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Sample records for 128-channel event-related potentials

  1. Neural Dynamics Underlying Event-Related Potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ankoor S.; Bressler, Steven L.; Knuth, Kevin H.; Ding, Ming-Zhou; Mehta, Ashesh D.; Ulbert, Istvan; Schroeder, Charles E.

    2003-01-01

    There are two opposing hypotheses about the brain mechanisms underlying sensory event-related potentials (ERPs). One holds that sensory ERPs are generated by phase resetting of ongoing electroencephalographic (EEG) activity, and the other that they result from signal averaging of stimulus-evoked neural responses. We tested several contrasting predictions of these hypotheses by direct intracortical analysis of neural activity in monkeys. Our findings clearly demonstrate evoked response contributions to the sensory ERP in the monkey, and they suggest the likelihood that a mixed (Evoked/Phase Resetting) model may account for the generation of scalp ERPs in humans.

  2. P 300 EVENT RELATED POTENTIAL IN DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Singh, R.; Shukla, R.; Dalal, P.K.; Sinha, P.K.; Trivedi, J.K.

    2000-01-01

    P300 component of the event related potential (ERP) provides one neurophysiological index of cognitive dysfunction in depression. Forty subjects fulfilling DSM-III criteria for depression were compared to 40 age and sex matched normal controls. The P300 was recorded using the auditory odd-ball paradigm. Depressives had a significantly prolonged P300 latency and reduced P300 amplitude as compared to the controls. The P300 latency showed a significant positive correlation with age of the patient and severity of depression while P300 amplitude showed a significant negative correlation with age. The clinical subcategory of depression, duration of illness and sex did not show any relationship with P300 abnormality. Twelve out of 40 depressives (30%) had an abnormal P300. The mean Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) score was significantly high in those with an abnormal P300. PMID:21407978

  3. Event-Related Potentials and the Stroop Effect

    PubMed Central

    Sahinoglu, Babur; Dogan, Gamze

    2016-01-01

    In this manuscript, the researches on the Event-Related Potentials (ERP) elicited by the standard Stroop effect were reviewed. For the sake of clarity, only the parts of the manuscripts that reported the standard Stroop effect - ERPs relation were taken into consideration. PMID:27026765

  4. Event-Related Brain Potential Correlates of Emotional Face Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eimer, Martin; Holmes, Amanda

    2007-01-01

    Results from recent event-related brain potential (ERP) studies investigating brain processes involved in the detection and analysis of emotional facial expression are reviewed. In all experiments, emotional faces were found to trigger an increased ERP positivity relative to neutral faces. The onset of this emotional expression effect was…

  5. Event-Related Potentials and the Stroop Effect.

    PubMed

    Sahinoglu, Babur; Dogan, Gamze

    2016-02-01

    In this manuscript, the researches on the Event-Related Potentials (ERP) elicited by the standard Stroop effect were reviewed. For the sake of clarity, only the parts of the manuscripts that reported the standard Stroop effect - ERPs relation were taken into consideration.

  6. Event-Related Potentials and the Stroop Effect.

    PubMed

    Sahinoglu, Babur; Dogan, Gamze

    2016-02-01

    In this manuscript, the researches on the Event-Related Potentials (ERP) elicited by the standard Stroop effect were reviewed. For the sake of clarity, only the parts of the manuscripts that reported the standard Stroop effect - ERPs relation were taken into consideration. PMID:27026765

  7. Effects of galvanic vestibular stimulation on event related potentials

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Woo; Park, Woong-Sik; Yoon, Se-Won

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of galvanic vestibular stimulation on event-related potentials. [Subjects and Methods] Forty normal female adult subjects were randomly distributed to a galvanic vestibular stimulation application group (20 subjects) and sham group (20 subjects). For galvanic vestibular stimulation application, a positive electrode was applied to the right mastoid process, and a negative electrode was applied to the left mastoid process; simulation was applied for 10 minutes. A test was conducted on the N100 and P300 components of the event-related potentials before and after galvanic vestibular stimulation. [Results] The N100 latency showed statistically significant differences in interaction effects between time and group in the F3, F4, Fz, and Pz areas. The P300 latency showed the same results in the Fp1 and Fp2 areas, the N100 amplitude showed the same results in the Fp2, Fz, and Pz areas; and the P300 amplitude showed the same results in the Pz area. [Conclusion] These results suggest that galvanic vestibular stimulation may play a positive role in the N100 and P300 components of the event-related potentials of the cerebral cortex related to decision-making in matching words with images. PMID:27799703

  8. Event-related potential markers of brain changes in preclinical familial Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Ally, B.A.; Celone, K.; McKeever, J.; Ruiz-Rizzo, A.L.; Lopera, F.; Stern, C.E.; Budson, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Event-related potentials (ERPs) can reflect differences in brain electrophysiology underlying cognitive functions in brain disorders such as dementia and mild cognitive impairment. To identify individuals at risk for Alzheimer disease (AD) we used high-density ERPs to examine brain physiology in young presymptomatic individuals (average age 34.2 years) who carry the E280A mutation in the presenilin-1 (PSEN1) gene and will go on to develop AD around the age of 45. Methods: Twenty-one subjects from a Colombian population with familial AD participated: 10 presymptomatic subjects positive for the PSEN1 mutation (carriers) and 11 siblings without the mutation (controls). Subjects performed a visual recognition memory test while 128-channel ERPs were recorded. Results: Despite identical behavioral performance, PSEN1 mutation carriers showed less positivity in frontal regions and more positivity in occipital regions, compared to controls. These differences were more pronounced during the 200–300 msec period. Discriminant analysis at this time interval showed promising sensitivity (72.7%) and specificity (81.8%) of the ERP measures to predict the presence of AD pathology. Conclusions: Presymptomatic PSEN1 mutation carriers show changes in brain physiology that can be detected by high-density ERPs. The relative differences observed showing greater frontal positivity in controls and greater occipital positivity in carriers indicates that control subjects may use frontally mediated processes to distinguish between studied and unstudied visual items, whereas carriers appear to rely more upon perceptual details of the items to distinguish between them. These findings also demonstrate the potential usefulness of ERP brain correlates as preclinical markers of AD. PMID:21775732

  9. The effect of jogging on P300 event related potentials.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Y; Nishimoto, K; Akamatu, M; Takahashi, M; Maruyama, A

    1999-03-01

    Physical exercise has beneficial effects not only on cardiovascular system and fat metabolism, may also directly effect the cognitive process. We studied the effect of physical exercise on cognitive processes by measuring the P300 event related-potential (ERP) after jogging. Seven well-trained joggers were enrolled in this study and the P300 potentials using auditory oddball paradigm. ERPs were measured before and after 30 minutes of jogging. The amplitude of the P300 significantly increased after jogging compared to values recorded before jogging. These findings suggest that jogging has the effect of facilitating cognitive processes involved in generation of the P300.

  10. Event-related brain potentials - Comparison between children and adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courchesne, E.

    1977-01-01

    The reported investigation shows that nontarget stimuli which are infrequently presented and deviate from the background elicit Nc and Pc waves in children. The same stimuli elicit P3 waves in adults. The scalp distribution of P3 waves in adults appears to vary with the ease of stimulus recognition or the degree of stimulus novelty. However, the Nc and Pc distributions in children do not seem to vary with these factors. The differences between children and adults in event-related potentials suggest corresponding differences in the mode of processing employed by each when rare, deviant stimuli are encountered

  11. What event-related potentials (ERPs) bring to social neuroscience?

    PubMed

    Ibanez, Agustin; Melloni, Margherita; Huepe, David; Helgiu, Elena; Rivera-Rei, Alvaro; Canales-Johnson, Andrés; Baker, Phil; Moya, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    Social cognitive neuroscience is a recent interdisciplinary field that studies the neural basis of the social mind. Event-related potentials (ERPs) provide precise information about the time dynamics of the brain. In this study, we assess the role of ERPs in cognitive neuroscience, particularly in the emerging area of social neuroscience. First, we briefly introduce the technique of ERPs. Subsequently, we describe several ERP components (P1, N1, N170, vertex positive potential, early posterior negativity, N2, P2, P3, N400, N400-like, late positive complex, late positive potential, P600, error-related negativity, feedback error-related negativity, contingent negative variation, readiness potential, lateralized readiness potential, motor potential, re-afferent potential) that assess perceptual, cognitive, and motor processing. Then, we introduce ERP studies in social neuroscience on contextual effects on speech, emotional processing, empathy, and decision making. We provide an outline of ERPs' relevance and applications in the field of social cognitive neuroscience. We also introduce important methodological issues that extend classical ERP research, such as intracranial recordings (iERP) and source location in dense arrays and simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging recordings. Further, this review discusses possible caveats of the ERP question assessment on neuroanatomical areas, biophysical origin, and methodological problems, and their relevance to explanatory pluralism and multilevel, contextual, and situated approaches to social neuroscience.

  12. Syntactic processing with aging: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Kemmer, Laura; Coulson, Seana; De Ochoa, Esmeralda; Kutas, Marta

    2004-05-01

    To assess age-related changes in simple syntactic processing with normal aging, event-related brain potentials (ERPs) elicited by grammatical number violations as individuals read sentences for comprehension were analyzed. Violations were found to elicit a P600 of equal amplitude and latency regardless of an individual's age. Instead, advancing age was associated with a change in the scalp distribution of the P600 effect, being less asymmetric and more frontal (though still with a parietal maximum) in older than younger adults. Our results thus show that the brain's response to simple syntactic violations, unlike those reported for simple binary categorizations and simple semantic violations, is neither slowed nor diminished in amplitude by age. At the same time, the brain's processing of these grammatical number violations did engage at least somewhat different brain regions as a function of age, suggesting a qualitative change rather than any simple quantitative change in speed of processing.

  13. Retinotopic mapping of visual event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Capilla, Almudena; Melcón, María; Kessel, Dominique; Calderón, Rosbén; Pazo-Álvarez, Paula; Carretié, Luis

    2016-07-01

    Visual stimulation is frequently employed in electroencephalographic (EEG) research. However, despite its widespread use, no studies have thoroughly evaluated how the morphology of the visual event-related potentials (ERPs) varies according to the spatial location of stimuli. Hence, the purpose of this study was to perform a detailed retinotopic mapping of visual ERPs. We recorded EEG activity while participants were visually stimulated with 60 pattern-reversing checkerboards placed at different polar angles and eccentricities. Our results show five pattern-reversal ERP components. C1 and C2 components inverted polarity between the upper and lower hemifields. P1 and N1 showed higher amplitudes and shorter latencies to stimuli located in the contralateral lower quadrant. In contrast, P2 amplitude was enhanced and its latency was reduced by stimuli presented in the periphery of the upper hemifield. The retinotopic maps presented here could serve as a guide for selecting optimal visuo-spatial locations in future ERP studies.

  14. Event-Related Potentials and Emotion Processing in Child Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Chronaki, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in the neural mechanisms underlying altered emotional processes in children and adolescents with psychopathology. This review provides a brief overview of the most up-to-date findings in the field of event-related potentials (ERPs) to facial and vocal emotional expressions in the most common child psychopathological conditions. In regards to externalizing behavior (i.e., ADHD, CD), ERP studies show enhanced early components to anger, reflecting enhanced sensory processing, followed by reductions in later components to anger, reflecting reduced cognitive-evaluative processing. In regards to internalizing behavior, research supports models of increased processing of threat stimuli especially at later more elaborate and effortful stages. Finally, in autism spectrum disorders abnormalities have been observed at early visual-perceptual stages of processing. An affective neuroscience framework for understanding child psychopathology can be valuable in elucidating underlying mechanisms and inform preventive intervention. PMID:27199803

  15. Event-Related Potentials and Emotion Processing in Child Psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Chronaki, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in the neural mechanisms underlying altered emotional processes in children and adolescents with psychopathology. This review provides a brief overview of the most up-to-date findings in the field of event-related potentials (ERPs) to facial and vocal emotional expressions in the most common child psychopathological conditions. In regards to externalizing behavior (i.e., ADHD, CD), ERP studies show enhanced early components to anger, reflecting enhanced sensory processing, followed by reductions in later components to anger, reflecting reduced cognitive-evaluative processing. In regards to internalizing behavior, research supports models of increased processing of threat stimuli especially at later more elaborate and effortful stages. Finally, in autism spectrum disorders abnormalities have been observed at early visual-perceptual stages of processing. An affective neuroscience framework for understanding child psychopathology can be valuable in elucidating underlying mechanisms and inform preventive intervention. PMID:27199803

  16. When memory meets beauty: Insights from event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Marzi, T; Viggiano, M P

    2010-05-01

    Facial attractiveness plays a key role in human social and affective behavior. To study the time course of the neural processing of attractiveness and its influence on recognition memory we investigated the event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited in an old/new recognition task in response to faces with a neutral expression that, at encoding, were rated for their attractiveness. Highly attractive faces elicited a specific early positive-going component on frontal sites; in addition, with respect to less attractive faces, they elicited larger later components related to structural encoding and recognition memory. All in all, our results show that facial attractiveness, independently from facial expression, modulates face processing throughout all stages from encoding to retrieval.

  17. When memory meets beauty: Insights from event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Marzi, T; Viggiano, M P

    2010-05-01

    Facial attractiveness plays a key role in human social and affective behavior. To study the time course of the neural processing of attractiveness and its influence on recognition memory we investigated the event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited in an old/new recognition task in response to faces with a neutral expression that, at encoding, were rated for their attractiveness. Highly attractive faces elicited a specific early positive-going component on frontal sites; in addition, with respect to less attractive faces, they elicited larger later components related to structural encoding and recognition memory. All in all, our results show that facial attractiveness, independently from facial expression, modulates face processing throughout all stages from encoding to retrieval. PMID:20109520

  18. Probabilistic delay differential equation modeling of event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Ostwald, Dirk; Starke, Ludger

    2016-08-01

    "Dynamic causal models" (DCMs) are a promising approach in the analysis of functional neuroimaging data due to their biophysical interpretability and their consolidation of functional-segregative and functional-integrative propositions. In this theoretical note we are concerned with the DCM framework for electroencephalographically recorded event-related potentials (ERP-DCM). Intuitively, ERP-DCM combines deterministic dynamical neural mass models with dipole-based EEG forward models to describe the event-related scalp potential time-series over the entire electrode space. Since its inception, ERP-DCM has been successfully employed to capture the neural underpinnings of a wide range of neurocognitive phenomena. However, in spite of its empirical popularity, the technical literature on ERP-DCM remains somewhat patchy. A number of previous communications have detailed certain aspects of the approach, but no unified and coherent documentation exists. With this technical note, we aim to close this gap and to increase the technical accessibility of ERP-DCM. Specifically, this note makes the following novel contributions: firstly, we provide a unified and coherent review of the mathematical machinery of the latent and forward models constituting ERP-DCM by formulating the approach as a probabilistic latent delay differential equation model. Secondly, we emphasize the probabilistic nature of the model and its variational Bayesian inversion scheme by explicitly deriving the variational free energy function in terms of both the likelihood expectation and variance parameters. Thirdly, we detail and validate the estimation of the model with a special focus on the explicit form of the variational free energy function and introduce a conventional nonlinear optimization scheme for its maximization. Finally, we identify and discuss a number of computational issues which may be addressed in the future development of the approach.

  19. Analysis of event-related potentials (ERP) by damped sinusoids.

    PubMed

    Demiralp, T; Ademoglu, A; Istefanopulos, Y; Gülçür, H O

    1998-06-01

    Several researchers propose that event-related potentials (ERPs) can be explained by a superposition of transient oscillations at certain frequency bands in response to external or internal events. The transient nature of the ERP is more suitable to be modelled as a sum of damped sinusoids. These damped sinusoids can be completely characterized by four sets of parameters, namely the amplitude, the damping coefficient, the phase and the frequency. The Prony method is used to estimate these parameters. In this study, the long-latency auditory-evoked potentials (AEP) and the auditory oddball responses (P300) of 10 healthy subjects are analysed by this method. It is shown that the original waveforms can be reconstructed by summing a small number of damped sinusoids. This allows for a parsimonious representation of the ERPs. Furthermore, the method shows that the oddball target responses contain higher amplitude, slower delta and slower damped theta components than those of the AEPs. With this technique, we show that the differentiation of sensory and cognitive potentials are not inherent in their overall frequency content but in their frequency components at certain bands.

  20. Stability of auditory event-related potentials in coma research.

    PubMed

    Schorr, Barbara; Schlee, Winfried; Arndt, Marion; Lulé, Dorothée; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Lopez-Rolon, Alex; Lopez-Rolon, Alexander; Bender, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS) or in minimally conscious state (MCS) after brain injury show significant fluctuations in their behavioural abilities over time. As the importance of event-related potentials (ERPs) in the detection of traces of consciousness increases, we investigated the retest reliability of ERPs with repeated tests at four different time points. Twelve healthy controls and 12 inpatients (8 UWS, 4 MCS; 6 traumatic, 6 non-traumatic) were tested twice a day (morning, afternoon) for 2 days with an auditory oddball task. ERPs were recorded with a 256-channel-EEG system, and correlated with behavioural test scores in the Coma Recovery Scale-revised (CRS-R). The number of identifiable P300 responses varied between zero and four in both groups. Reliabilities varied between Krippendorff's α = 0.43 for within-day comparison, and α = 0.25 for between-day comparison in the patient group. Retest reliability was strong for the CRS-R scores for all comparisons (α = 0.83-0.95). The stability of auditory information processing in patients with disorders of consciousness is the basis for other, even more demanding tasks and cognitive potentials. The relatively low ERP-retest reliability suggests that it is necessary to perform repeated tests, especially when probing for consciousness with ERPs. A single negative ERP test result may be mistaken for proof that a UWS patient truly is unresponsive.

  1. Communication of ALS Patients by Detecting Event-Related Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanou, Naoyuki; Sakuma, Kenji; Nakashima, Kenji

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis(ALS) patients are unable to successfully communicate their desires, although their mental capacity is the same as non-affected persons. Therefore, the authors put emphasis on Event-Related Potential(ERP) which elicits the highest outcome for the target visual and hearing stimuli. P300 is one component of ERP. It is positive potential that is elicited when the subject focuses attention on stimuli that appears infrequently. In this paper, the authors focused on P200 and N200 components, in addition to P300, for their great improvement in the rate of correct judgment in the target word-specific experiment. Hence the authors propose the algorithm that specifies target words by detecting these three components. Ten healthy subjects and ALS patient underwent the experiment in which a target word out of five words, was specified by this algorithm. The rates of correct judgment in nine of ten healthy subjects were more than 90.0%. The highest rate was 99.7%. The highest rate of ALS patient was 100.0%. Through these results, the authors found the possibility that ALS patients could communicate with surrounding persons by detecting ERP(P200, N200 and P300) as their desire.

  2. Social Comparison Manifests in Event-related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yi; Feng, Chunliang; Wu, Tingting; Broster, Lucas S.; Cai, Huajian; Gu, Ruolei; Luo, Yue-jia

    2015-01-01

    Social comparison, a widespread phenomenon in human society, has been found to affect outcome evaluation. The need to belong to a social group may result in distinct neural responses to diverse social comparison outcomes. To extend previous studies by examining how social comparison with hierarchical characteristics is temporally processed, electroencephalography responses were recorded in the current study. Participants played a lottery game with two pseudo-players simultaneously and received both their own and the other two players’ outcomes. Results of three event-related potential components, including the P2, the feedback-related negativity (FRN), and the late positive component (LPC), indicate that social comparison manifests in three stages. First, outcomes indicating a different performance from others elicited a larger P2 than evenness. Second, the FRN showed hierarchical sensitivity to social comparison outcomes. This effect manifested asymmetrically. Finally, large difference between the participant’s outcome and the other two players’ evoked a larger LPC than the medium difference and the even condition. We suggest that during social comparison, people detect if there is any difference between self and others, and then evaluate the information of this difference hierarchically, and finally interpret the situations in which oneself deviates from the group as most motivationally salient. PMID:26183734

  3. Multiple Component Event-Related Potential (mcERP) Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, K. H.; Clanton, S. T.; Shah, A. S.; Truccolo, W. A.; Ding, M.; Bressler, S. L.; Trejo, L. J.; Schroeder, C. E.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We show how model-based estimation of the neural sources responsible for transient neuroelectric signals can be improved by the analysis of single trial data. Previously, we showed that a multiple component event-related potential (mcERP) algorithm can extract the responses of individual sources from recordings of a mixture of multiple, possibly interacting, neural ensembles. McERP also estimated single-trial amplitudes and onset latencies, thus allowing more accurate estimation of ongoing neural activity during an experimental trial. The mcERP algorithm is related to informax independent component analysis (ICA); however, the underlying signal model is more physiologically realistic in that a component is modeled as a stereotypic waveshape varying both in amplitude and onset latency from trial to trial. The result is a model that reflects quantities of interest to the neuroscientist. Here we demonstrate that the mcERP algorithm provides more accurate results than more traditional methods such as factor analysis and the more recent ICA. Whereas factor analysis assumes the sources are orthogonal and ICA assumes the sources are statistically independent, the mcERP algorithm makes no such assumptions thus allowing investigators to examine interactions among components by estimating the properties of single-trial responses.

  4. Agency attribution: event-related potentials and outcome monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bednark, Jeffery G; Franz, Elizabeth A

    2014-04-01

    Knowledge about the effects of our actions is an underlying feature of voluntary behavior. Given the importance of identifying the outcomes of our actions, it has been proposed that the sensory outcomes of self-made actions are inherently different from those of externally caused outcomes. Thus, the outcomes of self-made actions are likely to be more motivationally significant for an agent. We used event-related potentials to investigate the relationship between the perceived motivational significance of an outcome and the attribution of agency in the presence of others. In our experiment, we assessed agency attribution in the presence of another agent by varying the degree of contiguity between participants' self-made actions and the sensory outcome. Specifically, we assessed the feedback correct-related positivity (fCRP) and the novelty P3 measures of an outcome's motivational significance and unexpectedness, respectively. Results revealed that both the fCRP and participants' agency attributions were significantly influenced by action-outcome contiguity. However, when action-outcome contiguity was ambiguous, novelty P3 amplitude was a reliable indicator of agency attribution. Prior agency attributions were also found to influence attribution in trials with ambiguous and low action-outcome contiguity. Participants' use of multiple cues to determine agency is consistent with the cue integration theory of agency. In addition to these novel findings, this study supports growing evidence suggesting that reinforcement processes play a significant role in the sense of agency. PMID:24504195

  5. Event-related potentials during an emotional Stroop task.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Susan J; Johnstone, Stuart J; Gonsalvez, Craig J

    2007-03-01

    Emotional Stroop tasks have gained wide interest in scientific literature in the last two decades. Although no direct measure of attention is employed, these studies infer the presence of preferential processing of threatening information based on reaction time (RT) impairment in a competing task. Because event-related potential (ERP) measures are sensitive to both the extent (amplitude) and speed (latency) of cerebral processing, they are valuable tools with which to examine more directly the claim that threatening stimuli are associated with enhanced attention. Twenty-two students rated a pool of words to identify those that were personally disturbing. Two word types (threat and neutral) were then compared in two tasks (color relevant, in which the color ink of words was identified, and word relevant in which words were classified as threatening or not). No emotional Stroop effect was observed in terms of longer RTs to identify the colors of threat words. ERP results provided valuable information about threat processing which was not observed with behavioral measures. Threat content was associated with larger P2 amplitude in the right than left hemisphere, and larger P3 amplitude, across tasks. The results indicate strong evidence for enhanced processing of threat-related stimuli in healthy individuals. It is concluded that ERPs are a sensitive measure of processes underlying emotional Stroop performance, which can be used to elucidate attentional biases in healthy and clinical populations.

  6. Agency attribution: event-related potentials and outcome monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bednark, Jeffery G; Franz, Elizabeth A

    2014-04-01

    Knowledge about the effects of our actions is an underlying feature of voluntary behavior. Given the importance of identifying the outcomes of our actions, it has been proposed that the sensory outcomes of self-made actions are inherently different from those of externally caused outcomes. Thus, the outcomes of self-made actions are likely to be more motivationally significant for an agent. We used event-related potentials to investigate the relationship between the perceived motivational significance of an outcome and the attribution of agency in the presence of others. In our experiment, we assessed agency attribution in the presence of another agent by varying the degree of contiguity between participants' self-made actions and the sensory outcome. Specifically, we assessed the feedback correct-related positivity (fCRP) and the novelty P3 measures of an outcome's motivational significance and unexpectedness, respectively. Results revealed that both the fCRP and participants' agency attributions were significantly influenced by action-outcome contiguity. However, when action-outcome contiguity was ambiguous, novelty P3 amplitude was a reliable indicator of agency attribution. Prior agency attributions were also found to influence attribution in trials with ambiguous and low action-outcome contiguity. Participants' use of multiple cues to determine agency is consistent with the cue integration theory of agency. In addition to these novel findings, this study supports growing evidence suggesting that reinforcement processes play a significant role in the sense of agency.

  7. Event-related potential alterations in fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Knoth, Inga S.; Lippé, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of X-linked intellectual disability (ID), associated with a wide range of cognitive and behavioral impairments. FXS is caused by a trinucleotide repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene located on the X-chromosome. FMR1 is expected to prevent the expression of the “fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP)”, which results in altered structural and functional development of the synapse, including a loss of synaptic plasticity. This review aims to unveil the contribution of electrophysiological signal studies for the understanding of the information processing impairments in FXS patients. We discuss relevant event-related potential (ERP) studies conducted with full mutation FXS patients and clinical populations sharing symptoms with FXS in a developmental perspective. Specific deviances found in FXS ERP profiles are described. Alterations are reported in N1, P2, Mismatch Negativity (MMN), N2, and P3 components in FXS compared to healthy controls. Particularly, deviances in N1 and P2 amplitude seem to be specific to FXS. The presented results suggest a cascade of impaired information processes that are in line with symptoms and anatomical findings in FXS. PMID:23015788

  8. Social Comparison Manifests in Event-related Potentials.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yi; Feng, Chunliang; Wu, Tingting; Broster, Lucas S; Cai, Huajian; Gu, Ruolei; Luo, Yue-jia

    2015-01-01

    Social comparison, a widespread phenomenon in human society, has been found to affect outcome evaluation. The need to belong to a social group may result in distinct neural responses to diverse social comparison outcomes. To extend previous studies by examining how social comparison with hierarchical characteristics is temporally processed, electroencephalography responses were recorded in the current study. Participants played a lottery game with two pseudo-players simultaneously and received both their own and the other two players' outcomes. Results of three event-related potential components, including the P2, the feedback-related negativity (FRN), and the late positive component (LPC), indicate that social comparison manifests in three stages. First, outcomes indicating a different performance from others elicited a larger P2 than evenness. Second, the FRN showed hierarchical sensitivity to social comparison outcomes. This effect manifested asymmetrically. Finally, large difference between the participant's outcome and the other two players' evoked a larger LPC than the medium difference and the even condition. We suggest that during social comparison, people detect if there is any difference between self and others, and then evaluate the information of this difference hierarchically, and finally interpret the situations in which oneself deviates from the group as most motivationally salient. PMID:26183734

  9. Bootstrap analysis of the single subject with event related potentials.

    PubMed

    Oruç, Ipek; Krigolson, Olav; Dalrymple, Kirsten; Nagamatsu, Lindsay S; Handy, Todd C; Barton, Jason J S

    2011-07-01

    Neural correlates of cognitive states in event-related potentials (ERPs) serve as markers for related cerebral processes. Although these are usually evaluated in subject groups, the ability to evaluate such markers statistically in single subjects is essential for case studies in neuropsychology. Here we investigated the use of a simple test based on nonparametric bootstrap confidence intervals for this purpose, by evaluating three different ERP phenomena: the face-selectivity of the N170, error-related negativity, and the P3 component in a Posner cueing paradigm. In each case, we compare single-subject analysis with statistical significance determined using bootstrap to conventional group analysis using analysis of variance (ANOVA). We found that the proportion of subjects who show a significant effect at the individual level based on bootstrap varied, being greatest for the N170 and least for the P3. Furthermore, it correlated with significance at the group level. We conclude that the bootstrap methodology can be a viable option for interpreting single-case ERP amplitude effects in the right setting, probably with well-defined stereotyped peaks that show robust differences at the group level, which may be more characteristic of early sensory components than late cognitive effects.

  10. Bilingual language control: an event-related brain potential study.

    PubMed

    Christoffels, Ingrid K; Firk, Christine; Schiller, Niels O

    2007-05-25

    This study addressed how bilingual speakers switch between their first and second language when speaking. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) and naming latencies were measured while unbalanced German (L1)-Dutch (L2) speakers performed a picture-naming task. Participants named pictures either in their L1 or in their L2 (blocked language conditions), or participants switched between their first and second language unpredictably (mixed language condition). Furthermore, form similarity between translation equivalents (cognate status) was manipulated. A cognate facilitation effect was found for L1 and L2 indicating phonological activation of the non-response language in blocked and mixed language conditions. The ERP data also revealed small but reliable effects of cognate status. Language switching resulted in equal switching costs for both languages and was associated with a modulation in the ERP waveforms (time windows 275-375 ms and 375-475 ms). Mixed language context affected especially the L1, both in ERPs and in latencies, which became slower in L1 than L2. It is suggested that sustained and transient components of language control should be distinguished. Results are discussed in relation to current theories of bilingual language processing.

  11. Auditory event-related potentials in poor readers.

    PubMed

    Bernal, J; Harmony, T; Rodríguez, M; Reyes, A; Yáñez, G; Fernández, T; Galán, L; Silva, J; Fernández- Bouzas, A; Rodríguez, H; Guerrero, V; Marosi, E

    2000-04-01

    Although poor readers (PR) are considered the major group among reading-disabled children, there are not event-related potentials (ERP) studies reported of PR on the subject. In this study, attentional and memory processes were studied in an auditory oddball task in PR and normal controls. ERP to auditory stimuli were recorded in 19 leads of the 10/20 system, using linked earlobes as references, in 20 normal children (10 female) and 20 PR (10 female) of the same age (10-12 years old). Two pure tones (1000 and 3000 Hz) were used in an oddball paradigm. No significant differences were observed in the amplitudes and latencies of N100 between the groups. However, N200 to frequent stimuli and P200 to both frequent and infrequent stimuli were of higher amplitude in poor readers than in normal children. There were no differences between groups in the latency and amplitude of P300. The results suggest that PR use more attentional resources in the components occurring before P300 to both frequent and infrequent stimuli than the normal children, and this finding is particularly marked for PR girls.

  12. Iconic Meaning in Music: An Event-Related Potential Study.

    PubMed

    Cai, Liman; Huang, Ping; Luo, Qiuling; Huang, Hong; Mo, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Although there has been extensive research on the processing of the emotional meaning of music, little is known about other aspects of listeners' experience of music. The present study investigated the neural correlates of the iconic meaning of music. Event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded while a group of 20 music majors and a group of 20 non-music majors performed a lexical decision task in the context of implicit musical iconic meaning priming. ERP analysis revealed a significant N400 effect of congruency in time window 260-510 ms following the onset of the target word only in the group of music majors. Time-course analysis using 50 ms windows indicated significant N400 effects both within the time window 410-460 ms and 460-510 ms for music majors, whereas only a partial N400 effect during time window 410-460 ms was observed for non-music majors. There was also a trend for the N400 effects in the music major group to be stronger than those in the non-major group in the sub-windows of 310-360 ms and 410-460 ms. Especially in the sub-window of 410-460 ms, the topographical map of the difference waveforms between congruent and incongruent conditions revealed different N400 distribution between groups; the effect was concentrated in bilateral frontal areas for music majors, but in central-parietal areas for non-music majors. These results imply probable neural mechanism differences underlying automatic iconic meaning priming of music. Our findings suggest that processing of the iconic meaning of music can be accomplished automatically and that musical training may facilitate the understanding of the iconic meaning of music.

  13. Cue reactivity in smokers: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Erika Litvin; Potts, Geoffrey F; Evans, David E; Drobes, David J

    2013-11-01

    Drugs-of-abuse may increase the salience of drug cues by sensitizing the dopaminergic (DA) system (Robinson and Berridge, 1993), leading to differential attention to smoking stimuli. Event-related potentials (ERPs) have been used to assess attention to smoking cues but not using an ERP component associated with DA-mediated salience evaluation. In this study the DA-related P2a and the P3, were compared in smokers (N = 21) and non-smokers (N = 21) during an attention selection cue exposure task including both cigarette and neutral images. We predicted that both the P2a and P3 would be larger to targets than non-targets, but larger to non-target cigarette images than non-target neutral images only in the smokers, reflecting smokers' evaluation of smoking stimuli as relevant even when they were not targets. Results indicated that smokers showed behavioral cue reactivity, with more false alarms to cigarette images (responding to cigarette images when they were not targets) than non-smokers; however, both smokers and non-smokers had a larger P2a and P3 to cigarette images. Thus, while smokers showed behavioral evidence of differential salience evaluation of the cigarette images, this group difference was not reflected in differential brain activity. These findings may reflect characteristics of the ERPs (both ERP components were smaller in the smokers), the smoking sample (they were not more impulsive, i.e. reward sensitive, than the non-smokers, in contrast to prior studies) and the design (all participants were aware that the aim of the study was related to smoking). PMID:23958866

  14. Iconic Meaning in Music: An Event-Related Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qiuling; Huang, Hong; Mo, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Although there has been extensive research on the processing of the emotional meaning of music, little is known about other aspects of listeners’ experience of music. The present study investigated the neural correlates of the iconic meaning of music. Event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded while a group of 20 music majors and a group of 20 non-music majors performed a lexical decision task in the context of implicit musical iconic meaning priming. ERP analysis revealed a significant N400 effect of congruency in time window 260-510 ms following the onset of the target word only in the group of music majors. Time-course analysis using 50 ms windows indicated significant N400 effects both within the time window 410-460 ms and 460-510 ms for music majors, whereas only a partial N400 effect during time window 410-460 ms was observed for non-music majors. There was also a trend for the N400 effects in the music major group to be stronger than those in the non-major group in the sub-windows of 310-360ms and 410-460ms. Especially in the sub-window of 410-460 ms, the topographical map of the difference waveforms between congruent and incongruent conditions revealed different N400 distribution between groups; the effect was concentrated in bilateral frontal areas for music majors, but in central-parietal areas for non-music majors. These results imply probable neural mechanism differences underlying automatic iconic meaning priming of music. Our findings suggest that processing of the iconic meaning of music can be accomplished automatically and that musical training may facilitate the understanding of the iconic meaning of music. PMID:26161561

  15. Iconic Meaning in Music: An Event-Related Potential Study.

    PubMed

    Cai, Liman; Huang, Ping; Luo, Qiuling; Huang, Hong; Mo, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Although there has been extensive research on the processing of the emotional meaning of music, little is known about other aspects of listeners' experience of music. The present study investigated the neural correlates of the iconic meaning of music. Event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded while a group of 20 music majors and a group of 20 non-music majors performed a lexical decision task in the context of implicit musical iconic meaning priming. ERP analysis revealed a significant N400 effect of congruency in time window 260-510 ms following the onset of the target word only in the group of music majors. Time-course analysis using 50 ms windows indicated significant N400 effects both within the time window 410-460 ms and 460-510 ms for music majors, whereas only a partial N400 effect during time window 410-460 ms was observed for non-music majors. There was also a trend for the N400 effects in the music major group to be stronger than those in the non-major group in the sub-windows of 310-360 ms and 410-460 ms. Especially in the sub-window of 410-460 ms, the topographical map of the difference waveforms between congruent and incongruent conditions revealed different N400 distribution between groups; the effect was concentrated in bilateral frontal areas for music majors, but in central-parietal areas for non-music majors. These results imply probable neural mechanism differences underlying automatic iconic meaning priming of music. Our findings suggest that processing of the iconic meaning of music can be accomplished automatically and that musical training may facilitate the understanding of the iconic meaning of music. PMID:26161561

  16. Cue Reactivity in Smokers: An Event-Related Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Erika Litvin; Potts, Geoffrey F.; Evans, David E.; Drobes, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Drugs-of-abuse may increase the salience of drug cues by sensitizing the dopaminergic (DA) system (Robinson & Berridge, 1993), leading to differential attention to smoking stimuli. Event-related potentials (ERPs) have been used to assess attention to smoking cues but not using an ERP component associated with DA-mediated salience evaluation. In this study the DA-related P2a and the P3, were compared in smokers (N=21) and non-smokers (N=21) during an attention selection cue exposure task including both cigarette and neutral images. We predicted that both the P2a and P3 would be larger to targets than non-targets, but larger to non-target cigarette images than non-target neutral images only in the smokers, reflecting smokers’ evaluation of smoking stimuli as relevant even when they were not targets. Results indicated that smokers showed behavioral cue reactivity, with more false alarms to cigarette images (responding to cigarette images when they were not targets) than non-smokers; however, both smokers and non-smokers had a larger P2a and P3 to cigarette images. Thus, while smokers showed behavioral evidence of differential salience evaluation of the cigarette images, this group difference was not reflected in differential brain activity. These findings may reflect characteristics of the ERPs (both ERP components were smaller in the smokers), the smoking sample (they were not more impulsive, i.e. reward sensitive, than the non-smokers, in contrast to prior studies) and the design (all participants were aware that the aim of the study was related to smoking). PMID:23958866

  17. Impaired Early Attentional Processes in Parkinson’s Disease: A High-Resolution Event-Related Potentials Study

    PubMed Central

    Bocquillon, Perrine; Bourriez, Jean-Louis; Palmero-Soler, Ernesto; Defebvre, Luc; Derambure, Philippe; Dujardin, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The selection of task-relevant information requires both the focalization of attention on the task and resistance to interference from irrelevant stimuli. A previous study using the P3 component of the event-related potentials suggested that a reduced ability to resist interference could be responsible for attention disorders at early stages of Parkinson’s disease (PD), with a possible role of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Methods Our objective was to better determine the origin of this impairment, by studying an earlier ERP component, the N2, and its subcomponents, as they reflect early inhibition processes and as they are known to have sources in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), which is involved together with the DLPFC in inhibition processes. Fifteen early-stage PD patients and 15 healthy controls (HCs) performed a three-stimulus visual oddball paradigm, consisting in detecting target inputs amongst standard stimuli, while resisting interference from distracter ones. A 128-channel electroencephalogram was recorded during this task and the generators of the N2 subcomponents were identified using standardized weighted low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (swLORETA). Results PD patients displayed fewer N2 generators than HCs in both the DLPFC and the ACC, for all types of stimuli. In contrast to controls, PD patients did not show any differences between their generators for different N2 subcomponents. Conclusion Our data suggest that impaired inhibition in PD results from dysfunction of the DLPFC and the ACC during the early stages of attentional processes. PMID:26135906

  18. Event-related brain potentials reveal correlates of the transformation of stimulus functions through derived relations in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, L M; Farina, F R; Hussey, I; Roche, R A P

    2015-03-01

    This research aimed to explore the neural correlates of relational learning by recording high-density EEG during a behavioural task involving derivation levels of varying complexity. A total of 15 participants (5 male; age range 18-23 years; mean age=20.0 years) completed contextual cue training, relational learning, function training and a derivation task while 128-channel event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from the scalp (Background). Differences in response latencies were observed between the two derived (symmetry and equivalence) and directly trained relations, with longest latencies found for equivalence and shortest for the directly trained relations. This pattern failed to reach statistical significance. Importantly, ERPs revealed an early P3a positivity (from 230 to 350ms) over right posterior scalp sites. Significantly larger mean amplitudes were found at three channels (P6, E115 and E121) for the equivalence relations compared to the two other types (Results). We believe this may constitute a first demonstration of differences in brain electrophysiology in the transformation of stimulus functions through derived relations of hierarchical levels of complexity (Conclusions).

  19. [Event-related potentials and performance errors during falling asleep].

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, V B; Verbitskaia, Iu S; Lavrova, T P

    2009-01-01

    Sound is the most adequate external stimulus for studying information processes in the brain during falling asleep and at different sleep stages. Common procedure of analysis of the event-related potentials (ERPs) averaged for a group of subjects has some drawbacks because of the ERP interindividual variability. Therefore in our work, we determined parameters of the auditory ERP components selectively summed up for individual subjects in different series of a psychomotor test with their subsequent group analysis. Search for the ERP parameters which would allow us to quantitatively estimate brain functional states during performance errors associated with a decrease in the level of wakefulness and falling asleep was the aim of our work. The ERPs were recorded in healthy volunteers (n = 41) in the evening from eight EEG derivations (F3, F4, C3, C4, P3, P4, O1, O2) in reference to a linked mastoid electrode. The analysis was performed in 14 subjects with a sufficient number of falling asleep episodes. A monotonous psychomotor test was performed in a supine position with the eyes closed. The test consisted of two alternating series: calculation of sound stimuli from 1 up to 10 with simultaneous pressing the button and calculation from 1 up to 5 without pressing the button and so on. Computer-generated sound stimuli (50-ms pulses with the frequency of 1000 Hz, 60 dB HL) were presented binaurally through earphones with interstimulus intervals in 2.4-2.7 s. Comparison of the ERP parameters (latency and amplitude of components N1, P2, N, and P3) during correct and erroneous performance of the psychomotor test showed that a decrease in the level of wakefulness caused a statistically significant increase in the amplitude of components of vertex complex N1-P2-N2 in series without pressing the button. The greatest changes in the ERPs in different series of the psychomotor test were observed for component N2 (latency 330-360 ms), which has the common origin with the EEG theta

  20. Event-related potentials and event-related oscillations during identity and facial emotional processing in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Loyo, Julieta; González-Garrido, Andrés A; Sánchez-Loyo, Luis Miguel; Medina, Virginia; Basar-Eroglu, Canan

    2009-01-01

    Impairments in emotional recognition have been consistently reported in schizophrenic patients. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate time-sequenced responses in ERPs and event-related oscillations during emotional recognition of happiness and fear compared to facial identity recognition in schizophrenic patients (SCH) versus healthy controls (CON). Ten paranoid SCH and ten CON subjects performed three oddball paradigm tasks, evaluating face identity recognition and facial emotional recognition of happiness and fear. Event-related potentials and event-related theta and alpha oscillations were obtained for each task. N170 and P2 components appeared with higher amplitude in SCH than in CON at the occipital locations. An early prefrontally distributed P3a component was observed while doing the identity task with lower amplitude in SCH than in CON. Comparatively, P3b amplitude was lower in SCH than in CON over parietal leads in the identity and happiness tasks. Additionally, theta oscillations showed significantly lower RMS values in SCH between 250 and 500 ms post-stimuli in frontal and central regions. On the other hand, the grand-averaged alpha oscillations demonstrated higher RMS values in the occipital leads in SCH compared to CON and the opposite over the frontal regions. Results are interpreted in the framework of a functional disruption in the distributed neuronal networks involved both in facial identity and emotional recognition in schizophrenics as indexed by the brain oscillatory activity and related ERP components. PMID:18727940

  1. Event Related Potential Analysis of Stimulus Over-Selectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Phil; Savile, Amy; Truzoli, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Stimulus over-selectivity is a phenomenon often displayed by individuals with many forms of developmental and intellectual disabilities, and also by individuals lacking such disabilities who are under cognitive strain. It occurs when only one of potentially many aspects of the environment controls behavior. Adult participants were trained and…

  2. Assessing attention and cognitive function in completely locked-in state with event-related brain potentials and epidural electrocorticography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensch, Michael; Martens, Suzanne; Halder, Sebastian; Hill, Jeremy; Nijboer, Femke; Ramos, Ander; Birbaumer, Niels; Bogdan, Martin; Kotchoubey, Boris; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Patients in the completely locked-in state (CLIS), due to, for example, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), no longer possess voluntary muscle control. Assessing attention and cognitive function in these patients during the course of the disease is a challenging but essential task for both nursing staff and physicians. Approach. An electrophysiological cognition test battery, including auditory and semantic stimuli, was applied in a late-stage ALS patient at four different time points during a six-month epidural electrocorticography (ECoG) recording period. Event-related cortical potentials (ERP), together with changes in the ECoG signal spectrum, were recorded via 128 channels that partially covered the left frontal, temporal and parietal cortex. Main results. Auditory but not semantic stimuli induced significant and reproducible ERP projecting to specific temporal and parietal cortical areas. N1/P2 responses could be detected throughout the whole study period. The highest P3 ERP was measured immediately after the patient's last communication through voluntary muscle control, which was paralleled by low theta and high gamma spectral power. Three months after the patient's last communication, i.e., in the CLIS, P3 responses could no longer be detected. At the same time, increased activity in low-frequency bands and a sharp drop of gamma spectral power were recorded. Significance. Cortical electrophysiological measures indicate at least partially intact attention and cognitive function during sparse volitional motor control for communication. Although the P3 ERP and frequency-specific changes in the ECoG spectrum may serve as indicators for CLIS, a close-meshed monitoring will be required to define the exact time point of the transition.

  3. Use of Event-Related Potentials to Identify Language and Reading Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molfese, Victoria J.; Molfese, Dennis L.; Beswick, Jennifer L.; Jacobi-Vessels, Jill; Molfese, Peter J.; Molnar, Andrew E.; Wagner, Mary C.; Haines, Brittany L.

    2008-01-01

    The extent to which oral language and emergent literacy skills are influenced by event-related potential measures of phonological processing was examined. Results revealed that event-related potential responses identify differences in letter naming but not receptive language skills.

  4. Event-related potential N270 correlates of brand extension.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingguo; Wang, Xiaoyi; Dai, Shenyi; Shu, Liangchao

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the neural mechanism of extending a brand in a specific product category to other product categories. Facing two sequential stimuli in pairs consisting of beverage brand names (stimulus 1) and product names (stimulus 2) in other categories, 16 participants were asked to indicate the suitability of extending the brand in stimulus 1 to the product category in stimulus 2. These stimulus pairs were divided into four conditions depending on the product category in stimulus 2: beverage, snack, clothing, and household appliance. A negative component, N270, was recorded for each condition on the participants' scalps,whereas the maximum amplitude was observed at the frontal area. Greater N270 amplitude was observed when participants were presented with stronger conflict between the brand product category (stimulus 1) and the extension category (stimulus 2). It suggests that N270 can be evoked not only by a conflict of physical attributes (different shapes of words of brand and product names) but also by that of lexical content. From the marketing perspective, N270 can be potentially used as a reference measure in brand-extension attempts. PMID:17558290

  5. A 128-channel picoammeter system and its application on charged particle beam current distribution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Deyang Liu, Junliang; Xue, Yingli; Zhang, Mingwu; Cai, Xiaohong; Hu, Jianjun; Dong, Jinmei; Li, Xin

    2015-11-15

    A 128-channel picoammeter system is constructed based on instrumentation amplifiers. Taking advantage of a high electric potential and narrow bandwidth in DC energetic charged beam measurements, a current resolution better than 5 fA can be achieved. Two sets of 128-channel strip electrodes are implemented on printed circuit boards and are employed for ion and electron beam current distribution measurements. Tests with 60 keV O{sup 3+} ions and 2 keV electrons show that it can provide exact boundaries when a positive charged particle beam current distribution is measured.

  6. Dissociation of Event-Related Potentials Indexing Arousal and Semantic Cohesion During Emotional Word Encoding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Daniel G.; Cooper, Julie J.; Grent-'t-Jong, Tineke; Woldorff, Marty G.; LaBar, Kevin S.

    2006-01-01

    Event-related potential (ERP) studies have shown that emotional stimuli elicit greater amplitude late positive-polarity potentials (LPPs) than neutral stimuli. This effect has been attributed to arousal, but emotional stimuli are also more semantically coherent than uncategorized neutral stimuli. ERPs were recorded during encoding of positive,…

  7. Localizing Cortical Sources of Event-Related Potentials in Infants' Covert Orienting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, John E.

    2005-01-01

    This study used cortical source analysis to locate potential cortical sources of event-related potentials (ERPs) during covert orienting in infants aged 14 and 20 weeks. The infants were tested in a spatial cueing procedure. The reaction time to localize the target showed response facilitation for valid trials relative to invalid or neutral…

  8. How Children Process Over-Regularizations: Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clahsen, Harald; Luck, Monika; Hahne, Anja

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the mental processes involved in children's on-line recognition of inflected word forms using event-related potentials (ERPs). Sixty children in three age groups (20 six- to seven-year-olds, 20 eight- to nine-year-olds, 20 eleven- to twelve-year-olds) and 23 adults (tested in a previous study) listened to sentences containing…

  9. The Influence of Contour Fragmentation on Recognition Memory: An Event-Related Potential Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodeur, Mathieu B.; Debruille, J. Bruno; Renoult, Louis; Prevost, Marie; Dionne-Dostie, Emmanuelle; Buchy, Lisa; Lepage, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The present study was carried out to examine how the event-related potentials to fragmentation predict recognition success. Stimuli were abstract meaningless figures that were either complete or fragmented to various extents but still recoverable. Stimuli were first encoded as part of a symmetry discrimination task. In a subsequent recognition…

  10. Evaluating Models of Object-Decision Priming: Evidence from Event-Related Potential Repetition Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soldan, Anja; Mangels, Jennifer A.; Cooper, Lynn A.

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to differentiate between structural description and bias accounts of performance in the possible/impossible object-decision test. Two event-related potential (ERP) studies examined how the visual system processes structurally possible and impossible objects. Specifically, the authors investigated the effects of object…

  11. Do U Txt? Event-Related Potentials to Semantic Anomalies in Standard and Texted English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Natalie I.; Coch, Donna

    2010-01-01

    Texted English is a hybrid, technology-based language derived from standard English modified to facilitate ease of communication via instant and text messaging. We compared semantic processing of texted and standard English sentences by recording event-related potentials in a classic semantic incongruity paradigm designed to elicit an N400 effect.…

  12. Conceptual Integration of Arithmetic Operations with Real-World Knowledge: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthormsen, Amy M.; Fisher, Kristie J.; Bassok, Miriam; Osterhout, Lee; DeWolf, Melissa; Holyoak, Keith J.

    2016-01-01

    Research on language processing has shown that the disruption of conceptual integration gives rise to specific patterns of event-related brain potentials (ERPs)--N400 and P600 effects. Here, we report similar ERP effects when adults performed cross-domain conceptual integration of analogous semantic and mathematical relations. In a problem-solving…

  13. Perception of Long-Distance Coarticulation: An Event-Related Potential and Behavioral Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosvald, Michael; Corina, David

    2012-01-01

    In this study we explore listeners' sensitivity to vowel to vowel (VV) coarticulation, using both event-related potential (ERP) and behavioral methodologies. The stimuli used were vowels "colored" by the coarticulatory influence of other vowels across one, three or five intervening segments. The paradigm used in the ERP portion of the study was…

  14. Developmental Changes in Memory Encoding: Insights from Event-Related Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollins, Leslie; Riggins, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate developmental changes in encoding processes between 6-year-old children and adults using event-related potentials (ERPs). Although episodic memory ("EM") effects have been reported in both children and adults at retrieval and subsequent memory effects have been established in adults, no…

  15. Use of Event-Related Potentials in the Study of Typical and Atypical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Charles A., III; McCleery, Joseph P.

    2008-01-01

    Event-related potential is a kind of neuroimaging tool which can be used in the study of neurodevelopment. Two areas of atypical development, children diagnosed with autism and children experiencing early psychosocial neglect, have benefited from ERPs. The physiological basis of ERPs and the constraints on their applications are also discussed.

  16. Event Related Potentials in the Understanding of Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Analytical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeste, Shafali S.; Nelson, Charles A., III

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we critically review the literature on the use of event related potentials (ERPs) to elucidate the neural sources of the core deficits in autism. We review auditory and visual ERP studies, and then review the use of ERPs in the investigation of executive function. We conclude that, in autism, impairments likely exist in both low and…

  17. Contingent Attentional Capture by Top-Down Control Settings: Converging Evidence from Event-Related Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lien, Mei-Ching; Ruthruff, Eric; Goodin, Zachary; Remington, Roger W.

    2008-01-01

    Theories of attentional control are divided over whether the capture of spatial attention depends primarily on stimulus salience or is contingent on attentional control settings induced by task demands. The authors addressed this issue using the N2-posterior-contralateral (N2pc) effect, a component of the event-related brain potential thought to…

  18. Mental Rotation of Mirrored Letters: Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunez-Pena, M. Isabel; Aznar-Casanova, J. Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were recorded while participants (n=13) were presented with mirrored and normal letters at different orientations and were asked to make mirror-normal letter discriminations. As it has been suggested that a mental rotation out of the plane might be necessary to decide on mirrored letters, we wanted to…

  19. Gender Differences in Memory Processing: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials to Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillem, F.; Mograss, M.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated gender differences on memory processing using event-related potentials (ERPs). Behavioral data and ERPs were recorded in 16 males and 10 females during a recognition memory task for faces. The behavioral data results showed that females performed better than males. Gender differences on ERPs were evidenced over anterior…

  20. Similar Neural Correlates for Language and Sequential Learning: Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christiansen, Morten H.; Conway, Christopher M.; Onnis, Luca

    2012-01-01

    We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate the time course and distribution of brain activity while adults performed (1) a sequential learning task involving complex structured sequences and (2) a language processing task. The same positive ERP deflection, the P600 effect, typically linked to difficult or ungrammatical syntactic…

  1. Cognitive Association Formation in Episodic Memory: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Alice S. N.; Vallesi, Antonino; Picton, Terence W.; Tulving, Endel

    2009-01-01

    The present study focused on the processes underlying cognitive association formation by investigating subsequent memory effects. Event-related potentials were recorded as participants studied pairs of words, presented one word at a time, for later recall. The findings showed that a frontal-positive late wave (LW), which occurred 1-1.6 s after the…

  2. Different Anaphoric Expressions Are Investigated by Event-Related Brain Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streb, Judith; Hennighausen, Erwin; Rosler, Frank

    2004-01-01

    Event-related potentials were recorded to substantiate the claim of a distinct psycholinguistic status of (a) pronouns vs. proper names and (b) ellipses vs. proper names. In two studies 41 students read sentences in which the number of intervening words between the anaphor and its antecedent was either small or large. Comparing the far with the…

  3. Does Discourse Congruence Influence Spoken Language Comprehension before Lexical Association? Evidence from Event-Related Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudewyn, Megan A.; Gordon, Peter C.; Long, Debra; Polse, Lara; Swaab, Tamara Y.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine how lexical association and discourse congruence affect the time course of processing incoming words in spoken discourse. In an event-related potential (ERP) norming study, we presented prime-target pairs in the absence of a sentence context to obtain a baseline measure of lexical priming. We observed a…

  4. An Event-Related Potentials Study of Mental Rotation in Identifying Chemical Structural Formulas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chin-Fei; Liu, Chia-Ju

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how mental rotation strategies affect the identification of chemical structural formulas. This study conducted event-related potentials (ERPs) experiments. In addition to the data collected in the ERPs, a Chemical Structure Conceptual Questionnaire and interviews were also admin-istered for data…

  5. Atypical Brain Responses to Reward Cues in Autism as Revealed by Event-Related Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohls, Gregor; Peltzer, Judith; Schulte-Ruther, Martin; Kamp-Becker, Inge; Remschmidt, Helmut; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Konrad, Kerstin

    2011-01-01

    Social motivation deficit theories suggest that children with autism do not properly anticipate and appreciate the pleasure of social stimuli. In this study, we investigated event-related brain potentials evoked by cues that triggered social versus monetary reward anticipation in children with autism. Children with autism showed attenuated P3…

  6. Temporal Dynamics of Late Second Language Acquisition: Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinhauer, Karsten; White, Erin J.; Drury, John E.

    2009-01-01

    The ways in which age of acquisition (AoA) may affect (morpho)syntax in second language acquisition (SLA) are discussed. We suggest that event-related brain potentials (ERPs) provide an appropriate online measure to test some such effects. ERP findings of the past decade are reviewed with a focus on recent and ongoing research. It is concluded…

  7. Developmental Changes in Error Monitoring: An Event-Related Potential Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiersema, Jan R.; van der Meere, Jacob J.; Roeyers, Herbert

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the developmental trajectory of error monitoring. For this purpose, children (age 7-8), young adolescents (age 13-14) and adults (age 23-24) performed a Go/No-Go task and were compared on overt reaction time (RT) performance and on event-related potentials (ERPs), thought to reflect error detection…

  8. Anaphoric Reference to Quantified Antecedents: An Event-Related Brain Potential Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filik, Ruth; Leuthold, Hartmut; Moxey, Linda M.; Sanford, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    We report an event-related brain potential (ERP) study examining how readers process sentences containing anaphoric reference to quantified antecedents. Previous studies indicate that positive (e.g. "many") and negative (e.g. "not many") quantifiers cause readers to focus on different sets of entities. For example in "Many of the fans attended the…

  9. P3 Event-Related Potentials and Childhood Maltreatment in Successful and Unsuccessful Psychopaths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Yu; Raine, Adrian; Schug, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Although P3 event-related potential abnormalities have been found in psychopathic individuals, it is unknown whether successful (uncaught) psychopaths and unsuccessful (caught) psychopaths show similar deficits. In this study, P3 amplitude and latency were assessed from a community sample of 121 male adults using an auditory three-stimulus oddball…

  10. Electrophysiological (Event-Related Potentials) Indices of Cognitive Processing in Autistic Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shibley, Ralph, Jr.; And Others

    Event-related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded to both auditory and visual stimuli from the scalps of nine autistic males and nine normal controls (all Ss between 12 and 22 years of age) to examine the differences in information processing strategies. Ss were tested on three different tasks: an auditory missing stimulus paradigm, a visual color…

  11. (De-)Accentuation and the Processing of Information Status: Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, Stefan; Schumacher, Petra B.

    2012-01-01

    The paper reports on a perception experiment in German that investigated the neuro-cognitive processing of information structural concepts and their prosodic marking using event-related brain potentials (ERPs). Experimental conditions controlled the information status (given vs. new) of referring and non-referring target expressions (nouns vs.…

  12. Event-Related Potential Indicators of Text Integration across Sentence Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Chin Lung; Perfetti, Charles A.; Schmalhofer, Franz

    2007-01-01

    An event-related potentials (ERPs) study examined word-to-text integration processes across sentence boundaries. In a two-sentence passage, the accessibility of a referent for the first content word of the second sentence (the target word) was varied by the wording of the first sentence in one of the following ways: lexically (explicitly using…

  13. Pitch Processing in Tonal-Language-Speaking Children with Autism: An Event-Related Potential Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Luodi; Fan, Yuebo; Deng, Zhizhou; Huang, Dan; Wang, Suiping; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated pitch processing in Mandarin-speaking children with autism using event-related potential measures. Two experiments were designed to test how acoustic, phonetic and semantic properties of the stimuli contributed to the neural responses for pitch change detection and involuntary attentional orienting. In comparison…

  14. Predicting Reading Growth with Event-Related Potentials: Thinking Differently about Indexing "Responsiveness"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemons, Christopher J.; Key, Alexandra P. F.; Fuchs, Douglas; Yoder, Paul J.; Fuchs, Lynn S.; Compton, Donald L.; Williams, Susan M.; Bouton, Bobette

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if event-related potential (ERP) data collected during three reading-related tasks (Letter Sound Matching, Nonword Rhyming, and Nonword Reading) could be used to predict short-term reading growth on a curriculum-based measure of word identification fluency over 19 weeks in a sample of 29 first-grade…

  15. Attentional Mechanisms in Sports via Brain-Electrical Event-Related Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hack, Johannes; Memmert, Daniel; Rup, Andre

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examined attention processes in complex, sport-specific decision-making tasks without interdependencies from anticipation. Psychophysiological and performance data recorded from advanced and intermediate level basketball referees were compared. Event-related potentials obtained while judging game situations in foul recognition…

  16. Two Languages, One Developing Brain: Event-Related Potentials to Words in Bilingual Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conboy, Barbara T.; Mills, Debra L.

    2006-01-01

    Infant bilingualism offers a unique opportunity to study the relative effects of language experience and maturation on brain development, with each child serving as his or her own control. Event-related potentials (ERPs) to words were examined in 19- to 22-month-old English-Spanish bilingual toddlers. The children's dominant vs. nondominant…

  17. Children's Performance on Pseudoword Repetition Depends on Auditory Trace Quality: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceponiene, Rita; Service, Elisabet; Kurjenluoma, Sanna; Cheour, Marie; Naatanen, Risto

    1999-01-01

    Compared the mismatch-negativity (MMN) component of auditory event-related brain potentials to explore the relationship between phonological short-term memory and auditory-sensory processing in 7- to 9-year olds scoring the highest and lowest on a pseudoword repetition test. Found that high and low repeaters differed in MMN amplitude to speech…

  18. [Unconscious Acoustical Stimuli Effects on Event-related Potentials in Humans].

    PubMed

    Kopeikina, E A; Choroshich, V V; Aleksandrov, A Y; Ivanova, V Y

    2015-01-01

    Unconscious perception essentially affects human behavior. The main results in this area obtained in experiments with visual stimuli. However, the acoustical stimuli play not less important role in behavior. The main idea of this paper is the electroencephalographic investigation of unconscious acoustical stimulation effects on electro-physiological activity of the brain. For this purpose, the event-related potentials were acquired under unconscious stimulus priming paradigm. The one syllable, three letter length, Russian words and pseudo-words with single letter substitution were used as primes and targets. As a result, we find out that repetition and alternative priming similarly affects the event-related potential's component with 200 ms latency after target application in frontal parietal and temporal areas. Under alternative priming the direction of potential amplitude modification nearby 400 ms was altered for word and semi-word targets. Alternative priming reliably increase ERP's amplitude in 400 ms locality with pseudo-word targets and decrease it under word targets. Taking into account, that all participants were unable to distinguish the applied prime stimuli, we can assume that the event-related potential changes evoked by unconscious perception of acoustical stimuli. The ERP amplitude dynamics revealed in current investigation demonstrate the opportunity of subliminal acoustical stimuli to modulate the electrical activity evoked by verbal acoustical stimulation. PMID:26237945

  19. Effects of handedness on olfactory event-related potentials in a simple olfactory task.

    PubMed

    Gottschlich, Marie; Hummel, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to re-investigate the influence of handedness on simple olfactory tasks to further clarify the role of handedness in chemical senses. Similar to language and other sensory systems, effects of handedness should be expected. Young, healthy subjects participated in this study, including 24 left-handers and 24 right-handers, with no indication of any major nasal or health problems. The two groups did not differ in terms of sex and age (14 women and 10 men in each group). They had a mean age of 24.0 years. Olfactory event-related potentials were recorded after left or right olfactory stimulation with the rose-like odor phenyl ethyl alcohol (PEA) or the smell of rotten eggs (hydrogen sulfide, H2S). Results suggested that handedness has no major influence on amplitude or latency of olfactory event-related potentials when it comes to simple olfactory tasks.

  20. Distinct pattern of P3a event-related potential in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Meares, Russell; Melkonian, Dmitriy; Gordon, Evian; Williams, Leanne

    2005-02-28

    P3a and P3b event-related brain potentials to auditory stimuli were recorded for 17 unmedicated patients with borderline personality disorder, 17 matched healthy controls and 100 healthy control participants spanning five decades. Using high-resolution fragmentary decomposition for single-trial event-related potential analysis, distinctive disturbances in P3a in borderline personality disorder patients were found: abnormally enhanced amplitude, failure to habituate and a loss of temporal locking with P3b. Normative age dependencies from 100 controls suggest that natural age-related decline in P3a amplitude is reduced in borderline personality disorder patients and is likely to indicate failure of frontal maturation. On the basis of the theories of Hughlings Jackson, this conceptualization of borderline personality disorder is consistent with an aetiological model of borderline personality disorder. PMID:15706238

  1. Nonhuman primate event-related potentials indexing covert shifts of attention.

    PubMed

    Woodman, Geoffrey F; Kang, Min-Suk; Rossi, Andrew F; Schall, Jeffrey D

    2007-09-18

    A half-century's worth of research has established the existence of numerous event-related potential components measuring different cognitive operations in humans including the selection of stimuli by covert attention mechanisms. Surprisingly, it is unknown whether nonhuman primates exhibit homologous electrophysiological signatures of selective visual processing while viewing complex scenes. We used an electrophysiological technique with macaque monkeys analogous to procedures for recording scalp event-related potentials from humans and found that monkeys exhibit short-latency visual components sensitive to sensory processing demands and lateralizations related to shifting of covert attention similar to the human N2pc component. These findings begin to bridge the gap between the disparate literatures by using electrophysiological measurements to study the deployment of visual attention in the brains of humans and nonhuman primates.

  2. Addressing misallocation of variance in principal components analysis of event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Dien, J

    1998-01-01

    Interpretation of evoked response potentials is complicated by the extensive superposition of multiple electrical events. The most common approach to disentangling these features is principal components analysis (PCA). Critics have demonstrated a number of caveats that complicate interpretation, notably misallocation of variance and latency jitter. This paper describes some further caveats to PCA as well as using simulations to evaluate three potential methods for addressing them: parallel analysis, oblique rotations, and spatial PCA. An improved simulation model is introduced for examining these issues. It is concluded that PCA is an essential statistical tool for event-related potential analysis, but only if applied appropriately.

  3. Simultaneous functional near-infrared brain imaging and event-related potential studies of Stroop effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Jiahuan; Li, Ting; Zhang, Zhongxing; Gong, Hui

    2009-02-01

    Functional near-infrared brain imaging (fNIRI) and event-related potential (ERP) were used simultaneous to detect the prefrontal cortex (PFC) which is considered to execute cognitive control of the subjects while performing the Chinese characters color-word matching Stroop task with event-related design. The fNIRI instrument is a portable system operating at three wavelengths (735nm & 805nm &850nm) with continuous-wave. The event-related potentials were acquired by Neuroscan system. The locations of optodes corresponding to the electrodes were defined four areas symmetrically. In nine native Chinese-speaking fit volunteers, fNIRI measured the hemodynamic parameters (involving oxy-/deoxy- hemoglobin) changes when the characteristic waveforms (N500/P600) were recorded by ERP. The interference effect was obvious as a longer reaction time for incongruent than congruent and neutral stimulus. The responses of hemodynamic and electrophysiology were also stronger during incongruent compared to congruent and neutral trials, and these results are similar to those obtained with fNIRI or ERP separately. There are high correlations, even linear relationship, in the two kinds of signals. In conclusion, the multi-modality approach combining of fNIRI and ERP is feasible and could obtain more cognitive function information with hemodynamic and electrophysiology signals. It also provides a perspective to prove the neurovascular coupling mechanism.

  4. Analysis and visualization of single-trial event-related potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, T. P.; Makeig, S.; Westerfield, M.; Townsend, J.; Courchesne, E.; Sejnowski, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a linear decomposition technique, independent component analysis (ICA), is applied to single-trial multichannel EEG data from event-related potential (ERP) experiments. Spatial filters derived by ICA blindly separate the input data into a sum of temporally independent and spatially fixed components arising from distinct or overlapping brain or extra-brain sources. Both the data and their decomposition are displayed using a new visualization tool, the "ERP image," that can clearly characterize single-trial variations in the amplitudes and latencies of evoked responses, particularly when sorted by a relevant behavioral or physiological variable. These tools were used to analyze data from a visual selective attention experiment on 28 control subjects plus 22 neurological patients whose EEG records were heavily contaminated with blink and other eye-movement artifacts. Results show that ICA can separate artifactual, stimulus-locked, response-locked, and non-event-related background EEG activities into separate components, a taxonomy not obtained from conventional signal averaging approaches. This method allows: (1) removal of pervasive artifacts of all types from single-trial EEG records, (2) identification and segregation of stimulus- and response-locked EEG components, (3) examination of differences in single-trial responses, and (4) separation of temporally distinct but spatially overlapping EEG oscillatory activities with distinct relationships to task events. The proposed methods also allow the interaction between ERPs and the ongoing EEG to be investigated directly. We studied the between-subject component stability of ICA decomposition of single-trial EEG epochs by clustering components with similar scalp maps and activation power spectra. Components accounting for blinks, eye movements, temporal muscle activity, event-related potentials, and event-modulated alpha activities were largely replicated across subjects. Applying ICA and ERP image

  5. Analysis and visualization of single-trial event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Jung, T P; Makeig, S; Westerfield, M; Townsend, J; Courchesne, E; Sejnowski, T J

    2001-11-01

    In this study, a linear decomposition technique, independent component analysis (ICA), is applied to single-trial multichannel EEG data from event-related potential (ERP) experiments. Spatial filters derived by ICA blindly separate the input data into a sum of temporally independent and spatially fixed components arising from distinct or overlapping brain or extra-brain sources. Both the data and their decomposition are displayed using a new visualization tool, the "ERP image," that can clearly characterize single-trial variations in the amplitudes and latencies of evoked responses, particularly when sorted by a relevant behavioral or physiological variable. These tools were used to analyze data from a visual selective attention experiment on 28 control subjects plus 22 neurological patients whose EEG records were heavily contaminated with blink and other eye-movement artifacts. Results show that ICA can separate artifactual, stimulus-locked, response-locked, and non-event-related background EEG activities into separate components, a taxonomy not obtained from conventional signal averaging approaches. This method allows: (1) removal of pervasive artifacts of all types from single-trial EEG records, (2) identification and segregation of stimulus- and response-locked EEG components, (3) examination of differences in single-trial responses, and (4) separation of temporally distinct but spatially overlapping EEG oscillatory activities with distinct relationships to task events. The proposed methods also allow the interaction between ERPs and the ongoing EEG to be investigated directly. We studied the between-subject component stability of ICA decomposition of single-trial EEG epochs by clustering components with similar scalp maps and activation power spectra. Components accounting for blinks, eye movements, temporal muscle activity, event-related potentials, and event-modulated alpha activities were largely replicated across subjects. Applying ICA and ERP image

  6. Cortical localization of cognitive function by regression of performance on event-related potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, R. W.; Montgomery, L. D.; Guisado, R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a new method of mapping cortical localization of cognitive function, using electroencephalographic data. Cross-subject regression analyses are used to identify cortical sites and post-stimulus latencies where there is a high correlation between subjects' performance and their cognitive event-related potential amplitude. The procedure was tested using a mental arithmetic task and was found to identify essentially the same cortical regions that have been associated with such tasks on the basis of research with patients suffering localized cortical lesions. Thus, it appears to offer an inexpensive, noninvasive tool for exploring the dynamics of localization in neurologically normal subjects.

  7. Cellular Origins of Auditory Event-Related Potential Deficits in Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Goffin, Darren; Brodkin, Edward S.; Blendy, Julie A.; Siegel, Steve J.; Zhou, Zhaolan

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction in sensory information processing is a hallmark of many neurological disorders including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), schizophrenia and Rett syndrome (RTT)1. Using mouse models of RTT, a monogenic disorder caused by mutations in MECP22, we demonstrate that the large scale loss of MeCP2 from forebrain GABAergic interneurons leads to deficits in auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) and seizure manifestation; but the restoration of MeCP2 in specific classes of interneurons ameliorates these deficits. PMID:24777420

  8. Use of Event-Related Potentials in the Study of Typical and Atypical Development

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Charles A; McCleery, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    A variety of neuroimaging tools are now available for use in studying neurodevelopment. In this paper we focus our attention on one such tool – the event-related potential (ERP). We begin by providing an overview of what ERPs are, their physiological basis, how they are recorded, and some constraints on their use. We then provide an abbreviated glossary of ERP components; that is, what processes are reflected in ERPs. We conclude by summarizing two areas of atypical development that have benefited from this method: children experiencing early psychosocial neglect, and children diagnosed with autism. We conclude by offering recommendations for future research. PMID:18827722

  9. [Advances in Event-related Potential and Its Forensic Application Value].

    PubMed

    Guan, Nan-si; Liu, Ji-hui; Zhang, Xin-yuan; Wang, Wan; Tan, Ja-ning; Peng, Bo

    2015-04-01

    The event-related potential (ERP) is considered as one of the most effective methods to study and analyze objectively human mental activity based on nerve electrophysiology. At present, ERP is not only used in the study of lie detection, but also in the clinical medicine for the cognitive assessment on patients with cerebrovascular disease, dementia or traumatic brain injury and auxiliary diagnosis of mental illness. With the further development of ERP detection technology, it would have a wider application prospect in the field of forensic medicine. PMID:26245094

  10. Event-related potential evidence for parallel activation of two languages in bilingual speech production.

    PubMed

    Guo, Taomei; Peng, Danling

    2006-11-27

    The cross-language identity effect refers to the benefit of processing a translation distractor in the cross-language picture-word interference task. The first event-related-potential evidence for this effect was obtained in a picture-naming priming task using Chinese-English bilinguals of languages with distinct scripts. The results indicated that parallel activation of both languages is a universal phenomenon in bilingual speech production. Furthermore, the present study revealed that the temporal course and magnitude of activation of the nontarget language during target language production was modulated by the relative proficiency in the two languages.

  11. The impacts of racial group membership on people's distributive justice: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Tang, Yi-Yuan; Deng, Yuqin

    2014-04-16

    How individuals and societies distribute benefits has long been studied by psychologists and sociologists. Previous work has highlighted the importance of social identity on people's justice concerns. However, it is not entirely clear how racial in-group/out-group relationship affects the brain activity in distributive justice. In this study, event-related potentials were recorded while participants made their decisions about donation allocation. Behavioral results showed that racial in-group factor affected participants' decisions on justice consideration. Participants were more likely to make relatively equity decisions when racial in-group factor was congruent with equity compared with the corresponding incongruent condition. Moreover, this incongruent condition took longer response times than congruent condition. Meanwhile, less equity decisions were made when efficiency was larger in the opposite side to equity than it was equal between the two options. Scalp event-related potential analyses revealed that greater P300 and late positive potential amplitudes were elicited by the incongruent condition compared with the congruent condition. These findings suggest that the decision-making of distributive justice could be modulated by racial group membership, and greater attentional resources or cognitive efforts are required when racial in-group factor and equity conflict with each other.

  12. The impacts of racial group membership on people's distributive justice: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Tang, Yi-Yuan; Deng, Yuqin

    2014-04-16

    How individuals and societies distribute benefits has long been studied by psychologists and sociologists. Previous work has highlighted the importance of social identity on people's justice concerns. However, it is not entirely clear how racial in-group/out-group relationship affects the brain activity in distributive justice. In this study, event-related potentials were recorded while participants made their decisions about donation allocation. Behavioral results showed that racial in-group factor affected participants' decisions on justice consideration. Participants were more likely to make relatively equity decisions when racial in-group factor was congruent with equity compared with the corresponding incongruent condition. Moreover, this incongruent condition took longer response times than congruent condition. Meanwhile, less equity decisions were made when efficiency was larger in the opposite side to equity than it was equal between the two options. Scalp event-related potential analyses revealed that greater P300 and late positive potential amplitudes were elicited by the incongruent condition compared with the congruent condition. These findings suggest that the decision-making of distributive justice could be modulated by racial group membership, and greater attentional resources or cognitive efforts are required when racial in-group factor and equity conflict with each other. PMID:24394904

  13. High-speed gas sensor for chemosensory event-related potentials or magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Toda, H; Saito, S; Yamada, H; Kobayakawa, T

    2006-04-15

    The observation of odor and air exchange with high temporal accuracy is necessary to obtain strict chemosensory event-related potentials (CSERPs) or magnetic fields, as proposed by Evans et al. [Evans W, Kobal G, Lorig T, Prah J. Suggestions for collection and reporting of chemosensory (olfactory) event-related potentials. Chem Senses, 1993; 18: 751- 6]. No suitable method for real time observation of gas stimuli, however, has been available until now. We have developed a technique to measure accurately gas molecule concentrations with a high temporal resolution. We determined that attenuation of sound amplitude varies in a manner dependent on the average molecular weight through which the sound wave passes. Based on this principle, we have designed a high-speed gas concentration sensor utilizing ultrasound. We investigated the practical potential of this sensor using a chemosensory stimulator (olfactometer); we succeeded in observing rapid gas exchange between air and nitrogen with a 2 kHz sampling rate. The signal/noise ratio of the stimulus was greater than 42 dB. In a 20 min experiment we determined that, for this olfactometer, the gas onset latency was 79 ms and the rise time was 16 ms. No significant artifact to magnetic fields was observed, even when the sensor was situated near a whole head magnetoencephalography (MEG) system. These results indicate that this sensor could be used for the observation of odor and air exchange, as well as, for real time monitoring of odor stimuli during actual experiments with a participant. PMID:16257056

  14. Syntactic and semantic processing of Chinese middle sentences: evidence from event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Tao; Mao, Wen; Lu, Qing

    2016-05-25

    Scalp-recorded event-related potentials are known to be sensitive to particular aspects of sentence processing. The N400 component is widely recognized as an effect closely related to lexical-semantic processing. The absence of an N400 effect in participants performing tasks in Indo-European languages has been considered evidence that failed syntactic category processing appears to block lexical-semantic integration and that syntactic structure building is a prerequisite of semantic analysis. An event-related potential experiment was designed to investigate whether such syntactic primacy can be considered to apply equally to Chinese sentence processing. Besides correct middles, sentences with either single semantic or single syntactic violation as well as double syntactic and semantic anomaly were used in the present research. Results showed that both purely semantic and combined violation induced a broad negativity in the time window 300-500 ms, indicating the independence of lexical-semantic integration. These findings provided solid evidence that lexical-semantic parsing plays a crucial role in Chinese sentence comprehension.

  15. Time-frequency analysis of event-related potentials: a brief tutorial.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Christoph S; Rach, Stefan; Vosskuhl, Johannes; Strüber, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) reflect cognitive processes and are usually analyzed in the so-called time domain. Additional information on cognitive functions can be assessed when analyzing ERPs in the frequency domain and treating them as event-related oscillations (EROs). This procedure results in frequency spectra but lacks information about the temporal dynamics of EROs. Here, we describe a method-called time-frequency analysis-that allows analyzing both the frequency of an ERO and its evolution over time. In a brief tutorial, the reader will learn how to use wavelet analysis in order to compute time-frequency transforms of ERP data. Basic steps as well as potential artifacts are described. Rather than in terms of formulas, descriptions are in textual form (written text) with numerous figures illustrating the topics. Recommendations on how to present frequency and time-frequency data in journal articles are provided. Finally, we briefly review studies that have applied time-frequency analysis to mismatch negativity paradigms. The deviant stimulus of such a paradigm evokes an ERO in the theta frequency band that is stronger than for the standard stimulus. Conversely, the standard stimulus evokes a stronger gamma-band response than does the deviant. This is interpreted in the context of the so-called match-and-utilization model. PMID:24194116

  16. Interference and facilitation in overt speech production investigated with event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Hirschfeld, Gerrit; Jansma, Bernadette; Bölte, Jens; Zwitserlood, Pienie

    2008-08-01

    We report an event-related potential study investigating the neural basis of interference and facilitation in the picture-word interference paradigm with immediate overt naming. We used the high temporal resolution of the electrophysiological response to dissociate general and specific interference processes, by comparing unrelated word distractors to nonlinguistic (a row of Xs), surface feature denoting, and category member distractors. Our results first indicate that the increased naming latencies for linguistic relative to nonlinguistic distractors are because of general conflict-monitoring processes, associated with early event-related potential effects (120-220 ms) and increased activity in the anterior cingulate cortex. Next, distractors specifying a surface feature of the picture seem to facilitate its identification within the same time window, which involves widespread networks. Finally, nonlinguistic and surface feature distractors also reduced the N400 amplitude, relative to unrelated word distractors. Taken together our results support the view that several distinct processes give rise to the reaction time results often observed in picture naming. PMID:18628670

  17. Influence of negative emotion on the framing effect: evidence from event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingguo; Pei, Guanxiong; Wang, Kai

    2015-04-15

    The framing effect is the phenomenon in which different descriptions of an identical problem can result in different choices. The influence of negative emotions on the framing effect and its neurocognitive basis are important issues, especially in the domain of saving lives, which is essential and highly risky. In each trial of our experiment, the emotion stimulus is presented to the participants, followed by the decision-making stimulus, which comprises certain and risky options with the same expected value. Each pair of options is positively or negatively framed. The behavioral results indicate a significant interactive effect between negative emotion and frame; thus, the risk preference under the positive frame can be enhanced by negative emotions, whereas this finding is not true under the negative frame. The event-related potential analysis indicates that choosing certain options under the positive frame with negative emotion priming generates smaller P2 and P3 amplitudes and a larger N2 amplitude than with neutral emotion priming. The event-related potential findings indicate that individuals can detect risk faster and experience more conflict and increased decision difficulty if they choose certain options under the positive frame with negative priming compared with neutral priming. PMID:25714423

  18. Early event-related brain potentials that reflect interest for content information in the media.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Shinobu; Morikawa, Koji; Nittono, Hiroshi

    2012-03-28

    This study investigated the relationship between event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to abridged content information in the media and the subsequent decisions to view the full content. Student volunteers participated in a task that simulated information selection on the basis of the content information. Screenshots of television clips and headlines of news articles on the Web were used as content information for the image condition and the headline condition, respectively. Following presentation of a stimulus containing content information, participants decided whether or not they would view the full content by pressing a select or a reject button. When the select button was pressed, participants were presented with a television clip or a news article. When the reject button was pressed, participants continued on to the next trial, without viewing further. In comparison with rejected stimuli, selected stimuli elicited a larger negative component, with a peak latency of ∼250 ms. The increase in the negative component was independent of the type of visual stimulus. These results suggest that interest toward content information is reflected in early-stage event-related brain potential responses. PMID:22336875

  19. Individual differences in arithmetic skill reflected in event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Peña, M Isabel; Gracia-Bafalluy, María; Tubau, Elisabet

    2011-05-01

    We used event-related brain potentials (ERP) to study the problem-size effect in individuals with high and low arithmetic skill. Participants were presented with a classic equality verification task, and problem size was manipulated by using small (e.g., 3+4), medium (e.g., 7+8) and large problems (e.g., 16+29). ERP analyses were time-locked to the onset of the second operand in order to address brain potentials during the production phase. High-skill individuals showed a positive slow wave when solving large problems and no differences in the ERP pattern when solving small and medium problems. In contrast, low-skill individuals showed a positive slow wave when solving medium and large problems. Given that differences between high and low skill individuals have been related to differences in calculation strategies, these results provide further support to the utility of using ERP as a signature of arithmetic strategy.

  20. P300 component of event-related potentials in persons with asperger disorder.

    PubMed

    Iwanami, Akira; Okajima, Yuka; Ota, Haruhisa; Tani, Masayuki; Yamada, Takashi; Yamagata, Bun; Hashimoto, Ryuichiro; Kanai, Chieko; Takashio, Osamu; Inamoto, Atsuko; Ono, Taisei; Takayama, Yukiko; Kato, Nobumasa

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, we investigated auditory event-related potentials in adults with Asperger disorder and normal controls using an auditory oddball task and a novelty oddball task. Task performance and the latencies of P300 evoked by both target and novel stimuli in the two tasks did not differ between the two groups. Analysis of variance revealed that there was a significant interaction effect between group and electrode site on the mean amplitude of the P300 evoked by novel stimuli, which indicated that there was an altered distribution of the P300 in persons with Asperger disorder. In contrast, there was no significant interaction effect on the mean P300 amplitude elicited by target stimuli. Considering that P300 comprises two main subcomponents, frontal-central-dominant P3a and parietal-dominant P3b, our results suggested that persons with Asperger disorder have enhanced amplitude of P3a, which indicated activated prefrontal function in this task.

  1. An event-related potential study of the impact of institutional rearing on face recognition.

    PubMed

    Parker, Susan W; Nelson, Charles A

    2005-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded to brief images of caregivers' and strangers' faces for 72 institutionalized children (IG), ages 7-32 months, and compared with ERPs from 33 children, ages 8-32 months, who had never been institutionalized. All children resided in Bucharest, Romania. Prominent differences in four ERP components were observed: early negative (N170), early positive (P250), midlatency negative (Nc), and positive slow wave (PSW). For all but the P250, the amplitude of these components was larger in the never institutionalized group than the institutionalized group; this pattern was reversed for the P250. Typical effects of the Nc (amplitude greater to stranger vs. caregiver) were observed in both groups; in contrast, the IG group showed an atypical pattern in the PSW. These findings are discussed in the context of the role of experience in influencing the neural circuitry putatively involved in recognizing familiar and novel faces. PMID:16262985

  2. Event-related potentials show online influence of lexical biases on prosodic processing.

    PubMed

    Itzhak, Inbal; Pauker, Efrat; Drury, John E; Baum, Shari R; Steinhauer, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    This event-related potential study examined how the human brain integrates (i) structural preferences, (ii) lexical biases, and (iii) prosodic information when listeners encounter ambiguous 'garden path' sentences. Data showed that in the absence of overt prosodic boundaries, verb-intrinsic transitivity biases influence parsing preferences (late closure) online, resulting in a larger P600 garden path effect for transitive than intransitive verbs. Surprisingly, this lexical effect was mediated by prosodic processing, a closure positive shift brain response was elicited in total absence of acoustic boundary markers for transitively biased sentences only. Our results suggest early interactive integration of hierarchically organized processes rather than purely independent effects of lexical and prosodic information. As a primacy of prosody would predict, overt speech boundaries overrode both structural preferences and transitivity biases.

  3. Cortical topography of event-related potentials to winning and losing in a video tennis game.

    PubMed

    Ivanitsky, A M; Kurnitskaya, I V; Sobotka, S

    1986-07-01

    The event-related potentials (ERP) in frontal and posterior associative cortex in right and left hemispheres were studied in two different outcomes of a television tennis game. These outcomes were 'win' and 'loss' of the ball, the first serving as a model of positive, the second as a model of negative emotional reactions. The ERPs consisted of 4 waves: P300, N600, P800, N1000. The most characteristic interhemispheric difference for 'win' was an increase of N600 in the left posterior associative cortex, and for 'loss', a decrease of P800 in the right frontal area. Thus, the positive and negative emotional reactions have specific spatio-temporal cortical organizations. The topography of ERP related to positive and negative emotions was disturbed in depressive patients. The patients revealed a larger negativity of the right posterior associative cortex and the left frontal cortex waves both at winning and losing the ball. PMID:3733492

  4. Self-relevant beauty evaluation: Evidence from an event-related potentials study.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanchang; Zhang, Yan; Tian, Yuan; Fan, Cuiying; Zhou, Zongkui

    2015-03-01

    This study examines the electrophysiological correlates of beauty evaluation when participants performed the self-reference task. About 13 (7 men, 6 women) undergraduates participated in the experiment using event-related potentials. Results showed that the response to self-relevant information was faster compared to other-relevant information and no significant differences for self-relevant relative to mother-relevant information were observed. Both physical and interior beauty words for self-relevant information showed an enhanced late positive component as compared to other-relevant information. Physical beauty for self-relevant information yielded a larger late positive component in contrast to mother-relevant information but not for interior beauty. This study indicates that beauty is specific to the person who judges it though an individual and one's mother may hold similar views of interior beauty. PMID:25519777

  5. Event-related potential study of attention capture by affective sounds.

    PubMed

    Thierry, Guillaume; Roberts, Mark V

    2007-02-12

    Affective pictures trigger attentional responses in humans but very little is known about the processing of affective environmental sounds. Here, we used an oddball event-related potential paradigm to determine the saliency of unpleasant sounds presented among affectively neutral sounds. Participants performed a one-back task while listening to pseudo-randomized sound sequences comprising 70% neutral sounds, 15% unpleasant sounds of matched peak intensity, and 15% louder neutral sounds. Louder neutral sounds elicited a larger N1 component and a significant P3a variation with a central distribution. Unpleasant sounds did not affect early components but elicited a significant frontocentral P3a modulation. We conclude that affective environmental sounds spontaneously capture human attention but fail to modulate early perceptual processing when sound peak intensity is controlled.

  6. Self-relevant beauty evaluation: Evidence from an event-related potentials study.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanchang; Zhang, Yan; Tian, Yuan; Fan, Cuiying; Zhou, Zongkui

    2015-03-01

    This study examines the electrophysiological correlates of beauty evaluation when participants performed the self-reference task. About 13 (7 men, 6 women) undergraduates participated in the experiment using event-related potentials. Results showed that the response to self-relevant information was faster compared to other-relevant information and no significant differences for self-relevant relative to mother-relevant information were observed. Both physical and interior beauty words for self-relevant information showed an enhanced late positive component as compared to other-relevant information. Physical beauty for self-relevant information yielded a larger late positive component in contrast to mother-relevant information but not for interior beauty. This study indicates that beauty is specific to the person who judges it though an individual and one's mother may hold similar views of interior beauty.

  7. Attentional mechanisms in sports via brain-electrical event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Hack, Johannes; Memmert, Daniel; Rupp, Andre

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we examined attention processes in complex, sport-specific decision-making tasks without interdependencies from anticipation. Psychophysiological and performance data recorded from advanced and intermediate level basketball referees were compared. Event-related potentials obtained while judging game situations in foul recognition and a control task provided insight into focus of attention, selective attention, and processing strategy (top-down vs. bottom-up). Results showed task-specific effects for advanced referees in components influenced by attentional focus and selective attention. Experts also seemed to profit from superior top-down strategy and were able to evaluate the stimuli more rapidly. These findings are discussed in connection with current models in neurosciences and theories of referee research.

  8. Mental workload measurement: Event-related potentials and ratings of workload and fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biferno, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Event-related potentials were elicited when a digitized word representing a pilot's call-sign was presented. This auditory probe was presented during 27 workload conditions in a 3x3x3 design where the following variables were manipulated: short-term load, tracking task difficulty, and time-on-task. Ratings of workload and fatigue were obtained between each trial of a 2.5-hour test. The data of each subject were analyzed individually to determine whether significant correlations existed between subjective ratings and ERP component measures. Results indicated that a significant number of subjects had positive correlations between: (1) ratings of workload and P300 amplitude, (2) ratings of workload and N400 amplitude, and (3) ratings of fatigue and P300 amplitude. These data are the first to show correlations between ratings of workload or fatigue and ERP components thereby reinforcing their validity as measures of mental workload and fatigue.

  9. The time course of implicit processing of erotic pictures: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chunliang; Wang, Lili; Wang, Naiyi; Gu, Ruolei; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2012-12-13

    The current study investigated the time course of the implicit processing of erotic stimuli using event-related potentials (ERPs). ERPs elicited by erotic pictures were compared with those by three other types of pictures: non-erotic positive, negative, and neutral pictures. We observed that erotic pictures evoked enhanced neural responses compared with other pictures at both early (P2/N2) and late (P3/positive slow wave) temporal stages. These results suggested that erotic pictures selectively captured individuals' attention at early stages and evoked deeper processing at late stages. More importantly, the amplitudes of P2, N2, and P3 only discriminated between erotic and non-erotic (i.e., positive, neutral, and negative) pictures. That is, no difference was revealed among non-erotic pictures, although these pictures differed in both valence and arousal. Thus, our results suggest that the erotic picture processing is beyond the valence and arousal.

  10. Characterization of spatio-temporal epidural event-related potentials for mouse models of psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Pinto-Duarte, António; Behrens, M Margarita; Zhou, Xianjin; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2015-01-01

    Distinctive features in sensory event-related potentials (ERPs) are endophenotypic biomarkers of psychiatric disorders, widely studied using electroencephalographic (EEG) methods in humans and model animals. Despite the popularity and unique significance of the mouse as a model species in basic research, existing EEG methods applicable to mice are far less powerful than those available for humans and large animals. We developed a new method for multi-channel epidural ERP characterization in behaving mice with high precision, reliability and convenience and report an application to time-domain ERP feature characterization of the Sp4 hypomorphic mouse model for schizophrenia. Compared to previous methods, our spatio-temporal ERP measurement robustly improved the resolving power of key signatures characteristic of the disease model. The high performance and low cost of this technique makes it suitable for high-throughput behavioral and pharmacological studies. PMID:26459883

  11. An event-related potentials study on the attention function of posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hong; Liu, Xiaohui; Chen, Guoliang; Shan, Moshui; Jia, Yanyan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In order to examine the functional defects and attentional bias in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients, event-related potentials (ERP) of attention was investigated. Methods: Three groups of emotion pictures, positive, negative (or violent) and neutral, were viewed by 19 PTSD patients and 15 normal controls. Each picture had a frame, and participants reacted to the color of the frame by clicking buttons. Electroencephalogram (EEG) and behavior data were recorded. Peak latencies and amplitudes of P2 were measured. Results: For the three groups of pictures, PTSD patients had longer reaction time than the controls. Significant difference was found between PTSD patients and controls in response to violent, positive and neutral pictures. PMID:26379882

  12. Context dependence of the event-related brain potential associated with reward and punishment.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, Clay B; Larsen, Jeff T; Cohen, Jonathan D

    2004-03-01

    The error-related negativity (ERN) is an event-related brain potential elicited by error commission and by presentation of feedback stimuli indicating incorrect performance. In this study, the authors report two experiments in which participants tried to learn to select between response options by trial and error, using feedback stimuli indicating monetary gains and losses. The results demonstrate that the amplitude of the ERN is determined by the value of the eliciting outcome relative to the range of outcomes possible, rather than by the objective value of the outcome. This result is discussed in terms of a recent theory that holds that the ERN reflects a reward prediction error signal associated with a neural system for reinforcement learning.

  13. Errors in reward prediction are reflected in the event-related brain potential.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, Clay B; Nieuwenhuis, Sander; Yeung, Nick; Cohen, Jonathan D

    2003-12-19

    The error-related negativity (ERN) is a negative deflection in the event-related brain potential associated with error processing. A recent theory holds that the ERN is elicited by the impact of a reward prediction error signal carried by the mesencephalic dopamine system on anterior cingulate cortex. The theory predicts that larger ERNs should be elicited by unexpected unfavorable outcomes than by expected unfavorable outcomes. We tested the theory in an experiment in which the frequency of occurrence of reward was varied by condition, reasoning that the system that produces the ERN would come to expect non-reward when rewards were infrequent. Consistent with the theory, we found that larger ERNs were elicited by unexpected absences of reward.

  14. Event-related brain potentials in selective listening to frequent and rare stimuli.

    PubMed

    Alho, K; Lavikainen, J; Reinikainen, K; Sams, M; Näätänen, R

    1990-01-01

    Our previous event-related brain potential (ERP) results suggest that during selective listening, relevant stimuli are selected for further processing by comparing each stimulus to an "attentional trace," a neuronal representation of the physical features of the relevant stimuli that distinguish them from the irrelevant stimuli. This comparison process is reflected by the early component of the processing negativity (PN), which is largest and longest to the relevant stimuli (perfectly matching with the trace). In the present study, the subjects selectively listened to designated tone stimuli which randomly appeared among irrelevant tones of a different pitch. The probability of relevant stimuli in a block was varied. The processing negativity elicited by relevant stimuli was smaller the less frequent they were. The results support the attentional-trace theory of selective attention, which proposes that, in addition to active maintenance, the trace also depends on the rate of sensory reinforcement provided by the relevant stimuli.

  15. Auditory event-related potentials measured in kindergarten predict later reading problems at school age.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, Jarmo A; Guttorm, Tomi K; Richardson, Ulla; Alku, Paavo; Lyytinen, Heikki; Leppänen, Paavo H T

    2013-01-01

    Identifying children at risk for reading problems or dyslexia at kindergarten age could improve support for beginning readers. Brain event-related potentials (ERPs) were measured for temporally complex pseudowords and corresponding non-speech stimuli from 6.5-year-old children who participated in behavioral literacy tests again at 9 years in the second grade. Children who had reading problems at school age had larger N250 responses to speech and non-speech stimuli particularly at the left hemisphere. The brain responses also correlated with reading skills. The results suggest that atypical auditory and speech processing are a neural-level risk factor for future reading problems. [Supplementary material is available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Developmental Neuropsychology for the following free supplemental resources: Sound files used in the experiments. Three speech sounds and corresponding non-speech sounds with short, intermediate, and long gaps]. PMID:24219695

  16. Early age-related changes in episodic memory retrieval as revealed by event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Cécile; Clochon, Patrice; Denise, Pierre; Rauchs, Géraldine; Guillery-Girard, Bérengère; Eustache, Francis; Desgranges, Béatrice

    2009-01-28

    Familiarity is better preserved than recollection in ageing. The age at which changes first occur and the slope of the subsequent decline, however, remain unclear. In this study, we investigated changes in episodic memory, by using event-related potentials (ERPs) in young (m=24), middle-aged (m=58) and older (m=70) adults. Although behavioural performance did not change before the age of 65 years, changes in ERP correlates were already present in the middle-aged adults. The ERP correlates of recollection and monitoring processes were the first to be affected by ageing, with a linear decrease as age increased. Conversely, the ERP correlate of familiarity remained unchanged, at least up to the age of 65 years. These results suggest a differential time course for the age effects on episodic retrieval. PMID:19104457

  17. Neuroprotection against vascular dementia after acupuncture combined with donepezil hydrochloride: P300 event related potential

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiang; Wang, Xiu-juan; Zhang, Zhe-cheng; Xue, Rong; Li, Ping; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture can be used to treat various nervous system diseases. Here, 168 vascular dementia patients were orally administered donepezil hydrochloride alone (5 mg/day, once a day for 56 days), or combined with acupuncture at Shenting (DU24), Tianzhu (BL10), Sishencong (Extra), Yintang (Extra), Renzhong (DU26), Neiguan (PC6), Shenmen (HT7), Fengchi (GB20), Wangu (GB12) and Baihui (DU20) (once a day for 56 days). Compared with donepezil hydrochloride alone, P300 event related potential latency was shorter with an increased amplitude in patients treated with donepezil hydrochloride and acupuncture. Mini-Mental State Examination score was also higher. Moreover, these differences in P300 latency were identified within different infarcted regions in patients treated with donepezil hydrochloride and acupuncture. These findings indicate that acupuncture combined with donepezil hydrochloride noticeably improves cognitive function in patients with vascular dementia, and exerts neuroprotective effects against vascular dementia. PMID:27127486

  18. Information structure influences depth of syntactic processing: event-related potential evidence for the Chomsky illusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Bastiaansen, Marcel; Yang, Yufang; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Information structure facilitates communication between interlocutors by highlighting relevant information. It has previously been shown that information structure modulates the depth of semantic processing. Here we used event-related potentials to investigate whether information structure can modulate the depth of syntactic processing. In question-answer pairs, subtle (number agreement) or salient (phrase structure) syntactic violations were placed either in focus or out of focus through information structure marking. P600 effects to these violations reflect the depth of syntactic processing. For subtle violations, a P600 effect was observed in the focus condition, but not in the non-focus condition. For salient violations, comparable P600 effects were found in both conditions. These results indicate that information structure can modulate the depth of syntactic processing, but that this effect depends on the salience of the information. When subtle violations are not in focus, they are processed less elaborately. We label this phenomenon the Chomsky illusion.

  19. Negativity bias of the self across time: an event-related potentials study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yangmei; Huang, Xiting; Chen, Youguo; Jackson, Todd; Wei, Dongtao

    2010-05-14

    To investigate the neural basis of self-evaluation across time as a function of emotional valence, event-related potentials were recorded among participants instructed to make self-reference judgments when evaluating their past, present and future selves. Results showed that, when evaluating present and past selves, negative words elicited a more positive ERP deflection in the time window between 650ms and 800ms (LPC) relative to positive words. However, when evaluating the future selves, there was no significant difference on the amplitude of the LPC evoked by negative versus positive words. Findings provided evidence for the effect of emotional valence on the self across time at a neurophysiological level and identified the time course of negative bias in the temporal self. More specifically, people were inclined to be relatively less negative and optimistic about their future self but had mixed emotions about past and present selves.

  20. Do u txt? Event-related potentials to semantic anomalies in standard and texted English.

    PubMed

    Berger, Natalie I; Coch, Donna

    2010-06-01

    Texted English is a hybrid, technology-based language derived from standard English modified to facilitate ease of communication via instant and text messaging. We compared semantic processing of texted and standard English sentences by recording event-related potentials in a classic semantic incongruity paradigm designed to elicit an N400 effect. In participants fluent in both text and standard English, an N400 effect was elicited in both the texted and standard English conditions. The amplitude and distribution of the N400 effect (300-500ms) in the texted and standard English conditions were similar, but the text semantic incongruity effect was characterized by a delayed peak latency and an extended duration into the 500-700ms epoch. This pattern of results replicates previous findings regarding differences in the N400 effect in native and non-native language processing, but for the first time extends the bilingual ERP literature to include the technological phenomenon of texted English.

  1. Integrating the Meaning of Person Names into Discourse Context: An Event-Related Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Yang, Yufang

    2013-01-01

    The meaning of person names is determined by their associated information. This study used event related potentials to investigate the time course of integrating the newly constructed meaning of person names into discourse context. The meaning of person names was built by two-sentence descriptions of the names. Then we manipulated the congruence of person names relative to discourse context in a way that the meaning of person names either matched or did not match the previous context. ERPs elicited by the names were compared between the congruent and the incongruent conditions. We found that the incongruent names elicited a larger N400 as well as a larger P600 compared to the congruent names. The results suggest that the meaning of unknown names can be effectively constructed from short linguistic descriptions and that the established meaning can be rapidly retrieved and integrated into contexts. PMID:24349462

  2. Characterization of spatio-temporal epidural event-related potentials for mouse models of psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Pinto-Duarte, António; Margarita Behrens, M.; Zhou, Xianjin; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Distinctive features in sensory event-related potentials (ERPs) are endophenotypic biomarkers of psychiatric disorders, widely studied using electroencephalographic (EEG) methods in humans and model animals. Despite the popularity and unique significance of the mouse as a model species in basic research, existing EEG methods applicable to mice are far less powerful than those available for humans and large animals. We developed a new method for multi-channel epidural ERP characterization in behaving mice with high precision, reliability and convenience and report an application to time-domain ERP feature characterization of the Sp4 hypomorphic mouse model for schizophrenia. Compared to previous methods, our spatio-temporal ERP measurement robustly improved the resolving power of key signatures characteristic of the disease model. The high performance and low cost of this technique makes it suitable for high-throughput behavioral and pharmacological studies. PMID:26459883

  3. Processing inferences derived from event-related potential measures in a monitoring task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horst, R. L.; Munson, R. C.; Ruchkin, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from the scalp of subjects as they monitored changing digital readouts for values that went 'out-of-bounds'. Workload was manipulated by varying the number of readouts that were monitored concurrently. The ERPs elicited by changes in the readouts showed long latency positivities that increased in amplitude, not only with the number of readouts monitored, but also with the number of monitored readouts that were 'in danger' of going out-of-bounds. No effects were found due to the number of nonmonitored readouts 'in danger'. This evidence indicates that subjects (1) selectively attended to the monitored readouts and (2) processed the monitored readouts differently as the readouts approached the out-of-bounds levels to which an overt response was required.

  4. Primary task event-related potentials related to different aspects of information processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munson, Robert C.; Horst, Richard L.; Mahaffey, David L.

    1988-01-01

    The results of two studies which investigated the relationships between cognitive processing and components of transient event-related potentials (ERPs) are presented in a task in which mental workload was manipulated. The task involved the monitoring of an array of discrete readouts for values that went out of bounds, and was somewhat analogous to tasks performed in cockpits. The ERPs elicited by the changing readouts varied with the number of readouts being monitored, the number of monitored readouts that were close to going out of bounds, and whether or not the change took a monitored readout out of bounds. Moreover, different regions of the waveform differentially reflected these effects. The results confirm the sensitivity of scalp-recorded ERPs to the cognitive processes affected by mental workload and suggest the possibility of extracting useful ERP indices of primary task performance in a wide range of man-machine settings.

  5. Early somatosensory event-related potentials reveal attentional bias for internal stimuli in social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Yoshihiro; Nittono, Hiroshi; Kubo, Kenta; Sasaki-Aoki, Shoko; Iwanaga, Makoto

    2012-03-01

    The present study used event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to investigate allocation of attentional resources to internal and external stimuli in individuals with social anxiety. High and low socially anxious individuals were presented with depictions of various facial expressions or household objects, followed by an internal (vibration presented to the finger) or external probe (the letter "E"). Participants were told that the vibration signals physiological changes and were asked to detect both probes. High socially anxious individuals showed larger front-central N140 amplitudes in response to vibratory internal probes as compared to non-anxious controls. ERPs elicited by picture stimuli and external probes and reaction times in response to both probe types did not differ between high and low social anxiety individuals. Early somatosensory ERPs reveal an attentional bias for internal stimuli that does not appear in overt behavior. PMID:22285128

  6. The cognitive demands of second order manual control: Applications of the event related brain potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickens, C.; Gill, R.; Kramer, A.; Ross, W.; Donchin, E.

    1981-01-01

    Three experiments are described in which tracking difficulty is varied in the presence of a covert tone discrimination task. Event related brain potentials (ERPs) elicited by the tones are employed as an index of the resource demands of tracking. The ERP measure reflected the control order variation, and this variable was thereby assumed to compete for perceptual/central processing resources. A fine-grained analysis of the results suggested that the primary demands of second order tracking involve the central processing operations of maintaining a more complex internal model of the dynamic system, rather than the perceptual demands of higher derivative perception. Experiment 3 varied tracking bandwidth in random input tracking, and the ERP was unaffected. Bandwidth was then inferred to compete for response-related processing resources that are independent of the ERP.

  7. Auditory recognition memory in 2-month-old infants as assessed by event-related potentials

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Xiaoqin; Xu, Lin; Li, Mingyan; Shao, Jie; Zhao, Zhengyan; deRegnier, Raye-Ann; Nelson, Charles A.; Lozoff, Betsy

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies of auditory recognition memory in sleeping newborns reported two event-related potential (ERP) components, P2 and negative slow wave (NSW), reflecting voice discrimination and detection of novelty, respectively. In the present study, using high-density recording arrays, ERPs were acquired from 26 2-month-old awake infants as they were presented with a familiar and unfamiliar voice (i.e., mother and stranger) with equal probability. In addition to P2 and NSW, we observed a positive slow wave (PSW) over the right temporo-parietal scalp, indicating memory updating. Our study suggests that infants appear to have the capacity to encode novel stimuli as early as 2 months of age. PMID:22799760

  8. Effects of Grammaticality and Morphological Complexity on the P600 Event-Related Potential Component

    PubMed Central

    Wampler, Emma K.; Valentine, Geoffrey D.; Osterhout, Lee

    2015-01-01

    We investigated interactions between morphological complexity and grammaticality on electrophysiological markers of grammatical processing during reading. Our goal was to determine whether morphological complexity and stimulus grammaticality have independent or additive effects on the P600 event-related potential component. Participants read sentences that were either well-formed or grammatically ill-formed, in which the critical word was either morphologically simple or complex. Results revealed no effects of complexity for well-formed stimuli, but the P600 amplitude was significantly larger for morphologically complex ungrammatical stimuli than for morphologically simple ungrammatical stimuli. These findings suggest that some previous work may have inadequately characterized factors related to reanalysis during morphosyntactic processing. Our results show that morphological complexity by itself does not elicit P600 effects. However, in ungrammatical circumstances, overt morphology provides a more robust and reliable cue to morphosyntactic relationships than null affixation. PMID:26488893

  9. Event-related brain potential evidence for animacy processing asymmetries during sentence comprehension.

    PubMed

    Nieuwland, Mante S; Martin, Andrea E; Carreiras, Manuel

    2013-08-01

    The animacy distinction is deeply rooted in the language faculty. A key example is differential object marking, the phenomenon where animate sentential objects receive specific marking. We used event-related potentials to examine the neural processing consequences of case-marking violations on animate and inanimate direct objects in Spanish. Inanimate objects with incorrect prepositional case marker 'a' ('al suelo') elicited a P600 effect compared to unmarked objects, consistent with previous literature. However, animate objects without the required prepositional case marker ('el obispo') only elicited an N400 effect compared to marked objects. This novel finding, an exclusive N400 modulation by a straightforward grammatical rule violation, does not follow from extant neurocognitive models of sentence processing, and mirrors unexpected "semantic P600" effects for thematically problematic sentences. These results may reflect animacy asymmetry in competition for argument prominence: following the article, thematic interpretation difficulties are elicited only by unexpectedly animate objects.

  10. Event related potentials reveal differences between morphological (prefixes) and phonological (syllables) processing of words.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Alberto; Alija, Maira; Cuetos, Fernando; de Vega, Mauel

    2006-11-01

    Behavioral measures in visual priming tasks show opposite effects for syllables and morphemes, which indicate that they are processed by two independent systems. We used event related potentials (ERPs) to explore two priming situations in Spanish: prefix related words (reacción-REFORMA [reaction-reform]), in which prime and target words shared a first syllable that was also a prefix, and syllable related words (regalo-REFORMA [gift-reform.]), in which the shared first syllable was a pseudoprefix in the prime word. Prefix related pairs, unlike syllable related pairs, evoked a very early positivity in reaction to the target (at 150-250ms window), suggesting that the prefix information is immediately available, at a prelexical stage. By contrast, syllable related pairs showed a larger N400 effect. This late negativity may be caused by lateral inhibition among lexical candidates activated in the lexicon by the prime's first syllable. PMID:16996688

  11. Probe-evoked event-related potential techniques for evaluating aspects of attention and information processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, John A.

    1988-01-01

    The study of probe event related potentials (probe ERPs) is reviewed. Several recent experiments are described which seem to leave in doubt the usefulness of applying ERP to simulation and field conditions as well as laboratory situations. Relatively minor changes in the experimental paradigm can produce major shifts in ERP findings, for reasons that are not clear. However, task-elicited ERPs might be used on a flight simulator if the experimenter takes time of arrival of the eyes on a particular instrument as one variable of concern and dwell time on the instrument as a second variable. One can then look at ERPs triggered by saccade termination for fixation pauses of specified durations. It may well be that ERP to a momentarily important display will differ from that elicited by routine instrument check.

  12. Additive Effects of Repetition and Predictability during Comprehension: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Shannon; Parker, Dan; Morini, Giovanna; Lau, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that neural responses to words during sentence comprehension are sensitive to both lexical repetition and a word’s predictability in context. While previous research has often contrasted the effects of these variables (e.g. by looking at cases in which word repetition violates sentence-level constraints), little is known about how they work in tandem. In the current study we examine how recent exposure to a word and its predictability in context combine to impact lexical semantic processing. We devise a novel paradigm that combines reading comprehension with a recognition memory task, allowing for an orthogonal manipulation of a word’s predictability and its repetition status. Using event-related brain potentials (ERPs), we show that word repetition and predictability have qualitatively similar and additive effects on the N400 amplitude. We propose that prior exposure to a word and predictability impact lexical semantic processing in an additive and independent fashion. PMID:24905459

  13. Event-related potentials in response to 3-D auditory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Fuchigami, Tatsuo; Okubo, Osami; Fujita, Yukihiko; Kohira, Ryutaro; Arakawa, Chikako; Endo, Ayumi; Haruyama, Wakako; Imai, Yuki; Mugishima, Hideo

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate auditory spatial cognitive function, age correlations for event-related potentials (ERPs) in response to auditory stimuli with a Doppler effect were studied in normal children. A sound with a Doppler effect is perceived as a moving audio image. A total of 99 normal subjects (age range, 4-21 years) were tested. In the task-relevant oddball paradigm, P300 and key-press reaction time were elicited using auditory stimuli (1000 Hz fixed and enlarged tones with a Doppler effect). From the age of 4 years, the P300 latency for the enlarged tone with a Doppler effect shortened more rapidly with age than did the P300 latency for tone-pips, and the latencies for the different conditions became similar towards the late teens. The P300 of auditory stimuli with a Doppler effect may be used to evaluate auditory spatial cognitive function in children.

  14. Event-related brain potentials in the study of visual selective attention

    PubMed Central

    Hillyard, Steven A.; Anllo-Vento, Lourdes

    1998-01-01

    Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) provide high-resolution measures of the time course of neuronal activity patterns associated with perceptual and cognitive processes. New techniques for ERP source analysis and comparisons with data from blood-flow neuroimaging studies enable improved localization of cortical activity during visual selective attention. ERP modulations during spatial attention point toward a mechanism of gain control over information flow in extrastriate visual cortical pathways, starting about 80 ms after stimulus onset. Paying attention to nonspatial features such as color, motion, or shape is manifested by qualitatively different ERP patterns in multiple cortical areas that begin with latencies of 100–150 ms. The processing of nonspatial features seems to be contingent upon the prior selection of location, consistent with early selection theories of attention and with the hypothesis that spatial attention is “special.” PMID:9448241

  15. Semantic relatedness between words in each individual brain: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Hata, Masahiro; Homae, Fumitaka; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2011-08-26

    The relationship between 2 words is judged by the meanings of words. Here, we examined how the semantic relatedness of words is structured in each individual brain. During measurements of event-related potentials (ERPs), participants performed semantic-relatedness judgments of word pairs. For each participant, we divided word pairs into 2 groups--related and unrelated pairs--and compared their ERPs. All of the participants showed a significant N400 effect. However, when we applied an identical grouping of pairs, this effect was observed only in half the number of the participants. These results show that our single-subject analysis of N400 extracted semantic relatedness of words in the individual brain. Future studies using this analysis will clarify the organization of the mental lexicon.

  16. Deficient auditory processing in children with Asperger Syndrome, as indexed by event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Jansson-Verkasalo, Eira; Ceponiene, Rita; Kielinen, Marko; Suominen, Kalervo; Jäntti, Ville; Linna, Sirkka Liisa; Moilanen, Irma; Näätänen, Risto

    2003-03-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) is characterized by normal language development but deficient understanding and use of the intonation and prosody of speech. While individuals with AS report difficulties in auditory perception, there are no studies addressing auditory processing at the sensory level. In this study, event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded for syllables and tones in children with AS and in their control counterparts. Children with AS displayed abnormalities in transient sound-feature encoding, as indexed by the obligatory ERPs, and in sound discrimination, as indexed by the mismatch negativity. These deficits were more severe for the tone stimuli than for the syllables. These results indicate that auditory sensory processing is deficient in children with AS, and that these deficits might be implicated in the perceptual problems encountered by children with AS.

  17. Musical training effect on reading musical notation: evidence from event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Horng-Yih; Lei, Sot-Fu

    2012-08-01

    Musical training enhances a range of non-musical cognitive functions, including visuospatial abilities. The aim of this study was to explore which event-related potential (ERP) components were enhanced or reduced as a result of musical training. Both electrophysiological and behavioral methods were used to compare musicians and non-musicians in the processing of pitch and duration when reading single musical notes. It was observed that in the early stage of note reading, the musician/non-musician differences emerged in the latency range of the N1 and N2. The N1 component was enhanced; in contrast, the N2 component was reduced in musicians. It is possible that musicians receive auditory meanings from visual music notations, so they therefore did not find it necessary to spend more resources on executing spatial attention than non-musicians do during pitch processing.

  18. The objective assessment of amnesia in dissociative identity disorder using event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Allen, J J; Movius, H L

    2000-10-01

    Assessment of amnesia in Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) typically relies on self-report, the veracity of which cannot often be independently verified. Memory in DID was therefore assessed using an objective method that involved event-related potentials (ERPs) as well as indirect behavioral measures of memory, and that provided statistically supported assessments for each participant. Four participants who met DSM-IV criteria for DID participated in an ERP memory assessment task, in which words learned by one identity (identity A) were then presented to a second identity (identity B). All four participants - tested as identity B - produced ERP and behavioral evidence consistent with recognition of the material learned by identity A. While it would be premature to generalize all cases of DID, the results suggest that there may be reasons to question the veracity of reports by individuals who meet diagnostic criteria for DID on the basis of a structured clinical interview.

  19. Exclusion and micro-rejection: event-related potential response predicts mitigated distress.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Michael J; Wu, Jia; McCarty, Erika R; David, Daryn H; Bailey, Christopher A; Mayes, Linda C

    2009-11-25

    We studied time-based neural activity with event-related potentials (ERPs) in young adults during a computer-simulated ball-toss game. Experiencing fair play initially, participants were ultimately excluded by other players. Dense-array ERPs showed time-dependent associations between slow-wave activity (580-900 ms) in left prefrontal/medial frontal cortical regions for exclusion events and self-reported distress. More subtle 'micro-rejections' during fair play showed a similar distress to ERP association (420-580 ms). In both cases, greater positive amplitude neural activity was associated with less post-exclusion distress. Findings suggest that rapidly occurring neural responses to social exclusion events are linked to individual differences in ostracism-related distress. Relations emerged even during fair play, providing a window into the neural basis of more subtle social-cognitive perceptual processes. PMID:19829163

  20. How personal earthquake experience impacts on the Stroop interference effect: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jiang; Su, Yanhua; Li, Hong; Wei, Dongtao; Tu, Shen; Zhang, Qinglin

    2010-11-01

    Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were measured when 24 Chinese subjects performed the classical Stroop task. All of subjects had experienced the great Sichuan earthquake (5/12), with 12 people in each of the Far (Chengdu city) and the Close (Deyang city) earthquake experience groups. The behavioral data showed that the Stroop task yielded a robust Stroop interference effect as indexed by longer RT for incongruent than congruent color words in both the Chengdu and Deyang groups. Scalp ERP data showed that incongruent stimuli elicited a more negative ERP deflection (N400-600; Stroop interference effect) than did congruent stimuli between 400-600 ms in the Chengdu group, while the Stroop interference ERP effect was not found in the Deyang group. Dipole source analysis localized the generator of the N400-600 in the right prefrontal cortex (PFC) and was possibly related to conflict monitoring and cognitive control.

  1. Negative feedback influences auditory recognition: behavioral and event-related potential evidence.

    PubMed

    Kuelzow, Nadine; Nessler, Doreen; Saenger, Jessica; Schneider, Till R; Debener, Stefan

    2010-08-01

    Stress induced by negative feedback is known to impair recognition memory, although little is known about its neural correlates. Immediately before an auditory recognition test, a negative- and positive-feedback group received different, faked scores about their performance in a Tower-of-Hanoi task. Negative feedback increased reaction times for correct rejections of new sounds. Although the positive-feedback group showed frontally and parietally more positive-going event-related potentials for correctly recognized old items than correct rejections (OLD/NEW effect) between 400 and 700 ms, suggesting the presence of familiarity and recollection-related recognition processes, the negative-feedback group showed late (>1100 ms) sustained right-frontal OLD/NEW effects possibly reflecting postmemory monitoring. Hence, negative feedback might change recognition memory by disabling recollection in favor of postmemory monitoring processes. PMID:20531235

  2. Event-related potentials to irrelevant deviant motion of visual shapes.

    PubMed

    Csibra, G; Czigler, I

    1991-08-01

    Event-related potentials to visual shapes moving across the visual field were recorded from 10 subjects. The subjects had to respond to the appearance of one of the shapes, while other shapes were irrelevant. On the periphery some of the shapes changed their orientation or their form. Sometimes the direction of movement was different from the standard direction. Subjects did not detect the changes of the pattern on the visual periphery, and the ERPs to these non-detected deviants were identical to the ERPs to the standard stimuli. Six subjects detected the irrelevant direction of movement. In these subjects the deviant direction of motion elicited a fronto-central positive wave (P3s) with 322 ms mean latency. There was no such sharp positive peak in the four subjects who did not detect the deviant direction of movement. Unlike the non-target stimuli, the targets elicited a large positive wave (P3b) with 530 ms mean latency.

  3. An auditory event related potential evaluation of sonar task experience and age.

    PubMed

    Merrill, L L; Kobus, D A; McGuigan, F J

    1995-06-01

    To gauge the interaction of real-world sonar-task experience and age on brain electrical activity, the effect of sonar experience and age on event related potentials (ERP) was examined. A three-group design was used and the results suggest that sonar experience and age affect the amplitude and distribution of the ERP component. The results concerning age and ERPs support and extend the results of previous studies and suggest that age-related differences occur at a much younger age than is reported elsewhere. Attentional and stimulus evaluation processes which have been linked to parameters of the ERP component may be enhanced with real-world auditory task experience. Research on ERP should control for the possible confounds of auditory-task experience and age.

  4. Electroencephalography (EEG) and event-related potentials (ERPs) with human participants.

    PubMed

    Light, Gregory A; Williams, Lisa E; Minow, Falk; Sprock, Joyce; Rissling, Anthony; Sharp, Richard; Swerdlow, Neal R; Braff, David L

    2010-07-01

    Understanding the basic neural processes that underlie complex higher-order cognitive operations and functional domains is a fundamental goal of cognitive neuroscience. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a non-invasive and relatively inexpensive method for assessing neurophysiological function that can be used to achieve this goal. EEG measures the electrical activity of large, synchronously firing populations of neurons in the brain with electrodes placed on the scalp. This unit outlines the basics of setting up an EEG experiment with human participants, including equipment, and a step-by-step guide to applying and preparing an electrode cap. Also included are support protocols for two event-related potential (ERP) paradigms, P50 suppression, and mismatch negativity (MMN), which are measures of early sensory processing. These paradigms can be used to assess the integrity of early sensory processing in normal individuals and clinical populations, such as individuals with schizophrenia.

  5. Neuronal generator patterns of olfactory event-related brain potentials in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Jürgen; Tenke, Craig E; Malaspina, Dolores; Kroppmann, Christopher J; Schaller, Jennifer D; Deptula, Andrew; Gates, Nathan A; Harkavy-Friedman, Jill M; Gil, Roberto; Bruder, Gerard E

    2010-11-01

    To better characterize neurophysiologic processes underlying olfactory dysfunction in schizophrenia, nose-referenced 30-channel electroencephalogram was recorded from 32 patients and 35 healthy adults (18 and 18 male) during detection of hydrogen sulfide (constant-flow olfactometer, 200 ms unirhinal exposure). Event-related potentials (ERPs) were transformed to reference-free current source density (CSD) waveforms and analyzed by unrestricted Varimax-PCA. Participants indicated when they perceived a high (10 ppm) or low (50% dilution) odor concentration. Patients and controls did not differ in detection of high (23% misses) and low (43%) intensities and also had similar olfactory ERP waveforms. CSDs showed a greater bilateral frontotemporal N1 sink (305 ms) and mid-parietal P2 source (630 ms) for high than low intensities. N1 sink and P2 source were markedly reduced in patients for high intensity stimuli, providing further neurophysiological evidence of olfactory dysfunction in schizophrenia.

  6. Experimental Study on Event-Related Potential for Objective Evaluation of Food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Motoshi; Honma, Tomohiro; Inoue, Hiroshi; Niiyama, Yoshitsugu; Takahashi, Toru; Kumagai, Masanori; Akiyama, Yoshinobu

    In order to study the application of event-related potential (ERP) for performing objective evaluation of food, the ERP was measured when subjectively judging the appearance of food by three-grade scale with the opinion “like”, “favorite” and “more favorite”. Sushi and cooked rice were selected as typical foods. Five pictures of each food that the subjects liked were chosen before measurements, and then were used in opinion tests. As a result, the P300 component of the ERP was detected, and the P300 area (surrounded by ERP waveform from the latency 250 to 500ms) became larger when the subjects judged as “more favorite”, which indicates the feasibility of evaluation of food using the ERP.

  7. Conveying the concept of movement in music: An event-related brain potential study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Linshu; Jiang, Cunmei; Wu, Yingying; Yang, Yufang

    2015-10-01

    This study on event-related brain potential investigated whether music can convey the concept of movement. Using a semantic priming paradigm, natural musical excerpts were presented to non-musicians, followed by semantically congruent or incongruent pictures that depicted objects either in motion or at rest. The priming effects were tested in object decision and implicit recognition tasks to distinguish the effects of automatic conceptual activation from response competition. Results showed that in both tasks, pictures that were incongruent to preceding musical excerpts elicited larger N400 than congruent pictures, suggesting that music can prime the representations of movement concepts. Results of the multiple regression analysis showed that movement expression could be well predicted by specific acoustic and musical features, indicating the associations between music per se and the processing of iconic musical meaning. PMID:26254996

  8. Conveying the concept of movement in music: An event-related brain potential study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Linshu; Jiang, Cunmei; Wu, Yingying; Yang, Yufang

    2015-10-01

    This study on event-related brain potential investigated whether music can convey the concept of movement. Using a semantic priming paradigm, natural musical excerpts were presented to non-musicians, followed by semantically congruent or incongruent pictures that depicted objects either in motion or at rest. The priming effects were tested in object decision and implicit recognition tasks to distinguish the effects of automatic conceptual activation from response competition. Results showed that in both tasks, pictures that were incongruent to preceding musical excerpts elicited larger N400 than congruent pictures, suggesting that music can prime the representations of movement concepts. Results of the multiple regression analysis showed that movement expression could be well predicted by specific acoustic and musical features, indicating the associations between music per se and the processing of iconic musical meaning.

  9. Two languages, one developing brain: event-related potentials to words in bilingual toddlers.

    PubMed

    Conboy, Barbara T; Mills, Debra L

    2006-01-01

    Infant bilingualism offers a unique opportunity to study the relative effects of language experience and maturation on brain development, with each child serving as his or her own control. Event-related potentials (ERPs) to words were examined in 19- to 22-month-old English-Spanish bilingual toddlers. The children's dominant vs. nondominant languages elicited different patterns of neural activity in the lateral asymmetry of an early positive component (P100), and the latencies and distributions of ERP differences to known vs. unknown words from 200-400 and 400-600 ms. ERP effects also differed for 'high' and 'low' vocabulary groups based on total conceptual vocabulary scores. The results indicate that the organization of language-relevant brain activity is linked to experience with language rather than brain maturation.

  10. Event-related potential evidence suggesting voters remember political events that never happened

    PubMed Central

    Federmeier, Kara D.; Gonsalves, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Voters tend to misattribute issue positions to political candidates that are consistent with their partisan affiliation, even though these candidates have never explicitly stated or endorsed such stances. The prevailing explanation in political science is that voters misattribute candidates’ issue positions because they use their political knowledge to make educated but incorrect guesses. We suggest that voter errors can also stem from a different source: false memories. The current study examined event-related potential (ERP) responses to misattributed and accurately remembered candidate issue information. We report here that ERP responses to misattributed information can elicit memory signals similar to that of correctly remembered old information—a pattern consistent with a false memory rather than educated guessing interpretation of these misattributions. These results suggest that some types of voter misinformation about candidates may be harder to correct than previously thought. PMID:23202775

  11. Bilingualism and increased attention to speech: Evidence from event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Jan Rouke; Thierry, Guillaume

    2015-10-01

    A number of studies have shown that from an early age, bilinguals outperform their monolingual peers on executive control tasks. We previously found that bilingual children and adults also display greater attention to unexpected language switches within speech. Here, we investigated the effect of a bilingual upbringing on speech perception in one language. We recorded monolingual and bilingual toddlers' event-related potentials (ERPs) to spoken words preceded by pictures. Words matching the picture prime elicited an early frontal positivity in bilingual participants only, whereas later ERP amplitudes associated with semantic processing did not differ between groups. These results add to the growing body of evidence that bilingualism increases overall attention during speech perception whilst semantic integration is unaffected.

  12. Association with positive outcome induces early effects in event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Schacht, Annekathrin; Adler, Nele; Chen, Peiyao; Guo, Taomei; Sommer, Werner

    2012-01-01

    Emotional pictures, faces, or words elicit an early posterior negativity (EPN) in the event-related potential, starting around 200-400 ms, followed by a late positive complex (LPC). Occasionally, also very early effects of emotion (VEEEs) are seen prior to 200 ms. The present study examined whether VEEEs can be due to direct links established by reinforcement learning. In the learning session, participants learned to associate previously unknown Chinese words with monetary gain, loss, or neither. In the test session, they were required to distinguish the learned stimuli from novel distracters. Specific to stimuli associated with positive outcome a VEEE, consisting of a posterior positivity, appeared around 150 ms and an LPC between 550 and 700 ms, whereas an EPN was absent. These results show that previous association with reward can induce VEEEs, indicating that emotion effects in ERPs may arise in the absence of biologically preparedness and semantic meaning. PMID:22027086

  13. Event related potentials reveal differences between morphological (prefixes) and phonological (syllables) processing of words.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Alberto; Alija, Maira; Cuetos, Fernando; de Vega, Mauel

    2006-11-01

    Behavioral measures in visual priming tasks show opposite effects for syllables and morphemes, which indicate that they are processed by two independent systems. We used event related potentials (ERPs) to explore two priming situations in Spanish: prefix related words (reacción-REFORMA [reaction-reform]), in which prime and target words shared a first syllable that was also a prefix, and syllable related words (regalo-REFORMA [gift-reform.]), in which the shared first syllable was a pseudoprefix in the prime word. Prefix related pairs, unlike syllable related pairs, evoked a very early positivity in reaction to the target (at 150-250ms window), suggesting that the prefix information is immediately available, at a prelexical stage. By contrast, syllable related pairs showed a larger N400 effect. This late negativity may be caused by lateral inhibition among lexical candidates activated in the lexicon by the prime's first syllable.

  14. Serial position effects in auditory event-related potentials during working memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Golob, Edward J; Starr, Arnold

    2004-01-01

    It is established that recall of an item from a list of sequentially presented items is sensitive to the item's position in the memorized list. However, little is known about the brain mechanisms that mediate these serial position effects. Studies of working memory retrieval using event-related potentials report amplitude reductions during retrieval (auditory cortical N100, neocortical late positive wave [LPW]) as memory load increases. We tested the hypothesis that N100 and LPW amplitudes to probes are also affected by serial position. Event-related potentials were recorded from subjects performing an auditory working memory task. A set of one or five digits was memorized, then subjects classified a probe digit as either present or absent from the memory set. A control task was also given. Amplitudes of the N100 and LPW were reduced in the 5-item versus the 1-item set. In the 5-item set N100 amplitude was significantly larger for the initial (1st) serial position, relative to Positions 2-5, while linear increases in LPW amplitude were seen across serial positions (5th > 1st position). A control task without memorization showed no N100 or LPW amplitude changes with set size or serial position. The findings reveal that the N100 and LPW are influenced differently by serial position during working memory retrieval: N100 shows a primacy effect and LPW demonstrates a recency effect. The results suggest that primacy and recency effects may be mediated by different brain regions at different times during memory retrieval.

  15. Reactivity and event-related potentials during attentional tests in athletes.

    PubMed

    Fontani, G; Maffei, D; Cameli, S; Polidori, F

    1999-09-01

    A series of attentional tests involving reaction times (RTs) was administered to 12 high-level young (age 17-18 years) volleyball players. During the tests, event-related potentials were recorded by electroencephalogram. In a simple reaction-time test (SRT), the subjects had to respond to a letter that appeared on a white screen. Other tests (attentional shifting tests) consisted of a go/no-go reaction time and a choice reaction time (CRT), divided into a short-latency CRT and a long-latency CRT. In the pre-stimulus period of these tests, there is a shift from broad attention to selective attention, represented by a crowding of black points on the computer screen, followed by the appearance of a letter in the centre of the crowding. The results show that RT increased from SRT to CRT. In the attentional shifting tests, averaged waves of event-related potentials showed a contingent-negative-variation-like wave that was closely related to selective attention (selective attention wave, SAW) before the onset of the stimulus. After the stimulus, a P3 complex was recorded. Correlations were found between the SAW amplitude and P3 latency and amplitude, and between these parameters and RT and its variability. Higher SAW and P3 amplitudes were accompanied by a shorter RT and a lower variability. The characteristics and the correlations that exist between the various parameters are consistent with a possible use of these tests in the analysis of the attentional styles of athletes, and in the evaluation of their progress with training.

  16. Event-related potentials associated with performance monitoring in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jessica M; Everling, Stefan

    2014-08-15

    The abilities to monitor performance outcomes and, when appropriate, impose strategic adjustments in behavior, are core features of the intact human cognitive control system. Errors committed in choice reaction time tasks are typically followed by two scalp potentials, the error negativity (Ne) and error positivity (Pe). These components are considered physiological signatures of the performance monitoring system. Several theories have been proposed to account for these error-related potentials and their functional and behavioral significance. These ideas were inspired by empirical data in humans and other mammalian species, and supported by the results of experiments in which performance monitoring, in humans and computational models, was investigated. However, an appropriate animal model is required to rigorously test the predictions that arise from these theories. Here, using a variant of the anti-saccade task, we demonstrate that event-related signals recorded from macaque monkeys, following errors in choice, resemble the human Ne and Pe. These components were modulated by cognitive variables, namely the degree of cognitive control associated with the applied rule, which implies the existence of hierarchical error processing systems in monkeys, and the degree of response control associated with the saccade. Error-related potential amplitudes were also correlated with remedial action, in a rule-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that error-related potentials in macaque monkeys and human subjects show important similarities, thus supporting the use of the macaque monkey as an animal model for the neurophysiological study of performance monitoring, and potentially, post-error adjustments.

  17. Sensory and cognitive event related potentials in workers chronically exposed to solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Massioui, F.E.; Lille, F.; Lesevre, N.; Hazemann, P.; Garnier, R.; Dally, S. )

    1990-01-01

    To obtain objective measures of possible impairment due to organic solvents, auditory, visual and somatosensory evoked potentials and cognitive event related potentials were recorded in a group of 13 workers occupationally exposed to a mixture of various solvents. The patients were compared to healthy subjects and to chronic alcoholics seen during post-alcohol withdrawal. Auditory and visual evoked potentials were almost normal but somatosensory evoked potentials showed a slight decrease of peripheral conduction velocities and an increase of central conduction times more marked in the solvent exposed workers who were also alcoholics. The late cognitive components reflecting attention processes (N2 and P3) were normal. Solvent-exposed workers and alcoholics were both characterized by some difficulty in modulating their attentional resources according to task demands, as reflected by a tendency to responses (N1, N2 and P3) of similar amplitudes whether the stimulus was or was not the target. These findings support the presence, in solvent exposed workers, of minor dysfunction of the nervous system at both peripheral and cortical levels potentiated by alcohol as well as of mild cognitive impairments concerning attention processes.

  18. Spatial filtering based on canonical correlation analysis for classification of evoked or event-related potentials in EEG data.

    PubMed

    Spüler, Martin; Walter, Armin; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Bogdan, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Classification of evoked or event-related potentials is an important prerequisite for many types of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). To increase classification accuracy, spatial filters are used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the brain signals and thereby facilitate the detection and classification of evoked or event-related potentials. While canonical correlation analysis (CCA) has previously been used to construct spatial filters that increase classification accuracy for BCIs based on visual evoked potentials, we show in this paper, how CCA can also be used for spatial filtering of event-related potentials like P300. We also evaluate the use of CCA for spatial filtering on other data with evoked and event-related potentials and show that CCA performs consistently better than other standard spatial filtering methods.

  19. Age, Intelligence, and Event-Related Brain Potentials during Late Childhood: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stauder, Johannes E. A.; van der Molen, Maurits W.; Molenaar, Peter C. M.

    2003-01-01

    Studied the relationship between event-related brain activity, age, and intelligence using a visual oddball task presented to girls at 9, 10, and 11 years of age. Findings for 26 girls suggest a qualitative shift in the relation between event-related brain activity and intelligence between 9 and 10 years of age. (SLD)

  20. The intention to conceal activates the right prefrontal cortex: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Izumi; Nittono, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies on deception have shown that a late positive potential (LPP), a component of event-related brain potentials, is elicited when a participant wishes to conceal recognition of the eliciting stimulus. The LPP occurs about 500 ms after stimulus onset and has an occipital scalp distribution with concurrent negativity at frontal sites. The present study investigated the cortical sources of the LPP associated with the intention to conceal. Standardized low-resolution electromagnetic tomography analysis was applied on previously published concealment-related LPP data (Matsuda, Nittono, and Ogawa, 2013, N=30). The cortical sources of the LPP were estimated in the right middle frontal gyrus and the right inferior frontal gyrus, which fits well with the findings of fMRI studies. Previous research suggests that activities in the middle frontal gyrus and the right inferior frontal gyrus are associated with cognitive control and that greater relative right than left frontal activities are associated with withdrawal motivation. On the basis of these findings, it is concluded that the LPP may reflect cognitive control with withdrawal motivation that is recruited by the participants' goal of concealing their recognition and avoiding disclosure. A positive potential at occipital sites can be a sign of the activation in the prefrontal cortex.

  1. Latency correction of event-related potentials between different experimental protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrate, I.; Chavarriaga, R.; Montesano, L.; Minguez, J.; Millán, JdR

    2014-06-01

    Objective. A fundamental issue in EEG event-related potentials (ERPs) studies is the amount of data required to have an accurate ERP model. This also impacts the time required to train a classifier for a brain-computer interface (BCI). This issue is mainly due to the poor signal-to-noise ratio and the large fluctuations of the EEG caused by several sources of variability. One of these sources is directly related to the experimental protocol or application designed, and may affect the amplitude or latency of ERPs. This usually prevents BCI classifiers from generalizing among different experimental protocols. In this paper, we analyze the effect of the amplitude and the latency variations among different experimental protocols based on the same type of ERP. Approach. We present a method to analyze and compensate for the latency variations in BCI applications. The algorithm has been tested on two widely used ERPs (P300 and observation error potentials), in three experimental protocols in each case. We report the ERP analysis and single-trial classification. Main results. The results obtained show that the designed experimental protocols significantly affect the latency of the recorded potentials but not the amplitudes. Significance. These results show how the use of latency-corrected data can be used to generalize the BCIs, reducing the calibration time when facing a new experimental protocol.

  2. Event-related potentials elicited by social commerce and electronic-commerce reviews.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan; Yao, Zhong; Cong, Fengyu; Zhang, Linlin

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing interest regarding the use of electroencephalography (EEG) in social commerce and electronic commerce (e-commerce) research. There are several reviews in the field of social commerce or e-commerce; these have great potential value and mining them is fundamental and significant. To our knowledge, EEG is rarely applied to study these. In this study, we examined the neural correlates of social commerce reviews (SCRs) and e-commerce reviews (ECRs) by using them as stimuli to evoke event-related potentials. All SCRs were from friends through a social media platform, whereas ECRs were from strangers through an e-commerce platform. The experimental design was similar to that of a priming paradigm, and included 40 pairs of stimuli consisting of product information (prime stimulus) and reviews (target stimulus). The results showed that the P300 component was successfully evoked by SCR and ECR stimuli. Moreover, the P300 components elicited by SCRs had higher amplitudes than those elicited by ECRs. These findings indicate that participants paid more attention to SCRs than to ECRs. In addition, the associations between neural responses and reviews in social commerce have the potential to assist companies in studying consumer behaviors, thus permitting them to enhance their social commerce strategies.

  3. Event-related potentials elicited by social commerce and electronic-commerce reviews.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan; Yao, Zhong; Cong, Fengyu; Zhang, Linlin

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing interest regarding the use of electroencephalography (EEG) in social commerce and electronic commerce (e-commerce) research. There are several reviews in the field of social commerce or e-commerce; these have great potential value and mining them is fundamental and significant. To our knowledge, EEG is rarely applied to study these. In this study, we examined the neural correlates of social commerce reviews (SCRs) and e-commerce reviews (ECRs) by using them as stimuli to evoke event-related potentials. All SCRs were from friends through a social media platform, whereas ECRs were from strangers through an e-commerce platform. The experimental design was similar to that of a priming paradigm, and included 40 pairs of stimuli consisting of product information (prime stimulus) and reviews (target stimulus). The results showed that the P300 component was successfully evoked by SCR and ECR stimuli. Moreover, the P300 components elicited by SCRs had higher amplitudes than those elicited by ECRs. These findings indicate that participants paid more attention to SCRs than to ECRs. In addition, the associations between neural responses and reviews in social commerce have the potential to assist companies in studying consumer behaviors, thus permitting them to enhance their social commerce strategies. PMID:26557933

  4. The impact of hunger on food cue processing: an event-related brain potential study.

    PubMed

    Stockburger, Jessica; Schmälzle, Ralf; Flaisch, Tobias; Bublatzky, Florian; Schupp, Harald T

    2009-10-01

    The present study used event-related brain potentials to examine deprivation effects on visual attention to food stimuli at the level of distinct processing stages. Thirty-two healthy volunteers (16 females) were tested twice 1 week apart, either after 24 h of food deprivation or after normal food intake. Participants viewed a continuous stream of food and flower images while dense sensor ERPs were recorded. As revealed by distinct ERP modulations in relatively earlier and later time windows, deprivation affected the processing of food and flower pictures. Between 300 and 360 ms, food pictures were associated with enlarged occipito-temporal negativity and centro-parietal positivity in deprived compared to satiated state. Of main interest, in a later time window (approximately 450-600 ms), deprivation increased amplitudes of the late positive potential elicited by food pictures. Conversely, flower processing varied by motivational state with decreased positive potentials in the deprived state. Minimum-Norm analyses provided further evidence that deprivation enhanced visual attention to food cues in later processing stages. From the perspective of motivated attention, hunger may induce a heightened state of attention for food stimuli in a processing stage related to stimulus recognition and focused attention.

  5. An Event-Related Potential Investigation of Fear Generalization and Intolerance of Uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Brady D; Weinberg, Anna; Pawluk, Joe; Gawlowska, Magda; Proudfit, Greg H

    2015-09-01

    Fear generalization is a key process in the development and maintenance of anxiety disorders. Psychobiological investigations of fear generalization have predominantly focused on defensive system activation (e.g., startle reflex), and it is unclear whether aberrant attentional processing contributes to fear generalization. The late positive potential (LPP) is an event-related potential component that indexes sustained attention and elaborative processing of motivationally salient information, and is larger in response to arousing compared to nonarousing stimuli. In the present study 48 participants completed a fear generalization paradigm using electric shocks. The LPP and retrospective risk ratings of shock likelihood were measured in response to the conditioned stimulus (CS+) and multiple generalization stimuli (GS) that varied in perceptual similarity to the CS+. In addition, intolerance of uncertainty (IU) was examined in relation to fear generalization. The LPP was enhanced for the CS+relative to the GS, but the GS did not differ from one another. Thus, overall the LPP did not reflect fear generalization. However, the LPP to the GS differed as a function of IU, such that high Prospective IU was associated with an attenuated LPP to the GS, and this was independent of trait anxiety. Risk ratings tracked fear generalization irrespective of IU. We discuss the potential influence of IU and attentional processing on fear generalization. Overall, the present study supports the LPP as a useful tool for examining individual differences in fear generalization.

  6. Stop-signal response inhibition in schizophrenia: behavioural, event-related potential and functional neuroimaging data.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Matthew Edward; Fulham, William Ross; Johnston, Patrick James; Michie, Patricia Therese

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitory control deficits are well documented in schizophrenia, supported by impairment in an established measure of response inhibition, the stop-signal reaction time (SSRT). We investigated the neural basis of this impairment by comparing schizophrenia patients and controls matched for age, sex and education on behavioural, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and event-related potential (ERP) indices of stop-signal task performance. Compared to controls, patients exhibited slower SSRT and reduced right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) activation, but rIFG activation correlated with SSRT in both groups. Go stimulus and stop-signal ERP components (N1/P3) were smaller in patients, but the peak latencies of stop-signal N1 and P3 were also delayed in patients, indicating impairment early in stop-signal processing. Additionally, response-locked lateralised readiness potentials indicated response preparation was prolonged in patients. An inability to engage rIFG may predicate slowed inhibition in patients, however multiple spatiotemporal irregularities in the networks underpinning stop-signal task performance may contribute to this deficit. PMID:22027085

  7. Syntactic priming in Chinese sentence comprehension: evidence from event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingrong; Xu, Xiaodong; Tan, Dingliang; Zhang, Jingjing; Zhong, Yuan

    2013-10-01

    Using the event-related potential (ERP) technique, this study examined the nature of syntactic priming effects in Chinese. Participants were required to read prime-target sentence pairs each embedding an ambiguous relative clause (RC) containing either the same verb or a synonymous verb. In Chinese, the word de serves as a relative clause marker. During reading a potential Chinese RC structure (either the prime or the target sentence), Chinese readers initially expect to read an subject-verb-object (SVO) structure but the encounter of a relative clause marker de would make readers abandon the initial strategy and reanalyze the structure as a relative clause. A reduced P600 effect was elicited by the critical word de in the target sentence containing the same initial verb as in the prime sentence. No significant reduction of the P600 was observed in the target sentences in the synonymous condition. The results demonstrated that verb repetition but not similarity in meaning produced a syntactic priming effect in Chinese. The constraint-based lexicalist hypothesis and the argument structure theory were adopted to explain the syntactic priming effect obtained in the current study.

  8. The impact of emotional involvement on online service buying decisions: an event-related potentials perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meina; Wang, Jing; Han, Weiwei

    2015-12-01

    When examining a buying process, changes in human brain signals and their event-related potential (ERP) components can be considered a reflection of the consumers' emotions. In this experiment, participants were shown 12 products and related services that were available for purchase. After recording ERP components, we used a questionnaire to measure the individuals' emotional involvement toward the services (i.e. the same services shown in the stimuli) of the 12 products to measure the emotional valence of the services. The emotional ERP components and the late positive potential (LPP) were elicited under the service conditions and distributed over the left frontal regions. We determined that the services may evoke an LPP and that services with a high emotional value may evoke a larger LPP, which suggests that positive emotion may be measured using the LPP amplitude in the left frontal regions. This result helps elucidate whether positive emotions are stimulated during the product-service system decision-making process and helps understand the emotional valences of different services. Our analysis of the emotional motivation of the consumer suggests that the LPP may be useful as an emotional indicator for measuring consumers' evaluation of services that provides a neural view of product-service system buying decisions. PMID:26457370

  9. The arithmetic problem size effect in children: an event-related potential study

    PubMed Central

    Van Beek, Leen; Ghesquièr, Pol; De Smedt, Bert; Lagae, Lieven

    2014-01-01

    This study used for the first time event-related potentials (ERPs) to examine the well-known arithmetic problem size effect in children. The electrophysiological correlates of this problem size effect have been well documented in adults, but such information in children is lacking. In the present study, 22 typically developing 12-year-olds were asked to solve single-digit addition problems of small (sum ≤ 10) and large problem size (sum > 10) and to speak the solution into a voice key while ERPs were recorded. Children displayed similar early and late components compared to previous adult studies on the problem size effect. There was no effect of problem size on the early components P1, N1, and P2. The peak amplitude of the N2 component showed more negative potentials on left and right anterior electrodes for large additions compared to small additions, which might reflect differences in attentional and working memory resources between large and small problems. The mean amplitude of the late positivity component which follows the N2, was significantly larger for large than for small additions at right parieto-occipital electrodes, in line with previous adult data. The ERPs of the problem size effect during arithmetic might be a useful neural marker for future studies on fact retrieval impairments in children with mathematical difficulties. PMID:25309405

  10. Emotional event-related potentials are reduced if negative pictures presented at fixation are unattended.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Stefan; Sand, Anders; Norberg, Joakim; Andersson, Per

    2011-05-20

    Viewing of emotional pictures elicits two event-related potentials (ERPs) to emotional versus neutral pictures: an early posterior negativity (EPN) and a late positive potential (LPP). Because it is unresolved whether these indexes of emotional processing are reduced to task-irrelevant pictures at fixation, negative and neutral pictures from the International Affective Picture Set (IAPS) were shown at fixation together with 6 letters that surrounded the pictures. In separate tasks, participants were instructed to attend either the pictures or the letters. When the pictures were task relevant, results showed an EPN and LPP. In contrast, when the pictures were task irrelevant, the EPN was eliminated and the LPP reduced. Performance was high in both tasks (hit rates>87%), but somewhat better when the pictures were relevant. However, analyses showed no relationship between this performance difference and the differences in EPN and LPP between tasks. These results suggest that emotional processing of strong, negative pictures is sensitive to manipulations of attention even if the pictures are shown at fixation.

  11. The impact of emotional involvement on online service buying decisions: an event-related potentials perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meina; Wang, Jing; Han, Weiwei

    2015-12-01

    When examining a buying process, changes in human brain signals and their event-related potential (ERP) components can be considered a reflection of the consumers' emotions. In this experiment, participants were shown 12 products and related services that were available for purchase. After recording ERP components, we used a questionnaire to measure the individuals' emotional involvement toward the services (i.e. the same services shown in the stimuli) of the 12 products to measure the emotional valence of the services. The emotional ERP components and the late positive potential (LPP) were elicited under the service conditions and distributed over the left frontal regions. We determined that the services may evoke an LPP and that services with a high emotional value may evoke a larger LPP, which suggests that positive emotion may be measured using the LPP amplitude in the left frontal regions. This result helps elucidate whether positive emotions are stimulated during the product-service system decision-making process and helps understand the emotional valences of different services. Our analysis of the emotional motivation of the consumer suggests that the LPP may be useful as an emotional indicator for measuring consumers' evaluation of services that provides a neural view of product-service system buying decisions.

  12. A frontal cortex event-related potential driven by the basal forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, David P; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) are widely used in both healthy and neuropsychiatric conditions as physiological indices of cognitive functions. Contrary to the common belief that cognitive ERPs are generated by local activity within the cerebral cortex, here we show that an attention-related ERP in the frontal cortex is correlated with, and likely generated by, subcortical inputs from the basal forebrain (BF). In rats performing an auditory oddball task, both the amplitude and timing of the frontal ERP were coupled with BF neuronal activity in single trials. The local field potentials (LFPs) associated with the frontal ERP, concentrated in deep cortical layers corresponding to the zone of BF input, were similarly coupled with BF activity and consistently triggered by BF electrical stimulation within 5–10 msec. These results highlight the important and previously unrecognized role of long-range subcortical inputs from the BF in the generation of cognitive ERPs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02148.001 PMID:24714497

  13. Age difference in numeral recognition and calculation: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Dong; Wang, Suhong; Yang, Yilin; Meng, Ping; Xu, Feng; Yang, Wen; Sheng, Wei; Yang, Yuxia

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the age difference in numeral recognition and calculation in one group of school-aged children (n = 38) and one of undergraduate students (n = 26) using the event-related potential (ERP) methods. Consistent with previous reports, the age difference was significant in behavioral results. Both numeral recognition and calculation elicited a negativity peaking at about 170-280 ms (N2) and a positivity peaking at 200-470 ms (pSW) in raw ERPs, and a difference potential (dN3) between 360 and 450 ms. The difference between the two age groups indicated that more attention resources were devoted to arithmetical tasks in school-aged children, and that school-aged children and undergraduate students appear to use different strategies to solve arithmetical problems. The analysis of frontal negativity suggested that numeral recognition and mental calculation impose greater load on working memory and executive function in schoolchildren than in undergraduate students. The topography data determined that the parietal regions were responsible for arithmetical function in humans, and there was an age-related difference in the area of cerebral activation. PMID:17364561

  14. On the violation of causal, emotional, and locative inferences: An event-related potentials study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gómez, Pablo; Sánchez-Carmona, Alberto; Smith, Cybelle; Pozo, Miguel A; Hinojosa, José A; Moreno, Eva M

    2016-07-01

    Previous event-related potential studies have demonstrated the online generation of inferences during reading for comprehension tasks. The present study contrasted the brainwave patterns of activity to the fulfilment or violation of various types of inferences (causal, emotional, locative). Relative to inference congruent sentence endings, a typical centro-parietal N400 was elicited for the violation of causal and locative inferences. This N400 effect was initially absent for emotional inferences, most likely due to their lower cloze probability. Between 500 and 750ms, a larger frontal positivity (pN400FP) was elicited by inference incongruent sentence endings in the causal condition. In emotional sentences, both inference congruent and incongruent endings exerted this frontally distributed late positivity. For the violation of locative inferences, the larger positivity was only marginally significant over left posterior scalp locations. Thus, not all inference eliciting sentences evoked a similar pattern of ERP responses. We interpret and discuss our results in line with recent views on what the N400, the P600 and the pN400FP brainwave potentials index.

  15. Identifying psychiatric patients with serotonergic dysfunctions by event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Hegerl, U; Juckel, G

    2000-04-01

    The increasing knowledge concerning anatomical structures and cellular processes underlying event-related potentials (ERP) as well as methodological advances in ERP data analysis (e.g. dipole source analysis) is beginning to bridge the gap between ERP and neurochemical aspects. Reliable indicators of the serotonin system are urgently needed because of its role in pathophysiology and as target of pharmacotherapeutic interventions in psychiatric disorders. Converging arguments from preclinical and clinical studies support the hypothesis that the loudness dependence of the auditory evoked N1/P2-response (LDAEP) is regulated by the level of central serotonergic neurotransmission. Dipole source analysis represents an important methodological advance in this context, because the two N1/P2-subcomponents, generated by the primary and secondary auditory cortex known to be differentially innervated by serotonergic fibres, can be separated. A pronounced LDAEP of primary auditory cortices is supposed to reflect low central serotonergic neurotransmission, and vice versa. LDAEP is a parameter with potential clinical value since subgroups of patients with a serotonergic dysfunction can be identified and can be treated more specifically. In depressed patients, a significant relationship between strong LDAEP, indicating low serotonergic function, and a favourable response to SSRI has been found. Additionally, there is evidence from several studies with patients with affective disorders that a strong LDAEP predicts favourable response to a preventive lithium treatment. PMID:12607207

  16. Emotional processing and psychopathic traits in male college students: An event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Medina, Amy L; Kirilko, Elvira; Grose-Fifer, Jillian

    2016-08-01

    Emotional processing deficits are often considered a hallmark of psychopathy. However, there are relatively few studies that have investigated how the late positive potential (LPP) elicited by both positive and negative emotional stimuli is modulated by psychopathic traits, especially in undergraduates. Attentional deficits have also been posited to be associated with emotional blunting in psychopathy, consequently, results from previous studies may have been influenced by task demands. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between the neural correlates of emotional processing and psychopathic traits by measuring event-related potentials (ERPs) during a task with a relatively low cognitive load. A group of male undergraduates were classified as having either high or low levels of psychopathic traits according to their total scores on the Psychopathic Personality Inventory - Revised (PPI-R). A subgroup of these participants then passively viewed complex emotional and neutral images from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) while their EEGs were recorded. As hypothesized, in general the late LPP elicited by emotional pictures was found to be significantly reduced for participants with high Total PPI-R scores relative to those with low scores, especially for pictures that were rated as less emotionally arousing. Our data suggest that male undergraduates with high, but subclinical levels of psychopathic traits did not maintain continued higher-order processing of affective information, especially when it was perceived to be less arousing in nature. PMID:27302151

  17. The impact of emotional involvement on online service buying decisions: an event-related potentials perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Han, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    When examining a buying process, changes in human brain signals and their event-related potential (ERP) components can be considered a reflection of the consumers’ emotions. In this experiment, participants were shown 12 products and related services that were available for purchase. After recording ERP components, we used a questionnaire to measure the individuals’ emotional involvement toward the services (i.e. the same services shown in the stimuli) of the 12 products to measure the emotional valence of the services. The emotional ERP components and the late positive potential (LPP) were elicited under the service conditions and distributed over the left frontal regions. We determined that the services may evoke an LPP and that services with a high emotional value may evoke a larger LPP, which suggests that positive emotion may be measured using the LPP amplitude in the left frontal regions. This result helps elucidate whether positive emotions are stimulated during the product-service system decision-making process and helps understand the emotional valences of different services. Our analysis of the emotional motivation of the consumer suggests that the LPP may be useful as an emotional indicator for measuring consumers’ evaluation of services that provides a neural view of product-service system buying decisions. PMID:26457370

  18. A two-level predictive event-related potential-based brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yaming; Nakajima, Yoshikazu

    2013-10-01

    Increasing the freedom of communication using conventional row/column (RC) P300 paradigm by naive way (increasing matrix size) may deteriorate inherent distraction effect and interaction speed. In this paper, we propose a two-level predictive (TLP) paradigm by integrating a 3×3 two-level matrix paradigm with a statistical language model. The TLP paradigm is evaluated using offline and online data from ten healthy subjects. Significantly larger event-related potentials (ERPs) are evoked by the TLP paradigm compared with the classical 6×6 RC. During an online task (correctly spell an English sentence with 57 characters), accuracy and information transfer rate for the TLP are increased by 14.45% and 29.29%, respectively, when compared with the 6×6 RC. Time to complete the task is also decreased by 24.61% using TLP. In sharp contrast, an 8×8 RC (naive extension of the 6×6 RC) consumed 19.18% more time than the classical 6×6 RC. Furthermore, the statistical language model is also exploited to improve classification accuracy in a Bayesian approach. The proposed Bayesian fusion method is tested offline on data from the online spelling tasks. The results show its potential improvement on single-trial ERP classification.

  19. Aesthetic appreciation of poetry correlates with ease of processing in event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Obermeier, Christian; Kotz, Sonja A; Jessen, Sarah; Raettig, Tim; von Koppenfels, Martin; Menninghaus, Winfried

    2016-04-01

    Rhetorical theory suggests that rhythmic and metrical features of language substantially contribute to persuading, moving, and pleasing an audience. A potential explanation of these effects is offered by "cognitive fluency theory," which stipulates that recurring patterns (e.g., meter) enhance perceptual fluency and can lead to greater aesthetic appreciation. In this article, we explore these two assertions by investigating the effects of meter and rhyme in the reception of poetry by means of event-related brain potentials (ERPs). Participants listened to four versions of lyrical stanzas that varied in terms of meter and rhyme, and rated the stanzas for rhythmicity and aesthetic liking. The behavioral and ERP results were in accord with enhanced liking and rhythmicity ratings for metered and rhyming stanzas. The metered and rhyming stanzas elicited smaller N400/P600 ERP responses than their nonmetered, nonrhyming, or nonmetered and nonrhyming counterparts. In addition, the N400 and P600 effects for the lyrical stanzas correlated with aesthetic liking effects (metered-nonmetered), implying that modulation of the N400 and P600 has a direct bearing on the aesthetic appreciation of lyrical stanzas. We suggest that these effects are indicative of perceptual-fluency-enhanced aesthetic liking, as postulated by cognitive fluency theory. PMID:26697879

  20. Olfactory short-term memory encoding and maintenance - an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Lenk, Steffen; Bluschke, Annet; Beste, Christian; Iannilli, Emilia; Rößner, Veit; Hummel, Thomas; Bender, Stephan

    2014-09-01

    This study examined whether the memory encoding and short term maintenance of olfactory stimuli is associated with neurophysiological activation patterns which parallel those described for sensory modalities such as vision and auditory. We examined olfactory event-related potentials in an olfactory change detection task in twenty-four healthy adults and compared the measured activation to that found during passive olfactory stimulation. During the early olfactory post-processing phase, we found a sustained negativity over bilateral frontotemporal areas in the passive perception condition which was enhanced in the active memory task. There was no significant lateralization in either experimental condition. During the maintenance interval at the end of the delay period, we still found sustained activation over bilateral frontotemporal areas which was more negative in trials with correct - as compared to incorrect - behavioural responses. This was complemented by a general significantly stronger frontocentral activation. Summarizing, we were able to show that olfactory short term memory involves a parallel sequence of activation as found in other sensory modalities. In addition to olfactory-specific frontotemporal activations in the memory encoding phase, we found slow cortical potentials over frontocentral areas during the memory maintenance phase indicating the activation of a supramodal memory maintenance system. These findings could represent the neurophysiological underpinning of the 'olfactory flacon', the olfactory counter-part to the visual sketchpad and phonological loop embedded in Baddeley's working memory model.

  1. Effects of emotional intensity under perceptual load: An event-related potentials (ERPs) study.

    PubMed

    Müller-Bardorff, Miriam; Schulz, Claudia; Peterburs, Jutta; Bruchmann, Maximilian; Mothes-Lasch, Martin; Miltner, Wolfgang; Straube, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Effects of emotional intensity and valence on visual event-related potentials (ERPs) are still poorly understood, in particular in the context of limited attentional resources. In the present EEG study, we investigated the effect of emotional intensity of different emotional facial expressions on P1, N170, early posterior negativity (EPN) and late positive potential (LPP) while varying the amount of available attentional resources. A new stimulus set comprising 90 full color pictures of neutral, happy (low, high intensity), and angry (low, high intensity) expressions was developed. These facial expressions were presented centrally, superimposed by two horizontal bars, and participants engaged in a focal bars task. Availability of attentional resources was varied in two conditions by manipulating the difficulty of the focal bars task (low vs. high perceptual load). Our findings demonstrate intensity and valence effects of task-irrelevant facial expressions on early (N170) and intermediate processing stages (EPN). In addition, task-related effects of perceptual load evolved at intermediate processing stages and were full blown in the time window of LPP. In line with limited resource accounts, valence effects on N170 and EPN were reduced under high perceptual load. Interestingly, apart from this valence by load interaction no further interactions between stimulus and task-driven factors were obtained: Effects of emotional intensity were not modulated by the perceptual load of the focal bars task, indicating that emotional intensity was processed even though attentional resources were heavily restricted. PMID:26995785

  2. Relationship between early and late stages of information processing: an event-related potential study

    PubMed Central

    Portella, Claudio; Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Sack, Alexander T.; Silva, Julio Guilherme; Orsini, Marco; Leite, Marco Antonio Araujo; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Nardi, Antonio E.; Cagy, Mauricio; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    The brain is capable of elaborating and executing different stages of information processing. However, exactly how these stages are processed in the brain remains largely unknown. This study aimed to analyze the possible correlation between early and late stages of information processing by assessing the latency to, and amplitude of, early and late event-related potential (ERP) components, including P200, N200, premotor potential (PMP) and P300, in healthy participants in the context of a visual oddball paradigm. We found a moderate positive correlation among the latency of P200 (electrode O2), N200 (electrode O2), PMP (electrode C3), P300 (electrode PZ) and the reaction time (RT). In addition, moderate negative correlation between the amplitude of P200 and the latencies of N200 (electrode O2), PMP (electrode C3), P300 (electrode PZ) was found. Therefore, we propose that if the secondary processing of visual input (P200 latency) occurs faster, the following will also happen sooner: discrimination and classification process of this input (N200 latency), motor response processing (PMP latency), reorganization of attention and working memory update (P300 latency), and RT. N200, PMP, and P300 latencies are also anticipated when higher activation level of occipital areas involved in the secondary processing of visual input rise (P200 amplitude). PMID:23355929

  3. Neural correlates of abstract rule learning: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fang; Hoshi-Shiba, Reiko; Abla, Dilshat; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2012-09-01

    Abstract rule learning is a fundamental aspect of human cognition, and is essential for language acquisition. However, despite its importance, the neural mechanisms underlying abstract rule learning are still largely unclear. In this study, we investigated the neural correlates of abstract rule learning by recording auditory event-related potentials (ERPs). Participants were first presented with artificial three-syllable sequences containing ABA or ABB abstract rules for learning. They were then tested on sequences of novel syllables following the ABA or ABB abstract rules, half of which were inconsistent with the rule previously learned. Grand-averaged ERPs revealed significant decreases in positivity at 200-260ms in response to consistent sequences during the earlier session of the test phase, and increased negativity at around 400ms in response to inconsistent sequences in the later session. The potentials exhibited a left anterior-dominant distribution. The appearance of the N400-like negativity in the later session suggests that temporal ERP changes occurred with the abstract rule learning process, and that the N400-like negativity is associated with the acquisition of abstract rules.

  4. Effects of emotional intensity under perceptual load: An event-related potentials (ERPs) study.

    PubMed

    Müller-Bardorff, Miriam; Schulz, Claudia; Peterburs, Jutta; Bruchmann, Maximilian; Mothes-Lasch, Martin; Miltner, Wolfgang; Straube, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Effects of emotional intensity and valence on visual event-related potentials (ERPs) are still poorly understood, in particular in the context of limited attentional resources. In the present EEG study, we investigated the effect of emotional intensity of different emotional facial expressions on P1, N170, early posterior negativity (EPN) and late positive potential (LPP) while varying the amount of available attentional resources. A new stimulus set comprising 90 full color pictures of neutral, happy (low, high intensity), and angry (low, high intensity) expressions was developed. These facial expressions were presented centrally, superimposed by two horizontal bars, and participants engaged in a focal bars task. Availability of attentional resources was varied in two conditions by manipulating the difficulty of the focal bars task (low vs. high perceptual load). Our findings demonstrate intensity and valence effects of task-irrelevant facial expressions on early (N170) and intermediate processing stages (EPN). In addition, task-related effects of perceptual load evolved at intermediate processing stages and were full blown in the time window of LPP. In line with limited resource accounts, valence effects on N170 and EPN were reduced under high perceptual load. Interestingly, apart from this valence by load interaction no further interactions between stimulus and task-driven factors were obtained: Effects of emotional intensity were not modulated by the perceptual load of the focal bars task, indicating that emotional intensity was processed even though attentional resources were heavily restricted.

  5. Pharmacodynamic modelling of placebo and buprenorphine effects on event-related potentials in experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Juul, Rasmus V; Foster, David J R; Upton, Richard N; Andresen, Trine; Graversen, Carina; Drewes, Asbjørn M; Christrup, Lona L; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate placebo and buprenorphine effects on event-related potentials (ERPs) in experimental pain and the potential benefit of population pharmacodynamic modelling in data analysis. Nineteen healthy volunteers received transdermal placebo and buprenorphine in a cross-over study. Drug plasma concentrations and ERPs after electrical stimulation at the median nerve with intensity adjusted to pain detection threshold were recorded until 144 hrs after administration. Placebo and concentration-effect models were fitted to data using non-linear mixed-effects modelling implemented in NONMEM (V7.2.0.). Pharmacodynamic models were developed to adequately describe both placebo and buprenorphine ERP data. Models predicted significant placebo effects, but did not predict significant effects related to buprenorphine concentration. Models revealed that ERPs varied both between subjects and between study occasions. ERPs were found to be reproducible within subjects and occasions as population variance was found to be eight times higher than the unexplained variances. Between-subject variance accounted for more than 75% of the population variance. In conclusion, pharmacodynamic modelling was successfully implemented to allow for placebo and variability correction in ERP of experimental pain. Improved outcome of ERP studies can be expected if variation between subjects and study occasions can be identified and described.

  6. Clinical Experiments of Communication by ALS Patient Utilizing Detecting Event-Related Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanou, Naoyuki; Sakuma, Kenji; Nakashima, Kenji

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis(ALS) patients are unable to successfully communicate their desires, although their mentality is normal, and so, the necessity of Communication Aids(CA) for ALS patients is realized. Therefore, the authors are focused on Event-Related Potential(ERP) which is elicited primarily for the target by visual and auditory stimuli. P200, N200 and P300 are components of ERP. These are potentials that are elicited when the subject focuses attention on stimuli that appears infrequently. ALS patient participated in two experiments. In the first experiment, a target word out of five words on a computer display was specified. The five words were linked to an each electric appliance, allowing the ALS patient to switch on a target appliance by ERP. In the second experiment, a target word in a 5×5 matrix was specified by measure of ERP. The rows and columns of the matrix were reversed randomly. The word on a crossing point of rows and columns including the target word, was specified as the target word. The rate of correct judgment in the first and second experiments were 100% in N200 and 96% in P200. For practical use of this system, it is very important to determine suitable communication algorithms for each patient by performing these experiments evaluating the results.

  7. Pleasant and Unpleasant Odors Influence Hedonic Evaluations of Human Faces: An Event-Related Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Stephanie; Fallon, Nicholas; Wright, Hazel; Thomas, Anna; Giesbrecht, Timo; Field, Matt; Stancak, Andrej

    2015-01-01

    Odors can alter hedonic evaluations of human faces, but the neural mechanisms of such effects are poorly understood. The present study aimed to analyze the neural underpinning of odor-induced changes in evaluations of human faces in an odor-priming paradigm, using event-related potentials (ERPs). Healthy, young participants (N = 20) rated neutral faces presented after a 3 s pulse of a pleasant odor (jasmine), unpleasant odor (methylmercaptan), or no-odor control (clean air). Neutral faces presented in the pleasant odor condition were rated more pleasant than the same faces presented in the no-odor control condition, which in turn were rated more pleasant than faces in the unpleasant odor condition. Analysis of face-related potentials revealed four clusters of electrodes significantly affected by odor condition at specific time points during long-latency epochs (600−950 ms). In the 620−640 ms interval, two scalp-time clusters showed greater negative potential in the right parietal electrodes in response to faces in the pleasant odor condition, compared to those in the no-odor and unpleasant odor conditions. At 926 ms, face-related potentials showed greater positivity in response to faces in the pleasant and unpleasant odor conditions at the left and right lateral frontal-temporal electrodes, respectively. Our data shows that odor-induced shifts in evaluations of faces were associated with amplitude changes in the late (>600) and ultra-late (>900 ms) latency epochs. The observed amplitude changes during the ultra-late epoch are consistent with a left/right hemisphere bias towards pleasant/unpleasant odor effects. Odors alter evaluations of human faces, even when there is a temporal lag between presentation of odors and faces. Our results provide an initial understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying effects of odors on hedonic evaluations. PMID:26733843

  8. Pleasant and Unpleasant Odors Influence Hedonic Evaluations of Human Faces: An Event-Related Potential Study.

    PubMed

    Cook, Stephanie; Fallon, Nicholas; Wright, Hazel; Thomas, Anna; Giesbrecht, Timo; Field, Matt; Stancak, Andrej

    2015-01-01

    Odors can alter hedonic evaluations of human faces, but the neural mechanisms of such effects are poorly understood. The present study aimed to analyze the neural underpinning of odor-induced changes in evaluations of human faces in an odor-priming paradigm, using event-related potentials (ERPs). Healthy, young participants (N = 20) rated neutral faces presented after a 3 s pulse of a pleasant odor (jasmine), unpleasant odor (methylmercaptan), or no-odor control (clean air). Neutral faces presented in the pleasant odor condition were rated more pleasant than the same faces presented in the no-odor control condition, which in turn were rated more pleasant than faces in the unpleasant odor condition. Analysis of face-related potentials revealed four clusters of electrodes significantly affected by odor condition at specific time points during long-latency epochs (600-950 ms). In the 620-640 ms interval, two scalp-time clusters showed greater negative potential in the right parietal electrodes in response to faces in the pleasant odor condition, compared to those in the no-odor and unpleasant odor conditions. At 926 ms, face-related potentials showed greater positivity in response to faces in the pleasant and unpleasant odor conditions at the left and right lateral frontal-temporal electrodes, respectively. Our data shows that odor-induced shifts in evaluations of faces were associated with amplitude changes in the late (>600) and ultra-late (>900 ms) latency epochs. The observed amplitude changes during the ultra-late epoch are consistent with a left/right hemisphere bias towards pleasant/unpleasant odor effects. Odors alter evaluations of human faces, even when there is a temporal lag between presentation of odors and faces. Our results provide an initial understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying effects of odors on hedonic evaluations. PMID:26733843

  9. Dissociation between morality and disgust: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qun; Li, An; Xiao, Xiao; Zhang, Ye; Tian, Xuehong

    2014-10-01

    This study explored the neural correlates of morality and disgust, particularly, how the mechanisms that mediate our avoidance of physically disgusting and morally abhorrent behaviors are neurologically dissociated during the time-course of processing. Twelve participants were asked to judge the acceptability of different types of behaviors, which varied in their level of moral wrongness and physical disgust, while event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. The main results showed that the two morally wrong conditions elicited greater amplitudes of P300-400 at frontal sites than the neutral condition and the physically disgusting, but not morally wrong, condition. The physically disgusting conditions (with and without moral content) elicited significantly more positive deflections in the 500-600 ms timeframe than the neutral condition at central-posterior sites. These findings indicate that our aversion to harmful substances in the physical environment and offensive behaviors in the social environment may be neurologically dissociable in the temporal dimension. Furthermore, the detection of moral violations may be processed earlier in time than that of physical disgust.

  10. Auditory information processing during human sleep as revealed by event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Atienza, M; Cantero, J L; Escera, C

    2001-11-01

    The main goal of this review is to elucidate up to what extent pre-attentive auditory information processing is affected during human sleep. Evidence from event-related brain potential (ERP) studies indicates that auditory information processing is selectively affected, even at early phases, across the different stages of sleep-wakefulness continuum. According to these studies, 3 main conclusions are drawn: (1) the sleeping brain is able to automatically detect stimulus occurrence and trigger an orienting response towards that stimulus if its degree of novelty is large; (2) auditory stimuli are represented in the auditory system and maintained for a period of time in sensory memory, making the automatic-change detection during sleep possible; and (3) there are specific brain mechanisms (sleep-specific ERP components associated with the presence of vertex waves and K-complexes) by which information processing can be improved during non-rapid eye movement sleep. However, the remarkably affected amplitude and latency of the waking-ERPs during the different stages of sleep suggests deficits in the building and maintenance of a neural representation of the stimulus as well as in the process by which neural events lead to an orienting response toward such a stimulus. The deactivation of areas in the dorsolateral pre-frontal cortex during sleep contributing to the generation of these ERP components is hypothesized to be one of the main causes for the attenuated amplitude of these ERPs during human sleep. PMID:11682341

  11. Spatiotemporal cortical activation underlying dilemma decision-making: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peifeng; Qiu, Jiang; Li, Hong; Zhang, Qinglin

    2009-10-01

    Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were measured when 18 Chinese subjects performed a dilemma decision task. During this task, subjects were required to decide who to rescue when two relatives (FN-FN, e.g., father and mother) or two strangers (SN-SN: stranger A and stranger B) were buried in the debris after a great earthquake. All subjects had experienced the great Sichuan earthquake on May 12th, 2008 in Chengdu city, China. Scalp ERP analysis revealed that FN-FN elicited a much more positive deflection (P2) than did SN-SN, which might reflect stimulus evaluation and conflict detection in the initiation of decision-making. In addition, a greater positivity (P350-450) in FN-FN as compared to SN-SN was found between 350 and 450ms post-stimulus, after hearing aftershock information. Dipole source analysis of difference wave (FN-FN minus SN-SN) indicated that two generators of the P350-450, localized in the parahippocampal gyrus and the cuneus, might be involved in dilemma interference resolution processes. PMID:19576947

  12. How culture gets embrained: Cultural differences in event-related potentials of social norm violations

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yan; Kitayama, Shinobu; Han, Shihui; Gelfand, Michele J.

    2015-01-01

    Humans are unique among all species in their ability to develop and enforce social norms, but there is wide variation in the strength of social norms across human societies. Despite this fundamental aspect of human nature, there has been surprisingly little research on how social norm violations are detected at the neurobiological level. Building on the emerging field of cultural neuroscience, we combine noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG) with a new social norm violation paradigm to examine the neural mechanisms underlying the detection of norm violations and how they vary across cultures. EEG recordings from Chinese and US participants (n = 50) showed consistent negative deflection of event-related potential around 400 ms (N400) over the central and parietal regions that served as a culture-general neural marker of detecting norm violations. The N400 at the frontal and temporal regions, however, was only observed among Chinese but not US participants, illustrating culture-specific neural substrates of the detection of norm violations. Further, the frontal N400 predicted a variety of behavioral and attitudinal measurements related to the strength of social norms that have been found at the national and state levels, including higher culture superiority and self-control but lower creativity. There were no cultural differences in the N400 induced by semantic violation, suggesting a unique cultural influence on social norm violation detection. In all, these findings provided the first evidence, to our knowledge, for the neurobiological foundations of social norm violation detection and its variation across cultures. PMID:26621713

  13. How culture gets embrained: Cultural differences in event-related potentials of social norm violations.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yan; Kitayama, Shinobu; Han, Shihui; Gelfand, Michele J

    2015-12-15

    Humans are unique among all species in their ability to develop and enforce social norms, but there is wide variation in the strength of social norms across human societies. Despite this fundamental aspect of human nature, there has been surprisingly little research on how social norm violations are detected at the neurobiological level. Building on the emerging field of cultural neuroscience, we combine noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG) with a new social norm violation paradigm to examine the neural mechanisms underlying the detection of norm violations and how they vary across cultures. EEG recordings from Chinese and US participants (n = 50) showed consistent negative deflection of event-related potential around 400 ms (N400) over the central and parietal regions that served as a culture-general neural marker of detecting norm violations. The N400 at the frontal and temporal regions, however, was only observed among Chinese but not US participants, illustrating culture-specific neural substrates of the detection of norm violations. Further, the frontal N400 predicted a variety of behavioral and attitudinal measurements related to the strength of social norms that have been found at the national and state levels, including higher culture superiority and self-control but lower creativity. There were no cultural differences in the N400 induced by semantic violation, suggesting a unique cultural influence on social norm violation detection. In all, these findings provided the first evidence, to our knowledge, for the neurobiological foundations of social norm violation detection and its variation across cultures.

  14. Event-related potential correlates of serial-position effects during an elaborative memory test.

    PubMed

    Rushby, Jacqueline A; Barry, Robert J; Johnstone, Stuart S

    2002-10-01

    Twenty undergraduate students participated in an elaborative learning test to evaluate the relationship between electrical brain activity and subsequently recalled and not-recalled words. Data collected from the midline (Fz, Cz, Pz) and lateral scalp sites (F3, F4, C3, C4, P3, P4) were analysed. The difference between event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by subsequently recalled and not-recalled words, the ERP memory effect, was evaluated for each portion (primacy, plateau and recency) of the serial-position curve (SPC). We compared peak amplitudes for the P1, N1, P2, N400, P3 and frontal positive slow wave (FPSW) components. The electrophysiological data support the hypothesis that different mechanisms underlie primacy and recency effects during free recall paradigms. There was no support for the hypothesis that an association arises between memory and the FPSW when subjects utilise elaborative learning strategies. The P2 component predicted subsequent recall at the primacy portion of the SPC, and P1 predicted recall at the primacy and plateau portions of the curve. The findings suggest that the early positive components of the ERP (i.e. P1 and P2) are useful indices of the differential stimulus processing during elaborative learning which predicts later recall.

  15. Event-related potential correlates of the expectancy violation effect during emotional prosody processing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuhai; Zhao, Lun; Jiang, Aishi; Yang, Yufang

    2011-03-01

    The present study investigated the expectancy violation effects evoked by deviation in sentential emotional prosody (EP), and their association with the deviation patterns. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded for mismatching EPs with different patterns of deviation and for matching control EPs while subjects performed emotional congruousness judgment in Experiment 1 and visual probe detection tasks in Experiment 2. In the control experiment, EPs and acoustically matched non-emotional materials were presented and ERPs were recorded while participants judged the sound intensity congruousness. It was found that an early negativity, whose peak latency varied with deviation pattern, was elicited by mismatching EPs relative to matching ones, irrespective of task-relevance. A late positivity was specifically induced by mismatching EPs, and was modulated by both deviation pattern and task-relevance. Moreover, these effects cannot be simply attributed to the change in non-emotional acoustic properties. These findings suggest that the brain detects the EP deviation rapidly, and then integrates it with context for comprehension, during which the emotionality plays a role of speeding up the perception and enhancing vigilance.

  16. Brain Signals of Face Processing as Revealed by Event-Related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Ela I.; Iglesias, Jaime; Saavedra, Cristina; Trujillo-Barreto, Nelson J.; Valdés-Sosa, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the functional significance of different event-related potentials (ERPs) as electrophysiological indices of face perception and face recognition, according to cognitive and neurofunctional models of face processing. Initially, the processing of faces seems to be supported by early extrastriate occipital cortices and revealed by modulations of the occipital P1. This early response is thought to reflect the detection of certain primary structural aspects indicating the presence grosso modo of a face within the visual field. The posterior-temporal N170 is more sensitive to the detection of faces as complex-structured stimuli and, therefore, to the presence of its distinctive organizational characteristics prior to within-category identification. In turn, the relatively late and probably more rostrally generated N250r and N400-like responses might respectively indicate processes of access and retrieval of face-related information, which is stored in long-term memory (LTM). New methods of analysis of electrophysiological and neuroanatomical data, namely, dynamic causal modeling, single-trial and time-frequency analyses, are highly recommended to advance in the knowledge of those brain mechanisms concerning face processing. PMID:26160999

  17. Kernel PLS Estimation of Single-trial Event-related Potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosipal, Roman; Trejo, Leonard J.

    2004-01-01

    Nonlinear kernel partial least squaes (KPLS) regressior, is a novel smoothing approach to nonparametric regression curve fitting. We have developed a KPLS approach to the estimation of single-trial event related potentials (ERPs). For improved accuracy of estimation, we also developed a local KPLS method for situations in which there exists prior knowledge about the approximate latency of individual ERP components. To assess the utility of the KPLS approach, we compared non-local KPLS and local KPLS smoothing with other nonparametric signal processing and smoothing methods. In particular, we examined wavelet denoising, smoothing splines, and localized smoothing splines. We applied these methods to the estimation of simulated mixtures of human ERPs and ongoing electroencephalogram (EEG) activity using a dipole simulator (BESA). In this scenario we considered ongoing EEG to represent spatially and temporally correlated noise added to the ERPs. This simulation provided a reasonable but simplified model of real-world ERP measurements. For estimation of the simulated single-trial ERPs, local KPLS provided a level of accuracy that was comparable with or better than the other methods. We also applied the local KPLS method to the estimation of human ERPs recorded in an experiment on co,onitive fatigue. For these data, the local KPLS method provided a clear improvement in visualization of single-trial ERPs as well as their averages. The local KPLS method may serve as a new alternative to the estimation of single-trial ERPs and improvement of ERP averages.

  18. Compound headedness in the mental lexicon: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Arcara, Giorgio; Marelli, Marco; Buodo, Giulia; Mondini, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Compound words in Romance languages may have the head either in the initial or in the final position. In the present event-related potential (ERP) study, we address the hypothesis that Italian compounds are processed differently according to their head position and that this is mostly due to the perceived change in the canonical order of syntactic elements. Compound stimuli (head-initial, head-final, or exocentric) were visually displayed in two presentation modes, as whole words or separated into their constituents, in the context of a lexical decision task. Behavioural results showed an increased split cost in head-final and exocentric compounds as compared to head-initial compounds. ERP results showed an enhanced left anterior negativity (LAN) for head-final and exocentric compounds as compared to head-initial compounds, regardless of the presentation mode. Results suggest that the analogy with syntactic order may influence the internal structure of a compound and, as a consequence, its processing, but other characteristics (such as the grammatical properties of constituents) may affect the processing itself.

  19. How children process over-regularizations: evidence from event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Clahsen, Harald; Lück, Monika; Hahne, Anja

    2007-08-01

    This study examines the mental processes involved in children's on-line recognition of inflected word forms using event-related potentials (ERPs). Sixty children in three age groups (20 six- to seven-year-olds, 20 eight- to nine-year-olds, 20 eleven- to twelve-year-olds) and 23 adults (tested in a previous study) listened to sentences containing correct or incorrect German noun plural forms. In the two older child groups, as well as in the adult group, over-regularized plural forms elicited brain responses that are characteristic of combinatorial (grammatical) violations. We also found that ERP components associated with language processing change from child to adult with respect to their onsets and their topography. The ERP violation effects obtained for over-regularizations suggest that children (aged eight years and above) and adults employ morphological computation for processing purposes, consistent with dual-mechanism models of inflection. The observed differences between children's and adults' ERP responses are argued to result from children's smaller lexicons and from slower and less efficient processing.

  20. An Event-Related Potential Study on the Effects of Cannabis on Emotion Processing.

    PubMed

    Troup, Lucy J; Bastidas, Stephanie; Nguyen, Maia T; Andrzejewski, Jeremy A; Bowers, Matthew; Nomi, Jason S

    2016-01-01

    The effect of cannabis on emotional processing was investigated using event-related potential paradigms (ERPs). ERPs associated with emotional processing of cannabis users, and non-using controls, were recorded and compared during an implicit and explicit emotional expression recognition and empathy task. Comparisons in P3 component mean amplitudes were made between cannabis users and controls. Results showed a significant decrease in the P3 amplitude in cannabis users compared to controls. Specifically, cannabis users showed reduced P3 amplitudes for implicit compared to explicit processing over centro-parietal sites which reversed, and was enhanced, at fronto-central sites. Cannabis users also showed a decreased P3 to happy faces, with an increase to angry faces, compared to controls. These effects appear to increase with those participants that self-reported the highest levels of cannabis consumption. Those cannabis users with the greatest consumption rates showed the largest P3 deficits for explicit processing and negative emotions. These data suggest that there is a complex relationship between cannabis consumption and emotion processing that appears to be modulated by attention. PMID:26926868

  1. Event-related potentials show taste and risk effects on food evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingguo; Wang, Cuicui; Wu, Yifan; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2014-07-01

    Tastes and claims about unhealthy food are important factors that affect consumption. This study investigated the correlation of the event-related potential (ERP) of the evaluation of processing of food information with the task of positive judgment. Given the information on possible diseases that arise with food consumption, sweet-tasting food elicited more conflict than salty food, and this conflict was reflected by a negative ERP component at 250-500 ms (N400). Moreover, the late positive wave at 500-800 ms that was evoked by presentation of food with the names of chronic diseases that could arise from the consumption of such food was larger than that evoked when acute diseases were presented. Sweet-tasting food caused a more intense conflict with disease-related risk than salty food, and chronic diseases aroused a stronger emotional fear than acute diseases. These findings provide new insights into the N400 component and the neurocognitive processes of evaluating food combined with taste and risk information.

  2. Lexical Processing Deficits in Children with Developmental Language Disorder: An Event-Related Potentials Study

    PubMed Central

    Kornilov, Sergey A.; Magnuson, James S.; Rakhlin, Natalia; Landi, Nicole; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2015-01-01

    Lexical processing deficits in children with developmental language disorder (DLD) have been postulated to arise as sequelae of their grammatical deficits (either directly or via compensatory mechanisms) and vice versa. We examined event-related potential indices of lexical processing in children with DLD (n = 23) and their typically developing peers (n = 16) using a picture–word matching paradigm. We found that children with DLD showed markedly reduced N400 amplitudes in response both to auditorily presented words that had initial phonological overlap with the name of the pictured object and to words that were not semantically or phonologically related to the pictured object. Moreover, this reduction was related to behavioral indices of phonological and lexical but not grammatical development. We also found that children with DLD showed a depressed phonological mapping negativity component in the early time window, suggesting deficits in phonological processing or early lexical access. The results are partially consistent with the overactivation account of lexical processing deficits in DLD and point to the relative functional independence of lexical/phonological and grammatical deficits in DLD, supporting a multidimensional view of the disorder. The results also, although indirectly, support the neuroplasticity account of DLD, according to which language impairment affects brain development and shapes the specific patterns of brain responses to language stimuli. PMID:25997765

  3. Gender, facial attractiveness, and early and late event-related potential components.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zimu; Deng, Zhidong

    2012-12-01

    Facial attractiveness has been an interesting topic in cognitive psychology due to its key role in human communication and experience. The evaluation of attractiveness is adjusted by many factors including gender differences and cultural biases. In this paper, event-related potential (ERP) activity was recorded in an oddball paradigm from 10 Chinese men and 10 Chinese women who judged attractiveness of faces. Participants were told to detect faces with neutral expression and judge their attractiveness among a train of neutral objects that were presented more frequently than the faces. The ERP analyses showed that there was enhanced detection over early (P1, N170, P2, N300) and late (P3b) components in both genders. This suggests that a biased electrophysiological response to attractive faces compared to unattractive faces could indicate the involvement of emotion and reward pathways in judging facial attractiveness. Specifically, there were delayed P1 and P3b latencies in response to attractive faces with slower response times in men compared to women. From an evolutionary perspective, this may suggest that men attribute more value to facial appearances, especially attractive features, than women do, as evidenced by their cognitive load while processing attractive faces compared to unattractive faces.

  4. Neural responses to cartoon facial attractiveness: An event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingjun; Wang, Jingmei; Wang, Ling; Wang, Junli; Qin, Jinliang

    2014-06-01

    Animation creates a vivid, virtual world and expands the scope of human imagination. In this study, we investigated the time-courses of brain responses related to the evaluation of the attractiveness of cartoon faces using the event-related potential (ERP) technique. The results demonstrated that N170 amplitude was higher for attractive than for unattractive cartoon faces in males, while the opposite was found in females. Facial attractiveness notably modulated the late positive component (LPC), which might reflect the task-related process of aesthetic appraisal of beauty. The mean LPC amplitude in males was significantly higher for attractive cartoon faces than for unattractive faces, while the LPC amplitude in females did not significantly differ between attractive and unattractive cartoon faces. Moreover, the paint mode (computer graphics, gouache, and stick figure) modulated the early encoding of facial structures and the late evaluative process. The early modulation effect by paint mode may be related to the spatial frequency of the pictures. The processing speed and intensity in females were both higher than those in males. In conclusion, our study, for the first time, reported ERP modulation based on the assessment of cartoon facial attractiveness, suggesting the facilitated selection of attractiveness information at the early stage, and that the attentional enhancement of attractive faces at the late stage only exists in males. This suggests that men's brains are hard-wired to be sensitive to facial beauty, even in cartoons.

  5. An Event-related Potential Study on the Interaction between Lighting Level and Stimulus Spatial Location

    PubMed Central

    Carretié, Luis; Ruiz-Padial, Elisabeth; Mendoza, María T.

    2015-01-01

    Due to heterogeneous photoreceptor distribution, spatial location of stimulation is crucial to study visual brain activity in different light environments. This unexplored issue was studied through occipital event-related potentials (ERPs) recorded from 40 participants in response to discrete visual stimuli presented at different locations and in two environmental light conditions, low mesopic (L, 0.03 lux) and high mesopic (H, 6.5 lux), characterized by a differential photoreceptor activity balance: rod > cone and rod < cone, respectively. Stimuli, which were exactly the same in L and H, consisted of squares presented at fixation, at the vertical periphery (above or below fixation) or at the horizontal periphery (left or right). Analyses showed that occipital ERPs presented important L vs. H differences in the 100 to 450 ms window, which were significantly modulated by spatial location of stimulation: differences were greater in response to peripheral stimuli than to stimuli presented at fixation. Moreover, in the former case, significance of L vs. H differences was even stronger in response to stimuli presented at the horizontal than at the vertical periphery. These low vs. high mesopic differences may be explained by photoreceptor activation and their retinal distribution, and confirm that ERPs discriminate between rod– and cone-originated visual processing. PMID:26635588

  6. An Event-Related Potential Study on the Effects of Cannabis on Emotion Processing.

    PubMed

    Troup, Lucy J; Bastidas, Stephanie; Nguyen, Maia T; Andrzejewski, Jeremy A; Bowers, Matthew; Nomi, Jason S

    2016-01-01

    The effect of cannabis on emotional processing was investigated using event-related potential paradigms (ERPs). ERPs associated with emotional processing of cannabis users, and non-using controls, were recorded and compared during an implicit and explicit emotional expression recognition and empathy task. Comparisons in P3 component mean amplitudes were made between cannabis users and controls. Results showed a significant decrease in the P3 amplitude in cannabis users compared to controls. Specifically, cannabis users showed reduced P3 amplitudes for implicit compared to explicit processing over centro-parietal sites which reversed, and was enhanced, at fronto-central sites. Cannabis users also showed a decreased P3 to happy faces, with an increase to angry faces, compared to controls. These effects appear to increase with those participants that self-reported the highest levels of cannabis consumption. Those cannabis users with the greatest consumption rates showed the largest P3 deficits for explicit processing and negative emotions. These data suggest that there is a complex relationship between cannabis consumption and emotion processing that appears to be modulated by attention.

  7. Does Speaking Two Dialects in Daily Life Affect Executive Functions? An Event-Related Potential Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan Jing; Zhang, Haoyun; Guo, Taomei

    2016-01-01

    Whether using two languages enhances executive functions is a matter of debate. Here, we take a novel perspective to examine the bilingual advantage hypothesis by comparing bi-dialect with mono-dialect speakers' performance on a non-linguistic task that requires executive control. Two groups of native Chinese speakers, one speaking only the standard Chinese Mandarin and the other also speaking the Southern-Min dialect, which differs from the standard Chinese Mandarin primarily in phonology, performed a classic Flanker task. Behavioural results showed no difference between the two groups, but event-related potentials recorded simultaneously revealed a number of differences, including an earlier P2 effect in the bi-dialect as compared to the mono-dialect group, suggesting that the two groups engage different underlying neural processes. Despite differences in the early ERP component, no between-group differences in the magnitude of the Flanker effects, which is an index of conflict resolution, were observed in the N2 component. Therefore, these findings suggest that speaking two dialects of one language does not enhance executive functions. Implications of the current findings for the bilingual advantage hypothesis are discussed. PMID:26991456

  8. The Event-related Potential P300 in Patients with Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Titlic, Marina; Mise, Nikolina Ivica; Pintaric, Irena; Rogosic, Veljko; Vanjaka-Rogosic, Lucija; Mihalj, Mario; Jurinovic, Pavao; Katic, Ana Curkovic;; Andjelinovic, Maja

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Recording of event-related potentials by using oddball paradigm of auditory P300 has yielded conflicting results in migraine. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that migraine patients have reduced P300 amplitude and prolonged P300 latency, suggesting alterations of the cognitive-evaluative component. Methods: We recruited 29 migraine patients (24 females; median age 40 years) and 29 healthy age- and gender-matched participants. Participants were subjected to the same testing procedures of auditory P300 by discrimination the target auditory stimulus from the frequent stimulus, and analyzing P300 target/frequent stimulus amplitudes, and P300 target/frequent stimulus latencies. Results: Patients with migraine don’t have prolonged P300 target stimulus latency, but have a longer P300 frequent stimulus latency for 17.5ms. Out of 29 participants with migraine 8 had pathological P300 target stimulus amplitude, and 19 had pathological P300 frequent stimulus amplitude. Conclusion: People with migraine have altered the P300 which indicates the presence of cognitive dysfunction in these patients and importance of early diagnosis and intervention to preventing any deterioration in cognitive functions. PMID:26862241

  9. Event-Related Brain Potential Investigation of Preparation for Speech Production in Late Bilinguals

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan Jing; Thierry, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    It has been debated how bilinguals select the intended language and prevent interference from the unintended language when speaking. Here, we studied the nature of the mental representations accessed by late fluent bilinguals during a rhyming judgment task relying on covert speech production. We recorded event-related brain potentials in Chinese–English bilinguals and monolingual speakers of English while they indicated whether the names of pictures presented on a screen rhymed.  Whether bilingual participants focussed on rhyming selectively in English or Chinese, we found a significant priming effect of language-specific sound repetition. Surprisingly, however, sound repetitions in Chinese elicited significant priming effects even when the rhyming task was performed in English. This cross-language priming effect was delayed by ∼200  ms as compared to the within-language effect and was asymmetric, since there was no priming effect of sound repetitions in English when participants were asked to make rhyming judgments in Chinese. These results demonstrate that second language production hinders, but does not seal off, activation of the first language, whereas native language production appears immune to competition from the second language. PMID:21687468

  10. Dispositional mindfulness and semantic integration of emotional words: Evidence from event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Dorjee, Dusana; Lally, Níall; Darrall-Rew, Jonathan; Thierry, Guillaume

    2015-08-01

    Initial research shows that mindfulness training can enhance attention and modulate the affective response. However, links between mindfulness and language processing remain virtually unexplored despite the prominent role of overt and silent negative ruminative speech in depressive and anxiety-related symptomatology. Here, we measured dispositional mindfulness and recorded participants' event-related brain potential responses to positive and negative target words preceded by words congruent or incongruent with the targets in terms of semantic relatedness and emotional valence. While the low mindfulness group showed similar N400 effect pattern for positive and negative targets, high dispositional mindfulness was associated with larger N400 effect to negative targets. This result suggests that negative meanings are less readily accessible in people with high dispositional mindfulness. Furthermore, high dispositional mindfulness was associated with reduced P600 amplitudes to emotional words, suggesting less post-analysis and attentional effort which possibly relates to a lower inclination to ruminate. Overall, these findings provide initial evidence on associations between modifications in language systems and mindfulness.

  11. Interactions between mood and the structure of semantic memory: event-related potentials evidence.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Ana P; del Re, Elisabetta; Nestor, Paul G; McCarley, Robert W; Gonçalves, Óscar F; Niznikiewicz, Margaret

    2013-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that affect acts as modulator of cognitive processes and in particular that induced mood has an effect on the way semantic memory is used on-line. We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to examine affective modulation of semantic information processing under three different moods: neutral, positive and negative. Fifteen subjects read 324 pairs of sentences, after mood induction procedure with 30 pictures of neutral, 30 pictures of positive and 30 pictures of neutral valence: 108 sentences were read in each mood induction condition. Sentences ended with three word types: expected words, within-category violations, and between-category violations. N400 amplitude was measured to the three word types under each mood induction condition. Under neutral mood, a congruency (more negative N400 amplitude for unexpected relative to expected endings) and a category effect (more negative N400 amplitude for between- than to within-category violations) were observed. Also, results showed differences in N400 amplitude for both within- and between-category violations as a function of mood: while positive mood tended to facilitate the integration of unexpected but related items, negative mood made their integration as difficult as unexpected and unrelated items. These findings suggest the differential impact of mood on access to long-term semantic memory during sentence comprehension.

  12. Event-related potential correlates of long-term memory for briefly presented faces.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Carrie A; Kutas, Marta

    2005-05-01

    Electrophysiological studies have investigated the nature of face recognition in a variety of paradigms; some have contrasted famous and novel faces in explicit memory paradigms, others have repeated faces to examine implicit memory/priming. If the general finding that implicit memory can last for up to several months also holds for novel faces, a reliable measure of it could have practical application for eyewitness testimony, given that explicit measures of eyewitness memory have at times proven fallible. The current study aimed to determine whether indirect behavioral and electrophysiological measures might yield reliable estimates of face memory over longer intervals than have typically been obtained with priming manipulations. Participants were shown 192 faces and then tested for recognition at four test delays ranging from immediately up to 1 week later. Three event-related brain potential components (e.g., N250r, N400f, and LPC) varied with memory measures although only the N250r varied regardless of explicit recognition, that is, with both repetition and recognition. PMID:15904542

  13. Lexical processing deficits in children with developmental language disorder: An event-related potentials study.

    PubMed

    Kornilov, Sergey A; Magnuson, James S; Rakhlin, Natalia; Landi, Nicole; Grigorenko, Elena L

    2015-05-01

    Lexical processing deficits in children with developmental language disorder (DLD) have been postulated to arise as sequelae of their grammatical deficits (either directly or via compensatory mechanisms) and vice versa. We examined event-related potential indices of lexical processing in children with DLD (n = 23) and their typically developing peers (n = 16) using a picture-word matching paradigm. We found that children with DLD showed markedly reduced N400 amplitudes in response both to auditorily presented words that had initial phonological overlap with the name of the pictured object and to words that were not semantically or phonologically related to the pictured object. Moreover, this reduction was related to behavioral indices of phonological and lexical but not grammatical development. We also found that children with DLD showed a depressed phonological mapping negativity component in the early time window, suggesting deficits in phonological processing or early lexical access. The results are partially consistent with the overactivation account of lexical processing deficits in DLD and point to the relative functional independence of lexical/phonological and grammatical deficits in DLD, supporting a multidimensional view of the disorder. The results also, although indirectly, support the neuroplasticity account of DLD, according to which language impairment affects brain development and shapes the specific patterns of brain responses to language stimuli. PMID:25997765

  14. The processing course of conflicts in third-party punishment: An event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Qu, Lulu; Dou, Wei; You, Cheng; Qu, Chen

    2014-09-01

    In social decision-making games, uninvolved third parties usually severely punish norm violators, even though the punishment is costly for them. For this irrational behavior, the conflict caused by punishment satisfaction and monetary loss is obvious. In the present study, 18 participants observed a Dictator Game and were asked about their willingness to incur some cost to change the offers by reducing the dictator's money. A response-locked event-related potential (ERP) component, the error negativity or error-related negativity (Ne/ERN), which is evoked by error or conflict, was analyzed to investigate whether a trade-off between irrational punishment and rational private benefit occurred in the brain responses of third parties. We examined the effect of the choice type ("to change the offer" or "not to change the offer") and levels of unfairness (90:10 and 70:30) on Ne/ERN amplitudes. The results indicated that there was an ERN effect for unfair offers as Ne/ERN amplitudes were more negative for not to change the offer choices than for to change the offer choices, which suggested that participants encountered more conflict when they did not change unfair offers. Furthermore, it was implied that altruistic punishment, rather than rational utilitarianism, might be the prepotent tendency for humans that is involved in the early stage of decision-making. PMID:26271939

  15. The neural origins of visual crowding as revealed by event-related potentials and oscillatory dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ronconi, Luca; Bertoni, Sara; Bellacosa Marotti, Rosilari

    2016-06-01

    Visual crowding is the difficulty in perceiving a target in the presence of nearby flankers. Most neurophysiological studies of crowding employed functional neuroimaging, but because of its low temporal resolution, no definitive answer can be given to the question: is crowding arising at the earliest or at later stages of visual processing? Here, we used a classic letters crowding paradigm in combination with electroencephalography (EEG). We manipulated the critical space between peripheral target and flankers, while ensuring a proper control of basic stimulus characteristics. Analyses were focused on event-related potentials (ERPs) and oscillatory activity in the alpha (8-12 Hz), beta (15-30 Hz) and gamma (30-80 Hz) bands. At the ERP level, we found that the first sign of a crowding-induced modulation of EEG activity was a suppression of the N1 component. Oscillatory analysis revealed an early stimulus-evoked gamma enhancement and a later alpha reduction that, however, were not influenced by the amount of crowding. Importantly, reduction in the beta band reflected the amount of crowding (i.e., stronger reduction for strong relative to mid crowding condition) and correlated with individual behavioral performance. Collectively, these findings show that crowding for complex objects emerges at later stages of visual processing, possibly as a result of large-scale network interaction.

  16. The processing of morphological structure information in Chinese coordinative compounds: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kevin K H; Tong, Xiuhong; Liu, Phil D; McBride-Chang, Catherine; Meng, Xiangzhi

    2010-09-17

    The aim of this study was to investigate the morphological structure processing of Chinese compounds at short SOAs of 57ms. Event-related potentials were recorded while 16 Hong Kong Chinese university students were instructed to make visual lexical decisions in a decision-making task involving Chinese compound words. Only words in the category of the coordinative compounding structure were included in the present study. In this compounding structure, both morphemes comprising the compound word are of equal importance, similar to the phrase "in-and-out" in English, where neither "in" nor "out" can be considered the head or modifier in the compound; both morphemes are of equal weight in communicating meaning. While the classic N400 semantic priming effect was replicated at this short SOA, an earlier P250 component, suggested to reflect semantic memory network activation during semantic information processing, was also obtained. The morphological structure effect was only found in the P250 component, suggesting that morphological structure may automatically influence the semantic information processing during Chinese compound word processing. PMID:20627093

  17. The role of event-related brain potentials in assessing central auditory processing.

    PubMed

    Alain, Claude; Tremblay, Kelly

    2007-01-01

    The perception of complex acoustic signals such as speech and music depends on the interaction between peripheral and central auditory processing. As information travels from the cochlea to primary and associative auditory cortices, the incoming sound is subjected to increasingly more detailed and refined analysis. These various levels of analyses are thought to include low-level automatic processes that detect, discriminate and group sounds that are similar in physical attributes such as frequency, intensity, and location as well as higher-level schema-driven processes that reflect listeners' experience and knowledge of the auditory environment. In this review, we describe studies that have used event-related brain potentials in investigating the processing of complex acoustic signals (e.g., speech, music). In particular, we examine the role of hearing loss on the neural representation of sound and how cognitive factors and learning can help compensate for perceptual difficulties. The notion of auditory scene analysis is used as a conceptual framework for interpreting and studying the perception of sound. PMID:18236645

  18. Interpreting dissociations between regular and irregular past-tense morphology: Evidence from event-related potentials

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Timothy; Larsen, Jary; de Mornay Davies, Paul; Swick, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Neuropsychological dissociations between regular and irregular English past-tense morphology have been reported using a lexical-decision task in which past-tense primes immediately precede present-tense targets. We present N400 event-related potential data from healthy participants using the same design. Both regular and irregular past-tense forms primed corresponding present-tense forms, but with a longer duration for irregular verbs. Phonological control conditions suggested that differences in formal overlap between prime and target contributes to, but does not account for this difference, suggesting a link between irregular morphology and semantics. Further analysis, dividing the irregular verbs into two categories (weak irregular and strong) revealed that priming for strong verbs was reliably stronger than that for weak irregular and regular verbs, which were statistically indistinguishable from one another. We argue that although we observe a regular-irregular dissociation, the nature of this dissociation is more consistent with single- than with dual-system models of inflectional morphology. PMID:18589508

  19. Neural Basis of Intrinsic Motivation: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jia; Yu, Liping; Ma, Qingguo

    2015-01-01

    Human intrinsic motivation is of great importance in human behavior. However, although researchers have focused on this topic for decades, its neural basis was still unclear. The current study employed event-related potentials to investigate the neural disparity between an interesting stop-watch (SW) task and a boring watch-stop task (WS) to understand the neural mechanisms of intrinsic motivation. Our data showed that, in the cue priming stage, the cue of the SW task elicited smaller N2 amplitude than that of the WS task. Furthermore, in the outcome feedback stage, the outcome of the SW task induced smaller FRN amplitude and larger P300 amplitude than that of the WS task. These results suggested that human intrinsic motivation did exist and that it can be detected at the neural level. Furthermore, intrinsic motivation could be quantitatively indexed by the amplitude of ERP components, such as N2, FRN, and P300, in the cue priming stage or feedback stage. Quantitative measurements would also be convenient for intrinsic motivation to be added as a candidate social factor in the construction of a machine learning model. PMID:26491430

  20. A hierarchy of event-related potential markers of auditory processing in disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Beukema, Steve; Gonzalez-Lara, Laura E; Finoia, Paola; Kamau, Evelyn; Allanson, Judith; Chennu, Srivas; Gibson, Raechelle M; Pickard, John D; Owen, Adrian M; Cruse, Damian

    2016-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging of covert perceptual and cognitive processes can inform the diagnoses and prognoses of patients with disorders of consciousness, such as the vegetative and minimally conscious states (VS;MCS). Here we report an event-related potential (ERP) paradigm for detecting a hierarchy of auditory processes in a group of healthy individuals and patients with disorders of consciousness. Simple cortical responses to sounds were observed in all 16 patients; 7/16 (44%) patients exhibited markers of the differential processing of speech and noise; and 1 patient produced evidence of the semantic processing of speech (i.e. the N400 effect). In several patients, the level of auditory processing that was evident from ERPs was higher than the abilities that were evident from behavioural assessment, indicating a greater sensitivity of ERPs in some cases. However, there were no differences in auditory processing between VS and MCS patient groups, indicating a lack of diagnostic specificity for this paradigm. Reliably detecting semantic processing by means of the N400 effect in passively listening single-subjects is a challenge. Multiple assessment methods are needed in order to fully characterise the abilities of patients with disorders of consciousness. PMID:27595064

  1. Mathematical anxiety effects on simple arithmetic processing efficiency: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Pellicioni, M; Núñez-Peña, M I; Colomé, A

    2013-12-01

    This study uses event-related brain potentials to investigate the difficulties that high math anxious individuals face when processing dramatically incorrect solutions to simple arithmetical problems. To this end, thirteen high math-anxious (HMA) and thirteen low math-anxious (LMA) individuals were presented with simple addition problems in a verification task. The proposed solution could be correct, incorrect but very close to the correct one (small-split), or dramatically incorrect (large-split). The two groups did not differ in mathematical ability or trait anxiety. We reproduced previous results for flawed scores suggesting HMA difficulties in processing large-split solutions. Moreover, large-split solutions elicited a late positive component (P600/P3b) which was more enhanced and delayed in the HMA group. Our study proposes that the pattern of flawed scores found by previous studies (and that we replicate) has to do with HMA individuals'difficulties in inhibiting an extended processing of irrelevant information (large-split solutions).

  2. Brain functions after sports-related concussion: insights from event-related potentials and functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Nadia; Saluja, Rajeet Singh; Chen, Jen-Kai; Bottari, Carolina; Johnston, Karen; Ptito, Alain

    2010-10-01

    The high incidence of concussions in contact sports and their impact on brain functions are a major cause for concern. To improve our understanding of brain functioning after sports-related concussion, advanced functional assessment techniques, namely event-related potentials (ERPs) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), have been recently used in research studies. Contrary to neuropsychological tests that measure verbal and/or motor responses, ERPs and fMRI assess the neural activities associated with cognitive/behavioral demands, and thus provide access to better comprehension of brain functioning. In fact, ERPs have excellent temporal resolution, and fMRI identifies the involved structures during a task. This article describes ERP and fMRI techniques and reviews the results obtained with these tools in sports-related concussion. Although these techniques are not yet readily available, they offer a unique clinical approach, particularly for complex cases (ie, athletes with multiple concussions, chronic symptoms) and objective measures that provide valuable information to guide management and return-to-play decision making.

  3. Estimation of single event-related potentials utilizing the Prony method.

    PubMed

    Hansson, M; Gänsler, T; Salomonsson, G

    1996-10-01

    This paper deals with estimation of the waveform of a single event-related potential, sERP. An additive noise model is used for the measured signal and the SNR of the disturbed sERP is approximately 0 dB. The sERP is described by a series expansion where the basis functions are damped sinusoids. The fundamental basis function is estimated by the least squares Prony method, derived for colored noise. The performance of the Prony method for different forms of the power density spectrum of the noise is investigated. A white noise approximation can be used at a low signal-to-noise (SNR). The basis functions change slowly but the waveform of the sERP may vary from one stimulus to another, thus we average a small number of correlation functions in order to increase the SNR. The method is evaluated by using measurements from four subjects and the results confirm the variability of the sERP.

  4. Learning from experience: event-related potential correlates of reward processing, neural adaptation, and behavioral choice.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Matthew M; Anderson, John R

    2012-09-01

    To behave adaptively, we must learn from the consequences of our actions. Studies using event-related potentials (ERPs) have been informative with respect to the question of how such learning occurs. These studies have revealed a frontocentral negativity termed the feedback-related negativity (FRN) that appears after negative feedback. According to one prominent theory, the FRN tracks the difference between the values of actual and expected outcomes, or reward prediction errors. As such, the FRN provides a tool for studying reward valuation and decision making. We begin this review by examining the neural significance of the FRN. We then examine its functional significance. To understand the cognitive processes that occur when the FRN is generated, we explore variables that influence its appearance and amplitude. Specifically, we evaluate four hypotheses: (1) the FRN encodes a quantitative reward prediction error; (2) the FRN is evoked by outcomes and by stimuli that predict outcomes; (3) the FRN and behavior change with experience; and (4) the system that produces the FRN is maximally engaged by volitional actions.

  5. Meditation (Vipassana) and the P3a event-related brain potential.

    PubMed

    Cahn, B Rael; Polich, John

    2009-04-01

    A three-stimulus auditory oddball series was presented to experienced Vipassana meditators during meditation and a control thought period to elicit event-related brain potentials (ERPs) in the two different mental states. The stimuli consisted of a frequent standard tone (500 Hz), an infrequent oddball tone (1000 Hz), and an infrequent distracter (white noise), with all stimuli passively presented through headphones and no task imposed. The strongest meditation compared to control state effects occurred for the distracter stimuli: N1 amplitude from the distracter was reduced frontally during meditation; P2 amplitude from both the distracter and oddball stimuli were somewhat reduced during meditation; P3a amplitude from the distracter was reduced during meditation. The meditation-induced reduction in P3a amplitude was strongest in participants reporting more hours of daily meditation practice and was not evident in participants reporting drowsiness during their experimental meditative session. The findings suggest that meditation state can decrease the amplitude of neurophysiologic processes that subserve attentional engagement elicited by unexpected and distracting stimuli. Consistent with the aim of Vipassana meditation to reduce cognitive and emotional reactivity, the state effect of reduced P3a amplitude to distracting stimuli reflects decreased automated reactivity and evaluative processing of task irrelevant attention-demanding stimuli.

  6. Unitization improves source memory in older adults: An event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhiwei; Li, Juan; Xiao, Fengqiu; Ren, Weicong; He, Rongqiao

    2016-08-01

    Aging-related decline in episodic memory, particularly in associative memory, is attributed to an impaired recollection of the specific details of a study episode. Fortunately, familiarity is relatively preserved in older adults. Previous studies have indicated that unitization is a specialized form of learning that increases the contribution of familiarity to associative retrieval. Here we examined whether older adults' associative memory could be improved when employing an encoding strategy that encouraged unitization. Young and older adults encoded items and background colors either in a unitized condition (i.e., by imagining the color as an internal feature of the item) or in a non-unitized condition (i.e., by imagining the color as a contextual feature of the item). The participants then performed a source recognition test. The effects of unitization on the neural correlates of familiarity were measured by event-related potentials (ERPs). The age differences in source memory performance were lower in the unitized condition than in the non-unitized condition. The older adults only demonstrated neural correlates of familiarity-based source recognition in the unitized condition. These findings suggest that a unitized encoding strategy could improve source memory performance in older adults by enhancing the involvement of familiarity in source recognition. PMID:27343684

  7. Event-related potentials findings differ between children and adults during arithmetic-fact retrieval.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Corona, Belén; Rodríguez-Camacho, Mario; Silva-Pereyra, Juan; Marosi, Erzsébet; Fernández, Thalía; Guerrero, Vicente

    2010-01-14

    Some cognitive abilities of arithmetical calculation depend on retrieval of arithmetic facts from long-term memory. Arithmetic-fact retrieval has been studied in adults through Event-Related Potentials (ERP) experiments. Such information in children, however, has been scarce. It has been reported that from the age of 9 years, children employ a memory retrieval strategy for solving simple multiplication problems. The present study compared arithmetical-fact retrieval in children and adults while they were being subjected to ERP recording. The subjects were asked to make judgments about solutions to simple multiplication problems. Both groups of participants displayed the so-called arithmetic N400 effect for incorrect solutions relative to correct solutions. Adults showed a posterior N400 effect, while children showed a widely distributed N400 effect. Children displayed a larger amplitude and longer latency arithmetic N400 component than adults; this observation could be due to children exerting greater effort involving more widespread cortical activation than adults to solve the experimental problems. The Late Positive Component (LPC), which follows the arithmetic N400 and has been described previously in adult subjects, was observed in the present adult subjects, but was present in children only for correct solutions. These results may indicate that, relative to adults, children showed slower memory retrieval and a different pattern of a verification mechanism for correct and incorrect solutions. PMID:19897015

  8. Rejection in Bargaining Situations: An Event-Related Potential Study in Adolescents and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zanolie, Kiki; de Cremer, David; Güroğlu, Berna; Crone, Eveline A.

    2015-01-01

    The neural correlates of rejection in bargaining situations when proposing a fair or unfair offer are not yet well understood. We measured neural responses to rejection and acceptance of monetary offers with event-related potentials (ERPs) in mid-adolescents (14–17 years) and early adults (19–24 years). Participants played multiple rounds of the Ultimatum Game as proposers, dividing coins between themselves and a second player (responder) by making a choice between an unfair distribution (7 coins for proposer and 3 for responder; 7/3) and one of two alternatives: a fair distribution (5/5) or a hyperfair distribution (3/7). Participants mostly made fair offers (5/5) when the alternative was unfair (7/3), but made mostly unfair offers (7/3) when the alternative was hyperfair (3/7). When participants’ fair offers (5/5; alternative was 7/3) were rejected this was associated with a larger Medial Frontal Negativity (MFN) compared to acceptance of fair offers and rejection of unfair offers (7/3; alternative was 3/7). Also, the MFN was smaller after acceptance of unfair offers (7/3) compared to rejection. These neural responses did not differ between adults and mid-adolescents, suggesting that the MFN reacts as a neural alarm system to social prediction errors which is already prevalent during adolescence. PMID:26445134

  9. Mindfulness (Vipassana) meditation: effects on P3b event-related potential and heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Pastor, Luis Carlos; Perakakis, Pandelis; Subramanya, Pailoor; Telles, Shirley; Vila, Jaime

    2013-11-01

    The concept of mindfulness is based on Vipassana, a Buddhist meditation technique. The present study examines the physiological indices of attention and autonomic regulation in experienced Vipassana meditators to test the claim that mindfulness is an effective therapeutic tool due to its effects on increasing awareness of present experience and emotional self-regulation. Ten male experienced Vipassana meditators underwent two assessment sessions, one where they practiced Vipassana meditation and another where they rested with no meditation (random thinking). Each meditation/no-meditation session lasted 30 min and was preceded and followed by an auditory oddball task with two tones (standard and target). Event-related potentials to the tones were recorded at the Fz, Cz, and Pz locations. Heart rate variability, derived from an EKG, was recorded continuously during the meditation/no-meditation sessions and during a 5-minute baseline before the task. The Vipassana experts showed greater P3b amplitudes to the target tone after meditation than they did both before meditation and after the no-meditation session. They also showed a larger LF/HF ratio increase during specific Vipassana meditation. These results suggest that expert Vipassana meditators showed increased attentional engagement after meditation and increased autonomic regulation during meditation supporting, at least partially, the two claims concerning the clinical effectiveness of mindfulness. PMID:23892096

  10. Event-related potentials reveal early activation of syntax information in Chinese verb processing.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuan; Wu, Qiuyan; Wang, Jin; Feng, Liping; Xiao, Qing

    2016-09-19

    By taking advantage of the semantic-syntactic characteristics of Chinese verbs, the current study examined the brain activity of automatic activation of syntactic features at the single word level. Both syntactic (transitivity) and semantic (integrity) features of the verb were manipulated. Event-related potentials were measured while subjects performed lexical decision tasks on visually presented verbs at the single word level. The results showed that there was a significant transitivity effect in both lateral and midline areas for the 150-200ms time window (N200 effect), indicating the retrieval of the syntactic feature. There was also a significant syntactic-semantic interaction at the late stage of verb processing (N400 effect) in the midline central-parietal region, reflecting syntactic influences on semantic processing. These findings suggest that transitivity is an integral part of the mental representation of Chinese verbs and such information can be retrieved at the early stage of single verb processing and can influence subsequent semantic integration. These results also reveal the special features of Chinese language processing. PMID:27466021

  11. The role of P300 event-related potentials in the cognitive recovery after the stroke.

    PubMed

    Dejanović, Mirjana; Ivetić, Vesna; Nestorović, Vojkan; Erić, Mirela; Stanojević, Zorica; Leštarević, Snežana

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of an ischemic stroke on the amplitude and latency of the P300 wave and evaluate their changes over a prospective 1-year follow-up period. We recorded the P300 wave using an auditory oddball paradigm in 60 consecutive brain infarct patients at baseline (i.e., within 4 weeks after the stroke), after 3 months, after 12 months and in 30 healthy control subjects. The P300 latencies in stroke patients were significantly longer and the P300 amplitudes were significantly smaller than those of the control group. The latency of P300 showed a highly significant average improvement 12 months after the stroke compared to the baseline. There was no significant change observed for the P300 amplitude during the same period. The P3 latency is initially more increased in the patients with hemispheric brain infarction but shows a better recovery compared to the patients with brainstem infarction. Also, the results of the P300 latency of patients with the left-sided lesions was significantly longer compared to the patients with right-sided lesions on the beginning of the study but not 3 and 12 months after the stroke. The results of our study show the importance of P300 event-related potentials in the detection and follow-up of cognitive changes after ischemic stroke.

  12. Event-related potentials and cognitive performance in multiple sclerosis patients with fatigue.

    PubMed

    Pokryszko-Dragan, Anna; Zagrajek, Mieszko; Slotwinski, Krzysztof; Bilinska, Malgorzata; Gruszka, Ewa; Podemski, Ryszard

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate event-related potentials (ERP) and cognition in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with regard to fatigue and disease-related variables. The study comprised 86 MS patients and 40 controls. Fatigue was assessed using the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS/FSS-5) and the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS/MFISmod). N200 and P300 components of auditory ERP were analyzed. Cognition was evaluated by means of Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Tests (BRBNT). The results of ERP and BRBNT were compared between non-fatigued, moderately and severely fatigued MS patients and controls. P300 latency was significantly longer in the whole MS group and in the fatigued patients than in the controls. A positive correlation was found between P300 latency and MFIS/MFISmod results, independent from age and MS-related variables. The fatigued patients scored less than non-fatigued ones in tests evaluating memory, visuomotor abilities and attention. Results of these tests correlated significantly with fatigue measures, independently from MS-related variables. Fatigue in MS patients showed significant relationships with impairment within the memory and attention domains. Parameters of auditory ERP, as electrophysiological biomarkers of cognitive performance, were not independently linked to fatigue.

  13. Event-related potentials reveal early activation of syntax information in Chinese verb processing.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuan; Wu, Qiuyan; Wang, Jin; Feng, Liping; Xiao, Qing

    2016-09-19

    By taking advantage of the semantic-syntactic characteristics of Chinese verbs, the current study examined the brain activity of automatic activation of syntactic features at the single word level. Both syntactic (transitivity) and semantic (integrity) features of the verb were manipulated. Event-related potentials were measured while subjects performed lexical decision tasks on visually presented verbs at the single word level. The results showed that there was a significant transitivity effect in both lateral and midline areas for the 150-200ms time window (N200 effect), indicating the retrieval of the syntactic feature. There was also a significant syntactic-semantic interaction at the late stage of verb processing (N400 effect) in the midline central-parietal region, reflecting syntactic influences on semantic processing. These findings suggest that transitivity is an integral part of the mental representation of Chinese verbs and such information can be retrieved at the early stage of single verb processing and can influence subsequent semantic integration. These results also reveal the special features of Chinese language processing.

  14. An Event-Related Potential Study on the Effects of Cannabis on Emotion Processing

    PubMed Central

    Troup, Lucy J.; Bastidas, Stephanie; Nguyen, Maia T.; Andrzejewski, Jeremy A.; Bowers, Matthew; Nomi, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of cannabis on emotional processing was investigated using event-related potential paradigms (ERPs). ERPs associated with emotional processing of cannabis users, and non-using controls, were recorded and compared during an implicit and explicit emotional expression recognition and empathy task. Comparisons in P3 component mean amplitudes were made between cannabis users and controls. Results showed a significant decrease in the P3 amplitude in cannabis users compared to controls. Specifically, cannabis users showed reduced P3 amplitudes for implicit compared to explicit processing over centro-parietal sites which reversed, and was enhanced, at fronto-central sites. Cannabis users also showed a decreased P3 to happy faces, with an increase to angry faces, compared to controls. These effects appear to increase with those participants that self-reported the highest levels of cannabis consumption. Those cannabis users with the greatest consumption rates showed the largest P3 deficits for explicit processing and negative emotions. These data suggest that there is a complex relationship between cannabis consumption and emotion processing that appears to be modulated by attention. PMID:26926868

  15. Event-related brain potential correlates of two states of conscious awareness in memory

    PubMed Central

    Düzel, Emrah; Yonelinas, Andrew P.; Mangun, George R.; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Tulving, Endel

    1997-01-01

    We report an event-related potential (ERP) experiment of human recognition memory that explored the relation between conscious awareness and electrophysiological activity of the brain. We recorded ERPs from healthy adults while they made “remember” and “know” recognition judgments about previously seen words. These two kinds of judgments reflect “autonoetic” and “noetic” awareness, respectively. The ERP effects differed between the two kinds of awareness while they were similar for “true” and “false” recognition. Noetic awareness was associated with a temporoparietal positivity in the N400 range (325–600 ms) and a late (600–1,000 ms) frontocentral negativity, whereas autonoetic awareness was associated with a widespread, late, bifrontal and left parietotemporal (600–1000 ms) positivity. In the very late (1,300–1,900 ms) time window, a right frontal positivity was observed for both remember and know judgments of both true and false targets. These results provide physiological evidence for two types of conscious awareness in episodic memory retrieval. PMID:9159185

  16. [Event related brain potentials as indicators of neurochemical dysfunctions in psychiatric patients].

    PubMed

    Hegerl, U; Juckel, G; Möller, H J

    1996-05-01

    The increasing knowledge concerning anatomical structures and cellular processes underlying event-related potentials (ERP) and methodological advances in ERP data analysis are beginning to bridge the gap between ERP and neurochemical aspects. ERP reflect directly postsynaptic effects of cortical neurotransmitters (e.g. GABA, glutamate) and indirectly modulating effects of neuromodulators (e.g. serotonin, acetylcholine) on cortical neuronal functioning and are therefore promising as noninvasive indicators of the functioning of neurochemical systems. Several recent reports are summarised suggesting that quite specific relationships may exist between certain ERP parameters and central cholinergic, noradrenergic and especially serotonergic function. Converging arguments from preclinical and clinical studies are presented supporting the hypothesis that the dependence of the response of primary auditory cortices on stimulus intensity (loudness) is regulated by the level of central serotonergic neurotransmission. This intensity dependence is shown to be of clinical value because, within different diagnostic categories, subgroups of patients with a serotonergic dysfunction can be identified and can be treated more specifically with serotonergic drugs. PMID:9005344

  17. An Event-Related Potential Study of Social Information Processing in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    diFilipo, Danielle; Grose-Fifer, Jillian

    2016-01-01

    Increased social awareness is a hallmark of adolescence. The primary aim of this event-related potential study was to investigate whether adolescents, in comparison to adults, would show relatively enhanced early neural processing of complex pictures containing socially-relevant information. A secondary aim was to investigate whether there are also gender and age differences in the ways adolescents and adults process social and nonsocial information. We recorded EEGs from 12-17 year-olds and 25-37 year-olds (N = 59) while they viewed pleasant pictures from the International Affective Picture System. We found age-related amplitude differences in the N1 and the LPP, and gender-related differences in the N2 region for socially-relevant stimuli. Social pictures (featuring mostly young children and adults) elicited larger N1s than nonsocial stimuli in adolescents, but not adults, whereas larger LPPs to social stimuli were seen in adults, but not adolescents. Furthermore, in general, males (regardless of age) showed larger N2s to nonsocial than to social images, but females did not. Our results imply that compared to adults, adolescents show relatively greater initial orientation toward social than toward nonsocial stimuli. PMID:27192210

  18. How Distance Affects Semantic Integration in Discourse: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaohong; Chen, Shuang; Chen, Xuhai; Yang, Yufang

    2015-01-01

    Event-related potentials were used to investigate whether semantic integration in discourse is influenced by the number of intervening sentences between the endpoints of integration. Readers read discourses in which the last sentence contained a critical word that was either congruent or incongruent with the information introduced in the first sentence. Furthermore, for the short discourses, the first and last sentence were intervened by only one sentence while for the long discourses, they were intervened by three sentences. We found that the incongruent words elicited an N400 effect for both the short and long discourses. However, a P600 effect was only observed for the long discourses, but not for the short ones. These results suggest that although readers can successfully integrate upcoming words into the existing discourse representation, the effort required for this integration process is modulated by the number of intervening sentences. Thus, discourse distance as measured by the number of intervening sentences should be taken as an important factor for semantic integration in discourse. PMID:26569606

  19. Neurophysiological evidence for the country-of-origin effect: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Min, Byoung-Kyong; Cho, Kwangsu; Sung, Jungyeon; Cho, Erin

    2014-03-01

    Consumers often rely on observable cues that hint at the hidden quality of a product. The aim of this study was to investigate brain activities associated with the country-of-origin (COO) effect and consumer evaluation of a product design. Electroencephalogram recordings were used to observe event-related brain potentials associated with the COO effect and design evaluation. We found that the frontocentral N90 and parieto-occipital P220 amplitudes are involved in forming preference to design, whereas the COO effect is processed in the centroparietal P500 amplitude. We also found a significant interaction effect between COO and design preference with regard to reaction times. Specifically, participants tended to spend more time making a preference decision when they did not like the product design made in a country with a favorable COO. These results imply that the two cognitive processes, evaluation of COO and formation of design preference, are activated independently at an early stage. It also suggests that these two processes interact with each other toward the end of the decision phase. Together, the results of this study provide neuropsychological evidence supporting a significant role of COO in the formation of design preference. Future studies are required to further delve into other neurophysiological activities associated with the COO effect. PMID:24518230

  20. (De-)accentuation and the process of information status: evidence from event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Stefan; Schumacher, Petra B

    2012-09-01

    The paper reports on a perception experiment in German that investigated the neuro-cognitive processing of information structural concepts and their prosodic marking using event-related brain potentials (ERPs). Experimental conditions controlled the information status (given vs. new) of referring and non-referring target expressions (nouns vs. adjectives) and were elicited via context sentences, which did not - unlike most previous ERP studies in the field--trigger an explicit focus expectation. Target utterances displayed prosodic realizations of the critical words which differed in accent position and accent type. Electrophysiological results showed an effect of information status, maximally distributed over posterior sites, displaying a biphasic N400--Late Positivity pattern for new information. We claim that this pattern reflects increased processing demands associated with new information, with the N400 indicating enhanced costs from linking information with the previous discourse and the Late Positivity indicating the listener's effort to update his/her discourse model. The prosodic manipulation registered more pronounced effects over anterior regions and revealed an enhanced negativity followed by a Late Positivity for deaccentuation, probably also reflecting costs from discourse linking and updating respectively. The data further lend indirect support for the idea that givenness applies not only to referents but also to non-referential expressions ('lexical givenness'). PMID:23094319

  1. Behavioural correlates of the P3b event-related potential in school-age children

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, O.; Bastien, C. H.; Muckle, G.; Saint-Amour, D.; Jacobson, S. W.; Jacobson, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    The latency and amplitude of the P3b component of event-related potentials (ERPs) have been related to behavioural performance on several attention and memory tasks in adult populations. However, the extent to which these results apply to children is unknown. This study examined the neurobehavioral correlates of the P3b component in a longitudinal sample of school-age children from Arctic Québec. Children (N = 110; mean age = 11.3 years) were assessed on an ERP auditory oddball paradigm and a neurobehavioral evaluation targeting several aspects of cognition, including the Stewart Extended Continuous Performance Test (E-CPT), California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT), Stroop Color-Word Interference Test, and five subtests from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children–Fourth edition (WISC-IV). P3b latency was positively related to reaction time measures and negatively associated with performance on the WISC-IV Digit Span Forward subtest. Amplitude of the P3b was associated with shorter completion time on the Stroop test and better delayed recognition memory performance among children who did not use semantic strategies on the CVLT. Profile analyses revealed no difference in scalp distribution of the P3b according to performance on these tests. The results are consistent with previous studies with older participants and suggest that, despite age-related differences in waveform and scalp distribution, the P3b component relates to similar neurocognitive processes in children and adults. PMID:20338199

  2. Human recognition memory and conflict control: An event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Liu, T; Liu, X; Xiao, T; Shi, J

    2016-01-28

    The relationship between recognition memory and cognitive control is an important research topic. The current study investigated how conflict control influences an individual's emotional memory. During the encoding phase, participants were required to judge the affective valence of a Chinese Chengyu word (either positive or negative) in a modified Simon paradigm and to remember the word. Half of the words were presented in the congruent condition and the other half were displayed in the incongruent condition. During the retrieval phase, participants were instructed to make an 'old/new judgment' and decide whether the word had been presented previously. Electrophysiological responses were recorded using the event-related potential (ERP) technique. The behavioral results of retrieval processes showed that participants remembered more positive than negative words when they were encoded in the congruent condition. The electrophysiological results revealed that the retrieval of words encoded in the incongruent condition elicited less negative frontal negativity (FN) and early posterior negativity (EPN) amplitudes than those encoded in the congruent condition. The retrieval of words encoded in the incongruent condition induced greater late positive complex (LPC) amplitudes, relative to those encoded in the congruent condition on the left hemisphere. It was also observed that the recognition of positive words induced faster LPC responses than negative words when they were encoded in the incongruent condition. The present electrophysiological study illustrates that emotional memory processes may be affected by conflict control. PMID:26633266

  3. Recognizing dynamic facial expressions of emotion: Specificity and intensity effects in event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Recio, Guillermo; Schacht, Annekathrin; Sommer, Werner

    2014-02-01

    Emotional facial expressions usually arise dynamically from a neutral expression. Yet, most previous research focused on static images. The present study investigated basic aspects of processing dynamic facial expressions. In two experiments, we presented short videos of facial expressions of six basic emotions and non-emotional facial movements emerging at variable and fixed rise times, attaining different intensity levels. In event-related brain potentials (ERP), effects of emotion but also for non-emotional movements appeared as early posterior negativity (EPN) between 200 and 350ms, suggesting an overall facilitation of early visual encoding for all facial movements. These EPN effects were emotion-unspecific. In contrast, relative to happiness and neutral expressions, negative emotional expressions elicited larger late positive ERP components (LPCs), indicating a more elaborate processing. Both EPN and LPC amplitudes increased with expression intensity. Effects of emotion and intensity were additive, indicating that intensity (understood as the degree of motion) increases the impact of emotional expressions but not its quality. These processes can be driven by all basic emotions, and there is little emotion-specificity even when statistical power is considerable (N (Experiment 2)=102). PMID:24361701

  4. Performance monitoring in autism spectrum disorders: A systematic literature review of event-related potential studies.

    PubMed

    Hüpen, Philippa; Groen, Yvonne; Gaastra, Geraldina F; Tucha, Lara; Tucha, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is marked by impairments in social-emotional situations, executive functioning, and behavioral regulation. These symptoms may be related to deficits in performance monitoring, i.e., the ability to observe and evaluate one's own behavior and performance which is necessary for the regulation of future behavior. The present literature review investigated electroencephalic correlates of performance monitoring in ASD. Event-related potentials (ERPs) considered in this review included internal performance monitoring components (error-related negativity, error positivity), external performance monitoring components (feedback-related negativity, feedback-P3), and observational performance monitoring components (observer error-related negativity, observer feedback-related negativity). The majority of studies point to reduced internal performance monitoring in ASD. External performance monitoring in reward-processing paradigms, where rewards are independent of performance, seems to be intact in ASD. So far, no studies have investigated the observer error-related negativity in ASD. Available data on the observer feedback-related negativity are inconclusive, since only two studies with differential study results investigated this construct in ASD. In general, results suggest that individuals with ASD have problems with internal performance monitoring and with learning from external, abstract feedback. In contrast, the processing of external, concrete feedback seems to be largely intact in ASD.

  5. Exploring the Neurodevelopment of Visual Statistical Learning Using Event-Related Brain Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Ethan; Conway, Christopher M.; Purdy, John D.; Walk, Anne M.; Hendricks, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Implicit statistical learning (ISL) allows for the learning of environmental patterns and is thought to be important for many aspects of perception, cognition, and language development. However, very little is known about the development of the underlying neural mechanisms that support ISL. To explore the neurodevelopment of ISL, we investigated the event-related potential (ERP) correlates of learning in adults, older children (aged 9-12), and younger children (aged 6-9) using a novel predictor-target paradigm. In this task, which was a modification of the standard oddball paradigm, participants were instructed to view a serial input stream of visual stimuli and to respond with a button press when a particular target appeared. Unbeknownst to the participants, covert statistical probabilities were embedded in the task such that the target was predicted to varying degrees by different predictor stimuli. The results were similar across all three age groups: a P300 component that was elicited by the high predictor stimulus after sufficient exposure to the statistical probabilities. These neurophysiological findings provide evidence for developmental invariance in ISL, with adult-like competence reached by at least age 6. PMID:25475992

  6. Neurocognitive mechanisms of statistical-sequential learning: what do event-related potentials tell us?

    PubMed Central

    Daltrozzo, Jerome; Conway, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Statistical-sequential learning (SL) is the ability to process patterns of environmental stimuli, such as spoken language, music, or one’s motor actions, that unfold in time. The underlying neurocognitive mechanisms of SL and the associated cognitive representations are still not well understood as reflected by the heterogeneity of the reviewed cognitive models. The purpose of this review is: (1) to provide a general overview of the primary models and theories of SL, (2) to describe the empirical research – with a focus on the event-related potential (ERP) literature – in support of these models while also highlighting the current limitations of this research, and (3) to present a set of new lines of ERP research to overcome these limitations. The review is articulated around three descriptive dimensions in relation to SL: the level of abstractness of the representations learned through SL, the effect of the level of attention and consciousness on SL, and the developmental trajectory of SL across the life-span. We conclude with a new tentative model that takes into account these three dimensions and also point to several promising new lines of SL research. PMID:24994975

  7. Effects of performing two visual tasks on single-trial detection of event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Cecotti, Hubert; Eckstein, Miguel P; Giesbrecht, Barry

    2012-01-01

    The detection of event-related potentials (ERPs) in brain-computer interface (BCI) depends on the ability of the subject to pay attention to specific stimuli presented during the BCI task. For healthy users, a BCI shall be used as a complement to other existing devices, which involve the response to other tasks. Those tasks may impair selective attention, particularly if the stimuli have the same modality e.g. visual. It is therefore critical to analyze how single-trial detection of brain evoked response is impaired by the addition of tasks concerning the same modality. We tested 10 healthy participants using an application that has two visual target detection tasks. The first one corresponds to a rapid serial visual presentation paradigm where target detection is achieved by brain-evoked single-trial detection in the recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. The second task is the detection of a visual event on a tactical map by a behavioral response. These tasks were tested individually (single task) and in parallel (dual-task). Whereas the performance of single-trial detection was not impaired between single and dual-task conditions, the behavioral performance decreased during the dual-task condition. These results quantify the performance drop that can occur in a dual-task system using both brain-evoked responses and behavioral responses. PMID:23366242

  8. The influence of contour fragmentation on recognition memory: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Brodeur, Mathieu B; Debruille, J Bruno; Renoult, Louis; Prévost, Marie; Dionne-Dostie, Emmanuelle; Buchy, Lisa; Lepage, Martin

    2011-06-01

    The present study was carried out to examine how the event-related potentials to fragmentation predict recognition success. Stimuli were abstract meaningless figures that were either complete or fragmented to various extents but still recoverable. Stimuli were first encoded as part of a symmetry discrimination task. In a subsequent recognition phase, encoded stimuli were presented complete along with never presented stimuli and participants performed an old/new discrimination task. Fragmentation stimuli elicited more negative ERPs than complete figures over the frontal, central and parietal areas between 180 and 260 ms, and over the occipito-temporal areas between 220 and 340 ms. Only this latter effect was modulated as a function of whether stimuli were recognized or not during the recognition phase of the memory test. More specifically, the effect occurred for stimuli that were later forgotten and was absent for stimuli that were later recognized. This ERP to fragmentation, the occipito-temporal N(frag), possibly reflects the brain response to encoding difficulty, and is thus predictive of recognition performance.

  9. Short-term effects of prosocial video games on aggression: an event-related potential study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanling; Teng, Zhaojun; Lan, Haiying; Zhang, Xin; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that exposure to violent video games increases aggression, whereas exposure to prosocial video games can reduce aggressive behavior. However, little is known about the neural correlates of these behavioral effects. This work is the first to investigate the electrophysiological features of the relationship between playing a prosocial video game and inhibition of aggressive behavior. Forty-nine subjects played either a prosocial or a neutral video game for 20 min, then participated in an event-related potential (ERP) experiment based on an oddball paradigm and designed to test electrophysiological responses to prosocial and violent words. Finally, subjects completed a competitive reaction time task (CRTT) which based on Taylor's Aggression Paradigm and contains reaction time and noise intensity chosen as a measure of aggressive behavior. The results show that the prosocial video game group (compared to the neutral video game group) displayed smaller P300 amplitudes, were more accurate in distinguishing violent words, and were less aggressive as evaluated by the CRTT of noise intensity chosen. A mediation analysis shows that the P300 amplitude evoked by violent words partially mediates the relationship between type of video game and subsequent aggressive behavior. The results support theories based on the General Learning Model. We provide converging behavioral and neural evidence that exposure to prosocial media may reduce aggression. PMID:26257620

  10. Event-related potentials in response to violations of content and temporal event knowledge.

    PubMed

    Drummer, Janna; van der Meer, Elke; Schaadt, Gesa

    2016-01-01

    Scripts that store knowledge of everyday events are fundamentally important for managing daily routines. Content event knowledge (i.e., knowledge about which events belong to a script) and temporal event knowledge (i.e., knowledge about the chronological order of events in a script) constitute qualitatively different forms of knowledge. However, there is limited information about each distinct process and the time course involved in accessing content and temporal event knowledge. Therefore, we analyzed event-related potentials (ERPs) in response to either correctly presented event sequences or event sequences that contained a content or temporal error. We found an N400, which was followed by a posteriorly distributed P600 in response to content errors in event sequences. By contrast, we did not find an N400 but an anteriorly distributed P600 in response to temporal errors in event sequences. Thus, the N400 seems to be elicited as a response to a general mismatch between an event and the established event model. We assume that the expectancy violation of content event knowledge, as indicated by the N400, induces the collapse of the established event model, a process indicated by the posterior P600. The expectancy violation of temporal event knowledge is assumed to induce an attempt to reorganize the event model in working memory, a process indicated by the frontal P600.

  11. Subject combination and electrode selection in cooperative brain-computer interface based on event related potentials.

    PubMed

    Cecotti, Hubert; Rivet, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    New paradigms are required in Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) systems for the needs and expectations of healthy people. To solve this issue, we explore the emerging field of cooperative BCIs, which involves several users in a single BCI system. Contrary to classical BCIs that are dependent on the unique subject's will, cooperative BCIs are used for problem solving tasks where several people shall be engaged by sharing a common goal. Similarly as combining trials over time improves performance, combining trials across subjects can significantly improve performance compared with when only a single user is involved. Yet, cooperative BCIs may only be used in particular settings, and new paradigms must be proposed to efficiently use this approach. The possible benefits of using several subjects are addressed, and compared with current single-subject BCI paradigms. To show the advantages of a cooperative BCI, we evaluate the performance of combining decisions across subjects with data from an event-related potentials (ERP) based experiment where each subject observed the same sequence of visual stimuli. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to achieve a mean AUC superior to 0.95 with 10 subjects and 3 electrodes on each subject, or with 4 subjects and 6 electrodes on each subject. Several emerging challenges and possible applications are proposed to highlight how cooperative BCIs could be efficiently used with current technologies and leverage BCI applications. PMID:24961765

  12. Perseveration for novel stimuli in Parkinson's disease: an evaluation based on event-related potentials topography.

    PubMed

    Hozumi, A; Hirata, K; Tanaka, H; Yamazaki, K

    2000-09-01

    Event-related potential topography produced by novel and target stimuli was used to detect dysfunction of mental switching (perseveration) in nondemented patients with Parkinson's disease. The study participants were 15 patients with Parkinson's disease and 13 age-matched healthy control patients. Ten percent of the novelty tones with pitches of 125 and 500 Hz were added to 20% of the target tones that had a pitch of 1000 Hz. Patients were instructed to count the target tones. The modified Wisconsin Card Sorting Test was used to evaluate frontal lobe function. Patients with Parkinson's disease showed a significant decrease in the achieved categories and an increase in perseverative errors in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. These results indicate that the cognitive impairment of patients with Parkinson's disease can be characterized as failure of mental switching related to frontal lobe dysfunction based on basal ganglia disturbance. As compared with the control patients, patients with Parkinson's disease had shorter P3 latencies to the novel stimuli and a more frontal distribution on the P3 map, especially for the 125-Hz stimuli. This characteristic of P3 to novel stimuli in the patients with Parkinson's disease, but not in the control patients, is categorized by P3a (novelty P3). Our findings suggest that decreased mental switching causes lack of novelty P3 habituation in patients with Parkinson's disease and that it is related to learning disabilities based on dysfunction of the frontal lobe and basal ganglia. PMID:11009188

  13. Distributed Patterns of Event-Related Potentials Predict Subsequent Ratings of Abstract Stimulus Attributes

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Stefan; Bennett, Daniel; Stahl, Jutta; Murawski, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to pleasant and rewarding visual stimuli can bias people's choices towards either immediate or delayed gratification. We hypothesised that this phenomenon might be based on carry-over effects from a fast, unconscious assessment of the abstract ‘time reference’ of a stimuli, i.e. how the stimulus relates to one's personal understanding and connotation of time. Here we investigated whether participants' post-experiment ratings of task-irrelevant, positive background visual stimuli for the dimensions ‘arousal’ (used as a control condition) and ‘time reference’ were related to differences in single-channel event-related potentials (ERPs) and whether they could be predicted from spatio-temporal patterns of ERPs. Participants performed a demanding foreground choice-reaction task while on each trial one task-irrelevant image (depicting objects, people and scenes) was presented in the background. Conventional ERP analyses as well as multivariate support vector regression (SVR) analyses were conducted to predict participants' subsequent ratings. We found that only SVR allowed both ‘arousal’ and ‘time reference’ ratings to be predicted during the first 200 ms post-stimulus. This demonstrates an early, automatic semantic stimulus analysis, which might be related to the high relevance of ‘time reference’ to everyday decision-making and preference formation. PMID:25271850

  14. Tracking the intrusion of unwanted memories into awareness with event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Hellerstedt, Robin; Johansson, Mikael; Anderson, Michael C

    2016-08-01

    Involuntary retrieval of unwanted memories is a common symptom in several clinical disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder. With an aim to track the temporal dynamics of such memory intrusions, we recorded electrophysiological measures of brain activity while participants engaged in a Think/No-Think task. We presented the left hand word (the cue) of previously encoded word pairs in green or red font. We asked participants to think of the associated right hand word (the associate) when the cue appeared in green (Think condition) and to avoid thinking of the associate when the cue appeared in red (No-Think condition). To isolate cases when participants experienced an intrusive memory, at the end of each trial, participants judged whether the response had come to mind; we classified memories that came to mind during No-Think trials, despite efforts to stop retrieval, as intrusions. In an event-related potential (ERP) analysis, we observed a negative going slow wave (NSW) effect that indexed the duration of a trace in mnemonic awareness; whereas voluntary retrieval and maintenance of the associate was related to a sustained NSW that lasted throughout the 3-s recording epoch, memory intrusions generated short-lived NSWs that were rapidly truncated. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that the intrusion-NSW reflects the associate briefly penetrating working memory. More broadly, these findings exploit the high temporal resolution of ERPs to track the online dynamics of memory intrusions. PMID:27396675

  15. Temporal Lobe Impairment in West Syndrome: Event-Related Potential Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Klaus; Fosi, Tangunu; Boyd, Stewart G; Baldeweg, Torsten; Scott, Rod C; Neville, Brian G

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study investigates auditory processing in infants with West syndrome (WS) using event-related potentials (ERPs). Methods ERPs were measured in 25 infants with mainly symptomatic WS (age range = 3–10 months) and 26 healthy term infants (age range = 3–9 months) using an auditory novelty oddball paradigm. The ERP recordings were made during wakefulness and repeated in stage II sleep. Results The obligatory components (P150, N250, P350) and novelty response components (P300, Nc) were recordable during both sleep and wakefulness in patients and controls. All ERP latencies decreased with age in controls but not in the WS group (age × group interaction, F = 22.3, p < 0.0001). These ERP latency alterations were not affected by pharmacological treatment for WS. Interpretation This study demonstrated a persistently altered ERP signature in patients with a recent history of infantile spasms. The prolongation of auditory obligatory and novelty ERPs in WS patients indicates a severe failure of temporal lobe maturation during infancy. It remains to be investigated whether this predicts long-term cognitive impairments characteristic for this epileptic encephalopathy. PMID:25363285

  16. Neurophysiological evidence for the country-of-origin effect: an event-related potential study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kwangsu; Sung, Jungyeon; Cho, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Consumers often rely on observable cues that hint at the hidden quality of a product. The aim of this study was to investigate brain activities associated with the country-of-origin (COO) effect and consumer evaluation of a product design. Electroencephalogram recordings were used to observe event-related brain potentials associated with the COO effect and design evaluation. We found that the frontocentral N90 and parieto-occipital P220 amplitudes are involved in forming preference to design, whereas the COO effect is processed in the centroparietal P500 amplitude. We also found a significant interaction effect between COO and design preference with regard to reaction times. Specifically, participants tended to spend more time making a preference decision when they did not like the product design made in a country with a favorable COO. These results imply that the two cognitive processes, evaluation of COO and formation of design preference, are activated independently at an early stage. It also suggests that these two processes interact with each other toward the end of the decision phase. Together, the results of this study provide neuropsychological evidence supporting a significant role of COO in the formation of design preference. Future studies are required to further delve into other neurophysiological activities associated with the COO effect. PMID:24518230

  17. Event-related potentials during word mapping to object shape predict toddlers' vocabulary size

    PubMed Central

    Borgström, Kristina; Torkildsen, Janne von Koss; Lindgren, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    What role does attention to different object properties play in early vocabulary development? This longitudinal study using event-related potentials in combination with behavioral measures investigated 20- and 24-month-olds' (n = 38; n = 34; overlapping n = 24) ability to use object shape and object part information in word-object mapping. The N400 component was used to measure semantic priming by images containing shape or detail information. At 20 months, the N400 to words primed by object shape varied in topography and amplitude depending on vocabulary size, and these differences predicted productive vocabulary size at 24 months. At 24 months, when most of the children had vocabularies of several hundred words, the relation between vocabulary size and the N400 effect in a shape context was weaker. Detached object parts did not function as word primes regardless of age or vocabulary size, although the part-objects were identified behaviorally. The behavioral measure, however, also showed relatively poor recognition of the part-objects compared to the shape-objects. These three findings provide new support for the link between shape recognition and early vocabulary development. PMID:25762957

  18. The impact of perceived quality on online buying decisions: an event-related potentials perspective.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Han, Weiwei

    2014-10-01

    Consumer neuroscience can provide useful insights into the neural foundations of consumer decisions, such as perceived quality. One of the applications is to guide attribute configuration of products to fit consumers' expectations on the basis of individual preferences. In this study, we required 20 participants to decide whether to buy the product provided in the stimuli and to respond as soon as possible. According to their reports of expectations after the experiment, we subdivided the stimuli into two conditions. Condition 1 contained the stimuli that fit individual preferences, whereas Condition 2 contained the other stimuli. An essential component of event-related potentials (ERPs), the P300, was elicited in the two conditions and distributed over almost all parietal and occipital regions. Products in Condition 1 induced a higher P300 amplitude than those in Condition 2. The results show that evaluating product attributes is a cognitive process that modulates attention in the aforementioned regions. When participants evaluate the alternatives, categorical processing occurred on the basis of similarity judgment. The situation in Condition 1 produced a similarity overlap between the product and the expectation and resulted in a higher P300. Otherwise, there was no overlap, leading to a smaller P300. Hence, the P300 may be a useful neural endogenous indicator for measuring consumers' evaluations of products in marketing research. PMID:25037004

  19. Short-term effects of prosocial video games on aggression: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanling; Teng, Zhaojun; Lan, Haiying; Zhang, Xin; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that exposure to violent video games increases aggression, whereas exposure to prosocial video games can reduce aggressive behavior. However, little is known about the neural correlates of these behavioral effects. This work is the first to investigate the electrophysiological features of the relationship between playing a prosocial video game and inhibition of aggressive behavior. Forty-nine subjects played either a prosocial or a neutral video game for 20 min, then participated in an event-related potential (ERP) experiment based on an oddball paradigm and designed to test electrophysiological responses to prosocial and violent words. Finally, subjects completed a competitive reaction time task (CRTT) which based on Taylor's Aggression Paradigm and contains reaction time and noise intensity chosen as a measure of aggressive behavior. The results show that the prosocial video game group (compared to the neutral video game group) displayed smaller P300 amplitudes, were more accurate in distinguishing violent words, and were less aggressive as evaluated by the CRTT of noise intensity chosen. A mediation analysis shows that the P300 amplitude evoked by violent words partially mediates the relationship between type of video game and subsequent aggressive behavior. The results support theories based on the General Learning Model. We provide converging behavioral and neural evidence that exposure to prosocial media may reduce aggression. PMID:26257620

  20. Compound headedness in the mental lexicon: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Arcara, Giorgio; Marelli, Marco; Buodo, Giulia; Mondini, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Compound words in Romance languages may have the head either in the initial or in the final position. In the present event-related potential (ERP) study, we address the hypothesis that Italian compounds are processed differently according to their head position and that this is mostly due to the perceived change in the canonical order of syntactic elements. Compound stimuli (head-initial, head-final, or exocentric) were visually displayed in two presentation modes, as whole words or separated into their constituents, in the context of a lexical decision task. Behavioural results showed an increased split cost in head-final and exocentric compounds as compared to head-initial compounds. ERP results showed an enhanced left anterior negativity (LAN) for head-final and exocentric compounds as compared to head-initial compounds, regardless of the presentation mode. Results suggest that the analogy with syntactic order may influence the internal structure of a compound and, as a consequence, its processing, but other characteristics (such as the grammatical properties of constituents) may affect the processing itself. PMID:24168167

  1. Dynamics of the spatial scale of visual attention revealed by brain event-related potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Y. J.; Greenwood, P. M.; Parasuraman, R.

    2001-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of the spatial scaling of attention during visual search were examined by recording event-related potentials (ERPs). A total of 16 young participants performed a search task in which the search array was preceded by valid cues that varied in size and hence in precision of target localization. The effects of cue size on short-latency (P1 and N1) ERP components, and the time course of these effects with variation in cue-target stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA), were examined. Reaction time (RT) to discriminate a target was prolonged as cue size increased. The amplitudes of the posterior P1 and N1 components of the ERP evoked by the search array were affected in opposite ways by the size of the precue: P1 amplitude increased whereas N1 amplitude decreased as cue size increased, particularly following the shortest SOA. The results show that when top-down information about the region to be searched is less precise (larger cues), RT is slowed and the neural generators of P1 become more active, reflecting the additional computations required in changing the spatial scale of attention to the appropriate element size to facilitate target discrimination. In contrast, the decrease in N1 amplitude with cue size may reflect a broadening of the spatial gradient of attention. The results provide electrophysiological evidence that changes in the spatial scale of attention modulate neural activity in early visual cortical areas and activate at least two temporally overlapping component processes during visual search.

  2. Evidence for implicit self-positivity bias: an event-related brain potential study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Zhong, Yiping; Zhou, Haibo; Zhang, Shanming; Tan, Qianbao; Fan, Wei

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the processing of self-related information under the prime paradigm using event-related potentials (ERPs) to provide evidence for implicit self-positivity bias in Chinese individuals. Reaction times and ERPs were recorded when participants made positive/negative emotional judgments to personality-trait adjectives about themselves or others. Faster responses occurred to self-related positive adjectives and other-related negative adjectives, indicating implicit self-positivity bias at the behavioral level. ERPs showed an interaction between prime and emotion at the P300 amplitude, with larger P300 amplitudes for words within the self-positivity bias, indicating that self-related information occupied more attentional resources. Larger N400 amplitudes elicited by words that were inconsistent with the self-positivity bias, suggesting that accessing non-self-relevant information is more difficult than self-relevant information. Thus, P300 and N400 could be used as neuro-indexes of the implicit self-positivity bias.

  3. Prestimulus EEG microstates influence visual event-related potential microstates in field maps with 47 channels.

    PubMed

    Kondakor, I; Lehmann, D; Michel, C M; Brandeis, D; Kochi, K; Koenig

    1997-01-01

    The influence of the immediate prestimulus EEG microstate (sub-second epoch of stable topography/map landscape) on the map landscape of visually evoked 47-channel event-related potential (ERP) microstates was examined using the frequent, non-target stimuli of a cognitive paradigm (12 volunteers). For the two frequent prestimulus microstate classes (oriented left anterior-right posterior and right anterior-left posterior), ERP map series were selectively averaged. The post-stimulus ERP grand average map series was segmented into microstates; 10 were found. The centroid locations of positive and negative map areas extracted as landscape descriptors. Significant differences (MANOVAs and t-tests) between the two prestimulus classes were found in four of the ten ERP microstates. The relative orientation of the two ERP microstate classes was the same as prestimulus in some ERP microstates, but reversed in others. Thus, brain electric microstates at stimulus arrival influence the landscapes of the post-stimulus ERP maps and therefore, information processing; prestimulus microstate effects differed for different post-stimulus ERP microstates.

  4. Discrepancy of neural response between exogenous and endogenous task switching: an event-related potentials study.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Maki; Toyomaki, Atsuhito; Hashimoto, Naoki; Kusumi, Ichiro; Murohashi, Harumitsu; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2012-08-01

    Task switching is a well-known cognitive paradigm to explore task-set reconfiguration processes such as rule shifting. In particular, endogenous task switching is thought to differ qualitatively from stimulus-triggered exogenous task switching. However, no previous study has examined the neural substrate of endogenous task switching. The purpose of the present study is to explore the differences between event-related potential responses to exogenous and endogenous rule switching at cue stimulus. We modified two patterns of cued switching tasks: exogenous (bottom-up) rule switching and endogenous (top-down) rule switching. In each task cue stimulus was configured to induce switching or maintaining rule. In exogenous switching tasks, late positive deflection was larger in the switch rule condition than in the maintain rule condition. However, in endogenous switching tasks late positive deflection was unexpectedly larger in the maintain-rule condition than in the switch-rule condition. These results indicate that exogenous rule switching is explicit stimulus-driven processes, whereas endogenous rule switching is implicitly parallel processes independent of external stimulus.

  5. Cognitive caching promotes flexibility in task switching: evidence from event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Lange, Florian; Seer, Caroline; Müller, Dorothea; Kopp, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Time-consuming processes of task-set reconfiguration have been shown to contribute to the costs of switching between cognitive tasks. We describe and probe a novel mechanism serving to reduce the costs of task-set reconfiguration. We propose that when individuals are uncertain about the currently valid task, one task set is activated for execution while other task sets are maintained at a pre-active state in cognitive cache. We tested this idea by assessing an event-related potential (ERP) index of task-set reconfiguration in a three-rule task-switching paradigm involving varying degrees of task uncertainty. In high-uncertainty conditions, two viable tasks were equally likely to be correct whereas in low-uncertainty conditions, one task was more likely than the other. ERP and performance measures indicated substantial costs of task-set reconfiguration when participants were required to switch away from a task that had been likely to be correct. In contrast, task-set-reconfiguration costs were markedly reduced when the previous task set was chosen under high task uncertainty. These results suggest that cognitive caching of alternative task sets adds to human cognitive flexibility under high task uncertainty. PMID:26643146

  6. Human recognition memory and conflict control: An event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Liu, T; Liu, X; Xiao, T; Shi, J

    2016-01-28

    The relationship between recognition memory and cognitive control is an important research topic. The current study investigated how conflict control influences an individual's emotional memory. During the encoding phase, participants were required to judge the affective valence of a Chinese Chengyu word (either positive or negative) in a modified Simon paradigm and to remember the word. Half of the words were presented in the congruent condition and the other half were displayed in the incongruent condition. During the retrieval phase, participants were instructed to make an 'old/new judgment' and decide whether the word had been presented previously. Electrophysiological responses were recorded using the event-related potential (ERP) technique. The behavioral results of retrieval processes showed that participants remembered more positive than negative words when they were encoded in the congruent condition. The electrophysiological results revealed that the retrieval of words encoded in the incongruent condition elicited less negative frontal negativity (FN) and early posterior negativity (EPN) amplitudes than those encoded in the congruent condition. The retrieval of words encoded in the incongruent condition induced greater late positive complex (LPC) amplitudes, relative to those encoded in the congruent condition on the left hemisphere. It was also observed that the recognition of positive words induced faster LPC responses than negative words when they were encoded in the incongruent condition. The present electrophysiological study illustrates that emotional memory processes may be affected by conflict control.

  7. Effects of incense on brain function: evaluation using electroencephalograms and event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Mutsumi; Osawa, Mikio; Nishitani, Nobuyuki; Iwata, Makoto

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of the odor of incense on brain activity, electroencephalograms (EEGs) and event-related potentials (ERPs) in a push/wait paradigm were recorded in 10 healthy adults (aged 23-39 years) with normal olfactory function. EEG was recorded from 21 electrodes on the scalp, according to the International 10-20 system, and EEG power spectra were calculated by fast Fourier transform for 3 min before and during odor presentation. ERPs were recorded from 15 electrodes on the scalp before, during and after exposure to incense with intervals of 10 min. In a push/wait paradigm, two Japanese words, 'push' as the go stimulus and 'wait' as the no-go stimulus, appeared randomly on a CRT screen with equal probability. The subjects were instructed to push a button whenever the 'push' signal appeared. Fast alpha activity (10-13 Hz) increased significantly in bilateral posterior regions during incense exposure compared to that during rose oil exposure. The peak amplitudes of no-go P3 at Fz and Cz were significantly greater during incense inhalation. The latencies of go P3 and no-go P3, and the amplitude and latencies of no-go N2 did not change by exposure to the odors of both incense, rose and odorless air. These results suggest that the odor of incense may enhance cortical activities and the function of inhibitory processing of motor response. PMID:19325250

  8. Perspective taking modulates positivity bias in self-appraisals: behavioral and event-related potential evidence.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Aibao; Li, Shifeng; Herbert, Cornelia; Xia, Ruixue; Xu, Kepeng; Xu, Qiongying; Zhu, Jing; Ren, Deyun

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that when people self-reflect--they typically judge the self as more positive (or less negative) compared to others on a range of dimensions (such as health, social skills, or achievement). In the present study, we investigated whether viewing the self through the eyes of other people reduces this egocentric (self-centered) bias. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were examined in 17 subjects who performed judgments of adjectives in positive or negative valences from either self-perspective or other-perspective. Reaction times revealed an interaction between the factors perspective and emotional valence. Faster responses occurred after positive words in the self-perspective condition. A similar interaction was observed in the ERP waveforms in the time range of the N400 component: smaller N400 amplitudes were elicited by positive stimuli compared to negative stimuli in the self-perspective condition, but not in the other-perspective condition. Similarly, a reversed pattern was found in the late positive component (LPC) at 415-815 ms. The present study suggests that shifts in perspectives between self and others can change self-appraisal, which in turn reduces egocentric biases of the self. On a neural level, this modulation may be associated with an increase in self-monitoring processes. PMID:23802122

  9. Neurophysiological evidence for the country-of-origin effect: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Min, Byoung-Kyong; Cho, Kwangsu; Sung, Jungyeon; Cho, Erin

    2014-03-01

    Consumers often rely on observable cues that hint at the hidden quality of a product. The aim of this study was to investigate brain activities associated with the country-of-origin (COO) effect and consumer evaluation of a product design. Electroencephalogram recordings were used to observe event-related brain potentials associated with the COO effect and design evaluation. We found that the frontocentral N90 and parieto-occipital P220 amplitudes are involved in forming preference to design, whereas the COO effect is processed in the centroparietal P500 amplitude. We also found a significant interaction effect between COO and design preference with regard to reaction times. Specifically, participants tended to spend more time making a preference decision when they did not like the product design made in a country with a favorable COO. These results imply that the two cognitive processes, evaluation of COO and formation of design preference, are activated independently at an early stage. It also suggests that these two processes interact with each other toward the end of the decision phase. Together, the results of this study provide neuropsychological evidence supporting a significant role of COO in the formation of design preference. Future studies are required to further delve into other neurophysiological activities associated with the COO effect.

  10. Scale-Free Brain Networks Based on the Event-Related Potential during Visual Spatial Attention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Jin, Zhen-Lan

    2011-04-01

    The human brain is thought of as one of the most complex dynamical systems in the universe. The network view of the dynamical system has emerged since the discovery of scale-free networks. Brain functional networks, which represent functional associations among brain regions, are extracted by measuring the temporal correlations from electroencephalogram data. We measure the topological properties of the brain functional network, including degree distribution, average degree, clustering coefficient and the shortest path length, to compare the networks of multi-channel event-related potential activity between visual spatial attention and unattention conditions. It is found that the degree distribution of the brain functional networks under both the conditions is a power law distribution, which reflects a scale-free property. Moreover, the scaling exponent of the attention condition is significantly smaller than that of the unattention condition. However, the degree distribution of equivalent random networks does not follow the power law distribution. In addition, the clustering coefficient of these random networks is smaller than those of brain networks, and the shortest path length of these random networks is large and comparable with those of brain networks. Our results, typical of scale-free networks, indicate that the scaling exponent of brain activity could reflect different cognitive processes.

  11. Detecting concealed information using feedback related event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Sai, Liyang; Lin, Xiaohong; Hu, Xiaoqing; Fu, Genyue

    2014-10-01

    Employing an event-related potential (ERP)-based concealed information test (CIT), the present study investigated (1) the neurocognitive processes when people received feedbacks regarding their deceptive/truthful responses and (2) whether such feedback-related ERP activities can be used to detect concealed information above and beyond the recognition-related P300. During the CIT, participants were presented with rare, meaningful probes (their own names) embedded within a series of frequent yet meaningless irrelevants (others' names). Participants were instructed to deny their recognition of the probes. Critically, following participants' responses, they were provided with feedbacks regarding whether they succeeded or failed in the CIT. Replicating previous ERP-based CITs, we found a larger P300 elicited by probe compared to irrelevant. Regarding feedback-related ERPs, a temporospatial Principle Component Analyses found two ERP components that were not only sensitive to feedback manipulations but also can discriminate probe from irrelevant: an earlier, central-distributed positivity that was elicited by "success" feedbacks peaked around 219ms; and a later, right central-distributed positivity that was also elicited by "success" feedbacks, peaked around 400ms. Importantly, the feedback ERPs were not correlated with P300 that was elicited by probe/irrelevant, suggesting that these two ERPs reflect independent processes underlying memory concealment. These findings illustrate the feasibility and promise of using feedback-related ERPs to detect concealed memory and thus deception. PMID:25058495

  12. Improving single-trial detection of event-related potentials through artificial deformed signals.

    PubMed

    Cecotti, H; Rivet, B

    2014-01-01

    To propose a reliable and robust Brain-Computer Interface (BCI), efficient machine learning and signal processing methods have to be used. However, it is often necessary to have a sufficient number of labeled brain responses to create a model. A large database that would represent all of the possible variabilities of the signal is not always possible to obtain, because calibration sessions have to be short. In the case of BCIs based on the detection of event-related potentials (ERPs), we propose to tackle this problem by including additional deformed patterns in the training database to increase the number of labeled brain responses. The creation of the additional deformed patterns is based on two approaches: (i) smooth deformation fields, and (ii) right and left shifted signals. The evaluation is performed with data from 10 healthy subjects participating in a P300 speller experiment. The results show that small shifts of the signal allow a better estimation of both spatial filters, and a linear classifier. The best performance, AUC=0.828 ± 0.061, is obtained by combining the smooth deformation fields and the shifts, after spatial filtering, compared to AUC=0.543 ± 0.025, without additional deformed patterns. The results support the conclusion that adding signals with small deformations can significantly improve the performance of single-trial detection when the amount of training data is limited.

  13. Visuo-tactile interactions in the congenitally deaf: a behavioral and event-related potential study

    PubMed Central

    Hauthal, Nadine; Debener, Stefan; Rach, Stefan; Sandmann, Pascale; Thorne, Jeremy D.

    2015-01-01

    Auditory deprivation is known to be accompanied by alterations in visual processing. Yet not much is known about tactile processing and the interplay of the intact sensory modalities in the deaf. We presented visual, tactile, and visuo-tactile stimuli to congenitally deaf and hearing individuals in a speeded detection task. Analyses of multisensory responses showed a redundant signals effect that was attributable to a coactivation mechanism in both groups, although the redundancy gain was less in the deaf. In line with these behavioral results, on a neural level, there were multisensory interactions in both groups that were again weaker in the deaf. In hearing but not deaf participants, somatosensory event-related potential N200 latencies were modulated by simultaneous visual stimulation. A comparison of unisensory responses between groups revealed larger N200 amplitudes for visual and shorter N200 latencies for tactile stimuli in the deaf. Furthermore, P300 amplitudes were also larger in the deaf. This group difference was significant for tactile and approached significance for visual targets. The differences in visual and tactile processing between deaf and hearing participants, however, were not reflected in behavior. Both the behavioral and electroencephalography (EEG) results suggest more pronounced multisensory interaction in hearing than in deaf individuals. Visuo-tactile enhancements could not be explained by perceptual deficiency, but could be partly attributable to inverse effectiveness. PMID:25653602

  14. Tobacco smoking and event-related brain potentials in a Stroop task.

    PubMed

    Ilan, A B; Polich, J

    2001-03-01

    Behavioral and event-related brain potential (ERP) measures were used to assess the effects of tobacco smoking on selective attention. Two groups of abstinent smokers performed a Stroop color-naming task. The display color of a stimulus word determined the correct response, whereas word meaning was irrelevant. Meaning was congruent, neutral, or incongruent with respect to color. After completing two blocks of trials under abstinent conditions, subjects received a 15-min break before performing two more blocks. Subjects in the Smoking group (N=12) smoked two cigarettes during the break. Matched Control subjects (N=12) did not smoke during the break. Typical Stroop effects were found, as reaction time (RT) was shortest to congruent words, intermediate to neutral words, and longest to incongruent words. Overall RT decreased after the break equally for the Smoking and Control groups, whereas the magnitude of the Stroop effect was unchanged for either group. P300 amplitude decreased after the break for the Smoking group but not for the Control group, which implied that smoking rather than practice produced component decline. Error rate and P300 latency did not change after the break for either group. The results suggest that tobacco smoking may decrease the availability of general attentional resources required to evaluate colored word stimuli, whereas the specific stimulus processing mechanisms responsible for the Stroop effect are relatively unaffected.

  15. Event-related potentials with the Stroop colour-word task: timing of semantic conflict.

    PubMed

    Zurrón, Montserrat; Pouso, María; Lindín, Mónica; Galdo, Santiago; Díaz, Fernando

    2009-06-01

    Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) elicited by congruent and incongruent colour-word stimuli of a Stroop paradigm, in a task in which participants were required to judge the congruence/incongruence of the two dimensions of the stimuli, were recorded in order to study the timing of the semantic conflict. The reaction time to colour-word incongruent stimuli was significantly longer than the reaction time to congruent stimuli (the Stroop effect). A temporal Principal Components Analysis was applied to the data to identify the ERP components. Three positive components were identified in the 300-600 ms interval in response to the congruent and incongruent stimuli: First P3, P3b and PSW. The factor scores corresponding to the First P3 and P3b components were significantly smaller for the incongruent stimuli than for the congruent stimuli. No differences between stimuli were observed in the factor scores corresponding to the PSW or in the ERP latencies. We conclude that the temporal locus of the semantic conflict, which intervenes in generating the Stroop effect, may occur within the time interval in which the First P3 and P3b components are identified, i.e. at approximately 300-450 ms post-stimulus. We suggest that the semantic conflict delays the start of the response selection process, which explains the longer reaction time to incongruent stimuli.

  16. The taste-visual cross-modal Stroop effect: An event-related brain potential study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, X; Dupuis-Roy, N; Yang, X L; Qiu, J F; Zhang, Q L

    2014-03-28

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded to explore, for the first time, the electrophysiological correlates of the taste-visual cross-modal Stroop effect. Eighteen healthy participants were presented with a taste stimulus and a food image, and asked to categorize the image as "sweet" or "sour" by pressing the relevant button as quickly as possible. Accurate categorization of the image was faster when it was presented with a congruent taste stimulus (e.g., sour taste/image of lemon) than with an incongruent one (e.g., sour taste/image of ice cream). ERP analyses revealed a negative difference component (ND430-620) between 430 and 620ms in the taste-visual cross-modal Stroop interference. Dipole source analysis of the difference wave (incongruent minus congruent) indicated that two generators localized in the prefrontal cortex and the parahippocampal gyrus contributed to this taste-visual cross-modal Stroop effect. This result suggests that the prefrontal cortex is associated with the process of conflict control in the taste-visual cross-modal Stroop effect. Also, we speculate that the parahippocampal gyrus is associated with the process of discordant information in the taste-visual cross-modal Stroop effect.

  17. Event-related potentials reveal early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Aitao; Liu, Jing; Zhang, John X

    2012-03-01

    With tasks involving action concept comprehension, many fMRI studies have reported brain activations in sensori-motor regions specific to effectors of the referent action. There is relatively less evidence whether such activations reflect early semantic access or late conceptual re-processing. Here we recorded event-related potentials when participants recognized noun-verb pairs. For Congruent pairs, the verb was the one most commonly associated with the noun (e.g., football-kick). Compared with a control condition, verbs in Congruent pairs showed priming effects in the time windows of 100-150 ms and 210-260 ms. Such activation seems to be specific to body part but not other aspects of the action as similar priming effect was also found when the noun and verb involved different actions though sharing the same body part (e.g., football-jump), documenting for the first time the early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension. PMID:22306088

  18. The event-related brain potential as an index of attention allocation in complex displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickens, C. D.; Heffley, E. F.; Kramer, A. F.; Donchin, E.

    1980-01-01

    The advantages of employing the event-related brain potential (ERP) in the assessment of allocation of attention in dynamic environments are discussed. Three experiments are presented in which the P300 component of the ERP is demonstrated to be a useful index of subjects' locus of attention. The first two experiments were concerned with the allocation of attention during discrete and continuous visual monitoring tasks. The results indicated that a P300 was elicited only by stimuli to which the subject had to attend in order to perform successfully the task. The third experiment was conducted to assess the sensitivity of P300 to the manner in which attention is allocated to different aspects of a display during the performance of a 3-dimensional target acquisition task. The amplitude of the P300 was found to reflect differences between two levels of workload, as well as the task relevance of the stimuli. The results of the experiments are discussed in terms of their utility in the evaluation of the design of man-machine systems as well as in the study of the allocation of attention in operational environments.

  19. Visual event-related potentials to biological motion stimuli in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bletsch, Anke; Krick, Christoph; Siniatchkin, Michael; Jarczok, Tomasz A.; Freitag, Christine M.; Bender, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Atypical visual processing of biological motion contributes to social impairments in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, the exact temporal sequence of deficits of cortical biological motion processing in ASD has not been studied to date. We used 64-channel electroencephalography to study event-related potentials associated with human motion perception in 17 children and adolescents with ASD and 21 typical controls. A spatio-temporal source analysis was performed to assess the brain structures involved in these processes. We expected altered activity already during early stimulus processing and reduced activity during subsequent biological motion specific processes in ASD. In response to both, random and biological motion, the P100 amplitude was decreased suggesting unspecific deficits in visual processing, and the occipito-temporal N200 showed atypical lateralization in ASD suggesting altered hemispheric specialization. A slow positive deflection after 400 ms, reflecting top-down processes, and human motion-specific dipole activation differed slightly between groups, with reduced and more diffuse activation in the ASD-group. The latter could be an indicator of a disrupted neuronal network for biological motion processing in ADS. Furthermore, early visual processing (P100) seems to be correlated to biological motion-specific activation. This emphasizes the relevance of early sensory processing for higher order processing deficits in ASD. PMID:23887808

  20. Tracking cognitive phases in analogical reasoning with event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Mandy J; McClelland, M Michelle; Donovan, Colin M; Tillman, Gail D; Krawczyk, Daniel C

    2012-03-01

    Analogical reasoning consists of multiple phases. Four-term analogies (A:B::C:D) have an encoding period in which the A:B pair is evaluated prior to a mapping phase. The electrophysiological timing associated with analogical reasoning has remained unclear. We used event-related potentials to identify neural timing related to analogical reasoning relative to perceptual and semantic control conditions. Spatiotemporal principal-components analyses revealed differences primarily in left frontal electrodes during encoding and mapping phases of analogies relative to the other conditions. The timing of the activity differed depending upon the phase of the problem. During the encoding of A:B terms, analogies elicited a positive deflection compared to the control conditions between 400 and 1,200 ms, but for the mapping phase analogical processing elicited a negative deflection that occurred earlier and for a shorter time period, between 350 and 625 ms. These results provide neural and behavioral evidence that 4-term analogy problems involve a highly active evaluation phase of the A:B pair.

  1. How Distance Affects Semantic Integration in Discourse: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohong; Chen, Shuang; Chen, Xuhai; Yang, Yufang

    2015-01-01

    Event-related potentials were used to investigate whether semantic integration in discourse is influenced by the number of intervening sentences between the endpoints of integration. Readers read discourses in which the last sentence contained a critical word that was either congruent or incongruent with the information introduced in the first sentence. Furthermore, for the short discourses, the first and last sentence were intervened by only one sentence while for the long discourses, they were intervened by three sentences. We found that the incongruent words elicited an N400 effect for both the short and long discourses. However, a P600 effect was only observed for the long discourses, but not for the short ones. These results suggest that although readers can successfully integrate upcoming words into the existing discourse representation, the effort required for this integration process is modulated by the number of intervening sentences. Thus, discourse distance as measured by the number of intervening sentences should be taken as an important factor for semantic integration in discourse.

  2. Distraction in a visual multi-deviant paradigm: behavioral and event-related potential effects.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Sabine; Bendixen, Alexandra; Deouell, Leon Y; Schröger, Erich

    2009-06-01

    The present study aimed at investigating visual distraction in a serial, multi-deviant oddball paradigm with deviant stimuli occurring regularly (every third trial), having a larger overall probability (1/3), and low dimension-specific probability (1/9). Participants performed a categorization task (odd/even) on centrally presented digits. Task-irrelevant geometrical forms were presented concurrently in the left and right periphery of the target. These forms were green triangles that, in every third trial, contained a deviancy either in location, color, or shape at the left or right peripheral position. Behavioral performance and event-related potentials (ERPs) were measured during the multi-deviant blocks and during corresponding control blocks to compensate for physical differences. Results revealed prolonged reaction times for the categorization task in trials containing a deviant feature relative to the respective control condition. Furthermore, two negative shifts were observed in the ERPs for deviant compared to control stimuli, the early one at the ascending part of the N1 component, and the later one at the onset latency of the N2 component. Deviant displays violating a sequential regularity on one of the dimensions thus elicit respective posterior ERP components of change detection and a deterioration in task performance even when they occur as frequently as in every third trial of a sequence. In analogy to findings in audition, these results reveal the importance of regularity processing and its immediate consequences for adaptive behavior also in vision.

  3. Effects of incense on brain function: evaluation using electroencephalograms and event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Mutsumi; Osawa, Mikio; Nishitani, Nobuyuki; Iwata, Makoto

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of the odor of incense on brain activity, electroencephalograms (EEGs) and event-related potentials (ERPs) in a push/wait paradigm were recorded in 10 healthy adults (aged 23-39 years) with normal olfactory function. EEG was recorded from 21 electrodes on the scalp, according to the International 10-20 system, and EEG power spectra were calculated by fast Fourier transform for 3 min before and during odor presentation. ERPs were recorded from 15 electrodes on the scalp before, during and after exposure to incense with intervals of 10 min. In a push/wait paradigm, two Japanese words, 'push' as the go stimulus and 'wait' as the no-go stimulus, appeared randomly on a CRT screen with equal probability. The subjects were instructed to push a button whenever the 'push' signal appeared. Fast alpha activity (10-13 Hz) increased significantly in bilateral posterior regions during incense exposure compared to that during rose oil exposure. The peak amplitudes of no-go P3 at Fz and Cz were significantly greater during incense inhalation. The latencies of go P3 and no-go P3, and the amplitude and latencies of no-go N2 did not change by exposure to the odors of both incense, rose and odorless air. These results suggest that the odor of incense may enhance cortical activities and the function of inhibitory processing of motor response.

  4. Short-term effects of prosocial video games on aggression: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanling; Teng, Zhaojun; Lan, Haiying; Zhang, Xin; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that exposure to violent video games increases aggression, whereas exposure to prosocial video games can reduce aggressive behavior. However, little is known about the neural correlates of these behavioral effects. This work is the first to investigate the electrophysiological features of the relationship between playing a prosocial video game and inhibition of aggressive behavior. Forty-nine subjects played either a prosocial or a neutral video game for 20 min, then participated in an event-related potential (ERP) experiment based on an oddball paradigm and designed to test electrophysiological responses to prosocial and violent words. Finally, subjects completed a competitive reaction time task (CRTT) which based on Taylor's Aggression Paradigm and contains reaction time and noise intensity chosen as a measure of aggressive behavior. The results show that the prosocial video game group (compared to the neutral video game group) displayed smaller P300 amplitudes, were more accurate in distinguishing violent words, and were less aggressive as evaluated by the CRTT of noise intensity chosen. A mediation analysis shows that the P300 amplitude evoked by violent words partially mediates the relationship between type of video game and subsequent aggressive behavior. The results support theories based on the General Learning Model. We provide converging behavioral and neural evidence that exposure to prosocial media may reduce aggression.

  5. The time course of word retrieval revealed by event-related brain potentials during overt speech

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Albert; Strijkers, Kristof; Martin, Clara; Thierry, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    Speech production is one of the most fundamental activities of humans. A core cognitive operation involved in this skill is the retrieval of words from long-term memory, that is, from the mental lexicon. In this article, we establish the time course of lexical access by recording the brain electrical activity of participants while they named pictures aloud. By manipulating the ordinal position of pictures belonging to the same semantic categories, the cumulative semantic interference effect, we were able to measure the exact time at which lexical access takes place. We found significant correlations between naming latencies, ordinal position of pictures, and event-related potential mean amplitudes starting 200 ms after picture presentation and lasting for 180 ms. The study reveals that the brain engages extremely fast in the retrieval of words one wishes to utter and offers a clear time frame of how long it takes for the competitive process of activating and selecting words in the course of speech to be resolved. PMID:19934043

  6. Post-Decision Wagering Affects Metacognitive Awareness of Emotional Stimuli: An Event Related Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Wierzchoń, Michał; Wronka, Eligiusz; Paulewicz, Borysław; Szczepanowski, Remigiusz

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigated metacognitive awareness of emotional stimuli and its psychophysiological correlates. We used a backward masking task presenting participants with fearful or neutral faces. We asked participants for face discrimination and then probed their metacognitive awareness with confidence rating (CR) and post-decision wagering (PDW) scales. We also analysed psychophysiological correlates of awareness with event-related potential (ERP) components: P1, N170, early posterior negativity (EPN), and P3. We have not observed any differences between PDW and CR conditions in the emotion identification task. However, the "aware" ratings were associated with increased accuracy performance. This effect was more pronounced in PDW, especially for fearful faces, suggesting that emotional stimuli awareness may be enhanced by monetary incentives. EEG analysis showed larger N170, EPN and P3 amplitudes in aware compared to unaware trials. It also appeared that both EPN and P3 ERP components were more pronounced in the PDW condition, especially when emotional faces were presented. Taken together, our ERP findings suggest that metacognitive awareness of emotional stimuli depends on the effectiveness of both early and late visual information processing. Our study also indicates that awareness of emotional stimuli can be enhanced by the motivation induced by wagering. PMID:27490816

  7. Does Speaking Two Dialects in Daily Life Affect Executive Functions? An Event-Related Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan Jing; Zhang, Haoyun; Guo, Taomei

    2016-01-01

    Whether using two languages enhances executive functions is a matter of debate. Here, we take a novel perspective to examine the bilingual advantage hypothesis by comparing bi-dialect with mono-dialect speakers’ performance on a non-linguistic task that requires executive control. Two groups of native Chinese speakers, one speaking only the standard Chinese Mandarin and the other also speaking the Southern-Min dialect, which differs from the standard Chinese Mandarin primarily in phonology, performed a classic Flanker task. Behavioural results showed no difference between the two groups, but event-related potentials recorded simultaneously revealed a number of differences, including an earlier P2 effect in the bi-dialect as compared to the mono-dialect group, suggesting that the two groups engage different underlying neural processes. Despite differences in the early ERP component, no between-group differences in the magnitude of the Flanker effects, which is an index of conflict resolution, were observed in the N2 component. Therefore, these findings suggest that speaking two dialects of one language does not enhance executive functions. Implications of the current findings for the bilingual advantage hypothesis are discussed. PMID:26991456

  8. Neural Basis of Intrinsic Motivation: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jia; Yu, Liping; Ma, Qingguo

    2015-01-01

    Human intrinsic motivation is of great importance in human behavior. However, although researchers have focused on this topic for decades, its neural basis was still unclear. The current study employed event-related potentials to investigate the neural disparity between an interesting stop-watch (SW) task and a boring watch-stop task (WS) to understand the neural mechanisms of intrinsic motivation. Our data showed that, in the cue priming stage, the cue of the SW task elicited smaller N2 amplitude than that of the WS task. Furthermore, in the outcome feedback stage, the outcome of the SW task induced smaller FRN amplitude and larger P300 amplitude than that of the WS task. These results suggested that human intrinsic motivation did exist and that it can be detected at the neural level. Furthermore, intrinsic motivation could be quantitatively indexed by the amplitude of ERP components, such as N2, FRN, and P300, in the cue priming stage or feedback stage. Quantitative measurements would also be convenient for intrinsic motivation to be added as a candidate social factor in the construction of a machine learning model. PMID:26491430

  9. Gender and number processing in Chinese learners of Spanish - evidence from Event Related Potentials.

    PubMed

    Dowens, Margaret Gillon; Guo, Taomei; Guo, Jingjing; Barber, Horacio; Carreiras, Manuel

    2011-06-01

    Traditionally, age of acquisition (AoA) has been considered the single most important factor in second language (L2) acquisition and processing, particularly in the area of syntax processing. However, there is now growing evidence of the importance of other factors, such as the level of proficiency attained and the degree of overlap or similarity between the first language (L1) and L2 structures and possibility of transfer of features and/or processing routines. However, the relative importance of these factors and the nature of L1-L2 transfer are still unclear. To shed light on these issues, we recorded the electrical brain activity of a group of Chinese proficient late learners of Spanish, using the Event Related Potentials technique, while they read Spanish sentences containing violations of number and grammatical gender agreement (adjective-noun agreement and article-noun agreement). Unlike Spanish, Mandarin Chinese is an isolating language in which morphosyntactic features such as gender and number are not computed and so the ERP results from this group can help to clarify the role of L1-L2 transfer in morpho-syntax processing routines. The results included P600 effects for both gender and number agreement violations, with no differences between these disagreement conditions. These results are taken to support second language acquisition models which stress the roles of proficiency and L1-L2 transfer in L2 syntax processing.

  10. Subject Combination and Electrode Selection in Cooperative Brain-Computer Interface Based on Event Related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Cecotti, Hubert; Rivet, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    New paradigms are required in Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) systems for the needs and expectations of healthy people. To solve this issue, we explore the emerging field of cooperative BCIs, which involves several users in a single BCI system. Contrary to classical BCIs that are dependent on the unique subject’s will, cooperative BCIs are used for problem solving tasks where several people shall be engaged by sharing a common goal. Similarly as combining trials over time improves performance, combining trials across subjects can significantly improve performance compared with when only a single user is involved. Yet, cooperative BCIs may only be used in particular settings, and new paradigms must be proposed to efficiently use this approach. The possible benefits of using several subjects are addressed, and compared with current single-subject BCI paradigms. To show the advantages of a cooperative BCI, we evaluate the performance of combining decisions across subjects with data from an event-related potentials (ERP) based experiment where each subject observed the same sequence of visual stimuli. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to achieve a mean AUC superior to 0.95 with 10 subjects and 3 electrodes on each subject, or with 4 subjects and 6 electrodes on each subject. Several emerging challenges and possible applications are proposed to highlight how cooperative BCIs could be efficiently used with current technologies and leverage BCI applications. PMID:24961765

  11. Does Speaking Two Dialects in Daily Life Affect Executive Functions? An Event-Related Potential Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan Jing; Zhang, Haoyun; Guo, Taomei

    2016-01-01

    Whether using two languages enhances executive functions is a matter of debate. Here, we take a novel perspective to examine the bilingual advantage hypothesis by comparing bi-dialect with mono-dialect speakers' performance on a non-linguistic task that requires executive control. Two groups of native Chinese speakers, one speaking only the standard Chinese Mandarin and the other also speaking the Southern-Min dialect, which differs from the standard Chinese Mandarin primarily in phonology, performed a classic Flanker task. Behavioural results showed no difference between the two groups, but event-related potentials recorded simultaneously revealed a number of differences, including an earlier P2 effect in the bi-dialect as compared to the mono-dialect group, suggesting that the two groups engage different underlying neural processes. Despite differences in the early ERP component, no between-group differences in the magnitude of the Flanker effects, which is an index of conflict resolution, were observed in the N2 component. Therefore, these findings suggest that speaking two dialects of one language does not enhance executive functions. Implications of the current findings for the bilingual advantage hypothesis are discussed.

  12. Inhibitory control in bilinguals and musicians: event related potential (ERP) evidence for experience-specific effects.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Sylvain; Wodniecka, Zofia; Tays, William; Alain, Claude; Bialystok, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Bilinguals and musicians exhibit behavioral advantages on tasks with high demands on executive functioning, particularly inhibitory control, but the brain mechanisms supporting these differences are unclear. Of key interest is whether these forms of experience influence cognition through similar or distinct information processing mechanisms. Here, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) in three groups - bilinguals, musicians, and controls - who completed a visual go-nogo task that involved the withholding of key presses to rare targets. Participants in each group achieved similar accuracy rates and responses times but the analysis of cortical responses revealed significant differences in ERP waveforms. Success in withholding a prepotent response was associated with enhanced stimulus-locked N2 and P3 wave amplitude relative to go trials. For nogo trials, there were altered timing-specific ERP differences and graded amplitude differences observed in the neural responses across groups. Specifically, musicians showed an enhanced early P2 response accompanied by reduced N2 amplitude whereas bilinguals showed increased N2 amplitude coupled with an increased late positivity wave relative to controls. These findings demonstrate that bilingualism and music training have differential effects on the brain networks supporting executive control over behavior.

  13. Endogenous language control in Chinese-English switching: an event-related potentials study.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhen-Lan; Zhang, Jin-Xiang; Li, Ling

    2014-06-01

    The neural basis of language switching, especially endogenous language control, remains largely unclear. We used a cue-stimulus paradigm and measured behavioral indices and scalp event-related potentials to investigate the endogenous control of switching between Chinese and English. In the experiment, unbalanced Chinese (L1) - English (L2) speakers named pictures in L1 or L2 according to an auditory cue presented 700 ms (cue-stimulus interval) before the picture onset. The reaction time (RT) was longer in the switch condition and the switch cost (difference of RTs between switch and repeat conditions) of L1 (L2→L1) was greater than L2 (L1→L2). P2 component elicited by the cue onset showed the neural switch cost of L1 at the frontocentral regions, with a leftward distribution, but not the switch cost of L2. The greater switch cost of L1 in behavioral responses and neural activity suggests that the frontocentral areas play an important role in endogenous language control, and switching back to the native language might require more endogenous control.

  14. Event-related potential correlates of language change detection in bilingual toddlers.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Jan Rouke; Thierry, Guillaume

    2012-01-01

    Children raised in a bilingual environment are faced with the daunting task of learning to extract meaning from language input that can differ between caregivers but, depending on the social context, also within caregivers. Here, we investigated monolingual and bilingual toddlers' brain responses to an unexpected language change. We presented 2-3 year old children with picture-word pairs and occasionally changed the language of the spoken word while recording event-related potentials (ERPs). In line with previous results obtained in adults, bilingual children differentiated between the languages of input faster than their monolingual peers, i.e., within 200 ms of spoken word onset, a time range previously associated with lexical access. However, while adult bilinguals displayed a late stimulus re-evaluation ERP response to a language change, no such modulation was found in bilingual toddlers. These results suggest that although bilingual individuals are sensitive to phonemic language cues already from an early age, language awareness and language monitoring mechanisms probably develop later in life.

  15. An Event-Related Potential Study of Social Information Processing in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    diFilipo, Danielle; Grose-Fifer, Jillian

    2016-01-01

    Increased social awareness is a hallmark of adolescence. The primary aim of this event-related potential study was to investigate whether adolescents, in comparison to adults, would show relatively enhanced early neural processing of complex pictures containing socially-relevant information. A secondary aim was to investigate whether there are also gender and age differences in the ways adolescents and adults process social and nonsocial information. We recorded EEGs from 12–17 year-olds and 25–37 year-olds (N = 59) while they viewed pleasant pictures from the International Affective Picture System. We found age-related amplitude differences in the N1 and the LPP, and gender-related differences in the N2 region for socially-relevant stimuli. Social pictures (featuring mostly young children and adults) elicited larger N1s than nonsocial stimuli in adolescents, but not adults, whereas larger LPPs to social stimuli were seen in adults, but not adolescents. Furthermore, in general, males (regardless of age) showed larger N2s to nonsocial than to social images, but females did not. Our results imply that compared to adults, adolescents show relatively greater initial orientation toward social than toward nonsocial stimuli. PMID:27192210

  16. Post-Decision Wagering Affects Metacognitive Awareness of Emotional Stimuli: An Event Related Potential Study.

    PubMed

    Wierzchoń, Michał; Wronka, Eligiusz; Paulewicz, Borysław; Szczepanowski, Remigiusz

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigated metacognitive awareness of emotional stimuli and its psychophysiological correlates. We used a backward masking task presenting participants with fearful or neutral faces. We asked participants for face discrimination and then probed their metacognitive awareness with confidence rating (CR) and post-decision wagering (PDW) scales. We also analysed psychophysiological correlates of awareness with event-related potential (ERP) components: P1, N170, early posterior negativity (EPN), and P3. We have not observed any differences between PDW and CR conditions in the emotion identification task. However, the "aware" ratings were associated with increased accuracy performance. This effect was more pronounced in PDW, especially for fearful faces, suggesting that emotional stimuli awareness may be enhanced by monetary incentives. EEG analysis showed larger N170, EPN and P3 amplitudes in aware compared to unaware trials. It also appeared that both EPN and P3 ERP components were more pronounced in the PDW condition, especially when emotional faces were presented. Taken together, our ERP findings suggest that metacognitive awareness of emotional stimuli depends on the effectiveness of both early and late visual information processing. Our study also indicates that awareness of emotional stimuli can be enhanced by the motivation induced by wagering. PMID:27490816

  17. Event-related potentials during word mapping to object shape predict toddlers' vocabulary size.

    PubMed

    Borgström, Kristina; Torkildsen, Janne von Koss; Lindgren, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    What role does attention to different object properties play in early vocabulary development? This longitudinal study using event-related potentials in combination with behavioral measures investigated 20- and 24-month-olds' (n = 38; n = 34; overlapping n = 24) ability to use object shape and object part information in word-object mapping. The N400 component was used to measure semantic priming by images containing shape or detail information. At 20 months, the N400 to words primed by object shape varied in topography and amplitude depending on vocabulary size, and these differences predicted productive vocabulary size at 24 months. At 24 months, when most of the children had vocabularies of several hundred words, the relation between vocabulary size and the N400 effect in a shape context was weaker. Detached object parts did not function as word primes regardless of age or vocabulary size, although the part-objects were identified behaviorally. The behavioral measure, however, also showed relatively poor recognition of the part-objects compared to the shape-objects. These three findings provide new support for the link between shape recognition and early vocabulary development.

  18. Time-Frequency Data Reduction for Event Related Potentials: Combining Principal Component Analysis and Matching Pursuit

    PubMed Central

    Aviyente, Selin; Bernat, Edward M.; Malone, Stephen M.; Iacono, William G.

    2010-01-01

    Joint time-frequency representations offer a rich representation of event related potentials (ERPs) that cannot be obtained through individual time or frequency domain analysis. This representation, however, comes at the expense of increased data volume and the difficulty of interpreting the resulting representations. Therefore, methods that can reduce the large amount of time-frequency data to experimentally relevant components are essential. In this paper, we present a method that reduces the large volume of ERP time-frequency data into a few significant time-frequency parameters. The proposed method is based on applying the widely-used matching pursuit (MP) approach, with a Gabor dictionary, to principal components extracted from the time-frequency domain. The proposed PCA-Gabor decomposition is compared with other time-frequency data reduction methods such as the time-frequency PCA approach alone and standard matching pursuit methods using a Gabor dictionary for both simulated and biological data. The results show that the proposed PCA-Gabor approach performs better than either the PCA alone or the standard MP data reduction methods, by using the smallest amount of ERP data variance to produce the strongest statistical separation between experimental conditions. PMID:20730031

  19. Inhibitory Control in Bilinguals and Musicians: Event Related Potential (ERP) Evidence for Experience-Specific Effects

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Sylvain; Wodniecka, Zofia; Tays, William; Alain, Claude; Bialystok, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Bilinguals and musicians exhibit behavioral advantages on tasks with high demands on executive functioning, particularly inhibitory control, but the brain mechanisms supporting these differences are unclear. Of key interest is whether these forms of experience influence cognition through similar or distinct information processing mechanisms. Here, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) in three groups – bilinguals, musicians, and controls – who completed a visual go-nogo task that involved the withholding of key presses to rare targets. Participants in each group achieved similar accuracy rates and responses times but the analysis of cortical responses revealed significant differences in ERP waveforms. Success in withholding a prepotent response was associated with enhanced stimulus-locked N2 and P3 wave amplitude relative to go trials. For nogo trials, there were altered timing-specific ERP differences and graded amplitude differences observed in the neural responses across groups. Specifically, musicians showed an enhanced early P2 response accompanied by reduced N2 amplitude whereas bilinguals showed increased N2 amplitude coupled with an increased late positivity wave relative to controls. These findings demonstrate that bilingualism and music training have differential effects on the brain networks supporting executive control over behavior. PMID:24743321

  20. A Discussion of Possibility of Reinforcement Learning Using Event-Related Potential in BCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Yuya; Tsubone, Tadashi; Wada, Yasuhiro

    Recently, Brain computer interface (BCI) which is a direct connecting pathway an external device such as a computer or a robot and a human brain have gotten a lot of attention. Since BCI can control the machines as robots by using the brain activity without using the voluntary muscle, the BCI may become a useful communication tool for handicapped persons, for instance, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients. However, in order to realize the BCI system which can perform precise tasks on various environments, it is necessary to design the control rules to adapt to the dynamic environments. Reinforcement learning is one approach of the design of the control rule. If this reinforcement leaning can be performed by the brain activity, it leads to the attainment of BCI that has general versatility. In this research, we paid attention to P300 of event-related potential as an alternative signal of the reward of reinforcement learning. We discriminated between the success and the failure trials from P300 of the EEG of the single trial by using the proposed discrimination algorithm based on Support vector machine. The possibility of reinforcement learning was examined from the viewpoint of the number of discriminated trials. It was shown that there was a possibility to be able to learn in most subjects.

  1. Empathy for Pain from Adolescence through Adulthood: An Event-Related Brain Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Mella, Nathalie; Studer, Joseph; Gilet, Anne-Laure; Labouvie-Vief, Gisela

    2012-01-01

    Affective and cognitive empathy are traditionally differentiated, the affective component being concerned with resonating with another’s emotional state, whereas the cognitive component reflects regulation of the resulting distress and understanding of another’s mental states (see Decety and Jackson, 2004 for a review). Adolescence is a critical period for the development of cognitive control processes necessary to regulate affective processes: it is only in young adulthood that these control processes achieve maturity (Steinberg, 2005). Thus, one should expect adolescents to show greater automatic empathy than young adults. The present study aimed at exploring the neural correlates of affective (automatic) and cognitive empathy for pain from adolescence to young adulthood. With this aim, Event Related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded in 32 participants (aged 11–39) in a task designed to dissociate these components. ERPs results showed an early automatic fronto-central response to pain (that was not modulated by task demand) and a late parietal response to painful stimuli modulated by attention to pain cues. Adolescents exhibited earlier automatic responses to painful situations than young adults did and showed greater activity in the late cognitive component even when viewing neutral stimuli. Results are discussed in the context of the development of regulatory abilities during adolescence. PMID:23189065

  2. An event-related brain potential study of explicit face recognition.

    PubMed

    Gosling, Angela; Eimer, Martin

    2011-07-01

    To determine the time course of face recognition and its links to face-sensitive event-related potential (ERP) components, ERPs elicited by faces of famous individuals and ERPs to non-famous control faces were compared in a task that required explicit judgements of facial identity. As expected, the face-selective N170 component was unaffected by the difference between famous and non-famous faces. In contrast, the occipito-temporal N250 component was linked to face recognition, as it was selectively triggered by famous faces. Importantly, this component was present for famous faces that were judged to be definitely known relative to famous faces that just appeared familiar, demonstrating that it is associated with the explicit identification of a particular face. The N250 is likely to reflect early perceptual stages of face recognition where long-term memory traces of familiar faces in ventral visual cortex are activated by matching on-line face representations. Famous faces also triggered a broadly distributed longer-latency positivity (P600f) that showed a left-hemisphere bias and was larger for definitely known faces, suggesting links between this component and name generation. These results show that successful face recognition is predicted by ERP components over face-specific visual areas that emerge within 230 ms after stimulus onset.

  3. Event-related potentials reveal early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Aitao; Liu, Jing; Zhang, John X

    2012-03-01

    With tasks involving action concept comprehension, many fMRI studies have reported brain activations in sensori-motor regions specific to effectors of the referent action. There is relatively less evidence whether such activations reflect early semantic access or late conceptual re-processing. Here we recorded event-related potentials when participants recognized noun-verb pairs. For Congruent pairs, the verb was the one most commonly associated with the noun (e.g., football-kick). Compared with a control condition, verbs in Congruent pairs showed priming effects in the time windows of 100-150 ms and 210-260 ms. Such activation seems to be specific to body part but not other aspects of the action as similar priming effect was also found when the noun and verb involved different actions though sharing the same body part (e.g., football-jump), documenting for the first time the early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension.

  4. Event-related potential studies of outcome processing and feedback-guided learning.

    PubMed

    San Martín, René

    2012-01-01

    In order to control behavior in an adaptive manner the brain has to learn how some situations and actions predict positive or negative outcomes. During the last decade cognitive neuroscientists have shown that the brain is able to evaluate and learn from outcomes within a few hundred milliseconds of their occurrence. This research has been primarily focused on the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P3, two event-related potential (ERP) components that are elicited by outcomes. The FRN is a frontally distributed negative-polarity ERP component that typically reaches its maximal amplitude 250 ms after outcome presentation and tends to be larger for negative than for positive outcomes. The FRN has been associated with activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). The P3 (~300-600 ms) is a parietally distributed positive-polarity ERP component that tends to be larger for large magnitude than for small magnitude outcomes. The neural sources of the P3 are probably distributed over different regions of the cortex. This paper examines the theories that have been proposed to explain the functional role of these two ERP components during outcome processing. Special attention is paid to extant literature addressing how these ERP components are modulated by outcome valence (negative vs. positive), outcome magnitude (large vs. small), outcome probability (unlikely vs. likely), and behavioral adjustment. The literature offers few generalizable conclusions, but is beset with a number of inconsistencies across studies. This paper discusses the potential reasons for these inconsistencies and points out some challenges that probably will shape the field over the next decade.

  5. Event-related potential correlates of the serial position effect in short-term memory.

    PubMed

    Patterson, J V; Pratt, H; Starr, A

    1991-06-01

    Event-related potential (ERP) correlates of the serial position effect in short-term memory were investigated using a memory scanning task. Nine normal young adults (18-39 years) indicated whether a probe item was a member of a previously presented 5-item memory set by pressing 1 of 2 reaction-time buttons. Three types of stimuli were used: verbal digits presented both auditorily and visually, and musical notes presented auditorily. The ERPs to the probes were separately averaged according to the serial position of the probe (1, 2, 3, 4 or 5) in the memory set. The ERPs to the memory set items in positions 1, 3 and 5 also were separately averaged. Both baseline-to-peak and average amplitudes of a late positive parietal potential to the probes were larger to probe items presented in the last position in the memory set than to probes presented in the middle positions (2, 3 and 4), showing a significant recency effect, but only for auditory digits. Reaction time reflected significant recency effects for both auditory digits and notes, but not for visual digits. Response accuracy (percent correct) showed a significant recency effect only for notes. For each stimulus type, both the baseline-to-peak and average amplitudes of a late frontal component to the memory set items became more negative (in the case of the visual digits, less positive) in the third and last serial position of the memory set compared to the first. These findings provide electrophysiological evidence of serial position effects in short-term memory, which, during memory scanning, are dependent on stimulus modality (auditory, visual) and type (verbal, non-verbal).

  6. Event-related lateralized readiness potential correlates of the emotion-priming Simon effect.

    PubMed

    Shang, Qian; Fu, Huijian; Qiu, Wenwei; Ma, Qingguo

    2016-08-01

    The Simon effect indicates that the reaction time (RT) is shorter when the stimulus and response locations are congruent than when they are not. This study used a priming-target paradigm to explore the emotion-priming Simon effect with event-related potential techniques. The technique of residue iteration decomposition was employed to analyze the lateralized readiness potential (LRP) component, which contributed to disentangling the overlap between LRP and N2 central contralateral in the Simon task with horizontal stimulus-response arrangements. The behavioral result revealed significant Simon effect in RT. In the neural process, the Simon effect was reflected by both the stimulus-locked LRP (S-LRP) and the response-locked LRP (R-LRP), with the incongruent condition showing longer onset latency, larger Gratton-dip, and smaller negative-going deflection of S-LRP and smaller negative-going deflection of R-LRP. These findings suggest that the interference of irrelevant location information is located at the perceptual-encoding (indicated by S-LRP) and response-execution stages (indicated by R-LRP), providing evidence for both the perceptual-interference and response-interference accounts. However, the further linear regression result signaled that the Simon effect might be more closely related to the response-execution stage than the perceptual-encoding stage. In addition, the influence of emotion on the Simon effect was salient only in the incongruent condition, showing longer onset latency of S-LRP and larger Gratton-dip of R-LRP in the negative emotion-priming condition than in the neutral emotion-priming condition, which revealed that the emotional interference effect arose from the stages of perceptual encoding and early response execution only when the locations of a stimulus and the corresponding response were incongruent.

  7. Event-related potential studies of outcome processing and feedback-guided learning

    PubMed Central

    San Martín, René

    2012-01-01

    In order to control behavior in an adaptive manner the brain has to learn how some situations and actions predict positive or negative outcomes. During the last decade cognitive neuroscientists have shown that the brain is able to evaluate and learn from outcomes within a few hundred milliseconds of their occurrence. This research has been primarily focused on the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P3, two event-related potential (ERP) components that are elicited by outcomes. The FRN is a frontally distributed negative-polarity ERP component that typically reaches its maximal amplitude 250 ms after outcome presentation and tends to be larger for negative than for positive outcomes. The FRN has been associated with activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). The P3 (~300–600 ms) is a parietally distributed positive-polarity ERP component that tends to be larger for large magnitude than for small magnitude outcomes. The neural sources of the P3 are probably distributed over different regions of the cortex. This paper examines the theories that have been proposed to explain the functional role of these two ERP components during outcome processing. Special attention is paid to extant literature addressing how these ERP components are modulated by outcome valence (negative vs. positive), outcome magnitude (large vs. small), outcome probability (unlikely vs. likely), and behavioral adjustment. The literature offers few generalizable conclusions, but is beset with a number of inconsistencies across studies. This paper discusses the potential reasons for these inconsistencies and points out some challenges that probably will shape the field over the next decade. PMID:23162451

  8. Event-related potential studies of outcome processing and feedback-guided learning.

    PubMed

    San Martín, René

    2012-01-01

    In order to control behavior in an adaptive manner the brain has to learn how some situations and actions predict positive or negative outcomes. During the last decade cognitive neuroscientists have shown that the brain is able to evaluate and learn from outcomes within a few hundred milliseconds of their occurrence. This research has been primarily focused on the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P3, two event-related potential (ERP) components that are elicited by outcomes. The FRN is a frontally distributed negative-polarity ERP component that typically reaches its maximal amplitude 250 ms after outcome presentation and tends to be larger for negative than for positive outcomes. The FRN has been associated with activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). The P3 (~300-600 ms) is a parietally distributed positive-polarity ERP component that tends to be larger for large magnitude than for small magnitude outcomes. The neural sources of the P3 are probably distributed over different regions of the cortex. This paper examines the theories that have been proposed to explain the functional role of these two ERP components during outcome processing. Special attention is paid to extant literature addressing how these ERP components are modulated by outcome valence (negative vs. positive), outcome magnitude (large vs. small), outcome probability (unlikely vs. likely), and behavioral adjustment. The literature offers few generalizable conclusions, but is beset with a number of inconsistencies across studies. This paper discusses the potential reasons for these inconsistencies and points out some challenges that probably will shape the field over the next decade. PMID:23162451

  9. Transdiagnostic Psychiatric Symptoms and Event-Related Potentials following Rewarding and Aversive Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bedwell, Jeffrey S.; Potts, Geoffrey F.; Gooding, Diane C.; Trachik, Benjamin J.; Chan, Chi C.; Spencer, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for a better understanding of transdiagnostic psychiatric symptoms that relate to neurophysiological abnormalities following rewarding and aversive feedback in order to inform development of novel targeted treatments. To address this need, we examined a transdiagnostic sample of 44 adults (mean age: 35.52; 57% female), which consisted of individuals with broadly-defined schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (n = 16), bipolar disorders (n = 10), other mood and anxiety disorders (n = 5), and no history of a psychiatric disorder (n = 13). Participants completed a Pavlovian monetary reward prediction task during 32-channel electroencephalogram recording. We assessed the event-related potentials (ERPs) of feedback-related negativity (FRN), feedback-related positivity (FRP), and the late positive potential (LPP), following better and worse than expected outcomes. Examination of symptom relationships using stepwise regressions across the entire sample revealed that an increase in the clinician-rated Negative Symptoms factor score from the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, was related to a decreased LPP amplitude during better than expected (i.e., rewarding) outcomes. We also found that increased self-reported scores on the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (Brief-Revised) Disorganized factor related to an increased FRN amplitude during worse than expected (i.e., aversive) outcomes. Across the entire sample, the FRP component amplitudes did not show significant relationships to any of the symptoms examined. Analyses of the three diagnostic groups of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, bipolar disorders, and nonpsychiatric controls did not reveal any statistically significant differences across the ERP amplitudes and conditions. These findings suggest relationships between specific neurophysiological abnormalities following rewarding and aversive outcomes and particular transdiagnostic psychiatric symptoms. PMID:27299996

  10. Reward Promotes Self-Face Processing: An Event-Related Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Youlong; Chen, Jie; Xiao, Xiao; Li, Jin; Yang, Zilu; Fan, Wei; Zhong, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    The present study adopted a reward-priming paradigm to investigate whether and how monetary reward cues affected self-face processing. Event-related potentials were recorded during judgments of head orientation of target faces (self, friend, and stranger), with performance associated with a monetary reward. The results showed self-faces elicited larger N2 mean amplitudes than other-faces, and mean N2 amplitudes increased after monetary reward as compared with no reward cue. Moreover, an interaction effect between cue type and face type was observed for the P3 component, suggesting that both self-faces and friend-faces elicited larger P3 mean amplitudes than stranger-faces after no reward cue, with no significant difference between self-faces and friend-faces under this condition. However, self-faces elicited larger P3 mean amplitudes than friend-faces when monetary reward cues were provided. Interestingly, the enhancement of reward on friend-faces processing was observed at late positive potentials (LPP; 450–600 ms), suggesting that the LPP difference between friend-faces and stranger-faces was enhanced with monetary reward cues. Thus, we found that the enhancement effect of reward on self-relevant processing occurred at the later stages, but not at the early stage. These findings suggest that the activation of the reward expectations can enhance self-face processing, yielding a robust and sustained modulation over their overlapped brain areas where reward and self-relevant processing mechanisms may operate together. PMID:27242637

  11. Event-related lateralized readiness potential correlates of the emotion-priming Simon effect.

    PubMed

    Shang, Qian; Fu, Huijian; Qiu, Wenwei; Ma, Qingguo

    2016-08-01

    The Simon effect indicates that the reaction time (RT) is shorter when the stimulus and response locations are congruent than when they are not. This study used a priming-target paradigm to explore the emotion-priming Simon effect with event-related potential techniques. The technique of residue iteration decomposition was employed to analyze the lateralized readiness potential (LRP) component, which contributed to disentangling the overlap between LRP and N2 central contralateral in the Simon task with horizontal stimulus-response arrangements. The behavioral result revealed significant Simon effect in RT. In the neural process, the Simon effect was reflected by both the stimulus-locked LRP (S-LRP) and the response-locked LRP (R-LRP), with the incongruent condition showing longer onset latency, larger Gratton-dip, and smaller negative-going deflection of S-LRP and smaller negative-going deflection of R-LRP. These findings suggest that the interference of irrelevant location information is located at the perceptual-encoding (indicated by S-LRP) and response-execution stages (indicated by R-LRP), providing evidence for both the perceptual-interference and response-interference accounts. However, the further linear regression result signaled that the Simon effect might be more closely related to the response-execution stage than the perceptual-encoding stage. In addition, the influence of emotion on the Simon effect was salient only in the incongruent condition, showing longer onset latency of S-LRP and larger Gratton-dip of R-LRP in the negative emotion-priming condition than in the neutral emotion-priming condition, which revealed that the emotional interference effect arose from the stages of perceptual encoding and early response execution only when the locations of a stimulus and the corresponding response were incongruent. PMID:26993492

  12. Does cigarette smoking relieve stress? Evidence from the event-related potential (ERP).

    PubMed

    Choi, Damee; Ota, Shotaro; Watanuki, Shigeki

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have reported a paradox that cigarette smoking reduces stress psychologically; however, it increases the arousal level physiologically. To examine this issue, our study aimed to investigate whether cigarette smoking relieves stress by measuring the late positive potential (LPP), a component of the event-related potential (ERP). In Experiment 1, participants first watched emotionally neutral images; second, they received a break; and finally, they watched emotionally neutral images again. In the break, they smoked a cigarette (smoking condition) or simply rested without smoking (non-smoking condition). The procedure of Experiment 2 was the same as that of Experiment 1, except that the participants watched unpleasant images as stress stimuli before the break. In Experiment 1, the LPP decreased from before to after the break in the smoking condition, but not in the non-smoking condition, suggesting that smoking cigarettes in the neutral state reduces the arousal level. In Experiment 2, the LPP for 400-600 ms decreased from before to after the break, both in the smoking and non-smoking conditions; however, the LPP for 200-400 ms decreased from before to after the break only in the smoking condition. This suggests the possibility that cigarette smoking in the unpleasant state may facilitate a decrease in the arousal level faster than with non-smoking. In both Experiments 1 and 2, the subjective rating results also suggested that cigarette smoking decreased anxiety. Taken together, both the physiological (LPP) and the psychological responses from our study suggest that cigarette smoking perhaps relieves stress.

  13. Who Are the True Fans? Evidence from an Event-Related Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qingguo; Jin, Jia; Yuan, Ruixian; Zhang, Wuke

    2015-01-01

    Fans of celebrities commonly exist in modern society. Researchers from social science have been concerned with this problem for years. Furthermore, such researchers have attempted to measure people’s involvement with celebrities in various ways. However, no study measured the degree of addiction to a specific celebrity at the neurological level. Therefore, the current study employed visually evoked event related potentials (ERPs) to examine people’s attitude toward celebrities by comparing different brain activities of fans and non-fans when they were shown a set of photos. These photos include a specific celebrity, a familiar person, a stranger and a butterfly. Furthermore, to examine the validity of the detected neural index, we also investigated the correlation between brain activity and the score of the Celebrity Attitude Scale (CAS), which was a questionnaire used to explore people’s attitude toward celebrities at behavioral level. Two groups of subjects were asked to complete an implicit task, i.e., to press a button when a picture of a butterfly appeared. Results revealed that fans showed significant positive N2 and P300 deflection when viewing the photos of their favorite celebrity, whereas in the non-fan group, the subjects only showed larger P300 amplitude as a response to the celebrity’s photos. Furthermore, a positive correlation between P300 amplitude elicited by the stimuli of a celebrity face and CAS scores was also observed. These findings indicated fan attitude to a specific celebrity can also be observed at the neurological level and suggested the potential utility of using ERP component as an index of fandom involvement. PMID:26057891

  14. Who Are the True Fans? Evidence from an Event-Related Potential Study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingguo; Jin, Jia; Yuan, Ruixian; Zhang, Wuke

    2015-01-01

    Fans of celebrities commonly exist in modern society. Researchers from social science have been concerned with this problem for years. Furthermore, such researchers have attempted to measure people's involvement with celebrities in various ways. However, no study measured the degree of addiction to a specific celebrity at the neurological level. Therefore, the current study employed visually evoked event related potentials (ERPs) to examine people's attitude toward celebrities by comparing different brain activities of fans and non-fans when they were shown a set of photos. These photos include a specific celebrity, a familiar person, a stranger and a butterfly. Furthermore, to examine the validity of the detected neural index, we also investigated the correlation between brain activity and the score of the Celebrity Attitude Scale (CAS), which was a questionnaire used to explore people's attitude toward celebrities at behavioral level. Two groups of subjects were asked to complete an implicit task, i.e., to press a button when a picture of a butterfly appeared. Results revealed that fans showed significant positive N2 and P300 deflection when viewing the photos of their favorite celebrity, whereas in the non-fan group, the subjects only showed larger P300 amplitude as a response to the celebrity's photos. Furthermore, a positive correlation between P300 amplitude elicited by the stimuli of a celebrity face and CAS scores was also observed. These findings indicated fan attitude to a specific celebrity can also be observed at the neurological level and suggested the potential utility of using ERP component as an index of fandom involvement.

  15. Increased Event-Related Potentials and Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-Activity Associated with Intentional Actions

    PubMed Central

    Karch, Susanne; Loy, Fabian; Krause, Daniela; Schwarz, Sandra; Kiesewetter, Jan; Segmiller, Felix; Chrobok, Agnieszka I.; Keeser, Daniel; Pogarell, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Internally guided actions are defined as being purposeful, self-generated and offering choices between alternatives. Intentional actions are essential to reach individual goals. In previous empirical studies, internally guided actions were predominantly related to functional responses in frontal and parietal areas. The aim of the present study was to distinguish event-related potentials and oscillatory responses of intentional actions and externally guided actions. In addition, we compared neurobiological findings of the decision which action to perform with those referring to the decision whether or not to perform an action. Methods: Twenty-eight subjects participated in adapted go/nogo paradigms, including a voluntary selection condition allowing participants to (1) freely decide whether to press the response button or (2) to decide whether they wanted to press the response button with the right index finger or the left index finger. Results: The reaction times were increased when participants freely decided whether and how they wanted to respond compared to the go condition. Intentional processes were associated with a fronto-centrally located N2 and P3 potential. N2 and P3 amplitudes were increased during intentional actions compared to instructed responses (go). In addition, increased activity in the alpha-, beta- and gamma-frequency range was shown during voluntary behavior rather than during externally guided responses. Conclusion: These results may indicate that an additional cognitive process is needed for intentional actions compared to instructed behavior. However, the neural responses were comparatively independent of the kind of decision that was made (1) decision which action to perform; (2) decision whether or not to perform an action). Significance: The study demonstrates the importance of fronto-central alpha-, beta-, and gamma oscillations for voluntary behavior. PMID:26834680

  16. Transdiagnostic Psychiatric Symptoms and Event-Related Potentials following Rewarding and Aversive Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bedwell, Jeffrey S; Potts, Geoffrey F; Gooding, Diane C; Trachik, Benjamin J; Chan, Chi C; Spencer, Christopher C

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for a better understanding of transdiagnostic psychiatric symptoms that relate to neurophysiological abnormalities following rewarding and aversive feedback in order to inform development of novel targeted treatments. To address this need, we examined a transdiagnostic sample of 44 adults (mean age: 35.52; 57% female), which consisted of individuals with broadly-defined schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (n = 16), bipolar disorders (n = 10), other mood and anxiety disorders (n = 5), and no history of a psychiatric disorder (n = 13). Participants completed a Pavlovian monetary reward prediction task during 32-channel electroencephalogram recording. We assessed the event-related potentials (ERPs) of feedback-related negativity (FRN), feedback-related positivity (FRP), and the late positive potential (LPP), following better and worse than expected outcomes. Examination of symptom relationships using stepwise regressions across the entire sample revealed that an increase in the clinician-rated Negative Symptoms factor score from the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, was related to a decreased LPP amplitude during better than expected (i.e., rewarding) outcomes. We also found that increased self-reported scores on the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (Brief-Revised) Disorganized factor related to an increased FRN amplitude during worse than expected (i.e., aversive) outcomes. Across the entire sample, the FRP component amplitudes did not show significant relationships to any of the symptoms examined. Analyses of the three diagnostic groups of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, bipolar disorders, and nonpsychiatric controls did not reveal any statistically significant differences across the ERP amplitudes and conditions. These findings suggest relationships between specific neurophysiological abnormalities following rewarding and aversive outcomes and particular transdiagnostic psychiatric symptoms. PMID:27299996

  17. Event-related potentials elicited by pre-attentive emotional changes in temporal context.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Tomomi; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    The ability to detect emotional change in the environment is essential for adaptive behavior. The current study investigated whether event-related potentials (ERPs) can reflect emotional change in a visual sequence. To assess pre-attentive processing, we examined visual mismatch negativity (vMMN): the negative potentials elicited by a deviant (infrequent) stimulus embedded in a sequence of standard (frequent) stimuli. Participants in two experiments pre-attentively viewed visual sequences of Japanese kanji with different emotional connotations while ERPs were recorded. The visual sequence in Experiment 1 consisted of neutral standards and two types of emotional deviants with a strong and weak intensity. Although the results indicated that strongly emotional deviants elicited more occipital negativity than neutral standards, it was unclear whether these negativities were derived from emotional deviation in the sequence or from the emotional significance of the deviants themselves. In Experiment 2, the two identical emotional deviants were presented against different emotional standards. One type of deviants was emotionally incongruent with the standard and the other type of deviants was emotionally congruent with the standard. The results indicated that occipital negativities elicited by deviants resulted from perceptual changes in a visual sequence at a latency of 100-200 ms and from emotional changes at latencies of 200-260 ms. Contrary to the results of the ERP experiment, reaction times to deviants showed no effect of emotional context; negative stimuli were consistently detected more rapidly than were positive stimuli. Taken together, the results suggest that brain signals can reflect emotional change in a temporal context. PMID:23671693

  18. Who Are the True Fans? Evidence from an Event-Related Potential Study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingguo; Jin, Jia; Yuan, Ruixian; Zhang, Wuke

    2015-01-01

    Fans of celebrities commonly exist in modern society. Researchers from social science have been concerned with this problem for years. Furthermore, such researchers have attempted to measure people's involvement with celebrities in various ways. However, no study measured the degree of addiction to a specific celebrity at the neurological level. Therefore, the current study employed visually evoked event related potentials (ERPs) to examine people's attitude toward celebrities by comparing different brain activities of fans and non-fans when they were shown a set of photos. These photos include a specific celebrity, a familiar person, a stranger and a butterfly. Furthermore, to examine the validity of the detected neural index, we also investigated the correlation between brain activity and the score of the Celebrity Attitude Scale (CAS), which was a questionnaire used to explore people's attitude toward celebrities at behavioral level. Two groups of subjects were asked to complete an implicit task, i.e., to press a button when a picture of a butterfly appeared. Results revealed that fans showed significant positive N2 and P300 deflection when viewing the photos of their favorite celebrity, whereas in the non-fan group, the subjects only showed larger P300 amplitude as a response to the celebrity's photos. Furthermore, a positive correlation between P300 amplitude elicited by the stimuli of a celebrity face and CAS scores was also observed. These findings indicated fan attitude to a specific celebrity can also be observed at the neurological level and suggested the potential utility of using ERP component as an index of fandom involvement. PMID:26057891

  19. Identification of a novel dynamic red blindness in human by event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiahua; Kong, Weijia; Yang, Zhongle

    2010-12-01

    Dynamic color is an important carrier that takes information in some special occupations. However, up to the present, there are no available and objective tests to evaluate dynamic color processing. To investigate the characteristics of dynamic color processing, we adopted two patterns of visual stimulus called "onset-offset" which reflected static color stimuli and "sustained moving" without abrupt mode which reflected dynamic color stimuli to evoke event-related brain potentials (ERPs) in primary color amblyopia patients (abnormal group) and subjects with normal color recognition ability (normal group). ERPs were recorded by Neuroscan system. The results showed that in the normal group, ERPs in response to the dynamic red stimulus showed frontal positive amplitudes with a latency of about 180 ms, a negative peak at about 240 ms and a peak latency of the late positive potential (LPP) in a time window between 290 and 580 ms. In the abnormal group, ERPs in response to the dynamic red stimulus were fully lost and characterized by vanished amplitudes between 0 and 800 ms. No significant difference was noted in ERPs in response to the dynamic green and blue stimulus between the two groups (P>0.05). ERPs of the two groups in response to the static red, green and blue stimulus were not much different, showing a transient negative peak at about 170 ms and a peak latency of LPP in a time window between 350 and 650 ms. Our results first revealed that some subjects who were not identified as color blindness under static color recognition could not completely apperceive a sort of dynamic red stimulus by ERPs, which was called "dynamic red blindness". Furthermore, these results also indicated that low-frequency ERPs induced by "sustained moving" may be a good and new method to test dynamic color perception competence.

  20. Using event related potentials to identify a user's behavioural intention aroused by product form design.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Guo, Fu; Zhang, Xuefeng; Qu, Qingxing; Liu, Weilin

    2016-07-01

    The capacity of product form to arouse user's behavioural intention plays a decisive role in further user experience, even in purchase decision, while traditional methods rarely give a fully understanding of user experience evoked by product form, especially the feeling of anticipated use of product. Behavioural intention aroused by product form designs has not yet been investigated electrophysiologically. Hence event related potentials (ERPs) were applied to explore the process of behavioural intention when users browsed different smart phone form designs with brand and price not taken into account for mainly studying the brain activity evoked by variety of product forms. Smart phone pictures with different anticipated user experience were displayed with equiprobability randomly. Participants were asked to click the left mouse button when certain picture gave them a feeling of behavioural intention to interact with. The brain signal of each participant was recorded by Curry 7.0. The results show that pictures with an ability to arouse participants' behavioural intention for further experience can evoke enhanced N300 and LPPs (late positive potentials) in central-parietal, parietal and occipital regions. The scalp topography shows that central-parietal, parietal and occipital regions are more activated. The results indicate that the discrepancy of ERPs can reflect the neural activities of behavioural intention formed or not. Moreover, amplitude of ERPs occurred in corresponding brain areas can be used to measure user experience. The exploring of neural correlated with behavioural intention provide an accurate measurement method of user's perception and help marketers to know which product can arouse users' behavioural intention, maybe taken as an evaluating indicator of product design. PMID:26995041

  1. Event-related potentials of the brain and cognitive processes: approaches and applications.

    PubMed

    Brandeis, D; Lehmann, D

    1986-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) are recordings of the electric field which the brain produces in fixed time-relation to an event. ERPs open a time and space window onto covert steps of brain information processing which need not be accompanied by overt behavior or private experiences. ERPs are the only noninvasive method which resolves the dynamic pattern of events in the human brain down to the millisecond range. Early ERP components are valuable tools in clinical testing of the afferent sensory systems in the absence of anamnestic or clinical pathology. Later components (e.g. the 'P300') index intermediate, covert steps of information processing and have clarified the time course and the contingencies of processes in attention, decisions and language. ERP waveshapes show electric potential differences between two recording points. Conventional analysis often ignores the fact that there is no unique voltage amplitude or signal latency for a single point, and interprets ambiguous results. Although important insights have emerged with such strategies, full utilization of ERP data requires unambiguous ERP assessment and converging evidence from neuropsychological and cognitive experimentation. Sequences of field distribution maps offer an unbiased display of ERP data. Spatial analysis yields unambiguous values for further comprehensive assessment, and should precede analysis over time. Examples of spatial analysis have shown that different ERP field configurations follow the presentation of noun and verb meaning of homophone words; that the ERP effects to subjective contours resemble those to attention in time course and topography; that the 'cognitive' P300 component reflects the specific stimulus location; and that subliminal information influences the configuration of late ERP fields.

  2. EVENT-RELATED POTENTIAL STUDY OF ATTENTION REGULATION DURING ILLUSORY FIGURE CATEGORIZATION TASK IN ADHD, AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER, AND TYPICAL CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Sokhadze, Estate M.; Baruth, Joshua M.; Sears, Lonnie; Sokhadze, Guela E.; El-Baz, Ayman S.; Williams, Emily; Klapheke, Robert; Casanova, Manuel F.

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are very common developmental disorders which share some similar symptoms of social, emotional, and attentional deficits. This study is aimed to help understand the differences and similarities of these deficits using analysis of dense-array event-related potentials (ERP) during an illusory figure recognition task. Although ADHD and ASD seem very distinct, they have been shown to share some similarities in their symptoms. Our hypothesis was that children with ASD will show less pronounced differences in ERP responses to target and non-target stimuli as compared to typical children, and to a lesser extent, ADHD. Participants were children with ASD (N=16), ADHD (N=16), and controls (N=16). EEG was collected using a 128 channel EEG system. The task involved the recognition of a specific illusory shape, in this case a square or triangle, created by three or four inducer disks. There were no between group differences in reaction time (RT) to target stimuli, but both ASD and ADHD committed more errors, specifically the ASD group had statistically higher commission error rate than controls. Post-error RT in ASD group was exhibited in a post-error speeding rather than corrective RT slowing typical for the controls. The ASD group also demonstrated an attenuated error-related negativity (ERN) as compared to ADHD and controls. The fronto-central P200, N200, and P300 were enhanced and less differentiated in response to target and non-target figures in the ASD group. The same ERP components were marked by more prolonged latencies in the ADHD group as compared to both ASD and typical controls. The findings are interpreted according to the “minicolumnar” hypothesis proposing existence of neuropathological differences in ASD and ADHD, specifically minicolumnar number/width morphometry spectrum differences. In autism, a model of local hyperconnectivity and long-range hypoconnectivity explains

  3. Different sensitivity of pain-related chemosensory potentials evoked by stimulation with CO2, tooth pulp event-related potentials, and acoustic event-related potentials to the tranquilizer diazepam.

    PubMed

    Thürauf, N; Ditterich, W; Kobal, G

    1994-12-01

    1. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity of pain-related potentials used in experimental pain models to the non-specific effects of the tranquilizer diazepam. Pain-related potentials were recorded after painful stimulation of the nasal mucosa with CO2 and after painful stimulation of the tooth pulp. Acoustically evoked potentials were measured in order to compare their sensitivity to the tranquilizer diazepam with the sensitivity of the pain-related potentials. 2. Twenty volunteers participated in this randomised, double-blind, three-fold crossover study. Measurements were obtained before and 20 min after the administration of the drug. Event-related potentials were recorded after painful stimulation of the nasal mucosa with CO2 (two stimulus intensities: 60% v/v and 70% v/v CO2), after painful stimulation of the tooth pulp (two stimulus intensities: 2.2 x and 3.3 x detection threshold), and after non-painful acoustical stimulation of the right ear. The subjects rated the perceived intensity of the painful stimuli by means of a visual analogue scale. In addition the spontaneous EEG was analysed in the frequency domain and the vigilance of the subjects was assessed in a tracking task. 3. Diazepam reduced significantly the amplitudes of the event-related potentials after painful stimulation of the tooth pulp and after acoustical stimulation. In contrast only a small, statistically non-significant reduction could be found after painful stimulation with CO2. The pain ratings of the painful stimuli were not affected by diazepam. Diazepam reduced the performance of the tracking task. A decrease of arousal could be found in the alpha 2-range, whereas in the beta 2 and the theta-range the power density increased under diazepam. 4. We demonstrated that event-related potentials after painful stimulation of the nasal mucosa with CO2 are less affected by the nonspecific effects of the tranquilizer diazepam than event-related potentials after painful

  4. Double dissociation between rules and memory in music: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Robbin A; Ullman, Michael T

    2007-11-01

    Language and music share a number of characteristics. Crucially, both domains depend on both rules and memorized representations. Double dissociations between the neurocognition of rule-governed and memory-based knowledge have been found in language but not music. Here, the neural bases of both of these aspects of music were examined with an event-related potential (ERP) study of note violations in melodies. Rule-only violations consisted of out-of-key deviant notes that violated tonal harmony rules in novel (unfamiliar) melodies. Memory-only violations consisted of in-key deviant notes in familiar well-known melodies; these notes followed musical rules but deviated from the actual melodies. Finally, out-of-key notes in familiar well-known melodies constituted violations of both rules and memory. All three conditions were presented, within-subjects, to healthy young adults, half musicians and half non-musicians. The results revealed a double dissociation, independent of musical training, between rules and memory: both rule violation conditions, but not the memory-only violations, elicited an early, somewhat right-lateralized anterior-central negativity (ERAN), consistent with previous studies of rule violations in music, and analogous to the early left-lateralized anterior negativities elicited by rule violations in language. In contrast, both memory violation conditions, but not the rule-only violation, elicited a posterior negativity that might be characterized as an N400, an ERP component that depends, at least in part, on the processing of representations stored in long-term memory, both in language and in other domains. The results suggest that the neurocognitive rule/memory dissociation extends from language to music, further strengthening the similarities between the two domains. PMID:17855126

  5. On self-feedback connectivity in neural mass models applied to event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Youssofzadeh, Vahab; Prasad, Girijesh; Wong-Lin, KongFatt

    2015-03-01

    Neural mass models (NMMs) applied to neuroimaging data often do not emphasise intrinsic self-feedback within a neural population. However, based on mean-field theory, any population of coupled neurons is intrinsically endowed with effective self-coupling. In this work, we examine the effectiveness of three cortical NMMs with different self-feedbacks using a dynamic causal modelling approach. Specifically, we compare the classic Jansen and Rit (1995) model (no self-feedback), a modified model by Moran et al. (2007) (only inhibitory self-feedback), and our proposed model with inhibitory and excitatory self-feedbacks. Using bifurcation analysis, we show that single-unit Jansen-Rit model is less robust in generating oscillatory behaviour than the other two models. Next, under Bayesian inversion, we simulate single-channel event-related potentials (ERPs) within a mismatch negativity auditory oddball paradigm. We found fully self-feedback model (FSM) to provide the best fit to single-channel data. By analysing the posterior covariances of model parameters, we show that self-feedback connections are less sensitive to the generated evoked responses than the other model parameters, and hence can be treated analogously to "higher-order" parameter corrections of the original Jansen-Rit model. This is further supported in the more realistic multi-area case where FSM can replicate data better than JRM and MoM in the majority of subjects by capturing the finer features of the ERP data more accurately. Our work informs how NMMs with full self-feedback connectivity are not only more consistent with the underlying neurophysiology, but can also account for more complex features in ERP data.

  6. Effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on event-related potential P300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Tetsuya; Sato, Aya; Iwahashi, Masakuni; Iramina, Keiji

    2012-04-01

    The present study analyzed the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on brain activity. P300 latency of event-related potential (ERP) was used to evaluate the effects of low-frequency and short-term rTMS by stimulating the supramarginal gyrus (SMG), which is considered to be the related area of P300 origin. In addition, the prolonged stimulation effects on P300 latency were analyzed after applying rTMS. A figure-eight coil was used to stimulate left-right SMG, and intensity of magnetic stimulation was 80% of motor threshold. A total of 100 magnetic pulses were applied for rTMS. The effects of stimulus frequency at 0.5 or 1 Hz were determined. Following rTMS, an odd-ball task was performed and P300 latency of ERP was measured. The odd-ball task was performed at 5, 10, and 15 min post-rTMS. ERP was measured prior to magnetic stimulation as a control. Electroencephalograph (EEG) was measured at Fz, Cz, and Pz that were indicated by the international 10-20 electrode system. Results demonstrated that different effects on P300 latency occurred between 0.5-1 Hz rTMS. With 1 Hz low-frequency magnetic stimulation to the left SMG, P300 latency decreased. Compared to the control, the latency time difference was approximately 15 ms at Cz. This decrease continued for approximately 10 min post-rTMS. In contrast, 0.5 Hz rTMS resulted in delayed P300 latency. Compared to the control, the latency time difference was approximately 20 ms at Fz, and this delayed effect continued for approximately 15 min post-rTMS. Results demonstrated that P300 latency varied according to rTMS frequency. Furthermore, the duration of the effect was not similar for stimulus frequency of low-frequency rTMS.

  7. Event related potentials recorded in patients with locked-in syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Onofrj, M.; Thomas, A.; Paci, C.; Scesi, M.; Tombari, R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the possibility of recording "cognitive" event related potentials (ERPs) in locked-in patients and therefore to determine whether ERPs can have a role in differential diagnosis of coma.
METHODS—ERPs to classic auditory or visual "odd ball paradigms" were recorded three to four days, seven to eight days, and 30 to 60days after admission to the intensive care unit, in four patients affected by basilar artery thrombembolism resulting in locked-in syndrome. Two patients (one 32 year old man, one 31 year old woman) could move the eyes laterally and vertically spontaneously and on command. One patient (a 39 year old man) had a "one and half syndrome", one patient (a 40 year old woman) could only elevate the left eyelid and eye. Results were compared with data from 30 age matched controls. In the last recording session a letter recognition paradigm was applied, in which ERPs were produced by the identification of letters forming a word. Results were compared with five age matched controls. Brainstem lesions extending to the pontomesencephalic junction were found on MRI and CT.
RESULTS—ERPs to the oddball paradigms were recorded in three patients in the first recording session, in all patients in the second recording session. Latency, amplitude, and topographic distribution of ERP components were inside normal limits. With the letter recognition paradigm the patients could emit a P3 component to correspond with target letters, with the same margin of error as controls.
CONCLUSION—It is possible to record ERPs in patients with locked-in syndrome shortly after the acute ischaemic lesion, and therefore to assess objectively cognitive activities. Furthermore the letter recognition paradigm could be implemented to facilitate linguistic communication with patients with locked-in syndrome.

 PMID:9416812

  8. Event-Related Potential Study of Executive Dysfunctions in a Speeded Reaction Task in Cocaine Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Sokhadze, Estate; Stewart, Christopher; Hollifield, Michael; Tasman, Allan

    2009-01-01

    This study used a flanker task with NoGo elements to investigate frontal executive function deficits in 19 cocaine abusers. The executive functions of interest in this study were cortical inhibition or ability to withhold motor response, the ability to select an appropriate response among several competing ones, the ability to inhibit inappropriate responses, and the ability to detect error and exercise corrective control. These processes were evaluated with specific frontal and parietal event-related potentials (ERP) registered during performance on this speeded reaction time task with conflicting motor response demands. Specifically we used behavioral response measures, stimulus-locked anterior (frontal N200, N450) ERP markers of conflict detection, response inhibition (NoGo-N2 and NoGo-P3), and response-locked error-related negativity (ERN) that represent different time points of signal classification, motor response conflict detection, response inhibition, and error monitoring processes. The results revealed that the higher-level executive motor control attributed to the prefrontal cortex is hypoactive in cocaine abusers, and therefore is incapable to effectively resolve response conflicts arising between the competing motor response alternatives. It was also demonstrated that the mesial frontal structures, such as the anterior cingulate cortex, implicated in motor response conflict detection and error monitoring functions were also compromised in addicts. It is reasonable to propose that a ‘hypofunctional’ prefrontal and midfrontal processing results in a diminished ability to effectively override strong habitual automated response tendencies controlled by the lower-level neural mechanisms triggered by the external stimuli. The results propose a neurobiological basis for the understanding why cocaine abusers are facing difficulties in controlling their drug-seeking and drug-taking behaviors, and why their drug-related habitual behavior is so vulnerable to

  9. Object Substitution Masking in Schizophrenia: An Event-Related Potential Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Jonathan K.; Mathis, Kristopher I.; Ford, Judith; Breitmeyer, Bruno G.; Green, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients exhibit deficits on visual processing tasks, including visual backward masking, and these impairments are related to deficits in higher-level processes. In the current study we used electroencephalography techniques to examine successive stages and pathways of visual processing in a specialized masking paradigm, four-dot masking, which involves masking by object substitution. Seventy-six schizophrenia patients and 66 healthy controls had event-related potentials (ERPs) recorded during four-dot masking. Target visibility was manipulated by changing stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between the target and mask, such that performance decreased with increasing SOA. Three SOAs were used: 0, 50, and 100 ms. The P100 and N100 perceptual ERPs were examined. Additionally, the visual awareness negativity (VAN) to correct vs. incorrect responses, an index of reentrant processing, was examined for SOAs 50 and 100 ms. Results showed that patients performed worse than controls on the behavioral task across all SOAs. The ERP results revealed that patients had significantly smaller P100 and N100 amplitudes, though there was no effect of SOA on either component in either group. In healthy controls, but not patients, N100 amplitude correlated significantly with behavioral performance at SOAs where masking occurred, such that higher accuracy correlated with a larger N100. Healthy controls, but not patients, exhibited a larger VAN to correct vs. incorrect responses. The results indicate that the N100 appears to be related to attentional effort in the task in controls, but not patients. Considering that the VAN is thought to reflect reentrant processing, one interpretation of the findings is that patients’ lack of VAN response and poorer performance may be related to dysfunctional reentrant processing. PMID:23382723

  10. Phase noise reveals early category-specific modulation of the event-related potentials

    PubMed Central

    Németh, Kornél; Kovács, Petra; Vakli, Pál; Kovács, Gyula; Zimmer, Márta

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have found that the amplitude of the early event-related potential (ERP) components evoked by faces, such as N170 and P2, changes systematically as a function of noise added to the stimuli. This change has been linked to an increased perceptual processing demand and to enhanced difficulty in perceptual decision making about faces. However, to date it has not yet been tested whether noise manipulation affects the neural correlates of decisions about face and non-face stimuli similarly. To this end, we measured the ERPs for faces and cars at three different phase noise levels. Subjects performed the same two-alternative age-discrimination task on stimuli chosen from young–old morphing continua that were created from faces as well as cars and were calibrated to lead to similar performances at each noise-level. Adding phase noise to the stimuli reduced performance and enhanced response latency for the two categories to the same extent. Parallel to that, phase noise reduced the amplitude and prolonged the latency of the face-specific N170 component. The amplitude of the P1 showed category-specific noise dependence: it was enhanced over the right hemisphere for cars and over the left hemisphere for faces as a result of adding phase noise to the stimuli, but remained stable across noise levels for cars over the left and for faces over the right hemisphere. Moreover, noise modulation altered the category-selectivity of the N170, while the P2 ERP component, typically associated with task decision difficulty, was larger for the more noisy stimuli regardless of stimulus category. Our results suggest that the category-specificity of noise-induced modulations of ERP responses starts at around 100 ms post-stimulus. PMID:24795689

  11. Promoting the perception of two and three concurrent sound objects: An event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Zsuzsanna; Winkler, István; Bendixen, Alexandra; Alain, Claude

    2016-09-01

    The auditory environment typically comprises several simultaneously active sound sources. In contrast to the perceptual segregation of two concurrent sounds, the perception of three simultaneous sound objects has not yet been studied systematically. We conducted two experiments in which participants were presented with complex sounds containing sound segregation cues (mistuning, onset asynchrony, differences in frequency or amplitude modulation or in sound location), which were set up to promote the perceptual organization of the tonal elements into one, two, or three concurrent sounds. In Experiment 1, listeners indicated whether they heard one, two, or three concurrent sounds. In Experiment 2, participants watched a silent subtitled movie while EEG was recorded to extract the object-related negativity (ORN) component of the event-related potential. Listeners predominantly reported hearing two sounds when the segregation promoting manipulations were applied to the same tonal element. When two different tonal elements received manipulations promoting them to be heard as separate auditory objects, participants reported hearing two and three concurrent sounds objects with equal probability. The ORN was elicited in most conditions; sounds that included the amplitude- or the frequency-modulation cue generated the smallest ORN amplitudes. Manipulating two different tonal elements yielded numerically and often significantly smaller ORNs than the sum of the ORNs elicited when the same cues were applied on a single tonal element. These results suggest that ORN reflects the presence of multiple concurrent sounds, but not their number. The ORN results are compatible with the horse-race principle of combining different cues of concurrent sound segregation. PMID:27374254

  12. Single-Trial Event-Related Potential Correlates of Belief Updating

    PubMed Central

    Murawski, Carsten; Bode, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Belief updating—the process by which an agent alters an internal model of its environment—is a core function of the CNS. Recent theory has proposed broad principles by which belief updating might operate, but more precise details of its implementation in the human brain remain unclear. In order to address this question, we studied how two components of the human event-related potential encoded different aspects of belief updating. Participants completed a novel perceptual learning task while electroencephalography was recorded. Participants learned the mapping between the contrast of a dynamic visual stimulus and a monetary reward and updated their beliefs about a target contrast on each trial. A Bayesian computational model was formulated to estimate belief states at each trial and was used to quantify the following two variables: belief update size and belief uncertainty. Robust single-trial regression was used to assess how these model-derived variables were related to the amplitudes of the P3 and the stimulus-preceding negativity (SPN), respectively. Results showed a positive relationship between belief update size and P3 amplitude at one fronto-central electrode, and a negative relationship between SPN amplitude and belief uncertainty at a left central and a right parietal electrode. These results provide evidence that belief update size and belief uncertainty have distinct neural signatures that can be tracked in single trials in specific ERP components. This, in turn, provides evidence that the cognitive mechanisms underlying belief updating in humans can be described well within a Bayesian framework. PMID:26473170

  13. Cognitive impairment correlates to low auditory event-related potential amplitudes in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cooray, Gerald K; Maurex, Liselotte; Brismar, Tom

    2008-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes may be associated with a mild decline in cognitive function and mostly in mental speed. In order to study the pathophysiology of this, we have investigated auditory event-related potentials (AERP) and their relation to cognitive function in diabetes patients. AERP was recorded in patients with type 1 diabetes (n=119) and in a healthy control group (n=61). AERP was obtained with an odd-ball and a two-stimulus paradigm. Cognitive function was evaluated in 10 domains in the patients. Patients had normal N100 latency, but a highly significant decrease in auditory N100 amplitude (p<10(-6)), which correlated with a decrease in psychomotor speed but not with function in other domains. Psychomotor speed also correlated with P300 amplitude, although P300 amplitude was only slightly decreased in the patients. Even stronger correlations were found with the parietal N100-P300 peak-to-peak amplitude, which correlated both to psychomotor speed (rho=0.61, p<10(-7)) and processing speed (p<0.005). P300 latency was increased in patients, and this correlated to low global cognitive score and older age. We conclude that the decline in psychomotor speed in type 1 diabetes is associated with a highly significant decrease in the auditory N100 peak amplitude. This association and the relatively small abnormality in P300 latency is quite different from those generally found in dementia, and suggest that the underlying defect is located in the brain stem or the white matter. Presumably small conduction defects in ascending fibers can distort the firing synchrony necessary for signal generation in the cortex. PMID:18650025

  14. Extending or creating a new brand: evidence from a study on event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jia; Wang, Cuicui; Yu, Liping; Ma, Qingguo

    2015-07-01

    Brand strategy is a critical problem in new product promotion. In relation to this, producers typically have two main options, namely, brand extension and new brand creation. The current study investigated the neural basis of evaluating these brand strategies at the brain level by using event-related potentials. The experiment used a word-pair paradigm, in which the first word was either a famous beverage brand name or a newly created brand, and the second word was a product name from one of the two product categories (beverage or household appliance). Therefore, four conditions existed as follows: a famous beverage brand paired with a beverage product (BB) or with a household appliance (BH) and a newly created brand paired with a beverage product (NB) or with a household appliance (NH). Behavioral results showed that brand extension obtained a higher acceptance rate than new brand creation under the beverage product category; however, a lower acceptance rate was observed under the household appliance category. Moreover, at the brain level, BB elicited lower N400 mean amplitude than the new brand product NB, whereas BH led to higher N400 amplitude than the new brand product NH. These results showed that the likelihood of accepting a product depended on the association between the brand name and product name, and that the N400 could serve as an index of brand strategy evaluation. In addition, this study also confirmed that brand extension is not always the best brand strategy; an inappropriate extension sometimes performed worse than the creation of a new brand.

  15. Abnormal verbal event related potentials in mild cognitive impairment and incipient Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Olichney, J; Morris, S; Ochoa, C; Salmon, D; Thal, L; Kutas, M; Iragui, V

    2002-01-01

    Background: It has been reported that patients with amnesia have a reduced effect of word repetition upon the late positive component of the event related potential (ERP), which peaks at around 600 ms after word onset. Objective: To study a word repetition ERP paradigm in subjects with mild cognitive impairment. Subjects: 14 patients with mild cognitive impairment (mean mini-mental state examination score = 27); 14 normal elderly controls. Methods: Auditory category statements were each followed by a single visual target word (50% "congruous" category exemplars, 50% "incongruous") while ERPs were recorded. N400 (an ERP component elicited by semantically "incongruous" words) and LPC amplitude data were submitted to analysis of variance. Results: The latency of the N400 was slower in mild cognitive impairment. In normal controls, the ERPs to "congruous" targets showed a late positive component to new words, which was greatly diminished with repetition. This repetition effect in normal subjects started before 300 ms at right frontal sites, and peaked at ∼600 ms post-stimulus over posterior sites. In contrast, the group with mild cognitive impairment had a reduced repetition effect (p < 0.02), which started around 500 ms, with a more central distribution. Further comparisons within the cognitive impairment group showed no appreciable congruous word repetition effect among seven individuals who subsequently converted to probable Alzheimer's disease. The congruous word repetition effect in the group with mild cognitive impairment was almost entirely accounted for by the non-converters. The amplitude of the congruous late positive component word repetition effect was significantly correlated (0.38 ≤ r ≤ 0.73) with several verbal memory measures. Conclusions: The congruous word repetition ERP effect appears sensitive to the memory impairment in mild cognitive impairment and could have value in predicting incipient Alzheimer's disease. PMID:12235303

  16. Examining Event-Related Potential (ERP) Correlates of Decision Bias in Recognition Memory Judgments

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Holger; Windmann, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Memory judgments can be based on accurate memory information or on decision bias (the tendency to report that an event is part of episodic memory when one is in fact unsure). Event related potentials (ERP) correlates are important research tools for elucidating the dynamics underlying memory judgments but so far have been established only for investigations of accurate old/new discrimination. To identify the ERP correlates of bias, and observe how these interact with ERP correlates of memory, we conducted three experiments that manipulated decision bias within participants via instructions during recognition memory tests while their ERPs were recorded. In Experiment 1, the bias manipulation was performed between blocks of trials (automatized bias) and compared to trial-by-trial shifts of bias in accord with an external cue (flexibly controlled bias). In Experiment 2, the bias manipulation was performed at two different levels of accurate old/new discrimination as the memory strength of old (studied) items was varied. In Experiment 3, the bias manipulation was added to another, bottom-up driven manipulation of bias induced via familiarity. In the first two Experiments, and in the low familiarity condition of Experiment 3, we found evidence of an early frontocentral ERP component at 320 ms poststimulus (the FN320) that was sensitive to the manipulation of bias via instruction, with more negative amplitudes indexing more liberal bias. By contrast, later during the trial (500–700 ms poststimulus), bias effects interacted with old/new effects across all three experiments. Results suggest that the decision criterion is typically activated early during recognition memory trials, and is integrated with retrieved memory signals and task-specific processing demands later during the trial. More generally, the findings demonstrate how ERPs can help to specify the dynamics of recognition memory processes under top-down and bottom-up controlled retrieval conditions. PMID

  17. Effects of Sound Frequency on Audiovisual Integration: An Event-Related Potential Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiping; Yang, Jingjing; Gao, Yulin; Tang, Xiaoyu; Ren, Yanna; Takahashi, Satoshi; Wu, Jinglong

    2015-01-01

    A combination of signals across modalities can facilitate sensory perception. The audiovisual facilitative effect strongly depends on the features of the stimulus. Here, we investigated how sound frequency, which is one of basic features of an auditory signal, modulates audiovisual integration. In this study, the task of the participant was to respond to a visual target stimulus by pressing a key while ignoring auditory stimuli, comprising of tones of different frequencies (0.5, 1, 2.5 and 5 kHz). A significant facilitation of reaction times was obtained following audiovisual stimulation, irrespective of whether the task-irrelevant sounds were low or high frequency. Using event-related potential (ERP), audiovisual integration was found over the occipital area for 0.5 kHz auditory stimuli from 190-210 ms, for 1 kHz stimuli from 170-200 ms, for 2.5 kHz stimuli from 140-200 ms, 5 kHz stimuli from 100-200 ms. These findings suggest that a higher frequency sound signal paired with visual stimuli might be early processed or integrated despite the auditory stimuli being task-irrelevant information. Furthermore, audiovisual integration in late latency (300-340 ms) ERPs with fronto-central topography was found for auditory stimuli of lower frequencies (0.5, 1 and 2.5 kHz). Our results confirmed that audiovisual integration is affected by the frequency of an auditory stimulus. Taken together, the neurophysiological results provide unique insight into how the brain processes a multisensory visual signal and auditory stimuli of different frequencies.

  18. Proficiency Differences in Syntactic Processing of Monolingual Native Speakers Indexed by Event-related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Pakulak, Eric; Neville, Helen J.

    2010-01-01

    While anecdotally there appear to be differences in the way native speakers use and comprehend their native language, most empirical investigations of language processing study university students and none have studied differences in language proficiency which may be independent of resource limitations such as working memory span. We examined differences in language proficiency in adult monolingual native speakers of English using an event-related potential (ERP) paradigm. ERPs were recorded to insertion phrase structure violations in naturally spoken English sentences. Participants recruited from a wide spectrum of society were given standardized measures of English language proficiency, and two complementary ERP analyses were performed. In between-groups analyses, participants were divided, based on standardized proficiency scores, into Lower Proficiency (LP) and Higher Proficiency (HP) groups. Compared to LP participants, HP participants showed an early anterior negativity that was more focal, both spatially and temporally, and a larger and more widely distributed positivity (P600) to violations. In correlational analyses, we utilized a wide spectrum of proficiency scores to examine the degree to which individual proficiency scores correlated with individual neural responses to syntactic violations in regions and time windows identified in the between-group analyses. This approach also employed partial correlation analyses to control for possible confounding variables. These analyses provided evidence for the effects of proficiency that converged with the between-groups analyses. These results suggest that adult monolingual native speakers of English who vary in language proficiency differ in the recruitment of syntactic processes that are hypothesized to be at least in part automatic as well as of those thought to be more controlled. These results also suggest that in order to fully characterize neural organization for language in native speakers it is

  19. Event-related brain potentials index cue-based retrieval interference during sentence comprehension.

    PubMed

    Martin, Andrea E; Nieuwland, Mante S; Carreiras, Manuel

    2012-01-16

    Successful language use requires access to products of past processing within an evolving discourse. A central issue for any neurocognitive theory of language then concerns the role of memory variables during language processing. Under a cue-based retrieval account of language comprehension, linguistic dependency resolution (e.g., retrieving antecedents) is subject to interference from other information in the sentence, especially information that occurs between the words that form the dependency (e.g., between the antecedent and the retrieval site). Retrieval interference may then shape processing complexity as a function of the match of the information at retrieval with the antecedent versus other recent or similar items in memory. To address these issues, we studied the online processing of ellipsis in Castilian Spanish, a language with morphological gender agreement. We recorded event-related brain potentials while participants read sentences containing noun-phrase ellipsis indicated by the determiner otro/a ('another'). These determiners had a grammatically correct or incorrect gender with respect to their antecedent nouns that occurred earlier in the sentence. Moreover, between each antecedent and determiner, another noun phrase occurred that was structurally unavailable as an antecedent and that matched or mismatched the gender of the antecedent (i.e., a local agreement attractor). In contrast to extant P600 results on agreement violation processing, and inconsistent with predictions from neurocognitive models of sentence processing, grammatically incorrect determiners evoked a sustained, broadly distributed negativity compared to correct ones between 400 and 1000ms after word onset, possibly related to sustained negativities as observed for referential processing difficulties. Crucially, this effect was modulated by the attractor: an increased negativity was observed for grammatically correct determiners that did not match the gender of the attractor

  20. Mind wandering and retrieval from episodic memory: a pilot event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Riby, Leigh Martin; Smallwood, Jonathan; Gunn, Valerie P

    2008-06-01

    The present study investigated the effects of mind wandering (task-unrelated thought) on the subcomponents of episodic memory as reflected by event-related potentials (ERPs). Specifically, individual differences in the pattern of ERP episodic 'old/new' effects (left-parietal, right-frontal and central-negativity effects) were examined across groups of participants experiencing either high or low frequencies of task-unrelated thought during encoding. Twenty participants studied lists of words and line drawings in one of two contexts (red versus green coloured boxes). At test, participants discriminated between target (old words or line drawings presented in one colour) and nontargets (old items from the other colour and new items). On completion of the memory task, participants completed the 'thinking' component of the Dundee Stress State Questionnaire to provide a retrospective measure of task-unrelated thought. Behavioural data indicated that irrespective of the presence of task-unrelated thought, participants were able to complete the memory task equally well. However, an analysis of ERPs across High and Low task-unrelated thought groups revealed differences in retrieval strategy. Those individuals with infrequent episodes of task-unrelated thought at study used a 'pure' recollection strategy (left-parietal effect only). Conversely, those participants experiencing frequent episodes of task-unrelated thought were unable to recollect the stimuli with ease, as indexed by a diminished parietal effect. As a consequence, these participants employed additional strategic processes for task completion, as indexed by an elevated amplitude of central negativity effects. These data are consistent with the decoupling hypothesis of mind wandering which suggests impaired recollection when attention becomes directed away from the task.

  1. Feature extraction of event-related potentials using wavelets: an application to human performance monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trejo, L. J.; Shensa, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the development and evaluation of mathematical models for predicting human performance from discrete wavelet transforms (DWT) of event-related potentials (ERP) elicited by task-relevant stimuli. The DWT was compared to principal components analysis (PCA) for representation of ERPs in linear regression and neural network models developed to predict a composite measure of human signal detection performance. Linear regression models based on coefficients of the decimated DWT predicted signal detection performance with half as many free parameters as comparable models based on PCA scores. In addition, the DWT-based models were more resistant to model degradation due to over-fitting than PCA-based models. Feed-forward neural networks were trained using the backpropagation algorithm to predict signal detection performance based on raw ERPs, PCA scores, or high-power coefficients of the DWT. Neural networks based on high-power DWT coefficients trained with fewer iterations, generalized to new data better, and were more resistant to overfitting than networks based on raw ERPs. Networks based on PCA scores did not generalize to new data as well as either the DWT network or the raw ERP network. The results show that wavelet expansions represent the ERP efficiently and extract behaviorally important features for use in linear regression or neural network models of human performance. The efficiency of the DWT is discussed in terms of its decorrelation and energy compaction properties. In addition, the DWT models provided evidence that a pattern of low-frequency activity (1 to 3.5 Hz) occurring at specific times and scalp locations is a reliable correlate of human signal detection performance. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  2. Disentangling the attention network test: behavioral, event related potentials, and neural source analyses

    PubMed Central

    Galvao-Carmona, Alejandro; González-Rosa, Javier J.; Hidalgo-Muñoz, Antonio R.; Páramo, Dolores; Benítez, María L.; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Vázquez-Marrufo, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Background: The study of the attentional system remains a challenge for current neuroscience. The “Attention Network Test” (ANT) was designed to study simultaneously three different attentional networks (alerting, orienting, and executive) based in subtraction of different experimental conditions. However, some studies recommend caution with these calculations due to the interactions between the attentional networks. In particular, it is highly relevant that several interpretations about attentional impairment have arisen from these calculations in diverse pathologies. Event related potentials (ERPs) and neural source analysis can be applied to disentangle the relationships between these attentional networks not specifically shown by behavioral measures. Results: This study shows that there is a basic level of alerting (tonic alerting) in the no cue (NC) condition, represented by a slow negative trend in the ERP trace prior to the onset of the target stimuli. A progressive increase in the CNV amplitude related to the amount of information provided by the cue conditions is also shown. Neural source analysis reveals specific modulations of the CNV related to a task-related expectancy presented in the NC condition; a late modulation triggered by the central cue (CC) condition and probably representing a generic motor preparation; and an early and late modulation for spatial cue (SC) condition suggesting specific motor and sensory preactivation. Finally, the first component in the information processing of the target stimuli modulated by the interaction between orienting network and the executive system can be represented by N1. Conclusions: The ANT is useful as a paradigm to study specific attentional mechanisms and their interactions. However, calculation of network effects is based in subtractions with non-comparable experimental conditions, as evidenced by the present data, which can induce misinterpretations in the study of the attentional capacity in human

  3. Auditory stream segregation using bandpass noises: evidence from event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yingjiu; Zhang, Yang; Nelson, Peggy B

    2014-01-01

    The current study measured neural responses to investigate auditory stream segregation of noise stimuli with or without clear spectral contrast. Sequences of alternating A and B noise bursts were presented to elicit stream segregation in normal-hearing listeners. The successive B bursts in each sequence maintained an equal amount of temporal separation with manipulations introduced on the last stimulus. The last B burst was either delayed for 50% of the sequences or not delayed for the other 50%. The A bursts were jittered in between every two adjacent B bursts. To study the effects of spectral separation on streaming, the A and B bursts were further manipulated by using either bandpass-filtered noises widely spaced in center frequency or broadband noises. Event-related potentials (ERPs) to the last B bursts were analyzed to compare the neural responses to the delay vs. no-delay trials in both passive and attentive listening conditions. In the passive listening condition, a trend for a possible late mismatch negativity (MMN) or late discriminative negativity (LDN) response was observed only when the A and B bursts were spectrally separate, suggesting that spectral separation in the A and B burst sequences could be conducive to stream segregation at the pre-attentive level. In the attentive condition, a P300 response was consistently elicited regardless of whether there was spectral separation between the A and B bursts, indicating the facilitative role of voluntary attention in stream segregation. The results suggest that reliable ERP measures can be used as indirect indicators for auditory stream segregation in conditions of weak spectral contrast. These findings have important implications for cochlear implant (CI) studies-as spectral information available through a CI device or simulation is substantially degraded, it may require more attention to achieve stream segregation. PMID:25309306

  4. An event-related potential examination of contour integration deficits in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Butler, Pamela D; Abeles, Ilana Y; Silverstein, Steven M; Dias, Elisa C; Weiskopf, Nicole G; Calderone, Daniel J; Sehatpour, Pejman

    2013-01-01

    Perceptual organization, which refers to the ability to integrate fragments of stimuli to form a representation of a whole edge, part, or object, is impaired in schizophrenia. A contour integration paradigm, involving detection of a set of Gabor patches forming an oval contour pointing to the right or left embedded in a field of randomly oriented Gabors, has been developed for use in clinical trials of schizophrenia. The purpose of the present study was to assess contributions of early and later stages of processing to deficits in contour integration, as well as to develop an event-related potential (ERP) analog of this task. Twenty-one patients with schizophrenia and 28 controls participated. The Gabor elements forming the contours were given a low or high degree of orientational jitter, making it either easy or difficult to identify the direction in which the contour was pointing. ERP results showed greater negative peaks at ~165 (N1 component) and ~270 ms for the low-jitter versus the high-jitter contours, with a much greater difference between jitter conditions at 270 ms. This later ERP component was previously termed Ncl for closure negativity. Source localization identified the Ncl in the lateral occipital object recognition area. Patients showed a significant decrease in the Ncl, but not N1, compared to controls, and this was associated with impaired behavioral ability to identify contours. In addition, an earlier negative peak was found at ~120 ms (termed N120) that differentiated jitter conditions, had a dorsal stream source, and differed between patients and controls. Patients also showed a deficit in the dorsal stream sensory P1 component. These results are in accord with impairments in distributed circuitry contributing to perceptual organization deficits and provide an ERP analog to the behavioral contour integration task.

  5. Distinct Features of Auditory Steady-State Responses as Compared to Transient Event-Related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Peng, Weiwei; Zhang, Zhiguo; Hu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Transient event-related potentials (ERPs) and steady-state responses (SSRs) have been popularly employed to investigate the function of the human brain, but their relationship still remains a matter of debate. Some researchers believed that SSRs could be explained by the linear summation of successive transient ERPs (superposition hypothesis), while others believed that SSRs were the result of the entrainment of a neural rhythm driven by the periodic repetition of a sensory stimulus (oscillatory entrainment hypothesis). In the present study, taking auditory modality as an example, we aimed to clarify the distinct features of SSRs, evoked by the 40-Hz and 60-Hz periodic auditory stimulation, as compared to transient ERPs, evoked by a single click. We observed that (1) SSRs were mainly generated by phase synchronization, while late latency responses (LLRs) in transient ERPs were mainly generated by power enhancement; (2) scalp topographies of LLRs in transient ERPs were markedly different from those of SSRs; (3) the powers of both 40-Hz and 60-Hz SSRs were significantly correlated, while they were not significantly correlated with the N1 power in transient ERPs; (4) whereas SSRs were dominantly modulated by stimulus intensity, middle latency responses (MLRs) were not significantly modulated by both stimulus intensity and subjective loudness judgment, and LLRs were significantly modulated by subjective loudness judgment even within the same stimulus intensity. All these findings indicated that high-frequency SSRs were different from both MLRs and LLRs in transient ERPs, thus supporting the possibility of oscillatory entrainment hypothesis to the generation of SSRs. Therefore, SSRs could be used to explore distinct neural responses as compared to transient ERPs, and help us reveal novel and reliable neural mechanisms of the human brain. PMID:23874901

  6. Focused analgesia in waking and hypnosis: effects on pain, memory, and somatosensory event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Cacace, Immacolata; Massicolle, Francesca

    2008-01-01

    Somatosensory event-related potentials (SERPs) to painful electric standard stimuli under an odd-ball paradigm were analyzed in 12 high hypnotizable (HH), 12 medium hypnotizable (MH), and 12 low hypnotizable (LH) subjects during waking, hypnosis, and a cued eyes-open posthypnotic condition. In each of these conditions subjects were suggested to produce an obstructive imagery of stimulus perception as a treatment for pain reduction. A No-Analgesia treatment served as a control in waking and hypnosis conditions. The subjects were required to count the number of delivered target stimuli. HH subjects experienced significant pain and distress reductions during posthypnotic analgesia as compared to hypnotic analgesia and between these two analgesic conditions as compared to the two control conditions. Outside of hypnosis, these subjects remembered less pain and distress levels than they reported during hypnotic and posthypnotic analgesia treatments. In contrast, for waking-analgesia treatment, HH subjects remembered similar pain and distress levels to those they reported concurrently with the stimulation. HH subjects, during hypnotic and posthypnotic analgesia treatments, detected a smaller number of target stimuli and displayed a significant amplitude reduction of the midline frontal and central N140 and P200 SERP components. No significant SERP differences were observed for these subjects between treatments in waking condition and between hypnotic and posthypnotic analgesic treatments. For the MH and LH subjects no significant N140 and P200 amplitude changes were observed among analgesic conditions as compared to control conditions. These amplitude findings are seen as indicating that hypnotic analgesia can affect earlier and later stages of stimulus processing. PMID:18023535

  7. Feature Extraction of Event-Related Potentials Using Wavelets: An Application to Human Performance Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trejo, Leonard J.; Shensa, Mark J.; Remington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the development and evaluation of mathematical models for predicting human performance from discrete wavelet transforms (DWT) of event-related potentials (ERP) elicited by task-relevant stimuli. The DWT was compared to principal components analysis (PCA) for representation of ERPs in linear regression and neural network models developed to predict a composite measure of human signal detection performance. Linear regression models based on coefficients of the decimated DWT predicted signal detection performance with half as many f ree parameters as comparable models based on PCA scores. In addition, the DWT-based models were more resistant to model degradation due to over-fitting than PCA-based models. Feed-forward neural networks were trained using the backpropagation,-, algorithm to predict signal detection performance based on raw ERPs, PCA scores, or high-power coefficients of the DWT. Neural networks based on high-power DWT coefficients trained with fewer iterations, generalized to new data better, and were more resistant to overfitting than networks based on raw ERPs. Networks based on PCA scores did not generalize to new data as well as either the DWT network or the raw ERP network. The results show that wavelet expansions represent the ERP efficiently and extract behaviorally important features for use in linear regression or neural network models of human performance. The efficiency of the DWT is discussed in terms of its decorrelation and energy compaction properties. In addition, the DWT models provided evidence that a pattern of low-frequency activity (1 to 3.5 Hz) occurring at specific times and scalp locations is a reliable correlate of human signal detection performance.

  8. Double dissociation between rules and memory in music: An event-related potential study

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Robbin A.; Ullman, Michael T.

    2007-01-01

    Language and music share a number of characteristics. Crucially, both domains depend on both rules and memorized representations. Double dissociations between the neurocognition of rule-governed and memory-based knowledge have been found in language but not music. Here, the neural bases of both of these aspects of music were examined with an event-related potential (ERP) study of note violations in melodies. Rule-only violations consisted of out-of-key deviant notes that violated tonal harmony rules in novel (unfamiliar) melodies. Memory-only violations consisted of in-key deviant notes in familiar well-known melodies; these notes followed musical rules but deviated from the actual melodies. Finally, out-of-key notes in familiar well-known melodies constituted violations of both rules and memory. All three conditions were presented, within-subjects, to healthy young adults, half musicians and half non-musicians. The results revealed a double dissociation, independent of musical training, between rules and memory: both rule violation conditions, but not the memory-only violations, elicited an early, somewhat right-lateralized anterior-central negativity (ERAN), consistent with previous studies of rule violations in music, and analogous to the early left-lateralized anterior negativities elicited by rule violations in language. In contrast, both memory violation conditions, but not the rule-only violation, elicited a posterior negativity that might be characterized as an N400, an ERP component that depends, at least in part, on the processing of representations stored in long-term memory, both in language and in other domains. The results suggest that the neurocognitive rule/memory dissociation extends from language to music, further strengthening the similarities between the two domains. PMID:17855126

  9. Attention bias in earthquake-exposed survivors: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Kong, Fanchang; Han, Li; Najam Ul Hasan, Abbasi; Chen, Hong

    2014-12-01

    The Chinese Wenchuan earthquake, which happened on the 28th of May in 2008, may leave deep invisible scars in individuals. China has a large number of children and adolescents, who tend to be most vulnerable because they are in an early stage of human development and possible post-traumatic psychological distress may have a life-long consequence. Trauma survivors without post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have received little attention in previous studies, especially in event-related potential (ERP) studies. We compared the attention bias to threat stimuli between the earthquake-exposed group and the control group in a masked version of the dot probe task. The target probe presented at the same space location consistent with earthquake-related words was the congruent trial, while in the space location of neutral words was the incongruent trial. Thirteen earthquake-exposed middle school students without PTSD and 13 matched controls were included in this investigation. The earthquake-exposed group showed significantly faster RTs to congruent trials than to incongruent trials. The earthquake-exposed group produced significantly shorter C1 and P1 latencies and larger C1, P1 and P2 amplitudes than the control group. In particular, enhanced P1 amplitude to threat stimuli was observed in the earthquake-exposed group. These findings are in agreement with the prediction that earthquake-exposed survivors have an attention bias to threat stimuli. The traumatic event had a much greater effect on earthquake-exposed survivors even if they showed no PTSD symptoms than individuals in the controls. These results will provide neurobiological evidences for effective intervention and prevention to post-traumatic mental problems.

  10. Effects of Sound Frequency on Audiovisual Integration: An Event-Related Potential Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiping; Yang, Jingjing; Gao, Yulin; Tang, Xiaoyu; Ren, Yanna; Takahashi, Satoshi; Wu, Jinglong

    2015-01-01

    A combination of signals across modalities can facilitate sensory perception. The audiovisual facilitative effect strongly depends on the features of the stimulus. Here, we investigated how sound frequency, which is one of basic features of an auditory signal, modulates audiovisual integration. In this study, the task of the participant was to respond to a visual target stimulus by pressing a key while ignoring auditory stimuli, comprising of tones of different frequencies (0.5, 1, 2.5 and 5 kHz). A significant facilitation of reaction times was obtained following audiovisual stimulation, irrespective of whether the task-irrelevant sounds were low or high frequency. Using event-related potential (ERP), audiovisual integration was found over the occipital area for 0.5 kHz auditory stimuli from 190-210 ms, for 1 kHz stimuli from 170-200 ms, for 2.5 kHz stimuli from 140-200 ms, 5 kHz stimuli from 100-200 ms. These findings suggest that a higher frequency sound signal paired with visual stimuli might be early processed or integrated despite the auditory stimuli being task-irrelevant information. Furthermore, audiovisual integration in late latency (300-340 ms) ERPs with fronto-central topography was found for auditory stimuli of lower frequencies (0.5, 1 and 2.5 kHz). Our results confirmed that audiovisual integration is affected by the frequency of an auditory stimulus. Taken together, the neurophysiological results provide unique insight into how the brain processes a multisensory visual signal and auditory stimuli of different frequencies. PMID:26384256

  11. Mouse model predicts effects of smoking and varenicline on event-related potentials in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rudnick, Noam D.; Strasser, Andrew A.; Phillips, Jennifer M.; Jepson, Christopher; Patterson, Freda; Frey, Joseph M.; Turetsky, Bruce I.; Lerman, Caryn

    2010-01-01

    Background: Nicotine alters auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) in rodents and humans and is an effective treatment for smoking cessation. Less is known about the effects of the partial nicotine agonist varenicline on ERPs. Methods: We measured the effects of varenicline and nicotine on the mouse P20 and varenicline and smoking on the human P50 in a paired-click task. Eighteen mice were tested following nicotine, varenicline, and their combination. One hundred and fourteen current smokers enrolled in a placebo-controlled within-subject crossover study to test the effects of varenicline during smoking and abstinence. Thirty-two subjects participated in the ERP study, with half receiving placebo first and half varenicline first (VP). Results: Nicotine and varenicline enhanced mouse P20 amplitude, while nicotine improved P20 habituation by selectively increasing the first-click response. Similar to mice, abstinence reduced P50 habituation relative to smoking by reducing the first-click response. There was no effect of varenicline on P50 amplitude during abstinence across subjects. However, there was a significant effect of medication order on P50 amplitude during abstinence. Subjects in the PV group displayed reduced P50 during abstinence, which was blocked by varenicline. However, subjects in the VP group did not display abstinence-induced P50 reduction. Conclusions: Data suggest that smoking improves sensory processing. Varenicline mimics amplitude changes associated with nicotine and smoking but fails to alter habituation. The effect of medication order suggests a possible carryover effect from the previous arm. This study supports the predictive validity of ERPs in mice as a marker of drug effects in human studies. PMID:20395358

  12. Hemispheric asymmetry in interpreting novel literal language: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Tristan; Coulson, Seana

    2013-04-01

    Conceptual mapping, or making connections between conceptual structure in different domains, is a key mechanism of creative language use whose neural underpinnings are not well understood. The present study involved the combination of event-related potentials (ERPs) with the divided visual field presentation technique to explore the relative contributions of the left and right hemispheres (LH and RH) to the construction of novel meanings in fully literal language. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded as healthy adults read sentences that supported either a conventional literal reading of the sentence final word ("His main method of transportation is a boat,"), or a novel literal meaning derived from conceptual mapping ("The clever boys used a cardboard box as a boat,"). The novel and conventional conditions were matched for cloze probability (a measure of predictability based on the sentence context), lexical association between the sentence frame and the final word (using latent semantic analysis), and other factors known to influence ERPs to language stimuli. To compare effects of novelty to previously reported effects of predictability, a high-cloze conventional condition ("The only way to get around Venice is to navigate the canals in a boat.") was included. ERPs were time-locked to sentence final words ("boat") presented in either the left visual field, to preferentially stimulate the RH (lvf/RH), or in the right visual field, targeting the LH (rvf/LH). The N400 component of the ERP was affected by predictability in both presentation sides, but by novelty only in rvf/LH. Two distinct late frontal positive effects were observed. Word predictability modulated a frontal positivity with a LH focus, but semantic novelty modulated a frontal positivity focused in RH. This is the first demonstration that the frontal positivity may be composed of multiple overlapping components with distinct functional and anatomical characteristics. Extending contemporary accounts

  13. [Changes in visual event-related potentials and SPECT in dissociative amnesia].

    PubMed

    Kurita, Akira; Yonezawa, Jin; Suzuki, Masahiko; Kawaguchi, Sachiko; Ito, Yasuhiko; Inoue, Kiyoharu

    2004-01-01

    A 29-year-old man was admitted because of sudden onset of retrograde amnesia. The patient was unable to recall events having occurred during the past 2 years. The impairment was especially serious with regard to personal memories during the 5 months prior to admission, while he had first been working as a full-time employee under stressful circumstance. A diagnosis of dissociative amnesia was made on the basis of absence of any systemic or neurological diseases that could cause amnesia, the inadaptable character of the patient, the nature of amnesia, and presence of stressful condition possibly related to the amnesia. Visual event-related potential (ERP) studies recorded with human face discrimination tasks demonstrated a P3a wave in response to a face of his superior in the office, whom he said that he had never seen before. The similar P3a wave was observed in response to a face quite familiar to the patient, his mother, but not to a face "truly" unknown to him. These findings suggest that the visual memory of his superior's face exists in the brain, but the patient is unable to retrieve it by some psychogenic mechanism. 131I-IMP SPECT revealed decreased perfusion in the left medial temporal lobe and the basal forebrain, suggesting the association between dissociative amnesia and focal brain dysfunction. While dissociative amnesia has been understood as psychogenic nature, both ERPs and SPECT are quite important tools to understand the association between the psychological phenomenon and biological changes of the brain in this disorder.

  14. Error processing and response inhibition in excessive computer game players: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Littel, Marianne; van den Berg, Ivo; Luijten, Maartje; van Rooij, Antonius J; Keemink, Lianne; Franken, Ingmar H A

    2012-09-01

    Excessive computer gaming has recently been proposed as a possible pathological illness. However, research on this topic is still in its infancy and underlying neurobiological mechanisms have not yet been identified. The determination of underlying mechanisms of excessive gaming might be useful for the identification of those at risk, a better understanding of the behavior and the development of interventions. Excessive gaming has been often compared with pathological gambling and substance use disorder. Both disorders are characterized by high levels of impulsivity, which incorporates deficits in error processing and response inhibition. The present study aimed to investigate error processing and response inhibition in excessive gamers and controls using a Go/NoGo paradigm combined with event-related potential recordings. Results indicated that excessive gamers show reduced error-related negativity amplitudes in response to incorrect trials relative to correct trials, implying poor error processing in this population. Furthermore, excessive gamers display higher levels of self-reported impulsivity as well as more impulsive responding as reflected by less behavioral inhibition on the Go/NoGo task. The present study indicates that excessive gaming partly parallels impulse control and substance use disorders regarding impulsivity measured on the self-reported, behavioral and electrophysiological level. Although the present study does not allow drawing firm conclusions on causality, it might be that trait impulsivity, poor error processing and diminished behavioral response inhibition underlie the excessive gaming patterns observed in certain individuals. They might be less sensitive to negative consequences of gaming and therefore continue their behavior despite adverse consequences.

  15. Strategic retrieval and retrieval orientation in reality monitoring studied by event-related potentials (ERPs).

    PubMed

    Rosburg, Timm; Johansson, Mikael; Mecklinger, Axel

    2013-02-01

    Reality monitoring requires the differentiation between perceived and imagined events or between our own actions and the actions of others. The role of control processes in reality monitoring is yet not fully understood. In the current event-related potential (ERP) study, we investigated such control processes in the form of retrieval orientation and strategic retrieval of nontarget information. At study, complete or incomplete object words were presented in sentences. Participants had to identify the words as the subject of the sentence (perceive condition) or had to complete them upon presentation of a word fragment (self-generate condition). The participants' memory accuracy was better for generated items than for perceived items, as tested in a subsequent memory exclusion task. Comparison of ERPs to new items between the two test conditions (i.e. assessing retrieval orientation) showed more positive ERPs when generated object names were targeted. Retrieval orientation also modulated the early midfrontal old/new effect: Items of the self-generate condition elicited this effect irrespective of their target/nontarget status, while in response to the less well remembered items of the perceive condition it was only found when these items were defined as targets. Target retrieval (as reflected in the left-parietal old/new effect) occurred in both test conditions, but nontarget retrieval was observed only for generated items (when perceived items were targeted). Current findings indicate that retrieval orientation can modulate familiarity-related processes. The selective occurrence of nontarget retrieval for generated items corroborates the concept that the ease with which nontarget information can be accessed promotes nontarget retrieval.

  16. An event-related potential component sensitive to images of the human body.

    PubMed

    Thierry, Guillaume; Pegna, Alan J; Dodds, Chris; Roberts, Mark; Basan, Sébastien; Downing, Paul

    2006-08-15

    One of the critical functions of vision is to provide information about other individuals. Neuroimaging experiments examining the cortical regions that analyze the appearance of other people have found partially overlapping networks that respond selectively to human faces and bodies. In event-related potential (ERP) studies, faces systematically elicit a negative component peaking 170 ms after presentation - the N170. To characterize the electrophysiological response to human bodies, we compared the ERPs elicited by faces, bodies and various control stimuli. In Experiment 1, a comparison of ERPs elicited by faces, bodies, objects and places showed that pictures of the human body (without the head) elicit a negative component peaking at 190 ms (an N190). While broadly similar to the N170, the N190 differs in both spatial distribution and amplitude from the N1 components elicited by faces, objects and scenes and peaks significantly later than the N170. The difference between N190 and N170 was further supported using topographic analyses of ERPs and source localization techniques. A unique, stable map topography was found to characterize human bodies between 130 and 230 ms. In Experiment 2, we tested the four conditions from Experiment 1, as well as intact and scrambled silhouettes and stick figures of the human body. We found that intact silhouettes and stick figures elicited significantly greater N190 amplitudes than their scrambled counterparts. Thus, the N190 generalizes to some degree to schematic depictions of the human form. Overall, our findings are consistent with intertwined, but functionally distinct, neural representations of the human face and body.

  17. Circumventing the deficit of context processing in schizophrenia: an event-related brain potential study.

    PubMed

    Debruille, J Bruno; Kumar, Namita; Saheb, Dominique; Chintoh, Araba; Gharghi, Daryoush; Lionnet, Claire; King, Suzanne

    2010-02-01

    The deficit in semantic processing observed in schizophrenia patients may be due 1) to a 'genuine' deficit in processing new semantic information and 2) to a deficit in the ability to process and maintain the context in which the new semantic information has to be integrated. In a previous study, we designed a paradigm to study only the processing of new information. The processing of context was eased in the hope that patients would perform it as normals do. The goal of the present work was to determine whether this was the case. To achieve this goal, the event-related brain potentials (ERPs) elicited by the two context words of the new protocol were examined in 35 schizophrenia patients and 30 normal controls. These two context words were 'INACTION' and 'ANIMAL?'. Each trial started by one or the other and continued with a target word. 'INACTION' announced that subjects had no decision to make for the target word. 'ANIMAL?' announced that subjects had to decide whether or not the target word could be integrated into the animal category. Two ERP differences were found between normals and patients. However, the first, for 'INACTION', could be related to patients' difficulties at inhibiting the planning of action and the second, for 'ANIMAL?', to the preparation of their motor responses. No ERP difference was found that could have indexed a problem in encoding or in maintaining context. Thus, we conclude that this particular type of protocol could be helpful to focus on the study of the processing of the new semantic information conveyed by target words.

  18. Fluid Intelligence and Automatic Neural Processes in Facial Expression Perception: An Event-Related Potential Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongran; Xiao, Tong; Li, Xiaoyan; Shi, Jiannong

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between human fluid intelligence and social-emotional abilities has been a topic of considerable interest. The current study investigated whether adolescents with different intellectual levels had different automatic neural processing of facial expressions. Two groups of adolescent males were enrolled: a high IQ group and an average IQ group. Age and parental socioeconomic status were matched between the two groups. Participants counted the numbers of the central cross changes while paired facial expressions were presented bilaterally in an oddball paradigm. There were two experimental conditions: a happy condition, in which neutral expressions were standard stimuli (p = 0.8) and happy expressions were deviant stimuli (p = 0.2), and a fearful condition, in which neutral expressions were standard stimuli (p = 0.8) and fearful expressions were deviant stimuli (p = 0.2). Participants were required to concentrate on the primary task of counting the central cross changes and to ignore the expressions to ensure that facial expression processing was automatic. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were obtained during the tasks. The visual mismatch negativity (vMMN) components were analyzed to index the automatic neural processing of facial expressions. For the early vMMN (50-130 ms), the high IQ group showed more negative vMMN amplitudes than the average IQ group in the happy condition. For the late vMMN (320-450 ms), the high IQ group had greater vMMN responses than the average IQ group over frontal and occipito-temporal areas in the fearful condition, and the average IQ group evoked larger vMMN amplitudes than the high IQ group over occipito-temporal areas in the happy condition. The present study elucidated the close relationships between fluid intelligence and pre-attentive change detection on social-emotional information. PMID:26375031

  19. Accessing word meaning in two languages: an event-related brain potential study of beginning bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Ruben P; Holcomb, Phillip J; Grainger, Jonathan

    2003-11-01

    Twenty-eight native-English speakers enrolled in beginning and intermediate university Spanish courses participated in a mixed language semantic categorization task in which critical words were presented in English (L1) and Spanish (L2) and repetitions of these words (within- and between-languages) were presented on subsequent trials (i.e., immediate repetition). Event-related potentials were recorded to all items allowing for comparisons of the N400 component to repetitions within- and between-languages as well as to words presented for the first time. Three important findings were observed in this sample of participants during relatively early stages of acquiring a second language. First, in the typical N400 window (300-500ms), between-language repetition (translation) produced a smaller reduction in N400 amplitude than did within-language repetition. Second, the time-course of between-language repetition effects tended to be more extended in time and differed as a function of language with L2-L1 repetitions producing larger priming effects early (during the typical N400 window) and L1-L2 repetitions producing larger priming effects later (during windows after the typical N400). Third, a greater negativity in the ERP waveforms was observed when the word on the directly preceding trial was from the other language. Within the time frame of the N400, this language switch effect arose only when the target word was Spanish and the preceding word English (i.e., L1-L2). The results are discussed within the framework of current models of bilingual lexical processing.

  20. Disturbances of Agency and Ownership in Schizophrenia: An Auditory Verbal Event Related Potentials Study.

    PubMed

    Bühler, Tim; Kindler, Jochen; Schneider, Rahel C; Strik, Werner; Dierks, Thomas; Hubl, Daniela; Koenig, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A 'sense of self' is essentially the ability to distinguish between self-generated and external stimuli. It consists of at least two very basic senses: a sense of agency and a sense of ownership. Disturbances seem to provide a basic deficit in many psychiatric diseases. The aim of our study was to manipulate those qualities separately in 28 patients with schizophrenia (14 auditory hallucinators and 14 non-hallucinators) and 28 healthy controls (HC) and to investigate the effects on the topographies and the power of the event-related potential (ERP). We performed a 76-channel EEG while the participants performed the task as in our previous paper. We computed ERPs and difference maps for the conditions and compared the amount of agency and ownership between the HC and the patients. Furthermore, we compared the global field power and the topographies of these effects. Our data showed effects of agency and ownership in the healthy controls and the hallucinator group and to a lesser degree in the non-hallucinator group. We found a reduction of the N100 during the presence of agency, and a bilateral temporal negativity related to the presence of ownership. For the agency effects, we found significant differences between HC and the patients. Contrary to the expectations, our findings were more pronounced in non-hallucinators, suggesting a more profoundly disturbed sense of agency compared to hallucinators. A contemporary increase of global field power in both patient groups indicates a compensatory recruitment of other mechanisms not normally associated with the processing of agency and ownership. PMID:27209172

  1. Event-Related Potential Effects of Object Repetition Depend on Attention and Part-Whole Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Gosling, Angela; Thoma, Volker; de Fockert, Jan W.; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan

    2016-01-01

    The effects of spatial attention and part-whole configuration on recognition of repeated objects were investigated with behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures. Short-term repetition effects were measured for probe objects as a function of whether a preceding prime object was shown as an intact image or coarsely scrambled (split into two halves) and whether or not it had been attended during the prime display. In line with previous behavioral experiments, priming effects were observed from both intact and split primes for attended objects, but only from intact (repeated same-view) objects when they were unattended. These behavioral results were reflected in ERP waveforms at occipital–temporal locations as more negative-going deflections for repeated items in the time window between 220 and 300 ms after probe onset (N250r). Attended intact images showed generally more enhanced repetition effects than split ones. Unattended images showed repetition effects only when presented in an intact configuration, and this finding was limited to the right-hemisphere electrodes. Repetition effects in earlier (before 200 ms) time windows were limited to attended conditions at occipito-temporal sites during the N1, a component linked to the encoding of object structure, while repetition effects at central locations during the same time window (P150) were found for attended and unattended probes but only when repeated in the same intact configuration. The data indicate that view-generalization is mediated by a combination of analytic (part-based) representations and automatic view-dependent representations. PMID:27721749

  2. Automatic Temporal Expectancy: A High-Density Event-Related Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Mento, Giovanni; Tarantino, Vincenza; Sarlo, Michela; Bisiacchi, Patrizia Silvia

    2013-01-01

    How we compute time is not fully understood. Questions include whether an automatic brain mechanism is engaged in temporally regular environmental structure in order to anticipate events, and whether this can be dissociated from task-related processes, including response preparation, selection and execution. To investigate these issues, a passive temporal oddball task requiring neither time-based motor response nor explicit decision was specifically designed and delivered to participants during high-density, event-related potentials recording. Participants were presented with pairs of audiovisual stimuli (S1 and S2) interspersed with an Inter-Stimulus Interval (ISI) that was manipulated according to an oddball probabilistic distribution. In the standard condition (70% of trials), the ISI lasted 1,500 ms, while in the two alternative, deviant conditions (15% each), it lasted 2,500 and 3,000 ms. The passive over-exposition to the standard ISI drove participants to automatically and progressively create an implicit temporal expectation of S2 onset, reflected by the time course of the Contingent Negative Variation response, which always peaked in correspondence to the point of S2 maximum expectation and afterwards inverted in polarity towards the baseline. Brain source analysis of S1- and ISI-related ERP activity revealed activation of sensorial cortical areas and the supplementary motor area (SMA), respectively. In particular, since the SMA time course synchronised with standard ISI, we suggest that this area is the major cortical generator of the temporal CNV reflecting an automatic, action-independent mechanism underlying temporal expectancy. PMID:23650537

  3. Double dissociation between rules and memory in music: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Robbin A; Ullman, Michael T

    2007-11-01

    Language and music share a number of characteristics. Crucially, both domains depend on both rules and memorized representations. Double dissociations between the neurocognition of rule-governed and memory-based knowledge have been found in language but not music. Here, the neural bases of both of these aspects of music were examined with an event-related potential (ERP) study of note violations in melodies. Rule-only violations consisted of out-of-key deviant notes that violated tonal harmony rules in novel (unfamiliar) melodies. Memory-only violations consisted of in-key deviant notes in familiar well-known melodies; these notes followed musical rules but deviated from the actual melodies. Finally, out-of-key notes in familiar well-known melodies constituted violations of both rules and memory. All three conditions were presented, within-subjects, to healthy young adults, half musicians and half non-musicians. The results revealed a double dissociation, independent of musical training, between rules and memory: both rule violation conditions, but not the memory-only violations, elicited an early, somewhat right-lateralized anterior-central negativity (ERAN), consistent with previous studies of rule violations in music, and analogous to the early left-lateralized anterior negativities elicited by rule violations in language. In contrast, both memory violation conditions, but not the rule-only violation, elicited a posterior negativity that might be characterized as an N400, an ERP component that depends, at least in part, on the processing of representations stored in long-term memory, both in language and in other domains. The results suggest that the neurocognitive rule/memory dissociation extends from language to music, further strengthening the similarities between the two domains.

  4. Early Processing of Emotional Faces in Children with Autism: An Event-Related Potential Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batty, Magali; Meaux, Emilie; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Roge, Bernadette; Taylor, Margot J.

    2011-01-01

    Social deficits are one of the most striking manifestations of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Among these social deficits, the recognition and understanding of emotional facial expressions has been widely reported to be affected in ASDs. We investigated emotional face processing in children with and without autism using event-related potentials…

  5. Pitch Discrimination without Awareness in Congenital Amusia: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreau, Patricia; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Peretz, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Congenital amusia is a lifelong disorder characterized by a difficulty in perceiving and producing music despite normal intelligence and hearing. Behavioral data have indicated that it originates from a deficit in fine-grained pitch discrimination, and is expressed by the absence of a P3b event-related brain response for pitch differences smaller…

  6. Synthetic event-related potentials: a computational bridge between neurolinguistic models and experiments.

    PubMed

    Barrès, Victor; Simons, Arthur; Arbib, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Our previous work developed Synthetic Brain Imaging to link neural and schema network models of cognition and behavior to PET and fMRI studies of brain function. We here extend this approach to Synthetic Event-Related Potentials (Synthetic ERP). Although the method is of general applicability, we focus on ERP correlates of language processing in the human brain. The method has two components: Phase 1: To generate cortical electro-magnetic source activity from neural or schema network models; and Phase 2: To generate known neurolinguistic ERP data (ERP scalp voltage topographies and waveforms) from putative cortical source distributions and activities within a realistic anatomical model of the human brain and head. To illustrate the challenges of Phase 2 of the methodology, spatiotemporal information from Friederici's 2002 model of auditory language comprehension was used to define cortical regions and time courses of activation for implementation within a forward model of ERP data. The cortical regions from the 2002 model were modeled using atlas-based masks overlaid on the MNI high definition single subject cortical mesh. The electromagnetic contribution of each region was modeled using current dipoles whose position and orientation were constrained by the cortical geometry. In linking neural network computation via EEG forward modeling to empirical results in neurolinguistics, we emphasize the need for neural network models to link their architecture to geometrically sound models of the cortical surface, and the need for conceptual models to refine and adopt brain-atlas based approaches to allow precise brain anchoring of their modules. The detailed analysis of Phase 2 sets the stage for a brief introduction to Phase 1 of the program, including the case for a schema-theoretic approach to language production and perception presented in detail elsewhere. Unlike Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM) and Bojak's mean field model, Synthetic ERP builds on models of networks

  7. Subclinical alexithymia modulates early audio-visual perceptive and attentional event-related potentials

    PubMed Central

    Delle-Vigne, Dyna; Kornreich, Charles; Verbanck, Paul; Campanella, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Previous studies have highlighted the advantage of using audio–visual oddball tasks (instead of unimodal ones) in order to electrophysiologically index subclinical behavioral differences. Since alexithymia is highly prevalent in the general population, we investigated whether the use of various bimodal tasks could elicit emotional effects in low- vs. high-alexithymic scorers. Methods: Fifty students (33 females and 17 males) were split into groups based on low and high scores on the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20). During event-related potential (ERP) recordings, they were exposed to three kinds of audio–visual oddball tasks: neutral-AVN—(geometrical forms and bips), animal-AVA—(dog and cock with their respective shouts), or emotional-AVE—(faces and voices) stimuli. In each condition, participants were asked to quickly detect deviant events occurring amongst a train of repeated and frequent matching stimuli (e.g., push a button when a sad face–voice pair appeared amongst a train of neutral face–voice pairs). P100, N100, and P300 components were analyzed: P100 refers to visual perceptive and attentional processing, N100 to auditory ones, and the P300 relates to response-related stages, involving memory processes. Results: High-alexithymic scorers presented a particular pattern of results when processing the emotional stimulations, reflected in early ERP components by increased P100 and N100 amplitudes in the emotional oddball tasks [P100: F(2, 48) = 20,319, p < 0.001; N100: F(2, 96) = 8,807, p = 0.001] as compared to the animal or neutral ones. Indeed, regarding the P100, subjects exhibited a higher amplitude in the AVE condition (8.717 μV), which was significantly different from that observed during the AVN condition (4.382 μV, p < 0.001). For the N100, the highest amplitude was found in the AVE condition (−4.035 μV) and the lowest was observed in the AVN condition (−2.687 μV, p = 0.003). However, no effect was found on the

  8. Cortical Neural Synchronization Underlies Primary Visual Consciousness of Qualia: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Babiloni, Claudio; Marzano, Nicola; Soricelli, Andrea; Cordone, Susanna; Millán-Calenti, José Carlos; Del Percio, Claudio; Buján, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews three experiments on event-related potentials (ERPs) testing the hypothesis that primary visual consciousness (stimulus self-report) is related to enhanced cortical neural synchronization as a function of stimulus features. ERP peak latency and sources were compared between “seen” trials and “not seen” trials, respectively related and unrelated to the primary visual consciousness. Three salient features of visual stimuli were considered (visuospatial, emotional face expression, and written words). Results showed the typical visual ERP components in both “seen” and “not seen” trials. There was no statistical difference in the ERP peak latencies between the “seen” and “not seen” trials, suggesting a similar timing of the cortical neural synchronization regardless the primary visual consciousness. In contrast, ERP sources showed differences between “seen” and “not seen” trials. For the visuospatial stimuli, the primary consciousness was related to higher activity in dorsal occipital and parietal sources at about 400 ms post-stimulus. For the emotional face expressions, there was greater activity in parietal and frontal sources at about 180 ms post-stimulus. For the written letters, there was higher activity in occipital, parietal and temporal sources at about 230 ms post-stimulus. These results hint that primary visual consciousness is associated with an enhanced cortical neural synchronization having entirely different spatiotemporal characteristics as a function of the features of the visual stimuli and possibly, the relative qualia (i.e., visuospatial, face expression, and words). In this framework, the dorsal visual stream may be synchronized in association with the primary consciousness of visuospatial and emotional face contents. Analogously, both dorsal and ventral visual streams may be synchronized in association with the primary consciousness of linguistic contents. In this line of reasoning, the ensemble

  9. Neurocognitive impairment of mental rotation in major depressive disorder: evidence from event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiu; Ma, Wentao; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Lai-Qi; Zhang, Zhijun; Wu, Xingqu; Deng, Zihe

    2014-08-01

    Mental rotation performance may be used as an index of mental slowing or bradyphrenia and may reflect speed of motor preparation. Previous studies suggest that major depressive disorder (MDD) presents correlates of impaired behavioral performance for mental rotation and psychomotor disturbance. Very little is known about the electrophysiological mechanism underlying this deficit. The present study was the first to investigate the event-related brain potential (ERP) correlates of mental rotation and their mental slowing or bradyphrenia in MDD. ERPs were recorded while we tested 25 MDD patients and 26 healthy controls by evaluating the performance of MDD patients on hand and letter rotation tasks at different orientations, and their 400-to-600-msec time window was measured and analyzed for latencies and peak amplitudes over the electrodes. First, individuals with MDD were slower and made more errors in mentally rotating hands and letters than healthy controls did, and individuals with MDD exhibited a greater difference in response times and errors than controls did between hands and letters. Second, the mean peak amplitude was significantly lower and the mean latency was significantly longer in the 400-to-600-msec time window at the parietal site in the hand tasks in MDD patients than in controls, but this was not seen in the letter task, with only lower mean peak amplitude. MDD patients present the absence of a typical mental rotation function for the amplitude of the rotation-related negativity in the hand and letter tasks. Third, the scalp activity maps in MDD patients exhibited the absence of activation in the left parietal site for the mental rotation of hands, as shown in healthy participants. In contrast, their brain activation for the letter task was similar to those of healthy participants. These data suggest that mental imagery of hands and letters relies on different cognitive and neural mechanisms and indicate that the left posterior parietal lobe is a

  10. Cortical Neural Synchronization Underlies Primary Visual Consciousness of Qualia: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Marzano, Nicola; Soricelli, Andrea; Cordone, Susanna; Millán-Calenti, José Carlos; Del Percio, Claudio; Buján, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews three experiments on event-related potentials (ERPs) testing the hypothesis that primary visual consciousness (stimulus self-report) is related to enhanced cortical neural synchronization as a function of stimulus features. ERP peak latency and sources were compared between "seen" trials and "not seen" trials, respectively related and unrelated to the primary visual consciousness. Three salient features of visual stimuli were considered (visuospatial, emotional face expression, and written words). Results showed the typical visual ERP components in both "seen" and "not seen" trials. There was no statistical difference in the ERP peak latencies between the "seen" and "not seen" trials, suggesting a similar timing of the cortical neural synchronization regardless the primary visual consciousness. In contrast, ERP sources showed differences between "seen" and "not seen" trials. For the visuospatial stimuli, the primary consciousness was related to higher activity in dorsal occipital and parietal sources at about 400 ms post-stimulus. For the emotional face expressions, there was greater activity in parietal and frontal sources at about 180 ms post-stimulus. For the written letters, there was higher activity in occipital, parietal and temporal sources at about 230 ms post-stimulus. These results hint that primary visual consciousness is associated with an enhanced cortical neural synchronization having entirely different spatiotemporal characteristics as a function of the features of the visual stimuli and possibly, the relative qualia (i.e., visuospatial, face expression, and words). In this framework, the dorsal visual stream may be synchronized in association with the primary consciousness of visuospatial and emotional face contents. Analogously, both dorsal and ventral visual streams may be synchronized in association with the primary consciousness of linguistic contents. In this line of reasoning, the ensemble of the cortical neural networks

  11. Enhanced Development of Auditory Change Detection in Musically Trained School-Aged Children: A Longitudinal Event-Related Potential Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putkinen, Vesa; Tervaniemi, Mari; Saarikivi, Katri; Ojala, Pauliina; Huotilainen, Minna

    2014-01-01

    Adult musicians show superior auditory discrimination skills when compared to non-musicians. The enhanced auditory skills of musicians are reflected in the augmented amplitudes of their auditory event-related potential (ERP) responses. In the current study, we investigated longitudinally the development of auditory discrimination skills in…

  12. Are Effects of Emotion in Single Words Non-Lexical? Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palazova, Marina; Mantwill, Katharina; Sommer, Werner; Schacht, Annekathrin

    2011-01-01

    Emotional meaning impacts word processing. However, it is unclear, at which functional locus this influence occurs and whether and how it depends on word class. These questions were addressed by recording event-related potentials (ERPs) in a lexical decision task with written adjectives, verbs, and nouns of positive, negative, and neutral…

  13. Tracking the Time Course of Word-Frequency Effects in Auditory Word Recognition with Event-Related Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufour, Sophie; Brunelliere, Angele; Frauenfelder, Ulrich H.

    2013-01-01

    Although the word-frequency effect is one of the most established findings in spoken-word recognition, the precise processing locus of this effect is still a topic of debate. In this study, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to track the time course of the word-frequency effect. In addition, the neighborhood density effect, which is known to…

  14. Infant Attention and Visual Preferences: Converging Evidence from Behavior, Event-Related Potentials, and Cortical Source Localization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Greg D.; Courage, Mary L.; Richards, John E.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we had 3 major goals. The 1st goal was to establish a link between behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures of infant attention and recognition memory. To assess the distribution of infant visual preferences throughout ERP testing, we designed a new experimental procedure that embeds a behavioral measure (paired…

  15. Right Hemisphere Sensitivity to Word- and Sentence-Level Context: Evidence From Event-Related Brain Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulson, Seana; Federmeier, Kara D.; Van Petten, Cyma; Kutas, Marta

    2005-01-01

    Researchers using lateralized stimuli have suggested that the left hemisphere is sensitive to sentence-level context, whereas the right hemisphere (RH) primarily processes word-level meaning. The authors investigated this message-blind RH model by measuring associative priming with event-related brain potentials (ERPs). For word pairs in…

  16. The Role of Animacy and Thematic Relationships in Processing Active English Sentences: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuperberg, Gina R.; Kreher, Donna A.; Sitnikova, Tatiana; Caplan, David N.; Holcomb, Phillip J.

    2007-01-01

    Recent event-related potential studies report a P600 effect to incongruous verbs preceded by semantically associated inanimate noun-phrase (NP) arguments, e.g., "eat" in "At breakfast the eggs would eat...". This P600 effect may reflect the processing cost incurred when semantic-thematic relationships between critical verbs and their preceding NP…

  17. Second Language Acquisition of Gender Agreement in Explicit and Implicit Training Conditions: An Event-Related Potential Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan-Short, Kara; Sanz, Cristina; Steinhauer, Karsten; Ullman, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    This study employed an artificial language learning paradigm together with a combined behavioral/event-related potential (ERP) approach to examine the neurocognition of the processing of gender agreement, an aspect of inflectional morphology that is problematic in adult second language (L2) learning. Subjects learned to speak and comprehend an…

  18. Does Silent Reading Speed in Normal Adult Readers Depend on Early Visual Processes? Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korinth, Sebastian Peter; Sommer, Werner; Breznitz, Zvia

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship of reading speed and early visual processes in normal readers. Here we examined the association of the early P1, N170 and late N1 component in visual event-related potentials (ERPs) with silent reading speed and a number of additional cognitive skills in a sample of 52 adult German readers utilizing a Lexical…

  19. Implicit and Explicit Measures of Sensitivity to Violations in Second Language Grammar: An Event-Related Potential Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tokowicz, Natasha; MacWhinney, Brian

    2005-01-01

    We used event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to investigate the contributions of explicit and implicit processes during second language (L2) sentence comprehension. We used a L2 grammaticality judgment task (GJT) to test 20 native English speakers enrolled in the first four semesters of Spanish while recording both accuracy and ERP data. Because…

  20. An Event-Related Potential (ERP) Investigation of Filler-Gap Processing in Native and Second Language Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallas, Andrea; DeDe, Gayle; Nicol, Janet

    2013-01-01

    The current study employed a neuro-imaging technique, Event-Related Potentials (ERP), to investigate real-time processing of sentences containing filler-gap dependencies by late-learning speakers of English as a second language (L2) with a Chinese native language background. An individual differences approach was also taken to examine the role of…

  1. Visual Information Processing Deficits as Biomarkers of Vulnerability to Schizophrenia: An Event-Related Potential Study in Schizotypy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koychev, Ivan; El-Deredy, Wael; Haenschel, Corinna; Deakin, John Francis William

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to clarify the importance of early visual processing deficits for the formation of cognitive deficits in the schizophrenia spectrum. We carried out an event-related potential (ERP) study using a computerised delayed matching to sample working memory (WM) task on a sample of volunteers with high and low scores on the Schizotypal…

  2. Perception and Bias in the Processing of Compound versus Phrasal Stress: Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCauley, Stewart M; Hestvik, Arild; Vogel, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Previous research using picture/word matching tasks has demonstrated a tendency to incorrectly interpret phrasally stressed strings as compounds. Using event-related potentials, we sought to determine whether this pattern stems from poor perceptual sensitivity to the compound/phrasal stress distinction, or from a post-perceptual bias in behavioral…

  3. An Event-Related Potential Study of Adolescents' and Young Adults' Judgments of Moral and Social Conventional Violations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahat, Ayelet; Helwig, Charles C.; Zelazo, Philip David

    2013-01-01

    The neurocognitive development of moral and conventional judgments was examined. Event-related potentials were recorded while 24 adolescents (13 years) and 30 young adults (20 years) read scenarios with 1 of 3 endings: moral violations, conventional violations, or neutral acts. Participants judged whether the act was acceptable or unacceptable…

  4. Individual Differences in Nonverbal Number Discrimination Correlate with Event-Related Potentials and Measures of Probabilistic Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsen, David J.; Woldorff, Marty G.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated the neural activity patterns associated with numerical sensitivity in adults. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while adults observed sequentially presented display arrays (S1 and S2) of non-symbolic numerical stimuli (dots) and made same/different judgments of these stimuli by pressing a button only when…

  5. Pre-Attentive Mental Processing of Music Expectation: Event-Related Potentials of a Partially Violating and Resolving Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pei, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chung, Chia-Ying; Chou, Shi-Wei; Wong, Alice M. K.; Tang, Simon F. T.

    2004-01-01

    Auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) were investigated in an oddball paradigm to verify electrophysiological evidence of music expectation, which is a key component of artistic presentation. The non-target condition consisted of four-chord harmonic chord sequences, while the target condition was manifested by a partially violating third chord…

  6. Language Context Effects on Interlingual Homograph Recognition: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials and Response Times in Semantic Priming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bruijn, Ellen R. A.; Dijkstra, Ton; Chwilla, Dorothee J.; Schriefers, Herbert J.

    2001-01-01

    Dutch-English bilinguals performed a generalized lexical decision task on triplets of items, responding with "yes" if all items wee correct Dutch and/or English words, and with "no" if one or ore of the items was not a word in wither language. Semantic priming effects were found in on-line response times. Event-related potentials that were…

  7. The Role of Episodic Memory in Controlled Evaluative Judgments about Attitudes: An Event-Related Potential Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ray, Jr.; Simon, Elizabeth J.; Henkell, Heather; Zhu, John

    2011-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) are unique in their ability to provide information about the timing of activity in the neural networks that perform complex cognitive processes. Given the dearth of extant data from normal controls on the question of whether attitude representations are stored in episodic or semantic memory, the goal here was to…

  8. Newborn Event-Related Potentials Predict Poorer Pre-Reading Skills in Children at Risk for Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guttorm, Tomi K.; Leppanen, Paavo H. T.; Hamalainen, Jarmo A.; Eklund, Kenneth M.; Lyytinen, Heikki J.

    2010-01-01

    Earlier results from the Jyvaskyla Longitudinal Study of Dyslexia showed that newborn event-related potentials (ERPs) of children with and without familial risk for dyslexia were associated with receptive language and verbal memory skills between 2.5 and 5 years of age. We further examined whether these ERPs (responses to synthetic consonant-vowel…

  9. Attenuated Auditory Event-Related Potentials and Associations with Atypical Sensory Response Patterns in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donkers, Franc C. L.; Schipul, Sarah E.; Baranek, Grace T.; Cleary, Katherine M.; Willoughby, Michael T.; Evans, Anna M.; Bulluck, John C.; Lovmo, Jeanne E.; Belger, Aysenil

    2015-01-01

    Neurobiological underpinnings of unusual sensory features in individuals with autism are unknown. Event-related potentials elicited by task-irrelevant sounds were used to elucidate neural correlates of auditory processing and associations with three common sensory response patterns (hyperresponsiveness; hyporesponsiveness; sensory seeking).…

  10. Hemispheric Differences in the Time-Course of Semantic Priming Processes: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials (ERPs)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouaffre, Sarah; Faita-Ainseba, Frederique

    2007-01-01

    To investigate hemispheric differences in the timing of word priming, the modulation of event-related potentials by semantic word relationships was examined in each cerebral hemisphere. Primes and targets, either categorically (silk-wool) or associatively (needle-sewing) related, were presented to the left or right visual field in a go/no-go…

  11. Auditory evoked potentials in young patients with Down syndrome. Event-related potentials (P3) and histaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Seidl, R; Hauser, E; Bernert, G; Marx, M; Freilinger, M; Lubec, G

    1997-06-01

    Subjects with Down syndrome exhibit various types of cognitive impairment. Besides abnormalities in a number of neurotransmitter systems (e.g. cholinergic), histaminergic deficits have recently been identified. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) and auditory event-related potentials (ERPs), were recorded from 10 children (aged 11-20 years) with Down syndrome and from 10 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. In Down subjects, BAEPs revealed shortened latencies for peaks III and V with shortened interpeak latencies I-III and I-V. ERPs showed a delay of components N1, P2, N2 and P3. In addition, subjects with Down syndrome failed to show P3 amplitude reduction during repeated stimulation. To evaluate the cognitive effects of histaminergic dysfunction, ERPs were recorded from 12 healthy adults (aged 20-28 years) before and after antihistaminergic intervention (pheniramine) compared to placebo. Whereas components N1, P2, N2 remained unchanged after H1-receptor antagonism, P3 latency increased and P3 amplitude showed no habituation in response to repeated stimulation. The results suggest that the characteristic neurofunctional abnormalities present in children with Down syndrome must be the consequence of a combination of structural and neurochemical aberrations. The second finding was that antihistaminergic treatment affects information processing tested by ERPs similar to that seen with anticholinergic treatment.

  12. The dysfunction of face processing in patients with internet addiction disorders: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Zhao, Lun

    2016-10-19

    To investigate face processing in patients with internet addiction disorders (IAD), an event-related brain potential experiment was conducted in IAD patients and healthy age-matched controls in which participants were instructed to classify each stimulus (face vs. nonface object) as quickly and accurately as possible. Although we did not find a significant difference in the performance between two groups, both the N110 and the P2 components in response to faces were larger in the IAD group than in the control group, whereas the N170 to faces decreased in the IAD group than in the control group. In addition, the source analysis of event-related potential components showed different generators between two groups. These data indicated that there was a dysfunction of face processing in IAD patients and the underlying mechanism of processing faces could be different from healthy individuals. PMID:27563738

  13. The dysfunction of face processing in patients with internet addiction disorders: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Zhao, Lun

    2016-10-19

    To investigate face processing in patients with internet addiction disorders (IAD), an event-related brain potential experiment was conducted in IAD patients and healthy age-matched controls in which participants were instructed to classify each stimulus (face vs. nonface object) as quickly and accurately as possible. Although we did not find a significant difference in the performance between two groups, both the N110 and the P2 components in response to faces were larger in the IAD group than in the control group, whereas the N170 to faces decreased in the IAD group than in the control group. In addition, the source analysis of event-related potential components showed different generators between two groups. These data indicated that there was a dysfunction of face processing in IAD patients and the underlying mechanism of processing faces could be different from healthy individuals.

  14. Emotion and novelty processing in an implicit aesthetic experience of architectures: evidence from an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingguo; Hu, Linfeng; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2015-03-25

    The present study explored the implicit aesthetic processing of different architectures using an event-related potential method. Event-related potential data were acquired in a categorization task in which participants were asked to distinguish between two different categories of pictures of everyday life objects and the architectures as soon as possible. The architectural pictures included two categories: noted-architect-designed and ordinary architectures. A smaller P2 amplitude and a larger N2 amplitude were elicited by the master architects' works than those of ordinary architectures, which indicated that perceived positive emotion and novelty perception occurred in the aesthetic processing of architectures. Our results present two sensitive neural indicators, P2 and N2, to judge the delight and novelty qualities shown by the architecture, respectively. PMID:25730678

  15. You know when: event-related potentials and theta/beta power indicate boundary prediction in music.

    PubMed

    Silva, Susana; Barbosa, Fernando; Marques-Teixeira, João; Petersson, Karl Magnus; Castro, São Luís

    2014-03-01

    Neuroscientific and musicological approaches to music cognition indicate that listeners familiarized in the Western tonal tradition expect a musical phrase boundary at predictable time intervals. However, phrase boundary prediction processes in music remain untested. We analyzed event-related potentials (ERPs) and event-related induced power changes at the onset and offset of a boundary pause. We made comparisons with modified melodies, where the pause was omitted and filled by tones. The offset of the pause elicited a closure positive shift (CPS), indexing phrase boundary detection. The onset of the filling tones elicited significant increases in theta and beta powers. In addition, the P2 component was larger when the filling tones started than when they ended. The responses to boundary omission suggest that listeners expected to hear a boundary pause. Therefore, boundary prediction seems to coexist with boundary detection in music segmentation. PMID:24738537

  16. You know when: event-related potentials and theta/beta power indicate boundary prediction in music.

    PubMed

    Silva, Susana; Barbosa, Fernando; Marques-Teixeira, João; Petersson, Karl Magnus; Castro, São Luís

    2014-03-01

    Neuroscientific and musicological approaches to music cognition indicate that listeners familiarized in the Western tonal tradition expect a musical phrase boundary at predictable time intervals. However, phrase boundary prediction processes in music remain untested. We analyzed event-related potentials (ERPs) and event-related induced power changes at the onset and offset of a boundary pause. We made comparisons with modified melodies, where the pause was omitted and filled by tones. The offset of the pause elicited a closure positive shift (CPS), indexing phrase boundary detection. The onset of the filling tones elicited significant increases in theta and beta powers. In addition, the P2 component was larger when the filling tones started than when they ended. The responses to boundary omission suggest that listeners expected to hear a boundary pause. Therefore, boundary prediction seems to coexist with boundary detection in music segmentation.

  17. A step into the anarchist’s mind: examining political attitudes and ideology through event-related brain potentials

    PubMed Central

    Van Hiel, Alain; Pattyn, Sven; Onraet, Emma; Severens, Els

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates patterns of event-related brain potentials following the presentation of attitudinal stimuli among political moderates (N = 12) and anarchists (N = 11). We used a modified oddball paradigm to investigate the evaluative inconsistency effect elicited by stimuli embedded in a sequence of contextual stimuli with an opposite valence. Increased late positive potentials (LPPs) of extreme political attitudes were observed. Moreover, this LPP enhancement was larger among anarchists than among moderates, indicating that an extreme political attitude of a moderate differs from an extreme political attitude of an anarchist. The discussion elaborates on the meaning of attitude extremity for moderates and extremists. PMID:21421734

  18. A Neurally Plausible Parallel Distributed Processing Model of Event-Related Potential Word Reading Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laszlo, Sarah; Plaut, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The Parallel Distributed Processing (PDP) framework has significant potential for producing models of cognitive tasks that approximate how the brain performs the same tasks. To date, however, there has been relatively little contact between PDP modeling and data from cognitive neuroscience. In an attempt to advance the relationship between…

  19. Do's and Don'ts with Lateralized Event-Related Brain Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praamstra, Peter

    2007-01-01

    K. Wiegand and E. Wascher (2005) used the lateralized readiness potential (LRP) to investigate the mechanisms underlying spatial stimulus-response (S-R) correspondence. The authors compared spatial S-R correspondence effects obtained with horizontal and vertical S-R arrangements. In some relevant previous investigations on spatial S-R…

  20. Effects of Additional Tasks on Language Perception: An Event-Related Brain Potential Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohlfeld, Annette; Sangals, Jorg; Sommer, Werner

    2004-01-01

    The authors investigated effects of task and overlapping processing load on semantic processing. In 3 experiments the brain potential component N400 was elicited by synonymous and nonsynonymous spoken noun pairs that were to be classified according to semantic relatedness. The time course of the N=400 component to the nouns was delayed, and its…

  1. Perceiving temporal regularity in music: the role of auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) in probing beat perception.

    PubMed

    Honing, Henkjan; Bouwer, Fleur L; Háden, Gábor P

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to give an overview of how the perception of a regular beat in music can be studied in humans adults, human newborns, and nonhuman primates using event-related brain potentials (ERPs). Next to a review of the recent literature on the perception of temporal regularity in music, we will discuss in how far ERPs, and especially the component called mismatch negativity (MMN), can be instrumental in probing beat perception. We conclude with a discussion on the pitfalls and prospects of using ERPs to probe the perception of a regular beat, in which we present possible constraints on stimulus design and discuss future perspectives.

  2. Imaginative Language: What Event-Related Potentials have Revealed about the Nature and Source of Concreteness Effects*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsu-Wen; Federmeier, Kara D.

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral and neuropsychological evidence suggest that abstract and concrete concepts may be represented, retrieved, and processed differently in the human brain. As reviewed in this paper, data using event-related potential measures, some in combination with visual half-field presentation methods, have offered a detailed picture of the nature and source of concreteness effects. In particular, the results provide strong evidence for multiple mechanisms underlying the behavioral processing differences that have long been noted for concrete and abstract words and, further, suggest an intriguing, unique role for the right hemisphere in associating words with sensory imagery. PMID:27559305

  3. Effects of second language study of phonemic discrimination and auditory event-related potentials in adults.

    PubMed

    Grubb, J D; Bush, A M; Geist, C R

    1998-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of acquisition of a second language on auditory even-related brain potentials and discrimination of foreign language phonemes by 36 women (ages 18 to 47 years), and 25 men (ages 18 to 36 years) and of varying linguistic background, in response to synthetic versions of Japanese phonemes. Subjects were subsequently tested on discrimination between spoken Japanese phonemes. Analysis indicated that the men and women differed in phonological processing and in the way acquisition of the second language affected phonological processing.

  4. Emotional Modulation of Conflict Processing in the Affective Domain: Evidence from Event-related Potentials and Event-related Spectral Perturbation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianling; Liu, Chang; Chen, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed the impact of emotion on conflict processing. The present study was conducted to investigate whether cognitive control in the affective domain is also affected by emotion. Emotional face-word and body-word Stroop tasks were explored and contrasted, and both behavioural and electrophysiological measures were recorded. Behavioural results showed that both tasks replicated previous robust interference effects. At the physiological level, the two tasks showed dissociable neural activity in the early attention and perception stages. It was also found that the face-word task evoked more pronounced N1 and P2 amplitudes than the body-word task. However, the two tasks evoked comparable N450 amplitudes. At later processing stages, positive slow potentials were modulated by target emotion and congruency. In addition, time-frequency analyses also revealed that the face-word task induced enhanced theta activity compared to the body-word task at both early and later stages of processing. The present findings provide support for the dual competition framework and suggest the dynamic modulation of emotion on cognitive control in the affective domain. PMID:27511609

  5. Emotional Modulation of Conflict Processing in the Affective Domain: Evidence from Event-related Potentials and Event-related Spectral Perturbation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianling; Liu, Chang; Chen, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed the impact of emotion on conflict processing. The present study was conducted to investigate whether cognitive control in the affective domain is also affected by emotion. Emotional face-word and body-word Stroop tasks were explored and contrasted, and both behavioural and electrophysiological measures were recorded. Behavioural results showed that both tasks replicated previous robust interference effects. At the physiological level, the two tasks showed dissociable neural activity in the early attention and perception stages. It was also found that the face-word task evoked more pronounced N1 and P2 amplitudes than the body-word task. However, the two tasks evoked comparable N450 amplitudes. At later processing stages, positive slow potentials were modulated by target emotion and congruency. In addition, time-frequency analyses also revealed that the face-word task induced enhanced theta activity compared to the body-word task at both early and later stages of processing. The present findings provide support for the dual competition framework and suggest the dynamic modulation of emotion on cognitive control in the affective domain. PMID:27511609

  6. Temporal dynamics of disgust and morality: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qun; Yan, Li; Luo, Junlong; Li, An; Zhang, Ye; Tian, Xuehong; Zhang, Dexuan

    2013-01-01

    Disgust is argued to be an emotion that motivates the avoidance of disease-causing entities in the physical domain and unacceptable behaviors in the social-moral domain. Empirical work from behavioral, physiological and brain imaging studies suggests moral judgments are strongly modulated by disgust feelings. Yet, it remains unclear how they are related in the time course of neural processing. Examining the temporal order of disgust emotion and morality could help to clarify the role of disgust in moral judgments. In the present research, a Go/No-Go paradigm was employed to evoke lateralized readiness potentials (LRPs) to investigate the temporal order of physical disgust and moral information processing. Participants were asked to give a "yes" or "no" response regarding the physical disgust and moral wrongness of a social act. The results showed that the evaluation of moral information was processed prior to that of physical disgust information. This suggests that moral information is available earlier than physical disgust, and provides more data on the biological heterogeneity between disgust and morality in terms of the time course of neural activity. The findings implicate that physical disgust emotion may not be necessary for people to make moral judgments. They also suggest that some of our moral experience may be more fundamental (than physical disgust experience) to our survival and development, as humans spend a considerable amount of time engaging in social interaction.

  7. Parafoveal processing in reading Chinese sentences: Evidence from event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Niefind, Florian; Wang, Suiping; Sommer, Werner; Dimigen, Olaf

    2015-10-01

    Natural reading involves the preprocessing of upcoming words, resulting in shorter fixations on words visible in the parafovea during preceding fixations. While this preview benefit is established in behavior, its brain-electric correlates have only recently been investigated. Using fixation-related potentials, an attenuation of the occipitotemporal N1 component for words that were parafoveally visible during preceding fixations has been demonstrated. In contrast, another study, using an RSVP paradigm with parafoveal flanker words, observed no such general preview benefit in ERPs, but instead reported N400 effects triggered by semantically incongruous parafoveal words. To follow up on these discrepant findings and to extend them to a nonalphabetic writing system, we conducted two ERP experiments with Chinese readers using the RSVP-with-flankers paradigm and rigorous fixation control via eye tracking. We replicate robust parafoveal N400 semantic congruency effects in Chinese participants. Additionally, we found that, once a word was directly looked at, words after a valid preview elicited a smaller N1 and a weaker N400 than those after an invalid preview. Results underline the importance of considering parafoveal vision in ERP studies on reading.

  8. Impaired Emotion Regulation in Schizophrenia: Evidence From Event-Related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Horan, William P.; Hajcak, Greg; Wynn, Jonathan K.; Green, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although several aspects of emotion appear intact in schizophrenia, there is emerging evidence that patients show an impaired ability to adaptively regulate their emotions. This ERP study examined whether schizophrenia is associated with impaired neural responses to appraisal frames – i.e., when negative stimuli are presented in a less negative context. Methods 31 schizophrenia outpatients and 27 healthy controls completed a validated picture viewing task with three conditions: 1) Neutral pictures preceded by neutral descriptions (“Neutral”), 2) Unpleasant pictures preceded by negative descriptions (“Preappraised negative”), 3) Unpleasant pictures preceded by more neutral descriptions (“Preappraised neutral”). Analyses focused on the Late Positive Potential (LPP), an index of facilitated attention to emotional stimuli that is reduced following cognitive emotion regulation strategies, during four time windows from 300 – 2000 ms post picture onset. Results Replicating prior studies, controls showed smaller LPP in Preappraised neutral and Neutral vs. Preappraised negative conditions throughout 300 – 2000 ms. In contrast, patients showed (a) larger LPP in Preappraised neutral and Preappraised negative vs. Neutral conditions in the initial period (300 – 600 ms) and (b) an atypical pattern of larger LPP to Preappraised neutral vs. Preappraised negative and Neutral conditions in the 600–1500 ms epochs. Conclusions Modulation of neural responses by a cognitive emotion regulation strategy appears impaired in schizophrenia during the first two seconds after exposure to unpleasant stimuli. PMID:23360592

  9. Newly-formed emotional memories guide selective attention processes: Evidence from event-related potentials

    PubMed Central

    Schupp, Harald T.; Kirmse, Ursula; Schmälzle, Ralf; Flaisch, Tobias; Renner, Britta

    2016-01-01

    Emotional cues can guide selective attention processes. However, emotional stimuli can both activate long-term memory representations reflecting general world knowledge and engage newly formed memory representations representing specific knowledge from the immediate past. Here, the self-completion feature of associative memory was utilized to assess the regulation of attention processes by newly-formed emotional memory. First, new memory representations were formed by presenting pictures depicting a person either in an erotic pose or as a portrait. Afterwards, to activate newly-built memory traces, edited pictures were presented showing only the head region of the person. ERP recordings revealed the emotional regulation of attention by newly-formed memories. Specifically, edited pictures from the erotic compared to the portrait category elicited an early posterior negativity and late positive potential, similar to the findings observed for the original pictures. A control condition showed that the effect was dependent on newly-formed memory traces. Given the large number of new memories formed each day, they presumably make an important contribution to the regulation of attention in everyday life. PMID:27321471

  10. Newly-formed emotional memories guide selective attention processes: Evidence from event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Schupp, Harald T; Kirmse, Ursula; Schmälzle, Ralf; Flaisch, Tobias; Renner, Britta

    2016-01-01

    Emotional cues can guide selective attention processes. However, emotional stimuli can both activate long-term memory representations reflecting general world knowledge and engage newly formed memory representations representing specific knowledge from the immediate past. Here, the self-completion feature of associative memory was utilized to assess the regulation of attention processes by newly-formed emotional memory. First, new memory representations were formed by presenting pictures depicting a person either in an erotic pose or as a portrait. Afterwards, to activate newly-built memory traces, edited pictures were presented showing only the head region of the person. ERP recordings revealed the emotional regulation of attention by newly-formed memories. Specifically, edited pictures from the erotic compared to the portrait category elicited an early posterior negativity and late positive potential, similar to the findings observed for the original pictures. A control condition showed that the effect was dependent on newly-formed memory traces. Given the large number of new memories formed each day, they presumably make an important contribution to the regulation of attention in everyday life. PMID:27321471

  11. Humor as a reward mechanism: event-related potentials in the healthy and diseased brain.

    PubMed

    Mensen, Armand; Poryazova, Rositsa; Schwartz, Sophie; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Humor processing involves distinct processing stages including incongruity detection, emotional response, and engagement of mesolimbic reward regions. Dysfunctional reward processing and clinical symptoms in response to humor have been previously described in both hypocretin deficient narcolepsy-cataplexy (NC) and in idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). For NC patients, humor is the strongest trigger for cataplexy, a transient loss of muscle tone, whereas dopamine-deficient PD-patients show blunted emotional responses to humor. To better understand the role of reward system and the various contributions of hypocretinergic and dopaminergic mechanisms to different stages of humor processing we examined the electrophysiological response to humorous and neutral pictures when given as reward feedback in PD, NC and healthy controls. Humor compared to neutral feedback demonstrated modulation of early ERP amplitudes likely corresponding to visual processing stages, with no group differences. At 270 ms post-feedback, conditions showed topographical and amplitudinal differences for frontal and left posterior electrodes, in that humor feedback was absent in PD patients but increased in NC patients. We suggest that this effect relates to a relatively early affective response, reminiscent of increased amygdala response reported in NC patients. Later ERP differences, corresponding to the late positive potential, revealed a lack of sustained activation in PD, likely due to altered dopamine regulation in reward structures in these patients. This research provides new insights into the temporal dynamics and underlying mechanisms of humor detection and appreciation in health and disease.

  12. Parafoveal processing in reading Chinese sentences: Evidence from event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Niefind, Florian; Wang, Suiping; Sommer, Werner; Dimigen, Olaf

    2015-10-01

    Natural reading involves the preprocessing of upcoming words, resulting in shorter fixations on words visible in the parafovea during preceding fixations. While this preview benefit is established in behavior, its brain-electric correlates have only recently been investigated. Using fixation-related potentials, an attenuation of the occipitotemporal N1 component for words that were parafoveally visible during preceding fixations has been demonstrated. In contrast, another study, using an RSVP paradigm with parafoveal flanker words, observed no such general preview benefit in ERPs, but instead reported N400 effects triggered by semantically incongruous parafoveal words. To follow up on these discrepant findings and to extend them to a nonalphabetic writing system, we conducted two ERP experiments with Chinese readers using the RSVP-with-flankers paradigm and rigorous fixation control via eye tracking. We replicate robust parafoveal N400 semantic congruency effects in Chinese participants. Additionally, we found that, once a word was directly looked at, words after a valid preview elicited a smaller N1 and a weaker N400 than those after an invalid preview. Results underline the importance of considering parafoveal vision in ERP studies on reading. PMID:26289548

  13. Temporal Dynamics of Disgust and Morality: An Event-Related Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qun; Yan, Li; Luo, Junlong; Li, An; Zhang, Ye; Tian, Xuehong; Zhang, Dexuan

    2013-01-01

    Disgust is argued to be an emotion that motivates the avoidance of disease-causing entities in the physical domain and unacceptable behaviors in the social-moral domain. Empirical work from behavioral, physiological and brain imaging studies suggests moral judgments are strongly modulated by disgust feelings. Yet, it remains unclear how they are related in the time course of neural processing. Examining the temporal order of disgust emotion and morality could help to clarify the role of disgust in moral judgments. In the present research, a Go/No-Go paradigm was employed to evoke lateralized readiness potentials (LRPs) to investigate the temporal order of physical disgust and moral information processing. Participants were asked to give a “yes” or “no” response regarding the physical disgust and moral wrongness of a social act. The results showed that the evaluation of moral information was processed prior to that of physical disgust information. This suggests that moral information is available earlier than physical disgust, and provides more data on the biological heterogeneity between disgust and morality in terms of the time course of neural activity. The findings implicate that physical disgust emotion may not be necessary for people to make moral judgments. They also suggest that some of our moral experience may be more fundamental (than physical disgust experience) to our survival and development, as humans spend a considerable amount of time engaging in social interaction. PMID:23724123

  14. Seeing sounds and hearing colors: an event-related potential study of auditory-visual synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Goller, Aviva I; Otten, Leun J; Ward, Jamie

    2009-10-01

    In auditory-visual synesthesia, sounds automatically elicit conscious and reliable visual experiences. It is presently unknown whether this reflects early or late processes in the brain. It is also unknown whether adult audiovisual synesthesia resembles auditory-induced visual illusions that can sometimes occur in the general population or whether it resembles the electrophysiological deflection over occipital sites that has been noted in infancy and has been likened to synesthesia. Electrical brain activity was recorded from adult synesthetes and control participants who were played brief tones and required to monitor for an infrequent auditory target. The synesthetes were instructed to attend either to the auditory or to the visual (i.e., synesthetic) dimension of the tone, whereas the controls attended to the auditory dimension alone. There were clear differences between synesthetes and controls that emerged early (100 msec after tone onset). These differences tended to lie in deflections of the auditory-evoked potential (e.g., the auditory N1, P2, and N2) rather than the presence of an additional posterior deflection. The differences occurred irrespective of what the synesthetes attended to (although attention had a late effect). The results suggest that differences between synesthetes and others occur early in time, and that synesthesia is qualitatively different from similar effects found in infants and certain auditory-induced visual illusions in adults. In addition, we report two novel cases of synesthesia in which colors elicit sounds, and vice versa.

  15. How attitude strength and information influence moral decision making: Evidence from event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Hundrieser, Manuela; Stahl, Jutta

    2016-05-01

    Moral judgments are based on complex processing. This study aimed to investigate neural correlates of moral decisions. Participants (N = 32) were asked to express their opinion on various moral issues while ERPs were recorded. After reading texts containing either confirming or contradicting arguments regarding the issues, participants were asked to express their opinion again. A higher N400 amplitude and a higher amplitude of the late positive potential for value-incongruent words compared to value-congruent words could be observed. Furthermore, after participants had read conflicting arguments, slower responses and larger N400 differences (value-incongruent minus value-congruent) were observed. These results showed that language processing for a moral context is influenced by the subjective value system, and it can be assumed that a demanding cognitive elaboration contributed to the observed RT and N400 priming effects. This is the first ERP study comparing moral judgments before and after reading confirming or conflicting information; it revealed that evaluative reasoning can influence neural processing for moral decisions.

  16. Environmental noise-exposed workers: event-related potentials, neuropsychological and mood assessment.

    PubMed

    Chiovenda, Paola; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Zappasodi, Filippo; Ercolani, Matilde; Milazzo, Daniele; Tomei, Gianfranco; Capozzella, Assuntina; Tomei, Francesco; Rossini, Paolo M; Tecchio, Franca

    2007-09-01

    Prolonged environmental noise exposure can induce pathogenic effects on various physical and psychosocial responses. The first aim of this study was to investigate whether long-term occupational noise exposure could affect neurophysiological, neuropsychological and emotional statuses, with particular respect to attention and working memory. The second aim was to evaluate the effects on the tactile P300 of a specific stressor (background traffic noise) vs a non-specific stress inductor (Stroop test). The comparison between a group of noise-exposed workers (traffic police officers), and a control group (office employees) did not show marked differences in cognitive and emotional profiles. The amplitude of the baseline cognitive potential (P300), recorded during a tactile (electric) discrimination task, resulted higher in noise-exposed workers than in controls, and this enhancement was associated with a lower level of trait anxiety and better mood profiles. Moreover, we found a wider P300 amplitude reduction in traffic police officers than in controls, under noisy conditions due to traffic. The effect of the Stroop test as a stress inductor was negligible and similar in the two groups. The wider amplitude of the non-auditory P300 in traffic police officers in the baseline condition could be a sign of cross-modal cerebral plasticity enhancing attentive processes in the 'stress-free' sensory channel. In addition, noise-exposed workers presented a higher cerebral sensitivity to stress selectively when they were exposed to the habitual environmental stressor.

  17. Time-Shift Correlation Algorithm for P300 Event Related Potential Brain-Computer Interface Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ju-Chi; Chou, Hung-Chyun; Chen, Chien-Hsiu; Lin, Yi-Tseng

    2016-01-01

    A high efficient time-shift correlation algorithm was proposed to deal with the peak time uncertainty of P300 evoked potential for a P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI). The time-shift correlation series data were collected as the input nodes of an artificial neural network (ANN), and the classification of four LED visual stimuli was selected as the output node. Two operating modes, including fast-recognition mode (FM) and accuracy-recognition mode (AM), were realized. The proposed BCI system was implemented on an embedded system for commanding an adult-size humanoid robot to evaluate the performance from investigating the ground truth trajectories of the humanoid robot. When the humanoid robot walked in a spacious area, the FM was used to control the robot with a higher information transfer rate (ITR). When the robot walked in a crowded area, the AM was used for high accuracy of recognition to reduce the risk of collision. The experimental results showed that, in 100 trials, the accuracy rate of FM was 87.8% and the average ITR was 52.73 bits/min. In addition, the accuracy rate was improved to 92% for the AM, and the average ITR decreased to 31.27 bits/min. due to strict recognition constraints. PMID:27579033

  18. Time-Shift Correlation Algorithm for P300 Event Related Potential Brain-Computer Interface Implementation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju-Chi; Chou, Hung-Chyun; Chen, Chien-Hsiu; Lin, Yi-Tseng; Kuo, Chung-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    A high efficient time-shift correlation algorithm was proposed to deal with the peak time uncertainty of P300 evoked potential for a P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI). The time-shift correlation series data were collected as the input nodes of an artificial neural network (ANN), and the classification of four LED visual stimuli was selected as the output node. Two operating modes, including fast-recognition mode (FM) and accuracy-recognition mode (AM), were realized. The proposed BCI system was implemented on an embedded system for commanding an adult-size humanoid robot to evaluate the performance from investigating the ground truth trajectories of the humanoid robot. When the humanoid robot walked in a spacious area, the FM was used to control the robot with a higher information transfer rate (ITR). When the robot walked in a crowded area, the AM was used for high accuracy of recognition to reduce the risk of collision. The experimental results showed that, in 100 trials, the accuracy rate of FM was 87.8% and the average ITR was 52.73 bits/min. In addition, the accuracy rate was improved to 92% for the AM, and the average ITR decreased to 31.27 bits/min. due to strict recognition constraints.

  19. Time-Shift Correlation Algorithm for P300 Event Related Potential Brain-Computer Interface Implementation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju-Chi; Chou, Hung-Chyun; Chen, Chien-Hsiu; Lin, Yi-Tseng; Kuo, Chung-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    A high efficient time-shift correlation algorithm was proposed to deal with the peak time uncertainty of P300 evoked potential for a P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI). The time-shift correlation series data were collected as the input nodes of an artificial neural network (ANN), and the classification of four LED visual stimuli was selected as the output node. Two operating modes, including fast-recognition mode (FM) and accuracy-recognition mode (AM), were realized. The proposed BCI system was implemented on an embedded system for commanding an adult-size humanoid robot to evaluate the performance from investigating the ground truth trajectories of the humanoid robot. When the humanoid robot walked in a spacious area, the FM was used to control the robot with a higher information transfer rate (ITR). When the robot walked in a crowded area, the AM was used for high accuracy of recognition to reduce the risk of collision. The experimental results showed that, in 100 trials, the accuracy rate of FM was 87.8% and the average ITR was 52.73 bits/min. In addition, the accuracy rate was improved to 92% for the AM, and the average ITR decreased to 31.27 bits/min. due to strict recognition constraints. PMID:27579033

  20. Event-related potential indices of congruency sequence effects without feature integration or contingency learning confounds.

    PubMed

    Larson, Michael J; Clayson, Peter E; Kirwan, C Brock; Weissman, Daniel H

    2016-06-01

    The congruency effect in Stroop-like tasks (i.e., increased response time and reduced accuracy in incongruent relative to congruent trials) is often smaller when the previous trial was incongruent as compared to congruent. This congruency sequence effect (CSE) is thought to reflect cognitive control processes that shift attention to the target and/or modulate the response engendered by the distracter differently after incongruent relative to congruent trials. The neural signatures of CSEs are therefore usually attributed to cognitive control processes that minimize distraction from irrelevant stimuli. However, CSEs in previous functional neuroimaging studies were ubiquitously confounded with feature integration and/or contingency learning processes. We therefore investigated whether a neural CSE can be observed without such confounds in a group of healthy young adults (n = 56). To this end, we combined a prime-probe task that lacks such confounds with high-density ERPs to identify, for the first time, the neural time course of confound-minimized CSEs. Replicating recent behavioral findings, we observed strong CSEs in this task for mean response time and mean accuracy. Critically, conceptually replicating prior ERP results from confounded tasks, we also observed a CSE in both the parietal conflict slow potential (conflict SP) and the frontomedial N450. These findings indicate for the first time that neural CSEs as indexed by ERPs can be observed without the typical confounds. More broadly, the present study provides a confound-minimized protocol that will help future researchers to better isolate the neural bases of control processes that minimize distraction from irrelevant stimuli. PMID:26854028

  1. Cortical Auditory Event Related Potentials (P300) for Frequency Changing Dynamic Tones

    PubMed Central

    Kalaiah, Mohan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives P300 has been studied with a variety of stimuli. However, the nature of P300 has not been investigated for deviant stimuli which change its characteristics from standard stimuli after a period of time from onset. Subjects and Methods Nine young adults with normal hearing participated in the study. The P300 was elicited using an oddball paradigm, the probability of standard and deviant stimuli was 80% and 20% respectively. Six stimuli were used to elicit P300, it included two pure-tones (1,000 Hz and 2,000 Hz) and four tone-complexes (tones with frequency changes). Among these stimuli, 1,000 Hz tone served as standard while others served as deviant stimuli. The P300 was recorded in five separate blocks, with one of the deviant stimuli as target in each block. Electroencephalographic was recorded from electrode sites Fz, Cz, C3, C4, and Pz. Latency and amplitude of components of the cortical auditory evoked potentials were measured at Cz. Results Waveforms obtained in the present study shows that, all the deviant stimuli elicited obligatory P1-N1-P2 for stimulus onset. 2,000 Hz deviant tone elicited P300 at a latency of 300 ms. While, tone-complexes elicited acoustic change complex (ACC) for frequency changes and finally elicited P300 at a latency of 600 ms. In addition, the results showed shorter latency and larger amplitude ACC and P300 for rising tone-complexes compared to falling tone-complexes. Conclusions Tone-complexes elicited distinct waveforms compared to 2,000 Hz deviant tone. Rising tone-complexes which had an increase in frequency elicited shorter latency and larger amplitude responses, which could be attributed to perceptual bias for frequency changes. PMID:27144230

  2. Perceptual and lexical effects in letter identification: an event-related potential study of the word superiority effect.

    PubMed

    Martin, Clara D; Nazir, Tatjana; Thierry, Guillaume; Paulignan, Yves; Démonet, Jean-François

    2006-07-01

    Most classical models of visual word recognition are based on sequentially organized levels of representation and involve feedback mechanisms to various extents. In this study, we aim at clarifying which of the early processing stages of visual word recognition are modulated by top-down lexical effects. We studied the identification of letters embedded in briefly presented words (e.g., TABLE) and illegal nonwords (e.g., GTFRS) using event-related potentials (ERPs). Participants were involved in the Reicher-Wheeler paradigm: they were asked to indicate which of two letters displayed above and below a string of hashes was flashed immediately before at fixation within a letter string, which was either a word or a nonword. Event-related potentials were significantly modulated by the lexical status of stimuli around 200 ms after stimulus onset, i.e., in the peaking window of the N1 component. In light of our results, we propose that visual word form representations can constrain letter identification at a prelexical stage i.e., during the extraction of letter-shape information. In addition, we show that this facilitatory top-down effect is sensitive to stimulus exposure duration. PMID:16774747

  3. Effects of ipsilateral and bilateral auditory stimuli on audiovisual integration: a behavioral and event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yulin; Li, Qi; Yang, Weiping; Yang, Jingjing; Tang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Jinglong

    2014-06-18

    We used event-related potential measures to compare the effects of ipsilateral and bilateral auditory stimuli on audiovisual (AV) integration. Behavioral results showed that the responses to visual stimuli with either type of auditory stimulus were faster than responses to visual stimuli only and that perceptual sensitivity (d') for visual detection was enhanced for visual stimuli with ipsilateral auditory stimuli. Furthermore, event-related potential components related to AV integrations were identified over the occipital areas at ∼180-200 ms during early-stage sensory processing by the effect of ipsilateral auditory stimuli and over the frontocentral areas at ∼300-320 ms during late-stage cognitive processing by the effect of ipsilateral and bilateral auditory stimuli. Our results confirmed that AV integration was also elicited, despite the effect of bilateral auditory stimuli, and only occurred at later stages of cognitive processing in response to a visual detection task. Furthermore, integration from early-stage sensory processing was observed by the effect of ipsilateral auditory stimuli, suggesting that the integration of AV information in the human brain might be particularly sensitive to ipsilaterally presented AV stimuli.

  4. Ageing affects event-related potentials and brain oscillations: a behavioral and electrophysiological study using a haptic recognition memory task.

    PubMed

    Sebastián, Manuel; Reales, José M; Ballesteros, Soledad

    2011-12-01

    In this electrophysiological study, we investigated the effects of ageing on recognition memory for three-dimensional (3D) familiar objects presented to touch in a continuous paradigm. To examine changes in event-related potentials (ERPs) and brain oscillations, we recorded the EEGs of healthy groups of young (n=14; mean age=32.3 years) and older adults (n=14; mean age=65.1). Both age groups exhibited similar accuracy and exploration times when making old-new judgments. Young and older participants showed a marginally significant ERP old/new effect widely distributed over the scalp between 550-750 ms. In addition, the elders showed lower amplitude than younger participants within 1200-1500 ms. There were age-related differences in brain oscillations as measured by event-related spectral perturbation (ERSP). Older adults showed greater alpha and beta power reductions than young participants, suggesting the recruitment of additional neural resources. In contrast, the two age groups showed a reliable old/new effect in the theta band that temporarily overlapped the ERP old/new effect. The present results suggest that despite similar behavioral performance, the young and older adults recruited different neural resources to perform a haptic recognition task. PMID:22027172

  5. Differentiating Event-Related Potential Components Sensitive to Emotion in Middle Childhood: Evidence from Temporal-Spatial PCA

    PubMed Central

    Kujawa, Autumn; Weinberg, Anna; Hajcak, Greg; Klein, Daniel N.

    2012-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) may be particularly useful for examining emotional processing across development. Though a number of ERP components are sensitive to emotional content in adults, previous studies have yet to systematically examine the components sensitive to emotion in children. The current study used temporal-spatial principal components analysis (PCA) to identify ERP components in response to complex emotional images in nine-year-old children. Three components were modulated by emotional content and were similar to those previously observed in adults, including: the early posterior negativity, the P300, and a sustained relative positivity similar to the late positive potential (LPP). Compared to those previously observed in adults, the components sensitive to emotion in children were maximal over more occipital regions and the LPP component appeared to be less protracted in time, perhaps indicative of less elaborative processing of emotional stimuli. PMID:22692816

  6. Seriality of semantic and phonological processes during overt speech in Mandarin as revealed by event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuebing; Damian, Markus F; Zhang, Qingfang

    2015-05-01

    How is information transmitted across semantic and phonological levels in spoken word production? Recent evidence from speakers of Western languages such as English and Dutch suggests non-discrete transmission, but it is not clear whether this view can be generalized to other languages such as Mandarin, given potential differences in phonological encoding across languages. The present study used Mandarin speakers and combined a behavioral picture-word interference task with event-related potentials. The design factorially crossed semantic and phonological relatedness. Results showed semantic and phonological effects both in behavioral and electrophysiological measurements, with statistical additivity in latencies, and discrete time signatures (250-450 ms and 450-600 ms after picture onset for the semantic and phonological condition, respectively). Overall, results suggest that in Mandarin spoken production, information is transmitted from semantic to phonological levels in a sequential fashion. Hence, temporal signatures associated with spoken word production might differ depending on target language. PMID:25880902

  7. Temporal dynamics of the face familiarity effect: bootstrap analysis of single-subject event-related potential data.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Prieto, Esther; Pancaroglu, Raika; Dalrymple, Kirsten A; Handy, Todd; Barton, Jason J S; Oruc, Ipek

    2015-01-01

    Prior event-related potential studies using group statistics within a priori selected time windows have yielded conflicting results about familiarity effects in face processing. Our goal was to evaluate the temporal dynamics of the familiarity effect at all time points at the single-subject level. Ten subjects were shown faces of anonymous people or celebrities. Individual results were analysed using a point-by-point bootstrap analysis. While familiarity effects were less consistent at later epochs, all subjects showed them between 130 and 195 ms in occipitotemporal electrodes. However, the relation between the time course of familiarity effects and the peak latency of the N170 was variable. We concluded that familiarity effects between 130 and 195 ms are robust and can be shown in single subjects. The variability of their relation to the timing of the N170 potential may lead to underestimation of familiarity effects in studies that use group-based statistics.

  8. Neurophysiological correlates of response inhibition predict relapse in detoxified alcoholic patients: some preliminary evidence from event-related potentials

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Géraldine; Cimochowska, Agnieszka; Kornreich, Charles; Hanak, Catherine; Verbanck, Paul; Campanella, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol dependence is a chronic relapsing disease. The impairment of response inhibition and alcohol-cue reactivity are the main cognitive mechanisms that trigger relapse. Despite the interaction suggested between the two processes, they have long been investigated as two different lines of research. The present study aimed to investigate the interaction between response inhibition and alcohol-cue reactivity and their potential link with relapse. Materials and methods Event-related potentials were recorded during a variant of a “go/no-go” task. Frequent and rare stimuli (to be inhibited) were superimposed on neutral, nonalcohol-related, and alcohol-related contexts. The task was administered following a 3-week detoxification course. Relapse outcome was measured after 3 months, using self-reported abstinence. There were 27 controls (seven females) and 27 patients (seven females), among whom 13 relapsed during the 3-month follow-up period. The no-go N2, no-go P3, and the “difference” wave (P3d) were examined with the aim of linking neural correlates of response inhibition on alcohol-related contexts to the observed relapse rate. Results Results showed that 1) at the behavioral level, alcohol-dependent patients made significantly more commission errors than controls (P<0.001), independently of context; 2) through the subtraction no-go P3 minus go P3, this inhibition deficit was neurophysiologically indexed in patients with greater P3d amplitudes (P=0.034); and 3) within the patient group, increased P3d amplitude enabled us to differentiate between future relapsers and nonrelapsers (P=0.026). Conclusion Our findings suggest that recently detoxified alcoholics are characterized by poorer response-inhibition skills that demand greater neural resources. We propose that event-related potentials can be used in conjunction with behavioral data to predict relapse; this would identify patients that need a higher level of neural resources when suppressing a

  9. Can monitoring in language comprehension in Autism Spectrum Disorder be modulated? Evidence from event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Koolen, Sophieke; Vissers, Constance Th W M; Egger, Jos I M; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2013-10-01

    The present study examined language comprehension in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in light of monitoring. It was studied whether individuals with ASD monitor their language perception, and whether monitoring during language perception could be modulated with instructions. We presented higher-level (semantic) linguistic violations and lower-level (orthographic) linguistic violations in a free reading condition and in an instructed condition, recording event-related potentials. For control participants, a monitoring response as tapped by the P600 effect was found to semantically and orthographically incorrect input in both conditions. For participants with ASD, however, a monitoring response to semantically implausible input, tapped by the P600, was found only in the instructed condition. For orthographic errors monitoring was observed both in the free reading and in the instructed condition. This suggests that people with ASD are less inclined than typical individuals to monitor their perception of higher-level linguistic input, but that this can be enhanced with instructions.

  10. Early detection of cognitive impairment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Wang, Yuping; Li, Shunwei; Huang, Xizhen; Cui, Lili

    2002-06-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded to visual stimuli in a task that required matching the shape and serial position of the probes against previously memorized items. The effects of hypoxia on ERP were investigated in 24 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and a matched control group. N2b-late positive-going (LPC) components were elicited by probes that identically matched the memorized items (no-conflict condition). In contrast, N270-LPC and N270-N430-LPC components were elicited by probes having low-conflict and high-conflict with the memory set. Conflict ERP effect decreased in mild, while both no-conflict and conflict ERP effects decreased in amplitude in severe OSAS patients. Conflict ERPs associated with processing of conflicting information are more vulnerable than no-conflict ERPs to hypoxic cerebral damage.

  11. Does silent reading speed in normal adult readers depend on early visual processes? evidence from event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Korinth, Sebastian Peter; Sommer, Werner; Breznitz, Zvia

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship of reading speed and early visual processes in normal readers. Here we examined the association of the early P1, N170 and late N1 component in visual event-related potentials (ERPs) with silent reading speed and a number of additional cognitive skills in a sample of 52 adult German readers utilizing a Lexical Decision Task (LDT) and a Face Decision Task (FDT). Amplitudes of the N170 component in the LDT but, interestingly, also in the FDT correlated with behavioral tests measuring silent reading speed. We suggest that reading speed performance can be at least partially accounted for by the extraction of essential structural information from visual stimuli, consisting of a domain-general and a domain-specific expertise-based portion.

  12. Using Event-Related Brain Potentials to Assess Perceptibility: The Case of French Speakers and English [h

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Jennifer; Goad, Heather; Steinhauer, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    French speaking learners of English encounter persistent difficulty acquiring English [h], thus confusing words like eat and heat in both production and perception. We assess the hypothesis that the acoustic properties of [h] may render detection of this segment in the speech stream insufficiently reliable for second language acquisition. We use the mismatch negativity (MMN) in event-related potentials to investigate [h] perception in French speaking learners of English and native English controls, comparing both linguistic and non-linguistic conditions in an unattended oddball paradigm. Unlike native speakers, French learners of English elicit an MMN response only in the non-linguistic condition. Our results provide neurobiological evidence against the hypothesis that French speakers’ difficulties with [h] are acoustically based. They instead suggest that the problem is in constructing an appropriate phonological representation for [h] in the interlanguage grammar. PMID:27757086

  13. Interplay of emotional valence and concreteness in word processing: an event-related potential study with verbs.

    PubMed

    Palazova, Marina; Sommer, Werner; Schacht, Annekathrin

    2013-06-01

    The functional locus of emotional valence in word processing remains an open question. In event-related potentials, emotion has been found to elicit an early posterior negativity (EPN), which is assumed to reflect attention catching by the words' meaning. Previously, the EPN was modulated by word category with verbs exhibiting longer EPN latencies compared with other word categories. Here we examined whether concreteness, a semantic variable, influences emotion processing. Within a lexical decision task for verbs, emotional valence (positive, negative, and neutral) was orthogonally combined with concreteness (concrete and abstract). EPN onset was found already at 250 ms post-stimulus for concrete verbs, whereas it started 50 ms later for abstract verbs. Concreteness effects occurred after the start of main effects of emotion. Thus, the elicitation of the EPN seems to be based on semantic processes, with emotional valence being accessed before other semantic aspects such as concreteness of verbs.

  14. Covert effects of "one drink" of alcohol on brain processes related to car driving: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Ebe, Kazutoshi; Itoh, Kosuke; Kwee, Ingrid L; Nakada, Tsutomu

    2015-04-23

    The effects of a low dose of alcohol on car driving remain controversial. To address this issue, event-related potentials were recorded while subjects performed a simple car-following task in a driving simulator before and after consuming either "one drink" of beer (representing one standard alcoholic beverage containing 14 g of alcohol) or mineral water (control condition). Subjects who had consumed the determined amount of alcohol demonstrated no detectable outward behavioral signs of intoxication while performing the driving task, an observation in agreement with previous findings. However, the parietal P3 elicited by the brake lights of the preceding car was significantly reduced in amplitude, approximately 50% that observed under the control condition, likely indicating alteration of the neural processing of visual information critical for safe driving. The finding suggests that alcohol begins to affect neural processes for driving even at quantities too low to modify behavior.

  15. Derived stimulus relations, semantic priming, and event-related potentials: testing a behavioral theory of semantic networks.

    PubMed

    Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Staunton, Carmel; Whelan, Robert; Barnes-Holmes, Yvonne; Commins, Sean; Walsh, Derek; Stewart, Ian; Smeets, Paul M; Dymond, Simon

    2005-11-01

    Derived equivalence relations, it has been argued, provide a behavioral model of semantic or symbolic meaning in natural language, and thus equivalence relations should possess properties that are typically associated with semantic relations. The present study sought to test this basic postulate using semantic priming. Across three experiments, participants were trained and tested in two 4-member equivalence relations using word-like nonsense words. Participants also were exposed to a single- or two-word lexical decision task, and both direct (Experiment 1) and mediated (Experiments 2 and 3) priming effects for reaction times and event-related potentials were observed within but not across equivalence relations. The findings support the argument that derived equivalence relations provides a useful preliminary model of semantic relations.

  16. Alterations in neural processing of emotional faces in adolescent anorexia nervosa patients - an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Sfärlea, Anca; Greimel, Ellen; Platt, Belinda; Bartling, Jürgen; Schulte-Körne, Gerd; Dieler, Alica C

    2016-09-01

    The present study explored the neurophysiological correlates of perception and recognition of emotional facial expressions in adolescent anorexia nervosa (AN) patients using event-related potentials (ERPs). We included 20 adolescent girls with AN and 24 healthy girls and recorded ERPs during a passive viewing task and three active tasks requiring processing of emotional faces in varying processing depths; one of the tasks also assessed emotion recognition abilities behaviourally. Despite the absence of behavioural differences, we found that across all tasks AN patients exhibited a less pronounced early posterior negativity (EPN) in response to all facial expressions compared to controls. The EPN is an ERP component reflecting an automatic, perceptual processing stage which is modulated by the intrinsic salience of a stimulus. Hence, the less pronounced EPN in anorexic girls suggests that they might perceive other people's faces as less intrinsically relevant, i.e. as less "important" than do healthy girls. PMID:27345597

  17. A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood: An Event-Related Potential Study of Lexical Relationships and Prediction in Context

    PubMed Central

    Laszlo, Sarah; Federmeier, Kara D.

    2009-01-01

    Two related questions critical to understanding the predictive processes that come online during sentence comprehension are 1) what information is included in the representation created through prediction and 2) at what functional stage does top-down, predicted information begin to affect bottom-up word processing? We investigated these questions by recording event-related potentials (ERPs) as participants read sentences that ended with expected words or with unexpected items (words, pseudowords, or illegal strings) that were either orthographically unrelated to the expected word or were one of its orthographic neighbors. The data show that, regardless of lexical status, attempts at semantic access (N400) for orthographic neighbors of expected words is facilitated relative to the processing of orthographically unrelated items. Our findings support a view of sentence processing wherein orthographically organized information is brought online by prediction and interacts with input prior to any filter on lexical status. PMID:20161064

  18. Inhibition in adults with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: event-related potentials in the stop task.

    PubMed

    MacLaren, Vance V; Taukulis, Harald K; Best, Lisa A

    2007-12-01

    The core deficit in Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) may be a deficiency in executive functions, particularly the processes that are associated with the inhibition of predominant responses. To test this notion in the adult population, healthy undergraduate volunteers and students with ADHD symptoms performed a visual Stop Signal Task (Logan et al. J Exp Psychol: Hum Percept Perform 10:276-291, 1984) while Event-Related brain Potentials were recorded. The two groups did not differ on behavioral measures of performance, but there was a significant difference in the N2-P3 component. These results underline the robustness of an N2-P3 difference between healthy adults and people with ADHD symptoms that have persisted into young adulthood. PMID:17922184

  19. Cognitive Event-Related Potentials: Biomarkers of Synaptic Dysfunction Across the Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Olichney, John M.; Yang, Jin-Chen; Taylor, Jason; Kutas, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive event-related brain potential (ERP) studies of decision-making and attention, language, and memory impairments in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are reviewed. Circumscribed lesions of the medial temporal lobe (MTL), as may be the case in individuals with amnestic MCI, generally produce altered plasticity of the late positive P600 component, with relative sparing of earlier sensory ERP components. However, as the neuropathology of AD extends to neocortical association areas, abnormalities of the P300 and N400 (and perhaps even P50) become more common. Critically, ERP studies of individuals at risk for AD may reveal neurophysiological changes prior to clinical deficits, which could advance the early detection and diagnosis of “presymptomatic AD”. PMID:21971462

  20. How experience shapes memory for faces: an event-related potential study on the own-age bias.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Holger; Wolff, Nicole; Steffens, Melanie C; Schweinberger, Stefan R

    2013-10-01

    Young adults more accurately remember own-age than older faces. We tested whether this own-age bias (OAB) is reduced by increased experience. Young experts (geriatric nurses) and controls performed a recognition experiment with young and old faces. Critically, while control participants demonstrated better memory for young faces, no OAB was observed in the experts. Event-related potentials revealed larger N170 and P2 amplitudes for young than old faces in both groups, suggesting no group differences during early perceptual processing. At test, N250 repetition effects were more anteriorily distributed for own- than other-age faces in control participants, whereas experts showed no corresponding effects. A larger late positive component (LPC) for old than young faces was observed in controls, but not in experts. Larger LPCs may reflect prolonged stimulus processing compromising memory retrieval. In sum, experience with other-age faces does not affect early perceptual processing, but modulates later stages related to memory retrieval.

  1. Bayesian Modeling of the Dynamics of Phase Modulations and their Application to Auditory Event Related Potentials at Different Loudness Scales

    PubMed Central

    Mortezapouraghdam, Zeinab; Wilson, Robert C.; Schwabe, Lars; Strauss, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    We study the effect of long-term habituation signatures of auditory selective attention reflected in the instantaneous phase information of the auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) at four distinct stimuli levels of 60, 70, 80, and 90 dB SPL. The analysis is based on the single-trial level. The effect of habituation can be observed in terms of the changes (jitter) in the instantaneous phase information of ERPs. In particular, the absence of habituation is correlated with a consistently high phase synchronization over ERP trials. We estimate the changes in phase concentration over trials using a Bayesian approach, in which the phase is modeled as being drawn from a von Mises distribution with a concentration parameter which varies smoothly over trials. The smoothness assumption reflects the fact that habituation is a gradual process. We differentiate between different stimuli based on the relative changes and absolute values of the estimated concentration parameter using the proposed Bayesian model. PMID:26858631

  2. Alterations in neural processing of emotional faces in adolescent anorexia nervosa patients - an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Sfärlea, Anca; Greimel, Ellen; Platt, Belinda; Bartling, Jürgen; Schulte-Körne, Gerd; Dieler, Alica C

    2016-09-01

    The present study explored the neurophysiological correlates of perception and recognition of emotional facial expressions in adolescent anorexia nervosa (AN) patients using event-related potentials (ERPs). We included 20 adolescent girls with AN and 24 healthy girls and recorded ERPs during a passive viewing task and three active tasks requiring processing of emotional faces in varying processing depths; one of the tasks also assessed emotion recognition abilities behaviourally. Despite the absence of behavioural differences, we found that across all tasks AN patients exhibited a less pronounced early posterior negativity (EPN) in response to all facial expressions compared to controls. The EPN is an ERP component reflecting an automatic, perceptual processing stage which is modulated by the intrinsic salience of a stimulus. Hence, the less pronounced EPN in anorexic girls suggests that they might perceive other people's faces as less intrinsically relevant, i.e. as less "important" than do healthy girls.

  3. Establishing a time-line of word recognition: evidence from eye movements and event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Sereno, S C; Rayner, K; Posner, M I

    1998-07-13

    The average duration of eye fixations in reading places constraints on the time for lexical processing. Data from event related potential (ERP) studies of word recognition can illuminate stages of processing within a single fixation on a word. In the present study, high and low frequency regular and exception words were used as targets in an eye movement reading experiment and a high-density electrode ERP lexical decision experiment. Effects of lexicality (words vs pseudowords vs consonant strings), word frequency (high vs low frequency) and word regularity (regular vs exception spelling-sound correspondence) were examined. Results suggest a very early time-course for these aspects of lexical processing within the context of a single eye fixation. PMID:9694199

  4. Conflict monitoring and stimulus categorization processes involved in the prosocial attitude implicit association test: Evidence from event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fengqiu; Zheng, Zhiwei; Wang, Ya; Cui, Jifang; Chen, Yinghe

    2015-08-01

    The implicit association test (IAT) is a promising method used to assess individual implicit attitudes by indirectly measuring the strengths of associations between target and attribute categories. To date, the cognitive processes involved in the prosocial attitude IAT task have received little attention. The present study examined the temporal dynamics of the IAT that measures prosocial attitude using event-related potentials (ERPs). ERP results revealed enhanced N2 amplitudes for incongruent trials when compared with congruent trials and enhanced P300 amplitudes for congruent trials when compared with incongruent trials. In addition, the N2 amplitude differences were significantly correlated with individual prosocial behavior (the amount of donation). Our findings suggest that conflict monitoring and stimulus categorization processes are involved in the prosocial attitude IAT task and that the ERP indices of IATs that measure prosocial attitude may predict individual prosocial behavior.

  5. Conflict monitoring and resolution: are two languages better than one? Evidence from reaction time and event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Kousaie, Shanna; Phillips, Natalie A

    2012-03-29

    An advantage for bilingual relative to monolingual young adults has been found for cognitive control tasks, although this finding is not consistent in the literature. The present investigation further examined this advantage using three tasks previously found to be sensitive to the effect. Furthermore, both behavioral and event-related brain potential (ERP) measures were included. Monolingual (n=25) and highly proficient bilingual (n=26) young adults completed a Stroop, Simon, and Eriksen flanker task while electrophysiological recording took place. Behaviorally there were no language group differences on any of the tasks. The ERP measures demonstrated differences between monolinguals and bilinguals with respect to conflict monitoring, resource allocation, stimulus categorization, and error-processing; however, these differences were not consistent across tasks. Given the similar behavioral performance across the groups the observed differences in brain responses may not represent an advantage for bilinguals. The results are discussed with respect to previous findings.

  6. Non-target language processing in Chinese-English bilinguals: a study of event-related potential.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Fan, Meng; Sun, Bing; Wang, Ruiming; Mo, Lei; Zhang, John Xuexin

    2012-06-01

    The event-related brain potential (ERP) technique was used to investigate the neural mechanism of non-target language processing in Chinese-English bilinguals. Participants were presented with a mixed list of Chinese and English words and required to make conceptual decisions for words in one language and ignore words in the other non-target language. Regardless of whether the nontarget word was in Chinese or English, the ERPs they elicited were modulated by word frequency, suggesting that their meaning had been accessed. The N400 peak was delayed in the English as the non-target language condition, probably because participants were less proficient in English. The results suggest that the non-target language can be processed during conceptual tasks with participants' proficiency in this language being a critical factor.

  7. Separating acoustic deviance from novelty during the first year of life: a review of event-related potential evidence

    PubMed Central

    Kushnerenko, Elena V.; Van den Bergh, Bea R. H.; Winkler, István

    2013-01-01

    Orienting to salient events in the environment is a first step in the development of attention in young infants. Electrophysiological studies have indicated that in newborns and young infants, sounds with widely distributed spectral energy, such as noise and various environmental sounds, as well as sounds widely deviating from their context elicit an event-related potential (ERP) similar to the adult P3a response. We discuss how the maturation of event-related potentials parallels the process of the development of passive auditory attention during the first year of life. Behavioral studies have indicated that the neonatal orientation to high-energy stimuli gradually changes to attending to genuine novelty and other significant events by approximately 9 months of age. In accordance with these changes, in newborns, the ERP response to large acoustic deviance is dramatically larger than that to small and moderate deviations. This ERP difference, however, rapidly decreases within first months of life and the differentiation of the ERP response to genuine novelty from that to spectrally rich but repeatedly presented sounds commences during the same period. The relative decrease of the response amplitudes elicited by high-energy stimuli may reflect development of an inhibitory brain network suppressing the processing of uninformative stimuli. Based on data obtained from healthy full-term and pre-term infants as well as from infants at risk for various developmental problems, we suggest that the electrophysiological indices of the processing of acoustic and contextual deviance may be indicative of the functioning of auditory attention, a crucial prerequisite of learning and language development. PMID:24046757

  8. Neuroimaging measures of error-processing: Extracting reliable signals from event-related potentials and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Steele, Vaughn R; Anderson, Nathaniel E; Claus, Eric D; Bernat, Edward M; Rao, Vikram; Assaf, Michal; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Calhoun, Vince D; Kiehl, Kent A

    2016-05-15

    Error-related brain activity has become an increasingly important focus of cognitive neuroscience research utilizing both event-related potentials (ERPs) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Given the significant time and resources required to collect these data, it is important for researchers to plan their experiments such that stable estimates of error-related processes can be achieved efficiently. Reliability of error-related brain measures will vary as a function of the number of error trials and the number of participants included in the averages. Unfortunately, systematic investigations of the number of events and participants required to achieve stability in error-related processing are sparse, and none have addressed variability in sample size. Our goal here is to provide data compiled from a large sample of healthy participants (n=180) performing a Go/NoGo task, resampled iteratively to demonstrate the relative stability of measures of error-related brain activity given a range of sample sizes and event numbers included in the averages. We examine ERP measures of error-related negativity (ERN/Ne) and error positivity (Pe), as well as event-related fMRI measures locked to False Alarms. We find that achieving stable estimates of ERP measures required four to six error trials and approximately 30 participants; fMRI measures required six to eight trials and approximately 40 participants. Fewer trials and participants were required for measures where additional data reduction techniques (i.e., principal component analysis and independent component analysis) were implemented. Ranges of reliability statistics for various sample sizes and numbers of trials are provided. We intend this to be a useful resource for those planning or evaluating ERP or fMRI investigations with tasks designed to measure error-processing.

  9. Disentangling neural processing of masked and masking stimulus by means of event-related contralateral - ipsilateral differences of EEG potentials.

    PubMed

    Verleger, Rolf; Jaśkowski, Piotr

    2007-01-01

    In spite of the excellent temporal resolution of event-related EEG potentials (ERPs), the overlapping potentials evoked by masked and masking stimuli are hard to disentangle. However, when both masked and masking stimuli consist of pairs of relevant and irrelevant stimuli, one left and one right from fixation, with the side of the relevant element varying between pairs, effects of masked and masking stimuli can be distinguished by means of the contralateral preponderance of the potentials evoked by the relevant elements, because the relevant elements may independently change sides in masked and masking stimuli. Based on a reanalysis of data from which only selected contralateral-ipsilateral effects had been previously published, the present contribution will provide a more complete picture of the ERP effects in a masked-priming task. Indeed, effects evoked by masked primes and masking targets heavily overlapped in conventional ERPs and could be disentangled to a certain degree by contralateral-ipsilateral differences. Their major component, the N2pc, is interpreted as indicating preferential processing of stimuli matching the target template, which process can neither be identified with conscious perception nor with shifts of spatial attention. The measurements showed that the triggering of response preparation by the masked stimuli did not depend on their discriminability, and their priming effects on the processing of the following target stimuli were qualitatively different for stimulus identification and for response preparation. These results provide another piece of evidence for the independence of motor-related and perception-related effects of masked stimuli.

  10. Solution of Poisson's equation in a volume conductor using resistor mesh models: Application to event related potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceries, X.; Doyon, B.; Chauveau, N.; Rigaud, B.; Celsis, P.; Morucci, J.-P.

    2003-03-01

    In electroencephalography (EEG) and event related potentials (ERP), localizing the electrical sources at the origin of scalp potentials (inverse problem) imposes, in a first step, the computation of scalp potential distribution from the simulation of sources (forward problem). This article proposes an alternative method for mimicing both the electrical and geometrical properties of the head, including brain, skull, and scalp tissue with resistors. Two resistor mesh models have been designed to reproduce the three-sphere reference model (analytical model). The first one (spherical resistor mesh) closely mimics the geometrical and electrical properties of the analytical model. The second one (cubic resistor mesh) is designed to conveniently handle anatomical data from magnetic resonance imaging. Both models have been validated, in reference to the analytical solution calculated on the three-sphere model, by computing the magnification factor and the relative difference measure. Results suggest that the mesh models can be used as robust and user-friendly simulation or exploration tools in EEG/ERP.

  11. The effects of reward magnitude on reward processing: An averaged and single trial event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Caroline C; Gable, Philip A; Lohse, Keith R; Miller, Matthew W

    2016-07-01

    From a neurobiological and motivational perspective, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and reward positivity (RewP) event-related potential (ERP) components should increase with reward magnitude (reward associated with valence (success/failure) feedback). To test this hypothesis, we recorded participants' electroencephalograms while presenting them with potential monetary rewards ($0.00-$4.96) pre-trial for each trial of a reaction time task and presenting them with valence feedback post-trial. Averaged ERPs time-locked to valence feedback were extracted, and results revealed a valence by magnitude interaction for neural activity in the FRN/RewP time window. This interaction was driven by magnitude affecting RewP, but not FRN, amplitude. Moreover, single trial ERP analyses revealed a reliable correlation between magnitude and RewP, but not FRN, amplitude. Finally, P3b and late positive potential (LPP) amplitudes were affected by magnitude. Results partly support the neurobiological (dopamine) account of the FRN/RewP and suggest motivation affects feedback processing, as indicated by multiple ERP components. PMID:27288743

  12. Brain and personality bases of insensitivity to infant cues in neglectful mothers: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, María José; León, Inmaculada; Quiñones, Ileana; Lage, Agustín; Byrne, Sonia; Bobes, María Antonieta

    2011-02-01

    This investigation examined the neural and personality correlates of processing infant facial expressions in mothers with substantiated neglect of a child under 5 years old. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from 14 neglectful and 14 control mothers as they viewed and categorized pictures of infant cries, laughs, and neutral faces. Maternal self-reports of anhedonia and empathy were also completed. Early (negative occipitotemporal component peaking at around 170 ms on the scalp [N170] and positive electrical potential peaking at about 200 ms [P200]) and late positive potential (LPP) components were selected. Both groups of mothers showed behavioral discrimination between the different facial expressions via reaction time and accuracy measures. Neglectful mothers did not exhibit increased N170 amplitude at temporal leads in response to viewing crying versus laughing and neutral expressions compared to control mothers. Both groups had greater P200 and LPP amplitudes at centroparietal leads in response to viewing crying versus neutral facial expressions. However, neglectful mothers displayed an overall attenuated brain response in LPP that was related to their higher scores in social anhedonia but not to their empathy scores. The ERP data suggest that the brain's failures in the early differentiation of cry stimuli and in the sustained processing of infant expressions related to social anhedonia may underlie the insensitive responding in neglectful mothers. The implications of these results for the design and evaluation of preventive interventions are discussed.

  13. The effects of reward magnitude on reward processing: An averaged and single trial event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Caroline C; Gable, Philip A; Lohse, Keith R; Miller, Matthew W

    2016-07-01

    From a neurobiological and motivational perspective, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and reward positivity (RewP) event-related potential (ERP) components should increase with reward magnitude (reward associated with valence (success/failure) feedback). To test this hypothesis, we recorded participants' electroencephalograms while presenting them with potential monetary rewards ($0.00-$4.96) pre-trial for each trial of a reaction time task and presenting them with valence feedback post-trial. Averaged ERPs time-locked to valence feedback were extracted, and results revealed a valence by magnitude interaction for neural activity in the FRN/RewP time window. This interaction was driven by magnitude affecting RewP, but not FRN, amplitude. Moreover, single trial ERP analyses revealed a reliable correlation between magnitude and RewP, but not FRN, amplitude. Finally, P3b and late positive potential (LPP) amplitudes were affected by magnitude. Results partly support the neurobiological (dopamine) account of the FRN/RewP and suggest motivation affects feedback processing, as indicated by multiple ERP components.

  14. The separate and combined effects of monoamine oxidase A inhibition and nicotine on the mismatch negativity event related potential.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dylan M; Fisher, Derek; Blier, Pierre; Ilivitsky, Vadim; Knott, Verner

    2015-10-01

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) auditory event-related potential (ERP) has been extensively studied as a potential biomarker for abnormal auditory processing in schizophrenia (SZ), a population which exhibits abnormally high smoking rates. The relationship between nicotinic activation and cognition in SZ may be related to underlying nicotinic and NMDA receptor dysfunction within the disease. However, transient cognitive improvements via smoking in patients may also result from monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition, achieved through tobacco smoke. In 24 healthy non-smoking males, we investigated the separate and combined effects of nicotine and MAO-A inhibition via moclobemide (75mg) on the optimal-5 variation of the MMN paradigm. No significant drug effects were observed in our total sample, however, stratification of individuals into low (N=12) and high (N=12) baseline MMN amplitude groups revealed increases in duration MMN amplitude relative to placebo by nicotine, as well as moclobemide, but not after the combination of the two. Because previous research has shown there was no effect of monoamine modulation on MMN, this study shows an unexpected effect of moclobemide on duration MMN. PMID:26226350

  15. Emotional Processing and Attention Control Impairments in Children with Anxiety: An Integrative Review of Event-Related Potentials Findings.

    PubMed

    Wauthia, Erika; Rossignol, Mandy

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders in adults have been associated with biased processing of emotional information which may be due to a deficit in attentional control. This deficit leads to an hypervigilance and a selective attention toward threatening information. Event-related potentials (ERPs) have been used to study this topic in anxious adults. Similar biases have been reported in children with anxiety but researches investigating the ERPs components underpinning these biases are more scarce. However, the understanding of the neural correlates of attentional biases in anxious children seem quite important since they could play a role in the etiology and the maintenance of this disorder. This review summarizes the results of researches having used ERPs to index emotional processing and attention control in children suffering from anxiety. We will focus on the P1, indexing basic visual perceptual processing, the N2, thought to reflect cognitive control process, the P3 typically associated with response inhibition, and the late positive potential (LPP) that indicates sustained attention toward motivationally salient stimuli. We will also examine the error-related negativity (ERN) that indexes monitoring system for detecting errors. Electro-physiological studies generally reported increased amplitudes of these components in anxious children, even when they did not differ from typically developing children at a behavioral level. These results suggest diminished cognitive control that influences children's selective attention mechanisms toward threatening information. Theoretical perspectives and implications for future researches will be discussed in the framework of current models of childhood anxiety. PMID:27199802

  16. Different timing features in brain processing of core and moral disgust pictures: an event-related potentials study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangyi; Guo, Qi; Zhang, Youxue; Lou, Liandi; Ding, Daoqun

    2015-01-01

    Disgust, an emotion motivating withdrawal from offensive stimuli, protects us from the risk of biological pathogens and sociomoral violations. Homogeneity of its two types, namely, core and moral disgust has been under intensive debate. To examine the dynamic relationship between them, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) for core disgust, moral disgust and neutral pictures while participants performed a modified oddball task. ERP analysis revealed that N1 and P2 amplitudes were largest for the core disgust pictures, indicating automatic processing of the core disgust-evoking pictures. N2 amplitudes were higher for pictures evoking moral disgust relative to core disgust and neutral pictures, reflecting a violation of social norms. The core disgust pictures elicited larger P3 and late positive potential (LPP) amplitudes in comparison with the moral disgust pictures which, in turn, elicited larger P3 and LPP amplitudes when compared to the neutral pictures. Taken together, these findings indicated that core and moral disgust pictures elicited different neural activities at various stages of information processing, which provided supporting evidence for the heterogeneity of disgust.

  17. Event-related potentials in drug-naïve pediatric patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Ota, Toyosaku; Nakanishi, Yoko; Matsuura, Hiroki; Okazaki, Kosuke; Kishimoto, Naoko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Iwasaka, Hidemi; Iida, Junzo; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2015-12-15

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is one of the most common mental health disorders, characterized by obsessive thoughts and/or compulsive behaviors, which may involve specific disorders in cognition and/or information processing. Event-related potentials (ERPs) are commonly used as physiological measures of cognitive function as they are easily measured and noninvasive. In the present study, 20 drug-naïve pediatric patients with OCD were compared with 20 healthy control participants who were age- and sex-matched to perform the ERP. Based on the guidelines for evoked potential measurement, the P300 and mismatch negativity (MMN) were obtained by auditory odd-ball tasks. We found that the amplitudes of the P300 components in the Fz, Cz, Pz, C3, and C4 regions were significantly smaller in the OCD group compared with the control group. There were no between-group differences in P300 latency, MMN amplitude, or MMN latency. Moreover, we found significant correlations between scores on the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) and P300 amplitudes at Cz, Pz, and C3. The present study is the first to report smaller P300s and the associations between P300 abnormalities and CY-BOCS scores.

  18. Event-related potentials. Do they reflect central serotonergic neurotransmission and do they predict clinical response to serotonin agonists?

    PubMed

    Hegerl, U; Gallinat, J; Juckel, G

    2001-01-01

    The increasing knowledge concerning anatomical structures and cellular processes underlying event-related potentials (ERP) as well as methodological advances in ERP data analysis (e.g. dipole source analysis) begin to bridge the gap between ERP and neurochemical aspects. Reliable indicators of the serotonin system are urgently needed because of its role in pathophysiology and as target of pharmacotherapeutic interventions in psychiatric disorders. Converging arguments from preclinical and clinical studies support the hypothesis that the loudness dependence of the auditory evoked N1/P2-response (LDAEP) is regulated by the level of central serotonergic neurotransmission. Dipole source analysis represents an important methodological advance in this context, because the two N1/P2-subcomponents, generated by the primary and secondary auditory cortex known to be differentially innervated by serotonergic fibers, can be separated. A pronounced LDAEP of primary auditory cortices is supposed to reflect low central serotonergic neurotransmission, and vice versa. LDAEP is a parameter with potential clinical value since subgroups of patients with a serotonergic dysfunction can be identified and can be treated more specifically. In depressed patients, a significant relationship between strong LDAEP, indicating low serotonergic function, and a favorable response to SSRI has been found. Additionally, there is evidence from several studies with patients with affective disorders implicating a strong LDAEP as a predictor of favorable response to a preventive lithium treatment. PMID:11172876

  19. Motivation and semantic context affect brain error-monitoring activity: an event-related brain potentials study.

    PubMed

    Ganushchak, Lesya Y; Schiller, Niels O

    2008-01-01

    During speech production, we continuously monitor what we say. In situations in which speech errors potentially have more severe consequences, e.g. during a public presentation, our verbal self-monitoring system may pay special attention to prevent errors than in situations in which speech errors are more acceptable, such as a casual conversation. In an event-related potential study, we investigated whether or not motivation affected participants' performance using a picture naming task in a semantic blocking paradigm. Semantic context of to-be-named pictures was manipulated; blocks were semantically related (e.g., cat, dog, horse, etc.) or semantically unrelated (e.g., cat, table, flute, etc.). Motivation was manipulated independently by monetary reward. The motivation manipulation did not affect error rate during picture naming. However, the high-motivation condition yielded increased amplitude and latency values of the error-related negativity (ERN) compared to the low-motivation condition, presumably indicating higher monitoring activity. Furthermore, participants showed semantic interference effects in reaction times and error rates. The ERN amplitude was also larger during semantically related than unrelated blocks, presumably indicating that semantic relatedness induces more conflict between possible verbal responses. PMID:17920932

  20. The separate and combined effects of monoamine oxidase A inhibition and nicotine on the mismatch negativity event related potential.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dylan M; Fisher, Derek; Blier, Pierre; Ilivitsky, Vadim; Knott, Verner

    2015-10-01

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) auditory event-related potential (ERP) has been extensively studied as a potential biomarker for abnormal auditory processing in schizophrenia (SZ), a population which exhibits abnormally high smoking rates. The relationship between nicotinic activation and cognition in SZ may be related to underlying nicotinic and NMDA receptor dysfunction within the disease. However, transient cognitive improvements via smoking in patients may also result from monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition, achieved through tobacco smoke. In 24 healthy non-smoking males, we investigated the separate and combined effects of nicotine and MAO-A inhibition via moclobemide (75mg) on the optimal-5 variation of the MMN paradigm. No significant drug effects were observed in our total sample, however, stratification of individuals into low (N=12) and high (N=12) baseline MMN amplitude groups revealed increases in duration MMN amplitude relative to placebo by nicotine, as well as moclobemide, but not after the combination of the two. Because previous research has shown there was no effect of monoamine modulation on MMN, this study shows an unexpected effect of moclobemide on duration MMN.

  1. Different Timing Features in Brain Processing of Core and Moral Disgust Pictures: An Event-Related Potentials Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youxue; Lou, Liandi; Ding, Daoqun

    2015-01-01

    Disgust, an emotion motivating withdrawal from offensive stimuli, protects us from the risk of biological pathogens and sociomoral violations. Homogeneity of its two types, namely, core and moral disgust has been under intensive debate. To examine the dynamic relationship between them, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) for core disgust, moral disgust and neutral pictures while participants performed a modified oddball task. ERP analysis revealed that N1 and P2 amplitudes were largest for the core disgust pictures, indicating automatic processing of the core disgust-evoking pictures. N2 amplitudes were higher for pictures evoking moral disgust relative to core disgust and neutral pictures, reflecting a violation of social norms. The core disgust pictures elicited larger P3 and late positive potential (LPP) amplitudes in comparison with the moral disgust pictures which, in turn, elicited larger P3 and LPP amplitudes when compared to the neutral pictures. Taken together, these findings indicated that core and moral disgust pictures elicited different neural activities at various stages of information processing, which provided supporting evidence for the heterogeneity of disgust. PMID:26011635

  2. Prenatal Tobacco Exposure and Response Inhibition in School-Aged Children: An Event-Related Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Olivier; Jacobson, Joseph L.; Burden, Matthew J.; Dewailly, Éric; Jacobson, Sandra W.; Muckle, Gina

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal cigarette smoke exposure (PCSE) has been linked to problems in behavioral inhibition and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children in several epidemiological studies. We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to examine the effects of PCSE on neural correlates of inhibitory control of behavior. In a prospective longitudinal study on child development in the Canadian Arctic, we assessed 186 Inuit children (mean age = 11.3 years) on a visual Go/No-go response inhibition paradigm. PCSE was assessed through maternal recall. Potential confounders were documented from a maternal interview, and exposure to neurotoxic environmental contaminants was assessed from umbilical cord and child blood samples. PCSE was not related to behavioral performance on this simple response inhibition task. Nevertheless, this exposure was associated with smaller amplitudes of the N2 and P3 components elicited by No-go stimuli, suggesting an impairment in the neural processes underlying response inhibition. Amplitude of the No-go P3 component was also inversely associated with behavioral measures of externalizing problems and hyperactivity/impulsivity in the classroom. This study is the first to report neurophysiological evidence of impaired response inhibition in school-aged children exposed to tobacco smoke in utero. Effects were found on ERP components associated with conflict processing and inhibition of a prepotent response, indicating neurophysiological deficits that may play a critical role in the attention and behavior problems observed in children with PCSE. PMID:24946039

  3. Development of a Method to Compensate for Signal Quality Variations in Repeated Auditory Event-Related Potential Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Paukkunen, Antti K. O.; Leminen, Miika M.; Sepponen, Raimo

    2010-01-01

    Reliable measurements are mandatory in clinically relevant auditory event-related potential (AERP)-based tools and applications. The comparability of the results gets worse as a result of variations in the remaining measurement error. A potential method is studied that allows optimization of the length of the recording session according to the concurrent quality of the recorded data. In this way, the sufficiency of the trials can be better guaranteed, which enables control of the remaining measurement error. The suggested method is based on monitoring the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and remaining measurement error which are compared to predefined threshold values. The SNR test is well defined, but the criterion for the measurement error test still requires further empirical testing in practice. According to the results, the reproducibility of average AERPs in repeated experiments is improved in comparison to a case where the number of recorded trials is constant. The test-retest reliability is not significantly changed on average but the between-subject variation in the value is reduced by 33–35%. The optimization of the number of trials also prevents excessive recordings which might be of practical interest especially in the clinical context. The efficiency of the method may be further increased by implementing online tools that improve data consistency. PMID:20407635

  4. Emotional Processing and Attention Control Impairments in Children with Anxiety: An Integrative Review of Event-Related Potentials Findings

    PubMed Central

    Wauthia, Erika; Rossignol, Mandy

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders in adults have been associated with biased processing of emotional information which may be due to a deficit in attentional control. This deficit leads to an hypervigilance and a selective attention toward threatening information. Event-related potentials (ERPs) have been used to study this topic in anxious adults. Similar biases have been reported in children with anxiety but researches investigating the ERPs components underpinning these biases are more scarce. However, the understanding of the neural correlates of attentional biases in anxious children seem quite important since they could play a role in the etiology and the maintenance of this disorder. This review summarizes the results of researches having used ERPs to index emotional processing and attention control in children suffering from anxiety. We will focus on the P1, indexing basic visual perceptual processing, the N2, thought to reflect cognitive control process, the P3 typically associated with response inhibition, and the late positive potential (LPP) that indicates sustained attention toward motivationally salient stimuli. We will also examine the error-related negativity (ERN) that indexes monitoring system for detecting errors. Electro-physiological studies generally reported increased amplitudes of these components in anxious children, even when they did not differ from typically developing children at a behavioral level. These results suggest diminished cognitive control that influences children's selective attention mechanisms toward threatening information. Theoretical perspectives and implications for future researches will be discussed in the framework of current models of childhood anxiety. PMID:27199802

  5. Effects of a psychophysiological system for adaptive automation on performance, workload, and the event-related potential P300 component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J 3rd; Freeman, Frederick G.; Scerbo, Mark W.; Mikulka, Peter J.; Pope, Alan T.

    2003-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of an electroencephalographic- (EEG-) based system for adaptive automation on tracking performance and workload. In addition, event-related potentials (ERPs) to a secondary task were derived to determine whether they would provide an additional degree of workload specificity. Participants were run in an adaptive automation condition, in which the system switched between manual and automatic task modes based on the value of each individual's own EEG engagement index; a yoked control condition; or another control group, in which task mode switches followed a random pattern. Adaptive automation improved performance and resulted in lower levels of workload. Further, the P300 component of the ERP paralleled the sensitivity to task demands of the performance and subjective measures across conditions. These results indicate that it is possible to improve performance with a psychophysiological adaptive automation system and that ERPs may provide an alternative means for distinguishing among levels of cognitive task demand in such systems. Actual or potential applications of this research include improved methods for assessing operator workload and performance.

  6. Auditory brain response modified by temporal deviation of language rhythm: an auditory event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Jomori, Izumi; Hoshiyama, Minoru

    2009-10-01

    The effects of the temporal disruption of language rhythm in Japanese on auditory evoked potentials were investigated in normal subjects. Auditory event-related evoked potentials (AERP) were recorded following syllables using a natural and deviated language rhythm by inserting various (0-400 ms) silent intervals between syllables. The language speed was changed to assess the effect of a deviant rhythm relative to the language speed on AERP in another experiment. The prolonging of intervals did not affect the N100-P150 components until the inserted interval became 400 ms, while the negative component (early negativity, EN), peaking at 250-300 ms, was enhanced when the interval was 100 ms or more. The N100-P150 components following deviated language rhythms did not change during the fast speed but did in the standard and slow speed. We considered that the N100-P150 components were changed by the mixed effects of adaptation and prediction related to the reading speed, and that EN was evoked by deviated language rhythm in a different way from that caused N100-P150 changes, possibly via mismatch detection process between deviant rhythm and intrinsic rehearsed rhythm.

  7. Morphosyntax can modulate the N400 component: event related potentials to gender-marked post-nominal adjectives.

    PubMed

    Guajardo, Lourdes F; Wicha, Nicole Y Y

    2014-05-01

    Event-related potential studies of grammatical gender agreement often report a left anterior negativity (LAN) when agreement violations occur. Some studies have shown that during sentence comprehension gender violations can also interact with semantic processing to modulate a negativity associated with processing meaning - the N400. Given that the LAN and N400 overlap in time, they are identified by their scalp distributions and purported functional roles. Critically, grammatical gender violations also elicit a right posterior positivity that can overlap temporally and potentially affect the scalp distribution of the LAN/N400. We measured the effect of grammatical gender violations in the LAN/N400 window and late positive component (LPC) during comprehension of Spanish sentences. A post-nominal adjective could either make sense or not, and either agree or disagree in gender with the preceding noun. We observed a negativity to gender agreement violations in the LAN/N400 window (300-500ms post stimulus onset) that was smaller than the semantic-congruity N400, but overlapped with it in time and distribution. The early portion of the LPC to gender violations was modulated by sentence constraint, occurring as early as 450ms in highly constraining sentences. A subadditive interaction occurred at the later portion of the LPC with equivalent effects for single and double violations (gender and semantics), reflecting a general stage of reprocessing. Overall, our data support models of language comprehension whereby both semantic and morphosyntactic information can affect processing at similar time points. PMID:24462934

  8. The role of REM sleep in the processing of emotional memories: evidence from behavior and event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Groch, S; Wilhelm, I; Diekelmann, S; Born, J

    2013-01-01

    Emotional memories are vividly remembered for the long-term. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep has been repeatedly proposed to support the superior retention of emotional memories. However, its exact contribution and, specifically, whether its effect is mainly on the consolidation of the contents or the processing of the affective component of emotional memories is not clear. Here, we investigated the effects of sleep rich in slow wave sleep (SWS) or REM sleep on the consolidation of emotional pictures and the accompanying changes in affective tone, using event-related potentials (ERPs) together with subjective ratings of valence and arousal. Sixteen healthy, young men learned 50 negative and 50 neutral pictures before 3-h retention sleep intervals that were filled with either SWS-rich early or REM sleep-rich late nocturnal sleep. In accordance with our hypothesis, recognition was better for emotional pictures than neutral pictures after REM compared to SWS-rich sleep. This emotional enhancement after REM-rich sleep expressed itself in an increased late positive potential of the ERP over the frontal cortex 300-500 ms after stimulus onset for correctly classified old emotional pictures compared with new emotional and neutral pictures. Valence and arousal ratings of emotional pictures were not differentially affected by REM or SWS-rich sleep after learning. Our results corroborate that REM sleep contributes to the consolidation of emotional contents in memory, but suggest that the affective tone is preserved rather than reduced by the processing of emotional memories during REM sleep.

  9. Event-related potentials during a selective attention task with short interstimulus intervals in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed Central

    Iwanami, A; Isono, H; Okajima, Y; Noda, Y; Kamijima, K

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study selective attention in schizophrenia by examining event-related potentials during a dichotic listening task with short interstimulus intervals (ISIs). DESIGN: Prospective study. PARTICIPANTS: Twelve patients with schizophrenia in remission and 12 age-matched controls with no history of psychiatric or neurological illness. INTERVENTIONS: Participants were asked to push a button in response to target stimuli in either ear. OUTCOME MEASURES: Reaction time, correct response rate and results of electroencephalography recorded at 3 regions: mean segmental amplitudes between 0 and 200 ms and between 200 and 400 ms after stimuli and processing negativity (Nd), measured by the negative area during these periods. RESULTS: Distinct slow-positive potentials for unattended stimuli, which were elicited in a task with long ISIs in a previous report, did not emerge in either group in this study. Although the 2 groups did not differ significantly in terms of Nd area, in the controls the mean segmental amplitude for attended standard stimuli was significantly greater than that in the patients with schizophrenia. CONCLUSIONS: Impairment of selective attention in patients with schizophrenia is related to a lack of ability to focus attention on attended task-relevant stimuli during a selective attention task with short ISI. PMID:9505059

  10. What's in a pause: event-related potential analysis of temporal disruptions in written and spoken sentences.

    PubMed

    Besson, M; Faita, F; Czternasty, C; Kutas, M

    1997-06-20

    Two experiments examined the effects of disrupting the temporal patterns that develop during sentence reading and listening. Sentences were presented either visually, one word at a time (Experiment 1) or as natural speech (Experiment 2). Half of the sentences were familiar (proverbs or idioms) while the other half were constructed anew for these experiments. Within half the sentences, there was an unexpected 600-ms delay between the final two words. In both modalities, the amplitude of the N400 component of the event-related brain potential (ERP) to sentence final words was larger for unfamiliar than familiar sentences. The results in the two modalities differed, however, in that a Contingent Negative Variation (CNV) developed during the delay interval in the visual modality, whereas in the auditory modality the delay was marked by an emitted potential. The present results show that temporal patterns are processed differently in natural speech and in reading words presented one at a time in the center of a computer screen.

  11. The time course of emotional picture processing: an event-related potential study using a rapid serial visual presentation paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chuanlin; He, Weiqi; Qi, Zhengyang; Wang, Lili; Song, Dongqing; Zhan, Lei; Yi, Shengnan; Luo, Yuejia; Luo, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    The present study recorded event-related potentials using rapid serial visual presentation paradigm to explore the time course of emotionally charged pictures. Participants completed a dual-target task as quickly and accurately as possible, in which they were asked to judge the gender of the person depicted (task 1) and the valence (positive, neutral, or negative) of the given picture (task 2). The results showed that the amplitudes of the P2 component were larger for emotional pictures than they were for neutral pictures, and this finding represents brain processes that distinguish emotional stimuli from non-emotional stimuli. Furthermore, positive, neutral, and negative pictures elicited late positive potentials with different amplitudes, implying that the differences between emotions are recognized. Additionally, the time course for emotional picture processing was consistent with the latter two stages of a three-stage model derived from studies on emotional facial expression processing and emotional adjective processing. The results of the present study indicate that in the three-stage model of emotion processing, the middle and late stages are more universal and stable, and thus occur at similar time points when using different stimuli (faces, words, or scenes). PMID:26217276

  12. Dissociating action inhibition, conflict monitoring and sensory mismatch into independent components of event related potentials in GO/NOGO task.

    PubMed

    Kropotov, Juri D; Ponomarev, Valery A; Hollup, Stig; Mueller, Andreas

    2011-07-15

    The anterior N2 and P3 waves of event related potentials (ERPs) in the GO/NOGO paradigm in trials related to preparatory set violations in previous studies were inconsistently associated either with action inhibition or conflict monitoring operations. In the present study a paired stimulus GO/NOGO design was used in order to experimentally control the preparatory sets. Three variants of the same stimulus task manipulated sensory mismatch, action inhibition and conflict monitoring operations by varying stimulus-response associations. The anterior N2 and P3 waves were decomposed into components by means of independent component analysis (ICA). The ICA was performed on collection of 114 individual ERPs in the three experimental conditions. Three of the independent components were selectively affected by the task manipulations indicating association of these components with sensory mismatch, action inhibition and conflict monitoring operations. According to sLORETA the sensory mismatch component was generated in the left and right temporal areas, the action suppression component was generated in the supplementary motor cortex, and the conflict monitoring component was generated in the anterior cingulate cortex.

  13. Identifying cognitive preferences for attractive female faces: an event-related potential experiment using a study-test paradigm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Kong, Fanchang; Chen, Hong; Jackson, Todd; Han, Li; Meng, Jing; Yang, Zhou; Gao, Jianguo; Najam ul Hasan, Abbasi

    2011-11-01

    In this experiment, sensitivity to female facial attractiveness was examined by comparing event-related potentials (ERPs) in response to attractive and unattractive female faces within a study-test paradigm. Fourteen heterosexual participants (age range 18-24 years, mean age 21.67 years) were required to judge 84 attractive and 84 unattractive face images as either "attractive" or "unattractive." They were then asked whether they had previously viewed each face in a recognition task in which 50% of the images were novel. Analyses indicated that attractive faces elicited more enhanced ERP amplitudes than did unattractive faces in judgment (N300 and P350-550 msec) and recognition (P160 and N250-400 msec and P400-700 msec) tasks on anterior locations. Moreover, longer reaction times and higher accuracy rate were observed in identifying attractive faces than unattractive faces. In sum, this research identified neural and behavioral bases related to cognitive preferences for judging and recognizing attractive female faces. Explanations for the results are that attractive female faces arouse more intense positive emotions in participants than do unattractive faces, and they also represent reproductive fitness and mating value from the evolutionary perspective.

  14. Event-Related Potential Responses to Beloved and Familiar Faces in Different Marriage Styles: Evidence from Mosuo Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haiyan; Luo, Li; Dai, Junqiang; Yang, Suyong; Wang, Naiyi; Luo, Yue-jia

    2016-01-01

    Research on familiar face recognition has largely focused on the neural correlates of recognizing a beloved partner or family member. However, no research has explored the effect of marriage style on the recognition of a beloved partner’s face, especially in matriarchal societies. Here, we examined the time course of event-related potentials (ERP) in response to the face of a beloved partner, sibling, or unknown person in a sample of individuals from the matriarchal Mosuo tribe. Two groups were assessed: intermarriage and walking marriage groups (i.e., couples in a committed relationship who do not cohabitate during the daytime). In agreement with previous reports, ERP results revealed more positive VPP, N250, and P300 waveforms for beloved faces than sibling faces in both groups. Moreover, P300 was more positive for beloved partner versus sibling faces; however, this difference emerged at fronto-central sites for the walking marriage group and at posterior sites for the intermarriage group. Overall, we observed that marriage style affects the later stage processing of a beloved partner’s face, and this may be associated with greater affective arousal and familiarity. PMID:26925002

  15. Event-Related Potential Responses to Beloved and Familiar Faces in Different Marriage Styles: Evidence from Mosuo Subjects.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiyan; Luo, Li; Dai, Junqiang; Yang, Suyong; Wang, Naiyi; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2016-01-01

    Research on familiar face recognition has largely focused on the neural correlates of recognizing a beloved partner or family member. However, no research has explored the effect of marriage style on the recognition of a beloved partner's face, especially in matriarchal societies. Here, we examined the time course of event-related potentials (ERP) in response to the face of a beloved partner, sibling, or unknown person in a sample of individuals from the matriarchal Mosuo tribe. Two groups were assessed: intermarriage and walking marriage groups (i.e., couples in a committed relationship who do not cohabitate during the daytime). In agreement with previous reports, ERP results revealed more positive VPP, N250, and P300 waveforms for beloved faces than sibling faces in both groups. Moreover, P300 was more positive for beloved partner versus sibling faces; however, this difference emerged at fronto-central sites for the walking marriage group and at posterior sites for the intermarriage group. Overall, we observed that marriage style affects the later stage processing of a beloved partner's face, and this may be associated with greater affective arousal and familiarity.

  16. Early event-related brain potentials and hemispheric asymmetries reveal mind-wandering while reading and predict comprehension.

    PubMed

    Broadway, James M; Franklin, Michael S; Schooler, Jonathan W

    2015-04-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) of mind-wandering (MW) was examined in event-related potentials (ERPs) and pre-stimulus alpha (8-12 Hz), over lateral-posterior sites of left and right brain hemispheres, while individuals read text passages. After controlling for individual differences in general intelligence (g), P1-asymmetry was greater (right-minus- left) and N1 amplitudes were more negative, when individuals were not MW (i.e., they were reading attentively). Approximately 82% of variance in reading comprehension was accounted for by the predictors: g, pre-stimulus alpha, left- and right-hemisphere P1, and left-hemisphere N1 (when individuals were not MW). Together, individual differences in MW-sensitive ERPs uniquely accounted for approximately 38% of the variance in reading comprehension, over and above prediction by g and pre-stimulus alpha. The within-person effect of MW on P1-asymmetry was estimated to account for an additional 4.6% of criterion variance. Implications for EEG/ERP research into attention, language processing, hemispheric asymmetries, and individual differences are discussed.

  17. The primacy of the individual versus the collective self: evidence from an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Youxue; Zhong, Jun; Hu, Li; Li, Hong

    2013-02-22

    Behavioral studies have suggested that the individual self is primary in self-conception as compared to the collective self. The aim of the present investigation was to further investigate the primacy of the individual self versus the collective self at neurophysiologic levels. In the present study, event-related potentials (ERPs) to three types of experimental stimuli (individual self-relevant, collective self-relevant and non-self-relevant stimuli) were recorded while subjects performed a three-stimulus oddball task. The results showed that larger P2 amplitudes were evoked by individual self-relevant and collective self-relevant stimuli than by non-self-relevant stimuli, and that there was no P2 amplitude difference observed between individual self-relevant and collective self-relevant stimuli. Furthermore, N2 amplitudes evoked by individual self-relevant stimuli were smaller than those evoked by collective self-relevant and non-self-relevant stimuli, and no difference was observed in N2 amplitudes between collective self-relevant and non-self-relevant stimuli. Moreover, individual self-relevant stimuli elicited larger P3 amplitudes than did collective self-relevant stimuli, which, in turn, elicited larger P3 amplitudes than did non-self-relevant stimuli. In summary, in addition to finding a classic self-relevant effect at the early P2 processing stage, the present study demonstrates the primacy of the individual self versus the collective self at the N2 and P3 processing stages.

  18. Electrophysiological correlates of local-global visual processing in college students with schizotypal traits: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Jung; Jang, Kyoung-Mi; Kim, Myung-Sun

    2014-02-01

    We examined local-global visual processing in college students with schizotypal traits using event-related potentials (ERPs). Local-global processing was assessed using a divided-attention task, in which large numbers (global level) composed of small numbers (local level) were presented. The control group had faster response time (RT) and more accurate responses to global-level than to local-level stimuli, whereas RT and accuracy did not differ between levels in the schizotypal-trait group. N150 amplitudes for local stimuli were larger than those for global stimuli in the schizotypal-trait group, whereas N150 amplitudes did not differ between levels in the control group. P300 amplitudes for local stimuli were larger relative to global stimuli in the control group, whereas P300 amplitudes did not differ between levels in the schizotypal-trait group. These results indicate that the global precedence effect was reduced in the schizotypal-trait group, possibly because of local-biased visual processing or difficulty in global processing.

  19. Single-trial classification of event-related potentials in rapid serial visual presentation tasks using supervised spatial filtering.

    PubMed

    Cecotti, Hubert; Eckstein, Miguel P; Giesbrecht, Barry

    2014-11-01

    Accurate detection of single-trial event-related potentials (ERPs) in the electroencephalogram (EEG) is a difficult problem that requires efficient signal processing and machine learning techniques. Supervised spatial filtering methods that enhance the discriminative information in EEG data are commonly used to improve single-trial ERP detection. We propose a convolutional neural network (CNN) with a layer dedicated to spatial filtering for the detection of ERPs and with training based on the maximization of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). The CNN is compared with three common classifiers: 1) Bayesian linear discriminant analysis; 2) multilayer perceptron (MLP); and 3) support vector machines. Prior to classification, the data were spatially filtered with xDAWN (for the maximization of the signal-to-signal-plus-noise ratio), common spatial pattern, or not spatially filtered. The 12 analytical techniques were tested on EEG data recorded in three rapid serial visual presentation experiments that required the observer to discriminate rare target stimuli from frequent nontarget stimuli. Classification performance discriminating targets from nontargets depended on both the spatial filtering method and the classifier. In addition, the nonlinear classifier MLP outperformed the linear methods. Finally, training based AUC maximization provided better performance than training based on the minimization of the mean square error. The results support the conclusion that the choice of the systems architecture is critical and both spatial filtering and classification must be considered together.

  20. Early event-related potentials indicate context-specific target processing for eye and hand motor systems.

    PubMed

    Wehrspaun, Claudia C; Pfabigan, Daniela M; Sailer, Uta

    2013-01-01

    Concurrent eye and hand movements toward a common visual target require different motor programs based on identical visual input. We used event-related brain potentials (ERP) to determine if and when the processing of the visual target differs for the two motor systems. The N2, an index for target evaluation, was more negative for the target of a hand than of an eye movement in two experiments. A possible interpretation for this finding is different visual target processing. Targets for hand movements require a different weighting of visual information, for example concerning features such as surface structure which are important for hand but not for eye movements. In experiment 2, the early C1-component, which had an average maximum at 67 ms following target onset, was significantly more negative when subjects pointed at the stimuli. Traditionally, the C1 has been regarded as a sensory component, but recent studies have linked it to higher order processing, such as attention and expectations. Thus, the present data indicate that target processing for eye or hand movements is already context-specific during early visual information processing. We suggest that differences in a target's relevance for upcoming movements modify target processing as well as sensory expectations.

  1. A longitudinal, event-related potential pilot study of adult obsessive-compulsive disorder with 1-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Okada, Koji; Kishimoto, Naoko; Ota, Toyosaku; Iida, Junzo; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Aim Earlier brain imaging research studies have suggested that brain abnormalities in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) normalize as clinical symptoms improve. However, although many studies have investigated event-related potentials (ERPs) in patients with OCD compared with healthy control subjects, it is currently unknown whether ERP changes reflect pharmacological and psychotherapeutic effects. As such, the current study examined the neurocognitive components of OCD to elucidate the pathophysiological abnormalities involved in the disorder, including the frontal-subcortical circuits. Methods The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale was used to evaluate 14 adult patients with OCD. The present study also included ten age-, sex-, and IQ-matched controls. The P300 and mismatch negativity (MMN) components during an auditory oddball task at baseline for both groups and after 1 year of treatment for patients with OCD were measured. Results Compared with controls, P300 amplitude was attenuated in the OCD group at Cz and C4 at baseline. Pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy treatment for 1 year reduced OCD symptomology. P300 amplitude after 1 year of treatment was significantly increased, indicating normalization compared with baseline at Fz, Cz, C3, and C4. We found no differences in P300 latency, MMN amplitude, or MMN latency between baseline and after one year of treatment. Conclusion ERPs may be a useful tool for evaluating pharmacological and cognitive behavioral therapy in adult patients with OCD. PMID:27713631

  2. [Event-related brain potentials when Russian verbs being conjugated: to the problem of language processing modularity].

    PubMed

    Dan'ko, S G; Boĭtsova, Iu A; Solov'eva, M L; Chernigovskaia, T V; Medvedev, S V

    2014-01-01

    In the light of alternative conceptions of "two-system" and "single-system" models of language processing the efforts have been undertaken to study brain mechanisnis for generation of regular and irregular forms of Russian verbs. The 19 EEG channels of evoked activity were registered along with casual alternations of speech morphology operations to be compared. Verbs of imperfective aspect in the form of an infinitive, belonging either to a group of productive verbs (default, conventionally regular class), or toan unproductive group of verbs (conventionally irregular class) were presented to healthy subjects. The subjects were requested to produce first person present time forms of these verbs. Results of analysis of event related potentials (ERP) for a group of 22 persons are presented. Statistically reliable ERP amplitude distinctions between the verb groups are found onlyin the latencies 600-850 ms in central and parietal zones of the cortex. In these latencies ERP values associated with a presentation of irregular verbs are negative in relation to ERP values associated with the presentation of regular verbs. The received results are interpreted as a consequence of various complexity of mental work with verbs of these different groups and presumably don't support a hypothesis of universality of the "two-system" brain mechanism for processing of the regular and irregular language forms.

  3. Neural correlates of inferring speaker sincerity from white lies: an event-related potential source localization study.

    PubMed

    Rigoulot, Simon; Fish, Karyn; Pell, Marc D

    2014-05-27

    During social interactions, listeners weigh the importance of linguistic and extra-linguistic speech cues (prosody) to infer the true intentions of the speaker in reference to what is actually said. In this study, we investigated what brain processes allow listeners to detect when a spoken compliment is meant to be sincere (true compliment) or not ("white lie"). Electroencephalograms of 29 participants were recorded while they listened to Question-Response pairs, where the response was expressed in either a sincere or insincere tone (e.g., "So, what did you think of my presentation?"/"I found it really interesting."). Participants judged whether the response was sincere or not. Behavioral results showed that prosody could be effectively used to discern the intended sincerity of compliments. Analysis of temporal and spatial characteristics of event-related potentials (P200, N400, P600) uncovered significant effects of prosody on P600 amplitudes, which were greater in response to sincere versus insincere compliments. Using low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA), we determined that the anatomical sources of this activity were likely located in the (left) insula, consistent with previous reports of insular activity in the perception of lies and concealments. These data extend knowledge of the neurocognitive mechanisms that permit context-appropriate inferences about speaker feelings and intentions during interpersonal communication.

  4. Dysfunctional information processing during an auditory event-related potential task in individuals with Internet gaming disorder.

    PubMed

    Park, M; Choi, J-S; Park, S M; Lee, J-Y; Jung, H Y; Sohn, B K; Kim, S N; Kim, D J; Kwon, J S

    2016-01-26

    Internet gaming disorder (IGD) leading to serious impairments in cognitive, psychological and social functions has gradually been increasing. However, very few studies conducted to date have addressed issues related to the event-related potential (ERP) patterns in IGD. Identifying the neurobiological characteristics of IGD is important to elucidate the pathophysiology of this condition. P300 is a useful ERP component for investigating electrophysiological features of the brain. The aims of the present study were to investigate differences between patients with IGD and healthy controls (HCs), with regard to the P300 component of the ERP during an auditory oddball task, and to examine the relationship of this component to the severity of IGD symptoms in identifying the relevant neurophysiological features of IGD. Twenty-six patients diagnosed with IGD and 23 age-, sex-, education- and intelligence quotient-matched HCs participated in this study. During an auditory oddball task, participants had to respond to the rare, deviant tones presented in a sequence of frequent, standard tones. The IGD group exhibited a significant reduction in response to deviant tones compared with the HC group in the P300 amplitudes at the midline centro-parietal electrode regions. We also found a negative correlation between the severity of IGD and P300 amplitudes. The reduced amplitude of the P300 component in an auditory oddball task may reflect dysfunction in auditory information processing and cognitive capabilities in IGD. These findings suggest that reduced P300 amplitudes may be candidate neurobiological marker for IGD.

  5. Vertical position of Chinese power words influences power judgments: Evidence from spatial compatibility task and event-related Potentials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangci; Jia, Huibin; Wang, Enguo; Du, Chenguang; Wu, Xianghua; Dang, Caiping

    2016-04-01

    The present study used event-related potentials (ERPs) to explore the influence of vertical position on power judgments. Participants were asked to identify whether a Chinese word represented a powerful or powerless group (e.g., "king" or "servant"), which was presented in the top or bottom of the screen. The behavioral analysis showed that judging the power of powerful words were significantly faster when they were presented at the top position, compared with when they were presented at the bottom position. The ERP analysis showed enhanced N1 amplitude for congruent trials (i.e., the powerful words in the top and the powerless words in the bottom of the screen) and larger P300 and LPC amplitude for incongruent trials (i.e., the powerful words in the bottom and the powerless words in the top of the screen). The present findings provide further electrophysiological evidence that thinking about power can automatically activate the underlying spatial up-down (verticality) image schema and that the influence of vertical position on the power judgments not only occurs at the early perceptual stage of power word processing, but also at the higher cognitive stage (i.e., allocation of attention resources, conflict solving and response selection). This study revealed the neural underpinnings of metaphor congruent effect which have great significance to our understanding of the abstract concept power.

  6. Life-long music practice and executive control in older adults: An event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Moussard, Aline; Bermudez, Patrick; Alain, Claude; Tays, William; Moreno, Sylvain

    2016-07-01

    Recent research has indicated that music practice can influence cognitive processing across the lifespan. Although extensive musical experience may have a mitigating effect on cognitive decline in older adults, the nature of changes to brain functions underlying performance benefits remains underexplored. The present study was designed to investigate the underlying neural mechanisms that may support apparent beneficial effects of life-long musical practice on cognition. We recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) in older musicians (N=17; average age=69.2) and non-musicians (N=17; average age=69.9), matched for age and education, while they completed an executive control task (visual go/no-go). Whereas both groups showed similar response speed and accuracy on go trials, older musicians showed fewer no-go errors. ERP recordings revealed the typical N2/P3 complex, but the nature of these responses differed between groups in that (1) older musicians showed larger N2 and P3 effects ('no-go minus go' amplitude), with the N2 amplitude being correlated with behavioral accuracy for no-go trials and (2) the topography of the P3 response was more anterior in musicians. Moreover, P3 amplitude was correlated with measures of musical experience in musicians. In our discussion of these results, we propose that music practice may have conferred an executive control advantage for musicians in later life. PMID:27021953

  7. Core disgust and moral disgust are related to distinct spatiotemporal patterns of neural processing: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu; Shen, Weilin; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Ting-yong; Huang, Hao; Li, Hong

    2013-10-01

    Core disgust is thought to rely more on sensory and perceptual processes, whereas moral disgust is thought to rely more on social evaluation processes. However, little is known about the neurocognitive mechanisms underlying these two types of disgust. We recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) from participants while they performed a lexical decision task in which core- and moral-disgust words were intermixed with neutral words and pseudowords. Lexical judgment was faster for coredisgust words and slower for moral-disgust words, relative to the neutral words. Core-disgust words, relative to neutral words, elicited a larger early posterior negative (EPN), a larger N320, a smaller N400, and a larger late positive component (LPC), whereas moral disgust words elicited a smaller N320 and a larger N400 than neutral words. These results suggest that the N320 and N400 components are particularly sensitive to the neurocognitive processes that overlap in processing both core and moral disgust, whereas the EPN and LPC may reflect process that are particularly sensitive to core disgust.

  8. Diminished social reward anticipation in the broad autism phenotype as revealed by event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Cox, Anthony; Kohls, Gregor; Naples, Adam J; Mukerji, Cora E; Coffman, Marika C; Rutherford, Helena J V; Mayes, Linda C; McPartland, James C

    2015-10-01

    Diminished responsivity to reward incentives is a key contributor to the social-communication problems seen in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Social motivation theories suggest that individuals with ASD do not experience social interactions as rewarding, leading to negative consequences for the development of brain circuitry subserving social information. In this study, we examined neural responses to social and non-social reward anticipation in 35 typically developing young adults, examining modulation of reward sensitivity by level of autistic traits. Using an Event-related potential incentive-delay task incorporating novel, more ecologically valid forms of reward, higher expression of autistic traits was associated with an attenuated P3 response to the anticipation of social (simulated real-time video feedback from an observer), but not non-social (candy), rewards. Exploratory analyses revealed that this was unrelated to mentalizing ability. The P3 component reflects motivated attention to reward signals, suggesting attenuated motivation allocation specific to social incentives. The study extends prior findings of atypical reward anticipation in ASD, demonstrating that attenuated social reward responsiveness extends to autistic traits in the range of typical functioning. Results support the development of innovative paradigms for investigating social and non-social reward responsiveness. Insight into vulnerabilities in reward processing is critical for understanding social function in ASD. PMID:25752905

  9. Detecting pop-out targets in contexts of varying homogeneity: investigating homogeneity coding with event-related brain potentials (ERPs).

    PubMed

    Schubö, Anna; Wykowska, Agnieszka; Müller, Hermann J

    2007-03-23

    Searching for a target among many distracting context elements might be an easy or a demanding task. Duncan and Humphreys (Duncan, J., Humphreys, G.W., 1989. Visual search and stimulus similarity. Psychol. Rev. 96, 433-458) showed that not only the target itself plays a role in the difficulty of target detection. Similarity among context elements and dissimilarity of target and context are two main factors also affecting search efficiency. Moreover, many studies have shown that search becomes particularly efficient with large set sizes and perfectly homogeneous context elements, presumably due to grouping processes involved in target-context segmentation. Especially N2p amplitude has been found to be modulated by the number of context elements and their homogeneity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of context elements of different heterogeneities on search performance using event-related brain potentials (ERPs). Results showed that contexts with perfectly homogeneous elements were indeed special: they were most efficient in visual search and elicited a large N2p differential amplitude effect. Increasing context heterogeneity led to a decrease in search performance and a reduction in N2p differential amplitude. Reducing the number of context elements led to a marked performance decrease for random heterogeneous contexts but not for grouped heterogeneous contexts. Behavioral and N2p results delivered evidence (a) in favor of specific processing modes operating on different spatial scales (b) for the existence of homogeneity coding postulated by Duncan and Humphreys.

  10. General Deficit in Inhibitory Control of Excessive Smartphone Users: Evidence from an Event-Related Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingwei; Liang, Yunsi; Mai, Chunmiao; Zhong, Xiyun; Qu, Chen

    2016-01-01

    With the popularity of smartphones, the problem of excessive use has drawn increasing attention. However, it is not clear whether there is an inhibitory deficit in excessive smartphone users. Using a modified Go/NoGo task with three types of context (blank, neutral, and smartphone-related), the present study combined measures of behavior and electrophysiology [event-related potentials (ERPs)] to examine general and specific inhibitory control in an excessive smartphone use group and a normal use group. Results showed that participants in both groups had larger amplitude of N2 and P3 on NoGo trials than Go trials. NoGo N2, an ERP component associated with inhibitory control, was more negative in the excessive smartphone use group than the normal use group. These results suggest that in the early stage of inhibition processing, excessive smartphone users experience more conflicts and show a general deficit that does not depend on smartphone-related cues. Moreover, the study provides further neuroscience evidence of the physiological correlates of excessive smartphone use. PMID:27148120

  11. Event-related potential correlates of extradimensional and intradimensional set-shifts in a modified Wisconsin Card Sorting Test.

    PubMed

    Watson, Todd D; Azizian, Allen; Squires, Nancy K

    2006-05-30

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded in healthy adult participants during the performance of a modified version of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test that was designed to isolate the effects of extradimensional (ED) and intradimensional (ID) set-shifts. ERP averages were created for ED- and ID-Shift trials, as well as for the 5th trial in each block (Maintain-Rule). Differences in sensory and longer latency ERP components were found between the ED- and ID conditions, and between the two shift conditions and the Maintain-Rule trials. Consistent with the previous literature, these data indicated that ED- and ID-Shifts require different levels of neural resources. A secondary goal of this experiment was to use the excellent temporal resolution of ERPs to examine the neural correlates of various other aspects of the performance of a set-shift task, including differences between correct shifts and the commission of errors, and the differences between the reception of correct and error feedback. Comparisons were made between ERP averages to correct ED-Shift trials and ED-Error trials, and to feedback following a correct ED-Shift compared to feedback following an error. As expected, ERP differences were found between correct trials and error trials, and between the ERP correlates of receiving different types of feedback. Overall, these data further indicate the utility of using ERP methodology to study various aspects of complex neuropsychological paradigms.

  12. Reduced sensitivity to neutral feedback versus negative feedback in subjects with mild depression: Evidence from event-related potentials study.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Song, Xinxin; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Xiaoran; Li, Jiayi; Lin, Fengtong; Hu, Zhonghua; Zhang, Xinxin; Cui, Hewei; Wang, Wenmiao; Li, Hong; Cong, Fengyu; Roberson, Debi

    2015-11-01

    Many previous event-related potential (ERP) studies have linked the feedback related negativity (FRN) component with medial frontal cortex processing and associated this component with depression. Few if any studies have investigated the processing of neutral feedback in mildly depressive subjects in the normal population. Two experiments compared brain responses to neutral feedback with behavioral performance in mildly depressed subjects who scored highly on the Beck Depression Inventory (high BDI) and a control group with lower BDI scores (low BDI). In the first study, the FRN component was recorded when neutral, negative or positive feedback was pseudo-randomly delivered to the two groups in a time estimation task. In the second study, real feedback was provided to the two groups in the same task in order to measure their actual accuracy of performance. The results of experiment one (Exp. 1) revealed that a larger FRN effect was elicited by neutral feedback than by negative feedback in the low BDI group, but no significant difference was found between neutral condition and negative condition in the High BDI group. The present findings demonstrated that depressive tendencies influence the processing of neutral feedback in medial frontal cortex. The FRN effect may work as a helpful index for investigating cognitive bias in depression in future studies. PMID:26432379

  13. Neural correlates of self-appraisals in the near and distant future: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yangmei; Jackson, Todd; Wang, Xiaogang; Huang, Xiting

    2013-01-01

    To investigate perceptual and neural correlates of future self-appraisals as a function of temporal distance, event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while participants (11 women, eight men) made judgments about the applicability of trait adjectives to their near future selves (i.e., one month from now) and their distant future selves (i.e., three years from now). Behavioral results indicated people used fewer positive adjectives, more negative adjectives, recalled more specific events coming to mind and felt more psychologically connected to the near future self than the distant future self. Electrophysiological results demonstrated that negative trait adjectives elicited more positive ERP deflections than did positive trait adjectives in the interval between 550 and 800 ms (late positive component) within the near future self condition. However, within the same interval, there were no significant differences between negative and positive traits adjectives in the distant future self condition. The results suggest that negative emotional processing in future self-appraisals is modulated by temporal distance, consistent with predictions of construal level theory.

  14. The effects of facial color and inversion on the N170 event-related potential (ERP) component.

    PubMed

    Minami, T; Nakajima, K; Changvisommid, L; Nakauchi, S

    2015-12-17

    Faces are important for social interaction because much can be perceived from facial details, including a person's race, age, and mood. Recent studies have shown that both configural (e.g. face shape and inversion) and surface information (e.g. surface color and reflectance properties) are important for face perception. Therefore, the present study examined the effects of facial color and inverted face properties on event-related potential (ERP) responses, particularly the N170 component. Stimuli consisted of natural and bluish-colored faces. Faces were presented in both upright and upside down orientations. An ANOVA was used to analyze N170 amplitudes and verify the effects of the main independent variables. Analysis of N170 amplitude revealed the significant interactions between stimulus orientation and color. Subsequent analysis indicated that N170 was larger for bluish-colored faces than natural-colored faces, and N170 to natural-colored faces was larger in response to inverted stimulus as compared to upright stimulus. Additionally, a multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) investigated face-processing dynamics without any prior assumptions. Results distinguished, above chance, both facial color and orientation from single-trial electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. Decoding performance for color classification of inverted faces was significantly diminished as compared to an upright orientation. This suggests that processing orientation is predominant over facial color. Taken together, the present findings elucidate the temporal and spatial distribution of orientation and color processing during face processing.

  15. Chemo-somatosensory event-related potentials in response to repetitive painful chemical stimulation of the nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hummel, T; Gruber, M; Pauli, E; Kobal, G

    1994-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how chemo-somatosensory event-related potentials (CSSERPs) and pain ratings are modified by repetitive painful stimulation of the nasal mucosa (58% v/v CO2, 200 msec duration). Twenty-two subjects performed 3 experiments during which trains of stimuli were applied. The interstimulus interval (ISI) between stimuli was constant for each experiment, but varied between experiments (8, 4, and 2 sec). CSSERPs were obtained from 5 positions (Fz, C3, Cz, C4, and Pz). The subjects not only rated the overall perceived intensities but also reported the quality of the stimuli. At an ISI of 8 sec estimates decreased and only stinging sensations were reported. In contrast, at an interval of 2 sec estimates increased being accompanied by the buildup of burning pain. This phenomenon was interpreted in terms of the superposition of first (sharp and stinging pain: A delta fibers) and second pain (dull and burning pain: C fibers), respectively. However, given the special circumstances of short ISIs CSSERP amplitudes decreased the more the shorter the ISI was. In line with previous investigations it is hypothesised that CSSERPs predominantly reflect nociceptive information transmitted via A delta fibers.

  16. Clinical symptoms of major depression are associated with the intensity dependence of auditory event-related potential components.

    PubMed

    Linka, Thomas; Sartory, Gudrun; Gastpar, Markus; Scherbaum, Norbert; Müller, Bernhard W

    2009-09-30

    The intensity (loudness) dependent amplitude change (IDAP) of the auditory event-related potential (ERP) has been shown to be associated with the outcome of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in major depression. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate associations between clinical symptoms of major depression and the IDAP as an indirect indicator of cortical serotonergic function. We assessed 40 in-patients suffering from a major depressive episode (DSM-IV) prior to antidepressant treatment. Psychometric characteristics of depression were assessed by means of psychiatric rating scales (CGI, HDRS, HAMA, STAI and BDI) and evaluated for associations with auditory evoked P1, N1, P2 as well as P1/N1 and N1/P2 peak to peak amplitude slopes. Our data revealed a positive correlation of the intensity dependent N1 amplitude slope with the degree of certain somatic symptoms of depression: loss of appetite and weight, insomnia, and sexual dysfunction. The results of our study might contribute to a more specific clinical basis in the differential indication of serotonergic versus noradrenergic antidepressants.

  17. The spatial reliability of task-irrelevant sounds modulates bimodal audiovisual integration: An event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Yu, Hongtao; Wu, Yan; Gao, Ning

    2016-08-26

    The integration of multiple sensory inputs is essential for perception of the external world. The spatial factor is a fundamental property of multisensory audiovisual integration. Previous studies of the spatial constraints on bimodal audiovisual integration have mainly focused on the spatial congruity of audiovisual information. However, the effect of spatial reliability within audiovisual information on bimodal audiovisual integration remains unclear. In this study, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to examine the effect of spatial reliability of task-irrelevant sounds on audiovisual integration. Three relevant ERP components emerged: the first at 140-200ms over a wide central area, the second at 280-320ms over the fronto-central area, and a third at 380-440ms over the parieto-occipital area. Our results demonstrate that ERP amplitudes elicited by audiovisual stimuli with reliable spatial relationships are larger than those elicited by stimuli with inconsistent spatial relationships. In addition, we hypothesized that spatial reliability within an audiovisual stimulus enhances feedback projections to the primary visual cortex from multisensory integration regions. Overall, our findings suggest that the spatial linking of visual and auditory information depends on spatial reliability within an audiovisual stimulus and occurs at a relatively late stage of processing.

  18. Cluster-based computational methods for mass univariate analyses of event-related brain potentials/fields: A simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Pernet, C.R.; Latinus, M.; Nichols, T.E.; Rousselet, G.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years, analyses of event related potentials/fields have moved from the selection of a few components and peaks to a mass-univariate approach in which the whole data space is analyzed. Such extensive testing increases the number of false positives and correction for multiple comparisons is needed. Method Here we review all cluster-based correction for multiple comparison methods (cluster-height, cluster-size, cluster-mass, and threshold free cluster enhancement – TFCE), in conjunction with two computational approaches (permutation and bootstrap). Results Data driven Monte-Carlo simulations comparing two conditions within subjects (two sample Student's t-test) showed that, on average, all cluster-based methods using permutation or bootstrap alike control well the family-wise error rate (FWER), with a few caveats. Conclusions (i) A minimum of 800 iterations are necessary to obtain stable results; (ii) below 50 trials, bootstrap methods are too conservative; (iii) for low critical family-wise error rates (e.g. p = 1%), permutations can be too liberal; (iv) TFCE controls best the type 1 error rate with an attenuated extent parameter (i.e. power < 1). PMID:25128255

  19. Event related potentials from closed head injury patients in an auditory "oddball" task: evidence of dysfunction in stimulus categorisation.

    PubMed Central

    Rugg, M D; Cowan, C P; Nagy, M E; Milner, A D; Jacobson, I; Brooks, D N

    1988-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from 19 closed head injury (CHI) patients, at least 6 months after injury, and an equal number of control subjects, during a task requiring the covert counting of rare auditory "target" stimuli against a background of frequent "non-targets". In both groups, ERPs to targets contained enhanced frontal N2 and parietal P3 components. N2 was larger in amplitude in the CHI patients than in the controls, and its peak latency was delayed. P3 amplitude was smaller in the patients, but its latency was not significantly different from that of the control group. The delay in N2 latency is interpreted as evidence of an increase in the time needed to achieve stimulus categorisation in CHI patients. The larger N2s in this group are thought to reflect the additional cognitive effort required after CHI to cope with the task. The negative findings with respect to P3 latency suggest that this may be a less sensitive measure of information-processing efficiency in this task than the latency of N2. PMID:3404166

  20. Event-related potentials reflect the efficacy of pharmaceutical treatments in children and adolescents with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Ota, Toyosaku; Iida, Junzo; Nakanishi, Yoko; Matsuura, Hiroki; Uratani, Mitsuhiro; Okazaki, Kosuke; Kishimoto, Naoko; Tanaka, Shohei; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2016-08-30

    Few objective biological measures of pharmacological treatment efficacy exist for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Although we have previously demonstrated that event-related potentials (ERPs) reflect the effects of osmotic-release methylphenidate in treatment of naïve pediatric patients with ADHD, whether this is true for the therapeutic effects of atomoxetine (ATX) is unknown. Here, we used the Japanese version of the ADHD rating-scale IV to evaluate 14 patients with ADHD, and compared their ERP data with 14 age- and sex-matched controls. We measured P300 and mismatch negativity (MMN) components during an auditory oddball task before treatment (treatment naïve) and after 2 months of ATX treatment. Compared with controls, P300 components at baseline were attenuated and prolonged in the ADHD group at Fz (fronto-central), Cz (centro-parietal), Pz (parietal regions), C3 and C4 electrodes. ATX treatment reduced ADHD symptomology, and after 2 months of treatment, P300 latencies at Fz, Cz, Pz, C3, and C4 electrodes were significantly shorter than those at baseline. Moreover, MMN amplitudes at Cz and C3 electrodes were significantly greater than those at baseline. Thus, ERPs may be useful for evaluating the pharmacological effects of ATX in pediatric and adolescent patients with ADHD. PMID:27318633