for interstitial 125I seed implantation in the patients with advanced stage hypopharyngeal cancer. The high local control results suggest that 125I seed brachytherapy implant as a salvage or palliative treatment for advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma merit further investigation. PMID:27440132

  7. Monte Carlo study of LDR seed dosimetry with an application in a clinical brachytherapy breast implant

    SciTech Connect

    Furstoss, C.; Reniers, B.; Bertrand, M. J.; Poon, E.; Carrier, J.-F.; Keller, B. M.; Pignol, J. P.; Beaulieu, L.; Verhaegen, F.

    2009-05-15

    A Monte Carlo (MC) study was carried out to evaluate the effects of the interseed attenuation and the tissue composition for two models of {sup 125}I low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seeds (Medi-Physics 6711, IBt InterSource) in a permanent breast implant. The effect of the tissue composition was investigated because the breast localization presents heterogeneities such as glandular and adipose tissue surrounded by air, lungs, and ribs. The absolute MC dose calculations were benchmarked by comparison to the absolute dose obtained from experimental results. Before modeling a clinical case of an implant in heterogeneous breast, the effects of the tissue composition and the interseed attenuation were studied in homogeneous phantoms. To investigate the tissue composition effect, the dose along the transverse axis of the two seed models were calculated and compared in different materials. For each seed model, three seeds sharing the same transverse axis were simulated to evaluate the interseed effect in water as a function of the distance from the seed. A clinical study of a permanent breast {sup 125}I implant for a single patient was carried out using four dose calculation techniques: (1) A TG-43 based calculation, (2) a full MC simulation with realistic tissues and seed models, (3) a MC simulation in water and modeled seeds, and (4) a MC simulation without modeling the seed geometry but with realistic tissues. In the latter, a phase space file corresponding to the particles emitted from the external surface of the seed is used at each seed location. The results were compared by calculating the relevant clinical metrics V{sub 85}, V{sub 100}, and V{sub 200} for this kind of treatment in the target. D{sub 90} and D{sub 50} were also determined to evaluate the differences in dose and compare the results to the studies published for permanent prostate seed implants in literature. The experimental results are in agreement with the MC absolute doses (within 5% for EBT

  8. SLM Produced Porous Titanium Implant Improvements for Enhanced Vascularization and Osteoblast Seeding

    PubMed Central

    Matena, Julia; Petersen, Svea; Gieseke, Matthias; Kampmann, Andreas; Teske, Michael; Beyerbach, Martin; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Haferkamp, Heinz; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Nolte, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    To improve well-known titanium implants, pores can be used for increasing bone formation and close bone-implant interface. Selective Laser Melting (SLM) enables the production of any geometry and was used for implant production with 250-µm pore size. The used pore size supports vessel ingrowth, as bone formation is strongly dependent on fast vascularization. Additionally, proangiogenic factors promote implant vascularization. To functionalize the titanium with proangiogenic factors, polycaprolactone (PCL) coating can be used. The following proangiogenic factors were examined: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12). As different surfaces lead to different cell reactions, titanium and PCL coating were compared. The growing into the porous titanium structure of primary osteoblasts was examined by cross sections. Primary osteoblasts seeded on the different surfaces were compared using Live Cell Imaging (LCI). Cross sections showed cells had proliferated, but not migrated after seven days. Although the cell count was lower on titanium PCL implants in LCI, the cell count and cell spreading area development showed promising results for titanium PCL implants. HMGB1 showed the highest migration capacity for stimulating the endothelial cell line. Future perspective would be the incorporation of HMGB1 into PCL polymer for the realization of a slow factor release. PMID:25849656

  9. SLM produced porous titanium implant improvements for enhanced vascularization and osteoblast seeding.

    PubMed

    Matena, Julia; Petersen, Svea; Gieseke, Matthias; Kampmann, Andreas; Teske, Michael; Beyerbach, Martin; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Haferkamp, Heinz; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Nolte, Ingo

    2015-04-02

    To improve well-known titanium implants, pores can be used for increasing bone formation and close bone-implant interface. Selective Laser Melting (SLM) enables the production of any geometry and was used for implant production with 250-µm pore size. The used pore size supports vessel ingrowth, as bone formation is strongly dependent on fast vascularization. Additionally, proangiogenic factors promote implant vascularization. To functionalize the titanium with proangiogenic factors, polycaprolactone (PCL) coating can be used. The following proangiogenic factors were examined: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12). As different surfaces lead to different cell reactions, titanium and PCL coating were compared. The growing into the porous titanium structure of primary osteoblasts was examined by cross sections. Primary osteoblasts seeded on the different surfaces were compared using Live Cell Imaging (LCI). Cross sections showed cells had proliferated, but not migrated after seven days. Although the cell count was lower on titanium PCL implants in LCI, the cell count and cell spreading area development showed promising results for titanium PCL implants. HMGB1 showed the highest migration capacity for stimulating the endothelial cell line. Future perspective would be the incorporation of HMGB1 into PCL polymer for the realization of a slow factor release.

  10. Optimization of permanent breast seed implant dosimetry incorporating tissue heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashouf, Shahram

    Seed brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose around brachytherapy sources is based on the AAPM TG43 formalism, which generates the dose in homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM task group no. 186 (TG186) emphasized the importance of accounting for heterogeneities. In this work we introduce an analytical dose calculation algorithm in heterogeneous media using CT images. The advantages over other methods are computational efficiency and the ease of integration into clinical use. An Inhomogeneity Correction Factor (ICF) is introduced as the ratio of absorbed dose in tissue to that in water medium. ICF is a function of tissue properties and independent of the source structure. The ICF is extracted using CT images and the absorbed dose in tissue can then be calculated by multiplying the dose as calculated by the TG43 formalism times ICF. To evaluate the methodology, we compared our results with Monte Carlo simulations as well as experiments in phantoms with known density and atomic compositions. The dose distributions obtained through applying ICF to TG43 protocol agreed very well with those of Monte Carlo simulations and experiments in all phantoms. In all cases, the mean relative error was reduced by at least a factor of two when ICF correction factor was applied to the TG43 protocol. In conclusion we have developed a new analytical dose calculation method, which enables personalized dose calculations in heterogeneous media using CT images. The methodology offers several advantages including the use of standard TG43 formalism, fast calculation time and extraction of the ICF parameters directly from Hounsfield Units. The methodology was implemented into our clinical treatment planning system where a cohort of 140 patients were processed to study the clinical benefits of a heterogeneity corrected dose.

  11. CT-Guided Radioactive {sup 125}I Seed Implantation Therapy of Symptomatic Retroperitoneal Lymph Node Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhongmin; Lu, Jian; Gong, Ju; Zhang, Liyun; Xu, Yingjia; Song, Shaoli; Chen, Kemin; Liu, Fenju; Gang, Huang

    2013-04-12

    PurposeThis study explored the clinical efficacy of CT-guided radioactive {sup 125}I seed implantation in treating patients with symptomatic retroperitoneal lymph node metastases.MethodsTwenty-five patients with pathologically confirmed malignant tumors received CT-guided radioactive {sup 125}I seed implantation to treat metastatic lymph nodes. The diameter of the metastatic lymph nodes ranged from 1.5 to 4.5 cm. Treatment planning system (TPS) was used to reconstruct the three-dimensional image of the tumor and then calculate the corresponding quantity and distribution of {sup 125}I seeds.ResultsFollow-up period for this group of patients was 2–30 months, and median time was 16 months. Symptoms of refractory pain were significantly resolved postimplantation (P < 0.05), and Karnofsky score rose dramatically (P < 0.05). Most patients reported pain relief 2–5 days after treatment. Follow-up imaging studies were performed 2 months later, which revealed CR in 7 patients, PR in 13 patients, SD in 3 patients, and PD in 2 patients. The overall effective rate (CR + PR) was 80 %. Median survival time was 25.5 months. Seven patients died of recurrent tumor; 16 patients died of multiorgan failure or other metastases. Two patients survived after 30 months follow-up. Two patients reported localized skin erythema 1 week postimplantation, which disappeared after topical treatment.ConclusionsCT-guided radioactive {sup 125}I seed implantation, which showed good palliative pain relief with acceptable short-term effects, has proved in our study to be a new, safe, effective, and relatively uncomplicated treatment option for symptomatic retroperitoneal metastatic lymph nodes.

  12. Antiurolithiatic activity of Abelmoschus moschatus seed extracts against zinc disc implantation-induced urolithiasis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Anil T.; Vyawahare, Niraj S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The commonly used techniques for removing renal calculi are associated with the risk of acute renal injury and increase in stone recurrence which indicates an urgent need for alternate therapy. Objectives: The aim was to evaluate the antiurolithiatic activity of Abelmoschus moschatus seed extracts in rats. Materials and Methods: Urolithiasis was induced by surgical implantations of zinc disc in the urinary bladders of rats. Upon postsurgical recovery, different doses of chloroform (CAM) and methanolic (MAM) extracts of A. moschatus seeds (viz., 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight) were administered to disc implanted rats for the period of 7 days by the oral route. Antiurolithiatic activity was evaluated by measuring various dimensions of stones and estimating levels of various biomarkers in serum and urine samples. Results: A significant decrease in urinary output was observed in disc implanted animals, which was prevented by the treatment with extracts. Supplementation with extracts caused significant improvement in glomerular filtration rate and urinary total protein excretion. The elevated levels of serum creatinine, uric acid, and blood urea nitrogen were also prevented by the extracts. The extracts significantly reduced deposition of calculi deposition around the implanted disc. This antiurolithiatic potential is observed at all doses (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) of MAM, whereas only higher dose (400 mg/kg) of CAM showed significant antiurolithiatic potential. Conclusion: The extracts of A. moschatus seeds possessed significant antiurolithiatic activity. The possible mechanism underlying this effect is mediated collectively through diuretic, antioxidant, and free-radical scavenging effects of the plant. PMID:27057124

  13. SU-F-19A-11: Retrospective Evaluation of Thermal Coverage by Thermobrachytherapy Seed Arrangements of Clinical LDR Prostate Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Warrell, G; Shvydka, D; Chen, C; Parsai, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The superiority of a properly-administered combination of radiation therapy and hyperthermia over radiation alone in treatment of human cancers has been demonstrated in multiple studies examining radiobiology, local control, and survival. Unfortunately, hyperthermia is not yet a common modality in oncology practice, due in part to the technical difficulty of heating a deep-seated target volume to sufficient temperature. To address this problem, our group has invented a thermobrachytherapy (TB) seed based on a commonly-used low dose-rate permanent brachytherapy seed for implant in solid tumors. Instead of the tungsten radiographic marker of the standard seed, the TB seed contains one of a self-regulating ferromagnetic alloy. Placement of a patient implanted with such seeds in an oscillating magnetic field generates heat via induction of eddy currents. We present the results of studies of the capability of clinically-realistic TB seed arrangements to adequately heat defined target volumes. Methods: Seed distributions for several past LDR prostate permanent implant brachytherapy patients were reproduced in the finite element analysis software package COMSOL Multiphysics 4.4, with the difference that TB seeds were modelled, rather than the radiation-only seeds actually used for their treatments. The implant geometries were mainly of the modified peripheral loading type; a range of prostatic volumes and blood perfusion rates likely to be seen in a clinical setting were examined. Results: According to the simulations, when distributed to optimize radiation dose, TB seeds also produce sufficient heat to provide thermal coverage of the target given proper selection of the magnetic field strength. However, the thermal distributions may be improved by additional use of hyperthermia-only seeds. Conclusion: A dual-modality seed intended as an alternative to and using the same implantation apparatus and technique as the standard LDR permanent implant seed has been

  14. Preventive effects of 125I seeds on benign restenosis following esophageal stent implantation in a dog model

    PubMed Central

    GAN, ZHEN; JING, JIAN; ZHU, GUANGYU; QIN, YONGLIN; TENG, GAOJUN; GUO, JINHE

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of iodine-125 (125I) seeds on the proliferation of primary esophageal fibroblasts in dogs, and to assess the safety and preventive efficacy of 125I seed-pre-loaded esophageal stents in benign restenosis following implantation. Primary fibroblasts were cultured with various 125I seed activities, which were then evaluated using cell proliferation and apoptosis assays as well as cell cycle analysis using Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining and PI staining. Prior to sacrification, animals were submitted to esophageal radiography under digital subtraction angiography. Esophageal tissues were collected and examined for macroscopic, microscopic and pathological alterations. The results demonstrated a significant and dose-dependent inhibition of fibroblast proliferation and increased apoptosis following exposure to 125I seeds. G0/G1 fibroblast populations increased in a dose-dependent manner following treatment with 125I seeds, in contrast to cells in S phase. Four weeks following implantation, α-smooth muscle actin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression levels in the experimental group were significantly lower compared with those in the control group; in addition, eight weeks following implantation, esophageal inner diameters were increased in the experimental group. 125I seeds inhibited proliferation of dog esophageal fibroblasts via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In conclusion, 125I seed-pre-loaded esophageal stents inhibited benign hyperplasia in the upper edge of the stent to a certain extent, which relieved benign restenosis following implantation with a good safety profile. PMID:25543838

  15. CT image artifacts from brachytherapy seed implants: A postprocessing 3D adaptive median filter

    SciTech Connect

    Basran, Parminder S.; Robertson, Andrew; Wells, Derek

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To design a postprocessing 3D adaptive median filter that minimizes streak artifacts and improves soft-tissue contrast in postoperative CT images of brachytherapy seed implantations. Methods: The filter works by identifying voxels that are likely streaks and estimating more reflective voxel intensity by using voxel intensities in adjacent CT slices and applying a median filter over voxels not identified as seeds. Median values are computed over a 5x5x5 mm region of interest (ROI) within the CT volume. An acrylic phantom simulating a clinical seed implant arrangement and containing nonradioactive seeds was created. Low contrast subvolumes of tissuelike material were also embedded in the phantom. Pre- and postprocessed image quality metrics were compared using the standard deviation of ROIs between the seeds, the CT numbers of low contrast ROIs embedded within the phantom, the signal to noise ratio (SNR), and the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of the low contrast ROIs. The method was demonstrated with a clinical postimplant CT dataset. Results: After the filter was applied, the standard deviation of CT values in streak artifact regions was significantly reduced from 76.5 to 7.2 HU. Within the observable low contrast plugs, the mean of all ROI standard deviations was significantly reduced from 60.5 to 3.9 HU, SNR significantly increased from 2.3 to 22.4, and CNR significantly increased from 0.2 to 4.1 (all P<0.01). The mean CT in the low contrast plugs remained within 5 HU of the original values. Conclusion: An efficient postprocessing filter that does not require access to projection data, which can be applied irrespective of CT scan parameters has been developed, provided the slice thickness and spacing is 3 mm or less.

  16. Seed Implant Retention Score Predicts the Risk of Prolonged Urinary Retention After Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hoon K.; Adams, Marc T.; Shi, Qiuhu; Basillote, Jay; LaMonica, Joanne; Miranda, Luis; Motta, Joseph

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To risk-stratify patients for urinary retention after prostate brachytherapy according to a novel seed implant retention score (SIRS). Patients and Methods: A total of 835 patients underwent transperineal prostate seed implant from March 1993 to January 2007; 197 patients had {sup 125}I and 638 patients had {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy. Four hundred ninety-four patients had supplemental external-beam radiation. The final downsized prostate volume was used for the 424 patients who had neoadjuvant hormone therapy. Retention was defined as reinsertion of a Foley catheter after the implant. Results: Retention developed in 7.4% of patients, with an average duration of 6.7 weeks. On univariate analysis, implant without supplemental external-beam radiation (10% vs. 5.6%; p = 0.02), neoadjuvant hormone therapy (9.4% vs. 5.4%; p = 0.02), baseline alpha-blocker use (12.5% vs. 6.3%; p = 0.008), and increased prostate volume (13.4% vs. 6.9% vs. 2.9%, >45 cm{sup 3}, 25-45 cm{sup 3}, <25 cm{sup 3}; p = 0.0008) were significantly correlated with increased rates of retention. On multivariate analysis, implant without supplemental external-beam radiation, neoadjuvant hormone therapy, baseline alpha-blocker use, and increased prostate volume were correlated with retention. A novel SIRS was modeled as the combined score of these factors, ranging from 0 to 5. There was a significant correlation between the SIRS and retention (p < 0.0001). The rates of retention were 0, 4%, 5.6%, 9%, 20.9%, and 36.4% for SIRS of 0 to 5, respectively. Conclusions: The SIRS may identify patients who are at high risk for prolonged retention after prostate brachytherapy. A prospective validation study of the SIRS is planned.

  17. Coherence-based photoacoustic imaging of brachytherapy seeds implanted in a canine prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    Visualization of individual brachytherapy seed locations assists with intraoperative updates to brachytherapy treatment plans. Photoacoustic imaging is advantageous when compared to current ultrasound imaging methods, due to its superior sensitivity to metal surrounded by tissue. However, photoacoustic images suffer from poor contrast with insufficient laser fluence. A short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamformer was implemented to enhance these low-contrast photoacoustic signals. Photoacoustic imaging was performed with a transrectal ultrasound probe and an optical fiber surrounded by a light-diffusing sheath, placed at a distance of approximately 4-5 mm from the location of seeds implanted in an in vivo canine prostate. The average energy density through the tip of the sheath was varied from 8 to 167 mJ/cm2. When compared to a fast Fourier transform (FFT)- based reconstruction method, the mean contrast and signal-to-noise ratios were improved by up to 22 dB and a factor of 4, respectively, with the SLSC beamformer (12% of the receive aperture elements were included in the short-lag sum). Image artifacts that were spatially coherent had spatial frequency spectra that were quadrantally symmetric about the origin, while the spatial frequency spectra of the seed signals possessed diagonal symmetry. These differences were utilized to reduce artifacts by 9-14 dB after applying a bandpass filter with diagonal symmetry. Results indicate that advanced methods, such as SLSC beamforming or frequency-based filters, hold promise for intraoperative localization of prostate brachytherapy seeds

  18. Cell Seeding Densities in Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation Techniques for Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Gomoll, Andreas H; Lind, Martin; Spector, Myron

    2012-04-01

    Cartilage repair techniques have been among the most intensively investigated treatments in orthopedics for the past decade, and several different treatment modalities are currently available. Despite the extensive research effort within this field, the generation of hyaline cartilage remains a considerable challenge. There are many parameters attendant to each of the cartilage repair techniques that can affect the amount and types of reparative tissue generated in the cartilage defect, and some of the most fundamental of these parameters have yet to be fully investigated. For procedures in which in vitro-cultured autologous chondrocytes are implanted under a periosteal or synthetic membrane cover, or seeded onto a porous membrane or scaffold, little is known about how the number of cells affects the clinical outcome. Few published clinical studies address the cell seeding density that was employed. The principal objective of this review is to provide an overview of the cell seeding densities used in cell-based treatments currently available in the clinic for cartilage repair. Select preclinical studies that have informed the use of specific cell seeding densities in the clinic are also discussed.

  19. WE-A-17A-11: Implanted Brachytherapy Seed Movement Due to Transrectal Ultrasound Probe-Induced Prostate Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D; Usmani, N; Sloboda, R; Meyer, T; Husain, S; Angyalfi, S; Kay, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the movement of implanted brachytherapy seeds due to transrectal ultrasound probe-induced prostate deformation and to estimate the effects on prostate dosimetry. Methods: Implanted probe-in and probe-removed seed distributions were reconstructed for 10 patients using C-arm fluoroscopy imaging. The prostate was delineated on ultrasound and registered to the fluoroscopy seeds using a visible subset of seeds and residual needle tracks. A linear tensor and shearing model correlated the seed movement with position. The seed movement model was used to infer the underlying prostate deformation and to simulate the prostate contour without probe compression. Changes in prostate and surrogate urethra dosimetry were calculated. Results: Seed movement patterns reflecting elastic decompression, lateral shearing, and rectal bending were observed. Elastic decompression was characterized by anterior-posterior expansion and superior-inferior and lateral contractions. For lateral shearing, anterior movement up to 6 mm was observed for extraprostatic seeds in the lateral peripheral region. The average intra-prostatic seed movement was 1.3 mm, and the residual after linear modeling was 0.6 mm. Prostate D90 increased by 4 Gy on average (8 Gy max) and was correlated with elastic decompression. For selected patients, lateral shearing resulted in differential change in D90 of 7 Gy between anterior and posterior quadrants, and increase in whole prostate D90 of 4 Gy. Urethra D10 increased by 4 Gy. Conclusion: Seed movement upon probe removal was characterized. The proposed model captured the linear correlation between seed movement and position. Whole prostate dose coverage increased slightly, due to the small but systematic seed movement associated with elastic decompression. Lateral shearing movement increased dose coverage in the anterior-lateral region, at the expense of the posterior-lateral region. The effect on whole prostate D90 was smaller due to the subset

  20. Aortic valve conduit implantation in the descending thoracic aorta in a sheep model: The outcomes of pre-seeded scaffold.

    PubMed

    Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Ahmadi Tafti, Seyed Hossein; Mokhber-Dezfooli, Mohammad-Reza; Khorramirouz, Reza; Sabetkish, Shabnam; Sabetkish, Nastaran; Rabbani, Shahram; Tavana, Hamid; Mohseni, Mohammad Javad

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the outcomes of implanting pre-seeded decellularized aortic valve conduit (AVC) with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in a sheep model. Eight sheep AVCs were obtained under sterile conditions and decellularized by using detergent-based methods. Decellularized AVCs were seeded with autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs in a dynamic bioreactor system. Pre-seeded AVCs were implanted in the descending thoracic aorta in a sheep model. In all sheep, a decellularized pericardial patch was also anastomosed to the proximal part in order to reduce the incidence of rupture. Pathological evaluations, echocardiography, multislice computed tomography (CT), and CT angiography were performed for the evaluation of implanted AVCs. The longest survival period was 19 months in pre-seeded animals with complete recellularization at the long-term follow-up. Immunohistochemical staining for desmin, smooth muscle actin, and cytokeratin was significantly positive in the pre-seeded samples and reached near normal ranges. CT angiography revealed no intimal tearing after 18 months of follow-up. Pre-seeded AVCs with bone marrow-derived MSCs may have satisfactory results in postoperative cell seeding capabilities with promising functional potentiality. This modality may be beneficial and may provide a new era of biological grafts in cardiovascular surgery. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Bypassing the learning curve in permanent seed implants using state-of-the-art technology

    SciTech Connect

    Beaulieu, Luc . E-mail: beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca; Evans, Dee-Ann Radford; Aubin, Sylviane; Angyalfi, Steven; Husain, Siraj; Kay, Ian; Martin, Andre-Guy; Varfalvy, Nicolas; Vigneault, Eric; Dunscombe, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to demonstrate, based on clinical postplan dose distributions, that technology can be used efficiently to eliminate the learning curve associated with permanent seed implant planning and delivery. Methods and Materials: Dose distributions evaluated 30 days after the implant of the initial 22 consecutive patients treated with permanent seed implants at two institutions were studied. Institution 1 (I1) consisted of a new team, whereas institution 2 (I2) had performed more than 740 preplanned implantations over a 9-year period before the study. Both teams had adopted similar integrated systems based on three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasonography, intraoperative dosimetry, and an automated seed delivery and needle retraction system (FIRST, Nucletron). Procedure time and dose volume histogram parameters such as D90, V100, V150, V200, and others were collected in the operating room and at 30 days postplan. Results: The average target coverage from the intraoperative plan (V100) was 99.4% for I1 and 99.9% for I2. D90, V150, and V200 were 191.4 Gy (196.3 Gy), 75.3% (73.0%), and 37.5% (34.1%) for I1 (I2) respectively. None of these parameters shows a significant difference between institutions. The postplan D90 was 151.2 Gy for I1 and 167.3 Gy for I2, well above the 140 Gy from the Stock et al. analysis, taking into account differences at planning, results in a p value of 0.0676. The procedure time required on average 174.4 min for I1 and 89 min for I2. The time was found to decrease with the increasing number of patients. Conclusion: State-of-the-art technology enables a new brachytherapy team to obtain excellent postplan dose distributions, similar to those achieved by an experienced team with proven long-term clinical results. The cost for bypassing the usual dosimetry learning curve is time, with increasing team experience resulting in shorter treatment times.

  2. Bypassing the learning curve in permanent seed implants using state-of-the-art technology.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Luc; Evans, Dee-Ann Radford; Aubin, Sylviane; Angyalfi, Steven; Husain, Siraj; Kay, Ian; Martin, André-Guy; Varfalvy, Nicolas; Vigneault, Eric; Dunscombe, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate, based on clinical postplan dose distributions, that technology can be used efficiently to eliminate the learning curve associated with permanent seed implant planning and delivery. Dose distributions evaluated 30 days after the implant of the initial 22 consecutive patients treated with permanent seed implants at two institutions were studied. Institution 1 (I1) consisted of a new team, whereas institution 2 (I2) had performed more than 740 preplanned implantations over a 9-year period before the study. Both teams had adopted similar integrated systems based on three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasonography, intraoperative dosimetry, and an automated seed delivery and needle retraction system (FIRST, Nucletron). Procedure time and dose volume histogram parameters such as D90, V100, V150, V200, and others were collected in the operating room and at 30 days postplan. The average target coverage from the intraoperative plan (V100) was 99.4% for I1 and 99.9% for I2. D90, V150, and V200 were 191.4 Gy (196.3 Gy), 75.3% (73.0%), and 37.5% (34.1%) for I1 (I2) respectively. None of these parameters shows a significant difference between institutions. The postplan D90 was 151.2 Gy for I1 and 167.3 Gy for I2, well above the 140 Gy from the Stock et al. analysis, taking into account differences at planning, results in a p value of 0.0676. The procedure time required on average 174.4 min for I1 and 89 min for I2. The time was found to decrease with the increasing number of patients. State-of-the-art technology enables a new brachytherapy team to obtain excellent postplan dose distributions, similar to those achieved by an experienced team with proven long-term clinical results. The cost for bypassing the usual dosimetry learning curve is time, with increasing team experience resulting in shorter treatment times.

  3. Acute urinary morbidity after a permanent 125I implantation for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohga, Saiji; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Sasaki, Tomonari; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Asai, Kaori; Hirata, Hideki; Naito, Seiji; Honda, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated the predictive factors of acute urinary morbidity (AUM) after prostate brachytherapy. From November 2005 to January 2007, 62 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated using brachytherapy. The (125)Iodine ((125)I) seed-delivering method was a modified peripheral pattern. The prescribed dose was 144 Gy. Urinary morbidity was scored at 3 months after implantation. The clinical and treatment parameters were analysed for correlation with AUM. In particular, in this study, Du90 (the minimal dose received by 90% of the urethra), Dup90 (the minimal dose received by 90% of the proximal half of the urethra on the bladder side) and Dud90 (the minimal dose received by 90% of the distal half of the urethra on the penile side) were analysed. We found that 43 patients (69.4%) experienced acute urinary symptoms at 3 months after implantation. Of them, 40 patients had Grade 1 AUM, one patient had Grade 2 pain, and two patients had Grade 2 urinary frequency. None of the patients had ≥Grade 3. Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that Du90 and Dup90 were significantly correlated with AUM. In this study, Du90 and Dup90 were the most significant predictors of AUM after prostate brachytherapy.

  4. Photon counting readout pixel array in 0.18-μm CMOS technology for on-line gamma-ray imaging of 103palladium seeds for permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldan, A. H.; Karim, K. S.; Reznik, A.; Caldwell, C. B.; Rowlands, J. A.

    2008-03-01

    Permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) brachytherapy technique was recently introduced as an alternative to high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and involves the permanent implantation of radioactive 103Palladium seeds into the surgical cavity of the breast for cancer treatment. To enable accurate seed implantation, this research introduces a gamma camera based on a hybrid amorphous selenium detector and CMOS readout pixel architecture for real-time imaging of 103Palladium seeds during the PBSI procedure. A prototype chip was designed and fabricated in 0.18-μm n-well CMOS process. We present the experimental results obtained from this integrated photon counting readout pixel.

  5. Survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer after iodine125 seeds implantation brachytherapy: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Han, Quanli; Deng, Muhong; Lv, Yao; Dai, Guanghai

    2017-02-01

    Brachytherapy with iodine-labeled seeds (I-seeds) implantation is increasingly being used to treat tumors because of its positional precision, minimal invasion, least damage to noncancerous tissue due to slow and continuous release of radioactivity and facilitation with modern medical imaging technologies. This study evaluates the survival and pain relief outcomes of the I-seeds implantation brachytherapy in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Literature search was carried out in multiple electronic databases (Google Scholar, Embase, Medline/PubMed, and Ovid SP) and studies reporting I seeds implantation brachytherapy in pancreatic cancer patients with unresectable tumor were selected by following predetermined eligibility criteria. Random effects meta-analysis was performed to achieve inverse variance weighted effect size of the overall survival rate after the intervention. Sensitivity and subgroups analyses were also carried out. Twenty-three studies (824 patients' data) were included in the meta-analysis. I-seeds implantation brachytherapy alone was associated with 8.98 [95% confidence interval (CI): 6.94, 11.03] months (P < 0.00001) overall survival with 1-year survival of 25.7 ± 9.3% (mean ± standard deviation; SD) and 2-year survival was 17.9 ± 8.6% (mean ± SD). In stage IV pancreatic cancer patients, overall survival was 7.13 [95% CI: 4.75, 9.51] months (P < 0.00001). In patients treated with I-seeds implantation along with 1 or more therapies, overall survival was 11.75 [95% CI: 9.84, 13.65] months (P < 0.00001) with 1-year survival of 47.4 ± 22.75% (mean ± SD) and 2-year survival was 16.97 ± 3.1% (mean ± SD). I-seeds brachytherapy was associated with relief of pain in 79.7 ± 9.9% (mean ± SD) of the patients. Survival of pancreatic cancer patients after I-seeds implantation brachytherapy is found to be 9 months, whereas a combined treatment with I-seeds brachytherapy and other therapies was

  6. Intraoperative 3D ultrasound guidance system for permanent breast seed implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Justin; Morton, Daniel; Batchelar, Deidre; Hilts, Michelle; Fenster, Aaron

    2017-03-01

    Permanent breast seed implantation (PBSI) is a single-visit technique for accelerated partial breast irradiation that uses a template and needles to implant seeds of Pd-103 under 2D ultrasound (US) guidance. The short treatment time is advantageous given the widely hypothesized link between treatment burden and mastectomy use. However, limitations of 2D US contribute to high operator dependence and seed placement error that we aim to address by developing a 3D US guidance system. A 3D US scanner for PBSI and a mechanism for template localization have been developed and validated. The 3D US system mechatronically moves and tracks a 2D US transducer over a 5 cm translation and 60° tilt, reconstructing the 2D images into a 3D volume as they are acquired. Additionally, a localizing arm, tracked via encoded joints and mounted to the scanner, determines template position by localizing divots on a modified needle template. Volume reconstruction was validated using linear measurements of a grid phantom and volumetric measurements of two surgical cavity phantoms. Localizing arm measurement accuracy was established using a testing jig with divots at known positions. Imaging volume was rigidly registered to scanner geometry using a string phantom mounted to a test jig. Lastly, volunteer scans were conducted to demonstrate clinical applicability. Median linear and average volumetric measurements were within +/-1.4% of nominal and +/-4.1% of water displacement measurements, respectively. Median measurement accuracy of the localizing arm was 0.475 mm. Imaging volume target registration error was 0.458 mm. Volunteer scans produced clinical quality images.

  7. Clinical effectiveness of 125I-seed implantation in combination with nimotuzumab therapy for the advanced oral carcinoma: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Meng, J; Wang, X; Zhuang, Q-W; Gu, Q-P; Zhang, J; Li, Z-P

    2014-01-01

    This study determines the short-term efficacy and toxicity of combined 125I-seed implantation and nimotuzumab in treating the advanced oral carcinoma. 125I-seed implantation is safe and has shown good short-term efficacy in clinical practice. Nimotuzumab is a useful biological agent for targeted therapy. Effect of 125I-seed implantation with nimotuzumab in treating oral carcinomas remains unclear. From November 2011 to December 2012, 11 patients with advanced oral carcinoma (pathologic types: 7 cases of squamous cell carcinoma and 4 cases of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma) were enrolled in our hospital. The patients did not receive surgery due to systemic disease or locally advanced cancer. All of them underwent 125I-seed implantation with the matched peripheral doses (MPD) ranging from 90-100 Gy. The apparent activity per seed ranged from 0.6 mCi (2.22 MBq) to 0.7 mCi (2.59 MBq). Later, all patients were given nimotuzumab (200 mg, intravenous drip, weekly, for 6 weeks). The patients were then followed up and the response rate, acute/chronic radiation-induced injury, and safety of the induction treatment were analyzed. Three patients achieved complete while 6 patients had partial response; yielding a response rate of 81.8%. Major adverse events included radiation-induced oral mucositis, local hemorrhage, bone marrow suppression, nausea/vomiting, and alopecia. Adverse reaction was not significantly different between the group of patients under 65 years of age and over 65 years of age (p > 0.05). Nimotuzumab enhanced the tumor sensitivity to brachytherapy without increasing AEs and improved the patients' life quality. 125I-seed implantation combined with nimotuzumab is effective and safe for patients with unresectable oral carcinoma.

  8. Dosimetric variations in permanent breast seed implant due to patient arm position.

    PubMed

    Watt, Elizabeth; Husain, Siraj; Sia, Michael; Brown, Derek; Long, Karen; Meyer, Tyler

    2015-01-01

    Planning and delivery for permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) are performed with the ipsilateral arm raised; however, changes in implant geometry can be expected because of healing and anatomical motion as the patient resumes her daily activities. The purpose of this study is to quantify the effect of ipsilateral arm position on postplan dosimetry. Twelve patients treated at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre were included in this study. Patients underwent two postimplant CT scans on the day of implant (Day 0) and two scans approximately 8 weeks later (Day 60). One scan at each time was taken with the ipsilateral arm raised, recreating the planning scan position, and the other with both arms down in a relaxed position beside the body, recreating a more realistic postimplant arm position. Postplans were completed on all four scans using deformable image registration (MIM Maestro). On the Day 0 scan, the V200 for the evaluation planning target volume was significantly increased in the arm-down position compared with the arm-up position. Lung, rib, and chest wall dose were significantly reduced at both time points. Left anterior descending coronary artery, heart, and skin dose showed no significant differences at either time point. Although some dosimetric indices show significant differences between the arm-up and arm-down positions, the magnitude of these differences is small and the values remain indicative of implant quality. Despite the delivery of the majority of dose with the arm down, it is reasonable to use CT scans taken in the arm-up position for postplanning. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Inverse planning optimization for hybrid prostate permanent-seed implant brachytherapy plans using two source strengths.

    PubMed

    Cunha, J Adam M; Pickett, Barby; Pouliot, Jean

    2010-06-03

    The purpose is to demonstrate the ability to generate clinically acceptable prostate permanent seed implant plans using two seed types which are identical except for their activity. The IPSA inverse planning algorithms were modified to include multiple dose matrices for the calculation of dose from different sources, and a selection algorithm was implemented to allow for the swapping of source type at any given source position. Five previously treated patients with a range of prostate volumes from 20-48 cm3 were re-optimized under two hybrid scenarios: (1) using 0.32 and 0.51 mGy m2 / h 125I, and (2) using 0.64 and 0.76 mGy m2 / h 125I. Isodose lines were generated and dosimetric indices , V150Prostate, D90Prostate, V150Urethra, V125Urethra, V120Urethra,V100Urethra, and D10Urethra were calculated. The algorithm allows for the generation of single-isotope, multi-activity hybrid brachytherapy plans. By dealing with only one radionuclide, but of different activity, the biology is unchanged from a standard plan. All V100Prostate were within 2.3 percentage points for every plan and always above the clinically desirable 95%. All V150Urethra were identically zero, and V120Urethra is always below the clinically acceptable value of 1.0 cm3. Clinical optimization times for the hybrid plans are still under one minute, for most cases. It is possible to generate clinically advantageous brachytherapy plans (i.e. obtain the same quality dose distribution as a standard single-activity plan) while incorporating leftover seeds from a previous patient treatment. This method will allow a clinic to continue to provide excellent patient care, but at a reduced cost. Multi-activity hybrid plans were equal in quality (as measured by the standard dosimetric indices) to plans with seeds of a single activity. Despite the expanded search space, optimization times for these studies were still under two minutes on a modern day laptop and can be reduced to below one minute in a clinical setting

  10. A comparative study of seed localization and dose calculation on pre- and post-implantation ultrasound and CT images for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Imad; Algan, Ozer; Thompson, Spencer; Sindhwani, Puneet; Herman, Terence; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2009-09-01

    This work investigates variation in the volume of the prostate measured at different stages through the prostate brachytherapy procedure for 30 patients treated with I-125 radioactive seeds. The implanted seeds were localized on post-implantation ultrasound (US) images and the effect of prostate enlargement due to edema on dose coverage for 15 patients was studied. The volume of the prostate was measured at four stages as follows: (a) 2-3 weeks prior to implantation using US imaging, (b) then at the start of the intra-operative prostate brachytherapy procedure on the day of the implant, (c) immediately post-implantation using US imaging in the operating room and (d) finally by CT imaging at nearly 4 weeks post-implantation. Comparative prostate volume studies were performed using US imaging stepper and twister modes. For the purpose of this study, the implanted seeds were localized successfully on post-implant ultrasound twister images, retrospectively. The plans using post-implant US imaging were compared with intra-operative plans on US and plans created on CT images. The prostate volume increases about 10 cm3 on average due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed loading during implantation. The visibility of the implanted seeds on US twister images acquired post-implantation is as good as those on CT images and can be localized and used for dose calculation. The dose coverage represented by parameters such as D90 (dose covering 90% of the volume) and V100 (volume covered by 100% dose) is poorer on plans performed on post-implantation twister US studies than on the intra-operative live plan or the CT scan performed 4 weeks post-operatively. For example, the mean D90 difference on post-implantation US is lower by more than 15% than that on pre-implantation US. The volume enlargement of the prostate due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed placement has a significant effect on the quality of dosimetric coverage in brachytherapy prostate seed

  11. Dosimetric effects of seed anisotropy and interseed attenuation for {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I prostate implants

    SciTech Connect

    Chibani, Omar; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Todor, Dorin

    2005-08-15

    A Monte Carlo study is carried out to quantify the effects of seed anisotropy and interseed attenuation for {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I prostate implants. Two idealized and two real prostate implants are considered. Full Monte Carlo simulation (FMCS) of implants (seeds are physically and simultaneously simulated) is compared with isotropic point-source dose-kernel superposition (PSKS) and line-source dose-kernel superposition (LSKS) methods. For clinical pre- and post-procedure implants, the dose to the different structures (prostate, rectum wall, and urethra) is calculated. The discretized volumes of these structures are reconstructed using transrectal ultrasound contours. Local dose differences (PSKS versus FMCS and LSKS versus FMCS) are investigated. The dose contributions from primary versus scattered photons are calculated separately. For {sup 103}Pd, the average absolute total dose difference between FMCS and PSKS can be as high as 7.4% for the idealized model and 6.1% for the clinical preprocedure implant. Similarly, the total dose difference is lower for the case of {sup 125}I: 4.4% for the idealized model and 4.6% for a clinical post-procedure implant. Average absolute dose differences between LSKS and FMCS are less significant for both seed models: 3 to 3.6% for the idealized models and 2.9 to 3.2% for the clinical plans. Dose differences between PSKS and FMCS are due to the absence of both seed anisotropy and interseed attenuation modeling in the PSKS approach. LSKS accounts for seed anisotropy but not for the interseed effect, leading to systematically overestimated dose values in comparison with the more accurate FMCS method. For both idealized and clinical implants the dose from scattered photons represent less than 1/3 of the total dose. For all studied cases, LSKS prostate DVHs overestimate D{sub 90} by 2 to 5% because of the missing interseed attenuation effect. PSKS and LSKS predictions of V{sub 150} and V{sub 200} are overestimated by up to 9% in

  12. Influence of Prostatic Edema on {sup 131}CS Permanent Prostate Seed Implants: A Dosimetric and Radiobiological Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kehwar, Than S.; Jones, Heather A.; Huq, M. Saiful; Smith, Ryan P.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To study the influence of prostatic edema on postimplant physical and radiobiological parameters using {sup 131}Cs permanent prostate seed implants. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients with early prostate cancer who underwent {sup 131}Cs permanent seed implantation were evaluated. Dose-volume histograms were generated for each set of prostate volumes obtained at preimplantation and postimplantion days 0, 14, and 28 to compute quality indices (QIs) and fractional doses at level x (FD{sub x}). A set of equations for QI, FD{sub x}, and biologically effective doses at dose level D{sub x} (BED{sub x}) were defined to account for edema changes with time after implant. Results: There were statistically significant differences found between QIs of pre- and postimplant plans at day 0, except for the overdose index (ODI). QIs correlated with postimplant time, and FD{sub x} was found to increase with increasing postimplant time. With the effect of edema, BED at different dose levels showed less improvement due to the short half-life of {sup 131}Cs, which delivers about 85% of the prescribed dose before the prostate reaches its original volume due to dissipation of edema. Conclusions: Results of the study show that QIs, FD{sub x}, and BEDs at the level of D{sub x} changed from preneedle plans to postimplant plans and have statistically significant differences (p < 0.05), except for the ODI (p = 0.106), which suggests that at the time of {sup 131}C seed implantation, the effect of edema must be accounted for when defining the seed positions, to avoid the possibility of poor dosimetric and radiobiologic results for {sup 131}Cs seed implants.

  13. SU-E-T-12: A Comparative Dosimetric Study of Pre and Post Prostate Iodine-125 Permanent Seed Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X; Rahimian, J; Goy, B; Cosmatos, H; Qian, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Post-implant dosimetry has become the gold standard for prostate implant evaluation. The goal of this research is to compare the dosimetry between pre-plan and post-plan in permanent prostate seed implant brachytherapy. Methods: A retrospective study of 91 patients treated with Iodine-125 prostate seed implant between year 2012∼2014 were performed. All plans were created using a VariSeed 8.0 planning system. Pre-plan ultrasound images were acquired using 0.5 cm slice thickness. Post-plan CT images acquired about 1–4 weeks after implant, fused with the preplan ultrasound images. The prostate and urethra contours were generated using the fusion of ultrasound and CT images. Iodine-125 seed source activities varied between 0.382 to 0.414 mCi per seed. The loading patterns varied slightly between patients depending on the prostate size. Statistical analysis of pre and post plans for prostate and urethra volumes, V100%, V150% and D90, and urethra D10 were performed and reported. Results: The pre and post implant average prostate size was 36.90cc vs. 38.58cc; V100% was 98.33% vs. 96.89%; V150% was 47.09% vs. 56.95%; D90 was 116.35Gy vs. 116.12Gy, urethra volume was 1.72cc vs. 1.85cc, urethra D10% was 122.0% vs. 135.35%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the pre and post-plan values for D90(p-value=0.43). However, there are significant differences between other parameters most likely due to post surgical edema; prostate size (p-value= 0.00015); V100% (p-value=3.7803E-07); V150% (p-value=1.49E-09); urethra volume (p-value= 2.77E-06); Urethra D10 (p-value=7.37E-11). Conclusion: The post-plan dosimetry using CT image set showed similar D90 dose coverage to the pre-plan using the ultrasound image dataset. The study showed that our prostate seed implants have consistently delivered adequate therapeutic dose to the prostate while sparing urethra. Future studies to correlate dose versus biochemical response using patients’ PSA

  14. Correlation Between Pre- and Postimplant Dosimetry for Iodine-125 Seed Implants for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar; Witteveen, Thelma Carey, Brendan; Henry, Ann; Bottomley, David; Smith, Jonathan; Franks, Kevin; Bownes, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: In order to evaluate implant quality for permanent prostate brachytherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer, American Brachytherapy Society and ESTRO guidelines recommend that postimplant dosimetry should be performed. To understand more about the relationship between pre- and postimplant dosimetry, a comparison was made of patients who received iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) brachytherapy between March 1995 and the end of 2004, using a preplan technique. Methods and Materials: CT postimplant dosimetry was available for 707 patients. Detailed dose volume analysis was performed using both preimplant ultrasound and postimplant CT data sets for a subgroup of 445 patients. The following parameters were compared: prostate volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose (Vp100), Vp150, and Vp200 and dose to 90% (D90) of the prostate. In addition, volume implanted (Vi) parameters were used to compare pre- and postimplant dosimetry. Vi parameters describe dose levels inside the patient, based on number of seeds, seed activity, and their spatial distribution relative to each other, without reference to the actual prostate volume or position. Results: The mean {+-} standard deviation values of preimplant (34.7 {+-} 8.9 cm{sup 3}) and postimplant (36.7 {+-} 9.4 cm{sup 3}) prostate volumes were similar. The mean ({+-}standard deviation) planned D90 was 183.4 ({+-}12.1) Gy while the D90 that was achieved was 145.5 ({+-}20.4) Gy. Over the study period, there was a steady increase of the average D90. Postimplant CT D90 and Vp100 values correlated significantly (R = 0.84; p < 0.001). The Vi and Vp parameters all showed a strong correlation. Conclusions: In this study, we showed that there is a strong correlation between transrectal ultrasound-based preimplant and CT-based postimplant dosimetry. The excellent correlation between prostate D90 and V100 values demonstrates they are both equally valid quality indices. Vi parameters are an additional measure that can be used

  15. Implanting iodine-125 seeds into rat dorsal root ganglion for neuropathic pain: neuronal microdamage without impacting hind limb motion.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Ling; Zhang, Tengda; Wang, Huixing; Zhang, Wenyi; Fan, Saijun; Huo, Xiaodong; Zheng, Baosen; Ma, Wenting

    2014-06-15

    The use of iodine-125 ((125)I) in cancer treatment has been shown to relieve patients' pain. Considering dorsal root ganglia are critical for neural transmission between the peripheral and central nervous systems, we assumed that (125)I could be implanted into rat dorsal root ganglia to provide relief for neuropathic pain. (125)I seeds with different radioactivity (0, 14.8, 29.6 MBq) were implanted separately through L4-5 and L5-6 intervertebral foramen into the vicinity of the L5 dorsal root ganglion. von Frey hair results demonstrated the mechanical pain threshold was elevated after implanting (125)I seeds from the high radioactivity group. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that nuclear membrane shrinkage, nucleolar margination, widespread mitochondrial swelling, partial vacuolization, lysosome increase, and partial endoplasmic reticulum dilation were visible at 1,440 hours in the low radioactivity group and at 336 hours in the high radioactivity group. Abundant nuclear membrane shrinkage, partial fuzzy nuclear membrane and endoplasmic reticulum necrosis were observed at 1,440 hours in the high radioactivity group. No significant difference in combined behavioral scores was detected between preoperation and postoperation in the low and high radioactivity groups. These results suggested that the mechanical pain threshold was elevated after implanting (125)I seeds without influencing motor functions of the hind limb, although cell injury was present.

  16. Dosimetry of a thyroid uptake detected in seed migration survey following a patient's iodine-125 prostate implant and in vitro measurements of intentional seed leakages

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qinsheng; Russell, John L. Jr.; Macklis, Roger R.; Weinhous, Martin S.; Blair, Henry F.

    2006-07-15

    As a quality control procedure, a post-implant seed migration survey has been accomplished on 340 prostate cancer patients since November 2001. Pulmonary seed embolization and intracardiac seed embolization have been detected. A case of thyroid uptake due to leaking iodine-125 (I-125) sources was also seized. In order to determine the dose to the thyroid, a dosimetry method was developed to link in vivo measurements and the cumulated dose to the thyroid. The calculated source leakage half-life in the case was approximately 15 days based on the measurements and the estimated cumulated dose to thyroid was 204 cGy. It is concluded that one seed was leaking. In order to verify the in vivo measurements, intentional in vitro seed leakage tests were performed. A seed was cut open and placed in a sealed glass container filled with a given volume of saline. The I-125 concentration in the saline was subsequently measured over a period of six months. Consistent in vivo and in vitro results were obtained. Recent incidents of seed leaks reported from other centers have drawn practitioners' attention to this problem. In order to make the measurements more useful, the seed leakage tests were expanded to include I-125 seeds from six other vendors. The results show that the leakage half-lives of those seeds varied from nine days to a half-year. Two seed models demonstrated least leakage. Since the measurements lasted for six months, the escape of iodine resulted from oxidation of iodide in the saline was a concern for the measurement accuracy. As a reference, another set of leakage tests were performed by adding sodium thiosulfate salt (Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O) to the saline. Sodium thiosulfate is a reducing agent that prevents the conversion of iodide to iodate so as to minimize I-125 evaporation. As a result, significantly shortened leakage half-lives were observed in this group. Seed agitation was also performed and no significant deviations of the

  17. Poster — Thur Eve — 77: Implanted Brachythearpy Seed Movement due to Transrectal Ultrasound Probe-Induced Prostate Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D; Usmani, N; Sloboda, R; Meyer, T; Husain, S; Angyalfi, S; Kay, I

    2014-08-15

    The study investigated the movement of implanted brachytherapy seeds upon transrectal US probe removal, providing insight into the underlying prostate deformation and an estimate of the impact on prostate dosimetry. Implanted seed distributions, one obtained with the prostate under probe compression and another with the probe removed, were reconstructed using C-arm fluoroscopy imaging. The prostate, delineated on ultrasound images, was registered to the fluoroscopy images using seeds and needle tracks identified on ultrasound. A deformation tensor and shearing model was developed to correlate probe-induced seed movement with position. Changes in prostate TG-43 dosimetry were calculated. The model was used to infer the underlying prostate deformation and to estimate the location of the prostate surface in the absence of probe compression. Seed movement patterns upon probe removal reflected elastic decompression, lateral shearing, and rectal bending. Elastic decompression was characterized by expansion in the anterior-posterior direction and contraction in the superior-inferior and lateral directions. Lateral shearing resulted in large anterior movement for extra-prostatic seeds in the lateral peripheral region. Whole prostate D90 increased up to 8 Gy, mainly due to the small but systematic seed movement associated with elastic decompression. For selected patients, lateral shearing movement increased prostate D90 by 4 Gy, due to increased dose coverage in the anterior-lateral region at the expense of the posterior-lateral region. The effect of shearing movement on whole prostate D90 was small compared to elastic decompression due to the subset of peripheral seeds involved, but is expected to have greater consequences for local dose coverage.

  18. Trans-bronchoscopy with implantation of (125)I radioactive seeds in patients with pulmonary atelectasis induced by lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingjian; Pu, Deli; Zhang, Weidong; Liao, Jiangrong; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Guang; Liu, Zhenyin; Singh, Sristi; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Fujun

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the role of low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy using trans-bronchoscope (125)I radioactive seeds implantation in patients with pulmonary atelectasis induced by lung cancer, in terms of feasibility, safety, quality of life (QOL), and survival time. Between April 2008 and June 2011, 15 patients from two medical institutions that had obstructive pulmonary atelectasis caused by inoperable lung cancer were assigned to receive (125)I implantation endoluminal brachytherapy by bronchoscopy. Subsequent to the implantation of (125)I seeds, the outcomes were measured in terms of procedure success rate, reopening of atelectasis, complications associated with the procedure, Karnofsky performance status (KPS) scores and survival time. The surgical procedure was successfully performed in all 15 patients. No procedure-associated mortality occurred and the complications were mild and considered acceptable. Irritable cough and temporary increase of hemoptysis occurred in 11 (73.3%) and 10 (66.7%) patients respectively, and were the most common complications. The pulmonary atelectasis reopening rate subsequent to the procedure was 86.7, 76.9, 80.0, 75.0 and 50.0% at 2, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months, respectively. The KPS score significantly improved following the implantation of (125)I seeds and the duration of improvement ranged between 3 and 27 months. The median and mean survival times were 15.6 and 16 months, respectively. Actuarial survival rates at 6, 12 and 24 months after the procedure were 86.7, 66.7 and 13.3%, respectively. In patients with advanced lung cancer and those presenting with obstructive pulmonary atelectasis, treatment with intraluminal implantation of (125)I seeds is a safe and effective therapy option with easy accessibility.

  19. Trans-bronchoscopy with implantation of 125I radioactive seeds in patients with pulmonary atelectasis induced by lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    LU, MINGJIAN; PU, DELI; ZHANG, WEIDONG; LIAO, JIANGRONG; ZHANG, TAO; YANG, GUANG; LIU, ZHENYIN; SINGH, SRISTI; GAO, FEI; ZHANG, FUJUN

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the role of low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy using trans-bronchoscope 125I radioactive seeds implantation in patients with pulmonary atelectasis induced by lung cancer, in terms of feasibility, safety, quality of life (QOL), and survival time. Between April 2008 and June 2011, 15 patients from two medical institutions that had obstructive pulmonary atelectasis caused by inoperable lung cancer were assigned to receive 125I implantation endoluminal brachytherapy by bronchoscopy. Subsequent to the implantation of 125I seeds, the outcomes were measured in terms of procedure success rate, reopening of atelectasis, complications associated with the procedure, Karnofsky performance status (KPS) scores and survival time. The surgical procedure was successfully performed in all 15 patients. No procedure-associated mortality occurred and the complications were mild and considered acceptable. Irritable cough and temporary increase of hemoptysis occurred in 11 (73.3%) and 10 (66.7%) patients respectively, and were the most common complications. The pulmonary atelectasis reopening rate subsequent to the procedure was 86.7, 76.9, 80.0, 75.0 and 50.0% at 2, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months, respectively. The KPS score significantly improved following the implantation of 125I seeds and the duration of improvement ranged between 3 and 27 months. The median and mean survival times were 15.6 and 16 months, respectively. Actuarial survival rates at 6, 12 and 24 months after the procedure were 86.7, 66.7 and 13.3%, respectively. In patients with advanced lung cancer and those presenting with obstructive pulmonary atelectasis, treatment with intraluminal implantation of 125I seeds is a safe and effective therapy option with easy accessibility. PMID:26171002

  20. [Relief effect of CT-guided (125)I seed implantation on patients with spinal and paraspinal osteolytic metastatic tumors].

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Li, F S; Wang, L; Du, Z G; Xu, S N

    2017-03-23

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of computed tomography (CT)-guided (125)I seed implantation in the treatment of patients with spinal and/or paraspinal osteolytic metastatic tumors. Methods: The radiation dose distribution was planned for 27 patients with 35 spinal and paraspinal osteolytic metastatic tumors by a treatment planning system (TPS). CT-guided (125)I seed implantation was carried out in the patients, and the quality of treatment was evaluated based on CT-imaging follow-up. Results: All the 27 patients underwent CT-guided (125)I seed implantation successfully. 12 to 50 (125)I seeds were injected into each spinal or paraspinal metastatic tumor, 39.15 on average, and the specific radioactive activity of the particles ranged from 0.60 to 0.80 mCi, 0.73 mCi on average. The minimal percentage of the dose received by 90% of the target volume (D(90)) of the spinal and paraspinal metastatic tumors ranged from 90 to 165 Gy, 115.03 Gy on average. Among the 27 patients, 21 (77.8%) had partial remission (PR) and 6(22.2%)had stable disease (SD). The Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) scores before implantation and at postoperative 3 and 6 months were 7.81±0.74, 2.04±1.10 and 1.81±0.79, respectively, (P<0.05). The assessment of pain intensity before (125)I seed implantation and at 3 postoperative months showed obvious improvements in the patients evaluated according to the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale: 12 (44.4%) patients with ASIA grade C were changed to grade D, 3 (11.1%) from grade C to grade E, 8 (29.6%) from grade D to grade E, 3 (11.1%) with a stable grade D, and 1 (3.7%)with a stablegrade C. The Karnovsky performance scale (KPS) scores before treatment and at 3 months and 6 months postoperatively were 66.30±6.88, 85.93±9.31 and 87.91±8.56, respectively (P<0.05). Their local control rate (LCR) at 3 months, 6 months and 1 year postoperatively were 100%, 92.6% and 51.9%, respectively, and the overall survival rates(OSR) were

  1. Postimplantation Analysis Enables Improvement of Dose-Volume Histograms and Reduction of Toxicity for Permanent Seed Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wust, Peter Postrach, Johanna; Kahmann, Frank; Henkel, Thomas; Graf, Reinhold; Cho, Chie Hee; Budach, Volker; Boehmer, Dirk

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate how postimplantation analysis is useful for improving permanent seed implantation and reducing toxicity. Patients and Methods: We evaluated 197 questionnaires completed by patients after permanent seed implantation (monotherapy between 1999 and 2003). For 70% of these patients, a computed tomography was available to perform postimplantation analysis. The index doses and volumes of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were determined and categorized with respect to the date of implantation. Differences in symptom scores relative to pretherapeutic status were analyzed with regard to follow-up times and DVH descriptors. Acute and subacute toxicities in a control group of 117 patients from an earlier study (June 1999 to September 2001) by Wust et al. (2004) were compared with a matched subgroup from this study equaling 110 patients treated between October 2001 and August 2003. Results: Improved performance, identifying a characteristic time dependency of DVH parameters (after implantation) and toxicity scores, was demonstrated. Although coverage (volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose of the prostate) increased slightly, high-dose regions decreased with the growing experience of the users. Improvement in the DVH and a reduction of toxicities were found in the patient group implanted in the later period. A decline in symptoms with follow-up time counteracts this gain of experience and must be considered. Urinary and sexual discomfort was enhanced by dose heterogeneities (e.g., dose covering 10% of the prostate volume, volume covered by 200% of prescription dose). In contrast, rectal toxicities correlated with exposed rectal volumes, especially the rectal volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose. Conclusion: The typical side effects occurring after permanent seed implantation can be reduced by improving the dose distributions. An improvement in dose distributions and a reduction of toxicities were identified with elapsed time between

  2. Matrix-encapsulation cell-seeding technique to prevent cell detachment during arthroscopic implantation of matrix-induced autologous chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Masri, Maria; Lombardero, Germán; Velasquillo, Cristina; Martínez, Valentín; Neri, Rosario; Villegas, Hilda; Ibarra, Clemente

    2007-08-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of obtaining a large number of viable cells within a construct that will not be detached by high fluid flow during arthroscopic implantation. Arthroscopic osteochondral biopsy specimens were obtained from the medial femoral trochlea of 8 horses. Chondrocytes were isolated by collagenase digestion and expanded in M199 media until confluency. After 10 to 12 days, cultures were trypsinized and cells resuspended in culture media. Then, 5 x 10(6) cells x mL(-1) were seeded on a culture dish and the same amount in a flask. Once extracellular matrix was formed, a polyglycolic/polylactic acid disk was placed in the culture dish. Cells obtained from the culture flasks (2 x 10(7) cells) were seeded onto the polymer and encapsulated by lifting the monolayer of cells and matrix from the bottom of the dish with surgical forceps. On days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9, viability was evaluated by calcein fluorescence. Fiber cell attachment was evaluated before implantation by environmental scanning electron microscopy. Six horses were implanted with naive cell-polymer constructs, and two horses were implanted with adenoviral vector with green fluorescent protein (AdGFP)-transduced cells. Biopsy specimens of repair tissue were evaluated at 8 weeks in 6 horses and at 4 weeks in the 2 horses implanted with AdGFP-transduced cells by second-look arthroscopy and biopsy, histochemistry, and confocal laser scanning microscopy via MitoTracker Red 580 (Invitrogen [Molecular Probes], Gibco, Carlsbad, CA) to assess cell viability. Viability and attachment of cells to polymer were confirmed by calcein fluorescence microscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy. Consistency of the construct was ideal for implantation between 7 and 9 days. Repair tissue with AdGFP chondrocytes after 4 weeks showed fluorescent cells also positive to MitoTracker probe by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Repair tissue after 8 weeks showed very cellular new

  3. Computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial permanent implantation of (125)I seeds for refractory chest wall metastasis or recurrence.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ping; Liu, Chen; Wang, Junjie; Yang, Ruijie; Jiang, Yuliang; Tian, Suqing

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of 125I seeds implantation for refractory chest wall (CW) metastasis or recurrence under CT guidance. In addition we assessed initial data obtained on the therapeutic response for refractory CW metastasis or recurrence. Twenty consecutive patients underwent permanent implantation of 125I seeds (from Jul. 2004 to Jan. 2011) under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Postoperative dosimetry was routinely performed for all patients. The actuarial D90 of the implanted 125I seeds ranged from 100 Gy to 160 Gy (median: 130 Gy). The activity of 125I seeds ranged from 0.5 mCi to 0.78 mCi (median: 0.71 mCi). The total number of seeds implanted ranged from 8 to 269 (median: 53). The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 54 months (median: 11.5 months). The survival and local control probabilities were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Among all the 20 patients, 3 patients had complete remission CR (15%), 12 patients had partial remission PR (60%), 5 patients had stable disease SD. The 1-, 2-, 3- and 4-year tumor control rates were all 88.7% respectively. The 1- and 2-, 3-, 4-year cancer specific survival rates were 56.5% and 47.1%, 47.1%, 47.1% respectively. The 1- and 2-, 3-, 4-year overall survival rates were 53.3% and 35.6%, 35.6%, 35.6% respectively, with a median survival of 15 months (95% CI, 7.0-22.9). Mild brachial plexus injury was seen in one patient; grade 1 or 2 skin reactions were seen in 6 patients (30%) who had received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) before. No grade 3 and 4 skin side effects were found. Rib fracture, ulceration, pneumothorax or hemopneumothorax were not seen. Interstitial permanent implantation of 125I seeds under CT guidance is feasible, efficacious and safe for refractory CW metastasis or recurrence. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Real-time intraoperative computed tomography assessment of quality of permanent interstitial seed implantation for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zelefsky, Michael J; Worman, Mick; Cohen, Gilad N; Pei, Xin; Kollmeier, Marisa; Yamada, Josh; Cox, Brett; Zhang, Zhigang; Bieniek, Eva; Dauer, Lawrence; Zaider, Marco

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate the use of real-time kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) during prostate brachytherapy for intraoperative dosimetric assessment and correcting deficient dose regions. A total of 20 patients were evaluated intraoperatively with a mobile CBCT unit immediately after implantation while still anesthetized. The source detector system was enclosed in a circular CT-like geometry with a bore that accommodates patients in the lithotomy position. After seed deposition, the CBCT scans were obtained. The dosimetry was evaluated and compared with the standard postimplantation CT-based assessment. In 8 patients, the deposited seeds were localized in the intraoperative CBCT frame of reference and registered to the intraoperative transrectal ultrasound images. With this information, a second intraoperative plan was generated to ascertain whether additional seeds were needed to achieve the planned prescription dose. The final dosimetry was compared with the postimplantation scan assessment. The mean differences between the dosimetric parameters from the intraoperative CBCT and postimplant CT scans were < .5% for percentage of volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose, minimal dose received by 90% of the prostate, and percentage of volume receiving 150% of the prescription dose. The minimal dose received by 5% (maximal dose) of the urethra differed by 8% on average and for the rectum an average difference of approximately 18% was observed. After fusion of the implanted seed coordinates from the intraoperative CBCT scans to the intraoperative transrectal ultrasound images, the dosimetric outcomes were not significantly different from the postimplantation CT dosimetric results. Intraoperative CT-based dosimetric evaluation of prostate permanent seed implantation before anesthesia reversal is feasible and might avert misadministration of dose delivery. The dosimetric measurements using the intraoperative CBCT scans were dependable and correlated well with

  5. Analysis of postoperative PSA changes after ultrasound-guided permanent [125I] seed implantation for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bian, X L; Wang, C Z; Wang, Y; Li, Y N; Zhang, L Z; Liu, L

    2015-06-29

    The aim of this study was to explore postoperative changes in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and risk factors that influence the clinical effects of ultrasound-guided permanent [(125)I] seed implantation in the treatment of prostate cancer. From July 2009 to December 2012, 41 prostate cancer patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided [(125)I] seed implantation were followed up for 3-56 months. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to their results: group A, benign rebound group, 31 cases; and group B, biochemical relapse group, 10 cases. A blood analysis of group A showed that the initial PSA rise after a nadir occurred postoperatively at 16.8 ± 1.2 months, and in 65.8% (27/41) patients the rise occurred during 15-27 weeks. For group B, the initial PSA rise after a nadir occurred postoperatively at 30.2 ± 2.1 months, and the difference in the time parameter of the initial PSA rise after the nadir was statistically significant between the 2 groups (P < 0.01). During treatment, age was shown to be a risk factor for group A (P = 0.0027, P < 0.01). Postoperative changes in PSA levels after ultrasound-guided permanent [(125)I] seed implantation contributed to the assessment of the clinical treatment effects.

  6. Automated matching of corresponding seed images of three simulator radiographs to allow 3D triangulation of implanted seeds.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, M D; Kassaee, A

    1997-02-01

    To match corresponding seed images in different radiographs so that the 3D seed locations can be triangulated automatically and without ambiguity requires (at least) three radiographs taken from different perspectives, and an algorithm that finds the proper permutations of the seed-image indices. Matching corresponding images in only two radiographs introduces inherent ambiguities which can be resolved only with the use of non-positional information obtained with intensive human effort. Matching images in three or more radiographs is an 'NP (Non-determinant in Polynomial time)-complete' problem. Although the matching problem is fundamental, current methods for three-radiograph seed-image matching use 'local' (seed-by-seed) methods that may lead to incorrect matchings. We describe a permutation-sampling method which not only gives good 'global' (full permutation) matches for the NP-complete three-radiograph seed-matching problem, but also determines the reliability of the radiographic data themselves, namely, whether the patient moved in the interval between radiographic perspectives.

  7. [Application of (125)I seeds combined with biliary stent implantation in the treatment of malignant obstructive jaundice].

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Liu, S; Zheng, Y B; Song, X P; Jiang, W J; Sun, B L; Wang, L G

    2016-03-23

    To study the feasibility and therapeutic effect of the application of (125)I seeds combined with biliary stent implantation on the treatment of malignant obstructive jaundice. Fifty patients with malignant obstructive jaundice treated from September 2010 to February 2013 in Yantai Yuhuangding Hospital were included in this study. Among them, 24 patients received biliary stent implantation combined with (125)I seeds intraluminal brachytherapy as experimental group, and 26 were treated by biliary stent implantation as control group.The total bilirubin, direct bilirubin and tumor markers (CA-199, CA-242, CEA) before and after surgery, the biliary stent patency status was assessed, and the survival time was evaluated. The 24 patients in experimental group were implanted with 30 (125)I seeds successfully in a total of 450 seeds. Jaundice was improved greatly in both groups. The CA-199 and CA-242 after treatment in the experimental group were significantly decreased than that before treatment (P=0.003 and P=0.004). CEA was also decreased, but showed no statistical significance (P>0.05). There were no significant improvement comparing the CA-199, CA-242 and CEA before and 2 months after surgery in the control group (P>0.05). The rate of biliary stent patency was 83.3% (20/24) in the experimental group and 57.7% (15/26) in the control group (P=0.048). The mean biliary stent patency time in the experimental group was 9.84 months (range 1-15.5 months). The mean biliary stent patency time in the control group was 5.57 months (range 0.8-9 months). There was a significant difference between the two groups (P=0.018). The median survival time was 10.2 months in the experimental group and 5.4 months in the control group (P<0.05). (125)I seeds combined with biliary stent implantation can inhibit the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells and the growth of tumor effectively, and can prolong the biliary stent patency time and the survival time obviously for patients with

  8. CT-guided 125I seed implantation for inoperable retroperitoneal sarcoma: A technique for delivery of local tumor brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Biao; Guo, Wen-Hao; Lan, Ting; Yuan, Fang; Liu, Guan-Jian; Zan, Rui-Yu; You, Xin; Tan, Qiao-Yue; Liao, Zheng-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Radical surgery is currently the first treatment of choice for retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma (RSTS). However, the prognosis of RSTS remains poor due to ineffective local control and a high incidence of metastasis after surgical resection. Brachytherapy has been shown to safely provide local radiotherapy for numerous types of cancer when used alone or in combination with surgical resection, but has not been well characterized in the management of RSTS. The aim of this study was to evaluate CT-guided 125I seed implantation for local control and pain relief in the treatment of inoperable RSTS. A total of 23 patients with RSTS were treated with 125I implantation. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Other endpoints were evaluated via computed tomography scan or phone call/e-mail records. The occurrence of complications was assessed preoperatively (baseline) and during postoperatively follow-up or until patient succumbed. All patients were successfully treated with 125I implantation. A mean number of 70.87 radioactive seeds were applied in each patient. During the follow-up, two patients were unaccounted for, local recurrence occurred in three patients, five succumbed and complications were observed in sixteen. The patient's VAS score changed from 7.4 preoperatively to 7.6, 2.3, 2.0, 1.2, 1.5, 1.4 and 2.5 at 24 h, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after the procedure, respectively. Good local control and significant pain relief after 125I seed implantation was observed in patients with inoperable RSTS. Thus, the present results suggest that this method could be an effective treatment option for patients with inoperable RSTS. PMID:28101168

  9. Clinical Study on Using (125)I Seeds Articles Combined with Biliary Stent Implantation in the Treatment of Malignant Obstructive Jaundice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Liu, Sheng; Zheng, Yan-Bo; Song, Xue-Peng; Sun, Bo-Lin; Jiang, Wen-Jin; Wang, Li-Gang

    2017-08-01

    Aim: To study the feasibility and curative effect of(125)I seeds articles combined with biliary stent implantation in the treatment of malignant obstructive jaundice. Patients and Methods: Fifty patients with malignant obstructive jaundice were included. Twenty-four were treated by biliary stent implantation combined with intraluminal brachytherapy by (125)I seeds articles as the experimental group, while the remaining 26 were treated by biliary stent implantation only as the control group. The goal of this study was to evaluate total bilirubin, direct bilirubin and tumor markers (cancer antigen (CA)-199, CA-242 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)), as well as biliary stent patency status and survival time before and after surgery. Results: Jaundice improved greatly in both groups. The decreases of CA-199 and CA-242 had statistical significance (p=0.003 and p=0.004) in the experimental group. The ratio of biliary stent patency was 83.3% (20/24) in the experimental group and 57.7% (15/26) in the control group (p=0.048). The biliary stent patency time in the experimental group was 1~15.5 (mean=9.84) months. The biliary stent patency time in the control group was 0.8~9 (mean=5.57) months, which was statistically significant (p=0.018). The median survival time was 10.2 months in the experimental group, while 5.4 months in control group (p<0.05). Conclusion:(125)I seeds articles combined with biliary stent implantation significantly prolongs biliary stent patency time and survival time for patients with malignant obstructive jaundice possibly by inhibiting the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells and the growth of tumor. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  10. Sequential Comparison of Seed Loss and Prostate Dosimetry of Stranded Seeds With Loose Seeds in {sup 125}I Permanent Implant for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Saibishkumar, Elantholi P.; Borg, Jette; Yeung, Ivan; Cummins-Holder, Cheryl; Landon, Angela; Crook, Juanita

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To compare stranded seeds (SSs) with loose seeds (LSs) in terms of prostate edema, dosimetry, and seed loss after {sup 125}I brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts of 20 men participated in an institutional review board-approved protocols to study postimplant prostate edema and its effect on dosimetry. The LS cohort underwent brachytherapy between September 2002 and July 2003 and the SS cohort between April 2006 and January 2007. Both cohorts were evaluated sequentially using computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging fusion-based dosimetry on Days 0, 7, and 30. No hormonal therapy or supplemental beam radiotherapy was used. Results: Prostate edema was less in the SS cohort at all points (p = NS). On Day 0, all the prostate dosimetric factors were greater in the LS group than in the SS group (p = 0.003). However, by Days 7 and 30, the dosimetry was similar between the two cohorts. No seeds migrated to the lung in the SS cohort compared with a total of five seeds in 4 patients in the LS cohort. However, the overall seed loss was greater in the SS cohort (24 seeds in 6 patients; 1.1% of total vs. 0.6% for LSs), with most seeds lost through urine (22 seeds in 5 patients). Conclusion: Despite elimination of venous seed migration, greater seed loss was observed with SSs compared with LSs, with the primary site of loss being the urinary tract. Modification of the technique might be necessary to minimize this. Prostate dosimetry on Days 7 and 30 was similar between the SS and LS cohorts.

  11. SU-E-T-301: Dosimetric Comparison Between Adaptive and Rectilinear Template-Based Prostate Seed Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Sugar, E Neubauer; Buzurovic, I; O’Farrell, D; Hansen, J; Devlin, P; Cormack, R; Nguyen, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetry of a standard rectilinear and an adaptive technique used in I125 prostate seed implants. Methods: To achieve favorable dosimetry in prostate implants we used adaptive needle updates to match actual positions in real-time. The seed locations were optimized based on actual needle locations. The seeds were delivered automatically with a robotic device seedSelectron™ (Elekta Brachytherapy). In this study, we evaluated the former approach against the standard rectilinear technique in which the needles have a parallel distribution. The treatment plans for 10 patients were analyzed. For comparison, the actual treatment plans were revised so each needle was repositioned to its original parallel location through the template. The analysis was performed by comparing the target coverage and dose to the organs at risk. The comparison was done using the following planning goals: the target D90> 90%, V100% > 90%, V50% <70% and V200% <30%; the urethra V125% < 1cm3 and V150%= 0cm3; and the Rectum V100%<1cm3 and V69% < 8cm3. The prescription dose to the target was 145Gy. Results: The average target volume and number of seeds were 44.39cm3(SD=11.14) and 74(SD=12), respectively. The D90 for adaptive and rectilinear plans was 159.9Gy(SD=2.99) and 155.53Gy(SD=4.04) resulting in a 2.74% difference for the average target coverage. A similar difference (1.75%) was noticed in the target V100[%]. No significant difference was noticed in the dose to the urethra and rectum. All planning goals were met with both the adaptive and rectilinear approach for each plan. Conclusion: The study reveals enhanced coverage of the target when using the adaptive needle adjustments as compared to the rectilinear approach for the analyzed cases. However, the differences in dosimetry did not translate to meaningful clinical outcomes.

  12. Effect of pedicle fixation combined with 125I seed implantation for metastatic thoracolumbar tumors

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jiale; Bao, Zhaohua; Zou, Jun; Yang, Huilin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of pedicle fixation combined with 125I brachytherapy in treating metastatic thoracolumbar tumors. Patients and methods A retrospective analysis of the clinical data of seven metastatic thoracolumbar tumor patients who received pedicle fixation combined with radioactive 125I seed implantation brachytherapy in our department between January 2009 and December 2013 was performed. The visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and the Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score before the operation and 1, 6, and 12 months after the operation were observed and recorded. The changes in the scores at each time point were compared. Results All the patients underwent a successful operation, without any complications during their hospitalization. All the patients received postoperative follow-up, and the duration of follow-up was 15–50 months, with an average of 32.2 months. One pancreatic cancer patient died of liver failure and hypoproteinemia 28 months post surgery. The VAS scores of patients before the operation and 1, 6, and 12 months after the operation were 7.43±0.98, 2.71±0.49, 3.00±0.82, and 4.29±0.98, respectively; the KPS scores were 52.9±9.5, 84.3±5.3, 75.7±5.3, and 72.9±4.9, respectively. These results suggest that the VAS score at each time point was significantly decreased compared with that before the operation, while the KPS score was significantly increased compared with that before the operation. Both differences had statistical significance (P<0.05). Conclusion As a therapy for advanced malignant tumors with thoracolumbar metastasis, pedicle fixation combined with 125I brachytherapy can effectively relieve short-term pain and improve patient’s quality of life. PMID:27274307

  13. Poster - Thur Eve - 12: Dosimetric manifestation of harmonic mode imaging for seed implant brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, G; Angyalfi, S; Dunscombe, P; Khan, R

    2012-07-01

    To demonstrate the dosimetric effects of observer variability in defining the prostate and critical organs, using Tissue Harmonic (H) ultrasound imaging mode for permanent seed implant brachytherapy. Images were acquired using a B -K medical 8848 probe with Brightness (B) and H mode for ten prostate brachytherapy patients. The prostate, rectum and urethra were contoured independently by five observers. The clinically used treatment plans based on B mode imaging fulfilling the dosimetric criteria were applied on these contours. Dosimetric parameters (prostate: D90, V100 and V200; rectum: V100; urethra: V140, V150 and V160) were computed using SPOT PRO™ planning system. Interobserver variability in dosimetric parameters was tested using standard deviations as percentages of means. Two-factor analysis of variances showed significant (p<0.05) interobserver variability in all dosimetric parameters for both modes. Interobserver agreement in dosimetric parameters improves in H mode due to improved interobserver consistency in contouring these organs on H mode images compared to B mode. There is no significant difference observed (paired student t test, p>0.05) in the mean values of dosimetric parameters in H and B mode for prostate and critical organs. H mode due to its better image quality helped to improve the interobserver agreement in contouring the prostate and critical organs and hence better interobserver consistency in all dosimetric parameter. Because the difference in the mean value of dosimetric parameters between two imaging modes is not statistically significant, H mode does not appear to offer any clinical advantages in terms of improving the dosimetric outcome. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. Defining the rectal dose constraint for permanent radioactive seed implantation of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Albert, Michele; Song, Jun S; Schultz, Delray; Cormack, Robert A; Tempany, Clare M; Haker, Steve; Devlin, Phillip M; Beard, Clair; Hurwitz, Mark D; Suh, Wonsuk W; Jolesz, Ferenc; D'Amico, Anthony V

    2008-01-01

    This study was performed to define the rectal dose constraint that would predict late rectal bleeding requiring argon plasma coagulation (APC) following prostate brachy mono-therapy. Between February 1999 and April 2002, 91 patients with low risk prostate cancer underwent permanent I(125) radioactive seed implantation without the use of supplemental external beam radiation or androgen suppression therapy. Patients received both CT and MRI scans 6 weeks postimplant for evaluation of dosimetry. The CT and MRI scans were fused. Rectal volumes were contoured on the T2 weighted MR images. For those patients requiring APC, the date on which a patient reported rectal bleeding was recorded. A Cox regression analysis was performed to assess whether there was a significant association between the rectal volume (continuous) exceeding 100 Gy time rectal bleeding. Comparisons of estimates of rectal bleeding requiring APC were made using a 2-sided log rank test. There was a significant association (hazard ratio = 5.6 [95% confidence interval: 1.3, 23.8]; P = 0.002) between the rectal volume exceeding 100 Gy and rectal bleeding requiring APC. After a median follow-up of 4.25 (1-6) years, no patient with less than a median value of 8 cc of rectum exceeding 100 Gy required APC, whereas 20% (P = 0.004) were estimated to require APC within 3 years following treatment. Keeping the rectal volume receiving more than 100 Gy below 8 cc will minimize the risk of rectal bleeding requiring APC following I(125) permanent prostate brachy mono-therapy.

  15. Influence of breast composition and interseed attenuation in dose calculations for post-implant assessment of permanent breast 103Pd seed implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsharpour, Hossein; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Carrier, Jean-François; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2010-08-01

    The impact of tissue heterogeneity and interseed attenuation is studied in post-implant evaluation of five clinical permanent breast 103Pd seed implants using the Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation method. Dose metrics for the target (PTV) as well as an organ at risk (skin) are used to visualize the differences between a TG43-like MC method and more accurate MC methods capable of considering the breast tissue heterogeneity as well as the interseed attenuation. PTV dose is reduced when using a breast tissue model instead of water in MC calculations while the dose to the skin is increased. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of varying the glandular/adipose proportion of the breast tissue on dose distributions. The dose to the PTV (skin) decreases (increases) with the increasing adipose proportion inside the breast. In a complete geometry and compared to a TG43-like situation, the average PTV D90 reduction varies from 3.9% in a glandular breast to 35.5% when the breast consists entirely of adipose. The skin D10 increases by 28.2% in an entirely adipose breast. The results of this work show the importance of an accurate and patient-dependent breast tissue model to be used in the dosimetry for this kind of low energy implant.

  16. Comparison of permanent 125I seeds implants with two different techniques in 500 cases of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ricós, Jose Vicente; Tortajada, Maria Isabel; Santos, Miguel Angel; Casanova, Juan; Clemente, Jose; Samper, Josefa; Santamaría, Paula; Arribas, Leoncio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To perform a comparative study of 500 consecutive 125I seeds implants for intracapsular prostate carcinoma with two techniques differing in terms of both strand implantation and planning. Material and methods From 2002 to 2007 we performed 250 implants with fixed stranded seeds (RapidStrand™) and a preplanning system and from 2007 to 2010, 250 with real-time and ProLink™ system. Mean age was 68 and 66, respectively, median PSA (prostate-specific antigen) 7.3 and 7.2, stage T1-T2a in 98% and 94%, and Gleason ≤ 6 in 96% and 86%. Low risk cases were 81% and 71%. The prescribed dose was 145 Gy to the prostate volume, or 108 Gy plus EBRT 46 Gy in some intermediate risk cases. Hormonal treatment was given to 42% and 28%. Results Median follow-up was 48 and 47 months, respectively, 14 patients in the first group and 7 patients in the second developed biochemical failure (BF). Actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) at 5 years increased from 90.2% to 97.2% (low risk from 91.3% to 97.2%, intermediate risk from 84.2% to 97.1%). Biochemical failure was independent of hormone treatment. Rectal complications were G1-2 in 1.2% and 5.2%, respectively. A urinary catheter was necessary in 6.9% and 9.6%, and urethral resection in 1.9% and 4.4%. Genitourinary toxicity was G1-2 in 4.6% and 12%, G3-4 in 1.9% and 4.8%. An assessment of mean D90 in a sample of patients showed that the dosimetry in postoperative planning based on CT improved from a mean D90 of 143 Gy to 157 Gy. Conclusions The outcome of patients with low risk prostate carcinoma treated with 125I seed is very good with low complications rate. The real-time approach in our hands achieved a more precise seed implantation, better dosimetry, and a statistically non-significant better biochemical control. We have made this our standard technique. PMID:26622228

  17. Antiovulatory and anti-implantation potential of the methanolic extract of seeds of Abrus precatorius in the rat.

    PubMed

    Okoko, Ini-Ibehe E; Osinubi, Abraham A A; Olabiyi, Olaleye O; Kusemiju, Taiwo O; Noronha, Cressie C; Okanlawon, Abayomi O

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of the methanolic extract of seeds of Abrus precatorius on the estrous cycle, ovulation, and implantation of fetuses in Sprague-Dawley rats. Cyclic female rats were randomly classified into 4 groups (A through D). Treated rats in group A had daily vaginal smears for a total of 64 consecutive days while being fed A precatorius extract for the first 32 of those days. Treated rats in group B received a single oral dose of the extract on the day of proestrus and were killed the following morning so that shed ova could be counted. Treated rats in group C received A precatorius extract from postcoital day 1 to 10 and were killed on day 12 to assess for anti-implantation effect, whereas the treated dams in group D received the extract from the 6th to the 19th day of gestation. The control animals in all 4 groups received an equal volume of distilled water. The methanolic extract of A precatorius caused a reversible disruption in the estrous cycle of the regularly cyclic rats and completely blocked ovulation in all the treated rats. Despite successful mating of the female rats with male rats of proven fertility, uterine dissection on postcoital day 12 revealed neither implantation nor resorption sites in all the animals treated with A precatorius. The extract of A precatorius caused a decrease in mean body weight, mean crown-rump length, and mean tail length of fetuses of the treated rats. There is a need to continue the search for new antifertility agents that have minimal side effects and widespread acceptability in addition to being reversible, affordable, and accessible. In this study, methanolic extract of A precatorius seeds caused reversible alterations in the estrous cycle pattern and completely blocked ovulation in Sprague-Dawley rats. In addition, the extract demonstrated anti-implantation activity and the potential to affect gross fetal morphometry in rats.

  18. A Radiation Badge Survey for Family Members Living With Patients Treated With a {sup 103}Pd Permanent Breast Seed Implant

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Brian M. Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Rakovitch, Eileen; Sankreacha, Raxa; O'Brien, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Sixty-seven patients with early-stage breast cancer were treated in a Phase I/II clinical trial using a {sup 103}Pd permanent breast seed implant as adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. We report the dose received by family members living with these patients and compare measured doses with theoretical worst-case scenario estimates. Methods and Materials: Exposure-rate measurements were taken at 1 m from the patient by using a calibrated low-energy survey meter. Landauer (Landauer Inc., Glenwood, IL) Luxel badges, with sensitivity of 0.01 mSv, were given to family members to wear after the implantation. Badge readings for 33 spouses and 28 other family members were used to estimate effective doses, and these were compared with theory. Results: Average preimplantation planning target volume from computed tomography was 50.3 ml (range, 18.0-96.7 ml), and average preimplantation distance between the skin and the most anterior planning target volume margin was 0.57 cm. The average maximum exposure rate was measured to be 2.4 {+-} 1.1 mR/h, and average measured dose to a spouse was 0.99 {+-} 1.0 mSv. The calculated exposure rates and spousal doses using preimplantation computed tomography scan data overestimated those measured. Average measured family member dose (excluding spouses) was 0.20 {+-} 0.58 mSv. Conclusions: Based on measured and calculated spousal doses, a permanent breast seed implant using {sup 103}Pd is safe for the public. However, it is recommended that extra precautions in the way of a breast patch be used when patients with an implant will be in the vicinity of toddlers or pregnant women.

  19. [Dosimetry verification of radioactive seed implantation with 3D printing template and CT guidance for paravertebral/retroperitoneal malignant tumor].

    PubMed

    Ji, Z; Jiang, Y L; Guo, F X; Peng, R; Sun, H T; Fan, J H; Wang, J J

    2017-04-04

    Objective: To compare the dose distributions of postoperative plans with preoperative plans for seeds implantations of paravertebral/retroperitoneal tumors assisted by 3D printing guide template and CT guidance, explore the effects of the technology for seeds implantations in dosimetry level and provide data support for the optimization and standardization in seeds implantation. Methods: Between December 2015 and July 2016, a total of 10 patients with paravertebral/retroperitoneal tumors (12 lesions) received 3D printing template assist radioactive seeds implantations in department of radiation oncology of Peking University Third Hospital, and included in the study. The diseases included cervical cancer, kidney cancer, abdominal stromal tumor, leiomyosarcoma of kidney, esophageal cancer and carcinoma of ureter. The prescribed doses was 110-150 Gy. All patients received preoperative planning design, individual template design and production, and the dose distribution of postoperative plan was compared with preoperative plan. Dose parameters including D(90), MPD, V(100), V(150,)conformal index(CI), EI of target volume and D(2cc) of organs at risk (spinal cord, aorta, kidney). Statistical software was SPSS 19.0 and statistical method was non-parameters Wilcoxon symbols test. Results: A total of 10 3D printing templates were designed and produced which were including 12 treatment areas.The mean D(90) of postoperative target area (GTV) was 131.1 (97.8-167.4 Gy) Gy. The actual seeds number of post operation increased by 3 to 12 in 5 cases (42.0%). The needle was well distributed. For postoperative plans, the mean D(90,)MPD, V(100,)V(150) was 131.1 Gy, 69.3 Gy, 90.2% and 65.2%, respectively, and which was 140.2 Gy, 65.6 Gy, 91.7% and 26.8%, respectively, in preoperative plans. This meant that the actual dose of target volume was slightly lower than preplanned dose, and the high dose area of target volume was larger than preplanned range, but there was no statistical

  20. Moving Toward Focal Therapy in Prostate Cancer: Dual-Isotope Permanent Seed Implants as a Possible Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Todor, Dorin A.; Barani, Igor J.; Lin, Peck-Sun; Anscher, Mitchell S.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the ability of single- and dual-isotope prostate seed implants to escalate biologically effective dose (BED) to foci of disease while reducing prescription dose to the prostate. Methods and Materials: Nine plans, using {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs alone and in combination were created retrospectively for 2 patients. Ultrasound and MRI/MRS datasets were used for treatment planning. Voxel-by-voxel BED was calculated for single- and dual-isotope plans. Equivalent uniform BED (EUBED) was used to compare plans. The MRS-positive planning target volumes (PTV{sub i}) were delineated along with PTV (prostate + 5 mm), rectum, and urethra. Single-isotope implants, prescribed to conventional doses, were generated to achieve good PTV coverage. The PTV{sub i} were prospectively used to generate implants using mixtures of isotopes. For mixed-radioisotope implants, we also explored the impact on EUBED of lowering prescription doses by 15%. Results: The EUBED of PTV{sub i} in the setting of primary {sup 125}I implant increased 20-66% when {sup 103}Pd and {sup 131}Cs were used compared with {sup 125}I boost. Decreasing prescription dose by 15% in mixed-isotope implants results in a potential 10% reduction in urethral EUBED with preservation of PTV coverage while still boosting PTV{sub i} (up to 80%). When radiobiologic parameters corresponding to more-aggressive disease are assigned to foci, faster-decaying isotopes used in mixed implants have the potential to preserve the equivalent biological effect of mono-isotope implants considering less-aggressive disease distributed in the entire prostate. Conclusions: This is a hypothesis-generating study proposing a treatment paradigm that could be the middle ground between whole-gland irradiation and focal-only treatment. The use of two isotopes concurrent with decreasing the minimal peripheral dose is shown to increase EUBED of selected subvolumes while preserving the therapeutic effect at the level of the

  1. Disease-related effects of perioperative blood transfusions associated with sup 125 I seed implantation for prostate carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, J.P.; Schellhammer, P.F.; el-Mahdi, A.M. )

    1990-08-01

    In some retrospective studies perioperative transfusions during oncologic surgery have been shown to decrease the time interval between surgery and local and/or distant recurrence of cancer. This study examines the disease-related effect, if any, of perioperative blood transfusions among 108 patients with localized carcinoma of the prostate treated by radioactive iodine-125 seed implantation of the prostate and lymphadenectomy. When all subjects were analyzed, there was no statistical difference of local and distant failure between the transfused and nontransfused groups. Patients with well-differentiated tumors had statistically fewer local recurrences (0% vs 22%, p = 0.036) if they were transfused perioperatively. However, the difference in distant metastases (0% vs 11%) was not statistically significant (p = 0.21). In contrast, patients with moderately and poorly differentiated disease receiving transfusions had more local recurrences and metastases, though this was not statistically significant. Our data suggest that there is no obvious evidence that perioperative blood transfusions have an adverse effect on local recurrence or distant metastases for iodine-125 seed implantation of carcinoma of the prostate.

  2. Permanent prostate implant using high activity seeds and inverse planning with fast simulated annealing algorithm: A 12-year Canadian experience

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Andre-Guy; Roy, Jean; Beaulieu, Luc; Pouliot, Jean; Harel, Francois; Vigneault, Eric . E-mail: Eric.Vigneault@chuq.qc.ca

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes and toxicity of the first Canadian permanent prostate implant program. Methods and Materials: 396 consecutive patients (Gleason {<=}6, initial prostate specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10 and stage T1-T2a disease) were implanted between June 1994 and December 2001. The median follow-up is of 60 months (maximum, 136 months). All patients were planned with fast-simulated annealing inverse planning algorithm with high activity seeds ([gt] 0.76 U). Acute and late toxicity is reported for the first 213 patients using a modified RTOG toxicity scale. The Kaplan-Meier biochemical failure-free survival (bFFS) is reported according to the ASTRO and Houston definitions. Results: The bFFS at 60 months was of 88.5% (90.5%) according to the ASTRO (Houston) definition and, of 91.4% (94.6%) in the low risk group (initial PSA {<=}10 and Gleason {<=}6 and Stage {<=}T2a). Risk factors statistically associated with bFFS were: initial PSA >10, a Gleason score of 7-8, and stage T2b-T3. The mean D90 was of 151 {+-} 36.1 Gy. The mean V100 was of 85.4 {+-} 8.5% with a mean V150 of 60.1 {+-} 12.3%. Overall, the implants were well tolerated. In the first 6 months, 31.5% of the patients were free of genitourinary symptoms (GUs), 12.7% had Grade 3 GUs; 91.6% were free of gastrointestinal symptoms (GIs). After 6 months, 54.0% were GUs free, 1.4% had Grade 3 GUs; 95.8% were GIs free. Conclusion: The inverse planning with fast simulated annealing and high activity seeds gives a 5-year bFFS, which is comparable with the best published series with a low toxicity profile.

  3. Combined use of transverse and scout computed tomography scans to localize radioactive seeds in an interstitial brachytherapy implant.

    PubMed

    Yue, N; Chen, Z; Bond, J E; Son, Y H; Nath, R

    1999-04-01

    Various techniques have been developed to localize radioactive sources in brachytherapy implants. The most common methods include the orthogonal film method, the stereo-shift film method, and recently, direct localization from a series of contiguous CT transverse images. The major advantage of the CT method is that it provides the seed locations relative to anatomic structures. However, it is often the case that accurate identification and localization of the sources become difficult because of partial source artifacts in more than one transverse cut and other artifacts on CT images. A new algorithm has been developed to combine the advantages of using a pair of orthogonal scout views with the advantages of using a stack of transverse cuts. In the new algorithm, a common reference point is used to correlate CT transverse images and two orthogonal scout CT scans (AP and lateral). The radioactive sources are localized on CT transverse images. At the same time, the sources are displayed automatically on the two CT scout scans. In this way, the individual sources can be clearly distinguished and ambiguities arising from partial source artifacts are resolved immediately. Because of the finite slice thickness of transverse cuts, the longitudinal coordinates are more accurately obtained from the scout views. Therefore, the longitudinal coordinates of seeds localized on the transverse cuts are adjusted so that they match the position of the seeds on scout views. The algorithm has been tested on clinical cases and has proved to be a time saving and accurate method.

  4. SU-E-T-602: Beryllium Seeds Implant for Photo-Neutron Yield Using External Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Koren, S; Veltchev, I; Furhang, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the Neutron yield obtained during prostate external beam irradiation. Methods: Neutrons, that are commonly a radiation safety concern for photon beams with energy above 10 MV, are induced inside a PTV from Beryllium implemented seeds. A high megavoltage photon beam delivered to a prostate will yield neutrons via the reaction Be-9(γ,n)2?. Beryllium was chosen for its low gamma,n reaction cross-section threshold (1.67 MeV) to be combined with a high feasible 25 MV photon beam. This beam spectra has a most probable photon energy of 2.5 to 3.0 MeV and an average photon energy of about 5.8 MeV. For this feasibility study we simulated a Beryllium-made common seed dimension (0.1 cm diameter and 0.5 cm height) without taking into account encapsulation. We created a 0.5 cm grid loading pattern excluding the Urethra, using Variseed (Varian inc.) A total of 156 seeds were exported to a 4cm diameter prostate sphere, created in Fluka, a particle transport Monte Carlo Code. Two opposed 25 MV beams were simulated. The evaluation of the neutron dose was done by adjusting the simulated photon dose to a common prostate delivery (e.g. 7560 cGy in 42 fractions) and finding the corresponding neutron dose yield from the simulation. A variance reduction technique was conducted for the neutrons yield and transported. Results: An effective dose of 3.65 cGy due to neutrons was found in the prostate volume. The dose to central areas of the prostate was found to be about 10 cGy. Conclusion: The neutron dose yielded does not justify a clinical implant of Beryllium seeds. Nevertheless, one should investigate the Neutron dose obtained when a larger Beryllium loading is combined with commercially available 40 MeV Linacs.

  5. Therapeutic value of 3-D printing template-assisted (125)I-seed implantation in the treatment of malignant liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Han, Tao; Yang, Xiaodan; Xu, Ying; Zheng, Zhendong; Yan, Ying; Wang, Ning

    2017-01-01

    To explore the therapeutic value of 3-D printing template-assisted (125)I-seed implantation in the treatment of malignant liver tumors. Fifteen liver cancer patients with 47 total lesions were treated with 3-D printing template-assisted radioactive seed implantation (group A), and 25 liver-tumor patients with 66 total lesions were treated with (125)I-seed implantation without a template auxiliary (group B). Operation time, in-hospital time, operation complications, dose distribution, and response rate (number) were compared between the two groups. Shorter operation times and better dose distribution were observed in group A than in group B, and the differences were statistically significant. The response rate after 2 months was 86.7% (13 of 15) in group A and 84% (21 of 25) in group B; differences between the two groups were not significant. Application of 3-D printing template-assisted radioactive seed implantation in the treatment of malignant liver tumors can help shorten operation time and optimize radiation-dose distribution, is worthy of further study, and has clinical significance.

  6. Therapeutic value of 3-D printing template-assisted 125I-seed implantation in the treatment of malignant liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Han, Tao; Yang, Xiaodan; Xu, Ying; Zheng, Zhendong; Yan, Ying; Wang, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore the therapeutic value of 3-D printing template-assisted 125I-seed implantation in the treatment of malignant liver tumors. Materials and methods Fifteen liver cancer patients with 47 total lesions were treated with 3-D printing template-assisted radioactive seed implantation (group A), and 25 liver-tumor patients with 66 total lesions were treated with 125I-seed implantation without a template auxiliary (group B). Operation time, in-hospital time, operation complications, dose distribution, and response rate (number) were compared between the two groups. Results Shorter operation times and better dose distribution were observed in group A than in group B, and the differences were statistically significant. The response rate after 2 months was 86.7% (13 of 15) in group A and 84% (21 of 25) in group B; differences between the two groups were not significant. Conclusion Application of 3-D printing template-assisted radioactive seed implantation in the treatment of malignant liver tumors can help shorten operation time and optimize radiation-dose distribution, is worthy of further study, and has clinical significance. PMID:28740402

  7. Edema-induced increase in tumour cell survival for 125I and 103Pd prostate permanent seed implants - a bio-mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Ning; Chen, Zhe; Nath, Ravinder

    2002-04-01

    Edema caused by the surgical procedure of prostate seed implantation expands the source-to-point distances within the prostate and hence decreases the dose coverage. The decrease of dose coverage results in an increase in tumour cell survival. To investigate the effects of edema on tumour cell survival, a bio-mathematical model of edema and the corresponding cell killing by continuous low dose rate irradiation (CLDRI) was developed so that tumour cell surviving fractions can be estimated in an edematous prostate for both 125I and 103Pd seed implants. The dynamic nature of edema and its resolution were modelled with an exponential function V(T) = Vp (1 + M exp(-0.693T/Te)) where Vp is the prostate volume before implantation, M is the edema magnitude and Te is edema half-life (EHL). The dose rate of a radioactive seed was calculated according to AAPM TG43, i.e. Λg(r) αBED), where α is the linear coefficient of the survival curve. The tumour cell survival was calculated for both 125I and 103Pd seed implants and for different tumour potential doubling time (TPDT) (from 5 days to 30 days) and for edemas of different magnitudes (from 0% to 95%) and edema half-lives (from 4 days to 30 days). Tumour cell survival increased with the increase of edema magnitude and EHL. For a typical edema of a half-life of 10 days and a magnitude of 50%, the edema increased tumour cell survival by about 1 and 2 orders of magnitude for 125I and 103Pd seed implants respectively. At the extreme (95% edema magnitude and an edema half-life of 30 days), the increase was more than 3 and 5 orders of magnitude for 125I and 103Pd seed implants respectively. The absolute increases were almost independent of TPDT and the prostate edema did not significantly change the effective treatment time. Tumour cell survival for prostate undergoing CLDRI using 125I or 103Pd seeds may be increased substantially due to the presence of edema caused by surgical trauma. This effect appears to be more pronounced for

  8. The gold button technique for intraoral interstitial implants with iridium-192 seeds.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P P; Henschke, U K

    1977-03-01

    The higher the radiation dose, the better is tumor control. High tumor doses are feasible only by interstitial irradiation. To achieve uniform dose distribution throughout the area or volume of implant, one has to use established distribution rules. In straight tube technique we have to use heavy endloading to compensate for uncrossed ends. In implants for intraoral lesions, heavy endloading gives a high dose to the opposing normal mucosa. The new gold button technique considerably reduces the dose to the normal mucosa, thus minimizing the morbidity.

  9. Five years' experience with the gold button technique for intraoral interstitial implants with iridium-192 seeds.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P P; Henschke, U K

    1977-07-01

    To simulate crossing of the ends in standard removable interstitial implants, we used the loop technique for intraoral tumors when treating them with afterloading interstitial removable implants. Because of technical problems, we changed to a straight tube method with heavy end-loading to compensate for the uncrossed ends. High doses to the normal mucosa close to heavy end-loading is reduced 2.5 times by the use of gold buttons in place of standard stainless steel buttons, thus decreasing unnecessary mucosal reactions and morbidity.

  10. Tolerance and Acceptance Results of a Palladium-103 Permanent Breast Seed Implant Phase I/II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pignol, Jean-Philippe Rakovitch, Eileen; Keller, Brian M.; Sankreacha, Raxa; Chartier, Carole

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To test, in a prospective Phase I/II trial, a partial breast irradiation technique using a {sup 103}Pd permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) realized in a single 1-h procedure under sedation and local freezing. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had infiltrating ductal carcinoma {<=}3 cm in diameter, surgical margin {>=}2 mm, no extensive intraductal component, no lymphovascular invasion, and negative lymph nodes. Patients received a permanent seed implant, and a minimal peripheral dose of 90 Gy was prescribed to the clinical target volume, with a margin of 1.5 cm. Results: From May 2004 to April 2007, 67 patients received the PBSI treatment. The procedure was well tolerated, with 17% of patients having significant pain after the procedure. Only 1 patient (1.5%) had an acute skin reaction (Grade 3 according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria). The rates of acute moist desquamation, erythema, and indurations were 10.4%, 42%, and 27%, respectively. At 1 year the rate of Grade 1 telangiectasia was 14%. The rate of skin reaction decreased from 65% to 28% when skin received less than the 85% isodose. According to a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group questionnaire, 80-90% of patients were very satisfied with their treatment, and the remainder were satisfied. One patient (1.5%) developed an abscess, which resolved after the use of antibiotics. There was no recurrence after a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 11-49 months). Conclusions: The feasibility, safety, and tolerability of PBSI compares favorably with that of external beam and other partial breast irradiation techniques.

  11. Does location of prostate cancer by sextant biopsies predict for relapse after (125)I seed implant brachytherapy?

    PubMed

    Hill, Jesse; Hackett, Cian; Sloboda, Ron; Menon, Geetha; Singhal, Sandeep; Pervez, Nadeem; Pedersen, John; Yee, Don; Murtha, Albert; Amanie, John; Usmani, Nawaid

    2015-01-01

    To report on the importance of cancer location from diagnostic prostate biopsies in predicting biochemical relapse for patients treated with (125)I seed implant brachytherapy as monotherapy for favorable risk disease; specifically, to assess the clinical significance of potentially underdosing the base region of the prostate gland. Of 1145 consecutive patients, 846 had pretreatment biopsies allowing for sextant analysis and consequent evaluation of biochemical failure tendencies. Biochemical failure was defined as a posttreatment rise in the nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) by at least 2 ng/mL. Patient and tumor characteristics, dosimetry, the use of hormone therapy, source strength, and postimplant PSA kinetics were analyzed between sextant subgroups. Sixty-two patients (7.3%) with sextant pathology had biochemical failure. There was no significant difference between the failure locations. There were 528 patients (62.4%) with some element of base involvement (BI), and 318 patients (37.6%) with no evidence of BI. Of the 62 patients with biochemical failure, 42 (67.7%) showed BI on biopsy and 20 (32.3%) had no BI. The 10-year relapse-free survival rate is 88.2% (95% confidence interval: 84.3%, 92.2%) and 92.0% (95% confidence interval: 88.4%, 95.8%) for the BI and no BI groups, respectively (p = 0.17). The mean D90 delivered to the base, midgland, and apex was 140.8 (±21.8) Gy, 170.8 (±22.5) Gy, and 177.9 (±29.5) Gy, respectively, for all patients. There are no significantly worse outcomes for patients treated with an (125)I seed implant for favorable risk prostate cancer with some element of BI, despite lower doses of radiation delivered to the base region. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. SU-E-T-41: A Method for Performing An In-House Batch Assay of I-125 Seeds Used for Prostate Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Muryn, J; Wilkinson, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to evaluate a method for confirming source strength of I-125 seeds in a bulk assay while maintaining sterility and time efficiency. Methods: The I-125 seeds used in this study (STM 1251, Bard Brachytherapy, Inc.) were available as loose seeds or linked in 3, 4, or 5 seed configurations. A third party 10% assay (NIST traceable) is provided. Source strengths ranging from 0.395 to 0.504 U were available for this study. A stand was built out of aluminum to hold an exposure meter (Inovision (Fluke) 451P) at 25 cm above the I-125 sources to measure the exposure rate. Three different seed configurations were measured: loose, linked, and loaded needles (Bard FastFil Seed Implant Needle). The measurements were made in an operating room, and a sterile sheet was used under the non-sterile aluminum stand. Seeds and needles were placed in a sterile tray. Results: One hundred forty-two loose seeds in 5 batches (0.395, 0.395, 0.409, 0.444, 0.444 U/seed) and 902 seeds in 7 batches containing various strands (0.444, 0.444,.0444, 0.466, 0.466, 0.504, 0.504 U/seed) were measured. The average exposure rate per unit activity was measured to be 0.593 mR per hr per U with a standard deviation of 0.016. The Result for loaded needles was 0.261 mR per hr per U with a standard deviation of 0.014. Once the apparatus is set up, measurements of 180 linked sources as supplied in the Bard package requires only a few minutes. Conclusion: The proposed method can confirm the activity of a batch of loose or stranded I-125 seeds within a range of 5%.

  13. SU-E-J-166: Sensitivity of Clinically Relevant Dosimetric Parameters to Contouring Uncertainty During Post Implant Dosimetry of Prostate Permanent Seed Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Mashouf, S; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: There is a strong evidence relating post-implant dosimetry for permanent seed prostate brachytherpy to local control rates. The delineation of the prostate on CT images, however, represents a challenge as it is difficult to confidently identify the prostate borders from soft tissue surrounding it. This study aims at quantifying the sensitivity of clinically relevant dosimetric parameters to prostate contouring uncertainty. Methods: The post-implant CT images and plans for a cohort of 43 patients, who have received I–125 permanent prostate seed implant in our centre, were exported to MIM Symphony LDR brachytherapy treatment planning system (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH). The prostate contours in post-implant CT images were expanded/contracted uniformly for margins of ±1.00mm, ±2.00mm, ±3.00mm, ±4.00mm and ±5.00mm (±0.01mm). The values for V100 and D90 were extracted from Dose Volume Histograms for each contour and compared. Results: The mean value of V100 and D90 was obtained as 92.3±8.4% and 108.4±12.3% respectively (Rx=145Gy). V100 was reduced by −3.2±1.5%, −7.2±3.0%, −12.8±4.0%, −19.0±4.8%, − 25.5±5.4% for expanded contours of prostate with margins of +1mm, +2mm, +3mm, +4mm, and +5mm, respectively, while it was increased by 1.6±1.2%, 2.4±2.4%, 2.7±3.2%, 2.9±4.2%, 2.9±5.1% for the contracted contours. D90 was reduced by −6.9±3.5%, −14.5±6.1%, −23.8±7.1%, − 33.6±8.5%, −40.6±8.7% and increased by 4.1±2.6%, 6.1±5.0%, 7.2±5.7%, 8.1±7.3% and 8.1±7.3% for the same set of contours. Conclusion: Systematic expansion errors of more than 1mm may likely render a plan sub-optimal. Conversely contraction errors may Result in labeling a plan likely as optimal. The use of MRI images to contour the prostate should results in better delineation of prostate organ which increases the predictive value of post-op plans. Since observers tend to overestimate the prostate volume on CT, compared with MRI, the impact of the

  14. Clinical application of computed tomography-guided (125)I seed interstitial implantation for head and neck cancer patients with unmanageable cervical lymph node metastases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hai; Xu, Shaonian; Li, Fusheng; Du, Zhenguang; Wang, Liang

    2016-04-27

    To assess clinical application of computed tomography (CT)-guided (125)I seed implantation for patients who cannot endure or unwillingly receive repeated surgery, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy for unmanageable cervical lymph node metastases in head and neck cancer (HNC). Thirty-one consecutive patients received CT-guided (125)I seed implantation between February 2010 and December 2013. To evaluate the clinical efficiency, karnofsky performance score (KPS), numeric rating scale (NRS), and tumor volume at 3-, and 6-month post-implantation were compared with pre-implantation, along with local control rate (LCR), overall survival rate (OSR), and complications at 3, 6 months, 1, and 2 years. The tumor volume was obviously decreased at 3-, and 6-month post-implantation (21.23 ± 8.83 versus 9.19 ± 7.52 cm(2); 21.23 ± 8.83 versus 6.42 ± 9.79 cm(2); P < 0.05) compared with pre-implantation. The NRS was statistically reduced (3.06 ± 1.06 versus 7.77 ± 0.92; 2.39 ± 1.15 versus 7.77 ± 0.92; P < 0.05), while KPS was significantly improved (83.18 ± 5.97 versus 73.60 ± 7.90; 82.86 ± 5.43 versus 73.60 ± 7.90; P < 0.05) postoperatively at 3 and 6 months, respectively. The LCR at 3, 6 months, 1, and 2 years was 96.30, 83.87, 64.51, and 45.16%, respectively. The OSR was 100, 100, 67.74, and 45.16%, respectively. Three cases experienced grade I and two had grade II acute radiation toxicity. CT-guided seed implantation may be feasible and safe for HNC patients whose neck nodes are not manageable by routine strategies with fewer complications, higher LCR, and significant pain relief.

  15. Portal Vein Stenting Combined with Iodine-125 Seeds Endovascular Implantation Followed by Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tanyang; Zhu, Tongyin; Zhang, Yuelin; Nie, Chunhui; Ai, Jing; Zhou, Guanhui; Zhang, Aibin; Dong, Meng-Jie; Wang, Wei-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Aim was to assess the therapeutic value of portal vein stenting (PVS) combined with iodine-125 seed (125I seed) strand endovascular implantation followed by transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for treating patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). This was a retrospective study of 34 patients aged 29–81 years, diagnosed HCC with PVTT, and treated with PVS combined with 125I seed strand endovascular implantation followed by TACE between January 2012 and August 2014. Survival, stent patency, technical success rate, complications related to the procedure, and adverse events were recorded. The technical success rate was 100%. No serious procedure-related adverse event was recorded. The median survival was 147 days. The cumulative survival rates and stent patency rates at 90, 180, and 360 days were 94.1%, 61.8%, and 32.4% and 97.1% (33/34), 76.9% (24/34), and 29.4% (10/34), respectively. PVS combined with 125I seed strand endovascular implantation followed by TACE is feasible for patients with HCC and PVTT. It resulted in appropriate survival and stent patency, with no procedure-related adverse effects. PMID:27999793

  16. Dosimetry Verification of (125)I Seeds Implantation With Three-Dimensional Printing Noncoplanar Templates and CT Guidance for Paravertebral/Retroperitoneal Malignant Tumors.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhe; Jiang, Yuliang; Su, Liang; Guo, Fuxin; Peng, Ran; Sun, Haitao; Fan, Jinghong; Wang, Junjie

    2017-01-01

    To compare dose distributions of postoperative plans with preoperative plans for radioactive seed implantation of paravertebral/retroperitoneal tumors assisted by 3-dimensional printing noncoplanar templates and computed tomography. Sixteen patients with paravertebral/retroperitoneal tumors (21 lesions) underwent radioactive seed implantation with 3-dimensional printing noncoplanar templates. Prescribed dose was 110 to 160 Gy. We compared the dose distribution of the postoperative plan with the preoperative plan. Dose parameters were D90, minimum peripheral dose, V100, V150, conformal index and external index of the target volume, and the dose received by 2 cm(3) of normal tissue of organs at risk (spinal cord, aorta, and kidney). Sixteen 3-dimensional printing noncoplanar templates were produced for 21 treatment areas. Mean gross tumor volume (preoperative) of patients was 61.1 cm(3), mean needle number was 17, mean number of implanted (125)I seeds was 65, and mean D90 of postoperative target area (gross tumor volume) was 131.1 Gy. Actual number of seeds postbrachytherapy increased by 1 to 12 in 8 cases. For postoperative plans, the mean D90, minimum peripheral dose, V100, V150 was 131.1 Gy, 67.1 Gy, 90.2%, and 64.1%, respectively, and 135.0 Gy, 64.7 Gy, 90.9%, and 64.1%, respectively, in preoperative plans. Comparing with the preplanned cases, the dose of the target volume was slightly lower and the high-dose area of the target volume was larger in postoperative cases, but the difference was not statistically significant ( P > .05). Actual dose conformity of the target volume was lower than preplanned, and the difference was statistically significant ( P = .005). Three-dimensional printing noncoplanar templates can provide good accuracy for positioning and direction in radioactive seed implantation.

  17. Two-stage implantation of the skin and bone integrated pylon (SBIP) seeded with autologous fibroblasts induced into osteoblast differentiation for direct skeletal attachment of limb prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Shevtsov, Maxim A.; Galibin, Oleg V.; Yudintceva, Nataliya M.; Blinova, Miralda I.; Pinaev, Grigoriy P.; Ivanova, Anna A.; Savchenko, Olga N.; Suslov, Dmitriy N.; Potokin, Igor L.; Pitkin, Emil; Raykhtsaum, Grigory; Pitkin, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Angio- and osteogenesis following the two-stage implantation of the Skin and Bone Integrated Pylon (SBIP) seeded with autologous fibroblasts was evaluated. Two consecutive animal substudies were undertaken: intramedullary subcutaneous implantation (fifteen rabbits) and a two-stage transcutaneous implantation (twelve rabbits). We observed enhanced osseointegrative properties of the intramedullary porous component seeded with fibroblasts induced into osteoblast differentiation, as compared to the untreated porous titanium pylon. The three-phase scintigraphy and subsequent histological analysis showed that the level of osteogenesis was 1.5-fold higher than in the control group, and significantly so (P<0.05). The biocompatibility was further proved by the absence of inflammatory response or encapsulation and sequestration on the histology assay. Treatment of the transcutaneous component with autologous fibroblasts was associated with nearly a 2-fold decrease in the period required for the ingrowth of dermal and subdermal soft tissues into the implant surface, as compared to the untreated porous titanium component. Direct dermal attachment to the transcutaneous implant prevented superficial and deep periprosthetic infections in rabbits in vivo. PMID:24115308

  18. Consequences of dose heterogeneity on the biological efficiency of ¹⁰³Pd permanent breast seed implants.

    PubMed

    Afsharpour, Hossein; Reniers, Brigitte; Landry, Guillaume; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian M; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-02-07

    Brachytherapy is associated with highly heterogeneous spatial dose distributions. This heterogeneity is usually ignored when estimating the biological effective dose (BED). In addition, the heterogeneities of the medium including the tissue heterogeneity (TH) and the interseed attenuation (ISA) are also contributing to the heterogeneity of the dose distribution, but they are both ignored in Task Group 43 (TG43)-based protocols. This study investigates the effect of dose heterogeneity, TH and ISA on metrics that are commonly used to quantify biological efficiency in brachytherapy. The special case of 29 breast cancer patients treated with permanent (103)Pd seed implant is considered here. BED is compared to equivalent uniform BED (EUBED) capable of considering the spatial heterogeneity of the dose distribution. The effects of TH and ISA on biological efficiency of treatments are taken into account by comparing TG43 with Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for each patient. The effect of clonogenic repopulation is also considered. The analysis is performed for different sets of (α/β, α) ratios of (2, 0.3), (4, 0.27) and (10, 0.3) [Gy, Gy(-1)] covering the whole range of reported α/β values in the literature. BED is sometimes larger and sometimes smaller than EUBED(TG43) indicating that the effect of the dose heterogeneity is not similar among patients. The effect of the dose heterogeneity can be characterized by using the D(99) dose metric. For each set of the radiobiological parameters considered, a D(99) threshold is found over which dose heterogeneity will cause an overestimation of the biological efficiencies while the inverse happens for smaller D(99) values. EUBED(MC) is always larger than EUBED(TG43) indicating that by neglecting TH and ISA in TG43-based dosimetry algorithms, the biological efficiencies may be underestimated by about 10 Gy. Overall, by going from BED to the more accurate EUBED(MC) there is a gain of about 9.6 to 13 Gy on the biological

  19. [CT guidance (125)I seed implantation for pelvic recurrent rectal cancer assisted by 3D printing individual non-coplanar template].

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wang, J J; Jiang, Y L; Tian, S Q; Ji, Z; Guo, F X; Sun, H T; Fan, J H; Xu, Y P

    2016-12-20

    Objective: To analyze the difference of dosimetric parameters between pre-plan and post-plan of (125)I radioactive seed implantation assisted by 3D printing individual non-coplanar template (3D printing template) for locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Methods: From February 2016 to April 2016, a total of 10 patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer received (125)I seeds implantation under CT guidance assisted by 3D printing template in Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University Third Hospital.Each patient underwent CT simulation, three-dimentional treatment planning pre-implantation, 3D printing template design, radioactive seed implantation assisted by 3D printing template and dosimetric verification post implantation. The median activity of seed was 0.63 mCi (0.58 to 0.7 mCi) (2.15- 2.59×10(7) Bq), and the median number of seeds was 80 (19 to 192). D90, D100, V100, V150, CI, EI, HI, D5cc, D2cc of bladder and bowel of pre-plan and post-plan were calculated, respectively.Paired t test was used to evaluate the difference of dosimetric parameters between pre-plan and post-plan. Results: The median D90 of pre-plan and post-plan were 13 761.0 and 12 798.8 cGy, respectively.The median D100 of pre-plan and post-plan were 5 293.6 and 5 397.9 cGy, respectively.The median V100 of pre-plan and post-plan were 90.0% and 90.0%, respectively.The median V150 of pre-plan and post-plan were 63.8% and 62.4%, respectively.The median CI of pre-plan and post-plan were 0.73 and 0.67.The median EI of pre-plan and post-plan were 0.22 and 0.30, respectively. The median HI of pre-plan and post-plan were 0.29 and 0.31.The median bladder D2cc of pre-plan and post-plan were 3 088.8 and 4 240.4 cGy, respectively.The median bowel D2cc of pre-plan and post-plan were 7 051.6 and 7 903.9 cGy, respectively. Conclusions: 3D printing template might be helpful for locally recurrent rectal cancer patients who received (125)I radioactive seed implantation assisted by 3D printing

  20. SU-E-J-215: Towards MR-Only Image Guided Identification of Calcifications and Brachytherapy Seeds: Application to Prostate and Breast LDR Implant Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Elzibak, A; Fatemi-Ardekani, A; Soliman, A; Mashouf, S; Safigholi, H; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, WY; Han, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify and analyze the appearance of calcifications and brachytherapy seeds on magnitude and phase MRI images and to investigate whether they can be distinguished from each other on corrected phase images for application to prostate and breast low dose rate (LDR) implant dosimetry. Methods: An agar-based gel phantom containing two LDR brachytherapy seeds (Advantage Pd-103, IsoAid, 0.8mm diameter, 4.5mm length) and two spherical calcifications (large: 7mm diameter and small: 4mm diameter) was constructed and imaged on a 3T Philips MR scanner using a 16-channel head coil and a susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) sequence (2mm slices, 320mm FOV, TR/ TE= 26.5/5.3ms, 15 degree flip angle). The phase images were unwrapped and corrected using a 32×32, 2D Hanning high pass filter to remove background phase noise. Appearance of the seeds and calcifications was assessed visually and quantitatively using Osirix (http://www.osirix-viewer.com/). Results: As expected, calcifications and brachytherapy seeds appeared dark (hypointense) relative to the surrounding gel on the magnitude MRI images. The diameter of each seed without the surrounding artifact was measured to be 0.1 cm on the magnitude image, while diameters of 0.79 and 0.37 cm were measured for the larger and smaller calcifications, respectively. On the corrected phase images, the brachytherapy seeds and the calcifications appeared bright (hyperintense). The diameter of the seeds was larger on the phase images (0.17 cm) likely due to the dipole effect. Conclusion: MRI has the best soft tissue contrast for accurate organ delineation leading to most accurate implant dosimetry. This work demonstrated that phase images can potentially be useful in identifying brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate and breast due to their bright appearance, which helps in their visualization and quantification for accurate dosimetry using MR-only. Future work includes optimizing phase filters to best identify

  1. First report of a permanent breast {sup 103}Pd seed implant as adjuvant radiation treatment for early-stage breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pignol, Jean-Philippe . E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca; Keller, Brian; Rakovitch, Eileen; Sankreacha, Raxa; Easton, Harry; Que, William

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: A new technique of adjuvant partial breast irradiation using {sup 103}Pd permanent breast seed implants (PBSI) is presented. The procedure is performed in a single 1-hour session under local anesthesia. Methods and Materials: Patients referred to a single institution for adjuvant radiotherapy after lumpectomy for an infiltrating ductal carcinoma {<=}3 cm in diameter, surgical margin {>=}2 mm, no extensive in situ carcinoma, no lymphovascular invasion, and minimal or negative lymph node involvement were offered a PBSI. Results: Between May and December 2004, 31 eligible patients underwent CT scan and ultrasound simulations assessing PBSI feasibility. Fifteen were excluded because of feasibility issues, and 16 received PBSI. A minimal peripheral dose of 90 Gy was prescribed to the planning target volume corresponding to the clinical target volume identified on the CT scan plus a margin of 1 cm. The procedure was well tolerated; 56% of the patients reported no pain during the procedure, and 46% of the patients developed National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 1 acute reaction. None experienced toxicity Grade 2 or 3. Conclusions: Permanent breast seed implantation seems feasible and well tolerated on these preliminary clinical data and represents an ultimate step in the reduction of treatment fraction for partial breast irradiation.

  2. Pilot Study Testing the Technical Feasibility and Toxicity of High Dose Rate Brachytherapy Combined with Hyperthermia to Treat Prostate Cancer Recurrences after External Beam Irradiation or Permanent Seed Implant Failure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    Jones (Duke): Uposomal chemotherapy and hyperthermia for breast cancer Coordinators: P. Corry, C. Diederich, P. Stauffer -14.00-14.25: P. Corry...infrared), and in preparation: skin and breast ( hyperthermia and ablation studies). These generic models are constructed using data of patients, anatomy... Hyperthermia to Treat Prostate Cancer Recurrences after External Beam Irradiation or Permanent Seed Implant Failure PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Peter M

  3. [Endovascular implantation of iodine-125 seeds strand and portal vein stenting followed by transcatheter arterial chemoembolization combined therapy with sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma with main portal vein tumor thrombus].

    PubMed

    Li, W W; Dai, Z Y; Wan, H G; Yao, L Z; Zhu, J; Li, C L; Wang, X J; Pan, J; Chen, L Z

    2016-06-21

    To compare the therapeutic effect of portal vein stenting and endovascular implantation of iodine-125 seeds strand followed by transcatheter arterial chemoembolization combined with or without sorafenib in patients for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with main portal vein tumor thrombus (MPVTT). A total of 53 patients with HCC complicated by MPVTT who received portal vein stenting and endovascular implantation of iodine-125 seeds strand followed by transcatheter arterial chemoembolization combined without (group A, n=38) or with (group B, n=15) sorafenib in Affiliated Yancheng Hospital of Southeast University Medical College during January 2010 and August 2015 were analyzed retropectively.Overal survival, progress free survival and procedure-related adverse event were compared between the two groups. The technical success rate was 100% for placement of (125)I seeds strand and stent in the obstructed main portal vein.No serious procedure-related adverse events occurred. Median survival time of group A and B were 12.1 and 14.8 months, respectively (P=0.037). Additionally, Median progress free survival time of group A and B were 2.8 and 4.0 months, respectively (P=0.002). Endovascular implantation of iodine-125 seeds strand and portal vein stenting followed by transcatheter arterial chemoembolization combined with sorafenib could improve the survival time, the progress free survival time of patients with HCC complicated by MPVTT.

  4. Viability of chondrocytes seeded onto a collagen I/III membrane for matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation.

    PubMed

    Hindle, Paul; Hall, Andrew C; Biant, Leela C

    2014-11-01

    Cell viability is crucial for effective cell-based cartilage repair. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of handling the membrane during matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation surgery on the viability of implanted chondrocytes. Images were acquired under five conditions: (i) Pre-operative; (ii) Handled during surgery; (iii) Cut edge; (iv) Thumb pressure applied; (v) Heavily grasped with forceps. Live and dead cell stains were used. Images were obtained for cell counting and morphology. Mean cell density was 6.60 × 10(5) cells/cm(2) (5.74-7.11 × 10(5) ) in specimens that did not have significant trauma decreasing significantly in specimens that had been grasped with forceps (p < 0.001) or cut (p = 0.004). Cell viability on delivery grade membrane was 75.1%(72.4-77.8%). This dropped to 67.4%(64.1-69.7%) after handling (p = 0.002), 56.3%(51.5-61.6%) after being thumbed (p < 0.001) and 28.8%(24.7-31.2%) after crushing with forceps (p < 0.001). When cut with scissors there was a band of cell death approximately 275 µm in width where cell viability decreased to 13.7%(10.2-18.2%, p < 0.001). Higher magnification revealed cells without the typical rounded appearance of chondrocytes. We found that confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) can be used to quantify and image the fine morphology of cells on a matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) membrane. Careful handling of the membrane is essential to minimise chondrocyte death during surgery. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Implantation of a collagen scaffold seeded with adult rat hippocampal progenitors in a rat model of penetrating brain injury.

    PubMed

    Elias, Paul Z; Spector, Myron

    2012-07-30

    Penetrating brain injury (PBI) is a complex central nervous system injury in which mechanical damage to brain parenchyma results in hemorrhage, ischemia, broad areas of necrosis, and eventually cavitation. The permanent loss of brain tissue affords the possibility of treatment using a biomaterial scaffold to fill the lesion site and potentially deliver pharmacological or cellular therapeutic agents. The administration of cellular therapy may be of benefit in both mitigating the secondary injury process and promoting regeneration through replacement of certain cell populations. This study investigated the survival and differentiation of adult rat hippocampal neural progenitor cells delivered by a collagen scaffold in a rat model of PBI. The cell-scaffold construct was implanted 1 week after injury and was observed to remain intact with open pores upon analysis 4 weeks later. Implanted neural progenitors were found to have survived within the scaffold, and also to have migrated into the surrounding brain. Differentiated phenotypes included astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, vascular endothelial cells, and possibly macrophages. The demonstrated multipotency of this cell population in vivo in the context of traumatic brain injury has implications for regenerative therapies, but additional stimulation appears necessary to promote neuronal differentiation outside normally neurogenic regions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Relationship between isotope half-life and prostatic edema for optimal prostate dose coverage in permanent seed implants

    SciTech Connect

    Villeneuve, Maxime; Leclerc, Ghyslain; Lessard, Etienne; Pouliot, Jean; Beaulieu, Luc

    2008-05-15

    The robustness of treatment planning to prostatic edema for three different isotopes ({sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs) is explored using dynamical dose calculations on 25 different clinical prostate cases. The treatment plans were made using the inverse planning by simulated annealing (IPSA) algorithm. The prescription was 144, 127, and 125 Gy for {sup 125}I, {sup 131}Cs, and {sup 103}Pd, respectively. For each isotope, three dose distribution schemes were used to impose different protection levels to the urethra: V{sub 120}=0%, V{sub 150}=0%, and V{sub 150}=30%. Eleven initial edema values were considered ranging from 1.0 (no edema) to 2.0 (100%). The edema was assumed to resolve exponentially with time. The prostate volume, seed positions, and seed activity were dynamically tracked to produce the final dose distribution. Edema decay half-lives of 10, 30, and 50 days were used. A total of 675 dynamical calculations were performed for each initial edema value. For the {sup 125}I isotope, limiting the urethra V{sub 120} to 0% leads to a prostate D{sub 90} under 140 Gy for initial edema values above 1.5. Planning with urethra V{sub 150} at 0% provides a good response to the edema; the prostate D{sub 90} remains higher than 140 Gy for edema values up to 1.8 and a half-life of 30 days or less. For {sup 103}Pd, the prostate D{sub 90} is under 97% of the prescription dose for approximately 66%, 40%, and 30% of edema values for urethra V{sub 120}=0%, V{sub 150}=0%, and V{sub 150}=30%, respectively. Similar behavior is seen for {sup 131}Cs and the center of the prostate becomes 'cold' for almost all edema scenarios. The magnitude of the edema following prostate brachytherapy, as well as the half-life of the isotope used and that of the edema resorption, all have important impacts on the dose distribution. The {sup 125}I isotope with its longer half-life is more robust to prostatic edema. Setting up good planning objectives can provide an adequate compromise

  7. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells seeded into a collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold promote bone augmentation after implantation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Giovanna; Giuffrida, Raffaella; Forte, Stefano; Fabbi, Claudia; Figallo, Elisa; Salvatorelli, Lucia; Memeo, Lorenzo; Parenti, Rosalba; Gulisano, Massimo; Gulino, Rosario

    2017-08-02

    Traumatic injury or surgical excision of diseased bone tissue usually require the reconstruction of large bone defects unable to heal spontaneously, especially in older individuals. This is a big challenge requiring the development of biomaterials mimicking the bone structure and capable of inducing the right commitment of cells seeded within the scaffold. In particular, given their properties and large availability, the human adipose-derived stem cells are considered as the better candidate for autologous cell transplantation. In order to evaluate the regenerative potential of these cells along with an osteoinductive biomaterial, we have used collagen/hydroxyapatite scaffolds to test ectopic bone formation after subcutaneous implantation in mice. The process was analysed both in vivo, by Fluorescent Molecular Tomography (FMT), and ex vivo, to evaluate the formation of bone and vascular structures. The results have shown that the biomaterial could itself be able of promoting differentiation of host cells and bone formation, probably by means of its intrinsic chemical and structural properties, namely the microenvironment. However, when charged with human mesenchymal stem cells, the ectopic bone formation within the scaffold was increased. We believe that these results represent an important advancement in the field of bone physiology, as well as in regenerative medicine.

  8. Repeated iodine-125 seed implantations combined with external beam radiotherapy for the treatment of locally recurrent or metastatic stage III/IV non-small cell lung cancer: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Dan, Gang; Jiang, Jianqing; Zheng, Yifeng; Zheng, Xiushan; Deng, Dan

    2016-09-13

    Recurrent or metastatic lung cancer is difficult to manage. This retrospective study aimed to assess the efficacy of repeated iodine-125 seed implantations combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for locally recurrent or metastatic stage-III/IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eighteen previously treated stage-III/IV NSCLC patients with local or metastatic recurrences underwent 1-to-3 iodine-125 implantations. Six of these patients received palliative EBRT and six patients received combined chemotherapy using gemcitabine and cisplatin. Near-term treatment efficacy was evaluated 3 months after seed implantation by comparing changes in tumor size on computed tomography images; the evaluated outcomes were complete response, partial response, stable disease, and local tumor control rate. Long-term efficacy was assessed based on 1- and 2-year survival rates. Patients were followed up for 6 to 50 months. The overall (i.e., complete + partial) response rate was 87.4 %. The local control rates after the first, second, and third years were 94.1, 58.8 and 41.2 %, respectively. The results of this study demonstrated that repeated implantation of radioactive particles combined with EBRT is a safe treatment that effectively controlled local recurrence and metastasis of stage III/IV NSCLC.

  9. A permanent breast seed implant as partial breast radiation therapy for early-stage patients: A comparison of palladium-103 and iodine-125 isotopes based on radiation safety considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Brian; Sankreacha, Raxa; Rakovitch, Eileen; O'Brien, Peter; Pignol, Jean-Philippe . E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: A permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) technique has been developed as a new form of partial adjuvant radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer. This study compares iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) and palladium-103 ({sup 103}Pd) isotopes by examining the exposure and effective dose (ED) to a patient's partner.Methods and Materials: A low-energy survey meter was used to measure exposure rates as a function of bolus thickness placed over {sup 103}Pd or {sup 125}I seeds. A general mathematical expression for the initial exposure rate at 1 m (x{sub o,1m}) from the skin surface as a function of the implant size, R, and the distance between the skin surface and the implant, d, was derived. Also, a second general equation is proposed to calculate the ED to the patient's partner.Results: The initial exposure rate at 1 meter and the ED are calculated as follows: x{sub o,1m} = (3{alpha})/2R{sup 3}{center_dot}{beta}{sup 3} [e{sup -{beta}}{sup (2R+d)}({beta}R + 1) + e{sup -{beta}}{sup {center_dot}}{sup d}({beta}R - 1)], and ED = aR{sup b} {center_dot} [e{sup -c(2R+d)} {center_dot} (cR + 1) + e{sup -cd} -bar (cR - 1)]. For {sup 125}I, the parameters are: {alpha} = 0.154409, {beta} = 0.388460, a = 197, b = -0.95, and c = 0.38846. For {sup 103}Pd, they are: {alpha} = 0.06877, {beta} = 0.421098, a = 18.6, b -0.78, and c = 0.421098. For implant diameters varying from 2 to 6 cm and skin-to-implant distances varying from 0.7 to 4 cm, the ED is consistently below 2.6 mSv using the {sup 103}Pd isotope, but more than 5 mSv in many instances and possibly up to 20 mSv using {sup 125}I.Conclusions: PBSI using {sup 103}Pd seeds appears safe because the patient's partner ED is consistently below 5 mSv. The{sup 125}I isotope is not recommended for PBSI.

  10. A permanent breast seed implant as partial breast radiation therapy for early-stage patients: a comparison of palladium-103 and iodine-125 isotopes based on radiation safety considerations.

    PubMed

    Keller, Brian; Sankreacha, Raxa; Rakovitch, Eileen; O'brien, Peter; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2005-06-01

    A permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) technique has been developed as a new form of partial adjuvant radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer. This study compares iodine-125 ((125)I) and palladium-103 ((103)Pd) isotopes by examining the exposure and effective dose (ED) to a patient's partner. A low-energy survey meter was used to measure exposure rates as a function of bolus thickness placed over (103)Pd or (125)I seeds. A general mathematical expression for the initial exposure rate at 1 m (x(o,1m)) from the skin surface as a function of the implant size, R, and the distance between the skin surface and the implant, d, was derived. Also, a second general equation is proposed to calculate the ED to the patient's partner. The initial exposure rate at 1 meter and the ED are calculated as follows: x(o,1m) = 3alpha2R(3) ; ;beta(3) [e(-beta(2R+d))(betaR + 1) + e(-betad)(betaR - 1)], and ED = aR(b) [e(-c(2R+d)) (cR + 1) + e(-cd) (cR - 1)]. For (125)I, the parameters are: alpha = 0.154409, beta = 0.388460, a = 197, b = -0.95, and c = 0.38846. For (103)Pd, they are: alpha = 0.06877, beta = 0.421098, a = 18.6, b = -0.78, and c = 0.421098. For implant diameters varying from 2 to 6 cm and skin-to-implant distances varying from 0.7 to 4 cm, the ED is consistently below 2.6 mSv using the (103)Pd isotope, but more than 5 mSv in many instances and possibly up to 20 mSv using (125)I. PBSI using (103)Pd seeds appears safe because the patient's partner ED is consistently below 5 mSv. The(125)I isotope is not recommended for PBSI.

  11. WE-A-17A-09: Exploiting Electromagnetic Technologies for Real-Time Seed Drop Position Validation in Permanent Implant Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Racine, E; Hautvast, G; Binnekamp, D; Beaulieu, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To report on preliminary results validating the performance of a specially designed LDR brachytherapy needle prototype possessing both electromagnetic (EM) tracking and seed drop detection abilities. Methods: An EM hollow needle prototype has been designed and constructed in collaboration with research partner Philips Healthcare. The needle possesses conventional 3D tracking capabilities, along with a novel seed drop detection mechanism exploiting local changes of electromagnetic properties generated by the passage of seeds in the needle's embedded sensor coils. These two capabilities are exploited by proprietary engineering and signal processing techniques to generate seed drop position estimates in real-time treatment delivery. The electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) used for the experiment is the NDI Aurora Planar Field Generator. The experiment consisted of dropping a total of 35 seeds in a prismatic agarose phantom, and comparing the 3D seed drop positions of the EMTS to those obtained by an image analysis of subsequent micro-CT scans. Drop position error computations and statistical analysis were performed after a 3D registration of the two seed distributions. Results: Of the 35 seeds dropped in the phantom, 32 were properly detected by the needle prototype. Absolute drop position errors among the detected seeds ranged from 0.5 to 4.8 mm with mean and standard deviation values of 1.6 and 0.9 mm, respectively. Error measurements also include undesirable and uncontrollable effects such as seed motion upon deposition. The true accuracy performance of the needle prototype is therefore underestimated. Conclusion: This preliminary study demonstrates the potential benefits of EM technologies in detecting the passage of seeds in a hollow needle as a means of generating drop position estimates in real-time treatment delivery. Such tools could therefore represent a potentially interesting addition to existing brachytherapy protocols for rapid dosimetry

  12. Incidence and prediction of seed migration to the chest after iodine-125 brachytherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junqing; Yang, Weizhu; Jiang, Na; Zheng, Qubin; Huang, Jingyao; Huang, Ning; Li, Ang; Jiang, Han

    2017-08-08

    The aims were to determine the incidence of seed migration to the chest and to analyze the predictive factors after iodine-125 brachytherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma. Three hundred ninety-nine patients with hepatocellular carcinoma underwent iodine-125 seed brachytherapy. After seed implantation, chest X-ray radiograph or computerized tomography were undertaken to assess the occurrence and location of seed migration at 3 months after brachytherapy. The incidence of seed migration to the lung and heart was calculated. A statistical analysis of the influences of seed loss to the chest was performed between patients with and without seed migration. A total of 13,977 seeds were implanted in 399 patients. One hundred fifty of the 13,977 (1.07%) seeds migrated to the chest in 81 of the 399 (20.30%) patients. Of all the migrated seeds, 112 (74.67%) migrated to the lungs in 59 (67.82%) patients, and 38 (25.33%) seeds migrated to the heart in 28 (47.46%) patients. No case exhibited clinical symptoms related to the migrated seeds. The number of seeds implanted and the number of seed implantations were significantly associated with seed migration. The occurrence of seed migration to the lungs and heart was evaluated. Furthermore, the number of seeds implanted and the number of seed implantation procedures are significant predictors of seed migration. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 02: Evaluation of Dosimetric Variations in Partial Breast Seed Implant (PBSI) due to Patient Arm Position (Up vs. Down)

    SciTech Connect

    Watt, E; Long, K; Husain, S; Meyer, T

    2014-08-15

    The planning for PBSI is done with the patient's ipsilateral arm raised, however, anatomical changes and variations are unavoidable as the patient resumes her daily activities, potentially resulting in significant deviations in implant geometry from the treatment plan. This study aims to quantify the impact of the ipsilateral arm position on the geometry and dosimetry of the implant at eight weeks, evaluated on post-plans using the MIM Symphony™ software (MIM Software, Cleveland, OH). The average dose metrics for the three patients treated at the TBCC thus far using rigid fusion and contour transfer for the arms up position were 76% for the CTV V100, 61% for the PTV V100, and 37% for the PTV V200; and for the arms down position 81% for the CTV V100, 64% for the PTV V100, and 42% for the PTV V200. Qualitative analysis of the post-implant CT for one of the three patients showed poor agreement between the seroma contour transferred from the pre-implant CT and the seroma visible on the post-implant CT. To obtain a clinically accurate plan for that patient, contour modifications were used, yielding improved dose metric averages for the arms-up position for all three patients of 87% for the CTV V100, 68% for the PTV V100, and 39% for the PTV V200. Overall, the data available shows that dosimetric parameters increase with the patient's arm down, both in terms of coverage and in terms of the hot spot, and accrual of more patients may confirm this in a larger population.

  14. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Cochlear Implants Cochlear Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... normal ear, ear with hearing loss, and cochlear implant procedure Welcome to the Food and Drug Administration ( ...

  15. Surface coating for prevention of metallic seed migration in tissues.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunseok; Lee, Won Seok; Park, Jong In; Son, Kwang-Jae; Park, Min; Bang, Young-bong; Choy, Young Bin; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2015-06-01

    In radiotherapy, metallic implants often detach from their deposited sites and migrate to other locations. This undesirable migration could cause inadequate dose coverage for permanent brachytherapy and difficulties in image-guided radiation delivery for patients. To prevent migration of implanted seeds, the authors propose a potential strategy to use a biocompatible and tissue-adhesive material called polydopamine. In this study, nonradioactive dummy seeds that have the same geometry and composition as commercial I-125 seeds were coated in polydopamine. Using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the surface of the polydopamine-coated and noncoated seeds was characterized. The detachment stress between the two types of seeds and the tissue was measured. The efficacy of polydopamine-coated seed was investigated through in vitro migration tests by tracing the seed location after tissue implantation and shaking for given times. The cytotoxicity of the polydopamine coating was also evaluated. The results of the coating characterization have shown that polydopamine was successfully coated on the surface of the seeds. In the adhesion test, the polydopamine-coated seeds had 2.1-fold greater detachment stress than noncoated seeds. From the in vitro test, it was determined that the polydopamine-coated seed migrated shorter distances than the noncoated seed. This difference was increased with a greater length of time after implantation. The authors suggest that polydopamine coating is an effective technique to prevent migration of implanted seeds, especially for permanent prostate brachytherapy.

  16. Surface coating for prevention of metallic seed migration in tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyunseok; Park, Jong In; Lee, Won Seok; Park, Min; Son, Kwang-Jae; Bang, Young-bong; Choy, Young Bin E-mail: sye@snu.ac.kr; Ye, Sung-Joon E-mail: sye@snu.ac.kr

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, metallic implants often detach from their deposited sites and migrate to other locations. This undesirable migration could cause inadequate dose coverage for permanent brachytherapy and difficulties in image-guided radiation delivery for patients. To prevent migration of implanted seeds, the authors propose a potential strategy to use a biocompatible and tissue-adhesive material called polydopamine. Methods: In this study, nonradioactive dummy seeds that have the same geometry and composition as commercial I-125 seeds were coated in polydopamine. Using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the surface of the polydopamine-coated and noncoated seeds was characterized. The detachment stress between the two types of seeds and the tissue was measured. The efficacy of polydopamine-coated seed was investigated through in vitro migration tests by tracing the seed location after tissue implantation and shaking for given times. The cytotoxicity of the polydopamine coating was also evaluated. Results: The results of the coating characterization have shown that polydopamine was successfully coated on the surface of the seeds. In the adhesion test, the polydopamine-coated seeds had 2.1-fold greater detachment stress than noncoated seeds. From the in vitro test, it was determined that the polydopamine-coated seed migrated shorter distances than the noncoated seed. This difference was increased with a greater length of time after implantation. Conclusions: The authors suggest that polydopamine coating is an effective technique to prevent migration of implanted seeds, especially for permanent prostate brachytherapy.

  17. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  18. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  19. I-125 seed calibration using the SeedSelectron® afterloader: a practical solution to fulfill AAPM-ESTRO recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Richart, Jose; Guirado, Damián; Pérez-García, Jordi; Rodríguez, Silvia; Santos, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose SeedSelectron® v1.26b (Nucletron BV, The Netherlands) is an afterloader system used in prostate interstitial permanent brachytherapy with I-125 selectSeed seeds. It contains a diode array to assay all implanted seeds. Only one or two seeds can be extracted during the surgical procedure and assayed using a well chamber to check the manufacturer air-kerma strength (SK) and to calibrate the diode array. Therefore, it is not feasible to assay 5–10% seeds as required by the AAPM-ESTRO. In this study, we present a practical solution of the SeedSelectron® users to fulfill the AAPM- ESTRO recommendations. Material and methods The method is based on: a) the SourceCheck® well ionization chamber (PTW, Germany) provided with a PTW insert; b) n = 10 selectSeed from the same batch and class as the seeds for the implant; c) the Nucletron insert to accommodate the n = 10 seeds on the SourceCheck® and to measure their averaged SK. Results for 56 implants have been studied comparing the SK value from the manufacturer with the one obtained with the n = 10 seeds using the Nucletron insert prior to the implant and with the SK of just one seed measured with the PTW insert during the implant. Results We are faced with SK deviation for individual seeds up to 7.8%. However, in the majority of cases SK is in agreement with the manufacturer value. With the method proposed using the Nucletron insert, the large deviations of SK are reduced and for 56 implants studied no deviation outside the range of the class were found. Conclusions The new Nucletron insert and the proposed procedure allow to evaluate the SK of the n = 10 seeds prior to the implant, fulfilling the AAPM-ESTRO recommendations. It has been adopted by Nucletron to be extended to seedSelectron® users under request. PMID:23346136

  20. Seed Germination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Initiation of seed germination is a critical decision for plants. It is important for seed populations under natural conditions to spread the timing of germination of individual seeds to maximize the probability of species survival. Therefore, seeds have evolved the multiple layers of mechanisms tha...

  1. Penile Implants

    MedlinePlus

    Penile Implants Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Penile implants are devices placed inside the penis to allow men with erectile dysfunction (ED) to get an erection. Penile implants are typically recommended after other treatments for ED ...

  2. A study of a pretreatment method to predict the number of I-125 seeds required for prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar . E-mail: bashar@medphysics.leeds.ac.uk; Brearley, Elizabeth; St Clair, Shaun; Flynn, Anthony

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: Prediction of the number of iodine seeds (I-125) required for prostate implantation is an important tool to reduce the number of unused seeds for brachytherapy. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between the number of seeds implanted vs. prostate volume. This can produce a tool to accurately estimate the number of seeds required for a given target volume. In addition, total cost of treatment, personal radiation risks during storage and handling, and errors in accounting for seeds can be reduced. Methods and Materials: Data from two groups of patients who had I-125 seed prostate implants (Oncura/Amersham RAPIDStrand model 6711 I-125) have been separately analyzed: (A) The relationship between prostate volume vs. number of seeds implanted was based on 401 patients treated between 1999 and 2002 who were implanted with seeds of air kerma strength (AKS) of 0.459 {mu}Gyh{sup -1} at 1 m per seed. (B) The relationship between prostate volume vs. total seed AKS was analyzed. This was based on 628 patients treated between 1999 and 2002 who were implanted with a range of seed strengths from 0.381 to 0.521 U. Both patient groups were subdivided into integer prostate volume bins. For each bin, the mean and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the implanted number of seeds or total AKS implanted were calculated. The upper 95% CI was used to investigate the relationship between the number of seeds implanted and total AKS implanted vs. prostate volume. Results: The new method of predicting the number of seeds shows valid and accurate results. The required number of seeds can be predicted, which helps to reduce the number of leftover seeds to 3% of the total number of seeds ordered. Conclusion: The number of I-125 seeds or the total activity that is required to deliver the prescribed dose for the target volume can be predicted. This could reduce the overall treatment cost by accurate seed ordering before implantation.

  3. Isolated implant metastasis in chest wall due to seeding of transpleurally placed PTBD catheter tract in a case of hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Talukder, Shibojit; Behera, Arunanshu; Tandup, Cherring; Mitra, Suvradeep

    2017-04-18

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) catheter site metastasis in cases of cholangiocarcinoma is reported sporadically. But it is unusual to see left-sided tumour metastasising to the right PTBD catheter site. Metastasis, in general, has a poor prognosis, but recurrence along the catheter tract in the absence of other systemic diseases can be a different scenario altogether. To date, there is no consensus on the management of this form of metastasis. But carefully selected patients can benefit from aggressive surgical resection. We report a case of a young patient with isolated chest wall metastasis 1 year after resection of left-sided hilar cholangiocarcinoma. The metastasis was resected and, on pathological analysis, was confirmed to be due to implantation of malignant cells along the tract of the PTBD catheter placed via a transpleural route. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Griggs, Jason A

    2017-10-01

    Systematic reviews of literature over the period between 2008 and 2017 are discussed regarding clinical evidence for the factors affecting survival and failure of dental implants. The factors addressed include publication bias, tooth location, insertion torque, collar design, implant-abutment connection design, implant length, implant width, bone augmentation, platform switching, surface roughness, implant coatings, and the use of ceramic materials in the implant body and abutment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Selective identification of different brachytherapy sources, ferromagnetic seeds, and fiducials in the prostate using an automated seed sorting algorithm.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brian J; Brinkmann, Debra H; Kruse, Jon J; Herman, Michael G; LaJoie, Wayne N; Schwartz, David J; Pisansky, Thomas M; Kline, Robert W

    2004-01-01

    Routine permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) includes CT-based postimplant dosimetry (PID). A method of identifying different source types from CT data in the same implant volume is described. A previously described automatic method for seed localization using CT data is used in this study. Two cases were analyzed: a PPB case with (103)Pd followed by salvage (125)I implantation, both performed at another institution, and a cadaver case where 4 different seed types, including ferromagnetic seeds, and fiducials were implanted. Automatic segregation of different seed types with minimal manual correction is demonstrated using the described localization algorithm. The process is confirmed accurate by comparison of plain film radiographs to CT data and digitally reconstructed radiographs. Unique identification of different source types, including PPB seeds, fiducial markers, and ferromagnetic seeds in permanent implants is possible and permits dosimetric analyses that are spatially coincident.

  6. Angle-dependent ultrasonic detection and imaging of two types of brachytherapy seeds using singular spectrum analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mamou, Jonathan; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Feleppa, Ernest J.

    2008-01-01

    Brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer uses transrectal ultrasound to guide implantation of titanium-shelled radioactive seeds. Transperitoneal implantation allows errors in placement that cause suboptimal dosimetry. Conventional ultrasound cannot reliably image implanted seeds; therefore, seed misplacements cannot be corrected in the operating room. Previously, an algorithm based on singular spectrum analysis was shown to image palladium seeds better than B-mode ultrasound could. The algorithm is now applied to imaging an iodine seed in gel and in beef tissue as a function of seed angle relative to the incident ultrasound. Results indicate that both seed types are imaged reliably by the algorithm. PMID:19206692

  7. Direct seeding

    Treesearch

    Richard M. Godman; G. A. Mattson

    1992-01-01

    At present, direct seeding of hardwoods in the Lake States is more of a supplemental than a primary means of artificial regeneration. Direct seeding may be used to augment a poor seed crop or increase the proportion of a preferred species. In the future, it will no doubt play a bigger role-in anticipation of this we need to collect and store the amounts of seed needed...

  8. Radioactive Seed Localization Compared to Wire Localization in Breast-Conserving Surgery: Initial 6-Month Experience

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, James O.; Moo, Tracy-Ann; King, Tari A.; Van Zee, Kimberly J.; Villegas, Kristine A.; Stempel, Michelle; Eaton, Anne; St. Germain, Jean M.; Morris, Elizabeth; Morrow, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Wire localization (WL) of non-palpable breast cancers on the day of surgery is uncomfortable for patients and impacts OR efficiency. Radioactive seed localization (RSL) before the day of surgery avoids these disadvantages. In this study we compare outcomes of our initial 6-month experience with RSL to those with WL in the preceding 6 months. Methods Lumpectomies for invasive or intraductal cancers localized with a single 125iodine seed (January-June 2012) were compared to those using 1 wire (July-December 2011). Surgeons and radiologists did not change. Positive and close margins were defined as tumor on ink and tumor ≤1mm from ink, respectively. Demographic and clinical characteristics and outcomes were compared between RSL and WL patients. Results There were 431 RSL and 256 WL lumpectomies performed. Clinicopathologic characteristics did not differ between groups. Most seeds (90%) were placed before the day of surgery. Positive margins were present in 7.7% of RSL versus 5.5% of WL patients, and 16.9% of RSL versus 19.9% of WL had close margins (p=0.38). The median operative time was longer for lumpectomy and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in the RSL group (55 versus 48 minutes, p<0.0001). There was no significant difference in the volume of tissue excised between groups. Conclusions In the first 6 months of RSL, operative scheduling was simplified, while rates of positive and close margins were similar to those seen after many years of experience with WL. Operative time was slightly longer for RSL lumpectomy and SLNB; we anticipate this will decrease with experience. PMID:23943024

  9. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  10. Penile Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Three-piece inflatable implants use a fluid-filled reservoir implanted under the abdominal wall, a pump and ... an erection, you pump the fluid from the reservoir into the cylinders. Afterward, you release the valve ...

  11. Evaluation of an automated seed loader for seed calibration in prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Wan, Shuying; Joshi, Chandra P; Carnes, Greg; Schreiner, L John

    2006-01-01

    Automated seed loaders for permanent prostate implants are now commercially available. Besides improved radiation safety, these systems offer seed assay capability and ease of needle loading, making preplanned as well as intra-operative implant procedures more time-efficient. The Isoloader (Mentor Corp., CA) uses individual I125 seeds (SL-125 ProstaSeed) loaded in up to 199 chambers inside a shielded cartridge. The unit performs seed counting and calibration using a builtin solid-state detector. In order to evaluate the reproducibility and accuracy of the calibration process, two test cartridges were measured with the Isoloader itself and compared with a well-type ionization chamber (HDR-1000Plus, Standard Imaging). The air kerma strength measurements for all seeds using the Isoloader had a standard deviation of about 2.7%. For the eight seeds assayed more intensively using both the Isoloader and well chamber, the standard deviations of the measurements for each seed were in the range of 0.8% to 2.8% and 0.6% to 1.3%, respectively. The variation in the Isoloader calibration is attributed to small detector solid angle and bead geometry within seed capsules (verified by radiographs). The reproducibility of the air kerma strength measured by the Isoloader was comparable to that from the well chamber and was clinically acceptable. Seed strength measured with the Isoloader was on average 1% 2% larger than that measured with the well chamber, indicating that the accuracy of the Isoloader was clinically acceptable.

  12. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications. PMID:27879873

  13. High Productivity Implantation ''PARTIAL IMPLANT''

    SciTech Connect

    Hino, Masayoshi; Miyamoto, Naoki; Sakai, Shigeki; Matsumoto, Takao

    2008-11-03

    The patterned ion implantation 'PARTIAL IMPLANT' has been developed as a productivity improvement tool. The Partial Implant can form several different ion dose areas on the wafer surface by controlling the speed of wafer moving and the stepwise rotation of twist axis. The Partial Implant system contains two implant methods. One method is 'DIVIDE PARTIAL IMPLANT', that is aimed at reducing the consumption of the wafer. The Divide Partial Implant evenly divides dose area on one wafer surface into two or three different dose part. Any dose can be selected in each area. So the consumption of the wafer for experimental implantation can be reduced. The second method is 'RING PARTIAL IMPLANT' that is aimed at improving yield by correcting electrical characteristic of devices. The Ring Partial Implant can form concentric ion dose areas. The dose of wafer external area can be selected to be within plus or minus 30% of dose of wafer central area. So the electrical characteristic of devices can be corrected by controlling dose at edge side on the wafer.

  14. Endodontic implants

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rakesh K.; Tikku, A. P.; Chandra, Anil; Wadhwani, K. K.; Ashutosh kr; Singh, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic implants were introduced back in 1960. Endodontic implants enjoyed few successes and many failures. Various reasons for failures include improper case selection, improper use of materials and sealers and poor preparation for implants. Proper case selection had given remarkable long-term success. Two different cases are being presented here, which have been treated successfully with endodontic implants and mineral trioxide aggregate Fillapex (Andreaus, Brazil), an MTA based sealer. We suggest that carefully selected cases can give a higher success rate and this method should be considered as one of the treatment modalities. PMID:25298723

  15. Mutation breeding by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zengliang; Deng, Jianguo; He, Jianjun; Huo, Yuping; Wu, Yuejin; Wang, Xuedong; Lui, Guifu

    1991-07-01

    Ion implantation as a new mutagenic method has been used in the rice breeding program since 1986, and for mutation breeding of other crops later. It has been shown, in principle and in practice, that this method has many outstanding advantages: lower damage rate; higher mutation rate and wider mutational spectrum. Many new lines of rice with higher yield rate; broader disease resistance; shorter growing period but higher quality have been bred from ion beam induced mutants. Some of these lines have been utilized for the intersubspecies hybridization. Several new lines of cotton, wheat and other crops are now in breeding. Some biophysical effects of ion implantation for crop seeds have been studied.

  16. Enhanced Ultrasound Visualization of Bracytherapy Seeds by a Novel Magnetically Induced Motion Imaging Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    Months 12-36) A) Simulate ultrasound RF echoes from seed and tissue vibrating as determined in Task 2 for varying seed-beam angle B) Evaluate...clutter targets in prostate phantom D) Capture RF echo data and generate seed images using the algorithm of Task 3 E) Implant seeds in excised animal...The resulting scans are shown in figure 1. As expected, the echo from the seed decreases rapidly as its angle to the transducer increases. For

  17. Radiobiological evaluation of low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaup, Courtney James

    Low dose-rate brachytherapy is a radiation therapy treatment for men with prostate cancer. While this treatment is common, the use of isotopes with varying dosimetric characteristics means that the prescription level and normal organ tolerances vary. Additionally, factors such as prostate edema, seed loss and seed migration may alter the dose distribution within the prostate. The goal of this work is to develop a radiobiological response tool based on spatial dose information which may be used to aid in treatment planning, post-implant evaluation and determination of the effects of prostate edema and seed migration. Aim 1: Evaluation of post-implant prostate edema and its dosimetric and biological effects. Aim 2: Incorporation of biological response to simplify post-implant evaluation. Aim 3: Incorporation of biological response to simplify treatment plan comparison. Aim 4: Radiobiologically based comparison of single and dual-isotope implants. Aim 5: Determine the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of seed disappearance and migration.

  18. Comparison between high and low source activity seeds for I-125 permanent seed prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Masucci, Giuseppina Laura; Donath, David; Tétreault-Laflamme, Audrey; Carrier, Jean-François; Hervieux, Yannick; Larouche, Renée Xavière; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Taussky, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    To compare low (mean 0.44, SD ± 0.0163 mCi) with high source activity (0.61 ± 0.0178 mCi) in I(125) permanent seed brachytherapy regarding seed loss, dosimetric outcome, and toxicity. The study included 199 patients with prostate cancer treated by permanent seed brachytherapy alone: the first 105 with seeds of lower activity (first cohort), the following 94 with higher seed activity (second cohort). The V100, V150, V200, and D90 were analyzed on the CT scan 30 days after implantation (CTD30). The V100, V150, and D2 of the rectum were also calculated on CTD30. Seed loss was determined 30 days after implantation. Urinary toxicity was measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire. Lower seed activity was associated with lower V150 and V200 (p = 0.01 and p ≤ 0.001, respectively) on CTD30. More patients had a V100 <90% and D90 <140 Gy in the lower activity cohort (p = 0.098 for D90 and p = 0.029 for V100) on CTD30. There was no difference between cohorts in dose to the rectum (p = 0.325-0.516) or difference in patients' IPSS score from baseline (p = 0.0.117-0.618), although there was a trend toward more urinary toxicity at 4 and 8 months for high activity seeds. Seed loss as a percentage of implanted seeds was not different (p = 0.324). Higher seed activity (I(125) ≥ 0.6 mCi) results in at least equal V100 and D90 on CTD30. However, dose inhomogeneity and a trend toward more urinary toxicity at 4 and 8 months after treatment may lead to a higher long-term urinary complications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Seed proteomics.

    PubMed

    Miernyk, Ján A; Hajduch, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Seeds comprise a protective covering, a small embryonic plant, and a nutrient-storage organ. Seeds are protein-rich, and have been the subject of many mass spectrometry-based analyses. Seed storage proteins (SSP), which are transient depots for reduced nitrogen, have been studied for decades by cell biologists, and many of the complicated aspects of their processing, assembly, and compartmentation are now well understood. Unfortunately, the abundance and complexity of the SSP requires that they be avoided or removed prior to gel-based analysis of non-SSP. While much of the extant data from MS-based proteomic analysis of seeds is descriptive, it has nevertheless provided a preliminary metabolic picture explaining much of their biology. Contemporary studies are moving more toward analysis of protein interactions and posttranslational modifications, and functions of metabolic networks. Many aspects of the biology of seeds make then an attractive platform for heterologous protein expression. Herein we present a broad review of the results from the proteomic studies of seeds, and speculate on a potential future research directions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical implementation of stereotaxic brain implant optimization.

    PubMed

    Rosenow, U F; Wojcicka, J B

    1991-01-01

    This optimization method for stereotaxic brain implants is based on seed/strand configurations of the basic type developed for the National Cancer Institute (NCI) atlas of regular brain implants. Irregular target volume shapes are determined from delineation in a stack of contrast enhanced computed tomography scans. The neurosurgeon may then select up to ten directions, or entry points, of surgical approach of which the program finds the optimal one under the criterion of smallest target volume diameter. Target volume cross sections are then reconstructed in 5-mm-spaced planes perpendicular to the implantation direction defined by the entry point and the target volume center. This information is used to define a closed line in an implant cross section along which peripheral seed strands are positioned and which has now an irregular shape. Optimization points are defined opposite peripheral seeds on the target volume surface to which the treatment dose rate is prescribed. Three different optimization algorithms are available: linear least-squares programming, quadratic programming with constraints, and a simplex method. The optimization routine is implemented into a commercial treatment planning system. It generates coordinate and source strength information of the optimized seed configurations for further dose rate distribution calculation with the treatment planning system, and also the coordinate settings for the stereotaxic Brown-Roberts-Wells (BRW) implantation device.

  1. Clinical implementation of stereotaxic brain implant optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenow, U.F.; Wojcicka, J.B. )

    1991-03-01

    This optimization method for stereotaxic brain implants is based on seed/strand configurations of the basic type developed for the National Cancer Institute (NCI) atlas of regular brain implants. Irregular target volume shapes are determined from delineation in a stack of contrast enhanced computed tomography scans. The neurosurgeon may then select up to ten directions, or entry points, of surgical approach of which the program finds the optimal one under the criterion of smallest target volume diameter. Target volume cross sections are then reconstructed in 5-mm-spaced planes perpendicular to the implantation direction defined by the entry point and the target volume center. This information is used to define a closed line in an implant cross section along which peripheral seed strands are positioned and which has now an irregular shape. Optimization points are defined opposite peripheral seeds on the target volume surface to which the treatment dose rate is prescribed. Three different optimization algorithms are available: linear least-squares programming, quadratic programming with constraints, and a simplex method. The optimization routine is implemented into a commercial treatment planning system. It generates coordinate and source strength information of the optimized seed configurations for further dose rate distribution calculation with the treatment planning system, and also the coordinate settings for the stereotaxic Brown-Roberts-Wells (BRW) implantation device.

  2. Radioactive seed migration following parotid gland interstitial brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yi; Huang, Ming-Wei; Zhao, Yi-Jiao; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the incidence and associated factors of pulmonary seed migration after parotid brachytherapy using a novel migrated seed detection technique. Patients diagnosed with parotid cancer who underwent permanent parotid brachytherapy from January 2006 to December 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Head and neck CT scans and chest X-rays were evaluated during routine follow-up. Mimics software and Geomagic Studio software were used for seed reconstruction and migrated seed detection from the original implanted region, respectively. Postimplant dosimetry analysis was performed after seeds migration if the seeds were still in their emitting count. Adverse clinical sequelae from seed embolization to the lung were documented. The radioactive seed implants were identified on chest X-rays in 6 patients. The incidence rate of seed migration in 321 parotid brachytherapy patients was 1.87% (6/321) and that of individual seed migration was 0.04% (6/15218 seeds). All migrated seeds were originally from the retromandibular region. No adverse dosimetric consequences were found in the target region. Pulmonary symptoms were not reported by any patient in this study. In our patient set, migration of radioactive seeds with an initial radioactivity of 0.6-0.7 mCi to the chest following parotid brachytherapy was rare. Late migration of a single seed from the central target region did not affect the dosimetry significantly, and patients did not have severe short-term complications. This study proposed a novel technique to localize the anatomical origin of the migrated seeds during brachytherapy. Our evidence suggested that placement of seeds adjacent to blood vessels was associated with an increased likelihood of seed migration to the lungs. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. About Implantable Contraception

    MedlinePlus

    ... TV, Video Games, and the Internet About Implantable Contraception KidsHealth > For Parents > About Implantable Contraception Print A ... How Much Does It Cost? What Is Implantable Contraception? Implantable contraception (often called the birth control implant) ...

  4. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... bilateral cochlear implantation: a review. Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 2007;15(5):315-318. PMID: 17823546. ... BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  5. Histrelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... implant (Supprelin LA) is used to treat central precocious puberty (CPP; a condition causing children to enter puberty too soon, resulting in faster than normal bone growth and development of sexual characteristics) in girls ...

  6. Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the United States: saline-filled and silicone gel-filled. Both types have a silicone outer shell. ... them. Provide information on saline-filled and silicone gel-filled breast implants, including data supporting a reasonable ...

  7. Cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Connell, Sarah S; Balkany, Thomas J

    2006-08-01

    Cochlear implants are cost-effective auditory prostheses that safely provide a high-quality sensation of hearing to adults who are severely or profoundly deaf. In the past 5 years, progress has been made in hardware and software design, candidate selection, surgical techniques, device programming, education and rehabilitation,and, most importantly, outcomes. Cochlear implantation in the elderly is well tolerated and provides marked improvement in auditory performance and psychosocial functioning.

  8. Contraceptive implants.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding.

  9. Project SEED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Reports on Project SEED (Summer Educational Experience for the Disadvantaged) a project in which high school students from low-income families work in summer jobs in a variety of academic, industrial, and government research labs. The program introduces the students to career possibilities in chemistry and to the advantages of higher education.…

  10. Swelling of the prostate gland by permanent brachytherapy may affect seed migration.

    PubMed

    Kono, Yuzuru; Kubota, Kazuo; Aruga, Takashi; Ishibashi, Akihiko; Morooka, Miyako; Ito, Kimiteru; Itami, Jun; Kanemura, Mikio; Minowada, Shigeru; Tanaka, Takashi

    2010-12-01

    The purpose was to monitor implanted seeds and to determine factors contributing to seed migration after permanent prostate brachytherapy. Sixty-two consecutive patients with Stage 1 prostate cancer who underwent brachytherapy with (125)I seeds between February 2008 and May 2009 were studied prospectively. On post-operative days 1, 7 and 30, scintigraphy was added to conventional radiography to monitor the migration of the implanted seeds. The prostate volume was measured during the pre-planning stage using ultrasound and during the post-planning stage using computed tomography on post-operative days 0 and 30. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed on day 30. Of the 4843 seeds implanted in the prostates of 62 patients, 108 seeds (2.2%) in 43 patients (69.4%) exhibited seed migration. Thirty-five seeds could not be identified using any of the imaging modalities and were likely passed during urination (0.7% of the total number of seeds). The maximum number of migrated seeds in one patient was 10 of the 85 implanted seeds. The fraction of patients with seed migration or loss increased from 27.4% on day 1 to 69.4% on day 30. The number of seeds that had migrated from the prostate increased from 48 (0.1% of the total number of seeds) on 1 day to 78 (1.0%) on day 7 and 108 (2.2%) on day 30. Of the seeds lost from the prostate, 38.9% embolized to the lungs. The seed loss during the first post-operative month was closely correlated with the swelling of the prostate gland between the pre-planning measurement and the post-planning measurement performed on day 0 (P < 0.0001). Prostate swelling between the pre-planning and post-planning (day 0) measurements was significantly associated with seed migration, and adequate attention should be given to this issue.

  11. Distortions induced by radioactive seeds into interstitial brachytherapy dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chuanyu; Inanc, Feyzi; Modrick, Joseph M

    2004-12-01

    In a previous article, we presented development and verification of an integral transport equation-based deterministic algorithm for computing three-dimensional brachytherapy dose distributions. Recently, we have included fluorescence radiation physics and parallel computation to the standing algorithms so that we can compute dose distributions for a large set of seeds without resorting to the superposition methods. The introduction of parallel computing capability provided a means to compute the dose distribution for multiple seeds in a simultaneous manner. This provided a way to study strong heterogeneity and shadow effects induced by the presence of multiple seeds in an interstitial brachytherapy implant. This article presents the algorithm for computing fluorescence radiation, algorithm for parallel computing, and display results for an 81-seed implant that has a perfect and imperfect lattice. The dosimetry data for a single model 6711 seeds is presented for verification and heterogeneity factor computations using simultaneous and superposition techniques are presented.

  12. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  13. Seed Treatment. Manual 92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    This training manual provides information needed to meet minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in the seed treatment category. The text discusses pests commonly associated with seeds; seed treatment pesticides; labels; chemicals and seed treatment equipment; requirements of federal and state seed laws;…

  14. Seed Treatment. Bulletin 760.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowery, Harvey C.

    This manual gives a definition of seed treatment, the types of seeds normally treated, diseases and insects commonly associated with seeds, fungicides and insecticides used, types of equipment used for seed treatment, and information on labeling and coloring of treated seed, pesticide carriers, binders, stickers, and safety precautions. (BB)

  15. Seed Treatment. Bulletin 760.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowery, Harvey C.

    This manual gives a definition of seed treatment, the types of seeds normally treated, diseases and insects commonly associated with seeds, fungicides and insecticides used, types of equipment used for seed treatment, and information on labeling and coloring of treated seed, pesticide carriers, binders, stickers, and safety precautions. (BB)

  16. Seed Treatment. Manual 92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    This training manual provides information needed to meet minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in the seed treatment category. The text discusses pests commonly associated with seeds; seed treatment pesticides; labels; chemicals and seed treatment equipment; requirements of federal and state seed laws;…

  17. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration. PMID:27790598

  18. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neha; Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-09-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration.

  19. Bioevaluation of 125I Ocu-Prosta seeds for application in prostate cancer brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Archana; Sarma, Haladhar Dev; Saxena, Sanjay; Kumar, Yogendra; Chaudhari, Pradip; Goda, Jayant Sastri; Adurkar, Pranjal; Dash, Ashutosh; Samuel, Grace

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: In recent years, brachytherapy involving permanent radioactive seed implantation has emerged as an effective modality for the management of cancer of prostate. 125I-Ocu-Prosta seeds were indigenously developed and studies were carried out to assess the safety of the indigenously developed 125I-Ocu-Prosta seeds for treatment of prostate cancer. Methods: Animal experiments were performed to assess the likelihood of in vivo release of 125I from radioactive seeds and migration of seeds implanted in the prostate gland of the rabbit. In vivo release of 125I activity was monitored by serial blood sampling from the auricular vein and subsequent measurement of 125I activity. Serial computed tomography (CT) scans were done at regular intervals till 6 months post implant to assess the physical migration of the seeds. Results: The laser welded seeds maintained their hermeticity and prevented the in vivo release of 125I activity into the blood as no radioactivity was detected during follow up blood measurements. Our study showed that the miniature 125I seeds were clearly resolved in CT images. Seeds remained within the prostate gland during the entire study period. Moreover, the seed displacement was minimal even within the prostate gland. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings have demonstrated that indigenously developed 125I-Ocu-Prosta seeds may be suitable for application in treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:24927341

  20. Bean Seed Imbibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Enables students to examine the time course for seed imbibition and the pressure generated by imbibing seeds. Provides background information, detailed procedures, and ideas for further investigation. (DDR)

  1. Singular Spectrum Analysis Applied to Ultrasonic Detection and Imaging of Brachytherapy Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Mamou, Jonathan; Feleppa, Ernest J.

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided brachytherapy using titanium-shelled radioactive seeds is a popular, effective means of treating prostate cancer. Unfortunately, implantation using needles inserted transperitoneally causes gland movement and distortion, which often results in seed misplacement and dosimetry errors. If actual seed locations could be determined in the operating room, then corrections to dosimetry errors could be made immediately. However, seed specularity, shadowing, and tissue clutter make imaging seeds difficult using conventional ultrasound. Singular spectrum analysis (SSA) shows promise for reliably imaging radioactive seeds implanted in the prostate and enabling additional corrective implantations to be made in the operating room. SSA utilizes eigenvalues derived from the diagonalized correlation matrix of envelope-detected radiofrequency echo signals to yield a P-value indicative of the likelihood of a seed-specific repetitive signal. We demonstrated the potential of SSA for seed detection and imaging and illustrated the trade-off considerations for optimization of SSA in clinical applications using simulations assessing performance as a function of different levels of noise and the presence of repetitive signals with various repetition periods; experiments in an ideal scattering environment; and experiments using seeds implanted in beef. PMID:17407916

  2. Refining prostate seed brachytherapy: Comparing high-, intermediate-, and low-activity seeds for I-125 permanent seed prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Delouya, Guila; Bahary, Pascal; Carrier, Jean-François; Larouche, Renée-Xavière; Hervieux, Yannick; Béliveau-Nadeau, Dominic; Donath, David; Taussky, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the difference in prostate coverage and dose to the rectum in men with prostate carcinoma treated with permanent seed brachytherapy with different seed activities. Forty-nine patients treated with iodine-125 permanent seed prostate brachytherapy with low-activity seeds of 0.30-0.37 mCi were identified. For each of these patients, 2 patients with similar prostate volume (±2 cc) were paired: one treated with intermediate seed activity (0.44-0.46 mCi) and one with high seed activity (0.60-0.66 mCi). The doses to prostate and rectum were compared using CT on Day 30. A total of 147 patients divided into the three seed activity groups were analyzed. Mean prostate volume was 35.7 cc (standard deviation [SD], 11.70). Compared with low-activity seeds, implants with high-activity seeds consisted of an average of 22 seeds and 4.7 needles less. The dose to the prostate (prostate volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose [V100], prostate volume receiving 150% of the prescribed dose, and minimal dose covering 90% of the prostate volume expressed in Gy) was not higher on Day 30 (p = 0.58-0.97). The mean volume (in cubic centimeters) of rectal wall receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V100) increased with activity: low activity, 0.34 cc (SD, 0.49), intermediate activity, 0.47 cc (SD, 0.48), and high activity, 0.72 cc (SD, 0.79) (p = 0.009). There was a trend (p = 0.073) toward a higher frequency of clinically unfavorable rectal dosimetry (V100 > 1.3 cc) in patients with high-activity seeds (16.7%) compared with low-activity (6.3%) or intermediate-activity (4.2%) seeds. High-activity seeds do not result in a higher dose to the prostate but in a higher dose to the rectum. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Method of electroplating a conversion electron emitting source on implant

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C [Setauket, NY; Gonzales, Gilbert R [New York, NY; Adzic, Radoslav [East Setauket, NY; Meinken, George E [Middle Island, NY

    2012-02-14

    Methods for preparing an implant coated with a conversion electron emitting source (CEES) are disclosed. The typical method includes cleaning the surface of the implant; placing the implant in an activating solution comprising hydrochloric acid to activate the surface; reducing the surface by H.sub.2 evolution in H.sub.2SO.sub.4 solution; and placing the implant in an electroplating solution that includes ions of the CEES, HCl, H.sub.2SO.sub.4, and resorcinol, gelatin, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, before tin plating, a seed layer is formed on the surface. The electroplated CEES coating can be further protected and stabilized by annealing in a heated oven, by passivation, or by being covered with a protective film. The invention also relates to a holding device for holding an implant, wherein the device selectively prevents electrodeposition on the portions of the implant contacting the device.

  4. Dental Implant Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Dental implant surgery Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Dental implant surgery is a procedure that replaces tooth roots ... that look and function much like real ones. Dental implant surgery can offer a welcome alternative to dentures ...

  5. Hip Implant Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Devices Products and Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants Hip Implants Share ... femoral head) is removed and replaced with a prosthetic ball made of metal or ceramic, and the ...

  6. A CT-based computerized treatment planning system for I-125 stereotactic brain implants

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, K.; Smith, V.; Lewis, J.D.; Lulu, B.; Barnett, C.M.; Leibel, S.A.; Gutin, P.; Larson, D.; Phillips, T. )

    1990-02-01

    A computer program has been developed at the University of California, San Francisco, as an aid in planning and evaluating stereotactic brain implants made with {sup 125}I seeds. The program allows images of seeds and catheters to be positioned in the target volume revealed by CT. It then generates and displays the resulting isodose distributions. Catheters may be changed interactively until an optimum implant is achieved. From the geometry of a stereotactic implant frame as measured by CT, the program calculates the approach angles of the catheters in the frame coordinate system. After the seeds are implanted, films made with a fiducial marker box can be used to generate true seed positions and hence true isodoses. This paper describes mathematically the geometrical transformations used by the program, and also outlines its many features and options. In its first 2 years of use the program has proved to be a valuable contributor to improved patient care.

  7. [Cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Lehnhardt, E; Battmer, R D; Nakahodo, K; Laszig, R

    1986-07-01

    Since the middle of 1984, the HNO-Klinik der Medizinischen Hochschule Hannover has provided deaf adults with a 22-channel cochlear implant (CI) device of Clark-NUCLEUS. The digital working system consists of an implantable stimulator/receiver and an externally worn speech processor. Energy and signals are transmitted transcutaneously via a transmitter coil. During the prevailing 26 operations (April 1986) the electrode array could be inserted at least 17 mm into the cochlea. The threshold and comfort levels of all patients were adjusted very quickly; the dynamic range usually grows during the first postoperative weeks. The individual rehabilitation results vary greatly, but all patients show a significant increase of vowel and consonant comprehension while using the speech processor and an improvement of words understood per minute in speech tracking from lip-reading alone to lip-reading with speech processor. Four months after surgery seven of 17 patients (group I) are able to understand on average 42.7 words per minute by speech tracking without lip-reading. Six patients (group II) recognise 69.2% of vowels and 42.5% of consonants by speech processor alone. Four patients (group III) can correctly repeat only vowels (52.3%) without lip-reading, but using the speech processor together with lip reading they have an improvement in consonant understanding of 37.9% and under freefield conditions they are able to understand up to 17.8% numbers of the Freiburg speech test.

  8. Investigating the dosimetric and tumor control consequences of prostate seed loss and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Knaup, Courtney; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Esquivel, Carlos; Stathakis, Sotirios; Swanson, Gregory; Baltas, Dimos; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Low dose-rate brachytherapy is commonly used to treat prostate cancer. However, once implanted, the seeds are vulnerable to loss and movement. The goal of this work is to investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of the types of seed loss and migration commonly seen in prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Five patients were used in this study. For each patient three treatment plans were created using Iodine-125, Palladium-103, and Cesium-131 seeds. The three seeds that were closest to the urethra were identified and modeled as the seeds lost through the urethra. The three seeds closest to the exterior of prostatic capsule were identified and modeled as those lost from the prostate periphery. The seed locations and organ contours were exported from Prowess and used by in-house software to perform the dosimetric and radiobiological evaluation. Seed loss was simulated by simultaneously removing 1, 2, or 3 seeds near the urethra 0, 2, or 4 days after the implant or removing seeds near the exterior of the prostate 14, 21, or 28 days after the implant. Results: Loss of one, two or three seeds through the urethra results in a D{sub 90} reduction of 2%, 5%, and 7% loss, respectively. Due to delayed loss of peripheral seeds, the dosimetric effects are less severe than for loss through the urethra. However, while the dose reduction is modest for multiple lost seeds, the reduction in tumor control probability was minimal. Conclusions: The goal of this work was to investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of the types of seed loss and migration commonly seen in prostate brachytherapy. The results presented show that loss of multiple seeds can cause a substantial reduction of D{sub 90} coverage. However, for the patients in this study the dose reduction was not seen to reduce tumor control probability.

  9. Implant marketing: cost effective implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Wohrle, P S; Levin, R P

    1996-01-01

    The application of the KAL-Technique to the field of implant dentistry allows both patients and dental practices to benefit. It is an exciting advance that decreases frustration and stress in providing implant procedures and lowers overall costs. Professionals using the KAL-Technique report significant predictability in achieving passive framework fit. They are also lowering overall cost of implant cases, which increases the number of patients who can accept implant treatment. It has been well established that the more individuals in a practice that receive implants, the more referrals a practice will gain. This is because implant patients find tremendous advances in the quality of life, and do not hesitate to tell others who can take advantage of this opportunity. Implant dentistry is one of the fastest growing fields in dentistry today. While some other areas of dentistry begin to decline in volume and need, implant dentistry provides the opportunity to keep practices strong and to insure long-term success.

  10. Interstitial therapy of perineal and gynecological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Martinez, A; Herstein, P; Portnuff, J

    1983-03-01

    Thirty-five patients, 38 to 88 years of age, were treated with 125-Iodine or 192-Iridium interstitial implants at Stanford University Medical Center between July 1974, and December, 1978. There were 25 primary epithelial malignancies, eight extensions from intrapelvic organs and two metastatic tumors (hypernephroma and Hodgkin's disease). The involved sites were: urethra (6 patients); vulva (9 patients); vagina (8 patients); anus (7 patients); cervix (5 patients). Implantation was usually performed to treat evident or microscopic disease in conjunction with external beam pelvic treatment with or without local excision. Computerized implant preplanning was used. 125-Iodine seeds were inserted either directly or within absorbable suture Polyglactin 910; 192-Iridium in nylon carriers was placed by suture or transperineal template. Two patients were lost to follow-up leaving 33 patients, 27 of whom are alive and free of local disease from 37 to 76 months. The overall local control rate was 88%, or 29/33 patients. All four local recurrences appeared before 24 months. Minor complications included: 10 patients with transient mucositis, four with superficial ulcers, and one patient with infection at the implanted site. Two major complications occurred: a necrotic rectal ulcer requiring a colostomy and a contracted, painful bladder necessitating a urinary diversion. We conclude that in selected cases interstitial irradiation provides good local control of perineal and gynecological malignancies with low morbidity in this elderly and quite often fragile group of patients.

  11. Tree Seed Technology Training Course

    Treesearch

    F.T. Bonner; James A. Vozzo; W.W. Elam; S.B. Land

    1994-01-01

    This manual is intended primarily to train seed collectors, seed-plant managers, seed analysts, and nursery managers, but it can serve as a resource for any training course in forest regeneration. It includes both temperate and tropical tree species of all intended uses. The manual covers the following topics: seed biology, seed collection, seed handling, seed-quality...

  12. Bilayer Implants

    PubMed Central

    Schagemann, Jan C.; Rudert, Nicola; Taylor, Michelle E.; Sim, Sotcheadt; Quenneville, Eric; Garon, Martin; Klinger, Mathias; Buschmann, Michael D.; Mittelstaedt, Hagen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the regenerative capacity of 2 distinct bilayer implants for the restoration of osteochondral defects in a preliminary sheep model. Methods Critical sized osteochondral defects were treated with a novel biomimetic poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) implant (Treatment No. 2; n = 6) or a combination of Chondro-Gide and Orthoss (Treatment No. 1; n = 6). At 19 months postoperation, repair tissue (n = 5 each) was analyzed for histology and biochemistry. Electromechanical mappings (Arthro-BST) were performed ex vivo. Results Histological scores, electromechanical quantitative parameter values, dsDNA and sGAG contents measured at the repair sites were statistically lower than those obtained from the contralateral surfaces. Electromechanical mappings and higher dsDNA and sGAG/weight levels indicated better regeneration for Treatment No. 1. However, these differences were not significant. For both treatments, Arthro-BST revealed early signs of degeneration of the cartilage surrounding the repair site. The International Cartilage Repair Society II histological scores of the repair tissue were significantly higher for Treatment No. 1 (10.3 ± 0.38 SE) compared to Treatment No. 2 (8.7 ± 0.45 SE). The parameters cell morphology and vascularization scored highest whereas tidemark formation scored the lowest. Conclusion There was cell infiltration and regeneration of bone and cartilage. However, repair was incomplete and fibrocartilaginous. There were no significant differences in the quality of regeneration between the treatments except in some histological scoring categories. The results from Arthro-BST measurements were comparable to traditional invasive/destructive methods of measuring quality of cartilage repair. PMID:27688843

  13. Automatic seed picking for brachytherapy postimplant validation with 3D CT images.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guobin; Sun, Qiyuan; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Zhiyong; Ma, Xiaodong; Jiang, Haisong

    2017-06-22

    Postimplant validation is an indispensable part in the brachytherapy technique. It provides the necessary feedback to ensure the quality of operation. The ability to pick implanted seed relates directly to the accuracy of validation. To address it, an automatic approach is proposed for picking implanted brachytherapy seeds in 3D CT images. In order to pick seed configuration (location and orientation) efficiently, the approach starts with the segmentation of seed from CT images using a thresholding filter which based on gray-level histogram. Through the process of filtering and denoising, the touching seed and single seed are classified. The true novelty of this approach is found in the application of the canny edge detection and improved concave points matching algorithm to separate touching seeds. Through the computation of image moments, the seed configuration can be determined efficiently. Finally, two different experiments are designed to verify the performance of the proposed approach: (1) physical phantom with 60 model seeds, and (2) patient data with 16 cases. Through assessment of validated results by a medical physicist, the proposed method exhibited promising results. Experiment on phantom demonstrates that the error of seed location and orientation is within ([Formula: see text]) mm and ([Formula: see text])[Formula: see text], respectively. In addition, the most seed location and orientation error is controlled within 0.8 mm and 3.5[Formula: see text] in all cases, respectively. The average process time of seed picking is 8.7 s per 100 seeds. In this paper, an automatic, efficient and robust approach, performed on CT images, is proposed to determine the implanted seed location as well as orientation in a 3D workspace. Through the experiments with phantom and patient data, this approach also successfully exhibits good performance.

  14. [Research progress in peri-implant soft tissue engineering augmentation method].

    PubMed

    Pei, Tingting; Yu, Hongqiang; Wen, Chaoju; Guo, Tianqi; Zhou, Yanmin; Peng, Huimin

    2016-05-01

    The sufficiency of hard and soft tissue at the implant site is the guarantee of long-term function, health and the appearance of implant denture. Problem of soft tissue recession at the implant site has always been bothering dentists. Traditional methods for augmentation of soft tissue such as gingival transplantation have disadvantages of instability of the increased soft-tissue and more trauma. Lately the methods that base on tissue engineering to increase the soft tissue of peri-implant sites have drawn great attention. This review focuses on the current methods of peri-implant restoration through tissue engineering, seed cells, biological scaffolds and cytokines.

  15. Transitory improvement of articular cartilage characteristics after implantation of polylactide:polyglycolic acid (PLGA) scaffolds seeded with autologous mesenchymal stromal cells in a sheep model of critical-sized chondral defect.

    PubMed

    Caminal, M; Moll, X; Codina, D; Rabanal, R M; Morist, A; Barrachina, J; Garcia, F; Pla, A; Vives, J

    2014-10-01

    Clinical translation of emerging technologies aiming at cartilage resurfacing is hindered by neither the appropriate scaffold design nor the optimal cell source having been defined. Here, critical-sized, chondral-only focal defects were created in sheep and treated with clinical-grade, co-polymeric poly-lactide:polyglycolic acid scaffolds either alone or seeded with 3.3 × 10(6) ± 0.4 × 10(6) autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells and studied over 12 month follow-up. An untreated group was included for comparison. Second-look arthroscopy performed at 4 months post-treatment evidenced the generation of neocartilage of better quality in those defects treated with cells. However, macroscopic scores in the cell-treated group declined significantly from 7.5 ± 2.3 at 4 months to 3.1 ± 2.6 (p = 0.0098) at 12 months post-treatment, whereas the other two experimental groups remained unaltered during 4-12 month post-treatment. The effectiveness of the cell-based approach proposed in this study is thus restricted to between months 1 and 4 post-treatment.

  16. Enhanced Ultrasound Visualization of Brachytherapy Seeds by a Novel Magnetically Induced Motion Imaging Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    function of vibration frequency Task 3. Seed detection algorithm development (Months 12-36) A) Simulate ultrasound RF echoes from seed and tissue...design developed in Task 1 B) Procure prostate phantom C) Implant seeds and clutter targets in prostate phantom D) Capture RF echo data and...scanner parameters are all controllable within this simulation. The output of the model is simulated ultrasound RF echo data. The simulated data were

  17. [Bilateral cochlear implantation].

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Jona; Migirov, Lela; Taitelbaum-Swead, Rikey; Hildesheimer, Minka

    2010-06-01

    Cochlear implant surgery became the standard of care in hearing rehabilitation of patients with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. This procedure may alter the lives of children and adults enabling them to integrate with the hearing population. In the past, implantation was performed only in one ear, despite the fact that binaural hearing is superior to unilateral, especially in noisy conditions. Cochlear implantation may be performed sequentially or simultaneously. The "sensitive period" of time between hearing loss and implantation and between the two implantations, when performed sequentially, significantly influences the results. Shorter time spans between implantations improve the hearing results after implantation. Hearing success after implantation is highly dependent on the rehabilitation process which includes mapping, implant adjustments and hearing training. Bilateral cochlear implantation in children is recommended as the proposed procedure in spite of the additional financial burden.

  18. Prostate brachytherapy postimplant dosimetry: Automatic plan reconstruction of stranded implants

    SciTech Connect

    Chng, N.; Spadinger, I.; Morris, W. J.; Usmani, N.; Salcudean, S.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Plan reconstruction for permanent implant prostate brachytherapy is the process of determining the correspondence between planned and implanted seeds in postimplant analysis. Plan reconstruction informs many areas of brachytherapy quality assurance, including the verification of seed segmentation, misplacement and migration assessment, implant simulations, and the dosimetry of mixed-activity or mixed-species implants. Methods: An algorithm has been developed for stranded implants which uses the interseed spacing constraints imposed by the suture to improve the accuracy of reconstruction. Seventy randomly selected clinical cases with a mean of 23.6 (range 18-30) needles and mean density of 2.0 (range 1.6-2.6) 2.0 (range 1.6-2.6) seeds/cm{sup 3} were automatically reconstructed and the accuracy compared to manual reconstructions performed using a custom 3D graphical interface. Results: Using the automatic algorithm, the mean accuracy of the assignment relative to manual reconstruction was found to be 97.7{+-}0.5%. Fifty-two of the 70 cases (74%) were error-free; of seeds in the remaining cases, 96.7{+-}0.3% were found to be attributed to the correct strand and 97.0{+-}0.3% were correctly connected to their neighbors. Any necessary manual correction using the interface is usually straightforward. For the clinical data set tested, neither the number of seeds or needles, average density, nor the presence of clusters was found to have an effect on reconstruction accuracy using this method. Conclusions: Routine plan reconstruction of stranded implants can be performed with a high degree of accuracy to support postimplant dosimetry and quality analyses.

  19. Prostate brachytherapy seed localization using a mobile c-arm without tracking.

    PubMed

    Ayad, Maria S; Lee, Junghoon; Prince, Jerry L; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2009-03-13

    The success of prostate brachytherapy depends on the faithful delivery of a dose plan. In turn, intraoperative localization and visualization of the implanted radioactive brachytherapy seeds enables more proficient and informed adjustments to the executed plan during therapy. Prior work has demonstrated adequate seed reconstructions from uncalibrated mobile c-arms using either external tracking devices or image-based fiducials for c-arm pose determination. These alternatives are either time-consuming or interfere with the clinical flow of the surgery, or both. This paper describes a seed reconstruction approach that avoids both tracking devices and fiducials. Instead, it uses the preoperative dose plan in conjunction with a set of captured images to get initial estimates of the c-arm poses followed by an auto-focus technique using the seeds themselves as fiducials to refine the pose estimates. Intraoperative seed localization is achieved through iteratively solving for poses and seed correspondences across images and reconstructing the 3D implanted seeds. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated through a series of simulations involving variable noise levels, seed densities, image separability and number of images. Preliminary results indicate mean reconstruction errors within 1.2 mm for noisy plans of 84 seeds or fewer. These are attained for additive noise whose standard deviation of the 3D mean error introduced to the plan to simulate the implant is within 3.2 mm.

  20. Efficiency of seed production in southern pine seed orchards

    Treesearch

    David L. Bramlett

    1977-01-01

    Seed production in southern pine seed orchards can be evaluated by estimating the efficiency of four separate stages of cone, seed, and seedling development. Calculated values are: cone efficiency (CE), the ratio of mature cones to the initial flower crop; seed efficiency (SE), the ratio of filled seeds per cone to the seed potential; extraction efficiency (EE), the...

  1. 7 CFR 201.18 - Other agricultural seeds (crop seeds).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Other agricultural seeds (crop seeds). 201.18 Section... SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.18 Other agricultural seeds (crop...

  2. 7 CFR 201.18 - Other agricultural seeds (crop seeds).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Other agricultural seeds (crop seeds). 201.18 Section... SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.18 Other agricultural seeds (crop...

  3. 7 CFR 201.18 - Other agricultural seeds (crop seeds).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Other agricultural seeds (crop seeds). 201.18 Section... SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.18 Other agricultural seeds (crop...

  4. 7 CFR 201.18 - Other agricultural seeds (crop seeds).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Other agricultural seeds (crop seeds). 201.18 Section... SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.18 Other agricultural seeds (crop...

  5. 7 CFR 201.18 - Other agricultural seeds (crop seeds).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Other agricultural seeds (crop seeds). 201.18 Section... SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.18 Other agricultural seeds (crop...

  6. Seed Treatment. Sale Publication 4076.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamsley, Mary Ann, Ed.; Vermeire, Donna M., Ed.

    This guide gives information about types of seeds that may require chemical protection against pests, seed treatment pesticide formulations, seed treatment methods, labeling treated seed, and safety and environmental precautions. (Author/BB)

  7. What Are Chia Seeds?

    MedlinePlus

    ... The seeds of a related plant, Salvia columbariae (golden chia), were used primarily by Native Americans in ... Sprinkle ground or whole chia seeds on cereal, rice, yogurt or vegetables. In Mexico, a dish called ...

  8. Equivalent Biochemical Control and Improved Prostate-Specific Antigen Nadir After Permanent Prostate Seed Implant Brachytherapy Versus High-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and High-Dose Conformal Proton Beam Radiotherapy Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbari, Siavash; Weinberg, Vivian K.; Shinohara, Katsuto; Speight, Joycelyn L.; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Hsu, I.-C.; Pickett, Barby; McLaughlin, Patrick W.; Sandler, Howard M.; Roach, Mack

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Permanent prostate implant brachytherapy (PPI), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and conformal proton beam radiotherapy (CPBRT) are used in the treatment of localized prostate cancer, although no head-to-head trials have compared these modalities. We studied the biochemical control (biochemical no evidence of disease [bNED]) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir achieved with contemporary PPI, and evaluated it against 3D-CRT and CPBRT. Patients and Methods: A total of 249 patients were treated with PPI at the University of California, San Francisco, and the outcomes were compared with those from a 3D-CRT cohort and the published results of a high-dose CPBRT boost (CPBRTB) trial. For each comparison, subsets of the PPI cohort were selected with patient and disease criteria similar to those of the reference group. Results: With a median follow-up of 5.3 years, the bNED rate at 5 and 7 years achieved with PPI was 92% and 86%, respectively, using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition, and 93% using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. Using the ASTRO definition, a 5-year bNED rate of 78% was achieved for the 3D-CRT patients compared with 94% for a comparable PPI subset and 93% vs. 92%, respectively, using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. The median PSA nadir for patients treated with PPI and 3D-CRT was 0.10 and 0.40 ng/mL, respectively (p < .0001). For the CPBRT comparison, the 5-year bNED rate after a CPBRTB was 91% using the ASTRO definition vs. 93% for a similar group of PPI patients. A greater proportion of PPI patients achieved a lower PSA nadir compared with those achieved in the CPBRTB trial (PSA nadir <=0.5 ng/mL, 91% vs. 59%, respectively). Conclusion: We have demonstrated excellent outcomes in low- to intermediate-risk patients treated with PPI, suggesting at least equivalent 5-year bNED rates and a greater proportion of men achieving lower PSA nadirs compared with 3D-CRT or

  9. Repair of Avascular Meniscus Tears with Electrospun Collagen Scaffolds Seeded with Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jihye; Sovani, Sujata; Glembotski, Nicholas E; Du, Jiang; Jin, Sungho; Grogan, Shawn P; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2016-03-01

    The self-healing capacity of an injured meniscus is limited to the vascularized regions and is especially challenging in the inner avascular regions. As such, we investigated the use of human meniscus cell-seeded electrospun (ES) collagen type I scaffolds to produce meniscal tissue and explored whether these cell-seeded scaffolds can be implanted to repair defects created in meniscal avascular tissue explants. Human meniscal cells (derived from vascular and avascular meniscal tissue) were seeded on ES scaffolds and cultured. Constructs were evaluated for cell viability, gene expression, and mechanical properties. To determine potential for repair of meniscal defects, human meniscus avascular cells were seeded and cultured on aligned ES collagen scaffolds for 4 weeks before implantation. Surgical defects resembling "longitudinal tears" were created in the avascular zone of bovine meniscus and implanted with cell-seeded collagen scaffolds and cultured for 3 weeks. Tissue regeneration and integration were evaluated by histology, immunohistochemistry, mechanical testing, and magentic resonance imaging. Ex vivo implantation with cell-seeded collagen scaffolds resulted in neotissue that was significantly better integrated with the native tissue than acellular collagen scaffolds or untreated defects. Human meniscal cell-seeded ES collagen scaffolds may therefore be useful in facilitating meniscal repair of avascular meniscus tears.

  10. Repair of Avascular Meniscus Tears with Electrospun Collagen Scaffolds Seeded with Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jihye; Sovani, Sujata; Glembotski, Nicholas E.; Du, Jiang; Jin, Sungho; Grogan, Shawn P.

    2016-01-01

    The self-healing capacity of an injured meniscus is limited to the vascularized regions and is especially challenging in the inner avascular regions. As such, we investigated the use of human meniscus cell-seeded electrospun (ES) collagen type I scaffolds to produce meniscal tissue and explored whether these cell-seeded scaffolds can be implanted to repair defects created in meniscal avascular tissue explants. Human meniscal cells (derived from vascular and avascular meniscal tissue) were seeded on ES scaffolds and cultured. Constructs were evaluated for cell viability, gene expression, and mechanical properties. To determine potential for repair of meniscal defects, human meniscus avascular cells were seeded and cultured on aligned ES collagen scaffolds for 4 weeks before implantation. Surgical defects resembling “longitudinal tears” were created in the avascular zone of bovine meniscus and implanted with cell-seeded collagen scaffolds and cultured for 3 weeks. Tissue regeneration and integration were evaluated by histology, immunohistochemistry, mechanical testing, and magentic resonance imaging. Ex vivo implantation with cell-seeded collagen scaffolds resulted in neotissue that was significantly better integrated with the native tissue than acellular collagen scaffolds or untreated defects. Human meniscal cell-seeded ES collagen scaffolds may therefore be useful in facilitating meniscal repair of avascular meniscus tears. PMID:26842062

  11. Seed Development and Germination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seed is the fertilized and matured ovule of angiosperms and gymnosperms and represents a crucial stage in the life cycle of plants. Seeds of diverse plant species may display differences in size, shape and color. Despite apparent morphological variations, most mature seeds consist of three major com...

  12. Needs of Seeds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2011-01-01

    The "Needs of Seeds" formative assessment probe can be used to find out whether students recognize that seeds have needs both similar to and different from plants and other living organisms (Keeley, Eberle, and Tugel 2007). The probe reveals whether students overgeneralize the needs of seeds by assuming they have the same needs as the adult plants…

  13. Pasture seed banks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In our surveys of northeastern pastures, we found the equivalent of more than 8 million seeds per acre in the surface soil (the top four inches) from the seed bank study. These seeds came from 58 species of plants. The annual forbs (all broadleaf plants with the exception of legumes and trees) domin...

  14. Preservation of recalcitrant seeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recalcitrant and intermediate seeds are not included in seed banks because of misperceptions that these efforts would be futile. Between 20 and 25% of the Earth’s angiosperm species are estimated to produce recalcitrant or intermediate seeds. These species are more prevalent in the tropics and sub...

  15. Going to Seed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Richard R.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a unit on seeds designed to introduce students to their scientific and nutritional uses. Unit activities are easily done, employ a variety of process skills, and can be used at various grade levels. Suggests field trips to gather seeds, seed sprouting, and making cookies out of various whole grains. (JM)

  16. Seed Proteomics"

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Proteomic analysis of seeds encounters some specific problems that do not impinge on analyses of other plant cells, tissues, or organs. There are anatomic considerations. Seeds comprise the seed coat, the storage organ(s), and the embryonic axis. Are these to be studied individually or as a compo...

  17. Needs of Seeds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2011-01-01

    The "Needs of Seeds" formative assessment probe can be used to find out whether students recognize that seeds have needs both similar to and different from plants and other living organisms (Keeley, Eberle, and Tugel 2007). The probe reveals whether students overgeneralize the needs of seeds by assuming they have the same needs as the adult plants…

  18. Norplant implants.

    PubMed

    Henley, E

    1993-06-01

    This letter to the editor is in response to 3 articles on the use of the Norplant implant contraceptive in The Indian Health Service (IHS) Provider. Norplant and the FDA-approved Depo-Provera now expand contraceptive options for women. All IHS and 638 sites might be able to offer both options. Several of the authors expressed concern regarding decreased Norplant effectiveness in heavier patients. Norplant is still more effective than any other currently available reversible contraceptive in the US at all weights. Many experts feel the current silastic capsule provides adequate hormone levels even in heavier women. The Crow Service Unit has initiated their Norplant program, although the Wyeth consent form seems unnecessarily extensive. The Albuquerque Service Unit consent form simply describes the procedure and confirms that patients have read and understand the fact sheet. The theoretical risk of thromboembolism is vastly outweighed by the potential benefit of reliable contraception in high risk alcoholic women, except perhaps in women with severe liver disease. While Norplant is expensive, programs need to consider the actual cost of a pregnancy, potential complications, and the financial and social costs of unintended pregnancy. For those in difficult straits, the manufacturer has set up a foundation for obtaining Norplant free of charge. Depo-Provera comes in a 150 mg dose vial that is given every 3 months. The mean time to ovulation is 4.5 months from the last dose. The adverse reaction spectrum is similar to Norplant as they are both progesterone-related agents. Providers and clinics should reduce barriers to family planning by giving out more pill packs at a time; letting adolescents who wish to delay their first pelvic exam have 3 months of pills without an exam; making condoms available in exam rooms rather than through pharmacy prescriptions; and increasing patient accessibility to the morning-after pill.

  19. [Biomaterials in cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Stöver, T; Lenarz, T

    2009-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) represent the "gold standard" for the treatment of congenitally deaf children and postlingually deafened adults. Thus, cochlear implantation is a success story of new bionic prosthesis development. Owing to routine application of cochlear implants in adults but also in very young children (below the age of one), high demands are placed on the implants. This is especially true for biocompatibility aspects of surface materials of implant parts which are in contact with the human body. In addition, there are various mechanical requirements which certain components of the implants must fulfil, such as flexibility of the electrode array and mechanical resistance of the implant housing. Due to the close contact of the implant to the middle ear mucosa and because the electrode array is positioned in the perilymphatic space via cochleostomy, there is a potential risk of bacterial transferral along the electrode array into the cochlea. Various requirements that have to be fulfilled by cochlear implants, such as biocompatibility, electrode micromechanics, and although a very high level of technical standards has been carried out there is still demand for the improvement of implants as well as of the materials used for manufacturing, ultimately leading to increased implant performance. General considerations of material aspects related to cochlear implants as well as potential future perspectives of implant development will be discussed.

  20. Evaluation of the dose distribution for prostate implants using various {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources

    SciTech Connect

    Meigooni, Ali S.; Luerman, Christine M.; Sowards, Keith T.

    2009-04-15

    Recently, several different models of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy sources have been introduced in order to meet the increasing demand for prostate seed implants. These sources have different internal structures; hence, their TG-43 dosimetric parameters are not the same. In this study, the effects of the dosimetric differences among the sources on their clinical applications were evaluated. The quantitative and qualitative evaluations were performed by comparisons of dose distributions and dose volume histograms of prostate implants calculated for various designs of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources. These comparisons were made for an identical implant scheme with the same number of seeds for each source. The results were compared with the Amersham model 6711 seed for {sup 125}I and the Theragenics model 200 seed for {sup 103}Pd using the same implant scheme.

  1. Protection by DMSO against Cell Death Caused by Intracellularly Localized Iodine-125, Iodine-131 and Polonium-210

    PubMed Central

    Bishayee, Anupam; Rao, Dandamudi V.; Bouchet, Lionel G.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which DNA-incorporated radionuclides impart lethal damage to mammalian cells were investigated by examining the capacity of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to protect against lethal damage to Chinese hamster V79 cells caused by unbound tritium (3H2O), DNA-incorporated 125I-and 131I-iododeoxyuridine (125IdU, 131IdU), and cytoplasmically localized 210Po citrate. The radionuclides 3H and 131I emit low-and medium-energy β particles, respectively, 125I is a prolific Auger electron emitter, and 210Po emits 5.3 MeV α particles. Cells were radiolabeled and maintained at 10.5°C for 72 h in the presence of different concentrations of DMSO (5–12.5% v/v), and the surviving fraction compared to that of unlabeled controls was determined. DMSO afforded no protection against the lethal effects of the high-LET α particles emitted by 210Po. Protection against lethal damage caused by unbound 3H, 131IdU and 125IdU depended on the concentration of DMSO in the culture medium. Ten percent DMSO provided maximum protection in all cases. The dose modification factors obtained at 10% DMSO for 3H2O, 131IdU, 125IdU and 210Po citrate were 2.9 ± 0.01, 2.3 ± 0.5, 2.6 ± 0.2 and 0.95 ± 0.07, respectively. These results indicate that the toxicity of Auger electron and β-particle emitters incorporated into the DNA of mammalian cells is largely radical-mediated and is therefore indirect in nature. This is also the case for the low-energy β particles emitted by 3H2O. In contrast, α particles impart lethal damage largely by direct effects. Finally, calculations of cellular absorbed doses indicate that β-particle emitters are substantially more toxic when incorporated into the DNA of mammalian cells than when they are localized extracellularly. PMID:10761002

  2. The seed nuclear proteome.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Ombretta; Rogniaux, Hélène; Larré, Colette; Thompson, Richard; Gallardo, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory networks coordinating seed development will help to manipulate seed traits, such as protein content and seed weight, in order to increase yield and seed nutritional value of important food crops, such as legumes. Because of the cardinal role of the nucleus in gene expression, sub-proteome analyses of nuclei from developing seeds were conducted, taking advantage of the sequences available for model species. In this review, we discuss the strategies used to separate and identify the nuclear proteins at a stage when the seed is preparing for reserve accumulation. We present how these data provide an insight into the complexity and distinctive features of the seed nuclear proteome. We discuss the presence of chromatin-modifying enzymes and proteins that have roles in RNA-directed DNA methylation and which may be involved in modifying genome architecture in preparation for seed filling. Specific features of the seed nuclei at the transition between the stage of cell divisions and that of cell expansion and reserve deposition are described here which may help to manipulate seed quality traits, such as seed weight.

  3. Peri-Implant Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Consumption and Gum Health Workshop on Regeneration Periodontal Disease More Prevalent among Ethnic Minorities Dental Implants Periodontal ... factors for developing peri-implant disease include previous periodontal disease diagnosis, poor plaque control, smoking , and diabetes . It ...

  4. Implants for lucky few

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, David

    2011-08-01

    In his article "Vision of beauty" (May pp22-27), Richard Taylor points the way to fractal design for retinal implants and makes an enthusiastic case for incorporating such features into the next generation of such implants.

  5. Characterization and optimization of cell seeding in scaffolds by factorial design: quality by design approach for skeletal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yantian; Bloemen, Veerle; Impens, Saartje; Moesen, Maarten; Luyten, Frank P; Schrooten, Jan

    2011-12-01

    Cell seeding into scaffolds plays a crucial role in the development of efficient bone tissue engineering constructs. Hence, it becomes imperative to identify the key factors that quantitatively predict reproducible and efficient seeding protocols. In this study, the optimization of a cell seeding process was investigated using design of experiments (DOE) statistical methods. Five seeding factors (cell type, scaffold type, seeding volume, seeding density, and seeding time) were selected and investigated by means of two response parameters, critically related to the cell seeding process: cell seeding efficiency (CSE) and cell-specific viability (CSV). In addition, cell spatial distribution (CSD) was analyzed by Live/Dead staining assays. Analysis identified a number of statistically significant main factor effects and interactions. Among the five seeding factors, only seeding volume and seeding time significantly affected CSE and CSV. Also, cell and scaffold type were involved in the interactions with other seeding factors. Within the investigated ranges, optimal conditions in terms of CSV and CSD were obtained when seeding cells in a regular scaffold with an excess of medium. The results of this case study contribute to a better understanding and definition of optimal process parameters for cell seeding. A DOE strategy can identify and optimize critical process variables to reduce the variability and assists in determining which variables should be carefully controlled during good manufacturing practice production to enable a clinically relevant implant.

  6. Cochlear Implants for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasenstab, M. Suzanne; Laughton, Joan

    1991-01-01

    The use of cochlear implants in children with profound bilateral hearing loss is discussed, focusing on how a cochlear implant works; steps in a cochlear implant program (evaluation, surgery, programing, and training); and rehabilitation procedures involved in auditory development and speech development. (JDD)

  7. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  8. Multilayer cell-seeded polymer nanofiber constructs for soft-tissue reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Barker, Daniel A; Bowers, Daniel T; Hughley, Brian; Chance, Elizabeth W; Klembczyk, Kevin J; Brayman, Kenneth L; Park, Stephen S; Botchwey, Edward A

    2013-09-01

    Cell seeding throughout the thickness of a nanofiber construct allows for patient-specific implant alternatives with long-lasting effects, earlier integration, and reduced inflammation when compared with traditional implants. Cell seeding may improve implant integration with host tissue; however, the effect of cell seeding on thick nanofiber constructs has not been studied. To use a novel cell-preseeded nanofiber tissue engineering technique to create a 3-dimensional biocompatible implant alternative to decellularized extracellular matrix. Animal study with mammalian cell culture to study tissue engineered scaffolds. Academic research laboratory. Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats each received 4 implant types. The grafts included rat primary (enhanced green fluorescent protein-positive [eGFP+]) fibroblast-seeded polycaprolactone (PCL)/collagen nanofiber scaffold, PCL/collagen cell-free nanofiber scaffold, acellular human cadaveric dermis (AlloDerm), and acellular porcine dermis (ENDURAGen). Rats were monitored postoperatively and received enrofloxacin in the drinking water for 4 days prophylactically and buprenorphine (0.2-0.5 mg/kg administered subcutaneously twice a day postoperatively for pain for 48 hours). The viability of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts cultured on PCL electrospun nanofibers was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy. Soft-tissue remodeling was examined histologically and with novel ex vivo volume determinations of implants using micro-computed tomography of cell-seeded implants relative to nanofibers without cells and commonly used dermal grafts of porcine and human origin (ENDURAGen and AlloDerm, respectively). The fate and distribution of eGFP+ seeded donor fibroblasts were assessed using immunohistochemistry. Fibroblasts migrated across nanofiber layers within 12 hours and remained viable on a single layer for up to 14 days. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed a nanoscale structure with a mean (SD) diameter of 158 (72) nm. Low extrusion

  9. Fast radioactive seed localization in intraoperative cone beam CT for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yu-chi; Xiong, Jian-ping; Cohan, Gilad; Zaider, Marco; Mageras, Gig; Zelefsky, Michael

    2013-03-01

    A fast knowledge-based radioactive seed localization method for brachytherapy was developed to automatically localize radioactive seeds in an intraoperative volumetric cone beam CT (CBCT) so that corrections, if needed, can be made during prostate implant surgery. A transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) scan is acquired for intraoperative treatment planning. Planned seed positions are transferred to intraoperative CBCT following TRUS-to-CBCT registration using a reference CBCT scan of the TRUS probe as a template, in which the probe and its external fiducial markers are pre-segmented and their positions in TRUS are known. The transferred planned seeds and probe serve as an atlas to reduce the search space in CBCT. Candidate seed voxels are identified based on image intensity. Regions are grown from candidate voxels and overlay regions are merged. Region volume and intensity variance is checked against known seed volume and intensity profile. Regions meeting the above criteria are flagged as detected seeds; otherwise they are flagged as likely seeds and sorted by a score that is based on volume, intensity profile and distance to the closest planned seed. A graphical interface allows users to review and accept or reject likely seeds. Likely seeds with approximately twice the seed volume are automatically split. Five clinical cases are tested. Without any manual correction in seed detection, the method performed the localization in 5 seconds (excluding registration time) for a CBCT scan with 512×512×192 voxels. The average precision rate per case is 99% and the recall rate is 96% for a total of 416 seeds. All false negative seeds are found with 15 in likely seeds and 1 included in a detected seed. With the new method, updating of calculations of dose distribution during the procedure is possible and thus facilitating evaluation and improvement of treatment quality.

  10. Localization of linked {sup 125}I seeds in postimplant TRUS images for prostate brachytherapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Jinyu . E-mail: Jinyu.Xue@mail.tju.edu; Waterman, Frank; Handler, Jay; Gressen, Eric

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that {sup 125}I seeds can be localized in transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images obtained with a high-resolution probe when the implant is performed with linked seeds and spacers. Adequate seed localization is essential to the implementation of TRUS-based intraoperative dosimetry for prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirteen preplanned peripherally loaded prostate implants were performed using {sup 125}I seeds and spacers linked together in linear arrays that prevent seed migration and maintain precise seed spacing. A set of two-dimensional transverse images spaced at 0.50-cm intervals were obtained with a high-resolution TRUS probe at the conclusion of the procedure with the patient still under anesthesia. The image set extended from 1.0 cm superior to the base to 1.0 cm inferior to the apex. The visible echoes along each needle track were first localized and then compared with the known construction of the implanted array. The first step was to define the distal and proximal ends of each array. The visible echoes were then identified as seeds or spacers from the known sequence of the array. The locations of the seeds that did not produce a visible echo were interpolated from their known position in the array. A CT scan was obtained after implantation for comparison with the TRUS images. Results: On average, 93% (range, 86-99%) of the seeds were visible in the TRUS images. However, it was possible to localize 100% of the seeds in each case, because the locations of the missing seeds could be determined from the known construction of the arrays. Two factors complicated the interpretation of the TRUS images. One was that the spacers also produced echoes. Although weak and diffuse, these echoes could be mistaken for seeds. The other was that the number of echoes along a needle track sometimes exceeded the number of seeds and spacers implanted. This was attributed to the overall length of the array, which was approximately 0.5 cm

  11. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management. PMID:15247993

  12. Artificial Ripening of Sweetgum Seeds

    Treesearch

    F. T. Bonner

    1969-01-01

    Untrained collectors of hardwood seeds often start picking the seeds too early in the year. The immature seeds germinate poorly, if at all, and nursery production suffers. In the study reported here, sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) seeds collected in central Mississippi in mid-August were ripe. Seeds collected as early as July 19 were artificially ripened by...

  13. A role for seed storage proteins in Arabidopsis seed longevity

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thu-Phuong; Cueff, Gwendal; Hegedus, Dwayne D; Rajjou, Loïc; Bentsink, Leónie

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics approaches have been a useful tool for determining the biological roles and functions of individual proteins and identifying the molecular mechanisms that govern seed germination, vigour and viability in response to ageing. In this work the dry seed proteome of four Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes, that carry introgression fragments at the position of seed longevity quantitative trait loci and as a result display different levels of seed longevity, was investigated. Seeds at two physiological states, after-ripened seeds that had the full germination ability and aged (stored) seeds of which the germination ability was severely reduced, were compared. Aged dry seed proteomes were markedly different from the after-ripened and reflected the seed longevity level of the four genotypes, despite the fact that dry seeds are metabolically quiescent. Results confirmed the role of antioxidant systems, notably vitamin E, and indicated that protection and maintenance of the translation machinery and energy pathways are essential for seed longevity. Moreover, a new role for seed storage proteins (SSPs) was identified in dry seeds during ageing. Cruciferins (CRUs) are the most abundant SSPs in Arabidopsis and seeds of a triple mutant for three CRU isoforms (crua crub cruc) were more sensitive to artificial ageing and their seed proteins were highly oxidized compared with wild-type seeds. These results confirm that oxidation is involved in seed deterioration and that SSPs buffer the seed from oxidative stress, thus protecting important proteins required for seed germination and seedling formation. PMID:26184996

  14. Crystallization on prestructured seeds.

    PubMed

    Jungblut, Swetlana; Dellago, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The crystallization transition of an undercooled monodisperse Lennard-Jones fluid in the presence of small prestructured seeds is studied with transition path sampling combined with molecular dynamics simulations. Compared to the homogeneous crystallization, clusters of a few particles arranged into a face- and body-centered cubic structure enhance the crystallization, while icosahedrally ordered seeds do not change the reaction rate. We identify two distinct nucleation regimes-close to the seed and in the bulk. Crystallites form close to the face- and body-centered structures and tend to stay away from the icosahedrally ordered seeds.

  15. Control of Insects in Slash Pine Cones with Trunk Implantations of Bidrin® Systemic Insecticide - First-Year Results

    Treesearch

    Edward P. Merkel

    1969-01-01

    Initial experiments with the implantation of the systemic insecticide Bidrin® into the trunks of slash pines in a seed production area resulted in various degrees of control of coneworms, Dioryctria spp., and the pine seed-worm, Laspeyresia anaronjada Miller, depending on dosage rates and time of application. When applied in early...

  16. Producing the target seed: Seed collection, treatment, and storage

    Treesearch

    Robert P. Karrfalt

    2011-01-01

    The role of high quality seeds in producing target seedlings is reviewed. Basic seed handling and upgrading techniques are summarized. Current advances in seed science and technology as well as those on the horizon are discussed.

  17. Multi-institutional retrospective analysis of learning curves on dosimetry and operation time before and after introduction of intraoperatively built custom-linked seeds in prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Satoh, Takefumi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Saito, Shiro; Kataoka, Masaaki; Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Nakamura, Ryuji; Tanji, Susumu; Masui, Koji; Okihara, Koji; Ohashi, Toshio; Momma, Tetsuo; Aoki, Manabu; Miki, Kenta; Kato, Masako; Morita, Masashi; Katayama, Norihisa; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kawanaka, Takashi; Fukumori, Tomoharu; Ito, Fumitaka; Shiroki, Ryoichi; Baba, Yuji; Inadome, Akito; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Takayama, Hitoshi; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2016-01-01

    This multi-institutional retrospective analysis examined learning curves for dosimetric parameters and operation time after introduction of intraoperatively built custom-linked (IBCL) seeds. Data from consecutive patients treated with seed implantation before and after introduction of IBCL seeds (loose seed, n = 428; IBCL seed, n = 426) were collected from 13 centers. Dose-volume histogram parameters, operation times, and seed migration rates were compared before and after introduction of IBCL seeds. At the 1-month CT analysis, no significant differences were seen in dose to 90% of prostate volume between before and after IBCL seed introduction. No learning curve for dosimetry was seen. Prostate and rectal volume receiving at least 150% of prescription dose (V150 and RV150) were higher in the loose-seed group than in the IBCL-seed group. Operation time was extended by up to 10 min when IBCL seeds were used, although there was a short learning curve of about five patients. The percentage of patients with seed migration in the IBCL-seed group was one-tenth that in the loose-seed group. Our study revealed no dosimetric demerits, no learning curve for dosimetry, and a slightly extended operation time for IBCL seeds. A significant reduction in the rate of seed migration was identified in the IBCL-seed group.

  18. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds with transurethral light delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel approach to photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds utilizing an existing urinary catheter for transurethral light delivery. Two canine prostates were surgically implanted with brachyther- apy seeds under transrectal ultrasound guidance. One prostate was excised shortly after euthanasia and fixed in gelatin. The second prostate was imaged in the native tissue environment shortly after euthanasia. A urinary catheter was inserted in the urethra of each prostate. A 1-mm core diameter optical fiber coupled to a 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser was inserted into the urinary catheter. Light from the fiber was either directed mostly parallel to the fiber axis (i.e. end-fire fire) or mostly 90° to the fiber axis (i.e. side-fire fiber). An Ultrasonix SonixTouch scanner, transrectal ultrasound probe with curvilinear (BPC8-4) and linear (BPL9-5) arrays, and DAQ unit were utilized for synchronized laser light emission and photoacoustic signal acquisition. The implanted brachytherapy seeds were visualized at radial distances of 6-16 mm from the catheter. Multiple brachytherapy seeds were si- multaneously visualized with each array of the transrectal probe using both delay-and-sum (DAS) and short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamforming. This work is the first to demonstrate the feasibility of photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds using a transurethral light delivery method.

  19. A quick SEED tutorial

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, Adam; Evans, John R.

    2015-01-01

    A number of different government-funded seismic data centers offer free open-access data (e.g., U.S. Geological Survey, National Earthquake Information Center, the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS), and Data Management System), which can be freely downloaded and shared among different members of the community (Lay, 2009). To efficiently share data, it is important that different data providers follow a common format. The Standard for the Exchange of Earthquake Data (SEED) provides one such format for storing seismic and other geophysical data. The SEED format is widely used in earthquake seismology; however, SEED and its structure can be difficult for many first-time users (ourselves included). Below is a quick tutorial that outlines the basic structure of SEED format. This write-up is in no way intended to replace the comprehensive SEED manual (Ahern et al., 2009), and instead of going into the details of any specific part of the SEED format we refer the reader to the manual for additional details. The goal of this write-up is to succinctly explain the basic structure of SEED format as well as the associated jargon, as most commonly used now, in a colloquial way so that novice users of SEED can become more familiar with the format and its application quickly. Our goal is to give the reader the necessary background so that when problems or questions about SEED format arise they will have some understanding of where they should look for more details or from where the problem might be stemming. As a secondary goal, we hope to help the reader become familiar with the SEED manual (Ahern et al., 2009), which contains detailed information about all aspects of the SEED format.

  20. Seed dormancy and germination.

    PubMed

    Penfield, Steven

    2017-09-11

    Reproduction is a critical time in plant life history. Therefore, genes affecting seed dormancy and germination are among those under strongest selection in natural plant populations. Germination terminates seed dispersal and thus influences the location and timing of plant growth. After seed shedding, germination can be prevented by a property known as seed dormancy. In practise, seeds are rarely either dormant or non-dormant, but seeds whose dormancy-inducing pathways are activated to higher levels will germinate in an ever-narrower range of environments. Thus, measurements of dormancy must always be accompanied by analysis of environmental contexts in which phenotypes or behaviours are described. At its simplest, dormancy can be imposed by the formation of a simple physical barrier around the seed through which gas exchange and the passage of water are prevented. Seeds featuring this so-called 'physical dormancy' often require either scarification or passage through an animal gut (replete with its associated digestive enzymes) to disrupt the barrier and permit germination. In other types of seeds with 'morphological dormancy' the embryo remains under-developed at maturity and a dormant phase exists as the embryo continues its growth post-shedding, eventually breaking through the surrounding tissues. By far, the majority of seeds exhibit 'physiological dormancy' - a quiescence program initiated by either the embryo or the surrounding endosperm tissues. Physiological dormancy uses germination-inhibiting hormones to prevent germination in the absence of the specific environmental triggers that promote germination. During and after germination, early seedling growth is supported by catabolism of stored reserves of protein, oil or starch accumulated during seed maturation. These reserves support cell expansion, chloroplast development and root growth until photoauxotrophic growth can be resumed. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Examining Children's Models of Seed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewell, Natalie

    2002-01-01

    Reports research that examines children's models of seed. Explores the conceptions held by children (N=75) of germination and seed formation. Concludes that children hold a restricted meaning for the term 'seed'. (DDR)

  2. Examining Children's Models of Seed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewell, Natalie

    2002-01-01

    Reports research that examines children's models of seed. Explores the conceptions held by children (N=75) of germination and seed formation. Concludes that children hold a restricted meaning for the term 'seed'. (DDR)

  3. Accomplishments of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Seed Money program

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1986-09-01

    In 1974, a modest program for funding new, innovative research was initiated at ORNL. It was called the "Seed Money" program and has become part of a larger program, called Exploratory R and D, which is being carried out at all DOE national laboratories. This report highlights 12 accomplishments of the Seed Money Program: nickel aluminide, ion implantation, laser annealing, burn meter, Legionnaires' disease, whole-body radiation counter, the ANFLOW system, genetics and molecular biology, high-voltage equipment, microcalorimeter, positron probe, and atom science. (DLC)

  4. Accomplishments of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Seed Money program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    In 1974, a modest program for funding new, innovative research was initiated at ORNL. It was called the ''Seed Money'' program and has become part of a larger program, called Exploratory R and D, which is being carried out at all DOE national laboratories. This report highlights 12 accomplishments of the Seed Money Program: nickel aluminide, ion implantation, laser annealing, burn meter, Legionnaires' disease, whole-body radiation counter, the ANFLOW system, genetics and molecular biology, high-voltage equipment, microcalorimeter, positron probe, and atom science. (DLC)

  5. [Quality classification criteria of Paeonia suffruticosa seeds].

    PubMed

    Cao, Ya-yue; Zhu, Zai-biao; Guo, Qiao-sheng; Liu, Li; Wang, Chang-lin

    2015-02-01

    In order to establish the quality classification criteria of Paeonia suffruticosa seeds, thirty-one batches of P. suffruticosa seeds from different provenances were selected. The seed rooting rate, seed germination rate, seed purity, seed viability, 1,000-seed weight and moisture content were determined and analyzed through SPSS 20.0 software. Seed rooting rate, seed germination rate and seed purity were selected as the main index for classification, while 1,000-seed weight, seed viability and moisture content could be used as important references. The seed quality grading of P. suffruticosa was set as three grades. The seed quality of each grade should meet following requirements: For the first grade seeds, seed rooting rate ≥ 80%, seed germination rate ≥ 80%, seed purity ≥ 90%, seed viability ≥ 80%, 1,000-seed weight ≥ 250 g, moisture content, ≤ 10. For the second grade seeds, seed rooting rate ≥ 50%, seed germination rate ≥ 60%, seed purity ≥ 70%, seed viability ≥ 75%, 1,000-seed weight ≥ 225 g, moisture content ≤ 10. For the third grade seeds, seed rooting rate ≥ 20%, seed germination rate ≥ 45%, seed purity ≥ 60%, seed viability ≥ 45%, 1,000-seed weight ≥ 205 g, moisture content ≤ 10. The quality classification criteria of P. suffruticosa seeds have been initially established.

  6. GROWING SEEDS, TEACHER'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elementary Science Study, Newton, MA.

    THIS TEACHER'S GUIDE IS DESIGNED FOR USE WITH AN ELEMENTARY SCIENCE STUDY UNIT, "GROWING SEEDS," IN WHICH SUCH BASIC SCIENCE SKILLS AND PROCESSES AS MEASUREMENT, OBSERVATION, AND HYPOTHESIS FORMATION ARE INTRODUCED THROUGH STUDENT ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SEEDS, GERMINATION, AND SEEDLING GROWTH. THE MATERIALS WERE DEVELOPED FOR USE IN…

  7. Longleaf Pine Seed Dispersal

    Treesearch

    William D. Boyer

    1963-01-01

    Production and dispersal of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) seeds were sampled in 1955, 1957, and 1958 on the Escambia Experimental Forest in southwest Alabama.Two transects of seed traps were established at right angles to each of four forest walls enclosing a rectangular 80-acre clearing. Walls were oriented in the cardinal...

  8. Chapter 26. Seed germination

    Treesearch

    Kent R. Jorgensen; G. Richard Wilson

    2004-01-01

    Seed germination represents the means for survival and spread of many plants (McDonough 1977). Germination consists of three overlapping processes: (1) absorption of water, mainly by imbibition, causing swelling of the seed; (2) concurrent enzymatic activity and increased respiration and assimilation rates; and (3) cell enlargement and divisions resulting in emergence...

  9. California tree seed zones

    Treesearch

    John M. Buck; Ronald S. Adams; Jerrold Cone; M. Thompson Conkle; William J. Libby; Cecil J. Eden; Michel J. Knight

    1970-01-01

    California forest tree seed zones were established originally by Fowells (1946), with revisions proposed by Roy (1963) and Schubert (1966). The Forest Tree Seed Committee of the Northern California Section, Society of American Foresters, has revised the original zones and updated the recording system described in the earlier reports. Fowells' (1946) Research Note...

  10. Southern Pine Seed Sources

    Treesearch

    Ronald C. Schmidtling

    2001-01-01

    The selection of an appropriate seed source is critical for successful southern pine plantations. Guidelines for selection of seed sources are presented for loblolly (Pinus taeda L.), slash (P. elliottii Engelm.), longleaf (P. palustris Mill.), Virginia (P. virginiana Mill.), shortleaf (P. echinata...

  11. GROWING SEEDS, TEACHER'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elementary Science Study, Newton, MA.

    THIS TEACHER'S GUIDE IS DESIGNED FOR USE WITH AN ELEMENTARY SCIENCE STUDY UNIT, "GROWING SEEDS," IN WHICH SUCH BASIC SCIENCE SKILLS AND PROCESSES AS MEASUREMENT, OBSERVATION, AND HYPOTHESIS FORMATION ARE INTRODUCED THROUGH STUDENT ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SEEDS, GERMINATION, AND SEEDLING GROWTH. THE MATERIALS WERE DEVELOPED FOR USE IN…

  12. Novel Silicone-Coated 125I Seeds for the Treatment of Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weixing; Cai, Xiaobo; Chen, Dafan; Wan, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    125I seeds coated with titanium are considered a safe and effective interstitial brachytherapy for tumors, while the cost of 125I seeds is a major problem for the patients implanting lots of seeds. The aim of this paper was to develop a novel silicone coating for 125I seeds with a lower cost. In order to show the radionuclide utilization ratio, the silicone was coated onto the seeds using the electro-spinning method and the radioactivity was evaluated, then the anti-tumor efficacy of silicone 125I seeds was compared with titanium 125I seeds. The seeds were divided into four groups: A (control), B (pure silicone), C (silicone 125I), D (titanium 125I) at 2 Gy or 4 Gy. Their anti-tumour activity and mechanism were assessed in vitro and in vivo using a human extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell line FRH-0201 and tumor-bearing BALB/c nude mice. The silicone 125I seeds showed higher radioactivity; the rate of cell apoptosis in vitro and the histopathology in vivo demonstrated that the silicone 125I seeds shared similar anti-tumor efficacy with the titanium 125I seeds for the treatment of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, while they have a much lower cost. PMID:26840346

  13. Novel Silicone-Coated 125I Seeds for the Treatment of Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lizhou; Guo, Lili; Zhang, Weixing; Cai, Xiaobo; Chen, Dafan; Wan, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    125I seeds coated with titanium are considered a safe and effective interstitial brachytherapy for tumors, while the cost of 125I seeds is a major problem for the patients implanting lots of seeds. The aim of this paper was to develop a novel silicone coating for 125I seeds with a lower cost. In order to show the radionuclide utilization ratio, the silicone was coated onto the seeds using the electro-spinning method and the radioactivity was evaluated, then the anti-tumor efficacy of silicone 125I seeds was compared with titanium 125I seeds. The seeds were divided into four groups: A (control), B (pure silicone), C (silicone 125I), D (titanium 125I) at 2 Gy or 4 Gy. Their anti-tumour activity and mechanism were assessed in vitro and in vivo using a human extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell line FRH-0201 and tumor-bearing BALB/c nude mice. The silicone 125I seeds showed higher radioactivity; the rate of cell apoptosis in vitro and the histopathology in vivo demonstrated that the silicone 125I seeds shared similar anti-tumor efficacy with the titanium 125I seeds for the treatment of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, while they have a much lower cost.

  14. Needle track seeding after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma: prevalence, impact, and management challenge

    PubMed Central

    Francica, Giampiero

    2017-01-01

    Neoplastic seeding may arise after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A low risk of seeding after RFA (0–1.1%) has been reported, which may rise up to 2.5% if ablation followed diagnostic biopsy. Needle track seeding presents with one or multiple rounded nodules along the needle track located within the peritoneum, along the abdominal muscles, which were penetrated by the needle, pleural surface, or in the subcutaneous and cutaneous tissues. The most widely used method for the assessment of seeding nodules is ultrasound (US), which usually displays hypoechoic nodules with intralesional vascularization. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of the nodule suspicious for malignant implant is mandatory to confirm the diagnosis and plan therapy. Wide surgical excision is the treatment of choice for neoplastic seeding. Thanks to early diagnosis and prompt treatment, development of needle track seeding is not likely to affect the long-term survival of patients. PMID:28176952

  15. The earliest seeds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillespie, W.H.; Rothwell, G.W.; Scheckler, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    Lagenostomalean-type seeds in bifurcating cupule systems have been discovered in the late Devonian Hampshire Formation of Randolph County, West Virginia, USA (Fig. 1). The associated megaflora, plants from coal balls, and vertebrate and invertebrate faunas demonstrate that the material is Famennian; the microflora indicates a more specific Fa2c age. Consequently, these seeds predate Archaeosperma arnoldii1 from the Fa2d of northeastern Pennsylvania, the oldest previously reported seed. By applying precision fracture, transfer, de??gagement, and thin-section techniques to selected cupules from the more than 100 specimens on hand, we have determined the three-dimensional morphology and histology of the seeds (Fig. 2a-h, k) and cupule systems. A comparison with known late Devonian to early Carboniferous seeds reveals that ours are more primitively organized than all except Genomosperma2,3. ?? 1981 Nature Publishing Group.

  16. Seed germination and vigor.

    PubMed

    Rajjou, Loïc; Duval, Manuel; Gallardo, Karine; Catusse, Julie; Bally, Julia; Job, Claudette; Job, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Germination vigor is driven by the ability of the plant embryo, embedded within the seed, to resume its metabolic activity in a coordinated and sequential manner. Studies using "-omics" approaches support the finding that a main contributor of seed germination success is the quality of the messenger RNAs stored during embryo maturation on the mother plant. In addition, proteostasis and DNA integrity play a major role in the germination phenotype. Because of its pivotal role in cell metabolism and its close relationships with hormone signaling pathways regulating seed germination, the sulfur amino acid metabolism pathway represents a key biochemical determinant of the commitment of the seed to initiate its development toward germination. This review highlights that germination vigor depends on multiple biochemical and molecular variables. Their characterization is expected to deliver new markers of seed quality that can be used in breeding programs and/or in biotechnological approaches to improve crop yields.

  17. [Cochlear implant in adults].

    PubMed

    Bouccara, D; Mosnier, I; Bernardeschi, D; Ferrary, E; Sterkers, O

    2012-03-01

    Cochlear implant in adults is a procedure, dedicated to rehabilitate severe to profound hearing loss. Because of technological progresses and their applications for signal strategies, new devices can improve hearing, even in noise conditions. Binaural stimulation, cochlear implant and hearing aid or bilateral cochlear implants are the best opportunities to access to better level of comprehension in all conditions and space localisation. By now minimally invasive surgery is possible to preserve residual hearing and use a double stimulation modality for the same ear: electrical for high frequencies and acoustic for low frequencies. In several conditions, cochlear implant is not possible due to cochlear nerve tumour or major malformations of the inner ear. In these cases, a brainstem implantation can be considered. Clinical data demonstrate that improvement in daily communication, for both cochlear and brainstem implants, is correlated with cerebral activation of auditory cortex.

  18. Physiology of Oil Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Ketring, D. L.; Morgan, P. W.

    1972-01-01

    To further elucidate the regulation of dormancy release, we followed the natural afterripening of Virginia-type peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) seeds from about the 5th to 40th week after harvest. Seeds were kept at low temperature (3 ± 2 C) until just prior to testing for germination, ethylene production, and internal ethylene concentration. Germination tended to fluctuate but did not increase significantly during the first 30 weeks; internal ethylene concentrations and ethylene production remained comparatively low during this time. When the seeds were placed at room temperature during the 30th to 40th weeks after harvest, there was a large increase in germination, 49% and 47% for apical and basal seeds, respectively. The data confirm our previous suggestion that production rates of 2.0 to 3.0 nanoliters per gram fresh weight per hour are necessary to provide internal ethylene concentrations at activation levels which cause a substantial increase of germination. Activation levels internally must be more than 0.4 microliter per liter and 0.9 microliter per liter for some apical and basal seeds, respectively, since dormant-imbibed seeds containing these concentrations did not germinate. Abscisic acid inhibited germination and ethylene production of afterripened seeds. Kinetin reversed the effects of ABA and this was correlated with its ability to stimulate ethylene production by the seeds. Ethylene also reversed the effects of abscisic acid. Carbon dioxide did not compete with ethylene action in this system. The data indicate that ethylene and an inhibitor, possibly abscisic acid, interact to control dormant peanut seed germination. The inability of CO2 to inhibit competitively the action of ethylene on dormancy release, as it does other ethylene effects, suggests that the primary site of action of ethylene in peanut seeds is different from the site for other plant responses to ethylene. PMID:16658179

  19. Implant treatment planning considerations.

    PubMed

    Kao, Richard T

    2008-04-01

    As dental implants become a more accepted treatment modality, there is a need for all parties involved with implant dentistry to be familiar with various treatment planning issues. Though the success can be highly rewarding, failure to forecast treatment planning issues can result in an increase of surgical needs, surgical cost, and even case failure. In this issue, the focus is on implant treatment planning considerations.

  20. [Intraoperative and post-implant dosimetry in patients treated with permanent prostate implant brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Herein, András; Ágoston, Péter; Szabó, Zoltán; Jorgo, Kliton; Markgruber, Balázs; Pesznyák, Csilla; Polgár, Csaba; Major, Tibor

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of our work was to compare intraoperative and four-week post-implant dosimetry for loose and stranded seed implants for permanent prostate implant brachytherapy. In our institute low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy is performed with encapsulated I-125 isotopes (seeds) using transrectal ultrasound guidance and metal needles. The SPOT PRO 3.1 (Elekta, Sweden) system is used for treatment planning. In this study the first 79 patients were treated with loose seed (LS) technique, the consecutive patients were treated with stranded seed (SS) technique. During intraoperative planning the dose constraints were the same for both techniques. All LSs were placed inside the prostate capsule, while with SS a 2 mm margin around the prostate was allowed for seed positioning. The prescribed dose for the prostate was 145 Gy. This study investigated prostate dose coverage in 30-30 randomly selected patients with LS and SS. Four weeks after the implantation native CT and MRI were done and CT/MRI image fusion was performed. The target was contoured on MRI and the plan was prepared on CT data. To assess the treatment plan dose-volume histograms were used. For the target coverage V100, V90, D90, D100, for the dose inhomogeneity V150, V200, and the dose-homogeneity index (DHI), for dose conformality the conformal index (COIN) were calculated. Intraoperative and postimplant plans were compared. The mean V100 values decreased at four-week plan for SS (97% vs. 84%) and for LS (96% vs. 80%) technique, as well. Decrease was observed for all parameters except for the DHI value. The DHI increased for SS (0.38 vs. 0.41) and for LS (0.38 vs. 0.47) technique, as well. The COIN decreased for both techniques at four-week plan (SS: 0.63 vs. 0.57; LS: 0.67 vs. 0.50). All differences were significant except for the DHI value at SS technique. The percentage changes were not significant, except the COIN value. The dose coverage of the target decreased significantly at four-week plans

  1. Clinical application and validation of an iterative forward projection matching algorithm for permanent brachytherapy seed localization from conebeam-CT x-ray projections

    PubMed Central

    Pokhrel, Damodar; Murphy, Martin J.; Todor, Dorin A.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To experimentally validate a new algorithm for reconstructing the 3D positions of implanted brachytherapy seeds from postoperatively acquired 2D conebeam-CT (CBCT) projection images. Methods: The iterative forward projection matching (IFPM) algorithm finds the 3D seed geometry that minimizes the sum of the squared intensity differences between computed projections of an initial estimate of the seed configuration and radiographic projections of the implant. In-house machined phantoms, containing arrays of 12 and 72 seeds, respectively, are used to validate this method. Also, four 103Pd postimplant patients are scanned using an ACUITY digital simulator. Three to ten x-ray images are selected from the CBCT projection set and processed to create binary seed-only images. To quantify IFPM accuracy, the reconstructed seed positions are forward projected and overlaid on the measured seed images to find the nearest-neighbor distance between measured and computed seed positions for each image pair. Also, the estimated 3D seed coordinates are compared to known seed positions in the phantom and clinically obtained VariSeed planning coordinates for the patient data. Results: For the phantom study, seed localization error is (0.58±0.33) mm. For all four patient cases, the mean registration error is better than 1 mm while compared against the measured seed projections. IFPM converges in 20–28 iterations, with a computation time of about 1.9–2.8 min∕iteration on a 1 GHz processor. Conclusions: The IFPM algorithm avoids the need to match corresponding seeds in each projection as required by standard back-projection methods. The authors’ results demonstrate ∼1 mm accuracy in reconstructing the 3D positions of brachytherapy seeds from the measured 2D projections. This algorithm also successfully localizes overlapping clustered and highly migrated seeds in the implant. PMID:20964229

  2. Seeding density is a crucial determinant for the in vivo vascularisation capacity of adipose tissue-derived microvascular fragments.

    PubMed

    Später, T; Körbel, C; Frueh, F S; Nickels, R M; Menger, M D; Laschke, M W

    2017-08-15

    Adipose tissue-derived microvascular fragments (ad-MVF) represent effective vascularisation units for the seeding of dermal substitutes. However, particularly in case of extensive skin defects, the required amounts of donor fat tissue for the harvesting of ad-MVF may not always be available. Therefore, we herein determined the lowest ad-MVF density needed to induce a sufficient vascularisation and incorporation of seeded implants. Collagen-glycosaminoglycan matrices (Integra®; diameter: 4 mm) were seeded with 15,000 (HD), 10,000 (MD) and 5,000 (LD) ad-MVF and implanted into full-thickness skin defects within mouse dorsal skinfold chambers, to analyse their in vivo vascularisation and incorporation. Intravital fluorescence microscopy showed a comparable vascularisation of HD and MD ad-MVF-seeded Integra®, which was significantly higher when compared to LD ad-MVF-seeded Integra®. As assessed by photoacoustic imaging, this was associated with an increased oxygenation of the implants. Additional histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed an enhanced cellular infiltration, collagen content, microvessel density and epithelialisation of HD and MD ad-MVF-seeded Integra®, indicating a better incorporation compared to LD ad-MVF-seeded implants. These findings demonstrate that 80,000 ad-MVF/cm² is the least required density to guarantee an effective vascularisation of the dermal substitute.

  3. Osseointegrated implant prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Rogoff, G S

    1992-06-01

    This review covers recent literature on prosthodontic aspects of osseointegrated implants. Long-term prognosis, diagnosis and treatment planning, and clinical impression techniques and fabrication technology are discussed.

  4. [Silastic implant and synovitis].

    PubMed

    Sennwald, G

    1989-07-22

    The silastic implant based on siloxane polymere induces granulomatous synovitis in certain predisposed individuals, a reaction which may continue even after removal of the implant. This is also true of a prosthesis of the trapezium in two of our patients, though to a lesser degree. This is probably the reason why the problem has not yet been widely recognized. The hypothesis is put forward that an enzymatic predisposition may allow chemical degradation of the fragmented silastic implant into a toxic component responsible for the pathologic condition. The slow progression of the lesions is a challenge for the future and puts in question the further use of silastic implants.

  5. Magnetic stimulation of marigold seed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, I.; Mukhtar, K.; Qasim, M.; Basra, S. M. A.; Shahid, M.; Haq, Z.

    2012-10-01

    The effects of magnetic field treatments of French marigold seeds on germination, early seedling growth and biochemical changes of seedlings were studied under controlled conditions. For this purpose, seeds were exposed to five different magnetic seed treatments for 3 min each. Most of seed treatments resulted in improved germination speed and spread, root and shoot length, seed soluble sugars and a-amylase activity. Magnetic seed treatment with 100 mT maximally improved germination, seedling vigour and starch metabolism as compared to control and other seed treatments. In emergence experiment, higher emergence percentage (4-fold), emergence index (5-fold) and vigorous seedling growth were obtained in seeds treated with 100 mT. Overall, the enhancement of marigold seeds by magnetic seed treatment with 100 mT could be related to enhanced starch metabolism. The results suggest that magnetic field treatments of French marigold seeds have the potential to enhance germination, early growth and biochemical parameters of seedlings.

  6. Automatic segmentation of radiographic fiducial and seeds from X-ray images in prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Nathanael; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny Y.; Burdette, Everette C.; Prince, Jerry L.; Lee, Junghoon

    2011-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy guided by transrectal ultrasound is a common treatment option for early stage prostate cancer. Prostate cancer accounts for 28% of cancer cases and 11% of cancer deaths in men with 217,730 estimated new cases and 32,050 estimated deaths in 2010 in the United States alone. The major current limitation is the inability to reliably localize implanted radiation seeds spatially in relation to the prostate. Multimodality approaches that incorporate X-ray for seed localization have been proposed, but they require both accurate tracking of the imaging device and segmentation of the seeds. Some use image-based radiographic fiducials to track the X-ray device, but manual intervention is needed to select proper regions of interest for segmenting both the tracking fiducial and the seeds, to evaluate the segmentation results, and to correct the segmentations in the case of segmentation failure, thus requiring a significant amount of extra time in the operating room. In this paper, we present an automatic segmentation algorithm that simultaneously segments the tracking fiducial and brachytherapy seeds, thereby minimizing the need for manual intervention. In addition, through the innovative use of image processing techniques such as mathematical morphology, Hough transforms, and RANSAC, our method can detect and separate overlapping seeds that are common in brachytherapy implant images. Our algorithm was validated on 55 phantom and 206 patient images, successfully segmenting both the fiducial and seeds with a mean seed segmentation rate of 96% and sub-millimeter accuracy. PMID:21802975

  7. Point-of-care seeding of nitinol stents with blood-derived endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jantzen, Alexandra E; Noviani, Maria; Mills, James S; Baker, Katherine M; Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Truskey, George A; Achneck, Hardean E

    2016-11-01

    Nitinol-based vascular devices, for example, peripheral and intracranial stents, are limited by thrombosis and restenosis. To ameliorate these complications, we developed a technology to promote vessel healing by rapidly seeding (QuickSeeding) autologous blood-derived endothelial cells (ECs) onto modified self-expanding nitinol stent delivery systems immediately before implantation. Several thousand micropores were laser-drilled into a delivery system sheath surrounding a commercial nitinol stent to allow for exit of an infused cell suspension. As suspension medium flowed outward through the micropores, ECs flowed through the delivery system attaching to the stent surface. The QuickSeeded ECs adhered to and spread on the stent surface following 24-h in vitro culture under static or flow conditions. Further, QuickSeeded ECs on stents that were deployed into porcine carotid arteries spread to endothelialize stent struts within 48 h (n = 4). The QuickSeeded stent struts produced significantly more nitric oxide in ex vivo flow circuits after 24 h, as compared to static conditions (n = 5). In conclusion, ECs QuickSeeded onto commercial nitinol stents within minutes of implantation spread to form a functional layer in vitro and in vivo, providing proof of concept that the novel QuickSeeding method with modified delivery systems can be used to seed functional autologous endothelium at the point of care. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1658-1665, 2016.

  8. Automatic segmentation of radiographic fiducial and seeds from X-ray images in prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Nathanael; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny Y; Burdette, Everette C; Prince, Jerry L; Lee, Junghoon

    2012-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy guided by transrectal ultrasound is a common treatment option for early stage prostate cancer. Prostate cancer accounts for 28% of cancer cases and 11% of cancer deaths in men with 217,730 estimated new cases and 32,050 estimated deaths in 2010 in the United States alone. The major current limitation is the inability to reliably localize implanted radiation seeds spatially in relation to the prostate. Multimodality approaches that incorporate X-ray for seed localization have been proposed, but they require both accurate tracking of the imaging device and segmentation of the seeds. Some use image-based radiographic fiducials to track the X-ray device, but manual intervention is needed to select proper regions of interest for segmenting both the tracking fiducial and the seeds, to evaluate the segmentation results, and to correct the segmentations in the case of segmentation failure, thus requiring a significant amount of extra time in the operating room. In this paper, we present an automatic segmentation algorithm that simultaneously segments the tracking fiducial and brachytherapy seeds, thereby minimizing the need for manual intervention. In addition, through the innovative use of image processing techniques such as mathematical morphology, Hough transforms, and RANSAC, our method can detect and separate overlapping seeds that are common in brachytherapy implant images. Our algorithm was validated on 55 phantom and 206 patient images, successfully segmenting both the fiducial and seeds with a mean seed segmentation rate of 96% and sub-millimeter accuracy.

  9. Implantable ultrasound devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilkomerson, David; Chilipka, Thomas; Bogan, John; Blebea, John; Choudry, Rashad; Wang, John; Salvatore, Michael; Rotella, Vittorio; Soundararajan, Krishnan

    2008-03-01

    Using medical implants to wirelessly report physiological data is a technique that is rapidly growing. Ultrasound is well-suited for implants -- it requires little power and this form of radiated energy has no ill effects on the body. We report here on techniques we have developed in our experience gained in implanting over a dozen Doppler ultrasound flow-measuring implants in dogs. The goal of our implantable device is to measure flow in an arterial graft. To accomplish this, we place a Doppler transducer in the wall of a graft and an implant unit under the skin that energizes the 20 MHz Doppler transducer system, either when started by external command or by internal timetable. The implant records the digitized Doppler real and imaginary channels and transmits the data to a nearby portable computer for storage and evaluation. After outlining the overall operation of the system, we will concentrate on three areas of implant design where special techniques are required: ensuring safety, including biocompatibility to prevent the body from reacting to its invasion; powering the device, including minimizing energy used so that a small battery can provide long-life; and transmitting the data obtained.

  10. Batteryless implanted echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    Miniature ultrasonic echosonometer implanted within laboratory animals obtains energy from RF power oscillator that is electronically transduced via induction loop to power receiving loop located just under animal's skin. Method of powering device offers significant advantages over those in which battery is part of implanted package.

  11. Implantable, Ingestible Electronic Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard

    1987-01-01

    Small quartz-crystal-controlled oscillator swallowed or surgically implanted provides continuous monitoring of patient's internal temperature. Receiver placed near patient measures oscillator frequency, and temperature inferred from previously determined variation of frequency with temperature. Frequency of crystal-controlled oscillator varies with temperature. Circuit made very small and implanted or ingested to measure internal body temperature.

  12. A no bleed implant.

    PubMed

    Ersek, R A; Navarro, J A; Nemeth, D Z; Sas, G

    1993-01-01

    Breast implants have evolved from the original saline-filled, smooth-surfaced silicone rubber bag to silicone gel-filled smooth-walled sacs to a combination of a silicone gel-filled bag within a saline-filled sac, and, most recently, a reversed, double-lumen implant with a saline bag inside of a gel-filled bag. Texture-surfaced implants were first used in 1970 when the standard silicone gel-filled implant was covered with a polyurethane foam. Because of concerns about the degradation products of this foam, they were removed from the market in 1991. In 1975 double-lumen silicone textured implants were developed, followed by silicone gel-filled textured implants. In 1990 a new radiolucent, biocompatible gel was produced that reduced the problem of radioopacity of silicone implants. Because of the gel's sufficiently low coefficient of friction, leakage caused by fold flaw fracture may also be decreased. We present a case where this new biocompatible gel implant was repositioned after four months. The resulting scar capsule in this soft breast was thin [< 0.002 cm (0.008 in.)] and evenly textured as a mirror image of the textured silicone surface. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray defraction spectrophotometry revealed no silicone bleed.

  13. Smoking and dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kasat, V.; Ladda, R.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is a prevalent behaviour in the population. The aim of this review is to bring to light the effects of smoking on dental implants. These facts will assist dental professionals when implants are planned in tobacco users. A search of “PubMed” was made with the key words “dental implant,” “nicotine,” “smoking,” “tobacco,” and “osseointegration.” Also, publications on tobacco control by the Government of India were considered. For review, only those articles published from 1988 onward in English language were selected. Smoking has its influence on general as well as oral health of an individual. Tobacco negatively affects the outcome of almost all therapeutic procedures performed in the oral cavity. The failure rate of implant osseointegration is considerably higher among smokers, and maintenance of oral hygiene around the implants and the risk of peri-implantitis are adversely affected by smoking. To increase implant survival in smokers, various protocols have been recommended. Although osseointegrated dental implants have become the state of the art for tooth replacement, they are not without limitations or complications. In this litigious era, it is extremely important that the practitioner clearly understands and is able and willing to convey the spectrum of possible complications and their frequency to the patients. PMID:24478965

  14. Batteryless implanted echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    Miniature ultrasonic echosonometer implanted within laboratory animals obtains energy from RF power oscillator that is electronically transduced via induction loop to power receiving loop located just under animal's skin. Method of powering device offers significant advantages over those in which battery is part of implanted package.

  15. Implantable CMOS Biomedical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Jun; Tokuda, Takashi; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Noda, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    The results of recent research on our implantable CMOS biomedical devices are reviewed. Topics include retinal prosthesis devices and deep-brain implantation devices for small animals. Fundamental device structures and characteristics as well as in vivo experiments are presented. PMID:22291554

  16. Teeth and implants.

    PubMed

    Palmer, R

    1999-08-28

    An osseointegrated implant restoration may closely resemble a natural tooth. However, the absence of a periodontal ligament and connective tissue attachment via cementum, results in fundamental differences in the adaptation of the implant to occlusal forces, and the structure of the gingival cuff.

  17. Percutaneous and skeletal biocarbon implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, V.

    1977-01-01

    Review of carbon implants developed by NASA discussed four different types of implants and subsequent improvements. Improvements could be of specific interest to rehabilitation centers and similar organizations.

  18. Percutaneous and skeletal biocarbon implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, V.

    1977-01-01

    Review of carbon implants developed by NASA discussed four different types of implants and subsequent improvements. Improvements could be of specific interest to rehabilitation centers and similar organizations.

  19. Graphene for Biomedical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas; Podila, Ramakrishna; Alexis, Frank; Rao, Apparao; Clemson Bioengineering Team; Clemson Physics Team

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we used graphene, a one-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms, to modify the surfaces of existing implant materials to enhance both bio- and hemo-compatibility. This novel effort meets all functional criteria for a biomedical implant coating as it is chemically inert, atomically smooth and highly durable, with the potential for greatly enhancing the effectiveness of such implants. Specifically, graphene coatings on nitinol, a widely used implant and stent material, showed that graphene coated nitinol (Gr-NiTi) supports excellent smooth muscle and endothelial cell growth leading to better cell proliferation. We further determined that the serum albumin adsorption on Gr-NiTi is greater than that of fibrinogen, an important and well understood criterion for promoting a lower thrombosis rate. These hemo-and biocompatible properties and associated charge transfer mechanisms, along with high strength, chemical inertness and durability give graphene an edge over most antithrombogenic coatings for biomedical implants and devices.

  20. TPS-guided interstitial Iodine-125 implantation in patients with oral cavity and maxillofacial carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Meng, J; Zhang, J; Zhuang, Q-W; Wang, X; Li, Z-P; Gu, Q-P

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the efficacy as well as the complications involved in the use of interstitial Iodine-125 implantation for the treatment of oral cavity and maxillofacial carcinomas. Fifteen patients with oral cavity and maxillofacial carcinomas received treatment planning system (TPS)-guided interstitial Iodine-125 implantation. The apparent activity per particle ranged from 0.6 mCi (2.22MBq) to 0.7 mCi (2.59MBq). The matched peripheral dose delivered by radioactive seeds ranged from 90 to 120 Gy. The efficacy of the treatment and the postoperative complications were evaluated during follow-up. The seeds were implanted successfully in all 15 patients and median number of seeds implanted was 36.53. CT scans were performed in all patients at 1-6 months postoperatively. During follow-up at 6-27 months, seed migration occurred and a good local tumor control was achieved with an overall response of 86.7%. No severe side effects were observed. TPS-guided interstitial Iodine-125 implantation is an effective and safe procedure with minimal invasiveness for the treatment of oral cavity and maxillofacial carcinomas, and it effectively prevents the recurrence of cancer and short-term lymphatic metastasis.

  1. Concerning seed spots

    Treesearch

    J. A. Larsen; R. J. Smith

    1913-01-01

    In connection with the sowing of Yellow pine, White pine and Western larch on The Blackfeet National Forest during the sea sons of 1911 and 1912, seventeen and one-half acres were sowed directly in seed spots.

  2. Fishing for Seeds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes a method to collect seeds that are dispersed from weeds while avoiding some outdoor hazards such as rough terrain or animals. Describes a plan for creating a weed fishing pole and includes a materials list. (SAH)

  3. Fishing for Seeds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes a method to collect seeds that are dispersed from weeds while avoiding some outdoor hazards such as rough terrain or animals. Describes a plan for creating a weed fishing pole and includes a materials list. (SAH)

  4. Grape Seed Extract

    MedlinePlus

    ... grape seed Latin Name: Vitis vinifera Background Since ancient Greece people have used grapes, grape leaves, and ... 8):1173-1181. Fine AM. Oligomeric proanthocyanidin complexes: history, structure, and phytopharmaceutical applications. Alternative Medicine Review. 2000; ...

  5. Seeds in Flight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Willard K.

    1978-01-01

    Discussed are the seed dispersal mechanisms of six different plants: big-leaf maple, pincushion tree, tree of heaven, squirting cucumber, digger pine, and bull thistle. Elaborate color and black-and-white drawings illustrate the text. (MA)

  6. Seeds in Flight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Willard K.

    1978-01-01

    Discussed are the seed dispersal mechanisms of six different plants: big-leaf maple, pincushion tree, tree of heaven, squirting cucumber, digger pine, and bull thistle. Elaborate color and black-and-white drawings illustrate the text. (MA)

  7. Tomato seeds for LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Tomato seeds are prepared for their launch aboard the Langley's Long Duration Exposure Facility. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (page 119), by James Schultz.

  8. In vivo evaluation of bone deposition in macroporous titanium implants loaded with mesenchymal stem cells and strontium-enriched hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Lovati, Arianna B; Lopa, Silvia; Talò, Giuseppe; Previdi, Sara; Recordati, Camilla; Mercuri, David; Segatti, Francesco; Zagra, Luigi; Moretti, Matteo

    2015-02-01

    Bone-implant integration represents a major requirement to grant implant stability and reduce the risk of implant loosening. This study investigates the effect of progenitor cells and strontium-enriched hydrogel on the osseointegration of titanium implants. To mimic implant-bone interaction, an ectopic model was developed grafting Trabecular Titanium(™) (TT) implants into decellularized bone seeded with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). TT was loaded or not with strontium-enriched amidated carboxymethylcellulose (CMCA) hydrogel and/or hBMSCs. Constructs were implanted subcutaneously in athymic mice and osteodeposition was investigated with microcomputed tomography (micro-CT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and pull-out test at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Fluorescence imaging was performed at 8 and 12 weeks, histology at 4 and 8 weeks. Micro-CT demonstrated the homogeneity of the engineered bone in all groups, supporting the reproducibility of the ectopic model. Fluorescence imaging, histology, SEM and pull-out mechanical testing showed superior tissue ingrowth in TT implants loaded with both strontium-enriched CMCA and hBMSCs. In our model, the synergic action of the bioactive hydrogel and hBMSCs increased both the bone deposition and TT integration. Thus, we suggest that using orthopedic prosthetic implant preloaded with strontium-enriched CMCA and seeded with BMSCs could represent a valid single-step surgical strategy to improve implant osseointegration.

  9. A role for seed storage proteins in Arabidopsis seed longevity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thu-Phuong; Cueff, Gwendal; Hegedus, Dwayne D; Rajjou, Loïc; Bentsink, Leónie

    2015-10-01

    Proteomics approaches have been a useful tool for determining the biological roles and functions of individual proteins and identifying the molecular mechanisms that govern seed germination, vigour and viability in response to ageing. In this work the dry seed proteome of four Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes, that carry introgression fragments at the position of seed longevity quantitative trait loci and as a result display different levels of seed longevity, was investigated. Seeds at two physiological states, after-ripened seeds that had the full germination ability and aged (stored) seeds of which the germination ability was severely reduced, were compared. Aged dry seed proteomes were markedly different from the after-ripened and reflected the seed longevity level of the four genotypes, despite the fact that dry seeds are metabolically quiescent. Results confirmed the role of antioxidant systems, notably vitamin E, and indicated that protection and maintenance of the translation machinery and energy pathways are essential for seed longevity. Moreover, a new role for seed storage proteins (SSPs) was identified in dry seeds during ageing. Cruciferins (CRUs) are the most abundant SSPs in Arabidopsis and seeds of a triple mutant for three CRU isoforms (crua crub cruc) were more sensitive to artificial ageing and their seed proteins were highly oxidized compared with wild-type seeds. These results confirm that oxidation is involved in seed deterioration and that SSPs buffer the seed from oxidative stress, thus protecting important proteins required for seed germination and seedling formation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  10. Interactive tool for visualization and segmentation of permanent radioactive seeds in postoperative prostate brachytherapy CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Sayan D.; Stoknes, Kevin; Grimm, Peter D.; Estlund, Jacque; Chalana, Vikram; Kim, Yongmin

    1999-05-01

    Implantation of radioactive isotopes within the prostate for the treatment of early stage localized prostate cancer is becoming a popular treatment option. Postoperative calculation of the dose delivered to the prostate requires accurate verification of the number and location of seeds within the prostate. Current post operative dosimetry technique requires the dosimetrist to manually count and record the position of each seed from x-ray computed tomography (CT) images. This procedure is operator-dependent and time-consuming, thus limiting the ability of different brachytherapy centers to compare results and create a standard methodology. Seed identification is performed by thresholding the CT images interactively, using a graphical user interface, followed by mathematical morphology to remove noise. Segmented seeds are grouped into regions via connected-component analysis. Regions are then classified into seeds using a prior knowledge of the seed dimensions and their relative positions in the consecutive CT images. Unresolved regions, which can indicate the presence of more than one seed, are corrected manually. The efficiency of this tool was evaluated by comparing the time to manually count the seeds to the time required to do the same task using the automated program. For 15 sets of images from 15 patients, the average time for manually counting the seeds was 45 minutes per patient versus 6.4 minutes on average per patients, the average time for manually counting the seeds was 45 minutes per patient versus 6.4 minutes on average per patient when the software was used to perform the same task. Using the interactive visualization and segmentation algorithm, the time required to count the seeds during post- implant dosimetry has been reduced by a factor of 7 compared to the existing manual technique.

  11. Seed dispersal in fens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, B.; Van Diggelen, R.; Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and reducing genetic exchange. Species in fragmented wetlands may have lower reproductive success, which can lead to biodiversity loss. While fens may have always been relatively isolated from each other, they have become increasingly fragmented in modern times within agricultural and urban landscapes in both Europe and North America. Dispersal by water, animals and wind has been hampered by changes related to development in landscapes surrounding fens. Because the seeds of certain species are long-lived in the seed bank, frequent episodes of dispersal are not always necessary to maintain the biodiversity of fens. However, of particular concern to restoration is that some dominant species, such as the tussock sedge Carex stricta, may not disperse readily between fens. Conclusions: Knowledge of seed dispersal can be used to maintain and restore the biodiversity of fens in fragmented landscapes. Given that development has fragmented landscapes and that this situation is not likely to change, the dispersal of seeds might be enhanced by moving hay or cattle from fens to damaged sites, or by reestablishing lost hydrological connections. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  12. Peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis: bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Khammissa, R A G; Feller, L; Meyerov, R; Lemmer, J

    2012-03-01

    Osseointegrated dental implants have a ong-term success rate of over 90%, but may be threatened by peri-implant mucostis and peri-implantitis, bacteria biofilm-induced inflammatory conditions. While peri-implant mucositis is a reversible inflammatory condition confined to the peri-implant soft-tissue unit, peri-implantitis is characterised by progressive inflammatory destruction of the crest of the alveolar bone supporting the implant, by increased peri-implant probing depths, and by bleeding and/or suppuration on probing. Effective treatment of peri-implant mucositis will prevent the development of peri-implantitis. Plaque accumulation on the implant/abutment surface juxtaposed to the junctional epithelium and to the connective tissue zone of the peri-implant soft-tissue unit induces the development of peri-implant mucositis which can subsequently progress to peri-implantitis. The aim of this paper is to review some aspects of bacterial infection of the tissue supporting dental implants, and to explore how to maintain the healthy peri-implant soft-tissue unit.

  13. [Extra-oral implants: principal areas of implantation].

    PubMed

    Badie-Modiri, B; Kaplanski, P

    2001-08-01

    The success of extra-oral implants raises a certain number of technical and medical problems. Among these, the anatomy of the implant zone and bone quality are determining factors for osteointegration of the implants. We describe the principal zones of implantation detailing the risks involved in each area.

  14. Seed coat color and seed weight contribute differential responses of targeted metabolites in soybean seeds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwook; Hwang, Young-Sun; Kim, Sun Tae; Yoon, Won-Byong; Han, Won Young; Kang, In-Kyu; Choung, Myoung-Gun

    2017-01-01

    The distribution and variation of targeted metabolites in soybean seeds are affected by genetic and environmental factors. In this study, we used 192 soybean germplasm accessions collected from two provinces of Korea to elucidate the effects of seed coat color and seeds dry weight on the metabolic variation and responses of targeted metabolites. The effects of seed coat color and seeds dry weight were present in sucrose, total oligosaccharides, total carbohydrates and all measured fatty acids. The targeted metabolites were clustered within three groups. These metabolites were not only differently related to seeds dry weight, but also responded differentially to seed coat color. The inter-relationship between the targeted metabolites was highly present in the result of correlation analysis. Overall, results revealed that the targeted metabolites were diverged in relation to seed coat color and seeds dry weight within locally collected soybean seed germplasm accessions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tree Seed Technology Training Course - Instructor's Manual

    Treesearch

    F.T. Bonner; John A. Vozzo; W.W. Elam; S.B. Land

    1994-01-01

    This manual is intended primarily to train seed collectors, seed-plant managers, seed analysts, and nursery managers, but it can serve as a resource for any training course in forest regeneration. It includes both temperate and tropical tree species of all intended uses. The manual covers the following topics: seed biology, seed collection, seed handling, seed-quality...

  16. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  17. Single implant tooth replacement.

    PubMed

    Briley, T F

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that direct bone anchorage of dental implants will provide long-term predictability for single tooth implants and multi-unit implants. The function of implant-supported restoration is now routinely achieved. The real challenge facing the restorative dentist and laboratory technician is to achieve optimal aesthetics. The learning objective of this article is to review the prosthodontic procedures essential to maximizing natural aesthetics in implant supported restorations. It will provide a review of master impression techniques, prepable titanium abutments and designing the cement on restoration. Particular emphasis is directed to the soft tissue model from which a series of sequenced techniques can be followed to achieve optimal aesthetics. Analysis of the implant alignment with regard to the neighboring teeth will result in having to make a choice of which prepable abutment will maximize the aesthetic result. The following case outlines how to replace a single missing tooth using an externally hexed implant system and a prefabricated titanium abutment on a 26-year-old male patient.

  18. Boron implanted strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. J. M.

    Single crystals of strontium titanate implanted with boron were found to have highly conductive surface layers. The effects of varying dose from 10 to the 16th power to 10 to the 17th power ions/sq cm, implantation voltage from 50 to 175 keV and annealing conditions on the room temperature surface resistance and Hall mobility are presented. Variation of the implantation voltage did not have a major effect on the sheet resistances obtained by boron implantation of strontium titanate, while dose and annealing conditions have major effects. Doses of 5 x 10 to the 16th power ions/sq cm required annealing on the order of one hour at 500 K for maximum reduction of the room temperature resistance in the implanted layer. Samples implanted with a dose of 1 x 10 to the 17th power ions/sq cm required slightly higher temperatures (approximately 575 K) to obtain a minimum resistance at room temperature. Long term (several weeks) room temperature annealing was found to occur in high dose samples. After one to two months at room temperature followed by an anneal to 575 K, the surface resistances were found to be lower than those produced by the annealing of a freshly implanted sample to 575 K.

  19. Automatic coregistration of volumetric images based on implanted fiducial markers.

    PubMed

    Koch, Martin; Maltz, Jonathan S; Belongie, Serge J; Gangadharan, Bijumon; Bose, Supratik; Shukla, Himanshu; Bani-Hashemi, Ali R

    2008-10-01

    The accurate delivery of external beam radiation therapy is often facilitated through the implantation of radio-opaque fiducial markers (gold seeds). Before the delivery of each treatment fraction, seed positions can be determined via low dose volumetric imaging. By registering these seed locations with the corresponding locations in the previously acquired treatment planning computed tomographic (CT) scan, it is possible to adjust the patient position so that seed displacement is accommodated. The authors present an unsupervised automatic algorithm that identifies seeds in both planning and pretreatment images and subsequently determines a rigid geometric transformation between the two sets. The algorithm is applied to the imaging series of ten prostate cancer patients. Each test series is comprised of a single multislice planning CT and multiple megavoltage conebeam (MVCB) images. Each MVCB dataset is obtained immediately prior to a subsequent treatment session. Seed locations were determined to within 1 mm with an accuracy of 97 +/- 6.1% for datasets obtained by application of a mean imaging dose of 3.5 cGy per study. False positives occurred in three separate instances, but only when datasets were obtained at imaging doses too low to enable fiducial resolution by a human operator, or when the prostate gland had undergone large displacement or significant deformation. The registration procedure requires under nine seconds of computation time on a typical contemporary computer workstation.

  20. Robotic implantation of biodegradable regenerative urinary conduit: experimental study.

    PubMed

    de Castro Abreu, Andre Luis; Azhar, Raed A; Berger, Andre K; Chopra, Sameer; Marien, Arnaud; Santomauro, Michael; Satkunasivam, Raj; Sun, Yi; Aron, Monish; Ukimura, Osamu; Desai, Mihir M; Gill, Inderbir S

    2015-01-01

    To determine the feasibility and develop a robotic technique for intracorporeal implantation of a biodegradable tubular scaffold seeded with adipose-sourced smooth muscle cells (Neo-Urinary-Conduit) that, when implanted as a conduit for urinary diversion, facilitates regeneration of native-like neourinary tissue. Robotic NUC implantation was performed in two fresh male cadavers. The greater omentum was widely detached from the greater curvature of the stomach, in preparation for final wrapping of the conduit. Bilateral ureters were mobilized for implantation. The NUC, with two precreated ureteral openings, was inserted into the abdomen. Bilateral, stented uretero-NUC anastomoses were created. The NUC was circumferentially wrapped with the predissected omentum, exteriorized through the abdominal wall, and maturated. Both procedures were successfully completed intracorporeally. Operative time for NUC implantation was 90 and 100 minutes, respectively. Examination of gross anatomy showed no injury to other organs. There was no omental kinking, rotation, eversion, or stripping from the NUC. Bilateral stents were confirmed to be in situ with the proximal coil in the kidney. Uretero-NUC anastomoses and omentum were tension free. The entire NUC, including its distal edge and posterior aspect, was circumferentially wrapped 360 degrees. We demonstrated the feasibility and developed a robotic technique for intracorporeal implantation of a biodegradable regenerative urinary conduit. This study serves as the foundation for the robotic surgical technique before the clinical application.

  1. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  2. Optimization of dental implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dol, Aleksandr V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern dentistry can not exist without dental implantation. This work is devoted to study of the "bone-implant" system and to optimization of dental prostheses installation. Modern non-invasive methods such as MRI an 3D-scanning as well as numerical calculations and 3D-prototyping allow to optimize all of stages of dental prosthetics. An integrated approach to the planning of implant surgery can significantly reduce the risk of complications in the first few days after treatment, and throughout the period of operation of the prosthesis.

  3. Oxygen implanter for simox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, M.; Benveniste, V.; Ryding, G.; Douglas-Hamilton, D. H.; Reed, M.; Gagne, G.; Armstrong, A.; Mack, M.

    1985-01-01

    Interest in silicon or) insulator (SOI) technology has led to the development of several alternatives to silicon on sapphire. One of the most promising techniques makes use of an ion implanter to form a buried oxide layer directly in the silicon substrate. To have useful single crystalline silicon on top of the oxide layer, it is necessary to do the implant at high wafer temperatures and rely on solid phase epitaxy to maintain surface structure. A high current, 160 keV, Nova ion implanter has been adapted to provide the ability to perform oxygen implants at elevated temperatures. The operator is free to choose any temperature in the range between 400°C and 600°C. The system then preheats the wafers to the selected temperature before the implant begins. A novel technique for providing both heating and cooling capability to the end station is employed. An infrared signal from the wafers is monitored by a room temperature lead salt detector. This signal is then used by a servo-loop to control the heating of the end station and to maintain the wafer temperature to within ± 20°C during the implant. High doses of the type necessary to form a silicon dioxide buried layer require long lived, high current oxygen sources. An oxygen source has been specially developed, which provides as much as 10 mA of ion current. At a 6 mA output, source lifetimes in excess of 40 hours have been achieved. The implanter uses a specifically designed high temperature disk, which holds ten wafers, each of four inch diameter. A variety of implant angles lying between 0° and 15° is available. The beam is scanned mechanically and an electron flood gun can be used to prevent wafer charging. Special thermal barriers have been employed to protect the apparatus from extreme temperatures and to make the heating sequence more efficient and more rapid. Every effort has been made to avoid contamination of the implant. The implant disk, for example, is overcoated with silicon monoxide. Silicon

  4. Biomedical implantable microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Meindl, J D

    1980-10-17

    Innovative applications of microelectronics in new biomedical implantable instruments offer a singular opportunity for advances in medical research and practice because of two salient factors: (i) beyond all other types of biomedical instruments, implants exploit fully the inherent technical advantages--complex functional capability, high reliability, lower power drain, small size and weight-of microelectronics, and (ii) implants bring microelectronics into intimate association with biological systems. The combination of these two factors enables otherwise impossible new experiments to be conducted and new paostheses developed that will improve the quality of human life.

  5. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Oliemy, Ahmed; Al-Attar, Nawwar

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was developed to offer a therapeutic solution to patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not candidates for conventional aortic valve replacement. The improvement in transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes is still of concern in the areas of stroke, vascular injury, heart block, paravalvular regurgitation and valve durability. Concomitantly, the progress, both technical and in terms of material advances of transcatheter valve systems, as well as in patient selection, renders transcatheter aortic valve implantation an increasingly viable treatment for more and more patients with structural heart disease.

  6. Angle-dependent ultrasonic detection and imaging of brachytherapy seeds using singular spectrum analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mamou, Jonathan; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Feleppa, Ernest J.

    2008-01-01

    Transrectal-ultrasound-guided brachytherapy uses small titanium-shelled radioactive seeds to locally treat prostate cancer. During the implantation procedure, needles inserted transperitoneally cause gland movement resulting in seed misplacement and suboptimal dosimetry. In a previous study, an algorithm based on singular spectrum analysis (SSA) applied to envelope-detected ultrasound signals was proposed to determine seed locations [J. Mamou and E. J. Feleppa, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 121, 1790–1801 (2007)]. Successful implementation of the SSA algorithm could allow correcting dosimetry errors during the implantation procedure. The algorithm demonstrated promise when the seed orientation was parallel to the needle and normal to the ultrasound beam. In this present study, the algorithm was tested when the seed orientation deviated up to 22° from normality. Experimental data from a seed in an ideal environment and in beef were collected with a single-element, spherically focused, 5 MHz transducer. Simulations were designed and evaluated with the algorithm. Finally, objective quantitative scoring metrics were developed to evaluate the algorithm performance and for comparison with B-mode images. The results quantitatively established that the SSA algorithm always outperformed B-mode images and that seeds could be detected accurately up to a deviation of approximately 10°. PMID:18397022

  7. Evaluation of source displacement and dose--volume changes after permanent prostate brachytherapy with stranded seeds.

    PubMed

    Pinkawa, Michael; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Piroth, Marc D; Borchers, Holger; Jakse, Gerhard; Eble, Michael J

    2007-08-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze source displacements and dose-volume changes in the first month after a permanent implant. In 51 consecutive patients, CT scans were performed at the postoperative day (day 1) and one month (day 30) after an (125)I implant with stranded seeds. Seed positions were determined relative to pelvic bones for five seeds at the base and five seeds at the apex for each patient (n=510) and compared. To verify these results, treatment margins (TM=distance of prescription isodose to prostate) and displacements of the prostate surface (anterior/posterior/right/left/superior/inferior) relative to pelvic bones were measured. Seed positions have moved significantly between day 1 and 30 in the posterior (mean 1.0mm; p<0.001) and inferior (mean 3.8mm; p<0.001) directions. TM increased particularly at the posterior (mean 2.2mm; p<0.001) and apical (median 3.0mm; p<0.001) prostate contour with decreasing oedema. With a stable apex position and a mean inward posterior surface displacement of 1.1mm (p<0.001) relative to pelvic bones, seed displacements could be well correlated with prescription isodose displacements (Pearson correlation coefficients >or=0.81; p<0.001). Both changes of prostate volume and seed displacements need to be considered to explain dosimetric changes after permanent prostate brachytherapy.

  8. Seeds in space experiment results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Jim A.

    1991-01-01

    Two million seeds of 120 different varieties representing 106 species, 97 genera, and 55 plant families were flown aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The seeds were housed on the space exposed experiment developed for students (SEEDS) tray in sealed canister number six and in two small vented canisters. The tray was in the F-2 position. The seeds were germinated and the germination rates and development of the resulting plants compared to the control seed that stayed in Park Seed's seed storage facility. The initial results are presented. There was a better survival rate in the sealed canister in space than in the storage facility at Park Seed. At least some of the seeds in each of the vented canisters survived the exposure to vacuum for almost six years. The number of observed apparent mutations was very low.

  9. Seeds in space experiment results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Jim A.

    1991-01-01

    Two million seeds of 120 different varieties representing 106 species, 97 genera, and 55 plant families were flown aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The seeds were housed on the space exposed experiment developed for students (SEEDS) tray in sealed canister number six and in two small vented canisters. The tray was in the F-2 position. The seeds were germinated and the germination rates and development of the resulting plants compared to the control seed that stayed in Park Seed's seed storage facility. The initial results are presented. There was a better survival rate in the sealed canister in space than in the storage facility at Park Seed. At least some of the seeds in each of the vented canisters survived the exposure to vacuum for almost six years. The number of observed apparent mutations was very low.

  10. Seed Transmission of Pseudoperonospora cubensis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Yigal; Rubin, Avia E.; Galperin, Mariana; Ploch, Sebastian; Runge, Fabian; Thines, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Pseudoperonospora cubensis, an obligate biotrophic oomycete causing devastating foliar disease in species of the Cucurbitaceae family, was never reported in seeds or transmitted by seeds. We now show that P. cubensis occurs in fruits and seeds of downy mildew-infected plants but not in fruits or seeds of healthy plants. About 6.7% of the fruits collected during 2012–2014 have developed downy mildew when homogenized and inoculated onto detached leaves and 0.9% of the seeds collected developed downy mildew when grown to the seedling stage. This is the first report showing that P. cubensis has become seed-transmitted in cucurbits. Species-specific PCR assays showed that P. cubensis occurs in ovaries, fruit seed cavity and seed embryos of cucurbits. We propose that international trade of fruits or seeds of cucurbits might be associated with the recent global change in the population structure of P. cubensis. PMID:25329308

  11. Implantation of Inferior Vena Cava Interposition Graft in Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Ung; Yi, Tai; Tara, Shuhei; Lee, Avione Y.; Hibino, Narutoshi; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable scaffolds seeded with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) are often used for reconstructive surgery to treat congenital cardiac anomalies. The long-term clinical results showed excellent patency rates, however, with significant incidence of stenosis. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of vascular neotissue formation and prevent stenosis development in tissue engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs), we developed a mouse model of the graft with approximately 1 mm internal diameter. First, the TEVGs were assembled from biodegradable tubular scaffolds fabricated from a polyglycolic acid nonwoven felt mesh coated with ε-caprolactone and L-lactide copolymer. The scaffolds were then placed in a lyophilizer, vacuumed for 24 hr, and stored in a desiccator until cell seeding. Second, bone marrow was collected from donor mice and mononuclear cells were isolated by density gradient centrifugation. Third, approximately one million cells were seeded on a scaffold and incubated O/N. Finally, the seeded scaffolds were then implanted as infrarenal vena cava interposition grafts in C57BL/6 mice. The implanted grafts demonstrated excellent patency (>90%) without evidence of thromboembolic complications or aneurysmal formation. This murine model will aid us in understanding and quantifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms of neotissue formation in the TEVG. PMID:24961688

  12. Automated seed manipulation and planting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Ray; Herrera, Javier; Holcomb, Scott; Kelly, Paul; Myers, Scott; Rosendo, Manny; Sivitz, Herbert; Wolsefer, Dave

    1988-01-01

    The Mechanical Division fabricated three seed separators utilizing pressure gradients to move and separate wheat seeds. These separators are called minnow buckets and use air, water, or a combination of both to generate the pressure gradient. Electrostatic fields were employed in the seed separator constructed by the Electrical Division. This separator operates by forcing a temporary electric dipole on the wheat seeds and using charged electrodes to attract and move the seeds. Seed delivery to the hydroponic growth tray is accomplished by the seed cassette. The cassette is compatible with all the seed separators, and it consists of a plastic tube threaded with millipore filter paper. During planting operations, the seeds are placed in an empty cassette. The loaded cassette is then placed in the growth tray and nutrient solution provided. The solution wets the filter paper and capillary action draws the nutrients up to feed the seeds. These seeding systems were tested and showed encouraging results. Seeds were effectively separated and the cassette can support the growth of wheat plants. Problems remaining to be investigated include improving the success of delivering the seeds to the cassette and providing adequate spacing between seeds for the electric separator.

  13. DEALING WITH DENTAL IMPLANT FAILURES

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Liran

    2008-01-01

    An implant-supported restoration offers a predictable treatment for tooth replacement. Reported success rates for dental implants are high. Nevertheless, failures that mandate immediate implant removal do occur. The consequences of implant removal jeopardize the clinician's efforts to accomplish satisfactory function and esthetics. For the patient, this usually involves further cost and additional procedures. The aim of this paper is to describe different methods and treatment modalities to deal with dental implant failure. The main topics for discussion include identifying the failing implant, implants replacing failed implants at the exact site, and the use of other restorative options. When an implant fails, a tailor made treatment plan should be provided to each patient according to all relevant variables. Patients should be informed regarding all possible treatment modalities following implant failure and give their consent to the most appropriate treatment option for them. PMID:19089213

  14. Dealing with dental implant failures.

    PubMed

    Levin, L

    2010-01-01

    An implant-supported restoration offers a predictable treatment for tooth replacement. Reported success rates for dental implants are high. Nevertheless, failures that mandate immediate implant removal do occur. The consequences of implant removal jeopardize the clinician's efforts to accomplish satisfactory function and esthetics. For the patient, this usually involves further cost and additional procedures. The aim of this paper is to describe different methods and treatment modalities to deal with dental implant failure. The main topics for discussion include identifying the failing implant, implants replacing failed implants at the exact site, and the use of other restorative options. When an implant fails, a tailor made treatment plan should be provided to each patient according to all relevant variables. Patients should be informed regarding all possible treatment modalities following implant failure and give their consent to the most appropriate treatment option for them.

  15. Dealing with dental implant failures.

    PubMed

    Levin, Liran

    2008-01-01

    An implant-supported restoration offers a predictable treatment for tooth replacement. Reported success rates for dental implants are high. Nevertheless, failures that mandate immediate implant removal do occur. The consequences of implant removal jeopardize the clinician's efforts to accomplish satisfactory function and esthetics. For the patient, this usually involves further cost and additional procedures. The aim of this paper is to describe different methods and treatment modalities to deal with dental implant failure. The main topics for discussion include identifying the failing implant, implants replacing failed implants at the exact site, and the use of other restorative options.When an implant fails, a tailor made treatment plan should be provided to each patient according to all relevant variables. Patients should be informed regarding all possible treatment modalities following implant failure and give their consent to the most appropriate treatment option for them.

  16. Dealing with dental implant failures.

    PubMed

    Levin, L

    2010-07-01

    An implant-supported restoration offers a predictable treatment for tooth replacement. Reported success rates for dental implants are high. Nevertheless, failures that mandate immediate implant removal do occur. The consequences of implant removal jeopardize the clinician's efforts to accomplish satisfactory function and esthetics. For the patient, this usually involves further cost and additional procedures. The aim of this paper is to describe different methods and treatment modalities to deal with dental implant failure. The main topics for discussion include identifying the failing implant, implants replacing failed implants at the exact site, and the use of other restorative options. When an implant fails, a tailor made treatment plan should be provided to each patient according to all relevant variables. Patients should be informed regarding all possible treatment modalities following implant failure and give their consent to the most appropriate treatment option for them.

  17. Source strength assay of iodine-125 seeds sealed within sterile packaging.

    PubMed

    Otani, Yuki; Yamada, Takahiro; Kato, Shingo; Shikama, Naoto; Funakoshi, Kazuto; Kuroda, Isao; Numasaki, Hodaka; Nose, Takayuki; Dokiya, Takushi; Oguchi, Masahiko

    2013-03-04

    Early-stage prostate cancer is widely treated by iodine-125 (I-125) seed implantation. While quality assurance methods are in place to assure consistency in I-125 seed source strength, current methods involve the breaking of the sterilization package, raising issues concerning sterility and time limitations. The purpose of this study was to develop a method of characterizing the total source strength of I-125 seeds within a cartridge that has been sealed within a sterilization package and to evaluate the probability of detecting an out-of-calibration seed (aberrant seed). We defined a protocol to determine the ability of a well-type ionization chamber to detect aberrant I-125 seeds within a cartridge sealed in the sterilization package. A novel jig for a well-type ionization chamber was designed to accommodate the sterilization package. One seed was chosen randomly from two cartridges containing five or 15 seeds (0.544 U source strength) and was exchanged with aberrant seeds of six different source strengths. The source strength was measured at each position within the cartridge. The results indicated that the response of the well chamber was sensitive to changes in the aberrant seed position within the cartridge and the source strength of the aberrant seed. The correlation coefficient between single seed and batch assay results was high (0.998). A novel jig and a measurement method using a well ionization chamber were developed, which allowed for a batch assay characterization of the total source strength of I-125 seeds within a cartridge sealed within sterilization package. This method is simple, time-saving, and offers greater practical application.

  18. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Ying, T.Y.; Chin, C.J.; Lu, S.C.; Yiacoumi, S.

    1997-10-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration consists of two steps: heterogeneous particle flocculation of magnetic and nonmagnetic particles in a stirred tank and high-gradient magnetic filtration (HGMF). The effects of various parameters affecting magnetic-seeding filtration (HGMF). The effects of various parameters affecting magnetic seeding filtration are theoretically and experimentally investigated. A trajectory model that includes hydrodynamic resistance, van der Waals, and electrostatic forces is developed to calculate the flocculation frequency in a turbulent-shear regime. Fractal dimension is introduced to simulate the open structure of aggregates. A magnetic-filtration model that consists of trajectory analysis, a particle build-up model, a breakthrough model, and a bivariate population-balance model is developed to predict the breakthrough curve of magnetic-seeding filtration. A good agreement between modeling results and experimental data is obtained. The results show that the model developed in this study can be used to predict the performance of magnetic-seeding filtration without using empirical coefficients or fitting parameters. 35 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Breast Reconstruction with Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... removes your breast to treat or prevent breast cancer. One type of breast reconstruction uses breast implants — silicone devices filled with silicone gel or salt water (saline) — to reshape your breasts. Breast reconstruction ...

  20. Biocompatibility of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaelble, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Method of selecting biocompatible materials for surgical implants uses fracture mechanic relationships and surface energies of candidate materials in presence of blood plasma. Technique has been used to characterize 190 materials by parameters that reflect their biocompatibility.

  1. Biocompatibility of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaelble, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Method of selecting biocompatible materials for surgical implants uses fracture mechanic relationships and surface energies of candidate materials in presence of blood plasma. Technique has been used to characterize 190 materials by parameters that reflect their biocompatibility.

  2. Implantable Medical Devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Heart Attack Treatment of a Heart Attack Life After a Heart Attack Heart Failure About Heart Failure ... Attack Introduction Medications Surgical Procedures Implantable Medical Devices • Life After a Heart Attack • Heart Attack Tools & Resources • Support ...

  3. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    Intrinsic sphincter deficiency repair; ISD repair; Injectable bulking agents for stress urinary incontinence ... Urine leakage that gets worse Pain where the injection was done Allergic reaction to the material Implant ...

  4. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  5. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... cosmetic surgery after breast cancer can improve your sense of well-being and your quality of life. Alternative Names Breast implants surgery References Roehl KR, Wilhelmi BJ, Phillips LG. Breast reconstruction. ...

  6. Seed harvesting is influenced by associational effects in mixed seed neighbourhoods, not just by seed density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostoja, Steven M.; Schupp, Eugene W.; Durham, Susan; Klinger, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Rodents frequently forage in a density-dependent manner, increasing harvesting in patches with greater seed densities. Although seldom considered, seed harvesting may also depend on the species identities of other individuals in the seed neighbourhood. When the seed harvest of a focal species increases in association with another seed species, the focal species suffers from Associational Susceptibility. In contrast, if seeds of the focal species are harvested less when in association with a second species, the focal species benefits from Associational Resistance.To evaluate density dependence and associational effects among seeds in mixtures, we conducted seed removal experiments using a completely additive design patterned after a two-species competition experiment using seeds of either Achnatherum hymenoides(Indian ricegrass), Leymus cinereus (basin wildrye) or Pseudoroegneria spicata (bluebunch wheatgrass), all native perennial grasses, combined with seeds of Bromus tectorum(cheatgrass), a non-native annual grass. The experiment involved placing five fixed quantities of the native seeds mixed with five fixed quantities of B. tectorum seeds in a factorial design, resulting in 35 seed mixture combinations. The seed-eating rodent community at our study sites, in order of abundance, is composed of Peromyscus maniculatus (North American deer mouse), Dipodomys ordii (Ord's kangaroo rat) and Perognathus parvus (Great Basin pocket mouse).Native seed harvesting was density dependent, with a greater proportion of seeds being harvested as density increased. In the mixed density model, the presence of B. tectorumdid not affect harvest of any of the native species' seeds when analysed individually. However, when all three native species were analysed together, increasing quantities of B. tectorum resulted in reduced harvest of native seeds, demonstrating weak but significant Associational Resistance. In contrast, harvest of B. tectorum seeds increased

  7. [Larynx: implants and stents].

    PubMed

    Sittel, C

    2009-05-01

    There is a wide variety of devices and materials to be implanted into the human larynx. Some are intended to remain only for a period of time, like laryngeal stents. If removal is not intended the device meets the definition for a medical implant. The majority of implants is used for the treatment of unilateral vocal fold immobility. There a 2 types of implants serving this purpose: Implants in a stricter sense are devices of solid material, which are brought into the paraglottic space through a window in the laryngeal framework (medialization thyroplasty). Several different products are presented in this review. In contrast, there are different substances available for endoscopic injection into the paralyzed vocal fold (injection laryngoplasty). Since some of these substances show a corpuscular consistency and a high viscosity they need to be deposited into the lateral paraglottic space. Therefore, the term "injectable implants" has been coined for these materials. The different substances available are discussed in detail in this review. Laryngeal stents are primarily used in the early postoperative phase after open reconstruction of the larynx. The different devices available on the market are described with their specific characteristics and intended use.

  8. Anodized dental implant surface.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Kumar, Muktadar Anand; Chowdhary, Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    Anodized implants with moderately rough surface were introduced around 2000. Whether these implants enhanced biologic effect to improve the environment for better osseointegration was unclear. The purpose of this article was to review the literature available on anodized surface in terms of their clinical success rate and bone response in patients till now. A broad electronic search of MEDLINE and PubMed databases was performed. A focus was made on peer-reviewed dental journals. Only articles related to anodized implants were included. Both animal and human studies were included. The initial search of articles resulted in 581 articles on anodized implants. The initial screening of titles and abstracts resulted in 112 full-text papers; 40 animal studies, 16 studies on cell adhesion and bacterial adhesion onto anodized surfaced implants, and 47 human studies were included. Nine studies, which do not fulfill the inclusion criteria, were excluded. The long-term studies on anodized surface implants do favor the surface, but in most of the studies, anodized surface is compared with that of machined surface, but not with other surfaces commercially available. Anodized surface in terms of clinical success rate in cases of compromised bone and immediately extracted sockets has shown favorable success.

  9. Biocompatible implant surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Bikash; Pawar, Sudhir; Pattanaik, Seema

    2012-01-01

    Surface plays a crucial role in biological interactions. Surface treatments have been applied to metallic biomaterials in order to improve their wear properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. A systematic review was performed on studies investigating the effects of implant surface treatments on biocompatibility. We searched the literature using PubMed, electronic databases from 1990 to 2009. Key words such as implant surface topography, surface roughness, surface treatment, surface characteristics, and surface coatings were used. The search was restricted to English language articles published from 1990 to December 2009. Additionally, a manual search in the major dental implant journals was performed. When considering studies, clinical studies were preferred followed by histological human studies, animal studies, and in vitro studies. A total of 115 articles were selected after elimination: clinical studies, 24; human histomorphometric studies, 11; animal histomorphometric studies, 46; in vitro studies, 34. The following observations were made in this review: · The focus has shifted from surface roughness to surface chemistry and a combination of chemical manipulations on the porous structure. More investigations are done regarding surface coatings. · Bone response to almost all the surface treatments was favorable. · Future trend is focused on the development of osteogenic implant surfaces. Limitation of this study is that we tried to give a broader overview related to implant surface treatments. It does not give any conclusion regarding the best biocompatible implant surface treatment investigated till date. Unfortunately, the eventually selected studies were too heterogeneous for inference of data.

  10. Biomaterials in cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The cochlear implant (CI) represents, for almost 25 years now, the gold standard in the treatment of children born deaf and for postlingually deafened adults. These devices thus constitute the greatest success story in the field of ‘neurobionic’ prostheses. Their (now routine) fitting in adults, and especially in young children and even babies, places exacting demands on these implants, particularly with regard to the biocompatibility of a CI’s surface components. Furthermore, certain parts of the implant face considerable mechanical challenges, such as the need for the electrode array to be flexible and resistant to breakage, and for the implant casing to be able to withstand external forces. As these implants are in the immediate vicinity of the middle-ear mucosa and of the junction to the perilymph of the cochlea, the risk exists – at least in principle – that bacteria may spread along the electrode array into the cochlea. The wide-ranging requirements made of the CI in terms of biocompatibility and the electrode mechanism mean that there is still further scope – despite the fact that CIs are already technically highly sophisticated – for ongoing improvements to the properties of these implants and their constituent materials, thus enhancing the effectiveness of these devices. This paper will therefore discuss fundamental material aspects of CIs as well as the potential for their future development. PMID:22073103

  11. Contraceptive implants and lactation.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Soledad

    2002-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of four contraceptive implants, plant, Implanon, Nestorone and Elcometrine, have been evaluated during use in the postpartum period by lactating women. These implants provide highly effective contraceptive protection with no negative effect on breastfeeding or infant growth and development. Breastfeeding women initiating Norplant use in the second postpartum month experience significantly longer periods of amenorrhea than do untreated women or intrauterine device users. After weaning, the bleeding pattern is similar to that observed in non-nursing women. Norplant use does not affect bone turnover and density during lactation. Norplant and Implanon release orally active progestins while Nestorone and Elcometrine implants release an orally inactive progestin, which represents an advantage since the infant should be free of steroidal effects. The infant's daily intake of steroids (estimated from concentrations in maternal milk during the first month of use) range from 90 to 100 ng of levonorgestrel (Norplant), 75-120 ng of etonogestrel (Implanon), and 50 ng and 110 ng of Nestorone (Nestorone and Elcometrine implants, respectively). Nursing women needing contraception may use progestin-only implants when nonhormonal methods are not available or acceptable. Implants that deliver orally active steroids should only be used after 6 weeks postpartum to avoid transferring of steroids to the newborn.

  12. Simple Implant Augmentation Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Anh H.; Bartlett, Erica L.; Kania, Katarzyna; Bae, Sang Mo

    2015-01-01

    Augmentation rhinoplasty among Asian patients is often performed to improve the height of the nasal dorsum. As the use of autogenous tissues poses certain limitations, alloplastic materials are a viable alternative with a long history of use in Asia. The superiority of one implant prosthesis over another for augmentation rhinoplasty is a matter of debate, with each material representing varying strengths and weaknesses, indications for use, and precautions to consider in nasal implant placement. An implant prosthesis should be used on a case-by-case basis. Augmentation rhinoplasty requires the consideration of specific anatomical preoperative factors, including the external nose, nasal length, nasofrontal angle, humps, and facial proportions. It is equally important to consider several operative guidelines to appropriately shape implants to minimize the occurrence of adverse effects and postoperative complications. The most common postoperative complications include infection, nasal height change, movement of implant prosthesis, and silicone implant protrusion. In addition, the surgeon should consider the current standards of Asian beauty aesthetics to better understand the patient's desired outcome. PMID:26648804

  13. Automated seed localization for intraoperative prostate brachytherapy based on 3D line segment patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Mingyue; Wei, Zhouping; Downey, Donal B.; Fenster, Aaron

    2005-04-01

    Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided brachytherapy is a treatment option for localized prostate cancer, in which 125I or 103Pd radioactive seeds are implanted into the prostate. In this procedure, automated seed localization is important for intra-operative evaluation of dose delivery, which permits the identification of under-dosed regions and remedial seed placement, and ensures that the entire prostate receives the prescribed dose. In this paper, we describe the development of an automated seed segmentation method for use with 3D TRUS images. It is composed of five steps: 1) 3D needle segmentation; 2) volume cropping along the detected needle; 3) non-seed structure removal based on tri-bar model projection; 4) seed candidate recognition using 3D line segment detection; and 5) localization of seed positions. Experiments with the agar and chicken phantom images demonstrated that our method could segment 93% of the seeds in the 3D TRUS images with a mean distance error of 1.0 mm in an agar phantom and 1.7 mm in a chicken phantom, both with respect to manual segmented seed positions. The false positive rate was 7% while the segmentation time on a PC computer with dual AMD Athlon 1.8GHz processor was 280 seconds.

  14. Dose reduction in LDR brachytherapy by implanted prostate gold fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Lutgens, Ludy; Murrer, Lars; Afsharpour, Hossein; Haas-Kock, Danielle de; Visser, Peter; Gils, Francis van; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric impact of gold fiducial markers (FM) implanted prior to external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer on low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seed implants performed in the context of combined therapy was investigated. Methods: A virtual water phantom was designed containing a single FM. Single and multi source scenarios were investigated by performing Monte Carlo dose calculations, along with the influence of varying orientation and distance of the FM with respect to the sources. Three prostate cancer patients treated with LDR brachytherapy for a recurrence following external beam radiotherapy with implanted FM were studied as surrogate cases to combined therapy. FM and brachytherapy seeds were identified on post implant CT scans and Monte Carlo dose calculations were performed with and without FM. The dosimetric impact of the FM was evaluated by quantifying the amplitude of dose shadows and the volume of cold spots. D{sub 90} was reported based on the post implant CT prostate contour. Results: Large shadows are observed in the single source-FM scenarios. As expected from geometric considerations, the shadows are dependent on source-FM distance and orientation. Large dose reductions are observed at the distal side of FM, while at the proximal side a dose enhancement is observed. In multisource scenarios, the importance of shadows appears mitigated, although FM at the periphery of the seed distribution caused underdosage (seed implant dose distributions. Therefore, reduced tumor control could be expected from FM implanted in tumors, although

  15. Soybean seed proteome rebalancing

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Eliot M.

    2014-01-01

    The soybean seed’s protein content and composition are regulated by both genetics and physiology. Overt seed protein content is specified by the genotype’s genetic framework and is selectable as a breeding trait. Within the genotype-specified protein content phenotype soybeans have the capacity to rebalance protein composition to create differing proteomes. Soybeans possess a relatively standardized proteome, but mutation or targeted engineering can induce large-scale proteome rebalancing. Proteome rebalancing shows that the output traits of seed content and composition result from two major types of regulation: genotype and post-transcriptional control of the proteome composition. Understanding the underlying mechanisms that specifies the seed proteome can enable engineering new phenotypes for the production of a high-quality plant protein source for food, feed, and industrial proteins. PMID:25232359

  16. Short dental implants: an emerging concept in implant treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Hashedi, Ashwaq Ali; Taiyeb Ali, Tara Bai; Yunus, Norsiah

    2014-06-01

    Short implants have been advocated as a treatment option in many clinical situations where the use of conventional implants is limited. This review outlines the effectiveness and clinical outcomes of using short implants as a valid treatment option in the rehabilitation of edentulous atrophic alveolar ridges. Initially, an electronic search was performed on the following databases: Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and DARE using key words from January 1990 until May 2012. An additional hand search was included for the relevant articles in the following journals: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants, Clinical Oral Implants Research, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, International Journal of Periodontics, Journal of Periodontology, and Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research. Any relevant papers from the journals' references were hand searched. Articles were included if they provided detailed data on implant length, reported survival rates, mentioned measures for implant failure, were in the English language, involved human subjects, and researched implants inserted in healed atrophic ridges with a follow-up period of at least 1 year after implant-prosthesis loading. Short implants demonstrated a high rate of success in the replacement of missing teeth in especially atrophic alveolar ridges. The advanced technology and improvement of the implant surfaces have encouraged the success of short implants to a comparable level to that of standard implants. However, further randomized controlled clinical trials and prospective studies with longer follow-up periods are needed.

  17. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Depaoli, D.

    1996-10-01

    This task will investigate the capabilities of magnetic-seeding filtration for the enhanced removal of magnetic and nonmagnetic particulates from liquids. This technology appies to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatant. Magnetic-seeding filtration can be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal-size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes.

  18. Cone and seed yields in white spruce seed production areas

    Treesearch

    John A. Pitcher

    1966-01-01

    The source of seed is an important consideration in the reforestation program on the National Forests in the North Central Region. Thirty-five seed production areas have been set up in the Region, along the lines proposed by the North Central Forest Experiment Station, to provide control of seed source. Red pine, white pine, shortleaf and loblolly pine, and white...

  19. Restoration seed reserves for assisted gene flow within seed orchards

    Treesearch

    C.S. Echt; B.S. Crane

    2017-01-01

    Changing climate and declining forest populations imperil the future of certain forest tree species. To complement forest management and genetic conservation plans, we propose a new paradigm for seedling seed orchards: foster genetic mixing among a variety of seed sources to increase genetic diversity and adaptive potential of seed supplies used for forest restoration...

  20. Seed-feeding insects impacting globemallow seed production

    Treesearch

    Robert Hammon; Melissa Franklin

    2012-01-01

    Weevils (Anthonomus sphaeralciae Fall [Coleoptera: Curculionidae]), which attack flowers and developing seeds, can significantly impact globemallow Sphaeralcea spp. A. St.-Hil. (Malvaceae) seed production without a grower even noticing there was insect damage. This weevil damaged almost one-quarter of the flowers in a seed production field in Delta County, Colorado,...

  1. Fiber and seed loss from seed cotton cleaning machinery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fiber and seed loss from seed cotton cleaning equipment in cotton gins occurs, but the quantity of material lost, factors affecting fiber and seed loss, and the mechanisms that cause material loss are not well understood. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of different factors on...

  2. Multiple seeds sensitivity using a single seed with threshold.

    PubMed

    Egidi, Lavinia; Manzini, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    Spaced seeds are a fundamental tool for similarity search in biosequences. The best sensitivity/selectivity trade-offs are obtained using many seeds simultaneously: This is known as the multiple seed approach. Unfortunately, spaced seeds use a large amount of memory and the available RAM is a practical limit to the number of seeds one can use simultaneously. Inspired by some recent results on lossless seeds, we revisit the approach of using a single spaced seed and considering two regions homologous if the seed hits in at least t sufficiently close positions. We show that by choosing the locations of the don't care symbols in the seed using quadratic residues modulo a prime number, we derive single seeds that when used with a threshold t > 1 have competitive sensitivity/selectivity trade-offs, indeed close to the best multiple seeds known in the literature. In addition, the choice of the threshold t can be adjusted to modify sensitivity and selectivity a posteriori, thus enabling a more accurate search in the specific instance at issue. The seeds we propose also exhibit robustness and allow flexibility in usage.

  3. Permanent Iodine-125 Interstitial Planar Seed Brachytherapy for Close or Positive Margins for Thoracic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Mutyala, Subhakar; Stewart, Alexandra; Khan, Atif J.; Cormack, Robert A.; O'Farrell, Desmond; Sugarbaker, David; Devlin, Phillip M.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To assess toxicity and outcome following permanent iodine-125 seed implant as an adjunct to surgical resection in cases of advanced thoracic malignancy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved retrospective review was performed. Fifty-nine patients were identified as having undergone thoracic brachytherapy seed implantation between September 1999 and December 2006. Data for patient demographics, tumor details, and morbidity and mortality were recorded. Results: Fifty-nine patients received 64 implants. At a median follow-up of 17 months, 1-year and 2-year Kaplan-Meier rates of estimated overall survival were 94.1% and 82.0%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year local control rates were 80.1% and 67.4%, respectively. The median time to develop local recurrence was 11 months. Grades 3 and 4 toxicity rates were 12% at 1 year. Conclusions: This review shows relatively low toxicity for interstitial planar seed implantation after thoracic surgical resection. The high local control results suggest that an incomplete oncologic surgery plus a brachytherapy implant for treating advanced thoracic malignancy merit further investigation.

  4. Physical View of Cloud Seeding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tribus, Myron

    1970-01-01

    Reviews experimental data on various aspects of climate control. Includes a discussion of (1) the physics of cloud seeding, (2) the applications of cloud seeding, and (3) the role of statistics in the field of weather modification. Bibliography. (LC)

  5. Physical View of Cloud Seeding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tribus, Myron

    1970-01-01

    Reviews experimental data on various aspects of climate control. Includes a discussion of (1) the physics of cloud seeding, (2) the applications of cloud seeding, and (3) the role of statistics in the field of weather modification. Bibliography. (LC)

  6. The importance of good seed

    Treesearch

    Robert P. Karrfalt

    2013-01-01

    The importance of seed to human culture and conservation of the natural world is briefly discussed. The effect of seed on seedling quality and cost is described through several examples and illustrations.

  7. [Dental implant-related infections].

    PubMed

    López-Cerero, Lorena

    2008-11-01

    Dental implant-associated infections are expected to be increasingly more common as the number of patients with implants for more than 10 years rises. There are 2 stages of peri-implant infection: early mucositis, consisting of inflammation of the peri-implant soft tissues without loss of supporting bone, and a more advanced form involving a loss of osseointegration, known as peri-implantitis. The estimated prevalence of this latter infection is 10% of 5-year implants and the main risk factor is previous periodontal disease. The etiopathogenesis of peri-implantitis is related with reservoirs of periodontal pathogens; however factors that lead to colonization of the implant surface or increased susceptibility to infection may also have an influence. Treatment should include removal of the bacterial biofilm, debridement of the exposed surface, and surgical regeneration of the peri-implant pocket.

  8. Practical considerations for maximizing heat production in a novel thermobrachytherapy seed prototype

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Bhoj; Warrell, Gregory; Shvydka, Diana; Subramanian, Manny; Ishmael Parsai, E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A combination of hyperthermia and radiation in the treatment of cancer has been proven to provide better tumor control than radiation administered as a monomodality, without an increase in complications or serious toxicities. Moreover, concurrent administration of hyperthermia and radiation displays synergistic enhancement, resulting in greater tumor cell killing than hyperthermia and radiation delivered separately. The authors have designed a new thermobrachytherapy (TB) seed, which serves as a source of both radiation and heat for concurrent brachytherapy and hyperthermia treatments when implanted in solid tumors. This innovative seed, similar in size and geometry to conventional seeds, will have self-regulating thermal properties. Methods: The new seed's geometry is based on the standard BEST Model 2301 125I seed, resulting in very similar dosimetric properties. The TB seed generates heat when placed in an oscillating magnetic field via induction heating of a ferromagnetic Ni–Cu alloy core that replaces the tungsten radiographic marker of the standard Model 2301. The alloy composition is selected to undergo a Curie transition near 50 °C, drastically decreasing power production at higher temperatures and providing for temperature self-regulation. Here, the authors present experimental studies of the magnetic properties of Ni–Cu alloy material, the visibility of TB seeds in radiographic imaging, and the ability of seed prototypes to uniformly heat tissue to a desirable temperature. Moreover, analyses are presented of magnetic shielding and thermal expansion of the TB seed, as well as matching of radiation dose to temperature distributions for a short interseed distance in a given treatment volume. Results: Annealing the Ni–Cu alloy has a significant effect on its magnetization properties, increasing the sharpness of the Curie transition. The TB seed preserves the radiographic properties of the BEST 2301 seed in both plain x rays and CT images

  9. Practical considerations for maximizing heat production in a novel thermobrachytherapy seed prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Gautam, Bhoj; Warrell, Gregory; Shvydka, Diana; Ishmael Parsai, E.; Subramanian, Manny

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: A combination of hyperthermia and radiation in the treatment of cancer has been proven to provide better tumor control than radiation administered as a monomodality, without an increase in complications or serious toxicities. Moreover, concurrent administration of hyperthermia and radiation displays synergistic enhancement, resulting in greater tumor cell killing than hyperthermia and radiation delivered separately. The authors have designed a new thermobrachytherapy (TB) seed, which serves as a source of both radiation and heat for concurrent brachytherapy and hyperthermia treatments when implanted in solid tumors. This innovative seed, similar in size and geometry to conventional seeds, will have self-regulating thermal properties. Methods: The new seed's geometry is based on the standard BEST Model 2301{sup 125}I seed, resulting in very similar dosimetric properties. The TB seed generates heat when placed in an oscillating magnetic field via induction heating of a ferromagnetic Ni–Cu alloy core that replaces the tungsten radiographic marker of the standard Model 2301. The alloy composition is selected to undergo a Curie transition near 50 °C, drastically decreasing power production at higher temperatures and providing for temperature self-regulation. Here, the authors present experimental studies of the magnetic properties of Ni–Cu alloy material, the visibility of TB seeds in radiographic imaging, and the ability of seed prototypes to uniformly heat tissue to a desirable temperature. Moreover, analyses are presented of magnetic shielding and thermal expansion of the TB seed, as well as matching of radiation dose to temperature distributions for a short interseed distance in a given treatment volume. Results: Annealing the Ni–Cu alloy has a significant effect on its magnetization properties, increasing the sharpness of the Curie transition. The TB seed preserves the radiographic properties of the BEST 2301 seed in both plain x rays and CT

  10. Human alveolar bone cell adhesion and growth on ion-implanted titanium.

    PubMed

    Nayab, S N; Jones, F H; Olsen, I

    2004-06-15

    Surface characteristics play a vital role in determining the biocompatibility of materials used as bone implants. Calcium ion implantation of titanium was previously reported to enhance osseointegration and bone formation in vivo, although the lack of consistent and reproducible effects highlight the need to understand the basic mechanisms involved in the response of target cells to such surfaces. The aim of this study was therefore to measure the precise effects of ion implantation of titanium on bone cells in vitro. Alveolar bone cells were seeded on the surface of polished titanium disks implanted with calcium, potassium, and argon ions. Using radioisotopically tagged bone cells, the results showed that although the calcium ion implanted surface reduced cell adhesion, it nevertheless significantly enhanced cell spreading and subsequent cell growth. In contrast, few differences in bone cell behavior were observed between the potassium- and argon-implanted titanium and the control nonimplanted titanium disks. These findings suggest the possibility that the calcium-implanted surface may significantly affect the biocompatibility of titanium implants by enhancing bone cell growth. Surface modification by ion implantation could thus prove to be a valuable tool for improving the clinical efficacy of titanium for bone repair and regeneration in vivo. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Surface stiffening and enhanced photoluminescence of ion implanted cellulose - polyvinyl alcohol - silica composite.

    PubMed

    Shanthini, G M; Sakthivel, N; Menon, Ranjini; Nabhiraj, P Y; Gómez-Tejedor, J A; Meseguer-Dueñas, J M; Gómez Ribelles, J L; Krishna, J B M; Kalkura, S Narayana

    2016-11-20

    Novel Cellulose (Cel) reinforced polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-Silica (Si) composite which has good stability and in vitro degradation was prepared by lyophilization technique and implanted using N(3+) ions of energy 24keV in the fluences of 1×10(15), 5×10(15) and 1×10(16)ions/cm(2). SEM analysis revealed the formation of microstructures, and improved the surface roughness on ion implantation. In addition to these structural changes, the implantation significantly modified the luminescent, thermal and mechanical properties of the samples. The elastic modulus of the implanted samples has increased by about 50 times compared to the pristine which confirms that the stiffness of the sample surface has increased remarkably on ion implantation. The photoluminescence of the native cellulose has improved greatly due to defect site, dangling bonds and hydrogen passivation. Electric conductivity of the ion implanted samples was improved by about 25%. Hence, low energy ion implantation tunes the mechanical property, surface roughness and further induces the formation of nano structures. MG63 cells seeded onto the scaffolds reveals that with the increase in implantation fluence, the cell attachment, viability and proliferation have improved greatly compared to pristine. The enhancement of cell growth of about 59% was observed in the implanted samples compared to pristine. These properties will enable the scaffolds to be ideal for bone tissue engineering and imaging applications.

  12. The Effects of Metallic Implants on Electroporation Therapies: Feasibility of Irreversible Electroporation for Brachytherapy Salvage

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, Robert E.; Smith, Ryan L.; Kavnoudias, Helen; Rosenfeldt, Franklin Ou, Ruchong; Mclean, Catriona A.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Thomson, Kenneth R.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Electroporation-based therapies deliver brief electric pulses into a targeted volume to destabilize cellular membranes. Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (IRE) provides focal ablation with effects dependent on the electric field distribution, which changes in heterogeneous environments. It should be determined if highly conductive metallic implants in targeted regions, such as radiotherapy brachytherapy seeds in prostate tissue, will alter treatment outcomes. Theoretical and experimental models determine the impact of prostate brachytherapy seeds on IRE treatments. Materials and Methods: This study delivered IRE pulses in nonanimal, as well as in ex vivo and in vivo tissue, with and in the absence of expired radiotherapy seeds. Electrical current was measured and lesion dimensions were examined macroscopically and with magnetic resonance imaging. Finite-element treatment simulations predicted the effects of brachytherapy seeds in the targeted region on electrical current, electric field, and temperature distributions. Results: There was no significant difference in electrical behavior in tissue containing a grid of expired radiotherapy seeds relative to those without seeds for nonanimal, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments (all p > 0.1). Numerical simulations predict no significant alteration of electric field or thermal effects (all p > 0.1). Histology showed cellular necrosis in the region near the electrodes and seeds within the ablation region; however, there were no seeds beyond the ablation margins. Conclusion: This study suggests that electroporation therapies can be implemented in regions containing small metallic implants without significant changes to electrical and thermal effects relative to use in tissue without the implants. This supports the ability to use IRE as a salvage therapy option for brachytherapy.

  13. Evaluation of dosimetry and excess seeds in permanent brachytherapy using a modified hybrid method: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kana; Okihara, Koji; Iwata, Tsuyoshi; Aibe, Norihiro; Kodani, Naohiro; Tsubokura, Takuji; Kamoi, Kazumi; Miki, Tsuneharu; Yamazaki, Hideya

    2013-05-01

    Permanent prostate brachytherapy is frequently performed worldwide, and many studies have demonstrated its favorable outcomes. Implant seeds used in this procedure contain a precise amount of radionuclide and are completely sealed. Because these seeds are not manufactured in Japan, they are expensive (6300 yen per seed) and therefore need careful management as a radioisotope. The proper implantation technique requires considerable procedure time, good dosimetric outcomes and simple radioactive isotope management. To evaluate the modified hybrid interactive technique based on these considerations, we assessed 313 patients who underwent hybrid interactive brachytherapy without additional external beam radiotherapy. We evaluated the duration of the procedure, dosimetric factors and the total number of excess seeds. The dosimetric results from computed tomography on Day 30 of follow-up were: 172 Gy (range 130-194 Gy) for pD90, 97.8% (83.5-100%) for pV100, 54.6% (27.5-82.4%) for pV150, 164 Gy (120-220 Gy) for uD90, 194 Gy (126-245 Gy) for uD30, 210 Gy (156-290 Gy) for uD5, 0.02 ml (0-1.2 ml) for rV100 and 0 ml (0-0.2 ml) for rV150. The number of excess seeds was determined by subtracting the number of implanted seeds from the expected number of seeds calculated from previously proposed nomograms. As per our method, nine excess seeds were used for two patients, whereas using the nomograms, the number of excess seeds was approximately eight per patient. Our modified hybrid interactive technique reduced the number of excess seeds while maintaining treatment quality.

  14. Seeds: A Celebration of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Bob

    The Space Exposed Experiment Developed for Students (SEEDS) Project offered science classes at the 5-12 and college levels the opportunity to conduct experiments involving tomato seeds that had been space-exposed over long periods of time. SEEDS kits were complete packages obtained from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for…

  15. Germination of red alder seed.

    Treesearch

    M.A. Radwan; D.S. DeBell

    1981-01-01

    Red alder seeds were collected from six locations throughout the natural range of the species. Each seed lot was obtained from a single tree, and the seeds were used to determine germination with and without stratification treatment. Irrespective of treatment, germination varied significantly (P

  16. Corridors cause differential seed predation.

    SciTech Connect

    Orrock, John L.; Damschen, Ellen I.

    2005-06-01

    Orrock, John, L., and Ellen I. Damschen. 2005. Corridors cause differential seed predation. Ecol. Apps. 15(3):793-798. Abstract. Corridors that connect disjunct populations are heavily debated in conservation, largely because the effects of corridors have rarely been evaluated by replicated, large-scale studies. Using large-scale experimental landscapes, we found that, in addition to documented positive effects, corridors also have negative impacts on bird-dispersed plants by affecting seed predation, and that overall predation is a function of the seeds primary consumer (rodents or arthropods). Both large-seeded Prunus serotina and small-seeded Rubus allegheniensis experienced greater predation in connected patches. However, P. serotina experienced significantly less seed predation compared to R. allegheniensis in unconnected patches, due to decreased impacts of rodent seed predators on this large-seeded species. Viewed in light of previous evidence that corridors have beneficial impacts by increasing pollination and seed dispersal, this work demonstrates that corridors may have both positive and negative effects for the same plant species at different life stages. Moreover, these effects may differentially affect plant species within the same community: seeds primarily consumed by rodents suffer less predation in unconnected patches. By shifting the impact of rodent and arthropod seed predators, corridors constructed for plant conservation could lead to shifts in the seed bank.

  17. Sexual reproduction, seeds, and seedlings

    Treesearch

    Walter T. McDonough

    1985-01-01

    Natural genetic interchange and extensive colonization of aspen by seed strongly depends upon favorable climatic and microclimatic conditions and upon human intervention. At times, in regions with the right combination of environmental conditions, there is significant L, reproduction by seed; elsewhere such establishment is rare. Seed production generally is profuse;...

  18. Direct seeding of shortleaf pine

    Treesearch

    Corinne S. Mann; David Gwaze

    2007-01-01

    Direct seeding is a potentially viable method for regenerating shortleaf pine, but it has not been used extensively. In Missouri, an estimated 10,000 acres have been direct-seeded with shortleaf pine; half of which are at Mark Twain National Forest. Direct seeding offers a flexible and efficient alternative to planting as a way to restore shortleaf pine in the Ozarks....

  19. Phomopsis seed decay of soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean Phomopsis seed decay (PSD) causes poor seed quality and suppresses yield in most soybean-growing countries. The disease is caused primarily by the fungal pathogen Phomopsis longicolla along with other Phomopsis and Diaporthe spp. Infected seed range from symptomless to shriveled, elongated, ...

  20. Upgrading Yellow-Poplar Seeds

    Treesearch

    F. T. Bonner; G. L. Switzer

    1971-01-01

    Yellow-poplar seed lots can be upgraded considerably by dewinging in a debearder and then cleaning and separating the seeds into four specific-gravity fractions with a fractionating aspirator or a gravity separator. By this process, lots with an original soundness of 6 to 10 percent were upgraded to between 60 and 65 percent full seeds.

  1. The SEED Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teich, Carolyn R.

    2011-01-01

    Committed to fulfilling the promise of the green economy, the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) launched the Sustainability Education and Economic Development (SEED) initiative (www.theseedcenter.org) in October 2010. The project advances sustainability and clean energy workforce development practices at community colleges by…

  2. The Seeds of Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viola, Herman J.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses "Seeds of Change," a Columbian quincentenary exhibition at the Smithsonian Institution. Describes the rapid transformation of the Americas after contact with the Europeans. Reports that the exhibit explores the destruction of the native population by disease, war, slavery, the ongoing decimation of the rain forest, and the…

  3. Direct seeding for forestation

    Treesearch

    Walter H. Davidson

    1980-01-01

    Direct seeding, an attractive alternative to planting, is not a simple method of forestation. Past experiences show far more failures than successes. Well documented procedures must be followed to insure any degree of success. In general, conifers have given the best results. Black walnut and black locust are notable exceptions. Current research suggests that other...

  4. Seed cotton unloading systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this article was to review the literature and describe the current technology used by U.S. cotton gins for seed cotton unloading. Unloading systems supply the gin with raw material. Their essential functions are 1) to remove non-cotton materials such as protective covers used duri...

  5. SEED Software Annotations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bethke, Dee; And Others

    This document provides a composite index of the first five sets of software annotations produced by Project SEED. The software has been indexed by title, subject area, and grade level, and it covers sets of annotations distributed in September 1986, April 1987, September 1987, November 1987, and February 1988. The date column in the index…

  6. Seeding and planting birch

    Treesearch

    John C. Bjorkbom

    1969-01-01

    Artificial regeneration of hardwoods does not have a very good reputation. Many of the early attempts to establish these species by seeding or planting resulted in failure. Then too, natural regeneration is usually adequate on cut over areas, so that there is little need for artificial regeneration on such areas. Nevertheless there are situations where artificial...

  7. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    SciTech Connect

    DePaoli, D.W.; Tsouris, C.; Yiacoumi, Sotira

    1997-10-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration is a technology under development for the enhanced removal of magnetic and non-magnetic particulates from liquids. This process involves the addition of a small amount of magnetic seed particles (such as naturally occurring iron oxide) to a waste suspension, followed by treatment with a magnetic filter. Non-magnetic and weakly magnetic particles are made to undergo nonhomogeneous flocculation with the seed particles, forming flocs of high magnetic susceptibility that are readily removed by a conventional high-gradient magnetic filter. This technology is applicable to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatants. Magnetic-seeding filtration may be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes. Waste stream characteristics for which the technology may be applicable include (1) particle sizes ranging from relatively coarse (several microns) to colloidal particles, (2) high or low radiation levels, (3) broad-ranging flow rates, (4) low to moderate solids concentration, (5) cases requiring high decontamination factors, and (6) aqueous or non-aqueous liquids. At this point, the technology is at the bench-scale stage of development; laboratory studies and fundamental modeling are currently being employed to determine the capabilities of the process.

  8. The Seeds of Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viola, Herman J.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses "Seeds of Change," a Columbian quincentenary exhibition at the Smithsonian Institution. Describes the rapid transformation of the Americas after contact with the Europeans. Reports that the exhibit explores the destruction of the native population by disease, war, slavery, the ongoing decimation of the rain forest, and the…

  9. 7 CFR 201.15 - Weed seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Weed seeds. 201.15 Section 201.15 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.15 Weed seeds. The percentage of weed seeds shall include seeds of plants considered weeds in the State into which the seed is offered for transportation or...

  10. 7 CFR 201.15 - Weed seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Weed seeds. 201.15 Section 201.15 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.15 Weed seeds. The percentage of weed seeds shall include seeds of plants considered weeds in the State into which the seed is offered for transportation or...

  11. 7 CFR 201.15 - Weed seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Weed seeds. 201.15 Section 201.15 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.15 Weed seeds. The percentage of weed seeds shall include seeds of plants considered weeds in the State into which the seed is offered for transportation or...

  12. 7 CFR 201.15 - Weed seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Weed seeds. 201.15 Section 201.15 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.15 Weed seeds. The percentage of weed seeds shall include seeds of plants considered weeds in the State into which the seed is offered for transportation or...

  13. 7 CFR 201.15 - Weed seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weed seeds. 201.15 Section 201.15 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.15 Weed seeds. The percentage of weed seeds shall include seeds of plants considered weeds in the State into which the seed is offered for transportation...

  14. Seeding big sagebrush successfully on Intermountain rangelands

    Treesearch

    Susan E. Meyer; Thomas W. Warren

    2015-01-01

    Big sagebrush can be seeded successfully on climatically suitable sites in the Great Basin using the proper seeding guidelines. These guidelines include using sufficient quantities of high-quality seed of the correct subspecies and ecotype, seeding in late fall to mid-winter, making sure that the seed is not planted too deeply, and seeding into an environment...

  15. Tree Seed Technology Training Course: Student Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonner, F. T.; And Others

    This manual is intended primarily to train seed collectors, seed-plant managers, seed analysts, and nursery managers, but can serve as a resource for any training course in forest regeneration. It includes both temperate and tropical tree species of all intended uses and covers the following topics: seed biology, seed collection, seed handling,…

  16. Positron implantation in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, V.J.; Lynn, K.G.; Welch, D.O.

    1993-12-31

    The Monte Carlo technique for modeling positron prior to annihilation and electron implantation in semi-infinite metals is described. Particle implantation is modelled as a multistep process, a series of collisions with the atoms of the host material. In elastic collisions with neutral atoms there is no transfer of energy. The particle loses energy by several different channels, excitation of the electron gas, ionization of the ion cores, or, at low energies, by phonon excitation. These competing scattering mechanisms have been incorporated into the Monte Carlo framework and several different models are being used. Brief descriptions of these Monte Carlo schemes, as well as an analytic model for positron implantation are included. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations are presented and compared with expermental data. Problems associated with modeling positron implantation are discuss and the need for more expermental data on energy-loss in different materials is stressed. Positron implantation in multilayers of different metals is briefly described and extensions of this work to include a study of multilayers and heterostructures is suggested.

  17. Safety and efficacy of concomitant chemotherapeutic wafers and iodine-125 seeds for recurrent glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ko, Andrew L; Fink, Kathleen R; Stelzer, Keith M; Silbergeld, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    Patients with recurrent malignant gliomas have a uniformly poor prognosis. However, further treatment is often warranted at the time of recurrence. Low-activity implanted brachytherapeutic devices, such as iodine-125 seeds, and implantable chemotherapeutic devices such as 1, 3-bis (2-chloroethyl)-nitrosourea (BCNU) impregnated polymer wafers (Gliadel(®)) have been shown to be safe and modestly effective, but a comparison of combination therapy versus Gliadel(®) implantation alone has not been performed. We retrospectively examined 24 patients following re-resection of recurrent glioblastoma, with 17 patients undergoing implantation of both Gliadel(®) and iodine-125 seeds, and 7 patients undergoing implantation of Gliadel(®) only. Outcomes examined included adverse events, survival after re-resection (SAR), and time to tumor progression after re-resection (PAR). Implantation of both Gliadel(®) and low activity iodine-125 seeds is safe with only two wound infections noted, a complication rate comparable to previous reports. The combination appears to confer a median SAR benefit if the activity per tumor resection volume exceeds 0.8 mCi/mL (60 versus 31 weeks, P = 0.02), and this benefit remained significant on multivariate analysis (HR =0.26 [CI:0.07-0.93], P = 0.03). Gross total resection of tumor was also significantly associated with longer time to PAR (HR =5.4 [CI: 1.13-26.0], P = 0.03). The concomitant use of Gliadel(®) and low activity iodine-125 seeds following re-resection of recurrent glioblastoma is safe. Our study demonstrated a significant benefit in SAR if the iodine-125 activity per tumor volume is greater than 0.8 mCi/mL. While our sample size is small, our results are in agreement with previous studies demonstrating the efficacy of combination treatment.

  18. [Effects of seed priming on vigor of Prunella vulgaris seeds].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-Xiu; Guo, Qiao-Sheng; Wang, Yan-Ru

    2008-03-01

    To select an effective way to enhance vigor of Prunella vulgaris seeds. Three population seeds were treated at the 20 degrees C and dark enviroment. Priming with 20% - 30% PEG and 200 - 400 mg x L(-1) GA3 could enhance seeds germination and vigor. Germination percentage of three population seeds treated with 0. 6% - 3.0% NaCl reduced, but they started to germinate in advance. Treated with 0.6% - 2.4% KNO3-KH2PO4, germination rate and vigor of seeds in Zijinshan and Pan' an both increased and the one in Bozhou decreased. Vigor of P. vulgaris seed treated with PEG and GA3 under proper concentration increases, while treated with KNO3-KH2PO, and NaCl low vigor seeds germination rate reduces.

  19. Seed priming to alleviate salinity stress in germinating seeds.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Ehab A

    2016-03-15

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses that affect crop production in arid and semiarid areas. Seed germination and seedling growth are the stages most sensitive to salinity. Salt stress causes adverse physiological and biochemical changes in germinating seeds. It can affect the seed germination and stand establishment through osmotic stress, ion-specific effects and oxidative stress. The salinity delays or prevents the seed germination through various factors, such as a reduction in water availability, changes in the mobilization of stored reserves and affecting the structural organization of proteins. Various techniques can improve emergence and stand establishment under salt conditions. One of the most frequently utilized is seed priming. The process of seed priming involves prior exposure to an abiotic stress, making a seed more resistant to future exposure. Seed priming stimulates the pre-germination metabolic processes and makes the seed ready for radicle protrusion. It increases the antioxidant system activity and the repair of membranes. These changes promote seed vigor during germination and emergence under salinity stress. The aim of this paper is to review the recent literature on the response of plants to seed priming under salinity stress. The mechanism of the effect of salinity on seed germination is discussed and the seed priming process is summarized. Physiological, biochemical and molecular changes induced by priming that lead to seed enhancement are covered. Plants' responses to some priming agents under salinity stress are reported based on the best available data. For a great number of crops, little information exists and further research is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Extraoral prostheses using extraoral implants.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, G; Tuna, S H; Oghan, F

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate extraoral prostheses and the use of extraoral implants in patients with facial defects. 10 cases were treated utilizing maxillofacial prostheses employing extraoral implants in five cases. 16 extraoral implants were installed. Seven implants were placed in irradiated sites in the orbital regions. Six implants were placed in mastoid regions and three in a zygoma region that was irradiated. Two implants failed before initial integration was achieved in irradiated areas. Using 14 extraoral implants as anchors, five extraoral prostheses were set. The other five cases were treated with extraoral prostheses without using extraoral implants due to cost and patient-related factors. The data included age, sex, primary disease, implant length, implant failure, prosthetic attachment, radiation therapy, and peri-implant skin reactions. The use of extraoral implants for the retention of extraoral prostheses has simplified the placement, removal, and cleaning of the prosthesis by the patient. The stability of the prostheses was improved by anchors. Clinical and technical problems are presented with the techniques used for their resolution. Using extraoral implants resulted in a high rate of success in retaining facial prostheses and gave good stability and aesthetic satisfaction.

  1. Management of peri-implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Prathapachandran, Jayachandran; Suresh, Neethu

    2012-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is a site-specific infectious disease that causes an inflammatory process in soft tissues, and bone loss around an osseointegrated implant in function. The etiology of the implant infection is conditioned by the status of the tissue surrounding the implant, implant design, degree of roughness, external morphology, and excessive mechanical load. The microorganisms most commonly associated with implant failure are spirochetes and mobile forms of Gram-negative anaerobes, unless the origin is the result of simple mechanical overload. Diagnosis is based on changes of color in the gingiva, bleeding and probing depth of peri-implant pockets, suppuration, X-ray, and gradual loss of bone height around the tooth. Treatment will differ depending upon whether it is a case of peri-implant mucositis or peri-implantitis. The management of implant infection should be focused on the control of infection, the detoxification of the implant surface, and regeneration of the alveolar bone. This review article deals with the various treatment options in the management of peri-implantitis. The article also gives a brief description of the etiopathogenesis, clinical features, and diagnosis of peri-implantitis. PMID:23559913

  2. Comprehensive I-125 multi-seed comparison for prostate brachytherapy: dosimetry and visibility analysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar; Smith, David W; Brearley, Elizabeth; St Clair, Shaun; Bownes, Peter

    2007-08-01

    To compare the visibility of different manufacturers I-125, seeds, and to investigate the effect of differences in dosimetry on treatment planning. Oncura Oncoseed, Oncura Echoseed, IBT Intersource, Bebig Isoseed and Nucletron Selectseed were investigated. The point dose at increasing distances from each seed type was calculated for three different angles; theta=0 degrees, 45 degrees and 90 degrees (where theta=0 degrees lies parallel to seed length). 10 patient plans were used to assess the effect of a change in dosimetry on treatment planning and quality of prostate and rectum implant indices such as Vp100, Vp200, Dp90, Vr100 and Vr69. All implant indices and dosimetry data were compared to Oncoseed. Visibility under X-ray, fluoroscopy, CT and MRI was investigated using prostate phantoms created in-house. Statistical significance was calculated using paired two-tailed t-tests. Dosimetric analysis was carried out for seeds of the same source strength. Differences in dose increase closer to the centre of each source, with the largest changes occurring for the angle theta=0 degrees. Selectseed and Isoseed seed types provide a consistently lower dose in all three directions. Changes to Vp100 are small and statistically insignificant for all seeds except Selectseed which shows a statistically significant decrease of 0.04% (p=0.02). Changes to Vp150 and Vp200 are statistically significant (p<0.01), with Intersource showing the greatest increase in both values. Selectseed shows a decrease in both Vp150 and Vp200. Echoseed shows an increase in both Vp150 and Vp200. Changes to D90 are statistically significant (p<0.01), with Intersource showing the greatest increase, followed by Isoseed then Echoseed. Selectseed shows a decrease in D90. For Vr100 there is no statistically significant change for any seed type. However, all seeds except Selectseed show a statistically significant increase in the value of Vr69, with Intersource showing the greatest increase. On fluoroscopy

  3. Clinical and histologic response of subcutaneous expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (Gore-Tex) and porous high-density polyethylene (Medpor) implants to acute and early infection.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, A P; Thomas, J R; Cox, A J; Cooper, M H

    1997-03-01

    size, PHDPE promotes faster fibrovascular ingrowth. The presence of vascularized host tissue in and around the implant lends stability and resistance to experimentally induced infection. Conservative management of clinical implant infections should be considered if bacterial seeding occurs after substantial fibrovascular ingrowth is present. Future alloplast designs should include pore sizes that will encourage invasion of the implant by host tissue.

  4. Bone formation in trabecular bone cell seeded scaffolds used for reconstruction of the rat mandible.

    PubMed

    Schliephake, H; Zghoul, N; Jäger, V; van Griensven, M; Zeichen, J; Gelinsky, M; Szubtarsky, N

    2009-02-01

    This study tested whether different in vitro cultivation techniques for tissue-engineered scaffolds seeded with human trabecular bone cells affect in vivo bone formation when implanted into critical-size defects in rat mandibles. Human trabecular cells were isolated and seeded into three types of scaffolds (porous CaCO(3), mineralized collagen, porous tricalcium phosphate). Four in vitro groups were produced: empty control scaffolds incubated with cell culture medium for 24 h; scaffolds seeded with trabecular bone cells, cultivated under static conditions for 24 h; scaffolds seeded with trabecular bone cells, cultivated for 14 days under static conditions; scaffolds seeded with trabecular bone cells, cultivated for 14 days in a continuous flow perfusion bioreactor. The scaffolds were implanted press fit into non-healing defects, 5 mm diameter, in rat mandibles. After 6 weeks the presence of human cells was assessed; none were detected. Histomorphometric evaluation showed that neither seeding human trabecular bone cells nor the culturing technique increased the amount of early bone formation compared with the level provided by osteoconductive bone ingrowth from the defect edges. It is concluded that human bone marrow stroma cells in tissue-engineered scaffolds and associated in vitro technology are difficult to test in the mandible in animal models.

  5. Crop protection by seed coating.

    PubMed

    Ehsanfar, S; Modarres-Sanavy, S A M

    2005-01-01

    Providence of sufficient and healthy food for increasing human population clears the importance of notice to increasing crop production in company with environmental loss reduction. Growth and yield of every plant with sexual reproduction, depends on germination & emergence of sown seeds. Seed is a small alive plant that its biological function is protection and nutrition of embryo. Biological, chemical and physiological characteristics of seed, affect on plant performance & its resistance to undesirable environmental conditions, and even on its total yield. So attention to seed and try to increase its performance is so important. One of the factors that cause reduction in germination percentage and seedling establishment, is seed disease. It's possible to control these diseases by treating the seed before planting it. Coating the seed with pesticides, is one of the ways to gain this goal. Seed coating is a technique in which several material as fertilizers, nutritional elements, moisture attractive or repulsive agents, plant growth regulators, rhizobium inocolum, chemical & pesticide etc, add to seed by adhesive agents and cause to increase seed performance and germination. Seed coating, leads to increase benefits in seed industry, because seeds can use all of their genetic vigor. This technique is used for seeds of many garden plants, valuable crops (such as corn, sunflower, canola, alfalfa,...) and some of the grasses. In this technique that was first used in coating cereal seeds in 1930, a thin and permeable layer of pesticide is stuck on seed surface and prevent damage of seedborn pathogens. This layer is melted or splited after absorption of moisture and suitable temperature by seed, and let the radical to exit the seed. In this approach materials are used accurately with seed, evaporation & leakage of pesticide and also adverse effects of some pesticides on seeds are diminished, and these factors cause to increase the accuracy and performance of pesticide

  6. Dental implants: A review.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, B

    2016-12-01

    A high number of patients have one or more missing tooth and it is estimated that one in four American subjects over the age of 74 have lost all their natural teeth. Many options exist to replace missing teeth but dental implants have become one of the most used biomaterial to replace one (or more) missing tooth over the last decades. Contemporary dental implants made with titanium have been proven safe and effective in large series of patients. This review considers the main historical facts concerned with dental implants and present the different critical factors that will ensure a good osseo-integration that will ensure a stable prosthesis anchorage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Towards biodegradable wireless implants.

    PubMed

    Boutry, Clémentine M; Chandrahalim, Hengky; Streit, Patrick; Schinhammer, Michael; Hänzi, Anja C; Hierold, Christofer

    2012-05-28

    A new generation of partially or even fully biodegradable implants is emerging. The idea of using temporary devices is to avoid a second surgery to remove the implant after its period of use, thereby improving considerably the patient's comfort and safety. This paper provides a state-of-the-art overview and an experimental section that describes the key technological challenges for making biodegradable devices. The general considerations for the design and synthesis of biodegradable components are illustrated with radiofrequency-driven resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) resonators made of biodegradable metals (Mg, Mg alloy, Fe, Fe alloys) and biodegradable conductive polymer composites (polycaprolactone-polypyrrole, polylactide-polypyrrole). Two concepts for partially/fully biodegradable wireless implants are discussed, the ultimate goal being to obtain a fully biodegradable sensor for in vivo sensing.

  8. Complications in implant dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Hanif, Ayesha; Qureshi, Saima; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Rashid, Haroon

    2017-01-01

    After tooth loss, an individual may seek tooth replacement so that his/her function and esthetics could be restored. Clinical prosthodontics, during the past decade, has significantly improved and developed according to the advancements in the science and patient's demands and needs. Conventional options in prosthodontics for substituting a missing single tooth include the removable partial denture, partial and full coverage bridgework, and resin-bonded bridgework. Dental implants have gained increasing popularity over the years as they are capable of restoring the function to near normal in both partial and completely edentulous arches. With substantial evidence available, fixed implant-supported prosthesis are fully acknowledged as a reliable treatment option for the replacement of single or multiple missing teeth nowadays. While dental implants are increasingly becoming the choice of replacement for missing teeth, the impediments associated with them are progressively emerging too. PMID:28435381

  9. 7 CFR 201.33 - Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.33 Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing. (a) In the case of seed in bulk, the information required under...

  10. 7 CFR 201.33 - Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.33 Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing. (a) In the case of seed in bulk, the information required under...

  11. 7 CFR 201.33 - Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.33 Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing. (a) In the case of seed in bulk, the information required under...

  12. 7 CFR 201.33 - Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.33 Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing. (a) In the case of seed in bulk, the information required under...

  13. 7 CFR 201.33 - Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.33 Seed in bulk or large quantities; seed for cleaning or processing. (a) In the case of seed in bulk, the information required under...

  14. Vibro-acoustography with 1.75D ultrasound array transducer for detection and localization of permanent prostate brachytherapy seeds: ex vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Alizad, Azra; Kinnick, Randall R.; Davis, Brian J.; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2013-03-01

    Effective brachytherapy procedures require precise placement of radioactive seeds in the prostate. Currently, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging is one of the main intraoperative imaging modalities to assist physicians in placement of brachytherapy seeds. However, the seed detection rate with TRUS is poor mainly because ultrasound imaging is highly sensitive to variations in seed orientation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the abilities of a new acoustic radiation force imaging modality, vibro-acoustography (VA), equipped with a 1.75D array transducer and implemented on a customized clinical ultrasound scanner, to image and localize brachytherapy seeds in prostatic tissue. To perform experiments, excised cadaver prostate specimens were implanted with dummy brachytherapy seeds, and embedded in tissue mimicking gel to simulate the properties of the surrounding soft tissues. The samples were scanned using the VA system and the resulting VA signals were used to reconstruct VA images at several depths inside the tissue. To further evaluate the performance of VA in detecting seeds, X-ray computed tomography (CT) images of the same tissue sample, were obtained and used as a gold-standard to compare the number of seeds detected by the two methods. Our results indicate that VA is capable of imaging of brachytherapy seeds with accuracy and high contrast, and can detect a large percentage of the seeds implanted within the tissue samples.

  15. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Medrad utilized NASA's Apollo technology to develop a new device called the AID implantable automatic pulse generator which monitors the heart continuously, recognizes the onset of ventricular fibrillation and delivers a corrective electrical shock. AID pulse generator is, in effect, a miniaturized version of the defibrillator used by emergency squads and hospitals to restore rhythmic heartbeat after fibrillation, but has the unique advantage of being permanently available to the patient at risk. Once implanted, it needs no specially trained personnel or additional equipment. AID system consists of a microcomputer, a power source and two electrodes which sense heart activity.

  16. Hydroxylapatite Otologic Implants

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, A.D.; Lauf, R.J.; Beale, B.; Johnson, R.

    2000-01-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMER) and Smith and Nephew Richards Inc. of Bartlett, TN, was initiated in March 1997. The original completion date for the Agreement was March 25, 1998. The purpose of this work is to develop and commercialize net shape forming methods for directly creating dense hydroxylapatite (HA) ceramic otologic implants. The project includes three tasks: (1) modification of existing gelcasting formulations to accommodate HA slurries; (2) demonstration of gelcasting to fabricate green HA ceramic components of a size and shape appropriate to otologic implants: and (3) sintering and evaluation of the HA components.

  17. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  18. Investigation of the Effect of Cell Seeding on Neotissue Formation in a Tissue Engineered Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Elizabeth S.; Best, Cameron; Onwuka, Ekene; Sugiura, Tadahisa; Mahler, Nathan; Bolon, Brad; Niehaus, Andrew; James, Iyore; Hibino, Narutoshi; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Johnson, Jed; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical management of long segment tracheal disease is limited by a paucity of donor tissue and poor performance of synthetic materials. A potential solution is the development of a tissue-engineered tracheal graft (TETG), which promises an autologous airway conduit with growth capacity. Methods We created a TETG by vacuum seeding bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) on a polymeric nanofiber scaffold. First, we evaluated the role of scaffold porosity on cell seeding efficiency in vitro. We then determined the effect of cell seeding on graft performance in vivo using an ovine model. Results Seeding efficiency of normal porosity (NP) grafts was significantly increased when compared to high porosity (HP) grafts (NP: 360.3 ± 69.19 ×103 cells/mm2; HP: 133.7 ± 22.73 ×103 cells/mm2; p<0.004). Lambs received unseeded (n=2) or seeded (n=3) NP scaffolds as tracheal interposition grafts for 6 weeks. Three animals were terminated early due to respiratory complications (n=2 unseeded, n=1 seeded). Seeded TETG explants demonstrated wound healing, epithelial migration, and delayed stenosis when compared to their unseeded counterparts. Conclusion Vacuum seeding BM-MNCs on nanofiber scaffolds for immediate implantation as tracheal interposition grafts is a viable approach to generate TETGs, but further preclinical research is warranted before advocating this technology for clinical application. PMID:26552897

  19. Computational and Experimental Evaluations of a Novel Thermo-Brachytherapy Seed for Treatment of Solid Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrell, Gregory R.

    Hyperthermia has long been known as a radiation therapy sensitizer of high potential; however successful delivery of this modality and integrating it with radiation have often proved technically difficult. We present the dual-modality thermobrachytherapy (TB) seed, based on the ubiquitous low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy permanent implant, as a simple and effective combination of hyperthermia and radiation therapy. Heat is generated from a ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic core within the seed, which produces Joule heating by eddy currents. A strategically-selected Curie temperature provides thermal self-regulation. In order to obtain a uniform and sufficiently high temperature distribution, additional hyperthermia-only (HT-only) seeds are proposed to be used in vacant spots within the needles used to implant the TB seeds; this permits a high seed density without the use of additional needles. Experimental and computational studies were done both to optimize the design of the TB and HT-only seeds and to quantitatively assess their ability to heat and irradiate defined, patient-specific targets. Experiments were performed with seed-sized ferromagnetic samples in tissue-mimicking phantoms heated by an industrial induction heater. The magnetic and thermal properties of the seeds were studied computationally in the finite element analysis (FEA) solver COMSOL Multiphysics, modelling realistic patient-specific seed distributions. These distributions were derived from LDR permanent prostate implants previously conducted at our institution; various modifications of the seeds' design were studied. The calculated temperature distributions were analyzed by generating temperature-volume histograms, which were used to quantify coverage and temperature homogeneity for a range of blood perfusion rates, as well as for a range of seed Curie temperatures and thermal power production rates. The impact of the interseed attenuation and scatter (ISA) effect on radiation dose distributions

  20. Effects of surface seeding with vital cells on the calcium uptake of biological materials for heart valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Dahm, M; Prüfer, D; Mayer, E; Hafner, G; Groh, E; Oelert, H

    1996-03-01

    Up to 35% of bioprosthetic heart valves need to be replaced during the first decade after implantation because of tissue degeneration or calcification. The aim of the studies was to evaluate the influence of surface seeding with viable cells on the calcium uptake of biomaterials. Samples of glutaraldehyde tanned bovine pericardium (GBP, n = 52) or porcine valves (GPV, n = 50), or glycerol treated bovine pericardium (GlyBP, n = 35), which had either been rinsed with saline (GBP, n = 30; GPV, n = 26; GlyBP, n = 18) or seeded with rat fibrocytes (GBP, n = 22; GPV, n = 24; GlyBP, n = 17) were incubated with cell culture medium containing physiologic levels of calcium. Similarly treated material was implanted into the abdominal muscles of 88 rats (seeded: GBP, n = 16; GPV, n = 16; GlyBP, n = 14; non-seeded: GBP, n = 6; GPV, n = 8; GlyBP, n = 7). The specimens were analyzed two and four weeks later for their calcium content. Over time untreated GBP and GlyBP calcified in vitro and in vivo while GPV retained low calcium levels in vivo. Surface seeding with rat fibrocytes significantly reduced the calcium accumulation in GBP and GlyBP in vitro and in vivo (p < 0.05). Seeding with viable cells might be a promising method of reducing calcium accumulation in bovine pericardial implants.

  1. Empty Seeds Are Not Always Bad: Simultaneous Effect of Seed Emptiness and Masting on Animal Seed Predation

    PubMed Central

    Perea, Ramón; Venturas, Martin; Gil, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Seed masting and production of empty seeds have often been considered independently as different strategies to reduce seed predation by animals. Here, we integrate both phenomena within the whole assemblage of seed predators (both pre and post-dispersal) and in two contrasting microsites (open vs. sheltered) to improve our understanding of the factors controlling seed predation in a wind-dispersed tree (Ulmus laevis). In years with larger crop sizes more avian seed predators were attracted with an increase in the proportion of full seeds predated on the ground. However, for abundant crops, the presence of empty seeds decreased the proportion of full seeds predated. Empty seeds remained for a very long period in the tree, making location of full seeds more difficult for pre-dispersal predators and expanding the overall seed drop period at a very low cost (in dry biomass and allocation of C, N and P). Parthenocarpy (non-fertilized seeds) was the main cause of seed emptiness whereas seed abortion was produced in low quantity. These aborted seeds fell prematurely and, thus, could not work as deceptive seeds. A proportion of 50% empty seeds significantly reduced ground seed predation by 26%. However, a high rate of parthenocarpy (beyond 50% empty seeds) did not significantly reduce seed predation in comparison to 50% empty seeds. We also found a high variability and unpredictability in the production of empty seeds, both at tree and population level, making predator deception more effective. Open areas were especially important to facilitate seed survival since rodents (the main post-dispersal predators) consumed seeds mostly under shrub cover. In elm trees parthenocarpy is a common event that might work as an adaptive strategy to reduce seed predation. Masting per se did not apparently reduce the overall proportion of seeds predated in this wind-dispersed tree, but kept great numbers of seeds unconsumed. PMID:23776503

  2. Empty seeds are not always bad: simultaneous effect of seed emptiness and masting on animal seed predation.

    PubMed

    Perea, Ramón; Venturas, Martin; Gil, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Seed masting and production of empty seeds have often been considered independently as different strategies to reduce seed predation by animals. Here, we integrate both phenomena within the whole assemblage of seed predators (both pre and post-dispersal) and in two contrasting microsites (open vs. sheltered) to improve our understanding of the factors controlling seed predation in a wind-dispersed tree (Ulmus laevis). In years with larger crop sizes more avian seed predators were attracted with an increase in the proportion of full seeds predated on the ground. However, for abundant crops, the presence of empty seeds decreased the proportion of full seeds predated. Empty seeds remained for a very long period in the tree, making location of full seeds more difficult for pre-dispersal predators and expanding the overall seed drop period at a very low cost (in dry biomass and allocation of C, N and P). Parthenocarpy (non-fertilized seeds) was the main cause of seed emptiness whereas seed abortion was produced in low quantity. These aborted seeds fell prematurely and, thus, could not work as deceptive seeds. A proportion of 50% empty seeds significantly reduced ground seed predation by 26%. However, a high rate of parthenocarpy (beyond 50% empty seeds) did not significantly reduce seed predation in comparison to 50% empty seeds. We also found a high variability and unpredictability in the production of empty seeds, both at tree and population level, making predator deception more effective. Open areas were especially important to facilitate seed survival since rodents (the main post-dispersal predators) consumed seeds mostly under shrub cover. In elm trees parthenocarpy is a common event that might work as an adaptive strategy to reduce seed predation. Masting per se did not apparently reduce the overall proportion of seeds predated in this wind-dispersed tree, but kept great numbers of seeds unconsumed.

  3. Biofilm related to dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Angie; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2010-10-01

    Oral biofilm-related diseases such as periodontal and peri-implant diseases are unique infections in that they develop from the resident indigenous microflora. As more implants are nowadays being placed, clinicians may encounter more complications. Therefore, understanding the etiology is warranted to establish adequate diagnosis and provide proper treatment. This article focuses on understanding peri-implant microbiology and its roles in peri-implant diseases.

  4. Re-endothelialization of rat lung scaffolds through passive, gravity-driven seeding of segment-specific pulmonary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Scarritt, Michelle E; Pashos, Nicholas C; Motherwell, Jessica M; Eagle, Zachary R; Burkett, Brian J; Gregory, Ashley N; Mostany, Ricardo; Weiss, Daniel J; Alvarez, Diego F; Bunnell, Bruce A

    2016-12-12

    Effective re-endothelialization is critical for the use of decellularized scaffolds for ex vivo lung engineering. Current approaches yield insufficiently re-endothelialized scaffolds that hemorrhage and become thrombogenic upon implantation. Herein, gravity-driven seeding coupled with bioreactor culture facilitated widespread distribution and engraftment of endothelial cells throughout rat lung scaffolds. Initially, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were seeded into the pulmonary artery by either gravity-driven, variable flow perfusion seeding or pump-driven, pulsatile flow perfusion seeding. Gravity seeding evenly distributed cells and supported cell survival and re-lining of the vascular walls while perfusion pump-driven seeding led to increased cell fragmentation and death. Using gravity seeding, rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) and rat pulmonary vein endothelial cells (PVECs) attached in intermediate and large vessels, while rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) deposited mostly in microvessels. Combination seeding of PAECs, PVECs, and MVECs led to positive VE-cadherin staining. In addition, combination seeding improved barrier function as assessed by serum albumin extravasation; however, leakage was observed in the distal portions of the re-endothelialized tissue suggesting that recellularization of the alveoli is necessary to complete barrier function of the capillary-alveolar network. Overall, these data indicate that vascular recellularization of rat lung scaffolds is achieved through gravity seeding. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Biomimetic approach to dental implants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Il; Jang, Jun-Hyeog; Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C; Ku, Young

    2008-01-01

    Titanium, as an implant material, is regarded to be durable and biocompatible, which allows functional replacement of missing teeth. Successful dental implantation depends on an osseointegration phenomenon, a direct structural and functional binding reaction between bone and implant. It is well known that physicochemical characteristics of the dental implant surface, such as roughness, topography, chemistry, and electrical charge affect the biological reactions occurring at the interface of tissue and implant. Therefore, considerable efforts have been made to modify the surface of titanium implants which are based on mechanical, physical and chemical treatments. Recently, biological molecules were introduced onto the surface of implants to stimulate osteogenic cells in the early stage of implantation and consequently accelerate bone formation around implant and subsequent rapid implant stabilization. A range of extracellular matrix components, designed peptides, and growth factors have been proposed as the biological moiety. In this review, we address several issues related to the biology of dental implants and discuss biomimetic modification of the implant surface as a novel approach to obtain successful osseointegration.

  6. The silicone breast implant controversy.

    PubMed

    Guerette, P H

    1995-02-01

    Feminists call it objectification. Consumer advocates call it victimization. Medical personnel call it augmentation. Women, implantation. Whatever the term, media hype and the increasing number of lawsuits against U.S. manufacturers of silicone breast implants has caused widespread concern among women and raised serious questions about the long term health risks and safety of breast implant devices.

  7. Sterilisation of bioresorbable polymer implants.

    PubMed

    Bernkopf, M

    2007-01-01

    Bioresorbable polymer implants are rapidly growing alternatives to traditional implants in many applications. Because of their resorption in the body, it is necessary to sterilise the complete product before application. The suitability of different sterilisation methods for bioresorbable polymers is discussed using polylactic acid implants as an example.

  8. Adult Stem Cells Properties in Terms of Commitment, Aging and Biological Safety of Grit-Blasted and Acid-Etched Ti Dental Implants Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Bressan, Eriberto; Calvo - Guirado, José L.; Degidi, Marco; Piattelli, Adriano; Zavan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is one of the most widely used biomaterials for manufacturing dental implants. The implant surface properties strongly influence osseointegration. The aim of the present study was to in vitro investigate the characteristics of Ti dental implants in terms of mutagenicity, hemocompatibility, biocompatibility, osteoinductivity and biological safety. The Ames test was used to test the mutagenicity of the Ti dental implants, and the hemolysis assay for evaluating their hemocompatibility. Human adipose - derived stem cells (ADSCs) were then seeded onto these implants in order to evaluate their cytotoxicity. Gene expression analyzing with real-time PCR was carried out to investigate the osteoinductivity of the biomaterials. Finally, the genetic stability of the cells cultured onto dental implants was determined by karyotyping. Our results demonstrated that Ti dental implants are not mutagenic, do not cause hemolysis, and are biocompatible. The MTT assay revealed that ADSCs, seeded on Ti dental implants, proliferate up to 30 days in culture. Moreover, ADSCs loaded on Ti dental implants show a substantial expression of some osteoblast specific markers, such as COL1A1, OPN, ALPL, and RUNX2, as well as chromosomal stability after 30 days of culture in a medium without osteogenic factors. In conclusion, the grit-blasted and acid-etched treatment seems to favor the adhesion and proliferation of ADSCs and improve the osteoinductivity of Ti dental implant surfaces. PMID:25635249

  9. Heterotopic and orthotopic autologous chondrocyte implantation using a minipig chondral defect model.

    PubMed

    Lohan, Anke; Marzahn, Ulrike; El Sayed, Karym; Bock, Christopher; Haisch, Andreas; Kohl, Benjamin; Stoelzel, Katharina; John, Thilo; Ertel, Wolfgang; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2013-10-01

    Implantation of non-articular (heterotopic) chondrocyte-based implants might be an alternative approach to articular cartilage repair. This strategy could be helpful in cases in which there are no or too few articular chondrocytes available. Therefore, this study was undertaken to compare joint cartilage defect healing in the minipig model after implantation of heterotopic auricular and orthotopic articular chondrocytes. Poly-glycolic acid (PGA) associated three-dimensional (3D) constructs were prepared culturing autologous minipig-derived articular and auricular chondrocytes for 7 days in a dynamic culture system. Chondrocyte PGA constructs were implanted into 8mm diameter and ∼1.1mm deep chondral defects within the medial and lateral condyles of the minipig knee joints. Empty defects served as controls for assessment of the intrinsic healing response. Defect healing was monitored 6 months post implantation using a macroscopic and microscopic score system and biomechanical analysis. Neo-cartilage formation could be observed in the PGA constructs seeded with articular and auricular chondrocytes in vivo. The defect healing did not significantly differ at the macroscopic and histological level in response to implantation of either autologous articular or auricular chondrocytes seeded constructs compared with the empty defects. Although the differences were not significant, the auricular chondrocytes-based implants led to a slightly inferior repair quality at the macroscopic level, but a histologically superior healing response when compared with the empty defect group. However, biomechanical analysis revealed a higher stiffness in repair tissues produced by auricular chondrocyte implantation compared with the other groups. Deduced from these results, articular chondrocytes represent the preferable cell source for implantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment of peri-implantitis and the failing implant.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Kevin; Shahbazian, Timothy; MacLeod, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Appropriate treatment of implants is becoming increasingly important for the general dentist as the number of implants placed per year continues to increase. Early diagnosis of peri-implantitis is imperative; initiating the correct treatment protocol depends on a proper diagnosis. Several risk factors exist for the development of peri-implantitis, which can guide patient selection and treatment planning. Treatment of peri-implantitis should be tailored to the severity of the lesion (as outlined by the cumulative interceptive supportive treatment protocol), ranging from mechanical debridement to explantation. Several surgical and nonsurgical treatment alternatives exist. There is little consensus on superior treatment methods. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Seed-to-Seed-to-Seed Growth and Development of Arabidopsis in Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Link, Bruce M.; Busse, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Arabidopsis thaliana was grown from seed to seed wholly in microgravity on the International Space Station. Arabidopsis plants were germinated, grown, and maintained inside a growth chamber prior to returning to Earth. Some of these seeds were used in a subsequent experiment to successfully produce a second (back-to-back) generation of microgravity-grown Arabidopsis. In general, plant growth and development in microgravity proceeded similarly to those of the ground controls, which were grown in an identical chamber. Morphologically, the most striking feature of space-grown Arabidopsis was that the secondary inflorescence branches and siliques formed nearly perpendicular angles to the inflorescence stems. The branches grew out perpendicularly to the main inflorescence stem, indicating that gravity was the key determinant of branch and silique angle and that light had either no role or a secondary role in Arabidopsis branch and silique orientation. Seed protein bodies were 55% smaller in space seed than in controls, but protein assays showed only a 9% reduction in seed protein content. Germination rates for space-produced seed were 92%, indicating that the seeds developed in microgravity were healthy and viable. Gravity is not necessary for seed-to-seed growth of plants, though it plays a direct role in plant form and may influence seed reserves. Key Words: Arabidopsis—Branch—Inflorescence—Microgravity—Morphology—Seed—Space. Astrobiology 14, 866–875. PMID:25317938

  12. Seed-to-seed-to-seed growth and development of Arabidopsis in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Link, Bruce M; Busse, James S; Stankovic, Bratislav

    2014-10-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana was grown from seed to seed wholly in microgravity on the International Space Station. Arabidopsis plants were germinated, grown, and maintained inside a growth chamber prior to returning to Earth. Some of these seeds were used in a subsequent experiment to successfully produce a second (back-to-back) generation of microgravity-grown Arabidopsis. In general, plant growth and development in microgravity proceeded similarly to those of the ground controls, which were grown in an identical chamber. Morphologically, the most striking feature of space-grown Arabidopsis was that the secondary inflorescence branches and siliques formed nearly perpendicular angles to the inflorescence stems. The branches grew out perpendicularly to the main inflorescence stem, indicating that gravity was the key determinant of branch and silique angle and that light had either no role or a secondary role in Arabidopsis branch and silique orientation. Seed protein bodies were 55% smaller in space seed than in controls, but protein assays showed only a 9% reduction in seed protein content. Germination rates for space-produced seed were 92%, indicating that the seeds developed in microgravity were healthy and viable. Gravity is not necessary for seed-to-seed growth of plants, though it plays a direct role in plant form and may influence seed reserves.

  13. Two-stage implant systems.

    PubMed

    Fritz, M E

    1999-06-01

    Since the advent of osseointegration approximately 20 years ago, there has been a great deal of scientific data developed on two-stage integrated implant systems. Although these implants were originally designed primarily for fixed prostheses in the mandibular arch, they have been used in partially dentate patients, in patients needing overdentures, and in single-tooth restorations. In addition, this implant system has been placed in extraction sites, in bone-grafted areas, and in maxillary sinus elevations. Often, the documentation of these procedures has lagged. In addition, most of the reports use survival criteria to describe results, often providing overly optimistic data. It can be said that the literature describes a true adhesion of the epithelium to the implant similar to adhesion to teeth, that two-stage implants appear to have direct contact somewhere between 50% and 70% of the implant surface, that the microbial flora of the two-stage implant system closely resembles that of the natural tooth, and that the microbiology of periodontitis appears to be closely related to peri-implantitis. In evaluations of the data from implant placement in all of the above-noted situations by means of meta-analysis, it appears that there is a strong case that two-stage dental implants are successful, usually showing a confidence interval of over 90%. It also appears that the mandibular implants are more successful than maxillary implants. Studies also show that overdenture therapy is valid, and that single-tooth implants and implants placed in partially dentate mouths have a success rate that is quite good, although not quite as high as in the fully edentulous dentition. It would also appear that the potential causes of failure in the two-stage dental implant systems are peri-implantitis, placement of implants in poor-quality bone, and improper loading of implants. There are now data addressing modifications of the implant surface to alter the percentage of

  14. Implant contamination during spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Bible, Jesse E; O'Neill, Kevin R; Crosby, Colin G; Schoenecker, Jonathan G; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2013-06-01

    Postoperative spine infections have been reported to occur in 1% to 15% of patients and subsequently lead to significant morbidity and cost, with an elevated risk for instrumented cases. Every effort should be made to minimize the risk of intraoperative wound contamination. Consequently, certain practices are followed in the operating room to prevent contamination, many of which are not evidence based. Conversely, certain objects believed to be sterile are frequently overlooked as potential sources of contamination. To assess to what degree contamination of spinal implants occurs during spine surgery and evaluate whether coverage of implants alters the rate of contamination. Prospective study. This study included 105 consecutive noninfection surgical cases performed by a single spine surgeon that required the use of instrumentation. Spinal implant contamination. Cases were randomized to have all implant trays either remain uncovered (n=54) or covered (n=51) with sterile surgical towels on opening until implants were required for the case. After the last implant was placed, a sterile culture swab was used to obtain a sample from all open implants that had been present at the start of the case. The paper outer wraps of the implant trays were sampled in each case as a positive control, and an additional 105 swabs were capped immediately after they were opened to obtain negative controls. Swab samples were assessed for bacterial growth on 5% sheep blood Columbia agar plates. Of note, only departmental funding was used and no applicable financial relationships exist with any author. No growth was observed on any of the 105 negative controls, whereas 99.1% of positive controls demonstrated obvious contamination. Cultures from implant samples demonstrated a 9.5% overall rate of contamination with 2.0% (n=1) of covered implants versus 16.7% (n=9) of uncovered implants demonstrating contamination. Length of time implant trays were open before sample collection; implant type

  15. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  16. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E.; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Kenneth J.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S.; Wilgen, John B.; Evans, Boyd Mccutchen

    2016-05-10

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  17. Implantable electrical device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M. D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fully implantable and self contained device is disclosed composed of a flexible electrode array for surrounding damaged nerves and a signal generator for driving the electrode array with periodic electrical impulses of nanoampere magnitude to induce regeneration of the damaged nerves.

  18. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  19. Implantable continuous glucose sensors.

    PubMed

    Renard, Eric

    2008-08-01

    Because of the limits of wearable needle-type or microdialysis-based enzymatic sensors in clinical use, fully implantable glucose monitoring systems (IGMS) represent a promising alternative. Long-term use reducing impact of invasiveness due to implantation, less frequent calibration needs because of a more stable tissue environment around the sensor and potential easier inclusion in a closed-loop insulin delivery system are the expected benefits of IGMS. First experiences with subcutaneous and intravenous IGMS have been recently collected in pilot studies. While no severe adverse events have been reported, biointerface issues have been responsible for the failures of IGMS. Tissue reactions around implanted subcutaneous devices and damages of intravenous sensors due to shearing forces of blood flow impaired IGMS function and longevity. In functioning systems, accuracy of glucose measurement reached satisfactory levels for average durations of about 120 days with subcutaneous IGMS and 259 days with intravenous sensors. Moreover, sensor information could help to improve time spent in normal glucose range when provided to patients wearing subcutaneous IGMS and allowed safe and effective closed-loop glucose control when intravenous sensors were connected to implanted pumps using intra-peritoneal insulin delivery. These data could open a favourable perspective for IGMS after improvement of biointerface conditions and if compatible with an affordable cost.

  20. Cochlear Implantation in Neurobrucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Bajin, Münir Demir; Savaş, Özden; Aslan, Filiz; Sennaroğlu, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurobrucellosis is a disease consisting of a wide spectrum of complications such as peripheral neuropathy, cranial nerve involvement, ataxia, meningeal irritation, paraplegia, seizures, coma, and even death. The vestibulocochlear nerve seems to be the most commonly affected cranial nerve (10%). We present a patient with neurobrucellosis whose auditory perception and speech intelligibility skill performances improved after cochlear implantation. Case Report: A 35 year-old woman was admitted to another hospital 2 years ago with the symptoms of headache, nausea, and altered consciousness, who was finally diagnosed with neurobrucellosis. She developed bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss during the following 6 months. There was no benefit of using hearing aids. After successful treatment of her illness, she was found to be suitable for cochlear implantation. After the operation, her auditory perception skills improved significantly with a Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) score of 5. According to clinical observations and her family members’ statements, her Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) score was 3. Her speech intelligibility skills are still improving. Conclusion: Our case report represents the second case of hearing rehabilitation with cochlear implantation after neurobrucellosis. Cochlear implantation is a cost-effective and time-proven successful intervention in post-lingual adult patients with sensorineural hearing loss. Early timing of the surgery after appropriate treatment of meningitis helps the patient to achieve better postoperative results. PMID:26966626

  1. Practicing implant dentistry profitably.

    PubMed

    Stump, G; Adams, M; Alwan, M

    1997-03-01

    The success of dental implants has opened up countless treatment possibilities for restorative dentists to offer to their patients. Just as our clinical paradigms have had to change because of this new technology, so too must our paradigms concerning the way we communicate with our patients change if we are to get them to say "yes" to treatment that we know that they need. Success in clinical treatment using implants requires a systematic approach. A systematic approach to communicating with your patients will allow you to have the same high degree of success with treatment acceptance that is possible with dental implants. The key to the systems we have discussed is Relationship Centered Care. A relationship is fostered and enhanced through a Comprehensive Examination Process, a structured Consultation Process utilizing the influencing process and Financial Arrangements that allow the patient to receive what they want while the office maintains the profitability that it needs. A system for calculating rational fees can be utilized that allows the practice to have control over an area that traditionally was controlled by anecdotal factors. The Pride Institute has developed this material and is presenting it to the profession so that restorative dentists can truly practice implant dentistry profitably.

  2. Implantable Drug Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs such as insulin are injected as needed directly into bloodstream by compact implantable dispensing unit. Two vapor cavities produce opposing forces on drug-chamber diaphragm. Heaters in cavities allow control of direction and rate of motion of bellows. Dispensing capsule fitted with coil so batteries can be recharged by induction.

  3. Implantable Drug Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs such as insulin are injected as needed directly into bloodstream by compact implantable dispensing unit. Two vapor cavities produce opposing forces on drug-chamber diaphragm. Heaters in cavities allow control of direction and rate of motion of bellows. Dispensing capsule fitted with coil so batteries can be recharged by induction.

  4. Implantable Impedance Plethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Theodor, Michael; Ruh, Dominic; Ocker, Martin; Spether, Dominik; Förster, Katharina; Heilmann, Claudia; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Manoli, Yiannos; Zappe, Hans; Seifert, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate by theory, as well as by ex vivo and in vivo measurements that impedance plethysmography, applied extravascularly directly on large arteries, is a viable method for monitoring various cardiovascular parameters, such as blood pressure, with high accuracy. The sensor is designed as an implant to monitor cardiac events and arteriosclerotic progression over the long term. PMID:25123467

  5. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at 7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at 6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing `only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around 2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  6. Effect of oral bacteria on the mechanical behavior of titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Gil, Francisco Javier; Rodriguez, Ana; Espinar, Eduardo; Llamas, Jose Maria; Padullés, Esteban; Juárez, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether the mechanical properties of titanium dental implants changed after exposure to bacteria. Two strains of bacteria (Streptococcus sanguinis and Lactobacillus salivarius) were used in the study. The adhesive properties of the two strains were investigated as follows. Titanium implants were placed in bacteria broth, seeded with the two bacteria strains, and left in the broth for 1 or 3 months. Another group of titanium implants was immersed in artificial saliva at 37°C for 3 months. Ten implants in each group were tested in 37°C artificial saliva to evaluate their mechanical flexural strength and fatigue life. The bacterial cultures grew quickly on titanium surfaces. After 1 month of bacteria culture in vitro, the bacteria had produced corrosion pits on the titanium surfaces. After 3 months of bacterial culture, a 7% decrease in the flexural strength of the implant samples and a decrease of 15% in the number of cycles to failure by fatigue were seen versus implants not exposed to bacteria. These results demonstrate that, in physiologic conditions in vitro, bacteria have the capacity to produce a pitting corrosion phenomenon on exposed titanium surfaces, leading to a significant deterioration in the mechanical properties of the implant. It is therefore logical to conclude that bacteria may produce corrosion that reduces the useful life of dental implants.

  7. Detection of changes in DNA methylation induced by low-energy ion implantation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haichan; Zhao, Jin; Xu, Jing; Li, Xiaoqu; Zhang, Fengshou; Wang, Yugang; Carr, Christopher; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Genfa

    2011-05-01

    This study evaluated changes in DNA methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown from seeds implanted with low-energy N(+) and Ar(+) ions. Methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) testing revealed altered DNA methylation patterns after ion implantation at doses of 1 × 10(14) to 1 × 10(16) ions/cm(2). Comparison of the MSAP electrophoretic profiles revealed nine types of polymorphisms in ion-implanted seedlings relative to control seedlings, among which four represented methylation events, three represented demethylation events, and the methylation status of two was uncertain. The diversity of plant DNA methylation was increased by low-energy ion implantation. At the same time, total genomic DNA methylation levels at CCGG sites were unchanged by ion implantation. Moreover, a comparison of polymorphisms seen in N(+) ion-implanted, Ar(+) ion-implanted, and control DNA demonstrated that the species of incident ion influenced the resulting DNA methylation pattern. Sequencing of eight isolated fragments that showed different changing patterns in implanted plants allowed their mapping onto variable regions on one or more of the five Arabidopsis chromosomes; these segments included protein-coding genes, transposon and repeat DNA sequence. A further sodium bisulfite sequencing of three fragments also displayed alterations in methylation among either different types or doses of incident ions. Possible causes for the changes in methylation are discussed.

  8. Effect of implant design on initial stability of tapered implants.

    PubMed

    Chong, Linus; Khocht, Ahmed; Suzuki, Jon B; Gaughan, John

    2009-01-01

    Implant design is one of the parameters for achieving successful primary stability. This study aims to examine the effect of a self-tapping blades implant design on initial stability in tapered implants. Polyurethane blocks of different densities were used to simulate different bone densities. The two different implant designs included one with self-tapping blades and one without self-tapping blades. Implants were placed at 3 different depths: apical third, middle third, and fully inserted at 3 different densities of polyurethane blocks. A resonance frequency (RF) analyzer was then used to measure stability of the implants. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to examine the effect of implant design, insertion depth, and block density on RF. Analysis of covariance was used to examine the strength of association between RF and the aforementioned factors. In both medium-density (P = .017) and high-density (P = .002) blocks, fully inserted non-self-tapping implants showed higher initial stability than self-tapping implants. No differences were noted between the 2 implant designs that were not fully inserted. The highest strength of association was with insertion depth (standardized beta [std beta] = -0.60, P = .0001), followed by block density (std beta = -0.15, P = .0002). Implant design showed a weak association (std beta = -0.07, P = .09). In conclusion, fully inserted implants without self-tapping blades have higher initial stability than implants with self-tapping blades. However, the association strength between implant design and initial stability is less relevant than other factors, such as insertion depth and block density. Thus, if bone quality and quantity are optimal, they may compensate for design inadequacy.

  9. Dosimetry of IRIDIUM-192 and CESIUM-137 Seed Sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomason, Cynthia

    The use of ^{192}Ir in brachytherapy implants both alone and in conjunction with other modalities for the treatment of various types of cancer has greatly increased in recent years. This increased usage has led to a greater need for detailed information concerning the dose distribution surrounding commerically available ^{192} Ir seed sources. This is especially truce since improvements in computer technology along with their increased availability and utilization have enabled more precise calculation of dose distributions. The radiation does distribution in water was measured using LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters for an ^{192}Ir seed source with platinum encapsulation, for an ^{192}Ir seed source with stainless steel encapsulation and for a ^{137}Cs seed source intended as a substitute for ^{192 }Ir. The Electron-Gamma-Shower (EGS) computer code, which is a package for doing Monte Carlo simulation of the transport of photons and electrons in any medium or geometry specified by the user, also was used to study the dose distribution around these seed sources. In addition, the exposure rate constant, exposure rate at 1 meter, transmission through the source capsule, f-factor, and energy distribution exiting the source capsule were evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation of these three sources. Good agreement was seen between the measured data and the Monte Carlo generated data. In addition to producing valuable dosimetric data, this study has demonstrated that Monte Carlo modeling of ^{192} Ir and ^{137}Cs seed sources using the EGS Monte Carlo code can provide an accurate means of evaluating these data.

  10. Prosthodontic management of implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Ghadeer; Bryington, Matthew; De Kok, Ingeborg J; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2014-01-01

    Implant-supported dental restorations can be screw-retained, cement-retained, or a combination of both, whereby a metal superstructure is screwed to the implants and crowns are individually cemented to the metal frame. Each treatment modality has advantages and disadvantages. The use of computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture technologies for the manufacture of implant superstructures has proved to be advantageous in the quality of materials, precision of the milled superstructures, and passive fit. Maintenance and recall evaluations are an essential component of implant therapy. The longevity of implant restorations is limited by their biological and prosthetic maintenance requirements.

  11. [Allergic reactions to implant materials].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P

    2003-01-01

    The extent of the immune response upon implantation of metallic devices depends on the individual reactivity and on material characteristics. If specific T-cellular sensitization occurs or an allergy to metal preexists, hypersensitive reactions to implant components may develop. They include eczema, impaired wound healing, and sterile osteomyelitis. The existence of allergy-induced implant loosening is still an open question. Further improvement of clinical allergological diagnostics, better understanding of peri-implantar immune reactions, and interdisciplinary collection of epidemiological data concerning allergy to implants will contribute to a better knowledge about tolerance of implant material in humans.

  12. Differential seed handling by two African primates affects seed fate and establishment of large-seeded trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross-Camp, Nicole D.; Kaplin, Beth A.

    2011-11-01

    We examined the influence of seed handling by two semi-terrestrial African forest primates, chimpanzees ( Pan troglodytes) and l'Hoest's monkeys ( Cercopithecus lhoesti), on the fate of large-seeded tree species in an afromontane forest. Chimpanzees and l'Hoest's monkeys dispersed eleven seed species over one year, with quantity and quality of dispersal varying through time. Primates differed in their seed handling behaviors with chimpanzees defecating large seeds (>0.5 cm) significantly more than l'Hoest's. Furthermore, they exhibited different oral-processing techniques with chimpanzees discarding wadges containing many seeds and l'Hoest's monkeys spitting single seeds. A PCA examined the relationship between microhabitat characteristics and the site where primates deposited seeds. The first two components explained almost half of the observed variation. Microhabitat characteristics associated with sites where seeds were defecated had little overlap with those characteristics describing where spit seeds arrived, suggesting that seed handling in part determines the location where seeds are deposited. We monitored a total of 552 seed depositions through time, recording seed persistence, germination, and establishment. Defecations were deposited significantly farther from an adult conspecific than orally-discarded seeds where they experienced the greatest persistence but poorest establishment. In contrast, spit seeds were deposited closest to an adult conspecific but experienced the highest seed establishment rates. We used experimental plots to examine the relationship between seed handling, deposition site, and seed fate. We found a significant difference in seed handling and fate, with undispersed seeds in whole fruits experiencing the lowest establishment rates. Seed germination differed by habitat type with open forest experiencing the highest rates of germination. Our results highlight the relationship between primate seed handling and deposition site and seed

  13. Seed size selection by olive baboons.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Britta Kerstin; Linsenmair, Karl Eduard

    2008-10-01

    Seed size is an important plant fitness trait that can influence several steps between fruiting and the establishment of a plant's offspring. Seed size varies considerably within many plant species, yet the relevance of the trait for intra-specific fruit choice by primates has received little attention. Primates may select certain seed sizes within a species for a number of reasons, e.g. to decrease indigestible seed load or increase pulp intake per fruit. Olive baboons (Papio anubis, Cercopithecidae) are known to select seed size in unripe and mature pods of Parkia biglobosa (Mimosaceae) differentially, so that pods with small seeds, and an intermediate seed number, contribute most to dispersal by baboons. We tested whether olive baboons likewise select for smaller ripe seeds within each of nine additional fruit species whose fruit pulp baboons commonly consume, and for larger seeds in one species in which baboons feed on the seeds. Species differed in fruit type and seed number per fruit. For five of these species, baboons dispersed seeds that were significantly smaller than seeds extracted manually from randomly collected fresh fruits. In contrast, for three species, baboons swallowed seeds that were significantly longer and/or wider than seeds from fresh fruits. In two species, sizes of ingested seeds and seeds from fresh fruits did not differ significantly. Baboons frequently spat out seeds of Drypetes floribunda (Euphorbiaceae) but not those of other plant species having seeds of equal size. Oral processing of D. floribunda seeds depended on seed size: seeds that were spat out were significantly larger and swallowed seeds smaller, than seeds from randomly collected fresh fruits. We argue that seed size selection in baboons is influenced, among other traits, by the amount of pulp rewarded per fruit relative to seed load, which is likely to vary with fruit and seed shape.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell seeding promotes reendothelialization of the endovascular stent.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xue; Wang, Guixue; Tang, Chaojun; Zhang, Dechuan; Li, Zhenggong; Du, Dingyuan; Zhang, Zhengcai

    2011-09-01

    This study is designed to make a novel cell seeding stent and to evaluate reendothelialization and anti-restenosis after the stent implantation. In comparison with cell seeding stents utilized in previous studies, Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have advantages on promoting of issue repair. Thus it was employed to improve the reendothelialization effects of endovascular stent in present work. MSCs were isolated by density gradient centrifugation and determined as CD29(+) CD44(+) CD34(-) cells by immunofluorescence and immunocytochemistry; gluten and polylysine coated stents were prepared by ultrasonic atomization spray, and MSCs seeded stents were made through rotation culture according to the optimized conditions that were determined in previous studies. The results from animal experiments, in which male New Zealand white rabbits were used, show that the reendothelialization of MSCs coated stents can be completed within one month; in comparison with 316L stainless steel stents (316L SS stents) and gluten and polylysine coated stents, the intimal hyperplasia and in-stent restenosis are significantly inhibited by MSCs coated stents. Endovascular stent seeded with MSCs promotes reendothelialization and inhibits the intimal hyperplasia and in-stent restenosis compared with the 316L SS stents and the gluten and polylysine coated stents.

  15. Bilateral cochlear implantation: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Eapen, Rose J; Buchman, Craig A

    2009-10-01

    The goal of this review is to examine the most recent literature exploring the indications, outcomes, and long-term benefit of bilateral cochlear implantation in children and adults. The indications for cochlear implantation have expanded, as many unilaterally implanted individuals are able to achieve open-set word recognition. Despite the benefits seen in unilateral implantation, many individuals have difficulty perceiving speech in noisy environments. Bilateral cochlear implantation has made great strides in providing individuals access to sound information from both ears, allowing improved speech perception in quiet and in noise, as well as sound localization. Recently, the House Cochlear Implant study group released a position statement in which the group strongly endorsed bilateral cochlear implantation. Improved speech perception in quiet has also been demonstrated by many groups with bilateral implantation. Improved sound localization abilities have been shown to be dependent on interaural level differences. The binaural benefits of head shadow and summation have been long shown in bilaterally implanted individuals. Recently, a growth in squelch has been seen in these individuals likely as a result of increased experience with both implants. This may indicate neural integration of the inputs over time. The literature supports the binaural benefit of bilateral cochlear implantation with demonstrated improved speech perception outcomes in quiet and in noise, sound localization data, and subjective benefits.

  16. Engineered porous metals for implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vamsi Krishna, B.; Xue, Weichang; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2008-05-01

    Interest is significant in patient-specific implants with the possibility of guided tissue regeneration, particularly for load-bearing implants. For such implants to succeed, novel design approaches and fabrication technologies that can achieve balanced mechanical and functional performance in the implants are necessary. This article is focused on porous load-bearing implants with tailored micro-as well as macrostructures using laser-engineered net shaping (LENS™), a solid freeform fabrication or rapid prototyping technique that can be used to manufacture patient-specific implants. This review provides an insight into LENS, some properties of porous metals, and the potential applications of this process to fabricate unitized structures which can eliminate longstanding challenges in load-bearing implants to increase their in-vivo lifetime, such as in a total hip prosthesis.

  17. Impression techniques for implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Chee, W; Jivraj, S

    2006-10-07

    The object of making an impression in implant dentistry is to accurately relate an analogue of the implant or implant abutment to the other structures in the dental arch. This is affected by use of an impression coping which is attached to the implant or implant abutment. This impression coping is incorporated in an impression - much as a metal framework is 'picked up' in a remount impression for fixed prosthodontics. With implant copings the coping is usually attached to the implant or abutment with screws. The impression material used is usually an elastomeric impression material; the two types most widely used and shown to be the most appropriate are polyether and polyvinyl siloxane impression materials.

  18. Dose calculation for permanent prostate implants incorporating spatially anisotropic linearly time-resolving edema

    SciTech Connect

    Monajemi, T. T.; Clements, Charles M.; Sloboda, Ron S.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were (i) to develop a dose calculation method for permanent prostate implants that incorporates a clinically motivated model for edema and (ii) to illustrate the use of the method by calculating the preimplant dosimetry error for a reference configuration of {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 137}Cs seeds subject to edema-induced motions corresponding to a variety of model parameters. Methods: A model for spatially anisotropic edema that resolves linearly with time was developed based on serial magnetic resonance imaging measurements made previously at our center to characterize the edema for a group of n=40 prostate implant patients [R. S. Sloboda et al., ''Time course of prostatic edema post permanent seed implant determined by magnetic resonance imaging,'' Brachytherapy 9, 354-361 (2010)]. Model parameters consisted of edema magnitude, {Delta}, and period, T. The TG-43 dose calculation formalism for a point source was extended to incorporate the edema model, thus enabling calculation via numerical integration of the cumulative dose around an individual seed in the presence of edema. Using an even power piecewise-continuous polynomial representation for the radial dose function, the cumulative dose was also expressed in closed analytical form. Application of the method was illustrated by calculating the preimplant dosimetry error, RE{sub preplan}, in a 5x5x5 cm{sup 3} volume for {sup 125}I (Oncura 6711), {sup 103}Pd (Theragenics 200), and {sup 131}Cs (IsoRay CS-1) seeds arranged in the Radiological Physics Center test case 2 configuration for a range of edema relative magnitudes ({Delta}=[0.1,0.2,0.4,0.6,1.0]) and periods (T=[28,56,84] d). Results were compared to preimplant dosimetry errors calculated using a variation of the isotropic edema model developed by Chen et al. [''Dosimetric effects of edema in permanent prostate seed implants: A rigorous solution,'' Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol., Phys. 47, 1405-1419 (2000

  19. Commercial Seed Lots Exhibit Reduced Seed Dormancy in Comparison to Wild Seed Lots of Echinacea purpurea

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Luping; Wang, Xiping; Chen, Ying; Scalzo, Richard; Widrlechner, Mark P.; Davis, Jeanine M.; Hancock, James F.

    2005-01-01

    Seed germination patterns were studied in E. purpurea (L.) Moench grouped by seed source, one group of seven lots from commercially cultivated populations and a second group of nine lots regenerated from ex situ conserved wild populations. Germination tests were conducted in a growth chamber in light (40 μmol·m−2·s−1) or darkness at 25 °C for 20 days after soaking the seeds in water for 10 minutes. Except for two seed lots from wild populations, better germination was observed for commercially cultivated populations in light (90% mean among seed lots, ranging from 82% to 95%) and in darkness (88% mean among seed lots, ranging from 82% to 97%) than for wild populations in light (56% mean among seed lots, ranging from 9% to 92%) or in darkness (37% mean among seed lots, ranging from 4% to 78%). No germination difference was measured between treatments in light and darkness in the commercially cultivated populations, but significant differences were noted for treatments among wild populations. These results suggest that repeated cycles of sowing seeds during cultivation without treatments for dormancy release resulted in reduced seed dormancy in E. purpurea. PMID:16429595

  20. Penile urethra replacement with autologous cell-seeded tubularized collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    De Filippo, Roger E; Kornitzer, Benjamin S; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Acellular collagen matrices have been used as an onlay material for urethral reconstruction. However, cell-seeded matrices have been recommended for tubularized urethral repairs. In this study we investigated whether long segmental penile urethral replacement using autologous cell-seeded tubularized collagen-based matrix is feasible. Autologous bladder epithelial and smooth muscle cells from nine male rabbits were grown and seeded onto preconfigured tubular matrices constructed from decellularized bladder matrices obtained from lamina propria. The entire anterior penile urethra was resected in 15 rabbits. Urethroplasties were performed with tubularized matrices seeded with cells in nine animals, and with matrices without cells in six. Serial urethrograms were performed at 1, 3 and 6 months. Retrieved urethral tissues were analysed using histo- and immunohistochemistry, western blot analyses and organ bath studies. The urethrograms showed that animals implanted with cell-seeded matrices maintained a wide urethral calibre without strictures. In contrast, the urethras with unseeded scaffolds collapsed and developed strictures. Histologically, a transitional cell layer surrounded by muscle was observed in the cell-seeded constructs. The epithelial and smooth muscle phenotypes were confirmed with AE1/AE3 and α-actin antibodies. Organ bath studies of the neourethras confirmed both physiological contractility and the presence of neurotransmitters. Tubularized collagen matrices seeded with autologous cells can be used successfully for long segmental penile urethra replacement, while implantation of tubularized collagen matrices without cells leads to poor tissue development and stricture formation. The cell-seeded collagen matrices are able to form new tissue, which is histologically similar to native urethra.

  1. The mechanical defence advantage of small seeds.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Evan C; Wright, S Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Seed size and toughness affect seed predators, and size-dependent investment in mechanical defence could affect relationships between seed size and predation. We tested how seed toughness and mechanical defence traits (tissue density and protective tissue content) are related to seed size among tropical forest species. Absolute toughness increased with seed size. However, smaller seeds had higher specific toughness both within and among species, with the smallest seeds requiring over 2000 times more energy per gram to break than the largest seeds. Investment in mechanical defence traits varied widely but independently of the toughness-mass allometry. Instead, a physical scaling relationship confers a toughness advantage on small seeds independent of selection on defence traits and without a direct cost. This scaling relationship may contribute to seed size diversity by decreasing fitness differences among large and small seeds. Allometric scaling of toughness reconciles predictions and conflicting empirical relationships between seed size and predation.

  2. A living thick nanofibrous implant bifunctionalized with active growth factor and stem cells for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Eap, Sandy; Keller, Laetitia; Schiavi, Jessica; Huck, Olivier; Jacomine, Leandro; Fioretti, Florence; Gauthier, Christian; Sebastian, Victor; Schwinté, Pascale; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    New-generation implants focus on robust, durable, and rapid tissue regeneration to shorten recovery times and decrease risks of postoperative complications for patients. Herein, we describe a new-generation thick nanofibrous implant functionalized with active containers of growth factors and stem cells for regenerative nanomedicine. A thick electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) nanofibrous implant (from 700 μm to 1 cm thick) was functionalized with chitosan and bone morphogenetic protein BMP-7 as growth factor using layer-by-layer technology, producing fish scale-like chitosan/BMP-7 nanoreservoirs. This extracellular matrix-mimicking scaffold enabled in vitro colonization and bone regeneration by human primary osteoblasts, as shown by expression of osteocalcin, osteopontin, and bone sialoprotein (BSPII), 21 days after seeding. In vivo implantation in mouse calvaria defects showed significantly more newly mineralized extracellular matrix in the functionalized implant compared to a bare scaffold after 30 days’ implantation, as shown by histological scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray microscopy study and calcein injection. We have as well bifunctionalized our BMP-7 therapeutic implant by adding human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The activity of this BMP-7-functionalized implant was again further enhanced by the addition of hMSCs to the implant (living materials), in vivo, as demonstrated by the analysis of new bone formation and calcification after 30 days’ implantation in mice with calvaria defects. Therefore, implants functionalized with BMP-7 nanocontainers associated with hMSCs can act as an accelerator of in vivo bone mineralization and regeneration. PMID:25709432

  3. Influence of endothelial cell seeding on platelet deposition and patency in small-diameter Dacron arterial grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.T.; Long, J.A.; Clark, R.E.; Sicard, G.A.; Hopkins, K.T.; Welch, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Serial platelet deposition, surface topography, and patency were evaluated in control (N . 28) and endothelial cell-seeded (N . 28) small-diameter (4 mm inner diameter) USCI Dacron grafts implanted in the carotid and femoral arteries of dogs. All dogs received aspirin (325 mg) daily for 2 weeks starting 24 hours prior to graft implantation. Endothelial cell seeding was performed by mixing suspensions of autologous endothelial cells that had been enzymatically harvested from segments of external jugular vein with blood that was used to preclot the prostheses. The platelet deposition on each graft was quantitated by means of indium 111-labeled platelets and technetium 99m-labeled red cells in a dual-isotope platelet-imaging technique. Platelet deposition on seeded grafts 24 hours after implantation was significantly higher than on the controls (p less than 0.05). Two weeks after implantation platelet deposition on seeded prostheses had decreased to a level significantly lower than that on the controls and continued to decline on serial studies up to 7 months. In contrast to seeded grafts, platelet accumulation on control grafts dramatically increased after the withdrawal of aspirin therapy and was associated with a sharp rise in control graft thromboses. Cumulative 7-month patency for seeded prostheses was significantly higher than for the controls (96% and 29%, respectively; p less than 0.001). We conclude that endothelial cell seeding in combination with short-term aspirin therapy is a simple, reliable diameter Dacron prostheses. Abrupt withdrawal of aspirin therapy may be contraindicated in nonseeded control grafts because it results in increased platelet deposition and thrombosis.

  4. Maturation of sugar maple seed

    Treesearch

    Clayton M., Jr. Carl; Albert G., Jr. Snow; Albert G. Snow

    1971-01-01

    The seeds of a sugar maple tree (Acer saccharum Marsh.) do not mature at the same time every year. And different trees mature their seeds at different times. So time of year is not a reliable measure of when seeds are ripe. Better criteria are needed. In recent studies we have found that moisture content and color are the best criteria for judging when sugar maple...

  5. The Woody Plant Seed Manual

    Treesearch

    Franklin T. Bonner; Robert P. Karrfalt

    2008-01-01

    The first comprehensive handbook on the seeds of trees and shrubs produced by the USDA Forest Service was USDA Misc. Pub. 654, Woody-Plant Seed Manual. The manuscript was ready for publication in 1941, but World War II delayed publication until 1948. The boom in tree planting in the 1950s and 1960s created a large demand for seeds and exposed the gaps in our knowledge...

  6. Cochlear implants in children implanted in Jordan: A parental overview.

    PubMed

    Alkhamra, Rana A

    2015-07-01

    Exploring the perspective of parents on the cochlear implant process in Jordan. Sixty parents of deaf children were surveyed on the information gathering process prior to cochlear implant surgery, and their implant outcome expectations post-surgery. Whether child or parent characteristics may impact parents' post-surgical expectations was explored. Although parents used a variety of information sources when considering a cochlear implant, the ear, nose and throat doctor comprised their major source of information (60%). Parents received a range of information prior to cochlear implant but agreed (93.3%) on the need for a multidisciplinary team approach. Post-surgically, parents' expected major developments in the areas of spoken language (97%), and auditory skills (100%). Receiving education in mainstream schools (92%) was expected too. Parents perceived the cochlear implant decision as the best decision they can make for their child (98.3%). A significant correlation was found between parents contentment with the cochlear implant decision and expecting developments in the area of reading and writing (r=0.7). Child's age at implantation and age at hearing loss diagnosis significantly affected parents' post-implant outcome expectations (p<0.05). Despite the general satisfaction from the information quantity and quality prior to cochlear implant, parents agree on the need for a comprehensive multidisciplinary team approach during the different stages of the cochlear implant process. Parents' education about cochlear implants prior to the surgery can affect their post-surgical outcome expectations. The parental perspective presented in this study can help professionals develop better understanding of parents' needs and expectations and henceforth improve their services and support during the different stages of the cochlear implant process. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Management of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Figuero, Elena; Graziani, Filippo; Sanz, Ignacio; Herrera, David; Sanz, Mariano

    2014-10-01

    Peri-implant diseases are defined as inflammatory lesions of the surrounding peri-implant tissues and include peri-implant mucositis (an inflammatory lesion limited to the surrounding mucosa of an implant) and peri-implantitis (an inflammatory lesion of the mucosa that affects the supporting bone with resulting loss of osseointegration). This review aims to describe the different approaches to manage both entities and to provide a critical evaluation of the evidence available on their efficacy. Therapy of peri-implant mucositis and nonsurgical therapy of peri-implantitis usually involve mechanical debridement of the implant surface using curettes, ultrasonic devices, air-abrasive devices or lasers, with or without the adjunctive use of local antibiotics or antiseptics. The efficacy of these therapies has been demonstrated for mucositis: controlled clinical trials show an improvement in clinical parameters, especially in bleeding on probing. For peri-implantitis, the results are limited, especially in terms of probing pocket-depth reduction. Surgical therapy of peri-implantitis is indicated when nonsurgical therapy fails to control the inflammatory changes. Selection of the surgical technique should be based on the characteristics of the peri-implant lesion. In the presence of deep circumferential and intrabony defects, surgical interventions should aim to provide thorough debridement, implant-surface decontamination and defect reconstruction. In the presence of defects without clear bony walls or with a predominant suprabony component, the aim of the surgical intervention should be the thorough debridement and the repositioning of the marginal mucosa to enable the patient to perform effective oral-hygiene practices, although this aim may compromise the esthetic result of the implant-supported restoration. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. role of seed analysis in genetic conservation

    Treesearch

    V.G. Vankus; R.P. Karrfalt

    2017-01-01

    Long term storage of seeds at freezing temperatures is one strategy for genetic conservation of tree species. It can be used to preserve species that produce seeds that remain viable after drying to a low seed moisture content. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service (USDA FS) National Seed Laboratory (NSL) began long term seed storage for genetic...

  9. 7 CFR 201.50 - Weed seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weed seed. 201.50 Section 201.50 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Purity Analysis in the Administration of the Act § 201.50 Weed seed. Seeds (including bulblets or tubers) of plants shall be considered weed seeds when recognized as weed seeds by the law or rules and...

  10. Chapter 24. Seed collection, cleaning, and storage

    Treesearch

    Kent R. Jorgensen; Richard Stevens

    2004-01-01

    Acquisition of quality seed in the quantity needed is essential for successful restoration and revegetation programs. Seed is grown and harvested as a crop, or collected from native stands. In the past, when native species were seeded, it was either collect the seed yourself, or go without. Now, there are dealers who supply seed of many native species on a regular...

  11. Improvements on a Reliable Oak Seed Trap

    Treesearch

    Carl N. Phillips; Marianne K. Burke; Thomas B. Hunnicutt

    1995-01-01

    The need for seed trap longevity, capture of heavy seed, and protection from predation in several forest types for long-term studies of seed production prompted seed trap design improvements. Critical improvements were achieved by painting the trap with a latex exterior gloss house paint, raising traps above water lines in areas tbat flooded, and enclosing the seed...

  12. The Seed Scene: An Outdoor Teaching Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1976-01-01

    The study of seeds and their dispersal is an excellent way to help students understand basic concepts which will help them in their adult decision-making activities regarding environmental problems. This article discusses the purpose of seeds, aspects of seeds, and collecting seeds. Classroom and outdoor activities with seeds are listed. (NQ)

  13. The Seed Scene: An Outdoor Teaching Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1976-01-01

    The study of seeds and their dispersal is an excellent way to help students understand basic concepts which will help them in their adult decision-making activities regarding environmental problems. This article discusses the purpose of seeds, aspects of seeds, and collecting seeds. Classroom and outdoor activities with seeds are listed. (NQ)

  14. Seed invasion filters and forest fire severity

    Treesearch

    Tom R. Cottrell; Paul F. Hessburg; Jonathan A. Betz

    2008-01-01

    Forest seed dispersal is altered after fire. Using seed traps, we studied impacts of fire severity on timing of seed dispersal, total seed rain, and seed rain richness in patches of high and low severity fire and unburned Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forests in the Fischer and Tyee fire complexes in the eastern Washington Cascades. Unburned...

  15. [Seed aging and survival mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Grappin, Philippe; Bourdais, Gildas; Collet, Boris; Godin, Béatrice; Job, Dominique; Ogé, Laurent; Jullien, Marc; Rajjou, Loïc

    2008-01-01

    Aging and death are universal to living systems. In temperate climate latitudes the mature seeds of higher plants are exposed to aging and have developed resistance mechanisms allowing survival and plant propagation. In addition to the physicochemical properties of the seed that confer stress resistance, the protein metabolism contributes importantly to longevity mechanisms. Recently, genetic studies have demonstrated the occurrence of the Protein L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase repair enzyme in controlling age-related protein damages and seed survival. These protective mechanisms by protein repair are widespread in all kingdoms, so that the use of seeds as models to study these controlling processes offers the prospect of understanding longevity mechanisms better.

  16. Metal deposition using seed layers

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

    2013-11-12

    Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

  17. Study on the growth and the photosynthetic characteristics of low energy C(+) ion implantation on peanut.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuguo; Xu, Lei; Yang, Peiling; Ren, Shumei

    2013-01-01

    Employing the Nonghua 5 peanut as experimental material, the effects of low energy C(+) ion implantation on caulis height, root length, dry weight, photosynthetic characteristics and leaf water use efficiency (WUE) of Peanut Ml Generation were studied. Four fluences were observed in the experiment. The results showed that ion implantation harmed the peanut seeds because caulis height, root length and dry weight all were lower in the treatments than in CK, and the harm was aggravated with the increase of ion fluence. Both Pn and Tr show a saddle-shape curve due to midday depression of photosynthesis. Low fluence of low energy C(+) ion implantation could increase the diurnal average Pn of peanut. The diurnal variation of Tr did not change as significantly as Pn. The light saturation point (LSP) was restrained by the ions. After low energy C(+) ion implantation, WUE was enhanced. When the fluence increased to a certain level, the WUE began to decrease.

  18. Identification and removal of reflection artifacts in minimally invasive photoacoustic imaging for accurate visualization of brachytherapy seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuniyil Ajith Singh, Mithun; Parameshwarappa, Vinay; Hendriksen, Ellen; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2017-03-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by the high signal from the optical fiber/ needle tip reflecting off the seed is an important problem in minimally invasive photoacoustic imaging of brachytherapy seeds. The presence of these artifacts confounds the interpretation of images and reduces contrast. We apply a new method called PAFUSion (Photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound) to identify and reduce reflection artifacts generated in interstitial illumination imaging of brachytherapy seeds. We present the system comprising of a US imager and linear array, with illumination provided via a cutting needle. Non-radioactive brachytherapy seeds are implanted in a tissue mimicking phantom and ex vivo porcine tissue. The PAFUSion-corrected imaging results successfully demonstrate that our approach can identify and strongly reduce reflection artifacts in the context of photoacoustic needle. The phantom result also shows that multi-spectral photoacoustics can separate signals between the seeds and other optical absorbers.

  19. Rupture of poly implant prothèse silicone breast implants: an implant retrieval study.

    PubMed

    Swarts, Eric; Kop, Alan M; Nilasaroya, Anastasia; Keogh, Catherine V; Cooper, Timothy

    2013-04-01

    Poly Implant Prothèse implants were recalled in Australia in April of 2010 following concerns of higher than expected rupture rates and the use of unauthorized industrial grade silicone as a filler material. Although subsequent investigations found that the gel filler material does not pose a threat to human health, the important question of what caused a relatively modern breast implant to have such a poor outcome compared with contemporary silicone breast implants is yet to be addressed. From a cohort of 27 patients, 19 ruptured Poly Implant Prothèse breast implants were subjected to a range of mechanical tests and microscopic/macroscopic investigations to evaluate possible changes in properties as a result of implantation. New Poly Implant Prothèse implants were used as controls. All samples, explanted and controls, complied with the requirements for shell integrity as specified in the International Organization for Standardization 14607. Compression testing revealed rupture rates similar to those reported in the literature. Shell thickness was highly variable, with most shells having regions below the minimum thickness of 0.57 mm that was specified by the manufacturer. Potential regions of stress concentration were observed on the smooth inner surfaces and outer textured surfaces. The high incidence of Poly Implant Prothèse shell rupture is most likely a result of inadequate quality control, with contributory factors being shell thickness variation and manufacturing defects on both inner and outer surfaces of the shell. No evidence of shell degradation with implantation time was determined.

  20. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Stübinger, Stefan; Stricker, Andres; Berg, Britt-Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. PMID:26635486

  1. [Fully implantable hearing systems].

    PubMed

    Maurer, J

    2009-03-01

    As yet comparatively little experience has been gained with fully implantable hearing systems, as the two systems available at present have only recently received CE permission for Europe and the FDA permissions are still pending in the USA. Additionally the technology is expensive and usually not covered by insurance companies. However, it could be shown that by careful patient selection and very careful surgical techniques, good results can be achieved with this highly sensitive technology, often with better patient satisfaction and hearing quality than with conventional hearing aids. To spread the technology further, the systems must also show reliable results on a broad application. Further surgery to change the batteries should not be necessary more frequently than with cardiac pacemakers. Not all technical problems are finally solved. However, it is to be foreseen that fully implantable hearing systems will be a good long-term alternative to conventional hearing aids for some patients.

  2. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Stübinger, Stefan; Stricker, Andres; Berg, Britt-Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies.

  3. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize... Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification as seed potatoes under subheading 0701.10.00, as seed corn (maize) under subheading 1005.10...

  4. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize... Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification as seed potatoes under subheading 0701.10.00, as seed corn (maize) under subheading 1005.10...

  5. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize... Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification as seed potatoes under subheading 0701.10.00, as seed corn (maize) under subheading 1005.10...

  6. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize... Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification as seed potatoes under subheading 0701.10.00, as seed corn (maize) under subheading 1005.10...

  7. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize... Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification as seed potatoes under subheading 0701.10.00, as seed corn (maize) under subheading 1005.10...

  8. Implantable visual prostheses.

    PubMed

    Thanos, S; Heiduschka, P; Stupp, T

    2007-01-01

    Visual impairment and blindness is primarily caused by optic neuropathies like injuries and glaucomas, as well as retinopathies like agerelated macular degeneration (MD), systemic diseases like diabetes, hypertonia and hereditary retinitis pigmentosa (RP). These pathological conditions may affect retinal photoreceptors, or retinal pigment epithelium, or particular subsets of retinal neurons, and in particular retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The RGCs which connect the retina with the brain are unique cells with extremely long axons bridging the distance from the retina to visual relays within the thalamus and midbrain, being therefore vulnerable to heterogeneous pathological conditions along this pathway. When becoming mature, RGCs loose the ability to divide and to regenerate their accidentally or experimentally injured axons. Consequently, any loss of RGCs is irreversible and results to loss of visual function. The advent of micro- and nanotechnology, and the construction of artificial implants prompted to create visual prostheses which aimed at compensating for the loss of visual function in particular cases. The purpose of the present contribution is to review the considerable engineering expertise that is essential to fabricate current visual prostheses in connection with their functional features and applicability to the animal and human eye. In this chapter, 1) Retinal and cortical implants are introduced, with particular emphasis given to the requirements they have to fulfil in order to replace very complex functions like vision. 2) Advanced work on material research is presented both from the technological and from the biocompatibility aspect as prerequisites of any perspectives for implantation. 3) Ultimately, experimental studies are presented showing the shaping of implants, the procedures of testing their biocompatibility and essential modifications to improve the interfaces between technical devices and the biological environment. The review ends by

  9. Seed to Seed, The Secret Life of Plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This is a book review of "Seed to Seed, The Secret Life of Plants", by Nicholas Harberd. The book is a diary of ruminations/introspections about plant development and about the main research topic of Nick Harberd’s laboratory. His intended audience is initially nonscientists; many of the explanation...

  10. Comparison of Intraoperatively Built Custom Linked Seeds Versus Loose Seed Gun Applicator Technique Using Real-Time Intraoperative Planning for Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zauls, A. Jason; Ashenafi, Michael S.; Onicescu, Georgiana; Clarke, Harry S.; Marshall, David T.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report our dosimetric results using a novel push-button seed delivery system that constructs custom links of seeds intraoperatively. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2007, 43 patients underwent implantation using a gun applicator (GA), and from 2007 to 2008, 48 patientsunderwent implantation with a novel technique allowing creation of intraoperatively built custom links of seeds (IBCL). Specific endpoint analyses were prostate D90% (pD90%), rV100% > 1.3 cc, and overall time under anesthesia. Results: Final analyses included 91 patients, 43 GA and 48 IBCL. Absolute change in pD90% ({Delta}pD90%) between intraoperative and postoperative plans was evaluated. Using GA method, the {Delta}pD90% was -8.1Gy and -12.8Gy for I-125 and Pd-103 implants, respectively. Similarly, the IBCL technique resulted in a {Delta}pD90% of -8.7Gy and -9.8Gy for I-125 and Pd-103 implants, respectively. No statistically significant difference in {Delta}pD90% was found comparing methods. The GA method had two intraoperative and 10 postoperative rV100% >1.3 cc. For IBCL, five intraoperative and eight postoperative plans had rV100% >1.3 cc. For GA, the mean time under anesthesia was 75 min and 87 min for Pd-103 and I-125 implants, respectively. For IBCL, the mean time was 86 and 98 min for Pd-103 and I-125. There was a statistical difference between the methods when comparing mean time under anesthesia. Conclusions: Dosimetrically relevant endpoints were equivalent between the two methods. Currently, time under anesthesia is longer using the IBCL technique but has decreased over time. IBCL is a straightforward brachytherapy technique that can be implemented into clinical practice as an alternative to gun applicators.

  11. Bone Substitutes for Peri-Implant Defects of Postextraction Implants

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Pâmela Letícia; Gulinelli, Jéssica Lemos; Telles, Cristino da Silva; Betoni Júnior, Walter; Chiacchio Buchignani, Vivian; Queiroz, Thallita Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Placement of implants in fresh sockets is an alternative to try to reduce physiological resorption of alveolar ridge after tooth extraction. This surgery can be used to preserve the bone architecture and also accelerate the restorative procedure. However, the diastasis observed between bone and implant may influence osseointegration. So, autogenous bone graft and/or biomaterials have been used to fill this gap. Considering the importance of bone repair for treatment with implants placed immediately after tooth extraction, this study aimed to present a literature review about biomaterials surrounding immediate dental implants. The search included 56 articles published from 1969 to 2012. The results were based on data analysis and discussion. It was observed that implant fixation immediately after extraction is a reliable alternative to reduce the treatment length of prosthetic restoration. In general, the biomaterial should be used to increase bone/implant contact and enhance osseointegration. PMID:24454377

  12. Zirconia in fixed implant prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Guess, Petra Christine; Att, Wael; Strub, Joerg Rudolf

    2012-10-01

    CAD/CAM technology in combination with zirconia ceramic has increasingly gained popularity in implant dentistry. This narrative review presents the current knowledge on zirconia utilized as framework material for implant-borne restorations and implant abutments, laboratory tests and developments, clinical performance, and possible future trends for implant dentistry are addressed. A review of available literature from 1990 through 2010 was conducted with search terms zirconia,"implants,"abutment,"crown," and "fixed dental prosthesis" using electronic databases (PubMed) and manual searching. Latest applications of zirconia in implant dentistry include implant abutments, multiple unit and full-arch frameworks as well as custom-made bars to support fixed and removable prostheses. High biocompatibility, low bacterial surface adhesion as well as favorable chemical properties of zirconia ceramics are reported. Zirconia stabilized with yttrium oxide exhibits high flexural strength and fracture toughness due to a transformation toughening mechanism. Preliminary clinical data confirmed the high stability of zirconia for abutments and as a framework material for implant borne crowns and fixed dental prostheses. Zirconia abutment or framework damage has rarely been encountered. However, veneering porcelain fractures are the most common technical complication in implant-supported zirconia restorations. These porcelain veneer failures have led to concerns regarding differences in coefficient of thermal expansions between core and veneering porcelain and their respective processing techniques. As presently evidence of clinical long-term data is missing, caution with regard to especially extensive implant-borne zirconia frameworks is recommended. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. [Implantable middle ear hearing aids].

    PubMed

    à Wengen, D F

    2004-01-01

    Conventional acoustic hearing aids are limited in their performance. Due to physical laws their amplification of sound is limited to within 5 kHz. However, the frequencies between 5 and 10 kHz are essential for understanding consonants. Words can only be understood correctly if their consonants can be understood. Furthermore noise amplification remains a problem with hearing aids. Other problems consist of recurrent infections of the external auditory canal, intolerance for occlusion of the ear canal, feedback noise, and resonances in speech or singing. Implantable middle ear hearing aids like the Soundbridge of Symphonix-Siemens and the MET of Otologics offer improved amplification and a more natural sound. Since the first implantation of a Soundbridge in Switzerland in 1996 almost one thousand patients have been implanted worldwide. The currents systems are semi-implantable. The external audio processor containing the microphone, computer chip, battery and radio system is worn in the hair bearing area behind the ear. Implantation is only considered after unsuccessful fitting of conventional hearing aids. In Switzerland the cost for these implantable hearing aids is covered by social insurances. Initially the cost for an implant is higher than for hearing aids. However, hearing aids need replacement every 5 or 6 years whereas implants will last 20 to 30 years. Due to the superior sound quality and the improved understanding of speech in noise, the number of patients with implantable hearing aids will certainly increase in the next years. Other middle ear implants are in clinical testing.

  14. Cartilaginous constructs using primary chondrocytes from continuous expansion culture seeded in dense collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, D H; Chicatun, F; Nazhat, S N; Quinn, T M

    2013-12-01

    Cell-based therapies such as autologous chondrocyte implantation require in vitro cell expansion. However, standard culture techniques require cell passaging, leading to dedifferentiation into a fibroblast-like cell type. Primary chondrocytes grown on continuously expanding culture dishes (CE culture) limits passaging and protects against dedifferentiation. The authors tested whether CE culture chondrocytes were advantageous for producing mechanically competent cartilage matrix when three-dimensionally seeded in dense collagen gels. Primary chondrocytes, grown either in CE culture or passaged twice on static silicone dishes (SS culture; comparable to standard methods), were seeded in dense collagen gels and cultured for 3 weeks in the absence of exogenous chondrogenic growth factors. Compared with gels seeded with SS culture chondrocytes, CE chondrocyte-seeded gels had significantly higher chondrogenic gene expression after 2 and 3 weeks in culture, correlating with significantly higher aggrecan and type II collagen protein accumulation. There was no obvious difference in glycosaminoglycan content from either culture condition, yet CE chondrocyte-seeded gels were significantly thicker and had a significantly higher dynamic compressive modulus than SS chondrocyte-seeded gels after 3 weeks. Chondrocytes grown in CE culture and seeded in dense collagen gels produce more cartilaginous matrix with superior mechanical properties, making them more suitable than SS cultured cells for tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Detection and correction of patient movement in prostate brachytherapy seed reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Steve T.; Cho, Paul S.; Marks, Robert J., II; Narayanan, Sreeram

    2005-05-01

    Intraoperative dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy can help optimize the dose distribution and potentially improve clinical outcome. Evaluation of dose distribution during the seed implant procedure requires the knowledge of 3D seed coordinates. Fluoroscopy-based seed localization is a viable option. From three x-ray projections obtained at different gantry angles, 3D seed positions can be determined. However, when local anaesthesia is used for prostate brachytherapy, the patient movement during fluoroscopy image capture becomes a practical problem. If uncorrected, the errors introduced by patient motion between image captures would cause seed mismatches. Subsequently, the seed reconstruction algorithm would either fail to reconstruct or yield erroneous results. We have developed an algorithm that permits detection and correction of patient movement that may occur between fluoroscopy image captures. The patient movement is decomposed into translational shifts along the tabletop and rotation about an axis perpendicular to the tabletop. The property of spatial invariance of the co-planar imaging geometry is used for lateral movement correction. Cranio-caudal movement is corrected by analysing the perspective invariance along the x-ray axis. Rotation is estimated by an iterative method. The method can detect and correct for the range of patient movement commonly seen in the clinical environment. The algorithm has been implemented for routine clinical use as the preprocessing step for seed reconstruction.

  16. A simple ion implanter for material modifications in agriculture and gemmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singkarat, S.; Wijaikhum, A.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Intarasiri, S.; Bootkul, D.; Phanchaisri, B.; Techarung, J.; Rhodes, M. W.; Suwankosum, R.; Rattanarin, S.; Yu, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    In our efforts in developing ion beam technology for novel applications in biology and gemmology, an economic simple compact ion implanter especially for the purpose was constructed. The designing of the machine was aimed at providing our users with a simple, economic, user friendly, convenient and easily operateable ion implanter for ion implantation of biological living materials and gemstones for biotechnological applications and modification of gemstones, which would eventually contribute to the national agriculture, biomedicine and gem-industry developments. The machine was in a vertical setup so that the samples could be placed horizontally and even without fixing; in a non-mass-analyzing ion implanter style using mixed molecular and atomic nitrogen (N) ions so that material modifications could be more effective; equipped with a focusing/defocusing lens and an X-Y beam scanner so that a broad beam could be possible; and also equipped with a relatively small target chamber so that living biological samples could survive from the vacuum period during ion implantation. To save equipment materials and costs, most of the components of the machine were taken from decommissioned ion beam facilities. The maximum accelerating voltage of the accelerator was 100 kV, ideally necessary for crop mutation induction and gem modification by ion beams from our experience. N-ion implantation of local rice seeds and cut gemstones was carried out. Various phenotype changes of grown rice from the ion-implanted seeds and improvements in gemmological quality of the ion-bombarded gemstones were observed. The success in development of such a low-cost and simple-structured ion implanter provides developing countries with a model of utilizing our limited resources to develop novel accelerator-based technologies and applications.

  17. Electronic retinal implant surgery.

    PubMed

    MacLaren, R E

    2017-02-01

    Blindness due to outer retinal degeneration still remains largely untreatable. Photoreceptor loss removes light sensitivity, but the remaining inner retinal layers, the optic nerve, and indeed the physical structure of the eye itself may be unaffected by the degenerative processes. This provides the opportunity to restore some degree of vision with an electronic device in the subretinal space. In this lecture I will provide an overview of our experiences with the first-generation retinal implant Alpha IMS, developed by Retina Implant AG and based on the technology developed by Eberhart Zrenner as part of a multicentre clinical trial (NCT01024803). We are currently in the process of running a second NIHR-funded clinical trial to assess the next-generation device. The positive results from both studies to date indicate that the retinal implant should be included as a potential treatment for patients who are completely blind from retinitis pigmentosa. Evolution of the technology in future may provide further opportunities for earlier intervention or for other diseases.

  18. [Neurotology and cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Merchán, Miguel A

    2015-05-01

    In this review we analyse cochlear implantation in terms of the fundamental aspects of the functioning of the auditory system. Concepts concerning neuronal plasticity applied to electrical stimulation in perinatal and adult deep hypoacusis are reviewed, and the latest scientific bases that justify early implantation following screening for congenital deafness are discussed. Finally, this review aims to serve as an example of the importance of fostering the sub-specialty of neurotology in our milieu, with the aim of bridging some of the gaps between specialties and thus improving both the knowledge in the field of research on auditory pathologies and in the screening of patients. The objectives of this review, targeted above all towards specialists in the field of otorhinolaryngology, are to analyse some significant neurological foundations in order to reach a better understanding of the clinical events that condition the indications and the rehabilitation of patients with cochlear implants, as well as to use this means to foster the growth of the sub-specialty of neurotology.

  19. The breast implant controversy.

    PubMed

    Cook, R R; Harrison, M C; LeVier, R R

    1994-02-01

    The breast implant issue is a "bad news/good news" story. For many women with implants, the controversy has caused a fair degree of anxiety which may or may not be resolved as further information becomes available. It has also taken its toll on Dow Corning. Whole lines of medical products have been eliminated or are being phase out. The development of new medical applications has been terminated. As a consequence, employees have lost their jobs. What the effect will be on the biomedical industry as a whole remains to be seen (11). While silicones have been an important component in various medical devices, it is likely that other materials can be used as replacements. However, suppliers of non-silicone materials are also reevaluating their role in this market. For example, Du Pont, the nation's largest chemical company, has determined that the unpredictable and excessive costs of doing business with manufacturers of implantable medical devices no longer justifies the unrestricted sale of standard raw materials into this industry. Other companies are quietly following suit. On the up side, it is possible that the research being driven by this controversy will result in a greater understanding of the immunologic implications of xenobiotics, of the importance of nonbiased observations, of the need for ready access to valid data sets, and of the opportunity for valid scientific information to guide legal decisions. Only time will tell.

  20. Tubo-uterine implantation.

    PubMed

    Green-armytage, V G

    1957-02-01

    After characterizing 2 types of patients presenting with tubal infertility (1 that is "as a rule overweight (the uterus is fixed (and there is easily palpable tubo-uterine pathology," and 1 that is "slim, young, intelligent and often beautiful", 12 1-sentence suggestions are made to increase the success of tubo-uterine implantations in the second type of presenting patient (because the first group has, in the author's mind, disappointing prognosis). Figures are the bulk of the document, with 3 figures demonstrating the type of operation, 3 showing the scheme of the operation, 1 figure showing a posterior view of the implanted tube in utero with a polyethylene prosthesis in situ down to the cervix, and 1 figure showing the instruments used in the operation. A few points of experience the author shares are: 1) operate immediately after a menstrual period; 2) give antibiotics prophylactically and after the procedure; 3) use a Bonney Myomectomy Clamp to elevate the uterus; 4) never use a knife or bistoury at the cornua; 5) use polyethylene rods, when available; and 6) caesarean section is the indicated delivery route after tubo-uterine implantation. Out of 38 patients with the requisite history and findings who have been operated on by this author, 14 have gone to full-term, i.e., 36.1%; 2 have aborted, giving a pregnancy rate of 42.2%, and there was 1 ectopic pregnancy.

  1. An implantable electrical bioreactor for enhancement of cell viability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Lee, Tae Hyung; Song, Yun Mi; Kim, In Sook; Cho, Tae Hyung; Hwang, Sune Jung; Kim, Sung June

    2011-01-01

    Low survival of injected cells which are prepared by ex-vivo culture is main obstacle in cell-based tissue regeneration. To elevate cell adaptation, we designed an implantable electrical bioreactor where human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) can be cultured and stimulated electrically. Bioreactor was composed of biocompatible cylindrical Teflon body containing a flexible polyimide electrode and implantable stimulator. The Teflon body has about 300 holes with a diameter of 300 um for effective nutrients supply inside the bioreactor and has a length of 17 mm and a diameter of 8mm for implantation. After hMSCs seeded on the collagen sponge that serves as scaffold to form a bone tissue graft, they are cultured in the bioreactor with biphasic electric current (BEC) stimulation. BEC stimulation with amplitude of 20/40 uA, duration of 100 us and a frequency of 100 Hz was applied for one week in the early stage of cultivation. Subsequently, after hMSCS were cultured for another week without electrical stimulation, cell response such as cell proliferation, cell attachment and gene expression are evaluated. In vitro and In vivo culture of hMSCs showed 19% and 22% increase in cell proliferation at stimulated groups, compared to unstimulated control. The expression of type I collagen increased significantly at stimulated group. These results suggest that the usage of implantable electrical bioreactor can be a good strategy to enhance the efficiency of stem cell-based tissue engineering.

  2. Deformable registration of x-ray to MRI for post-implant dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seyoun; Song, Danny Y.; Lee, Junghoon

    2016-03-01

    Post-implant dosimetric assessment in prostate brachytherapy is typically performed using CT as the standard imaging modality. However, poor soft tissue contrast in CT causes significant variability in target contouring, resulting in incorrect dose calculations for organs of interest. CT-MR fusion-based approach has been advocated taking advantage of the complementary capabilities of CT (seed identification) and MRI (soft tissue visibility), and has proved to provide more accurate dosimetry calculations. However, seed segmentation in CT requires manual review, and the accuracy is limited by the reconstructed voxel resolution. In addition, CT deposits considerable amount of radiation to the patient. In this paper, we propose an X-ray and MRI based post-implant dosimetry approach. Implanted seeds are localized using three X-ray images by solving a combinatorial optimization problem, and the identified seeds are registered to MR images by an intensity-based points-to-volume registration. We pre-process the MR images using geometric and Gaussian filtering. To accommodate potential soft tissue deformation, our registration is performed in two steps, an initial affine transformation and local deformable registration. An evolutionary optimizer in conjunction with a points-to-volume similarity metric is used for the affine registration. Local prostate deformation and seed migration are then adjusted by the deformable registration step with external and internal force constraints. We tested our algorithm on six patient data sets, achieving registration error of (1.2+/-0.8) mm in < 30 sec. Our proposed approach has the potential to be a fast and cost-effective solution for post-implant dosimetry with equivalent accuracy as the CT-MR fusion-based approach.

  3. An experimental palladium-103 seed (OptiSeed{sup exp}) in a biocompatible polymer without a gold marker: Characterization of dosimetric parameters including the interseed effect

    SciTech Connect

    Abboud, F.; Scalliet, P.; Vynckier, S.

    2008-12-15

    Permanent implantation of {sup 125}I (iodine) or {sup 103}Pd (palladium) sources is a popular treatment option in the management of early stage prostate cancer. New sources are being developed, some of which are being marketed for different clinical applications. A new technique of adjuvant stereotactic permanent seed breast implant, similar to that used in the treatment of prostate cancer, has been proposed by [N. Jansen et al., Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 67, 1052-1058 (2007)] with encouraging results. The presence of artifacts from the metallic seeds, however, can disturb follow-up imaging. The development of plastic seeds has reduced these artifacts. This paper presents a feasibility study of the advantages of palladium-103 seeds, encapsulated with a biocompatible polymer, for future clinical applications, and on the effect of the gold marker on the dosimetric characteristics of such seeds. Experimental palladium seeds, OptiSeed{sup exp}, were manufactured by International Brachytherapy (IBt), Seneffe, Belgium, from a biocompatible polymer, including the marker. Apart from the absence of a gold marker, the studied seed has an identical design to the OptiSeed{sup 103}[Phys. Med. Biol. 50, 1493-1504 (2005)]; [Appl. Radiat. Isot. 63, 311-321 (2005)]. Polymer encapsulation was preferred by IBt in order to reduce the quantity of radioactive material needed for a given dose rate and to reduce the anisotropy of the radiation field around the seed. In addition, this design is intended to decrease the interseed effects that can occur as a result of the marker and the encapsulation. Dosimetric measurements were performed using LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (1 mm{sup 3}) in solid water phantoms (WT1). Measured data were compared to Monte Carlo simulated data in solid water using the MCNP code, version 4C. Updated cross sections [Med. Phys. 30, 701-711 (2003)] were used. As the measured and calculated data were in agreement, Monte Carlo calculations were then

  4. A guide to forest seed handling

    SciTech Connect

    Willan, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    This guide to forest seed handling focuses on seed quality, i.e., the physiological viability and vigor of the seeds. Seed and fruit development, germination, and dormancy and the fundamentals of planning seed collections are covered. The guide includes discussions on seed collection of fallen fruits or seeds from the forest floor from the crowns of felled trees, and from standing trees with access from the ground and with other means of access. Also considered are precautions to be followed during fruit and seed handling between collection and processing. The different stages in seed processing are detailed, including extraction, depulping, drying, tumbling and threshing, dewinging, cleaning, grading, and mixing. Factors affecting seed longevity in storage and the choice of storage methods are reviewed. Different forms of seed pretreatment and seed testing methods are described.

  5. Seed cryopreservation of Halimium and Helianthemum species.

    PubMed

    Pérez-García, Félix; González-Benito, M Elena

    2008-01-01

    Seed germination of four Halimium species [H. atriplicifolium, H.hHalimifolium, H. ocymoides, H. umbellatum] and eight Helianthemum species [H. almeriense pau, H. appeninum.,H. cinereum, H. hirtum, H. marifolium, H. nummularium, H. syriacum, H. squamatum], all cistaceae species from the mediterranean region, was studied after seed storage in liquid nitrogen (Ln, -196C) for four months. In all samples assayed, mechanical scarification of the seed coat was carried out to enhance seed germination. For most samples studied, final germination percentages were unaffected by storage of seeds in Ln, both for intact seeds and for scarified seeds. The germination rate of cryopreserved seeds, expressed as days to reach 50 percent of the final germination percentage, was lower only for four samples of intact seeds and for three samples of scarified seeds. Therefore, this study shows that seed cryopreservation could be a suitable procedure for the long-term seed conservation of several Halimium and Helianthemum species.

  6. Implantable vaccine development using in vitro antigen-pulsed macrophages absorbed on laser micro-structured Si scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zerva, Ioanna; Simitzi, Chara; Siakouli-Galanopoulou, Alexandra; Ranella, Anthi; Stratakis, Emmanuel; Fotakis, Costas; Athanassakis, Irene

    2015-06-17

    To overcome the limiting antigenic repertoire of protein sub-units and the side effects of adjuvants applied in second generation vaccines, the present work combined in vitro and in vivo manipulations to develop biomaterials allowing natural antigen-loading and presentation in vitro and further activation of the immune response in vivo. 3-dimensional laser micro-textured implantable Si-scaffolds supported mouse macrophage adherence, allowed natural seeding with human serum albumin (antigen) and specific antibody and inflammatory cytokine production in vitro. Implantation of Si-scaffolds loaded with antigen-activated macrophages induced an inflammatory reaction along with antigen-specific antibody production in vivo, which could be detected even 30 days post implantation. Analysis of implant histology using scanning electron microscopy showed that Si-scaffolds could be stable for a 6-month period. Such technology leads to personalized implantable vaccines, opening novel areas of research and treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Seed dormancy in Mexican teosinte

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seed dormancy in wild Zea species may affect fitness and relate to ecological adaptation. The primary objective of this study was to characterize the variation in seed germination of the wild species of the genus Zea that currently grow in Mexico, and to relate this variation to their ecological zon...

  8. Genebanking seeds from natural populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conventional storage protocols have been developed to preserve genetic diversity of seeds of crops in genebanks. These same principles have been applied to preserve seeds from wild populations. While most principles for conventional storage protocols are applicable to a broad range of wild species...

  9. Training for Certification: Seed Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Univ., State College. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This Cooperative Extension Service publication from Mississippi State University is a training guide for commercial pesticide applicators. Focusing specifically on the treatment of seeds with pesticides, this publication is meant to prepare one to take the written examination for Environmental Protection Agency Seed Treatment certification.…

  10. Seed Planting in Veggie Pillows

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-08

    Seeds are secured in plant pillows for the Veggie plant growth system inside a laboratory in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The plant pillows, containing Outredgeous lettuce, Mizuna Mustard and Waldmann's green lettuce seeds, were packed for delivery to Veggie on SpaceX's 12th commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station.

  11. Automated seed manipulation and planting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Ray; Herrera, Javier; Holcomb, Scott; Kelly, Paul; Myers, Scott; Rosendo, Manny; Sivitz, Herbert; Wolsefer, Dave

    1988-01-01

    Activities for the Fall Semester, 1987 focused on investigating the mechanical/electrical properties of wheat seeds and forming various Seed Planting System (SPS) concepts based on those properties. The Electrical Division of the design group was formed to devise an SPS using electrostatic charge fields for seeding operations. Experiments concerning seed separation using electrical induction (rearranging of the charges within the seed) were conducted with promising results. The seeds, when exposed to the high voltage and low current field produced by a Van de Graff generator, were observed to move back and forth between two electrodes. An SPS concept has been developed based on this phenomena, and will be developed throughout the Spring Semester, 1988. The Mechanical Division centered on SPS concepts involving valves, pumps, and fluids to separate and deliver seeds. An SPS idea utilizing the pressure difference caused by air as it rushes out of holes drilled in the wall of a closed container has been formulated and will be considered for future development. Also, a system of seed separation and delivery employing a combination of centrifugal force, friction, and air flow was considered.

  12. Seed dormancy in alpine species.

    PubMed

    Schwienbacher, Erich; Navarro-Cano, Jose Antonio; Neuner, Gilbert; Erschbamer, Brigitta

    2011-10-01

    In alpine species the classification of the various mechanisms underlying seed dormancy has been rather questionable and controversial. Thus, we investigated 28 alpine species to evaluate the prevailing types of dormancy. Embryo type and water impermeability of seed coats gave an indication of the potential seed dormancy class. To ascertain the actual dormancy class and level, we performed germination experiments comparing the behavior of seeds without storage, after cold-dry storage, after cold-wet storage, and scarification. We also tested the light requirement for germination in some species. Germination behavior was characterized using the final germination percentage and the mean germination time. Considering the effects of the pretreatments, a refined classification of the prevailing dormancy types was constructed based on the results of our pretreatments. Only two out of the 28 species that we evaluated had predominantly non-dormant seeds. Physiological dormancy was prevalent in 20 species, with deep physiological dormancy being the most abundant, followed by non-deep and intermediate physiological dormancy. Seeds of four species with underdeveloped embryos were assigned to the morphophysiologial dormancy class. An impermeable seed coat was identified in two species, with no additional physiological germination block. We defined these species as having physical dormancy. Light promoted the germination of seeds without storage in all but one species with physiological dormancy. In species with physical dormancy, light responses were of minor importance. We discuss our new classification in the context of former germination studies and draw implications for the timing of germination in the field.

  13. Microwave drying of seed cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A small lab dryer was designed for use in drying seed cotton with components of a microwave generator mounted thereon. The magnetron emitted radiation directly into the seed cotton and a fan directed air cross-flow to the radiation direction. The microwave components were a 1.1 kW magnetron, trans...

  14. Seeding and planting upland oaks

    Treesearch

    Paul S. Johnson

    1989-01-01

    Oaks can be planted or seeded in uplands to: (1) afforest old fields, strip-mined areas, or other areas devoid of trees, and (2) supplement natural reproduction within existing forests. Planting is usually more successful than direct seeding. But even under good conditions survival and growth of planted oak has been considerably poorer than with conifers and other...

  15. Insecticide seed treatments for sugarbeet

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pest feeding and vectoring of viruses cause serious problems in sugarbeet production worldwide. In order to ameliorate pest and disease problems on sugarbeet, two seed treatments, Poncho Beta (60 g a.i. clothianidin + 8 g a.i. beta-cyfluthrin/100,000 seed) and Cruiser Tef (60 g a.i. thiamethoxam + 8...

  16. Seed dormancy in alpine species

    PubMed Central

    Schwienbacher, Erich; Navarro-Cano, Jose Antonio; Neuner, Gilbert; Erschbamer, Brigitta

    2011-01-01

    In alpine species the classification of the various mechanisms underlying seed dormancy has been rather questionable and controversial. Thus, we investigated 28 alpine species to evaluate the prevailing types of dormancy. Embryo type and water impermeability of seed coats gave an indication of the potential seed dormancy class. To ascertain the actual dormancy class and level, we performed germination experiments comparing the behavior of seeds without storage, after cold-dry storage, after cold-wet storage, and scarification. We also tested the light requirement for germination in some species. Germination behavior was characterized using the final germination percentage and the mean germination time. Considering the effects of the pretreatments, a refined classification of the prevailing dormancy types was constructed based on the results of our pretreatments. Only two out of the 28 species that we evaluated had predominantly non-dormant seeds. Physiological dormancy was prevalent in 20 species, with deep physiological dormancy being the most abundant, followed by non-deep and intermediate physiological dormancy. Seeds of four species with underdeveloped embryos were assigned to the morphophysiologial dormancy class. An impermeable seed coat was identified in two species, with no additional physiological germination block. We defined these species as having physical dormancy. Light promoted the germination of seeds without storage in all but one species with physiological dormancy. In species with physical dormancy, light responses were of minor importance. We discuss our new classification in the context of former germination studies and draw implications for the timing of germination in the field. PMID:24415831

  17. Differential predation of forage seed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In recent field experiments we observed that the main invertebrate seed predators of overseeded tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) or Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) seed in unimproved pastures were harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex sp.) and common field crickets (Gryllus sp.) To determ...

  18. Storage of Water Tupelo Seeds

    Treesearch

    F. T. Bonner; H. E. Kennedy

    1973-01-01

    Water tupelo seeds can be stored for at least 30 months without significant losses in viability. Moisture contents of 20 percent or lower and polyethylene bags with walls 4 mils thick gave the best results at 38F. At 14F, seed moisture must be below 10 percent.

  19. Banking Wyoming big sagebrush seeds

    Treesearch

    Robert P. Karrfalt; Nancy Shaw

    2013-01-01

    Five commercially produced seed lots of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. var. wyomingensis (Beetle & Young) S.L. Welsh [Asteraceae]) were stored under various conditions for 5 y. Purity, moisture content as measured by equilibrium relative humidity, and storage temperature were all important factors to successful seed storage. Our results indicate...

  20. Chapter 3: Seed and Varieties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seed is one of the most important factors in sugarbeet production. Seed selection is one of the most important decisions a grower can make. Without a uniform plant population of a sugarbeet variety adapted to the growing region, the producer will have difficulty achieving economical crop production....