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Sample records for 12d1 impact properties

  1. Subtask 12D1: Impact properties of production heat of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    Following previous reports of excellent properties of a laboratory heat of V-4Cr-4Ti, the alloy identified as the primary vanadium-based candidate for application as fusion reactor structural components, a large production-scale (500-kg) heat of the alloy was fabricated successfully. Since impact toughness has been known to be most sensitive to alloy composition and microstructure, impact testing of the production-scale heat was conducted in this work between -200{degrees}C and +200{degrees}C. A 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti, an alloy identified previously as the primary vanadium-based candidate alloy for application as fusion reactor structural components, has been produced successfully. Impact tests were conducted at -196{degrees}C to 150{degrees}C on 1/3-size Charpy specimens of the scale-up heat in as-rolled condition and after annealing for 1 h at 950, 1000, and 1050{degrees}C in high-quality vacuum. The annealed material remained ductile at all test temperatures; the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was lower than -200{degrees}C. The upper-shelf energy of the production-scale heat was similar to that of the laboratory-scale ({approx}30-kg) heat of V-4Cr-4Ti investigated previously. Effect of annealing temperature was not significant; however, annealing at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h not only produces best impact properties but also ensures a sufficient tolerance to effect of temperature inhomogeneity expected when annealing large components. Effect of notch geometry was also investigated on the production heat. When annealed properly (e.g., at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h), impact properties were not sensitive to notch geometry (45{degrees}-notch, root radius 0.25 mm; and 300-notch, root radius 0.08 mm). 11 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. 17 CFR 270.12d1-2 - Exemptions for investment companies relying on section 12(d)(1)(G) of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-12(d)(1)(G)(i)(II)), a registered open-end investment company or a registered unit investment trust... by an investment company); and (3) Securities issued by a money market fund, when the acquisition is in reliance on § 270.12d1-1. (b) Definitions. For purposes of this section, money market fund has...

  3. 17 CFR 270.12d1-2 - Exemptions for investment companies relying on section 12(d)(1)(G) of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-12(d)(1)(G)(i)(II)), a registered open-end investment company or a registered unit investment trust... by an investment company); and (3) Securities issued by a money market fund, when the acquisition is in reliance on § 270.12d1-1. (b) Definitions. For purposes of this section, money market fund has...

  4. 17 CFR 270.12d1-2 - Exemptions for investment companies relying on section 12(d)(1)(G) of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-12(d)(1)(G)(i)(II)), a registered open-end investment company or a registered unit investment trust... by an investment company); and (3) Securities issued by a money market fund, when the acquisition is in reliance on § 270.12d1-1. (b) Definitions. For purposes of this section, money market fund has...

  5. 17 CFR 240.12d1-1 - Registration effective as to class or series.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... class or series. 240.12d1-1 Section 240.12d1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Registration § 240.12d1-1 Registration effective as to class or series. (a) An application filed pursuant to... of additional shares or amounts. (d) If a class of security is issuable in two or more series...

  6. 17 CFR 240.12d1-1 - Registration effective as to class or series.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... class or series. 240.12d1-1 Section 240.12d1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Registration § 240.12d1-1 Registration effective as to class or series. (a) An application filed pursuant to... of additional shares or amounts. (d) If a class of security is issuable in two or more series...

  7. 17 CFR 240.12d1-1 - Registration effective as to class or series.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... class or series. 240.12d1-1 Section 240.12d1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Registration § 240.12d1-1 Registration effective as to class or series. (a) An application filed pursuant to... of additional shares or amounts. (d) If a class of security is issuable in two or more series...

  8. 17 CFR 240.12d1-1 - Registration effective as to class or series.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... class or series. 240.12d1-1 Section 240.12d1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Registration § 240.12d1-1 Registration effective as to class or series. (a) An application filed pursuant to... of additional shares or amounts. (d) If a class of security is issuable in two or more series...

  9. 17 CFR 240.12d1-1 - Registration effective as to class or series.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... class or series. 240.12d1-1 Section 240.12d1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Registration § 240.12d1-1 Registration effective as to class or series. (a) An application filed pursuant to... of additional shares or amounts. (d) If a class of security is issuable in two or more series...

  10. 17 CFR 270.12d1-1 - Exemptions for investments in money market funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... money market funds. 270.12d1-1 Section 270.12d1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Exemptions for investments in money market funds. (a) Exemptions for acquisition of money market fund shares... issued by a money market fund; and (2) A money market fund, any principal underwriter thereof, and...

  11. 17 CFR 270.12d1-1 - Exemptions for investments in money market funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... money market funds. 270.12d1-1 Section 270.12d1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Exemptions for investments in money market funds. (a) Exemptions for acquisition of money market fund shares... issued by a money market fund; and (2) A money market fund, any principal underwriter thereof, and...

  12. 17 CFR 270.12d1-1 - Exemptions for investments in money market funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... money market funds. 270.12d1-1 Section 270.12d1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Exemptions for investments in money market funds. (a) Exemptions for acquisition of money market fund shares... issued by a money market fund; and (2) A money market fund, any principal underwriter thereof, and...

  13. 17 CFR 270.12d1-1 - Exemptions for investments in money market funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) of the Act (15 U.S.C. 80a-3(c)(1) and 80a-3(c)(7)). (2) Money market fund means: (i) An open-end... as if it were a registered open-end investment company: (A) Operates in compliance with § 270.2a-7... money market funds. 270.12d1-1 Section 270.12d1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES...

  14. 17 CFR 270.12d1-1 - Exemptions for investments in money market funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) of the Act (15 U.S.C. 80a-3(c)(1) and 80a-3(c)(7)). (2) Money market fund means: (i) An open-end... as if it were a registered open-end investment company: (A) Operates in compliance with § 270.2a-7... money market funds. 270.12d1-1 Section 270.12d1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES...

  15. 17 CFR 240.12d1-3 - Requirements as to certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requirements as to... § 240.12d1-3 Requirements as to certification. (a) Certification that a security has been approved by an... shall be manually signed by the appropriate exchange authority. (Sec. 12, 48 Stat. 892, as amended; 15 U...

  16. 17 CFR 240.12d1-2 - Effectiveness of registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Certification by Exchanges and Effectiveness of Registration § 240.12d1-2 Effectiveness of registration. (a) A request for acceleration of the effective date of registration pursuant to... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effectiveness of...

  17. The Mitochondrion-Located Protein OsB12D1 Enhances Flooding Tolerance during Seed Germination and Early Seedling Growth in Rice

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongli; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Pingfang

    2014-01-01

    B12D belongs to a function unknown subgroup of the Balem (Barley aleurone and embryo) proteins. In our previous work on rice seed germination, we identified a B12D-like protein encoded by LOC_Os7g41350 (named OsB12D1). OsB12D1 pertains to an ancient protein family with an amino acid sequence highly conserved from moss to angiosperms. Among the six OsB12Ds, OsB12D1 is one of the major transcripts and is primarily expressed in germinating seed and root. Bioinformatics analyses indicated that OsB12D1 is an anoxic or submergence resistance-related gene. RT-PCR results showed OsB12D1 is induced remarkably in the coleoptiles or roots by flooding during seed germination and early seedling growth. The OsB12D1-overexpressed rice seeds could protrude radicles in 8 cm deep water, further exhibiting significant flooding tolerance compared to the wild type. Moreover, this tolerance was not affected by the gibberellin biosynthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol. OsB12D1 was identified in the mitochondrion by subcellular localization analysis and possibly enhances electron transport through mediating Fe and oxygen availability under flooded conditions. This work indicated that OsB12D1 is a promising gene that can help to enhance rice seedling establishment in farming practices, especially for direct seeding. PMID:25089878

  18. Tensile properties of impact ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Kellackey, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    A special test apparatus was developed to measure the tensile strength of impact ices perpendicular to the direction of growth. The apparatus consists of a split tube carefully machined to minimize the effect of the joint on impact ice strength. The tube is supported in the wind tunnel by two carefully aligned bearings. During accretion the tube is turned slowly in the icing cloud to form a uniform coating of ice on the split tube specimen. The two halves of the split tube are secured firmly by a longitudinal bolt to prevent relative motion between the two halves during ice accretion and handling. Tensile test strength results for a variety of icing conditions were obtained. Both glaze and rime ice conditions were investigated. In general, the tensile strength of impact ice was significantly less than refrigerator ice. Based on the limited data taken, the median strength of rime ice was less than glaze ice. However, the mean values were similar.

  19. Measuring Disturbance Impact on Soil Hydraulic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinshaw, S.; Mirus, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    Disturbances associated with land cover change such as forest clearing and mono-cropping can have a substantial impact on soil-hydraulic properties, which in turn have a cascading impact on surface and near-surface hydrologic response. Although disturbances and vegetation change can alter soil-water retention and conductivity relations, hydrologic models relying on traditional soil-texture based pedotransfer functions would not be able to capture the disturbance impact on infiltration and soil-moisture storage. Therefore, in-situ estimates of characteristic curves of soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity relations are needed to understand and predict hydrologic impacts of land cover change. We present a method for in-situ estimates of effective characteristic curves that capture hysteretic soil-water retention properties at the plot scale. We apply this method to two different forest treatments and in urban settings to investigate the impact of land-use disturbances on soil-hydraulic properties. We compare our in-situ estimation method to results for simple pedotransfer functions to illustrate how this approach can improve understanding of disturbance impacts on hydrologic processes and function.

  20. Global Geometric Properties of Martian Impact Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Frawley, J. J.; Schnetzler, C.

    2002-01-01

    We present impact crater geometric properties for more than 5000 fresh martian features using high resolution Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter digital elevation models and topographic profiles. We discuss global results and significant regional variations. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Impact failure and fragmentation properties of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Kipp, M.E.

    1998-03-01

    In the present study we describe the development of an experimental fracture material property test method specific to dynamic fragmentation. Spherical test samples of the metals of interest are subjected to controlled impulsive stress loads by acceleration to high velocities with a light-gas launcher facility and subsequent normal impact on thin plates. Motion, deformation and fragmentation of the test samples are diagnosed with multiple flash radiography methods. The impact plate materials are selected to be transparent to the x-ray method so that only test metal material is imaged. Through a systematic series of such tests both strain-to-failure and fragmentation resistance properties are determined through this experimental method. Fragmentation property data for several steels, copper, aluminum, tantalum and titanium have been obtained to date. Aspects of the dynamic data have been analyzed with computational methods to achieve a better understanding of the processes leading to failure and fragmentation, and to test an existing computational fragmentation model.

  2. Enhancements in Magnesium Die Casting Impact Properties

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Yulong Zhu; Srinath Viswanathan; Shafik Iskander

    2000-06-30

    The need to produce lighter components in transportation equipment is the main driver in the increasing demand for magnesium castings. In many automotive applications, components can be made of magnesium or aluminum. While being lighter, often times the magnesium parts have lower impact and fatigue properties than the aluminum. The main objective of this study was to identify potential improvements in the impact resistance of magnesium alloys. The most common magnesium alloys in automotive applications are AZ91D, AM50 and AM60. Accordingly, these alloys were selected as the main candidates for the study. Experimental quantities of these alloys were melted in an electrical furnace under a protective atmosphere comprising sulfur hexafluoride, carbon dioxide and dry air. The alloys were cast both in a permanent mold and in a UBE 315 Ton squeeze caster. Extensive evaluation of tensile, impact and fatigue properties was conducted at CWRU on permanent mold and squeeze cast test bars of AZ91, AM60 and AM50. Ultimate tensile strength values between 20ksi and 30ksi were obtained. The respective elongations varied between 25 and 115. the Charpy V-notch impact strength varied between 1.6 ft-lb and 5 ft-lb depending on the alloy and processing conditions. Preliminary bending fatigue evaluation indicates a fatigue limit of 11-12 ksi for AM50 and AM60. This is about 0.4 of the UTS, typical for these alloys. The microstructures of the cast specimens were investigated with optical and scanning electron microscopy. Concomitantly, a study of the fracture toughness in AM60 was conducted at ORNL as part of the study. The results are in line with values published in the literature and are representative of current state of the art in casting magnesium alloys. The experimental results confirm the strong relationship between aluminum content of the alloys and the mechanical properties, in particular the impact strength and the elongation. As the aluminum content increases from about 5

  3. Atmospheric Aerosol Properties and Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Kahn, Ralph A.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Yu, Hongbin; Rind, David; Feingold, Graham; Quinn, Patricia K.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Streets, David G.; DeCola, Phillip; Halthore, Rangasayi

    2009-01-01

    This report critically reviews current knowledge about global distributions and properties of atmospheric aerosols, as they relate to aerosol impacts on climate. It assesses possible next steps aimed at substantially reducing uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcing estimates. Current measurement techniques and modeling approaches are summarized, providing context. As a part of the Synthesis and Assessment Product in the Climate Change Science Program, this assessment builds upon recent related assessments, including the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR4, 2007) and other Climate Change Science Program reports. The objectives of this report are (1) to promote a consensus about the knowledge base for climate change decision support, and (2) to provide a synthesis and integration of the current knowledge of the climate-relevant impacts of anthropogenic aerosols for policy makers, policy analysts, and general public, both within and outside the U.S government and worldwide.

  4. Fracture toughness and impact properties of laminated metal composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.; Riddle, R.A.; Gogolewski, R.P.; Syn, C.K.; Cunningham, B.J.

    1996-03-04

    Laminated metal composites consist of alternating metal (or metal matrix composite) layers bonded together. These materials can provide fracture toughness and impact properties superior to those of the component materials. These properties are a function of component material properties, laminate architecture (volume fraction, thickness) and interface properties. Properties are compared for seven lightweight materials.

  5. Impact of urea on detergent micelle properties.

    PubMed

    Broecker, Jana; Keller, Sandro

    2013-07-09

    Co-solvents, such as urea, can entail drastic changes in the micellization behavior of detergents. We present a systematic quantification of the impact of urea on the critical micellar concentration, the micellization thermodynamics, and the micelle size in three homologous series of commonly used non-ionic alkyl detergents. To this end, we performed demicellization experiments by isothermal titration calorimetry and hydrodynamic size measurements by dynamic light scattering on alkyl maltopyranosides, cyclohexyl alkyl maltopyranosides, and alkyl glucopyranosides at urea concentrations of 0-8 M. For all detergents studied, we found that the critical micellar concentration increases exponentially because the absolute Gibbs free energy of micellization decreases linearly over the entire urea concentration range, as does the micelle size. In contrast, the enthalpic and entropic contributions to micellization reveal more complex, nonlinear dependences on urea concentration. Both free energy and size changes are more pronounced for long-chain detergents, which bury more apolar surface area upon micelle formation. The Gibbs free energy increments per methylene group within each detergent series depend on urea concentration in a linear fashion, although they result from the entropic term for alkyl maltosides but are of enthalpic origin for cyclohexyl alkyl maltosides. We compare our results to transfer free energies of amino acid side chains, relate them to protein-folding data, and discuss how urea-induced changes in detergent micelle properties affect in vitro investigations on membrane proteins.

  6. Impact properties of A356-T6 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivkumar, S.; Wang, L.; Keller, C.

    1994-02-01

    The Charpy impact energy of A356 alloys has been measured. Instrumented Charpy impact tests have been conducted at 25,100,150, and 200 °C. The Charpy specimens were machined from plate castings ortapered cylindrical castings. The plates were produced in sand molds, and tapered cylinders were produced in water-cooled copper molds. Both unmodified and strontium-modified castings were tested. The results indicate that strontium modification improves the impact properties of sand and permanent mold castings. The impact energy increases with solution treatment time. Strontium modification reduces the solution treatment time for attaining a specific impact property level in the casting.

  7. Impact of surface coal mining on soil hydraulic properties

    Treesearch

    X. Liu; J. Q. Wu; P. W. Conrad; S. Dun; C. S. Todd; R. L. McNearny; William Elliot; H. Rhee; P. Clark

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion is strongly related to soil hydraulic properties. Understanding how surface coal mining affects these properties is therefore important in developing effective management practices to control erosion during reclamation. To determine the impact of mining activities on soil hydraulic properties, soils from undisturbed areas, areas of roughly graded mine...

  8. Subtask 12D2: Baseline impact properties of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the baseline impact properties of vanadium-base alloys as a function of compositional variables. Up-to-date results on impact properties of unirradiated V, V-Ti, V-Cr-Ti and V-Ti-Si alloys are presented and reviewed in this paper, with an emphasis on the most promising class of alloys, i.e., V-(4-5)Cr-(3-5)Ti containing 400-1000 wppm Si. Database on impact energy and ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) has been established from Charpy impact tests on small laboratory as well as production-scale heats. DBTT is influenced most significantly by Cr contents and, to a lesser extent, by Ti contents of the alloys. When combined contents of Cr and Ti were {le}10 wt.%, V-Cr-Ti alloys exhibit excellent impact properties, i.e., DBTT<-200{degrees}C and upper shelf energies of {approx}120-140 J/cm{sup 2}. Impact properties of the production-scale heat of the U.S. reference alloy V-4Cr- 4Ti were as good as those of the laboratory-scale heats. Optimal impact properties of the reference alloy were obtained after annealing the as-rolled products at 1000{degrees}C-1050{degrees}C for 1-2 h in high-quality vacuum. 17 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Predicting the impact of biochar additions on soil hydraulic properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Different physical and chemical properties of biochar, which is made out of a variety of biomass materials, can impact water movement through amended soil. The objective of this research was to develop a decision support tool predicting the impact of biochar additions on soil saturated hydraulic con...

  10. Predicting the impact of biochar additions on soil hydraulic properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Different physical and chemical properties of biochar, which is made out of a variety of biomass materials, can impact water movement through amended soil. The objective of this research was to develop a decision support tool predicting the impact of biochar additions on soil saturated hydraulic con...

  11. Impacts of doping on thermal and thermoelectric properties of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2010-07-01

    Thermal transport in nanoscale structures has attracted an increasing interest in the last two decades. On the one hand, the low dimensional nanostructured materials are platforms for testing novel phonon transport theories. On the other hand, nanomaterials are promising candidates for nanoscale on-chip coolers. This review is focused on the thermal conductance, thermoelectric property, and impacts of doping on these properties.

  12. Fatigue and impact properties of metal honeycomb sandwich panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Guang ping; Lu, Jie; Liang, Jun; Chang, Zhong liang

    2008-11-01

    Honeycomb sandwich structures are significant to be used as applied to thermal protection system on reusable launch vehicle. In this paper the fatigue and impact properties of a novel metallic thermal protection material have been investigated and predicted at room temperature. A series of strength tests are carried out to obtain parameters firstly for further experiments. A set of tension-tension stress fatigue tests and impact tests based on split-Hopkinson pressure bar are carried out. Different high strain rate impact experiments are accomplished. The curves of dynamical stress, strain and strain rate are obtained. Also the cell units images after impact are presented. The results show the fatigue properties of honeycomb sandwich panels are comparatively better. And it has the advantages of anti-impact resistance and high, energy absorption capability.

  13. Recent Impacts on Mars: Cluster Properties and Seismic Signal Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justine Daubar, Ingrid; Schmerr, Nicholas; Banks, Maria; Marusiak, Angela; Golombek, Matthew P.

    2016-10-01

    Impacts are a key source of seismic waves that are a primary constraint on the formation, evolution, and dynamics of planetary objects. Geophysical missions such as InSight (Banerdt et al., 2013) will monitor seismic signals from internal and external sources. New martian craters have been identified in orbital images (Malin et al., 2006; Daubar et al., 2013). Seismically detecting such impacts and subsequently imaging the resulting craters will provide extremely accurate epicenters and source crater sizes, enabling calibration of seismic velocities, the efficiency of impact-seismic coupling, and retrieval of detailed regional and local internal structure.To investigate recent impact-induced seismicity on Mars, we have assessed ~100 new, dated impact sites. In approximately half of new impacts, the bolide partially disintegrates in the atmosphere, forming multiple craters in a cluster. We incorporate the resulting, more complex, seismic effects in our model. To characterize the variation between sites, we focus on clustered impacts. We report statistics of craters within clusters: diameters, morphometry indicating subsurface layering, strewn-field azimuths indicating impact direction, and dispersion within clusters indicating combined effects of bolide strength and elevation of breakup.Measured parameters are converted to seismic predictions for impact sources using a scaling law relating crater diameter to the momentum and source duration, calibrated for impacts recorded by Apollo (Lognonne et al., 2009). We use plausible ranges for target properties, bolide densities, and impact velocities to bound the seismic moment. The expected seismic sources are modeled in the near field using a 3-D wave propagation code (Petersson et al., 2010) and in the far field using a 1-D wave propagation code (Friederich et al., 1995), for a martian seismic model. Thus we calculate the amplitudes of seismic phases at varying distances, which can be used to evaluate the detectability

  14. Droplet impact patterns on inclined surfaces with variable properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockard, Michael; Neitzel, G. Paul; Smith, Marc K.

    2014-11-01

    Bloodstain pattern analysis is used in the investigation of a crime scene to infer the impact velocity and size of an impacting droplet and, from these, the droplet's point and cause of origin. The final pattern is the result of complex fluid mechanical processes involved in the impact and spreading of a blood drop on a surface coupled with the wetting properties of the surface itself. Experiments have been designed to study these processes and the resulting patterns for the case of a single Newtonian water droplet impacting a planar, inclined surface with variable roughness and wetting properties. Results for Reynolds numbers in the range of (9,000 - 27,000) and Weber numbers in the range of (300 - 2,600) will be presented. Transient video images and final impact patterns will be analyzed and compared with results from traditional bloodstain pattern-analysis techniques used by the forensics community. In addition, preliminary work with a new Newtonian blood simulant designed to match the viscosity and surface tension of blood will be presented. Supported by the National Institute of Justice.

  15. Viton's Impact on NASA Standard Initiator Propellant Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohmann, Carl; Tipton, Bill, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the properties of Viton that are relevant to its use as a pyrotechnic binder in a NASA standard initiator (NSI) propellant. Nearly every aspect of NSI propellant manufacture and use is impacted by the binder system. The effect of Viton's molecular weight on solubility, solution viscosity, glass transition temperature, and strength characteristics as applied to NSI production and performance are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the Viton fractionation that occurs during the precipitation cycle and its impact on bridgewire functions. Special consideration is given to the production of bridgewire slurry mixtures.

  16. Impact of physiochemical properties on pharmacokinetics of protein therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Swami, Rajan; Shahiwala, Aliasgar

    2013-12-01

    Physicochemical properties, such as molecular weight, size, partition coefficient, acid dissociation constant and solubility have a great impact on pharmacokinetics of traditional small molecule drugs and substantially used in development of small drugs. However, predicting pharmacokinetic fate (absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination) of protein therapeutics from their physicochemical parameters is extremely difficult due to the macromolecular nature of therapeutic proteins and peptides. Their structural complexity and immunogenicity are other contributing factors that determine their biological fate. Therefore, to develop generalized strategies concerning development of therapeutic proteins and peptides are highly challenging. However, reviewing the literature, authors found that physiochemical properties, such as molecular weight, charge and structural modification are having great impact on pharmacokinetics of protein therapeutics and an attempt is made to provide the major findings in this manuscript. This manuscript will serve to provide some bases for developing protein therapeutics with desired pharmacokinetic profile.

  17. Modeling of Impact Properties of Auxetic Materials Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    Modeling of Impact Properties of Auxetic Materials – Phase 2 Lei Jiang, Dustin Pearson, Tim Dunbar Martec Limited Prepared By: Martec Limited 400...Manager: Lei Jiang, 902-425-5101 PWGSC Contract Number: W7707-135609/001/HAL CSA: Dr. Jeff Szabo, Defence Scientist, 902-427-3427 The scientific or...specifies the in-plane integration rule for 4-node shell elements. With IRQUAD = 2, “2×2 Gauss quadrature integration is employed”. The

  18. Structural properties of impact ices accreted on aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scavuzzo, R. J.; Chu, M. L.

    1987-01-01

    The structural properties of ice accretions formed on aircraft surfaces are studied. The overall objectives are to measure basic structural properties of impact ices and to develop finite element analytical procedures for use in the design of all deicing systems. The Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was used to produce simulated natural ice accretion over a wide range of icing conditions. Two different test apparatus were used to measure each of the three basic mechanical properties: tensile, shear, and peeling. Data was obtained on both adhesive shear strength of impact ices and peeling forces for various icing conditions. The influences of various icing parameters such as tunnel air temperature and velocity, icing cloud drop size, material substrate, surface temperature at ice/material interface, and ice thickness were studied. A finite element analysis of the shear test apparatus was developed in order to gain more insight in the evaluation of the test data. A comparison with other investigators was made. The result shows that the adhesive shear strength of impact ice typically varies between 40 and 50 psi, with peak strength reaching 120 psi and is not dependent on the kind of substrate used, the thickness of accreted ice, and tunnel temperature below 4 C.

  19. Method for Investigation of Frictional Properties at Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundin, K. G.; Åhrström, B. O.

    1999-05-01

    In the assessment of lubricant performance and also in various other contact applications it is of importance to know the frictional qualities of a surface. Under quasi-static conditions, normal and frictional forces are measured using force transducers but the task is more difficult when loads are transient. The experimental method presented in this paper is based on the analysis of propagating waves in a beam, due to an impact on the end surface. The impact is oblique and therefore a transverse as well as a normal force is generated. The normal force history is measured from the axial non-dispersive wave using strain gauges. Transverse force and bending moment both generate dispersive flexural waves. From the FFT of two transverse acceleration histories, the frictional force at the end of the rod is evaluated using beam theory. The relation between normal and frictional force histories displays the frictional properties at the impact. Preliminary results are presented.

  20. Asteroid Impact Deflection and Assessment (AIDA) mission - Properties of Impact Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Fahnestock, Eugene G.; Schwartz, Stephen R.; Murdoch, Naomi; Asphaug, Erik; Cheng, Andrew F.; Housen, Kevin R.; Michel, Patrick; Miller, Paul L.; Stickle, Angela; Tancredi, Gonzalo; Vincent, Jean-Baptiste; Wuennemann, Kai; Yu, Yang; AIDA Impact Simulation Working Group

    2016-10-01

    The Asteroid Impact Deflection and Assessment (AIDA) mission is composed of NASA's Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission and ESA's Asteroid Impact Monitor (AIM) rendezvous mission. The DART spacecraft is designed to impact the small satellite of near-Earth asteroid 65803 Didymos in October 2022, while the in-situ AIM spacecraft observes. AIDA's Modeling and Simulation of Impact Outcomes Working Group is tasked with investigating properties of the debris ejected from the impact. The orbital evolution of this ejecta has important implications for observations that the AIM spacecraft will take as well as for the safety of the spacecraft itself. Ejecta properties including particle sizes, bulk densities, and velocities all depend on the poorly-known physical properties of Didymos' moon. The moon's density, internal strength, and especially its porosity have a strong effect on all ejecta properties. Making a range of assumptions, we perform a suite of numerical simulations to determine the fate of the ejected material; we will use simulation predictions to optimize AIM observations and safety. Ultimately, combining AIM's observations of the ejecta with detailed numerical simulations will help constrain key satellite parameters.We use distinct types of numerical tools to explore ejecta properties based on additional target parameters (different forms of friction, cohesion), e.g., the shock physics code iSALE, smoothed particle hydrodynamics codes, and the granular code PKDGRAV. Given the large discrepancy between the 6 km/s impact speed of DART and the moon's 6 cm/s escape speed, a great challenge will be to determine properties of the low-speed ejecta. Very low-speed material relevant to the safety of the AIM spacecraft and its ability to conduct its observations may loft from the crater at late stages of the impact process, or from other locations far from the impact site due to seismic energy propagation. The manner in which seismic waves manifests in

  1. Impact properties of shear thickening fluid impregnated foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soutrenon, M.; Michaud, V.

    2014-03-01

    Concentrated colloidal suspensions of silica particles in polyethylene glycol exhibit a shear thickening behavior: above a critical shear rate in a confined environment, they show a steep increase of viscosity. This reversible transition from a low to a high viscosity state is associated with a large energy absorption that could be harnessed for impact protection. As these suspensions are liquid at rest, however, shear thickening fluids (STFs) are difficult to use in practical applications. Furthermore, their specific rheological properties exist within a narrow range of concentration, so they tend to disappear when the material is in contact with air and humidity. In this work, a soft foam scaffold was impregnated with STF to provide a three-dimensional shape to the assembly at rest, while a silicone was cast around it to serve as a physical barrier to the external environment. A method to quickly impregnate the foam was proposed. Impact tests were carried out on the STF/foam/silicone composite pads using a free fall impact tower. Compared to rubber or pure silicone, larger energy absorptions, up to 85%, were observed, which could be repeated for multiple impacts. The transmitted shock waves were also reduced, showing the potential of this system for impact protection of structures.

  2. Characterization of Triaxial Braided Composite Material Properties for Impact Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Biniendak, Wieslaw K.; Arnold, William A.; Littell, Justin D.; Kohlman, Lee W.

    2009-01-01

    The reliability of impact simulations for aircraft components made with triaxial braided carbon fiber composites is currently limited by inadequate material property data and lack of validated material models for analysis. Improvements to standard quasi-static test methods are needed to account for the large unit cell size and localized damage within the unit cell. The deformation and damage of a triaxial braided composite material was examined using standard quasi-static in-plane tension, compression, and shear tests. Some modifications to standard test specimen geometries are suggested, and methods for measuring the local strain at the onset of failure within the braid unit cell are presented. Deformation and damage at higher strain rates is examined using ballistic impact tests on 61- by 61- by 3.2-mm (24- by 24- by 0.125-in.) composite panels. Digital image correlation techniques were used to examine full-field deformation and damage during both quasi-static and impact tests. An impact analysis method is presented that utilizes both local and global deformation and failure information from the quasi-static tests as input for impact simulations. Improvements that are needed in test and analysis methods for better predictive capability are examined.

  3. The impact of yeast fermentation on dough matrix properties.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Mohammad N; Jayaram, Vinay B; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Courtin, Christophe M

    2016-08-01

    Most studies on dough properties are performed on yeastless dough to exclude the complicating, time-dependent effect of yeast. Baker's yeast, however, impacts dough matrix properties during fermentation, probably through the production of primary (CO2 and ethanol) and secondary (glycerol, acetic acid and succinic acid) metabolites. The aim of this study is to obtain a better understanding of the changes in yeasted dough behavior introduced by fermentation, by investigating the impact of yeast fermentation on Farinograph dough consistency, dough spread, Kieffer rig dough extensibility and gluten agglomeration behavior in a fermented dough-batter gluten starch separation system. Results show that fermentation leads to a dough with less flow and lower extensibility that breaks more easily under stress and strain. The dough showed less elastic and more plastic deformation behavior. Gluten agglomerates were smaller for yeasted dough than for the unyeasted control. These changes probably have to be attributed to metabolites generated during fermentation. Indeed, organic acids and also ethanol in concentrations produced by yeast were previously shown to have similar effects in yeastless dough. These findings imply the high importance of yeast fermentation metabolites on dough matrix properties in industrial bread production. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. The impact of landmark properties in shaping exploration and navigation.

    PubMed

    Yaski, Osnat; Eilam, David

    2007-10-01

    This study was aimed at uncovering physical and geometric properties that make a particular landmark a target of exploration and navigation. Rats were tested in a square open-field arena with additional portable corners featuring the same properties as the arena corners. It was found that the routes of progression converged upon the added corners, whether located at the arena wall or the arena center. Route convergence upon the added corners involved numerous visits to these corners. However, time spent at the added corners was relatively short compared with the arena corners, including that from which rats were introduced into the arena. There was no differential effect of testing rats in light or dark, or with a low versus a high portable corner. It is suggested that the added corners were distinct against the background of the arena enclosure, whereas the four arena corners and walls were encoded by the rats as one geometric module. This distinctness, together with the greater accessibility of the added corners, made them salient landmarks and a target of exploration. Thus, the impact of a landmark extended beyond its specific self-geometry to include accessibility and distinctness, which are contextual properties. In addition to the contextual impact on locomotor behavior there was also a temporal effect, with security initially dominating the rats' behavior but then declining along with an increased attraction to salient landmarks. These spatiotemporal patterns characterized behavior in both lit and dark arenas, indicating that distal cues were secondary to local proximal cues in shaping routes.

  5. Impact of Foliage Surface Properties on Vegetation Reflection and Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Yan, L.; Zhao, Y.; Jiao, J.

    2013-12-01

    Optical properties of phytoelements and their distribution in the canopy space (i.e., canopy structure) are among key factors that determine light environment in vegetation canopies, which in turn drives various physiological and physical processes required for the functioning of plants. Canopy radiative response is the source of information about ecosystem properties from remote sensing. Understanding of how radiation interacts with foliage and traverses in the 3D vegetation canopy is essential to both modeling and remote sensing communities. Radiation scattered by a leaf includes information from two dissimilar sources - the leaf surface and leaf interior. The first component of scattered radiation emanates from light reflected at the air-cuticle interface. This portion of reflected radiation does not interact with biochemical constituents inside the leaf and depends on the properties of the leaf surface. The leaf cuticle acts as a "barrier" for photons to enter the mesophyll and be absorbed; thus, tending to increase the leaf scattering. The second component mainly results from radiation interactions within the leaf-interior. The canopy radiation regime is sensitive to canopy structure, leaf surface properties and leaf biochemical constituents. Impact of leaf surface properties on canopy reflection and absorption is poorly understood. Radiation scattered at the surface of leaves is partly polarized. Fresnel reflection is the principal cause of light polarization. Polarization measurements provide a means to assess the impact of leaf surface properties on canopy radiation regime. We measured Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) in the principal plane and its polarized portion of needles and shoots of two coniferous species in the 400 to 1000 nm spectral interval. The needle and shoot BRF spectra were decomposed into polarized (PBRF) and diffuse (DBRF) components: BRF=PBRF+DBRF. Our analyses indicate: 1) PBRF in forward directions can account for up to 70% of

  6. Impact absorption properties of carbon fiber reinforced bucky sponges.

    PubMed

    Thevamaran, Ramathasan; Saini, Deepika; Karakaya, Mehmet; Zhu, Jingyi; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao; Daraio, Chiara

    2017-03-24

    We describe the super compressible and highly recoverable response of bucky sponges as they are struck by a heavy flat-punch striker. The bucky sponges studied here are structurally stable, self-assembled mixtures of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and carbon fibers (CFs). We engineered the microstructure of the sponges by controlling their porosity using different CF contents. Their mechanical properties and energy dissipation characteristics during impact loading are presented as a function of their composition. The inclusion of CFs improves the impact force damping by up to 50% and the specific damping capacity by up to 7% compared to bucky sponges without CFs. The sponges also exhibit significantly better stress mitigation characteristics compared to vertically aligned carbon nanotube foams of similar densities. We show that delamination on the MWCNT-CF interfaces occurs during unloading, and arises from the heterogeneous fibrous microstructure of the bucky sponges.

  7. Impact absorption properties of carbon fiber reinforced bucky sponges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thevamaran, Ramathasan; Saini, Deepika; Karakaya, Mehmet; Zhu, Jingyi; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao M.; Daraio, Chiara

    2017-05-01

    We describe the super compressible and highly recoverable response of bucky sponges as they are struck by a heavy flat-punch striker. The bucky sponges studied here are structurally stable, self-assembled mixtures of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and carbon fibers (CFs). We engineered the microstructure of the sponges by controlling their porosity using different CF contents. Their mechanical properties and energy dissipation characteristics during impact loading are presented as a function of their composition. The inclusion of CFs improves the impact force damping by up to 50% and the specific damping capacity by up to 7% compared to bucky sponges without CFs. The sponges also exhibit significantly better stress mitigation characteristics compared to vertically aligned CNT foams of similar densities. We show that delamination occurs at the MWCNT-CF interfaces during unloading, and it arises from the heterogeneous fibrous microstructure of the bucky sponges.

  8. The evolution, impact and properties of exonic splice enhancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In humans, much of the information specifying splice sites is not at the splice site. Exonic splice enhancers are one of the principle non-splice site motifs. Four high-throughput studies have provided a compendium of motifs that function as exonic splice enhancers, but only one, RESCUE-ESE, has been generally employed to examine the properties of enhancers. Here we consider these four datasets to ask whether there is any consensus on the properties and impacts of exonic splice enhancers. Results While only about 1% of all the identified hexamer motifs are common to all analyses we can define reasonably sized sets that are found in most datasets. These consensus intersection datasets we presume reflect the true properties of exonic splice enhancers. Given prior evidence for the properties of enhancers and splice-associated mutations, we ask for all datasets whether the exonic splice enhancers considered are purine enriched; enriched near exon boundaries; able to predict trends in relative codon usage; slow evolving at synonymous sites; rare in SNPs; associated with weak splice sites; and enriched near longer introns. While the intersect datasets match expectations, only one original dataset, RESCUE-ESE, does. Unexpectedly, a fully experimental dataset identifies motifs that commonly behave opposite to the consensus, for example, being enriched in exon cores where splice-associated mutations are rare. Conclusions Prior analyses that used the RESCUE-ESE set of hexamers captured the properties of consensus exonic splice enhancers. We estimate that at least 4% of synonymous mutations are deleterious owing to an effect on enhancer functioning. PMID:24359918

  9. Predicting the impact of biochar additions on soil hydraulic properties.

    PubMed

    Lim, T J; Spokas, K A; Feyereisen, G; Novak, J M

    2016-01-01

    Different physical and chemical properties of biochar, which is made out of a variety of biomass materials, can impact water movement through amended soil. The objective of this research was to develop a decision support tool predicting the impact of biochar additions on soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat). Four different kinds of biochar were added to four different textured soils (coarse sand, fine sand, loam, and clay texture) to assess these effects at the rates of 0%, 1%, 2%, and 5% (w/w). The Ksat of the biochar amended soils were significantly influenced by the rate and type of biochar, as well as the original particle size of soil. The Ksat decreased when biochar was added to coarse and fine sands. Biochar with larger particles sizes (60%; >1 mm) decreased Ksat to a larger degree than the smaller particle size biochar (60%; <1 mm) in the two sandy textured soils. Increasing tortuosity in the biochar amended sandy soil could explain this behavior. On the other hand, for the clay loam 1% and 2% biochar additions universally increased the Ksat with higher biochar amounts providing no further alterations. The developed model utilizes soil texture pedotransfer functions for predicting agricultural soil Ksat as a function of soil texture. The model accurately predicted the direction of the Ksat influence, even though the exact magnitude still requires further refinement. This represents the first step to a unified theory behind the impact of biochar additions on soil saturated conductivity. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Electromagnetic Properties of Impact-Generated Plasma, Vapor and Debris

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.A.; Schultz, P.H.

    1998-11-02

    Plasma, vapor and debris associated with an impact or explosive event have been demonstrated in the laboratory to produce radiofrequency and optical electromagnetic emissions that can be diagnostic of the event. Such effects could potentially interfere with communications or remote sensing equipment if an impact occurred, for example, on a satellite. More seriously, impact generated plasma could end the life of a satellite by mechanisms that are not well understood and not normally taken into account in satellite design. For example, arc/discharge phenomena resulting from highly conductive plasma acting as a current path across normally shielded circuits may have contributed to the loss of the Olympus experimental communications satellite on August 11, 1993. The possibility of significant storm activity during the Leonid meteor showers of November 1998, 1999 and 2000 (impact velocity, 72 km/s) has heightened awareness of potential vulnerabilities from hypervelocity electromagnetic effects to orbital assets. The concern is justified. The amount of plasma, electrostatic charge and the magnitude of the resulting currents and electric fields scale nearly as the cube of the impact velocity. Even for microscopic Leonid impacts, the amount of plasma approaches levels that could be dangerous to spacecraft electronics. The degree of charge separation that occurs during hypervelocity impacts scales linearly with impactor mass. The resulting magnetic fields increase linearly with impactor radius and could play a significant role in our understanding of the paleomagnetism of planetary surfaces. The electromagnetic properties of plasma produced by hypervelocity impact have been exploited by researchers as a diagnostic tool, invoked to potentially explain the magnetically jumbled state of the lunar surface and blamed for the loss of the Olympus experimental communications satellite. The production of plasma in and around an impact event can lead to several effects: (1) the

  11. Magnetic properties of tektites and other related impact glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochette, P.; Gattacceca, J.; Devouard, B.; Moustard, F.; Bezaeva, N. S.; Cournède, C.; Scaillet, B.

    2015-12-01

    We present a comprehensive overview of the magnetic properties of the four known tektite fields and related fully melted impact glasses (Aouelloul, Belize, Darwin, Libyan desert and Wabar glasses, irghizites, and atacamaites), namely magnetic susceptibility and hysteresis properties as well as properties dependent on magnetic grain-size. Tektites appear to be characterized by pure Fe2+ paramagnetism, with ferromagnetic traces below 1 ppm. The different tektite fields yield mostly non-overlapping narrow susceptibility ranges. Belize and Darwin glasses share similar characteristics. On the other hand the other studied glasses have wider susceptibility ranges, with median close to paramagnetism (Fe2+ and Fe3+) but with a high-susceptibility population bearing variable amounts of magnetite. This signs a fundamental difference between tektites (plus Belize and Darwin glasses) and other studied glasses in terms of oxygen fugacity and heterogeneity during formation, thus bringing new light to the formation processes of these materials. It also appears that selecting the most magnetic glass samples allows to find impactor-rich material, opening new perspectives to identify the type of impactor responsible for the glass generation.

  12. EVALUATION OF THE IMPACT OF THIN POURS ON SALTSTONE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A.; Langton, C.; Fox, K.

    2012-10-02

    testing showed increased flow when the number of cold joints was increased. Compressive strength testing showed that the maximum load at the onset of cracking was reduced by approximately 26% for those samples that contained cold joints as compared to the monolithic samples. The number of cold joints in the sample had no significant impact on the maximum load prior to cracking. The porosity of the samples was not influenced by cold joints. This result was expected as the porosity is a material property affected by the properties of the components (premix and salt solution) and the water to premix ratio. Overall, the only obvious impact of cold joints in the samples was to significantly increase hydraulic conductivity in the direction parallel to the cold joints. An increasing number of cold joints (thin layers) in the simulated saltstone samples did not exacerbate this effect, nor did it have a negative impact on the Leachability Indices or porosity for surfaces exposed for approximately four days. The presence of a cold joint reduced the compressive strength of the material, although this impact was seen regardless of the number of cold joints in the sample.

  13. Psychometric properties of the modified fatigue impact scale.

    PubMed

    Larson, Rebecca D

    2013-01-01

    Psychometric assessments are tests or questionnaires that have been designed to measure constructs of interest in an individual or a target population. A goal of many of these self-report instruments is to provide researchers with the ability to gather subjective information in a manner that might allow for quantitative analysis and interpretation of these results. This requires the instrument of choice to have adequate psychometric properties of reliability and validity. Much research has been conducted on creating self-report quality of life questionnaires for individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). This article focuses on one in particular, the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS). The article starts with a brief description of the rationale, construction, and scoring of the inventory. Next, the best available reliability and validity data on the MFIS are presented. The article concludes with a brief discussion on the interpretation of scores, followed by suggestions for future research. This summative analysis is intended to examine whether the instrument is adequately measuring the impact of fatigue and whether the scores allow for meaningful interpretations.

  14. Predicting the impact of biochar additions on soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spokas, Kurt; Lim, Tae Jun; Feyereisen, Gary; Novak, Jeff

    2015-04-01

    Different physical and chemical properties of biochar, which is made out of a variety of biomass materials, can impact water movement through amended soil. The objective of this research was to develop a decision support tool predicting the impact of biochar additions on soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat). Four different kinds of biochar were added to four different textured soils (coarse sand, fine sand, loam, and clay texture) to assess these effects at the rates of 0, 1, 2, and 5 % (w/w). The Ksat of the biochar amended soils were significantly influenced by the rate and type of biochar, as well as the original particle size of soil. The Ksat decreased when biochar was added to coarse and fine sands. Biochar with larger particles sizes (60%; >1 mm) decreased Ksat to a larger degree than the smaller particle size biochar (60%; <1 mm) in the two sandy textured soils. Increasing tortuosity in the amended sandy soil could explain this behavior. On the other hand, for the clay loam 1% and 2% biochar additions universally increased the Ksat with higher biochar amounts providing no further alterations. The developed model utilizes soil texture pedotransfer functions for predicting agricultural soil Ksat as a function of soil texture. The model accurately predicted the direction of the Ksat influence, even though the exact magnitude still requires further refinement.

  15. Unique Properties of Lunar Impact Glass: Nanophase Metallic Fe Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Thompson, James R; Schnare, Darren W.; Park, Jae-Sung

    2007-01-01

    Lunar regolith contains important materials that can be used for in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) on the Moon, thereby providing for substantial economic savings for development of a manned base. However, virtually all activities on the Moon will be affected by the deleterious effects of the adhering, abrasive, and pervasive nature of lunar dust (<20 {micro}m portion of regolith, which constitutes {approx}20 wt% of the soil). In addition, the major impact-produced glass in the lunar soil, especially agglutinitic glass (60-80 vol% of the dust), contains unique nanometer-sized metallic Fe (np-Fe{sup 0}), which may pose severe pulmonary problems for humans. The presence of the np-Fe0 imparts considerable magnetic susceptibility to the fine portion of the lunar soil, and dust mitigation techniques can be designed using these magnetic properties. The limited availability of Apollo lunar soils for ISRU research has made it necessary to produce materials that simulate this unique np-Fe{sup 0} property, for testing different dust mitigation methods using electromagnetic fields, and for toxicity studies of human respiratory and pulmonary systems, and for microwave treatment of lunar soil to produce paved roads, etc. A method for synthesizing np-Fe{sup 0} in an amorphous silica matrix is presented here. This type of specific simulant can be used as an additive to other existing lunar soil simulants.

  16. Economic impact of fuel properties on turbine powered business aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, F. D.

    1984-01-01

    The principal objective was to estimate the economic impact on the turbine-powered business aviation fleet of potential changes in the composition and properties of aviation fuel. Secondary objectives include estimation of the sensitivity of costs to specific fuel properties, and an assessment of the directions in which further research should be directed. The study was based on the published characteristics of typical and specific modern aircraft in three classes; heavy jet, light jet, and turboprop. Missions of these aircraft were simulated by computer methods for each aircraft for several range and payload combinations, and assumed atmospheric temperatures ranging from nominal to extremely cold. Five fuels were selected for comparison with the reference fuel, nominal Jet A. An overview of the data, the mathematic models, the data reduction and analysis procedure, and the results of the study are given. The direct operating costs of the study fuels are compared with that of the reference fuel in the 1990 time-frame, and the anticipated fleet costs and fuel break-even costs are estimated.

  17. Economic impact of fuel properties on turbine powered business aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, F. D.

    1984-01-01

    The principal objective was to estimate the economic impact on the turbine-powered business aviation fleet of potential changes in the composition and properties of aviation fuel. Secondary objectives include estimation of the sensitivity of costs to specific fuel properties, and an assessment of the directions in which further research should be directed. The study was based on the published characteristics of typical and specific modern aircraft in three classes; heavy jet, light jet, and turboprop. Missions of these aircraft were simulated by computer methods for each aircraft for several range and payload combinations, and assumed atmospheric temperatures ranging from nominal to extremely cold. Five fuels were selected for comparison with the reference fuel, nominal Jet A. An overview of the data, the mathematic models, the data reduction and analysis procedure, and the results of the study are given. The direct operating costs of the study fuels are compared with that of the reference fuel in the 1990 time-frame, and the anticipated fleet costs and fuel break-even costs are estimated.

  18. The Effect of Material Properties on the Impact Cratering Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierazzo, E.; Ivanov, B.; Artemieva, N.

    2007-12-01

    The cratering process is strongly affected by the physical and chemical properties of target material, including porosity, volatile content and natural mixtures of diverse rocks. On Earth craters in water-saturated sediments are larger than their energy-equivalents in dry soils, which, in turn, are larger than their energy-equivalents in crystalline rocks. On Mars, the distinctly lobate outer boundary (and sometimes several overlapping sets of flow lobes) of impact crater ejecta blankets suggests mobilization of subsurface volatiles, in contrast to evidence from the much drier Moon and Mercury, where craters are surrounded by ballistically emplaced ejecta. A thorough understanding of the behavior and influence of material characteristics on the impact process is crucial for using impact cratering as a tool to better understand the physical, geological, and biogeochemical processes on a given planetary body. The presence of volatiles, namely water, in the target may affect shock propagation and consequently target melting and the final crater morphology. When the target is a mixture of materials with very different impedance, as is the case for rocks and water, the shock wave propagation may be affected by the interaction of the original shock wave with shocks reflected at material boundaries. Single- and multiple-shocked materials experiencing the same peak shock pressure will reach substantially different thermodynamic states, with the multiple-shocked material having lower shock temperature and shock entropy. As a result, for mixtures of materials with very different impedances the maximum shock pressure alone may not be the best criterion for estimating melting and vaporization. Water vaporization may also influence the ejection process by affecting the amount and dispersion of shocked ejecta. We carried out a series of numerical studies to investigate the effect of water and/or ice in the target on the cratering process. Initial results indicate that there is

  19. Privacy Impact Assessment for the Environmental Assessments for Residential Properties (EARP)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In the course of EPA assessments, EPA finds that there are the potential for releases to impact residential properties. To complete the assessments and public health evaluations related to the release EPA must specifically assess individual properties.

  20. Impact of soil properties on selected pharmaceuticals adsorption in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodesova, Radka; Kocarek, Martin; Klement, Ales; Fer, Miroslav; Golovko, Oksana; Grabic, Roman; Jaksik, Ondrej

    2014-05-01

    The presence of human and veterinary pharmaceuticals in the environment has been recognized as a potential threat. Pharmaceuticals may contaminate soils and consequently surface and groundwater. Study was therefore focused on the evaluation of selected pharmaceuticals adsorption in soils, as one of the parameters, which are necessary to know when assessing contaminant transport in soils. The goals of this study were: (1) to select representative soils of the Czech Republic and to measure soil physical and chemical properties; (2) to measure adsorption isotherms of selected pharmaceuticals; (3) to evaluate impact of soil properties on pharmaceutical adsorptions and to propose pedotransfer rules for estimating adsorption coefficients from the measured soil properties. Batch sorption tests were performed for 6 selected pharmaceuticals (beta blockers Atenolol and Metoprolol, anticonvulsant Carbamazepin, and antibiotics Clarithromycin, Trimetoprim and Sulfamethoxazol) and 13 representative soils (soil samples from surface horizons of 11 different soil types and 2 substrates). The Freundlich equations were used to describe adsorption isotherms. The simple correlations between measured physical and chemical soil properties (soil particle density, soil texture, oxidable organic carbon content, CaCO3 content, pH_H2O, pH_KCl, exchangeable acidity, cation exchange capacity, hydrolytic acidity, basic cation saturation, sorption complex saturation, salinity), and the Freundlich adsorption coefficients were assessed using Pearson correlation coefficient. Then multiple-linear regressions were applied to predict the Freundlich adsorption coefficients from measured soil properties. The largest adsorption was measured for Clarithromycin (average value of 227.1) and decreased as follows: Trimetoprim (22.5), Metoprolol (9.0), Atenolol (6.6), Carbamazepin (2.7), Sulfamethoxazol (1.9). Absorption coefficients for Atenolol and Metoprolol closely correlated (R=0.85), and both were also

  1. Impact of pasteurization on the antibacterial properties of human milk.

    PubMed

    Van Gysel, Marjan; Cossey, Veerle; Fieuws, Steffen; Schuermans, Annette

    2012-08-01

    Growing evidence favours the use of human milk for the feeding of preterm newborns based on its many beneficial effects. Despite the many benefits, human milk has been associated as a possible vehicle of transmission for a number of infections. Although pasteurization of human milk can diminish the risk of neonatal infection, it also significantly reduces the concentrations of immunological components in human milk due to thermal damage. In order to evaluate the impact of pasteurization on the antibacterial properties of human milk, we aimed to compare the capacity of raw and pasteurized human milk to inhibit bacterial proliferation. Therefore, a single milk sample was collected from ten healthy lactating mothers. Each sample was divided into two aliquots; one aliquot was pasteurized, while the other was kept raw. Both aliquots were inoculated either with Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus and incubated at 37 °C during 8 h. Viable colony counts from the inoculated samples were performed at regular time points to compare the bacterial growth in both forms of breast milk. Relative to the tryptic soy broth control sample, both raw and pasteurized milk samples exhibited an inhibitory effect on the growth of E. coli and S. aureus. Compared with the raw portion, growth inhibition was significantly lower in the pasteurized milk at every time point beyond T0 (after 2, 4 and 8 h of incubation) (p = 0.0003 for E. coli and p < 0.0001 for S. aureus). Our study shows that pasteurization adversely affects the antibacterial properties of human milk.

  2. Impact of Astroglial Connexins on Modafinil Pharmacological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Duchêne, Adeline; Perier, Magali; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Xinhe; Thomasson, Julien; Chauveau, Frédéric; Piérard, Christophe; Lagarde, Didier; Picoli, Christèle; Jeanson, Tiffany; Mouthon, Franck; Dauvilliers, Yves; Giaume, Christian; Lin, Jian-Sheng; Charvériat, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Y, Liu X, Thomasson J, Chauveau F, Piérard C, Lagarde D, Picoli C, Jeanson T, Mouthon F, Dauvilliers Y, Giaume C, Lin JS, Charvériat M. Impact of astroglial connexins on modafinil pharmacological properties. SLEEP 2016;39(6):1283–1292. PMID:27091533

  3. Quantifying the impact of livestock grazing on soil physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fučík, Petr; Zajíček, Antonín; Holubík, Ondřej

    2014-05-01

    Livestock grazing is considered to have a noticeable influence on soil properties, when pedocompaction / soil pore reduction induced either by cattle or sheeps may curtail water residence time and accelerate the beginning and volume of overland flow. However, direct measurements of soil physical parameters and their changes under different pastoral management are seldom reported in central European conditions. Knowledge about these alterations are indispensable for setting the proper, soil and water conservative grazing management in the view of increasing areas of pastures, not only in the Czech Republic. Impact of cattle grazing on changes of soil properties was studied in three experimental upland catchments in the Czech Republic, differing in soil characteristics and grazing management. Values of soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), assessed three times a year in-situ during 2012 - 2013 with pressure infiltrometers, were compared for grazed and ungrazed cambisols, pseudogleys and gleysols, for grazing intensity ranging from 0.5 to 2 Livestock units / ha. Soil bulk density (BD) and macroporosity (MP) were determined before and after grazing season every year with ring 100 cm3 steel cyllinders. These parameters were measured also on heavily treaded plots by cattle - hotspots - in each catchment. Ks values on grazed plots were significantly lower (on average by 39 - 66 %) than on ungrazed sites, BD values were reduced on average by 15 % and MP values were lower roughly about 22 % on grazed plots. Ks values on hotspots were lower by 50 - 90 %, BD values by 5 - 18 % and MP values by 8 - 28 % comparing to the rest of grazed areas. Decrease of soil infiltration capacity was influenced by grazing intensity and soil characteristics. The greatest reductions concerning infiltration capacity were manifested in soils being periodically waterlogged (either by surface or by groundwater). A profound influence on the infiltration process was revealed in pasture soils

  4. Impact of temperature on the biological properties of soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowik, Agata; Wyszkowska, Jadwiga

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the response of soil microorganisms and enzymes to the temperature of soil. The effect of the temperatures: 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25°C on the biological properties of soil was investigated under laboratory conditions. The study was performed using four different soils differing in their granulometric composition. It was found that 15°C was the optimal temperature for the development of microorganisms in soil. Typically, in the soil, the highest activity of dehydrogenases was observed at 10-15°C, catalase and acid phosphatase - at 15°C, alkaline phosphatase at 20°C, urease and β-glucosidase at 25°C. The highest colony development index for heterotrophic bacteria was recorded in soils incubated at 25°C, while for actinomycetes and fungi at 15°C. The incubation temperature of soil only slightly changed the ecophysiological variety of the investigated groups of microorganisms. Therefore, the observed climate changes might have a limited impact on the soil microbiological activity, because of the high ability of microorganisms to adopt. The response of soil microorganisms and enzymes was more dependent on the soil granulometric composition, organic carbon, and total nitrogen than on its temperature.

  5. IMPACT OF INCREASED ALUMINATE CONCENTRATIONS ON PROPERTIES OF SALTSTONE MIXES

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J; Tommy Edwards, T; Erich Hansen, E; Vickie Williams, V

    2007-10-12

    One of the goals of the Saltstone variability study is to identify the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone mixes. The protocols developed in this variability study are ideally suited as a tool to assess the impact of proposed changes to the processing flow sheet for Liquid Waste Operations (LWO). One such proposal that is currently under consideration is to introduce a leaching step in the treatment of the High Level Waste (HLW) sludge to remove aluminum prior to vitrification at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This leachate would significantly increase the soluble aluminate concentrations as well as the free hydroxide ion concentration in the salt feed that will be processed at the Saltstone Processing Facility (SPF). Consequently, an initial study of the impact of increased aluminate concentration on the Saltstone grout properties was performed. The projected compositions and ranges of the aluminate rich salt stream (which includes the blending strategy) are not yet available and consequently, in this initial report, two separate salt stream compositions were investigated. The first stream starts with the previously projected baseline composition of the salt solution that will be fed to SPF from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The second stream is the solution that results from washing of the current Tank 51 sludge and subsequent transfer of the salt solution to Tank 11. The SWPF simulant has higher nitrate and lower free hydroxide than the Tank 11 simulant. In both of these cases, the aluminate was varied up to a maximum of 0.40 to 0.45M aluminate in order to evaluate the impact of increasing aluminate ion concentration on the grout properties. In general, the fresh grout properties of mixes made with SWPF and Tank 11 simulants were relatively insensitive to an increase in aluminate concentration in the salt solutions. However, the overall

  6. The Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR): validation and psychometric properties

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Robert M; Friend, Ronald; Jones, Kim D; Ward, Rachel; Han, Bobby K; Ross, Rebecca L

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) is a commonly used instrument in the evaluation of fibromyalgia (FM) patients. Over the last 18 years, since the publication of the original FIQ, several deficiencies have become apparent and the cumbersome scoring algorithm has been a barrier to widespread clinical use. The aim of this paper is to describe and validate a revised version of the FIQ: the FIQR. Methods The FIQR was developed in response to known deficiencies of the FIQ with the help of a patient focus group. The FIQR has the same 3 domains as the FIQ (that is, function, overall impact and symptoms). It differs from the FIQ in having modified function questions and the inclusion of questions on memory, tenderness, balance and environmental sensitivity. All questions are graded on a 0–10 numeric scale. The FIQR was administered online and the results were compared to the same patient's online responses to the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the original FIQ. Results The FIQR was completed online by 202 FM patients, 51 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients (31 RA and 20 SLE), 11 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 213 healthy controls (HC). The mean total FIQR score was 56.6 ± 19.9 compared to a total FIQ score of 60.6 ± 17.8 (P < 0.03). The total scores of the FIQR and FIQ were closely correlated (r = 0.88, P < 0.001). Each of the 3 domains of the FIQR correlated well with the 3 related FIQ domains (r = 0.69 to 0.88, P < 0.01). The FIQR showed good correlation with comparable domains in the SF-36, with a multiple regression analysis showing that the three FIQR domain scores predicted the 8 SF-36 subscale scores. The FIQR had good discriminant ability between FM and the 3 other groups; total FIQR scores were HC (12.1 ± 11.6), RA/SLE (28.6 ± 21.2) and MDD (17.3 ± 11.8). The patient completion time was 1.3 minutes; scoring took about 1 minute. Conclusions The FIQR is an updated

  7. Aqueous aerosol SOA formation: impact on aerosol physical properties.

    PubMed

    Woo, Joseph L; Kim, Derek D; Schwier, Allison N; Li, Ruizhi; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry in aerosol water has recently been recognized as a potentially important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material. This SOA material may be surface-active, therefore potentially affecting aerosol heterogeneous activity, ice nucleation, and CCN activity. Aqueous aerosol chemistry has also been shown to be a potential source of light-absorbing products ("brown carbon"). We present results on the formation of secondary organic aerosol material in aerosol water and the associated changes in aerosol physical properties from GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a photochemical box model with coupled gas and detailed aqueous aerosol chemistry. The detailed aerosol composition output from GAMMA was coupled with two recently developed modules for predicting a) aerosol surface tension and b) the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the aerosol, based on our previous laboratory observations. The simulation results suggest that the formation of oligomers and organic acids in bulk aerosol water is unlikely to perturb aerosol surface tension significantly. Isoprene-derived organosulfates are formed in high concentrations in acidic aerosols under low-NO(x) conditions, but more experimental data are needed before the potential impact of these species on aerosol surface tension may be evaluated. Adsorption of surfactants from the gas phase may further suppress aerosol surface tension. Light absorption by aqueous aerosol SOA material is driven by dark glyoxal chemistry and is highest under high-NO(x) conditions, at high relative humidity, in the early morning hours. The wavelength dependence of the predicted absorption spectra is comparable to field observations and the predicted mass absorption efficiencies suggest that aqueous aerosol chemistry can be a significant source of aerosol brown carbon under urban conditions.

  8. Notched bar Izod impact properties of zinc die castings

    SciTech Connect

    Schrems, K.K.; Dogan, O.N.; Goodwin, F.E.

    2007-03-01

    Notched bar Izod impact testing of zinc die cast Alloy 3, Alloy 5, ZA-8, and AcuZinc 5 was performed at five temperatures between -40\\mDC and room temperature in accordance with ASTM E23 for impact testing of metallic materials. A direct comparison between ASTM D256 for impact testing of plastics and ASTM E23 was performed using continuously cast zinc specimens of Alloy 5 and ZA-8 at -40\\mDC and room temperature. There are differences in sample sizes, impact velocity, and striker geometry between the two tests. Bulk zinc tested according to ASTM E23 resulted in higher impact energies at -40\\mDC and lower impact energies at room temperature then did the same alloys when tested according to ASTM D256.

  9. The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoen, Ben; Wiser, Ryan; Cappers, Peter; Thayer, Mark; Sethi, Gautam

    2009-12-01

    This report uses statistical analysis to evaluate the impact of wind power projects on property values, and fails to uncovers conclusive evidence of the existence of any widespread property value impacts.

  10. Deflection by kinetic impact: Sensitivity to asteroid properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bruck Syal, Megan; Michael Owen, J.; Miller, Paul L.

    2016-05-01

    Impacting an asteroid with a spacecraft traveling at high speed delivers an impulsive change in velocity to the body. In certain circumstances, this strategy could be used to deflect a hazardous asteroid, moving its orbital path off of an Earth-impacting course. However, the efficacy of momentum delivery to asteroids by hypervelocity impact is sensitive to both the impact conditions (particularly velocity) and specific characteristics of the target asteroid. We numerically model asteroid response to kinetic impactors under a wide range of initial conditions, using an Adaptive Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code. Impact velocities spanning 1–30 km/s were investigated, yielding, for a particular set of assumptions about the modeled target material, a power-law dependence consistent with a velocity-scaling exponent of μ = 0.44. Target characteristics including equation of state, strength model, porosity, rotational state, and shape were varied, and corresponding changes in asteroid response were documented. Moreover, the kinetic-impact momentum-multiplication factor, β, decreases with increasing asteroid cohesion and increasing porosity. Although increased porosity lowers β, larger porosities result in greater deflection velocities, as a consequence of reduced target masses for asteroids of fixed size. Porosity also lowers disruption risk for kinetic impacts near the threshold of disruption. Including fast (P = 2.5 h) and very fast (P = 100 s) rotation did not significantly alter β but did affect the risk of disruption by the impact event. Asteroid shape is found to influence the efficiency of momentum delivery, as local slope conditions can change the orientation of the crater ejecta momentum vector. Our results emphasize the need for asteroid characterization studies to bracket the range of target conditions expected at near-Earth asteroids while also highlighting some of the principal uncertainties associated with the kinetic-impact deflection strategy.

  11. Deflection by kinetic impact: Sensitivity to asteroid properties

    DOE PAGES

    Bruck Syal, Megan; Michael Owen, J.; Miller, Paul L.

    2016-05-01

    Impacting an asteroid with a spacecraft traveling at high speed delivers an impulsive change in velocity to the body. In certain circumstances, this strategy could be used to deflect a hazardous asteroid, moving its orbital path off of an Earth-impacting course. However, the efficacy of momentum delivery to asteroids by hypervelocity impact is sensitive to both the impact conditions (particularly velocity) and specific characteristics of the target asteroid. We numerically model asteroid response to kinetic impactors under a wide range of initial conditions, using an Adaptive Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code. Impact velocities spanning 1–30 km/s were investigated, yielding, for amore » particular set of assumptions about the modeled target material, a power-law dependence consistent with a velocity-scaling exponent of μ = 0.44. Target characteristics including equation of state, strength model, porosity, rotational state, and shape were varied, and corresponding changes in asteroid response were documented. Moreover, the kinetic-impact momentum-multiplication factor, β, decreases with increasing asteroid cohesion and increasing porosity. Although increased porosity lowers β, larger porosities result in greater deflection velocities, as a consequence of reduced target masses for asteroids of fixed size. Porosity also lowers disruption risk for kinetic impacts near the threshold of disruption. Including fast (P = 2.5 h) and very fast (P = 100 s) rotation did not significantly alter β but did affect the risk of disruption by the impact event. Asteroid shape is found to influence the efficiency of momentum delivery, as local slope conditions can change the orientation of the crater ejecta momentum vector. Our results emphasize the need for asteroid characterization studies to bracket the range of target conditions expected at near-Earth asteroids while also highlighting some of the principal uncertainties associated with the kinetic-impact deflection

  12. Impact and dynamic mechanical thermal properties of textile silk reinforced epoxy resin composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, K.; Guan, J.

    2016-07-01

    Silk fabric reinforced epoxy resin composites (SFRPs) were prepared using simple techniques of hand lay-up, hot-press and vacuum treatment, and a series of volume fractions of silk reinforcements were achieved. The impact properties and dynamic mechanical properties of SFRPs were investigated using a pendulum impact testing method and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The results suggest that silk reinforcement could greatly enhance the mechanical performances of SFRPs. The impact strength reached a maximum of 71 kJ/m2 for 60%-silk SFRP, which demonstrated a potential of silk composites for defence and impact- resistant materials.

  13. Thermoplastic impact property improvement in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite bumper beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoodi, M. M.; Sapuan, S. M.; Ali, Aidy; Ahmad, D.; Khalina, A.

    2010-05-01

    Utilization of thermoset resin as a bumper beam composite matrix is currently more dominated in car manufacturer suppliers, because of availability, easy processing, low material cost and production equipment investment. Moreover, low viscosity, shrinkage and excellent flow facilitate better fibre impregnation and proper surface resin wetting. Three-dimensional cross linking curing increase impact, creep and environmental stress cracking resistance properties. Low impact properties of natural fibre epoxy composite, are main issues in its employment for automotive structural components. Impact properties in epoxy composite bumper beam could be increased by modifying the resin, reinforcement and manufacturing process as well as geometry parameters such as cross section, thickness, added ribs and fixing method optimizations could strengthen impact resistance. There are two main methods, flexibilisation and toughening, as modifying the resin in order to improve the impact properties of epoxy composite, which form single phase or two-phase morphology to make modifier as epoxy or from separate phase to keep the thermo-mechanical properties. Liquid rubber, thermoplastic, core shell particle and rigid particle are different methods of toughening improvements. In this research, thermoplastic toughening has used to improve impact properties in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite for automotive bumper beam and has achieved reasonable impact improvements.

  14. On the Possible Influence of Small Impact on Geoengineering Properties of Subsoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaga, A.; Radaszewski, R.; Wierzbicki, J.

    2016-08-01

    The main aim of the study was to investigate the changes in geoengineering properties of non lithified deposits below the craters in comparison to genetically the similar types of sediments unaffected by impact.

  15. A review of the impacts of degradation threats on soil properties in the UK.

    PubMed

    Gregory, A S; Ritz, K; McGrath, S P; Quinton, J N; Goulding, K W T; Jones, R J A; Harris, J A; Bol, R; Wallace, P; Pilgrim, E S; Whitmore, A P

    2015-10-01

    National governments are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of their soil resources and are shaping strategies accordingly. Implicit in any such strategy is that degradation threats and their potential effect on important soil properties and functions are defined and understood. In this paper, we aimed to review the principal degradation threats on important soil properties in the UK, seeking quantitative data where possible. Soil erosion results in the removal of important topsoil and, with it, nutrients, C and porosity. A decline in soil organic matter principally affects soil biological and microbiological properties, but also impacts on soil physical properties because of the link with soil structure. Soil contamination affects soil chemical properties, affecting nutrient availability and degrading microbial properties, whilst soil compaction degrades the soil pore network. Soil sealing removes the link between the soil and most of the 'spheres', significantly affecting hydrological and microbial functions, and soils on re-developed brownfield sites are typically degraded in most soil properties. Having synthesized the literature on the impact on soil properties, we discuss potential subsequent impacts on the important soil functions, including food and fibre production, storage of water and C, support for biodiversity, and protection of cultural and archaeological heritage. Looking forward, we suggest a twin approach of field-based monitoring supported by controlled laboratory experimentation to improve our mechanistic understanding of soils. This would enable us to better predict future impacts of degradation processes, including climate change, on soil properties and functions so that we may manage soil resources sustainably.

  16. Comparison of petrophysical properties of impactites for four meteoritic impact structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Y.; Mayr, S.; Romushkevich, R.; Burkhardt, H.; Wilhelm, H.

    2014-05-01

    We reanalyzed and compared unique data sets, which we obtained in the frame of combined petrophysical and geothermal investigations within scientific drilling projects on four impact structures: the Puchezh-Katunki impact structure (Vorotilovo borehole, Russia), the Ries impact structure (Noerdlingen-73 borehole, Germany), the Chicxulub impact structure (ICDP Yaxcopoil-1 borehole, Mexico), and the Chesapeake impact structure (ICDP-USGS-Eyreville borehole, USA). For a joined interpretation, we used the following previously published data: thermal properties, using the optical scanning technique, and porosities, both measured on densely sampled halfcores of the boreholes. For the two ICDP boreholes, we also used our previously published P-wave velocities measured on a subset of cores. We show that thermal conductivity, thermal anisotropy, porosity, and velocity can be correlated with shock metamorphism (target rocks of the Puchezh-Katunki and Ries impact structures), and confirm the absence of shock metamorphism in the samples taken from megablocks (Chicxulub and Chesapeake impact structure). The physical properties of the lithic impact breccias and suevites are influenced mainly by their impact-related porosity. Physical properties of lower porosity lithic impact breccias and suevites are also influenced by their chemical composition. These data allow for a distinction between different types of breccias due to differences concerning the texture and chemistry and the different amounts of melt and rock clasts.

  17. Properties of the tibial component regarding impact load.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Kazunori; Koga, Yoshio; Segawa, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Yuichi; Tanabe, Yuji; Endo, Naoto; Omori, Go

    2004-06-01

    Load transmission through knee prostheses was examined to clarify how the tibial component behaves under dynamic loading conditions. We did Genesis II total knee arthroplasty using sawbones and measured impact load transmission ratios using the split-Hopkinson pressure bar technique. We also measured the polyethylene strain when an impact load was applied using a strain gauge bonded to the anterior surface of the polyethylene. The impact load transmission ratios of metal-backed and all-polyethylene tibial components were less than 4%. Greater load transmission was observed with metal-backed components, which suggests that some of the applied dynamic load is transferred directly to the tibial cortical bone. Increasing polyethylene thickness decreased impact load transmission ratios in both components, which might lower the cancellous bone stresses beneath tibial implants. Greater strain in the tibial component was observed in all-polyethylene components. Increased polyethylene thickness did not significantly decrease the polyethylene strain, probably because of the nonlinear elastic behavior of the polyethylene material. The distant positioning of the strain gauge may, however, have prevented the detection of local contact strains. Recent clinical studies did not confirm our theoretical predictions, suggesting that other factors contribute more significantly to the clinical outcome in current total knee arthroplasty.

  18. [Sugar substitute products impact on oral fluid biochemical properties].

    PubMed

    Tsapok, P I; Imbriakov, K V; Chuchkova, M R

    2012-01-01

    Sugar substitute products impact on oral fluid protein and carbohydrate content, as well as oxidative balance were studied in 60 medical school students in compare with conventional sugar. Sugar intake proved to cause cariesogenic carbohydrate metabolism disorders in oral fluid, intensification of lipoperoxidation and decrease in antioxidation activity. Sugar substitute products help to prevent dental decay.

  19. Online Data Resources in Chemical Engineering Education: Impact of the Uncertainty Concept for Thermophysical Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sun Hyung; Kang, Jeong Won; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Magee, Joseph W.; Diky, Vladimir; Muzny, Chris D.; Kazakov, Andrei F.; Chirico, Robert D.; Frenkel, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We review the concept of uncertainty for thermophysical properties and its critical impact for engineering applications in the core courses of chemical engineering education. To facilitate the translation of developments to engineering education, we employ NIST Web Thermo Tables to furnish properties data with their associated expanded…

  20. Online Data Resources in Chemical Engineering Education: Impact of the Uncertainty Concept for Thermophysical Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sun Hyung; Kang, Jeong Won; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Magee, Joseph W.; Diky, Vladimir; Muzny, Chris D.; Kazakov, Andrei F.; Chirico, Robert D.; Frenkel, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We review the concept of uncertainty for thermophysical properties and its critical impact for engineering applications in the core courses of chemical engineering education. To facilitate the translation of developments to engineering education, we employ NIST Web Thermo Tables to furnish properties data with their associated expanded…

  1. Impact properties of 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.; Gazda, J.

    1995-04-01

    Following previous reports of excellent properties of a laboratory heat of V-4Cr-4Ti, the alloy identified as the primary vanadium-based candidate for application as fusion reactor structural components, a large industrial-scale (500-kg) heat of the alloy was fabricated successfully. The objective of this work is to determine the impact properties of the industrial-scale heat.

  2. Knitted Strain Sensors: Impact of Design Parameters on Sensing Properties

    PubMed Central

    Atalay, Ozgur; Kennon, William Richard

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the sensing properties exhibited by textile-based knitted strain sensors. Knitted sensors were manufactured using flat-bed knitting technology, and electro-mechanical tests were subsequently performed on the specimens using a tensile testing machine to apply strain whilst the sensor was incorporated into a Wheatstone bridge arrangement to allow electrical monitoring. The sensing fabrics were manufactured from silver-plated nylon and elastomeric yarns. The component yarns offered similar diameters, bending characteristics and surface friction, but their production parameters differed in respect of the required yarn input tension, the number of conductive courses in the sensing structure and the elastomeric yarn extension characteristics. Experimental results showed that these manufacturing controls significantly affected the sensing properties of the knitted structures such that the gauge factor values, the working range and the linearity of the sensors varied according to the knitted structure. These results confirm that production parameters play a fundamental role in determining the physical behavior and the sensing properties of knitted sensors. It is thus possible to manipulate the sensing properties of knitted sensors and the sensor response may be engineered by varying the production parameters applied to specific designs. PMID:24608010

  3. Property value impacts of hemlock woolly adelgid in residential forests

    Treesearch

    Thomas P. Holmes; Elizabeth A. Murphy; Kathleen P. Bell; Denise D. Royle

    2010-01-01

    This study estimates the economic losses attributable to a nonindigenous forest insect, the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsuga), using cross-sectional and difference-in-difference hedonic price models. The data span a decade of residential property value transactions in West Milford, New Jersey. Hemlock health in naturally regenerated hemlock stands was measured...

  4. How lichens impact on terrestrial community and ecosystem properties.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Johan; Wardle, David A

    2016-10-11

    Lichens occur in most terrestrial ecosystems; they are often present as minor contributors, but in some forests, drylands and tundras they can make up most of the ground layer biomass. As such, lichens dominate approximately 8% of the Earth's land surface. Despite their potential importance in driving ecosystem biogeochemistry, the influence of lichens on community processes and ecosystem functioning have attracted relatively little attention. Here, we review the role of lichens in terrestrial ecosystems and draw attention to the important, but often overlooked role of lichens as determinants of ecological processes. We start by assessing characteristics that vary among lichens and that may be important in determining their ecological role; these include their growth form, the types of photobionts that they contain, their key functional traits, their water-holding capacity, their colour, and the levels of secondary compounds in their thalli. We then assess how these differences among lichens influence their impacts on ecosystem and community processes. As such, we consider the consequences of these differences for determining the impacts of lichens on ecosystem nutrient inputs and fluxes, on the loss of mass and nutrients during lichen thallus decomposition, and on the role of lichenivorous invertebrates in moderating decomposition. We then consider how differences among lichens impact on their interactions with consumer organisms that utilize lichen thalli, and that range in size from microfauna (for which the primary role of lichens is habitat provision) to large mammals (for which lichens are primarily a food source). We then address how differences among lichens impact on plants, through for example increasing nutrient inputs and availability during primary succession, and serving as a filter for plant seedling establishment. Finally we identify areas in need of further work for better understanding the role of lichens in terrestrial ecosystems. These include

  5. Impact of Biochar Amendment on Soil Hydrological Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifunovic, B.; Gonzales, H. B.; Ravi, S.

    2016-12-01

    Large-scale biochar application can provide sustainable pathways to increase the terrestrial storage of carbon, boost bioenergy production, and improve soil and water quality. In agricultural systems, the application of biochar to soil has been shown to increase crop productivity by improving water and nutrient retention properties. Due to the recalcitrant nature of the organic carbon in biochar, biochar can last hundreds of years in soils. Hence understanding the soil hydrological properties affected by biochar addition needs to be investigated to identify the tradeoffs and synergies of large-scale biochar application. We investigated, using extensive hydraulic conductivity (saturated and unsaturated) and soil water potential measurements, the changes in soil hydrological processes induced by different concentrations (1, 2 and 5 % by weight) and size fractions (unsieved, fine and coarse) of biochar for three soil types (sand, sandy loam, and silt loam). Our results indicate that for the unsieved biochar (a commercial product) the saturated hydraulic conductivity increased by 77% with increasing concentration of biochar up to a point (2% by weight) and then decreased by 27% overall at 5% by weight. For fine and coarse biochar the increase in biochar concentration decreased the saturated hydraulic conductivity by 82% and 31%, respectively. Soil water retention curves became steeper with increasing biochar concentration, mostly due to its ability to retain moisture. The changes in soil hydrologic properties were strongly dependent on background soil properties. Our experimental findings highlight the importance of considering the soil (texture) and biochar properties (application rate and particle size distribution) for biochar-based soil improvement or carbon sequestration programs.

  6. Excellent Ballistic Impact Properties Demonstrated By New Fabric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    2002-01-01

    Recently, a relatively new industrial fiber known by the trade name Zylon has been under commercial development by Toyobo Co., Ltd., Japan. In ballistic impact tests conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center, it was found that dry fabric braided of Zylon had greater ballistic impact capacity than comparable (braid style and weight) fabric braided of Kevlar. To study the potential use of Zylon fabric in jet engine containment systems, the fabric was tested in Glenn's Structures and Acoustics Division Ballistic Impact Facility under conditions simulating those which occur in a jet engine blade-out event. Circular ring test specimens were fabricated by wrapping five layers of braided Zylon or Kevlar fabric around an inner ring made of a thin sheet of aluminum and a 1-in.-thick layer of aluminum honeycomb. The test specimens had an inner diameter of 40 in., an axial length of 10 in., and a wall thickness of approximately 1.5in. A test specimen is shown in the photograph.

  7. Role of impactor properties on the computational simulation of particle impact damage in transparent ceramic windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Robert; Guven, Ibrahim; Zelinski, Brian J.

    2014-05-01

    The ability to deploy advanced sensor and seeker systems in harsh environments is often restricted by the mechanical durability of the external electromagnetic window or dome. Mission environments may range from long flights at high speeds through rain, ice, or sand to exposure at slower speeds to debris on runways or from helicopter downwash. While significant progress has been made to characterize, understand, and model rain damage, less is known about modeling damage in windows and domes caused by impacts from solid particles such as stones, pebbles, and sand. This paper highlights recent progress made to simulate particle impact damage in zinc sulfide (ZnS) using peridynamics (PD). Early versions of the PD model of sand impact damage simulated the sand particle as a rigid disk. Results from these early models indicated that the extent of damage in relation to the size of the impacting particle was significantly larger than the actual damage observed by experimentation. In order to identify possible explanations for this discrepancy, the shape, impact orientation and mechanical properties of the impacting particle were modified to more closely resemble actual sand particle impacts, that is, the particle was made friable (deformable and breakable). The impacting geometries considered include sphere, flat face of a cylinder, cube-face, cube-edge, and cube-corner. Results confirm that modification of the impacting particle's mechanical properties, shape and impact orientation lead to better agreement between experimental observations and simulation results.

  8. Impact attenuation properties of new and used lacrosse helmets.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Thomas G; Breedlove, Katherine M; Breedlove, Evan L; Dodge, Thomas M; Nauman, Eric A

    2015-11-05

    The National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) has developed impact attenuation thresholds that protective helmets worn in sport must meet to be commercially available in an attempt to prevent injury. It remains unknown how normal helmet use in athletic activity alters the force attenuation ability of lacrosse helmets. We tested 3 new and 3 randomly selected used helmets from 2 popular lacrosse models (Cascade Pro7, Cascade CPXR). All used helmets had been worn for 3 collegiate seasons prior to testing and had never been refurbished. Helmets were drop-tested using 3 prescribed impact velocities at 6 locations according to the NOCSAE lacrosse helmet standard, and we compared the Gadd Severity Index (GSI) scores between new and used helmets using a repeated measure ANOVA with location as the repeated variable and data separated by impact velocity. All 12 helmets passed the NOCSAE GSI threshold for all testing conditions; however 1 used helmet shell cracked resulting in a failed test. We found a significant main effect for helmet age at the low (F5,50=2.98, P=.02), medium (F5,50=3.71, P=.006), and high (F5,50=2.70, P=.03) velocities. We suspect that helmet use can degrade materials under some conditions, but improve performance in others due to changes in helmet composition from use. The clinical implications of the differences in GSI scores noted remain unclear. Because one helmet shell cracked resulting in a failed test, used helmets should be regularly inspected for cracks or other signs of mechanical fatigue that may weaken helmet integrity.

  9. Psychometric properties of the Impact on Participation and Autonomy Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Cardol, M; de Haan, R J; de Jong, B A; van den Bos, G A; de Groot, I J

    2001-02-01

    To examine the homogeneity, test-retest reliability, construct validity, and concurrent validity of the Impact on Participation and Autonomy Questionnaire (IPAQ). Cross-sectional study with a test-retest subsample. One hundred twenty-six persons from 5 diagnostic groups recruited from the outpatients clinics of 2 rehabilitation centers and the rehabilitation department of an academic hospital. The IPAQ and 3 other self-administered questionnaires (Sickness Impact Profile [68-item version], London Handicap Scale [LHS], Medical Outcome Study Short-Form Health Survey). The IPAQ was completed twice by 75 respondents within approximately 2 weeks. The IPAQ addresses autonomy and participation in 5 domains: autonomy indoors, family role, autonomy outdoors, social relations, and work and educational opportunities. Cronbach's alpha for the several domains ranged between.81 and.91, indicating good homogeneity. On item level, weighted kappas ranged between.56 and.90. On domain level, the test-retest reliability of the IPAQ was good: intraclass correlation coefficients ranged between.83 and.91. Convergent validity was largely supported by the correlations between 4 domains of the LHS and the IPAQ. Discriminant validity was best demonstrated by low correlations between the IPAQ and 2 domains of the LHS representing theoretically different constructs. The IPAQ is a reliable and valid instrument for assessing autonomy and participation in chronic disorders. Its responsiveness requires further study.

  10. Repeated Impact Method and Devices to Simulate the Impact Fatigue Property of Drillstring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. H.; Li, B.; Pan, J.; Li, Q.; Liu, W. Y.; Pan, Y.

    2017-05-01

    It is well known that drillstring failures are a pendent problem in drilling engineering, because of the fatigue accumulation caused by the low amplitude-repeated impact. In order to reveal the effect of low amplitude-repeated impact on the failure mechanism of the drillstring, a repeated impact method and instrument have been developed based on the Charpy impact method, by which a series of tests have been performed in the condition of non-corrosive medium and with H2S environment respective. Test results of non-corrosive medium environment indicates that, with the increase of single impact energy, the low amplitude-repeated impact resistance of drillstring decreases significantly; For H2S corrosion environment, the low amplitude-repeated impact resistances with H2S is much lower than that without H2S corrosion, and high strength material such as V-150 drillstring is more sensitive to H2S corrosion media. Furthermore, based on the experiment data, the accumulation fatigue model to predict the service life of the drillstring is developed, which could be used to predict the fatigue life. Research fruits are very vital to select a suitable rotational speed for drilling job and drillstring design.

  11. Measurements of Lunar Dust Charging Properties by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Tankosic, Dragana; Craven, Paul D.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; LeClair, Andre; Spann, James F.; Norwood, Joseph K.

    2009-01-01

    Dust grains in the lunar environment are believed to be electrostatically charged predominantly by photoelectric emissions resulting from solar UV radiation on the dayside, and on the nightside by interaction with electrons in the solar wind plasma. In the high vacuum environment on the lunar surface with virtually no atmosphere, the positive and negative charge states of micron/submicron dust grains lead to some unusual physical and dynamical dust phenomena. Knowledge of the electrostatic charging properties of dust grains in the lunar environment is required for addressing their hazardous effect on the humans and mechanical systems. It is well recognized that the charging properties of individual small micron size dust grains are substantially different from the measurements on bulk materials. In this paper we present the results of measurements on charging of individual Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 dust grains by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-100 eV energy range. The charging/discharging rates of positively and negatively charged particles of approx. 0.1 to 5 micron radii are discussed in terms of the sticking efficiencies and secondary electron yields. The secondary electron emission process is found to be a complex and effective charging/discharging mechanism for incident electron energies as low as 10-25 eV, with a strong dependence on particle size. Implications of the laboratory measurements on the nature of dust grain charging in the lunar environment are discussed.

  12. Impact properties of vanadium-base alloys irradiated at < 430 C

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Smith, D.L.

    1998-03-01

    Recent attention to vanadium-base alloys has focused on the effect of low-temperature (<430 C) neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties, especially the phenomena of loss of work-hardening capability under tensile loading and loss of dynamic toughness manifested by low impact energy and high ductile-brittle-transition temperature (DBTT). This paper summarizes results of an investigation of the low-temperature impact properties of V-5Ti, V-4Cr-4Ti, and V-3Ti-Si that were irradiated in several fission reactor experiments, i.e., FFTF-MOTA, EBR-II X-530, and ATR-A1. Irradiation performance of one production-scale and one laboratory heat of V-4C-4Ti and one laboratory heat of V-3Ti-Si was the focus of the investigation. Even among the same lass of alloy, strong heat-to-heat variation was observed in low-temperature impact properties. A laboratory heat of V-4Cr-4Ti and V-3Ti-1Si exhibited good impact properties whereas a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti exhibited unacceptably high DBTT. The strong heat-to-heat variation in impact properties of V-4Cr-4Ti indicates that fabrication procedures and minor impurities play important roles in the low-temperature irradiation performance of the alloys.

  13. Impact of electron beam irradiation on fish gelatin film properties.

    PubMed

    Benbettaïeb, Nasreddine; Karbowiak, Thomas; Brachais, Claire-Hélène; Debeaufort, Frédéric

    2016-03-15

    The objective of this work was to display the effect of electron beam accelerator doses on properties of plasticized fish gelatin film. Electron spin resonance indicates free radical formation during irradiation, which might induce intermolecular cross-linking. Tensile strength for gelatin film significantly increases after irradiation (improved by 30% for 60 kGy). The vapour permeability is weakly affected by irradiation. Surface tension and its polar component increase significantly and are in accordance with the increase of wettability. So, irradiation may change the orientation of polar groups of gelatin at the film surface and crosslink the hydrophobic amino acids. No modification of the crystallinity of the film is observed. These findings suggest that if structure changes, it only occurs in the amorphous phase of the gelatin matrix. It is also observed that irradiation enhances the thermal stability of the gelatin film, by increasing the glass transition temperature and the degradation temperature.

  14. The Impact of Biophysical Properties of Erythrocytes on their Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Elblbesy, Mohamed A; Moustafa, Maisa E

    2017-06-01

    Erythrocytes aggregation takes places under low shear conditions or at stasis. All suggested mechanisms of erythrocytes aggregation indicated the importance role of fibrinogen and other blood proteins in enhanced erythrocyte aggregation. Recently a special attention is given to the cellular factors that may effect on erythrocytes aggregation. The present study inferred the effect of the cellular properties of erythrocytes on their aggregation. In the present study, aggregation index was calculated by a simple microscopic method. Correlations between erythrocytes aggregation index and mean cell volume, osmotic fragility, electrophoretic mobility, and magnetophoretic mobility were studied. The findings of this study indicated that the aggregation index is significatly correlated to mean cell volume, magnetophoretic mobility, osmotic fragility and electrophoretic mobility. Thus, It is concluded that cellular factors should be taken into consideration when studying the mechanism of erythrocytes aggregation.

  15. Aerosol physical properties and their impact on climate change processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzalkowska, Agata; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Makuch, Przemyslaw; Pakszys, Paulina; Markuszewski, Piotr; Piskozub, Jacek; Drozdowska, Violetta; Gutowska, Dorota; Rozwadowska, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Characterizing aerosols involves the specification of not only their spatial and temporal distributions but their multi-component composition, particle size distribution and physical properties as well. Due to their light attenuation and scattering properties, aerosols influence radiance measured by satellite for ocean color remote sensing. Studies of marine aerosol production and transport are important for many earth sciences such as cloud physics, atmospheric optics, environmental pollution studies, and interaction between ocean and atmosphere. It was one of the reasons for the growth in the number of research programs dealing with marine aerosols. Sea salt aerosols are among the most abundant components of the atmospheric aerosol, and thus it exerts a strong influence on radiation, cloud formation, meteorology and chemistry of the marine atmosphere. An accurate understanding and description of these mechanisms is crucial to modeling climate and climate change. This work provides information on combined aerosol studies made with lidars and sun photometers onboard the ship and in different coastal areas. We concentrate on aerosol optical thickness and its variations with aerosol advections into the study area. We pay special attention to the problem of proper data collection and analyses techniques. We showed that in order to detect the dynamics of potential aerosol composition changes it is necessary to use data from different stations where measurements are made using the same techniques. The combination of such information with air mass back-trajectories and data collected at stations located on the route of air masses provides comprehensive picture of aerosol variations in the study area both vertically and horizontally. Acknowledgements: The support for this study was provided by the project Satellite Monitoring of the Baltic Sea Environment - SatBałtyk founded by European Union through European Regional Development Fund contract No. POIG 01

  16. Thermal properties of rocks of the borehole Yaxcopoil-1 (Impact Crater Chicxulub, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Yu.; Romushkevich, R.; Korobkov, D.; Mayr, S.; Bayuk, I.; Burkhardt, H.; Wilhelm, H.

    2011-02-01

    The results of thermal property measurements on cores from the scientific well Yaxcopoil-1 (1511 m in depth) drilled in the Chicxulub impact structure (Mexico) are described. The thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, volumetric heat capacity, thermal anisotropy coefficient, thermal heterogeneity factor, and, in addition, porosity and density were measured on 451 dry and water-saturated cores from the depth interval of 404-1511 m. The acoustic velocities were determined on a subgroup of representative samples. Significant vertical short- and long-scale variations of physical properties related to the grade of shock-thermal metamorphism and correlations between thermal and other physical properties are established. Rocks of the post-impact and impact complexes differ significantly in heterogeneity demonstrating that the impact complex has larger micro- heterogeneity on sample scale. The pre-impact rocks differ essentially from the impact and post-impact rocks in the thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, density and porosity. The thermal anisotropy of rocks of all structural-lithological complexes is very low (K = 1.02 … 1.08), which is similar to the situation in the Puchezh-Katunk and Ries impact structures. Correlations are established between the thermal conductivity and elastic wave velocities measured in laboratory. For limestone-calcarenites, the thermal conductivity (λ) can be calculated from the compressional wave velocity (Vp) using the formula λ= 0.346 Vp + 0.844, and for dolomite-anhydrites this relation has the form λ= 0.998 Vp + 1.163 [for λ in W (m K)-1 and Vp in km s-1]. These correlations are used for downscaling of the sonic velocities to the decimetre scale. The effective medium theory is applied to invert the matrix thermal conductivity and pore/crack geometry from the thermal conductivity measured on the studied samples. Representative experimental data on the thermal properties for all lithological groups encountered by the

  17. Side impact: influence of impact conditions and bone mechanical properties on pelvic response using a fracturable pelvis model.

    PubMed

    Song, Eric; Trosseille, Xavier; Guillemot, Hevé

    2006-11-01

    This study aimed at determining the influence of impact conditions and occupant mechanical properties on pelvic response in side impact. First, a fracturable pelvis model was developed and validated against dynamic tests on isolated pelvic bones and on whole cadavers. By coupling a fixed cortical bone section thickness within a single subject's pelvis and across the population with a parametric material law for the pelvic bone, this model reproduced the pelvic response and tolerance variation among individuals. Three material laws were also identified to represent fragile, medium and strong pelvic bones for the 50th percentile male. With this model, the influence of impact mass, velocity and surface shape on pelvic response was examined. Results indicated that the shape difference between four main impactors reported in the literature has little effect on the pelvic response. Under iso-energy conditions, the relationship of pelvic loading between different combinations of impact mass and velocity was also determined. Based on this relationship, existing data from different impactor tests were scaled and combined to establish a pelvic response corridor in terms of pelvis loading versus impact energy. The relationship between bone mechanical properties and pelvic response and tolerance was also investigated with this model. Results indicated that changes in the mechanical properties due to ageing affected the pelvic tolerance more than the pelvic mechanical response. Assuming that the ultimate stress of the pelvic bone decreases 0.4% per year from 25 to 80 years old, the pelvic tolerance should be scaled by 0.4% per year while the pelvic loading response should be scaled only by 0.1% per year. Finally, it is to be noted that the model developed in this paper is a "global" model, not a "descriptive" model. Therefore, while it may be a useful tool for the analysis presented in this paper (e.g., overall fracture tolerance, overall effects of age, etc.), it cannot be

  18. The impact of surface properties on particle-interface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Anna; Kaz, David; McGorty, Ryan; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    2013-03-01

    The propensity for particles to bind to oil-water interfaces was first noted by Ramsden and Pickering over a century ago, and has been attributed to the huge reduction in surface energy when a particle breaches an oil-water interface and straddles it at its equilibrium height. Since then materials on a variety of length scales have been fabricated using particles at interfaces, from Pickering emulsions to Janus particles. In these applications, it is simply assumed that the particle sits at its hugely energetically favourable equilibrium position. However, it was recently shown that the relaxation of particles towards their equilibrium position is logarithmic in time and could take months, much longer than typical experiments. Here we investigate how surface charge and particle 'hairiness' impact the interaction between micron-sized particles and oil-water interfaces, and explore a molecular kinetic theory model to help understand these results. We use digital holographic microscopy to track micron-sized particles as they approach an oil-water interface with a resolution of 2 nm in all three dimensions at up to thousands of frames per second.

  19. Experimental studies on the impact properties of water ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, F. G.; Lin, D. N. C.; Hatzes, A. P.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental studies on the impact of ice particles at very low velocity were continued. These measurements have applications in the dynamics of Saturn's rings. Initially data were obtained on the coefficient of restitution for ice spheres of one radius of curvature. The type of measurements were expanded to include restitution data for balls with a variety of surfaces as well as sticking forces between ice particles. Significant improvements were made to this experiment, the most important being the construction of a new apparatus. The new apparatus consists of a smaller version of the disk pendulum and a stainless steel, double-walled cryostat. The apparatus has proved to be a significant improvement over the old one. Measurements can now be made at temperatures near 90 K, comparable to the temperature of the environment of Saturn's rings, and with much greater temperature stability. It was found that a roughened contact surface or the presence of frost can cause a much larger change in the restitution measure than the geometrical effect of the radius of curvature.

  20. Biological Invasions Impact Ecosystem Properties and can Affect Climate Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Meler, M.; Matamala, R.; Cook, D. R.; Graham, S.; Fan, Z.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change models vary widely in their predictions of the effects of climate forcing, in part because of difficulties in assigning sources of uncertainties and in simulating changes in the carbon source/sink status and climate-carbon cycle feedbacks of terrestrial ecosystems. We studied the impacts of vegetation and weather variations on carbon and energy fluxes at a restored tallgrass prairie in Illinois. The prairie was a strong carbon sink, despite a prolonged drought period and vegetation changes due to the presence of a non-native biennial plant. A model considering the combined effects of air temperature, precipitation, RH, incoming solar radiation, and vegetation was also developed and used to describe net ecosystem exchange for all years. The vegetation factor was represented in the model with summer albedo and/or NDVI. Results showed that the vegetation factor was more important than abiotic factors in describing changes in C and energy fluxes in ecosystems under disturbances. Changes from natives to a non-native forbs species had the strongest effect in reducing net ecosystem production and increasing sensible heat flux and albedo, which may result in positive feedbacks on warming. Here we show that non-native species invasions can alter the ecosystem sensitivity to climatic factors often construed in models.

  1. Impact Properties of Copper-Alloyed and Nickel-Copper Alloyed ADI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Uma; Ray, Subrata; Prabhakar, S. R.

    2007-08-01

    The influence of austenitization and austempering parameters on the impact properties of copper-alloyed and nickel-copper-alloyed austempered ductile irons (ADIs) has been studied. The austenitization temperature of 850 and 900 °C have been used in the present study for which austempering time periods of 120 and 60 min were optimized in an earlier work. The austempering process was carried out for 60 min for three austempering temperatures of 270, 330, and 380 °C to study the effect of austempering temperature. The influence of the austempering time on impact properties has been studied for austempering temperature of 330 °C for time periods of 30-150 min. The variation in impact strength with the austenitization and austempering parameters has been correlated to the morphology, size and amount of austenite and bainitic ferrite in the austempered structure. The fracture surface of ADI failed under impact has been studied using SEM.

  2. Impact of fuel properties on advanced power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sondreal, E.A.; Jones, M.L.; Hurley, J.P.; Benson, S.A.; Willson, W.G.

    1995-12-01

    Advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power systems currently in development and demonstration have the goal of increasing generating efficiency to a level approaching 50% while reducing the cost of electricity from new plants by 20% and meeting stringent standards on emissions of SO{sub x} NO{sub x} fine particulates, and air toxic metals. Achieving these benefits requires that clean hot gas be delivered to a gas turbine at a temperature approaching 1350{degrees}C, while minimizing energy losses in the gasification, combustion, heat transfer, and/or gas cleaning equipment used to generate the hot gas. Minimizing capital cost also requires that the different stages of the system be integrated as simply and compactly as possible. Second-generation technologies including integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC), externally fired combined cycle (EFCC), and other advanced combustion systems rely on different high-temperature combinations of heat exchange, gas filtration, and sulfur capture to meet these requirements. This paper describes the various properties of lignite and brown coals.

  3. Understanding the impact of microcrystalline cellulose physicochemical properties on tabletability.

    PubMed

    Thoorens, Gregory; Krier, Fabrice; Rozet, Eric; Carlin, Brian; Evrard, Brigitte

    2015-07-25

    The quality by design (QbD) initiative is promoting a better understanding of excipient performance and the identification of critical material attributes (CMAs). Despite microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) being one of the most popular direct compression binders, only a few studies attempted identifying its CMAs. These studies were based either on a limited number of samples or on MCC produced on a small scale and/or in conditions that deviate from those normally encountered in production. The present work utilizes multivariate analyses first to describe a large database of MCCs produced on a commercial scale, including an overview of their physicochemical properties, and secondly to correlate the most significant material attributes with tabletability. Particle size and moisture content are often considered as the most common if not the sole CMAs with regard to MCC performance in direct compression. The evaluation of more than 80 neat MCCs and the performance of selected samples in a model formulation revealed the importance of other potential critical attributes such as tapped density. Drug product developers and excipient suppliers should work together to identify these CMAs, which may not always be captured by the certificate of analysis.

  4. Extent of pyrolysis impacts on fast pyrolysis biochar properties.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Catherine E; Hu, Yan-Yan; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Loynachan, Thomas E; Laird, David A; Brown, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    A potential concern about the use of fast pyrolysis rather than slow pyrolysis biochars as soil amendments is that they may contain high levels of bioavailable C due to short particle residence times in the reactors, which could reduce the stability of biochar C and cause nutrient immobilization in soils. To investigate this concern, three corn ( L.) stover fast pyrolysis biochars prepared using different reactor conditions were chemically and physically characterized to determine their extent of pyrolysis. These biochars were also incubated in soil to assess their impact on soil CO emissions, nutrient availability, microorganism population growth, and water retention capacity. Elemental analysis and quantitative solid-state C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed variation in O functional groups (associated primarily with carbohydrates) and aromatic C, which could be used to define extent of pyrolysis. A 24-wk incubation performed using a sandy soil amended with 0.5 wt% of corn stover biochar showed a small but significant decrease in soil CO emissions and a decrease in the bacteria:fungi ratios with extent of pyrolysis. Relative to the control soil, biochar-amended soils had small increases in CO emissions and extractable nutrients, but similar microorganism populations, extractable NO levels, and water retention capacities. Corn stover amendments, by contrast, significantly increased soil CO emissions and microbial populations, and reduced extractable NO. These results indicate that C in fast pyrolysis biochar is stable in soil environments and will not appreciably contribute to nutrient immobilization. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  5. Terrain representation impact on periurban catchment morphological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, F.; Bocher, E.; Chancibault, K.

    2013-04-01

    SummaryModelling the hydrological behaviour of suburban catchments requires an estimation of environmental features, including land use and hydrographic networks. Suburban areas display a highly heterogeneous composition and encompass many anthropogenic elements that affect water flow paths, such as ditches, sewers, culverts and embankments. The geographical data available, either raster or vector data, may be of various origins and resolutions. Urban databases often offer very detailed data for sewer networks and 3D streets, yet the data covering rural zones may be coarser. This study is intended to highlight the sensitivity of geographical data as well as the data discretisation method used on the essential features of a periurban catchment, i.e. the catchment border and the drainage network. Three methods are implemented for this purpose. The first is the DEM (for digital elevation model) treatment method, which has traditionally been applied in the field of catchment hydrology. The second is based on urban database analysis and focuses on vector data, i.e. polygons and segments. The third method is a TIN (or triangular irregular network), which provides a consistent description of flow directions from an accurate representation of slope. It is assumed herein that the width function is representative of the catchment's hydrological response. The periurban Chézine catchment, located within the Nantes metropolitan area in western France, serves as the case study. The determination of both the main morphological features and the hydrological response of a suburban catchment varies significantly according to the discretization method employed, especially on upstream rural areas. Vector- and TIN-based methods allow representing the higher drainage density of urban areas, and consequently reveal the impact of these areas on the width function, since the DEM method fails. TINs seem to be more appropriate to take streets into account, because it allows a finer

  6. The impact of drought on wheat leaf cuticle properties.

    PubMed

    Bi, Huihui; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Langridge, Peter; Tricker, Penny J; Lopato, Sergiy; Borisjuk, Nikolai

    2017-05-08

    The plant cuticle is the outermost layer covering aerial tissues and is composed of cutin and waxes. The cuticle plays an important role in protection from environmental stresses and glaucousness, the bluish-white colouration of plant surfaces associated with cuticular waxes, has been suggested as a contributing factor in crop drought tolerance. However, the cuticle structure and composition is complex and it is not clear which aspects are important in determining a role in drought tolerance. Therefore, we analysed residual transpiration rates, cuticle structure and epicuticular wax composition under well-watered conditions and drought in five Australian bread wheat genotypes, Kukri, Excalibur, Drysdale, RAC875 and Gladius, with contrasting glaucousness and drought tolerance. Significant differences were detected in residual transpiration rates between non-glaucous and drought-sensitive Kukri and four glaucous and drought-tolerant lines. No simple correlation was found between residual transpiration rates and the level of glaucousness among glaucous lines. Modest differences in the thickness of cuticle existed between the examined genotypes, while drought significantly increased thickness in Drysdale and RAC875. Wax composition analyses showed various amounts of C31 β-diketone among genotypes and increases in the content of alkanes under drought in all examined wheat lines. The results provide new insights into the relationship between drought stress and the properties and structure of the wheat leaf cuticle. In particular, the data highlight the importance of the cuticle's biochemical makeup, rather than a simple correlation with glaucousness or stomatal density, for water loss under limited water conditions.

  7. Embedding of Superelastic SMA Wires into Composite Structures: Evaluation of Impact Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappadà, Silvio; Rametta, Rocco; Toia, Luca; Coda, Alberto; Fumagalli, Luca; Maffezzoli, Alfonso

    2009-08-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) represents the most versatile way to realize smart materials with sensing, controlling, and actuating functions. Due to their unique mechanical and thermodynamic properties and to the possibility to obtain SMA wires with very small diameters, they are used as smart components embedded into the conventional resins or composites, obtaining active abilities, tunable properties, self-healing properties, and damping capacity. Moreover, superelastic SMAs are used to increase the impact resistance properties of composite materials. In this study, the influence of the integration of thin superelastic wires to suppress propagating damage of composite structures has been investigated. Superelastic SMAs have very high strain to failure and recoverable elastic strain, due to a stress-induced martensitic phase transition creating a plateau region in the stress-strain curve. NiTi superelastic wires ( A f = -15 °C fully annealed) of 0.10 mm in diameter have been produced and characterized by SAES Getters. The straight annealed wire shows the typical flag stress-strain behavior. The measured loading plateau is about 450 MPa at ambient temperature with a recoverable elastic strain of more than 6%. For these reasons superelastic SMA fibers can absorb much more strain energy than other fibers before their failure, partly with a constant stress level. In this paper, the improvement of composite laminates impact properties by embedding SMA wires is evaluated and indications for design and manufacturing of SMA composites with high-impact properties are also given.

  8. Determining perception-based impacts of noxious facilities on wage rates and property values

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, L.A.; Clark, D.E.

    1992-02-01

    This document, written for the US Department of Energy, discusses current information and the need for future research on estimating the impacts on wages and property values that could result from people's perceptions of the risks associated with noxious facilities. Psychometric studies indicate that the US population is averse to living near noxious facilities, nuclear-related facilities in particular. Contingent valuation and hedonic studies find that the net economic impacts of proximity to noxious facilities are generally negative and often substantial. Most of these studies are limited in scope, and none estimate the impacts derived from public perceptions of such facilities. This study examines the mechanisms by which negative public perceptions result in economic impacts reflected in wages and property values. On the basis of these mechanisms, it develops a predictive model of perception-based impacts and identifies the data and methods needed to implement it. The key to predicting perception-based impacts lies in combining psychometric and hedonic methods. The reliability of psychometric measures as indicators of aversive stimuli that precipitate economic impacts can be empirically tested. To test the robustness of the findings, alternative estimation methods an be employed in the hedonic analysis. Contingent valuation methods can confirm the results.

  9. Determining perception-based impacts of noxious facilities on wage rates and property values

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, L.A.; Clark, D.E.

    1992-02-01

    This document, written for the US Department of Energy, discusses current information and the need for future research on estimating the impacts on wages and property values that could result from people`s perceptions of the risks associated with noxious facilities. Psychometric studies indicate that the US population is averse to living near noxious facilities, nuclear-related facilities in particular. Contingent valuation and hedonic studies find that the net economic impacts of proximity to noxious facilities are generally negative and often substantial. Most of these studies are limited in scope, and none estimate the impacts derived from public perceptions of such facilities. This study examines the mechanisms by which negative public perceptions result in economic impacts reflected in wages and property values. On the basis of these mechanisms, it develops a predictive model of perception-based impacts and identifies the data and methods needed to implement it. The key to predicting perception-based impacts lies in combining psychometric and hedonic methods. The reliability of psychometric measures as indicators of aversive stimuli that precipitate economic impacts can be empirically tested. To test the robustness of the findings, alternative estimation methods an be employed in the hedonic analysis. Contingent valuation methods can confirm the results.

  10. The economic impacts of noxious facilities on wages and property values: An exploratory analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, L.A.; Hemphill, R.C.; Clark, D.E.

    1991-05-01

    Recent assessments of socioeconomic impacts resulting from the location of potentially hazardous facilities have concentrated on the issue of negative public perceptions and their resulting economic consequences. This report presents an analysis designed to answer the question: Can economic impacts resulting from negative perceptions of ``noxious facilities`` be identified and measured? To identify the impacts of negative perceptions, data on noxious facilities sited throughout the United States were compiled, and secondary economic and demographic data sufficient to analyze the economic impacts on the surrounding study areas were assembled. This study uses wage rate and property value differentials to measure impacts on social welfare so that the extent to which noxious facilities and their associated activities have affected surrounding areas can be determined.

  11. The economic impacts of noxious facilities on wages and property values: An exploratory analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, L.A.; Hemphill, R.C.; Clark, D.E.

    1991-05-01

    Recent assessments of socioeconomic impacts resulting from the location of potentially hazardous facilities have concentrated on the issue of negative public perceptions and their resulting economic consequences. This report presents an analysis designed to answer the question: Can economic impacts resulting from negative perceptions of noxious facilities'' be identified and measured To identify the impacts of negative perceptions, data on noxious facilities sited throughout the United States were compiled, and secondary economic and demographic data sufficient to analyze the economic impacts on the surrounding study areas were assembled. This study uses wage rate and property value differentials to measure impacts on social welfare so that the extent to which noxious facilities and their associated activities have affected surrounding areas can be determined.

  12. Impact of dietary carbohydrate and protein source and content on swine manure foaming properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Diet ingredients are thought to contribute to foaming problems associated with swine deep-pit systems. Two experiments explored the impact of protein and carbohydrate sources in swine diets on the physicochemical properties, methane production potential, and foaming characteristics of swine manure. ...

  13. The impact of carbohydrate and protein level and sources on swine manure foaming properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study explored the impact of swine diet on the composition, methane production potential, and foaming properties of manure. Samples of swine manure were collected from controlled feeding trials with diets varying in protein and carbohydrate levels and sources. Protein sources consisted of corn ...

  14. The effect of heat treatment on the hardness and impact properties of medium carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazni Ismail, Noor; Khatif, Nurul Aida Amir; Aliff Kamil Awang Kecik, Mohamad; Hanafiah Shaharudin, Mohd Ali

    2016-02-01

    This paper covers the effect of heat treatment on the mechanical properties of medium carbon steel. The main objective of this project is to investigate the hardness and impact properties of medium carbon steel treated at different heat treatment processes. Three types of heat treatment were performed in this project which are annealing, quenching and tempering. During annealing process, the specimens were heated at 900°C and soaked for 1 hour in the furnace. The specimens were then quenched in a medium of water and open air, respectively. The treatment was followed by tempering processes which were done at 300°C, 450°C, and 600°C with a soaking time of 2 hours for each temperature. After the heat treatment process completed, Rockwell hardness test and Charpy impact test were performed. The results collected from the Rockwell hardness test and Charpy impact test on the samples after quenching and tempering were compared and analysed. The fractured surfaces of the samples were also been examined by using Scanning Electron Microscope. It was observed that different heat treatment processes gave different hardness value and impact property to the steel. The specimen with the highest hardness was found in samples quenched in water. Besides, the microstructure obtained after tempering provided a good combination of mechanical properties due to the process reduce brittleness by increasing ductility and toughness.

  15. Stover harvest impacts soil and hydrologic properties on three Minnesota farms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stover is the material remaining after harvesting corn (Zea Mays L.) grain, which may be removed for a variety of purposes, but these material are also crucial for protecting and enriching soil properties. This research was conducted on-farm in collaboration to assess the impact of harvesting cobs (...

  16. A Demographic Analysis of the Impact of Property Tax Caps on Indiana School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirth, Marilyn A.; Lagoni, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, the Indiana legislature passed and the governor signed into law House Enrolled Act No. 1001, now referred to as Public Law 146-2008, which capped Indiana school districts' ability to raise revenues from the local property tax without local voter approval. To phase in the impact of the law, the state provided school districts with levy…

  17. Impact of reaction conditions on architecture and rheological properties of starch graft polyacrylamide polymers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We carried out experiments examining the impact that solvent selection and reaction conditions have on the radical initiated graft polymerization reaction of acrylamide onto starch. We have also evaluated the rheological properties the starch graftpolyacrylamide product when a gel is formed in water...

  18. A Demographic Analysis of the Impact of Property Tax Caps on Indiana School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirth, Marilyn A.; Lagoni, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, the Indiana legislature passed and the governor signed into law House Enrolled Act No. 1001, now referred to as Public Law 146-2008, which capped Indiana school districts' ability to raise revenues from the local property tax without local voter approval. To phase in the impact of the law, the state provided school districts with levy…

  19. Impact of magnetic properties on the Casimir torque between anisotropic metamaterial plates

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Gang; Liu Zhongzhu; Luo Jun

    2009-12-15

    The quantized surface mode technique is used to calculate the Casimir torque between two parallel anisotropic metamaterial plates with in-plane optical axes, and our main concern is focused on the impact of the magnetic properties of the plates on the Casimir torque. Our result shows that at small separation, the Casimir torque between the two plates with frequency dependent permeabilities is larger than that between two nonmagnetic plates, while at large separation it is smaller. This can be explained as a result of the impact of both magnetic properties and material dispersion of the plates. The impact of the Drude background in connected metallic metamaterial is also discussed. These phenomena provide us with new understanding about the Casimir effect and show great potential in application.

  20. Impact property enhancement of poly (lactic acid) with different flexible copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likittanaprasong, N.; Seadan, M.; Suttiruengwong, S.

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this work was to improve the impact property of Poly (lactic acid) (PLA) by blending with different copolymers. Six flexible copolymers, namely, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) powder, Biomax, polybutyrate adipate co-terephthalate (PBAT), polyether block amide (PEBAX), ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) and ethylene acrylic elastomer (EAE), with loading less than 20wt% were used and compared. The rheological, mechanical and morphological properties of samples were investigated by melt flow index, tensile testing, impact testing and scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. It was found that PLA added 20wt% EAE showed the highest impact strength (59.5 kJ/m2), which was 22 times higher than neat PLA. The elongation at break was also increased by 12 folds compared to neat PLA. The SEM images showed good interface and distribution for PLA containing 20wt% EAE, 15 phr Biomax and 20 wt% PEBAX.

  1. Impact of wheat bran derived arabinoxylanoligosaccharides and associated ferulic acid on dough and bread properties.

    PubMed

    Snelders, Jeroen; Dornez, Emmie; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2014-07-23

    The impact of arabinoxylanoligosaccharides (AXOS) with varying bound or free ferulic acid (FA) content on dough and bread properties was studied in view of their prebiotic and antioxidant properties. AXOS with an FA content of 0.1-1.7% caused an increase in dough firmness with increasing AXOS concentration. AXOS with a high FA content (7.2%), on the contrary, resulted in an increase in dough extensibility and a decrease in resistance to extension, similar to that for free FA, when added in levels up to 2%. Higher levels resulted in unmanageable dough. A limited impact on dough gluten network formation was observed. These results suggest that for highly feruloylated AXOS, the FA-mediated dough softening supersedes the firming effect displayed by the carbohydrate moiety of AXOS. The impact of the different AXOS on bread volume, however, was minimal. Furthermore, AXOS in bread were not engaged in covalent cross-linking and significantly increased its antioxidant capacity.

  2. Impact of phase transition from neutrons to hyperons in neutron star properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrizal, Sulaksono, A.

    2017-07-01

    We revisit the impact of phase transition from neutrons to hyperons in the properties of neutron star using BSP parameter set of relativistic mean field (RMF) model. Similar to the work reported in Reference [1], the significance of the phase transition is observed from the impact gσ∗Λ/gσN variation on the corresponding neutron stars equation of state and mass versus radius relation. The impact of anisotropic pressure on equation of state and mass versus radius relation of neutron stars is also investigated. It is found that equation of state of neutron stars is very sensitive to gσ∗Λ/gσN coupling constant variation. However, different to the result of Reference [1], we do not obtain hyperon stars with very small radii R˜ 8 km. We do not also find significant effect of anisotropic pressure to change the behavior of neutron star properties due to phase transition.

  3. The Impact of Halloysite on the Thermo-Mechanical Properties of Polymer Composites.

    PubMed

    Gaaz, Tayser Sumer; Sulong, Abu Bakar; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Al-Amiery, Ahmed A; Nassir, Mohamed H; Jaaz, Ahed Hameed

    2017-05-20

    Nanotubular clay minerals, composed of aluminosilicate naturally structured in layers known as halloysite nanotubes (HNTs), have a significant reinforcing impact on polymer matrixes. HNTs have broad applications in biomedical applications, the medicine sector, implant alloys with corrosion protection and manipulated transportation of medicines. In polymer engineering, different research studies utilize HNTs that exhibit a beneficial enhancement in the properties of polymer-based nanocomposites. The dispersion of HNTs is improved as a result of pre-treating HNTs with acids. The HNTs' percentage additive up to 7% shows the highest improvement of tensile strength. The degradation of the polymer can be also significantly improved by doping a low percentage of HNTs. Both the mechanical and thermal properties of polymers were remarkably improved when mixed with HNTs. The effects of HNTs on the mechanical and thermal properties of polymers, such as ultimate strength, elastic modulus, impact strength and thermal stability, are emphasized in this study.

  4. Global Geometric Properties of Martian Impact Craters: A Preliminary Assessment Using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Schnetzler, C.; Frawley, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    Impact craters on Mars have been used to provide fundamental insights into the properties of the martian crust, the role of volatiles, the relative age of the surface, and on the physics of impact cratering in the Solar System. Before the three-dimensional information provided by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument which is currently operating in Mars orbit aboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), impact features were characterized morphologically using orbital images from Mariner 9 and Viking. Fresh-appearing craters were identified and measurements of their geometric properties were derived from various image-based methods. MOLA measurements can now provide a global sample of topographic cross-sections of martian impact features as small as approx. 2 km in diameter, to basin-scale features. We have previously examined MOLA cross-sections of Northern Hemisphere and North Polar Region impact features, but were unable to consider the global characteristics of these ubiquitous landforms. Here we present our preliminary assessment of the geometric properties of a globally-distributed sample of martian impact craters, most of which were sampled during the initial stages of the MGS mapping mission (i.e., the first 600 orbits). Our aim is to develop a framework for reconsidering theories concerning impact cratering in the martian environment. This first global analysis is focused upon topographically-fresh impact craters, defined here on the basis of MOLA topographic profiles that cross the central cavities of craters that can be observed in Viking-based MDIM global image mosaics. We have considered crater depths, rim heights, ejecta topologies, cross-sectional "shapes", and simple physical models for ejecta emplacement. To date (May, 1999), we have measured the geometric properties of over 1300 impact craters in the 2 to 350 km diameter size interval. A large fraction of these measured craters were sampled with cavity-center cross-sections during the first

  5. Global Geometric Properties of Martian Impact Craters: A Preliminary Assessment Using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Schnetzler, C.; Frawley, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    Impact craters on Mars have been used to provide fundamental insights into the properties of the martian crust, the role of volatiles, the relative age of the surface, and on the physics of impact cratering in the Solar System. Before the three-dimensional information provided by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument which is currently operating in Mars orbit aboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), impact features were characterized morphologically using orbital images from Mariner 9 and Viking. Fresh-appearing craters were identified and measurements of their geometric properties were derived from various image-based methods. MOLA measurements can now provide a global sample of topographic cross-sections of martian impact features as small as approx. 2 km in diameter, to basin-scale features. We have previously examined MOLA cross-sections of Northern Hemisphere and North Polar Region impact features, but were unable to consider the global characteristics of these ubiquitous landforms. Here we present our preliminary assessment of the geometric properties of a globally-distributed sample of martian impact craters, most of which were sampled during the initial stages of the MGS mapping mission (i.e., the first 600 orbits). Our aim is to develop a framework for reconsidering theories concerning impact cratering in the martian environment. This first global analysis is focused upon topographically-fresh impact craters, defined here on the basis of MOLA topographic profiles that cross the central cavities of craters that can be observed in Viking-based MDIM global image mosaics. We have considered crater depths, rim heights, ejecta topologies, cross-sectional "shapes", and simple physical models for ejecta emplacement. To date (May, 1999), we have measured the geometric properties of over 1300 impact craters in the 2 to 350 km diameter size interval. A large fraction of these measured craters were sampled with cavity-center cross-sections during the first

  6. A Novel Ni-Containing Powder Metallurgy Steel with Ultrahigh Impact, Fatigue, and Tensile Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Wei; Shu, Guo-Jiun; Chang, Shih-Ying; Lin, Bing-Hao

    2014-08-01

    The impact toughness of powder metallurgy (PM) steel is typically inferior, and it is further impaired when the microstructure is strengthened. To formulate a versatile PM steel with superior impact, fatigue, and tensile properties, the influences of various microstructures, including ferrite, pearlite, bainite, and Ni-rich areas, were identified. The correlations between impact toughness with other mechanical properties were also studied. The results demonstrated that ferrite provides more resistance to impact loading than Ni-rich martensite, followed by bainite and pearlite. However, Ni-rich martensite presents the highest transverse rupture strength (TRS), fatigue strength, tensile strength, and hardness, followed by bainite, pearlite, and ferrite. With 74 pct Ni-rich martensite and 14 pct bainite, Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo-4Ni-0.5C steel achieves the optimal combination of impact energy (39 J), TRS (2170 MPa), bending fatigue strength at 2 × 106 cycles (770 MPa), tensile strength (1323 MPa), and apparent hardness (38 HRC). The impact energy of Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo-4Ni-0.5C steel is twice as high as those of the ordinary high-strength PM steels. These findings demonstrate that a high-strength PM steel with high-toughness can be produced by optimized alloy design and microstructure.

  7. Impact attenuation properties of jazz shoes alter lower limb joint stiffness during jump landings.

    PubMed

    Fong Yan, Alycia; Smith, Richard M; Hiller, Claire E; Sinclair, Peter J

    2017-05-01

    To quantify the impact attenuation properties of the jazz shoes, and to investigate the in-vivo effect of four jazz shoe designs on lower limb joint stiffness during a dance-specific jump. Repeated measures. A custom-built mechanical shoe tester similar to that used by athletic shoe companies was used to vertically impact the forefoot and heel region of four different jazz shoe designs. Additionally, dancers performed eight sautés in second position in bare feet and the shoe conditions. Force platforms and 3D-motion capture were used to analyse the joint stiffness of the midfoot, ankle, knee and hip during the jump landings. Mechanical testing of the jazz shoes revealed significant differences in impact attenuation characteristics among each of the jazz shoe designs. Gross knee and midfoot joint stiffness were significantly affected by the jazz shoe designs in the dancers' jump landings. The tested jazz shoe designs altered the impact attenuating capacity of jump landing technique in dancers. The cushioned jazz shoes are recommended particularly for injured dancers to reduce impact on the lower limb. Jazz shoe design should consider the impact attenuation properties of the forefoot region, due to the toe-strike landing technique in dance movement. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Physical and Social Impacts on Hydrologic Properties of Residential Lawn Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. L.; Band, L. E.

    2009-12-01

    Land development practices result in compacted soils that filter less water, increase surface runoff and decrease groundwater infiltration. Literature review of soil infiltration rates reveals that developed sites’ rates, 0.1 to 24 cm/hr, are reduced when compared to rates of undeveloped sites, 14.7 to 48.7 cm/hr. Yet, most hydrologic models neglect the impacts of residential soil compaction on infiltration and runoff. The objectives of this study included: determination of differences between soil properties of forested and residential lawn sites in Baltimore Ecosystem Study; parcel-scale location impacts on soil properties; and the impact of social and physical factors on the distribution of soil properties of residential lawns. Infiltration measures were collected in situ using a Cornell Sprinkle Infiltrometer and soil cores were collected for water retention and texture analysis. These soil properties were paired with GIS data relating to age of house construction, property value, parcel area, percent canopy cover per parcel and parcel distance from stream. The study finds that saturated infiltration rates in residential lawn soils are significantly lower than forest soils due to reduced macroporosity of residential lawn soils. Intra-parcel differences in bulk density and soil depth indicate that runoff from residential lawns is more likely from near-house and near-curb locations than the mid-front or backyards. The range of infiltration rate, bulk density and percent organic matter can be explained by readily attainable social and physical factors—age of house construction and parcel distance to stream. The impacts of land management on soil properties appear to be more prominent than percent canopy.

  9. Impact of lux gene insertion on bacterial surface properties and transport.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Srinivasa Ranga, Vijay Penagonda; Mao, Yongjun; Chen, Kevin; Qiao, Hanzi

    2008-03-01

    Genetic markers have been in popular use for tracing microbial movement in the environment. However, the impact of genetic marker insertion on microbial surface properties and consequent transport is often ignored. For this research, we investigated the impact of luminescence-based genetic marker insertion on bacterial surface properties and transport. Typical Gram-positive bacterial strains of Lactobacillus casei, Streptococcus mitis and Micrococcus luteus were used as model bacterial strains in this research. We manipulated gene transfer to observe the impact of lux gene insertion on bacterial surface properties based on contact angle measurements, and we conducted column experiments to evaluate the impact of lux gene insertion on bacterial transport. After lux gene insertion, bacterial interactions with the porous media increased, demonstrating stronger deposition potential in the porous media. Accordingly, retention of the daughter strains increased. Lux gene insertion also resulted in an increase in bacterial dispersion and equilibrium adsorption in the porous media. The bacterial deposition coefficient was found to correlate with the free energy of interactions between bacteria and the porous media.

  10. Impact properties of the aircraft cast aluminium alloy Al-7Si0.6Mg (A357)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexopoulos, N. D.

    2010-06-01

    The impact mechanical properties of the widely used in the aeronautics A357 cast aluminum alloy were investigated by exploiting experiments on an instrumented Charpy impact testing machine. The evaluated impact properties for 25 different artificial aging heat treatment conditions were analyzed and discussed in conjunction with the respective tensile properties. Correlations are proposed to establish useful relationships between impact resistance and tensile strain energy density properties. The established correlations, which are well supported by the performed experiments, can be used to estimate the tensile ductility and toughness of the A357 cast aluminum alloy from the Charpy impact test. Performed fractographic analyses were supporting the physically arbitrary correlation between tensile strain energy density and impact resistance.

  11. Impact properties of rubber-modified epoxy resin-graphite-fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J.; Nir, Z.

    1984-01-01

    To improve the impact resistance of graphite-fiber composites, a commercial and an experimental epoxy resin were modified with liquid reactive rubber and a brominated epoxy resin. The commercial epoxy was a tetrafunctional resin, and the experimental epoxy was a trifunctional resin. The reactive rubber was a carboxyl-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer. The rubber content was varied from 0 to 25 percent (wt). The brominated epoxy resin was used at Br levels of 4, 19, and 35 percent of the resin. Composites were prepared with woven graphite cloth reinforcement. The composites were evaluated by using flexural strength in the dry state and an elevated temperature after saturation with water. The impact properties were determined by measuring shear strength after falling-ball impact and instrumented impact. The rubber-modified, trifunctional resin exhibited better properties, when tested in hot-wet conditions in a heated oven at 366 K (after boiling the material for 2 h in demineralized water), than the tetrafunctional resin. Improved impact resistance was observed with the addition of the reactive rubber to the epoxy resin. Further improvement was observed with the addition of the brominated epoxy resin.

  12. Impact of environmental temperature on optical power properties of intraocular lenses.

    PubMed

    Walker, Bennett N; James, Robert H; Calogero, Don; Ilev, Ilko K

    2014-01-20

    Optical power properties of lenses and materials in general can be influenced by thermal changes of the material and surrounding medium. In the case of an intraocular lens (IOL) implant, the spherical power (SP), cylinder power, (CP), astigmatism, and spherical aberration are the critical fundamental properties that can significantly impact its efficacy. Directly evaluating how changes in temperature can affect these optical properties may show the importance of considering temperature when evaluating IOL optical characteristics. In this paper, we present a quantitative study on evaluating the impact of environmental temperature changes on IOL fundamental optical properties by testing IOL samples with different materials (e.g., hydrophobic and hydrophilic) and designs (e.g., monofocal and toric) to better encompass types of IOLs in conventional use today. The results from this study demonstrate that significant changes are observed as temperatures are changed from room temperature (20°C) to slightly above body temperature (40°C). Findings indicate that evaluating optical properties at arbitrary temperatures could significantly affect the characterization of IOLs that are already near the tolerance thresholds.

  13. Impacts of imperfect geometry structure on the nonlinear and chromatic dispersion properties of a microstructure fiber.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianguo; Xue, Lifang; Wang, Yingjian; Kai, Guiyun; Dong, Xiaoyi

    2007-11-01

    We numerically investigated the impacts of the imperfect geometry structure on the nonlinear and chromatic dispersion properties of a microstructure fiber (MF). The statistical results show that the imperfect geometry structure degrades the high nonlinearity and fluctuates the chromatic dispersion in a MF. Moreover, the smaller air holes and the larger pitch are more likely to maintain the properties of nonlinearity and chromatic dispersion. Finally, the nonlinearity and chromatic dispersion are more insensitive to air-hole nonuniformity than to air-hole disorder. All of these will provide references for designing and fabricating MF.

  14. Impact of ion irradiation on the thermal, structural, and mechanical properties of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, S.G.

    2005-04-01

    The impact of ion-beam irradiation on the thermal, structural, and mechanical properties of metallic glasses is investigated using the model glass, CuTi, in molecular dynamics computer simulations. It is found that ion-beam bombardment successively modifies the compositional and structural order toward a universal steady state, which proves to be independent of the initial relaxation state and thermal history of the unirradiated sample. This is reflected by key materials properties, including enthalpy, structural and compositional short-range order, as well as Young's modulus and fracture behavior. The results are interpreted within the framework of competing dynamics, where radiation-induced plastic relaxation counteracts ion-beam disordering.

  15. Dynamic-Mechanical and Impact Properties of Conductive Polymer Blends Based on Polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acierno, Domenico; Russo, Pietro

    2007-04-01

    Plastic materials with significant electrical properties are getting more and more interest as witnessed by the wide spectra of industrial applications such as high performance textiles, fabrics for military, electronics and display technologies, automotive field (fuel delivery lines, exterior body panels) and so on. In this context, in the last decade an increasing interest has been devoted to the use of intrinsically conductive polymers such as polyaniline (PANI). In this work melt blended formulations based on polypropylene, containing 5% and 10% by weight of PANI, were investigated in terms of dynamic-mechanical and impact properties. Preliminary results indicate that, besides the processing conditions, inclusions of PANI make a general worsening of the dumping behaviour, especially in the rubbery region. Anyway, it is evident a clear improvement of the impact resistance with respect to the matrix, processed under the same conditions and taken as a reference, for the 5wt % system.

  16. Impact of Viral Infection on Absorption and Scattering Properties of Marine Bacteria and Phytoplankton

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    assured that 1) inoculated viruses are host specific, 2) host culturing conditions are optimal for virus assays, 3) host growth conditions are... virus /host systems which will be used in laboratory scale and mesocosm experiments. Work to date has focused on the isolation of viruses of non...properties of their specific host cells. TRANSITIONS We are preparing to examine the impact of newly isolated viruses of marine non-photosynthetic bacteria on

  17. Corn Stover Impacts on Near-Surface Soil Properties of No-Till Corn In Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Canqui, H; Lal, Rattan; Post, W M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Owens, L B.

    2006-01-06

    Corn stover is a primary biofuel feedstock and its expanded use could help reduce reliance on fossil fuels and net CO2 emissions. Excessive stover removal may, however, negatively impact near-surface soil properties within a short period after removal. We assessed changes in soil crust strength, bulk density, and water content over a 1-yr period following a systematic removal or addition of stover from three no-till soils under corn in Ohio.

  18. Impact of Interlayer Dwell Time on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nickel and Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, B. K.; Beese, A. M.; Keist, J. S.; McHale, E. T.; Palmer, T. A.

    2017-09-01

    Path planning in additive manufacturing (AM) processes has an impact on the thermal histories experienced at discrete locations in simple and complex AM structures. One component of path planning in directed energy deposition is the time required for the laser or heat source to return to a given location to add another layer of material. As structures become larger and more complex, the length of this interlayer dwell time can significantly impact the resulting thermal histories. The impact of varying dwell times between 0 and 40 seconds on the microstructural and mechanical properties of Inconel® 625 and Ti-6Al-4V builds has been characterized. Even though these materials display different microstructures and solid-state phase transformations, the addition of an interlayer dwell generally led to a finer microstructure in both materials that impacted the resulting mechanical properties. With the addition of interlayer dwell times up to 40 seconds in the Inconel® 625 builds, finer secondary dendrite arm spacing values, produced by changes in the thermal history, correspond to increased yield and tensile strengths. These mechanical properties did not appear to change significantly, however, for dwell times greater than 20 seconds in the Inconel® 625 builds, indicating that longer dwell times have a minimal impact. The addition of interlayer dwell times in Ti-6Al-4V builds resulted in a slight decrease in the measured alpha lath widths and a much more noticeable decrease in the width of prior beta grains. In addition, the yield and tensile values continued to increase, nearly reaching the values observed in the rolled plate substrate material with dwell times up to 40 seconds.

  19. Impact of Interlayer Dwell Time on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nickel and Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, B. K.; Beese, A. M.; Keist, J. S.; McHale, E. T.; Palmer, T. A.

    2017-06-01

    Path planning in additive manufacturing (AM) processes has an impact on the thermal histories experienced at discrete locations in simple and complex AM structures. One component of path planning in directed energy deposition is the time required for the laser or heat source to return to a given location to add another layer of material. As structures become larger and more complex, the length of this interlayer dwell time can significantly impact the resulting thermal histories. The impact of varying dwell times between 0 and 40 seconds on the microstructural and mechanical properties of Inconel® 625 and Ti-6Al-4V builds has been characterized. Even though these materials display different microstructures and solid-state phase transformations, the addition of an interlayer dwell generally led to a finer microstructure in both materials that impacted the resulting mechanical properties. With the addition of interlayer dwell times up to 40 seconds in the Inconel® 625 builds, finer secondary dendrite arm spacing values, produced by changes in the thermal history, correspond to increased yield and tensile strengths. These mechanical properties did not appear to change significantly, however, for dwell times greater than 20 seconds in the Inconel® 625 builds, indicating that longer dwell times have a minimal impact. The addition of interlayer dwell times in Ti-6Al-4V builds resulted in a slight decrease in the measured alpha lath widths and a much more noticeable decrease in the width of prior beta grains. In addition, the yield and tensile values continued to increase, nearly reaching the values observed in the rolled plate substrate material with dwell times up to 40 seconds.

  20. Physical properties of the Yaxcopoil-1 deep drill core, Chicxulub impact structure, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbra, Tiiu; Pesonen, Lauri J.

    2011-11-01

    The Chicxulub structure in Mexico, one of the largest impact structures on Earth, was formed 65 Ma by a hypervelocity impact that led to the large mass extinction at the K-Pg boundary. The Chicxulub impact structure is well preserved, but is buried beneath a sequence of carbonate sediments and, thus, requires drilling to obtain subsurface information. The Chicxulub Scientific Drilling Program was carried out at Hacienda Yaxcopoil in the framework of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program in 2001-2002. The structure was cored from 404 m down to 1511 m, through three intervals: 794 m of postimpact Tertiary sediments, a 100 m thick impactite sequence, and 616 m of preimpact Cretaceous rocks thought to represent a suite of megablocks. Physical property investigations show that the various lithologies, including the impactite units and the K-Pg boundary layer, can be characterized by their physical properties, which depend on either changes in fabric or on mineralogical variations. The magnetic properties show mostly dia- or paramagnetic behavior, with the exception of the impactite units that indicate the presence of ferromagnetic, probably hydrothermally deposited magnetite and pyrrhotite. The magnetic fraction contributes mainly to enhanced magnetization in the impactite lithologies and, in this way, to the observed magnetic anomalies. The shape and orientation of the magnetic grains are varied and reflect inhomogeneous fabric development and the influence of impact-related redeposition and hydrothermal activity. The Chicxulub impact occurred at the time of the reverse polarity geomagnetic chron 29R, and this finding is consistent with the age of the K-Pg boundary.

  1. Influence of Surface Properties and Impact Conditions on Adhesion of Insect Residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Smith, Joseph G.; Connell, John W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Doss, Jereme R.; Shanahan, Michelle H.; Penner, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    Insect residues can cause premature transition to turbulent flow on laminar flow airfoils. Engineered surfaces that mitigate the adhesion of insect residues provide, therefore, a route to more efficient aerodynamics and reduced fuel burn rates. Areal coverage and heights of residues depend not only on surface properties, but also on impact conditions. We report high speed photography of fruit fly impacts at different angles of inclination on a rigid aluminum surface, optical microscopy and profilometry, and contact angle goniometry to support the design of engineered surfaces. For the polyurethane and epoxy coatings studied, some of which exhibited superhydrophobicity, it was determined that impact angle and surface compositions play critical roles in the efficacy of these surfaces to reduce insect residue adhesion.

  2. Impact of Interfacial Defects on the Properties of Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Lateral Heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhen; Harb, Moussab; Lardhi, Sheikha; Cavallo, Luigi

    2017-03-28

    We explored the impact of interfacial defects on the stability and optoelectronic properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide lateral heterojunctions using a density functional theory approach. As a prototype, we focused on the MoS2-WSe2 system and found that even a random alloy-like interface with a width of less than 1 nm has only a minimal impact on the band gap and alignment compared to the defect-less interface. The largest impact is on the evolution of the electrostatic potential across the monolayer. Similar to defect-less interfaces, a small number of defects results in an electrostatic potential profile with a sharp change at the interface, which facilitates exciton dissociation. Differently, a large number of defects results in an electrostatic potential profile switching smoothly across the interface, which is expected to reduce the capability of the heterojunction to promote exciton dissociation. These results are generalizable to other transition metal dichalcogenide lateral heterojunctions.

  3. Thermophysical properties of lunar impact ejecta and their evolution through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, R. R.; Bandfield, J.; Hayne, P. O.; Tai Udovicic, C.; Carter, L. M.; Paige, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    On the Moon, impact cratering has occurred continuously over the past 4 billion years, and has a profound effect on all aspects of lunar geology. Large impacts excavate large blocks from beneath the regolith, and impacts of sub-cm sized objects rupture and sandblast large ejected fragments and turn them into regolith. The regolith, in turn, is space weathered and aged by the impact of micrometeorites, together with exposure to solar wind. The state of impact-related materials at any given site can thus be interpreted in the context of relative or absolute age, and can provide information about the rates of geological processes. Here, we report on observations of the thermophysical properties of lunar impact ejecta from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Diviner thermal radiometer. Nighttime thermal IR data are sensitive to the abundance of meter-scale rocks at the surface, and to variations in the density structure of the upper meter of the regolith. Comparison of these thermal observations with those from radar instruments allows us to distinguish between large ejecta at the surface and those buried or suspended in the upper 10 m of regolith, and thus to examine the evolution of these two ejecta populations ejecta through time. We have previously found that the surface ejecta rocks associated with large craters break down at a quantifiable rate, and that rocky surface ejecta disappear completely in 1.5 Gyr. Here, we show that rocks buried within the upper m of regolith, detected by radar, can remain undisturbed by surface processes for >3 Gyr. We also investigate the thermophysical properties of radar-dark haloes, comprised of fine-grained distal ejecta, and find that they also persist for long periods (> 3 Gyr). Thus, the surface rockiness of a given ejecta deposit can be used to determine its age. Current work is focusing on exploiting the state of preservation of buried ejecta to constrain the rate of regolith overturn.

  4. Lunar Crustal Properties: Insights from the GRAIL Gravity Signatures of Lunar Impact Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, J. M.; Andrews-Hanna, J. C.; Evans, A. J.; Johnson, B. C.; Melosh, J., IV; Milbury, C.; Miljkovic, K.; Nimmo, F.; Phillips, R. J.; Smith, D. E.; Solomon, S. C.; Wieczorek, M. A.; Zuber, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Impact cratering is a violent process, shattering and melting rock and excavating deep-seated material. The resulting scars are apparent on every planetary surface across our Solar System. Subsurface density variations associated with the resulting impact structures contain clues to aid in unlocking the details of this process. High-resolution gravity fields, such as those derived from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission, are ideal for investigating these density variations. With gravity measurements from GRAIL and topography from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA), we derived high-resolution Bouguer gravity fields (i.e., the gravity field after the contribution from topography is removed) that we correlated with craters mapped from LOLA data. We found that the mass deficit beneath lunar impact craters relates directly to crater size, up to diameter ~130 km, whereas craters larger than this diameter display no further systematic change. This observation, coupled with the greater depth of impact damage expected beneath larger craters, indicates that some process is affecting the production and/or preservation of porosity at depth or otherwise altering the mean density beneath the larger craters (note, measurable mantle uplift is observed for craters larger than ~184-km diameter). The observed crater gravity anomalies, however, exhibit considerable variation about these mean trends, suggesting that other factors are also important in determining the bulk density of impact crater structures. Milbury et al. (this conference) have demonstrated that pre-impact crustal porosity strongly influences the resulting density contrast between the impact damage zone beneath a crater and its surroundings. Herein, we extend these studies using the same GRAIL- and LOLA-derived maps to further investigate the effects that crustal properties have on the bulk density of the rock beneath lunar impact features. We focus, in particular, on the processes that

  5. Impact of the post fire management in some soil chemical properties. First results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francos, Marcos; Pereira, Paulo; Alcañiz, Meritxell; Úbeda, Xavi

    2016-04-01

    Post-fire management after severe wildfires has impact on soil properties. In Mediterranean environments management of fire affected areas is a common practice. This intervention may change soil chemical properties of the soil such as major cations. The aim of this work is to study the impact of different types of forest management in soil extractable calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium after a severe wildfire. The study area is located in Ódena (Catalonia, Spain). The wildfire occurred at July 27th of 2015 and burned 1235 ha. After the fire an experimental plot was designed 9 plots with 2x2 meters (4 square meters). The different managements were: a) clear-cuted area and wood removed, b) no treatment); and c) clear-cutted. The results of the first sampling showed significant differences among all treatments in extractable calcium, sodium and potassium. The amount of these extractable elements was high in clear-cutted treatment in comparison to the others. No differences were identified in extractable magnesium. Overall, in the immediate period after the fire, burned area management, changed the studied soil properties. We are currently studying the evolution of this soil properties in these plots with the time

  6. Cervical Injury Risk Resulting From Rotary Wing Impact: Assessment of Injury Based Upon Aviator Size, Helmet Mass Properties and Impact Severity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-21

    NAWCADPAX/TR-2004/86 CERVICAL INJURY RISK RESULTING FROM ROTARY WING IMPACT: ASSESSMENT OF INJURY BASED UPON AVIATOR SIZE, HELMET MASS...DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVAL AIR WARFARE CENTER AIRCRAFT DIVISION PATUXENT RIVER, MARYLAND NAWCADPAX/TR-2004/86 21 October 2004 CERVICAL ... Cervical Injury Risk Resulting From Rotary Wing Impact: Assessment of Injury Based Upon Aviator Size, Helmet Mass Properties and Impact Severity 5b

  7. Relationships between seat properties and human subject kinematics in rear impact tests.

    PubMed

    Welcher, J B; Szabo, T J

    2001-05-01

    The mitigation of whiplash associated disorders (WAD) has received increased priority in the last 10 years. Although the exact mechanism(s) for WAD causation have not been established, several have been proposed and it is likely the mechanism(s) are associated with the kinematics of the head relative to the torso. It follows that automotive seat designs that address reductions in certain head-torso kinematics may lead to a reduction in WAD potential. Seat properties that may have an effect on head-neck kinematics include geometry, stiffness and energy absorption. This study evaluated the performance of five seats with varying properties, including the new Volvo 'WHIPS' seat. Seat properties such as geometry relative to the occupant's head, dynamic and static stiffness, and energy absorption were determined via component testing. A new prototype dynamic seat test, which used a pendulum and seat back pan, was evaluated. Human subject impact tests were conducted using three occupants in rear impacts with velocity changes of 4 and 8 km/h. Potentially relevant occupant kinematic parameters were identified, and then correlated with seat properties in an attempt to determine any relative influence of seat properties on potential WAD mechanisms. Two higher velocity human subject tests using the Volvo Whiplash Injury Protection System (WHIPS) seat were also conducted. Vertical and horizontal head to head restraint distances were found to be most influential on occupant head-neck kinematics. Horizontal and vertical head to head restraint offsets were significantly correlated with rearward translational motion of the head center of gravity relative to the upper torso across all occupants. Rearward offset was also significantly correlated with rearward rotation of the head relative to upper torso, while vertical offset was significantly correlated with head acceleration relative to the upper torso during the flexion phase of the impact. Seat constitutive properties such as

  8. The correlation of low-velocity impact resistance of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites with matrix properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1986-01-01

    Summarized are basic studies that were conducted to correlate the impact resistance of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites with polymer matrix properties. Three crosslinked epoxy resins and a linear polysulfone were selected as composite matrices. As a group, these resins possess a significantly large range of mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of the resins and their respective composites were measured. Neat resin specimens and unidirectional and crossply composite specimens were impact tested with an instrumented dropweight tester. Impact resistances of the specimens were assessed on the basis of loading capability, energy absorption, and extent of damage.

  9. Modulation of pyridinium cationic lipid-DNA complex properties by pyridinium gemini surfactants and its impact on lipoplex transfection properties

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishnu Dutt; Lees, Julia; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Brailoiu, Eugen; Madesh, Muniswamy; Wunder, Stephanie L.; Ilies, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    The study presents the effects of blending a cationic gemini surfactant into cationic lipid bilayers and its impact towards plasmid DNA compaction and delivery process. Using nanoDSC, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential and electrophoretic mobility measurements, together with transfection (2D- and 3D-) and viability assays, we identified the main physicochemical parameters of the lipid bilayers, liposomes and lipoplexes that are affected by the gemini surfactant addition. We also correlated the cationic bilayer composition with the dynamics of the DNA compaction process, and with transfection efficiency, cytotoxicity and internalization mechanism of the resultant nucleic acid complexes. We found that blending of gemini surfactant into the cationic bilayers fluidized the supramolecular assemblies, reduced the amount of positive charge required to fully compact the plasmid DNA and, in certain cases, changed the internalization mechanism of the lipoplexes. Transfection efficiency of select ternary lipoplexes derived from cationic gemini surfactants and lipids was several times superior to transfection efficiency of corresponding binary lipoplexes, also surpassing standard transfection systems. The overall impact of gemini surfactants into the formation and dynamic of cationic bilayers was found to depend heavily on the presence of co-lipids, their nature and amount present into lipoplexes. The study confirmed the possibility of combining the specific properties of pyridinium gemini surfactants and cationic lipids synergistically for obtaining efficient synthetic transfection systems with negligible cytotoxicity useful for therapeutic gene delivery. PMID:24377350

  10. Modulation of pyridinium cationic lipid-DNA complex properties by pyridinium gemini surfactants and its impact on lipoplex transfection properties.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishnu Dutt; Lees, Julia; Hoffman, Nicholas E; Brailoiu, Eugen; Madesh, Muniswamy; Wunder, Stephanie L; Ilies, Marc A

    2014-02-03

    The study presents the effects of blending a cationic gemini surfactant into cationic lipid bilayers and its impact on the plasmid DNA compaction and delivery process. Using nanoDSC, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, and electrophoretic mobility measurements, together with transfection (2D- and 3D-) and viability assays, we identified the main physicochemical parameters of the lipid bilayers, liposomes, and lipoplexes that are affected by the gemini surfactant addition. We also correlated the cationic bilayer composition with the dynamics of the DNA compaction process and with transfection efficiency, cytotoxicity, and the internalization mechanism of the resultant nucleic acid complexes. We found that the blending of gemini surfactant into the cationic bilayers fluidized the supramolecular assemblies, reduced the amount of positive charge required to fully compact the plasmid DNA and, in certain cases, changed the internalization mechanism of the lipoplexes. The transfection efficiency of select ternary lipoplexes derived from cationic gemini surfactants and lipids was several times superior to the transfection efficiency of corresponding binary lipoplexes, also surpassing standard transfection systems. The overall impact of gemini surfactants into the formation and dynamic of cationic bilayers was found to depend heavily on the presence of colipids, their nature, and amount present in lipoplexes. The study confirmed the possibility of combining the specific properties of pyridinium gemini surfactants and cationic lipids synergistically to obtain efficient synthetic transfection systems with negligible cytotoxicity useful for therapeutic gene delivery.

  11. Mechanical properties of impact-assembled nanoparticle composites: Fabrication, measurements and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Rajesh

    Nanomaterials have assumed substantial importance due to their exotic chemical, mechanical, optical and electro-magnetic properties. Our research focuses on producing nanoparticulate building blocks for producing and evaluating superhard films and micropatterns. Nanoparticles of Si, Ti, their carbides and nitrides are generated by injecting gas-phase precursors into a thermal plasma jet and expanding the flow through a convergent boron nitride nozzle into a low-pressure chamber. The particles subsequently deposit onto temperature-controlled silicon or molybdenum substrates via hypersonic impaction. High impact velocities of about ˜1650 m/s (calculated for a 20 nm SiC particle) are the primary mechanism by which nanoparticles are consolidated into films. We have developed an aerodynamically focused nanoparticle beam deposition method for micromolding of nanoparticulate MEMS components. Evaluation of basic mechanical properties of such materials is of significant interest as they have been proposed to be extremely hard, wear- and friction-resistant. For engineering purposes, the Young's modulus of a material is one of the most important properties tied to design of components and coatings. We have developed a Nanoindenter-aided load-deflection measurement system for evaluating the Young's modulus of our nanoparticle composites. The Nanoindenter deflects clamped-clamped beams machined from our deposits using focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The nanoparticle beams behave elastically for small deformations. Porosity variation in our deposits was linked to variation of measured Young's moduli for the FIB-milled beams. Finally we have used discrete element method models (using PFC3D, Itasca Consulting Group) with support from molecular dynamics simulations to create a multiscale framework to mimic the measured Young's modulus behavior of our nanoparticulate deposits. We have found that higher impact velocity of the particles leads to larger contact radii between impacting

  12. Dynamical properties measurements for asteroid, comet and meteorite material applicable to impact modeling and mitigation calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.; Boslough, M.B.; Gray, G.T. III; Remo, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    We describe methods for measuring dynamical properties for two material categories of interest in understanding large-scale extraterrestrial impacts: iron-nickel and underdense materials (e.g. snow). Particular material properties measured by the present methods include Hugoniot release paths and constitutive properties (stress vs. strain). The iron-nickel materials lend themselves well to conventional shock and quasi-static experiments. As examples, a suite of experiments is described including six impact tests (wave profile compression/release) over the stress range 2--20 GPa, metallography, quasi-static and split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) mechanical testing, and ultrasonic mapping and sound velocity measurements. Temperature sensitivity of the dynamic behavior was measured at high and low strain rates. Among the iron-nickel materials tested, an octahedrite was found to have behavior close to that of Armco iron under shock and quasi-static conditions, while an ataxite exhibited a significantly larger quasi-static yield strength than did the octahedrite or a hexahedrite. The underdense materials pose three primary experimental difficulties. First, the samples are friable; they can melt or sublimate during storage, preparation and testing. Second, they are brittle and crushable; they cannot withstand such treatment as traditional machining or launch in a gun system. Third, with increasing porosity the calculated Hugoniot density becomes rapidly more sensitive to errors in wave time-of-arrival measurements. Carefully chosen simulants eliminate preservation (friability) difficulties, but the other difficulties remain. A family of 36 impact tests was conducted on snow and snow simulants at Sandia, yielding reliable Hugoniot and reshock states, but limited release property information. Other methods for characterizing these materials are discussed.

  13. IMPACT OF TIME / TEMPERATURE CURING CONDITIONS AND ALUMINATE CONCENTRATIONS ON SALTSTONE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J.; Edwards, T.; Williams, V.

    2009-05-05

    This report addresses the impact of (1) the time and temperature curing conditions (profile) and (2) the impact of higher aluminate concentrations in the decontaminated salt solution on Saltstone processing and performance properties. The results demonstrate that performance properties as well as some of the processing properties of Saltstone are highly sensitive to the conditions of time and temperature under which curing occurs. This sensitivity is in turn dependent on the concentration of aluminate in the salt feed solution. In general, the performance properties and indicators (Young's modulus, compressive strength and total porosity) are reduced when curing is initially carried out under high temperature. However, this reduction in performance properties is dependent on the sequence of temperatures (the time/temperature profile) experienced during the curing process. That is, samples that are subjected to a 1, 2, 3 or 4 day curing time at 60 C followed by final curing at 22 C lead to performance properties that are significantly different than the properties of grouts allowed to cure for 1, 2, 3 or 4 days at 22 C followed by a treatment at 60 C. The performance properties of Saltstone cured in the sequence of higher temperature first are generally less (and in some cases significantly less) than performance properties of Saltstone cured only at 22 C. This loss in performance was shown to be mitigated by increased slag content or cement content in the premix at the expense of fly ash. For the sequence in which the Saltstone is initially cured at 22 C followed by a higher temperature cure, the performance properties can be equal to or greater than the properties observed with curing only at 22 C curing. The results in this report indicate that in order to meaningfully measure and report the performance properties of Saltstone, one has to know the time/temperature profile conditions under which the Saltstone will be cured. This will require thermal modeling and

  14. Impact of morphology on the radiative properties of fractal soot aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doner, Nimeti; Liu, Fengshan

    2017-01-01

    The impact of morphology on the radiative properties of fractal soot aggregates was investigated using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). The optical properties of four different types of aggregates of freshly emitted soot with a fractal dimension Df=1.65 and a fractal pre-factor kf=1.76 were calculated. The four types of aggregates investigated are formed by uniform primary particles in point-touch, by uniform but overlapping primary particles, by uniform but enlarged primary particles in point-touch, and formed by point-touch and polydisperse primary particles. The radiative properties of aggregates consisting of N=20, 56 and 103 primary particles were numerically evaluated for a given refractive index at 0.532 and 1.064 μm. The radiative properties of soot aggregates vary strongly with the volume equivalent radius aeff and wavelength. The accuracy of DDA was evaluated in the first and fourth cases against the generalized multi-sphere Mie (GMM) solution in terms of the vertical-vertical differential scattering cross section (Cvv). The model predicted the average relative deviations from the base case to be within 15-25% for Cvv, depending on the number of particles for the aggregate. The scattering cross sections are only slightly affected by the overlapping but more significantly influenced by primary particle polydispersity. It was also found that the enlargement of primary particles by 20% has a strong effect on soot aggregate radiative properties.

  15. Factors impacting stemflow generation in a European beech forest: Individual tree versus neighborhood properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Johanna Clara; Germer, Sonja; Hildebrandt, Anke

    2017-04-01

    The redistribution of precipitation by canopies changes the water flow dynamics to the forest floor. The spatial pattern of throughfall has been researched in a number of studies in different ecosystems. Yet, also stemflow substantially influences water input patterns, constituting a mean of 12% of gross precipitation for European beech as one of the most abundant tree species in Central Europe. While the initiation of stemflow depends mostly on precipitation event properties, stemflow amounts are strongly shaped by canopy structure. Stemflow research has mainly addressed the impact of single tree morphological variables. In previous studies, the impact of forest structure on area-based stemflow was studied comparing plots with different properties using few exemplary stemflow measurements. In non-homogeneous stands, this approach might not be accurate, as the variation of stand properties like tree density could change tree individual stemflow fluxes. To investigate this, a total measurement of all trees per plot is required. We hypothesize, that in addition to individual tree metrics, tree neighborhood relations have a significant impact on stemflow generation in a heterogeneous beech forest. Our study site is located in the pristine forest of the National Park Hainich, central Germany. It is heterogeneous in respect to tree density, species composition and tree age. We measured stemflow in an areal approach, for all trees on 11 subplots (each 10 m x 10 m) spaced evenly throughout a 1 ha plot. This involved overall 65 trees, which is 11% of the plot's trees. 27 precipitation events were recorded in spring and early summer of 2015 and 2016. Stand properties were surveyed, including diameter at breast height, height, position and species of a tree. From this data, we calculated neighborhood properties for each tree, as number, basal area, and relative height of neighboring trees within a radius of the plot's mean tree distance. Using linear mixed effects models, we

  16. Examining the economic impacts of hydropower dams on property values using GIS.

    PubMed

    Bohlen, Curtis; Lewis, Lynne Y

    2009-07-01

    While the era of dam building is largely over in the United States, globally dams are still being proposed and constructed. The articles in this special issue consider many aspects and impacts of dams around the world. This paper examines dam removal and the measurement of the impacts of dams on local community property values. Valuable lessons may be found. In the United States, hundreds of small hydropower dams will come up for relicensing in the coming decade. Whether or not the licenses are renewed and what happens to the dams if the licenses expires is a subject of great debate. Dams are beginning to be removed for river restoration and fisheries restoration and these "end-of-life" decisions may offer lessons for countries proposing or currently building small (and large) hydropower dams. What can these restoration stories tell us? In this paper, we examine the effects of dams along the Penobscot River in Maine (USA) on residential property values. We compare the results to findings from a similar (but ex post dam removal) data set for properties along the Kennebec river in Maine, where the Edwards Dam was removed in 1999. The Penobscot River Restoration Project, an ambitious basin-wide restoration effort, includes plans to remove two dams and decommission a third along the Penobscot River. Dam removal has significant effects on the local environment, and it is reasonable to anticipate that environmental changes will themselves be reflected in changes in property values. Here we examine historical real estate transaction data to examine whether landowners pay a premium or penalty to live near the Penobscot River or near a hydropower generating dam. We find that waterfront landowners on the Penobscot or other water bodies in our study area pay approximately a 16% premium for the privilege of living on the water. Nevertheless, landowners pay LESS to live near the Penobscot River than they do to live further away, contrary to the expectation that bodies of water

  17. Temporal Variability of Aerosol Properties during TCAP: Impact on Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Lantz, K.; Hodges, G. B.

    2013-11-01

    Ground-based remote sensing and in situ observations of aerosol microphysical and optical properties have been collected during summertime (June-August, 2012) as part of the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/), which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (http://www.arm.gov/). The overall goal of the TCAP field campaign is to study the evolution of optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol transported from North America to the Atlantic and their impact on the radiation energy budget. During TCAP, the ground-based ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed on Cape Cod, an arm-shaped peninsula situated on the easternmost portion of Massachusetts (along the east coast of the United States) and that is generally downwind of large metropolitan areas. The AMF site was equipped with numerous instruments for sampling aerosol, cloud and radiative properties, including a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS), and a three-wavelength nephelometer. In this study we present an analysis of diurnal and day-to-day variability of the column and near-surface aerosol properties obtained from remote sensing (MFRSR data) and ground-based in situ measurements (SMPS, APS, and nephelometer data). In particular, we show that the observed diurnal variability of the MFRSR aerosol optical depth is strong and comparable with that obtained previously from the AERONET climatology in Mexico City, which has a larger aerosol loading. Moreover, we illustrate how the variability of aerosol properties impacts the direct aerosol radiative forcing at different time scales.

  18. Impact Toughness Properties of Nickel- and Manganese-Free High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh; Akbari, Alireza; Mohammadzadeh, Mina

    2016-12-01

    A large amount of manganese (>10 wt pct) in nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels (Ni-free HNASSs) can induce toxicity. In order to develop Ni-free HNASSs with low or no manganese, it is necessary to investigate their mechanical properties for biomedical applications. This work aims to study the Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact toughness properties of a Ni- and Mn-free Fe-22.7Cr-2.4Mo-1.2N HNASS plate in the temperature range of 103 K to 423 K (-170 °C to 150 °C). The results show that unlike conventional AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel, the Ni- and Mn-free HNASS exhibits a sharp ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT). The intergranular brittle fracture associated with some plasticity and deformation bands is observed on the fracture surface at 298 K (25 °C). Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis of the impact-tested sample in the longitudinal direction indicates that deformation bands are parallel to {111} slip planes. By decreasing the temperature to 273 K, 263 K, and 103 K (0 °C, -10 °C, and -70 °C), entirely intergranular brittle fracture occurs on the fracture surface. The fracture mode changes from brittle fracture to ductile as the temperature increases to 423 K (150 °C). The decrease in impact toughness is discussed on the basis of temperature sensitivity of plastic flow and planarity of deformation mechanism.

  19. Instrumented impact properties of zircaloy-oxygen and zircaloy-hydrogen alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Garde, A.M.; Kassner, T.F.

    1980-04-01

    Instrumented-impact tests were performed on subsize Charpy speciments of Zircaloy-2 and -4 with up to approx. 1.3 wt % oxygen and approx. 2500 wt ppM hydrogen at temperatures between 373 and 823/sup 0/K. Self-consistent criteria for the ductile-to-brittle transition, based upon a total absorbed energy of approx. 1.3 x 10/sup 4/ J/m/sup 2/, a dynamic fracture toughness of approx. 10 MPa.m/sup 1/2/, and a ductility index of approx. 0, were established relative to the temperature and oxygen concentration of the transformed BETA-phase material. The effect of hydrogen concentration and hydride morphology, produced by cooling Zircaloy-2 specimens through the temperature range of the BETA ..-->.. ..cap alpha..' = hydride phase transformation at approx. 0.3 and 3 K/s, on the impact properties was determined at temperatures between 373 and 673 K. On an atom fraction basis, oxygen has a greater effect than hydrogen on the impact properties of Zircaloy at temperatures between approx. 400 and 600 K. 34 figures.

  20. IMPACT OF ALUMINATE IONS ON THE PROPERTIES OF SALTSTONE GROUT MIXES

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J; Tommy Edwards, T; Erich Hansen, E; Vickie Williams, V

    2008-02-21

    It is important to identify and control the operational and compositional variables that impact the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone grout mixes. The grout that is produced at the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) is referred to as Saltstone and is a waste form that immobilizes low concentrations of radionuclides as well as certain toxic metals. The Saltstone will be disposed of in vaults at Savannah River Site (SRS). An effort referred to as the Saltstone Variability Study has been initiated to achieve this goal. The protocols developed in this variability study are also ideally suited as a tool to assess the impact of proposed changes to the processing flow sheet for Liquid Waste Operations at SRS. One such proposal that is currently under consideration is to introduce a leaching step in the treatment of the High Level Waste (HLW) sludge to remove aluminum prior to vitrification at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This leachate would significantly increase the soluble aluminate concentration in the salt feed that will be processed at the SPF. Consequently, an initial study of the impact of increased aluminate concentration on the Saltstone grout properties was performed. Prior work by Lukens (1) showed that aluminate in the salt solutions increases the amount of heat generation.

  1. Processing and thermal properties of filament wound carbon-carbon composites for impact shell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zee, Ralph; Romanoski, Glenn; Gale, H. Shyam; Wang, Hsin

    2001-02-01

    The performance and safety of the radioisotope power source depend in part on the thermal and impact properties of the materials used in the general purpose heat source (GPHS) through the use of an impact shell, thermal insulation and an aeroshell. Results from an earlier study indicate the importance of circumferential fibers to the mechanical properties of cylindrical filament wound carbon-carbon composites for the impact shell application. Based on this study, an investigation was initiated to determine the processing characteristics and the mechanical and thermal response of three filament wound configurations with different percentages of circumferential fibers: 50%, 66% and 80%. The performs were fabricated using a 3-D filament winding machine followed by five cycles of resin impregnation and carbonization. In this paper, the processing sequence and the resulting microstructures of the composites will be described. The thermal conductivity values of the composites as a function of fiber configuration and density will be discussed. These results will be compared with the fine-weave pierced-fabric (FWPF) material and carbon-bonded carbon-fiber insulation. Finally, the relevance of the new configurations for applications in the general purpose heat source (GPHS) will also be inferred. .

  2. Saponaria officinalis L. extract: Surface active properties and impact on environmental bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Smułek, Wojciech; Zdarta, Agata; Pacholak, Amanda; Zgoła-Grześkowiak, Agnieszka; Marczak, Łukasz; Jarzębski, Maciej; Kaczorek, Ewa

    2017-02-01

    Plant-derived surfactants are characterised by low toxicity, high biodegradability and environmental compatibility. They therefore have many applications; for instance, they can be used in bioremediation to accelerate biodegradation processes, especially of hydrophobic pollutants. This paper analyses the properties of an extract from Saponaria officinalis L. containing saponins and its impact on bacterial strains isolated from soil, as well as its potential for application in hydrocarbon bioremediation. The tested extract from Saponaria officinalis L. contains gypsogenin, hederagenin, hydroxyhederagenin and quillaic acid aglycone structures and demonstrates good emulsification properties. Contact with the extract led to modification of bacterial cell surface properties. A decrease in cell surface hydrophobicity and an increase in membrane permeability were recorded in the experiments. An increase of up to 63% in diesel oil biodegradation was also recorded for Pseudomonas putida DA1 on addition of 1gL(-1) of saponins from Saponaria officinalis L. Saponaria extract showed no toxic impact on the tested environmental bacterial strains at the concentration used in the biodegradation process.

  3. Impact of Interfacial Roughness on the Sorption Properties of Nanocast Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Sridhar, Manasa; Gunugunuri, Krishna R.; Hu, Naiping; Motahari, Ahmad; Zuo, Xiaobing; Schaefer, Dale W.; Thiel, Stephen W.; Smirniotis, Panagiotis G.

    2016-03-16

    Nanocasting is an emerging method to prepare organic polymers with regular, nanometer pores using inorganic templates. This report assesses the impact of imperfect template replication on the sorption properties of such polymer castings. Existing X-ray diffraction data show that substantial diffuse scattering exists in the small-angle region even though TEM images show near perfect lattices of uniform pores. To assess the origin of the diffuse scattering, the morphology of the phenol - formaldehyde foams (PFF) was investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The observed diffuse scattering is attributed to interfacial roughness due to fractal structures. Such roughness has a profound impact on the sorption properties. Conventional pore- filling models, for example, overestimate protein sorption capacity. A mathematical framework is presented to calculate sorption properties based on observed morphological parameters. The formalism uses the surface fractal dimension determined by SAXS in conjunction with nitrogen adsorption isotherms to predict lysozyme sorption. The results are consistent with measured lysozyme loading.

  4. Impact of Interfacial Roughness on the Sorption Properties of Nanocast Polymers

    DOE PAGES

    Sridhar, Manasa; Gunugunuri, Krishna R.; Hu, Naiping; ...

    2016-03-16

    Nanocasting is an emerging method to prepare organic polymers with regular, nanometer pores using inorganic templates. This report assesses the impact of imperfect template replication on the sorption properties of such polymer castings. Existing X-ray diffraction data show that substantial diffuse scattering exists in the small-angle region even though TEM images show near perfect lattices of uniform pores. To assess the origin of the diffuse scattering, the morphology of the phenol - formaldehyde foams (PFF) was investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The observed diffuse scattering is attributed to interfacial roughness due to fractal structures. Such roughness has a profoundmore » impact on the sorption properties. Conventional pore- filling models, for example, overestimate protein sorption capacity. A mathematical framework is presented to calculate sorption properties based on observed morphological parameters. The formalism uses the surface fractal dimension determined by SAXS in conjunction with nitrogen adsorption isotherms to predict lysozyme sorption. The results are consistent with measured lysozyme loading.« less

  5. The Impact of Chemical Substitutions on Interfacial Properties of REE Orthophosphates (Monazite, Xenotime)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage McEvoy, J.; Thibault, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Mineral surface properties strongly influence liquid-solid interface behaviour in the presence of various ligands, and can significantly affect processes of natural (ex. fluids, melts) and industrial (ex. oil recovery) relevance. Many Rare Earth Element (REE)-bearing minerals display extensive solid solutions resulting in significant chemical variations which influence their crystal and surface properties and, can consequently impact the interfacial features of their interaction with substances such as organic molecules (i.e. reactivity and sorption). For example, the surface charge properties of some REE orthophosphates show an uncharacteristically wide variation in reported values, where large differences in literature are commonly attributed to compositional differences between samples. However the impact of these chemical substitutions remains largely unknown. As such, the aim of this research was to systematically investigate the influence of mineralogical variation within the compositional space of the REE orthophosphates on their surface chemistry and resulting interaction with organic molecules. To better isolate the chemical, structural, and morphological variables, the synthesis of REE orthophosphate crystals along a number of defined substitutions was conducted, and their surface chemistry characteristics benchmarked against well-characterized natural monazite and xenotime from various localities. The interaction of these crystal surfaces with model organic molecules (long chain carboxylic acids and alkyl hydroxamic acids, respectively) was then studied and characterized via surface (X-ray photoelectron) and near-surface (vibrational) spectroscopic techniques. The implications of crystal surface-organic molecule interactions to mineral processing through flotation were also experimentally investigated.

  6. Impact of hemicellulose pre-extraction for bioconversion on birch Kraft pulp properties.

    PubMed

    Helmerius, Jonas; von Walter, Jonas Vinblad; Rova, Ulrika; Berglund, Kris A; Hodge, David B

    2010-08-01

    The combination of hemicellulose extraction with chemical pulping processes is one approach to generate a sugar feedstock amenable to biochemical transformation to fuels and chemicals. Extractions of hemicellulose from silver birch (Betula pendula) wood chips using either water or Kraft white liquor (NaOH, Na(2)S, and Na(2)CO(3)) were performed under conditions compatible with Kraft pulping, using times ranging between 20 and 90 min, temperatures of 130-160 degrees C, and effective alkali (EA) charges of 0-7%. The chips from select extractions were subjected to subsequent Kraft pulping and the refined pulps were made into handsheets. Several metrics for handsheet strength properties were compared with a reference pulp made without an extraction step. This study demonstrated that white liquor can be utilized to extract xylan from birch wood chips prior to Kraft cooking without decreasing the pulp yield and paper strength properties, while simultaneously impregnating cooking alkali into the wood chips. However, for the alkaline conditions tested extractions above pH 10 resulted in low concentrations of xylan. Water extractions resulted in the highest final concentrations of xylan; yielding a liquor without the presence of toxic or inhibitory inorganics and minimal soluble aromatics that we demonstrate can be successfully enzymatically hydrolyzed to monomeric xylose and fermented to succinic acid. However, water extractions were found to negatively impact some pulp properties including decreases in compression strength, bursting strength, tensile strength, and tensile stiffness while exhibiting minimal impact on elongation and slight improvement in tearing strength index.

  7. Global Geometric Properties of Martian Impact Craters: An Assessment from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Frawley, J. J.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Schnetzler, C.

    2000-01-01

    Global geometric characteristics of topographically fresh impact craters have been assessed, for the first time, from gridded MOLA topography. Global trends of properties such as depth/diameter differ from previous estimates. Regional differences are observed.

  8. Impact of wet season river flood discharge on phytoplankton absorption properties in the southern Great Barrier Reef region coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherukuru, Nagur; Brando, Vittorio E.; Blondeau-Patissier, David; Ford, Phillip W.; Clementson, Lesley A.; Robson, Barbara J.

    2017-09-01

    Light absorption due to particulate and dissolved material plays an important role in controlling the underwater light environment and the above water reflectance signature. Thorough understanding of absorption properties and their variability is important to estimate light propagation in the water column. However, knowledge of light absorption properties in flood impacted coastal waters is limited. To address this knowledge gap we investigated a bio-optical dataset collected during a flood (2008) in the southern Great Barrier Reef (GBR) region coastal waters. Results presented here show strong impact of river flood discharges on water column stratification, distribution of suspended substances and light absorption properties in the study area. Bio-optical analysis showed phytoplankton absorption efficiency to reduce in response to increased coloured dissolved organic matter presence in flood impacted coastal waters. Biogeophysical property ranges, relationships and parametrisation presented here will help model realistic underwater light environment and optical signature in flood impacted coastal waters.

  9. Global Geometric Properties of Martian Impact Craters: An Assessment from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Frawley, J. J.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Schnetzler, C.

    2000-01-01

    Global geometric characteristics of topographically fresh impact craters have been assessed, for the first time, from gridded MOLA topography. Global trends of properties such as depth/diameter differ from previous estimates. Regional differences are observed.

  10. Impact properties of irradiated HT9 from the fuel duct of FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Lewis, W. Daniel; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports Charpy impact test data for the ACO-3 duct material (HT9) from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and its archive material. Irradiation doses for the specimens were in the range of 3– 148 dpa and irradiation temperatures in the range of 378–504 *C. The impact tests were performed for the small V-notched Charpy specimens with dimensions of 3 * 4 * 27 mm at an impact speed of 3.2 m/s in a 25 J capacity machine. Irradiation lowered the upper-shelf energy (USE) and increased the transition temperatures significantly. The shift of ductile–brittle transition temperatures (DDBTT) was greater after relatively low temperature irradiation. The USE values were in the range of 5.5–6.7 J before irradiation and decreased to the range of 2–5 J after irradiation. Lower USEs were measured for lower irradiation temperatures and specimens with T-L orientation. The dose dependences of transition temperature and USE were not significant because of the radiation effect on impact behavior nearly saturated at the lowest dose of about 3 dpa. A comparison showed that the lateral expansion of specimens showed a linear correlation with absorbed impact energy, but with large scatter in the results. Size effect was also discussed to clarify the differences in the impact property data from subsize and standard specimens as well as to provide a basis for comparison of data from different specimens. The USE and DDBTT data from different studies were compared.

  11. Comparison of quasistatic to impact mechanical properties of multiwall carbon nanotube/polycarbonate composites

    SciTech Connect

    Brühwiler, Paul A.; Barbezat, Michel; Necola, Adly; Kohls, Doug J.; Bunk, Oliver; Schaefer, Dale W.; Pötschke, Petra

    2010-10-22

    We report the quasistatic tensile and impact penetration properties (falling dart test) of injection-molded polycarbonate samples, as a function of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) concentration (0.0-2.5%). The MWNT were incorporated by dilution of a commercial MWNT/polycarbonate masterbatch. The stiffness and quasistatic yield strength of the composites increased approximately linearly with MWNT concentration in all measurements. The energy absorbed in fracture was, however, a negative function of the MWNT concentration, and exhibited different dependencies in quasistatic and impact tests. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) showed that the dispersion of the MWNT was similar at all concentrations. The negative effects on energy absorption are attributed to agglomerates remaining in the samples, which were observed in optical microscopy and SAXS. Overall, there was a good correspondence between static and dynamic energy absorption.

  12. Impact of heat treatment and oxidation of Carbon-carbon composites on microstructure and physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Sardar Sarwat

    Carbon-carbon (C/C) composites are notable among engineering materials in aerospace and defense industries possessing excellent specific mechanical, thermal, frictional and wear properties. C/C maintain their properties at temperatures where most of the high end alloys give in, and maintain their dimensional stability at temperatures above 2000 °C. C/C is frequently used in aircraft and automotive industries as brake materials. However, frictional performance is dependent on various parameters: microstructure, fiber type, fiber orientation distribution, fiber/matrix interfacial bond, heat treatment, and oxidation. The present study in dissertation provides an insight into the impact of heat treatment, and oxidation on microstructure, mechanical and thermal properties. The heat treatment (performed at 1800, 2100, 2400 °C in argon) of two-directional (2-D) pitch-fiber with charred resin carbon matrix, and three-directional (3-D) PAN-fiber with CVI carbon matrix influenced microstructure, mechanical and thermal properties. Microstructure characterized by polarized light microscopy (PLM), XRD, and Raman spectroscopy changed with increasing heat treatment temperature. The RL microstructure of 3-D C/C progressively highly organized, whereas ISO microstructure of 2-D C/C's charred resin hardly organized into an ordered structure as evident from Raman spectroscopy and Raman profiling of polished samples. Pitch-fiber organized more than the ISO microstructure of charred resin matrix. On the other, PAN-fiber became more ordered, but was organization was lower than pitch-fiber. Thermal conductivity increased for both (2-D, 3-D C/C) materials in comparison to non-heat treated (NHT) C/Cs. Thermal conductivity of oxidized samples decreased significantly than non-oxidized samples. In-plane thermal conductivity of 3-D C/C was much higher than that of 2-D C/C, and was attributed to the rough laminar (RL) microstructure of carbon matrix and continuous PAN-fiber when compared to

  13. Chain Dynamics and Structure Property Relation in High Impact Strength Polycarbonate Plastic.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-04

    AD-fli52 Oil CHAIN DYNAIIICS AND STRUCTURE PROPERTY RELATION IN HIH jTT IMPACT STRENGTH P0.. (U) COLLEGE OF THE HOLY CROSS WORCESTER MR P T...OOO1 C\\J ERFONM’N G ORGANI ATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK( AREA & W ORK UNIT NUMBERS ICO CC) IlIoge~ of the !Ho lv Cross ...January 4, 1985 U.S. ARMY RESEARCH OFFICE GRANT NUMBER DAAG 29-82-G-0001 College of the Holy Cross Worcester, Mass. 01610 Approved for Public Release

  14. [Impact of directly compressed auxiliary materials on powder property of fermented cordyceps powder].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Hua; Yue, Guo-Chao; Guan, Yong-Mei; Yang, Ming; Zhu, Wei-Feng

    2014-01-01

    To investigate such physical indexes as hygroscopicity, angle of repose, bulk density, fillibility of compression of mixed powder of directly compressed auxiliary materials and fermented cordyceps powder by using micromeritic study methods. The results showed that spray-dried lactose Flowlac100 and microcrystalline cellulose Avicel PH102 had better effect in liquidity and compressibility on fermented cordyceps powder than pregelatinized starch. The study on the impact of directly compressed auxiliary materials on the powder property of fermented cordyceps powder had guiding significant to the research of fermented cordyceps powder tablets, and could provide basis for the development of fermented cordyceps powder tablets.

  15. Tensile and impact properties of General Atomics 832864 heat of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Nowicki, L.J.; Gazda, J.; Billone, M.C.; Smith, D.L.; Johnson, W.R.; Trester, P.

    1998-09-01

    A 1300-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy was procured by General Atomics (GA) for the DIII-D radiative divertor program. To determine the mechanical properties of this alloy, tensile and Charpy tests were conducted on specimens prepared from pieces of 4.8-mm-thick as-rolled plates, a major product form for the DIII-D application. The tensile tests were conducted at three temperatures, 26, 280 and 380 C, the last two being the anticipated peak temperatures during DIII-D boronization and postvent bake-out, respectively. Results from these tests show that the tensile and impact properties of the 832864 heat are comparable to those of the other smaller V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti alloy heats previously developed by the US Fusion Materials Program and that scale-up of vanadium alloy production can be successfully achieved as long as reasonable process control is implemented.

  16. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: Cluster properties and the impact on galaxy star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owers, Matt S.

    2015-08-01

    The SAMI Galaxy Survey will provide resolved spectroscopy for around 3000 galaxies. Of those galaxies, ~600 have been selected to be members of eight massive clusters of galaxies. These eight clusters were the subject of a deep redshift survey using the AAOmega multi-object spectrograph with the aim of characterising the cluster dynamical properties (galaxy membership, cluster mass and substructure). Seven of the clusters also have existing Chandra and/or XMM-Newton X-ray data. In this talk I will describe the global characteristics of the clusters, such as the total masses and merging status, which have been measured using the combination of the redshift and X-ray data. These data are also used to provide a more physical description of galaxy environment local to the SAMI targets. Preliminary results will be presented on the environments of galaxies with evidence for environmentally impacted star formation properties, as indicated by the resolved information provided by the SAMI data.

  17. Impact of future fuel properties on aircraft engines and fuel systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.; Grobman, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the propulsion-system problems that will most likely be encountered if the specifications of hydrocarbon-based jet fuels must undergo significant changes in the future and, correspondingly, the advances in technology that will be required to minimize the adverse impact of these problems. Several investigations conducted are summarized. Illustrations are used to describe the relative effects of selected fuel properties on the behavior of propulsion-system components and fuel systems. The selected fuel properties are those that are most likely to be relaxed in future fuel specifications. Illustrations are also used to describe technological advances that may be needed in the future. Finally, the technological areas needing the most attention are described, and programs that are under way to address these needs are briefly discussed.

  18. Impact of ion irradiation on the thermal, structural, and mechanical properties of metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, S. G.

    2005-04-01

    The impact of ion-beam irradiation on the thermal, structural, and mechanical properties of metallic glasses is investigated using the model glass, CuTi, in molecular dynamics computer simulations. It is found that ion-beam bombardment successively modifies the compositional and structural order toward a universal steady state, which proves to be independent of the initial relaxation state and thermal history of the unirradiated sample. This is reflected by key materials properties, including enthalpy, structural and compositional short-range order, as well as Young’s modulus and fracture behavior. The results are interpreted within the framework of competing dynamics, where radiation-induced plastic relaxation counteracts ion-beam disordering.

  19. Impact of low level praseodymium substitution on the magnetic properties of YCrO3 orthochromites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Surendra; Coondoo, Indrani; Rao, Ashok; Lu, Bo-Han; Kuo, Yung-Kang; Kholkin, Andrei L.; Panwar, Neeraj

    2017-04-01

    Praseodymium (Pr) modified yttrium orthochromites (YCrO3 with Pr =0% and 5% at Y-sites) have been investigated with the aim of exploring the impact of low level Pr substitution on the magnetic properties including magnetization reversal, spin reorientation, and exchange bias of YCrO3 compound. The samples exhibit a distorted orthorhombic structure with Pnma space group. A negative magnetization (or magnetization reversal) was observed under zero-field cooled (ZFC) mode for the pristine YCrO3 sample, whereas such a feature disappeared with a 5% Pr substitution. In addition, the Pr-doped samples exhibited a spin reorientation behaviour which was absent in the pristine sample. Most interestingly, the ZFC magnetic hysteresis loops revealed a left and upward shift, resembling a negative exchange bias effect. These results indicate the effectiveness of low level doping in tailoring the magnetic properties of orthochromites.

  20. Metformin: A Review of characteristics, properties, analytical methods and impact in the green chemistry.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Mariana Teixeira da; Kogawa, Ana Carolina; Salgado, Hérida Regina Nunes

    2017-09-11

    Diabetes mellitus is considered a public health problem. The initial treatment consists of improving the lifestyle and making changes in the diet. When these changes are not enough, the use of medication becomes necessary. The metformin aims to reduce the hepatic production of glucose and is the preferred treatment for type 2. The objective is to survey the characteristics and properties of metformin, as well as hold a discussion on the existing analytical methods to green chemistry and their impacts for both the operator and the environment. For the survey data searches were conducted by scientific papers in the literature as well as in official compendium. The characteristics and properties are shown, also, methods using liquid chromatography techniques, titration, absorption spectrophotometry in the ultraviolet and the infrared region. Most of the methods presented are not green chemistry oriented. It is necessary the awareness of everyone involved in the optimization of the methods applied through the implementation of green chemistry to determine the metformin.

  1. The impact of relative humidity during electrospinning on the morphology and mechanical properties of nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Pelipenko, Jan; Kristl, Julijana; Janković, Biljana; Baumgartner, Saša; Kocbek, Petra

    2013-11-01

    Electrospinning is an efficient and flexible method for nanofiber production, but it is influenced by many systemic, process, and environmental parameters that govern the electrospun product morphology. This study systematically investigates the influence of relative humidity (RH) on the electrospinning process. The results showed that the morphology of the electrospun product (shape and diameter) can be manipulated with precise regulation of RH during electrospinning. Because the diameter of nanofibers correlates with their rigidity, it was shown that RH control can lead to manipulation of material mechanical properties. Finally, based on the solution's rheological parameter-namely, phase shift angle-we were able to predict the loss of homogenous nanofiber structure in correlation with RH conditions during electrospinning. This research addresses the mechanism of RH impact on the electrospinning process and offers the background to exploit it in order to better control nanomaterial properties and alter its applicability.

  2. Effect of polyimide interphase on impact and fatigue properties of PEEK/carbon fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.M.; Gardner, S.H.; Gonzalez, A.

    1995-12-01

    There is a growing interest in carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites. Aqueous suspension prepregging is a new prepregging technique which provides a method for manufacturing PEEK/carbon fiber composites. This method also allows systematic variance of the properties of the interphase region between the carbon fiber and the bulk matrix. It has been found that this interphase region has a effect on dynamic mechanical properties. Notched fatigue testing and impact testing have been used to illustrate the effect of this interphase region. Notched fatigue testing is sensitive to the strength of the fiber-matrix bond. Through these mechanical tests it has been shown that PEEK composites made with a BisP-BTDA binder have a stronger fiber-matrix bond than a reference composite made from APC-2. PEEK composites made with a LaRC TPI binder also have a stronger fiber-matrix bond than APC-2.

  3. Impact of degree of oxidation on the physicochemical properties of microcrystalline cellulose.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jie; Xu, Shuyi; Xu, Naiyu; Li, Duxin; Linhardt, Robert J; Zhang, Zhenqing

    2017-01-02

    Microcrystalline cellulose, a major component of cell wall of plants, is one of the most abundant natural materials, but the poor solubility of cellulose limits its applications. Cellulose is a linear glucan with exclusive β 1→4 linkage. Oxidation carried out with TEMPO-NaBr-NaClO system can selectively oxidize the C6 of glucose residues in cellulose. This modification improves polysaccharide solubility and other physicochemical properties. In this work, the impact of degree of oxidation on solubility, degree of crystallization, thermostability, molecular weight and the structures of the resulting oligosaccharide products of selectively oxidized cellulose were investigated using x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, gel permeation chromatography-multiple angle laser light scattering and ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-electrospray-quadrupole/time of flight-mass spectrometry, respectively. The physicochemical properties of selectively oxidized cellulose having different degrees of oxidation were carefully characterized providing a theoretical foundation for the more accurate selection of applications of oxidized celluloses.

  4. Computational Assessment of the Impact of Gamma-ray Detector Material Properties on Spectroscopic Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Hensley, Walter K.; Miller, Erin A.; Wittman, Richard S.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2011-09-01

    Abstract Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is performing a computational assessment of the impact of several important gamma-ray detector material properties (e.g. energy resolution and intrinsic detection efficiency) on the scenario-specific spectroscopic performance of these materials. The research approach combines 3D radiation transport calculations, detector response modeling, and spectroscopic analysis of simulated energy deposition spectra to map the functional dependence of detection performance on the underlying material properties. This assessment is intended to help guide formulation of performance goals for new detector materials within the context of materials discovery programs, with an emphasis on applications in the threat reduction, nonproliferation, and safeguards/ verification user communities. The research results will also provide guidance to the gamma-ray sensor design community in estimating relative spectroscopic performance merits of candidate materials for novel or notional detectors.

  5. Asteroid surface archaeology: Identification of eroded impact structures by spectral properties on (4) Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, M.; Nathues, A.; Schäfer, M.; Schmedemann, N.; Vincent, J.; Russell, C.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Vesta's surface material is characterized as a deep regolith [1,2], mobilized by countless impacts. The almost catastrophic impact near Vesta's south pole, which has created the Rheasilvia basin, and the partly overlapping older impact of similar size, Veneneia, have not only reshaped the areas of their interior (roughly 50 % of the Vesta surface), but also emplaced each time a huge ejecta blanket of similar size, thus covering the whole remaining surface. In this context, pristine and even younger morphologic features have been erased. However, the spectral signatures of the early differentiation and alteration products by impacts have partially remained in situ. While near the north pole several large old eroded impact features are visible, the equatorial zone close to the basin rims seems to be void of those. Since it is unlikely, that this zone has been entirely avoided by large projectiles, in this area the results of such impacts may have left morphologically not detectable remnants: Individual distribution of particle sizes and altered photometric properties, excavated layers, shock metamorphism, melt generation inside particles and on macroscopic scales, and emplacement of exogenous projectile material. An analysis by color ratio images and spatial profiles of diagnostic spectral parameters reveals such features. Results: Based on local spectroscopic evidence we have detected eroded impact features of three categories: 1) Small craters with diameters of a few kilometers, 2) Large craters or, if even larger, incipient impact basins, 3) Sub-global ejecta blankets. The eastern part of Feralia Planitia, diameter 140 km, has little evidence of a round outline in the shape model, but it features spectral gradients towards its center. A feature of similar size, centered north of Lucaria Tholus becomes only visible by a similar spectra gradient and a circular outline in specific spectral ratio mosaics. These features seem to be related to the

  6. Impact of Deforestation on Cloud Properties and Rainfall Over the Costa Rica-Nicaraguan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, D. K.; Nair, U. S.; Welch, R. M.; Lawton, R. O.

    2002-12-01

    The Nicaraguan-Costa Rican region in Central America exhibits the typical pattern of complex deforestation now seen throughout the tropics. The region is a mixture of lowland, mostly converted to agriculture, and mountainous regions, where pristine forests still persist. At present the northern fertile plains of Costa Rica are mostly utilized for agriculture. However in the adjacent regions of southern Nicaragua lowland forests are relatively intact. The extensive agricultural areas of northern Costa Rica is a region of discontinuity in the proposed Mesoamerican Biological Corridor which would connect the montane forests in Costa Rica to the lowland forests in Nicaragua. The present study is part of a larger study which investigates the effects of continuing lowland deforestation and associated regional climate change in Central America on the stability of the entire proposed Mesoamerican Biological Corridor. The present work focuses on the effects of land use on the formation of cloudiness, cloud properties and rainfall in the forested regions of southern Nicaragua and the deforested regions of northern Costa Rica. Land surface and cloud properties are retrieved using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) satellite data and products. The land surface properties retrieved are land surface temperature, albedo, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Available Soil Moisture fraction and surface energy fluxes. The cloud properties retrieved are cloud optical thickness and effective radii. In addition, the frequency of cumulus cloudiness on hourly basis are derived from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and rainfall is studied using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite products. The correlations between the surface properties, cloud properties, cumulus cloudiness and rainfall as a function of ecosystem and topography is

  7. Impact of leg lengthening on viscoelastic properties of the deep fascia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Qiang; Wei, Yi-Yong; Wu, Zi-Xiang; Luo, Zhuo-Jing

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the morphological alterations of the deep fascia subjected to leg lengthening have been investigated in cellular and extracellular aspects, the impact of leg lengthening on viscoelastic properties of the deep fascia remains largely unknown. This study aimed to address the changes of viscoelastic properties of the deep fascia during leg lengthening using uniaxial tensile test. Methods Animal model of leg lengthening was established in New Zealand white rabbits. Distraction was initiated at a rate of 1 mm/day and 2 mm/day in two steps, and preceded until increases of 10% and 20% in the initial length of tibia had been achieved. The deep fascia specimens of 30 mm × 10 mm were clamped with the Instron 1122 tensile tester at room temperature with a constant tensile rate of 5 mm/min. After 5 load-download tensile tests had been performed, the specimens were elongated until rupture. The load-displacement curves were automatically generated. Results The normal deep fascia showed typical viscoelastic rule of collagenous tissues. Each experimental group of the deep fascia after leg lengthening kept the properties. The curves of the deep fascia at a rate of 1 mm/day with 20% increase in tibia length were the closest to those of normal deep fascia. The ultimate tension strength and the strain at rupture on average of normal deep fascia were 2.69 N (8.97 mN/mm2) and 14.11%, respectively. The increases in ultimate tension strength and strain at rupture of the deep fascia after leg lengthening were statistically significant. Conclusion The deep fascia subjected to leg lengthening exhibits viscoelastic properties as collagenous tissues without lengthening other than increased strain and strength. Notwithstanding different lengthening schemes result in varied viscoelastic properties changes, the most comparable viscoelastic properties to be demonstrated are under the scheme of a distraction rate of 1 mm/day and 20% increase in tibia length. PMID:19698092

  8. Physico-chemical properties and cytotoxic effects of sugar-based surfactants: Impact of structural variations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Biao; Vayssade, Muriel; Miao, Yong; Chagnault, Vincent; Grand, Eric; Wadouachi, Anne; Postel, Denis; Drelich, Audrey; Egles, Christophe; Pezron, Isabelle

    2016-09-01

    Surfactants derived from the biorefinery process can present interesting surface-active properties, low cytotoxicity, high biocompatibility and biodegradability. They are therefore considered as potential sustainable substitutes to currently used petroleum-based surfactants. To better understand and anticipate their performances, structure-property relationships need to be carefully investigated. For this reason, we applied a multidisciplinary approach to systematically explore the effect of subtle structural variations on both physico-chemical properties and biological effects. Four sugar-based surfactants, each with an eight carbon alkyl chain bound to a glucose or maltose head group by an amide linkage, were synthesized and evaluated together along with two commercially available standard surfactants. Physico-chemical properties including solubility, Krafft point, surface-tension lowering and critical micellar concentration (CMC) in water and biological medium were explored. Cytotoxicity evaluation by measuring proliferation index and metabolic activity against dermal fibroblasts showed that all surfactants studied may induce cell death at low concentrations (below their CMC). Results revealed significant differences in both physico-chemical properties and cytotoxic effects depending on molecule structural features, such as the position of the linkage on the sugar head-group, or the orientation of the amide linkage. Furthermore, the cytotoxic response increased with the reduction of surfactant CMC. This study underscores the relevance of a methodical and multidisciplinary approach that enables the consideration of surfactant solution properties when applied to biological materials. Overall, our results will contribute to a better understanding of the concomitant impact of surfactant structure at physico-chemical and biological levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Systematic Satellite Observations of the Impact of Aerosols from Passive Volcanic Degassing on Local Cloud Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Sayer, A. M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions is a significant source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect radiative forcing, especially with respect to emissions from passive de-gassing and minor explosions. Understanding the impact of volcanic emissions on indirect radiative forcing is important assessing present day atmospheric properties and also to define the pre-industrial baseline to assess anthropogenic perturbations. We present observations of the time-averaged indirect aerosol effect within 200 km downwind of isolated island volcanoes in regions of low present-day aerosol burden using MODIS and AATSR data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kilauea (Hawaii), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (Reunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent according to wind direction, so that retrievals downwind of the volcano can be averaged to improve signal to noise ratio. The emissions from all three volcanoes, including those from passive degassing, strombolian activity and minor explosions lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference in effective radius ranging from 48 microns at the different volcanoes. A comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands with no significant source of aerosol suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. This approach sets out a first step for the systematic measurement of the effects of present day low altitude volcanic emissions on cloud properties, and our observations of unpolluted, isolated marine settings may capture processes similar to those in the preindustrial marine atmosphere.

  10. Investigating the impact of anthropogenic pollution on cloud properties at the North Slope of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maahn, M.; de Boer, G.; Creamean, J.; Wu, W.; McFarquhar, G. M.

    2016-12-01

    Aerosols have a strong potential to influence cloud properties when acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nucleating particles (INPs). In particular, they can impact the number, size, and phase of cloud particles as well as the cloud lifetime through aerosol indirect and semi-direct effects. These effects are of great importance for the radiation budget in polar regions due to the longwave emissions of mixed-phase clouds. In this study, we investigate how cloud properties such as phase, liquid water content, and droplet effective radius are altered due to aerosols originating from mostly anthropogenic pollution. In situ aircraft observations obtained from June to September 2015 during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME-V) field campaign are used to characterize the aerosol and cloud properties. For this, the Gulfstream-1 aircraft was equipped with a wide range of instruments to sample cloud particles (e.g., Fast Cloud Droplet Probe (FCDP), 2D Stereo Particle Imaging Probe (2DS), High Volume Precipitation Spectrometer (HVPS)), aerosols (e.g., nephelometer, Condensation Particle Counter (CPC), Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer (PCASP)) and trace gases. These in situ measurements are complemented by ground-based remote sensing cloud instruments (cloud radar, radiometer, and lidar) located at the two ARM sites on the North Slope of Alaska (Barrow and Oliktok Point). Additional surface observations at these sites enabled us to examine how meteorological and surface conditions influence the impact of aerosols on cloud properties. Comparisons of data collected at these two sites are of particular interest due to the different characteristics with respect to anthropogenic aerosol background: While Oliktok Point is surrounded by petroleum production facilities, Barrow represents a more pristine environment.

  11. Systematic satellite observations of the impact of aerosols from passive volcanic degassing on local cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Sayer, A. M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions is a significant source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect radiative forcing, especially with respect to emissions from passive degassing and minor explosions. Understanding the impact of volcanic emissions on indirect radiative forcing is important for assessing present day atmospheric properties and also to define the pre-industrial baseline to assess anthropogenic perturbations. We present observations of the time-averaged indirect aerosol effect within 200 km downwind of isolated island volcanoes in regions of low present-day aerosol burden using MODIS and AATSR data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kīlauea (Hawai'i), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (Réunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent according to wind direction, so that retrievals downwind of the volcano can be averaged to improve signal to noise ratio. The emissions from all three volcanoes, including those from passive degassing, strombolian activity and minor explosions lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference in effective radius of 4-8 μm at the different volcanoes. A comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands with no significant source of aerosol suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. This approach sets out a first step for the systematic measurement of the effects of present day low altitude volcanic emissions on cloud properties. Our observations of unpolluted, isolated marine settings may also capture processes similar to those in the pre-industrial marine atmosphere.

  12. Impact of carbonation on the durability of cementitious materials: water transport properties characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auroy, M.; Poyet, S.; Le Bescop, P.; Torrenti, J.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Within the context of long-lived intermediate level radioactive waste geological disposal, reinforced concrete would be used. In service life conditions, the concrete structures would be subjected to drying and carbonation. Carbonation relates to the reaction between carbon dioxide (CO2) and the main hydrates of the cement paste (portlandite and C-S-H). Beyond the fall of the pore solution pH, indicative of steel depassivation, carbonation induces mineralogical and microstructural changes (due to portlandite and C-S-H dissolution and calcium carbonate precipitation). This results in the modification of the transport properties, which can impact the structure durability. Because concrete durability depends on water transport, this study focuses on the influence of carbonation on water transport properties. In fact, the transport properties of sound materials are known but they still remain to be assessed for carbonated ones. An experimental program has been designed to investigate the transport properties in carbonated materials. Four hardened cement pastes, differing in mineralogy, are carbonated in an accelerated carbonation device (in controlled environmental conditions) at CO2 partial pressure of about 3%. Once fully carbonated, all the data needed to describe water transport, using a simplified approach, will be evaluated.

  13. IMPACT OF IRRADIATION AND THERMAL AGING ON DWPF SIMULATED SLUDGE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Eibling, R; Michael Stone, M

    2006-10-16

    The research and development programs in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and other high-level waste vitrification processes require the use of both nonradioactive waste simulants and actual waste samples. While actual waste samples are the ideal materials to study, acquiring large quantities of actual waste is difficult and expensive. Tests utilizing actual high-level waste require the use of expensive shielded cells facilities to provide sufficient shielding for the researchers. Nonradioactive waste simulants have been used for laboratory testing, pilot-scale testing and full-scale integrated facility testing. These waste simulants were designed to reproduce the chemical and, if possible, the physical properties of the actual high-level waste. This technical report documents a study on the impact of irradiating a Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) simulant and of additional tests on aging a SB3 simulant by additional thermal processing. Prior simulant development studies examined methods of producing sludge and supernate simulants and processes that could be used to alter the physical properties of the simulant to more accurately mimic the properties of actual waste. Development of a precipitated sludge simulant for the River Protection Project (RPP) demonstrated that the application of heat for a period of time could significantly alter the rheology of the sludge simulant. The RPP precipitated simulant used distillation to concentrate the sludge solids and produced a reduction in sludge yield stress of up to 80% compared to the initial sludge properties. Observations at that time suggested that a substantial fraction of the iron hydroxide had converted to the oxide during the distillation. DWPF sludge simulant studies showed a much smaller reduction in yield stress ({approx}10%), demonstrated the impact of shear on particle size, and showed that smaller particle sizes yielded higher yield stress products. The current study documented in this report

  14. Laser Peening Process and Its Impact on Materials Properties in Comparison with Shot Peening and Ultrasonic Impact Peening

    PubMed Central

    Gujba, Abdullahi K.; Medraj, Mamoun

    2014-01-01

    The laser shock peening (LSP) process using a Q-switched pulsed laser beam for surface modification has been reviewed. The development of the LSP technique and its numerous advantages over the conventional shot peening (SP) such as better surface finish, higher depths of residual stress and uniform distribution of intensity were discussed. Similar comparison with ultrasonic impact peening (UIP)/ultrasonic shot peening (USP) was incorporated, when possible. The generation of shock waves, processing parameters, and characterization of LSP treated specimens were described. Special attention was given to the influence of LSP process parameters on residual stress profiles, material properties and structures. Based on the studies so far, more fundamental understanding is still needed when selecting optimized LSP processing parameters and substrate conditions. A summary of the parametric studies of LSP on different materials has been presented. Furthermore, enhancements in the surface micro and nanohardness, elastic modulus, tensile yield strength and refinement of microstructure which translates to increased fatigue life, fretting fatigue life, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and corrosion resistance were addressed. However, research gaps related to the inconsistencies in the literature were identified. Current status, developments and challenges of the LSP technique were discussed. PMID:28788284

  15. An interregional hedonic analysis of noxious facility impacts on local wages and property values

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E.; Nieves, L.A.

    1991-12-31

    Claims of property value loss are commonly raised by homeowners when noxious facilities are sited or when new information about the hazards of existing facilities is made public. While the capitalization of externalities into land values is consistent with economic theory, empirical measurement of impacts has not generated consistent results. This is true both for hedonic measurements as well as other types of econometric analyses. While it is well established that job and site risks have similar impacts on regional labor markets, there are no studies relating the presence of a broad range of noxious facilities to local wage premiums. In contrast, this study employs an interregional framework in a hedonic analysis of both wage and property markets and considers eight different facility classifications. This paper discusses the development of the hedonic model employed in this study. It develops more fully the theoretical advantages of the intercity model and alternative methods of deriving implicit prices for environmental amenities and disamenities. The unique data base and the structure of the estimated model are described. It also includes a discussion of the research findings. Major conclusions and suggestions for further research are presented.

  16. An interregional hedonic analysis of noxious facility impacts on local wages and property values

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E.; Nieves, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    Claims of property value loss are commonly raised by homeowners when noxious facilities are sited or when new information about the hazards of existing facilities is made public. While the capitalization of externalities into land values is consistent with economic theory, empirical measurement of impacts has not generated consistent results. This is true both for hedonic measurements as well as other types of econometric analyses. While it is well established that job and site risks have similar impacts on regional labor markets, there are no studies relating the presence of a broad range of noxious facilities to local wage premiums. In contrast, this study employs an interregional framework in a hedonic analysis of both wage and property markets and considers eight different facility classifications. This paper discusses the development of the hedonic model employed in this study. It develops more fully the theoretical advantages of the intercity model and alternative methods of deriving implicit prices for environmental amenities and disamenities. The unique data base and the structure of the estimated model are described. It also includes a discussion of the research findings. Major conclusions and suggestions for further research are presented.

  17. Compatible solutes: Thermodynamic properties and biological impact of ectoines and prolines.

    PubMed

    Held, Christoph; Neuhaus, Thorsten; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2010-11-01

    Compatible solutes like ectoine and its derivatives are deployed by halophile organisms as osmolytes to sustain the high salt concentration in the environment. This work investigates the relation of the thermodynamic properties of compatible solutes and their impact as osmolytes. The ectoines considered in this work are ectoine, hydroxyectoine, and homoectoine. Besides solution densities (15-45°C) and solubilities in water (3-80°C), component activity coefficients in the aqueous solutions were determined in the temperature range between 0 and 50°C. The latter is important for adjusting a certain water activity and therewith a respective osmotic pressure within a cell. The characteristic effect of ectoines is compared to that of prolines, as well as to that of incompatible solutes as salts and urea. The experimental results show that the influence on the activity (coefficient) of water is quite different for compatible and incompatible solutes: whereas compatible solutes cause decreasing water activity coefficients, incompatible solutes lead to an increase in water activity coefficients. Based on this quantity, the paper discusses the impact of various osmolytes on biological systems and contributes to the explanation why some osmolytes are more often and at other temperatures used than others. Moreover, it was found that the anti-stress effect of an osmolyte is weakened in the presence of a salt. Finally, it is shown that the thermodynamic properties of compatible solutes can be modeled and even predicted using the thermodynamic model PC-SAFT (Perturbed-Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory).

  18. Impact of active ingredients on the swelling properties of orally disintegrating tablets prepared by microwave treatment.

    PubMed

    Sano, Syusuke; Iwao, Yasunori; Kimura, Susumu; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2014-07-01

    The impact of different active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) loading on the properties of orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs) prepared according to our previously reported microwave (MW) treatment process was evaluated using famotidine (FAM), acetaminophen (AAP), and ibuprofen (IBU). None of the APIs interrupted the tablet swelling during the MW treatment and the tablet hardness were improved by more than 20 N. MW treatment, however, led to a significant increase in the disintegration time of the ODTs containing IBU, but it had no impact on that of the ODTs containing FAM or AAP. This increased disintegration time of the ODTs containing IBU was attributed to the relatively low melting point of IBU (Tm=76 °C), with the IBU particles melting during the MW treatment to form agglomerates, which interrupted the penetration of water into the tablets and delayed their disintegration. The effects of the MW treatment on the chemical stability and dissolution properties of ODTs were also evaluated. The results revealed that MW treatment did not promote the degradations of FAM and AAP or delay their release from the ODTs, while dissolution of the ODTs containing IBU delayed by MW treatment. Based on these results, the MW method would be applicable to the preparation of ODTs containing APIs with melting points higher than 110 °C.

  19. Microstructural Features Controlling Mechanical Properties in Nb-Mo Microalloyed Steels. Part II: Impact Toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isasti, Nerea; Jorge-Badiola, Denis; Taheri, Mitra L.; Uranga, Pello

    2014-10-01

    The present paper is the final part of a two-part paper where the influence of coiling temperature on the final microstructure and mechanical properties of Nb-Mo microalloyed steels is described. More specifically, this second paper deals with the different mechanisms affecting impact toughness. A detailed microstructural characterization and the relations linking the microstructural parameters and the tensile properties have already been discussed in Part I. Using these results as a starting point, the present work takes a step forward and develops a methodology for consistently incorporating the effect of the microstructural heterogeneity into the existing relations that link the Charpy impact toughness to the microstructure. In conventional heat treatments or rolling schedules, the microstructure can be properly described by its mean attributes, and the ductile-brittle transition temperatures measured by Charpy tests can be properly predicted. However, when different microalloying elements are added and multiphase microstructures are formed, the influences of microstructural heterogeneity and secondary hard phases have to be included in a modified equation in order to accurately predict the DB transition temperature in Nb and Nb-Mo microalloyed steels.

  20. Investigating the Impact of Optical Selection Effects on Observed Rest-frame Prompt GRB Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, D.; Heussaff, V.; Dezalay, J.-P.; Atteia, J.-L.; Klotz, A.; Dornic, D.

    2016-11-01

    Measuring gamma-ray burst (GRB) properties in their rest frame is crucial for understanding the physics at work in GRBs. This can only be done for GRBs with known redshifts. Since redshifts are usually measured from the optical spectrum of the afterglow, correlations between prompt and afterglow emissions may introduce biases into the distribution of the rest-frame properties of the prompt emission, especially considering that we measure the redshift of only one-third of Swift GRBs. In this paper, we study the optical flux of GRB afterglows and its connection to various intrinsic properties of GRBs. We also discuss the impact of the optical selection effect on the distribution of rest-frame prompt properties of GRBs. Our analysis is based on a sample of 90 GRBs with good optical follow-up and well-measured prompt emission. Seventy-six of them have a measure of redshift and 14 have no redshift. We compare the rest-frame prompt properties of GRBs with different afterglow optical fluxes in order to check for possible correlations between the promt properties and the optical flux of the afterglow. The optical flux is measured two hours after the trigger, which is a typical time for the measure of the redshift. We find that the optical flux of GRB afterglows in our sample is mainly driven by their optical luminosity and depends only slightly on their redshift. We show that GRBs with low and high afterglow optical fluxes have similar E {}{{pi}}, E {}{{iso}}, and L {}{{iso}}, indicating that the rest-frame distributions computed from GRBs with a redshift are not significantly distorted by optical selection effects. However, we found that the {T}90{rest} distribution is not immune to optical selection effects, which favor the selection of GRBs with longer durations. Finally, we note that GRBs well above the E {}{{pi}}-E {}{{iso}} relation have lower optical fluxes and we show that optical selection effects favor the detection of GRBs with bright optical afterglows located

  1. Effects of Various Heat Treatments on the Ballistic Impact Properties of Inconel 718 Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2000-01-01

    Uncontained failures of aircraft engine fan blades are serious events that can cause equipment damage and loss of life. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification requires that all engines demonstrate the ability to contain a released fan blade with the engine running at full power. However, increased protection generally comes at the expense of weight. Proper choice of materials is therefore imperative to an optimized design. The process of choosing a good casing material is done primarily through trial and error. This costly procedure could be minimized if there was a better understanding of the relationships among static material properties, impact properties, and failure mechanisms. This work is part of a program being conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field to study these relationships. Ballistic impact tests were conducted on flat, square sheets of Inconel 718 that had been subjected to different heat treatments. Two heat treatments and the as-received condition were studied. In addition, results were compared with those from an earlier study involving a fourth heat treatment. The heat treatments were selected on the basis of their effects on the static tensile properties of the material. The impact specimens used in this study were 17.8-cm square panels that were centered and clamped over a 15.2-cm square hole in a 1.27-cm-thick steel plate. Three nominal plate thickness dimensions were studied, 1.0, 1.8, and 2.0 mm. For each thickness, all the specimens were taken from the same sheet of material. The projectile was a Ti-6Al-4V cylinder with a length of 25.4 mm, a diameter of 12.7 mm, and a mass ranging from 14.05 to 14.20 g. The projectiles were accelerated toward the specimens at normal incidence using a gas gun with a 2-m-long, 12.7-mm inner-diameter barrel. The ballistic limit for each heat treatment condition and thickness was determined by conducting a number of impact tests that bracketed as closely as possible the velocity

  2. Tensile and Impact Toughness Properties of Gas Tungsten Arc Welded and Friction Stir Welded Interstitial Free Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-02-01

    Welded regions of interstitial free (IF) steel grades in the vicinity of weld center exhibits larger grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often causes inferior weld mechanical properties. In the present study, tensile properties, charpy impact toughness, microhardness, microstructure, lowest hardness distribution profile, and fracture surface morphology of the gas tungsten arc welded (GTAW) and friction stir welded joints were evaluated, and the results are compared. From this investigation, it is found that friction stir welded joint of IF steel showed superior tensile and impact properties compared with GTAW joint, and this is mainly due to the formation of very fine, equiaxed microstructure in the weld zone.

  3. Impacts of land use changes on physical and chemical soil properties in the Central Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadal Romero, Estela; Hoitinga, Leo; Valdivielso, Sergio; Pérez Cardiel, Estela; Serrano Muela, Pili; Lasanta, Teodoro; Cammeraat, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Soils and vegetation tend to evolve jointly in relation to climate evolution and the impacts of human activity. Afforestation has been one of the main policies for environmental management of forest landscapes in Mediterranean areas. Afforestation has been based mainly on conifers because they are fast-growing species, and also because it was believed that this would lead to rapid restoration of soil properties and hydrological processes, and the formation of protective vegetation cover. This study analyses the effects of afforestation on physical and chemical soil properties. Specifically, we addressed this research question: (i) How do soil properties change after land abandonment? The 11 microsites considered were: Afforestation Pinus sylvestris (escarpment, terrace and close to the stem), Afforestation Pinus nigra (escarpment, terrace and close to the stem), natural shrubland, grasslands, bare lands, and undisturbed forest site (pine cover and close to the stem). An extensive single sampling was carried out in September 2014. We systematically collected 5 top soil samples (0-10 cm) and 3 deep soil samples (10-20 cm) per microsite (88 composite samples in total). These properties were analysed: (i) soil texture, (ii) bulk density, (iii) pH and electrical conductivity, (iv) total SOC, (v) Total Nitrogen, (vi) organic matter, (vii) CaCO3 and (viii) aggregate stability. Statistical tests have been applied to determine relationships between the different soil properties and are used to assess differences between different soil samples, land use areas and soil depths. Implications of reafforestation for soil development and environmental response are discussed. Acknowledgments This research was supported by a Marie Curie Intra-European Fellowship in the project "MED-AFFOREST" (PIEF-GA-2013-624974).

  4. New insights into the properties of contrail cirrus and their impact on climate from airborne experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Christiane; Schumann, Ulrich; Minikin, Andreas; Schlager, Hans; Anderson, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    Current growth rates in aviation demand a profound scientific data base of contrail cirrus properties in order to accurately assess their climate impact. In particular, the differentiation of contrail cirrus in natural cirrus fields is challenging. Direct observations of contrail cirrus throughout their life cycle are scarce and therefore limit our understanding of the climate effects from contrail cirrus. Here, we give new insights into the growth, life-cycle and climate impact from contrail cirrus based on results from suite of aircraft experiments. NASA's ACCESSII mission focused on the detection of aircraft emissions and initial contrail stages. Nascent contrails were detected at cruise altitudes at 100 m distance to the engine exit. Contrail growth to 10-min contrail age was investigated during DLR's CONCERT campaigns. Finally, the objective of the ML-CIRRUS experiment was to study the life cycle and climate impact of contrail cirrus. The contrail measurements are related to previous observations and discussed in the context of recent developments in contrail modeling. Highlights include the quantification of the effects of aircraft type on contrail microphysics, the analysis of ice particle shapes and the quantitative distinction of contrail cirrus and natural cirrus.

  5. Tensile and Charpy impact properties of irradiated reduced-activation ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on 8 reduced-activation Cr-W steels after irradiation to 15-17 and 26-29 dpa, and Charpy impact tests were conducted on steels irradiated to 26-29 dpa. Irradiation was in Fast Flux Test Facility at 365 C on steels containing 2.25-12% Cr, varying amounts of W, V, and Ta, and 0.1%C. Previously, tensile specimens were irradiated to 6-8 dpa and Charpy specimens to 6-8, 15- 17, and 20-24 dpa. Tensile and Charpy specimens were also thermally aged to 20,000 h at 365 C. Thermal aging had little effect on tensile properties or ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), but several steels showed a slight increase in upper-shelf energy (USE). After 7 dpa, strength increased (hardened) and then remained relatively unchanged through 26-29 dpa (ie, strength saturated with fluence). Post-irradiation Charpy impact tests after 26-29 dpa showed that the loss of impact toughness (increased DBTT, decreased USE) remained relatively unchanged from the values after 20-24 dpa, which had been relatively unchanged from the earlier irradiations. As before, the two 9Cr steels had the most irradiation resistance.

  6. Impact of phytic acid on nutrient bioaccessibility and antioxidant properties of dehusked rice.

    PubMed

    Lee, H H; Loh, S P; Bong, C F J; Sarbini, S R; Yiu, P H

    2015-12-01

    Whole grains consumption promotes health benefits, but demonstrates controversial impacts from phytic acid in meeting requirements of good health. Therefore, this study was aimed to determine the nutrient bioaccessibility and antioxidant properties of rice cultivars named "Adan" or "Bario" and deduce the nutritional impact of phytic acid. Majority of the dehusked rice in the collection showed an acceptable level of in-vitro starch digestibility and in-vitro protein digestibility, but were poor in antioxidant properties and bioaccessibility of minerals (Ca, Fe and Zn). The drawbacks identified in the rice cultivars were due to relatively high phytic acid content (2420.6 ± 94.6 mg/100 g) and low phenolic content (152.39 ± 18.84 μg GAE/g). The relationship between phytic acid content and mineral bioaccessibility was strongest in calcium (r = 0.60), followed by iron (r = 0.40) and zinc (r = 0.27). Phytic acid content did not significantly correlate with in-vitro starch digestibility and in-vitro protein digestibility but showed a weak relationship with antioxidant properties. These suggest that phytic acid could significantly impair the mineral bioaccessibility of dehusked rice, and also act as an important antioxidant in non-pigmented rice. Bario rice cultivars offered dehusked rice with wide range of in-vitro digestibility of starch and protein, and also pigmented rice as a good source of antioxidants. However, there is a need to reduce phytic acid content in dehusked rice for improved mineral bioaccessibility among Bario rice cultivars.

  7. Systematic Satellite Observations of the Impact of Aerosols from Passive Volcanic Degassing on Local Cloud Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebmeier, S.K.; Sayer, Andrew M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions, especially from passive degassing and minor explosions, is a source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect effects. Observations of the impact of volcanic aerosol on clouds contribute to our understanding of both present-day atmospheric properties and of the pre-industrial baseline necessary to assess aerosol radiative forcing. We present systematic measurements over several years at multiple active and inactive volcanic islands in regions of low present-day aerosol burden. The timeaveraged indirect aerosol effects within 200 kilometers downwind of island volcanoes are observed using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, 2002-2013) and Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR, 2002- 2008) data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kilauea (Hawaii), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (la Reunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent to be parallel to wind direction, so that upwind and downwind retrievals can be compared. The emissions from all three volcanoes - including those from passive degassing, Strombolian activity and minor explosions - lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference ranging from 2 - 8 micrometers at the different volcanoes in different seasons. Estimations of the difference in Top of Atmosphere upward Short Wave flux upwind and downwind of the active volcanoes from NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) suggest a downwind elevation of between 10 and 45 Watts per square meter at distances of 150 - 400 kilometers from the volcano, with much greater local (less than 80 kilometers) effects. Comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands without degassing or erupting volcanoes suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. Our observations of unpolluted

  8. Systematic satellite observations of the impact of aerosols from passive volcanic degassing on local cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Sayer, A. M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-10-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions, especially from passive degassing and minor explosions, is a source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect effects. Observations of the impact of volcanic aerosol on clouds contribute to our understanding of both present-day atmospheric properties and of the pre-industrial baseline necessary to assess aerosol radiative forcing. We present systematic measurements over several years at multiple active and inactive volcanic islands in regions of low present-day aerosol burden. The time-averaged indirect aerosol effects within 200 km downwind of island volcanoes are observed using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, 2002-2013) and Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR, 2002-2008) data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kīlauea (Hawai'i), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (la Réunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent to be parallel to wind direction, so that upwind and downwind retrievals can be compared. The emissions from all three volcanoes - including those from passive degassing, Strombolian activity and minor explosions - lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference ranging from 2-8 μm at the different volcanoes in different seasons. Estimations of the difference in Top of Atmosphere upward Short Wave flux upwind and downwind of the active volcanoes from NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) suggest a downwind elevation of between 10 and 45 Wm-2 at distances of 150-400 km from the volcano, with much greater local (< 80 km) effects. Comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands without degassing or erupting volcanoes suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. Our observations of unpolluted, isolated marine settings may capture processes similar to

  9. [Impact of reclaimed water irrigation on soil chemical properties and culturable microorganisms ].

    PubMed

    Gong, Xue; Wang, Ji-hua; Guan, Jian-fei; Yang, Xue-chen; Chen, Dai-ci

    2014-09-01

    This research used batch soil column experiment to study the effects of irrigating with reclaimed water and tap water on the soil chemical properties and culturable microorganisms. The results indicated that reclaimed water could markedly increase the soil organic material (OM) and total nitrogen (TN) content, but it had no obvious effect on total phosphorus (TP), available phosphorus (AP) and pH value. Reclaimed water irrigation could significantly enhance the amounts of surface soil bacteria and actinomycetes at a depth of 0-20 cm, but it had little effect on the biomass of 20-40 cm and 40-60 cm soil layers. The dominant bacteria in tap water irrigation area was the genus Bacillus whereas that of reclaimed water irrigation area was the genus Acinetobacter. Tap water irrigation area had four endemic genera and reclaimed water irrigation area had six endemic genera. Reclaimed water had no obvious effect on the microbial community Shannon diversity of 0-20 cm soil layer, while it decreased Pielou evenness index, and improved Margalef richness index. Through SPSS 17. 0 correlation analysis between soil microbes quantity and soil chemical properties, it was shown that the soil microbes quantity was positively correlated with OM, TN, TP and AP, but negatively correlated with soil water content (SWC) and pH value. Based on CANOCO 4.5 detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and redundancy analysis (RDA) between soil microbes species and soil chemical properties, it was shown that AP had the strongest correlation with the microbial community (P = 0.002). TN and TP had larger impact on Streptococcus, Aeromonas and Neisseria. OM and AP had larger impact on Aerococcus, Planococcus and Halobacterium.

  10. Impact of neutrino properties on the estimation of inflationary parameters from current and future observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbino, Martina; Freese, Katherine; Vagnozzi, Sunny; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Mena, Olga; Giusarma, Elena; Ho, Shirley

    2017-02-01

    We study the impact of assumptions about neutrino properties on the estimation of inflationary parameters from cosmological data, with a specific focus on the allowed contours in the ns/r plane, where ns is the scalar spectral index and r is the tensor-to-scalar ratio. We study the following neutrino properties: (i) the total neutrino mass Mν=∑i mi (where the index i =1 , 2, 3 runs over the three neutrino mass eigenstates); (ii) the number of relativistic degrees of freedom Neff at the time of recombination; and (iii) the neutrino hierarchy. Whereas previous literature assumed three degenerate neutrino masses or two massless neutrino species (approximations that clearly do not match neutrino oscillation data), we study the cases of normal and inverted hierarchy. Our basic result is that these three neutrino properties induce <1 σ shift of the probability contours in the ns/r plane with both current or upcoming data. We find that the choice of neutrino hierarchy (normal, inverted, or degenerate) has a negligible impact. However, the minimal cutoff on the total neutrino mass Mν ,min=0 that accompanies previous works using the degenerate hierarchy does introduce biases in the ns/r plane and should be replaced by Mν ,min=0.059 eV as required by oscillation data. Using current cosmic microwave background (CMB) data from Planck and Bicep/Keck, marginalizing over the total neutrino mass Mν and over r can lead to a shift in the mean value of ns of ˜0.3 σ toward lower values. However, once baryon acoustic oscillation measurements are included, the standard contours in the ns/r plane are basically reproduced. Larger shifts of the contours in the ns/r plane (up to 0.8 σ ) arise for nonstandard values of Neff. We also provide forecasts for the future CMB experiments Cosmic Origins Explorer (COrE, satellite) and Stage-IV (ground-based) and show that the incomplete knowledge of neutrino properties, taken into account by a marginalization over Mν, could induce a shift

  11. Dynamic performance of a static or throwing droplet impact onto a solid substrate with different properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie; Li, Ya-Dong

    2016-03-01

    The dynamic performance of a static or throwing droplet impact onto a solid substrate with different properties is numerically studied in this work. After being released or horizontally thrown out, a two-dimensional droplet can fall freely under gravity. The substrate, which is below the droplet, is either hydrophilic/hydrophobic or inhomogeneous. To conduct numerical simulations, a hybrid method is adopted, in which the flow field is solved by using the lattice Boltzmann method and the interface is captured by solving the Cahn-Hilliard equation directly. Given a fixed distance between the droplet and the substrate (H∗), the effects of Bond number (Bo), Weber number (We), and surface property on the performance of droplet impingement are investigated in detail. With the increase of Bond number, the surface coverage area of a static droplet also increases. A hydrophilic surface or an inhomogeneous surface with small advancing/receding angle difference can lead to the breakup of droplet rim due to the bubble entrapment. Moreover, dependent on the Weber number and the surface property, the leading edge rim of a throwing droplet developing on an inhomogeneous surface may break up before or after it contacts the substrate. As a result, compared to the case of static droplet, the surface coverage area will be reduced due to the diffusion of small droplet segment.

  12. Laboratory device to analyse the impact of soil properties on electrical and thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertermann, David; Schwarz, Hans

    2017-04-01

    Gathering information about soil properties in an efficient way is essential for many soil applications also for very shallow geothermal systems (e.g. collector systems or heat baskets). In the field, electrical resistivity tomogramphy measurements enable non-invasive and extensive analyses regarding the determination of soil properties. For a better understanding of measured electrical resistivity values in relation to soil properties within this study, a laboratory setup was developed. The structure of this laboratory setup is geared to gather electrical resistivity or rather electrical conductivity values which are directly comparable to data measured in the field. Within this setup grain size distribution, moisture content, and bulk density, which are the most important soil parameters affecting the electrical resistivity, can be adjusted. In terms of a better estimation of the geothermal capability of soil, thermal conductivity measurements were also implemented within the laboratory test sequence. The generated data reveals the serious influence of the water content and also provides a huge impact of the bulk density on the electrical as well as on the thermal conductivity. Furthermore, different behaviour patterns of electrical and thermal conductivity in their particular relation to the different soil parameters could be identified.

  13. The psychomechanics of simulated sound sources: material properties of impacted thin plates.

    PubMed

    McAdams, Stephen; Roussarie, Vincent; Chaigne, Antoine; Giordano, Bruno L

    2010-09-01

    Sounds convey information about the materials composing an object. Stimuli were synthesized using a computer model of impacted plates that varied their material properties: viscoelastic and thermoelastic damping and wave velocity (related to elasticity and mass density). The range of damping properties represented a continuum between materials with predominant viscoelastic and thermoelastic damping (glass and aluminum, respectively). The perceptual structure of the sounds was inferred from multidimensional scaling of dissimilarity judgments and from their categorization as glass or aluminum. Dissimilarity ratings revealed dimensions that were closely related to mechanical properties: a wave-velocity-related dimension associated with pitch and a damping-related dimension associated with timbre and duration. When asked to categorize sounds, however, listeners ignored the cues related to wave velocity and focused on cues related to damping. In both dissimilarity-rating and identification experiments, the results were independent of the material of the mallet striking the plate (rubber or wood). Listeners thus appear to select acoustical information that is reliable for a given perceptual task. Because the frequency changes responsible for detecting changes in wave velocity can also be due to changes in geometry, they are not as reliable for material identification as are damping cues.

  14. Characterizing Multiscale Mechanical Properties of Brain Tissue Using Atomic Force Microscopy, Impact Indentation, and Rheometry.

    PubMed

    Canovic, Elizabeth Peruski; Qing, Bo; Mijailovic, Aleksandar S; Jagielska, Anna; Whitfield, Matthew J; Kelly, Elyza; Turner, Daria; Sahin, Mustafa; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2016-09-06

    To design and engineer materials inspired by the properties of the brain, whether for mechanical simulants or for tissue regeneration studies, the brain tissue itself must be well characterized at various length and time scales. Like many biological tissues, brain tissue exhibits a complex, hierarchical structure. However, in contrast to most other tissues, brain is of very low mechanical stiffness, with Young's elastic moduli E on the order of 100s of Pa. This low stiffness can present challenges to experimental characterization of key mechanical properties. Here, we demonstrate several mechanical characterization techniques that have been adapted to measure the elastic and viscoelastic properties of hydrated, compliant biological materials such as brain tissue, at different length scales and loading rates. At the microscale, we conduct creep-compliance and force relaxation experiments using atomic force microscope-enabled indentation. At the mesoscale, we perform impact indentation experiments using a pendulum-based instrumented indenter. At the macroscale, we conduct parallel plate rheometry to quantify the frequency dependent shear elastic moduli. We also discuss the challenges and limitations associated with each method. Together these techniques enable an in-depth mechanical characterization of brain tissue that can be used to better understand the structure of brain and to engineer bio-inspired materials.

  15. Mechanical property characterization and impact resistance of selected graphite/PEEK composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.

    1994-01-01

    To use graphite polyetheretherketone (PEEK) material on highly curved surfaces requires that the material be drapable and easily conformable to the surface. This paper presents the mechanical property characterization and impact resistance results for laminates made from two types of graphite/PEEK materials that will conform to a curved surface. These laminates were made from two different material forms. These forms are: (1) a fabric where each yarn is a co-mingled Celion G30-500 3K graphite fiber and PEEK thermoplastic fiber; and (2) an interleaved material of Celion G30-500 3K graphite fabric interleaved with PEEK thermoplastic film. The experimental results from the fabric laminates are compared with results for laminates made from AS4/PEEK unidirectional tape. The results indicate that the tension and compression moduli for quasi-isotropic and orthotropic laminates made from fabric materials are at least 79 percent of the modulus of equivalent laminates made from tape material. The strength of fabric material laminates is at least 80 percent of laminates made from tape material. The evaluation of fabric material for shear stiffness indicates that a tape material laminate could be replaced by a fabric material laminate and still maintain 89 percent of the shear stiffness of the tape material laminate. The notched quasi-isotropic compression panel failure strength is 42 to 46 percent of the unnotched quasi-isotropic laminate strength. Damage area after impact with 20 ft-lbs of impact energy is larger for the co-mingled panels than for the interleaved panels. The inerleaved panels have less damage than panels made from tape material. Residual compression strength of quasi-isotropic panels after impact of 20 ft-lbs of energy varies between 33 percent of the undamaged quasi-isotropic material strength for the tape material and 38 percent of the undamaged quasi-isotropic material strength for the co-mingled fabric material.

  16. Impact of surfactants for aquifer remediation on physical properties of the aqueous phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vivek; Demond, Avery H.

    1999-11-01

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) has shown great promise in laboratory studies as a technique for removing nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from soils. Failures of SEAR in the field are often attributed to the reduction of conductivity of the soil. Conductivity may be altered due to changes in liquid properties, in porous medium properties or in both. This study focuses on the changes in liquid properties, specifically viscosity and density, in systems comprising aqueous solutions of surfactants selected for their solubilization potential of NAPLs that are denser than water, such as tetrachloroethylene (PCE). Measurements showed that the viscosity of the surfactant solutions increased with surfactant concentration, with the increase being considerably greater with the addition of ethanol as a co-surfactant. The impact of temperature was also substantial, with the viscosity increasing as the temperature decreased. The solubilization of PCE and the subsequent formation of a dilute emulsion also increased the viscosity, but only slightly. This increase could be predicted using equations developed for calculating the viscosity of emulsions, even at organic liquid concentrations below the point of emulsion formation. The density increased somewhat with the solubilization of PCE in the surfactant solution. This increase could be estimated from a weighted-volume average of the densities of PCE and the surfactant solution. The resultant reductions in conductivity calculated based on the measured changes in viscosity and density ranged from about 26% to 73% at a surfactant concentration of 4% and a PCE concentration of 40-50 g/l, depending on the temperature, the type of surfactant and the ethanol concentration. Since some laboratory studies, particularly those employing fine-grained soils, have reported reductions in conductivity greater than those determined here, changes in porous medium properties must contribute to conductivity reductions as well.

  17. Radiopacifier Particle Size Impacts the Physical Properties of Tricalcium Silicate–based Cements

    PubMed Central

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Gutmann, James L.; Orangi, Jafar; Asatourian, Armen; Sheibani, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of radiopaque additive, bismuth oxide, particle size on the physical properties, and radiopacity of tricalcium silicate–based cements. Methods Six types of tricalcium silicate cement (CSC) including CSC without bismuth oxide, CSC + 10% (wt%) regular bismuth oxide (particle size 10 μm), CSC + 20% regular bismuth oxide (simulating white mineral trioxide aggregate [WMTA]) as a control, CSC + 10% nano bismuth oxide (particle size 50–80 nm), CSC + 20% nano-size bismuth oxide, and nano WMTA (a nano modification of WMTA comprising nanoparticles in the range of 40–100 nm) were prepared. Twenty-four samples from each group were divided into 4 groups and subjected to push-out, surface microhardness, radiopacity, and compressive strength tests. Data were analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance with the post hoc Tukey test. Results The push-out and compressive strength of CSC without bismuth oxide and CSC with 10% and 20% nano bismuth oxide were significantly higher than CSC with 10% or 20% regular bismuth oxide (P < .05). The surface micro-hardness of CSC without bismuth oxide and CSC with 10% regular bismuth oxide had the lowest values (P < .05). The lowest radiopacity values were seen in CSC without bismuth oxide and CSC with 10% nano bismuth oxide (P < .05). Nano WMTA samples showed the highest values for all tested properties (P < .05) except for radiopacity. Conclusions The addition of 20% nano bismuth oxide enhanced the physical properties of CSC without any significant changes in radiopacity. Regular particle-size bismuth oxide reduced the physical properties of CSC material for tested parameters. PMID:25492489

  18. Radiopacifier particle size impacts the physical properties of tricalcium silicate-based cements.

    PubMed

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Gutmann, James L; Orangi, Jafar; Asatourian, Armen; Sheibani, Nader

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of radiopaque additive, bismuth oxide, particle size on the physical properties, and radiopacity of tricalcium silicate-based cements. Six types of tricalcium silicate cement (CSC) including CSC without bismuth oxide, CSC + 10% (wt%) regular bismuth oxide (particle size 10 μm), CSC + 20% regular bismuth oxide (simulating white mineral trioxide aggregate [WMTA]) as a control, CSC + 10% nano bismuth oxide (particle size 50-80 nm), CSC + 20% nano-size bismuth oxide, and nano WMTA (a nano modification of WMTA comprising nanoparticles in the range of 40-100 nm) were prepared. Twenty-four samples from each group were divided into 4 groups and subjected to push-out, surface microhardness, radiopacity, and compressive strength tests. Data were analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance with the post hoc Tukey test. The push-out and compressive strength of CSC without bismuth oxide and CSC with 10% and 20% nano bismuth oxide were significantly higher than CSC with 10% or 20% regular bismuth oxide (P < .05). The surface microhardness of CSC without bismuth oxide and CSC with 10% regular bismuth oxide had the lowest values (P < .05). The lowest radiopacity values were seen in CSC without bismuth oxide and CSC with 10% nano bismuth oxide (P < .05). Nano WMTA samples showed the highest values for all tested properties (P < .05) except for radiopacity. The addition of 20% nano bismuth oxide enhanced the physical properties of CSC without any significant changes in radiopacity. Regular particle-size bismuth oxide reduced the physical properties of CSC material for tested parameters. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Impact of gravels and organic matter on the thermal properties of grassland soils in southern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvet, J.-C.; Fritz, N.; Berne, C.; Piguet, B.; Maurel, W.; Meurey, C.

    2015-06-01

    Soil moisture is the main driver of temporal changes in values of the soil thermal conductivity. The latter is a key variable in land surface models (LSMs) used in hydrometeorology, for the simulation of the vertical profile of soil temperature in relation to soil moisture. Shortcomings in soil thermal conductivity models tend to limit the impact of improving the simulation of soil moisture in LSMs. Models of the thermal conductivity of soils are affected by uncertainties, especially in the representation of the impact of soil properties such as the volumetric fraction of quartz (q), soil organic matter, and gravels. As soil organic matter and gravels are often neglected in LSMs, the soil thermal conductivity models used in most LSMs represent the mineral fine earth, only. Moreover, there is no map of q and it is often assumed that this quantity is equal to the volumetric fraction of sand. In this study, q values are derived by reverse modelling from the continuous soil moisture and soil temperature sub-hourly observations of the Soil Moisture Observing System - Meteorological Automatic Network Integrated Application (SMOSMANIA) network at 21 grassland sites in southern France, from 2008 to 2015. The soil temperature observations are used to retrieve the soil thermal diffusivity (Dh) at a depth of 0.10 m in unfrozen conditions, solving the thermal diffusion equation. The soil moisture and Dh values are then used together with the measured soil properties to retrieve soil thermal conductivity (λ) values. For ten sites, the obtained λ value at saturation (λsat) cannot be retrieved or is lower than the value corresponding to a null value of q, probably in relation to a high density of grass roots at these sites or to the presence of stones. For the remaining eleven sites, q is negatively correlated with the volumetric fraction of solids other than sand. The impact of neglecting gravels and organic matter on λsat is assessed. It is shown that these factors have a

  20. Thermal Properties of Starch From New Corn Lines as Impacted by Environment and During Line Development

    SciTech Connect

    Lenihan, Elizabeth M

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to further characterize exotic by adapted corn inbreds by studying the impact of environment on their starch thermal properties, and investigating the development of starch thermal properties during kernel maturation by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A method to expedite identification of unusual starch thermal traits was investigated by examining five corn kernels at a time, instead of one kernel, which the previous screening methods used. Corn lines with known thermal functions were blended with background starch (control) in ratios of unique starch to control starch, and analyzed by using DSC. Control starch was representative of typical corn starch. The values for each ratio within a mutant type were unique (α < 0.01) for most DSC measurements. These results supported the five-kernel method for rapidly screening large amounts of corn germplasm to identify unusual starch traits. The effects of 5 growing locations on starch thermal properties from exotic by adapted corn and Corn Belt lines were studied using DSC. The warmest location, Missouri, generally produced starch with greater gelatinization onset temperature (ToG), narrower range of gelatinization (RG), and greater enthalpy of gelatinization (ΔHG). The coolest location, Illinois, generally resulted in starch with lower ToG, wider RG, and lower ΔHG. Starch from the Ames 1 farm had thermal properties similar to those of Illinois, whereas starch from the Ames 2 farm had thermal properties similar to those of Missouri. The temperature at Ames 2 may have been warmer since it was located near a river; however, soil type and quality also were different. Final corn starch structure and function change during development and maturity. Thus, the changes in starch thermal properties during 5 stages of endosperm development from exotic by adapted corn and Corn Belt lines at two locations were

  1. Impact of Texture Heterogeneity on Elastic and Viscoelastic Properties of Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ravi

    This thesis discusses the impacts of fabric heterogeneity, fluids and fluid saturations, effective pressures, and frequency of investigation on the elastic and viscoelastic properties of calcite-rich limestone and chalk formations. Carbonate reservoirs have been analyzed either with empirical relations and analogs from siliciclastic reservoirs or using simplistic models. However, under the varying parameters mentioned above, their seismic response can be very different. The primary reason is because these rocks of biochemical origins readily undergo textural changes and support heterogeneous distribution of fluid flow and elastic properties. Thus, many current rock physics models are unable to predict the time-lapse elastic response in these reservoirs. I have measured elastic properties of calcite rich rocks in the seismic frequency range of 2 to 2000 Hz and at the ultrasonic frequency of 800 kHz. The samples selected for this study represent the typical heterogeneities found in carbonate formations. These measurements covering a large frequency range provide an understanding of the dispersion and attenuation mechanisms during seismic wave propagation in the subsurface. I find that a heterogeneous formation shows significant velocity dispersion and attenuations when saturated with brine, and even more on saturation with CO2. I also show that the shear modulus of carbonate rocks changes significantly (from 8% for brine saturation to 70% for CO2 saturation) upon fluid saturation with polar fluids. I evaluated rock physics models, such as Gassmann's and with uniform and patchy fluid substitution, and Hashin-Shtrikman to predict saturated elastic properties in carbonates. Fluid sensitivity is directly related to the initial stiffness of the rock instead of porosity, as normally assumed. The Gassmann model can predict elastic properties for uniform saturations - mostly in homogenous rocks. Heterogeneous rocks, however, are better modeled using a patchy fluid saturation

  2. Impacts of gantry angle dependent scanning beam properties on proton PBS treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuting; Clasie, Benjamin; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Flanz, Jacob; Shen, Tim; Jee, Kyung-Wook

    2017-01-21

    While proton beam models in treatment planning systems are generally assumed invariant with respect to the beam deliveries at different gantry angles. Physical properties of scanning pencil beams can change. The gantry angle dependent properties include the delivered charge to the monitor unit chamber, the spot position and the spot shape. The aim of this study is to investigate the extent of the changes and their dosimetric impacts using historical pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment data. Online beam delivery records at the time of the patient-specific qualify assurance were retrospectively collected for a total of 34 PBS fields from 28 patients treated at our institution. For each field, proton beam properties at two different gantry angles (the planned and zero gantry angles) were extracted by a newly-developed machine log analysis method and used to reconstruct the delivered dose distributions in the cubic water phantom geometry. The reconstructed doses at the two different angles and a planar dose measurement by a 2D ion-chamber array were compared and the dosimetric impacts of the gantry angle dependency were accessed by a 3D γ-index analysis. In addition, the pencil beam spot size was independently characterized as a function of the gantry angle and the beam energy. The dosimetric effects of the perturbed beam shape were also investigated. Comparisons of spot-by-spot beam positions between both gantry angles show a mean deviation of 0.4 and 0.7 mm and a standard deviation of 0.3 and 0.6 mm for x and y directions, respectively. The delivered giga-protons per spot show a percent mean difference and a standard deviation of 0.01% and 0.3%, respectively, from each planned spot weight. These small deviations lead to an excellent agreement in dose comparisons with an average γ passing rate of 99.1%. When each calculation for both planned and zero gantry angles was compared to the measurement, a high correlation in γ values was also observed, also

  3. Impacts of gantry angle dependent scanning beam properties on proton PBS treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuting; Clasie, Benjamin; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Flanz, Jacob; Shen, Tim; Jee, Kyung-Wook

    2017-01-01

    While proton beam models in treatment planning systems are generally assumed invariant with respect to the beam deliveries at different gantry angles. Physical properties of scanning pencil beams can change. The gantry angle dependent properties include the delivered charge to the monitor unit chamber, the spot position and the spot shape. The aim of this study is to investigate the extent of the changes and their dosimetric impacts using historical pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment data. Online beam delivery records at the time of the patient-specific qualify assurance were retrospectively collected for a total of 34 PBS fields from 28 patients treated at our institution. For each field, proton beam properties at two different gantry angles (the planned and zero gantry angles) were extracted by a newly-developed machine log analysis method and used to reconstruct the delivered dose distributions in the cubic water phantom geometry. The reconstructed doses at the two different angles and a planar dose measurement by a 2D ion-chamber array were compared and the dosimetric impacts of the gantry angle dependency were accessed by a 3D γ-index analysis. In addition, the pencil beam spot size was independently characterized as a function of the gantry angle and the beam energy. The dosimetric effects of the perturbed beam shape were also investigated. Comparisons of spot-by-spot beam positions between both gantry angles show a mean deviation of 0.4 and 0.7 mm and a standard deviation of 0.3 and 0.6 mm for x and y directions, respectively. The delivered giga-protons per spot show a percent mean difference and a standard deviation of 0.01% and 0.3%, respectively, from each planned spot weight. These small deviations lead to an excellent agreement in dose comparisons with an average γ passing rate of 99.1%. When each calculation for both planned and zero gantry angles was compared to the measurement, a high correlation in γ values was also observed, also

  4. Spectral properties of Titan's impact craters imply chemical weathering of its surface.

    PubMed

    Neish, C D; Barnes, J W; Sotin, C; MacKenzie, S; Soderblom, J M; Le Mouélic, S; Kirk, R L; Stiles, B W; Malaska, M J; Le Gall, A; Brown, R H; Baines, K H; Buratti, B; Clark, R N; Nicholson, P D

    2015-05-28

    We examined the spectral properties of a selection of Titan's impact craters that represent a range of degradation states. The most degraded craters have rims and ejecta blankets with spectral characteristics that suggest that they are more enriched in water ice than the rims and ejecta blankets of the freshest craters on Titan. The progression is consistent with the chemical weathering of Titan's surface. We propose an evolutionary sequence such that Titan's craters expose an intimate mixture of water ice and organic materials, and chemical weathering by methane rainfall removes the soluble organic materials, leaving the insoluble organics and water ice behind. These observations support the idea that fluvial processes are active in Titan's equatorial regions.

  5. Impact of intrinsic localized modes of atomic motion on materials properties

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, M E

    2010-01-20

    Recent neutron and x-ray scattering measurements show intrinsic localized modes (ILMs) in metallic uranium and ionic sodium iodide. Here, the role ILMs play in the behavior of these materials is examined. With the thermal activation of ILMs, thermal expansion is enhanced, made more anisotropic, and, at a microscopic level, becomes inhomogeneous. Interstitial diffusion, ionic conductivity, the annealing rate of radiation damage, and void growth are all influenced by ILMs. The lattice thermal conductivity is suppressed above the ILM activation temperature while no impact is observed in the electrical conductivity. This complement of transport properties suggests that ILMs could improve thermoelectric performance. Ramifications also include thermal ratcheting, a transition from brittle to ductile fracture, and possibly a phase transformation in uranium.

  6. Morphology and properties of poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffolds: impact of process variables.

    PubMed

    Ye, Mao; Mohanty, Pravansu; Ghosh, Gargi

    2014-09-01

    Successful engineering of functional biological substitutes requires scaffolds with three-dimensional interconnected porous structure, controllable rate of biodegradation, and ideal mechanical strength. In this study, we report the development and characterization of micro-porous PVA scaffolds fabricated by freeze drying method. The impact of molecular weight of PVA, surfactant concentration, foaming time, and stirring speed on pore characteristics, mechanical properties, swelling ratio, and rate of degradation of the scaffolds was characterized. Results show that a foaming time of 60s, a stirring speed of 1,000 rpm, and a surfactant concentration of 5% yielded scaffolds with rigid structure but with interconnected pores. Study also demonstrated that increased foaming time increased porosity and swelling ratio and reduced the rigidity of the samples.

  7. Experimental investigation into the effects of meteoritic impacts on the spectral properties of phyllosilicates on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavin, P.; Chevrier, V.; Ninagawa, K.; Gucsik, A.; Hasegawa, S.

    2013-01-01

    Phyllosilicates have been identified in some of the most highly cratered Noachian terrains on Mars. To study the effects of such impacts on the properties of phyllosilicates, we experimentally shocked six phyllosilicate minerals relevant to the Martian surface: montmorillonite, nontronite, kaolinite, prehnite, chlorite, and serpentine. The shock-treated samples were analyzed with X-ray diffraction (XRD), near- and mid-infrared (NIR and MIR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, cathodoluminescence (CL), and the shock pressures and temperatures in some were modeled using Autodyn modeling software. XRD data show that the structure of each mineral, except prehnite, underwent partial structural deformation or amorphization. We also found that while the NIR spectra of shocked samples were very similar to that of the original sample, the MIR spectra changed significantly. This may explain some of the discrepancies between CRISM/OMEGA data (NIR) and TES/THEMIS (MIR) observations of phyllosilicates on Mars. Quartz was identified as a secondary phase in the XRD of shocked chlorite.

  8. Impact of observational incompleteness on the structural properties of protein interaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhnt, Mathias; Glauche, Ingmar; Greiner, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The observed structure of protein interaction networks is corrupted by many false positive/negative links. This observational incompleteness is abstracted as random link removal and a specific, experimentally motivated (spoke) link rearrangement. Their impact on the structural properties of gene-duplication-and-mutation network models is studied. For the degree distribution a curve collapse is found, showing no sensitive dependence on the link removal/rearrangement strengths and disallowing a quantitative extraction of model parameters. The spoke link rearrangement process moves other structural observables, like degree correlations, cluster coefficient and motif frequencies, closer to their counterparts extracted from the yeast data. This underlines the importance to take a precise modeling of the observational incompleteness into account when network structure models are to be quantitatively compared to data.

  9. Impact of finite temperatures on the transport properties of Gd from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadova, K.; Mankovsky, S.; Minár, J.; Ebert, H.

    2017-03-01

    Finite-temperature effects have a pronounced impact on the transport properties of solids. In magnetic systems, besides the scattering of conduction electrons by impurities and phonons, an additional scattering source coming from the magnetic degrees of freedom must be taken into account. A first-principle scheme which treats all these scattering effects on equal footing was recently suggested within the framework of the multiple scattering formalism. Employing the alloy analogy model treated by means of the CPA, thermal lattice vibrations and spin fluctuations are effectively taken into account. In the present work the temperature dependence of the longitudinal resistivity and the anomalous Hall effect in the strongly correlated metal Gd is considered. The comparison with experiments demonstrates that the proposed numerical scheme does provide an adequate description of the electronic transport at finite temperatures.

  10. Spectral properties of Titan's impact craters imply chemical weathering of its surface

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, J. W.; Sotin, C.; MacKenzie, S.; Soderblom, J. M.; Le Mouélic, S.; Kirk, R. L.; Stiles, B. W.; Malaska, M. J.; Le Gall, A.; Brown, R. H.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We examined the spectral properties of a selection of Titan's impact craters that represent a range of degradation states. The most degraded craters have rims and ejecta blankets with spectral characteristics that suggest that they are more enriched in water ice than the rims and ejecta blankets of the freshest craters on Titan. The progression is consistent with the chemical weathering of Titan's surface. We propose an evolutionary sequence such that Titan's craters expose an intimate mixture of water ice and organic materials, and chemical weathering by methane rainfall removes the soluble organic materials, leaving the insoluble organics and water ice behind. These observations support the idea that fluvial processes are active in Titan's equatorial regions. PMID:27656006

  11. Changes in the properties of solonetzic soil complexes in the dry steppe zone under anthropogenic impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimova, I. N.; Novikova, A. F.

    2016-05-01

    Long-term studies of changes in the properties of solonetzic soil complexes of the dry steppe zone under anthropogenic impacts (deep plowing, surface leveling, irrigation, and post-irrigation use) have been performed on the Privolzhskaya sand ridge and the Khvalyn and Ergeni plains. The natural morphology of solonetzic soils was strongly disturbed during their deep ameliorative plowing. At present, the soil cover consists of solonetzic agrozems (Sodic Protosalic Cambisols (Loamic, Aric, Protocalcic)), textural (clay-illuvial) calcareous agrozems (Eutric Cambisols (Loamic, Aric, Protocalcic)), agrosolonetzes (Endocalcaric Luvisols (Loamic, Aric, Cutanic, Protosodic), agrochestnut soils (Eutric Cambisols (Siltic, Aric)), and meadowchestnut soils (Haplic Kastanozems). No features attesting to the restoration of the initial profile of solonetzes have been found. The dynamics of soluble salts and exchangeable sodium differ in the agrosolonetzes and solonetzic agrozems. A rise in pH values takes place in the middle part of the soil profiles on the Khvalyn and Ergeni plains.

  12. New method of the polymeric material properties experimental investigation under powerful energy flux impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, B. A.; Efremov, V. P.; Kalinin, Yu G.; Kazakov, E. D.; Metelkin, S. Yu; Petrov, V. A.; Potapenko, A. I.

    2015-11-01

    Investigation of the polymeric material properties under powerfull energy flux impact is relevant as for basic research (mathematical modeling of polymeric materials behavior in extreme conditions, testing the state equations), as for practical applications (for testing of protective coatings for space research and laboratory facilities). This paper presents the results of experimental studies of the interaction of polymeric materials with a relativistic electron beam produced by a high-current electron accelerator Calamary. Calamary facility provides a wide range of electron beam parameters: diameter 10-15 mm, the voltage on the diode up to 300 kV, the current through the diode up to 30 kA. New method of beam-target interaction area measurement was developed. The original method for the mechanical kick impulse measuring based on piezoelectric vibration sensor was presented. The dependence of the kick impulse from the power flux was obtained.

  13. Thermal Properties of Methane Hydrate by Experiment and Modeling and Impacts on Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Warzinski, R.P.; Gamwo, I.K.; Rosenbaum, E.M.; Jiang, Hao; Jordan, K.D.; English, N.J.; Shaw, D.W.

    2008-07-01

    Thermal properties of pure methane hydrate, under conditions similar to naturally occurring hydrate-bearing sediments being considered for potential production, have been determined both by a new experimental technique and by advanced molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). A novel single-sided, Transient Plane Source (TPS) technique has been developed and used to measure thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity values of low-porosity methane hydrate formed in the laboratory. The experimental thermal conductivity data are closely matched by results from an equilibrium MDS method using in-plane polarization of the water molecules. MDS was also performed using a non-equilibrium model with a fully polarizable force field for water. The calculated thermal conductivity values from this latter approach were similar to the experimental data. The impact of thermal conductivity on gas production from a hydrate-bearing reservoir was also evaluated using the Tough+/Hydrate reservoir simulator.

  14. Impact of strain on the electronic properties of InAs/GaSb quantum well systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemann, L.; Mueller, S.; Wu, Q.-S.; Tschirky, T.; Ensslin, K.; Wegscheider, W.; Troyer, M.; Soluyanov, A. A.; Ihn, T.

    2017-03-01

    Electron-hole hybridization in InAs/GaSb double quantum well structures leads to the formation of a mini-band-gap. We experimentally and theoretically studied the impact of strain on the transport properties of this material system. Thinned samples were mounted to piezoelectric elements to exert strain along the [011] and [001] crystal directions. When the Fermi energy is tuned through the minigap, the resistivity at the charge neutrality point is found to be susceptible to external strain. In the electron and hole regimes, strain influences the Landau level structure. By analyzing the intrinsic strain from the epitaxial growth and the external strain from the piezo elements and combining our experimental results with numerical simulations of strained and unstrained quantum wells, we can illustrate why the InAs/GaSb material system is regularly found to be semimetallic.

  15. Impacts of Hematite Nanoparticle Exposure on Biomechanical, Adhesive, and Surface Electrical Properties of Escherichia coli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Hughes, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Despite a wealth of studies examining the toxicity of engineered nanomaterials, current knowledge on their cytotoxic mechanisms (particularly from a physical perspective) remains limited. In this work, we imaged and quantitatively characterized the biomechanical (hardness and elasticity), adhesive, and surface electrical properties of Escherichia coli cells with and without exposure to hematite nanoparticles (NPs) in an effort to advance our understanding of the cytotoxic impacts of nanomaterials. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that E. coli cells had noticeable deformation with hematite treatment for 45 min with a statistical significance. The hematite-treated cells became significantly harder or stiffer than untreated ones, as evidenced by indentation and spring constant measurements. The average indentation of the hematite-treated E. coli cells was 120 nm, which is significantly lower (P < 0.01) than that of the untreated cells (approximately 400 nm). The spring constant of hematite-treated E. coli cells (0.28 ± 0.11 nN/nm) was about 20 times higher than that of untreated ones (0.01 ± 0.01 nN/nm). The zeta potential of E. coli cells, measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS), was shown to shift from −4 ± 2 mV to −27 ± 8 mV with progressive surface adsorption of hematite NPs, a finding which is consistent with the local surface potential measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Overall, the reported findings quantitatively revealed the adverse impacts of nanomaterial exposure on physical properties of bacterial cells and should provide insight into the toxicity mechanisms of nanomaterials. PMID:22467500

  16. Impacts of hematite nanoparticle exposure on biomechanical, adhesive, and surface electrical properties of Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Hughes, Joseph; Chen, Yongsheng

    2012-06-01

    Despite a wealth of studies examining the toxicity of engineered nanomaterials, current knowledge on their cytotoxic mechanisms (particularly from a physical perspective) remains limited. In this work, we imaged and quantitatively characterized the biomechanical (hardness and elasticity), adhesive, and surface electrical properties of Escherichia coli cells with and without exposure to hematite nanoparticles (NPs) in an effort to advance our understanding of the cytotoxic impacts of nanomaterials. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that E. coli cells had noticeable deformation with hematite treatment for 45 min with a statistical significance. The hematite-treated cells became significantly harder or stiffer than untreated ones, as evidenced by indentation and spring constant measurements. The average indentation of the hematite-treated E. coli cells was 120 nm, which is significantly lower (P < 0.01) than that of the untreated cells (approximately 400 nm). The spring constant of hematite-treated E. coli cells (0.28 ± 0.11 nN/nm) was about 20 times higher than that of untreated ones (0.01 ± 0.01 nN/nm). The zeta potential of E. coli cells, measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS), was shown to shift from -4 ± 2 mV to -27 ± 8 mV with progressive surface adsorption of hematite NPs, a finding which is consistent with the local surface potential measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Overall, the reported findings quantitatively revealed the adverse impacts of nanomaterial exposure on physical properties of bacterial cells and should provide insight into the toxicity mechanisms of nanomaterials.

  17. Phase Stability and Stoichiometry in Thin Film Iron Pyrite: Impact on Electronic Transport Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Scott, Tom; Socha, Tyler; Nielsen, David; Manno, Michael; Johnson, Melissa; Yan, Yuqi; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Dowben, Peter; Aydil, Eray S; Leighton, Chris

    2015-07-01

    The use of pyrite FeS2 as an earth-abundant, low-cost, nontoxic thin film photovoltaic hinges on improved understanding and control of certain physical and chemical properties. Phase stability, phase purity, stoichiometry, and defects, are central in this respect, as they are frequently implicated in poor solar cell performance. Here, phase-pure polycrystalline pyrite FeS2 films, synthesized by ex situ sulfidation, are subject to systematic reduction by vacuum annealing (to 550 °C) to assess phase stability, stoichiometry evolution, and their impact on transport. Bulk probes reveal the onset of pyrrhotite (Fe(1-δ)S) around 400 °C, rapidly evolving into the majority phase by 425 °C. This is supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on (001) crystals, revealing surface Fe(1-δ)S formation as low as 160 °C, with rapid growth near 400 °C. The impact on transport is dramatic, with Fe(1-δ)S minority phases leading to a crossover from diffusive transport to hopping (due to conductive Fe(1-δ)S nanoregions in an FeS2 matrix), followed by metallicity when Fe(1-δ)S dominates. Notably, the crossover to hopping leads to an inversion of the sign, and a large decrease in magnitude of the Hall coefficient. By tracking resistivity, magnetotransport, magnetization, and structural/chemical parameters vs annealing, we provide a detailed picture of the evolution in properties with stoichiometry. A strong propensity for S-deficient minority phase formation is found, with no wide window where S vacancies control the FeS2 carrier density. These findings have important implications for FeS2 solar cell development, emphasizing the need for (a) nanoscale chemical homogeneity, and (b) caution in interpreting carrier types and densities.

  18. Aerosol impacts on radiative and microphysical properties of clouds and precipitation formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh-Choobari, O.; Gharaylou, M.

    2017-03-01

    Through modifying the number concentration and size of cloud droplets, aerosols have intricate impacts on radiative and microphysical properties of clouds, which together influence precipitation processes. Aerosol-cloud interactions for a mid-latitude convective cloud system are investigated using a two-moment aerosol-aware bulk microphysical scheme implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Three sensitivity experiments with initial identical dynamic and thermodynamic conditions, but different cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations were conducted. Increased aerosol number concentration has resulted in more numerous cloud droplets of overall smaller sizes, through which the optical properties of clouds have been changed. While the shortwave cloud forcing is significantly increased in more polluted experiments, changes in the aerosol number concentration have negligible impacts on the longwave cloud forcing. For the first time, it is found that polluted clouds have higher cloud base heights, the feature that is caused by more surface cooling due to a higher shortwave cloud forcing, as well as a drier boundary layer in the polluted experiment compared to the clean. The polluted experiment was also associated with a higher liquid water content (LWC), caused by an increase in the number of condensation of water vapor due to higher concentration of hygroscopic aerosols acting as condensation nuclei. The domain-averaged accumulated precipitation is little changed under both polluted and clean atmosphere. Nevertheless, changes in the rate of precipitation are identified, such that under polluted atmosphere light rain is reduced, while both moderate and heavy rain are intensified, confirming the fact that if an ample influx of water vapor exists, an increment of hygroscopic aerosols can increase the amount of precipitation.

  19. Impact of speciation on the electron charge transfer properties of nanodiamond drug carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Baichuan; Barnard, Amanda S.

    2016-07-01

    Unpassivated diamond nanoparticles (bucky-diamonds) exhibit a unique surface reconstruction involving graphitization of certain crystal facets, giving rise to hybrid core-shell particles containing both aromatic and aliphatic carbon. Considerable effort is directed toward eliminating the aromatic shell, but persistent graphitization of subsequent subsurface-layers makes perdurable purification a challenge. In this study we use some simple statistical methods, in combination with electronic structure simulations, to predict the impact of different fractions of aromatic and aliphatic carbon on the charge transfer properties of the ensembles of bucky-diamonds. By predicting quality factors for a variety of cases, we find that perfect purification is not necessary to preserve selectivity, and there is a clear motivation for purifying samples to improve the sensitivity of charge transfer reactions. This may prove useful in designing drug delivery systems where the release of (selected) drugs needs to be sensitive to specific conditions at the point of delivery.Unpassivated diamond nanoparticles (bucky-diamonds) exhibit a unique surface reconstruction involving graphitization of certain crystal facets, giving rise to hybrid core-shell particles containing both aromatic and aliphatic carbon. Considerable effort is directed toward eliminating the aromatic shell, but persistent graphitization of subsequent subsurface-layers makes perdurable purification a challenge. In this study we use some simple statistical methods, in combination with electronic structure simulations, to predict the impact of different fractions of aromatic and aliphatic carbon on the charge transfer properties of the ensembles of bucky-diamonds. By predicting quality factors for a variety of cases, we find that perfect purification is not necessary to preserve selectivity, and there is a clear motivation for purifying samples to improve the sensitivity of charge transfer reactions. This may prove

  20. Depth-diameter ratios for Martian impact craters: Implications for target properties and episodes of degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, N. G.

    This study determines crater depth through use of photoclinometric profiles. Random checks of the photoclinometric results are performed using shadow estimation techniques. The images are Viking Orbiter digital format frames; in cases where the digital image is unusable for photoclinometric analysis, shadow estimation is used to determine crater depths. The two techniques provide depth results within 2 percent of each other. Crater diameters are obtained from the photoclinometric profiles and checked against the diameters measured from the hard-copy images using a digitizer. All images used in this analysis are of approximately 40 m/pixel resolution. The sites that have been analyzed to date include areas within Arabia, Maja Valles, Memnonia, Acidalia, and Elysium. Only results for simple craters (craters less than 5 km in diameter) are discussed here because of the low numbers of complex craters presently measured in the analysis. General results indicate that impact craters are deeper than average. A single d/D relationship for fresh impact craters on Mars does not exist due to changes in target properties across the planet's surface. Within regions where target properties are approximately constant, however, d/D ratios for fresh craters can be determined. In these regions, the d/D ratios of nonpristine craters can be compared with the fresh crater d/D relationship to obtain information on relative degrees of crater degradation. This technique reveals that regional episodes of enhanced degradation have occurred. However, the lack of statistically reliable size-frequency distribution data prevents comparison of the relative ages of these events between different regions, and thus determination of a large-scale episode (or perhaps several episodes) cannot be made at this time.

  1. Effect of single aging on microstructure and impact property of INCONEL X-750

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, B.; Sinha, A. K.; Moore, J. J.

    1985-05-01

    The microstructural changes and grain boundary chemistry of high strength, age hardenable Ni-Cr-Fe alloy, INCONEL * X-750, have been studied using electron and Auger microscopy following a sequence of thermal treatments in the carbide precipitation temperature zone of 704 ‡C to 871 ‡C. The thermal treatment consisted of a solution anneal and quench from 1075 ‡C followed by aging up to 200 hours in this temperature region. An attempt has been made to correlate the microstructural data with Charpy impact test results, hardness values, and modified Huey Corrosion Test results (ASTM G28-72). Aging was conducted in a vacuum and in air from which the specimens were cooled at different rates. Aging at 871 ‡C for 50 to 100 hours under both air and vacuum furnace cooling conditions resulted in increased mechanical strength and corrosion resistance compared with aging at 704 ‡C or 760 ‡C, in which temperature range both apparent fracture toughness and corrosion rate deteriorate. The reprecipitation of secondary carbides along with a possible 17 phase precipitation upon aging at 871 ‡C for 200 hours under vacuum furnace cooling resulted in poor corrosion resistance and inferior impact properties.

  2. Reinforced Flax Mat/Modified Polylactide (PLA) Composites: Impact, Thermal, and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siengchin, S.

    2014-05-01

    Polylactide (PLA)/flax mat and modified PLA/flax mat composites were produced by the hot pressing technique. The dispersion of the flax mat in the composites was studied by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The PLA composites were subjected to an instrumented falling-weight impact test. The mechanical and thermal properties of the composites were determined by using tensile tests, a thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and a dynamic-mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). It was found that the flat mat increased the impact resistance of PLA, but the tensile strength of the modified PLA/flax mat composite decreased slightly compared with that of PLA. Data on the elongation at break pointed to a higher ductility of the modified PLA and its composites. Moreover, the addition of a thermal modifier enhanced the thermal resistance below the processing temperature of PLA and had a marginal effect on its glass-transition temperature. The master curves of the storage modulus were constructed by employing the time-temperature superposition (TTS) principle. The principle of a linear viscoelastic material was fairly applicable to transition from the modulus to the creep compliance for all the systems studied.

  3. The influence of body mass index and gender on the impact attenuation properties of flooring systems.

    PubMed

    Bhan, Shivam; Levine, Iris; Laing, Andrew C

    2013-12-01

    The biomechanical effectiveness of safety floors has never been assessed during sideways falls with human volunteers. Furthermore, the influence of body mass index (BMI) and gender on the protective capacity of safety floors is unknown. The purpose of this study was to test whether safety floors provide greater impact attenuation compared with traditional flooring, and whether BMI and gender modify their impact attenuation properties. Thirty participants (7 men and 7 women of low BMI; 7 men and 9 women of high BMI) underwent lateral pelvis release trials on 2 common floors and 4 safety floors. As a group, the safety floors reduced peak force (by up to 11.7%), and increased the time to peak force (by up to 25.5%) compared with a traditional institutional grade floor. Force attenuation was significantly higher for the low BMI group, and for males. Force attenuation was greatest for the low BMI males, averaging 26.5% (SD = 3.0) across the safety floors. These findings demonstrate an overall protective effect of safety floors during lateral falls on the pelvis, but also suggest augmented benefits for frail older adults (often with low body mass) who are at an increased risk of hip fracture.

  4. Uniaxial Properties versus Temperature, Creep and Impact Energy of an Austenitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brnic, Josip; Turkalj, Goran; Krscanski, Sanjin; Vukelic, Goran; Canadija, Marko

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, uniaxial material properties, creep resistance and impact energy of the austenitic heat-resistant steel (1.4841) are experimentally determined and analysed. Engineering stress-strain diagrams and uniaxial short-time creep curves are examined with computer-controlled testing machine. Impact energy has been determined and fracture toughness assessed. Investigated data are shown in the form of curves related to ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, modulus of elasticity and creep resistance. All of these experimentally obtained results are analysed and may be used in the design process of the structure where considered material is intended to be applied. Based on these results, considered material may be classified as material of high tensile strength (688 MPa/293 K; 326 MPa/923 K) and high yield strength (498 MPa/293 K; 283 MPa/923 K) as well as satisfactory creep resistance (temperature/stress → to strain (%) at 1,200 min: 823 K/167 MPa → to 0.25 %; 923 K/85 MPa → to 0.2 %).

  5. Impacts of air pollution exposure on the allergenic properties of Arizona cypress pollens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahali, Y.; Pourpak, Z.; Moin, M.; Zare, A.; Majd, A.

    2009-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that urbanization and high levels of vehicle emissions correlated with the increasing trend of pollen-induced respiratory allergies. Numerous works have investigated the role of pollutants in the pathogenesis of respiratory diseases but impacts of anthropogenic pollution on pollen allergenic properties are still poorly understood. The objective of this survey was to evaluate impacts of the traffic-related pollution on the structure and allergenic protein content of Arizona cypress (Cupressus arizonica, CA) pollens, recognized as a rising cause of seasonal allergy in various regions worldwide. According to our results, traffic-related air pollution by its direct effects on the elemental composition of pollens considerably increased the fragility of the pollen exine, causing numerous cracks in its surface and facilitating pollen content liberation. Pollen grains were also covered by numerous submicronic orbicules which may act as effective vectors for pollen-released components into the lower regions of respiratory organs. On the other hand, this study provides us reliable explications about the low efficiency of standard commercial allergens in the diagnosis of the Arizona cypress pollen allergy in Tehran. Although traffic related pollution affects the allergenic components of CA pollens, the repercussions on the respiratory health of urban populations have yet to be clarified and need further investigations.

  6. Impact of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) on biochar micropores and sorption properties for sulfamethoxazole.

    PubMed

    Sun, Binbin; Lian, Fei; Bao, Qiongli; Liu, Zhongqi; Song, Zhengguo; Zhu, Lingyan

    2016-07-01

    The interaction between biochar (BC) and antibiotics with the presence of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) is largely unknown, although it is crucial for understanding the role of BC in reducing the bioavailability of antibiotics in rhizosphere. The impacts of two typical LMWOAs (citric and malic acids) on sorption of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) by crop-straw BCs produced at 300 °C (BCs300) and 600 °C (BCs600), respectively, were examined. The sorption of SMX on BCs increased more than 5 times with the concentration of LMWOAs increasing from 0 to 100 mmol/L, which was mainly attributed to the elevated microporosity of BCs (measured by CO2) after treated by LMWOAs. The pore development of BCs was mainly derived from the release of dissolved organic residues from BC by LMWOA washing. For H2O2-oxidized BCs, however, LMWOAs had little effect on SMX sorption by BCs300 but greatly increased that by BCs600, which can be explained by the distinct sorption mechanisms of SMX on BCs300 and BCs600. These results indicate that the impact of LMWOAs on SMX sorption is highly dependent on the properties of BCs and LMWOAs, as well as their interaction mechanisms.

  7. PROPERTIES OF CP: COEFFICIENT OF THERMAL EXPANSION, DECOMPOSITION KINETICS, AND REACTION TO SPARK, FRICTION AND IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Weese, R K; Burnham, A K

    2005-09-28

    The properties of pentaamine (5-cyano-2H-tetrazolato-N2) cobalt (III) perchlorate (CP), which was first synthesized in 1968, continues to be of interest for predicting behavior in handling, shipping, aging, and thermal cook-off situations. We report coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values over four specific temperature ranges, decomposition kinetics using linear and isothermal heating, and the reaction to three different types of stimuli: impact, spark, and friction. The CTE was measured using a Thermal Mechanical Analyzer (TMA) for samples that were uniaxially compressed at 10,000 psi and analyzed over a dynamic temperature range of -20 C to 70 C. Differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, was used to monitor CP decomposition at linear heating rates of 1-7 C min{sup -1} in perforated pans and of 0.1-1.0 C min{sup -1} in sealed pans. The kinetic triplet was calculated using the LLNL code Kinetics05, and predictions for 210 and 240 C are compared to isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) experiments. Values are also reported for spark, friction, and impact sensitivity.

  8. Contribution of raindrop impact to the change of soil physical properties and water erosion under semi-arid rainfalls.

    PubMed

    Vaezi, Ali Reza; Ahmadi, Morvarid; Cerdà, Artemi

    2017-04-01

    Soil erosion by water is a three-phase process that consists of detachment of soil particles from the soil mass, transportation of detached particles either by raindrop impact or surface water flow, and sedimentation. Detachment by raindrops is a key component of the soil erosion process. However, little information is available on the role of raindrop impact on soil losses in the semi-arid regions where vegetation cover is often poor and does not protect the soil from rainfall. The objective of this study is to determine the contribution of raindrop impact to changes in soil physical properties and soil losses in a semiarid weakly-aggregated agricultural soil. Soil losses were measured under simulated rainfalls of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70mmh(-1), and under two conditions: i) with raindrop impact; and, ii) without raindrop impact. Three replications at each rainfall intensity and condition resulted in a total of 42 microplots of 1m×1.4m installed on a 10% slope according to a randomized complete block design. The contribution of raindrop impact to soil loss was computed using the difference between soil loss with raindrop impact and without raindrop impact at each rainfall intensity. Soil physical properties (aggregate size, bulk density and infiltration rate) were strongly damaged by raindrop impact as rainfall intensity increased. Soil loss was significantly affected by rainfall intensity under both soil surface conditions. The contribution of raindrop impact to soil loss decreased steadily with increasing rainfall intensity. At the lower rainfall intensities (20-30mmh(-1)), raindrop impact was the dominant factor controlling soil loss from the plots (68%) while at the higher rainfall intensities (40-70mmh(-1)) soil loss was mostly affected by increasing runoff discharge. At higher rainfall intensities the sheet flow protected the soil from raindrop impact.

  9. Impact of Cosmetics on the Surface Properties of Silicone Hydrogel Contact Lenses.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sruthi; Otchere, Heinz; Yu, Mili; Yang, Jeffery; Luensmann, Doerte; Jones, Lyndon

    2015-07-01

    This study evaluated the impact of various cosmetics on the surface properties of silicone hydrogel (SiHy) contact lens materials. In this in vitro experiment, 7 SiHy contact lens materials were coated with 1 of 9 cosmetics, including common hand creams (3), eye makeup removers (3), and mascaras (3). Dark-field microscopy images were taken to determine pixel brightness (PB) after cosmetic exposure, which describes the visible surface deposition (n=6 for each lens type), with a higher PB indicating increased deposition. The sessile drop technique was used to determine the advancing contact angle (CA). Measurements were repeated for both methods after a single peroxide-based cleaning cycle. Pixel brightness was significantly higher for mascara-coated lenses compared with the other cosmetic products (P<0.01). The peroxide-based lens care solution removed most deposits from the nonwaterproof mascara for 4 lens types, whereas deposits remained relatively unchanged for 1 waterproof mascara (P>0.05). Hand creams and makeup remover had minimal impact on PB. Changes in CA measurements after cosmetic application were highly lens dependent. Hand creams caused primarily a decrease in CA for 5 of the 7 lens types, whereas 1 of the waterproof mascaras caused a significant increase of 30 to 50° for 3 lens types. Some mascara-lens combinations resulted in increased CA and PB, which could have an impact on in vivo lens performance. Nonwaterproof mascara was mostly removed after a cleaning cycle. Further research is needed to understand the clinical implications for SiHy lens wearers using cosmetics.

  10. Impact of Packing and Processing Technique on Mechanical Properties of Acrylic Denture Base Materials

    PubMed Central

    Nejatian, Touraj; Sefat, Farshid; Johnson, Tony

    2015-01-01

    The fracture resistance of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) as the most popular denture base material is not satisfactory. Different factors can be involved in denture fracture. Among them, flexural fatigue and impact are the most common failure mechanisms of an acrylic denture base. It has been shown that there is a correlation between the static strength and fatigue life of composite resins. Therefore, the transverse strength of the denture base materials can be an important indicator of their service life. In order to improve the fracture resistance of PMMA, extensive studies have been carried out; however, only a few promising results were achieved, which are limited to some mechanical properties of PMMA at the cost of other properties. This study aimed at optimizing the packing and processing condition of heat-cured PMMA as a denture base resin in order to improve its biaxial flexural strength (BFS). The results showed that the plain type of resin with a powder/monomer ratio of 2.5:1 or less, packed conventionally and cured in a water bath for 2 h at 95 °C provides the highest BFS. Also, it was found that the performance of the dry heat processor is inconsistent with the number of flasks being loaded.

  11. A reassessment of the effects of helium on Charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L.; Hankin, G.L.

    1998-03-01

    To test the effect of helium on Charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels, two approaches are reviewed: quantification of results of tests performed on specimens irradiated in reactors with very different neutron spectra, and isotopic tailoring experiments. Data analysis can show that if the differences in reactor response are indeed due to helium effects, then irradiation in a fusion machine at 400 C to 100 dpa and 1000 appm He will result in a ductile to brittle transition temperature shift of over 500 C. However, the response as a function of dose and helium level is unlikely to be simply due to helium based on physical reasoning. Shear punch tests and microstructural examinations also support this conclusion based on irradiated samples of a series of alloys made by adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation in HFIR. The addition of nickel at any isotopic balance to the Fe-12Cr base alloy significantly increased the shear yield and maximum strengths of the alloys. However, helium itself, up to 75 appm at over 7 dpa appears to have little effect on the mechanical properties of the alloys. This behavior is instead understood to result from complex precipitation response. The database for effects of helium on embrittlement based on nickel additions is therefore probably misleading and experiments should be redesigned to avoid nickel precipitation.

  12. Evaluating the impact of aquifer layer properties on geomechanical response during CO2 geological sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Lin, Guang; Fang, Yilin

    2013-04-01

    Numerical models play an essential role in understanding the facts of carbon dioxide (CO2) geological sequestration in the life cycle of a storage reservoir. We present a series of test cases that reflect a broad and realistic range of aquifer reservoir properties to systematically evaluate and compare the impacts on the geomechanical response to CO2 injection. In this study, a coupled hydro-mechanical model was introduced to simulate the sequestration process, and a quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method was introduced to efficiently sample the value of aquifer properties and geometry parameters. Aquifer permeability was found to be of significant importance to the geomechanical response to the injection. To study the influence of uncertainty of the permeability distribution in the aquifer, an additional series of tests is presented, based on a default permeability distribution site sample with various distribution deviations generated by the Monte Carlo sampling method. The results of the test series show that different permeability distributions significantly affect the displacement and possible failure zone.

  13. Black carbon mixing state impacts on cloud microphysical properties: effects of aerosol plume and environmental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, Ping Pui; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew

    2016-05-27

    Black carbon (BC) is usually mixed with other aerosol species within individual aerosol particles. This mixture, along with the particles' size and morphology, determines the particles' optical and cloud condensation nuclei properties, and hence black carbon's climate impacts. In this study the particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC was used to quantify the importance of black carbon mixing state for predicting cloud microphysical quantities. Based on a set of about 100 cloud parcel simulations a process level analysis framework was developed to attribute the response in cloud microphysical properties to changes in the underlying aerosol population ("plume effect") and the cloud parcel cooling rate ("parcel effect"). It shows that the response of cloud droplet number concentration to changes in BC emissions depends on the BC mixing state. When the aerosol population contains mainly aged BC particles an increase in BC emission results in increasing cloud droplet number concentrations ("additive effect"). In contrast, when the aerosol population contains mainly fresh BC particles they act as sinks for condensable gaseous species, resulting in a decrease in cloud droplet number concentration as BC emissions are increased ("competition effect"). Additionally, we quantified the error in cloud microphysical quantities when neglecting the information on BC mixing state, which is often done in aerosol models. The errors ranged from -12% to +45% for the cloud droplet number fraction, from 0% to +1022% for the nucleation-scavenged black carbon (BC) mass fraction, from -12% to +4% for the effective radius, and from -30% to +60% for the relative dispersion.

  14. A review of some effects of helium on charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelles, D. S.; Hankin, G. L.; Hamilton, M. L.

    1998-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of helium on Charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels, two approaches are reviewed: quantification of results of earlier tests performed by other researchers on specimens irradiated in reactors with very different neutron spectra, and evaluation of isotopic tailoring experiments. Data analysis can show that if the differences in reactor response are indeed due to helium effects, then irradiation in a fusion machine at 400°C to 100 dpa and 1000 appm He will result in a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift of over 500°C. However, it can be shown that the response as a function of dose and helium level is unlikely to be simply due to helium based on physical reasoning. Shear punch tests and microstructural examinations support this conclusion based on irradiated samples of a series of alloys made by adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation in High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The addition of nickel at any isotopic balance to the Fe-12Cr base alloy significantly increased the shear yield and maximum strengths of the alloys. However, helium itself, up to 75 appm at over 7 dpa appears to have little effect on the mechanical properties of the alloys. This behavior is instead understood to result from complex precipitation response. The database for effects of helium on embrittlement based on nickel additions is therefore probably misleading and experiments should be redesigned to avoid nickel precipitation.

  15. Impact of microbial transglutaminase on gelling properties of Indian mackerel fish protein isolates.

    PubMed

    Chanarat, Sochaya; Benjakul, Soottawat

    2013-01-15

    Impacts of microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) (0-0.6 units/g sample) on gel properties of Indian mackerel unwashed mince, surimi and protein isolates with and without prewashing were studied. Generally, lower myoglobin and lipid contents were found in protein isolate with and without prewashing, compared to those of unwashed mince and surimi (P<0.05). Protein isolate had the decreased Ca(2+)-ATPase and protein solubility, indicating protein denaturation. When MTGase was incorporated, breaking force and deformation of all gels markedly increased, especially as MTGase levels increased (P<0.05). At the same MTGase level, gel from protein isolate with prewashing exhibited the highest breaking force and deformation (P<0.05). The addition of MTGase could lower the expressible moisture content of most gels. No change in whiteness of gel was observed with the addition of MTGase (P>0.05), but gel from protein isolate gels had decreased whiteness as MTGase at high level was added. The microstructure of protein isolate gels without prewashing showed a similar network to unwashed mince gels, whilst a similar network was observed between surimi gel and gel from protein isolate with prewashing. Nevertheless, a larger void was noticeable in gels from protein isolates. All gels incorporated with MTGase (0.6 units/g) showed a slightly denser network than those without MTGase. Thus, gel with improved properties could be obtained from protein isolate from Indian mackerel with added MTGase.

  16. Impact of Inconsistencies in Experimental Thermodynamic Data on Thermophysical Properties of Planetary Mantles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, M. H.; de Jong, B. H.; Matas, J.; van den Berg, A. P.

    2004-12-01

    A new thermodynamic analysis has been performed on experimental thermophysical and phase diagram data of (Mg,Fe)2SiO_4 olivine, wadsleyite and ringwoodite solid solutions. The analysis demonstrates that large inconsistencies exist in the V- P- T data of wadsleyite and ringwoodite. It has been suggested in recent literature that a hydration effect is able to explain the large differences in volume measured by several independent groups of investigators [1,2]. However, this hydration effect does not explain the combination of a large measured volume associated with a large measured bulk modulus for a number of experimental V- P- T data sets [3-7]. We show the effects of the inconsistencies on the calculated phase diagram, bulk sound velocities and other thermodynamic properties. We have applied our thermodynamic analysis to iron rich compositions at pressure/temperature/iron content conditions representative for the mantles of Earth and Mars. For these conditions a strong compositional effect on thermodynamic properties in two- phase regions is observed from our thermodynamic model. This compositional effect is associated with the slopes of two- phase boundaries in pressure- composition and temperature- composition phase diagrams leading to a change up to 100% or more for specific thermodynamic properties thermal expansivity α , specific heat cP and bulk modulus kS. The amplitude of the anomalies increases with iron content larger than 10%. These anomalous two-phase zones, where olivine transforms to ringwoodite via wadsleyite, cover a pressure range of about 5 GPa. In the Earth's mantle transition zone these two-phase zones therefore occupy a depth range of some 150 km and the impact of these strong variations in α and cP on mantle dynamics may be limited. Planet Mars with its weaker gravity field and reduced pressure gradient is an environment more susceptible to the impact of these two-phase compositional effects, even more so since the iron content of the

  17. Impact of fluorine based reactive chemistry on structure and properties of high moment magnetic material

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaoyu Chen, Lifan; Han, Hongmei; Fu, Lianfeng; Sun, Ming; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Jinqiu

    2014-05-07

    The impact of the fluorine-based reactive ion etch (RIE) process on the structural, electrical, and magnetic properties of NiFe and CoNiFe-plated materials was investigated. Several techniques, including X-ray fluorescence, 4-point-probe, BH looper, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), were utilized to characterize both bulk film properties such as thickness, average composition, Rs, ρ, Bs, Ms, and surface magnetic “dead” layers' properties such as thickness and element concentration. Experimental data showed that the majority of Rs and Bs changes of these bulk films were due to thickness reduction during exposure to the RIE process. ρ and Ms change after taking thickness reduction into account were negligible. The composition of the bulk films, which were not sensitive to surface magnetic dead layers with nano-meter scale, showed minimum change as well. It was found by TEM and EELS analysis that although both before and after RIE there were magnetic dead layers on the top surface of these materials, the thickness and element concentration of the layers were quite different. Prior to RIE, dead layer was actually native oxidation layers (about 2 nm thick), while after RIE dead layer consisted of two sub-layers that were about 6 nm thick in total. Sub-layer on the top was native oxidation layer, while the bottom layer was RIE “damaged” layer with very high fluorine concentration. Two in-situ RIE approaches were also proposed and tested to remove such damaged sub-layers.

  18. Impact of effective ocean optical properties on the Pacific subtropical cell: a CGCM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, G.; Tsujino, H.; Ishizaki, H.; Nakano, H.; Hirabara, M.

    2012-12-01

    The choice of ocean radiant scheme is important for modeling the upper ocean. According to the ocean-only simulation (Yamanaka et al., 2012), introduction of the chlorophyll-a dependent ocean radiant scheme results in the decreased mixed layer depth (MLD), the enhanced subtropical cell (STC), and the cooling of the eastern tropical Pacific sea surface temperature (SST). They also found that the enhanced STC results from the velocity profile change associated with the decreased Ekman boundary layer. However, the impact is not well understood when the air-sea feedback process is at work. This study examines the impact of the effective ocean optical properties on the Pacific mean fields, especially focusing on the STC, using a coupled general circulation model (CGCM). The CGCM we employed is the Meteorological Research Institute Earth System Model (MRI-ESM1). The atmospheric model is TL159L48, and the ocean model has a horizontal resolution of 1 x 0.5 deg. with 51 levels in vertical. Experimental design basically follows the CMIP5 protocol. Two experiments (CTL and SLR runs) are performed to investigate the impact of the effective ocean optical properties. In the CTL run, a conventional ocean radiant heating scheme (Paul and Simpson, 1977) is used, whereas a new ocean radiant heating scheme is used in the SLR run, where the satellite-derived chlorophyll-a distribution is taken into consideration based on Morel and Antoine (1994) as well as the effect of the varying solar angle (Ishizaki and Yamanaka, 2010). Each experiment is integrated during the period from 1985 to 2005. It is found that introduction of the new ocean radiant scheme (SLR run) changes the long-term mean wind pattern in the Pacific: easterly winds are strengthened in the equatorial Pacific, but weakened in the off-equatorial region. In the tropical Pacific, the enhanced equatorial upwelling cools the equatorial SST and the MLD becomes shallower. This is similar to the ocean-only simulation, but is more

  19. Impact of soil types and management practices on soil microbiological properties - a case study in salt affected area of Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangwar, Ravi Kumar; Makádi, Marianna; Michéli, Erika; Weldmichael, Tsedekech G.; Szegi, Tamás

    2017-04-01

    The impact of different land use systems on soil microbiological properties in salt affected soils were investigated in the Nádudvar region of Hajdu-Bihar County, Hungary. The study area is characterized by associations of Solonetz and Chernozem soils. Soils were collected from both arable (cultivated) and pasture (non-cultivated) land from the upper 15 cm, in May, 2016. Besides soil physical and chemical properties (SOM, pH, CaCO3, EC, E4/E6, available macro, meso and micro nutrients and moisture content), soil microbiological properties were also investigated, phosphatase and dehydrogenase activities of the samples were measured, as well as soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and soil microbiological respiration. The results were statistically compared on the different soil types and land uses. It was concluded that land management has greater impact on soil microbiology than inherent properties or soil types.

  20. Biomass burning aerosol over the Amazon during SAMBBA: impact of chemical composition on radiative properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, William; Allan, James; Flynn, Michael; Darbyshire, Eoghan; Hodgson, Amy; Liu, Dantong; O'shea, Sebastian; Bauguitte, Stephane; Szpek, Kate; Langridge, Justin; Johnson, Ben; Haywood, Jim; Longo, Karla; Artaxo, Paulo; Coe, Hugh

    2014-05-01

    Biomass burning represents one of the largest sources of particulate matter to the atmosphere, resulting in a significant perturbation to the Earth's radiative balance coupled with serious impacts on public health. Globally, biomass burning aerosols are thought to exert a small warming effect but with the uncertainty being 4 times greater than the central estimate. On regional scales, the impact is substantially greater, particularly in areas such as the Amazon Basin where large, intense and frequent burning occurs on an annual basis for several months. Absorption by atmospheric aerosols is underestimated by models over South America, which points to significant uncertainties relating to Black Carbon (BC) aerosol properties. Initial results from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which took place during September and October 2012 over Brazil on-board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft, are presented here. Aerosol chemical composition was measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a DMT Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). The physical, chemical and optical properties of the aerosols across the region will be characterized in order to establish the impact of biomass burning on regional air quality, weather and climate. The aircraft sampled a range of conditions including sampling of pristine Rainforest, fresh biomass burning plumes, regional haze and elevated biomass burning layers within the free troposphere. The aircraft sampled biomass burning aerosol across the southern Amazon in the states of Rondonia and Mato Grosso, as well as in a Cerrado (Savannah-like) region in Tocantins state. This presented a range of fire conditions, both in terms of their number, intensity, vegetation-type and their combustion efficiencies. Near-source sampling of fires in Rainforest environments suggested that smouldering combustion dominated, while flaming combustion dominated

  1. The Rational Design of Selective Benzoxazepin Inhibitors of the α-Isoform of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Culminating in the Identification of (S)-2-((2-(1-Isopropyl-1H-1,2,4-triazol-5-yl)-5,6-dihydrobenzo[f]imidazo[1,2-d][1,4]oxazepin-9-yl)oxy)propanamide (GDC-0326).

    PubMed

    Heffron, Timothy P; Heald, Robert A; Ndubaku, Chudi; Wei, BinQing; Augistin, Martin; Do, Steven; Edgar, Kyle; Eigenbrot, Charles; Friedman, Lori; Gancia, Emanuela; Jackson, Philip S; Jones, Graham; Kolesnikov, Aleksander; Lee, Leslie B; Lesnick, John D; Lewis, Cristina; McLean, Neville; Mörtl, Mario; Nonomiya, Jim; Pang, Jodie; Price, Steve; Prior, Wei Wei; Salphati, Laurent; Sideris, Steve; Staben, Steven T; Steinbacher, Stefan; Tsui, Vickie; Wallin, Jeffrey; Sampath, Deepak; Olivero, Alan G

    2016-02-11

    Inhibitors of the class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) isoform PI3Kα have received substantial attention for their potential use in cancer therapy. Despite the particular attraction of targeting PI3Kα, achieving selectivity for the inhibition of this isoform has proved challenging. Herein we report the discovery of inhibitors of PI3Kα that have selectivity over the other class I isoforms and all other kinases tested. In GDC-0032 (3, taselisib), we previously minimized inhibition of PI3Kβ relative to the other class I insoforms. Subsequently, we extended our efforts to identify PI3Kα-specific inhibitors using PI3Kα crystal structures to inform the design of benzoxazepin inhibitors with selectivity for PI3Kα through interactions with a nonconserved residue. Several molecules selective for PI3Kα relative to the other class I isoforms, as well as other kinases, were identified. Optimization of properties related to drug metabolism then culminated in the identification of the clinical candidate GDC-0326 (4).

  2. A Review of the Property Value Approach to Measuring the Welfare Impact of an Externality Excerpt from NUREG/CR-0989, PNL-2952 Vol. II Appendix B

    SciTech Connect

    RC. Adams

    1980-08-01

    This paper reviews 1) the quantitative measurement of the welfare impact due to an externality and 2) the empirical estimation of the welfare impact of an externality using the property value approach.

  3. Impact of roots, mycorrhizas and earthworms on soil physical properties as assessed by shrinkage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milleret, R.; Le Bayon, R.-C.; Lamy, F.; Gobat, J.-M.; Boivin, P.

    2009-07-01

    SummarySoil biota such as earthworms, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and plant roots are known to play a major role in engineering the belowground part of the terrestrial ecosystems, thus strongly influencing the water budget and quality on earth. However, the effect of soil organisms and their interactions on the numerous soil physical properties to be considered are still poorly understood. Shrinkage analysis allows quantifying a large spectrum of soil properties in a single experiment, with small standard errors. The objectives of the present study were, therefore, to assess the ability of the method to quantify changes in soil properties as induced by single or combined effects of leek roots ( Allium porrum), AMF ( Glomus intraradices) and earthworms ( Allolobophora chlorotica). The study was performed on homogenised soil microcosms and the experiments lasted 35 weeks. The volume of the root network and the external fungal hyphae was measured at the end, and undisturbed soil cores were collected. Shrinkage analysis allowed calculating the changes in soil hydro-structural stability, soil plasma and structural pore volumes, soil bulk density and plant available water, and structural pore size distributions. Data analysis revealed different impacts of the experimented soil biota on the soil physical properties. At any water content, the presence of A. chlorotica resulted in a decrease of the specific bulk volume and the hydro-structural stability around 25%, and in a significant increase in the bulk soil density. These changes went with a decrease of the structural pore volumes at any pore size, a disappearing of the thinnest structural pores, a decrease in plant available water, and a hardening of the plasma. On the contrary, leek roots decreased the bulk soil density up to 1.23 g cm -3 despite an initial bulk density of 1.15 g cm -3. This increase in volume was accompanied with a enhanced hydro-structural stability, a larger structural pore volume at any

  4. The development of a custom-built portable impact-testing device for assessing the cushioning properties of athletic socks.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Tim; Jessop, David; Bruce-Low, Stewart; Scurr, Joanna

    2013-12-01

    Despite manufacturer claims that athletic socks attenuate force during exercise, no device exists to assess this. Therefore, this study outlines the development of a custom-built impact-testing device for assessing the cushioning properties of socks. The device used a gravity-driven impact striker (8.5 kg), released from 0.05 m, which impacted a no-sock, sock or a basic shoe/sock condition in the vertical axis. A load cell (10,000 Hz) assessed peak impact force, time to peak impact force and loading rate. Reliability was investigated between day, between trial and within trial. Excellent reliability (coefficient of variation < 5% adjusted for 95% confidence limits) was reported for peak impact force in all conditions, with no evidence of systematic bias. Good reliability (coefficient of variation < 10% adjusted for 68% confidence limits) was reported for time to peak impact force and loading rate with some evidence of systematic bias. It was concluded that the custom-built impact-testing device was reliable and sensitive for the measurement of peak impact force on socks.

  5. Perceived Impact of a Land and Property Rights Program on Violence Against Women in Rural Kenya: A Qualitative Investigation.

    PubMed

    Hilliard, Starr; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Grabe, Shelly; Lu, Tiffany; Hatcher, Abigail M; Kwena, Zachary; Mwaura-Muiru, Esther; Dworkin, Shari L

    2016-03-06

    The current study focuses on a community-led land and property rights program in two rural provinces in western Kenya. The program was designed to respond to women's property rights violations to reduce violence against women and HIV risks at the community level. Through in-depth interviews with 30 women, we examine the perceived impact that this community-level property rights program had on violence against women at the individual and community level. We also examine perceptions as to how reductions in violence were achieved. Finally, we consider how our findings may aid researchers in the design of structural violence-prevention strategies. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Impact of gas injection on the apparent viscosity and viscoelastic property of waste activated sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Bobade, Veena; Baudez, Jean Christophe; Evans, Geoffery; Eshtiaghi, Nicky

    2017-05-01

    Gas injection is known to play a major role on the particle size of the sludge, the oxygen transfer rate, as well as the mixing efficiency of membrane bioreactors and aeration basins in the waste water treatment plants. The rheological characteristics of sludge are closely related to the particle size of the sludge floc. However, particle size of sludge floc depends partly on the shear induced in the sludge and partly on physico-chemical nature of the sludge. The objective of this work is to determine the impact of gas injection on both the apparent viscosity and viscoelastic property of sludge. The apparent viscosity of sludge was investigated by two methods: in-situ and after sparging. Viscosity curves obtained by in-situ measurement showed that the apparent viscosity decreases significantly from 4000 Pa s to 10 Pa s at low shear rate range (below 10 s(-1)) with an increase in gas flow rate (0.5LPM to 3LPM); however the after sparging flow curve analysis showed that the reduction in apparent viscosity throughout the shear rate range is negligible to be displayed. Torque and displacement data at low shear rate range revealed that the obtained lower apparent viscosity in the in-situ method is not the material characteristics, but the slippage effect due to a preferred location of the bubbles close to the bob, causing an inconsistent decrease of torque and increase of displacement at low shear rate range. In linear viscoelastic regime, the elastic and viscous modulus of sludge was reduced by 33% & 25%, respectively, due to gas injection because of induced shear. The amount of induced shear measured through two different tests (creep and time sweep) were the same. The impact of this induced shear on sludge structure was also verified by microscopic images. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Vertical migration of the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis and the impact on ocean optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, Oscar; Kerfoot, John; Mahoney, Kevin; Moline, Mark; Oliver, Matthew; Lohrenz, Steven; Kirkpatrick, Gary

    2006-06-01

    Vertical migration behavior is found in many harmful algal blooms; however, the corresponding impact on ocean optical properties has not been quantified. A near-monospecific population of the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis was encountered off the west coast of Florida. The community was tracked for 24 hours by following a Lagrangian drifter deployed at the beginning of the experiment. A suite of inherent optical and cellular measurements was made. Over the 24 hour period, the K. brevis population increased during the day with concentrations peaking in the late afternoon (1600 local daylight time) in the upper 2 m of the water column. The increase in K. brevis in surface waters resulted in enhanced reflectance at the sea surface with distinct spectral changes. There was a 22% decrease in the relative amount of the green reflectance due to increased pigment absorption. There was enhanced red (35%) and infrared (75%) light reflectance due to the increased particle backscatter and chlorophyll a fluorescence; however, the relative impact of the fluorescence was relatively small despite high cell numbers due to the significant fluorescence quenching present in K. brevis. The relative change in the blue light reflectance was not as large as the change in green light reflectance, which is surprising given the pigment absorption in the blue wavelengths of light. The increased blue light pigment absorption was offset by a significant decrease in nonalgal particle absorption. The inverse relationship between K. brevis and nonalgal particles was robust. This relationship may reflect low grazing on K. brevis populations due to the neurotoxins associated with this dinoflagellate. The low-grazing pressure may provide the mechanism by which this slow-growing dinoflagellate can achieve high cell numbers in the ocean.

  8. The impact of subgroup type and subgroup configurational properties on work team performance.

    PubMed

    Carton, Andrew M; Cummings, Jonathon N

    2013-09-01

    Scholars have invoked subgroups in a number of theories related to teams, yet certain tensions in the literature remain unresolved. In this article, we address 2 of these tensions, both relating to how subgroups are configured in work teams: (a) whether teams perform better with a greater number of subgroups and (b) whether teams perform better when they have imbalanced subgroups (majorities and minorities are present) or balanced subgroups (subgroups are of equal size). We predict that the impact of the number and balance of subgroups depends on the type of subgroup-whether subgroups are formed according to social identity (i.e., identity-based subgroups) or information processing (i.e., knowledge-based subgroups). We first propose that teams are more adversely affected by 2 identity-based subgroups than by any other number, yet the uniquely negative impact of a 2-subgroup configuration is not apparent for knowledge-based subgroups. Instead, a larger number of knowledge-based subgroups is beneficial for performance, such that 2 subgroups is worse for performance when compared with 3 or more subgroups but better for performance when compared with no subgroups or 1 subgroup. Second, we argue that teams perform better when identity-based subgroups are imbalanced yet knowledge-based subgroups are balanced. We also suggest that there are interactive effects between the number and balance of subgroups-however, the nature of this interaction depends on the type of subgroup. To test these predictions, we developed and validated an algorithm that measures the configurational properties of subgroups in organizational work teams. Results of a field study of 326 work teams from a multinational organization support our predictions. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  9. Martian subsurface properties and crater formation processes inferred from fresh impact crater geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Sarah T.; Valiant, Gregory J.

    2006-10-01

    The geometry of simple impact craters reflects the properties of the target materials, and the diverse range of fluidized morphologies observed in Martian ejecta blankets are controlled by the near-surface composition and the climate at the time of impact. Using the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data set, quantitative information about the strength of the upper crust and the dynamics of Martian ejecta blankets may be derived from crater geometry measurements. Here, we present the results from geometrical measurements of fresh craters 3-50 km in rim diameter in selected highland (Lunae and Solis Plana) and lowland (Acidalia, Isidis, and Utopia Planitiae) terrains. We find large, resolved differences between the geometrical properties of the freshest highland and lowland craters. Simple lowland craters are 1.5-2.0 times deeper (≥5σo difference) with >50% larger cavities (≥2σo) compared to highland craters of the same diameter. Rim heights and the volume of material above the preimpact surface are slightly greater in the lowlands over most of the size range studied. The different shapes of simple highland and lowland craters indicate that the upper ˜6.5 km of the lowland study regions are significantly stronger than the upper crust of the highland plateaus. Lowland craters collapse to final volumes of 45-70% of their transient cavity volumes, while highland craters preserve only 25-50%. The effective yield strength of the upper crust in the lowland regions falls in the range of competent rock, approximately 9-12 MPa, and the highland plateaus may be weaker by a factor of 2 or more, consistent with heavily fractured Noachian layered deposits. The measured volumes of continuous ejecta blankets and uplifted surface materials exceed the predictions from standard crater scaling relationships and Maxwell's Z model of crater excavation by a factor of 3. The excess volume of fluidized ejecta blankets on Mars cannot be explained by concentration of ejecta through

  10. Polyolefin blends with immiscible polymers; weld line strength, impact properties, microlayer morphology, and barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarus, David Alan

    2002-09-01

    In Chapter 1, stress-strain behavior coupled with fractography was used to investigate the weld line strength of 30/70 w/w poly(vinyl chloride)/high density polyethylene (PVC/HDPE) blends. The weld line strength depended upon the domain shape of the PVC phase, with elongated domains causing weld line weakness. To alter the PVC domain shape, the viscosity ratio (etaPVC /etaHDPE) of the blend was varied by changing the PVC molecular weight. The domain shape at the fracture initiation site was used in conjunction with a modified Nielsen approach to predict the ductile to brittle transition at the weld line. For the composition studied, a critical aspect ratio of the PVC phase of 1.24 was determined. The calculations predicted that a viscosity ratio of 21 would produce a particle with an aspect ratio of 1.24. The observed weld line strength confirmed this prediction: blends with a viscosity ratio below 21 were brittle and those with a viscosity ratio above 21 had ductile weld lines. Chapter 2 also consisted of PVC/polyethylene blends. In this chapter, an ultra low density polyethylene copolymer was dispersed in the PVC to act as an impact modifier. Good impact properties were achieved in quiescient systems, but were subsequently lost due to coalescence of the polyethylene during injection molding. In Chapter 3, microlayer coextrusion was used as a tool to create structures with microplatelets of high aspect ratio. Polypropylene was combined with polyamide 66 (PA66) by microlayering. A high volume fraction of PA66 microplatelets dispersed in the PP was achieved by injection molding the microlayer materials between the melting temperatures. The PA66 remained in the solid state, and resulted in good barrier enhancement due to the microplatelet structure. In Chapter 4, the gas barrier properties of injection molded structures prepared in Chapter 3 were investigated further. The resulting material had significantly reduced permeability to oxygen and carbon dioxide compared

  11. Quantifying the impact of AGN and nebular emission on stellar population properties with REBETIKO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, L. S. M.; Gomes, J. M.; Papaderos, P.

    2016-06-01

    Spectral synthesis enables the reconstruction of the star formation and chemical evolution histories (SFH & CEH) of a galaxy that are encoded in its spectral energy distribution (SED). Most state-of-the-art population synthesis codes however consider only purely stellar emission and are hence inadequate for modelling studies of galaxies where non-stellar emission components contribute significantly to the SED. This work combines evolutionary and population synthesis techniques to quantify the impact of active galactic nucleus (AGN) and nebular emission on the determination of the stellar population properties in galaxies. We have developed an evolutionary synthesis code called REBETIKO - Reckoning galaxy Emission By means of Evolutionary Tasks with Input Key Observables - to compute and study the time evolution of the SED of AGN-hosts and starburst galaxies. Our code takes into account the main ingredients of a galaxy's SED (e.g. non-thermal emission and/or nebular continuum and lines) for various commonly used parameterizations of the SFH, such as instantaneous burst, constant, exponentially decreasing, and gradually increasing peaking at a redshift between 1-10. Synthetic SEDs computed with REBETIKO have been subsequently fitted with the STARLIGHT population synthesis code (PSC) which can be regarded as representative for currently available state-of-the-art (i.e. purely stellar) PSCs. The objective is to study the impact of non-stellar SED components on the recovery of the true total stellar mass M_{star} and SFH of a galaxy, as well as other evolutionary properties, such as CEH and light- and mass-weighted mean stellar age and metallicity. We find that purely stellar fits in galaxies with a strong non-stellar continuum (e.g. Seyfert and/or starburst galaxies) can for instance overestimate M_{star} by up to 3 orders of magnitude, while the mean stellar age and metallicity can deviate from their true values up to 2 and 4 dex, respectively. These results imply

  12. Investigation of Carbonaceous Aerosol Optical Properties to Understand Impacts on Air Quality and Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Michael R.

    The optical properties of carbonaceous aerosols were investigated to understand the impact source emissions and ambient particulate matter (PM) have on atmospheric radiative forcing. Black carbon (BC) is a strong absorber of visible light and contributes highly to atmospheric radiative forcing, therefore it is important to link BC properties to combustion emission sources. Brown carbon (BrC) is poorly understood and may be an important contributor to both positive and negative radiative forcing. The research investigates these primary knowledge gaps. The optical properties of carbonaceous aerosols were investigated to understand the impact source emissions and ambient particulate matter (PM) have on atmospheric radiative forcing. Black carbon (BC) is a strong absorber of visible light and contributes highly to atmospheric radiative forcing, therefore it is important to link BC properties to combustion emission sources. Brown carbon (BrC) is poorly understood and may be an important contributor to both positive and negative radiative forcing. The research investigates these primary knowledge gaps. Multiple methods were developed and applied to quantify the mass absorption cross-section (MAC) at multiple wavelengths of source and ambient samples. The MAC of BC was determined to be approximately 7.5 m2g-1 at 520nm. However, the MAC was highly variable with OC fraction and wavelength. The BrC MAC was similar for all sources, with the highest absorption in the UV at 370nm; the MAC quickly decreases at larger wavelengths. In the UV, the light absorption by BrC could exceed BC contribution by over 100 times, but only when the OC fraction is large (>90%) as compared to the total carbon. BrC was investigated by measuring the light absorption of solvent extracted fractions in water, dichloromethane, and methanol. Source emissions exhibited greater light absorption in methanol extractions as compared to water and DCM extracts. The BrC MAC was 2.4 to 3.7 m2g-1 at 370nm in

  13. Impact of the substitution of rice bran on rheological properties of dough and in the new product development.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice bran is a nutrient-rich co-product of the rice milling industries. The impact of adding 2-20% rice bran in wheat flour on the rheological behavior of the dough was investigated using the instruments, Farinograph, Consistograph, and Alveograph. The changes in physico-chemical properties were fo...

  14. 77 FR 55466 - Environmental Impact Statement for Short Range-Projects and Update of the Real Property Master...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... currently programmed for construction in fiscal years 2013- 2017. These projects include new office... Department of the Army Environmental Impact Statement for Short Range-Projects and Update of the Real... proposed short-range improvement projects and the proposed update of the Real Property Master Plan (RPMP...

  15. School Improvement and Urban Renewal: The Impact of a Turnaround School's Performance on Real Property Values in Its Surrounding Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Stephen L.; Szczesek, Jill

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the economic impact of a "turnaround" school on real property values in its surrounding community as related to the argument introduced by Tiebout in 1956 correlating local public goods, in this case school success, to housing-location decision making. Using single-family home sales found on the Multiple Listing System and…

  16. Recycled newspaper fibers as reinforcing fillers in thermoplastics. Part I, Analysis of tensile and impact properties in polypropylene

    Treesearch

    A. R. Sanadi; R. A. Young; C. Clemons; R. M. Rowell

    1994-01-01

    Recycled newspaper fibers (ONP) are potentially outstanding nonabrasive reinforcing fibers with high specific properties. In this study, a high energy thermokinetic mixer was used to mix these fibers in a polypropylene (PP) matrix, and the blends were then injection molded in order to observe the tensile and impact strengths of the composites. A 40% (weight) of ONP in...

  17. School Improvement and Urban Renewal: The Impact of a Turnaround School's Performance on Real Property Values in Its Surrounding Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Stephen L.; Szczesek, Jill

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the economic impact of a "turnaround" school on real property values in its surrounding community as related to the argument introduced by Tiebout in 1956 correlating local public goods, in this case school success, to housing-location decision making. Using single-family home sales found on the Multiple Listing System and…

  18. Impact of a low intensity controlled-fire in some chemical soil properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Murillo, Juan F.; Hueso-González, Paloma; Aranda-Gómez, Francisco; Damián Ruiz-Sinoga, José

    2014-05-01

    Some changes in chemical soil properties can be observed after fires of low intensities. pH and electric conductivity tend to increase, while C/N ratio decrease. In the case of organic matter, the content can increase due to the massive incorporation of necromass including, especially, plants and roots. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of low intensity and controlled fire in some soil properties in field conditions. El Pinarillo experimental area is located in South of Spain. Two set of closed plots were installed (24 m2: 12 m length x 2 m width). One of them was remained as control with the original vegetation cover (Mediterranean matorral: Rosmarinus officinalis, Cistus clusii, Lavandula stoechas, Chamaeropos humilis, Thymus baetica), and the other one was burnt in a controlled-fire in 2011. Weather conditions and water content of vegetation influenced in the intensity of fire (low). After the controlled-fire, soil surface sample (0-5 cm) were taken in both set of plots (B, burnt soil samples; C, control soil samples). Some soil chemical properties were analysed: organic matter content (OM), C/N ratio, pH and electrical conductivity (EC). Some changes were observed in B corroborating a controlled-fire of low intensity. pH remained equal after fire (B: pH=7.7±0.11; C: pH=7.7±0.04). An increment was obtained in the case of EC (B: EC=0.45 mScm-1±0.08 mScm-1; C: EC=0.35 mScm-1±0.07 mScm-1) and OM (B: OM=8.7%±3.8%; C: pH=7.3%±1.5%). Finally, C/N ratio decreased after fire respect to the control and initial conditions (B: C/N=39.0±14.6; C: C/N =46.5±10.2).

  19. The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoen, Ben; Wiser, Ryan; Cappers, Peter; Thayer, Mark; Sethi, Gautam

    2009-12-02

    With wind energy expanding rapidly in the U.S. and abroad, and with an increasing number of communities considering wind power development nearby, there is an urgent need to empirically investigate common community concerns about wind project development. The concern that property values will be adversely affected by wind energy facilities is commonly put forth by stakeholders. Although this concern is not unreasonable, given property value impacts that have been found near high voltage transmission lines and other electric generation facilities, the impacts of wind energy facilities on residential property values had not previously been investigated thoroughly. The present research collected data on almost 7,500 sales of singlefamily homes situated within 10 miles of 24 existing wind facilities in nine different U.S. states. The conclusions of the study are drawn from eight different hedonic pricing models, as well as both repeat sales and sales volume models. The various analyses are strongly consistent in that none of the models uncovers conclusive evidence of the existence of any widespread property value impacts that might be present in communities surrounding wind energy facilities. Specifically, neither the view of the wind facilities nor the distance of the home to those facilities is found to have any consistent, measurable, and statistically significant effect on home sales prices. Although the analysis cannot dismiss the possibility that individual homes or small numbers of homes have been or could be negatively impacted, it finds that if these impacts do exist, they are either too small and/or too infrequent to result in any widespread, statistically observable impact.

  20. Deposition velocities and impact of physical properties on ozone removal for building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chi-Chi; Hsu, Shu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to estimate the ozone deposition velocities of eight commonly used building materials (BMs) which include calcium silicate board (CSB), green calcium silicate board (GCSB), mineral fiber ceiling (MFC), green mineral fiber ceiling (GMFC), gypsum board (GB), green gypsum board (GGB), wooden flooring (WF) and green wooden flooring (GWF). In addition, the impact of physical properties (specific surface area and total pore volume of BM) on ozone removal ability was also explored and discussed. Studies were conducted in a small-scale environmental stainless steel chamber. CSB and GCSB showed the highest ozone deposition velocities, while WF and GWF showed the lowest ozone deposition velocities among test BMs materials. All reaction probabilities were estimated to fall within the order of magnitude of 10-6. Green BMs showed lower reaction probabilities with ozone comparing with non-green BMs except for GGB. Consistent with the trends for deposition velocity, fleecy and porous materials exhibit higher reaction probabilities than smooth, non-porous surfaces. Specific surface area of BM is more closely related to ozone removal than total pore volume of BM with R2 of 0.93 vs. R2 of 0.84. Discussion of Thiele modulus for all test BMs indicates surface reactions are occurring quickly relative to internal diffusion and ozone removal is internal diffusion-limited.

  1. Secondary materials: Engineering properties, environmental consequences, and social and economic impacts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Breslin, V.; Reaven, S.; Schwartz, M.; Swanson, L.; Zweig, M.; Bortman, M.; Schubel, J.

    1993-08-01

    This report investigates two secondary materials, plastic lumber made from mixed plastic waste, and cement blocks and structures made with incinerator ash. Engineering properties, environmental impacts, and energy costs and savings of these secondary materials are compared to standard lumber products and cement blocks. Market capacity and social acceptance of plastic lumber and stabilized ash products are analyzed. These secondary materials apparently have potential markets; however, their economic value is primarily that they will not take up landfill space. For plastic lumber and stabilized incinerator ash products, marine and highway construction seem ideal public works applications. Incinerator ash may be suitable to use in seawalls, jetties, fishing reefs, highway barriers, and roadbed applications. Docks, piers, highway sound barriers, parking stops, and park furniture may all be made from plastic lumber. To encourage public acceptance and improve the market potential of secondary materials, these activities could be beneficial: industry should emphasize developing useful, long-lived products; industry and governments should create product performance criteria; government should provide rigorous testing and demonstration programs; and government and industry should cooperate to improve public outreach and educational programs.

  2. Impact of Organic and Conventional Systems of Coffee Farming on Soil Properties and Culturable Microbial Diversity.

    PubMed

    Velmourougane, Kulandaivelu

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken with an objective of evaluating the long-term impacts of organic (ORG) and conventional (CON) methods of coffee farming on soil physical, chemical, biological, and microbial diversity. Electrical conductivity and bulk density were found to increase by 34% and 21%, respectively, in CON compared to ORG system, while water holding capacity was found decreased in both the systems. Significant increase in organic carbon was observed in ORG system. Major nutrients, nitrogen and potassium, levels showed inclination in both ORG and CON system, but the trend was much more pronounced in CON system. Phosphorus was found to increase in both ORG and CON system, but its availability was found to be more with CON system. In biological attributes, higher soil respiration and fluorescein diacetate activity were recorded in ORG system compared to CON system. Higher soil urease activity was observed in CON system, while dehydrogenase activity does not show significant differences between ORG and CON systems. ORG system was found to have higher macrofauna (31.4%), microbial population (34%), and microbial diversity indices compared to CON system. From the present study, it is accomplished that coffee soil under long-term ORG system has better soil properties compared to CON system.

  3. Impact of Simulated Microgravity on Cytoskeleton and Viscoelastic Properties of Endothelial Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janmaleki, M.; Pachenari, M.; Seyedpour, S. M.; Shahghadami, R.; Sanati-Nezhad, A.

    2016-09-01

    This study focused on the effects of simulated microgravity (s-μg) on mechanical properties, major cytoskeleton biopolymers, and morphology of endothelial cells (ECs). The structural and functional integrity of ECs are vital to regulate vascular homeostasis and prevent atherosclerosis. Furthermore, these highly gravity sensitive cells play a key role in pathogenesis of many diseases. In this research, impacts of s-μg on mechanical behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were investigated by utilizing a three-dimensional random positioning machine (3D-RPM). Results revealed a considerable drop in cell stiffness and viscosity after 24 hrs of being subjected to weightlessness. Cortical rigidity experienced relatively immediate and significant decline comparing to the stiffness of whole cell body. The cells became rounded in morphology while western blot analysis showed reduction of the main cytoskeletal components. Moreover, fluorescence staining confirmed disorganization of both actin filaments and microtubules (MTs). The results were compared statistically among test and control groups and it was concluded that s-μg led to a significant alteration in mechanical behavior of ECs due to remodeling of cell cytoskeleton.

  4. Chitosan-Based Nano-Embedded Microparticles: Impact of Nanogel Composition on Physicochemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Islam, Paromita; Water, Jorrit J; Bohr, Adam; Rantanen, Jukka

    2016-12-22

    Chitosan-based nanogels have been widely applied as drug delivery vehicles. Spray-drying of said nanogels allows for the preparation of dry powder nano-embedded microparticles. In this work, chitosan-based nanogels composed of chitosan, alginate, and/or sodium tri-penta phosphate were investigated, particularly with respect to the impact of composition on the resulting physicochemical properties. Different compositions were obtained as nanogels with sizes ranging from 203 to 561 nm. The addition of alginate and exclusion of sodium tri-penta phosphate led to an increase in nanogel size. The nanogels were subsequently spray-dried to form nano-embedded microparticles with trehalose or mannitol as matrix excipient. The microparticles of different composition were mostly spherical with a smooth surface and a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 6-10 µm. Superior redispersibility was observed for microparticles containing amorphous trehalose. This study demonstrates the potential of nano-embedded microparticles for stabilization and delivery of nanogel-based delivery systems.

  5. The impact of accretion material composition and properties on interior structure dynamics of Kuiper belt objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchuko, Oleg; Shchuko, Svetlana D.; Kartashov, Daniil; Orosei, Roberto

    The building material of the forming Kuiper belt objects is supposed in the model to consist of solid dust material of protosolar cloud fringe regions and H2 O amorphous ice. A spheri-cally symmetric celestial body was being created as a result of accretion. The body's internal structure was determined by the composition and the properties of the accretion material and the evolution of the structure -by internal thermal processes. The accretion material compo-sition and structure have been studied, which provide now the existence of large icy Kuiper belt objects. Radionuclides 26 Al, 40 K, 232 Th, 235 U and 238 U embedded in solid dust matter particles have been main sources of radiogenic heat for the Kuiper belt object life time. The impact of the heat-and-power potentials of radiogenic heat sources on H2 O phase transition dynamics in the celestial body matter has been investigated. The parameter variation domains of these potentials have been found at which there can be formed areas partly or fully filled with H2 O of different phase states. In addition, the dynamic boundaries of areas have been determined where the ice component is presented by amorphous ice or cubic and hexagonal crystal ice. The parameter domains of celestial body accretion and radiogenic heat processes have been determined where the body evolution may have a catastrophic scenario up to its complete destruction.

  6. Mechanical property characterization and impact resistance of selected graphite/PEEK composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    To use graphite/PEEK material on highly curved surfaces requires that the material be drapable and easily conformable to the surface. The mechanical property characterization and impact resistance results are presented for laminates made from two types of graphite/PEEK materials that will conform to a curved surface. These laminates were made from two different material forms. These forms are: (1) a fabric where each yarn is a co-mingled Celion G30-500 3K graphite fiber and PEEK fiber; and (2) an interleaved material of Celion G30-500 3K graphite fiber interleaved with PEEK film. The experimental results from the fabric laminates are compared with results for laminates made from AS4/PEEK unidirectional tape. The results indicate that the tension and compression moduli for quasi-isotropic and orthotropic laminates made from fabric materials are at least 98 pct. of the modulus of equivalent laminates made from tape materials. The strength of fabric material laminates is at least 80 pct. of laminates made from tape material. The evaluation of the fabric material for shear stiffness indicates that a tape material laminate could be replaced by a fabric material laminate and still maintain 89 pct. of the shear stiffness of the tape material laminate.

  7. The impact of antibiotics (benzylpenicillin, and nystatin) on the biological properties of ordinary chernozems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimenko, Yu. V.; Kazeev, K. Sh.; Kolesnikov, S. I.

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, the input of antibiotics into soils has sharply increased. We studied the impact antibiotics (benzylpenicillin, pharmasin, and nystatin) at different concentrations (100 and 600 mg/kg) on population densities of microorganisms and enzymatic activity of ordinary chernozems in model experiments. The applied doses of antibiotics had definite suppressing effects on population densities of microorganisms (up to 30-70% of the control) and on the soil enzymatic activity (20-70% of the control). Correlation analysis showed close correlation between the concentrations of antibiotics and the population densities of soil microorganisms ( r = -0.68-0.86). Amylolytic bacteria had the highest resistance to the antibiotics, whereas ammonifying bacteria had the lowest resistance. Among the studied enzymes belonging to oxidoreductases and hydrolases, catalase and phosphatase had the highest and the lowest resistance to the antibiotics, respectively. The effect of antibiotics on the biological properties of the chernozem lasted for a long time. The studied parameters were not completely recovered in 120 days.

  8. The impact of roller compaction and tablet compression on physicomechanical properties of pharmaceutical excipients.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Raman Mahadevan; Hegde, Shridhar; Dinunzio, James; Singhal, Dharmendra; Malick, Waseem

    2014-08-01

    Material properties play a significant role in pharmaceutical processing. The impact of roller compaction (RC) and tablet compression on solid fraction (SF), tensile strength (TS) and flexural modulus (FM) of Avicel DG [co-processed excipient with 75% microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and 25% anhydrous dibasic calcium phosphate (DCPA)], lactose and 1:1 Mixture of the two was studied. Materials were roller compacted at different force and roller type and compressed into tablets over a range of compression pressures (CP). SF, TS and FM were determined for ribbons and tablets. Roller force was a significant variable affecting SF while roller type was not. Both SF and TS of tablets increased with CP with Avicel DG exhibiting greater TS than that of 1:1 Mixture while tablets of lactose had the lowest TS. The TS of tablets decreased exponentially with tablet porosity. Ribbon of Avicel DG had higher TS and lower SF than lactose and greater reworkability. This is attributed to plastic deformation of MCC resulting in high degree of bonding and fragmentation of DCPA that fills the void spaces during tablet compression. The lack of significant increase in SF and low tablet TS for lactose upon compression is likely due to its brittle fragmentation and some elastic recovery as shown by the high FM.

  9. Impact of Argon gas on optical and electrical properties of Carbon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Arslan; Rafique, M. S.; Shaukat, S. F.; Siraj, Khurram; Ashfaq, Afshan; Anjum, Safia; Imran, Muhammad; Sattar, Abdul

    2016-12-01

    Nanostructured thin films of carbon were synthesized and investigated for their electrical, optical, structural and surface properties. Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique was used for the preparation of these films under Argon gas environment. A KrF Laser (λ=248 nm) was used as source of ablation and plasma formation. It was observed that the carbon ions and the background gas environment has deep impact on the morphology as well as on the microstructure of the films. Time of Flight (TOF) method was used to determine the energies of the ablated carbon ions. The morphology of film surfaces deposited at various argon pressure was analysed using an atomic force microscope. The Raman spectroscopic measurement reveal that there is shift in phase from sp3 to sp2 and a decrease in FWHM of G band, which is a clear indication of enhanced graphitic clusters. The electrical resistivity was also reduced from 85.3×10-1 to 2.57×10-1 Ω-cm. There is an exponential decrease in band gap Eg of the deposited films from 1.99 to 1.37 eV as a function of argon gas pressure.

  10. Chemical precursor impact on the properties of Cu2ZnSnS4 absorber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashistha, Indu B.; Sharma, Mahesh C.; Sharma, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    In present work impact of different chemical precursor on the deposition of solar absorber layer Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) were studied by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) method without using expensive vacuum facilities and followed by annealing. As compared to the other deposition methods, CBD method is interesting one because it is simple, reproducible, non-hazardous, cost effective and well suited for producing large-area thin films at low temperatures, although effect of precursors and concentration plays a vital role in the deposition. So, the central theme of this work is optimizing and controlling of chemical reactions for different chemical precursors. Further Effect of different chemical precursors i.e. sulphate and chloride is analyzed by structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) of annealed CZTS thin film revealed that films were polycrystalline in nature with kestarite tetragonal crystal structure. The Atomic Force micrographs (AFM) images indicated total coverage compact film and as well as growth of crystals. The band gap of annealed CZTS films was found in the range of optimal band gap by absorption spectroscopy.

  11. Chitosan-Based Nano-Embedded Microparticles: Impact of Nanogel Composition on Physicochemical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Paromita; Water, Jorrit J.; Bohr, Adam; Rantanen, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan-based nanogels have been widely applied as drug delivery vehicles. Spray-drying of said nanogels allows for the preparation of dry powder nano-embedded microparticles. In this work, chitosan-based nanogels composed of chitosan, alginate, and/or sodium tri-penta phosphate were investigated, particularly with respect to the impact of composition on the resulting physicochemical properties. Different compositions were obtained as nanogels with sizes ranging from 203 to 561 nm. The addition of alginate and exclusion of sodium tri-penta phosphate led to an increase in nanogel size. The nanogels were subsequently spray-dried to form nano-embedded microparticles with trehalose or mannitol as matrix excipient. The microparticles of different composition were mostly spherical with a smooth surface and a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 6–10 µm. Superior redispersibility was observed for microparticles containing amorphous trehalose. This study demonstrates the potential of nano-embedded microparticles for stabilization and delivery of nanogel-based delivery systems. PMID:28025505

  12. Impact of computational methods and spectral models on the retrieval of optical properties via spectral optimization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaohui; Li, Yonghong; Shang, Shaoping; Shang, Shaoling

    2013-03-11

    Spectral optimization algorithm (SOA) is a well-accepted scheme for the retrieval of water constituents from the measurement of ocean color radiometry. It defines an error function between the input and output remote sensing reflectance spectrum, with the latter modeled with a few variables that represent the optically active properties, while the variables are solved numerically by minimizing the error function. In this paper, with data from numerical simulations and field measurements as input, we evaluate four computational methods for minimization (optimization) for their efficiency and accuracy on solutions, and illustrate impact of bio-optical models on the retrievals. The four optimization routines are the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM), the Generalized Reduced Gradient (GRG), the Downhill Simplex Method (Amoeba), and the Simulated Annealing-Downhill Simplex (i.e. SA + Amoeba, hereafter abbreviated as SAA). The Garver-Siegel-Maritorena SOA model is used as a base to test these computational methods. It is observed that 1) LM is the fastest method, but SAA has the largest number of valid retrievals; 2) the quality of final solutions are strongly influenced by the forms of spectral models (or eigen functions); and 3) dynamically-varying eigen functions are necessary to obtain smaller errors for both reflectance spectrum and retrievals. Results of this study provide helpful guidance for the selection of a computational method and spectral models if an SOA scheme is to be used to process ocean color images.

  13. Glycoengineering of pertuzumab and its impact on the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Cheng; Chen, Song; Xu, Na; Wang, Chi; Sai, Wen bo; Zhao, Wei; Li, Ying chun; Hu, Xiao jing; Tian, Hong; Gao, Xiang dong; Yao, Wen bing

    2017-01-01

    Pertuzumab is an antihuman HER2 antibody developed for HER2 positive breast cancer. Glycosylation profiles are always the important issue for antibody based therapy. Previous findings have suggested the impact of glycosylation profiles on the function of antibodies, like pharmacodynamics, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). However, the roles of fucose and sialic acid in the function of therapeutic antibodies still need further investigation, especially the role of sialic acid in nonfucosylated antibodies. This study focused on the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of pertuzumab after glycoengineering. Herein, nonfucosylated pertuzumab was produced in CHOFUT8−/− cells, and desialylated pertuzumab was generated by enzymatic hydrolysis. Present data indicated that fucose was critical for ADCC activity by influencing the interaction between pertuzumab and FcγRIIIa, nevertheless removal of sialic acid increased the ADCC and CDC activity of pertuzumab. Meanwhile, regarding to sialic acid, sialidase hydrolysis directly resulted in asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs) dependent clearance in hepatic cells in vitro. The pharmacokinetic assay revealed that co-injection of asialofetuin can protect desialylated pertuzumab against ASGPRs-mediated clearance. Taken together, the present study elucidated the importance of fucose and sialic acid for pertuzumab, and also provided further understanding of the relationship of glycosylation/pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of therapeutic antibody. PMID:28397880

  14. Impact of Organic and Conventional Systems of Coffee Farming on Soil Properties and Culturable Microbial Diversity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken with an objective of evaluating the long-term impacts of organic (ORG) and conventional (CON) methods of coffee farming on soil physical, chemical, biological, and microbial diversity. Electrical conductivity and bulk density were found to increase by 34% and 21%, respectively, in CON compared to ORG system, while water holding capacity was found decreased in both the systems. Significant increase in organic carbon was observed in ORG system. Major nutrients, nitrogen and potassium, levels showed inclination in both ORG and CON system, but the trend was much more pronounced in CON system. Phosphorus was found to increase in both ORG and CON system, but its availability was found to be more with CON system. In biological attributes, higher soil respiration and fluorescein diacetate activity were recorded in ORG system compared to CON system. Higher soil urease activity was observed in CON system, while dehydrogenase activity does not show significant differences between ORG and CON systems. ORG system was found to have higher macrofauna (31.4%), microbial population (34%), and microbial diversity indices compared to CON system. From the present study, it is accomplished that coffee soil under long-term ORG system has better soil properties compared to CON system. PMID:27042378

  15. Impact of Simulated Microgravity on Cytoskeleton and Viscoelastic Properties of Endothelial Cell

    PubMed Central

    Janmaleki, M.; Pachenari, M.; Seyedpour, S. M.; Shahghadami, R.; Sanati-Nezhad, A.

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on the effects of simulated microgravity (s-μg) on mechanical properties, major cytoskeleton biopolymers, and morphology of endothelial cells (ECs). The structural and functional integrity of ECs are vital to regulate vascular homeostasis and prevent atherosclerosis. Furthermore, these highly gravity sensitive cells play a key role in pathogenesis of many diseases. In this research, impacts of s-μg on mechanical behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were investigated by utilizing a three-dimensional random positioning machine (3D-RPM). Results revealed a considerable drop in cell stiffness and viscosity after 24 hrs of being subjected to weightlessness. Cortical rigidity experienced relatively immediate and significant decline comparing to the stiffness of whole cell body. The cells became rounded in morphology while western blot analysis showed reduction of the main cytoskeletal components. Moreover, fluorescence staining confirmed disorganization of both actin filaments and microtubules (MTs). The results were compared statistically among test and control groups and it was concluded that s-μg led to a significant alteration in mechanical behavior of ECs due to remodeling of cell cytoskeleton. PMID:27581365

  16. Modeling the impact of conservation agriculture on crop production and soil properties in Mediterranean climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussadek, Rachid; Mrabet, Rachid; Dahan, Rachid; Laghrour, Malika; Lembiad, Ibtissam; ElMourid, Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    In Morocco, rainfed agriculture is practiced in the majority of agricultural land. However, the intensive land use coupled to the irregular rainfall constitutes a serious threat that affect country's food security. Conservation agriculture (CA) represents a promising alternative to produce more and sustainably. In fact, the direct seeding showed high yield in arid regions of Morocco but its extending to other more humid agro-ecological zones (rainfall > 350mm) remains scarce. In order to promote CA in Morocco, differents trials have been installed in central plateau of Morocco, to compare CA to conventional tillage (CT). The yields of the main practiced crops (wheat, lentil and checkpea) under CA and CT were analyzed and compared in the 3 soils types (Vertisol, Cambisol and Calcisol). Also, we studied the effect of CA on soil organic matter (SOM) and soil losses (SL) in the 3 different sites. The APSIM model was used to model the long term impact of CA compared to CT. The results obtained in this research have shown favorable effects of CA on crop production, SOM and soil erosion. Key words: Conservation agriculture, yield, soil properties, modeling, APSIM, Morocco.

  17. Variability of aerosol optical depth and their impact on cloud properties in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Khan; Khan, Rehana; Blaschke, Thomas; Mukhtiar, Azam

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes seasonal and temporal variations in aerosol optical depth (AOD), and the impact of these variations on the properties of clouds over five cities in Pakistan, using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, obtained from the Terra satellite during the period (2001-2011). The obtained results indicated seasonal variation in AOD, with a high value of 2.3, in summer and low values of 0.2, in winter for the costal part of the region. The relationship between AOD and other cloud parameters, namely water vapor (WV), cloud fraction (CF), cloud optical thickness (COT), cloud liquid water path (CLWP), cloud top temperature (CTT), and cloud top pressure (CTP) were analyzed. On a temporal scale, latitudinal variations of both WV and AOD produce high correlations (>0.6) in some regions, and moderate correlations (0.4-0.6) in the other regions. An increasing trend in CF with AOD was found over urban regions in the period of observations. The CF values were higher for Lahore than the other selected regions during the whole period. During autumn and winter seasons the correlation was found to be positive between AOD and CLWP, while negative correlation was observed during the other seasons for all the selected regions. COT showed negative correlation with AOD at all locations except Karachi during spring and summer seasons.

  18. Impact of preparation conditions on the magnetocaloric properties of Gd thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, H. F.; Belyea, D. D.; Willman, J. T.; Hendryx, C. J.; Miller, C. W.

    2012-02-01

    The impact of the deposition temperature and gettering were investigated on Ta(5nm)/Gd(30nm)/Ta(5nm) thin films' magneto caloric(MCE) properties. The samples were grown by magnetron at temperatures up to 600 C, with and without gettering. Structure of the samples was investigated by X-ray diffraction and ray reflectivity. The isothermal magnetization of the samples was above and below the Curie temperature of the Gd. The entropy change associated with the second order phasewas calculated from M(H,T) using the thermodynamic Maxwell. Increasing the deposition temperature generally improves entropy peak (magnitude, FWHM, and temperature of the peak), but leads to significant oxidation. The ungettered sample grown at00 C was purely GdO (111). Gettering the chamber by sputtering Tathe walls of the chamber for 30 minutes prior to deposition this oxidation issue, and increased the relative cooling power RCP) of films grown at elevated temperatures. The RCP values of the sample set were increased by as much as 42% over ungettered. Supported by AFOSR and NSF.

  19. Impact of Intellectual Property Laws on Part-Time Faculty. The Effective Voice for You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duby, James R., Jr.

    This guide explains some of the intellectual property rights of part-time college faculty members and the circumstances under which faculty can defend intellectual property rights. The term "intellectual property" refers to proprietary information, materials, or products, the owner of which may possess intellectual property rights under trademark,…

  20. Impact of Intellectual Property Laws on Part-Time Faculty. The Effective Voice for You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duby, James R., Jr.

    This guide explains some of the intellectual property rights of part-time college faculty members and the circumstances under which faculty can defend intellectual property rights. The term "intellectual property" refers to proprietary information, materials, or products, the owner of which may possess intellectual property rights under trademark,…

  1. Impact of land management on soil structure and soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodesova, Radka; Jirku, Veronika; Nikodem, Antonin; Muhlhanselova, Marcela; Zigova, Anna

    2010-05-01

    Study is focused on a comparison of a soil structure and soil hydraulic properties within soil profiles of a same soil type under different land management. Study was performed in Haplic Luvisol in Hnevceves the Czech Republic. Two soil profiles, which were in close distance from each other, were chosen: 1. under the conventional tillage, 2. under the permanent (30 years) grass cover. Soil sampling and field experiments were carried out immediately after the harvest of winter barley in 2008. The micromorphological images were used to evaluate the soil structure of all Ap, Bt1, Bt2 and C diagnostic horizons. The hydraulic properties of the diagnostic horizons were studied in the laboratory using multistep outflow experiments performed on the undisturbed 100-cm3 soil samples. A tension disc infiltrometer (with a disc radius of 10 cm) and minidisc tension infiltrometers (with a disc radius of 2.2 cm) were used to measure cumulative water infiltration under unsaturated conditions created using a pressure head of -2 cm. Measurements were performed at a depths of 5, 45, 75 and 110 cm, which corresponded to the Ap, Bt1, Bt2 and C horizons of studied Haplic Luvisol at both locations. The Guelph permeameter was used to measure cumulative water flux under surface ponding conditions. The depth of the drilled well was 10, 50, 80 and 115 cm, the well radius was 3 cm, and the well ponding depth was 5 cm. Both tests were used to evaluate hydraulic conductivity (K for h=-2cm, and Ks) values. Results showed, that while properties in the Bt2 and C horizons of both soil profiles were relatively similar, properties in the Ap and Bt1 horizons were different. The fraction of gravitational pores (which may cause preferential flow) in the Ap and Bt1 horizons of the soil profile under the convectional tillage was large than those in the Ap and Bt1 horizons of the soil profile under the permanent grass. This influenced for instance the Ks values measured using the Guelph permeametr. The Ks

  2. Delamination Effect on Impact Properties of Ultrafine-Grained Low-Carbon Steel Processed by Warm Caliber Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Tadanobu; Yin, Fuxing; Kimura, Yuuji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki; Ochiai, Shojiro

    2010-02-01

    Bulk ultrafine-grained (UFG) low-carbon steel bars were produced by caliber rolling, and the impact and tensile properties were investigated. Initial samples with two different microstructures, ferrite-pearlite and martensite (or bainite), were prepared and then caliber rolling was conducted at 500 °C. The microstructures in the rolled bars consisted of an elongated UFG structure with a strong α-fiber texture. The rolled bar consisting of spheroidal cementite particles that distributed uniformly in the elongated ferrite matrix of transverse grain sizes 0.8 to 1.0 μm exhibited the best strength-ductility balance and impact properties. Although the yield strength in the rolled bar increased 2.4 times by grain refinement, the upper-shelf energy did not change, and its value was maintained from 100 °C to -40 °C. In the rolled bars, cracks during an impact test branched parallel to the longitudinal direction of the test samples as temperatures decreased. Delamination caused by such crack branching appeared, remarkably, near the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). The effect of delamination on the impact properties was associated with crack propagation on the basis of the microstructural features in the rolled bars. In conclusion, the strength-toughness balance is improved by refining crystal grains and controlling their shape and orientation; in addition, delamination effectively enhances the low-temperature toughness.

  3. Aerosol Impacts on Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Stratocumulus Clouds in the Southeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Toohey, D. W.; Andrejczuk, M.; Anderson, J. R.; Adams, A.; Lytle, M.; George, R.; Wood, R.; Zuidema, P.; Leon, D.

    2011-12-01

    The southeast Pacific Ocean is covered by the world's largest stratocumulus cloud layer, which has a strong impact on ocean temperatures and climate in the region. The effect of anthropogenic sources of aerosol particles was investigated during the VOCALS field experiment. Aerosol measurements below and above cloud were made with a ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer and analytical electron microscopy. In addition to more standard in-cloud measurements, cloud droplets were collected and evaporated using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), and the non-volatile residual particles were analyzed. Many flights focused on the gradient in cloud properties along an E-W track from near the Chilean coast to remote areas offshore. Mean statistics from seven flights were compiled. Consistent with a continental source of cloud condensation nuclei, below-cloud accumulation-mode aerosol and droplet number concentration generally decreased from near shore to offshore. The effect extends ~800 to 1000 km from shore. The additional particles are mainly sulfates from anthropogenic sources. Liquid water content and drizzle concentration tended to increase with distance from shore, but exhibited much greater variability. Analysis of the droplet residual measurements showed that not only were there more residual nuclei near shore, but that they tended to be larger than those offshore. Single particle analysis over a broad particle size range was used to reveal types and sources of CCN, which were primarily sulfates near shore. Differences in the size distribution of droplet residual particles and ambient aerosol particles were observed due to the preferential activation of large aerosol particles. By progressively excluding small droplets from the CVI sample, we were able to show that the larger drops, which initiate drizzle, contain the largest aerosol particles. However, the scavenging efficiency is not sharp as expected from a simple parcel activation model. A wide range of

  4. Experimental Techniques for Evaluating the Effects of Aging on Impact and High Strain Rate Properties of Triaxial Braided Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Roberts, Gary D.; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Gilat, Amos; Matrka, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    An experimental program is underway to measure the impact and high strain rate properties of triaxial braided composite materials and to quantify any degradation in properties as a result of thermal and hygroscopic aging typically encountered during service. Impact tests are being conducted on flat panels using a projectile designed to induce high rate deformation similar to that experienced in a jet engine fan case during a fan blade-out event. The tests are being conducted on as-fabricated panels and panels subjected to various numbers of aging cycles. High strain rate properties are being measured using a unique Hopkinson bar apparatus that has a larger diameter than conventional Hopkinson bars. This larger diameter is needed to measure representative material properties because of the large unit cell size of the materials examined in this work. In this paper the experimental techniques used for impact and high strain rate testing are described and some preliminary results are presented for both as-fabricated and aged composites.

  5. Impact damage resistance and residual property assessment of (0/+/-45/90)s SCS-6/Timetal 21S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jennifer L.; Portanova, Marc A.; Johnson, W. Steven

    1995-01-01

    The impact damage resistance and residual mechanical properties of (0/ +/- 45/90)s SCS-6/Timetal 21S composites were evaluated. Both quasi-static indentation and drop-weight impact tests were used to investigate the impact behavior at two nominal energy levels (5.5 and 8.4 J) and determine the onset of internal damage. Through x-ray inspection, the extent of internal damage was characterized non-destructively. The composite strength and constant amplitude fatigue response were evaluated to assess the effects of the sustained damage. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize internal damage from impact in comparison to damage that occurs during mechanical loading alone. The effect of stacking sequence was examined by using specimens with the long dimension of the specimen both parallel (longitudinal) and perpendicular (transverse) to the 0 deg fiber direction. Damage in the form of longitudinal and transverse cracking occurred in all longitudinal specimens tested at energies greater than 6.3 J. Similar results occurred in the transverse specimens tested above 5.4 J. Initial load drop, characteristic of the onset of damage, occurred on average at 6.3 J in longitudinal specimens and at 5.0 J in transverse specimens. X-ray analysis showed broken fibers in the impacted region in specimens tested at the higher impact energies. At low impact energies, visible matrix cracking may occur, but broken fibers may not. Matrix cracking was noted along fiber swims and it appeared to depend on the surface quality of composite. At low impact energies, little damage has been incurred by the composite and the residual strength and residual life is not greatly reduced as compared to an undamaged composite. At higher impact energies, more damage occurred and a greater effect of the impact damage was observed.

  6. Impact of network activity on the integrative properties of neocortical pyramidal neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Destexhe, A; Paré, D

    1999-04-01

    During wakefulness, neocortical neurons are subjected to an intense synaptic bombardment. To assess the consequences of this background activity for the integrative properties of pyramidal neurons, we constrained biophysical models with in vivo intracellular data obtained in anesthetized cats during periods of intense network activity similar to that observed in the waking state. In pyramidal cells of the parietal cortex (area 5-7), synaptic activity was responsible for an approximately fivefold decrease in input resistance (Rin), a more depolarized membrane potential (Vm), and a marked increase in the amplitude of Vm fluctuations, as determined by comparing the same cells before and after microperfusion of tetrodotoxin (TTX). The model was constrained by measurements of Rin, by the average value and standard deviation of the Vm measured from epochs of intense synaptic activity recorded with KAc or KCl-filled pipettes as well as the values measured in the same cells after TTX. To reproduce all experimental results, the simulated synaptic activity had to be of relatively high frequency (1-5 Hz) at excitatory and inhibitory synapses. In addition, synaptic inputs had to be significantly correlated (correlation coefficient approximately 0.1) to reproduce the amplitude of Vm fluctuations recorded experimentally. The presence of voltage-dependent K+ currents, estimated from current-voltage relations after TTX, affected these parameters by <10%. The model predicts that the conductance due to synaptic activity is 7-30 times larger than the somatic leak conductance to be consistent with the approximately fivefold change in Rin. The impact of this massive increase in conductance on dendritic attenuation was investigated for passive neurons and neurons with voltage-dependent Na+/K+ currents in soma and dendrites. In passive neurons, correlated synaptic bombardment had a major influence on dendritic attenuation. The electrotonic attenuation of simulated synaptic inputs was

  7. The Impacts of Thermal and Smouldering Remediation on Soil Properties Related to Rehabilitation and Plant Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, A.; Knapp, C.; Switzer, C.

    2012-04-01

    Tens of thousands of sites worldwide are contaminated with toxic non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) reducing their economic and environmental value. As a result a number of treatments involving heat and smouldering have been developed to desorb and extract or destroy these contaminants including; steam injection (<110°C), electrical heating (<110°C), microwave heating (ambient to 400°C),conductive heating (ambient to 800°C) and in-situ smouldering (800°C to 1200°C). Implemented correctly these treatments are efficient enough for the soil to be safe for use, but the heating may unintentionally reduce the capability of the soil to act as a growing media. To investigate the effects of elevated temperature soils samples were heated at fixed temperatures (ambient to 1000°C) for one hour or smouldered after artificial contamination. Temperatures up to 105°C resulted in very little change in soil properties but at 250°C nutrients became more available. At 500°C little organic matter or nitrogen remained in the soil and clay sized particles started to decompose and aggregate. By 1000°C total and available phosphorus were very low, cation exchange capacity had been reduced, pH had increased and the clay fraction had been completely lost. Similar changes were observed in smouldered soils with variations dependent upon remediation conditions. As a result the smouldered soils will require nutrient supplementation to facilitate plant growth. Nutrient addition will also improve the physical properties of the soil and serve to re-inoculate it with microbes, particularly if an organic source such as compost or sewage sludge is used. The soils may remain effective growing media during lower temperature treatments; however some sort of soil inoculant would also be beneficial as these temperatures are sufficient to sterilise the system, which may impact nutrient cycling. Further work involving months-long exposure to the elevated temperatures that are typical of thermal

  8. The German 19-item version of the Child Oral Health Impact Profile: translation and psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Sierwald, Ira; John, Mike T; Sagheri, Darius; Neuschulz, Julia; Schüler, Elisabeth; Splieth, Christian; Jost-Brinkmann, Paul-Georg; Reissmann, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    This study seeks to develop and validate the 19-item German version of the Child Oral Health Impact Profile (COHIP-G19), an instrument to assess the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in children and adolescents. The 19 items of the original English-language COHIP were translated into German using an established forward-backward approach. For the assessment of the psychometric properties of the COHIP-G19, children and adolescents aged 7-17 years came from two samples: 112 patients were consecutively recruited at a university-based orthodontic clinic and 313 came from a convenience sample of students in public schools. Internal consistency of the COHIP-G19 was satisfactory in both populations (Cronbach's alpha, 0.78/0.80; average inter-item correlation, 0.16/0.17). The COHIP-G19 summary scores were correlated in the expected direction with a global oral health rating (r = 0.46/0.40) and two measures for perceived general health (EQ-5D-Y: r = 0.26/0.29; KIDSCREEN-27: r = 0.40/0.33). While COHIP-G19 summary scores did not significantly differ with respect to the presence of caries or gingivitis (p > 0.05), malocclusion and insufficient oral hygiene behavior were related to more impaired OHRQoL, represented in significantly lower COHIP-G19 summary scores in students in public schools (p < 0.05), but not in orthodontic patients. While this study revealed some potential to improve reliability and validity in scores of the German version of the COHIP-19, overall, the study proved the instrument has sufficient psychometric properties and is well comparable to the original English-language version. The COHIP-G19 is a valid and reliable instrument to assess OHRQoL in German children and adolescents in clinical and community settings.

  9. Land-use change impacts on soil hydrological properties and overland flow in Mediterranean periurban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Carla S. S.; Ferreira, António J. D.; Walsh, Rory P. D.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.; Coelho, Celeste O. A.

    2014-05-01

    Urbanization leads to significant land-surface changes that affect soil properties and hydrological processes. Understanding landscape pattern and its impact on flow connectivity is still a challenge. In relation to a catchment undergoing active peri-urbanization, this paper aims to: 1) assess the spatiotemporal variability of soil hydrological properties in different land-uses; 2) understand how overland flow processes and spatial patterns change with season and weather; 3) discuss the impact of landscape pattern on flow connectivity and urban planning in order to prevent flood hazards. The study has been carried out in a Portuguese periurban catchment (620ha) with a sub-humid Mediterranean climate and part-limestone, part-sandstone lithology. Due to its proximity to the expanding city of Coimbra, the urban area increased from 6% to 30% between 1958 and 2009, and this trend is expected to continue. Currently the catchment is dominated by forest (62%), with only 8% under agriculture. Repeat field surveys and hydrological monitoring provided data to assess spatiotemporal dynamics of overland flow for different land-uses. Measurements of moisture content, hydrophobicity and infiltration capacity were carried out at 31 sites under different land-uses on nine occasions over a one-year period. Overland flow in eucalypt, oak and scrub forest was measured using 8mx2m runoff plots from Autumn 2010 (3 plots per forest type). Five raingauges and nine water-level recorders provided continuous records of hydrological data for upstream sub-catchments and the catchment outlet. The results showed spatiotemporal variations in hydrological processes and responses with land-use and geology. In dry weather, urban soils were hydrophilic and soil matrix infiltration capacity reached 12mm/h, while soils under forest and agriculture were hydrophobic and infiltration capacities were only 3-6 mm/h. In agricultural and scrub areas, hydrophobicity was easier to break down after rainfall

  10. Quantifying the impact of lithology upon the mechanical properties of rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherley, Dion

    2013-04-01

    The physical characteristics of rock, its lithology, undoubtedly influences its deformation under natural or engineering loads. Mineral texture, micro-damage, joints, bedding planes, inclusions, unconformities and faults are all postulated to alter the mechanical response of rock on different scales and under different stressing conditions. Whilst laboratory studies have elucidated some aspects of the relationship between lithology and mechanical properties, these small-scale results are difficult to extrapolate to lithospheric scales. To augment laboratory-derived knowledge, physics-based numerical modelling is a promising avenue [3]. Bonded particle models implemented using the Discrete Element Method (DEM [1]) are a practical numerical laboratory to investigate the interplay between lithology and the mechanical response of rock specimens [4]. Numerical rock specimens are represented as an assembly of indivisible spherical particles connected to nearest neighbours via brittle-elastic beams which impart forces and moments upon one-another as particles move relative to each other. By applying boundary forces and solving Newton's Laws for each particle, elastic deformation and brittle failure may be simulated [2]. Each beam interaction is defined by four model parameters: Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, cohesive strength and internal friction angle. Beam interactions in different subvolumes of the specimen are assigned different parameters to model different rock types or mineral assemblages. Micro-cracks, joints, unconformities and faults are geometrically incorporated by fitting particles to either side of triangulated surfaces [5]. The utility of this modelling approach is verified by reproducing analytical results from fracture mechanics (Griffith crack propagation and wing-crack formation) and results of controlled laboratory investigations. To quantify the impact of particular lithologic structures on mechanical response, a range of control experiments are

  11. Impact of controlled particle size nanofillers on the mechanical properties of segmented polyurethane nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Finnigan, Bradley; Casey, Phil; Cookson, David; Halley, Peter; Jack, Kevin; Truss, Rowan; Martin, Darren

    2008-04-02

    The impact of average layered silicate particle size on the mechanical properties of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) nanocomposites has been investigated. At fixed addition levels (3 wt% organosilicate), an increase in average particle size resulted in an increase in stiffness. Negligible stiffening was observed for the smallest particles (30 nm) due to reduced long-range intercalation and molecular confinement, as well as ineffective stress transfer from matrix to filler. At low strain ({le}100%), an increase in filler particle size was associated with an increase in the rate of stress relaxation, tensile hysteresis, and permanent set. At high strain (1200%), two coexisting relaxation processes were observed. The rate of the slower (long-term) relaxation process, which is believed to primarily involve the hard segment rich structures, decreased on addition of particles with an average diameter of 200 nm or less. At high strain the tensile hysteresis was less sensitive to particle size, however the addition of particles with an average size of 200 nm or more caused a significant increase in permanent set. This was attributed to slippage of temporary bonds at the polymer-filler interface, and to the formation of voids at the sites of unaligned tactoids. Relative to the host TPU, the addition of particles with an average size of 30 nm caused a reduction in permanent set. This is a significant result because the addition of fillers to elastomers has long been associated with an increase in hysteresis and permanent set. At high strain, well dispersed and aligned layered silicates with relatively small interparticle distances and favourable surface interactions are capable of imparting a resistance to molecular slippage throughout the TPU matrix.

  12. Complexation of buffer constituents with neutral complexation agents: part I. Impact on common buffer properties.

    PubMed

    Riesová, Martina; Svobodová, Jana; Tošner, Zdeněk; Beneš, Martin; Tesařová, Eva; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2013-09-17

    The complexation of buffer constituents with the complexation agent present in the solution can very significantly influence the buffer properties, such as pH, ionic strength, or conductivity. These parameters are often crucial for selection of the separation conditions in capillary electrophoresis or high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and can significantly affect results of separation, particularly for capillary electrophoresis as shown in Part II of this paper series (Beneš, M.; Riesová, M.; Svobodová, J.; Tesařová, E.; Dubský, P.; Gaš, B. Anal. Chem. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/ac401381d). In this paper, the impact of complexation of buffer constituents with a neutral complexation agent is demonstrated theoretically as well as experimentally for the model buffer system composed of benzoic acid/LiOH or common buffers (e.g., CHES/LiOH, TAPS/LiOH, Tricine/LiOH, MOPS/LiOH, MES/LiOH, and acetic acid/LiOH). Cyclodextrins as common chiral selectors were used as model complexation agents. We were not only able to demonstrate substantial changes of pH but also to predict the general complexation characteristics of selected compounds. Because of the zwitterion character of the common buffer constituents, their charged forms complex stronger with cyclodextrins than the neutral ones do. This was fully proven by NMR measurements. Additionally complexation constants of both forms of selected compounds were determined by NMR and affinity capillary electrophoresis with a very good agreement of obtained values. These data were advantageously used for the theoretical descriptions of variations in pH, depending on the composition and concentration of the buffer. Theoretical predictions were shown to be a useful tool for deriving some general rules and laws for complexing systems.

  13. Short-term sustainability of drainage water reuse: spatio-temporal impacts on soil chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Corwin, Dennis L; Lesch, Scott M; Oster, James D; Kaffka, Stephen R

    2008-01-01

    Greater urban demand for finite water resources, increased frequency of drought resulting from erratic weather, and increased pressure to reduce drainage water volumes have intensified the need to reuse drainage water. A study was initiated in 1999 on a 32.4-ha saline-sodic field (Lethent clay loam series; fine, montmorillonitic, thermic, Typic Natrargid) located on the west side of California's San Joaquin Valley (WSJV) with the objective of evaluating the sustainability of drainage water reuse with respect to impact on soil quality. An evaluation after 5 yr of irrigation with drainage water is presented. Geo-referenced measurements of apparent soil electrical conductivity (EC(a)) were used to direct soil sampling at 40 sites to characterize the spatial variability of soil properties (i.e., salinity, Se, Na, B, and Mo) crucial to the soil's intended use of growing Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon (l.) Pers.) for livestock consumption. Soil samples were taken at 0.3-m increments to a depth of 1.2 m at each site in August 1999, April 2002, and November 2004. Drainage water varying in salinity (0.8-16.2 dS m(-1)), SAR (5.4-52.4), Mo (80-400 microg L(-1)), and Se (<1-700 microg L(-1)) was applied to the field since July 2000. An analysis of the general temporal trend shows that overall soil quality has improved due to leaching of B from the top 0.6 m of soil; salinity and Na from the top 1.2 m, but primarily from 0 to 0.6 m; and Mo from the top 1.2 m. Short-term sustainability of drainage water reuse is supported by the results.

  14. Magnetic Properties of the Chicxulub Impact Breccia Sequence in UNAM-5 Borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, M.; Fucugauchi, J. U.

    2013-05-01

    The Chicxulub crater (65.5 Ma, at the K/Pg limit) is one of the big impact structures (~200 km rim diameter) in the terrestrial record and the only one that preserves the ejecta deposits. The ejecta formed by melt mixing and dynamic vaporized from the impact site and bolide. The ejecta plume with hot gases and solid debris were expanded to great velocities, the collapse of these resulted in the proximal fill deposits that record information on transport and emplacement. Their study allows investigating the emplacement mode and collapsing from the fireball. Chicxulub crater is located in Yucatan carbonate platform. As part of the scientific drilling in Chicxulub, it was drilled five wells: UNAM-1 to UNAM-5 in 1994. One year later, three wells were drilled more: UNAM-6 to UNAM-8. The wells that intercepted impact breccia were UNAM-5, UNAM-6 and UNAM-7. The UNAM-5 borehole is located 110 km radial distance from crater center. This study was carried out in the impactites section measuring the magnetic properties. The breccias section is made up of 172m thick (332-504m of depth), divided in 4 lithologic units. Unit 1 is a suevitic breccia with clay matrix. Unit 2, suevitic breccia with melt matrix. Unit 3, suevitic breccia with vitreous and clay matrix. Unit 4 is a suevitic breccia with melt matrix. The susceptibility varies from 100 to 2000x10(-6)SI with some values greater than 5000x10(-6)SI and from the beginning the susceptibility shows a variable behavior with values minors than 1000x10(-6)SI. At 450m to the 504 m, the susceptibility increase and it is better grouped. The NRM presents a very variable behavior from the beginnig of this section to 410 m. At 440m their values increase and it behavior is more regular than the principle. The NRM shows values between 0 to 0.6 A/m although most are in the range (0.0 - 0.15A/m). AF and thermal demagnetizations were carried on 29 specimens. The Zigderveld diagrams for thermal and AF demagnetization showed several

  15. Modeling the Impacts of Spatial Heterogeneity in the Castor Watershed on Runoff, Sediment, and Phosphorus Loss Using SWAT: I. Impacts of Spatial Variability of Soil Properties.

    PubMed

    Boluwade, Alaba; Madramootoo, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Spatial accuracy of hydrologic modeling inputs influences the output from hydrologic models. A pertinent question is to know the optimal level of soil sampling or how many soil samples are needed for model input, in order to improve model predictions. In this study, measured soil properties were clustered into five different configurations as inputs to the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) simulation of the Castor River watershed (11-km(2) area) in southern Quebec, Canada. SWAT is a process-based model that predicts the impacts of climate and land use management on water yield, sediment, and nutrient fluxes. SWAT requires geographical information system inputs such as the digital elevation model as well as soil and land use maps. Mean values of soil properties are used in soil polygons (soil series); thus, the spatial variability of these properties is neglected. The primary objective of this study was to quantify the impacts of spatial variability of soil properties on the prediction of runoff, sediment, and total phosphorus using SWAT. The spatial clustering of the measured soil properties was undertaken using the regionalized with dynamically constrained agglomerative clustering and partitioning method. Measured soil data were clustered into 5, 10, 15, 20, and 24 heterogeneous regions. Soil data from the Castor watershed which have been used in previous studies was also set up and termed "Reference". Overall, there was no significant difference in runoff simulation across the five configurations including the reference. This may be attributable to SWAT's use of the soil conservation service curve number method in flow simulation. Therefore having high spatial resolution inputs for soil data may not necessarily improve predictions when they are used in hydrologic modeling.

  16. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    Several court cases involving acquisition, use, and disposal of property by institutions of higher education are briefly summarized in this chapter. Cases discussed touch on such topics as municipal annexation of university property; repurchase of properties temporarily allocated to faculty members; implications of zoning laws and zoning board…

  17. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    Several court cases involving acquisition, use, and disposal of property by institutions of higher education are briefly summarized in this chapter. Cases discussed touch on such topics as municipal annexation of university property; repurchase of properties temporarily allocated to faculty members; implications of zoning laws and zoning board…

  18. Impacts of the Cerro Grande fire on Homestead era and Manhattan Project properties at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    McGehee, E. D.; Isaacson, J.

    2001-01-01

    In May of 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned approximately 8,000 acres of Department of Energy (DOE) managed land at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Although the fire was generally of low intensity, it impacted a significant number of LANL's cultural resources. Historic wooden properties were affected more heavily than prehistoric archaeological sites. This paper will provide an overview of the Homestead and Manhattan Project Periods at LANL and will discuss the effects of the Cerro Grande Fire on historic wooden properties. Post-fire cultural resource management issues will also be discussed.

  19. The Impact of Specific Prior Experiences on Infants' Extension of Animal Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furrer, Stephanie D.; Younger, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the influence of prior exposure to specific animal properties on 15-month-old infants' inductive generalization. Using picture books, 29 infants were trained on properties linked in a congruent or incongruent manner with four animal categories. A generalized imitation task was then administered to assess patterns of property extension…

  20. Effect of Ultrasonic Treatment on The Tensile and Impact Properties of Thermoplastic Natural Rubber Nanocomposites Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Tarawneh, Mou'ad A.; Ahmad, Sahrim Hj.; Rasid, Rozaidi; Yahya, S. Y.

    2009-06-01

    This study investigates the effect of ultrasonic treatment on the mechanical properties of thermoplastic natural rubber (TPNR) nanocomposites reinforced with multi-walled nanotubes. The TPNR nanocomposites were prepared using melt blending method from polypropylene (PP), natural rubber (NR) and liquid natural rubber (LNR) as a compatibilizer, respectively, with 1% of Multi-wall nanotubes. The nanocomposite was prepared using the indirect technique (IDT) with the optimum processing parameters at 180 deg. C with 80 rpm mixing speed and 11 minutes processing time. The results have showed that the good dispersion on nanotubes was achieved by ultrasonic treatment. The optimization of ultrasonic time indicated that the maximum tensile and impact properties occurred with 1 h ultrasonic treatment. The Young's modulus, tensile strength, elongation at break and impact strength have increased by almost 11%, 21%, 43% and 50%, respectively. The results from our study indicate that nanotubes have as excellent reinforcement filler in TPNR matrix.

  1. Charpy Impact Properties of Reduced-Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels Irradiated in HFIR up to 20 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Tanigawa, H.; Shiba, K.; Sokolov, M.A.; Klueh, R.L.

    2003-07-15

    The effects of irradiation up to 20 dpa on the Charpy impact properties of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFs) were investigated. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of F82H-IEA shifted up to around 323K. TIG weldments of F82H showed a fairly small variation on their impact properties. A finer prior austenite grain size in F82H-IEA after a different heat treatment resulted in a 20K lower DBTT compared to F82H-IEA after the standard heat treatment, and that effect was maintained even after irradiation. Helium effects were investigated utilizing Ni-doped F82H, but no obvious evidence of helium effects was obtained. ORNL9Cr-2WVTa and JLF-1 steels showed smaller DBTT shifts compared to F82H-IEA.

  2. Enchasing the mechanical properties of heavy pseudo-alloys of tungsten by high-voltage electric pulse impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, N. S.; Bashlykov, S. S.; Grigoriev, E. G.; Golstev, V. I.

    2017-07-01

    The article presents a study of the effect of the high-voltage electric pulse modes of impact under pressure on the structural and mechanical properties of compacts of heavy tungsten alloy VNZh 7-3. Identified an increase in density of material, in microhardness and tensile strength with voltage increase in high-voltage discharge. The optimum exposure mode determinate, which provides the highest level of strength and ductility of the sintered material.

  3. Supplemental Information For: Asymmetric Distribution of Lunar Impact Basins Caused by Variations in Target Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miljkovic, Katarina; Wieczorek, Mark; Collins, Gareth S.; Laneuville, Matthieu; Neumann, Gregory A.; Melosh, H. Jay; Solomon, Sean C.; Phillips, Roger J.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2014-01-01

    Maps of crustal thickness derived from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission revealed more large impact basins on the nearside hemisphere of the Moon than on its farside. The enrichment in heat-producing elements and prolonged volcanic activity on the lunar nearside hemisphere indicate that the temperature of the nearside crust and uppermantle was hotter than that of the farside at the time of basin formation. Using the iSALE-2D hydrocode to model impact basin formation, we found that impacts on the hotter nearside would have formed basins up to two times larger than similar impacts on the cooler farside hemisphere. The size distribution of lunar impact basins is thus not representative of the earliest inner Solar system impact bombardment

  4. Asymmetric Distribution of Lunar Impact Basins Caused by Variations in Target Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miljkovic, Katarina; Wieczorek, Mark A.; Collins, Gareth S.; Laneuville, Matthieu; Neumann, Gregory A.; Melosh, H. Jay; Solomon, Sean C.; Phillips, Roger J.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2014-01-01

    Maps of crustal thickness derived from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission revealed more large impact basins on the nearside hemisphere of the Moon than on its farside. The enrichment in heat-producing elements and prolonged volcanic activity on the lunar nearside hemisphere indicate that the temperature of the nearside crust and upper mantle was hotter than that of the farside at the time of basin formation. Using the iSALE-2D hydrocode to model impact basin formation, we found that impacts on the hotter nearside would have formed basins up to two times larger than similar impacts on the cooler farside hemisphere. The size distribution of lunar impact basins is thus not representative of the earliest inner Solar system impact bombardment.

  5. Recovery of soil physical properties and microbiology in foresty drained peatlands from the impact of forest machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepilin, Dmitrii; Kimura, Bryn; Uusitalo, Jori; Laiho, Raija; Fritze, Hannu; Lauren, Ari; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina

    2016-04-01

    Forestry-drained peatlands occupy approximately 5.7 million ha and represent almost one fourth of the total forest surface in Finland. They are subjected to the same silvicultural harvesting operations as upland forests. However, although the potential of timber harvesting to cause detrimental effects on soil is well documented in upland forests, the knowledge on environmental impact of harvesting machinery on peat soils is still lacking. To assess the impact of harvesting machines on peat physical properties and biology we collected soil samples from six peatland forests that were harvested by commonly employed Harvester and Forwarder. Samples were taken from trails formed by harvesting machinery (treatment plots) and outside of trails (control plots unaffected by machinery traffic) to a depth of 15 cm. To adders the recovery of soil properties after disturbance we sampled sites that form a chronosequence in respect to time since harvesting: 1 month (class I), 3-4 years (class II) and 14-15 years (class III). The physical and microbiological properties of soil samples were analyzed in laboratory. Harvesting operations with heavy machinery appeared to significantly increase the bulk density of peat in the machines' trails at recently harvested sites in comparison to control plots. Following change in bulk density there was change of pore size distribution with decreasing macrospores quantity. This led to slight decrease of total porosity and decrease of air filled porosity. Water retention capacity increased with increasing bulk density. CO2 evolution increased in the trails of class I site with where dissolved organic carbon concurrently decreased. While there was not impact of harvesting on microbial biomass or carbon, PLFA analysis indicated that machinery traffic caused a shift in microbial community structure. Results of class II and class III sites showed a recovery of physical properties within 16 years: treatment plots and control plots started to resemble

  6. Effects of curing type, silica fume fineness, and fiber length on the mechanical properties and impact resistance of UHPFRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arel, Hasan Şahan

    The effects of silica fume fineness and fiber aspect ratio on the compressive strength and impact resistance of ultra high-performance fiber-reinforced concrete (UHPFRC) are investigated experimentally. To this end, UHPFRC mixtures are manufactured by combining silica fumes with different fineness (specific surface areas: 17,200, 20,000, and 27,600 m2/kg) and hooked-end steel fibers with various aspect ratios (lengths: 8, 13, and 16 mm). The samples are subjected to standard curing, steam curing, and hot-water curing. Compressive strength tests are conducted after 7-, 28-, 56-, and 90-day curing periods, and an impact resistance experiment is performed after the 90th day. A steam-cured mixture of silica fumes with a specific surface area of 27,600 m2/kg and 16-mm-long fibers produce better results than the other mixtures in terms of mechanical properties. Moreover, impact resistance increases with the fiber aspect ratio.

  7. Impact properties of 304L stainless steel GTAW joints evaluated by high strain rate of compression tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woei-Shyan; Lin, Chi-Feng; Liu, Chen-Yang; Tzeng, Fan-Tzung

    2004-12-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the high velocity impact of 304L stainless steel gas tungsten arc welded (GTAW) joints at strain rates between 10-3 and 7.5 × 103 s-1 using a compressive split-Hopkinson bar. The results show that the impact properties and fracture characteristics of the tested weldments depend strongly on applied strain rate. This rate-dependent behavior is in good agreement with model predictions using the hybrid Zerilli-Armstrong constitutive law. It is determined that the tested weldments fail as a result of adiabatic shearing. The fracture surfaces of the fusion zone and base metal regions are characterized by the presence of elongated dimples. The variation in the observed dimple features with strain rate is consistent with the results of the impact stress-strain curves.

  8. Evaluating the impacts of caprock and reservoir properties on potential risk of CO2 leakage after injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Z.; Murray, C. J.; Rockhold, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    Numerical models are essential tools for CO2 sequestration projects and should be included in the life cycle of a project. Common practice involves modeling the behavior of CO2 during and after injection using site-specific reservoir and caprock properties. Little has been done to systematically evaluate and compare the effects of a realistic range of reservoir and caprock properties on potential CO2 leakage through caprock. Broad-based research addressing the impacts of caprock properties and their heterogeneity on seal permeation is absent. Efforts along this direction require obtaining information about the physically reasonable range of caprock and reservoir properties, effectively sampling the parameter space to fully explore the range of these properties, and performing flow and transport calculations using reliable numerical simulators. In this study, we identify the most important factors affecting CO2 leakage through intact caprock and try to understand the underlying mechanisms. We use caprock and reservoir properties from various field sites and literature data to identify the range of caprock thickness, permeability, and porosity that might occur. We use a quasi Monte Carlo sampling approach to ensure that the full range of caprock and seal properties is evaluated without introducing bias. For each set of sampled properties, the migration of injected CO2 is simulated for up to 200 years using the water-salt-CO2 operational mode of the STOMP simulator, developed by PNNL. Preliminary results show that critical factors determining CO2 leakage rate through intact caprock are, in decreasing order of significance, the caprock thickness, caprock permeability, reservoir permeability, reservoir porosity, and caprock porosity. This study provides a relatively complete “look-up table” for potential CO2 leakage risk due to permeation of intact caprock, and identifies a range of acceptable seal thicknesses and permeability for sequestration projects. This

  9. Influence of microstructure on impact properties of 9-18%Cr ODS steels for fusion/fission applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadraba, H.; Fournier, B.; Stratil, L.; Malaplate, J.; Rouffié, A.-L.; Wident, P.; Ziolek, L.; Béchade, J.-L.

    2011-04-01

    The paper describes the influence of the microstructure (coming from the extrusion shape, the chemical composition and the thermo-mechanical treatments) of (9-18%)Cr-W-Ti-Y 2O 3 ODS steels on their impact fracture properties. The extrusion shape plays a major role on the impact properties, materials extruded as a rod present a higher upper shelf energy (USE) and a lower ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) compared to materials extruded as plates. The DBTT for the non-recrystallized 14%Cr ferritic steels was shifted towards higher temperatures compared to the 9%Cr tempered ferritic-martensitic steel. Increasing the W and Ti content in 9%Cr tempered ferritic-martensitic ODS steel leads to a USE and a DBTT shifted towards higher energies and higher temperatures respectively. Increasing the yttria content leads to a drop of the impact energy and a shift of the DBTT of ferritic ODS steel towards higher temperatures. The present study highlights extensive splitting of the fracture surfaces and a dependency of the impact energy on the fracture plane orientation according to the microstructure anisotropy.

  10. JV Task 117 - Impact of Lignite Properties on Powerspan's NOx Oxidation System

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Tolbert; Steven Benson

    2008-02-29

    Powerspan's multipollutant control process called electrocatalytic oxidation (ECO) technology is designed to simultaneously remove SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, PM{sub 2.5}, acid gases (such as hydrogen fluoride [HF], hydrochloric acid [HCl], and sulfur trioxide [SO{sub 3}]), Hg, and other metals from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. The core of this technology is a dielectric barrier discharge reactor composed of cylindrical quartz electrodes residing in metal tubes. Electrical discharge through the flue gas, passing between the electrode and the tube, produces reactive O and OH radicals. The O and OH radicals react with flue gas components to oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} and HNO{sub 3} and a small portion of the SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The oxidized compounds are subsequently removed in a downstream scrubber and wet electrostatic precipitator. A challenging characteristic of selected North Dakota lignites is their high sodium content. During high-sodium lignite combustion and gas cooling, the sodium vaporizes and condenses to produce sodium- and sulfur-rich aerosols. Based on past work, it was hypothesized that the sodium aerosols would deposit on and react with the silica electrodes and react with the silica electrodes, resulting in the formation of sodium silicate. The deposit and reacted surface layer would then electrically alter the electrode, thus impacting its dielectric properties and NO{sub x} conversion capability. The purpose of this project was to determine the impact of lignite-derived flue gas containing sodium aerosols on Powerspan's dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor with specific focus on the interaction with the quartz electrodes. Partners in the project were Minnkota Power Cooperative; Basin Electric Power Cooperative; Montana Dakota Utilities Co.; Minnesota Power; the North Dakota Industrial Commission, the Lignite Energy Council, and the Lignite Research Council; the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC); and

  11. Subtask 12F4: Effects of neutron irradiation on the impact properties and fracture behavior of vanadium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    Up-to-date results on the effects of neutron irradiation on the impact properties and fracture behavior of V, V-Ti, V-Cr-Ti and V-Ti-Si alloys are presented in this paper, with an emphasis on the behavior of the U.S. reference alloys V-4Cr-4Ti containing 500-1000 wppm Si. Database on impact energy and cluctile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) has been established from Charpy impact tests of one-third-size specimens irradiated at 420{degrees}C-600{degrees}C up to {approx}50 dpa in lithium environment in fast fission reactors. To supplement the Charpy impact tests fracture behavior was also characterized by quantitative SEM fractography on miniature tensile and disk specimens that were irradiated to similar conditions and fractured at -196{degrees}C to 200{degrees}C by multiple bending. For similar irradiation conditions irradiation-induced increase in DBTT was influenced most significantly by Cr content, indicating that irradiation-induced clustering of Cr atoms takes place in high-Cr (Cr {ge} 7 wt.%) alloys. When combined contents of Cr and Ti were {le}10 wt.%, effects of neutron irradiation on impact properties and fracture behavior were negligible. For example, from the Charpy-impact and multiple-bend tests there was no indication of irradiation-induced embrittlement for V-5Ti, V-3Ti-1Si and the U.S. reference alloy V-4Cr-4Ti after irradiation to {approx}34 dpa at 420{degrees}C to 600{degrees}C, and only ductile fracture was observed for temperatures as low as -196{degrees}C. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Steel Processing Properties and Their Effect on Impact Deformation of Lightweight Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Simunovic, S

    2003-09-23

    The objective of the research was to perform a comprehensive computational analysis of the effects of material and process modeling approaches on performance of UltraLight Steel Auto Body (ULSAB) vehicle models. The research addressed numerous material related effects, impact conditions as well as analyzed the performance of the ULSAB vehicles in crashes against designs representing the current US vehicle fleet. This report is organized into three main sections. The first section describes the results of the computational analysis of ULSAB crash simulations that were performed using advanced material modeling techniques. The effects of strain-rate sensitivity on a high strength steel (HSS) intensive vehicle were analyzed. Frontal and frontal offset crash scenarios were used in a finite element parametric study of the ULSAB body structure. Comparisons are made between the crash results using the piece-wise-linear isotropic plasticity strain-rate dependent material model, and the isotropic plasticity material model based on quasi-static properties. The simulation results show the importance of advanced material modeling techniques for vehicle crash simulations due to strain-rate sensitivity and rapid hardening characteristics of advanced high strength steels. Material substitution was investigated for the main frontal crush structure using the material of similar yield stress a significantly different strain-rate and hardening characteristics. The objective of the research presented in Section 2 was to assess the influence of stamping process on crash response of ULSAB vehicle. Considered forming effects included thickness variations and plastic strain hardening imparted in the part forming process. The as-formed thickness and plastic strain for front crash parts were used as input data for vehicle crash analysis. Differences in structural performance between crash models with and without forming data were analyzed in order to determine the effects and feasibility of

  13. Impact of the seasonal evolution of snow properties on microwave emission model performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, M.; Derksen, C.; Lemmetyinen, J.; Yackel, J.

    2010-12-01

    Snow cover exhibits great spatio-temporal variability, and is dynamically coupled with global hydrological and climatological processes. Accounting for snowpack evolution related to snow accumulation, metamorphosis, and melt are essential for both modeling and remote sensing applications. Microwave emission has frequency dependant relationships with snow water equivalent (SWE), but snow grain-size, snowpack layering, and snow liquid-water content can confuse the estimation of snow parameters with empirical stand-alone algorithms. This work presents an overview of seasonal snow and multi-frequency dual-polarization microwave emission measurements collected during the 2009-2010 winter season at a network of sites near Churchill, Manitoba, Canada. These observations were used to parameterize and evaluate model simulations of microwave snow emission using the multiple-layer version of the Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) microwave emission model. The HUT model is utilized in the European Space Agency’s (ESA) GlobSnow global snow monitoring service, applied to SWE and snow depth (SD) retrievals for the Northern Hemisphere. The HUT model used for forward brightness temperature simulations in the GlobSnow retrieval scheme is currently limited to one layer which necessitates idealizing physical properties of the entire snow pack. In this study, we explore the performance of simulations with the addition of a depth hoar layer and, when appropriate, an ice lens. Simulations for forest, lake, and open environments were synthesized through a scene simulation formulation of the HUT model to produce output suitable for comparison with measured brightness temperatures from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E). While the multi-layer model better represents the vertical complexities of grain size and layering, implementation of a multi-layer approach remains a challenge due to model sensitivity with regard to the method of generalization of a complex snow

  14. Impact of long-term wastewater application on microbiological properties of vadose zone.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Santosh K; Singh, Anil Kumar; Datta, Siba Prasad; Annapurna, K

    2011-04-01

    Impact of wastewater irrigation on some biological properties was studied in an area where treated sewage water is being supplied to the farmers since 1979 in the western part of National Capital Territory of New Delhi under Keshopur Effluent Irrigation Scheme. Three fields were selected which had been receiving irrigation through wastewater for last 20, 10 and 5 years. Two additional fields were selected in which the source of irrigation water was tubewell. The soil bacterial and fungal population density was studied in soil layers of 0-15, 15-30, 30-60 and 60-120 cm depths. Groundwater samples were collected from the piezometers installed in the field irrigated with sewage water for last 20, 10 and 5 years. Results indicate that there was significant increase in bacterial and fungal count in sewage-irrigated soils as compared to their respective control. The population density of bacteria and fungi in waste water-irrigated soils increased with the duration of sewage water application and decreased with increasing depth. The bacterial and fungal count was also directly proportional to organic carbon, sand and silt content and negatively correlated to the clay content, electrical conductivity, pH and bulk density of the soil. Groundwater under sewage-irrigated fields had higher values of most probable number (MPN) index as compared to that of tubewell water-irrigated fields. All the shallow and deep groundwaters were found to be contaminated with faecal coliforms. The vadose zone had filtered the faecal coliform to the tune of 98-99%, as the MPN index was reduced from ≥18,000 per 100 ml of applied waste water to 310 per 100 ml of groundwater under 20 years sewage-irrigated field. The corresponding values of MPN were 250 and 130 per 100 ml of shallow groundwater under 10 and 05 years sewage-irrigated fields, respectively. Rapid detection of faecal contamination suggested that the Citrobacter freundii and Salmonella were dominant in shallow groundwater

  15. Bacterial ice nuclei impact cloud lifetime and radiative properties and reduce atmospheric heat loss in the BRAMS simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Tassio S.; Gonçalves, Fábio L. T.; Yamasoe, Marcia A.; Martins, Jorge A.; Morris, Cindy E.

    2014-08-01

    This study examines the effect of the bacterial species Pseudomonas syringae acting as ice nuclei (IN) on cloud properties to understand its impact on local radiative budget and heating rates. These bacteria may become active IN at temperatures as warm as -2 °C. Numerical simulations were developed using the Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Model System (BRAMS). To investigate the isolated effect of bacterial IN, four scenarios were created considering only homogeneous and bacterial ice nucleation, with 1, 10 and 100 IN per cubic meter of cloud volume and one with no bacteria. Moreover, two other scenarios were generated: the BRAMS default parameterization and its combination with bacterial IN. The model reproduced a strong convective cell over São Paulo on 3 March 2003. Results showed that bacterial IN may change cloud evolution as well as its microphysical properties, which in turn influence cloud radiative properties. For example, the reflected shortwave irradiance over an averaged domain in a scenario considering bacterial IN added to the BRAMS default parameterization was 14% lower than if bacteria were not considered. Heating rates can also be impacted, especially due to differences in cloud lifetime. Results suggest that the omission of bacterial IN in numerical models, including global cloud models, could neglect relevant ice nucleation processes that potentially influence cloud radiative properties.

  16. Impact of Friedel oscillations on vapor-liquid equilibria and supercritical properties in two and three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desgranges, Caroline; Huber, Landon; Delhommelle, Jerome

    2016-07-01

    We determine the impact of the Friedel oscillations on the phase behavior, critical properties, and thermodynamic contours in films [two dimensions (2 D )] and bulk phases [three dimensions (3 D )]. Using expanded Wang-Landau simulations, we calculate the grand-canonical partition function and, in turn, the thermodynamic properties of systems modeled with a linear combination of the Lennard-Jones and Dzugutov potentials, weighted by a parameter X (0 properties over a wide range of conditions. For 3 D systems, we are able to show that the critical parameters exhibit a linear dependence on X and that the loci for the thermodynamic state points, for which the system shows the same compressibility factor or enthalpy as an ideal gas, are two straight lines spanning the subcritical and supercritical regions of the phase diagram for all X values. Reducing the dimensionality to 2 D results in a loss of impact of the Friedel oscillation on the critical properties, as evidenced by the virtually constant critical density across the range of X values. Furthermore, our results establish that the straightness of the two ideality lines is retained in 2 D and is independent from the height of the first Friedel oscillation in the potential.

  17. 76 FR 30319 - Real Property Master Plan Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, at Yuma Proving Ground...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... analyze potential impacts from new construction, changes in testing and training, and activities conducted..., under which no new construction would occur and there would be no changes in testing and training... the installation. Resource areas that may be impacted include air quality, airspace, traffic, noise...

  18. Harvesting Impacts on Soil Properties and Tree Regeneration in Pure and Mixed Aspen Stands

    Treesearch

    Melissa J. Arikian; Kiaus J. Peuttmann; Alaina L. Davis; George E. Host; John Zasada

    1999-01-01

    Impacts of clearcutting and selective harvesting on pure aspen/mixed aspen hardwood stands were examined in northern Minnesota. We studied these impacts on 18 stands, which were harvested 4 to 11 years ago and received no further treatment. In each stand, residual composition, soil compaction, and tree regeneration were determined along a gradient of disturbance in the...

  19. Impacts of deficit irrigation and altered rooting patterns on soil structure and associated soil properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A better understanding of belowground systems and overall management impacts on soil health is needed to improve crop production and long-term sustainability under deficit irrigation. This study investigates effects of deficit irrigation on rooting patterns in maize and subsequent impacts on soil pr...

  20. Properties of largest fragment produced by hypervelocity impact of aluminum spheres with thin aluminum sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piekutowski, Andrew J.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from hypervelocity impact tests in which 1.275 g spheres of 2017-T4 Al alloy were fired at normal incidence at eight thicknesses of 6061-T6 Al alloy sheets, with impact velocity of about 6.7 km/sec; additional data are presented for smaller and larger spheres than these, in the cases of other Al alloy impact bumpers. A large fragment of the projectile is observable at the center of the debris clouds generated upon impact. The velocity of these large fragments decreased continuously with increasing bumper thickness/projectile diameter ratio, from 99 percent to less than 80 percent of impact velocity; there is a linear increase in the size of the central projectile fragment with decreasing shock-induced stress in the projectile.

  1. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldblatt, Steven M.; Piele, Philip K.

    This chapter reviews 1982 cases related to school property. Cases involving citizen efforts to overturn school board decisions to close schools dominate the property chapter, and courts continue to uphold school board authority to close schools, transfer students, and sell or lease the buildings. Ten cases involving detachment and attachment of…

  2. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.; Johnson, Margaret M.

    This chapter deals with 1981 cases involving disputes over property. Cases involving the detachment and attachment of land continue to dominate the property chapter with 11 cases reported, the same number summarized in last year's chapter. One case involving school board referenda raised the interesting question of whether or not a state could…

  3. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    Chapter 7 of a book on school law, this chapter deals with 1979 cases involving disputes over property. Cases involving taxpayer attempts to prevent the construction of school buildings dominate this year's property chapter, as they did last year's. Yet, paradoxically, there is also a significant increase in cases in which taxpayers tried to…

  4. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickel, Robert D.; Zeller, Trisha A.

    A number of cases related to property issues involving institutions of higher education are examined in this chapter. Cases discussed touch on such topics as funding for property and equipment acquisition; opposition to building construction or demolition; zoning issues; building construction and equipment contracts; and lease agreements. Current…

  5. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickel, Robert D.; Zeller, Trisha A.

    A number of cases related to property issues involving institutions of higher education are examined in this chapter. Cases discussed touch on such topics as funding for property and equipment acquisition; opposition to building construction or demolition; zoning issues; building construction and equipment contracts; and lease agreements. Current…

  6. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.; Johnson, Margaret M.

    This chapter deals with 1981 cases involving disputes over property. Cases involving the detachment and attachment of land continue to dominate the property chapter with 11 cases reported, the same number summarized in last year's chapter. One case involving school board referenda raised the interesting question of whether or not a state could…

  7. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    Chapter 7 of a book on school law, this chapter deals with 1979 cases involving disputes over property. Cases involving taxpayer attempts to prevent the construction of school buildings dominate this year's property chapter, as they did last year's. Yet, paradoxically, there is also a significant increase in cases in which taxpayers tried to…

  8. Impact of an intense rainfall event on soil properties following a wildfire in a Mediterranean environment (North-East Spain).

    PubMed

    Francos, Marcos; Pereira, Paulo; Alcañiz, Meritxell; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Úbeda, Xavier

    2016-12-01

    Intense rainfall events after severe wildfires can have an impact on soil properties, above all in the Mediterranean environment. This study seeks to examine the immediate impact and the effect after a year of an intense rainfall event on a Mediterranean forest affected by a high severity wildfire. The work analyses the following soil properties: soil aggregate stability, total nitrogen, total carbon, organic and inorganic carbon, the C/N ratio, carbonates, pH, electrical conductivity, extractable calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, available phosphorous and the sodium and potassium adsorption ratio (SPAR). We sampled soils in the burned area before, immediately after and one year after the rainfall event. The results showed that the intense rainfall event did not have an immediate impact on soil aggregate stability, but a significant difference was recorded one year after. The intense precipitation did not result in any significant changes in soil total nitrogen, total carbon, inorganic carbon, the C/N ratio and carbonates during the study period. Differences were only registered in soil organic carbon. The soil organic carbon content was significantly higher after the rainfall than in the other sampling dates. The rainfall event did increase soil pH, electrical conductivity, major cations, available phosphorous and the SPAR. One year after the fire, a significant decrease in soil aggregate stability was observed that can be attributed to high SPAR levels and human intervention, while the reduction in extractable elements can be attributed to soil leaching and vegetation consumption. Overall, the intense rainfall event, other post-fire rainfall events and human intervention did not have a detrimental impact on soil properties in all probability owing to the flat plot topography. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of long-term tillage and manure application on soil physical properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil physical properties play an integral role in maintaining soil quality for sustainable agricultural practices. Agronomic practices such as tillage systems and organic amendments have been shown to influence soil physical properties. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate effects of long-term ma...

  10. Impacts of an integrated crop-livestock system on soil properties to enhance precipitation capture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cropping/Livestock systems alter soil properties that are important in enhancing capture of precipitation by developing and maintaining water infiltration and storage. In this paper we will relate soil hydraulic conductivity and other physical properties on managed Old World Bluestem grassland, whea...

  11. Long term impact of organic amendments on forest soil properties under semiarid Mediterranean climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso González, Paloma; Francisco Martinez Murillo, Juan; Damian Ruiz Sinoga, Jose

    2017-04-01

    M, Zorzona BG, Caravaca F.: Soil microbial biomass and activity under different agricultural management systems in a semiarid Mediterranean agroecosystem. Soil and Tillage Research 109: 110-115, 2010. DOI: 10.1016/j.still.2010.05.005 Hueso-González, P., Martínez-Murillo, J.F., and Ruiz Sinoga., J.D.: The impact of organic amendments on forest soil properties under Mediterranean climatic conditions, Land Degradation and Development, 25, 604-612, 2014. Hueso-González, P., Martínez-Murillo, J.F., and Ruiz Sinoga., J.D.: Effects of topsoil treatments on afforestation in a dry-Mediterranean climate (Southern Spain), Solid Earth, 7, 1479-1489, 2016. Hueso-González, P., Ruíz Sinoga, J.D., Martínez-Murillo, J.F., and Lavee, H.: Overland flow generation mechanisms affected by topsoil treatment: Application to soil conservation, Geomorphology, 228, 796-804, 2015. Martínez-Murillo, J.F., Hueso-González, P., Ruiz-Sinoga, J.D., Lavee, H.: Short-Experimental fire effects in soil and water losses in southern of Spain. Land Degradation and Development, 27, 1513-1522, 2016. Parras-Alcántara L, Díaz-Jaimes L, Lozano-García B.: Organic farming affects C and N in soils under olive groves in Mediterranean areas. Land Degradation & Development, 2013. DOI: 10.1002/ldr.2231.

  12. Impact of solid state fermentation on nutritional, physical and flavor properties of wheat bran.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui-Min; Guo, Xiao-Na; Zhu, Ke-Xue

    2017-02-15

    To improve the nutritional, physical and flavor properties of wheat bran, yeast and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were used for fermenting wheat bran in solid state. Appearance properties, nutritional properties, microstructure, hydration properties and flavor of raw bran and fermented bran were evaluated. After treatments, water extractable arabinoxylans were 3-4 times higher than in raw bran. Total dietary fiber and soluble dietary fiber increased after solid state fermentation. Over 20% of phytic acid was degraded. Microstructure changes and protein degradation were observed in fermented brans. Water holding capacity and water retention capacity of fermented brans were improved. Results suggest that solid state fermentation is an effective way to improve the properties of wheat brans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of Heat Treatment on the Ballistic Impact Properties of Inconel 718 for Jet Engine Fan Containment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of heat treating Inconel 718 on the ballistic impact response and failure mechanisms were studied. Two different annealing conditions and an aged condition were considered. Large differences in the static properties were found between the annealed and the aged material, with the annealed condition having lower strength and hardness and greater elongation than the aged. High strain rate tests show similar results. Correspondingly large differences were found in the velocity required to penetrate material in the two conditions in impact tests involving 12.5 mm diameter, 25.4 mm long cylindrical Ti-6-4 projectiles impacting flat plates at velocities in the range of 150 to 300 m/sec. The annealed material was able to absorb over 25 percent more energy than the aged. This is contrary to results observed for ballistic impact response for higher velocity impacts typically encountered in military applications where it has been shown that there exists a correlation between target hardness and ballistic impact strength. Metallographic examination of impacted plates showed strong indication of failure due to adiabatic shear. In both materials localized bands of large shear deformation were apparent, and microhardness measurements indicated an increase in hardness in these bands compared to the surrounding material. These bands were more localized in the aged material than in the annealed material. In addition the annealed material underwent significantly greater overall deformation before failure. The results indicate that lower elongation and reduced strain hardening behavior lead to a transition from shear to adiabatic shear failure, while high elongation and better strain hardening capabilities reduce the tendency for shear to localize and result in an unstable adiabatic shear failure. This supports empirical containment design methods that relate containment thickness to the static toughness.

  14. Effects of Heat Treatment on the Ballistic Impact Properties of Inconel 718 for Jet Engine Fan Containment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Lerch, Bradley A.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of heat treating Inconel 718 on the ballistic impact response and failure mechanisms were studied. Two different annealing conditions and an aged condition were considered. Large differences in the static properties were found between the annealed and the aged material, with the annealed condition having lower strength and hardness and greater elongation than the aged. High strain rate tests show similar results. Correspondingly large differences were found in the velocity required to penetrate material in the two conditions in impact tests involving 12.5 mm diameter, 25.4 mm long cylindrical Ti-6-4 projectiles impacting flat plates at velocities in the range of 150 to 300 m/sec. The annealed material was able to absorb over 25 percent more energy than the aged. This is contrary to results observed for ballistic impact response for higher velocity impacts typically encountered in military applications where it has been shown that there exists a correlation between target hardness and ballistic impact strength. Metallographic examination of impacted plates showed strong indication of failure due to adiabatic shear. In both materials localized bands of large shear deformation were apparent, and microhardness measurements indicated an increase in hardness in these bands compared to the surrounding material. These bands were more localized in the aged material than in the annealed material. In addition the annealed material underwent significantly greater overall deformation before failure. The results indicate that lower elongation and reduced strain hardening behavior lead to a transition from shear to adiabatic shear failure, while high elongation and better strain hardening capabilities reduce the tendency for shear to localize and result in an unstable adiabatic shear failure. This supports empirical containment design methods that relate containment thickness to the static toughness.

  15. Effects of Heat Treatment on the Ballistic Impact Properties of Inconel 718 for Jet Engine Fan Containment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of heat treating Inconel 718 on the ballistic impact response and failure mechanisms were studied. Two different annealing conditions and an aged condition were considered. Large differences in the static properties were found between the annealed and the aged material, with the annealed condition having lower strength and hardness and greater elongation than the aged. Correspondingly large differences were found in the velocity required to penetrate material in the two conditions in impact tests involving 12.5 mm diameter, 25.4 mm long cylindrical Ti-6-4 projectiles impacting flat plates at velocities in the range of 150 to 300 m/sec. The annealed material was able to absorb over 25 percent more energy than the aged. This is contrary to results observed for ballistic impact response for higher velocity impacts typically encountered in military applications where it has been shown that there exists a correlation between target hardness and ballistic impact strength. Metallographic examination of impacted plates showed strong indication of failure due to adiabatic shear. In both materials localized bands of large shear deformation were apparent, and microhardness measurements indicated an increase in hardness in these bands compared to the surrounding material. These bands were more localized in the aged material than in the annealed material. In addition the annealed material underwent significantly greater overall deformation before failure. The results indicate that high elongation and better strain hardening capabilities reduce the tendency for shear to localize and result in an unstable adiabatic shear failure. This supports empirical containment design methods that relate containment thickness to the static toughness.

  16. Identifying military impacts to archaeological resources based on differences in vertical stratification of soil properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The National Historic Preservation Act requires land-managing agencies to identify and account for their impacts on archaeological resources. Regulatory agencies that oversee compliance with historic preservation legislation frequently assume military training adversely affects archaeological resou...

  17. Properties of Ejecta Blanket Deposits Surrounding Morasko Meteorite Impact Craters (Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szokaluk, M.; Muszyński, A.; Jagodziński, R.; Szczuciński, W.

    2016-08-01

    Morasko impact craters are a record of the fall of a meteorite into the soft sediments. The presented results illustrate the geological structure of the area around the crater as well as providing evidence of the occurrence of ejecta blanket.

  18. Effect of stitching on impact and interlaminar properties of graphite/epoxy laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.K.; Sankar, B.V.

    1994-12-31

    Effects of through-the-thickness stitching on the impact damage resistance, impact damage tolerance and interlaminar fracture toughness (Mode I and Mode II) of plain woven and uniweave textile graphite/epoxy laminates are investigated. The laminates were manufactured using resin-infusion-molding and resin-transfer-molding processes. Kevlar{reg_sign} and glass yarns of different yam numbers were used for stitching. Static Indentation-flexure (SI), Compression-After-Impact (CAI), Double-Cantilever-Beam (DCB) and End-Notched-Flexure (ENF) tests were conducted. Stitching did not have any significant effect on impact damage resistance. However, stitching leads to significant improvement (25-40%) in impact damage tolerance as measured by CAI strength and impact damage area. Mode I fracture toughness as characterized by critical strain energy release rate (G{sub Ic}) was found to increase by at least an order higher (15--30 times) than the unstitched laminates. Mode II fracture toughness (G{sub Ic}) increased by 5--15 times over the unstitched laminates. New methods to estimate Mode 11 critical strain energy release rate in the stitched laminates are presented.

  19. The impact of local processes and the prohibition of multiple links in the topological properties of directed complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel-Gómez, J.; Arjona-Villicaña, P. D.; Acosta-Elías, J.

    2015-05-01

    Local processes exert influence on the growth and evolution of complex networks, which in turn shape the topological and dynamic properties of these networks. Some local processes have been researched, for example: Addition of nodes and links, rewiring of links between nodes, accelerated growth, link removal, aging, copying and multiple links prohibition. These processes impact directly into the topological and dynamical properties of complex networks. This paper introduces a new model for growth of directed complex networks which incorporates the prohibition of multiple links, addition of nodes and links, and rewiring of links. This paper also reports on the impact that these processes have in the topological properties of the networks generated with the proposed model. Numerical simulation shows that, when the frequency of rewiring increases in the proposed model, the γ exponent of the in-degree distribution approaches a value of 1.1. When the frequency of adding new links increases, the γ exponent approaches 1. That is the proposed model is able to generate all exponent values documented in real-world networks which range 1.05 < γ < 8.94.

  20. Effects of carbide precipitation on the strength and Charpy impact properties of low carbon Mn-Ni-Mo bainitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Young-Roc; Jun Oh, Yong; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Hwa Hong, Jun; Lee, Hu-Chul

    2001-08-01

    The effects of carbide precipitation on the strength and Charpy impact properties of tempered bainitic Mn-Ni-Mo steels have been investigated. An attempt has also been made to modify the microstructure of the steels in order to improve the Charpy properties, by controlling the alloy composition being guided by thermodynamic calculations of phase equilibria. Coarse rod type or agglomerated spherical type cementite particles in inter-lath region were considered to be mostly detrimental to Charpy impact properties. By reducing the precipitation of cementite through decreasing carbon content and/or by substituting it into fine M 2C carbides through increasing the molybdenum content, DBTT could be lowered significantly. Further decrease of DBTT could be achieved by substituting part of manganese content by nickel. Yield strength of tested alloys could be maintained at the level of a reference 0.2 wt% carbon alloy in spite of the significant reduction in carbon content, mainly by the increase in the precipitation of fine M 2C type carbides with increased molybdenum content.

  1. Impact of Wetting/Oven-Drying Cycles on the Mechanical and Physical Properties of Birch Plywood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sooru, M.; Kasepuu, K.; Kask, R.; Lille, H.

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to explore some physical and mechanical properties and the dimensional stability of birch (Betula sp.) nine-ply veneers glued with phenol-formaldehyde (PF) after 10 cycles of soaking/oven-drying. The properties to be determined were bending strength (BS), modulus of elasticity in bending (MOE), Janka hardness (JH) and thickness swelling (TS), which were tested according to the European Standards (EN). An analytical equation was used for approximation of the change in the physical and mechanical properties of the samples depending on the number of cycles. It was shown that the values of the studied properties were affected most by the first soaking and drying cycles after which BS and MOE decreased continuously while the values of JH and TS stabilized. After 10 cycles the final values of BS, MOE, JH and TS accounted for 75-81%, 95%, 82% and 98.5% of the initial values, respectively.

  2. Impact of thermal properties of the trees cultivated by processed waste water and sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Drakatos, P.A.; Kalavrouziotis, I.K.; Skuras, D.G.; Drakatos, S.P.; Fanariotou, I.

    1997-07-01

    Eucalyptus trees were planted and irrigated with wastewater from the wastewater treatment plan (WWTP) of the University of Patras in certain experimental design including treatment and control groups. Measurements of the thermal properties from treatment and control specimens (Eucalyptus sp.), showed significantly different values. Preliminary findings showed that the use of sludge and wastewater affect the thermal properties of wood. The implications of this finding on the future planning of wastewater reuse are discussed.

  3. The Impact of Organic Amendments on Soil Properties Under Mediterranean Climatic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso Gonzalez, Paloma; Francisco Martinez Murillo, Juan; Damian Ruiz Sinoga, Jose

    2014-05-01

    Soil erosion and unsustainable land uses produce adverse effect on SOC content. Soil management techniques and corrections can be applied for soil recovery, especially, with afforestation purposes. This study presents the short term effects of the application of different treatments and amendments on soil properties for soils included in several sets of closed plots located in the experimental area of Pinarillo (Nerja, Spain). The analysed soil properties were: pH, EC, Organic Carbon, total Nitrogen and total Carbon. In order to verify possible differences, we applied the test of Mann-Whitney U in corroboration with the previous homogeneity test of variance. The result of each strategy set compared to the initial condition shows at least one significant modification in the analysed soil properties. Electrical conductivity was the most changeable soil property respect to the initial condition. Similarly, organic carbon content and total organic carbon remained quite similar. However, when all of the strategy sets are compared among them, total carbon was the most significantly changeable property. Mulching, polymers and urban residue seem to highly modify the soil initial conditions. Although soil physic-chemical parameters generally used to evaluate soil quality change very slowly. The analysed soil properties shows significant differences between dry and wet season. This fact, could be indicating the effect of certain seasonality as it is usual in Mediterranean condition.

  4. A Multiple Impact Hypothesis for Moon Formation: Target Spin and Disk Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufu, R.; Aharonson, O.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate aspects of the multiple impact hypothesis for Moon's formation, whereby the proto-Earth suffers successive collisions, each forming a debris disk that accretes to form a moonlet. The moonlets tidally advance outward, and potentially coalesce to form the Moon. In addressing the fundamental problem of the Moon's formation, we consider smaller impactors than previously studied, and investigate the effect of new geometries using a Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics (SPH) code. For impacts within the equatorial plane, we find multiple impactors are effective in draining angular momentum from the target's initial spin due to the often-neglected angular momentum carried by escaping mass. Our simulations reveal new consequences of non-equatorial inclination of the impactor, also previously neglected. We note relationships with the resulting disks of corresponding equatorial cases, but find that the target's axis of rotation can now be tilted by a significant amount (10's of degrees) with sub-Mars size impactors. Importantly for distinguishing among competing Moon formation hypotheses, our results imply that (i) the rotational acceleration of the proto-Earth by successive impacts may be limited by angular momentum drain if the impacting population contains multiple members of medium size, and (ii) impacts onto such a non-rapidly rotation proto-Earth (well below break-up speed) can produce disks compatible with sub-Moon fragments in mass, momentum, and composition.

  5. Impact testing to determine the mechanical properties of articular cartilage in isolation and on bone.

    PubMed

    Burgin, Leanne V; Aspden, Richard M

    2008-02-01

    The biomechanical response of cartilage to impact loads, both in isolation and in situ on its bone substrate, has been little studied despite the common occurrence of osteoarthritis subsequent to cartilage injury. An instrumented drop tower was used to apply controlled impact loads of different energies to explants of bovine articular cartilage. Results were compared with a conventional slow stress-strain test. The effects of the underlying bone were investigated by progressively shortening a core of bone removed with the cartilage, and by gluing cartilage samples to substrates of different moduli. The maximum dynamic modulus of isolated samples of bovine articular cartilage, at strain rates between 1100 and 1500 s(-1), was approximately two orders of magnitude larger than the quasistatic modulus and varied non-linearly with applied stress. When attached to a substrate of higher modulus, increasing the thickness of the substrate increased the effective modulus of the combination until a steady value was achieved. A lower modulus substrate reduced the effective modulus of the combination. Severe impacts resulted in damage to the bone rather than to the cartilage. The modulus of cartilage rises rapidly and non-linearly with strain rate, giving the tissue a remarkable ability to withstand impact loads. The presence of cartilage attenuated the peak force experienced by the bone and spread the impact loading period over a longer time.

  6. A STUDY OF THE PROPERTIES OF CP: COEFFICIENT OF THERMAL EXPANSION, DECOMPOSITION KINETICS AND REACTION TO SPARK, FRICTION AND IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Weese, R K; Burnham, A K; Fontes, A T

    2005-03-30

    The properties of pentaamine (5-cyano-2H-tetrazolato-N2) cobalt (III) perchlorate (CP), which was first synthesized in 1968, continues to be of interest for predicting behavior in handling, shipping, aging, and thermal cook-off situations. We report coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values over four specific temperature ranges, decomposition kinetics using linear heating rates, and the reaction to three different types of stimuli: impact, spark, and friction. The CTE was measured using a Thermal Mechanical Analyzer (TMA) for samples that were uniaxially compressed at 10,000 psi and analyzed over a dynamic temperature range of -20 C to 70 C. Using differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, CP was decomposed at linear heating rates of 1, 3, and 7 C/min and the kinetic triplet calculated using the LLNL code Kinetics05. Values are also reported for spark, friction, and impact sensitivity.

  7. A Study on the Mechanical Properties and Impact-Induced Initiation Characteristics of Brittle PTFE/Al/W Reactive Materials

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Chao; Maimaitituersun, Wubuliaisan; Dong, Yongxiang; Tian, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene/aluminum/tungsten (PTFE/Al/W) reactive materials of three different component mass ratios (73.5/26.5/0, 68.8/24.2/7 and 63.6/22.4/14) were studied in this research. Different from the PTFE/Al/W composites published elsewhere, the materials in our research were fabricated under a much lower sintering temperature and for a much shorter duration to achieve a brittle property, which aims to provide more sufficient energy release upon impact. Quasi-static compression tests, dynamic compression tests at room and elevated temperatures, and drop weight tests were conducted to evaluate the mechanical and impact-induced initiation characteristics of the materials. The materials before and after compression tests were observed by a scanning electron microscope to relate the mesoscale structural characteristics to their macro properties. All the three types of materials fail at very low strains during both quasi-static and dynamic compression. The stress-strain curves for quasi-static tests show obvious deviations while that for the dynamic tests consist of only linear-elastic and failure stages typically. The materials were also found to exhibit thermal softening at elevated temperatures and were strain-rate sensitive during dynamic tests, which were compared using dynamic increase factors (DIFs). Drop-weight test results show that the impact-initiation sensitivity increases with the increase of W content due to the brittle mechanical property. The high-speed video sequences and recovered sample residues of the drop-weight tests show that the reaction is initiated at two opposite positions near the edges of the samples, where the shear force concentrates the most intensively, indicating a shear-induced initiation mechanism. PMID:28772812

  8. A Study on the Mechanical Properties and Impact-Induced Initiation Characteristics of Brittle PTFE/Al/W Reactive Materials.

    PubMed

    Ge, Chao; Maimaitituersun, Wubuliaisan; Dong, Yongxiang; Tian, Chao

    2017-04-26

    Polytetrafluoroethylene/aluminum/tungsten (PTFE/Al/W) reactive materials of three different component mass ratios (73.5/26.5/0, 68.8/24.2/7 and 63.6/22.4/14) were studied in this research. Different from the PTFE/Al/W composites published elsewhere, the materials in our research were fabricated under a much lower sintering temperature and for a much shorter duration to achieve a brittle property, which aims to provide more sufficient energy release upon impact. Quasi-static compression tests, dynamic compression tests at room and elevated temperatures, and drop weight tests were conducted to evaluate the mechanical and impact-induced initiation characteristics of the materials. The materials before and after compression tests were observed by a scanning electron microscope to relate the mesoscale structural characteristics to their macro properties. All the three types of materials fail at very low strains during both quasi-static and dynamic compression. The stress-strain curves for quasi-static tests show obvious deviations while that for the dynamic tests consist of only linear-elastic and failure stages typically. The materials were also found to exhibit thermal softening at elevated temperatures and were strain-rate sensitive during dynamic tests, which were compared using dynamic increase factors (DIFs). Drop-weight test results show that the impact-initiation sensitivity increases with the increase of W content due to the brittle mechanical property. The high-speed video sequences and recovered sample residues of the drop-weight tests show that the reaction is initiated at two opposite positions near the edges of the samples, where the shear force concentrates the most intensively, indicating a shear-induced initiation mechanism.

  9. Theoretical study of the effect of ball properties on impact force in soccer heading.

    PubMed

    Queen, Robin M; Weinhold, Paul S; Kirkendall, Donald T; Yu, Bing

    2003-12-01

    The objective of this study was to theoretically model, based on the Hertz contact theory, the impact force and contact time, as well as the linear and angular head accelerations during heading in children using two neck stiffness conditions (infinite and negligible stiffness). The following mathematical model inputs were obtained: elastic modulus and mass of size three, four, and five balls at inflation pressures of 10, 12, and 14 psi, head modulus, head mass, head length, head and trunk moment of inertia, and the precontact ball velocity. The model outputs consisted of linear and angular head acceleration, impact force, contact time between the ball and head, and head impact criteria (HIC) all at the point of impact. Head mass and length were obtained as a percentage of body weight and height, respectively, based on age. With an increase in head mass, there is a decrease in the linear and angular head acceleration. With an increase in ball size, for the same head mass, there is an increase in the contact time between the head and the ball. Changing ball inflation pressure has little effect on the impact characteristics. Infinite neck stiffness decreased linear and angular head acceleration and HIC. Head mass and ball size have an effect on linear and angular head acceleration and contact time, respectively, whereas ball inflation pressure has a minimal effect on the impact characteristics. These results indicate that children should be restricted to using the appropriate ball for their age. Smaller head size within an age group is an underemphasized though important identifier of a player's injury risk.

  10. Economic Impacts from the Boulder County, Colorado, ClimateSmart Loan Program: Using Property-Assessed Clean Energy Financing

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, M.; Cliburn, J. K.; Coughlin, J.

    2011-04-01

    This report examines the economic impacts (including job creation) from the Boulder County, Colorado, ClimateSmart Loan Program (CSLP), an example of Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing. The CSLP was the first test of PACE financing on a multi-jurisdictional level (involving individual cities as well as the county government). It was also the first PACE program to comprehensively address energy efficiency measures and renewable energy, and it was the first funded by a public offering of both taxable and tax-exempt bonds.

  11. Influence of seat foam and geometrical properties on BioRID P3 kinematic response to rear impacts.

    PubMed

    Szabo, T J; Voss, D P; Welcher, J B

    2003-12-01

    As the primary interface with the human body during rear impact, the automotive seat holds great promise for mitigation of Whiplash Associated Disorders (WAD). Recent research has chronicled the potential influence of both seat geometrical and constitutive properties on occupant dynamics and injury potential. Geometrical elements such as reduced head to head restraint, rearward offset, and increased head restraint height have shown strong correlation with reductions in occupant kinematics. The stiffness and energy absorption of both the seating foam and the seat infrastructure are also influential on occupant motion; however, the trends in injury mitigation are not as clear as for the geometrical properties. It is of interest to determine whether, for a given seat frame and infrastructure, the properties of the seating foam alone can be tailored to mitigate WAD potential. Rear impact testing was conducted using three model year 2000 automotive seats (Chevrolet Camaro, Chevrolet S-10 pickup, and Pontiac Grand Prix), using the BioRID P3 anthropometric rear impact dummy. Each seat was distinct in construction and geometry. Each seat back was tested with various foams (i.e., standard, viscoelastic, low or high density). Seat geometries and infrastructures were constant so that the influence of the seating foams on occupant dynamics could be isolated. Three tests were conducted on each foam combination for a given seat (total of 102 tests), with a nominal impact severity of Delta V = 11 km/h (nominal duration of 100 msec). The seats were compared across a host of occupant kinematic variables most likely to be associated with WAD causation. No significant differences (p < 0.05) were found between seat back foams for tests within any given seat. However, seat comparisons yielded several significant differences (p < 0.05). The Camaro seat was found to result in several significantly different occupant kinematic variables when compared to the other seats. No significant

  12. Efficient simulation of the impact of interface grading on the transport and optical properties of semiconductor heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Lü, X.; Schrottke, L.; Luna, E.; Grahn, H. T.

    2014-06-09

    An efficient model is proposed to evaluate the impact of interface grading on the properties of semiconductor heterostructures. In the plane-wave approximation, the interface grading is taken into account by simply multiplying the Fourier components of the potential by a Gaussian function, which results only in a very small increase of the computation time. We show that the interface grading may affect the transition energies, the field strength for resonant coupling of subbands, and even the miniband formation in complex systems such as quantum-cascade lasers. This model provides a convenient tool for the incorporation of interface grading into the design of heterostructures.

  13. Effect of heat treatment on the impact properties of a 12Cr-1Mo-V-W steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, B.A.; Wilcox, R.C.

    1983-11-11

    This paper describes the effects of austenitization and tempering treatments on the strength and impact properties of a 12Cr-1Mo-V-W steel. Data are reported for austenitization temperatures covering the range 900 to 1250/sup 0/C and tempering treatments of 600 to 800/sup 0/C. A 50/sup 0/C improvement in the ductile brittle transition temperature is achieved through heat treatment. This is found to result from elimination of delta ferrite and associated carbides at the delta ferrite-matrix interface. 17 figures.

  14. Impact of thermal annealing on optical properties of vacuum evaporated CdTe thin films for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chander, Subhash; Purohit, A.; Lal, C.; Nehra, S. P.; Dhaka, M. S.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the impact of thermal annealing on optical properties of cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films is investigated. The films of thickness 650 nm were deposited on thoroughly cleaned glass substrate employing vacuum evaporation followed by thermal annealing in the temperature range 250-450 °C. The as-deposited and annealed films were characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The optical band gap is found to be decreased from 1.88 eV to 1.48 eV with thermal annealing. The refractive index is found to be in the range 2.73-2.92 and observed to increase with annealing treatment. The experimental results reveal that the thermal annealing plays an important role to enhance the optical properties of CdTe thin films and annealed films may be used as absorber layer in CdTe/CdS solar cells.

  15. Impact of thermal annealing on optical properties of vacuum evaporated CdTe thin films for solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, Subhash Purohit, A.; Lal, C.; Nehra, S. P.; Dhaka, M. S.

    2016-05-06

    In this paper, the impact of thermal annealing on optical properties of cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films is investigated. The films of thickness 650 nm were deposited on thoroughly cleaned glass substrate employing vacuum evaporation followed by thermal annealing in the temperature range 250-450 °C. The as-deposited and annealed films were characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The optical band gap is found to be decreased from 1.88 eV to 1.48 eV with thermal annealing. The refractive index is found to be in the range 2.73-2.92 and observed to increase with annealing treatment. The experimental results reveal that the thermal annealing plays an important role to enhance the optical properties of CdTe thin films and annealed films may be used as absorber layer in CdTe/CdS solar cells.

  16. The impact of lone pair-π interactions on photochromic properties in 1-D naphthalene diimide coordination networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Jun; Guan, Ying-Fang; Chen, Yong; Lin, Mei-Jin; Huang, Chang-Cang; Dai, Wen-Xin

    2015-10-21

    Lone pair-π interaction is an important but less studied binding force. Generally, it is too weak to influence the physical properties of supramolecular systems. Herein we reported the first example exhibiting the impact of lone pair-π interactions on photochromic properties of naphthalene diimide based coordination networks. In three isostructural 1-D networks, [(DPNDI)ZnX2] (DPNDI = N,N-di(4-pyridyl)-1,4,5,8-naphthalene diimide, X = Cl for 1, X = Br for 2 and X = I for 3), they exhibit different electron-transfer photochromic behaviors due to different lone pair-π interactions between the capped halogen atoms and electron-deficient DPNDI moieties. Specifically, 1 and 2 but not 3 are photochromic, which is attributed to a stronger lone pair-π interaction in 3 than those in 1 and 2. This study anticipates breaking a new path for designing novel photochromic materials through such unnoticeable supramolecular interactions.

  17. Correlation of Impact Conditions, Interface Reactions, Microstructural Evolution, and Mechanical Properties in Kinetic Spraying of Metals: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaeick; Lee, Changhee

    2016-12-01

    In the past, most studies into kinetic spraying technology focused on basic research, but a large portion of current research is devoted to industrial applications of the technology. To advance, however, studies about industrial applications of kinetic spraying require profound understanding of the scientific foundations of the kinetic spray process. Nevertheless, no one has yet provided a well-organized summary of the correlations among impact conditions, interface reactions, microstructural evolution, and mechanical properties across the whole field of kinetic spraying technology. This paper provides such an overview of these correlations for kinetic spraying of metals. For each correlation, the interactions between the given conditions and the material properties of the metal feedstock powder are the most influential. These interactions are so complicated that it is difficult to systematically classify all cases into certain types. Nonetheless, we try to explain and summarize the critical factors and their roles in each relationship.

  18. Soluble Dietary Fiber Fractions in Wheat Bran and Their Interactions with Wheat Gluten Have Impacts on Dough Properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Liu, Rui; Wu, Tao; Wang, Man; Zhang, Min

    2016-11-23

    Six soluble dietary fiber (SDF) fractions were prepared via stepwise ethanol precipitation from natural and fermented wheat bran. The chemical composition, molecular weight distribution, and glycosidic linkage and substitution pattern of each SDF fraction were elucidated by sugar analysis, periodate oxidation and Smith degradation, molecular determination, and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. The impacts of SDF fractions on the rheological properties and morphologies of doughs were investigated by farinography, rheometry, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to clarify the relationship between the microstructural features of SDF fractions and the macroscopic properties of SDF-containing doughs. The interactions between SDF fractions and wheat glutens in doughs were further studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The experimental results indicated that the SDF fraction with an intermediate molecular weight but a higher substitution degree and a larger disubstitution ratio was most compatible with the dough network and beneficial to dough quality.

  19. Shock wave properties of anorthosite and gabbro. [to model hypervelocity impact cratering on planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boslough, M. B.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    Huyoniot data on San Gabriel anorthosite and San Marcos gabbro to 11 GPA are presented. Release paths in the stress-density plane and sound velocities are reported as determined from partial velocity data. Electrical interference effects precluded the determination of accurate release paths for the gabbro. Because of the loss of shear strength in the shocked state, the plastic behavior exhibited by anorthosite indicates that calculations of energy partitioning due to impact onto planetary surfaces based on elastic-plastic models may underestimate the amount of internal energy deposited in the impacted surface material.

  20. Cooked rice texture and rice flour pasting properties; impacted by rice temperature during milling.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammed; Meullenet, Jean-Francois

    2015-03-01

    Rice milling plays a key factor in determining rice quality and value. Therefore accurate quality assessments are critical to the rice industry. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of exposing rice to elevated temperatures during milling, on cooked rice texture and rice flour pasting properties. Two long (Cybonnett and Francis) and one medium (Jupiter) rice (oryzae sativa L.) cultivars were milled using McGill laboratory mill for 30 and 40 s after warmed up the mill before milling. Four different milling temperatures per milling duration were achieved. Cooked rice texture properties were assessed using a uniaxial compression test and rice flour pasting properties measured using a TA-2000 rheometer. Results of this study showed that exposure of rice to high temperatures during milling significantly decreased cooked rice firmness. An increase in milled rice temperature after milling from 10.0 to 13.3 °C resulted in a 5.4 and 8.1 N decrease in cooked rice firmness. Although not always significant, the increase in milled rice temperature during milling resulted in an increase in cooked rice stickiness. The increase in milling temperature also showed significant increase in rice flour pasting properties. Changes in rice functional characteristics were attributed to the changes occurring to rice chemical constituents due to temperature exposure as indicated by the increase in rice protein hydrophobicity. Proteins are known to affect rice starch water holding capacity and other starch gelatinization properties.

  1. Impact of carbon quantum dots on dynamic properties of BSA and BSA/DPPC adsorption layers.

    PubMed

    Lai, Lu; Wei, Xiao-Qian; Huang, Wei-Hua; Mei, Ping; Ren, Zhao-Hua; Liu, Yi

    2017-11-15

    The effects of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) on the dynamic properties of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated using pendant drop profile analysis method. Moreover, the effects of CQDs on the competitive adsorption of BSA and dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) were examined. CQDs reduce the fluorescence intensity of BSA and cause a red shift in fluorescence emission. The quenching constant at pH 4.3 is almost twice as large as that of the value obtained at pH 6.0. A small amount of CQDs does not influence the dynamic surface adsorption properties of BSA molecules. As the CQD concentration increases, a gradual increase in adsorption rate of BSA molecules is observed. Moreover, the addition of CQDs results in a significant transition of kinetic dependencies of surface elasticity of BSA solution when the CQD concentration exceeds a critical value. The appearance of the maximum surface elasticity value is probably attributed to the formation of tails and loops. When the dynamic surface properties are dominated by BSA molecules, the effects of CQDs on the surface properties of BSA/DPPC mixture are similar to those of BSA alone. However, when the surface film mainly consists of DPPC, CQDs can obviously change the interfacial properties of DPPC monolayer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Spatial variability of the properties of marsh soils and their impact on vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorova, V. A.; Svyatova, E. N.; Tseits, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    Spatial variability of the properties of soils and the character of vegetation was studied on seacoasts of the Velikii Island in the Kandalaksha Bay of the White Sea. It was found that the chemical and physicochemical properties of marsh soils (Tidalic Fluvisols) are largely dictated by the distance from the sea and elevation of the sampling point above sea level. The spatial distribution of the soil properties is described by a quadratic trend surface. With an increase in the distance from the sea, the concentration of ions in the soil solution decreases, and the organic carbon content and soil acidity become higher. The spatial dependence of the degree of variability in the soil properties is moderate. Regular changes in the soil properties along the sea-land gradient are accompanied by the presence of specific spatial patterns related to the system of temporary water streams, huge boulders, and beached heaps of sea algae and wood debris. The cluster analysis made it possible to distinguish between five soil classes corresponding to the following plant communities: barren surface (no permanent vegetation), clayey-sandy littoral with sparse halophytes, marsh with large rhizomatous grasses, and grass-forb-bunchberry vegetation of forest margins. The subdivision into classes is especially distinct with respect to the concentration of chloride ions. The following groups of factors affect the distribution of vegetation: the composition of the soil solution, the height above sea level, the pH of water suspensions, and the humus content.

  3. Nanoparticle size and surface properties determine the protein corona with possible implications for biological impacts

    PubMed Central

    Lundqvist, Martin; Stigler, Johannes; Elia, Giuliano; Lynch, Iseult; Cedervall, Tommy; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    Nanoparticles in a biological fluid (plasma, or otherwise) associate with a range of biopolymers, especially proteins, organized into the “protein corona” that is associated with the nanoparticle and continuously exchanging with the proteins in the environment. Methodologies to determine the corona and to understand its dependence on nanomaterial properties are likely to become important in bionanoscience. Here, we study the long-lived (“hard”) protein corona formed from human plasma for a range of nanoparticles that differ in surface properties and size. Six different polystyrene nanoparticles were studied: three different surface chemistries (plain PS, carboxyl-modified, and amine-modified) and two sizes of each (50 and 100 nm), enabling us to perform systematic studies of the effect of surface properties and size on the detailed protein coronas. Proteins in the corona that are conserved and unique across the nanoparticle types were identified and classified according to the protein functional properties. Remarkably, both size and surface properties were found to play a very significant role in determining the nanoparticle coronas on the different particles of identical materials. We comment on the future need for scientific understanding, characterization, and possibly some additional emphasis on standards for the surfaces of nanoparticles. PMID:18809927

  4. Impact of heating on sensory properties of French Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) blue cheeses. Relationships with physicochemical parameters.

    PubMed

    Bord, Cécile; Guerinon, Delphine; Lebecque, Annick

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the impact of heating on the sensory properties of blue-veined cheeses in order to characterise their sensory properties and to identify their specific sensory typology associated with physicochemical parameters. Sensory profiles were performed on a selection of Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) cheeses representing the four blue-veined cheese categories produced in the Massif Central (Fourme d'Ambert, Fourme de Montbrison, Bleu d'Auvergne and Bleu des Causses). At the same time, physicochemical parameters were measured in these cheeses. The relationship between these two sets of data was investigated. Four types of blue-veined cheeses displayed significantly different behaviour after heating and it is possible to discriminate these cheese categories through specific sensory attributes. Fourme d'Ambert and Bleu d'Auvergne exhibited useful culinary properties: they presented good meltability, stretchability and a weak oiling-off. However, basic tastes (salty, bitter and sour) are also sensory attributes which can distinguish heated blue cheeses. The relationship between the sensory and physicochemical data indicated a correlation suggesting that some of these sensory properties may be explained by certain physicochemical parameters of heated cheeses.

  5. Short-term grazing exclusion has no impact on soil properties and nutrients of degraded alpine grassland in Tibet, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Yan, Y.; Sun, J.; Zhang, X.; Chen, Y.; Wang, X.; Cheng, G.

    2015-11-01

    Since the 1980s, alpine grasslands have been seriously degraded on the Tibetan Plateau. Grazing exclusion by fencing has been widely adopted to restore degraded grasslands. To clarify the effect of grazing exclusion on soil quality, we investigated soil properties and nutrients by comparing free-grazing (FG) and grazing exclusion (GE) grasslands in Tibet. Soil properties - including soil bulk density, pH, particle size distributions, and proportion of aggregates - showed no significant difference between FG and GE plots. Soil organic carbon, soil available nitrogen, and available phosphorus contents did not differ with grazing exclusion treatments in both the 0-15 and 15-30 cm layer. However, soil total nitrogen and total phosphorus contents were remarkably reduced due to grazing exclusion at 0-15 cm depth. Furthermore, growing season temperature and/or growing season precipitation had significant effects on almost all soil property and nutrient indicators. This study demonstrates that grazing exclusion had no impact on most soil properties and nutrients in Tibet. Additionally, the potential shift of climate conditions should be considered when recommending any policy designed for restoration of degraded soil in alpine grasslands in the future. Nevertheless, because the results of the present study come from a short-term (6-8 years) grazing exclusion, the assessments of the ecological effects of the grazing exclusion management strategy on soil quality of degraded alpine grasslands in Tibet still need long-term continued research.

  6. Short-term grazing exclusion has no impact on soil properties and nutrients of degraded alpine grassland in Tibet, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Yan, Y.; Sun, J.; Zhang, X.; Chen, Y.; Wang, X.; Cheng, G.

    2015-08-01

    Since the 1980s, alpine grasslands have been seriously degraded on the Tibetan Plateau. Grazing exclusion by fencing has been widely adopted to restore degraded grasslands. To clarify the effect of grazing exclusion on soil quality, we investigated soil properties and nutrients by comparing free grazing (FG) and grazing exclusion (GE) grasslands in Tibet. Soil properties, including soil bulk density, pH, particle size distributions, and proportion of aggregates, were not significant different between FG and GE plots. Soil organic carbon, soil available nitrogen, available phosphorus contents did not differ with grazing exclusion treatments in both 0-15 and 15-30 cm layer. However, soil total nitrogen and total phosphorus contents were remarkably reduced due to grazing exclusion at the 0-15 cm depth. Furthermore, growing season temperature and/or growing season precipitation had significant effects on almost all soil properties and nutrients indicators. This study demonstrates that grazing exclusion had no impact on most soil properties and nutrients in Tibet. Additionally, the potential shift of climate conditions should be considered when recommend any policies designed for alpine grasslands degraded soil restoration in the future. Nevertheless, because the results of the present study come from short term (6-8 years) grazing exclusion, the assessments of the ecological effects of the grazing exclusion management strategy on soil quality of degraded alpine grasslands in Tibet still need long term continued research.

  7. The impact of sintering temperature on structural, morphological and thermoelectric properties of zinc titanate nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, P.; Murugu thiruvalluvan, T. M. V.; Arivanandhan, M.; Jayakumari, T.; Anandan, P.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of sintering temperature and Ti:Zn ratio of precursor solutions on the structural, morphological and thermoelectric properties of Zinc titanate (TZO) nanocrystals have been investigated. TZO nanocrystals were synthesized by changing the molar ratio of precursors of Zn and Ti sources by sol-gel method. The synthesized materials were sintered at different temperatures and the formation of multi phases of TZO were analysed by x-ray diffraction studies. The morphological properties and composition of TZO samples were studied by FESEM, TEM and XPS analysis. The thermoelectric properties of the TZO have been studied by measuring the Seebeck coefficient of the materials at various temperature. It was observed that the Seebeck coefficient of TZO sample increases with increasing Zn content in the sample especially at high temperature.

  8. Organization of the dermal matrix impacts the biomechanical properties of skin.

    PubMed

    Langton, A K; Graham, H K; McConnell, J C; Sherratt, M J; Griffiths, C E M; Watson, R E B

    2017-09-01

    Human skin has the crucial roles of maintaining homeostasis and protecting against the external environment. Skin offers protection against mechanical trauma due to the reversible deformation of its structure; these biomechanical properties are amenable to dynamic testing using noninvasive devices. To characterize the biomechanical properties of young, black African/African-Caribbean and white Northern European skin from different anatomical sites, and to relate underlying skin architecture to biomechanical function. Using cutometry and ballistometry, the biomechanical properties of buttock and dorsal forearm skin were determined in black African/African-Caribbean (n = 18) and white Northern European (n = 20) individuals aged 18-30 years. Skin biopsies were obtained from a subset of the volunteers (black African/African-Caribbean, n = 5; white Northern European, n = 6) and processed for histological and immunohistochemical detection of the major elastic fibre components and fibrillar collagens. We have determined that healthy skin from young African and white Northern European individuals has similar biomechanical properties (F3): the skin is resilient (capable of returning to its original position following deformation, R1), exhibits minimal fatigue (R4) and is highly elastic (R2, R5 and R7). At the histological level, skin with these biomechanical properties is imbued with strong interdigitation of the rete ridges at the dermoepidermal junction (DEJ) and candelabra-like arrays of elastic fibres throughout the papillary dermis. Dramatic disruption to this highly organized arrangement of elastic fibres, effacement of the rete ridges and alterations to the alignment of the fibrillar collagens is apparent in the white Northern European forearm and coincides with a marked decline in biomechanical function. Maintenance of skin architecture - both epidermal morphology and elastic fibre arrangement - is essential for optimal skin biomechanical properties. Disruption to

  9. Novel slow release nanocomposite nitrogen fertilizers: the impact of polymers on nanocomposite properties and function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Efficient use of fertilizers, especially nitrogen, is essential and strategic to agricultural production. Among the technologies that can contribute to efficient use of fertilizers are slow or controlled release products. This paper describes the impact on structure, urea release rate and function i...

  10. Pilot plant assessment of blend properties and their impact on critical power plant components

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    A series of tests were performed to determine the effects of blending eastern bituminous coals with western subbituminous coals on utility boiler operation. Relative to the baseline bituminous coal, the testing reported here indicated that there were significant impacts to boiler performance due to the blending of the eastern and western coals. Results indicated that fuel blending can be used to adequately control flue gas emissions of both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} at the expense of reduced milling efficiency, increased sootblowing in the high-temperature and low-temperature regions of the boiler and, to a lesser extent, decreased collection efficiency for an electrostatic precipitator. The higher reactivity of the subbituminous coal increased the overall combustion efficiency, which may tend to decrease the impact of milling efficiency losses. The extent of these impacts was directly related to the percentage of subbituminous coal in the blends. At the lowest blend ratios of subbituminous coal, the impacts were greatly reduced.

  11. The Impact of Federally Tax Exempt Property Ownership on National County Poverty Rank and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuessner, Sonia Shedd

    2016-01-01

    Education in the 21st century is subject to standardized testing with financial implications associated with testing. Under continued focus at the federal level to close the socioeconomic achievement gap, equitable distribution of funding is critical to ensure all schools have resources available to offset impacts of low socioeconomic status on…

  12. Impacts of fungal stalk rot pathogens on physicochemical properties of sorghum grain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stalk rot diseases are among the most ubiquitous and damaging fungal diseases of sorghum worldwide. Although reports of quantitative stalk rot yield losses are available, the impact of stalk rot on the physicochemical attributes of sorghum grain is currently unknown. This study was conducted to test...

  13. The Impact of Federally Tax Exempt Property Ownership on National County Poverty Rank and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuessner, Sonia Shedd

    2016-01-01

    Education in the 21st century is subject to standardized testing with financial implications associated with testing. Under continued focus at the federal level to close the socioeconomic achievement gap, equitable distribution of funding is critical to ensure all schools have resources available to offset impacts of low socioeconomic status on…

  14. Nutrient source and tillage impacts on tall fescue production and soil properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) grass provides a major forage base for many livestock production systems in the southeastern United States. Forage production with manure helps recycle nutrients with less environmental impacts. This two year study examined tall fescue forage production and ...

  15. Ultrasonic impact treatment of CoCrMo alloy: Surface composition and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenakin, S. P.; Filatova, V. S.; Makeeva, I. N.; Vasylyev, M. A.

    2017-06-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray diffraction were employed to study the effect of intense mechanical treatment on the surface chemical state, composition and structure of a commercial biomedical CoCrMo alloy ('Bondi-Loy'). The ultrasonic impact treatment of the alloy in air with duration up to 30 s was found to cause the deformation-enhanced oxidation and deformation-induced surface segregation of the components and impurities from the bulk. The compositionally inhomogeneous mixed oxide layer formed under impact treatment was composed mainly of Cr2O3 and silicon oxide with admixture of CoO, MoO2, MoO3 and iron oxide/hydroxide, the latter being transferred onto the alloy surface from the steel pin. The impact treatment promoted a progressive accumulation of carbon on the alloy surface due to its deformation-induced segregation from the bulk and deformation-induced uptake of hydrocarbons from the ambient; concurrently, the dissolution/refinement of carbides originally present in the as-cast CoCrMo alloy occurred. The impact treatment gave rise to a two-fold increase in the volume fraction of the martensitic hcp ε-phase, a 30% increase in the surface microhardness and improved resistance to corrosion in the solution of artificial saliva compared to the as-polished alloy.

  16. Understanding Material Property Impacts on Co-Current Flame Spread: Improving Understanding Crucial for Fire Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary (Technical Monitor); Rangwala, Ali S.; Buckley, Steven G.; Torero, Jose L.

    2004-01-01

    The prospect of long-term manned space flight brings fresh urgency to the development of an integrated and fundamental approach to the study of material flammability. Currently, NASA uses two tests, the upward flame propagation test and heat and visible smoke release rate test, to assess the flammability properties of materials to be used in space under microgravity conditions. The upward flame propagation test can be considered in the context of the 2-D analysis of Emmons. This solution incorporates material properties by a "mass transfer number", B in the boundary conditions.

  17. Late Stages of Stellar Evolution and their Impact on Spectrophotometric Properties of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzoni, A.

    2007-12-01

    The connection between AGB evolution of stellar populations and infrared vs. ultraviolet properties of the parent galaxies is reviewed relying on the updated lookout provided by population-synthesis theory. In particular, planetary-nebula events and hot horizontal-branch evolution are assessed in a unitary view to outline a plain general picture of galaxy spectrophotometric evolution. This will include a brief discussion of relevant phenomena such as the ``UV upturn'' in ellipticals and the stellar mass loss properties along the galaxy morphological sequence.

  18. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    The author notes that controversies over construction bids and contracts continue to represent the largest number of property cases reported in this year's chapter. Most of these cases are routine disputes between colleges or universities and contractors over such issues as the return of bid bonds, recovery of additional costs for construction…

  19. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    Numerous cases in this year's chapter dealt with the same topics of previous years--contracts and bids for building construction, and detachment and annexation of a portion of a school district. The courts continued to attribute board discretionary authority to school boards in school property matters. Intergovernmental disputes over ownership or…

  20. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.; Forsberg, James R.

    This chapter summarizes and analyze all state supreme court and federal court decisions as well as other significant court decisions involving school property. The cases discussed are generally limited to those decided during 1974 and reported in the General Digest on or before March 1, 1975. In their discussion, the authors attempt to integrate…

  1. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.; Forsberg, James R.

    This chapter summarizes recent state supreme court and federal court decisions involving school property. The cases discussed are generally limited to those decided during 1975 and reported in the General Digest as of March 1976. In their discussion, the authors attempt to integrate related cases and to illuminate any unifying legal principles…

  2. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    A review of cases involving higher education property matters shows that many are concerned with building construction, equipment installation, or repair contracts. A number of other cases involve routine conflicts between colleges or universities and other governmental entities over matters such as requests for special exceptions to zoning…

  3. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    Numerous cases in this year's chapter dealt with the same topics of previous years--contracts and bids for building construction, and detachment and annexation of a portion of a school district. The courts continued to attribute board discretionary authority to school boards in school property matters. Intergovernmental disputes over ownership or…

  4. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.; Forsberg, James R.

    This chapter summarizes and analyze all state supreme court and federal court decisions as well as other significant court decisions involving school property. The cases discussed are generally limited to those decided during 1974 and reported in the General Digest on or before March 1, 1975. In their discussion, the authors attempt to integrate…

  5. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    A review of cases involving higher education property matters shows that many are concerned with building construction, equipment installation, or repair contracts. A number of other cases involve routine conflicts between colleges or universities and other governmental entities over matters such as requests for special exceptions to zoning…

  6. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.; Forsberg, James R.

    This chapter summarizes recent state supreme court and federal court decisions involving school property. The cases discussed are generally limited to those decided during 1975 and reported in the General Digest as of March 1976. In their discussion, the authors attempt to integrate related cases and to illuminate any unifying legal principles…

  7. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    Reflecting widespread unhappiness with the growing tax burdens in this country, the most active area of litigation reported in the property chapter this year involves various attempts by taxpayers to prevent the construction or remodeling of public school facilities. While some taxpayers fought to keep schools from being built, others in New York…

  8. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    The author notes that controversies over construction bids and contracts continue to represent the largest number of property cases reported in this year's chapter. Most of these cases are routine disputes between colleges or universities and contractors over such issues as the return of bid bonds, recovery of additional costs for construction…

  9. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.; Johnson, Margaret M.

    While the number of cases dealing with school property issues was significantly lower than in previous years, a significant number of cases involving the detachment and attachment of land to school districts arose. Eight of the eleven cases dealing with land detachment come from Illinois. The cases concerned requests from parents that their…

  10. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.; Forsberg, James R.

    While the types of cases reported in this year's chapter are essentially the same as those reported in last year's, the number of certain types of cases have changed--in some instances significantly. For example, the number of cases raising constitutional issues in the areas of school construction, location, and property use have declined. On the…

  11. Life cycle impact assessment modeling for particulate matter: A new approach based on physico-chemical particle properties.

    PubMed

    Notter, Dominic A

    2015-09-01

    Particulate matter (PM) causes severe damage to human health globally. Airborne PM is a mixture of solid and liquid droplets suspended in air. It consists of organic and inorganic components, and the particles of concern range in size from a few nanometers to approximately 10μm. The complexity of PM is considered to be the reason for the poor understanding of PM and may also be the reason why PM in environmental impact assessment is poorly defined. Currently, life cycle impact assessment is unable to differentiate highly toxic soot particles from relatively harmless sea salt. The aim of this article is to present a new impact assessment for PM where the impact of PM is modeled based on particle physico-chemical properties. With the new method, 2781 characterization factors that account for particle mass, particle number concentration, particle size, chemical composition and solubility were calculated. Because particle sizes vary over four orders of magnitudes, a sound assessment of PM requires that the exposure model includes deposition of particles in the lungs and that the fate model includes coagulation as a removal mechanism for ultrafine particles. The effects model combines effects from particle size, solubility and chemical composition. The first results from case studies suggest that PM that stems from emissions generally assumed to be highly toxic (e.g. biomass combustion and fossil fuel combustion) might lead to results that are similar compared with an assessment of PM using established methods. However, if harmless PM emissions are emitted, established methods enormously overestimate the damage. The new impact assessment allows a high resolution of the damage allocatable to different size fractions or chemical components. This feature supports a more efficient optimization of processes and products when combating air pollution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Corn and soybean rotation under reduced tillage management: impacts on soil properties, yield, and net return

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A 4-yr field study was conducted from 2007 to 2010 at Stoneville, MS to examine the effects of rotating corn and soybean under reduced tillage conditions on soil properties, yields, and net return. The six rotation systems were continuous corn (CCCC), continuous soybean (SSSS), corn-soybean (CSCS),...

  13. Structural and Thermodynamic Properties of Amyloid-β Peptides: Impact of Fragment Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitahara, T.; Wise-Scira, O.; Coskuner, O.

    2010-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease whose physiological characteristics include the accumulation of amyloid-containing deposits in the brain and consequent synapse and neuron loss. Unfortunately, most widely used drugs for the treatment can palliate the outer symptoms but cannot cure the disease itself. Hence, developing a new drug that can cure it. Most recently, the ``early aggregation and monomer'' hypothesis has become popular and a few drugs have been developed based on this hypothesis. Detailed understanding of the amyloid-β peptide structure can better help us to determine more effective treatment strategies; indeed, the structure of Amyloid has been studied extensively employing experimental and theoretical tools. Nevertheless, those studies have employed different fragment sizes of Amyloid and characterized its conformational nature in different media. Thus, the structural properties might be different from each other and provide a reason for the existing debates in the literature. Here, we performed all-atom MD simulations and present the structural and thermodynamic properties of Aβ1-16, Aβ1-28, and Aβ1-42 in the gas phase and in aqueous solution. Our studies show that the overall structures, secondary structures, and the calculated thermodynamic properties change with increasing peptide size. In addition, we find that the structural properties of those peptides are different from each other in the gas phase and in aqueous solution.

  14. The impact of plant-based antimicrobials on sensory properties of organic leafy greens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant extracts and essential oils are well known for their antibacterial activity. However, studies concerning their effect on the organoleptic properties of treated foods are limited. The objective was to study the sensory attributes of organic leafy greens treated with plant antimicrobials and ide...

  15. Impact of thinning on soil properties and biomass in Apalachicola National Forest, Florida

    Treesearch

    Kelechi James Nwaokorie; Odemari Stephen Mbuya; Johnny Grace

    2016-01-01

    The effect of a silvicultural operation, row thinning at two intensities (single row, SR, and double row, DR, thinning), on soil properties and biomass were investigated in selected 28 year-old slash pine (Pinus elliotti) plantations in the Apalachicola National Forest. Stands were thinned in May 2011 and burn regimes were executed during dormant...

  16. Selection harvests in Amazonian rainforests: long-term impacts on soil properties

    Treesearch

    K.L. McNabb; M.S. Miller; B.G. Lockaby; B.J. Stokes; R.G. Clawson; John A. Stanturf; J.N.M. Silva

    1997-01-01

    Surface soil properties were compared among disturbance classes associated with a single-tree selection harvest study installed in 1979 in the Brazilian Amazon. Response variables included pH, total N, total organic C, extractable P, exchangeable K, Ca, Mg, and bulk density. In general, concentrations of all elements displayed residual effects 16 years after harvests...

  17. The Impact of Parks on Property Values: A Review of the Empirical Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crompton, John L.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews research on whether parks and open spaces influence increasing property values (the proximate principle); the magnitude of this effect; and how distance affects the proximate principle. Data from 30 studies on the extent and legitimacy of the proximate principle find that only 5 studies do not support the proximate principle. These…

  18. Impact of deficit irrigation on sorghum physical and chemical properties and ethanol yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this research was to study the effect of irrigation levels (five levels from 304.8 to 76.2 mm water) on the physical and chemical properties and ethanol fermentation performance of sorghum. Ten sorghum samples grown under semi-arid climatic conditions were harvested in 2011 from the...

  19. Impact of deficit irrigation on maize physical and chemical properties and ethanol yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this research was to study the effect of irrigation levels (five levels from 102 to 457 mm of water) on the physical and chemical properties and ethanol fermentation performance of maize. Twenty maize samples with two crop rotation systems, grain sorghum–maize and maize–maize, were ...

  20. The economic impact of timber harvesting practices on NIPF properties in West Virginia

    Treesearch

    Stuart A. Moss; Eric. Heitzman

    2013-01-01

    Post-harvest inventories were performed on 90 timber harvests conducted on nonindustrial private forest (NIPF) properties in West Virginia. Each harvest was evaluated based on a combination of residual stocking level, proportion of the residual stand in acceptable growing stock, and damage to the residual trees. Four post-harvest stands representative of good or poor...

  1. Widows' and orphans' property disputes: the impact of AIDS in Rakai District, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Roys, C

    1995-11-01

    The 1991 census identified 44,000 orphans in the Rakai District of Uganda. The Child Social Care Project (CSCP) in the district helps ensure that orphaned children under 18 years who have lost one or both parents to AIDS receive the property rights to which they are entitled. The property rights of widows are also championed by the CSCP. The project has enjoyed considerable success in settling individual disputes. The CSCP has also had some success in enabling communities to deal appropriately with the conflicts without recourse to experts. The author notes that while it is important to promote the empowerment of women, the phrase is so overused that it is in danger of becoming meaningless. That said, a vital aspect of empowerment is economic independence. The CSCP helps women claim the right to own property, land, and housing, as well as to care for their children in the attempt to give them some degree of economic control over their destiny and that of their children. The paper discusses widows' and orphans' property disputes in sections on wills, customary law, and statutory law. The CSCP is described followed by a case study and consideration of gender and legal reform.

  2. Impact of further processing on dielectric properties of broiler poultry meat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Currently in the U.S. more than 90% of the turkeys and more than 70% of the broilers are processed beyond the normal ready-to-cook stage. Up to 50% of raw poultry meat is marinated with mixtures of water, salts, and phosphates. Physical properties of foods provide essential data to the food industr...

  3. Mesquite removal and mulching treatment impacts on herbage production and selected soil chemical properties

    Treesearch

    Stacy Pease; Peter F. Ffolliott; Leonard F. DeBano; Gerald J. Gottfried

    2003-01-01

    Determining the effects of mesquite (Prosopis velutina) overstory removal, posttreatment control of sprouting, and mulching treatments on herbage production (standing biomass) and selected soil chemical properties on the Santa Rita Experimental Range were the objectives of this study. Mesquite control consisted of complete overstory removals with and without the...

  4. Impact of solid-state properties on lubrication efficacy of magnesium stearate.

    PubMed

    Rao, K Phanidhara; Chawla, Garima; Kaushal, Aditya M; Bansal, Arvind K

    2005-01-01

    The advent of high-speed tableting and slug capsule-filling machines has ushered in an increasingly important role for the lubricants to enact during manufacturing of dosage forms. Although lubricants help in processing, they can also adversely affect the flow properties and dissolution profile of the drug. It is thus critical to maintain a balance between these two behaviors, by understanding the underlying mechanisms and using their optimum concentration in the formulation. The source and manufacturing process inculcate different solid-state properties to magnesium stearate, the most commonly used lubricant, leading to variations in its lubrication efficacy. However, there has been no complete study relating the lubrication efficacy of magnesium stearate to various levels of solid state. Hence, this study was aimed at comprehensively scrutinizing the role of molecular, particle, and bulk level properties of solid state on the lubrication efficacy of magnesium stearate. A method based on net work done during compression using texture analyzer, was developed and validated to analyze its performance. Particle and bulk-level properties were studied using microscopy, particle size analysis, and particle surface area determination, and molecular level was characterized using thermal, spectroscopic, and crystallographic methods. Interplay of solid-state characteristics such as particle size, degree of agglomeration, and crystal habit were found to markedly influence the lubrication potential of magnesium stearate.

  5. Impacts of four decades of stand density management treatments on wood properties of loblolly pine

    Treesearch

    M.A. Blazier; A. Clark; J.M. Mahon; M.R. Strub; R.F. Daniels; L.R. Schimleck

    2013-01-01

    Stand density management is a powerful silvicultural tool for manipulating stand volumes, but it has the potential to alter key wood properties. At a site in northcentral Louisiana, five density management regimes were conducted over a 45-year period. At age 49, a stratified sample of trees was destructively harvested for crown length, taper, and specific gravity...

  6. Impact of fatty ester composition on low temperature properties of biodiesel-petroleum diesel blends

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several biodiesel fuels along with neat fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) commonly encountered in biodiesel were blended with ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel at low blend levels permitted by ASTM D975 (B1-B5) and cold flow properties such as cloud point (CP), cold filter plugging point (CFPP), an...

  7. Recognizing impact glass on Mars using surface texture, mechanical properties, and mid-infrared spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, James Thomson

    A primary goal of future Mars sample return missions is to obtain samples whose isotopic ages can be used to place absolute time constraints on the relative Martian crater chronology. Thus, identifying the origin of surface material as impact or volcanic prior to its return to Earth will be critical. This dissertation focuses on four strategies for identifying and characterizing impact melt breccias from both landed and orbital perspectives. In Part 1, the geology of Viking 2 Landing (VL2) site is re-evaluated using recently acquired orbital data. Measurements of relict landform topography indicate that a layer of sedimentary material at least 120 m thick has been eroded from the site. Crater counts indicate an extreme deficiency of small-diameter craters (<500 m), indicating that resurfacing has continued up to the present. Thermal inertia data over the site is consistent with some rocks being impact-emplaced and possibly impact-derived. In Part 2, three textural characteristics were identified as potential discriminants between vesicular impact and volcanic glasses: vesicle shape (elongation), orientation, and spatial density. Additionally, a theoretical model was developed to constrain the conditions necessary for the preservation of deformed bubble textures. The results suggest that deformed bubbles are unlikely to be preserved in typical Martian basalts or basaltic andesites. Part 3 is an endeavor to extract science from mission support operations. First, a method for determining the bulk density of rocks via a pushing (i.e., by a robotic spacecraft arm) was developed and applied to VL2 rock-pushing data. Although the large measurement uncertainties preclude drawing firm conclusions, the results demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. Second, results from the Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) on the Spirit rover were analyzed to infer the mechanical strength of ground surfaces. Rocks in the Columbia Hills were found to be mechanically consistent with impact melt

  8. Impact of Non-Invasively Induced Motor Deficits on Tibial Cortical Properties in Mutant Lurcher Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jindrová, Alena; Tuma, Jan; Sládek, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that Lurcher mutant mice have significantly altered motor abilities, regarding their motor coordination and muscular strength because of olivorecebellar degeneration. We assessed the response of the cross-sectional geometry and lacuno-canalicular network properties of the tibial mid-diaphyseal cortical bone to motor differences between Lurcher and wild-type (WT) male mice from the B6CBA strain. The first data set used in the cross-sectional geometry analysis consists of 16 mice of 4 months of age and 32 mice of 9 months of age. The second data set used in the lacunar-canalicular network analysis consists of 10 mice of 4 months of age. We compared two cross-sectional geometry and four lacunar-canalicular properties by I-region using the maximum and minimum second moment of area and anatomical orientation as well as H-regions using histological differences within a cross section. We identified inconsistent differences in the studied cross-sectional geometry properties between Lurcher and WT mice. The biggest significant difference between Lurcher and WT mice is found in the number of canaliculi, whereas in the other studied properties are only limited. Lurcher mice exhibit an increased number of canaliculi (p < 0.01) in all studied regions compared with the WT controls. The number of canaliculi is also negatively correlated with the distance from the centroid in the Lurcher and positively correlated in the WT mice. When the Lurcher and WT sample is pooled, the number of canaliculi and lacunar volume is increased in the posterior Imax region, and in addition, midcortical H-region exhibit lower number of canaliculi, lacuna to lacuna distance and increased lacunar volume. Our results indicate, that the importance of precise sample selection within cross sections in future studies is highlighted because of the histological heterogeneity of lacunar-canalicular network properties within the I-region and H-region in the mouse cortical bone. PMID:27387489

  9. Strong impact of lattice vibrations on electronic and magnetic properties of paramagnetic Fe revealed by disordered local moments molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alling, B.; Körmann, F.; Grabowski, B.; Glensk, A.; Abrikosov, I. A.; Neugebauer, J.

    2016-06-01

    We study the impact of lattice vibrations on magnetic and electronic properties of paramagnetic bcc and fcc iron at finite temperature, employing the disordered local moments molecular dynamics (DLM-MD) method. Vibrations strongly affect the distribution of local magnetic moments at finite temperature, which in turn correlates with the local atomic volumes. Without the explicit consideration of atomic vibrations, the mean local magnetic moment and mean field derived magnetic entropy of paramagnetic bcc Fe are larger compared to paramagnetic fcc Fe, which would indicate that the magnetic contribution stabilizes the bcc phase at high temperatures. In the present study we show that this assumption is not valid when the coupling between vibrations and magnetism is taken into account. At the γ -δ transition temperature (1662 K), the lattice distortions cause very similar magnetic moments of both bcc and fcc structures and hence magnetic entropy contributions. This finding can be traced back to the electronic densities of states, which also become increasingly similar between bcc and fcc Fe with increasing temperature. Given the sensitive interplay of the different physical excitation mechanisms, our results illustrate the need for an explicit consideration of vibrational disorder and its impact on electronic and magnetic properties to understand paramagnetic Fe. Furthermore, they suggest that at the γ -δ transition temperature electronic and magnetic contributions to the Gibbs free energy are extremely similar in bcc and fcc Fe.

  10. Impact of thermal annealing on physical properties of vacuum evaporated polycrystalline CdTe thin films for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chander, Subhash; Dhaka, M. S.

    2016-06-01

    A study on impact of post-deposition thermal annealing on the physical properties of CdTe thin films is undertaken in this paper. The thin films of thickness 500 nm were grown on ITO and glass substrates employing thermal vacuum evaporation followed by post-deposition thermal annealing in air atmosphere within low temperature range 150-350 °C. These films were subjected to the XRD, UV-Vis NIR spectrophotometer, source meter, SEM coupled with EDS and AFM for structural, optical, electrical and surface topographical analysis respectively. The diffraction patterns reveal that the films are having zinc-blende cubic structure with preferred orientation along (111) and polycrystalline in nature. The crystallographic parameters are calculated and discussed in detail. The optical band gap is found in the range 1.48-1.64 eV and observed to decrease with thermal annealing. The current-voltage characteristics show that the CdTe films exhibit linear ohmic behavior. The SEM studies show that the as-grown films are homogeneous, uniform and free from defects. The AFM studies reveal that the surface roughness of films is observed to increase with annealing. The experimental results reveal that the thermal annealing has significant impact on the physical properties of CdTe thin films and may be used as absorber layer to the CdTe/CdS thin films solar cells.

  11. How sea level rise and storm climate impact the looming morpho-economic bubble in coastal property value.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D.; Keeler, A.; Smith, M.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Murray, A.

    2012-12-01

    property is significantly reduced with the removal of nourishment subsidies, creating a temporary bubble in coastal property value. In both models, results show the extent to which rising sea level and changing storminess impact the size of the property value bubble. The utility of the optimal control model is that it provides an empirically grounded parameterization of the coupled human coastal system. The coupled agent-based physical coastline model is more difficult to constrain with current data, however the model provides insight into the dynamics of subjective beliefs about coastal risk, which depend on the weight agents place on scientific predictions and on the way they process signals from previous climate events. Results from this model illustrate how the dynamics of the property bubble burst depend on agent beliefs about their changing environment.

  12. Impact diamonds of the Popigai astrobleme: Main properties and practical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaitis, V. L.

    2013-12-01

    In the 1960s, the so-called "schistose" placer diamonds were found in sandy sediments of Ukraine. Their primary source remained unknown and their origin was supposed to be cosmic, by analogy with the diamonds detected in some meteorites. In the early 1970s, similar diamonds were found in terrestrial rocks of the Popigai impact crater (astrobleme) in northern Siberia. It was shown that these diamonds are products of the transformation of graphite contained in gneisses (Masaitis et al., 1972). Later, such diamonds were found in other astroblemes in Russia, Ukraine, Germany, Finland, and Canada. Impact diamonds markedly differ from diamonds hosted in kimberlites and lamproites in their appearance and in other features. In the 1970s-1990s, diamonds from the Popigai astrobleme were studied in many research institutions of Russia, Ukraine, and outside the USSR. The results of these investigations have been mostly published, and my brief review is based on these data.

  13. The impact of coulombic interactions among polar molecules and metal substrates on flow and lubrication properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkagkas, K.; Ponnuchamy, V.

    2017-09-01

    In the current work we present an extensive study on the impact of short- and long-range interactions between solids and liquids on the hydrodynamic and lubrication behaviour of a tribological system. We have implemented a coarse grain molecular dynamics description of two ionic liquids (ILs) as lubricants which are confined by two infinitely long flat iron solids and which are subjected to a shearing flow. The impact of surface polarizability and molecule geometry on the ion arrangement under shearing has been studied in detail. The results have revealed two regimes of lubrication, with a liquid phase being present under low normal loads, while solidification of the ILs, accompanied by a steep rise of normal forces and significant wall slip is observed at small plate-to-plate distances.

  14. Impact of presowing laser irradiation of seeds on sugar beet properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacała, E.; Demczuk, A.; Grzyś, E.; Prośba-Białczyk, U.; Szajsner, H.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the experiment was to establish the influence of biostimulation on the sugar beet seeds. The seeds came from the specialized breeding program energ'hill or were irradiated by the laser in two doses. The impact of the biostimulation was analyzed by determining the nitrate reductase activity and the nitrate, chlorophyll and carotenoids contents in leaves, as well as, the dry matter and sugar concentration in mature roots. The field experiment was established for two sugar beet cultivars. Biostimulation by irradiation and a special seed breeding program energ'hill had a positive influence on some examined parameters (particularly on nitrate reductase activity in Ruveta and in numerous cases on photosynthetic pigments in both cultivars). Regarding the dry matter accumulation and sugar concentration this impact was more favourable for Tiziana than for Ruveta cultivar.

  15. Physical Properties of Suevite Section of the Eyreville Core, Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbra, T.; Pesonen, L. J.

    2007-12-01

    Chesapeake is a 35 Ma old shallow marine, complex impact structure with a diameter of ca. 85 km. The structure has previously been mapped with shallow drillings. Recently, the deep drilling into inner crater zone near Cape Charles was carried out in order to provide constraints on cratering processes in multi-layered marine targets. The Eyreville-1 core includes three holes with total depth of 1766m (Gohn et al. 2006). We are analyzing the fragments of the Eyreville core including post-impact, impact and basement units of the structure. The sampling interval was chosen dense enough to allow high-resolution petrophysical, paleomagnetic and rock magnetic data to be extracted from the core. Hereby we report the preliminary petrophysical and rock-magnetic data from suevite section of Eyreville core B. Results obtained so far show large variations in magnetic susceptibility data of suevite section. Polymict lithic breccias and cataclasites in lower part of the section are characterized by low magnetic susceptibility (below 0.0003 SI). The upper part, however, consists of more magnetic (susceptibility up to 0.006 SI) suevites. The rock- magnetic measurements (including thermal behavior of magnetic susceptibility and magnetic hysteresis) show the presence of magnetites in lower part of the section. Upper part shows additionally a distinct change in the slope of the susceptibility curve also near 350C, which may indicate the presence of pyrrhotites or maghemites. More extensive studies will be applied in near future in order to clarify the magnetomineralogy and will be presented. References: G. S. Gohn, C. Koeberl, K. G. Miller, W. U. Reimold, C. S. Cockell, J. W. Horton, W. E. Sanford, M. A. Voytek, 2006. Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Drilled. EOS, vol 87. nr 35

  16. Impact Strength and Flexural Properties of Laminated Plastics at High and Low Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1946-08-01

    In their impact tests at 158° and 200° Ff Meyer and Erickson stated (reference 4) that the specimen was "tested at room tempera- ture within 15 to...Pbenolio KB, Aab»»toa-r"»brlo Fb«wUo Cottoo-pikrlo Fhtnolia SB, fUgU 3tMCgtiJ-?«p«r Fhanollo Vä, LOW-PMIJOTO u nmuuJA 313, Hlsb-Profliur

  17. The properties of chondrocyte membrane reservoirs and their role in impact-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Moo, Eng Kuan; Amrein, Matthias; Epstein, Marcelo; Duvall, Mike; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Herzog, Walter

    2013-10-01

    Impact loading of articular cartilage causes extensive chondrocyte death. Cell membranes have a limited elastic range of 3-4% strain but are protected from direct stretch during physiological loading by their membrane reservoir, an intricate pattern of membrane folds. Using a finite-element model, we suggested previously that access to the membrane reservoir is strain-rate-dependent and that during impact loading, the accessible membrane reservoir is drastically decreased, so that strains applied to chondrocytes are directly transferred to cell membranes, which fail when strains exceed 3-4%. However, experimental support for this proposal is lacking. The purpose of this study was to measure the accessible membrane reservoir size for different membrane strain rates using membrane tethering techniques with atomic force microscopy. We conducted atomic force spectroscopy on isolated chondrocytes (n = 87). A micron-sized cantilever was used to extract membrane tethers from cell surfaces at constant pulling rates. Membrane tethers could be identified as force plateaus in the resulting force-displacement curves. Six pulling rates were tested (1, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 80 μm/s). The size of the membrane reservoir, represented by the membrane tether surface areas, decreased exponentially with increasing pulling rates. The current results support our theoretical findings that chondrocytes exposed to impact loading die because of membrane ruptures caused by high tensile membrane strain rates. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Martian Polar Region Impact Craters: Geometric Properties From Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Frawley, J. J.; Matias, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument onboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft has so far observed approximately 100 impact landforms in the north polar latitudes (>60 degrees N) of Mars. Correlation of the topography with Viking Orbiter images indicate that many of these are near-center profiles, and for some of the most northern craters, multiple data passes have been acquired. The northern high latitudes of Mars may contain substantial ground ice and be topped with seasonal frost (largely CO2 with some water), forming each winter. We have analyzed various diagnostic crater topologic parameters for this high-latitude crater population with the objective of characterizing impact features in north polar terrains, and we explore whether there is evidence of interaction with ground ice, frost, dune movement, or other polar processes. We find that there are substantial topographic variations from the characteristics of midlatitude craters in the polar craters that are not readily apparent from prior images. The transition from small simple craters to large complex craters is not well defined, as was observed in the midlatitude MOLA data (transition at 7-8 km). Additionally, there appear to be additional topographic complexities such as anomalously large central structures in many polar latitude impact features. It is not yet clear if these are due to target-induced differences in the formation of the crater or post-formation modifications from polar processes.

  19. The Properties of Chondrocyte Membrane Reservoirs and Their Role in Impact-Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Moo, Eng Kuan; Amrein, Matthias; Epstein, Marcelo; Duvall, Mike; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Herzog, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Impact loading of articular cartilage causes extensive chondrocyte death. Cell membranes have a limited elastic range of 3–4% strain but are protected from direct stretch during physiological loading by their membrane reservoir, an intricate pattern of membrane folds. Using a finite-element model, we suggested previously that access to the membrane reservoir is strain-rate-dependent and that during impact loading, the accessible membrane reservoir is drastically decreased, so that strains applied to chondrocytes are directly transferred to cell membranes, which fail when strains exceed 3–4%. However, experimental support for this proposal is lacking. The purpose of this study was to measure the accessible membrane reservoir size for different membrane strain rates using membrane tethering techniques with atomic force microscopy. We conducted atomic force spectroscopy on isolated chondrocytes (n = 87). A micron-sized cantilever was used to extract membrane tethers from cell surfaces at constant pulling rates. Membrane tethers could be identified as force plateaus in the resulting force-displacement curves. Six pulling rates were tested (1, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 80 μm/s). The size of the membrane reservoir, represented by the membrane tether surface areas, decreased exponentially with increasing pulling rates. The current results support our theoretical findings that chondrocytes exposed to impact loading die because of membrane ruptures caused by high tensile membrane strain rates. PMID:24094400

  20. Acoustic impact localization in plates: properties and stability to temperature variation.

    PubMed

    Ribay, Guillemette; Catheline, Stefan; Clorennec, Dominique; Ing, Ros Kiri; Quieffin, Nicolas; Fink, Mathias

    2007-02-01

    Localizing an impact generated by a simple finger knock on plate-shaped solid objects is made possible in an acoustic time reversal experiment. It is shown that the technique works with a single accelerometer. To better understand the phenomenon and to know exactly the nature of the created waves, a two-dimensional (2-D) elastic simulation is used, showing that in a very good approximation the A0 Lamb mode is the only propagating one. However, it is shown that, within one wavelength distance from the edges, evanescent waves must be taken into account. As a first consequence, the ability to distinguish two neighboring impacts improves when the plate thickness decreases and the frequency increases. As a second consequence, it is expected theoretically that temperature variations lead to a stretching or a contraction of acoustic signatures. The experimental demonstration used a heterodyne interferometer to measure the impulse responses created by a knock on a plate during the cooling. A simple algorithm is shown to perfectly compensate for temperature impacts, which demonstrates the feasibility of the technique for outdoor time reversal interactive experiments.

  1. Martian Polar Region Impact Craters: Geometric Properties From Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Frawley, J. J.; Matias, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument onboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft has so far observed approximately 100 impact landforms in the north polar latitudes (>60 degrees N) of Mars. Correlation of the topography with Viking Orbiter images indicate that many of these are near-center profiles, and for some of the most northern craters, multiple data passes have been acquired. The northern high latitudes of Mars may contain substantial ground ice and be topped with seasonal frost (largely CO2 with some water), forming each winter. We have analyzed various diagnostic crater topologic parameters for this high-latitude crater population with the objective of characterizing impact features in north polar terrains, and we explore whether there is evidence of interaction with ground ice, frost, dune movement, or other polar processes. We find that there are substantial topographic variations from the characteristics of midlatitude craters in the polar craters that are not readily apparent from prior images. The transition from small simple craters to large complex craters is not well defined, as was observed in the midlatitude MOLA data (transition at 7-8 km). Additionally, there appear to be additional topographic complexities such as anomalously large central structures in many polar latitude impact features. It is not yet clear if these are due to target-induced differences in the formation of the crater or post-formation modifications from polar processes.

  2. Impact of pulp and paper mill effluents and solid wastes on soil mineralogical and physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Gopi; Bhattacharyya, Krishna G

    2015-03-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the impact of the effluents and the solid wastes generated by a giant pulp and paper mill in the northeastern part of India on soil mineralogy of the area. The impacts were monitored by analysis of soil samples from seven sites located in the potential impact zone and a control site where any kind of effluent discharge or solid waste dumping was absent. The soil belonged to medium texture type (sandy clay loam, sandy loam, loamy sand, and silt loam), and the soil aggregate analysis indicated higher levels of organic carbon, pH, electrical conductivity, effective cation exchange capacity, and mean weight diameter at sites receiving effluents and solid wastes from the pulp and paper mill. Depletion in soil silica level and in feldspar and quartz contents and rise in iron and calcium contents at the sites receiving effluents from the pulp and paper mill indicated significant influence on soil mineralogy. The soil contained a mixture of minerals consisting of tectosilicates (with silicate frameworks as in quartz or feldspar), phylosilicates (layered clays like kaolinite, smectite, chlorite, illite, etc.), and carbonates. Absence of pure clay minerals indicated a state of heterogeneous intermediate soil clay transformation. The significance of the mixed mineralogy in relation to the disposal of effluents and dumping of solid wastes is discussed in details.

  3. Tensile and charpy impact properties of irradiated reduced-activation ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on eight reduced-activation Cr-W steels after irradiation to 15-17 and 26-29 dpa, and Charpy impact tests were conducted on the steels irradiated to 26-29 dpa. Irradiation was in the Fast Flux Test Facility at 365{degrees}C on steels containing 2.25-12% Cr, varying amounts of W, V, and Ta, and 0.1%C. Previously, tensile specimens were irradiated to 6-8 dpa and Charpy specimens to 6-8, 15-17, and 20-24 dpa. Tensile and Charpy specimens were also thermally aged to 20000 h at 365{degrees}C. Thermal aging had little effect on the tensile behavior or the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), but several steels showed a slight increase in the upper-shelf energy (USE). After {approx}7 dpa, the strength of the steels increased and then remained relatively unchanged through 26-29 dpa (i.e., the strength saturated with fluence). Post-irradiation Charpy impact tests after 26-29 dpa showed that the loss of impact toughness, as measured by an increase in DBTT and a decrease in the USE, remained relatively unchanged from the values after 20-24 dpa, which had been relatively unchanged from the earlier irradiations. As before, the two 9Cr steels were the most irradiation resistant.

  4. Phase transformation and impact properties in the experimentally simulated weld heat-affected zone of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho; Jang, Min-Ho; Park, Min-Gu; Han, Heung Nam

    2014-12-01

    In this work, the phase transformation and impact properties in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel are investigated. The HAZs were experimentally simulated using a Gleeble simulator. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite through normalizing at 1000 °C and tempering at 750 °C, while the HAZs consisted of martensite, δ-ferrite and a small volume of autotempered martensite. The impact properties using a Charpy V-notch impact test revealed that the HAZs showed poor impact properties due to the formation of martensite and δ-ferrite as compared with the base steel. In addition, the impact properties of the HAZs further deteriorated with an increase in the δ-ferrite fraction caused by increasing the peak temperature. The impact properties of the HAZs could be improved through the formation of tempered martensite after post weld heat treatment (PWHT), but they remained lower than that of the base steel because the δ-ferrite remained in the tempered HAZs.

  5. Physical property data from the ICDP-USGS Eyreville cores A and B, Chesapeake Bay impact structure, Virginia, USA, acquired using a multisensor core logger

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, H.A.; Murray, J.B.

    2009-01-01

    The International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) drilled three core holes to a composite depth of 1766 m within the moat of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure. Core recovery rates from the drilling were high (??90%), but problems with core hole collapse limited the geophysical downhole logging to natural-gamma and temperature logs. To supplement the downhole logs, ??5% of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure cores was processed through the USGS GeoTek multisensor core logger (MSCL) located in Menlo Park, California. The measured physical properties included core thickness (cm), density (g cm-3), P-wave velocity (m s-1), P-wave amplitude (%), magnetic susceptibility (cgs), and resistivity (ohm-m). Fractional porosity was a secondary calculated property. The MSCL data-sampling interval for all core sections was 1 cm longitudinally. Photos of each MSCL sampled core section were imbedded with the physical property data for direct comparison. These data have been used in seismic, geologic, thermal history, magnetic, and gravity models of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure. Each physical property curve has a unique signature when viewed over the full depth of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure core holes. Variations in the measured properties reflect differences in pre-impact target-rock lithologies and spatial variations in impact-related deformation during late-stage crater collapse and ocean resurge. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  6. Impact of first-principles properties of deuterium–tritium on inertial confinement fusion target designs

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X. Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.; Collins, L. A.; Kress, J. D.; Militzer, B.

    2015-05-15

    A comprehensive knowledge of the properties of high-energy-density plasmas is crucial to understanding and designing low-adiabat, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through hydrodynamic simulations. Warm-dense-matter (WDM) conditions are routinely accessed by low-adiabat ICF implosions, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy often play an important role in determining the properties of warm dense plasmas. The WDM properties of deuterium–tritium (DT) mixtures and ablator materials, such as the equation of state, thermal conductivity, opacity, and stopping power, were usually estimated by models in hydro-codes used for ICF simulations. In these models, many-body and quantum effects were only approximately taken into account in the WMD regime. Moreover, the self-consistency among these models was often missing. To examine the accuracy of these models, we have systematically calculated the static, transport, and optical properties of warm dense DT plasmas, using first-principles (FP) methods over a wide range of densities and temperatures that cover the ICF “path” to ignition. These FP methods include the path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and quantum-molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, which treat electrons with many-body quantum theory. The first-principles equation-of-state table, thermal conductivities (κ{sub QMD}), and first principles opacity table of DT have been self-consistently derived from the combined PIMC and QMD calculations. They have been compared with the typical models, and their effects to ICF simulations have been separately examined in previous publications. In this paper, we focus on their combined effects to ICF implosions through hydro-simulations using these FP-based properties of DT in comparison with the usual model simulations. We found that the predictions of ICF neutron yield could change by up to a factor of ∼2.5; the lower the adiabat of DT capsules, the more variations in hydro-simulations. The FP

  7. Impact of first-principles properties of deuterium–tritium on inertial confinement fusion target designs

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; ...

    2015-04-20

    In this study, a comprehensive knowledge of the properties of high-energy-density plasmas is crucial to understanding and designing low-adiabat, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through hydrodynamic simulations. Warm-dense-matter (WDM) conditions are routinely accessed by low-adiabat ICF implosions, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy often play an important role in determining the properties of warm dense plasmas. The WDM properties of deuterium–tritium (DT) mixtures and ablator materials, such as the equation of state, thermal conductivity, opacity, and stopping power, were usually estimated by models in hydro-codes used for ICF simulations. In these models, many-body and quantum effects were only approximatelymore » taken into account in the WMD regime. Moreover, the self-consistency among these models was often missing. To examine the accuracy of these models, we have systematically calculated the static, transport, and optical properties of warm dense DT plasmas, using first-principles (FP) methods over a wide range of densities and temperatures that cover the ICF “path” to ignition. These FP methods include the path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and quantum-molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, which treat electrons with many-body quantum theory. The first-principles equation-of-state table, thermal conductivities (KQMD), and first principles opacity table of DT have been self-consistently derived from the combined PIMC and QMD calculations. They have been compared with the typical models, and their effects to ICF simulations have been separately examined in previous publications. In this paper, we focus on their combined effects to ICF implosions through hydro-simulations using these FP-based properties of DT in comparison with the usual model simulations. We found that the predictions of ICF neutron yield could change by up to a factor of –2.5; the lower the adiabat of DT capsules, the more variations in hydro

  8. Environmental and management impacts on temporal variability of soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodner, G.; Scholl, P.; Loiskandl, W.; Kaul, H.-P.

    2012-04-01

    Soil hydraulic properties underlie temporal changes caused by different natural and management factors. Rainfall intensity, wet-dry cycles, freeze-thaw cycles, tillage and plant effects are potential drivers of the temporal variability. For agricultural purposes it is important to determine the possibility of targeted influence via management. In no-till systems e.g. root induced soil loosening (biopores) is essential to counteract natural soil densification by settling. The present work studies two years of temporal evolution of soil hydraulic properties in a no-till crop rotation (durum wheat-field pea) with two cover crops (mustard and rye) having different root systems (taproot vs. fibrous roots) as well as a bare soil control. Soil hydraulic properties such as near-saturated hydraulic conductivity, flow weighted pore radius, pore number and macroporosity are derived from measurements using a tension infiltrometer. The temporal dynamics are then analysed in terms of potential driving forces. Our results revealed significant temporal changes of hydraulic conductivity. When approaching saturation, spatial variability tended to dominate over the temporal evolution. Changes in near-saturated hydraulic conductivity were mainly a result of changing pore number, while the flow weighted mean pore radius showed less temporal dynamic in the no-till system. Macroporosity in the measured range of 0 to -10 cm pressure head ranged from 1.99e-4 to 8.96e-6 m3m-3. The different plant coverage revealed only minor influences on the observed system dynamics. Mustard increased slightly the flow weighted mean pore radius, being 0.090 mm in mustard compared to 0.085 mm in bare soil and 0.084 mm in rye. Still pore radius changes were of minor importance for the overall temporal dynamics. Rainfall was detected as major driving force of the temporal evolution of structural soil hydraulic properties at the site. Soil hydraulic conductivity in the slightly unsaturated range (-7 cm to -10

  9. Impact of first-principles properties of deuterium–tritium on inertial confinement fusion target designs

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.; Collins, L. A.; Kress, J. D.; Militizer, B.

    2015-04-20

    In this study, a comprehensive knowledge of the properties of high-energy-density plasmas is crucial to understanding and designing low-adiabat, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through hydrodynamic simulations. Warm-dense-matter (WDM) conditions are routinely accessed by low-adiabat ICF implosions, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy often play an important role in determining the properties of warm dense plasmas. The WDM properties of deuterium–tritium (DT) mixtures and ablator materials, such as the equation of state, thermal conductivity, opacity, and stopping power, were usually estimated by models in hydro-codes used for ICF simulations. In these models, many-body and quantum effects were only approximately taken into account in the WMD regime. Moreover, the self-consistency among these models was often missing. To examine the accuracy of these models, we have systematically calculated the static, transport, and optical properties of warm dense DT plasmas, using first-principles (FP) methods over a wide range of densities and temperatures that cover the ICF “path” to ignition. These FP methods include the path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and quantum-molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, which treat electrons with many-body quantum theory. The first-principles equation-of-state table, thermal conductivities (KQMD), and first principles opacity table of DT have been self-consistently derived from the combined PIMC and QMD calculations. They have been compared with the typical models, and their effects to ICF simulations have been separately examined in previous publications. In this paper, we focus on their combined effects to ICF implosions through hydro-simulations using these FP-based properties of DT in comparison with the usual model simulations. We found that the predictions of ICF neutron yield could change by up to a factor of –2.5; the lower the adiabat of DT capsules, the more variations in hydro

  10. Analysis of the Thermal Comfort and Impact Properties of the Neoprene-Spacer Fabric Structure for Preventing the Joint Damages

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Ehsan; Hasani, Hossein; Rafeian, Homa; Hashemibeni, Batool

    2013-01-01

    Background: Frequent moves at the joint, plus external factors such as trauma, aging, and etc., are all reasons for joint damages. In order to protect and care of joints, the orthopedic textiles are used. To protect the joints, these textiles keep muscles warm to prevent shock. To produce orthopedic textiles, Neoprene foams have been traditionally used. These foams are flexible and resist impact, but are not comfortable enough and might cause problems for the consumer. This study introduces a new structure consisting of perforated Neoprene foam attached to the spacer fabric and also compares the properties of thermal and moisture comfort and impact properties of this structure in comparison with Neoprene foam. Methods: In order to measure the factors related to the samples lateral pressure behavior, a tensile tester was used. A uniform pressure is applied to the samples and a force – displacement curve is obtained. The test continues until the maximum compression force is reached to 50 N. The area under the curve is much greater; more energy is absorbed during the impact. In order to investigate the dynamic heat and moisture transfer of fabrics, an experimental apparatus was developed. This device made the simulation of sweating of human body possible and consisted of a controlled environmental chamber, sweating guarded hot plate, and data acquisition system. Results: The findings show that the Neoprene-spacer fabric structure represents higher toughness values compared to other samples (P ≤ 0.001). Neoprene-spacer fabric structure (A3) has higher rate of moisture transport than conventional Neoprene foam; because of undesirable comfort characteristics in Neoprene. Conclusions: Results of the tests indicate full advantage of the new structure compared with the Neoprene foam for use in orthopedic textiles (P ≤ 0.001). PMID:24049594

  11. Impact of North American intense fires on aerosol optical properties measured over the European Arctic in July 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowicz, K. M.; Pakszys, P.; Ritter, C.; Zielinski, T.; Udisti, R.; Cappelletti, D.; Mazzola, M.; Shiobara, M.; Xian, P.; Zawadzka, O.; Lisok, J.; Petelski, T.; Makuch, P.; Karasiński, G.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper impact of intensive biomass burning (BB) in North America in July 2015, on aerosol optical and microphysical properties measured in the European Arctic, is discussed. This study was made within the framework of the Impact of Absorbing aerosols on Radiating forcing in the European Arctic project. During the BB event aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm exceeded 1.2 in Spitsbergen and 0.7 in Andenes (Norway). Angstrom exponent exceeded 1.4, while the absorbing Angstrom exponent varied between 1 and 1.25. BB aerosols were observed in humid atmosphere with a total water vapor column between 2 and 2.5 cm. In such conditions aerosols are activated and may produce clouds at different altitudes. Vertical structure of aerosol plumes over Svalbard, obtained from ceilometers and lidars, shows variability of range-corrected signal between surface and middle and upper troposphere. Aerosol backscattering coefficients show values up to 10-5 m-1 sr-1 at 532 nm. Aerosol surface observations indicate chemical composition typical for biomass burning particles and very high single scattering properties. Scattering and absorption coefficients at 530 nm were up to 130 and 15 Mm-1, respectively. Single scattering albedo at the surface varied from 0.9 to 0.94. The averaged values over the entire atmospheric column ranged from 0.93 to 0.99. Preliminary statistics of model and Sun photometer data as well as previous studies indicate that this event, in the Arctic region, must be considered extreme (such AOD was not observed in Svalbard since 2005) with a significant impact on energy budget.

  12. A systematic review of the psychometric properties, usability and clinical impacts of mobile mood-monitoring applications in young people.

    PubMed

    Dubad, M; Winsper, C; Meyer, C; Livanou, M; Marwaha, S

    2017-06-23

    Mobile mood-monitoring applications are increasingly used by mental health providers, widely advocated within research, and a potentially effective method to engage young people. However, little is known about their efficacy and usability in young populations. A systematic review addressing three research questions focused on young people: (1) what are the psychometric properties of mobile mood-monitoring applications; (2) what is their usability; and (3) what are their positive and negative clinical impacts? Findings were synthesised narratively, study quality assessed and compared with evidence from adult studies. We reviewed 25 articles. Studies on the psychometric properties of mobile mood-monitoring applications were sparse, but indicate questionable to excellent internal consistency, moderate concurrent validity and good usability. Participation rates ranged from 30% to 99% across studies, and appeared to be affected by methodological factors (e.g. payments) and individual characteristics (e.g. IQ score). Mobile mood-monitoring applications are positively perceived by youth, may reduce depressive symptoms by increasing emotional awareness, and could aid in the detection of mental health and substance use problems. There was very limited evidence on potential negative impacts. Evidence for the use of mood-monitoring applications in youth is promising but limited due to a lack of high-quality studies. Future work should explicate the effects of mobile mood-monitoring applications on effective self-regulation, clinical outcomes across disorders and young people's engagement with mental health services. Potential negative impacts in this population should also be investigated, as the adult literature suggests that application use could potentially increase negativity and depression symptoms.

  13. The impact of human activities on the flushing properties of a semi-enclosed lagoon: Xiaohai, Hainan, China.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenping; Shen, Jian; Jia, Jianjun

    2008-02-01

    In this study, a Lagrangian particle tracking model driven by hydrodynamic fields was used to investigate the changes of flushing properties in Xiaohai Lagoon resulting from natural evolution and influences of human activities. Comparisons of residence times between 1936 and 2001 indicate that the flushing efficiency of the lagoon has deteriorated greatly during the past seven decades. Over this period, the average residence time of the lagoon has increased from 45 to 71 days, an increase of 59%. The Lagrangian residual velocity has decreased from 1936 to 2001 in the large portions of the lagoon, and the spatial distribution pattern of the residual current has changed significantly. The well-developed horizontal circulations in 1936 disappeared. Instead, the horizontal Lagrangian residual velocity showed uniformly seaward motion with reduced velocity in 2001. Human activities have incurred great impacts on the deterioration of flushing efficiency. The reduction of river inflow imposed the most significant impact, causing an increase of average residence time by 33%. The land reclamation in the lagoon came as the second most significant factor, causing an increase of 15%. Closure of the North Opening had posed minor impact. The model results suggest that restoring the river inflow, as well as the dredging of the tidal channel and the inner lagoon, should be the top proprieties for future water quality management.

  14. Impact of natural organic matter on monochloramine reduction by granular activated carbon: the role of porosity and electrostatic surface properties

    SciTech Connect

    Julian L. Fairey; Gerald E. Speitel Jr.; Lynn E. Katz

    2006-07-01

    Steady-state monochloramine reduction in fixed-bed reactors (FBRs) was quantified on five types of granular activated carbon (GAC) using two background waters - one natural source water (LAW) containing 2.5-3.5 mg/L organic carbon and one synthetic organic-free water (NW). GACs used were coal-based Filtrasorb 400, Filtrasorb 600, Centaur and Medical Grade, and wood-based AquaGuard. While more monochloramine was reduced at steady-state using NW compared to LAW for each GAC and empty-bed contact time studied, the differences in removal varied considerably among the GACs tested. Physical characterization of the GACs suggested that the degree of interference caused by natural organic matter (NOM) increased with increasing GAC surface area contained within pores greater than 2 nm in width. Acid/base and electrostatic properties of the GACs were not found to be significant in terms of NOM uptake, which indicated that size exclusion effects of the GAC pores overwhelmed the impact of the GAC surface chemistry. Therefore, selection of GAC to limit the impact of NOM on monochloramine reduction in FBRs should be based on pore size distribution alone, with the impact of NOM decreasing with decreasing mesoporosity and macroporosity. 23 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Stabilization of the Dimeric Birch Pollen Allergen Bet v 1 Impacts Its Immunological Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Stefan; Ackaert, Chloé; Samonig, Martin; Asam, Claudia; Briza, Peter; Horejs-Hoeck, Jutta; Cabrele, Chiara; Ferreira, Fatima; Duschl, Albert; Huber, Christian; Brandstetter, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Many allergens share several biophysical characteristics, including the capability to undergo oligomerization. The dimerization mechanism in Bet v 1 and its allergenic properties are so far poorly understood. Here, we report crystal structures of dimeric Bet v 1, revealing a noncanonical incorporation of cysteine at position 5 instead of genetically encoded tyrosine. Cysteine polysulfide bridging stabilized different dimeric assemblies, depending on the polysulfide linker length. These dimers represent quaternary arrangements that are frequently observed in related proteins, reflecting their prevalence in unmodified Bet v 1. These conclusions were corroborated by characteristic immunologic properties of monomeric and dimeric allergen variants. Hereby, residue 5 could be identified as an allergenic hot spot in Bet v 1. The presented results refine fundamental principles in protein chemistry and emphasize the importance of protein modifications in understanding the molecular basis of allergenicity. PMID:24253036

  16. Impact of feature-size dependent etching on the optical properties of photonic crystal devices

    SciTech Connect

    Berrier, A.; Anand, S.; Ferrini, R.; Talneau, A.; Houdre, R.

    2008-05-01

    Feature size dependence in Ar/Cl{sub 2} chemically assisted ion beam etching of InP-based photonic crystals (PhCs) and its influence on the optical properties of PhC devices operating in the band gap are investigated. The analysis of the measured quality factors, the determined mirror reflectivities, and losses of one-dimensional Fabry-Perot cavities clearly demonstrates the importance of feature-size dependent etching. The optical properties show a dramatic improvement up to a hole depth of about 3.5 {mu}m that is primarily due to a significant reduction in extrinsic losses. However, beyond this hole depth, the improvement is at a lower rate, which suggests that extrinsic losses, although present, are not dominant.

  17. Impact of silica-coating on the microwave absorption properties of carbonyl iron powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Feng, W. J.; Wang, J. S.; Zhao, X.; Zheng, W. Q.; Yang, H.

    2015-11-01

    Microwave absorption properties, especially the band width and depth of reflection loss are highlighted as key measurement in studies of microwave absorber. In order to improve the band width and depth of reflection loss of carbonyl iron powder (CIP), we prepared SiO2 layers on the surface of CIP by using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as a SiO2 source and 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) as a surface modifier. SiO2 layer was formed by the hydrolysis of TEOS. The results show that after treatment the CIP is covered by a 5-10 nm coating layer. Contrast to uncoated samples, coated samples show improved absorption properties. The minimum of reflection loss is -38.8 dB at 11 GHz and the band width of reflection loss exceeding -10 dB is from 8 GHz to 14 GHz.

  18. Seed incorporation during vinification and its impact on chemical and organoleptic properties in Syzygium cumini wine.

    PubMed

    VenuGopal, K S; Anu-Appaiah, K A

    2017-12-15

    Syzgium cumini (Jamun) is an evergreen tropical tree, its various parts are known for many therapeutic properties. The present work represents the production of wines from jamun fruits using two different native isolates (Saccharomyces cerevisiae - KF551990 and Pichia gummiguttae - MCC 1273) and influence of jamun seeds on the physico-chemical parameters, chromatic properties, phenolic components and sensory attributes of wine. Wine produced was bottle aged for one year. On aging there was a reduction in bitterness and astringency. Aging lead to reduction in monomeric anthocyanin with an increase in co-pigmented and polymeric anthocynins thus affecting the wine color. Anthocyanin analysis in jamun wine indicated petunidin 3,5-diglucoside as the principal anthocyanin. PCA analysis of wine revealed association of young jamun wine with anthocyanin components. PLS analysis exhibited both positive and negative correlation between various attributes indicating sensory perception of jamun wine is affected by overall composition of the wine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ultra-high pressure homogenization-induced changes in skim milk: impact on acid coagulation properties.

    PubMed

    Serra, Mar; Trujillo, Antonio J; Jaramillo, Pamela D; Guamis, Buenaventura; Ferragut, Victoria

    2008-02-01

    The effects of ultra-high pressure homogenization (UHPH) on skim milk yogurt making properties were investigated. UHPH-treated milk was compared with conventionally homogenised (15 MPa) heat-treated skim milk (90 degrees C for 90 s), and to skim milk treated under the same thermal conditions but fortified with 3% skim milk powder. Results of the present study showed that UHPH is capable of reducing skim milk particle size which leads to the formation of finer dispersions than those obtained by conventional homogenisation combined with heat treatment. In addition, results involving coagulation properties and yogurt characteristics reflected that, when increasing UHPH pressure conditions some parameters such as density of the gel, aggregation rate and water retention are improved.

  20. Stabilization of the dimeric birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 impacts its immunological properties.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Stefan; Ackaert, Chloé; Samonig, Martin; Asam, Claudia; Briza, Peter; Horejs-Hoeck, Jutta; Cabrele, Chiara; Ferreira, Fatima; Duschl, Albert; Huber, Christian; Brandstetter, Hans

    2014-01-03

    Many allergens share several biophysical characteristics, including the capability to undergo oligomerization. The dimerization mechanism in Bet v 1 and its allergenic properties are so far poorly understood. Here, we report crystal structures of dimeric Bet v 1, revealing a noncanonical incorporation of cysteine at position 5 instead of genetically encoded tyrosine. Cysteine polysulfide bridging stabilized different dimeric assemblies, depending on the polysulfide linker length. These dimers represent quaternary arrangements that are frequently observed in related proteins, reflecting their prevalence in unmodified Bet v 1. These conclusions were corroborated by characteristic immunologic properties of monomeric and dimeric allergen variants. Hereby, residue 5 could be identified as an allergenic hot spot in Bet v 1. The presented results refine fundamental principles in protein chemistry and emphasize the importance of protein modifications in understanding the molecular basis of allergenicity.

  1. Molecular simulations of hydrocarbon lubricants: Impact of molecular architecture on performance properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kioupis, Loukas I.

    2000-07-01

    With the increased power of modern computers, molecular modeling has been used widely and proven to be a valuable tool for elucidating the physical processes important in many industrial and engineering problems. Of particular interest to us is the rheology and physical chemistry of complex fluids, such as hydrocarbon lubricants and polymers. The goal is to provide qualitative and quantitative molecular-level explanations for the behavior of such fluids, and provide guidance in the development of new improved materials. For example, during the production of poly-α-olefin (PAO) synthetic lubricants, the number of the isomer skeletal structures that can be obtained is staggering. Which of the countless PAO isomers produce a lubricant with superior performance properties? How does it behave under different operational conditions of temperature, pressure, and shear rate? A fundamental understanding of the effect that molecular structure has on the oil's rheological and lubricant performance is first needed, in order to answer these questions. To serve this purpose, we have developed efficient molecular dynamics (MD) simulation programs, which utilize multiple time step algorithms and parallel computational techniques. This enables us to conduct simulations of typical PAO isomers and compute the viscosity, as well as several other dynamic and static properties, as a function of temperature, pressure, and shear rate. The key molecular mechanisms that determine important macroscopic properties, such as viscosity index, viscosity-pressure coefficient, traction coefficient, and shear thinning behavior are discussed. Based on this analysis, lubricant and traction fluid structures that have a high likelihood of having desirable properties are proposed. In addition, studies on simple alkane mixtures are presented, in an attempt to understand the more complex polydisperse lubricant fluids, their blends, and their interaction with additives.

  2. Impact of amylose content on starch physicochemical properties in transgenic sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenzhi; Yang, Jun; Hong, Yan; Liu, Guiling; Zheng, Jianli; Gu, Zhengbiao; Zhang, Peng

    2015-05-20

    The intrinsic relationship between amylose content and starch physicochemical properties was studied using six representative starch samples (amylose content 0-65%) produced from transgenic sweet potato (cultivar Xushu22). The transgenic lines (waxy and high-amylose) and wild-type (WT) sweet potatoes were analyzed for amylose content, particle size and chain length distribution, X-ray diffraction analysis, thermal characteristics, pasting and rheological property. Compared to the WT starch, the waxy and high-amylose starches showed larger average granule sizes and had fewer short chains and more medium and long chains. X-ray diffractogram analysis revealed that high-amylose starches show a type-B crystal form with a markedly decreased degree of crystallinity in contrast to the type-A crystal form of the WT and waxy starches. In the high-amylose sweet potato starches, the rise of setback value and the reduction of breakdown value led to the high shear resistance as indicated by the higher G', G", and tanδ from the oscillation test. ΔH was not found to be decreased with the reduction of crystallinity. The shear stress resistance of starch gel after gelatinization was also enhanced as amylose content increased. Principal component analysis also confirmed that the amylose content greatly influenced the starch structure and properties, e.g., storage modulus, setback value, and average chain length. Thus, our study not only shed light on how amylose content affects starch properties but also identified novel starches that are available for various applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of biochar addition on thermal properties of a sandy soil: modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usowicz, Boguslaw; Lipiec, Jerzy; Lukowski, Mateusz; Bis, Zbigniew; Marczewski, Wojciech; Usowicz, Jerzy

    2017-04-01

    Adding biochar can alter soil thermal properties and increase the water holding capacity and reduce the mineral soil fertilization. Biochar in the soil can determine the heat balance on the soil surface and the temperature distribution in the soil profile through changes in albedo and the thermal properties. Besides, amendment of soil with biochar results in improvement of water retention, fertility and pH that are of importance in sandy and acid soils, widely used in agriculture. In this study we evaluated the effects of wood-derived biochar (0, 10, 20, and 40 Mg ha-1) incorporated to a depth of 0-15 cm on the thermal conductivity, heat capacity, thermal diffusivity and porosity in sandy soil under field conditions. In addition, soil-biochar mixtures of various percentages of biochar were prepared to determine the thermal properties in function of soil water status and density in laboratory. It was shown that a small quantity of biochar added to the soil does not significantly affect all the thermal properties of the soil. Increasing biochar concentration significantly enhanced porosity and decreased thermal conductivity and diffusivity with different rate depending on soil water status. The soil thermal conductivity and diffusivity varied widely and non-linearly with water content for different biochar content and soil bulk density. However, the heat capacity increased with biochar addition and water content linearly and was greater at higher than lower soil water contents. The measured and literature thermal data were compared with those obtained from the analytic model of Zhang et al. (2013) and statistical-physical model (Usowicz et al., 2016) based on soil texture, biochar content, bulk density and water content.

  4. Prediction and impact of sea level rise on properties and infrastructure of Washington, DC.

    PubMed

    Ayyub, Bilal M; Braileanu, Haralamb G; Qureshi, Naeem

    2012-11-01

    The city of Washington, District of Columbia (DC) will face flooding, and eventual geographic changes, in both the short- and long-term future because of sea level rise (SLR) brought on by climate change, including global warming. To fully assess the potential damage, a linear model was developed to predict SLR in Washington, DC, and its results compared to other nonlinear model results. Using geographic information systems (GIS) and graphical visualization, analytical models were created for the city and its underlying infrastructure. Values of SLR used in the assessments were 0.1 m for the year 2043 and 0.4 m for the year 2150 to model short-term SLR; 1.0 m, 2.5 m, and 5.0 m were used for long-term SLR. All necessary data layers were obtained from free data banks from the U.S. Geological Survey and Washington, DC government websites. Using GIS software, inventories of the possibly affected infrastructure were made at different SLR. Results of the analysis show that low SLR would lead to a minimal loss of city area. Damages to the local properties, however, are estimated at an assessment value of at least US$2 billion based on only the direct losses of properties listed in real estate databases, without accounting for infrastructure damages that include military installations, residential areas, governmental property, and cultural institutions. The projected value of lost property is in excess of US$24.6 billion at 5.0 m SLR. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  5. Impacts of land use conversion on soil properties and soil erodibility.

    PubMed

    Korkanc, Selma Yasar; Ozyuvaci, Necdet; Hizal, Ahmet

    2008-05-01

    Land use conversion can affect natural ecological processes such as surface runoff and erosion. Therefore, it has potential to change soil stability To investigate this process in depth, Iskalan creek catchment in the Black sea region, where excessive land use applications and erosion events have often occured, was selected as the study area. The objective was to determine the effects of land use conversion on soil properties, soil erodibility and the relationships among soil properties and some erodibility indices. Duplicate topsoil samples were taken by using steel cylinders at 100 different sampling points from three different land use types; 34 of them are in farmlands, 34 in rangelands and 32 in forestlands. Soil particle size distribution, loss of ignition, pH, electrical conductivity skeleton percentage and three erodibility indices were determined. Data were analysed by using Pearson correlation analysis (at 95% and 99% significance level), ANOVA and Tukey's test at 95 % significance level. According to study results, land use conversion affects some properties of soils significantly Loss of ignition of soils in forests was significantly higher than soils in farmlands and rangelands. Soil skeleton percentage in rangelands and farmlands were significantly different. The study results showed that there was significant difference between pH of soils in forests and farmlands (p < 0.05). Pearson correlation analysis results showed significant correlations among erodibility indices and certain soil properties such as clay and sand fraction of soils (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01). Topsoils of the study area were sensitive to erosion according to all three erodibility indices. The most sensitive soils were in farmlands.

  6. Potential Impacts of Spilled Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Chemicals on Water Resources: Types, Volumes, and Physical-chemical Properties of Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knightes, C. D.; Daiss, R.; Williams, L.; Singer, A.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) fluid chemicals spilled on-site may impact drinking water resources. While chemicals generally make up <2% of the total injected fluid composition by mass, spills may have undiluted concentrations. HF fluids typically consist of a mixture of base fluid, proppant, and additives. Additives, comprised of one or more chemicals, are serve a specific engineering purpose (e.g., friction reducer, scale inhibitor, biocide). As part of the USEPA's Draft Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing for Oil and Gas on Drinking Water Resources, we investigated the different types, volumes injected, and physical-chemical properties of HF fluid chemicals. The USEPA identified 1,076 chemicals used in HF fluids, based on 10 sources covering chemical use from 2005 to 2013. These chemicals fall into different classes: acids, alcohols, aromatic hydrocarbons, bases, hydrocarbon mixtures, polysaccharides, and surfactants. The physical-chemical properties of these chemicals vary, which affects their movement through the environment if spilled. Properties range from fully miscible to insoluble, from highly hydrophobic to highly hydrophilic. Most of these chemicals are not volatile. HF fluid composition varies from site to site depending on a range of factors. No single chemical or set of chemicals are used at every site. A median of 14 chemicals are used per well, with a range of four to 28 (5th and 95th percentiles). Methanol was the chemical most commonly reported in FracFocus 1.0 (72% of disclosures), and hydrotreated light petroleum distillates and hydrochloric acid were both reported in over half the disclosures. Operators store chemicals on-site, often in multiple containers (typically in 760 to 1,500 L totes). We estimated that the total volume of all chemicals used per well ranges from approximately 10,000 to 110,000 L. The views expressed here are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views or policies of the USEPA.

  7. Atmospheric Aging and Its Impacts on Physical Properties of Soot Aerosols: Results from the 2009 SHARP/SOOT Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Khalizov, A. F.; Zheng, J.; Reed, C. C.; Collins, D. R.; Olaguer, E. P.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols impact the Earth energy balance directly by scattering solar radiation back to space and indirectly by changing the albedo, frequency, and lifetime of clouds. Carbon soot (or black carbon) produced from incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass burning represents a major component of primary aerosols. Because of high absorption cross-sections over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectra, black carbon contributes significantly to climate change by direct radiative forcing and is the second most important component causing global warming after carbon dioxide. In areas identified as aerosol hotspots, which include many megacities, solar heating by soot-containing aerosols is roughly comparable to heating due to greenhouse gases. In addition, light absorbing soot aerosols may reduce photolysis rates at the surface level, producing a noticeable impact on photochemistry. Enhanced light absorption and scattering by soot can stabilize the atmosphere, retarding vertical transport and exacerbating accumulation of gaseous and particulate matter (PM) pollutants within the planetary boundary layer. Less surface heating and atmospheric stabilization may decrease formation of clouds, and warming in the atmosphere can evaporate existing cloud droplets by lowering relative humidity. Furthermore, soot-containing aerosols represent a major type of PM that has adverse effects on human health. When first emitted, soot particles are low-density aggregates of loosely connected primary spherules. Freshly emitted soot particles are typically hydrophobic, but may become cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) during atmospheric aging by acquiring hydrophilic coatings. Hygroscopic soot particles, being efficient CCN, can exert indirect forcing on climate. In this talk, results will be presented on measurements of soot properties during the 2009 SHARP/SOOT Campaign. Ambient aerosols and fresh soot particles injected into a captured air chamber were monitored to

  8. Impact of Nanostructure on Mechanical Properties of Norbornene-based Block Copolymers under Simulated Operating Conditions for Biobutanol Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Changhuai; Takigawa, Tamami; Burtovvy, Oleksandr Sasha; Langsdorf, Leah; Jablonski, Dane; Bell, Andrew; Vogt, Bryan D

    2015-06-10

    The structure and mechanical properties of a novel block copolymer (BCP) system with T(g)'s for both segments exceeding 300 °C, poly(butylnorbornene)-block-poly(hydroxyhexafluoroisopropyl norbornene) (BuNB-b-HFANB), are investigated as a function of processing conditions used for solvent vapor annealing (SVA). Solvent selection impacts long-range order markedly, but unexpectedly vertical orientation of cylinders are preferred over a wide range of solubility parameters, as determined by atomic force microscopy and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering. The mechanical properties (elastic modulus, fracture strength, and onset fracture strain) are dependent upon the long-range order induced during SVA and determined using the combination of surface wrinkling and cracking. The modulus and fracture strength of the films increase from 1.44 GPa and 12.1 MPa to 1.77 GPa and 17.5 MPa, respectively, whereas the onset fracture strain decreases from 1.6% to approximately 0.6% as the ordering is improved. The polarity difference in the segments of the BCP is attractive for membrane separations, especially butanol-water. For biobutanol recovery, the titers are typically <3 wt % butanol; exposure of the BCP membrane to aqueous 1 wt % butanol decreases the elastic modulus to approximately 0.90 GPa, irrespective of the morphology, despite the high T(g) of both segments and limited swelling (5.0 wt %). Correspondingly, the onset fracture strain of these swollen films is estimated to increase significantly to 6-7%. These results indicate that operating conditions impact the mechanical performance of BCP membranes more than their morphology despite the high T(g) of the neat copolymer. Wrinkling and cracking provide a facile route to test the mechanical properties of membranes under simulated operando conditions.

  9. Investigating the impact of microbial interactions with geologic media on geophysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Caroline Ann

    The goals of this study were to investigate the effect of: (1) microbial metabolic byproducts, microbial growth, and biofilm formation on the low frequency electrical properties of porous media, (2) biofilm formation on acoustic wave properties, and (3) the natural electrical (self-potential) signatures associated with an in-situ biological permeable reactive barrier (PRB). The results suggest: (1) increases in electrolytic conductivity are consistent with increased concentrations of organic acids and biosurfactants; (2) mineral weathering promoted by organic acids causes increases in electrolytic conductivity, concomitant with increases in major cation concentrations; (3) interfacial conductivity generally parallels microbial cell concentrations and biofilm formation; (4) variations in microbial growth and biofilms causes spatiotemporal heterogeneity in the elastic properties of porous media; (5) SP signatures associated with the injection of groundwater into an in-situ biological PRB are dominated by diffusion potentials induced by the injections. The results suggest that electrolytic conductivity may be useful as an indicator of metabolism, while interfacial conductivity may be used as proxy indicator for microbial growth and biofilm formation in porous media. In addition, acoustic measurements may provide diagnostic spatiotemporal data for the validation of bioclogging models/simulations. Collectively, this study provides further evidence that geophysical measurements are sensitive to microbial-induced changes to geologic media, and may be useful for the detection and monitoring of subsurface microbial growth, activity, and distribution such as in microbial enhanced oil recovery, assessing biofilm barriers used for contaminant remediation, or as sealants for reservoirs in CO2 sequestration studies.

  10. Impact of self-assembly properties on antibacterial activity of short acyl-lysine oligomers.

    PubMed

    Sarig, Hadar; Rotem, Shahar; Ziserman, Lior; Danino, Dganit; Mor, Amram

    2008-12-01

    We investigated both the structural and functional consequences of modifying the hydrophobic, lipopeptide-mimetic oligo-acyl-lysine (OAK) N(alpha)-hexadecanoyl-l-lysyl-l-lysyl-aminododecanoyl-l-lysyl-amide (c(16)KKc(12)K) to its unsaturated analog hexadecenoyl-KKc(12)K [c(16(omega7))KKc(12)K]. Despite similar tendencies for self-assembly in solution (critical aggregation concentrations, approximately 10 muM), the analogous OAKs displayed dissimilar antibacterial properties (e.g., bactericidal kinetics taking minutes versus hours). Diverse experimental evidence provided insight into these discrepancies: whereas c(16(omega7))KKc(12)K created wiry interconnected nanofiber networks, c(16)KKc(12)K formed both wider and stiffer fibers which displayed distinct binding properties to phospholipid membranes. Unsaturation also shifted their gel-to-liquid transition temperatures and altered their light-scattering properties, suggesting the disassembly of c(16(omega7))KKc(12)K in the presence of bacteria. Collectively, the data indicated that the higher efficiency in interfering with bacterial viability emanated from a wobbly packing imposed by a single double bond. This suggests that similar strategies might improve hydrophobic OAKs and related lipopeptide antibiotics.

  11. Impact of high pressure treatment on functional, rheological, pasting, and structural properties of lentil starch dispersions.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Jasim; Thomas, Linu; Taher, Ayoub; Joseph, Antony

    2016-11-05

    Lentil starch (LS) dispersions (flour to water 1:4w/w) were subjected to high pressure (HP) treatment at 0.1, 400, 500 and 600MPa for 10min, followed by evaluation on the functional, particle size, rheological, pasting, and structural properties of post-process samples. Water holding capacity of pressurized starch increased with the pressure intensity due to increase in damaged starch. The amount of resistant starch increased from 5 to 6.8% after pressure treatment at 600MPa. An increase in starch granule particle size (196-207μm) was obvious after HP treatment. The lentil starch was completely gelatinized after pressure treatment at 600MPa for 10min as evidenced from differential scanning calorimetry, rheometry, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy observation. The elastic modulus, G' of lentil starch gel was less frequency dependent, and higher in magnitude at high pressure (>500MPa) than at lower pressure range (≤400MPa). XRD analysis revealed the disappearance of two diffraction peak intensities at 14.86° and 22.82° at 600MPa for 10min, which confirms the transformation of crystalline to amorphous region of lentil starch. Pasting properties were significantly influenced by the pressure treatment especially at 600MPa, resulting in a considerable decrease in peak viscosity, breakdown and final viscosity, and an increase in peak time. It can be inferred that the functional properties of pressure-treated LS are mainly based on the structural destruction of granules.

  12. On the impact of indium distribution on the electronic properties in InGaN nanodisks

    SciTech Connect

    Benaissa, M. E-mail: benaissa@fsr.ac.ma; Sigle, W.; Aken, P. A. van; Ng, T. K.; Ooi, B. S.; El Bouayadi, R.; Jahangir, S.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2015-03-09

    We analyze an epitaxially grown heterostructure composed of InGaN nanodisks inserted in GaN nanowires in order to relate indium concentration to the electronic properties. This study was achieved with spatially resolved low-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy using monochromated electrons to probe optical excitations—plasmons—at nanometer scale. Our findings show that each nanowire has its own indium fluctuation and therefore its own average composition. Due to this indium distribution, a scatter is obtained in plasmon energies, and therefore in the optical dielectric function, of the nanowire ensemble. We suppose that these inhomogeneous electronic properties significantly alter band-to-band transitions and consequently induce emission broadening. In addition, the observation of tailing indium composition into the GaN barrier suggests a graded well-barrier interface leading to further inhomogeneous broadening of the electro-optical properties. An improvement in the indium incorporation during growth is therefore needed to narrow the emission linewidth of the presently studied heterostructures.

  13. Diminished Cartilage Creep Properties and Increased Trabecular Bone Density Following a Single, Sub-Fracture Impact of the Rabbit Femoral Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Joseph; Zaegel, Melissa A.; Martinez, Mario D.; Silva, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injury to articular cartilage can lead to post-traumatic arthritis. We used a custom pendulum device to deliver a single, near-fracture impact to the medial femoral condyles of rabbits. Impact was localized to a region ~3 mm in diameter, and impact stress averaged ~100 MPa. Animals were euthanized at 0, 1 and 6 months after impact. Cartilage mechanical properties from impacted and sham knees were evaluated by creep-indentation testing and periarticular trabecular bone was evaluated by microCT and histomorphometry. Impact caused immediate and statistically significant loss of cartilage thickness (-40% vs. sham) and led to a greater than two-fold increase in creep strain. From 0 to 6 months after impact, the ability of cartilage to recover from creep deformation became significantly impaired (percent recovery different from control at 1 and 6 months). At 1 month, there was a 33% increase in the trabecular bone volume fraction of the epiphysis beneath the site of impact compared to control, and increased bone formation was observed histologically. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that a single, high-energy impact below the fracture threshold leads to acute deleterious changes in the viscoelastic properties of articular cartilage that worsen with time, while at the same time stimulating increased bone formation beneath the impact site. PMID:20225288

  14. Impact of an intensive management on soil biochemical and biological properties in an agricultural soil of Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotti, R.; D'Ascoli, R.; Rao, M. A.; Marzaioli, R.; Rutigliano, F. A.; Gianfreda, L.

    2009-04-01

    An intensive management of agricultural soils is widely carried out to increase vegetation productivity. Nevertheless, the large use of machineries, chemical fertilizers and pesticides can often cause, in time, a substantial decline in soil fertility by affecting soil physical and chemical properties and, in turn, growth and activity of soil microbial community. In fact, alteration in soil structure, nutrient losses and, in particular, changes in quality and quantity of soil organic matter are some of the principal soil degradation processes deriving from an intensive agricultural management that can affect, in different ways, soil biochemical and biological properties. The aim of this research was to assess the impact of intensive management on agricultural soils by measuring soil physical, chemical and biochemical/biological properties. The use of appropriate indicators as quantitative tools could allow to assess soil quality. Moreover, although soil physical and chemical properties have received great attention, soil biochemical/biological properties, such as enzyme activities and microbial biomass, functionally related properties involved in the nutrient cycles, can be considered as sensitive indicators of soil quality and health changes because, they show a faster turn over compared to soil organic matter. Our attention was focused on the Plane of Sele river (Campania region, Italy), an area characterized by an intensive agriculture and greenhouse cultures. Twenty-five farms were chosen, with the aid of regional soil map, in order to get soils with different physical and chemical properties. As common trait, the selected farms, all with greenhouse cultures, used no organic amendments but only mineral compounds to fertilize soils. Moreover, to better understand the impact of intensive agricultural practices on soil of each farm, control soils from orchards or uncultivated plots were chosen. In each farm soil samples were collected in three different plots

  15. Functional gradients in the pericarp of the green coconut inspire asymmetric fibre-composites with improved impact strength, and preserved flexural and tensile properties.

    PubMed

    Graupner, Nina; Labonte, David; Humburg, Heide; Buzkan, Tayfun; Dörgens, Anna; Kelterer, Wiebke; Müssig, Jörg

    2017-02-28

    Here we investigate the mechanical properties and structural design of the pericarp of the green coconut (Cocos nucifera L.). The pericarp showed excellent impact characteristics, and mechanical tests of its individual components revealed gradients in stiffness, strength and elongation at break from the outer to the inner layer of the pericarp. In order to understand more about the potential effect of such gradients on 'bulk' material properties, we designed simple, graded, cellulose fibre-reinforced polylactide (PLA) composites by stacking layers reinforced with fibres of different mechanical properties. Tensile properties of the graded composites were largely determined by the 'weakest' fibre, irrespective of the fibre distribution. However, a graded design led to pronounced asymmetric bending and impact properties. Bio-inspired, asymmetrically graded composites showed a flexural strength and modulus comparable to that of the strongest reference samples, but the elongation at maximum load was dependent on the specimen orientation. The impact strength of the graded composites showed a similar orientation-dependence, and peak values exceeded the impact strength of a non-graded reference composite containing identical fibre fractions by up to a factor of three. In combination, our results show that an asymmetric, systematic variation of fibre properties can successfully combine desirable properties of different fibre types, suggesting new routes for the development of high-performance composites, and improving our understanding of the structure-function relationship of the coconut pericarp.

  16. Impact of long-range transport pollution on aerosol properties over West Africa: observations during the DACCIWA airborne campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denjean, Cyrielle; Bourrianne, Thierry; Burnet, Frederic; Deroubaix, Adrien; Brito, Joel; Dupuy, Régis; Colomb, Aurélie; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Sellegri, Karine; Chazette, Patrick; Duplissy, Jonathan; Flamant, Cyrille

    2017-04-01

    Southern West Africa (SWA) is a region highly vulnerable to climate change. Emissions of anthropogenic pollution have increased substantially over the past decades in the region and are projected to keep increasing. The region is also strongly impacted by important natural pollution from distant locations. Biomass burning mainly from vegetation fires in Central Africa and mineral dust from the Saharan and Sahel-Sudan regions are advected by winds to the SWA region especially in summer. Both biomass burning and mineral dust aerosols scatter and absorb solar radiation and are able to significantly modify the regional radiative budget. Presently, the potential radiative impact of dust and biomass burning particles on SWA is unclear due to inadequate data information on the aerosols properties and vertical distribution. In the framework of the Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions in West Africa (DACCIWA) project, an unprecedented field campaign took place in summer 2016 in West Africa. The ATR-42 research aircraft operated by SAFIRE performed twenty flights to sample the local air pollution from maritime traffic and coastal megacities, as well as regional pollution from biomass burning and desert dust. The aircraft was equipped with state of the art in situ instrumentation to measure the aerosol optical properties (CAPS, nephelometer, PSAP), the aerosol size distribution (SMPS, GRIMM, USHAS, PCASP, FSSP) and the aerosol chemical composition (SP2, AMS). A mini backscattered lidar system provided additional measurements of the aerosol vertical structure and the aerosol optical properties such as the particulate depolarization ratio. The CHIMERE chemistry and transport model has been used to characterize the source area and the long-range transport of dust and biomass burning plumes. Here, we investigate the aerosol microphysical, chemical and optical properties of biomass burning and dust aerosols transported in SWA. In particular the following questions will be

  17. Protecting intellectual property associated with Canadian academic clinical trials--approaches and impact.

    PubMed

    Ross, Sue; Magee, Laura; Walker, Mark; Wood, Stephen

    2012-12-27

    Intellectual property is associated with the creative work needed to design clinical trials. Two approaches have developed to protect the intellectual property associated with multicentre trial protocols prior to site initiation. The 'open access' approach involves publishing the protocol, permitting easy access to the complete protocol. The main advantages of the open access approach are that the protocol is freely available to all stakeholders, permitting them to discuss the protocol widely with colleagues, assess the quality and rigour of the protocol, determine the feasibility of conducting the trial at their centre, and after trial completion, to evaluate the reported findings based on a full understanding of the protocol. The main potential disadvantage of this approach is the potential for plagiarism; however if that occurred, it should be easy to identify because of the open access to the original trial protocol, as well as ensure that appropriate sanctions are used to deal with plagiarism. The 'restricted access' approach involves the use of non-disclosure agreements, legal documents that must be signed between the trial lead centre and collaborative sites. Potential sites must guarantee they will not disclose any details of the study before they are permitted to access the protocol. The main advantages of the restricted access approach are for the lead institution and nominated principal investigator, who protect their intellectual property associated with the trial. The main disadvantages are that ownership of the protocol and intellectual property is assigned to the lead institution; defining who 'needs to know' about the study protocol is difficult; and the use of non-disclosure agreements involves review by lawyers and institutional representatives at each site before access is permitted to the protocol, significantly delaying study implementation and adding substantial indirect costs to research institutes. This extra step may discourage sites from

  18. Protecting intellectual property associated with Canadian academic clinical trials - approaches and impact

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Intellectual property is associated with the creative work needed to design clinical trials. Two approaches have developed to protect the intellectual property associated with multicentre trial protocols prior to site initiation. The ‘open access’ approach involves publishing the protocol, permitting easy access to the complete protocol. The main advantages of the open access approach are that the protocol is freely available to all stakeholders, permitting them to discuss the protocol widely with colleagues, assess the quality and rigour of the protocol, determine the feasibility of conducting the trial at their centre, and after trial completion, to evaluate the reported findings based on a full understanding of the protocol. The main potential disadvantage of this approach is the potential for plagiarism; however if that occurred, it should be easy to identify because of the open access to the original trial protocol, as well as ensure that appropriate sanctions are used to deal with plagiarism. The ‘restricted access’ approach involves the use of non-disclosure agreements, legal documents that must be signed between the trial lead centre and collaborative sites. Potential sites must guarantee they will not disclose any details of the study before they are permitted to access the protocol. The main advantages of the restricted access approach are for the lead institution and nominated principal investigator, who protect their intellectual property associated with the trial. The main disadvantages are that ownership of the protocol and intellectual property is assigned to the lead institution; defining who ‘needs to know’ about the study protocol is difficult; and the use of non-disclosure agreements involves review by lawyers and institutional representatives at each site before access is permitted to the protocol, significantly delaying study implementation and adding substantial indirect costs to research institutes. This extra step may discourage

  19. Impact Strength and Flexural Properties Enhancement of Methacrylate Silane Treated Oil Palm Mesocarp Fiber Reinforced Biodegradable Hybrid Composites

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Ariffin, Hidayah; Yunus, Wan Md. Zin Wan

    2014-01-01

    Natural fiber as reinforcement filler in polymer composites is an attractive approach due to being fully biodegradable and cheap. However, incompatibility between hydrophilic natural fiber and hydrophobic polymer matrix restricts the application. The current studies focus on the effects of incorporation of silane treated OPMF into polylactic acid (PLA)/polycaprolactone (PCL)/nanoclay/OPMF hybrid composites. The composites were prepared by melt blending technique and characterize the composites with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). FTIR spectra indicated that peak shifting occurs when silane treated OPMF was incorporated into hybrid composites. Based on mechanical properties results, incorporation of silane treated OPMF enhances the mechanical properties of unmodified OPMF hybrid composites with the enhancement of flexural and impact strength being 17.60% and 48.43%, respectively, at 10% fiber loading. TGA thermogram shows that incorporation of silane treated OPMF did not show increment in thermal properties of hybrid composites. SEM micrographs revealed that silane treated OPMF hybrid composites show good fiber/matrix adhesion as fiber is still embedded in the matrix and no cavity is present on the surface. Water absorption test shows that addition of less hydrophilic silane treated OPMF successfully reduces the water uptake of hybrid composites. PMID:25254230

  20. Impact of anti-tacking agents on properties of gas-entrapped membrane and effervescent floating tablets.

    PubMed

    Kriangkrai, Worawut; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Sriamornsak, Pornsak; Pongjanyakul, Thaned; Sungthongjeen, Srisagul

    2014-12-01

    Tackiness caused by the gas-entrapped membrane (Eudragit(®)RL 30D) was usually observed during storage of the effervescent floating tablets, leading to failure in floatation and sustained release. In this work, common anti-tacking agents (glyceryl monostearate (GMS) and talc) were used to solve this tackiness problem. The impact of anti-tacking agent on the properties of free films and corresponding floating tablets was investigated. GMS was more effective than talc in reducing tackiness of the film. Addition and increasing amount of anti-tacking agents lowered the film mechanical strength, but the coating films were still strong and flexible enough to resist the generated gas pressure inside the floating tablet. Wettability and water vapor permeability of the film decreased with increasing level of anti-tacking agents as a result of their hydrophobicity. No interaction between anti-tacking agents and polymer was observed as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffractometry, and differential scanning calorimetry studies. Increasing amount of anti-tacking agents decreased time to float and tended to retard drug release of the floating tablets. Floating properties and drug release were also influenced by type of anti-tacking agents. The obtained floating tablets still possessed good floating properties and controlled drug release even though anti-tacking agent had some effects. The results demonstrated that the tackiness problem of the floating tablets could be solved by incorporating anti-tacking agent into the gas-entrapped membrane.

  1. Impact of forest vegetation on soil characteristics: a correlation between soil biological and physico-chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Chandra, L R; Gupta, S; Pande, V; Singh, N

    2016-12-01

    Temperate and dry deciduous forest covers major portion of terrestrial ecosystem in India. The two forest types with different dominant tree species differ in litter quality and root exudates, thereby exerting species-specific impact on soil properties and microbial activity. This study aims to examine the influence of forest type or dominant tree species on soil physico-chemical properties and its relationship with microbial characters in temperate and dry deciduous forest types. We assessed soil physico-chemical properties among five different sites located within the selected forest stand covered by different dominant species. The soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC), nitrogen (MBN) and phosphorous (MBP) were recorded high in oak soil, i.e., the MBC/TOC ratio was significantly higher in dry deciduous forest. Basal respiration was recorded highest at oak-mixed soil while qCO2 was comparatively high in oak soil. Temperate forest displayed the highest MBC/MBN ratio, while dry deciduous forest had the highest MBC/MBP ratio. Moreover, the MBN/TN ratio was found high in dry deciduous forest, whereas MBP/TP ratio was high in temperate forest. Additionally, the enzyme activities were significantly higher in an oak-mixed soil among all the sites. The results displayed that the soil microbial characters and soil physico-chemical uniqueness are interrelated, and were significantly influenced by specific forest type and climatic variables.

  2. Impact strength and flexural properties enhancement of methacrylate silane treated oil palm mesocarp fiber reinforced biodegradable hybrid composites.

    PubMed

    Eng, Chern Chiet; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Zainuddin, Norhazlin; Ariffin, Hidayah; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan

    2014-01-01

    Natural fiber as reinforcement filler in polymer composites is an attractive approach due to being fully biodegradable and cheap. However, incompatibility between hydrophilic natural fiber and hydrophobic polymer matrix restricts the application. The current studies focus on the effects of incorporation of silane treated OPMF into polylactic acid (PLA)/polycaprolactone (PCL)/nanoclay/OPMF hybrid composites. The composites were prepared by melt blending technique and characterize the composites with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). FTIR spectra indicated that peak shifting occurs when silane treated OPMF was incorporated into hybrid composites. Based on mechanical properties results, incorporation of silane treated OPMF enhances the mechanical properties of unmodified OPMF hybrid composites with the enhancement of flexural and impact strength being 17.60% and 48.43%, respectively, at 10% fiber loading. TGA thermogram shows that incorporation of silane treated OPMF did not show increment in thermal properties of hybrid composites. SEM micrographs revealed that silane treated OPMF hybrid composites show good fiber/matrix adhesion as fiber is still embedded in the matrix and no cavity is present on the surface. Water absorption test shows that addition of less hydrophilic silane treated OPMF successfully reduces the water uptake of hybrid composites.

  3. Impacts of Aerosol, Surface and Meteorological Conditions on Polar Cloud Properties: Use of In-Situ Cloud Probe Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarquhar, Greg; Wu, Wei; Maahn, Maximilian

    2017-04-01

    Over the Southern Oceans, models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) almost universally underestimate sunlight reflected by near surface cloud in the Austral summer compared to Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data. These and other biases in radiative fluxes over the Arctic are believed to be associated with the poorly modeled properties of low-level clouds that are frequently composed of supercooled water. Because changes in cloud macrophysical (heights, coverage) and microphysical (sizes, shapes and phases of particles) can alter the radiative impact of clouds, it is important to understand the processes that control cloud properties. In this presentation, in-situ microphysical observations obtained in prior arctic field campaigns (e.g., the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign ISDAC, the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment M-PACE, and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Carbon Measurements Program-V ACME-V) are discussed. Strategies for comparing data collected in campaigns with different probes and processed with varying algorithms are introduced, along with procedures for using cloud probe data to refine assumptions about cloud properties in model schemes (e.g., size distributions, mass-dimension, and velocity-dimension relations) that affect rates at which mass and number are transferred between hydrometeor categories and hence estimates of latent and radiative heating, which feeds back on dynamics and hence cloud properties. Such observations from past arctic field experiments have enhanced our understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions acting in single-layer mixed phase clouds that are ubiquitous in the Arctic. But, it is still unknown what controls the amount of supercooled water in polar clouds (especially in frequently occurring complex multi-layer clouds), how probability distributions of cloud properties vary with aerosol loading and composition in different surface and meteorological conditions, and how

  4. Impact of nitrate addition on biofilm properties and activities in rising main sewers.

    PubMed

    Mohanakrishnan, J; Gutierrez, O; Sharma, K R; Guisasola, A; Werner, U; Meyer, R L; Keller, J; Yuan, Z

    2009-09-01

    Anaerobic sewer biofilm is a composite of many different microbial populations, including sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), methanogens and heterotrophic bacteria. Nitrate addition to sewers in an attempt to control hydrogen sulfide concentrations affects the behaviour of these populations, which in turn impacts on wastewater characteristics. Experiments were carried out on a laboratory reactor system simulating a rising main to determine the impact of nitrate addition on the microbial activities of anaerobic sewer biofilm. Nitrate was added to the start of the rising main during sewage pump cycles at a concentration of 30 mg-N L(-1) for over 5 months. While it reduced sulfide levels at the outlet of the system by 66%, nitrate was not toxic or inhibitory to SRB activity and did not affect the dominant SRB populations in the biofilm. Long-term nitrate addition in fact stimulated additional SRB activity in downstream biofilm. Nitrate addition also stimulated the activity of nitrate reducing, sulfide oxidizing bacteria that appeared to be primarily responsible for the prevention of sulfide build up in the wastewater in the presence of nitrate. A short adaptation period of three to four nitrate exposure events (approximately 10 h) was required to stimulate biological sulfide oxidation, beyond which no sulfide accumulation was observed under anoxic conditions. Nitrate addition effectively controlled methane concentrations in the wastewater. The nitrate uptake rate of the biofilm increased with repeated exposure to nitrate, which in turn increased the consumption of biodegradable COD in the wastewater. These results provide a comprehensive understanding of the impact of nitrate addition on wastewater composition and sewer biofilm microbial activities, which will facilitate optimization of nitrate dosing for effective sulfide control in rising main sewers.

  5. IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Elana M. Chapman; Andre Boehman; Kimberly Wain; Wallis Lloyd; Joseph M. Perez; Donald Stiver; Joseph Conway

    2003-06-01

    The objectives of this research program are to develop information on lubricity and viscosity improvers and their impact on the wear mechanisms in fuel injectors operating on blends of dimethyl ether (DME) and diesel fuel. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In the shuttle bus project, we have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Our strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. In this project, we have sought to develop methods for extending the permissible DME content in the DME-diesel blends without experiencing rapid injector failure due to wear. To date, our activities have covered three areas: examination of the impact of lubricity additives on the viscosity of DME, development of a high-pressure lubricity test apparatus for studies of lubricity and viscosity improvers and development of an injector durability stand for evaluation of wear rates in fuel injectors. This report provides summaries of the progress toward evaluation of the viscosity impacts of lubricity additives, completion of both experimental systems and a summary of the plan for completion of the project objectives.

  6. A comparative study of the impact properties of sandwich materials with different cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, K. R.; Shankar, K.; Viot, P.; Guerard, S.

    2012-08-01

    Sandwich panels are made of two high strength skins bonded to either side of a light weight core and are used in applications where high stiffness combined with low structural weight is required. The purpose of this paper is to compare the mechanical response of several sandwich panels whose core materials are different. Sandwich panels with glass fibre-reinforced polymer face sheets were used, combined with five different cores; polystyrene foam, polypropylene honeycomb, two different density Balsa wood and Cork. All specimens were subjected to low velocity impact and their structural response (Force-displacement curves) were compared to quasistatic response of the panel tested using an hemispherical indenter.

  7. Impact of radiation exposure on mechanical and superconducting properties of Bi-2212 superconductor ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, A. A.; Hamid, N. A.; Asbullah, M. S. N.

    2013-06-01

    In the last few years, rapid improvements have been made to improve the quality of high-temperature superconductors. Amongst the high temperature superconductors, the Bi-based (BSCCO) consists of interest for various applications. Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 (Bi-2212) have been used to make superconducting tapes and wires. Unlike conventional compound superconductors, the critical current, Ic of oxide superconducting tapes in the elastic strain is generally almost constant and degrades suddenly when it is subject to mechanical force by a strain beyond the limit. In this research, the Bi-2212 samples were prepared by solid state reaction method. Precursors oxide powders were pressed to pallets under hydrostatic pressure around 7 tons or 70 000 psi and then sintered at temperature of 850°C for 24 hours. The effect of radiation before and after irradiation on mechanical and superconducting properties of the samples was studied. Irradiation was carried out with a beam of 3 MeV, current of 10 mA and radiation dose of 100 and 200 KGray. The x-ray diffraction analysis is used to verify Bi-2212 phase. The samples were also characterized through electrical properties by using the four-point probe method. The microstructure of the samples was studied by using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and compression test was also conducted using the stress-strain relationship. The phase structure and electrical properties of the samples degrade slightly with irradiation exposure. Nevertheless the microstructure showed that when initial electron radiation dose was increased up to 100 kGray, the grain growth, texture and core density improved slightly but the grain growth, size and core density begin to deteriorate after the electron radiation dose is increased to 200 kGray. This may be due to the formation of larger size defects within the microstructure of the Bi-2212 phase as the radiation dose increases.

  8. Impact of the Soak and the Malt on the Physicochemical Properties of the Sorghum Starches

    PubMed Central

    Claver, Irakoze Pierre; Zhang, Haihua; Li, Qin; Zhu, Kexue; Zhou, Huiming

    2010-01-01

    Starches were isolated from soaked and malted sorghum and studied to understand their physicochemical and functional properties. The swelling power (SP) and the water solubility index (WSI) of both starches were nearly similar at temperatures below 50 °C, but at more than 50 °C, the starch isolated from malted sorghum showed lower SP and high WSI than those isolated from raw and soaked sorghum. The pasting properties of starches determined by rapid visco-analyzer (RVA) showed that malted sorghum starch had a lower viscosity peak value (86 BU/RVU) than raw sorghum starch (454 BU/RVU). For both sorghum, X-ray diffractograms exhibited an A-type diffraction pattern, typical of cereal starches and the relative degrees of crystallinity ranged from 9.62 to 15.50%. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) revealed that raw sorghum starch showed an endotherm with a peak temperature (Tp) at 78.06 °C and gelatinization enthalpies of 2.83 J/g whereas five-day malted sorghum starch had a Tp at 47.22 °C and gelatinization enthalpies of 2.06 J/g. Storage modulus (G′) and loss modulus (G″) of all starch suspensions increased steeply to a maximum at 70 °C and then decreased with continuous heating. The structural analysis of malted sorghum starch showed porosity on the granule’s surface susceptible to the amylolysis. The results showed that physicochemical and functional properties of sorghum starches are influenced by soaking and malting methods. PMID:21152287

  9. On the impact of the magnitude of Interstellar pressure on physical properties of Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anathpindika, S.; Burkert, A.; Kuiper, R.

    2017-01-01

    Recently reported variations in the typical physical properties of Galactic and extra-Galactic molecular clouds (MCs), and in their star-forming ability have been attributed to local variations in the magnitude of interstellar pressure. Inferences from these surveys have called into question two long-standing beliefs : (1) that MCs are Virialised, and (2) they obey the Larson's third law. Here we invoked the framework of cloud-formation via collision between warm gas-flows to examine if these latest observational inferences can be reconciled. To this end we traced the temporal evolution of the gas surface density, the fraction of dense gas, the distribution of gas column density (N-PDF), and the Virial nature of the assembled clouds. We conclude, these physical properties exhibit temporal variation and their respective peak-magnitude also increases in proportion with the magnitude of external pressure, Pext. The velocity dispersion in assembled clouds appears to follow the power-law, σ _{gas}∝ P_{ext}^{0.23}. The power-law tail at higher densities becomes shallower with increasing magnitude of external pressure for Pext/kB ≲ 107 K cm-3; at higher magnitudes such as those typically found in the Galactic CMZ (Pext/kB > 107 K cm-3), the power-law shows significant steepening. While our results are broadly consistent with inferences from various recent observational surveys, it appears, MCs do not exhibit a unique set of properties, but rather a wide variety that can be reconciled with a range of magnitudes of pressure between 104 K cm-3 - 108 K cm-3.

  10. Impact of phytoplankton community structure and function on marine particulate optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Malcolm Neil

    Phytoplankton are an ecologically important and diverse group of organisms whose distribution, abundance, and population dynamics vary significantly over small spatial (cm) and temporal (minutes) scales in the coastal ocean. Our inability to observe phytoplankton community structure and function at these small scales has severely limited our understanding of the fundamental ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that drive phytoplankton growth, mortality, adaptation and speciation. The goal of this dissertation was to enhance our understanding of phytoplankton ecology by improving in situ observational techniques based on the optical properties of cells, colonies, populations, and communities. Field and laboratory studies were used to determine the effects of phytoplankton species composition, morphology, and physiology on the inherent optical properties of communities and to explore the adaptive significance of bio-optically important cellular characteristics. Initial field studies found a strong association between species composition and the relative magnitude and shape of particulate absorption, scattering, and attenuation coefficient spectra. Subsequent field studies using scanning flow cytometry to directly measure optically important phytoplankton and non-algal particle characteristics demonstrated that the size and pigment content of large (>20 microm) phytoplankton cells and colonies vary significantly with the slope of particulate attenuation and absorption spectra, and with the ratio of particulate scattering to absorption. These relationships enabled visualization of phytoplankton community composition and mortality over small spatial and temporal scales derived from high resolution optical measurements acquired with an autonomous profiling system. Laboratory studies with diverse uni-algal cultures showed that morphological and physiological characteristics of cells and colonies can account for ˜30% of the optical variation observed in natural

  11. Impact of Residential Prairie Gardens on the Physical Properties of Urban Soil in Madison, Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Marie R; Balster, Nick J; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Prairie gardens have become a common addition to residential communities in the midwestern United States because prairie vegetation is native to the region, requires fewer resources to maintain than turfgrass, and has been promoted to help remediate urban soil. Although prairie systems typically have deeper and more diverse root systems than traditional turfgrass, no one has tested the effect of this vegetation type on the physical properties of urban soil. We hypothesized that residential prairie gardens would yield lower soil bulk density (BD), lower penetration resistance (PR), greater soil organic matter (SOM), and greater saturated hydraulic conductivity () compared with turfgrass lawns. To test this hypothesis, we examined 12 residential properties in Madison, WI, where homeowners had established a prairie garden within their turfgrass lawn. Despite a consistent trend in the difference between vegetation types, no significant main effects were found (i.e., a difference between vegetation types when averaged over depth) for any of the four soil properties measured in this study. Differences were found with depth and depended on a significant interaction with vegetation type. At the surface depth (0-0.15 m), soil beneath prairie gardens had 10% lower mean BD, 15% lower mean PR, 25% greater level of SOM, and 33% greater compared with soil beneath the adjacent lawns. These differences were not detected at deeper sampling intervals of 0.15 to 0.30 m and 0.30 to 0.45 m. Although not statistically significant, the consistent trend and direction among soil variables suggest that residential prairie gardens had changed the surface soil at a rate that marginally outpaced turfgrass and calls for controlled experiments to identify the mechanisms that might enhance these trends.

  12. Sweetness and other sensory properties of model fruit drinks: Does viscosity have an impact?

    PubMed

    Brandenstein, Cai V S; Busch-Stockfisch, Mechthild; Fischer, Markus

    2015-03-15

    The impact of thickening agents and viscosity levels on sensory perception was studied in model fruit drinks. Four formulations were prepared that varied in the sweetener blend (erythritol, maltitol and/or steviol glycosides). Locust bean gum and its blends with either xanthan or carrageenan were used to adjust viscosity levels (20, 40, and 70 mPa s). The ranges of viscosity and sweetness level were selected to represent a typical concentration range in commercially available beverages. An increase in viscosity resulted in significant increases in pulpiness, sliminess and perceived viscosity (P-values ≤ 0.001), which were not dependent on sweeteners or hydrocolloid type. Taste perception remained largely unchanged irrespective of the hydrocolloid used. The impact of viscosity on sweetness and taste perception was much smaller in the concentrations used than has been generally reported. The effect of the type of hydrocolloid on the perception of taste attributes was greater than that of viscosity. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Impact of densification on microstructure and transport properties of CaFe5O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacotte, C.; Hébert, S.; Hardy, V.; Bréard, Y.; Maki, R.; Mori, T.; Pelloquin, D.

    2016-04-01

    Monophasic CaFe5O7 ceramic has been synthesized by solid state route. Its microstructural features have been studied by diffraction techniques and electron microscopy images before and after Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) annealings. This work is completed by measurements of electrical and thermal properties. Especially, attention is focused around the structural and electronic transition at 360 K for which specific heat measurements have revealed a sharp peak. Densification by SPS techniques led to a significant improvement of electrical conductivity above 360 K.

  14. Impact of preacidification of milk and fermentation time on the properties of yogurt.

    PubMed

    Peng, Y; Horne, D S; Lucey, J A

    2009-07-01

    Casein interactions play an important role in the textural properties of yogurt. The objective of this study was to investigate how the concentration of insoluble calcium phosphate (CCP) that is associated with casein particles and the length of fermentation time influe