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Sample records for 12d3 fracture properties

  1. Subtask 12D3: Fracture properties of V-5Cr-5Ti Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Hamilton, M.L.; Jones, R.H.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of heat treatment on microstructure and fracture toughness of a V-5Cr-5Ti alloy in the range -50-100{degrees}C. Fracture toughness and impact tests were performed on a V-5Cr-5Ti alloy. Specimens annealed at 1125{degrees}C for 1 h and furnace cooled in a vacuum of 1.33 x 10{sup -5} Pa were brittle at room temperature (RT) and experienced a mixture of intergranular and cleavage fracture. Fracture toughness (J{sub IQ}) at RT was 52 kJ/m{sup 2} and the impact fracture energy (IFE) was 6 J. The IFE at -100{degrees}C was only 1 J. While specimens exhibited high fracture toughness at 100{degrees}C (J{sub IQ} is 485 kj/m{sup 2}), fracture was a mixture of dimple and intergranular failure, with intergranular fracture making up 40% of the total fracture surface. The ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was estimated to be about 20{degrees}C. When some specimens were given an additional annealing at 890{degrees}C for 24 h, they became very ductile at RT and fractured by microvoid coalescence. The J{sub IQ} value increased from 52 kJ/m{sup 2} to {approximately}1100 kJ/m{sup 2}. The impact test failed to fracture specimens at RT due to a large amount of plastic deformation. 7 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  2. Macroscopic properties of fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thovert, J.; Mourzenko, V. V.; Adler, P. M.

    2007-12-01

    The determination of the local fields in fractured porous media is a challenging problem, because of the multiple scales that are involved and of the possible nonlinearity of the governing equations. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overall view of the numerical technique which has been used to solve numerous problems. It is based on a three-dimensional discrete description of the fracture network and of the embedding matrix. Any fracture network geometry, any type of boundary condition, and any distribution of the fracture and matrix properties can be addressed, without simplifying approximations. The first step is to mesh the fracture network as it is by triangles of a controlled size. This meshing by an advancing front technique is done successively for each fracture and the intersections between fractures are taken into account. Then, the space in between the fractures is meshed by tetrahedra by the advancing front technique again. The faces of the tetrahedra which are in contact with fractures, coincide with the corresponding triangles in these fractures. The performances of these meshing codes will be illustrated by a few examples. The second step consists in discretizing the conservation equations by the finite volume technique. Specific properties are given to each fracture such as a surface permeability or a joint rigidity. This general technique has been applied to the basic and most important properties of fracture networks and of fractured porous media (1). These properties are single and two phase flows, wether they are accompagnied or not by dispersion of a solute and mechanical properties possibly coupled with flow. These applications will be briefly illustrated by some examples, including when possible comparison with real data. Ref: (1) P.M. Adler, V.V. Mourzenko, J.-F. Thovert, I. Bogdanov, in Dynamics of fluids and transport in fractured rock, ed. B. Faybishenko, Geophysical Monograph Series, 162, 33, 2005.

  3. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part I. Ductility and fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolin, B.; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Minkin, A.; Potapova, V.; Smirnov, V.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation swelling effect on the fracture properties of irradiated austenitic steels under static loading has been studied and analyzed from the mechanical and physical viewpoints. Experimental data on the stress-strain curves, fracture strain, fracture toughness and fracture mechanisms have been represented for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various swelling. Some phenomena in mechanical behaviour of irradiated austenitic steels have been revealed and explained as follows: a sharp decrease of fracture toughness with swelling growth; untypical large increase of fracture toughness with decrease of the test temperature; some increase of fracture toughness after preliminary cyclic loading. Role of channel deformation and channel fracture has been clarified in the properties of irradiated austenitic steel and different tendencies to channel deformation have been shown and explained for the same austenitic steel irradiated at different temperatures and neutron doses.

  4. When do fractured media become seismically anisotropic? Some implications on quantifying fracture properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, B. M.; Angus, D. A.

    2016-06-01

    Fractures are pervasive features within the Earth's crust and they have a significant influence on the multi-physical response of the subsurface. The presence of coherent fracture sets often leads to observable seismic anisotropy enabling seismic techniques to remotely locate and characterise fracture systems. In this study, we confirm the general scale-dependence of seismic anisotropy and provide new results specific to shear-wave splitting (SWS). We find that SWS develops under conditions when the ratio of wavelength to fracture size (λS / d) is greater than 3, where Rayleigh scattering from coherent fractures leads to an effective anisotropy such that effective medium model (EMM) theory is qualitatively valid. When 1 <λS / d < 3 there is a transition from Rayleigh to Mie scattering, where no effective anisotropy develops and hence the SWS measurements are unstable. When λS / d < 1 we observe geometric scattering and begin to see behaviour similar to transverse isotropy. We find that seismic anisotropy is more sensitive to fracture density than fracture compliance ratio. More importantly, we observe that the transition from scattering to an effective anisotropic regime occurs over a propagation distance between 1 and 2 wavelengths depending on the fracture density and compliance ratio. The existence of a transition zone means that inversion of seismic anisotropy parameters based on EMM will be fundamentally biased. More importantly, we observe that linear slip EMM commonly used in inverting fracture properties is inconsistent with our results and leads to errors of approximately 400% in fracture spacing (equivalent to fracture density) and 60% in fracture compliance. Although EMM representations can yield reliable estimates of fracture orientation and spatial location, our results show that EMM representations will systematically fail in providing quantitatively accurate estimates of other physical fracture properties, such as fracture density and compliance

  5. Influence of Natural Fractures Cohesive Properties on Geometry of Hydraulic Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Chavez, M. A.; Dahi Taleghani, A.; Puyang, P.

    2014-12-01

    An integrated modeling methodology is proposed to analyze hydraulic fracturing jobs in the presence of the natural fracture network in the formation. A propagating hydraulic fracture may arrest, cross, or diverts into a preexisting natural crack depending on fracture properties of rock and magnitude and direction of principal rock stresses. Opening of natural fractures during fracturing treatment could define the effectiveness of the stimulation technique. Here, we present an integrated methodology initiated with lab scale fracturing properties using Double Cantilever Beam tests (DCB) to determine cohesive properties of rock and natural fractures. We used cohesive finite element models to reproduce laboratory results to verify the numerical model for the interaction of the hydraulic fracture and individual cemented natural fractures. Based on the initial investigations, we found out that distribution of pre-existing natural fractures could play a significant role in the final geometry of the induced fracture network; however in practice, there is not much information about the distribution of natural fractures in the subsurface due to the limited access. Hence, we propose a special optimization scheme to generate natural fracture geometry from the location of microseismic events. Accordingly, the criteria of evaluating the fitness of natural fracture realizations is defined as the total minimum distance squares of all microseismic events, which is the sum of minimum square distance for all microseismic events. Moreover, an additional constraint in this problem is that we need to set a minimum distance between fracture grids. Using generated natural fracture realizations, forward field-scale simulations are implemented using cohesive finite element analysis to find the best match with the recorded bottomhole pressure. To show the robustness of the proposed workflow for real field problem, we implemented this technique on available data from several well Chicontepec

  6. Fracture toughness properties of welded stainless steels for tritium service

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.

    1994-10-01

    Studies to determine tritium exposure effects on the properties of welded steels are being conducted. In this investigation, the effects of tritium and decay helium on the fracture toughness properties of high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) Incoloy 903 were. Fracture toughness measurements were conducted for tritium-exposed samples in the as-forged condition and compared with welded samples. Tritium-exposed HERF Incoloy 903 had fracture toughness values that were 33% lower than those for unexposed HERF Incoloy 903. Tritium-exposed welded samples had fracture toughness values that were just 8% of the unexposed HERF alloys and 28% of unexposed welded alloys.

  7. Immunization of Bos taurus steers with Babesia bovis recombinant antigens MSA-1, MSA-2c and 12D3.

    PubMed

    Antonio Alvarez, J; Lopez, U; Rojas, C; Borgonio, V M; Sanchez, V; Castañeda, R; Vargas, P; Figueroa, J V

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the recombinant proteins MSA-1, MSA-2c and 12D3 as a combined immunogen for cattle. Fifteen steers were randomly assigned into three groups of five animals each (I, II and III). On day 0, cattle in group I were injected with 50 microg each of rMSA-1, rMSA-2c and r12D3 with the adjuvant Montanide 75; cattle in Group II received adjuvant-PBS, and Group III were untreated controls. On day 14, cattle in Group I received a second injection of the three recombinant proteins in adjuvant and cattle in Group II again received adjuvant alone. On day 28, all groups of cattle were challenged with a field strain of Babesia bovis. After challenge, the experimental cattle were clinically and serologically monitored. Three of the five steers immunized with the combined recombinant B. bovis proteins seroconverted on day 14 post-immunization (P.I.) and the maximum titre was 1 : 1600. All five immunized steers presented strong seropositivity to B. bovis antigens at day 21 P.I. The prepatent periods of vaccinated cattle were delayed until day 10 post-challenge exposure versus 8 and 7 days in Groups II and III, respectively. Cattle in all groups had fever above 41 degrees C; the reduction in packed cell volume was not significantly different (P > 0.05) in vaccinated group I compared with Groups II and III (29% versus 26% and 31%, respectively). Treatment was required for one steer in the control group. During the period of the study, the weight of cattle in Groups I and II increased an average of 9 and 7 kg, whereas the weight of the control cattle was reduced on average 4 kg. Immunization with rMSA-1-rMSA-2c-r12D3 proteins was not sufficient to prevent clinical symptoms against challenge, but the immunologic response was sufficient to protect steers against a mild virulent strain of B. bovis.

  8. Fracture properties of bioabsorbable HA/PLLA/PCL composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. D.; Todo, M.; Arakawa, K.; Tsuji, H.; Takenoshita, Y.

    2005-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite particle filled poly(L-lactic acid)/poly(e-caprolactone) blend (HA/PLLA/PCL) composite materials were developed by melt-mixing, and their bending mechanical properties and fracture toughness were examined. It was found that the fracture absorbed energy and fracture toughness are maximized with the PCL content of 5wt%. Local plastic deformation of PLLA/PCL matrix is the main mechanism of energy dissipation during fracture. This ductile deformation is considered to be initiated in the surroundings of voids formed due to interfacial debonding at HA/matrix interfaces and phase separation of PLLA and PCL. On the other hand, fracture toughness of HA/PLLA/PCL with the PCL contents of 10 and 15wt% becomes lower than that of HA/PLLA. In these composites, void formation causes severe local stress concentration and therefore degrades the materials rather than improving the fracture resistance.

  9. Characterization of the hydraulic properties of fractures in chalk.

    PubMed

    Nativ, Ronit; Adar, Eilon; Assaf, Lior; Nygaard, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The fracture systems intersecting Eocene chalk formations in the Negev desert, Israel, and their hydraulic properties were characterized using a variety of geologic and hydrologic techniques. These included identification of the prevailing directions of fracture systems in outcrops, in cores retrieved from inclined coreholes, in coreholes using video logs, and in trenches. The orientation and inclination of these fracture systems were determined, and evidence of ground water flow on the fracture surfaces was described and ranked. Their hydraulic conductivity was determined through slug and pumping tests performed at discrete intervals. Temperature, electrical conductivity, caliper, gamma and heat-pulse logs were conducted in the same coreholes. The results from the logs, tests, and core descriptions were compared to identify reliable and cost-effective tools for investigating the hydraulic characteristics of fracture systems. We concluded that in the study area: (1) fracture mapping in outcrops and coreholes (including downhole video and caliper logs) must be supplemented by hydraulic testing of the mapped fracture sets in the coreholes; (2) inclined coreholes provide information regarding the orientation of the hydraulically active fracture systems that cannot be obtained from vertical boreholes; (3) hydraulic testing of unpacked holes provides a reasonable estimate of the maximum hydraulic conductivity; and (4) the hydraulic conductivity distribution with depth is log normal and all significant ground water flow takes place within the upper 25 m.

  10. The fracture properties and toughening mechanisms of bone and dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Kurt John

    The mechanical properties of bone and dentin and in particular their fracture properties, are the subject of intense research. The relevance of these properties is increasing as our population ages and fracture incidence impacts the lives of a greater portion of the population. A robust framework is needed to understand the fracture properties of bone and dentin to guide researchers as they attempt to characterize the effects of aging, disease, and pharmaceutical treatments on the properties of these mineralized tissues. In the present work, this framework is provided and applied to human bone, human dentin, and animal bone. In situ electron microscopy was also used to identify the salient toughening mechanisms in bone and dentin. It was found that bone and dentin are extrinsically toughened materials and consequently their fracture properties are best characterized utilizing a crack-growth resistance approach. A description of the different mechanical measurements commonly employed when using small animal models (rats and mice) to evaluate the influence of drug therapies on bone fragility is provided. A study where these properties were measured for a large population of wild-type rats and mice was also conducted. Given my findings, it was determined that for the most complete understanding of small animal bone it was necessary to measure strength and toughness. Strength measurements probe the flaw distribution and toughness measurements to evaluate the resistance to facture in the presence of a single dominant worst-case flaw.

  11. Fracture properties evaluation of stainless steel piping for LBB applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.J.; Seok, C.S.; Chang, Y.S.

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the material properties of SA312 TP316 and SA312 TP304 stainless steels and their associated welds manufactured for shutdown cooling line and safety injection line of nuclear generating stations. A total of 82 tensile tests and 58 fracture toughness tests on specimens taken from actual pipes were performed and the effect of various parameters such as the pipe size, the specimen orientation, the test temperature and the welding procedure on the material properties are discussed. Test results show that the effect of the test temperature on the fracture toughness was significant while the effects of the pipe size and the specimen orientation on the fracture toughness were negligible. The material properties of the GTAW weld metal was in general higher than those of the base metal.

  12. 3D geostatistical modeling of fracture system in a granitic massif to characterize hydraulic properties and fracture distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Katsuaki; Kubo, Taiki; Liu, Chunxue; Masoud, Alaa; Amano, Kenji; Kurihara, Arata; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Lanyon, Bill

    2015-10-01

    This study integrates 3D models of rock fractures from different sources and hydraulic properties aimed at identifying relationships between fractures and permeability. The Tono area in central Japan, chiefly overlain by Cretaceous granite, was examined because of the availability of a unique dataset from deep borehole data at 26 sites. A geostatistical method (GEOFRAC) that can incorporate orientations of sampled data was applied to 50,900 borehole fractures for spatial modeling of fractures over a 12 km by 8 km area, to a depth of 1.5 km. GEOFRAC produced a plausible 3D fracture model, in that the orientations of simulated fractures correspond to those of the sample data and the continuous fractures appeared near a known fault. Small-scale fracture distributions with dominant orientations were also characterized around the two shafts using fracture data from the shaft walls. By integrating the 3D model of hydraulic conductivity using sequential Gaussian simulation with the GEOFRAC fractures from the borehole data, the fracture sizes and directions that strongly affect permeable features were identified. Four fracture-related elements: lineaments from a shaded 10-m DEM, GEOFRAC fractures using the borehole and shaft data, and microcracks from SEM images, were used for correlating fracture attributes at different scales. The consistency of the semivariogram models of distribution densities was identified. Using an experimental relationship between hydraulic conductivity and fracture length, the fractures that typically affect the hydraulic properties at the drift scale were surmised to be in the range 100-200 m. These results are useful for a comprehensive understanding of rock fracture systems and their hydraulic characteristics at multiple scales in a target area.

  13. 2D microscopic model of graphene fracture properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Peter

    2015-05-01

    An analytical two-dimensional (2D) microscopic fracture model based on Morse-type interaction is derived containing no adjustable parameter. From the 2D Young’s moduli and 2D intrinsic strengths of graphene measured by nanoindentation based on biaxial tension and calculated by density functional theory for uniaxial tension the widely unknown breaking force, line or edge energy, surface energy, fracture toughness, and strain energy release rate were determined. The simulated line energy agrees well with ab initio calculations and the fracture toughness of perfect graphene sheets is in good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations and the fracture toughness evaluated for defective graphene using the Griffith relation. Similarly, the estimated critical strain energy release rate agrees well with result of various theoretical approaches based on the J-integral and surface energy. The 2D microscopic model, connecting 2D and three-dimensional mechanical properties in a consistent way, provides a versatile relationship to easily access all relevant fracture properties of pristine 2D solids.

  14. Scale properties of sea ice deformation and fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jérôme; Marsan, David

    2004-09-01

    The sea ice cover, which insulates the ocean from the atmosphere, plays a fundamental role in the Earth's climate system. This cover deforms and fractures under the action of winds, ocean currents and thermal stresses. Along with thermodynamics, this deformation and fracturing largely controls the amount of open water within the ice cover and the distribution of ice thickness, two parameters of high climatic importance, especially during fall and winter (no melting). Here we present a scaling analysis of sea ice deformation and fracturing that allows us to characterize the heterogeneity of fracture patterns and of deformation fields, as well as the intermittency of stress records. We discuss the consequences of these scaling properties, particularly for sea ice modelling in global climate models. We show how multifractal scaling laws can be extrapolated to small scales to learn about the nature of the mechanisms that accommodate the deformation. We stress that these scaling properties preclude the use of homogenisation techniques (i.e. the use of mean values) to link different scales, and we discuss how these detailed observations should be used to constrain sea ice dynamics modelling. To cite this article: J. Weiss, D. Marsan, C. R. Physique 5 (2004).

  15. Relationship between Fracture Toughness and Tensile Properties of A357 Cast Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexopoulos, N. D.; Tiryakioğlu, M.

    2009-03-01

    The fracture-related mechanical properties of the A357 cast aluminum alloy, namely, elongation to fracture, tensile strain energy density (tensile toughness), strain-hardening exponent, and plane strain fracture toughness were investigated. Correlations between these properties have been established for 25 different artificial aging heat-treatment conditions and for five minor variations in chemical composition. Empirical relationships between the strain energy density and both the tensile elongation to fracture and the strain-hardening exponent have been developed. Analysis of the fracture surfaces indicated that the fracture mechanism of the investigated specimens varies according to the artificial aging conditions. Moreover, empirical relationships between the fracture toughness and strain energy density and between fracture toughness and strain-hardening exponent have been developed; these can be used to estimate the plane strain fracture toughness of A357 as a function of yield strength and tensile toughness.

  16. Mechanical Properties for Fracture Analysis of Mild Steel Storage Tasks

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.

    1999-03-03

    Mechanical properties of 1950's vintage, A285 Grade B carbon steels have been compiled for elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis of storage tanks (Lam and Sindelar, 1999). The properties are from standard Charpy V-notch (CVN), 0.4T planform Compact Tension (C(T)), and Tensile (T) specimens machined from archival steel from large water piping. The piping and storage tanks were constructed in the 1950s from semi-killed, hot-rolled carbon steel plate specified as A285 Grade B. Evaluation of potential aging mechanisms at both service conditions shows no loss in fracture resistance of the steel in either case.Site and literature data show that the A285, Grade B steel, at and above approximately 70 degrees Fahrenheit, is in the upper transition to upper shelf region for absorbed energy and is not subject to cleavage cracking or a brittle fracture mode. Furthermore, the tank sidewalls are 1/2 or 5/8-inch thick, and therefore, the J-resistance (JR) curve that characterizes material resistance to stable crack extension under elastic-plastic deformation best defines the material fracture toughness. The JR curves for several heats of A285, Grade B steel tested at 40 degrees Fahrenheit, a temperature near the average ductile-to-brittle (DBTT) transition temperature (CVN {at} 15 ft-lb), are presented. This data is applicable to evaluate flaw stability of the storage tanks that are operated above 70 degrees Fahrenheit since, even at 40 degrees Fahrenheit, crack advance is observed to proceed by ductile tearing.

  17. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF FORGED STAINLESS STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M

    2008-03-28

    The effect of hydrogen on the fracture toughness properties of Types 304L, 316L and 21-6-9 forged stainless steels was investigated. Fracture toughness samples were fabricated from forward-extruded forgings. Samples were uniformly saturated with hydrogen after exposure to hydrogen gas at 34 MPa or 69 and 623 K prior to testing. The fracture toughness properties were characterized by measuring the J-R behavior at ambient temperature in air. The results show that the hydrogen-charged steels have fracture toughness values that were about 50-60% of the values measured for the unexposed steels. The reduction in fracture toughness was accompanied by a change in fracture appearance. Both uncharged and hydrogen-charged samples failed by microvoid nucleation and coalescence, but the fracture surfaces of the hydrogen-charged steels had smaller microvoids. Type 316L stainless steel had the highest fracture toughness properties and the greatest resistance to hydrogen degradation.

  18. Measurement of fracture properties of concrete at high strain rates.

    PubMed

    Rey-De-Pedraza, V; Cendón, D A; Sánchez-Gálvez, V; Gálvez, F

    2017-01-28

    An analysis of the spalling technique of concrete bars using the modified Hopkinson bar was carried out. A new experimental configuration is proposed adding some variations to previous works. An increased length for concrete specimens was chosen and finite-element analysis was used for designing a conic projectile to obtain a suitable triangular impulse wave. The aim of this initial work is to establish an experimental framework which allows a simple and direct analysis of concrete subjected to high strain rates. The efforts and configuration of these primary tests, as well as the selected geometry and dimensions for the different elements, have been focused to achieve a simple way of identifying the fracture position and so the tensile strength of tested specimens. This dynamic tensile strength can be easily compared with previous values published in literature giving an idea of the accuracy of the method and technique proposed and the possibility to extend it in a near future to obtain other mechanical properties such as the fracture energy. The tests were instrumented with strain gauges, accelerometers and high-speed camera in order to validate the results by different ways. Results of the dynamic tensile strength of the tested concrete are presented.This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  19. Measurement of fracture properties of concrete at high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey-De-Pedraza, V.; Cendón, D. A.; Sánchez-Gálvez, V.; Gálvez, F.

    2017-01-01

    An analysis of the spalling technique of concrete bars using the modified Hopkinson bar was carried out. A new experimental configuration is proposed adding some variations to previous works. An increased length for concrete specimens was chosen and finite-element analysis was used for designing a conic projectile to obtain a suitable triangular impulse wave. The aim of this initial work is to establish an experimental framework which allows a simple and direct analysis of concrete subjected to high strain rates. The efforts and configuration of these primary tests, as well as the selected geometry and dimensions for the different elements, have been focused to achieve a simple way of identifying the fracture position and so the tensile strength of tested specimens. This dynamic tensile strength can be easily compared with previous values published in literature giving an idea of the accuracy of the method and technique proposed and the possibility to extend it in a near future to obtain other mechanical properties such as the fracture energy. The tests were instrumented with strain gauges, accelerometers and high-speed camera in order to validate the results by different ways. Results of the dynamic tensile strength of the tested concrete are presented. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  20. Inversion of Scattered Waves for Material Properties in Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Gritto, Roland; Korneev, Valeri A.; Johnson, Lane R.

    1999-07-01

    The authors apply a recently developed low-frequency, non-linear inversion method which includes near and far field terms to a crosshole data set to determine the bulk and shear modulus, as well as the density for a fractured zone in a granitic rock mass. The method uses the scattered elastic wavefield which is extracted from the recorded data before the inversion is performed. The inversion result is appraised by investigating the resolution and standard deviation of the model estimates. The sensitivity of the three parameters to different features of the medium is revealed. While the bulk modulus appears to be sensitive to voids and welded contacts, the density is mostly affected by fractured zones. The shear modulus is least constrained due to the absence of S wave anisotropy information. It is shown that the three medium parameters are generally sensitive to other medium features than those determined by velocity inversions. Thus this method is viewed as a complimentary approach to travel time tomography which provides more insight into the material properties of inhomogeneous media.

  1. Inferring the Properties of Fluid-Filled Fractures using Tube Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OReilly, O. J.; Dunham, E. M.; Moos, D.

    2014-12-01

    We present a methodology to infer the geometry of fluid-filled fractures (both aperture and length) using the interaction between tube waves in cylindrical fluid-filled conduits and trapped waves in fractures intersecting the conduit. This approach could be applied to study engineered fractures in oil and gas reservoirs as well as volcanic systems. We specifically investigate the reflection and transmission of tube waves, propagating along the cylindrical conduit, from fractures. Pressure changes carried by the tube wave can couple to resonant oscillations of the fractures, and the spectral properties of these oscillations carry information about fracture geometry. The fracture is coupled to the conduit at the fracture mouth by balancing pressure and conserving mass as fluid flows into or out of the fracture. In our linearized theory, the fracture response is quantified through a frequency-domain transfer function relating fluid pressure and velocity at the fracture mouth. For a given transfer function, tube wave seismograms can be obtained using a single, inverse fast Fourier transform. Fracture transfer functions are obtained from numerical simulations of wave propagation along fluid-filled cracks. These simulations rigorously couple an approximate version of the linearized Navier-Stokes equation for a viscous, compressible fluid to the elastic wave equation in the surrounding medium. To solve this problem, we have developed a two-dimensional high-order finite difference method capable of handling complex fracture geometries. Fracture resonance is associated with standing crack waves (also known as Krauklis waves) propagating along the fracture. We find that although details of fracture properties can be revealed by recorded pressure or seismic signals, reductions in aperture, as occur at crack tips, can reduce the amplitude of high frequency resonant modes through increased viscous dissipation.

  2. Dry fracture method for simultaneous measurement of in-situ stress state and material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Serata, S.; Oka, S.; Kikuchi, S.

    1996-04-01

    Based on the dry fracture principle, a computerized borehole probe has been developed to measure stress state and material properties, simultaneously. The probe is designed to obtain a series of measurements in a continuing sequence along a borehole length, without any interruptive measures, such as resetting packers, taking indentation of borehole wall, overcoming, etc. The new dry fracture probe for the single fracture method is designed to overcome the difficulties posed by its ancestor which was based on the double fracture method. The accuracy of the single fracture method is confirmed by a close agreement with the theory, FE modeling and laboratory testing.

  3. Experimental investigation of the hydraulic and heat-transfer properties of artificially fractured granite.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jin; Zhu, Yongqiang; Guo, Qinghai; Tan, Long; Zhuang, Yaqin; Liu, Mingliang; Zhang, Canhai; Xiang, Wei; Rohn, Joachim

    2017-01-05

    In this paper, the hydraulic and heat-transfer properties of two sets of artificially fractured granite samples are investigated. First, the morphological information is determined using 3D modelling technology. The area ratio is used to describe the roughness of the fracture surface. Second, the hydraulic properties of fractured granite are tested by exposing samples to different confining pressures and temperatures. The results show that the hydraulic properties of the fractures are affected mainly by the area ratio, with a larger area ratio producing a larger fracture aperture and higher hydraulic conductivity. Both the hydraulic apertureand the hydraulic conductivity decrease with an increase in the confining pressure. Furthermore, the fracture aperture decreases with increasing rock temperature, but the hydraulic conductivity increases owing to a reduction of the viscosity of the fluid flowing through. Finally, the heat-transfer efficiency of the samples under coupled hydro-thermal-mechanical conditions is analysed and discussed.

  4. Experimental investigation of the hydraulic and heat-transfer properties of artificially fractured granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jin; Zhu, Yongqiang; Guo, Qinghai; Tan, Long; Zhuang, Yaqin; Liu, Mingliang; Zhang, Canhai; Xiang, Wei; Rohn, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the hydraulic and heat-transfer properties of two sets of artificially fractured granite samples are investigated. First, the morphological information is determined using 3D modelling technology. The area ratio is used to describe the roughness of the fracture surface. Second, the hydraulic properties of fractured granite are tested by exposing samples to different confining pressures and temperatures. The results show that the hydraulic properties of the fractures are affected mainly by the area ratio, with a larger area ratio producing a larger fracture aperture and higher hydraulic conductivity. Both the hydraulic apertureand the hydraulic conductivity decrease with an increase in the confining pressure. Furthermore, the fracture aperture decreases with increasing rock temperature, but the hydraulic conductivity increases owing to a reduction of the viscosity of the fluid flowing through. Finally, the heat-transfer efficiency of the samples under coupled hydro-thermal-mechanical conditions is analysed and discussed.

  5. Experimental investigation of the hydraulic and heat-transfer properties of artificially fractured granite

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jin; Zhu, Yongqiang; Guo, Qinghai; Tan, Long; Zhuang, Yaqin; Liu, Mingliang; Zhang, Canhai; Xiang, Wei; Rohn, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the hydraulic and heat-transfer properties of two sets of artificially fractured granite samples are investigated. First, the morphological information is determined using 3D modelling technology. The area ratio is used to describe the roughness of the fracture surface. Second, the hydraulic properties of fractured granite are tested by exposing samples to different confining pressures and temperatures. The results show that the hydraulic properties of the fractures are affected mainly by the area ratio, with a larger area ratio producing a larger fracture aperture and higher hydraulic conductivity. Both the hydraulic apertureand the hydraulic conductivity decrease with an increase in the confining pressure. Furthermore, the fracture aperture decreases with increasing rock temperature, but the hydraulic conductivity increases owing to a reduction of the viscosity of the fluid flowing through. Finally, the heat-transfer efficiency of the samples under coupled hydro-thermal-mechanical conditions is analysed and discussed. PMID:28054594

  6. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open ... falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the ...

  7. Studies of Transport Properties of Fractures: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen R. Brown

    2006-06-30

    We proposed to study several key factors controlling the character and evolution of fracture system permeability and transport processes. We suggest that due to surface roughness and the consequent channeling in single fractures and in fracture intersections, the tendency of a fracture system to plug up, remain permeable, or for permeability to increase due to chemical dissolution/precipitation conditions will depend strongly on the instantaneous flow channel geometry. This geometry will change as chemical interaction occurs, thus changing the permeability through time. To test this hypothesis and advance further understanding toward a predictive capability, we endeavored to physically model and analyze several configurations of flow and transport of inert and chemically active fluids through channels in single fractures and through fracture intersections. This was an integrated program utilizing quantitative observations of fractures and veins in drill core, quantitative and visual observations of flow and chemical dissolution and precipitation within replicas of real rough-walled fractures and fracture intersections, and numerical modeling via lattice Boltzmann methods.

  8. Elastic properties and fracture strength of quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    The layups of the studied laminates are (0, + or - 60) sub s, (0, + or - 45, 90) sub s, (0, + or - 30, + or - 60, 90) sub s (0, + or - 22 1/2, + or - 45, + or - 67 1/2, 90) sub s. The properties determined were tensile modulus, Poisson's ratio, bending stiffness, fracture strength and fracture strain. Measured properties and properties predicted using laminate theory were found to be in reasonable agreement. Reasons for data scatter were determined.

  9. Characterization of hydraulic fractures and reservoir properties of shale using natural tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, J. E.; Gardner, P.; Kuhlman, K. L.; Malama, B.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing plays a major role in the economic production of hydrocarbon from shale. Current fracture characterization techniques are limited in diagnosing the transport properties of the fractures on the near wellbore scale to that of the entire stimulated reservoir volume. Microseismic reveals information on fracture geometries, but not transport properties. Production analysis (e.g., rate transient analysis using produced fluids) estimates fracture and reservoir flow characteristics, but often relies on simplified models in terms of fracture geometries and fluid storage and transport. We present the approach and potential benefits of incorporating natural tracers with production data analysis for fracture and reservoir characterization. Hydraulic fracturing releases omnipresent natural tracers that accumulate in low permeability rocks over geologic time (e.g., radiogenic 4He and 40Ar). Key reservoir characteristics govern the tracer release, which include: the number, connectivity, and geometry of fractures; the distribution of fracture-surface-area to matrix-block-volume; and the nature of hydrocarbon phases within the reservoir (e.g., methane dissolved in groundwater or present as a separate gas phase). We explore natural tracer systematics using numerical techniques under relevant shale-reservoir conditions. We evaluate the impact on natural tracer transport due to a variety of conceptual models of reservoir-transport properties and boundary conditions. Favorable attributes for analysis of natural tracers include the following: tracer concentrations start with a well-defined initial condition (i.e., equilibrium between matrix and any natural fractures); there is a large suite of tracers that cover a range of at least 7x in diffusion coefficients; and diffusive mass-transfer out of the matrix into hydraulic fractures will cause elemental and isotopic fractionation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by

  10. A hybrid numerical-experimental method for determination of dynamic fracture properties of material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihradi, S.; Putra, I. S.; Dirgantara, T.; Widagdo, D.; Truong, L. X.

    2010-03-01

    A novel hybrid numerical-experimental method to obtain dynamic fracture properties of materials has been developed in the present work. Specimens were tested with one-point bending configuration in the Hopkinson's bar apparatus, from which the impact loading profiles were measured. In this dynamic fracture experiment, the crack tip position was measured by two strips of special strain gage having five gages arranged in one strip. Since the strain gage record only gave strain signal of each gage as a function of time, a novel method is proposed to determine the time at which the crack tip passed each strain gage and the time when the crack finally stopped. From the data of crack tip position as a function of time, the crack speed then can be calculated. These data, i.e. the loading profile and the crack speed, were then used as the input of the Node-Based FEM program developed for dynamic fractures problems. With the proposed method, three dynamic fracture properties of materials i.e dynamic fracture toughness for crack initiation (KIcd), fracture toughness for crack propagation (KID), and crack arrest toughness (KIa) can simultaneously be obtained. The results obtained from the investigation of dynamic fracture properties of Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) material by the present method are well compared with the ones in the literature and from the direct experimental measurement. The good agreement suggests that the hybrid method developed in the present work can be used reliably to determine the dynamic fracture properties of materials.

  11. A hybrid numerical-experimental method for determination of dynamic fracture properties of material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihradi, S.; Putra, I. S.; Dirgantara, T.; Widagdo, D.; Truong, L. X.

    2009-12-01

    A novel hybrid numerical-experimental method to obtain dynamic fracture properties of materials has been developed in the present work. Specimens were tested with one-point bending configuration in the Hopkinson's bar apparatus, from which the impact loading profiles were measured. In this dynamic fracture experiment, the crack tip position was measured by two strips of special strain gage having five gages arranged in one strip. Since the strain gage record only gave strain signal of each gage as a function of time, a novel method is proposed to determine the time at which the crack tip passed each strain gage and the time when the crack finally stopped. From the data of crack tip position as a function of time, the crack speed then can be calculated. These data, i.e. the loading profile and the crack speed, were then used as the input of the Node-Based FEM program developed for dynamic fractures problems. With the proposed method, three dynamic fracture properties of materials i.e dynamic fracture toughness for crack initiation (KIcd), fracture toughness for crack propagation (KID), and crack arrest toughness (KIa) can simultaneously be obtained. The results obtained from the investigation of dynamic fracture properties of Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) material by the present method are well compared with the ones in the literature and from the direct experimental measurement. The good agreement suggests that the hybrid method developed in the present work can be used reliably to determine the dynamic fracture properties of materials.

  12. Effects of precracking methods on the fracture properties of alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Shannon, John L., Jr.; Jenkins, Michael G.; Ferber, Mattison K.

    1991-01-01

    Fracture toughness values were compared for quasi-statically cracked, rapidly precracked, and fatigue precracked specimens of the same 96 percent alumina. The quasi-statically cracked specimens exhibited a rising R-curve and crack length dependent fracture toughness values. The rising R-curve resulted from grain bridging in the crack wake. Tension and compression fatigue precracked specimens did not exhibit crack length dependence, but did produce consistent fracture toughness values from fast fracture tests. Specimens that were rapidly precracked with the bridge indentation method also did not exhibit crack length dependence. These results imply that the measured fracture toughness and observed crack growth resistance of some brittle ceramics are dependent on loading history, crack extension and environment.

  13. Mechanical properties and fracture strength of cathodically polarized prestressing wire

    SciTech Connect

    Kiszowski, S.; Hartt, W.H.

    1996-11-01

    Constant extension rate testing experiments were performed upon prestressing steel wire specimens prepared from three lots of Grade 270 and one lot of Grade 250 material for the purpose of characterizing susceptibility to environmental cracking under conditions associated with cathodic protection of prestressed concrete components and structures. Smooth, notched (six different geometries) and pitted (four different geometries) specimens were tested in air and deaerated saturated Ca(OH){sub 2}-distilled water at potentials of {minus}0.90 and {minus}1.30 v (SCE) and strength and ductility properties characterized. Relatively low strength was recorded for steel specimens at {minus}09.90 v from material for which the weight percent chromium was relatively high (0.24 w/o compared to 0.02 w/o). Under conditions that are likely to be most relevant to service, fracture load correlated with the amount by which the local wire cross section area was reduced, either from a notch or pit, and was independent of depth of the irregularity and of root radius to the extent to which these were addressed. It was concluded that it may be unsafe to apply cathodically protection to prestressing wire, even in situations where potential is maintained in the regime where hydrogen embrittlement should not occur.

  14. TRITIUM AGING EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF FORGED STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M

    2008-04-14

    The fracture toughness properties of Type 21-6-9 stainless steel were measured for forgings in the unexposed, hydrogen-exposed, and tritium-exposed-and-aged conditions. Fracture toughness samples were cut from conventionally-forged and high-energy-rate-forged forward-extruded cylinders and mechanically tested at room temperature using ASTM fracture-toughness testing procedures. Some of the samples were exposed to either hydrogen or tritium gas (340 MPa, 623 K) prior to testing. Tritium-exposed samples were aged for up to seven years and tested periodically in order to measure the effect on fracture toughness of {sup 3}He from radioactive tritium decay. The results show that hydrogen-exposed and tritium-exposed samples had lower fracture- toughness values than unexposed samples and that fracture toughness decreased with increasing decay {sup 3}He content. Forged steels were more resistant to the embrittling effects of tritium and decay {sup 3}He than annealed steels, although their fracture-toughness properties depended on the degree of sensitization that occurred during processing. The fracture process was dominated by microvoid nucleation, growth and coalescence; however, the size and spacing of microvoids on the fracture surfaces were affected by hydrogen and tritium with the lowest-toughness samples having the smallest microvoids and finest spacing.

  15. Modifications of Carbonate Fracture Hydrodynamic Properties by CO 2 -Acidified Brine Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hang; Ellis, Brian R.; Peters, Catherine A.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Crandall, Dustin; Bromhal, Grant S.

    2013-08-15

    Acidic reactive flow in fractures is relevant in subsurface activities such as CO{sub 2} geological storage and hydraulic fracturing. Understanding reaction-induced changes in fracture hydrodynamic properties is essential for predicting subsurface flows such as leakage, injectability, and fluid production. In this study, x-ray computed tomography scans of a fractured carbonate caprock were used to create three dimensional reconstructions of the fracture before and after reaction with CO{sub 2}-acidified brine (Ellis et al., 2011, Greenhouse Gases: Sci. Technol., 1:248-260). As expected, mechanical apertures were found to increase substantially, doubling and even tripling in some places. However, the surface geometry evolved in complex ways including ‘comb-tooth’ structures created from preferential dissolution of calcite in transverse sedimentary bands, and the creation of degraded zones, i.e. porous calcite-depleted areas on reacted fracture surfaces. These geometric alterations resulted in increased fracture roughness, as measured by surface Z{sub 2} parameters and fractal dimensions D{sub f}. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted to quantify the changes in hydraulic aperture, fracture transmissivity and permeability. The results show that the effective hydraulic apertures are smaller than the mechanical apertures, and the changes in hydraulic apertures are nonlinear. Overestimation of flow rate by a factor of two or more would be introduced if fracture hydrodynamic properties were based on mechanical apertures, or if hydraulic aperture is assumed to change proportionally with mechanical aperture. The differences can be attributed, in part, to the increase in roughness after reaction, and is likely affected by contiguous transverse sedimentary features. Hydraulic apertures estimated by the 1D statistical model and 2D local cubic law (LCL) model are consistently larger than those calculated from the CFD simulations. In addition, a novel

  16. Correlation of physical properties of ceramic materials with resistance to fracture by thermal shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lidman, W G; Bobrowsky, A R

    1949-01-01

    An analysis is made to determine which properties of materials affect their resistance to fracture by thermal stresses.From this analysis, a parameter is evaluated that is correlated with the resistance of ceramic materials to fracture by thermal shock as experimentally determined. This parameter may be used to predict qualitatively the resistance of a material to fracture by thermal shock. Resistance to fracture by thermal shock is shown to be dependent upon the following material properties: thermal conductivity, tensile strength, thermal expansion, and ductility modulus. For qualitative prediction of resistance of materials to fracture by thermal shock, the parameter may be expressed as the product of thermal conductivity and tensile strength divided by the product of linear coefficient of thermal expansion and ductility modulus of the specimen.

  17. Correlating laboratory observations of fracture mechanical properties to hydraulically-induced microseismicity in geothermal reservoirs.

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen L. Karner, Ph.D

    2006-02-01

    To date, microseismicity has provided an invaluable tool for delineating the fracture network produced by hydraulic stimulation of geothermal reservoirs. While the locations of microseismic events are of fundamental importance, there is a wealth of information that can be gleaned from the induced seismicity (e.g. fault plane solutions, seismic moment tensors, source characteristics). Closer scrutiny of the spatial and temporal evolution of seismic moment tensors can shed light on systematic characteristics of fractures in the geothermal reservoir. When related to observations from laboratory experiments, these systematic trends can be interpreted in terms of mechanical processes that most likely operate in the fracture network. This paper reports on mechanical properties that can be inferred from observations of microseismicity in geothermal systems. These properties lead to interpretations about fracture initiation, seismicity induced after hydraulic shut-in, spatial evolution of linked fractures, and temporal evolution of fracture strength. The correlations highlight the fact that a combination of temperature, stressing rate, time, and fluid-rock interactions can alter the mechanical and fluid transport properties of fractures in geothermal systems.

  18. Intrinsic material property differences in bone tissue from patients suffering low-trauma osteoporotic fractures, compared to matched non-fracturing women.

    PubMed

    Vennin, S; Desyatova, A; Turner, J A; Watson, P A; Lappe, J M; Recker, R R; Akhter, M P

    2017-04-01

    Osteoporotic (low-trauma) fractures are a significant public health problem. Over 50% of women over 50yrs. of age will suffer an osteoporotic fracture in their remaining lifetimes. While current therapies reduce skeletal fracture risk by maintaining or increasing bone density, additional information is needed that includes the intrinsic material strength properties of bone tissue to help develop better treatments, since measurements of bone density account for no more than ~50% of fracture risk. The hypothesis tested here is that postmenopausal women who have sustained osteoporotic fractures have reduced bone quality, as indicated with measures of intrinsic material properties compared to those who have not fractured. Transiliac biopsies (N=120) were collected from fracturing (N=60, Cases) and non-fracturing postmenopausal women (N=60, age- and BMD-matched Controls) to measure intrinsic material properties using the nano-indentation technique. Each biopsy specimen was embedded in epoxy resin and then ground, polished and used for the nano-indentation testing. After calibration, multiple indentations were made using quasi-static (hardness, modulus) and dynamic (storage and loss moduli) testing protocols. Multiple indentations allowed the median and variance to be computed for each type of measurement for each specimen. Cases were found to have significantly lower median values for cortical hardness and indentation modulus. In addition, cases showed significantly less within-specimen variability in cortical modulus, cortical hardness, cortical storage modulus and trabecular hardness, and more within-specimen variability in trabecular loss modulus. Multivariate modeling indicated the presence of significant independent mechanical effects of cortical loss modulus, along with variability of cortical storage modulus, cortical loss modulus, and trabecular hardness. These results suggest mechanical heterogeneity of bone tissue may contribute to fracture resistance

  19. Association of microstructural and mechanical properties of cancellous bone and their fracture risk assessment tool scores

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dengke; Li, Xin; Tao, Cheng; Dai, Ruchun; Ni, Jiangdong; Liao, Eryuan

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the association between fracture probabilities determined by using the fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) and the microstructure and mechanical properties of femoral bone trabecula in osteoporosis (OP) and osteoarthritis (OA) patients with hip replacements. By using FRAX, we evaluated fracture risks of the 102 patients with bone replacements. Using micro CT scanning, we obtained the analysis parameters of microstructural properties of cancellous bone. Through morphometric observations, fatigue tests and compression tests, we obtained parameters of mechanical properties of cancellous bones. Relevant Pearson analysis was performed to investigate the association between the fracture probability and the microstructure and mechanical properties of femoral bone trabecula in patients. Fifteen risk factors in FRAX were compared between OP and OA patients. FRAX hip fracture risk score and major osteoporotic in OP and OA patients were significantly different. FRAX was associated with tissue bone mineral density and volumetric bone mineral density. Our study suggests that the probabilities of major osteoporotic and hip fracture using FRAX is associated with bone mass but not with micro bone quality. PMID:26064297

  20. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part II. Fatigue crack growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolin, B.; Minkin, A.; Smirnov, V.; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Potapova, V.

    2016-11-01

    The experimental data on the fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) have been obtained for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various radiation swelling. The performed study of the fracture mechanisms for cracked specimens under cyclic loading has explained why radiation swelling affects weakly FCGR unlike its effect on fracture toughness. Mechanical modeling of fatigue crack growth has been carried out and the dependencies for prediction of FCGR in irradiated austenitic steel with and with no swelling are proposed and verified with the obtained experimental results. As input data for these dependencies, FCGR for unirradiated steel and the tensile mechanical properties for unirradiated and irradiated steels are used.

  1. Investigating flow properties of partially cemented fractures in Travis Peak Formation using image-based pore-scale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokan-Lawal, Adenike; Prodanović, Maša.; Eichhubl, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Natural fractures can provide preferred flow pathways in otherwise low-permeability reservoirs. In deep subsurface reservoirs including tight oil and gas reservoirs, as well as in hydrothermal systems, fractures are frequently lined or completely filled with mineral cement that reduces or occludes fracture porosity and permeability. Fracture cement linings potentially reduce flow connectivity between the fracture and host rock and increase fracture wall roughness, which constricts flow. We combined image-based fracture space characterization, mercury injection capillary pressure and permeability experiments, and numerical simulations to evaluate the influence of fracture-lining cement on single-phase and multiphase flows along a natural fracture from the Travis Peak Formation, a tight gas reservoir sandstone in East Texas. Using X-ray computed microtomographic image analysis, we characterized fracture geometry and the connectivity and geometric tortuosity of the fracture pore space. Combining level set method-based progressive quasistatic and lattice Boltzmann simulations, we assessed the capillary-dominated displacement properties and the (relative) permeability of a cement-lined fracture. Published empirical correlations between aperture and permeability for barren fractures provide permeability estimates that vary among each other, and differ from our results, vary by several orders of magnitude. Compared to barren fractures, cement increases the geometric tortuosity, aperture variation of the pore space, and capillary pressure while reducing the single-phase permeability by up to 2 orders of magnitude. For multiphase displacement, relative permeability and fluid entrapment geometry resemble those of porous media and differ from those characteristic of barren fractures.

  2. Pore-Scale Study of the Impact of Fracture and Wettability on Two-Phase Flow Properties of Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, D.; Ajo-Franklin, J.; Helland, J. O.; Jettestuen, E.; Hatzignatiou, D. G.

    2012-08-01

    Fractures and wettability are among other factors that can strongly affect the twophase flow properties of porous media. Maximal-inscribed spheres (MIS) and finite-difference flow simulations on computer-generated structures mimicking micro-CT images of fractured rock suggest the character of the capillary pressure and relative permeability curves modification by natural or induced fracture and wettability alteration.

  3. Geometric properties of distal radius and pathogenesis of Colles fracture: a peripheral quantitative computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, S P; Xie, X; Bärenholdt, O

    2001-01-01

    It is well known among clinicians that Colles fracture patients may have normal projected axial bone mineral density and that bone mass is not synonymous with bone strength. The aim of this work was to investigate whether cross-sectional properties of the distal radius in female patients with recent Colles fracture differ from those of a younger group of normal women without fracture. It was hypothesized that patients with Colles fracture had petite distal radii and that cortical thinning and reduced cortical and trabecular volumetric density are dominant features of this fracture type. We used a multilayer high-precision peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) device with a long-term precision error of 0.1% for a dedicated phantom during the measurement period (152 d). Clinical measurements were made at an ultradistal site rich in trabecular bone and a less ultradistal site rich in cortical bone. The results show that the following pQCT variables were significantly reduced in the nonfractured radius of the Colles fracture cases: mean ultradistal trabecular volumetric density, mean ultradistal and distal cortical volumetric density, mean ultradistal and distal cortical thickness (p < 0.001 for all differences). The outer cortical diameter, cross-sectional bone area, and cortical bending moment of inertia were not statistically different in the two groups. Thus, it would appear that Colles fracture cases did not have petite distal radii. The results suggest that the deforming force of Colles fracture has a transaxial direction (fall on outstretched arm), resulting in a crush fracture, and that it is not a bending force. We suggest that Colles fracture occurs as a result of the combined effect of a fall on the out-stretched arm, low trabecular and cortical volumetric bone density, and reduced cortical thickness.

  4. Influence of mechanical rock properties and fracture healing rate on crustal fluid flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel; de Riese, Tamara

    2016-04-01

    Fluid flow in the Earth's crust is very slow over extended periods of time, during which it occurs within the connected pore space of rocks. If the fluid production rate exceeds a certain threshold, matrix permeability alone is insufficient to drain the fluid volume and fluid pressure builds up, thereby reducing the effective stress supported by the rock matrix. Hydraulic fractures form once the effective pressure exceeds the tensile strength of the rock matrix and act subsequently as highly effective fluid conduits. Once local fluid pressure is sufficiently low again, flow ceases and fractures begin to heal. Since fluid flow is controlled by the alternation of fracture permeability and matrix permeability, the flow rate in the system is strongly discontinuous and occurs in intermittent pulses. Resulting hydraulic fracture networks are largely self-organized: opening and subsequent healing of hydraulic fractures depends on the local fluid pressure and on the time-span between fluid pulses. We simulate this process with a computer model and describe the resulting dynamics statistically. Special interest is given to a) the spatially and temporally discontinuous formation and closure of fractures and fracture networks and b) the total flow rate over time. The computer model consists of a crustal-scale dual-porosity setup. Control parameters are the pressure- and time-dependent fracture healing rate, and the strength and the permeability of the intact rock. Statistical analysis involves determination of the multifractal properties and of the power spectral density of the temporal development of the total drainage rate and hydraulic fractures. References Bons, P. D. (2001). The formation of large quartz veins by rapid ascent of fluids in mobile hydrofractures. Tectonophysics, 336, 1-17. Miller, S. a., & Nur, A. (2000). Permeability as a toggle switch in fluid-controlled crustal processes. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 183(1-2), 133-146. Sachau, T., Bons, P. D

  5. Quantifying fractured crystalline-rock properties using well tests, earth tides and barometric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbey, Thomas J.; Hisz, David; Murdoch, Lawrence C.; Zhang, Meijing

    2012-01-01

    SummaryCharacterization of fractured rock aquifers often requires the acquisition and analysis of diverse datasets obtained from various instrumentation configurations. In this investigation at the fractured rock research site in Floyd County, Virginia, a high-precision borehole extensometer and tiltmeter were used during pumping to monitor deformation in the vicinity of fractures identified from borehole logging. Strain data obtained from earth tide analyses were used with the extensometer and tiltmeter data to quantify hydromechanical properties, including fracture volumetric specific storage, porosity, Poisson's ratio, the drained formation elastic modulus, and the effective dip direction of the fracture. Borehole tiltmeter data were used to estimate deformation caused by an aquifer test consisting of three pumping and recovery periods performed in well EX-1. During each period of the aquifer test the extensometer, located in W-03 and 27.7 m from the pumping well, was anchored over 2-m-long sections of (1) a fracture in hydraulic communication with EX-1, (2) a fracture that is not hydraulically connected with EX-1, and (3) an unfractured portion of bedrock directly above the hydraulically connected fracture. Results from the pumping tests yielded compressibilities of 1.3 × 10 -11 Pa -1, and 1.7 × 10 -11 Pa -1 for the lower and upper fractures, respectively. When coupled with areal strain calculated from earth tide analyses the volumetric specific storage values are 3.2 × 10 -11 Pa -1, and 2.8 × 10 -11 Pa -1 and the Poisson's ratios are 0.26 and 0.31, respectively. Using this with a calculated barometric efficiency of 0.45 allows for porosity calculations of 0.02 and 0.03, respectively for the vicinity of fractures in well W-03.

  6. Explaining the texture properties of whey protein isolate/starch co-gels from fracture structures.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wei; Nakamura, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    The effects of tapioca starch (TS) and potato starch (PS) on texture properties of whey protein isolate (WPI)/starch co-gels were investigated for fracture structures. We focused on two types of WPI network structures. In a fine-stranded structure at pH 6.8, the WPI/TS co-gel fractured similarly to the WPI single gel. The WPI/PS co-gel was broken at a lower strain and lower stress. In a random aggregation at pH 5.8, the WPI/TS co-gel reached a yielding point at a lower strain, whereas the WPI/PS co-gel fractured at a higher strain and higher stress. In the fracture structures, it was revealed that breaks occurred in different places in these cases, which could explain the different texture properties of samples. This study tries to explain the texture properties of WPI/starch co-gels from fracture structures and provides a reference to predict texture properties of the WPI/starch food system.

  7. Elastic properties and fracture strength of quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    A research program is described which was devised to determine experimentally the elastic properties in tension and bending of quasi-isotropic laminates made from high-modulus graphite fiber and epoxy. Four laminate configurations were investigated, and determinations were made of the tensile modulus, Poisson's ratio, bending stiffness, fracture strength, and fracture strain. The measured properties are compared with those predicted by laminate theory, reasons for scatter in the experimental data are discussed, and the effect of fiber misalignment on predicted elastic tensile properties is examined. The results strongly suggest that fiber misalignment in combination with variation in fiber volume content is responsible for the scatter in both elastic constants and fracture strength.

  8. Stratigraphic variations in oil-shale fracture properties. [Colorado and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.; Patti, N. C.; Trent, B. C.

    1982-09-01

    The proper design and evaluation of in situ oil shale fracture and retorting experiments require that both the extreme values and spatial distribution of the controlling rock properties be adequately known. Many of the in situ technologies being considered for processing within the Green River Formation in Colorado, Wyoming and Utah depend upon the carefully controlled explosive fracturing of the rock such that suitably uniform permeabilities are achieved. The prediction, control and evaluation of explosive oil shale fracturing require a detailed knowledge of tensile strength behavior as a function of shale grade and stratigraphic position. Direct-pull tensile tests, point-load pinch tests, and four-point-bend fracture toughness tests have been utilized to develop detailed logs of the relevant fracture properties for the 37 m thick Mahogany Zone section of the Green River Formation near Anvil Points, Colorado and for the rich, upper 13 m of the Tipton Member near Rock Springs, Wyoming. For the Mahogany Zone shale tensile strengths ranged up to 15.3 MPa for direct-pull tests and 43.4 MPa for indirect tests. Fracture energy values for this shale ranged from 8 J/m/sup 2/ to 191 J/m/sup 2/. For the Tipton shale tensile strengths ranged up to 3.7 MPa for direct-pull tests and 12.6 MPa for indirect tests. Fracture energy values for the Tipton averaged from 5 J/m/sup 2/ to 91 J/m/sup 2/. Detailed statistical analyses were performed on these data and on Fischer assay oil yield data to establish the correlations between them. Data from both tensile strength and fracture energy tests correlate well with lithologic and oil yield characteristics of the Mahogany Zone shale while poor correlations were found for the Tipton shale. 27 figures, 8 tables.

  9. Effect of Hydrogen on the Mechnical Properties and Fracture Behavior of High Purity Aluminum.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    RD-0171 214 EFFECT OF HYDROGEN ON THE NECHNICAL PROPERTIES AND 1/2 FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF H.. (U) ILLINOIS UNIV AT URBANA DEPT OF MATERIALS SCIENCE F...University of Illinois at Urbana -Champaign, 1986 Accesion For NTIS CRA&I DTIC TAB 3 UWanno~r-ced 1 JAificatioil Urbana , Illinois Ditb jtion I orc...and should eventually 2 I RD-0171 214 EFFECT OF HYDROGEN ON THE NECHNXCAL PROPERTIES AND 2/2 FRACTURE BEHAYIOR OF H..(U) ILLINOIS UNIV AT URBANA DEPT

  10. Experimental Investigation of Seepage Properties of Fractured Rocks Under Different Confining Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, D.; Miao, X. X.; Chen, Z. Q.; Mao, X. B.

    2013-09-01

    The effectiveness of transmitting underground water in rock fractures is strongly influenced by the widths of the fractures and their interconnections. However, the geometries needed for water flow in fractured rock are also heavily controlled by the confining pressure conditions. This paper is intended to study the seepage properties of fractured rocks under different confining pressures. In order to do this, we designed and manufactured a water flow apparatus that can be connected to the electro-hydraulic servo-controlled test system MTS815.02, which provides loading and exhibits external pressures in the test. Using this apparatus, we tested fractured mudstone, limestone and sandstone specimens and obtained the relationship between seepage properties and variations in confining pressure. The calculation of the seepage properties based on the collection of water flow and confining pressure differences is specifically influenced by non-Darcy flow. The results show that: (1) The seepage properties of fractured rocks are related to confining pressure, i.e. with the increase of confining pressure, the permeability decreases and the absolute value of non-Darcy flow coefficient increases. (2) The sandstone coefficients and range from to m2 and to m-1, respectively, and exhibit a greater change compared to coefficients of mudstone and limestone. (3) From the regression analysis of experimental data, it is concluded that the polynomial function is a better fit than the power and logarithmic functions. The results obtained can provide an important reference for understanding the stability of rock surrounding roadways toward prevention of underground water gushing-out, and for developing underground resources (e.g. coal).

  11. Temperature dependent fracture properties of shape memory alloys: novel findings and a comprehensive model.

    PubMed

    Maletta, Carmine; Sgambitterra, Emanuele; Niccoli, Fabrizio

    2016-12-01

    Temperature dependent fracture properties of NiTi-based Shape Memory Alloys (SMAs), within the pseudoelastic regime, were analyzed. In particular, the effective Stress Intensity Factor (SIF) was estimated, at different values of the testing temperature, by a fitting of the William's expansion series, based on Digital Image Correlation (DIC) measurements. It was found that temperature plays an important role on SIF and on critical fast fracture conditions. As a consequence, Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) approaches are not suitable to predict fracture properties of SMAs, as they do not consider the effects of temperature. On the contrary, good agreements between DIC results and the predictions of an ad-hoc analytical model were observed. In fact, the model takes into account the whole thermo mechanical loading condition, including both mechanical load and temperature. Results revealed that crack tip stress-induced transformations do not represent a toughening effect and this is a completely novel result within the SMA community. Furthremore, it was demonstrated that the analytical model can be actually used to define a temperature independent fracture toughness parameter. Therefore, a new approach is proposed, based on the analytical model, where both mechanical load and temperature are considered as loading parameters in SIF computation.

  12. Properties of a pair of fracture networks produced by triaxial deformation experiments: insights on fluid flow using discrete fracture network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghislain, Trullenque; Rishi, Parashar; Clément, Delcourt; Lucille, Collet; Pauline, Villard; Sébastien, Potel

    2016-09-01

    Results of a series of deformation experiments conducted on gabbro samples and numerical models for computation of flow are presented. Rocks were subjected to triaxial tests (σ1 > σ2 = σ3) under σ3 = 150 MPa confining pressure at room temperature, to generate fracture network patterns. These patterns were either produced by keeping a constant confining pressure and loading the sample up to failure (conventional test: CT), or by building up a high differential stress and suddenly releasing the confining pressure (confining pressure release test: CPR). The networks are similar in overall density but differ primarily in the orientation of smaller fractures. In the case of CT tests, a conjugate fracture set is observed with one dominant fracture zone running at about 20° from σ1. CPR tests do not show such a conjugate pattern and the mean fracture orientation is at around 35° from σ1. Discrete fracture network (DFN) methodology was used to determine the distribution of flow and hydraulic head for both fracture sets under simple boundary conditions and uniform transmissivity values. The fracture network generated by CT and CPR tests exhibit different patterns of flow field and hydraulic head configurations, but convey approximately the same amount of flow at all scales for which DFN models were simulated. The numerical modelling results help to develop understanding of qualitative differences in flow distribution that may arise in rocks of the same mineralogical composition and mechanical properties, but under the influence of different stress conditions, albeit at similar overall stress magnitude.

  13. Relationships between the elastic and fracture properties of boronitrene and molybdenum disulfide and those of graphene.

    PubMed

    Hess, Peter

    2017-02-10

    A consistent set of 2D elastic and fracture properties of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) monolayers (boronitrene) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanosheets is derived. Reported literature values for Young's moduli and fracture strengths, based on experiments and DFT calculations, were used to estimate the line or edge energy with a local 2D bond-breaking model. Consistent information was obtained for intrinsic fracture properties. The basic mechanical properties of boronitrene are roughly 25% lower than the corresponding graphene values. This is consistent with the tensile bond force model, and the lower ionic-covalent bonding energy of sp(2)-hybridized B-N bonds in comparison with sp(2)-hybridized carbon bonds. While the intrinsic stiffness and strength of MoS2 correlate with the strength of its constituent chemical bonds, DFT calculations of the line or edge energy scale with roughly two times the Mo-S bonding energy, whereas the 2D bond-breaking model yields a correlation similar to that found for h-BN. Additional failure properties such as the fracture toughness and strain energy release rate were determined. Together with the intrinsic strengths a Griffith plot of the effective strength of defective h-BN and MoS2 versus the square root of half the defect size of single defects such as (multi)vacancies and micro-cracks exhibits a slope similar to that of the graphene plot.

  14. Relationship between microstructure, material distribution, and mechanical properties of sheep tibia during fracture healing process.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiazi; Gong, He; Huang, Xing; Fang, Juan; Zhu, Dong; Fan, Yubo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between microstructural parameters, material distribution, and mechanical properties of sheep tibia at the apparent and tissue levels during the fracture healing process. Eighteen sheep underwent tibial osteotomy and were sacrificed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Radiographs and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scanning were taken for microstructural assessment, material distribution evaluation, and micro-finite element analysis. A displacement of 5% compressive strain on the longitudinal direction was applied to the micro-finite element model, and apparent and tissue-level mechanical properties were calculated. Principle component analysis and linear regression were used to establish the relationship between principle components (PCs) and mechanical parameters. Visible bony callus formation was observed throughout the healing process from radiographic assessment. Apparent mechanical property increased at 8 weeks, but tissue-level mechanical property did not increase significantly until 12 weeks. Three PCs were extracted from microstructural parameters and material distribution, which accounted for 87.592% of the total variation. The regression results showed a significant relationship between PCs and mechanical parameters (R>0.8, P<0.05). Results of this study show that microstructure and material distribution based on micro-CT imaging could efficiently predict bone strength and reflect the bone remodeling process during fracture healing, which provides a basis for exploring the fracture healing mechanism and may be used as an approach for fractured bone strength assessment.

  15. Relationships between the elastic and fracture properties of boronitrene and molybdenum disulfide and those of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Peter

    2017-02-01

    A consistent set of 2D elastic and fracture properties of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) monolayers (boronitrene) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanosheets is derived. Reported literature values for Young’s moduli and fracture strengths, based on experiments and DFT calculations, were used to estimate the line or edge energy with a local 2D bond-breaking model. Consistent information was obtained for intrinsic fracture properties. The basic mechanical properties of boronitrene are roughly 25% lower than the corresponding graphene values. This is consistent with the tensile bond force model, and the lower ionic-covalent bonding energy of sp2-hybridized B-N bonds in comparison with sp2-hybridized carbon bonds. While the intrinsic stiffness and strength of MoS2 correlate with the strength of its constituent chemical bonds, DFT calculations of the line or edge energy scale with roughly two times the Mo-S bonding energy, whereas the 2D bond-breaking model yields a correlation similar to that found for h-BN. Additional failure properties such as the fracture toughness and strain energy release rate were determined. Together with the intrinsic strengths a Griffith plot of the effective strength of defective h-BN and MoS2 versus the square root of half the defect size of single defects such as (multi)vacancies and micro-cracks exhibits a slope similar to that of the graphene plot.

  16. Finite element modeling of the influence of hand position and bone properties on the Colles' fracture load during a fall.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Drew; Ural, Ani

    2010-08-01

    Distal forearm fracture is one of the most frequently observed osteoporotic fractures, which may occur as a result of low energy falls such as falls from a standing height and may be linked to the osteoporotic nature of the bone, especially in the elderly. In order to prevent the occurrence of radius fractures and their adverse outcomes, understanding the effect of both extrinsic and intrinsic contributors to fracture risk is essential. In this study, a nonlinear fracture mechanics-based finite element model is applied to human radius to assess the influence of extrinsic factors (load orientation and load distribution between scaphoid and lunate) and intrinsic bone properties (age-related changes in fracture properties and bone geometry) on the Colles' fracture load. Seven three-dimensional finite element models of radius were created, and the fracture loads were determined by using cohesive finite element modeling, which explicitly represented the crack and the fracture process zone behavior. The simulation results showed that the load direction with respect to the longitudinal and dorsal axes of the radius influenced the fracture load. The fracture load increased with larger angles between the resultant load and the dorsal axis, and with smaller angles between the resultant load and longitudinal axis. The fracture load also varied as a function of the load ratio between the lunate and scaphoid, however, not as drastically as with the load orientation. The fracture load decreased as the load ratio (lunate/scaphoid) increased. Multiple regression analysis showed that the bone geometry and the load orientation are the most important variables that contribute to the prediction of the fracture load. The findings in this study establish a robust computational fracture risk assessment method that combines the effects of intrinsic properties of bone with extrinsic factors associated with a fall, and may be elemental in the identification of high fracture risk individuals

  17. Fracture properties from tight reservoir outcrop analogues with application to geothermal exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, Sonja L.; Reyer, Dorothea; Afsar, Filiz; Bauer, Johanna F.; Meier, Silke; Reinecker, John

    2015-04-01

    In geothermal reservoirs, similar to other tight reservoirs, fluid flow may be intensely affected by fracture systems, in particular those associated with fault zones. When active (slipping) the fault core, that is, the inner part of a fault zone, which commonly consists of breccia or gouge, can suddenly develop high permeability. Fault cores of inactive fault zones, however, may have low permeabilities and even act as flow barriers. In the outer part of a fault zone, the damage zone, permeability depends mainly on the fracture properties, that is, the geometry (orientation, aperture, density, connectivity, etc.) of the fault-associated fracture system. Mineral vein networks in damage zones of deeply eroded fault zones in palaeogeothermal fields demonstrate their permeability. In geothermal exploration, particularly for hydrothermal reservoirs, the orientation of fault zones in relation to the current stress field as well as their internal structure, in particular the properties of the associated fracture system, must be known as accurately as possible for wellpath planning and reservoir engineering. Here we present results of detailed field studies and numerical models of fault zones and associated fracture systems in palaeogeo¬thermal fields and host rocks for geothermal reservoirs from various stratigraphies, lithologies and tectonic settings: (1) 74 fault zones in three coastal sections of Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic age (mudstones and limestone-marl alternations) in the Bristol Channel Basin, UK. (2) 58 fault zones in 22 outcrops from Upper Carboniferous to Upper Cretaceous in the Northwest German Basin (siliciclastic, carbonate and volcanic rocks); and (3) 16 fault zones in 9 outcrops in Lower Permian to Middle Triassic (mainly sandstone and limestone) in the Upper Rhine Graben shoulders. Whereas (1) represent palaeogeothermal fields with mineral veins, (2) and (3) are outcrop analogues of reservoir horizons from geothermal exploration. In the study

  18. Are the High Hip Fracture Rates Among Norwegian Women Explained by Impaired Bone Material Properties?

    PubMed

    Duarte Sosa, Daysi; Vilaplana, Laila; Güerri, Roberto; Nogués, Xavier; Wang-Fagerland, Morten; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; F Eriksen, Erik

    2015-10-01

    Hip fracture rates in Norway rank among the highest in the world, more than double that of Spanish women. Previous studies were unable to demonstrate significant differences between the two populations with respect to bone mass or calcium metabolism. In order to test whether the difference in fracture propensity between both populations could be explained by differences in bone material quality we assessed bone material strength using microindentation in 42 Norwegian and 46 Spanish women with normal BMD values, without clinical or morphometric vertebral fractures, no clinical or laboratory signs of secondary osteoporosis, and without use of drugs with known influence on bone metabolism. Bone material properties were assessed by microindentation of the thick cortex of the mid tibia following local anesthesia of the area using the Osteoprobe device (Active Life Scientific, Santa Barbara, CA, USA). Indentation distance was standardized against a calibration phantom of methylmethacrylate and results, as percentage of this reference value, expressed as bone material strength index units (BMSi). We found that the bone material properties reflected in the BMSi value of Norwegian women was significantly inferior when compared to Spanish women (77 ± 7.1 versus 80.7 ± 7.8, p < 0.001). Total hip BMD was significantly higher in Norwegian women (1.218 g/cm(2) versus 0.938 g/cm(2) , p < 0.001) but regression analysis revealed that indentation values did not vary with BMD r(2)  = 0.03 or age r(2)  = 0.04. In conclusion Norwegian women show impaired bone material properties, higher bone mass, and were taller than Spanish women. The increased height will increase the impact on bone after falls, and impaired bone material properties may further enhance the risk fracture after such falls. These ethnic differences in bone material properties may partly explain the higher propensity for fracture in Norwegian women.

  19. Effects of chemical alteration on fracture mechanical properties in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, O. A.; Eichhubl, P.; Olson, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Fault and fracture networks often control the distribution of fluids and heat in hydrothermal and epithermal systems, and in related geothermal and mineral resources. Additional chemical influences on conduit evolution are well documented, with dissolution and precipitation of mineral species potentially changing the permeability of fault-facture networks. Less well understood are the impacts of chemical alteration on the mechanical properties governing fracture growth and fracture network geometry. We use double-torsion (DT) load relaxation tests under ambient air conditions to measure the mode-I fracture toughness (KIC) and subcritical fracture growth index (SCI) of variably altered rock samples obtained from outcrop in Dixie Valley, NV. Samples from southern Dixie Valley include 1) weakly altered granite, characterized by minor sericite in plagioclase, albitization and vacuolization of feldspars, and incomplete replacement of biotite with chlorite, and 2) granite from an area of locally intense propylitic alteration with chlorite-calcite-hematite-epidote assemblages. We also evaluated samples of completely silicified gabbro obtained from the Dixie Comstock epithermal gold deposit. In the weakly altered granite KIC and SCI are 1.3 ±0.2 MPam1/2 (n=8) and 59 ±25 (n=29), respectively. In the propylitic assemblage KIC is reduced to 0.6 ±0.1 MPam1/2 (n=11), and the SCI increased to 75 ±36 (n = 33). In both cases, the altered materials have lower fracture toughness and higher SCI than is reported for common geomechanical standards such as Westerly Granite (KIC ~1.7 MPam1/2; SCI ~48). Preliminary analysis of the silicified gabbro shows a significant increase in fracture toughness, 3.6 ±0.4 MPam1/2 (n=2), and SCI, 102 ±45 (n=19), compared to published values for gabbro (2.9 MPam1/2 and SCI = 32). These results suggest that mineralogical and textural changes associated with different alteration assemblages may result in spatially variable rates of fracture

  20. Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume 1. Fracturing proppants and their properties

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    A review of previously published literature on proppant permeability is presented. This data will be used in the subsequent phases of the geothermal stimulation project. Much information comes from the oil and gas industry which has tested various proppants during the past thirty years over a range of different closure stresses at the lower temperatures found in oil reservoirs. The historical development of proppants is summarized and reviewed and a variety of data on proppants found in today's literature is presented. Also included are several standard test procedures and equipment setups used in measuring proppant properties and in proppant testing.

  1. The effects of shot-peening residual stresses on the fracture and crack growth properties of D6AC steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elber, W.

    1973-01-01

    The fracture strength and cyclic crack-growth properties of surface-flawed, shot-peened D6AC steel plate were investigated. For short crack lengths (up to 1.5mm) simple linear elastic fracture mechanics - based only on applied loading - did not predict the fracture strengths. Also, Paris' Law for cyclic crack growth did not correlate the crack-growth behavior. To investigate the effect of shot-peening, additional fracture and crack-growth tests were performed on material which was precompressed to remove the residual stresses left by the shot-peening. Both tests and analysis show that the shot-peening residual stresses influence the fracture and crack-growth properties of the material. The analytical method of compensating for residual stresses and the fracture and cyclic crack-growth test results and predictions are presented.

  2. Altered distributions of bone tissue mineral and collagen properties in women with fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen Xiang; Lloyd, Ashley A; Burket, Jayme C; Gourion-Arsiquaud, Samuel; Donnelly, Eve

    2016-03-01

    Heterogeneity of bone tissue properties is emerging as a potential indicator of altered bone quality in pathologic tissue. The objective of this study was to compare the distributions of tissue properties in women with and without histories of fragility fractures using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) imaging. We extended a prior study that examined the relationship of the mean FTIR properties to fracture risk by analyzing in detail the widths and the tails of the distributions of FTIR properties in biopsies from fracture and non-fracture cohorts. The mineral and matrix properties of cortical and trabecular iliac crest tissue were compared in biopsies from women with a history of fragility fracture (+Fx; n=21, age: mean 54±SD 15y) and with no history of fragility fracture (-Fx; n=12, age: 57±5y). A subset of the patients included in the -Fx group were taking estrogen-plus-progestin hormone replacement therapy (HRT) (-Fx+HRT n=8, age: 58±5y) and were analyzed separately from patients with no history of HRT (-Fx-HRT n=4, age: 56±7y). When the FTIR parameter mean values were examined by treatment group, the trabecular tissue of -Fx-HRT patients had a lower mineral:matrix ratio (M:M) and collagen maturity (XLR) than that of -Fx+HRT patients (-22% M:M, -18% XLR) and +Fx patients (-17% M:M, -18% XLR). Across multiple FTIR parameters, tissue from the -Fx-HRT group had smaller low-tail (5th percentile) values than that from the -Fx+HRT or +Fx groups. In trabecular collagen maturity and crystallinity (XST), the -Fx-HRT group had smaller low-tail values than those in the -Fx+HRT group (-16% XLR, -5% XST) and the +Fx group (-17% XLR, -7% XST). The relatively low values of trabecular mineral:matrix ratio and collagen maturity and smaller low-tail values of collagen maturity and crystallinity observed in the -Fx-HRT group are characteristic of younger tissue. Taken together, our data suggest that the presence of newly formed tissue that includes small/imperfect crystals

  3. Estimating properties of unsaturated fractured formations from injection and falloff tests

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Attanayake, M.P.

    1987-12-01

    A new technique for calculating hydraulic properties of unsaturated fractured formations is proposed as an alternative to the common approach involving steady-state analysis of multi-rate gas injection tests. This method is based on graphical analysis of unsteady-state pressure-time data from an injection-falloff test sequence. Both gas and water injection testing are considered. Flow in a horizontal fracture of limited lateral extent, bounded above and below by an impermeable matrix, and intersected by a cylindrical borehole is described by two analytical models developed in this study. The first model corresponds to the early-time infinite acting radial flow period, and the second to the late-time linear flow period. Interpretive equations are derived for computing fracture conductivity and volumetric aperture from early-time pressure data, and fracture width from late-time pressure data. Effects of fracture inclination and gravity are studied numerically and found to be practically negligible for gas as well as water injection. Two simulated injection-falloff tests are analyzed using the suggested procedure. Results are found to be in good agreement with simulator input values. 13 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Characterization of the Microstructure, Fracture, and Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Alloys 7085-O and 7175-T7452 Hollow Cylinder Extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Samuel G.; Chalivendra, Vijaya B.; Rice, Matthew A.; Doleski, Robert F.

    2016-09-01

    Microstructural, tensile, and fracture characterizations of cylindrically forged forms of aluminum alloys AA7085-O and AA7175-T7452 were performed. Mechanical and fracture properties were investigated along radial, circumferential, and longitudinal directions to determine directional dependency. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) test methods (ASTM E8-04 and ASTM E1820) were employed for both the tensile and fracture characterizations, respectively. The tensile and fracture properties were related to microstructure in each direction. The strength, elongation at break, and ultimate tensile strength of AA7085-O were higher than those of AA7175-T7452. AA7175-T7452 alloy failed in a brittle manner during fracture studies. AA7085-O outperformed AA7175-T7452 on fracture energy in all of the orientations studied. Smaller grain sizes on the planes normal to circumferential and longitudinal directions showed improvement in both elongation at break and fracture energy values compared to those of radial direction. Scanning electron microscopy images demonstrated cleavage fracture in AA7175-T7452 and transgranular fracture in AA7085-O.

  5. Determination of design allowable properties. Fracture of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engstrom, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to provide a comprehensive report of available valid data on tensile properties, fracture toughness, fatigue crack propagation, and sustained load behavior of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy base metal and weldments, as applicable to manned spacecraft tankage. Most of the data found were from tests conducted at room temperature, -320 F and -423 F. Data are presented in graphical and tabular form, and areas in which data are lacking are established.

  6. Tiltmeters as Tools for Characterizing Geometrical and Hydrodynamical Properties of Fractured Crystalline Aquifers and Fault Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuite, J.; Longuevergne, L.; Bour, O.; Lavenant, N.; Boudin, F.

    2014-12-01

    In many geological reservoirs, open fractures or fault zones generally induce high spatial variability of hydrodynamical properties and shape the main deep-seated flow paths. It is of crucial interest to determine their structure and properties in order to achieve a sound and sustained exploitation of resources or to estimate the risk of failure of any underground storage. Tiltmeters have emerged as new tools to observe deformation generated by groundwater flow. As such instruments are highly sensitive to pressure gradients, they are perfectly suited for monitoring channelized flow in connected fractures and fault zones. Hence, they provide a unique insight of these reservoirs' geometry and dynamics over broad time scales. Here we demonstrate that continuous tilt data from surface long baseline tiltmeters (LBT) can be used alone to evaluate the general functioning of a fractured hardrock system and estimate the hydraulic properties of its main conductive features. The study is applied to the pumping site of Ploemeur observatory (Brittany, France) which is well documented and instrumented, and therefore forms a convenient setting for introducing LBT as tools for fractured media hydrology. On the short term, tilt signals are strongly correlated with pumping cycles and associated head level changes in well-connected boreholes. Besides, when pumps are stopped the maximal tilt direction is systematically perpendicular to a subvertical fault zone whose azimuth of strike has thereby been refined down to degree precision. By using a semi-analytical model of deformation, we establish the link between tilt and pressure change during pumping interruptions which then allows for hydraulic properties estimation from tilt measurements only. Finally, we validate our results with previous estimates obtained from other studies and discuss the orientation of future work that could enhance these estimates.

  7. Solid solution directionally solidified eutectics: Model systems for structure-property relationships in interfacial fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Luke Nathaniel

    The next generation of high temperature materials for application in aerospace and power generation systems will be required to withstand temperatures well in excess of 1200°C, often in oxidizing atmospheres. Oxide-oxide directionally solidified eutectics (DSE's) have shown promise as high temperature ceramic materials, only to be limited by their lack of fracture toughness at room temperature. In the case of DSE oxide materials, the interfacial fracture behavior has been blamed for the poor performance in the past and is the subject of interest in this work. In this thesis, the solid solution, directionally solidified quaternary eutectic (SS-DSE), Co1-xNixO/ZrO2(CaO), is developed as a model system for the study of interfacial fracture in oxide-oxide DSE's. A variety of structural and mechanical characterization techniques are applied to investigate structure-property relationships for interfacial fracture behavior. The optical floating zone technique was employed for growing both the eutectic crystals and their single crystal counterparts, Co1-x NixO. Co1-xNixO/ZrO2(CaO) was shown to possess the necessary structural elements to serve as a model system for interfacial fracture. Lamellar microstructures were observed for all compositions. The crystallographic relationships between phases evolved as a model solid solution. Interdiffusion of chemical species was minimal, allowing the layers to treated independently. The core of this thesis is dedicated to studying the nature of interfacial fracture behavior in oxide eutectics. This study is motivated by the novel observation of extensive interfacial delamination for the system CoO/ZrO 2(CaO). A transition from interfacial delamination to interfacial penetration is observed for compositions of Co1-xNixO/ZrO 2(CaO) with x > 0.2. The residual stress state in these materials was investigated using X-ray and neutron diffraction-based techniques. The role of plasticity in interfacial fracture was explored using a

  8. Tensile and Fracture Toughness Properties of Neutron-Irradiated CuCrZr

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Mikhail A; Zinkle, Steven J; Li, Meimei

    2009-01-01

    Tensile and fracture toughness properties of a precipitation-hardened CuCrZr alloy were investigated in two heat treatment conditions: solutionized, water quenched and aged (CuCrZr SAA), and hot isostatic pressed, solutionized, slow-cooled and aged (CuCrZr SCA). The second heat treatment simulated the manufacturing cycle for large components, and is directly relevant for the ITER divertor components. Specimens were neutron irradiated at {approx}80 C to two fluences, 2 x 10{sup 24} and 2 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV), corresponding to displacement doses of 0.15 and 1.5 displacements per atom (dpa). Tensile and fracture toughness tests were carried out at room temperature. Significant irradiation hardening and plastic instability at yield occurred in both heat treatment conditions with a saturation dose of {approx}0.1 dpa. Neutron irradiation slightly reduced fracture toughness in CuCrZr SAA and CuCrZr SCA. The fracture toughness of CuCrZr remained high up to 1.5 dpa (J{sub Q} > 200 kJ/m{sup 2}) for both heat treatment conditions.

  9. Quantifying mechanical properties in a murine fracture healing system using inverse modeling: preliminary work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miga, Michael I.; Weis, Jared A.; Granero-Molto, Froilan; Spagnoli, Anna

    2010-03-01

    Understanding bone remodeling and mechanical property characteristics is important for assessing treatments to accelerate healing or in developing diagnostics to evaluate successful return to function. The murine system whereby mid-diaphaseal tibia fractures are imparted on the subject and fracture healing is assessed at different time points and under different therapeutic conditions is a particularly useful model to study. In this work, a novel inverse geometric nonlinear elasticity modeling framework is proposed that can reconstruct multiple mechanical properties from uniaxial testing data. To test this framework, the Lame' constants were reconstructed within the context of a murine cohort (n=6) where there were no differences in treatment post tibia fracture except that half of the mice were allowed to heal 4 days longer (10 day, and 14 day healing time point, respectively). The properties reconstructed were a shear modulus of G=511.2 +/- 295.6 kPa, and 833.3+/- 352.3 kPa for the 10 day, and 14 day time points respectively. The second Lame' constant reconstructed at λ=1002.9 +/-42.9 kPa, and 14893.7 +/- 863.3 kPa for the 10 day, and 14 day time points respectively. An unpaired Student t-test was used to test for statistically significant differences among the groups. While the shear modulus did not meet our criteria for significance, the second Lame' constant did at a value p<0.0001. Traditional metrics that are commonly used within the bone fracture healing research community were not found to be statistically significant.

  10. Molecular composites via ionic interactions and their deformation/fracture properties

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.; Chen, W.; Hara, M.

    1995-12-01

    Homogeneous molecular composites have been made from ionic PPTA and PVP, in which a good dispersion of rod molecules is achieved via ion-dipole interactions. Appearance of a single T{sub g} as well as morphological observations by TEM have indicated good dispersion of the rigid-rod PPTA molecules. The deformation mode of the matrix polymer is modified significantly with the addition of rod molecules: while crazing is the only deformation mechanism of PVP, an addition of ionic PPTA molecules into the PVP matrix induces shear deformation. This suggests better fracture properties of these molecular composites. Initial studies have indicated significant enhancement in mechanical properties.

  11. Effects of Strain Rates on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Mechanism of DP780 Dual Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengci; Kang, Yonglin; Zhu, Guoming; Kuang, Shuang

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical properties of DP780 dual phase steel were measured by quasi-static and high-speed tensile tests at strain rates between 0.001 and 1000 s-1 at room temperature. The deformation and fracture mechanisms were analyzed by observation of the tensile fracture and microstructure near the fracture. Dynamic factor and feret ratio quantitative methods were applied to study the effect of strain rate on the microstructure and properties of DP780 steel. The constitutive relation was described by a modified Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong model. The results showed that the strain rate sensitivity of yield strength is bigger than that of ultimate tensile strength; as strain rate increased, the formation of microcracks and voids at the ferrite/martensite interface can be alleviated; the strain rate effect is unevenly distributed in the plastic deformation region. Moreover, both models can effectively describe the experimental results, while the modified Zerilli-Armstrong model is more accurate because the strain-hardening rate of this model is independent of strain rate.

  12. Mechanical properties and fracture behaviour of polyimide (SINTIMID) at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschegg, E.; Humer, K.; Weber, H. W.

    In view of emerging applications in aeronautics, low temperature and nuclear fusion technology, the mechanical properties of plastics have to be tested both at cryogenic temperatures and under certain radiation environments. In the present paper measurements are reported of the elastic modulus, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and the failure strain of a polyimide (SINTIMID), which were carried out at room temperature, 77 and 4.2 K. In addition to this temperature dependence, the influence of sample size on the mechanical properties, as well as the fracture behaviour in mode I on cylindrical precracked samples with a circumferential notch, have been investigated. The results show an increase in both the elastic modulus and the UTS by 40 and 60%, respectively, on decreasing the temperature to 77 K, but no further change at lower temperatures. On the other hand, the failure strain decreases continuously (by ≈ 25%) down to 4.2 K, while the fracture toughness increases in a similar way (by ≈ 10%). No sample size dependence could be detected. These results will be discussed in conjunction with additional observations of the fracture behaviour made using optical and scanning electron microscopes.

  13. Friction Stir-Welded Titanium Alloy Ti-6Al-4V: Microstructure, Mechanical and Fracture Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, D. G.; Edwards, P.; Cantrell, A. M.; Gangwar, K.; Ramulu, M.

    2015-05-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been refined to create butt welds from two sheets of Ti-6Al-4V alloy to have an ultra-fine grain size. Weld specimen testing was completed for three different FSW process conditions: As welded, stress relieved, stress relieved and machined, and for the un-welded base material. The investigation includes macrostructure, microstructure, microhardness, tensile property testing, notched bar impact testing, and fracture toughness evaluations. All experiments were conducted in accordance with industry standard testing specifications. The microstructure in the weld nugget was found to consist of refined and distorted grains of alpha in a matrix of transformed beta containing acicular alpha. The enhanced fracture toughness of the welds is a result of increased hardness, which is attributed to an increase in alpha phase, increase in transformed beta in acicular alpha, and grain refinement during the weld process. The noted general trend in mechanical properties from as welded, to stress relieved, to stress relieved and machined conditions exhibited a decrease in ultimate tensile strength, and yield strength with a small increase in ductility and a significant increase in fracture toughness.

  14. Characterization of Mode I Fracture and Morphological Properties of PLLA Blends with Addition of Lysine Triisocyanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannaladsaysy, Vilay; Todo, Mitsugu

    Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) was toughened by blending with three different ductile biopolymers such as poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL), poly(butylene succinate-co-e-caprolactone) (PBSC), poly (butylene succinate-co-L-lactate) (PBSL). The blend ratio was fixed to 50:50. Lysine triisocyanate (LTI) was added to the blends as a compatibilizer. Characterizations such as Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, field-emission electron microscope (FE-SEM), and mode I fracture test were used to characterize the effectiveness of LTI on the mechanical and morphological properties of various PLLA blends. It was found that PLLA/PCL blend shows the highest toughness energy among the binary blends. On the other hand, addition of LTI in PLLA/PBSC blend exhibits the best toughness property. Based on the FE-SEM observation, fractured surfaces of PLLA blends with LTI indicate ductile fracture with dense elongated fibrils. The largest damage zone is generated in the vicinity of crack-trip, suggesting that high energy dissipation occurred in the crack-trip region. FT-IR analysis also suggested that the NCO groups of LTI were acted as a compatibilizer, as the results of interaction between the two phases of the polymer blends.

  15. Effects of Atomic-Scale Structure on the Fracture Properties of Amorphous Carbon - Carbon Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    The fracture of carbon materials is a complex process, the understanding of which is critical to the development of next generation high performance materials. While quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are the most accurate way to model fracture, the fracture behavior of many carbon-based composite engineering materials, such as carbon nanotube (CNT) composites, is a multi-scale process that occurs on time and length scales beyond the practical limitations of QM methods. The Reax Force Field (ReaxFF) is capable of predicting mechanical properties involving strong deformation, bond breaking and bond formation in the classical molecular dynamics framework. This has been achieved by adding to the potential energy function a bond-order term that varies continuously with distance. The use of an empirical bond order potential, such as ReaxFF, enables the simulation of failure in molecular systems that are several orders of magnitude larger than would be possible in QM techniques. In this work, the fracture behavior of an amorphous carbon (AC) matrix reinforced with CNTs was modeled using molecular dynamics with the ReaxFF reactive forcefield. Care was taken to select the appropriate simulation parameters, which can be different from those required when using traditional fixed-bond force fields. The effect of CNT arrangement was investigated with three systems: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. For each arrangement, covalent bonds are added between the CNTs and AC, with crosslink fractions ranging from 0-25% of the interfacial CNT atoms. The SWNT and MWNT array systems represent ideal cases with evenly spaced CNTs; the SWNT bundle system represents a more realistic case because, in practice, van der Waals interactions lead to the agglomeration of CNTs into bundles. The simulation results will serve as guidance in setting experimental processing conditions to optimize the mechanical properties of CNT

  16. Sealing properties of different obturation systems applied over apically fractured rotary nickel-titanium files.

    PubMed

    Altundasar, Emre; Sahin, Cem; Ozcelik, Bahar; Cehreli, Zafer C

    2008-02-01

    This study investigated the sealing properties of cold laterally compacted gutta percha and Thermafil applied over different apically fractured rotary nickel-titanium files. Extracted human premolars were prepared by using ProTaper (Dentsply-Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) or ProFile (Dentsply-Maillefer) systems (n = 40 for each), after which half of the specimens in each subgroup were subjected to instrument separation at the apical level. For each rotary system, roots with and without apically separated instruments (n = 10 for each) were filled with the two obturation systems and the levels of fluid conductance were recorded. In the absence of instrument separation, the leakage of Thermafil (Dentsply Maillefer) was significantly less than that achieved with cold lateral compaction (p < 0.05), whereas Thermafil yielded similar amounts of leakage in roots prepared with the ProTaper and ProFile systems (p < 0.05). Roots with fractured ProTaper instruments displayed significantly less leakage than those filled without ProTaper fragments, regardless of the obturation technique used (p < 0.05). However, intracanal separation of ProFile instruments increased the leakage (p < 0.05), but the obturation method did not influence fluid conduction (p > 0.05). These results reveal the variability of leakage associated with apically fractured ProFile and ProTaper files and different obturation methods used.

  17. Anomalous surface states modify the size-dependent mechanical properties and fracture of silica nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chun; Dávila, Lilian P.

    2014-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of amorphous silica nanowires under tension were analyzed for size and surface stress effects on mechanical properties and for structural modifications via bond angle distributions. Their fracture behavior was also investigated beyond the elastic limit. The Young’s moduli of silica nanowires were predicted to be about 75-100 GPa, depending on the nanowire size. The ultimate strength was calculated to be ˜10 GPa, depending on the diameter, which is in excellent agreement with the experiments. The dependence of the Young’s modulus on nanowire diameter is explained in terms of surface compressive stress effects. The fracture behavior of nanowires was also found to be influenced by surface compressive stresses. Bond angle distribution analysis of various nanowires reveals significant compressive surface states, as evidenced by the appearance of a secondary peak in the Si-O-Si bond angle distribution at ˜97°, which is absent in bulk silica. The strain rate was found to have a negligible effect on the Young’s modulus of the silica nanowires, but it has a critical role in determining their fracture mode.

  18. Tensile, fracture and thermal properties of polyarylates at room and cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humer, K.; Tschegg, E. K.; Weber, H. W.

    In the present paper, measurements of the modulus of elasticity, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and the ultimate tensile strain of polyarylates (ISARYL 15X and ISARYL 25X) carried out at room temperature, 77 and 4.2 K are reported on. In addition, the fracture behaviour in mode I on cylindrical circumferentially sharp notched samples as well as the thermal expansion have been investigated. The results show an increase in both the modulus of elasticity and the UTS by about a factor of two on decreasing the temperature to 77 K. Further cooling to 4.2 K leads to a decrease of ≈ 10% in these properties. On the other hand, the ultimate tensile strain of ISARYL 15X decreases by ≈65% at 4.2 K, whereas a non-uniform temperature dependence is found for ISARYL 25X. The fracture toughness of both materials increases by about a factor of three upon decreasing the temperature to 77 K, but decreases by a factor of two at lower temperatures. These results are discussed in conjunction with additional observations of the fracture behaviour made with optical and scanning electron microscopes.

  19. Quantitative local topological texture properties obtained from radiographs of the proximal femur in patients with pertrochanteric and transcervical hip fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Lutz, J.; Koerner, M.; Notohamiprodjo, M.; Reiser, M.

    2009-02-01

    The incidence of osteoporosis and associated fractures becomes an increasingly relevant issue for the public health institutions of industrialized nations. Fractures of the hip represent the worst complication of osteoporosis with a significantly elevated rate of mortality. Prediction of fracture risk is a major focus of osteoporosis research and, over the years, has been approched from different angles. There exist two distinct subtypes of transcervical and pertrochanteric hip fracture that can be distinguished on the basis of the anatomical location of the injury. While the epidemiology of hip fractures has been well described, typically, little or no distinction is made between the subtypes. The object of this study was to determine whether local topological texture properties based on the Minkowski Functionals (MF) obtained from standard radiographs of the proximal femur in patients with hip fracture can be used to differentiate between the two types of fracture pattern. The texture features were extracted from standardized regions of interest (femoral head, neck, and pertrochanteric region) in clinical radiographs of the hip obtained from 90 post-menopausal women (69.8 +/- 7.9 yrs). 30 of the women had sustained pertrochanteric fractures, 30 had transcervical hip fractures and 30 were age-matched controls. We determined an optimized topological parameter MF2Dloc using an integrative filtering procedure based on a sliding-windows algorithm. Statistical relationship between the fracture type (pertrochanteric/transcervical) and the value of MF2Dloc was assessed by receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. Depending on the anatomical location of the region of interest for texture analysis correct classification of tanscervial and pertrochanteric fractures ranged from AUC = 0.79 to 0.98. In conclusion, quantitative texture properties of trabecular bone extracted from radiographs of the hip can be used to identify patients with hip fracture and to distinguish

  20. The effect of thermal treatment on the fracture properties of alloy X-750 in aqueous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, R.; Elliott, C.S.; Hwang, I.S.; Prybylowski, J.

    1993-05-01

    Alloy X-750 is a high strength, age hardenable nickel-base alloy used in light water nuclear reactors. The excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature strength of alloy X-750 make it suitable for use in a variety of structure components in both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. These applications involve exposure of highly stressed material to aqueous media. Operational stresses are subject to low frequency thermally induced fluctuations and high frequency flow induced fluctuations. In general, alloy X-750 has performed well in light water reactors. However, an economically significant number of components have failed unexpectedly due to localized forms of attack such as corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking. Thermal processing history is known to play a significant role in the fracture properties of alloy X-750 in aqueous environments. While thermal treatments have been developed recently to improve performance, in many cases the reason for improved performance remains unclear. Therefore, identification of the mechanisms responsible for the degradation of fracture properties in aqueous environments is necessary. As a corollary it is necessary to achieve an understanding of how thermal treatment influences microstructure and, in turn, how microstructure influences fracture properties in aqueous environments. This report discusses five thermal treatments which were studied: (1) SA-1 hr at 1093{degree}C, (2) AH - 24 hr at 885{degree}C + 20 hr at 704{degree}C, (3) HTH - 1 hr at 1093{degree}C + 20 hr at 704{degree}C, (4) AHTH - 1 hr at 1093{degree}C + 24 hr at 885{degree}C + 20 hr at 704{degree}C, and (5) HOA - 1 hr at 1093{degree}C + 100 hrs at 760{degree}C. Microstructural characterization of these materials was accomplished through the use of optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy,scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and x-ray diffractometry.

  1. Modeling and additive manufacturing of bio-inspired composites with tunable fracture mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Dimas, Leon S; Buehler, Markus J

    2014-07-07

    Flaws, imperfections and cracks are ubiquitous in material systems and are commonly the catalysts of catastrophic material failure. As stresses and strains tend to concentrate around cracks and imperfections, structures tend to fail far before large regions of material have ever been subjected to significant loading. Therefore, a major challenge in material design is to engineer systems that perform on par with pristine structures despite the presence of imperfections. In this work we integrate knowledge of biological systems with computational modeling and state of the art additive manufacturing to synthesize advanced composites with tunable fracture mechanical properties. Supported by extensive mesoscale computer simulations, we demonstrate the design and manufacturing of composites that exhibit deformation mechanisms characteristic of pristine systems, featuring flaw-tolerant properties. We analyze the results by directly comparing strain fields for the synthesized composites, obtained through digital image correlation (DIC), and the computationally tested composites. Moreover, we plot Ashby diagrams for the range of simulated and experimental composites. Our findings show good agreement between simulation and experiment, confirming that the proposed mechanisms have a significant potential for vastly improving the fracture response of composite materials. We elucidate the role of stiffness ratio variations of composite constituents as an important feature in determining the composite properties. Moreover, our work validates the predictive ability of our models, presenting them as useful tools for guiding further material design. This work enables the tailored design and manufacturing of composites assembled from inferior building blocks, that obtain optimal combinations of stiffness and toughness.

  2. Numerical modeling of fluid effects on seismic properties of fractured magmatic geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grab, Melchior; Quintal, Beatriz; Caspari, Eva; Maurer, Hansruedi; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2017-02-01

    Seismic investigations of geothermal reservoirs over the last 20 years have sought to interpret the resulting tomograms and reflection images in terms of the degree of reservoir fracturing and fluid content. Since the former provides the pathways and the latter acts as the medium for transporting geothermal energy, such information is needed to evaluate the quality of the reservoir. In conventional rock physics-based interpretations, this hydro-mechanical information is approximated from seismic velocities computed at the low-frequency (field-based) and high-frequency (lab-based) limits. In this paper, we demonstrate how seismic properties of fluid-filled, fractured reservoirs can be modeled over the full frequency spectrum using a numerical simulation technique which has become popular in recent years. This technique is based on Biot's theory of poroelasticity and enables the modeling of the seismic velocity dispersion and the frequency dependent seismic attenuation due to wave-induced fluid flow. These properties are sensitive to key parameters such as the hydraulic permeability of fractures as well as the compressibility and viscosity of the pore fluids. Applying the poroelastic modeling technique to the specific case of a magmatic geothermal system under stress due to the weight of the overlying rocks requires careful parameterization of the model. This includes consideration of the diversity of rock types occurring in the magmatic system and examination of the confining-pressure dependency of each input parameter. After the evaluation of all input parameters, we use our modeling technique to determine the seismic attenuation factors and phase velocities of a rock containing a complex interconnected fracture network, whose geometry is based on a fractured geothermal reservoir in Iceland. Our results indicate that in a magmatic geothermal reservoir the overall seismic velocity structure mainly reflects the lithological heterogeneity of the system, whereas

  3. Off-axis tensile properties and fracture in a unidirectional graphite/polyimide composite (Celion 6000/PMR 15)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, J.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hurwitz, F. I.

    1984-01-01

    Tensile properties of unidirectional Celion 6000 graphite/PMR 15 polyimide composites prepared by hot molding and cold molding processes were measured at room temperature and 316 C, the upper use temperature of the polyimide resin, at both 45 and 90 deg to the fiber axis. The resulting fractures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and materialographic techniques. Variation in tensile properties with processing history occurred in the elastic modulus and strain to failure for specimens loaded at 90 deg at 316 C, and in the fracture stress, and hence the in-plane shear stress, for those loaded at 45 deg at room temperature. Significant plastic deformation was observed in the 45 deg orientation at 316 C for material produced by both processing methods. In general, fracture occurred by both failure within the matrix and at the fiber-matrix interface; the degree of interfacial failure increased with temperature. Secondary cracking below the primary fracture surface was also observed.

  4. A Stochastic XFEM Model to Study Delamination in PPS/Glass UD Composites: Effect of Uncertain Fracture Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motamedi, D.; Milani, A. S.; Komeili, M.; Bureau, M. N.; Thibault, F.; Trudel-Boucher, D.

    2014-04-01

    A nonlinear extended finite element (XFEM) modeling framework under a stochastic cohesive zone is presented for realistic prediction of delamination in polyphenylene sulfide (PPS)/glass composites in mode I of fracture. The cohesive zone model adopts damage evolution of the material based on a bilinear traction-separation law, the critical energy release rate and the J-integral method to formulate the delamination interface under stochastic fracture properties. To demonstrate the application of the approach, numerical predictions are compared to experimental data using Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) tests. In particular, it is shown how the XFEM model can be used to capture test non-repeatability due to uncertain fracture properties, which is often the case during the characterization of composites using standard fracture tests.

  5. Effect of nano/micro B4C and SiC particles on fracture properties of aluminum 7075 particulate composites under chevron-notch plane strain fracture toughness test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morovvati, M. R.; Lalehpour, A.; Esmaeilzare, A.

    2016-12-01

    Reinforcing aluminum with SiC and B4C nano/micro particles can lead to a more efficient material in terms of strength and light weight. The influence of adding these particles to an aluminum 7075 matrix is investigated using chevron-notch fracture toughness test method. The reinforcing factors are type, size (micro/nano), and weight percent of the particles. The fracture parameters are maximum load, notch opening displacement, the work up to fracture and chevron notch plane strain fracture toughness. The findings demonstrate that addition of micro and nano size particles improves the fracture properties; however, increasing the weight percent of the particles leads to increase of fracture properties up to a certain level and after that due to agglomeration of the particles, the improvement does not happen for both particle types and size categories. Agglomeration of particles at higher amounts of reinforcing particles results in improper distribution of particles and reduction in mechanical properties.

  6. Implementing ground surface deformation tools to characterize field-scale properties of a fractured aquifer during a short hydraulic test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuite, Jonathan; Longuevergne, Laurent; Bour, Olivier; Boudin, Frédérick; Durand, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    In naturally fractured reservoirs, fluid flow is governed by the structural and hydromechanical properties of fracture networks or conductive fault zones. In order to ensure a sustained exploitation of resources or to assess the safety of underground storage, it is necessary to evaluate these properties. As they generally form highly heterogeneous and anisotropic reservoirs, fractured media may be well characterized by means of several complementary experimental methods or sounding techniques. In this framework, the observation of ground deformation has been proved useful to gain insight of a fractured reservoir's geometry and hydraulic properties. Commonly, large conductive structures like faults can be studied from surface deformation from satellite methods at monthly time scales, whereas meter scale fractures have to be examined under short-term in situ experiments using high accuracy intruments like tiltmeters or extensometers installed in boreholes or at the ground's surface. To the best of our knowledge, the feasability of a field scale (~ 100 m) characterization of a fractured reservoir with geodetic tools in a short term experiment has not yet been addressed. In the present study, we implement two complementary ground surface geodetic tools, namely tiltmetry and optical leveling, to monitor the deformation induced by a hydraulic recovery test at the Ploemeur hydrological observatory (France). Employing a simple purely elastic modeling approach, we show that the joint use of time constraining data (tilt) and spatially constraining data (vertical displacement) makes it possible to evaluate the geometry (dip, root depth and lateral extent) and the storativity of a hydraulically active fault zone, in good agreement with previous studies. Hence we demonstrate that the adequate use of two complementary ground surface deformation methods offer a rich insight of large conductive structure's properties using a single short term hydraulic load. Ground surface

  7. Measuring Fracture Properties of Meteorites: 3D Scans and Disruption Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotto-Figueroa, Desireé; Asphaug, Erik; Morris, Melissa A.; Garvie, Laurence

    2014-11-01

    The Arizona State University (ASU) Center for Meteorite Studies (CMS) houses over 30,000 specimens that represent almost every known meteorite type. A number of these are available for fragmentation experiments in small samples, but in most cases non-destructive experiments are desired in order to determine the fundamental mechanical properties of meteorites, and by extension, the Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and other planetary bodies they derive from. We present results from an ongoing suite of measurements and experiments, featuring automated 3D topographic scans of a comprehensive suite of meteorites in the CMS collection, basic mechanical studies, and culminating in catastrophic fragmentation of four representative meteorites: Tamdakht (H5), Allende (CV3), Northwest Africa 869 (L3-6) and Chelyabinsk (LL5). Results will include high-resolution 3D color-shape models of meteorites, including specimens such as the 349g oriented and fusion crusted Martian (shergottite) Tissint, and the delicately fusion crusted and oriented 131g Whetstone Mountains (H5) ordinary chondrite. The 3D color-shape models will allow us to obtain basic physical properties (such as volume to derive density) and to derive fractal dimensions of fractured surfaces. Fractal dimension is closely related to the internal structural heterogeneity and fragmentation of the material, to macroscopic optical properties, and to rubble friction and cohesion. Freshly fractured surfaces of fragments that will result from catastrophic hypervelocity impact experiments will be subsequently scanned and analyzed in order to determine whether fractal dimension is preserved or if it changes with surface maturation.

  8. Grain Size Effect of Commercial Pure Titanium Foils on Mechanical Properties, Fracture Behaviors and Constitutive Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daming, Nie; Zhen, Lu; Kaifeng, Zhang

    2017-02-01

    The constitutive models based on grain size effect are crucial for analyzing the deformation of metal foils. Previous investigations on the constitutive models concentrate on the foils whose thickness/average grain diameter (T/D) ratios are more than 3. In this study, the commercial pure titanium foils with thickness of 0.1 and 0.2 mm were employed as the experimental materials. The mechanical properties of foils with dimensions of nine different T/D ratios categorized into three ranges (T/D < 1, 1 ≤ T/D < 3, T/D ≥ 3)were tested. Meanwhile, the fracture behaviors and fracture mechanisms of the samples with different T/D ratios were compared and analyzed. Besides, three constitutive models incorporating the surface layer effect and grain boundary strengthening effect were established for the three T/D ratio ranges correspondingly. In these models, the thickness of the surface layers is set T for T/D < 1 foils, D for T/D > 3, and increases with D linearly in 1 ≤ T/D < 3. The results calculated by the three models were compared. The experiments indicate that those models are all in good agreement.

  9. Effects of Diffusive Property Heterogeneity on Effective MatrixDiffusion Coefficient for Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yingqi; Liu, Hui-hai; Zhou, Quanlin; Finsterle, Stefan

    2005-08-16

    Heterogeneities of diffusion properties are likely toinfluence the effective matrix diffusion coefficient determined fromtracer breakthrough curves. The objectives of this study are (1) toexamine if it is appropriate to use a single, effective matrix diffusioncoefficient to predict breakthrough curves in a fractured formation, (2)to examine if a postulated scale dependence of the effective matrixdiffusion coefficient is caused by heterogeneity in diffusion properties,and (3) to examine whether multirate diffusion results in the previouslyobserved time dependence of the effective matrix diffusion coefficient.The results show that the use of a single effective matrix diffusioncoefficient is appropriate only if the interchannel and intrachannelvariability of diffusion properties is small. The scale dependence of theeffective matrix diffusion coefficient is not caused by the studied typesof heterogeneity. Finally, the multirate diffusion process does notresult in the time dependence of the effective matrix diffusioncoefficient. oefficient is appropriate only if the inter- andintrachannel variability of diffusion properties is small. The scaledependence of the effective matrix diffusion coefficient is not caused byeither type of the studied heterogeneity. Finally, the multi-ratediffusion process does not result in the time dependence of the effectivematrix diffusion coefficient.

  10. Microstructure, fracture characteristics, and tensile properties of two tungsten heavy alloys. Final report, January 1992-March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, E.W.

    1995-11-01

    The influence of microstructure on fracture behavior and tensile properties was investigated for two tungsten heavy alloys (93W-4.9Ni-2.1Fe and 91W-6Ni-3Co by weight-percentage) that are suitable materiai candidates for use as kinetic energy penetrators. Both alloys were evaluated in swaged and aged conditions. For comparable levels of swaging and aging, the W-Ni-Co alloy exhibited increased tensile strength and ductility compared to the W-Ni-Fe material. The W-Ni-Co alloy had a smaller average W grain size and a larger percentage of W in the matrix. Fracture surfaces of failed uniaxial tensile specimens tested at quasi-static and low-to-medium strain rates were characterized using scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate a strong relationship between microstructure, fracture behavior, and tensile properties as a function of alloy composition and strain rate.

  11. Predicting Fracture Toughness of TRIP 800 using Phase Properties Characterized by In-Situ High Energy X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Soulami, Ayoub; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Ren, Yang; Wang, Yan-Dong

    2010-05-01

    TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel is a typical representative of 1st generation advanced high strength steel (AHSS) which exhibits a combination of high strength and excellent ductility due to its multiphase microstructure. In this paper, we study the crack propagation behavior and fracture resistance of a TRIP 800 steel using a microstructure-based finite element method with the various phase properties characterized by in-situ high energy Xray diffraction (HEXRD) technique. Uniaxial tensile tests on the notched TRIP 800 sheet specimens were also conducted, and the experimentally measured tensile properties and R-curves (Resistance curves) were used to calibrate the modeling parameters and to validate the overall modeling results. The comparison between the simulated and experimentally measured results suggests that the micromechanics based modeling procedure can well capture the overall complex crack propagation behaviors and the fracture resistance of TRIP steels. The methodology adopted here may be used to estimate the fracture resistance of various multiphase materials.

  12. Petrophysical properties, mineralogy, fractures, and flow tests in 25 deep boreholes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.; Kibler, Joyce E.

    2014-01-01

    As part of a site investigation for the disposal of radioactive waste, numerous boreholes were drilled into a sequence of Miocene pyroclastic flows and related deposits at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This report contains displays of data from 25 boreholes drilled during 1979–1984, relatively early in the site investigation program. Geophysical logs and hydrological tests were conducted in the boreholes; core and cuttings analyses yielded data on mineralogy, fractures, and physical properties; and geologic descriptions provided lithology boundaries and the degree of welding of the rock units. Porosity and water content were computed from the geophysical logs, and porosity results were combined with mineralogy from x-ray diffraction to provide whole-rock volume fractions. These data were composited on plates and used by project personnel during the 1990s. Improvements in scanning and computer technology now make it possible to publish these displays.

  13. Review of fracture properties of nuclear materials determined by Hertzian indentation

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J.; Matzke, H.

    1985-01-01

    A brief description of the determination of the surface fracture energy and the fracture toughness from a Hertzian indentation test is given. A number of theoretical and experimental problems are discussed. Results obtained on a variety of nuclear fuels and nuclear-waste-containment materials are reviewed and compared with values measured by other techniques. The Hertzian indentation test yields reliable fracture parameters.

  14. Determination of Transport Properties From Flowing Fluid Temperature LoggingIn Unsaturated Fractured Rocks: Theory And Semi-Analytical Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.

    2008-08-01

    Flowing fluid temperature logging (FFTL) has been recently proposed as a method to locate flowing fractures. We argue that FFTL, backed up by data from high-precision distributed temperature sensors, can be a useful tool in locating flowing fractures and in estimating the transport properties of unsaturated fractured rocks. We have developed the theoretical background needed to analyze data from FFTL. In this paper, we present a simplified conceptualization of FFTL in unsaturated fractured rock, and develop a semianalytical solution for spatial and temporal variations of pressure and temperature inside a borehole in response to an applied perturbation (pumping of air from the borehole). We compare the semi-analytical solution with predictions from the TOUGH2 numerical simulator. Based on the semi-analytical solution, we propose a method to estimate the permeability of the fracture continuum surrounding the borehole. Using this proposed method, we estimated the effective fracture continuum permeability of the unsaturated rock hosting the Drift Scale Test (DST) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Our estimate compares well with previous independent estimates for fracture permeability of the DST host rock. The conceptual model of FFTL presented in this paper is based on the assumptions of single-phase flow, convection-only heat transfer, and negligible change in system state of the rock formation. In a sequel paper [Mukhopadhyay et al., 2008], we extend the conceptual model to evaluate some of these assumptions. We also perform inverse modeling of FFTL data to estimate, in addition to permeability, other transport parameters (such as porosity and thermal conductivity) of unsaturated fractured rocks.

  15. Experimental investigation of quasistatic and dynamic fracture properties of titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, David Deloyd

    2002-09-01

    The goal of this work is to investigate the quasistatic and dynamic fracture properties of three titanium alloys: 6Al-4V titanium, 6Al-4V titanium ELI, and Timetal 5111. While standard tests exist for measuring quasistatic fracture toughness, the dynamic investigation requires that several measurement techniques are employed including Coherent Gradient Sensing (CGS), Crack Opening Displacement (COD), and the use of strain gages. The use of these methods with difficult engineering materials in the dynamic loading regime requires methodologies to be advanced beyond that previously required with model materials having properties ideal for experimental measurements techniques. After a description of each measurement technique is given, stress intensity factor measurements made on 12.7 mm thick pre-cracked 6Al-4V titanium specimens are compared. These specimens were dynamically impacted in three point bend in a drop weight tower. Specimens with and without side-grooves were tested as each measurement technique allows. Resulting stress intensity factor-time histories from the different techniques are compared to verify that their results mutually agree. Advancements in employing CGS, a shearing interferometric technique, are described in more detail. First, the analysis of CGS interferograms is extended to allow experimental fringe data to be fit to very general analytical asymptotic crack tip solution to determine mixed mode stress intensity factors. As formulated in this work, the CGS technique can be used to measure stress intensity factors for non-uniformly propagating dynamic mixed mode cracks moving along arbitrary paths in homogeneous linear elastic isotropic materials. Other advancements are also detailed which improve analysis accuracy, objectivity, and efficiency. Finally, with the equivalence of the three measurement technique results established, tests were performed on 8--17 mm thick pre-cracked three point bend specimens of the three materials to measure

  16. THE EFFECTS OF HYDROGEN, TRITIUM, AND HEAT TREATMENT ON THE DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.; Tosten, M.; Chapman, G.

    2013-09-06

    The deformation and fracture toughness properties of forged stainless steels pre-charged with tritium were compared to the deformation and fracture toughness properties of the same steels heat treated at 773 K or 873 K and precharged with hydrogen. Forged stainless steels pre-charged with tritium exhibit an aging effect: Fracture toughness values decrease with aging time after precharging because of the increase in concentration of helium from tritium decay. This study shows that forged stainless steels given a prior heat treatment and then pre-charged with hydrogen also exhibit an aging effect: Fracture toughness values decrease with increasing time at temperature. A microstructural analysis showed that the fracture toughness reduction in the heat-treated steels was due to patches of recrystallized grains that form within the forged matrix during the heat treatment. The combination of hydrogen and the patches of recrystallized grains resulted in more deformation twinning. Heavy deformation twinning on multiple slip planes was typical for the hydrogen-charged samples; whereas, in the non-charged samples, less twinning was observed and was generally limited to one slip plane. Similar effects occur in tritium pre-charged steels, but the deformation twinning is brought on by the hardening associated with decay helium bubbles in the microstructure.

  17. Effects of Annealing Treatment Prior to Cold Rolling on Delayed Fracture Properties in Ferrite-Austenite Duplex Lightweight Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Seok Su; Song, Hyejin; Kim, Jung Gi; Kwak, Jai-Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-02-01

    Tensile properties of recently developed automotive high-strength steels containing about 10 wt pct of Mn and Al are superior to other conventional steels, but the active commercialization has been postponed because they are often subjected to cracking during formation or to the delayed fracture after formation. Here, the delayed fracture behavior of a ferrite-austenite duplex lightweight steel whose microstructure was modified by a batch annealing treatment at 1023 K (750 °C) prior to cold rolling was examined by HCl immersion tests of cup specimens, and was compared with that of an unmodified steel. After the batch annealing, band structures were almost decomposed as strong textures of {100}<011> α-fibers and {111}<112> γ-fibers were considerably dissolved, while ferrite grains were refined. The steel cup specimen having this modified microstructure was not cracked when immersed in an HCl solution for 18 days, whereas the specimen having unmodified microstructure underwent the delayed fracture within 1 day. This time delayed fracture was more critically affected by difference in deformation characteristics such as martensitic transformation and deformation inhomogeneity induced from concentration of residual stress or plastic strain, rather than the difference in initial microstructures. The present work gives a promise for automotive applications requiring excellent mechanical and delayed fracture properties as well as reduced specific weight.

  18. Nose fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It ... with other fractures of the face. Sometimes a blunt injury can ...

  19. Effect of thickness and loading mode on the fracture properties of V-4Cr-4Ti at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Kurtz, R.J.; Jones, R.H.

    1998-03-01

    The effect of thickness on the room temperature (RT) mode I fracture behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti has been investigated. Mode i fracture properties were measured from J-integral tests of compact tension (CT) specimens ranging in thickness from 6.4 mm to 25.4 mm. All specimens were machined in the T-L orientation and vacuum annealed following final matching. Two heats of V-4Cr-4Ti were tested. Specimens 6.4 mm and 12.7 mm thick were taken from ANL Heat No. 832665. The 25.4 mm thick specimens were obtained from GA Heat No. 832864. J-R curves were generated by the single specimen unload-compliance test technique in accordance with ASTM E813. All tests were performed in laboratory air at 25 C. Fracture of V-4Cr-4Ti under mixed-mode loading conditions showed the same trend observed previously for V-5Cr-5Ti and for other tough materials. For materials which fail by microvoid coalescence, the addition of an out-of-plane shear loading component introduces incompatibility stresses at particle interfaces in the trajectory of the crack. These incompatibility stresses cause particle/matrix decohesion or particle fracture which leads to void formation that limits the mode i plastic flow field. The present results demonstrates that fracture of V-4Cr-4Ti is sensitive to the addition of shear loading components and that model fracture toughness tests may not give the most conservative measure of resistance to ductile fracture.

  20. Geometry and Properties of the Excavation-Induced Fractures at the Meuse/Haute-Marne URL Drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armand, G.; Leveau, F.; Nussbaum, C.; de La Vaissiere, R.; Noiret, A.; Jaeggi, D.; Landrein, P.; Righini, C.

    2014-01-01

    The performance and safety assessment and technology demonstration are the main objectives of research programs for feasibility studies for deep geological repository of radioactive waste. In this context, the French national radioactive waste management agency (ANDRA) started to develop the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory (URL) at Bure, nearly 300 km East of Paris. The host formation consists of a Callovo-Oxfordian claystone found between 420 and 550 m below ground, overlain and underlain by poorly permeable carbonate formations. One of the major concerns related to performance assessment is the excavation-induced fractures which may provide groundwater preferential pathway for radionuclide migration. The extent of the fractures possibly acting significantly in the radionuclide migration is known as the excavation damaged zone (EDZ). A scientific study on the EDZ characterization is performed at the main level of the URL (-490 m). Observations such as structural analysis on core, overcored resin-filled samples, geological survey of the drift face and sidewalls, were made to better understand the fracture network characteristics, extent and its generation. Pulse and constant head test hydraulic conductivity measurements were performed with multi packer system to estimate the extension of the EDZ hydraulic conductivity. Fractures exhibited high transmissivity near the excavation walls, but farther from the exaction walls, shear fractures showed hydraulic conductivity values reflecting values of undisturbed or slightly disturbed rock mass condition. The major findings in terms of geometry and properties of excavation-induced fractures are discussed in detail in this paper. For example, it is observed that the shape of the fracture network depends on the orientation of the drift in relation to the orientation of the in situ stress field.

  1. Structural control of weathering processes within exhumed granitoids: Compartmentalisation of geophysical properties by faults and fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Place, J.; Géraud, Y.; Diraison, M.; Herquel, G.; Edel, J.-B.; Bano, M.; Le Garzic, E.; Walter, B.

    2016-03-01

    In the latter stages of exhumation processes, rocks undergo weathering. Weathering halos have been described in the vicinity of structures such as faults, veins or dykes, with a lateral size gradually narrowing with depth, symmetrically around the structures. In this paper, we describe the geophysical characterisation of such alteration patterns on two granitoid outcrops of the Catalan Coastal Ranges (Spain), each of which is affected by one major fault, as well as minor faults and fractures. Seismic, electric and ground penetrating radar surveys were carried out to map the spatial distribution of P-wave velocity, electrical resistivity and to identify reflectors of electromagnetic waves. The analysis of this multi-method and complementary dataset revealed that, at shallow depth, geophysical properties of the materials are compartmentalised and asymmetric with respect to major and subsidiary faults affecting the rock mass. This compartmentalisation and asymmetry both tend to attenuate with depth, whereas the effect of weathering is more symmetric with respect to the major structure of the outcrops. We interpret such compartmentalisation as resulting from the role of hydraulic and mechanical boundaries played by subsidiary faults, which tend to govern both the chemical and physical alterations involved in weathering. Thus, the smoothly narrowing halo model is not always accurate, as weathering halos can be strongly asymmetrical and present highly irregular contours delimiting sharp contrasts of geophysical properties. These results should be considered when investigating and modelling fluid storage and transfer in top crystalline rock settings for groundwater applications, hydrocarbon or geothermal reservoirs, as well as mineral deposits.

  2. Architecture, fracture system, mechanical properties and permeability structure of a fault zone in Lower Triassic sandstone, Upper Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Johanna F.; Meier, Silke; Philipp, Sonja L.

    2015-04-01

    Close to the western Upper Rhine Graben Main Fault, Alsace, a NNE-SSW-striking fault zone, crosscutting porous, thick bedded Lower Triassic Bunter sandstone was investigated in detail, including its architecture, discontinuity system, mechanical rock properties and implications on its permeability structure and fault zone type. Field observations indicate a three-part fault zone structure including core-, transition- and damage zone. The at least 14 m thick fault core is composed of various slip surfaces and deformation bands, which encompass fractured host rock lenses. When connected, host rock lenses may transport fluids through the core zone. Adjacent transition zones are highly fractured in R1-orientation, show folded beds and contain P1-oriented deformation bands. R1 and P1-fractures are synthetic shear fractures and project with an acute angle (10-20°) toward the fault plane. Only in the damage zone, fault-parallel striking fractures occur. Here, increasing fracture apertures and connectivity may increase the permeability toward the fault core. Mechanical rock properties from 12 rock samples (Young's modulus, uniaxial compressive strength, tensile strength) measured in all the parts of the fault zone, show highest values within the transition zone. In-situ measurements of rebound-hardnesses with a Schmidt-Hammer and analytical approaches, however, indicate that effective Young's moduli are two to sixteen times lower than the Young's moduli of intact rock. Values clearly decrease toward the fault core, even in the transition zone and are in average lower than effective Young's moduli in the damage zone. Although many fault zones in sandstone are sealing structures these field study show, that fault zones in porous sandstone may allow fluid flow.

  3. Ambient- to elevated-temperature fracture and fatigue properties of Mo-Si-B alloys: Role of microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruzic, J. J.; Schneibel, J. H.; Ritchie, R. O.

    2005-09-01

    Ambient- to elevated-temperature fracture and fatigue-crack growth results are presented for five Mo-Mo3Si-Mo5SiB2-containing α-Mo matrix (17 to 49 vol pct) alloys, which are compared to results for intermetallic-matrix alloys with similar compositions. By increasing the α-Mo volume fraction, ductility, or microstructural coarseness, or by using a continuous α-Mo matrix, it was found that improved fracture and fatigue properties are achieved by promoting the active toughening mechanisms, specifically crack trapping and crack bridging by the α-Mo phase. Crack-initiation fracture toughness values increased from 5 to 12 MPa√m with increasing α-Mo content from 17 to 49 vol pct, and fracture toughness values rose with crack extension, ranging from 8.5 to 21 MPa√m at ambient temperatures. Fatigue thresholds benefited similarly from more α-Mo phase, and the fracture and fatigue resistance was improved for all alloys tested at 1300 °C, the latter effects being attributed to improved ductility of the α-Mo phase at elevated temperatures.

  4. J-integral fracture toughness, Tearing modulus and tensile properties of Vitamin E stabilized radiation crosslinked UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    Bellare, Anuj; Dorfman, Robert; Samuel, Ashwanth; Thornhill, Thomas S

    2016-08-01

    Radiation crosslinking of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) increases its wear resistance in total joint replacement prostheses. Unfortunately, it is accompanied by a dose-dependent decrease in several mechanical properties. In this study, the tensile properties and fracture behavior of radiation crosslinked, Vitamin E stabilized UHMWPE was studied as a function of radiation dose. The Rice and Sorensen model, applicable to elastic-plastic materials, was utilized to obtain the initial crack driving force, J1c, steady state J-integral fracture toughness, Jss and the Tearing modulus. Tensile tests showed the dependence of tensile properties on radiation dose. Jss of non-crosslinked UHMWPE was higher than for crosslinked UHMWPE׳s but there was no dose dependent change in Jss whereas there was almost no change in J1c over the entire dose range. Finally, a monotonic decrease in Tearing modulus was observed with radiation dose.

  5. Investigation of the mechanical properties and failure modes of hybrid natural fiber composites for potential bone fracture fixation plates.

    PubMed

    Manteghi, Saeed; Mahboob, Zia; Fawaz, Zouheir; Bougherara, Habiba

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the mechanical feasibility of a hybrid Glass/Flax/Epoxy composite material for bone fracture fixation such as fracture plates. These hybrid composite plates have a sandwich structure in which the outer layers are made of Glass/Epoxy and the core from Flax/Epoxy. This configuration resulted in a unique structure compared to prior composites proposed for similar clinical applications. In order to evaluate the mechanical properties of this hybrid composite, uniaxial tension, compression, three-point bending and Rockwell Hardness tests were conducted. In addition, water absorption tests were performed to investigate the rate of water absorption for the specimens. This study confirms that the proposed hybrid composite plates are significantly more flexible axially compared to conventional metallic plates. Furthermore, they have considerably higher ultimate strength in tension, compression and flexion. Such high strength will ensure good stability of bone-implant construct at the fracture site, immobilize adjacent bone fragments and carry clinical-type forces experienced during daily normal activities. Moreover, this sandwich structure with stronger and stiffer face sheets and more flexible core can result in a higher stiffness and strength in bending compared to tension and compression. These qualities make the proposed hybrid composite an ideal candidate for the design of an optimized fracture fixation system with much closer mechanical properties to human cortical bone.

  6. Structure, mechanical properties and fracture behavior of organosilicate glass thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Youbo

    2007-12-01

    Organosilicate glass (OSG) thin films with low permittivity made by means of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition are the inter-metal insulator in advanced integrated circuits. These materials are employed to reduce the interconnect delay and power consumption associated with the inter-line capacitance. However the implementation of OSG is hampered by its poor mechanical properties and susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking. In this work, we present a study of the structure evolution of OSG under various processing conditions, as well as the impact of structure and environment on the mechanical properties and fracture behavior. We will show that the composition and structure of OSG can be finely tuned by changing the parameters during film deposition or post-treatments. Adding carbon content in the film lowers the density and reduces the dielectric constant, accompanied by a decrease of the network connectivity. Ultraviolet-cure is very effective in crosslinking and stabilizing the network structure without causing significant increase in permittivity. With the assist of a structure model, we determined the infrared absorption inverse cross-sections that may be used to analyze infrared spectra of other OSG films. The mechanical properties of OSG are very sensitive to the network structure. Both the mean connectivity number and networking bond density correlate well with mechanical properties. The comparison of cohesive and adhesion energies reveals that plasma treatments substantially enhance the adhesion. However, the enhancement diminishes when the films are exposed to reactive environments. Our study shows that the adhesion energy at given crack velocity changes linearly with the logarithm of the water partial pressure in ambient, or with pH value in aqueous environment. On the other hand, water degrades the electrical property and adhesion when absorbed. We found that the water diffusion in OSG film stacks is very fast, reversible under mild annealing

  7. The fracture energy and some mechanical properties of a polyurethane elastomer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, H. K.; Knauss, W. G.

    1971-01-01

    The energy required to form a unit of new surface in the fracture of a polyurethane elastomer is determined. The rate sensitivity of the material has been reduced by swelling it in toluene. This paper primarily describes the experimental work of measuring the lower limit of the fracture energy. With this value and the creep compliance as a basis, the rate dependence of fracture energy for the unswollen material has been determined. It is thus shown that the dependence of the fracture energy on the rate of crack propagation can be explained by energy dissipation around the tip of the crack. Good agreement between the theoretically and experimentally determined relationships for the rate-sensitive fracture energy is demonstrated.

  8. Evolution of Deformability and Transport Properties of Fractured Rocks Under the Action of Stress and Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsworth, Derek; Taron, Josh; Faoro, Igor; Lee, Dae-Sung; Liu, Jishan; Niemeijer, Andre; Yasuhara, Hideaki

    2010-05-01

    Fluids in the shallow crust exert important controls on a wide spectrum of natural and engineered phenomena. The complex interaction of stress and particularly that of chemistry exhibit important feedbacks which influence the evolution of the mechanical and transport properties of rocks. These feedbacks in turn relate crucially to the subsurface recovery of hydrocarbons from the full spectrum of conventional through unconventional reservoirs, to the recovery of hydrothermal and non-hydrothermal geothermal resources, to the secure and enduring sequestration of energy by-products, and to the earthquake cycle, for example. We report on enigmatic interactions between stress and chemistry in mediating the evolution of permeability and strength in natural and engineered systems pushed far-from equilibrium. These include the roles of excess pore fluid pressures in driving transient changes in permeability and as well as the influence of changes in chemical potential in systems driven far-from-equilibrium. These effects are shown to result in significant changes in permeability that may vary on timescales of minutes to years as feedbacks switch from mechanically-driven to chemically-driven and as the length-scale of the prototype grows. These interactions are explored through coupled modeling including feedbacks in stress and chemistry as relevant to high-carbon through low-carbon energy systems. Examples are selected to illustrate the significance of these interactions in controlling the response of hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs, fracture treatments and radioactive waste disposal.

  9. An Experimental Evaluation of Material Properties and Fracture Simulation of Cryorolled 7075 Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Prosenjit; Singh, I. V.; Jayaganthan, R.

    2012-07-01

    This work presents an experimental evaluation of yield strength, tensile strength, and impact toughness of 7075 Al alloy. The extended finite element method (XFEM) has been chosen for quasi-static crack growth simulations using Charpy impact energy as the crack growth criterion for both Bulk and ultrafine-grained (UFG) 7075 Al alloy. The 7075 Al alloy is rolled for different thickness reductions (40 and 70%) at cryogenic (liquid nitrogen) temperature, and its mechanical properties are studied by performing the tensile and Charpy impact testing. The microstructural characterization of the alloy was carried out using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The rolling of the Al alloy at cryogenic temperature suppresses dynamic recovery, and dislocation cells formed during processing, transformed into fully formed ultrafine-grains (600 nm) at 70% thickness reduction. The impact energy used as the crack growth criterion under quasi-static loading condition based on the Griffith energy concept. The elastic-plastic ductile fracture simulations are performed by XFEM using ABAQUS Software (Version 6.9). For crack modeling, two different types of functions are used to model a crack based on partition of unity concept. A discontinuous function is used to model the portion behind the crack tip, whereas crack tip is modeled by near-tip asymptotic functions. This permits the crack is to be represented explicitly without meshing the crack surfaces, thus crack propagation simulations can be carried out without a need of re-meshing. Strain energy release and stress distribution ahead of the crack tip is found for some practical crack problems. The numerical examples indicate a significant improvement in crack growth properties of UFG 7075 Al alloy as compared to its bulk form due to an effective grain refinement.

  10. Subtask 12F4: Effects of neutron irradiation on the impact properties and fracture behavior of vanadium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    Up-to-date results on the effects of neutron irradiation on the impact properties and fracture behavior of V, V-Ti, V-Cr-Ti and V-Ti-Si alloys are presented in this paper, with an emphasis on the behavior of the U.S. reference alloys V-4Cr-4Ti containing 500-1000 wppm Si. Database on impact energy and cluctile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) has been established from Charpy impact tests of one-third-size specimens irradiated at 420{degrees}C-600{degrees}C up to {approx}50 dpa in lithium environment in fast fission reactors. To supplement the Charpy impact tests fracture behavior was also characterized by quantitative SEM fractography on miniature tensile and disk specimens that were irradiated to similar conditions and fractured at -196{degrees}C to 200{degrees}C by multiple bending. For similar irradiation conditions irradiation-induced increase in DBTT was influenced most significantly by Cr content, indicating that irradiation-induced clustering of Cr atoms takes place in high-Cr (Cr {ge} 7 wt.%) alloys. When combined contents of Cr and Ti were {le}10 wt.%, effects of neutron irradiation on impact properties and fracture behavior were negligible. For example, from the Charpy-impact and multiple-bend tests there was no indication of irradiation-induced embrittlement for V-5Ti, V-3Ti-1Si and the U.S. reference alloy V-4Cr-4Ti after irradiation to {approx}34 dpa at 420{degrees}C to 600{degrees}C, and only ductile fracture was observed for temperatures as low as -196{degrees}C. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Influence of injection mode on transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks

    DOE PAGES

    Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Painter, S. L.; Viswanathan, H.; ...

    2015-09-12

    We investigate how the choice of injection mode impacts transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN). The choice of injection mode, resident and flux-weighted, is designed to mimic different physical phenomena. It has been hypothesized that solute plumes injected under resident conditions evolve to behave similarly to solutes injected under flux-weighted conditions. Previously, computational limitations have prohibited the large-scale simulations required to investigate this hypothesis. We investigate this hypothesis by using a high-performance DFN suite, dfnWorks, to simulate flow in kilometer-scale three-dimensional DFNs based on fractured granite at the Forsmark site in Sweden, and adopt a Lagrangian approachmore » to simulate transport therein. Results show that after traveling through a pre-equilibrium region, both injection methods exhibit linear scaling of the first moment of travel time and power law scaling of the breakthrough curve with similar exponents, slightly larger than 2. Lastly, the physical mechanisms behind this evolution appear to be the combination of in-network channeling of mass into larger fractures, which offer reduced resistance to flow, and in-fracture channeling, which results from the topology of the DFN.« less

  12. Influence of injection mode on transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Painter, S. L.; Viswanathan, H.; Makedonska, N.; Karra, S.

    2015-09-12

    We investigate how the choice of injection mode impacts transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN). The choice of injection mode, resident and flux-weighted, is designed to mimic different physical phenomena. It has been hypothesized that solute plumes injected under resident conditions evolve to behave similarly to solutes injected under flux-weighted conditions. Previously, computational limitations have prohibited the large-scale simulations required to investigate this hypothesis. We investigate this hypothesis by using a high-performance DFN suite, dfnWorks, to simulate flow in kilometer-scale three-dimensional DFNs based on fractured granite at the Forsmark site in Sweden, and adopt a Lagrangian approach to simulate transport therein. Results show that after traveling through a pre-equilibrium region, both injection methods exhibit linear scaling of the first moment of travel time and power law scaling of the breakthrough curve with similar exponents, slightly larger than 2. Lastly, the physical mechanisms behind this evolution appear to be the combination of in-network channeling of mass into larger fractures, which offer reduced resistance to flow, and in-fracture channeling, which results from the topology of the DFN.

  13. The Impacts of Rock Composition and Properties on the Ability to Stimulate Production of Ultra-Low Permeability Oil and Gas Reservoirs Through Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoback, M. D.; Sone, H.; Kohli, A. H.; Heller, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    In this talk, we present the results of several research projects investigating how rock properties, natural fractures and the state of stress affect the success of hydraulic fracturing operations during stimulation of shale gas and tight oil reservoirs. First, through laboratory measurements on samples of the Barnett, Eagle Ford, Haynesville and Horn River shales, we discuss pore structure, adsorption and permeability as well as the importance of clay content on the viscoplastic behavior of shale formations. Second, we present several lines of evidence that indicates that the principal way in which hydraulic fracturing stimulates production from shale gas reservoirs is by inducing slow slip on pre-existing fractures and faults, which are not detected by conventional microseismic monitoring, Finally, we discuss how hydraulic fracturing can be optimized in response to variations of rock properties.

  14. Fracture channel waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nihei, Kurt T.; Yi, Weidong; Myer, Larry R.; Cook, Neville G. W.; Schoenberg, Michael

    1999-03-01

    The properties of guided waves which propagate between two parallel fractures are examined. Plane wave analysis is used to obtain a dispersion equation for the velocities of fracture channel waves. Analysis of this equation demonstrates that parallel fractures form an elastic waveguide that supports two symmetric and two antisymmetric dispersive Rayleigh channel waves, each with particle motions and velocities that are sensitive to the normal and tangential stiffnesses of the fractures. These fracture channel waves degenerate to shear waves when the fracture stiffnesses are large, to Rayleigh waves and Rayleigh-Lamb plate waves when the fracture stiffnesses are low, and to fracture interface waves when the fractures are either very closely spaced or widely separated. For intermediate fracture stiffnesses typical of fractured rock masses, fracture channel waves are dispersive and exhibit moderate to strong localization of guided wave energy between the fractures. The existence of these waves is examined using laboratory acoustic measurements on a fractured marble plate. This experiment confirms the distinct particle motion of the fundamental antisymmetric fracture channel wave (A0 mode) and demonstrates the ease with which a fracture channel wave can be generated and detected.

  15. Subducting fracture zones control earthquake distribution and upper plate properties: examples from Sumatra and Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaedicke, C.; Freitag, R.; Barckhausen, U.; Franke, D.; Ladage, S.; Schnabel, M.; Tsukanov, N.

    2010-12-01

    the style of deformation. Seismicity changes significantly north and south of the subducting Krusenstern FZ, in addition the magmatic arc shows a sharp bend right at the subducting fracture. The Sumatra and Kamchatka examples show that preexisting structures and morphology of the oceanic crust significantly influences earthquake occurrence and extension of earthquake ruptures as well as the properties of the fore arc and the magmatic arc.

  16. Hydraulic and mechanical properties of natural fractures in low-permeability rock

    SciTech Connect

    Pyrack-Nolte, L.J.; Myer, L.R.; Cook, N.G.W.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive laboratory study of the mechanical displacement, permeability, and void geometry of single rock fractures in a quartz monzonite are summarized and analyzed. A metal-injection technique was developed that provided quantitative data on the precise geometry of the void spaces between the fracture surfaces and the areas of contact at different stresses. At effective stresses of less than 20 MPa fluid flow was proportional to the mean fracture aperture raised to a power greater than 3. As stress was increased, contact area was increased and void spaces become interconnected by small tortuous channels that constitute the principal impediment to fluid flow. At effective stresses higher than 20 MPa, the mean fracture aperture continued to diminish with increasing stress, but this had little effect on flow because the small tortuous flow channels deformed little with increasing stress.

  17. Effect of service usage on tensile, fatigue, and fracture properties of 7075-T6 and 7178-T6 aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A study has been made to determine the effects of extensive service usage on some basic material properties of 7075-T6 and 7178-T6 aluminum alloy materials. The effects of service usage were determined by comparing material properties for new material (generally obtained from the literature) with those for material cut from the center wing box of a C-130B transport airplane with 6385 flight-hours of service. The properties investigated were notched and unnotched fatigue strengths, fatigue-crack-growth rate, fracture toughness, and tensile properties. For the properties investigated and the parameter ranges considered (crack length, stress ratio, etc.), the results obtained showed no significant difference between service and new materials.

  18. Side impact: influence of impact conditions and bone mechanical properties on pelvic response using a fracturable pelvis model.

    PubMed

    Song, Eric; Trosseille, Xavier; Guillemot, Hevé

    2006-11-01

    This study aimed at determining the influence of impact conditions and occupant mechanical properties on pelvic response in side impact. First, a fracturable pelvis model was developed and validated against dynamic tests on isolated pelvic bones and on whole cadavers. By coupling a fixed cortical bone section thickness within a single subject's pelvis and across the population with a parametric material law for the pelvic bone, this model reproduced the pelvic response and tolerance variation among individuals. Three material laws were also identified to represent fragile, medium and strong pelvic bones for the 50th percentile male. With this model, the influence of impact mass, velocity and surface shape on pelvic response was examined. Results indicated that the shape difference between four main impactors reported in the literature has little effect on the pelvic response. Under iso-energy conditions, the relationship of pelvic loading between different combinations of impact mass and velocity was also determined. Based on this relationship, existing data from different impactor tests were scaled and combined to establish a pelvic response corridor in terms of pelvis loading versus impact energy. The relationship between bone mechanical properties and pelvic response and tolerance was also investigated with this model. Results indicated that changes in the mechanical properties due to ageing affected the pelvic tolerance more than the pelvic mechanical response. Assuming that the ultimate stress of the pelvic bone decreases 0.4% per year from 25 to 80 years old, the pelvic tolerance should be scaled by 0.4% per year while the pelvic loading response should be scaled only by 0.1% per year. Finally, it is to be noted that the model developed in this paper is a "global" model, not a "descriptive" model. Therefore, while it may be a useful tool for the analysis presented in this paper (e.g., overall fracture tolerance, overall effects of age, etc.), it cannot be

  19. Using microstructure observations to quantify fracture properties and improve reservoir simulations. Final report, September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Laubach, S.E.; Marrett, R.; Rossen, W.; Olson, J.; Lake, L.; Ortega, O.; Gu, Y.; Reed, R.

    1999-01-01

    The research for this project provides new technology to understand and successfully characterize, predict, and simulate reservoir-scale fractures. Such fractures have worldwide importance because of their influence on successful extraction of resources. The scope of this project includes creation and testing of new methods to measure, interpret, and simulate reservoir fractures that overcome the challenge of inadequate sampling. The key to these methods is the use of microstructures as guides to the attributes of the large fractures that control reservoir behavior. One accomplishment of the project research is a demonstration that these microstructures can be reliably and inexpensively sampled. Specific goals of this project were to: create and test new methods of measuring attributes of reservoir-scale fractures, particularly as fluid conduits, and test the methods on samples from reservoirs; extrapolate structural attributes to the reservoir scale through rigorous mathematical techniques and help build accurate and useful 3-D models of the interwell region; and design new ways to incorporate geological and geophysical information into reservoir simulation and verify the accuracy by comparison with production data. New analytical methods developed in the project are leading to a more realistic characterization of fractured reservoir rocks. Testing diagnostic and predictive approaches was an integral part of the research, and several tests were successfully completed.

  20. Influence of repair welding of aged 18Ni 250 maraging steel weldments on tensile and fracture properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, P.P.; Arumugham, S.; Nagarajan, K.V. . Materials and Metallurgy Group)

    1993-08-01

    The effects of repair welding on tensile strength and fracture toughness of aged weldments of 18 Ni 250-grade maraging steel have been studied. It has been established that aged weldments in the steel can be repaired and approximately 95% of the tensile strength of the initial welds could be achieved by postrepair aging treatment. Also, the repairs had practically no effect on the fracture toughness (K[sub IC]) of the weldment. These results have been discussed in terms of microstructural conditions in the various affected and unaffected zones of the initial weld. One important inference that emerges from the mechanical properties-microstructural correlation in the study is that (K[sub IC]) of the weld is independent of the gross microstructural features of the dendritic size and shapes in the ranges observed in this study. It has, however, been cautioned that the above statement is not valid in cases in which heavy segregation occurs along the interdendritic boundaries resulting in heavily banded microstructure. This can result from faulty weld parameters such as excessive heat input. A second aging to recover the mechanical properties of the repaired zone has additional beneficial effects on tensile strengths and helps in maintaining fracture toughness to the original level of the initial weld.

  1. Tensile properties and translaminar fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced unsaturated polyester resin composites aged in distilled and salt water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiman, Gozali, M. Hulaifi; Setyawan, Paryanto Dwi

    2016-03-01

    Glass fiber reinforced polymer has been widely used in chemical industry and transportation due to lightweight and cost effective manufacturing. However due to the ability to absorb water from the environment, the durability issue is of interest for up to days. This paper investigated the water uptake and the effect of absorbed water on the tensile properties and the translaminar fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced unsaturated polyester composites (GFRP) aged in distilled and salt water up to 30 days at a temperature of 50°C. It has been shown that GFRP absorbed more water in distilled water than in salt water. In distilled water, the tensile strength of GFRP tends to decrease steeply at 7 days and then slightly recovered for further immersion time. In salt water, the tensile strength tends to decrease continually up to 30 days immersion. The translaminar fracture toughness of GFRP aged in both distilled and salt-water shows the similar behavior. The translaminar fracture toughness increases after 7 days immersion and then tends to decrease beyond that immersion time. In the existence of ionics content in salt water, it causes more detrimental effect on the mechanical properties of fiberglass/unsaturated polyester composites compared to that of distilled water.

  2. Determining the shear fracture properties of HIP joints of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel by a torsion test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Takashi; Noh, Sanghoon; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2012-08-01

    Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is a key technology used to fabricate a first wall with cooling channels for the fusion blanket system utilizing a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel. To qualify the HIPped components, small specimen test techniques are beneficial not only to evaluate the thin-wall cooling channels containing the HIP joint but also to use in neutron irradiation studies. This study aims to develop the torsion test method with special emphasis on providing a reasonable and comprehensive method to determine interfacial shear properties of HIP joints during the torsional fracture process. Torsion test results identified that the torsion process shows yield of the base metal followed by non-elastic deformation due to work hardening of the base metal. By considering this work hardening issue, we propose a reasonable and realistic solution to determine the torsional yield shear stress and the ultimate torsional shear strength of the HIPped interface. Finally, a representative torsion fracture process was identified.

  3. Tissue level microstructure and mechanical properties of the femoral head in the proximal femur of fracture patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Linwei; Meng, Guangwei; Gong, He; Zhu, Dong; Gao, Jiazi; Fan, Yubo

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the regional variations of trabecular morphological parameters and mechanical parameters of the femoral head, as well as to determine the relationship between trabecular morphological and mechanical parameters. Seven femoral heads from patients with fractured proximal femur were scanned using a micro-CT system. Each femoral head was divided into 12 sub-regions according to the trabecular orientation. One trabecular cubic model was reconstructed from each sub-region. A total of 81 trabecular models were reconstructed, except three destroyed sub-regions from two femoral heads during the surgery. Trabecular morphological parameters, i.e. trabecular separation (Tb.Sp), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), specific bone surface (BS/BV), bone volume fraction (BV/TV), structural model index (SMI), and degree of anisotropy (DA) were measured. Micro-finite element analyses were performed for each cube to obtain the apparent Young's modulus and tissue level von Mises stress distribution under 1 % compressive strain along three orthogonal directions, respectively. Results revealed significant regional variations in the morphological parameters (). Young's moduli along the trabecular orientation were significantly higher than those along the other two directions. In general, trabecular mechanical properties in the medial region were lower than those in the lateral region. Trabecular mechanical parameters along the trabecular orientation were significantly correlated with BS/BV, BV/TV, Tb.Th, and DA. In this study, regional variations of microstructural features and mechanical properties in the femoral head of patients with proximal femur fracture were thoroughly investigated at the tissue level. The results of this study will help to elucidate the mechanism of femoral head fracture for reducing fracture risk and developing treatment strategies for the elderly.

  4. Effect of Natural Fractures on Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben, Y.; Wang, Y.; Shi, G.

    2012-12-01

    Hydraulic Fracturing has been used successfully in the oil and gas industry to enhance oil and gas production in the past few decades. Recent years have seen the great development of tight gas, coal bed methane and shale gas. Natural fractures are believed to play an important role in the hydraulic fracturing of such formations. Whether natural fractures can benefit the fracture propagation and enhance final production needs to be studied. Various methods have been used to study the effect of natural fractures on hydraulic fracturing. Discontinuous Deformation Analysis (DDA) is a numerical method which belongs to the family of discrete element methods. In this paper, DDA is coupled with a fluid pipe network model to simulate the pressure response in the formation during hydraulic fracturing. The focus is to study the effect of natural fractures on hydraulic fracturing. In particular, the effect of rock joint properties, joint orientations and rock properties on fracture initiation and propagation will be analyzed. The result shows that DDA is a promising tool to study such complex behavior of rocks. Finally, the advantages of disadvantages of our current model and future research directions will be discussed.

  5. Dynamic Mechanical Properties and Fracture Surface Morphologies of Core-Shell Rubber (CSR) Toughened Epoxy at Liquid Nitrogen (Ln2) Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Magee, D.; Schneider, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties and fracture surface morphologies were evaluated for a commercial epoxy resin toughened with two types of core-shell rubber (CSR) toughening agents (Kane Ace(Registered TradeMark) MX130 and MX960). The impact resistance (R) was evaluated by the resulting breaking energy measured in Charpy impact tests conducted on an instrumented drop tower. The resulting fracture surface morphologies were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Fractographic observations of the CSR toughened epoxy tested at ambient temperature, showed a fracture as characterized by slender dendrite textures with large voids. The increasing number of dendrites and decreasing size of scale-like texture with more CSR particles corresponded with increased R. As the temperature decreased to Liquid Nitrogen (LN 2), the fracture surfaces showed a fracture characterized by a rough, torn texture containing many river markings and deep furrows.

  6. Fracture properties of atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide free-standing membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Berdova, Maria Rontu, Ville; Franssila, Sami; Ylivaara, Oili M. E.; Puurunen, Riikka L.; Törmä, Pekka T.

    2015-01-01

    The fracture strength of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membranes deposited by atomic layer deposition at 110, 150, 200, and 300 °C was investigated. The fracture strength was found to be in the range of 2.25–3.00 GPa using Weibull statistics and nearly constant as a function of deposition temperature. This strength is superior to common microelectromechanical systems materials such as diamondlike carbon, SiO{sub 2}, or SiC. As-deposited membranes sustained high cycling pressure loads >10 bar/s without fracture. Films featured, however, significant reduction in the resistance to failure after annealing (800 °C) or high humidity (95%, 60 °C) treatments.

  7. Fractal properties of cancellous bone of the iliac crest in vertebral crush fracture.

    PubMed

    Fazzalari, N L; Parkinson, I H

    1998-07-01

    Fractal analysis is a method for describing complex shapes, including the cancellous structure of bone. It describes the surface texture and form of individual trabecular profiles and the overall cancellous structure. Sixty-four postmenopausal women with symptoms of back pain were referred for investigation for osteoporosis. The patients were divided into two groups for comparison: vertebral crush fracture (n = 31, mean age 68.58 +/- 6.47 years), and no vertebral crush fracture (n = 33, mean age 63.36 +/- 7.21 years). Cores of cancellous bone, 3 mm in diameter, were taken from the iliac crest and sectioned. A box-counting method implemented on an image analyzer was used to measure the fractal dimension. Three fractal dimensions describing trabecular surface texture (fractal 1), trabecular shape (fractal 2), and trabecular arrangement (fractal 3) were measured, indicating that cancellous bone has sectional self-similarity. Conventional histomorphometry was also performed on the samples. The results show that fractal 2 is significantly lower in the vertebral crush fracture group than in the nonfracture group (1.15 +/- 0.10 < 1.23 +/- 0.090, p < 0.0013). The histomorphometric analysis shows that bone surface total volume (p < 0.0002), trabecular number (p < 0.0001), and osteoid surface bone surface (p < 0.028) are significantly lower in the fracture group than the nonfracture group. Eroded surface/bone surface (p < 0.056) follows this trend, whereas trabecular separation (p < 0.001) is significantly higher in the fracture group than in the nonfracture group. Fractal 1 and fractal 3 were not significantly different between study groups. The fractal dimension detects changes in the cancellous architecture and gives information about iliac bone transformation in postmenopausal women with vertebral fracture.

  8. EFFECTS OF MINERAL CONTENT ON THE FRACTURE PROPERTIES OF EQUINE CORTICAL BONE IN DOUBLE-NOTCHED BEAMS

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Jordan; Stover, Susan M.; Gibeling, Jeffery C.; Fyhrie, David P.

    2012-01-01

    We recently developed a method to measure cortical bone fracture initiation toughness using a double-notched beam in four-point bending. This method was used to test the hypothesis that mineralization around the two notch roots is correlated with fracture toughness and crack extension (physical damage). Total energy absorbed to failure negatively correlated with average mineralization of the beam (r2=0.62), but not with notch root mineralization. Fracture initiation toughness was positively correlated to mineralization at the broken notch root (r2=0.34). Crack length extension at the unbroken notch was strongly negatively correlated with the average mineralization of the notch roots (r2=0.81) whereas crack length extension at the broken notch did not correlate with any of the mineralization measurements. Mineralization at the notch roots and the average mineralization contributed independently to the mechanical and damage properties. The data are consistent with an hypothesis that a) high notch root mineralization results in less stable crack length extension but high force to initiate unstable crack propagation while b) higher average mineralization leads to low post-yield (and total) energy absorption to failure. PMID:22394589

  9. Structural analysis of an outcropping granite (Proterozoic basement of Yémen): faults and fractures distributions and scaling properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Garzic, Edouard; de L'Hamaide, Thibaut; Diraison, Marc; Géraud, Yves; de Urreiztieta, Marc; Hauville, Benoit; Champanhet, Jean-Michel

    2010-05-01

    Numerous deep fractured reservoirs in basement have risen in recent years for oil or geothermal production. Such reservoirs are often badly-known because of a lack of direct information. Indeed, structural models proposed are mostly based on 1D borehole data, and conventional geophysical methods like seismic profiles are not so good techniques to image basement structures. Therefore, understanding the effects of scale in the organization of fracture system is a key problem in modelling geometry of deep fractured reservoir. The aim of this study is to present a detailed structural analysis of an outcropping granite at different scales and to contribute to comprehension of scaling properties of faults systems. Multi-scale structural maps were produced by remote sensing techniques and field approaches in the granitic Proterozoic basement of Al-Mukalla (Yémen). This region, located at the Southern boundary of the Arabian Plate, has a Pan-African tectonic signature and then has undergone two phases of continental extension since Mesozoic times: Jurassic-Cretaceous and Oligo-Miocene rifting (i.e. Gulf of Aden opening). In a first time, very high resolution satellite imagery (QUICKBIRD) was used to construct map of structural lineaments from regional scale to micro-block scale (~1 km x 1 km). In a second time, field observations and fractures measurements performed at outcrop scale allow us to confirm suitability of satellite picking. Finally, description of the various structures existing in Burum's granite and characterization of geometrical and morphological features of faults, fractured corridors and joints enable us to interpret structural lineaments with better accuracy. Major faults strike N090°E and N120°E, whereas secondary structures strike N000°E and N040°E and are interpreted as minor faults, fractured corridors or joints. Consequently, brittle deformation is mainly characterised by structural blocks with parallelogram shaped with fault segments

  10. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behaviors of GTA-Additive Manufactured 2219-Al After an Especial Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, J. Y.; Fan, C. L.; Lin, S. B.; Yang, C. L.; Dong, B. L.

    2017-03-01

    2219-Al parts were produced by gas tungsten arc-additive manufacturing and sequentially processed by an especial heat treatment. In order to investigate the effects of heat treatment on its mechanical properties, multiple tests were conducted. Hardness tests were carried out on part scale and layer scale along with tensile tests which were performed on welding and building directions. Results show that compared to conventional casting + T6 2219-Al, the current deposit + T6 2219-Al exhibits satisfying properties with regard to strength but unsatisfying results in plasticity. Additionally, anisotropy is significant. Fractures were observed and the cracks' propagating paths in both directional specimens are described. The effects of heat treatment on the cracks' initiation and propagation were also investigated. Ultimately, a revised formula was developed to calculate the strength of the deposit + T6 2219-Al. The aforementioned formula, which takes into consideration the belt-like porosities-distributing feature, can scientifically describe the anisotropic properties in the material.

  11. Measurement of adhesive joint fracture properties as a function of environmental degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wylde, J.W.; Spelt, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    The increased use of structural adhesives in industry would benefit from a comprehensive failure load prediction tool to ensure competent design. The work of Fernlund and Spelt has proposed a fracture envelope that relates the critical strain energy release rate to the nominal phase angle of loading. The work of Plasinus and Spelt extended this work to incorporate the viscoelastic effect of the adhesive. The objective of the present research is to incorporate the effects of temperature and water absorption into the prediction of adhesive joint fracture. Ample evidence exists to demonstrate the notion that absorbed water has an effect predominantly detrimental, on the strength of an adhesive joint. Past work was concentrated on degrading typical, in service joints such as the Single Lap Shear (SLS) joint or the Cracked Lap Shear (CLS) joint. Since water is absorbed through the exposed edges, typically small in area compared to the volume of the joint, degradation times are usually long and the water concentration varies both with time and spatially throughout the joint. In this research, a novel method of degrading adhesive fracture specimens to a spatially constant degradation condition is being used to incorporate environmental effects into the fracture load prediction tool of Spelt et al.

  12. Cotton properties: relative humidity and its effect on flat bundle strength elongation and fracture morphology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of the relative humidity (RH) of testing conditions on stelometer cotton flat bundle strength and elongation measurements, and on the morphology of fiber fractures will be discussed in this talk. We observed a trend for stelometer strength and elongations measurements. Testing in conditi...

  13. Fracture properties of hydrided Zircaloy-4 cladding in recrystallization and stress-relief anneal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hung; Tsay, Leu-Wen

    2012-03-01

    In this work, the stress-relieved (SRA) and recrystallized (RXA) Zircaloy-4 cladding specimens were hydrogen-charged to the target concentration of 300 wppm and then manufactured into X-specimens for fracture toughness test. The hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of Zircaloy-4 cladding specimens in both SRA and RXA conditions were investigated. At the hydrogen concentration level of 300 wppm, J-integral values for RXA cladding were higher than those for SRA cladding at both 25 °C and 300 °C. The formation of brittle zirconium hydrides had a significant impact on the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-4 cladding in both SRA and RXA states, especially at 25 °C. Among all the tests, SRA cladding tested at 25 °C exhibited a great loss of the fracture toughness. The micrographic and fractographic observations further demonstrated that the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-4 cladding would be improved by the coarse grains in RXA cladding, but degraded by zirconium hydrides precipitated along the grain boundary.

  14. Microstructures, mechanical properties, and fracture behaviors of metal-injection molded 17-4PH stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Wei; Huang, Zeng-Kai; Tseng, Chun-Feng; Hwang, Kuen-Shyang

    2015-05-01

    Metal injection molding (MIM) is a versatile technique for economically manufacturing various metal parts with complicated shapes and excellent properties. The objective of this study was to clarify the effects of powder type (water-atomized and gas-atomized powders) and various heat treatments (sintering, solutioning, H900, and H1100) on the microstructures, mechanical properties, and fracture behaviors of MIM 17-4PH stainless steels. The results showed that better mechanical properties of MIM 17-4PH can be achieved with gas-atomized powder than with water-atomized powder due mainly to the lower silicon and oxygen contents and fewer SiO2 inclusions in the steels. The presence of 10 vol% δ ferrite does not impair the UTS or elongation of MIM 17-4PH stainless steels. The δ ferrite did not fracture, even though the neighboring martensitic matrix was severely cracked. Moreover, H900 treatment produces the highest hardness and UTS, along with moderate elongation. H1100 treatment produces the best elongation, along with moderate hardness and UTS.

  15. Two-phase flow properties in aperture-based fractures under normal deformation conditions: Analytical approach and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zuyang; Liu, Hui-Hai; Jiang, Qinghui; Liu, Yanzhang; Cheng, Aiping

    2017-02-01

    A systematic method has been proposed to estimate the two-phase flow properties of horizontal fractures under normal deformation condition. Based on Gaussian aperture distributions and the assumption of local parallel plate model, a simple model was obtained in closed form to predict the capillary pressure-saturation relationships for both wetting and non-wetting phases. Three conceptual models were also developed to characterize the relative permeability behaviors. In order to investigate the effect of normal deformation on two-phase flow properties, the normal deformation could be represented with the maximum void space closure on the basis of penetration model. A rigorous successive random addition (SRA) method was used to generate the aperture-based fractures and a numerical approach based on invasion percolation (IP) model was employed to model capillary-dominated displacements between wetting and non-wetting phases. The proposed models were partially verified by a laboratory dataset and numerical calculations without consideration of deformation. Under large normal deformations, it was found that the macroscopic model is in better agreement with simulated observations. The simulation results demonstrated that the two-phase flow properties including the relationships between capillary pressure, relative permeability and saturation, phase interference, phase structures, residual-saturation-rated parameters and tortuosity factor, were highly sensitive to the spatial correlation of aperture distribution and normal deformation.

  16. Fractures in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Siyi

    Rocks may be composed of layers and contain fracture sets that cause the hydraulic, mechanical and seismic properties of a rock to be anisotropic. Coexisting fractures and layers in rock give rise to competing mechanisms of anisotropy. For example: (1) at low fracture stiffness, apparent shear-wave anisotropy induced by matrix layering can be masked or enhanced by the presence of a fracture, depending on the fracture orientation with respect to layering, and (2) compressional-wave guided modes generated by parallel fractures can also mask the presence of matrix layerings for particular fracture orientations and fracture specific stiffness. This report focuses on two anisotropic sources that are widely encountered in rock engineering: fractures (mechanical discontinuity) and matrix layering (impedance discontinuity), by investigating: (1) matrix property characterization, i.e., to determine elastic constants in anisotropic solids, (2) interface wave behavior in single-fractured anisotropic media, (3) compressional wave guided modes in parallel-fractured anisotropic media (single fracture orientation) and (4) the elastic response of orthogonal fracture networks. Elastic constants of a medium are required to understand and quantify wave propagation in anisotropic media but are affected by fractures and matrix properties. Experimental observations and analytical analysis demonstrate that behaviors of both fracture interface waves and compressional-wave guided modes for fractures in anisotropic media, are affected by fracture specific stiffness (controlled by external stresses), signal frequency and relative orientation between layerings in the matrix and fractures. A fractured layered medium exhibits: (1) fracture-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are weakly coupled; (2) isotropic behavior when fractures delay waves that are usually fast in a layered medium; and (3) matrix-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are closed and no longer delay the signal. The

  17. Fundamental properties of fracture and seismicity in a non extensive statistical physics framework.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallianatos, Filippos

    2010-05-01

    A fundamental challenge in many scientific disciplines concerns upscaling, that is, of determining the regularities and laws of evolution at some large scale, from those known at a lower scale. Earthquake physics is no exception, with the challenge of understanding the transition from the laboratory scale to the scale of fault networks and large earthquakes. In this context, statistical physics has a remarkably successful work record in addressing the upscaling problem in physics. It is natural then to consider that the physics of many earthquakes has to be studied with a different approach than the physics of one earthquake and in this sense we can consider the use of statistical physics not only appropriate but necessary to understand the collective properties of earthquakes [see Corral 2004, 2005a,b,c;]. A significant attempt is given in a series of works [Main 1996; Rundle et al., 1997; Main et al., 2000; Main and Al-Kindy, 2002; Rundle et al., 2003; Vallianatos and Triantis, 2008a] that uses classical statistical physics to describe seismicity. Then a natural question arises. What type of statistical physics is appropriate to commonly describe effects from fracture level to seismicity scale?? The application of non extensive statistical physics offers a consistent theoretical framework, based on a generalization of entropy, to analyze the behavior of natural systems with fractal or multi-fractal distribution of their elements. Such natural systems where long - range interactions or intermittency are important, lead to power law behavior. We note that this is consistent with a classical thermodynamic approach to natural systems that rapidly attain equilibrium, leading to exponential-law behavior. In the frame of non extensive statistical physics approach, the probability function p(X) is calculated using the maximum entropy formulation of Tsallis entropy which involves the introduction of at least two constraints (Tsallis et al., 1998). The first one is the

  18. Structural properties of fracture haematoma: current status and future clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Friis, Thor; Glatt, Vaida; Crawford, Ross; Xiao, Yin

    2016-07-12

    Blood clots (haematomas) that form immediately following a bone fracture have been shown to be vital for the subsequent healing process. During the clotting process, a number of factors can influence the fibrin clot structure, such as fibrin polymerization, growth factor binding, cellular infiltration (including platelet retraction), protein concentrations and cytokines. The modulation of the fibrin clot structure within the fracture site has important clinical implications and could result in the development of multifunctional scaffolds that mimic the natural structure of a haematoma. Artificial haematoma structures such as these can be created from the patient's own blood and can therefore act as an ideal bone defect filling material for potential clinical application to accelerate bone regeneration. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. 2016 Accomplishments. Tritium aging studies on stainless steel. Forging process effects on the fracture toughness properties of tritium-precharged stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Forged austenitic stainless steels are used as the materials of construction for pressure vessels designed to contain tritium at high pressure. These steels are highly resistant to tritium-assisted fracture but their resistance can depend on the details of the forging microstructure. During FY16, the effects of forging strain rate and deformation temperature on the fracture toughness properties of tritium-exposed-and-aged Type 304L stainless steel were studied. Forgings were produced from a single heat of steel using four types of production forging equipment – hydraulic press, mechanical press, screw press, and high-energy-rate forging (HERF). Each machine imparted a different nominal strain rate during the deformation. The objective of the study was to characterize the J-Integral fracture toughness properties as a function of the industrial strain rate and temperature. The second objective was to measure the effects of tritium and decay helium on toughness. Tritium and decay helium effects were measured by thermally precharging the as-forged specimens with tritium gas at 34.5 MPa and 350°C and aging for up to five years at -80°C to build-in decay helium prior to testing. The results of this study show that the fracture toughness properties of the as-forged steels vary with forging strain rate and forging temperature. The effect is largely due to yield strength as the higher-strength forgings had the lower toughness values. For non-charged specimens, fracture toughness properties were improved by forging at 871°C versus 816°C and Screw-Press forgings tended to have lower fracture toughness values than the other forgings. Tritium exposures reduced the fracture toughness values remarkably to fracture toughness values averaging 10-20% of as-forged values. However, forging strain rate and temperature had little or no effect on the fracture toughness after tritium precharging and aging. The result was confirmed by fractography which indicated that fracture modes

  20. Fracture Toughness, Mechanical Property, And Chemical Characterization Of A Critical Modification To The NASA SLS Solid Booster Internal Material System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pancoast, Justin; Garrett, William; Moe, Gulia

    2015-01-01

    A modified propellant-liner-insulation (PLI) bondline in the Space Launch System (SLS) solid rocket booster required characterization for flight certification. The chemical changes to the PLI bondline and the required additional processing have been correlated to mechanical responses of the materials across the bondline. Mechanical properties testing and analyses included fracture toughness, tensile, and shear tests. Chemical properties testing and analyses included Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, cross-link density, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and wave dispersion X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF). The testing identified the presence of the expected new materials and found the functional bondline performance of the new PLI system was not significantly changed from the old system.

  1. Characterization of Gas Transport Properties of Fractured Rocks By Borehole and Chamber Tests.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimo, M.; Shimaya, S.; Maejima, T.

    2014-12-01

    Gas transport characteristics of fractured rocks is a great concern to variety of engineering applications such as underground storage of LPG, nuclear waste disposal, CCS and gas flooding in the oil field. Besides absolute permeability, relative permeability and capillary pressure as a function of water saturation have direct influences to the results of two phase flow simulation. However, number of the reported gas flow tests for fractured rocks are limited, therefore, the applicability of the conventional two-phase flow functions used for porous media, such as Mualem-van Genuchten model, to prediction of the gas transport in the fractured rock mass are not well understood. The authors conducted the two types of in-situ tests, with different scales, a borehole gas-injection test and a chamber gas-injection test in fractured granitic rock. These tests were conducted in the Cretaceous granitic rocks at the Namikata underground LPG storage cavern construction site in Ehime Prefecture in Japan, preceding to the cavern scale gas-tightness test. A borehole injection test was conducted using vertical and sub-vertical boreholes drilled from the water injection tunnel nearly at the depth of the top of the cavern, EL-150m. A new type downhole gas injection equipment that is capable to create a small 'cavern' within a borehole was developed. After performing a series of preliminary tests to investigate the hydraulic conductivity and gas-tightness, i.e. threshold pressure, gas injection tests were conducted under different gas pressure. Fig.1 shows an example of the test results From a chamber test using a air pressurizing chamber with volume of approximately166m3, the gas-tightness was confirmed within the uncertainty of 22Pa under the storage pressure of 0.7MPa, however, significant air leakage occurred possibly through an open fracture intersecting the chamber just after cavern pressure exceeds the initial hydrostatic pressure at the ceiling level of the chamber. Anomalies

  2. Influence of titanium diboride reinforcements on the microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture behavior of cast zinc-aluminum composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionne, Sylvie

    The objective of the present study was to examine the relationships between the microstructure, mechanical properties and failure mechanisms which control the performance of TiB2 particle reinforced Zn-8 wt.% Al (ZA-8) composites. Unreinforced ZA-8 and four composite heats with nominal particle contents of 5, 10, 20 and 30 vol.% were prepared using stir casting and permanent mold casting techniques. Tensile, compression, Charpy impact and short bar chevron-notch fracture toughness tests were conducted at room temperature. The microstructure and fracture surfaces of the specimens were characterized using optical, scanning electron, transmission electron and focused ion beam microscopy. These experimental results were compared with relevant MMC models and with published data on Zn-based composites. The TiB2/ZA-8 composites had a homogeneous distribution of particles in a matrix similar to unreinforced ZA-8. The matrix grain size decreased as the TiB2 content increased. No interfacial reaction products were detected. A good correlation was obtained between the measured composite stiffness and the values predicted using an Eshelby model. The yield strength and work hardening rate of TiB2/ZA-8 were only marginally higher than those of unreinforced ZA-8. The strength properties did not increase with the particle content as predicted by the Eshelby model. The premature activation of relaxation processes limited the extent to which particle reinforcement improved the strength of the ZA-8 matrix. Temperature-activated relaxation processes such as diffusion and dislocation motion can occur readily in ZA-8 at room temperature, which corresponds to 0.44 TM. Particle reinforcement of the ZA-8 alloy produced a degradation of the toughness which was sensitive to the loading rate. The Charpy energy of TiB 2/ZA-8 was up to 85% smaller than that of ZA-8, while the corresponding loss in fracture toughness was only 15%. The moderate fracture toughness decrease was explained by the

  3. Inhibition of GSK-3β rescues the impairments in bone formation and mechanical properties associated with fracture healing in osteoblast selective connexin 43 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Loiselle, Alayna E; Lloyd, Shane A J; Paul, Emmanuel M; Lewis, Gregory S; Donahue, Henry J

    2013-01-01

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) is the most abundant gap junction protein in bone and is required for osteoblastic differentiation and bone homeostasis. During fracture healing, Cx43 is abundantly expressed in osteoblasts and osteocytes, while Cx43 deficiency impairs bone formation and healing. In the present study we selectively deleted Cx43 in the osteoblastic lineage from immature osteoblasts through osteocytes and tested the hypothesis that Cx43 deficiency results in delayed osteoblastic differentiation and impaired restoration of biomechanical properties due to attenuated β-catenin expression relative to wild type littermates. Here we show that Cx43 deficiency results in alterations in the mineralization and remodeling phases of healing. In Cx43 deficient fractures the mineralization phase is marked by delayed expression of osteogenic genes. Additionally, the decrease in the RankL/Opg ratio, osteoclast number and osteoclast size suggest decreased osteoclast bone resorption and remodeling. These changes in healing result in functional deficits as shown by a decrease in ultimate torque at failure. Consistent with these impairments in healing, β-catenin expression is attenuated in Cx43 deficient fractures at 14 and 21 days, while Sclerostin (Sost) expression, a negative regulator of bone formation is increased in Cx43cKO fractures at 21 days, as is GSK-3β, a key component of the β-catenin proteasomal degradation complex. Furthermore, we show that alterations in healing in Cx43 deficient fractures can be rescued by inhibiting GSK-3β activity using Lithium Chloride (LiCl). Treatment of Cx43 deficient mice with LiCl restores both normal bone formation and mechanical properties relative to LiCl treated WT fractures. This study suggests that Cx43 is a potential therapeutic target to enhance fracture healing and identifies a previously unknown role for Cx43 in regulating β-catenin expression and thus bone formation during fracture repair.

  4. Effect of chemical environment and rock composition on fracture mechanics properties of reservoir lithologies in context of CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, J. R.; Eichhubl, P.; Callahan, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    The coupled chemical and mechanical response of reservoir and seal rocks to injection of CO2 have major implications on the short and long term security of sequestered carbon. Many current numerical models evaluating behavior of reservoirs and seals during and after CO2 injection in the subsurface consider chemistry and mechanics separately and use only simple mechanical stability criteria while ignoring time-dependent failure parameters. CO2 injection irreversibly alters the subsurface chemical environment which can then affect geomechanical properties on a range of time scales by altering rock mineralogy and cements through dissolution, remobilization, and precipitation. It has also been documented that geomechanical parameters such as fracture toughness (KIC) and subcritical index (SCI) are sensitive to chemical environment. Double torsion fracture mechanics testing of reservoir lithologies under controlled environmental conditions relevant to CO2 sequestration show that chemical environment can measurably affect KIC and SCI. This coupled chemical-mechanical behavior is also influenced by rock composition, grains, amount and types of cement, and fabric. Fracture mechanics testing of the Aztec Sandstone, a largely silica-cemented, subarkose sandstone demonstrate it is less sensitive to chemical environment than Entrada Sandstone, a silty, clay-rich sandstone. The presence of de-ionized water lowers KIC by approximately 20% and SCI 30% in the Aztec Sandstone relative to tests performed in air, whereas the Entrada Sandstone shows reductions on the order of 70% and 90%, respectively. These results indicate that rock composition influences the chemical-mechanical response to deformation, and that the relative chemical reactivity of target reservoirs should be recognized in context of CO2 sequestration. In general, inert grains and cements such as quartz will be less sensitive to the changing subsurface environment than carbonates and clays.

  5. Effect of dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate mass fraction on fracture toughness and antibacterial properties of CaP nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junling; Zhou, Han; Weir, Michael D.; Melo, Mary Anne S.; Levine, Eric D.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Biofilm acids contribute to secondary caries which is a reason for restoration failure. Previous studies synthesized nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM). The objectives of this study were to develop DMAHMD-NACP nanocomposite for double benefits of antibacterial and remineralization capabilities, and investigate the DMAHMD mass fraction effects on fracture toughness and biofilm response of NACP nanocomposite for the first time. Methods DMAHDM was incorporated into NACP nanocomposite at mass fractions of 0% (control), 0.75%, 1.5%, 2.25% and 3%. A single edge V-notched beam method was used to measure fracture toughness Kic. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model using human saliva as inoculum was used to measure the antibacterial properties of composites. Results Kic was about 1 MPa·m1/2 for all composite (mean ± sd; n = 6). Adding DMAHDM from 0% to 3% did not affect Kic (p > 0.1). Lactic acid production by biofilms on composite containing 3% DMAHDM was reduced to less than 1% of that on composite control. Metabolic activity of adherent biofilms on composite containing 3% DMAHDM was reduced to 4% of that on composite control. Biofilm colony-forming unit (CFU) counts were reduced by three orders of magnitude on NACP nanocomposite containing 3% DMAHDM. Conclusions DMAHDM-NACP nanocomposite had good fracture resistance, strong antibacterial potency, and NACP for remineralization (shown in previous studies). The DMAHDM-NACP nanocomposite may be promising for caries-inhibiting dental restorations, and the method of using double agents (DMAHDM and NACP) may have a wide applicability to other dental materials including bonding agents and cements. PMID:26404407

  6. Fatigue Properties and Morphology of Fatigue Fracture of Bulk Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X. Y.; Chen, Z. H.; Wang, H. P.; Zhan, J.

    2016-11-01

    Changes in the amorphous structure and fatigue resistance of Zr57.5Cu27.3Al8.5Ni6.7 bulk metallic glass are studied. A copper-rich phase produced by cyclic stresses is discovered. This phase observed on the fracture surface may hinder crack propagation. The specimens after fatigue failure have a V shape (do not break into two completely) due to the high density of shear bands and multiple branching of the shear bands in the strained region.

  7. Effects of Thermal Aging on Material Properties, Stress Corrosion Cracking, and Fracture Toughness of AISI 316L Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Timothy; Forsström, Antti; Saukkonen, Tapio; Ballinger, Ronald; Hänninen, Hannu

    2016-08-01

    Thermal aging and consequent embrittlement of materials are ongoing issues in cast stainless steels, as well as duplex, and high-Cr ferritic stainless steels. Spinodal decomposition is largely responsible for the well-known "748 K (475 °C) embrittlement" that results in drastic reductions in ductility and toughness in these materials. This process is also operative in welds of either cast or wrought stainless steels where δ-ferrite is present. While the embrittlement can occur after several hundred hours of aging at 748 K (475 °C), the process is also operative at lower temperatures, at the 561 K (288 °C) operating temperature of a boiling water reactor (BWR), for example, where ductility reductions have been observed after several tens of thousands of hours of exposure. An experimental program was carried out in order to understand how spinodal decomposition may affect changes in material properties in Type 316L BWR piping weld metals. The study included material characterization, nanoindentation hardness, double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR), Charpy-V, tensile, SCC crack growth, and in situ fracture toughness testing as a function of δ-ferrite content, aging time, and temperature. SCC crack growth rates of Type 316L stainless steel weld metal under simulated BWR conditions showed an approximate 2 times increase in crack growth rate over that of the unaged as-welded material. In situ fracture toughness measurements indicate that environmental exposure can result in a reduction of toughness by up to 40 pct over the corresponding at-temperature air-tested values. Material characterization results suggest that spinodal decomposition is responsible for the degradation of material properties measured in air, and that degradation of the in situ properties may be a result of hydrogen absorbed during exposure to the high-temperature water environment.

  8. Potential Impacts of Spilled Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Chemicals on Water Resources: Types, Volumes, and Physical-chemical Properties of Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knightes, C. D.; Daiss, R.; Williams, L.; Singer, A.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) fluid chemicals spilled on-site may impact drinking water resources. While chemicals generally make up <2% of the total injected fluid composition by mass, spills may have undiluted concentrations. HF fluids typically consist of a mixture of base fluid, proppant, and additives. Additives, comprised of one or more chemicals, are serve a specific engineering purpose (e.g., friction reducer, scale inhibitor, biocide). As part of the USEPA's Draft Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing for Oil and Gas on Drinking Water Resources, we investigated the different types, volumes injected, and physical-chemical properties of HF fluid chemicals. The USEPA identified 1,076 chemicals used in HF fluids, based on 10 sources covering chemical use from 2005 to 2013. These chemicals fall into different classes: acids, alcohols, aromatic hydrocarbons, bases, hydrocarbon mixtures, polysaccharides, and surfactants. The physical-chemical properties of these chemicals vary, which affects their movement through the environment if spilled. Properties range from fully miscible to insoluble, from highly hydrophobic to highly hydrophilic. Most of these chemicals are not volatile. HF fluid composition varies from site to site depending on a range of factors. No single chemical or set of chemicals are used at every site. A median of 14 chemicals are used per well, with a range of four to 28 (5th and 95th percentiles). Methanol was the chemical most commonly reported in FracFocus 1.0 (72% of disclosures), and hydrotreated light petroleum distillates and hydrochloric acid were both reported in over half the disclosures. Operators store chemicals on-site, often in multiple containers (typically in 760 to 1,500 L totes). We estimated that the total volume of all chemicals used per well ranges from approximately 10,000 to 110,000 L. The views expressed here are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views or policies of the USEPA.

  9. Scale dependence of the hydraulic properties of a fractured aquifer estimated using transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedretti, D.; Russian, A.; Sanchez-Vila, X.; Dentz, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present an investigation of the scale dependence of hydraulic parameters in fractured media based on the concept of transfer functions (TF). TF methods provide an inexpensive way to perform aquifer parameter estimation, as they relate the fluctuations of an observation time series (hydraulic head fluctuations) to an input function (aquifer recharge) in frequency domain. Fractured media are specially sensitive to this approach as hydraulic parameters are strongly scale-dependent, involving nonstationary statistical distributions. Our study is based on an extensive data set, involving up to 130 measurement points with periodic head measurements that in some cases extend for more than 30 years. For each point, we use a single-porosity and dual-continuum TF formulation to obtain a distribution of transmissivities and storativities in both mobile and immobile domains. Single-porosity TF estimates are compared with data obtained from the interpretation of over 60 hydraulic tests (slug and pumping tests). Results show that the TF is able to estimate the scale dependence of the hydraulic parameters, and it is consistent with the behavior of estimates from traditional hydraulic tests. In addition, the TF approach seems to provide an estimation of the system variance and the extension of the ergodic behavior of the aquifer (estimated in approximately 500 m in the analyzed aquifer). The scale dependence of transmissivity seems to be independent from the adopted formulation (single or dual-continuum), while storativity is more sensitive to the presence of multiple continua.

  10. Tensile deformation and fracture properties of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Alam, M. Ershadul; Pal, Soupitak; Fields, Kirk; ...

    2016-08-13

    Here, a new larger heat of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA), FCRD NFA-1, was synthesized by ball milling FeO and argon atomized Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti-0.2Y (wt%) powders, followed by hot extrusion, annealing and cross rolling to produce an ≈10 mm-thick plate. NFA-1 contains a bimodal size distribution of pancake-shaped, mostly very fine scale, grains. The as-processed plate also contains a large population of microcracks running parallel to its broad surfaces. The small grains and large concentration of Y–Ti–O nano-oxides (NOs) result in high strength up to 800 °C. The uniform and total elongations range from ≈1–8%, and ≈10–24%, respectively. The strengthmore » decreases more rapidly above ≈400 °C and deformation transitions to largely viscoplastic creep by ≈600 °C. While the local fracture mechanism is generally ductile-dimple microvoid nucleation, growth and coalescence, perhaps the most notable feature of tensile deformation behavior of NFA-1 is the occurrence of periodic delamination, manifested as fissures on the fracture surfaces.« less

  11. Tensile deformation and fracture properties of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M. Ershadul; Pal, Soupitak; Fields, Kirk; Maloy, S. A.; Hoelzer, David T.; Odette, George R.

    2016-08-13

    Here, a new larger heat of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA), FCRD NFA-1, was synthesized by ball milling FeO and argon atomized Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti-0.2Y (wt%) powders, followed by hot extrusion, annealing and cross rolling to produce an ≈10 mm-thick plate. NFA-1 contains a bimodal size distribution of pancake-shaped, mostly very fine scale, grains. The as-processed plate also contains a large population of microcracks running parallel to its broad surfaces. The small grains and large concentration of Y–Ti–O nano-oxides (NOs) result in high strength up to 800 °C. The uniform and total elongations range from ≈1–8%, and ≈10–24%, respectively. The strength decreases more rapidly above ≈400 °C and deformation transitions to largely viscoplastic creep by ≈600 °C. While the local fracture mechanism is generally ductile-dimple microvoid nucleation, growth and coalescence, perhaps the most notable feature of tensile deformation behavior of NFA-1 is the occurrence of periodic delamination, manifested as fissures on the fracture surfaces.

  12. The Derivation of Fault Volumetric Properties from 3D Trace Maps Using Outcrop Constrained Discrete Fracture Network Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgetts, David; Seers, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Fault systems are important structural elements within many petroleum reservoirs, acting as potential conduits, baffles or barriers to hydrocarbon migration. Large, seismic-scale faults often serve as reservoir bounding seals, forming structural traps which have proved to be prolific plays in many petroleum provinces. Though inconspicuous within most seismic datasets, smaller subsidiary faults, commonly within the damage zones of parent structures, may also play an important role. These smaller faults typically form narrow, tabular low permeability zones which serve to compartmentalize the reservoir, negatively impacting upon hydrocarbon recovery. Though considerable improvements have been made in the visualization field to reservoir-scale fault systems with the advent of 3D seismic surveys, the occlusion of smaller scale faults in such datasets is a source of significant uncertainty during prospect evaluation. The limited capacity of conventional subsurface datasets to probe the spatial distribution of these smaller scale faults has given rise to a large number of outcrop based studies, allowing their intensity, connectivity and size distributions to be explored in detail. Whilst these studies have yielded an improved theoretical understanding of the style and distribution of sub-seismic scale faults, the ability to transform observations from outcrop to quantities that are relatable to reservoir volumes remains elusive. These issues arise from the fact that outcrops essentially offer a pseudo-3D window into the rock volume, making the extrapolation of surficial fault properties such as areal density (fracture length per unit area: P21), to equivalent volumetric measures (i.e. fracture area per unit volume: P32) applicable to fracture modelling extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate an approach which harnesses advances in the extraction of 3D trace maps from surface reconstructions using calibrated image sequences, in combination with a novel semi

  13. HAZ fracture properties of Ti-microalloyed offshore steel in as-welded and simulated condition

    SciTech Connect

    Rak, I.F.; Kocak, M.; Petrovski, B.I.; Gliha, V.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents a study on the heat affected zone (HAZ) fracture toughness of submerged arc welded (SAW) joints of 40 mm thick Ti treated StE 355 grade offshore steel. The CTOD values measured on 34 mm thick SENB specimens taken from multipass 1/2K joints were compared with the values obtained from 8 mm thick SENB specimens with simulated microstructures of CGHAZ at {minus}10 C (a/W=0.5). Single and double thermal cycles were used to simulate various thermal treatments which HAZ may experience during welding. The microstructural examination of these simulated specimens show the presence of the local brittle zones (LBZ) in the CGHAZ in spite of the steel being Ti-microalloyed. The CTOD fracture toughness testing of the simulated specimens can produce toughness values not affected by the mechanical heterogeneity (strength mis-match between weld and base metals) provided the microstructure of interest has been simulated correctly. Seven different thermal simulations were examined, one single cycle and six double cycles. The peak temperature of the first thermal cycle was always above 1,350 C and cooling time (800--500 C) was about 40 sec. The peak temperature of the second thermal cycle was varied between 700 and 1,025 C and cooling time was 40 sec as well which reflects the situation in the multipass HAZ of the real joint adjacent to the fusion line. The measurement of fracture toughness and metallographical examination prove that a second thermal cycle below AC{sub 1} and between AC{sub 1} and AC{sub 3} does not improve the lowest toughness values of the unaffected CGHAZ. The CTOD results of the simulated and real weld specimens show similar toughness values in terms of stable crack initiation (CTOD at {Delta}a=0.2 mm). However, the CTOD values obtained after stable crack growth ({delta}{sub u} or {delta}{sub m}) show no correlation between both sets of data.

  14. Evaluation of Fatigue Crack Growth and Fracture Properties of Cryogenic Model Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Forth, Scott C.; Everett, Richard A., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.; Kimmel, William M.

    2002-01-01

    The criteria used to prevent failure of wind-tunnel models and support hardware were revised as part of a project to enhance the capabilities of cryogenic wind tunnel testing at NASA Langley Research Center. Specifically, damage-tolerance fatigue life prediction methods are now required for critical components, and material selection criteria are more general and based on laboratory test data. The suitability of two candidate model alloys (AerMet 100 and C-250 steel) was investigated by obtaining the fatigue crack growth and fracture data required for a damage-tolerance fatigue life analysis. Finally, an example is presented to illustrate the newly implemented damage tolerance analyses required of wind-tunnel model system components.

  15. Degree of cure and fracture properties of experimental acid-resin modified composites under wet and dry conditions

    PubMed Central

    López-Suevos, Francisco; Dickens, Sabine H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the effects of core structure and storage conditions on the mechanical properties of acid-resin modified composites and a control material by three-point bending and conversion measurements 15 min and 24 h after curing. Methods The monomers pyromellitic dimethacrylate (PMDM), biphenyldicarboxylic-acid dimethacrylate (BPDM), (isopropylidene-diphenoxy)bis(phthalic-acid) dimethacrylate (IPDM), oxydiphthalic-acid dimethacrylate (ODPDM), and Bis-GMA were mixed with triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) in a 40/60 molar ratio, and photo-activated. Composite bars (Barium-oxide-glass/resin = 3/1 mass ratio, (2 × 2 × 25) mm, n = 5) were light-cured for 1 min per side. Flexural strength (FS), elastic modulus (E), and work-of-fracture (WoF) were determined in three-point bending after 15 min (stored dry); and after 24 h under dry and wet storage conditions at 37 °C. Corresponding degrees of conversion (DC) were evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Data was statistically analyzed (2-way analysis of variance, ANOVA, Holm-Sidak, p < 0.05). Results Post-curing significantly increased FS, E and DC in nearly all cases. WoF did not change, or even decreased with time. For all properties ANOVA found significant differences and interactions of time and material. Wet storage reduced the moduli and the other properties measured with the exception of FS and WoF of ODPDM; DC only decreased in BPDM and IPDM composites. Significance Differences in core structure resulted in significantly different physical properties of the composites studied with two phenyl rings connected by one ether linkage as in ODPDM having superior FS, WoF and DC especially after 24 h under wet conditions. As expected, post-curing significantly contributed to the final mechanical properties of the composites, while wet storage generally reduced the mechanical properties. PMID:17980422

  16. 2014 Accomplishments-Tritium aging studies on stainless steel: Fracture toughness properties of forged stainless steels-Effect of hydrogen, forging strain rate, and forging temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Michael J.

    2015-02-01

    Forged stainless steels are used as the materials of construction for tritium reservoirs. During service, tritium diffuses into the reservoir walls and radioactively decays to helium-3. Tritium and decay helium cause a higher propensity for cracking which could lead to a tritium leak or delayed failure of a tritium reservoir. The factors that affect the tendency for crack formation and propagation include: Environment; steel type and microstructure; and, vessel configuration (geometry, pressure, residual stress). Fracture toughness properties are needed for evaluating the long-term effects of tritium on their structural properties. Until now, these effects have been characterized by measuring the effects of tritium on the tensile and fracture toughness properties of specimens fabricated from experimental forgings in the form of forward-extruded cylinders. A key result of those studies is that the long-term cracking resistance of stainless steels in tritium service depends greatly on the interaction between decay helium and the steels’ forged microstructure. New experimental research programs are underway and are designed to measure tritium and decay helium effects on the cracking properties of stainless steels using actual tritium reservoir forgings instead of the experimental forgings of past programs. The properties measured should be more representative of actual reservoir properties because the microstructure of the specimens tested will be more like that of the tritium reservoirs. The programs are designed to measure the effects of key forging variables on tritium compatibility and include three stainless steels, multiple yield strengths, and four different forging processes. The effects on fracture toughness of hydrogen and crack orientation were measured for type 316L forgings. In addition, hydrogen effects on toughness were measured for Type 304L block forgings having two different yield strengths. Finally, fracture toughness properties of type 304L

  17. Anisotropic and heterogeneous mechanical properties of a stratified shale/limestone sequence at Nash Point, South Wales: A case study for hydraulic fracture propagation through a layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes Inskip, Nathaniel; Meredith, Philip; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-04-01

    While considerable effort has been expended on the study of fracture propagation in rocks in recent years, our understanding of how fractures propagate through layered sedimentary rocks with different mechanical and elastic properties remains poorly constrained. Yet this is a key issue controlling the propagation of both natural and anthropogenic hydraulic fractures in layered sequences. Here we report measurements of the contrasting mechanical and elastic properties of the Lower Lias at Nash Point, South Wales, which comprises an interbedded sequence of shale and limestone layers, and how those properties may influence fracture propagation. Elastic properties of both materials have been characterised via ultrasonic wave velocity measurements as a function of azimuth on samples cored both normal and parallel to bedding. The shale is highly anisotropic, with P-wave velocities varying from 2231 to 3890 m s-1, giving an anisotropy of ~55%. By contrast, the limestone is essentially isotropic, with a mean P-wave velocity of 5828 m s-1 and an anisotropy of ~2%. The dynamic Young's modulus of the shale, calculated from P- and S-wave velocity data, is also anisotropic with a value of 36 GPa parallel to bedding and 12 GPa normal to bedding. The modulus of the limestone is again isotropic with a value of 80 GPa. It follows that for a vertical fracture propagating (i.e. normal to bedding) the modulus contrast is 6.6. This is important because the contrast in elastic properties is a key factor in controlling whether fractures arrest, deflect, or propagate across interfaces between layers in a sequence. There are three principal mechanisms by which a fracture may deflect across or along an interface, namely: Cook-Gordon debonding, stress barrier, and elastic mismatch. Preliminary numerical modelling results (using a Finite Element Modelling software) of induced fractures at Nash Point suggest that all three are important. The results demonstrate a rotation of the maximum

  18. An ORMOSIL-Containing Orthodontic Acrylic Resin with Concomitant Improvements in Antimicrobial and Fracture Toughness Properties

    PubMed Central

    Rueggeberg, Frederick A.; Niu, Li-na; Mettenberg, Donald; Yiu, Cynthia K. Y.; Blizzard, John D.; Wu, Christine D.; Mao, Jing; Drisko, Connie L.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2012-01-01

    Global increase in patients seeking orthodontic treatment creates a demand for the use of acrylic resins in removable appliances and retainers. Orthodontic removable appliance wearers have a higher risk of oral infections that are caused by the formation of bacterial and fungal biofilms on the appliance surface. Here, we present the synthetic route for an antibacterial and antifungal organically-modified silicate (ORMOSIL) that has multiple methacryloloxy functionalities attached to a siloxane backbone (quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate, or QAMS). By dissolving the water-insoluble, rubbery ORMOSIL in methyl methacrylate, QAMS may be copolymerized with polymethyl methacrylate, and covalently incorporated in the pressure-processed acrylic resin. The latter demonstrated a predominantly contact-killing effect on Streptococcus mutans ATCC 36558 and Actinomyces naselundii ATCC 12104 biofilms, while inhibiting adhesion of Candida albicans ATCC 90028 on the acrylic surface. Apart from its favorable antimicrobial activities, QAMS-containing acrylic resins exhibited decreased water wettability and improved toughness, without adversely affecting the flexural strength and modulus, water sorption and solubility, when compared with QAMS-free acrylic resin. The covalently bound, antimicrobial orthodontic acrylic resin with improved toughness represents advancement over other experimental antimicrobial acrylic resin formulations, in its potential to simultaneously prevent oral infections during appliance wear, and improve the fracture resistance of those appliances. PMID:22870322

  19. The effect of friction stir processing on the microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture behavior of investment cast titanium aluminum vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilchak, Adam L.

    . Thus, the mechanical properties were investigated using micropillar compression and microtensile specimens. The effect of friction stir processing on crack initiation resistance was assessed using high cycle fatigue tests conducted in four-point bend which put only the stir zone in maximum tension. The results indicated that at constant stress amplitude, there was greater than an order of magnitude increase in fatigue life after friction stir processing. In addition, the fatigue strength of the investment cast material was improved between 20 pct. and 60 pct. by friction stir processing. These improvements have been verified with a statistically significant number of tests. Finally, the wide range of microstructures created by friction stir processing provided an opportunity to study the effect of underlying microstructure on the fracture behavior of alpha + beta titanium alloys. For this purpose, high resolution fractography coupled with quantitative tilt fractography and electron backscatter diffraction was used to provide a direct link between microstructure, crystallography and fracture topography. These techniques have been used extensively to study the early stages of post-initiation crack growth in Ti-6Al-4V, especially at low stress intensity ranges (DeltaK) in the as-cast material. A limited number of experiments were also performed on Ti-6Al-4V specimens in other microstructural conditions to assess the generality of the detailed results obtained for the fully lamellar material. The results show that fracture topography depends strongly on DeltaK and microstructural length scale. In addition, many of the features observed on the fracture surface were directly related to the underlying crystallographic orientation.

  20. Evaluation of Wave Propagation Properties during a True-Triaxial Rock Fracture Experiment using Acoustic Emission Frequency Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfellow, S. D.; Ghofrani Tabari, M.; Nasseri, M. B.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    A true-triaxial deformation experiment was conducted to study the evolution of wave propagation properties by using frequency characteristics of AE waveforms to diagnose the state of fracturing in a sample of sandstone. Changes in waveform frequency content has been interpreted as either the generation of progressively larger fractures or the relative attenuation of high-frequency wave components as a result of micro-crack formation. A cubic sample of Fontainebleau sandstone was initially loaded to a stress state of σ1 = σ2 = 35 MPa, σ3 = 5 MPa at which point σ1¬ was increased until failure. Acoustic emission (AE) activity was monitored by 18 PZT transducers, three embedded in each platen. The sensor amplitude response spectrum was determined by following an absolute source calibration procedure and showed a relatively constant sensitivity in the frequency range between 20 kHz and 1200 kHz. Amplified waveforms were continuously recorded at a sampling rate of 10 MHz and 12-bit resolution. Continuous acoustic emission waveforms were harvested to extract discrete events. Using a time-varying transverse isotropic velocity model, 48,502 events were locatable inside the sample volume. Prior to peak-stress, AE activity was associated with stable quasi-static growth of fractures coplanar with σ1 and σ2 located near the platen boundaries. In the post peak-stress regime, fracture growth displays unstable ¬dynamic propagation. Analysis of waveform frequency characteristics was limited to the pre peak-stress regime. Analysis of AE frequency characteristics was conducted on all 48,502 located AE events; each event file containing 18 waveforms of varied quality. If the signal to noise ratio was greater than 5, the waveforms power spectrum was estimated and the source-receiver raypath vector was calculated. The power spectrum of each waveform was divided into three frequency bands (Low: 100 - 300 kHz, Medium: 300 - 600 kHz and High: 600 - 1000 kHz) and the power in each

  1. Shoulder Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Journal of Hand Surgery (JHS) Home Anatomy Shoulder Fractures Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... create difficulty with its function. Types of Shoulder Fractures The type of fracture varies by age. Most ...

  2. Stress Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    Stress fractures Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by ... up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also arise from normal use of a ...

  3. Greenstick Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    Greenstick fractures Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A greenstick fracture occurs when a bone bends and cracks, instead of breaking completely into separate pieces. The fracture looks similar to what happens when you try ...

  4. Subtask 12G3: Fracture properties of V-4Cr-4Ti irradiated in the dynamic helium charging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.J.; Busch, D.E.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effect of simultaneous displacement damage and dynamically charged helium on the ductile-brittle transition behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti specimens irradiated to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE). One property of vanadium-base alloys that is not well understood in terms of their potential use as fusion reactor structural materials is the effect of simultaneous generation of helium and neutron damage under conditions relevant to fusion reactor operation. In the present DHCE, helium was produced uniformly in the specimen at linear rates ranging from {approx}0.4 to 4.2 appm helium/dpa by the decay of tritium during irradiation to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in Li-filled DHCE capsules in the Fast Flux Test Facility. Ductile-brittle transition behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti, recently identified as the most promising vanadium-base alloy for fusion reactor use, was determined from multiple-bending tests (at -196{degrees}C to 50{degrees}C) and quantitative SEM fractography on TEM disks (0.3-mm thick) and broken tensile specimens (1.0-mm thick). No brittle behavior was observed at temperatures >-150{degrees}C, and predominantly brittle-cleavage fracture morphologies were observed only at -196{degrees}C in some specimens irradiated to 31 dpa at 425{degrees}C during DHCE. Ductile-brittle transition temperatures (DBTTs) were -200{degrees}C to -175{degrees}C for both types of specimens. In strong contrast to tritium-trick experiments in which dense coalescence of helium bubbles is produced on grain boundaries in the absence of displacement damage, no intergranular fracture was observed in the bend-tested specimens irradiated in the DHCE. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Influence of ion nitriding regime on mechanical properties and fracture mechanism of austenitic steel subjected to different thermomechanical treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskvina, Valentina; Astafurova, Elena; Ramazanov, Kamil; Melnikov, Eugene; Maier, Galina; Budilov, Vladimir

    2016-11-01

    The effect of thermomechanical treatments and low-temperature ion nitriding on mechanical properties and a fracture mechanism of stable austenitic stainless steel Fe-17Cr-13Ni-1.7Mn-2.7Mo-0.5Si-0.01C (in wt %, 316L-type) was investigated. Irrespective of initial heat treatments of steel and the regime of nitrogen saturation, traditional ion nitriding and nitriding with hollow cathode effect do not influence the stages of plastic flow and strain hardening; instead, they contribute to surface hardening of steel samples and reduce their plastic properties due to formation of a brittle surface layer. Ion nitriding leads to formation of a hardened surface layer with the microhardness of 12 GPa. Formation of a high-defective grain/subgrain structure with high dislocation density contributes to strengthening of steel samples under ion nitriding and formation of a thicker strengthened layer in comparison with fine-crystalline and coarse-crystalline samples.

  6. Hydromechanical Imaging of Fractured-Porous Rocks Properties and Coupled Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmi, Y.; Cappa, F.; Rutqvist, J.; Wang, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    The High-Pulse Poroelasticity Protocol (HPPP) project is dedicated to geophysical monitoring of CO2 injection in reservoirs (http://hppp.unice.fr/), focusing currently on hydromechanical testing in carbonate rock. The HPPP probe uses fiber-optic sensors for dynamic fluid pressure/mechanical deformation measurements in boreholes, with reflection of light at specific wavelength from fiber Bragg gratings mounted between inflatable packers. The probe requires no downhole electrical supply, thus the operation is passive, with response time << 0.5 ms and probe sizes from ~12 to ~25 mm. The sensor is immune to EM interference, and can stand harsh environments. The probe laboratory and in situ calibration and the development of receiving array of sensors around HPPP are established prior to borehole installation. The field measurements include the detection of coupled seismic - poroelastic waves (Fast Biot Waves) in saturated and unsaturated zones. Within the injection chamber, seismic pressure waves of 1 to 10 Hz and static hydraulic diffusion are measured to quantify the coupling to the reservoir. Oscillations with period of several ms are induced by the onset of fluid pulses and quickly reach quasi-static state with high pressure maintained for seconds. The accuracies of fiber optical displacement sensor is 10-7 m and pressure sensor 103 Pa. In the rock medium, 3D MEM accelerometers with frequency range of 0 - 1 kHz can be mounted with distances of deci-meters to meters from the HPPP probe. Undrained responses with strong differences in amplitude and shape between velocity components are detected right after the rise of fluid pressure. After the pressure pulse, seismicity related to pulse pressure diffusion is detected. Accelerometers are also deployed in the Coaraze site (in southeastern France) with both fault related fractures and bedding planes well characterized. Water tables can be raised or lowered in the fracture/porous block by closing and opening a spring

  7. Heterogeneity of hydrodynamic properties and groundwater circulation of a coastal andesitic volcanic aquifer controlled by tectonic induced faults and rock fracturing - Martinique island (Lesser Antilles - FWI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittecoq, B.; Reninger, P. A.; Violette, S.; Martelet, G.; Dewandel, B.; Audru, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a multidisciplinary study to analyze the structure and the hydrogeological functioning of an andesitic coastal aquifer and to highlight the importance of faults and associated rock fracturing on groundwater flow. A helicopter-borne geophysical survey with an unprecedented resolution (SkyTEM) was flown over this aquifer in 2013. TDEM resistivity, total magnetic intensity, geological and hydrogeological data from 30 boreholes and two pumping tests were correlated, including one which lasted an exceptional 15 months. We demonstrate that heterogeneous hydrodynamic properties and channelized flows result from tectonically-controlled aquifer compartmentalization along the structural directions of successive tectonic phases. Significant fracturing of the central compartment results in enhanced hydrodynamic properties of the aquifer and an inverse relationship between electrical resistivity and transmissivity. Basalts within the fractured compartment have lower resistivity and higher permeability than basalts outside the compartment. Pumping tests demonstrate that the key factor is the hydraulic conductivity contrast between compartments rather than the hydrodynamic properties of the fault structure. In addition, compartmentalization and associated transmissivity contrasts protect the aquifer from seawater intrusion. Finally, unlike basaltic volcanic islands, the age of the volcanic formations is not the key factor that determines hydrodynamic properties of andesitic islands. Basalts that are several million years old (15 Ma here) have favorable hydrodynamic properties that are generated or maintained by earthquakes/faulting that result from active subduction beneath these islands, which is superimposed on their primary permeability.

  8. Cotton fiber properties relative humidity and its effect on flat bundle strength elongation and fracture morphology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is well known that cotton fibers readily exchange moisture content with their surrounding atmosphere. As moisture exchange progresses, several physical properties of the fiber are significantly affected. In this study, the effects of relative humidity (RH), a factor that affects the atmospheric m...

  9. Inference of Fractured Rock Transport Properties by Joint Inversion of Push-Pull and Single-Hole Ground Penetrating Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakas, A.; Linde, N.; Bour, O.; Le Borgne, T.

    2015-12-01

    Flow and transport characterization of fractured rock formations is very challenging and important for a multitude of applications that include groundwater extraction, nuclear waste storage and geothermal energy production. One popular hydrogeological method to study fractured rock is a push-pull test, in which injection and retrieval of a tracer is made at the same depth interval in a borehole. In theory, push-pull tests are not sensitive to changes in the heterogeneity of the tracer flow path since the retrieval at the injection location minimizes advective effects and makes the test more sensitive to time-dependent transport processes. This assumption is limiting in the presence of a natural hydraulic gradient or if non-neutrally buoyant tracers are used, but these limitations can be reduced by monitoring push-pull tests with ground penetrating radar (GPR). We present a methodology for combined modeling and inversion of a series of push-pull tests that we monitored with the single hole ground penetrating radar (GPR) method. For the GPR modeling we use a newly developed approach to simulate the GPR response in fractured rock. We coupled the GPR model to a flow-and-transport simulator that we use to define the electrical properties of the fracture filling. The combined model can cope with heterogeneous fractures of any orientation, aperture and size and allows for the effect of density driven flow (that is strong during the saline tracer tests). We use the combined simulator to create synthetic datasets for both the time-series of the GPR traces at different locations and the tracer breakthrough curves. Since the combined problem is highly non-linear and the inverse solution is ill-posed, we use stochastic inversion techniques to obtain probabilistic estimates of the parameters of interest (fracture length, orientation and aperture distribution) and assess the use of different measures to compare the simulated and experimental data.

  10. Inulin and erythritol as sucrose replacers in short-dough cookies: sensory, fracture, and acoustic properties.

    PubMed

    Laguna, Laura; Primo-Martín, Cristina; Salvador, Ana; Sanz, Teresa

    2013-05-01

    The effect of sucrose replacement by erythritol and inulin was studied in short-dough cookies using instrumental and sensory analysis. Two levels of replacement were used (25% and 50% of total sucrose content). Descriptive sensory analysis showed that the sucrose replacement affects visual and texture cookies characteristics, being the differences perceived by mouth greater than by hand. In general, sucrose substitutes produced a less crispy cookie and lower consumer acceptability, with the exception of 25% sucrose replacement by inulin. Matrix aeration attributes such as open and crumbly obtained by trained panel were important properties, and correlated positively with consumer acceptance and negatively with maximum force at break (hardness). Inulin cookies sensory properties were more similar to the control than the erythritol cookies. Also, consumer overall acceptance decreased significantly with sucrose replacement by erythritol. The analysis of texture and sound revealed that inulin cookies were softer whereas erythritol cookies were harder in comparison with control cookies; despite this difference, inulin cookies had similar sound characteristics to erythritol cookies.

  11. Enhancement of the antimicrobial properties of orthorhombic molybdenum trioxide by thermal induced fracturing of the hydrates.

    PubMed

    Shafaei, Shahram; Van Opdenbosch, Daniel; Fey, Tobias; Koch, Marcus; Kraus, Tobias; Guggenbichler, Josef Peter; Zollfrank, Cordt

    2016-01-01

    The oxides of the transition metal molybdenum exhibit excellent antimicrobial properties. We present the preparation of molybdenum trioxide dihydrate (MoO3 × 2H2O) by an acidification method and demonstrate the thermal phase development and morphological evolution during and after calcination from 25 °C to 600 °C. The thermal dehydration of the material was found to proceed in two steps. Microbiological roll-on tests using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were performed and exceptional antimicrobial activities were determined for anhydrous samples with orthorhombic lattice symmetry and a large specific surface area. The increase in the specific surface area is due to crack formation and to the loss of the hydrate water after calcination at 300 °C. The results support the proposed antimicrobial mechanism for transition metal oxides, which based on a local acidity increase as a consequence of the augmented specific surface area.

  12. Rock fracture processes in chemically reactive environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rock fracture is traditionally viewed as a brittle process involving damage nucleation and growth in a zone ahead of a larger fracture, resulting in fracture propagation once a threshold loading stress is exceeded. It is now increasingly recognized that coupled chemical-mechanical processes influence fracture growth in wide range of subsurface conditions that include igneous, metamorphic, and geothermal systems, and diagenetically reactive sedimentary systems with possible applications to hydrocarbon extraction and CO2 sequestration. Fracture processes aided or driven by chemical change can affect the onset of fracture, fracture shape and branching characteristics, and fracture network geometry, thus influencing mechanical strength and flow properties of rock systems. We are investigating two fundamental modes of chemical-mechanical interactions associated with fracture growth: 1. Fracture propagation may be aided by chemical dissolution or hydration reactions at the fracture tip allowing fracture propagation under subcritical stress loading conditions. We are evaluating effects of environmental conditions on critical (fracture toughness KIc) and subcritical (subcritical index) fracture properties using double torsion fracture mechanics tests on shale and sandstone. Depending on rock composition, the presence of reactive aqueous fluids can increase or decrease KIc and/or subcritical index. 2. Fracture may be concurrent with distributed dissolution-precipitation reactions in the hostrock beyond the immediate vicinity of the fracture tip. Reconstructing the fracture opening history recorded in crack-seal fracture cement of deeply buried sandstone we find that fracture length growth and fracture opening can be decoupled, with a phase of initial length growth followed by a phase of dominant fracture opening. This suggests that mechanical crack-tip failure processes, possibly aided by chemical crack-tip weakening, and distributed

  13. Numerical Modeling of Fracture Propagation in Naturally Fractured Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Prodanovic, M.; Olson, J. E.; Schultz, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing consists of injecting fluid at high pressure and high flowrate to the wellbore for the purpose of enhancing production by generating a complex fracture network. Both tensile failure and shear failure occur during the hydraulic fracturing treatment. The shear event can be caused by slip on existing weak planes such as faults or natural fractures. From core observation, partially cemented and fully cemented opening mode natural fractures, often with considerable thickness are widely present. Hydraulic fractures can propagate either within the natural fracture (tensile failure) or along the interface between the natural fracture and the rock matrix (tensile/shear failure), depending on the relative strength of cement and rock matrix materials, the bonding strength of interface, as well as the presence of any heterogeneities. In this study, we evaluate the fracture propagation both experimentally and numerically. We embed one or multiple inclusions of different mechanical properties within synthetic hydrostone samples in order to mimic cemented natural fractures and rock. A semi-circular bending test is performed for each set of properties. A finite element model built with ABAQUS is used to mimic the semi-circular bending test and study the fracture propagation path, as well as the matrix-inclusion bonding interface status. Mechanical properties required for the numerical model are measured experimentally. The results indicate that the match between experiment and modeling fracture path are extremely sensitive to the chosen interface (bonding) model and related parameters. The semi-circular bending test is dry and easily conducted, providing a good platform for validating numerical approaches. A validated numerical model will enable us to add pressurized fluid within the crack and simulate hydraulic fracture-natural fracture interaction in the reservoir conditions, ultimately providing insights into the extent of the fracture network.

  14. Determination of Filtration Properties of a Deformable Porous-Fractured Bed from the Results of Hydrodynamic Investigations of Horizontal Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullin, A. I.; Mardanov, R. Sh.; Morozov, P. E.; Shamsiev, M. N.; Khairullin, M. Kh.

    2014-09-01

    A computational algorithm has been proposed for interpretation of results of hydrodynamic investigations of horizontal wells in unsteady regimes of filtration in deformable porous-fractured beds. The proposed approach makes it possible to evaluate the dependence of the permeability coefficient of fractures on pressure. A study has been made of the dynamics of change in the bottom-hole pressure after bringing a horizontal well into production and shutting it down in the nonlinear elastic regime of filtration of the fluid in a porous-fractured bed.

  15. Fracture properties of a neutron-irradiated stainless steel submerged arc weld cladding overlay

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.; Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of stainless steel cladding to increase the resistance of an operating nuclear reactor pressure vessel to extension of surface flaws depends greatly on the properties of the irradiated cladding. Therefore, weld overlay cladding irradiated at temperatures and fluences relevant to power reactor operation was examined. The cladding was applied to a pressure vessel steel plate by the submerged arc, single-wire, oscillating-electrode method. Three layers of cladding provided a thickness adequate for fabrication of test specimens. The first layer was type 309, and the upper two layers were type 308 stainless steel. The type 309 was diluted considerably by excessive melting of the base plate. Specimens were taken from near the base plate-cladding interface and also from the upper layers. Charpy V-notch and tensile specimens were irradiated at 288/sup 0/C to a fluence of 2 x 10/sup 23/ neutrons/m/sup 2/ (>1 MeV). 10 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Fracture Property of Y-Shaped Cracks of Brittle Materials under Compression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Zheming; Liu, Hongjie

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the properties of Y-shaped cracks of brittle materials under compression, compression tests by using square cement mortar specimens with Y-shaped crack were conducted. A true triaxial loading device was applied in the tests, and the major principle stresses or the critical stresses were measured. The results show that as the branch angle θ between the branch crack and the stem crack is 75°, the cracked specimen has the lowest strength. In order to explain the test results, numerical models of Y-shaped cracks by using ABAQUS code were established, and the J-integral method was applied in calculating crack tip stress intensity factor (SIF). The results show that when the branch angle θ increases, the SIF KI of the branch crack increases from negative to positive and the absolute value KII of the branch crack first increases, and as θ is 50°, it is the maximum, and then it decreases. Finally, in order to further investigate the stress distribution around Y-shaped cracks, photoelastic tests were conducted, and the test results generally agree with the compressive test results. PMID:25013846

  17. Fracture property of Y-shaped cracks of brittle materials under compression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Zheming; Liu, Hongjie

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the properties of Y-shaped cracks of brittle materials under compression, compression tests by using square cement mortar specimens with Y-shaped crack were conducted. A true triaxial loading device was applied in the tests, and the major principle stresses or the critical stresses were measured. The results show that as the branch angle θ between the branch crack and the stem crack is 75°, the cracked specimen has the lowest strength. In order to explain the test results, numerical models of Y-shaped cracks by using ABAQUS code were established, and the J-integral method was applied in calculating crack tip stress intensity factor (SIF). The results show that when the branch angle θ increases, the SIF K I of the branch crack increases from negative to positive and the absolute value K II of the branch crack first increases, and as θ is 50°, it is the maximum, and then it decreases. Finally, in order to further investigate the stress distribution around Y-shaped cracks, photoelastic tests were conducted, and the test results generally agree with the compressive test results.

  18. Characterisation of the fracture properties in the ductile to brittle transition region of the weld material of a reactor pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scibetta, M.; Ferreño, D.; Gorrochategui, I.; Lacalle, R.; van Walle, E.; Martín, J.; Gutiérrez-Solana, F.

    2011-04-01

    This work presents the results of the fracture characterisation of the weld material of a nuclear vessel, currently in service, in the ductile to brittle transition region. The tests consisted of Charpy impact and tensile tests, performed in the framework of the surveillance programme of the plant. Moreover, in the context of this research, K Jc fracture toughness tests on pre-cracked Charpy V notch specimens (evaluated according to the Master Curve methodology) together with some mini-tensile tests, were performed; non-irradiated and several irradiated material conditions were characterised. The analysis of the experimental results revealed some inconsistencies concerning the material embrittlement as measured through Charpy and K Jc fracture tests: in order to obtain an adequate understanding of the results, an extended experimental scope well beyond the regulatory framework was developed, including Charpy tests and K Jc fracture tests, both performed on reconstituted specimens. Moreover, Charpy specimens irradiated in the high flux BR2 material test reactor were tested with the same purpose. With this extensive experimental programme, a coherent and comprehensive description of the irradiation behaviour of the weld material in the transition region was achieved. Furthermore it revealed better material properties in comparison with the initial expectations based on the information obtained in the framework of the surveillance programme.

  19. Viscoelastic Properties of Silica Fibre Reinforced Epoxides and a Theory of Fracture of Fibre Reinforced Viscoelastic Materials,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    the rate at which elastic energy, released by fiber breakage, can be absorbed, is calculated. Analogies of fiber reinforcement theory and chain fracture theories in polymers are discussed. (Author Modified Abstract)

  20. Improved Mechanical Performance Fracture Properties and Reliability of Radical-Cured Thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Redline, Erica Marie; Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Lane, J. Matthew; Stevens, Mark J.; Alam, Todd M.; Celina, Mathias C.

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to alter polymerization chemistry to improve network homogeneity in free-radical crosslinked systems. It was hypothesized that a reduction in heterogeneity of the network would lead to improved mechanical performance. Experiments and simulations were carried out to investigate the connection between polymerization chemistry, network structure and mechanical properties. Experiments were conducted on two different monomer systems - the first is a single monomer system, urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA), and the second is a two-monomer system consisting of bisphenol A glycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) in a ratio of 70/30 BisGMA/TEGDMA by weight. The methacrylate systems were crosslinked using traditional radical polymeriza- tion (TRP) with azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) or benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as an initiator; TRP systems were used as the control. The monomers were also cross-linked using activator regenerated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (ARGET ATRP) as a type of controlled radical polymerization (CRP). FTIR and DSC were used to monitor reac- tion kinetics of the systems. The networks were analyzed using NMR, DSC, X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). These techniques were employed in an attempt to quantify differences between the traditional and controlled radical polymerizations. While a quantitative methodology for characterizing net- work morphology was not established, SAXS and AFM have shown some promising initial results. Additionally, differences in mechanical behavior were observed between traditional and controlled radical polymerized thermosets in the BisGMA/TEGDMA system but not in the UDMA materials; this finding may be the result of network ductility variations between the two materials. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations employing a novel model of the CRP reaction were carried out for

  1. The effect of extreme temperatures on the elastic properties and fracture behavior of graphite/polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. H.; Simonds, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of elevated and cryogenic temperatures on the elastic moduli and fracture strengths of several C6000/PMR-15 and C6000/NR-15082 laminates was measured. Tests were conducted at -157 C, 24 C, and 316 C (-250 F, 75 F, and 600 F). Both notched and unnotched laminates were tested. The average stress failure criterion was used to predict the fracture strength of quasi-isotropic notched laminates.

  2. The effect of extreme temperatures on the elastic properties and fracture behavior of graphite/polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. H.; Simonds, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of elevated and cryogenic temperatures on the elastic moduli and fracture strengths of several C6000/PMR-15 and C6000/NR-15082 laminates was measured. Tests were conducted at -157 C, 24 C, and 316 C (-250 F, 75 F, and 600 F). Both notched and unnotched laminates were tested. The average stress failure criterion was used to predict the fracture strength of quasi-isotropic notched laminates.

  3. Phenomenological and mechanics aspects of nondestructive evaluation and characterization by sound and ultrasound of material and fracture properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. S. W.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in fracture mechanics and elastic wave theory enhance the understanding of many physical phenomena in a mathematical context. Available literature in the material, and fracture characterization by NDT, and the related mathematical methods in mechanics that provide fundamental underlying principles for its interpretation and evaluation are reviewed. Information on the energy release mechanism of defects and the interaction of microstructures within the material is basic in the formulation of the mechanics problems that supply guidance for nondestructive evaluation (NDE).

  4. [Atlas fractures].

    PubMed

    Schären, S; Jeanneret, B

    1999-05-01

    Fractures of the atlas account for 1-2% of all vertebral fractures. We divide atlas fractures into 5 groups: isolated fractures of the anterior arch of the atlas, isolated fractures of the posterior arch, combined fractures of the anterior and posterior arch (so-called Jefferson fractures), isolated fractures of the lateral mass and fractures of the transverse process. Isolated fractures of the anterior or posterior arch are benign and are treated conservatively with a soft collar until the neck pain has disappeared. Jefferson fractures are divided into stable and unstable fracture depending on the integrity of the transverse ligament. Stable Jefferson fractures are treated conservatively with good outcome while unstable Jefferson fractures are probably best treated operatively with a posterior atlanto-axial or occipito-axial stabilization and fusion. The authors preferred treatment modality is the immediate open reduction of the dislocated lateral masses combined with a stabilization in the reduced position using a transarticular screw fixation C1/C2 according to Magerl. This has the advantage of saving the atlanto-occipital joints and offering an immediate stability which makes immobilization in an halo or Minerva cast superfluous. In late instabilities C1/2 with incongruency of the lateral masses occurring after primary conservative treatment, an occipito-cervical fusion is indicated. Isolated fractures of the lateral masses are very rare and may, if the lateral mass is totally destroyed, be a reason for an occipito-cervical fusion. Fractures of the transverse processes may be the cause for a thrombosis of the vertebral artery. No treatment is necessary for the fracture itself.

  5. A computational method for determining tissue material properties in ovine fracture calluses using electronic speckle pattern interferometry and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Malte; Claes, Lutz; Simon, Ulrich; Ignatius, Anita; Wehner, Tim

    2012-12-01

    For numerical simulations of biological processes the assignment of reliable material properties is essential. Since literature data show huge variations for each parameter, this study presents a method for determining tissue properties straight from the investigated specimens by combining electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) with finite element (FE) analysis in a two-step parameter analysis procedure. ESPI displacement data from two mid-sagittal ovine fracture callus slices under 5 N compressive load were directly compared to data from FE simulations of the respective experimental setup. In the first step a parameter sensitivity analysis quantified the influence of single tissues on the mechanical behavior of the callus specimens. In the second step, material properties (i.e. Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios) for the most dominant material of each callus specimen were determined through a parameter sampling procedure minimizing the mean local deviations between the simulated (FE) and measured (ESPI) equivalent element strains. The resulting material properties showed reasonable ranges downsizing the variability of previous published values, especially for Young's modulus which was 1881 MPa for woven bone and 16 MPa for cartilage in average. In conclusion, a numerical method was developed to determine material properties straight from independent fracture callus specimens based on experimentally derived local mechanical conditions.

  6. Skull fracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... compress the underlying brain tissue (subdural or epidural hematoma). A simple fracture is a break in the bone without damage ... Causes of skull fracture can include: Head trauma Falls, automobile accidents, physical assault, and sports

  7. Rib Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... From Brain Injury Additional Content Medical News Rib Fractures By Thomas G. Weiser, MD, MPH, Department of ... Hemothorax Injury to the Aorta Pulmonary Contusion Rib Fractures Tension Pneumothorax Traumatic Pneumothorax (See also Introduction to ...

  8. Hand Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thumb Arthritis Thumb Sprains Trigger Finger Tumors Wrist Fracture Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety ... Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Thumb Arthritis Trigger Finger Wrist Fracture Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety ...

  9. Effects of Al3(Sc,Zr) and Shear Band Formation on the Tensile Properties and Fracture Behavior of Al-Mg-Sc-Zr Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongfeng; Jiang, Feng; Zhou, Jiang; Wei, Lili; Qu, Jiping; Liu, Lele

    2015-11-01

    The mechanical properties and microstructures of Al-6Mg-0.25Sc-0.1Zr alloy (wt.%) during annealing were investigated by means of uniaxial tensile testing, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and high-resolution transmission electron microscope. The results show that a large number of micro and grain-scale shear bands form in this alloy after cold rolling. As the tensile-loading force rises, strain softening would generate in shear bands, resulting in the occurrence of shear banding fracture in cold-rolled Al-Mg-Sc-Zr alloys. Recrystallization takes place preferentially in shear bands during annealing. Due to the formation of coarse-grain bands constructed by new subgrains, recrystallization softening tends to occur in these regions. During low-temperature annealing, recrystallization is inhibited by nano-scale Al3(Sc,Zr) precipitates which exert significant coherency strengthening and modulus hardening. However, the strengthening effect of Al3(Sc,Zr) decreases with the increasing of particle diameter at elevated annealing temperature. The mechanical properties of the recrystallized Al-Mg-Sc-Zr alloy decrease to a minimum level, and the fracture plane exhibits pure ductile fracture characteristics.

  10. Characterisation of the mechanical and fracture properties of a uni-weave carbon fibre/epoxy non-crimp fabric composite.

    PubMed

    Bru, Thomas; Hellström, Peter; Gutkin, Renaud; Ramantani, Dimitra; Peterson, Göran

    2016-03-01

    A complete database of the mechanical properties of an epoxy polymer reinforced with uni-weave carbon fibre non-crimp fabric (NCF) is established. In-plane and through-the-thickness tests were performed on unidirectional laminates under normal loading and shear loading. The response under cyclic shear loading was also measured. The material has been characterised in terms of stiffness, strength, and failure features for the different loading cases. The critical energy release rates associated with different failure modes in the material were measured from interlaminar and translaminar fracture toughness tests. The stress-strain data of the tensile, compressive, and shear test specimens are included. The load-deflection data for all fracture toughness tests are also included. The database can be used in the development and validation of analytical and numerical models of fibre reinforced plastics (FRPs), in particular FRPs with NCF reinforcements.

  11. Characterisation of the mechanical and fracture properties of a uni-weave carbon fibre/epoxy non-crimp fabric composite

    PubMed Central

    Bru, Thomas; Hellström, Peter; Gutkin, Renaud; Ramantani, Dimitra; Peterson, Göran

    2016-01-01

    A complete database of the mechanical properties of an epoxy polymer reinforced with uni-weave carbon fibre non-crimp fabric (NCF) is established. In-plane and through-the-thickness tests were performed on unidirectional laminates under normal loading and shear loading. The response under cyclic shear loading was also measured. The material has been characterised in terms of stiffness, strength, and failure features for the different loading cases. The critical energy release rates associated with different failure modes in the material were measured from interlaminar and translaminar fracture toughness tests. The stress–strain data of the tensile, compressive, and shear test specimens are included. The load–deflection data for all fracture toughness tests are also included. The database can be used in the development and validation of analytical and numerical models of fibre reinforced plastics (FRPs), in particular FRPs with NCF reinforcements. PMID:26958626

  12. Facial fractures.

    PubMed Central

    Carr, M. M.; Freiberg, A.; Martin, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    Emergency room physicians frequently see facial fractures that can have serious consequences for patients if mismanaged. This article reviews the signs, symptoms, imaging techniques, and general modes of treatment of common facial fractures. It focuses on fractures of the mandible, zygomaticomaxillary region, orbital floor, and nose. Images p520-a p522-a PMID:8199509

  13. Dynamic Fracture Properties of Rocks Subjected to Static Pre-load Using Notched Semi-circular Bend Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rong; Li, Kang; Xia, Kaiwen; Lin, Yuliang; Yao, Wei; Lu, Fangyun

    2016-10-01

    A dynamic load superposed on a static pre-load is a key problem in deep underground rock engineering projects. Based on a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar test system, the notched semi-circular bend (NSCB) method is selected to investigate the fracture initiation toughness of rocks subjected to pre-load. In this study, a two-dimensional ANSYS finite element simulation model is developed to calculate the dimensionless stress intensity factor. Three groups of NSCB specimen are tested under a pre-load of 0, 37 and 74 % of the maximum static load and with the loading rate ranging from 0 to 60 GPa m1/2 s-1. The results show that under a given pre-load, the fracture initiation toughness of rock increases with the loading rate, resembling the typical rate dependence of materials. Furthermore, the dynamic rock fracture toughness decreases with the static pre-load at a given loading rate. The total fracture toughness, defined as the sum of the dynamic fracture toughness and initial stress intensity factor calculated from the pre-load, increases with the pre-load at a given loading rate. An empirical equation is used to represent the effect of loading rate and pre-load force, and the results show that this equation can depict the trend of the experimental data.

  14. Hydraulic fracture propagation modeling and data-based fracture identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing

    Successful shale gas and tight oil production is enabled by the engineering innovation of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Hydraulically induced fractures will most likely deviate from the bi-wing planar pattern and generate complex fracture networks due to mechanical interactions and reservoir heterogeneity, both of which render the conventional fracture simulators insufficient to characterize the fractured reservoir. Moreover, in reservoirs with ultra-low permeability, the natural fractures are widely distributed, which will result in hydraulic fractures branching and merging at the interface and consequently lead to the creation of more complex fracture networks. Thus, developing a reliable hydraulic fracturing simulator, including both mechanical interaction and fluid flow, is critical in maximizing hydrocarbon recovery and optimizing fracture/well design and completion strategy in multistage horizontal wells. A novel fully coupled reservoir flow and geomechanics model based on the dual-lattice system is developed to simulate multiple nonplanar fractures' propagation in both homogeneous and heterogeneous reservoirs with or without pre-existing natural fractures. Initiation, growth, and coalescence of the microcracks will lead to the generation of macroscopic fractures, which is explicitly mimicked by failure and removal of bonds between particles from the discrete element network. This physics-based modeling approach leads to realistic fracture patterns without using the empirical rock failure and fracture propagation criteria required in conventional continuum methods. Based on this model, a sensitivity study is performed to investigate the effects of perforation spacing, in-situ stress anisotropy, rock properties (Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and compressive strength), fluid properties, and natural fracture properties on hydraulic fracture propagation. In addition, since reservoirs are buried thousands of feet below the surface, the

  15. Estimating the fracture density of small-scale vertical fractures when large-scale vertical fractures are present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuwei; Dong, Ning; Fehler, Mike; Fang, Xinding; Liu, Xiwu

    2015-06-01

    Fractures in reservoirs significantly affect reservoir flow properties in subsequent years, which means that fracture characteristics such as preferred orientation, crack density or fracture compliance, what filling is in the fractures and so on are of great importance for reservoir development. When fractures are vertical, aligned and their dimensions are small relative to the seismic wavelength, the medium can be considered to be an equivalent horizontal transverse isotropic (HTI) medium. However, geophysical data acquired over naturally fractured reservoirs often reveal the presence of multiple fracture sets. We investigate a case where there are two vertical sets of fractures having differing length scales. One fracture set has length scale that is much smaller than the seismic wavelength but the other has length scale that is similar to the seismic wavelength. We use synthetic data to investigate the ability to infer the properties of the small-scale fractures in the presence of the large-scale fracture set. We invert for the Thomsen-type anisotropic coefficients of the small-scale fracture set by using the difference of the P wave amplitudes at two azimuths, which makes the inversion convex. Then we investigate the influence of the presence of the large-scale fractures on our ability to infer the properties of the small-scale fracture set. Surprisingly, we find that we can reliably infer the fracture density of the small-scale fractures even in the presence of large-scale fractures having significant compliance values. Although the inversion results for Thomsen-type anisotropic coefficients of small-scale fractures for one model are not good enough to figure out whether it is gas-filled or fluid-filled, we can find a big change of Thomsen-type anisotropic coefficient {{\\varepsilon}(V)} between the models in which small-scale fractures are filled with gas and fluid.

  16. Mechanical properties of heterophase polymer blends of cryogenically fractured soy flour composite filler and poly(styrene-butadiene)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reinforcement effect of cryogenically fractured soy Flour composite filler in soft polymer was investigated in this study. Polymer composites were prepared by melt-mixing polymer and soy flour composite fillers in an internal mixer. Soy flour composite fillers were prepared by blending aqueous dis...

  17. Potential Impacts of Spilled Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Chemicals on Water Resources: Types, volumes, and physical-chemical properties of chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) fluid chemicals spilled on-site may impact drinking water resources. While chemicals generally make up <2% of the total injected fluid composition by mass, spills may have undiluted concentrations. HF fluids typically consist of a mixture of base flui...

  18. Transport of Radon Gas into a Tunnel at Yucca Mountain-Estimating Large-Scale Fractured Tuff Hydraulic Properties and Implications for the Operation of the Ventilation System

    SciTech Connect

    A. Unger; S. Finsterle; G. Bodvarsson

    2003-06-06

    Radon gas concentrations have been monitored as part of the operation of a tunnel (the Exploratory Studies Facility-ESF) at Yucca Mountain to ensure worker safety. The objective of this study was to examine the potential use of the radon data to estimate large-scale formation properties of fractured tuffs. This objective was examined by developing a numerical model, based upon the characteristics of the ESF and the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) tuff unit, capable of predicting radon concentrations for prescribed ventilation conditions. The model was used to address two specific issues. First, it was used to estimate the permeability and porosity of the fractures in the TSw at the length scale of the ESF and extending tens of meters into the TSw, which surrounds the ESF. Second, the model was used to understand the mechanism leading to radon concentrations exceeding a specified level within the ESF. The mechanism controlling radon concentrations in the ESF is a function of atmospheric barometric fluctuations being propagated down the ESF along with ventilated air flow and the slight suction induced by the ventilation exhaust fans at the South Portal of the ESF. These pressure fluctuations are dampened in the TSw fracture continuum according to its permeability and porosity. Consequently, as the barometric pressure in the ESF drops rapidly, formation gases from the TSw are pulled into the ESF, resulting in an increase in radon concentrations. Model calibration to both radon concentrations measured in the ESF and gas-phase pressure fluctuations in the TSw yielded concurrent estimates of TSw fracture permeability and porosity of l x 10{sup -11} m{sup 2} and 0.00034, respectively. The calibrated model was then used as a design tool to predict the effect of adjusting the current ventilation-system operation strategy for reducing the probability of radon gas concentrations exceeding a specified level.

  19. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behaviors of the As-Extruded Mg-5Al-3Ca Alloys Containing Yttrium at Elevated Temperature.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyeon-Taek; Kim, Yong-Ho; Kim, Taek-Soo; Lee, Seong-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Effects of yttrium (Y) addition on mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of the as-extruded Mg-Al-Ca based alloys at elevated temperature were investigated by a tensile test. After hot extrusion, the average grain size was refined by Y addition and eutectic phases were broken down into fine particles. Y addition to Mg-5Al-3Ca based alloy resulted in the improvement of strength and ductility at elevated temperature due to fine grain and suppression of grain growth by formation of thermally stable Al2Y intermetallic compound.

  20. LRP4 association to bone properties and fracture and interaction with genes in the Wnt- and BMP signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jitender; Swanberg, Maria; McGuigan, Fiona; Callreus, Mattias; Gerdhem, Paul; Akesson, Kristina

    2011-09-01

    Osteoporosis is a common complex disorder in postmenopausal women leading to changes in the micro-architecture of bone and increased risk of fracture. Members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) gene family regulates the development and physiology of bone through the Wnt/β-catenin (Wnt) pathway that in turn cross-talks with the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. In two cohorts of Swedish women: OPRA (n=1002; age 75 years) and PEAK-25 (n=1005; age 25 years), eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from Wnt pathway genes (LRP4; LRP5; G protein-coupled receptor 177, GPR177) were analyzed for association with Bone Mineral Density (BMD), rate of bone loss, hip geometry, quantitative ultrasound and fracture. Additionally, interaction of LRP4 with LRP5, GPR177 and BMP2 were analyzed. LRP4 (rs6485702) was associated with higher total body (TB) and lumbar spine (LS) BMD in the PEAK-25 cohort (p=0.006 and 0.005 respectively), and interaction was observed with LRP5 (p=0.007) and BMP2 (p=0.004) for TB BMD. LRP4 also showed significant interaction with LRP5 for femoral neck (FN) and LS BMD in this cohort. In the OPRA cohort, LRP4 polymorphisms were associated with significantly lower fracture incidence overall (p=0.008-0.001) and fewer hip fractures (rs3816614, p=0.006). Significant interaction in the OPRA cohort was observed for LRP4 with BMP2 and GPR177 for FN BMD as well as for rate of bone loss at TB and FN (p=0.007-0.0001). In conclusion, LRP4 and interaction between LRP4 and genes in the Wnt and BMP signaling pathways modulate bone phenotypes including peak bone mass and fracture, the clinical endpoint of osteoporosis.

  1. Effect of Interfacial Microstructure Evolution on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of Friction Stir-Welded Al-Cu Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, P.; Xiao, B. L.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2015-07-01

    The interfacial microstructure evolution of Al-Cu joints during friction stir welding and post-welding annealing and its influence on the tensile strength and the fracture behavior were investigated in detail. An obvious interface including three sub-layers of α-Al, Al2Cu, and Al4Cu9 intermetallic compound (IMC) layers is generated in the as-FSW joint. With the development of annealing process, the α-Al layer disappeared and a new IMC layer of AlCu formed between initial two IMC layers of Al2Cu and Al4Cu9. The growth rate of IMC layers was diffusion controlled before the formation of Kirkendall voids, with activation energy of 117 kJ/mol. When the total thickness of IMC layers was less than the critical value of 2.5 μm, the FSW joints fractured at the heat-affected zone of Al side with a high ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of ~100 MPa. When the thickness of IMC layers exceeded 2.5 μm, the joints fractured at the interface. For relatively thin IMC layer, the joints exhibited a slightly decreased UTS of ~90 MPa and an inter-granular fracture mode with crack propagating mainly between the Al2Cu and AlCu IMC layers. However, when the IMC layer was very thick, crack propagated in the whole IMC layers and the fracture exhibited trans-granular mode with a greatly decreased UTS of 50-60 MPa.

  2. A 3-Dimensional discrete fracture network generator to examine fracture-matrix interaction using TOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Kazumasa; Yongkoo, Seol

    2003-04-09

    Water fluxes in unsaturated, fractured rock involve the physical processes occurring at fracture-matrix interfaces within fracture networks. Modeling these water fluxes using a discrete fracture network model is a complicated effort. Existing preprocessors for TOUGH2 are not suitable to generate grids for fracture networks with various orientations and inclinations. There are several 3-D discrete-fracture-network simulators for flow and transport, but most of them do not capture fracture-matrix interaction. We have developed a new 3-D discrete-fracture-network mesh generator, FRACMESH, to provide TOUGH2 with information about the fracture network configuration and fracture-matrix interactions. FRACMESH transforms a discrete fracture network into a 3 dimensional uniform mesh, in which fractures are considered as elements with unique rock material properties and connected to surrounding matrix elements. Using FRACMESH, individual fractures may have uniform or random aperture distributions to consider heterogeneity. Fracture element volumes and interfacial areas are calculated from fracture geometry within individual elements. By using FRACMESH and TOUGH2, fractures with various inclinations and orientations, and fracture-matrix interaction, can be incorporated. In this paper, results of flow and transport simulations in a fractured rock block utilizing FRACMESH are presented.

  3. Characterisation and monitoring of the Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ) in fractured gneisses of the Roselend underground laboratory: permeability measurements, transport property changes and related radon bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassermann, Jérôme; Sabroux, Jean-Christophe; Richon, Patrick; Pontreau, Sébastien; Guillon, Sophie; Pili, Eric

    2010-05-01

    pressure measurements between an obturated borehole and the tunnel is conducted to monitor the possible modifications of the transport properties of the EDZ due to hydraulical and/or mechanical sollicitations of the nearby Roselend reservoir lake. As radon level is controlled by emanation and transport path through the medium. The observed bursts of radon should be due to changes of the radon transport properties (Trique et al. 1999) of the EDZ. A correlation between the differential pressure variations and radon bursts is clearly observed. Radon bursts seem to be related to overpressure events that take place in the instrumented borehole. Which external sollicitations, hydraulical or mechanical, or both, induce such a behaviour? References Bossart, P., Meier, P. M., Moeri, A., Trick, T., and J.-C. Mayor (2002). Geological and hydraulic characterisation of the excavation disturbed zone in the Opalinus Clay of the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, Engineering Geology, 66, 19-38. Dezayes, C., and T. Villemin (2002). Etat de la fracturation dans la galerie CEA de Roselend et analyse de la déformation cassante dans le massif du Méraillet, technical report, Lab. de Geodyn. de Chaisnes Alp., Univ. de Savoie, Savoie, France. Jakubick, A. T., and T. Franz (1993). Vacuum testing of the permeability of the excavation damaged zone, Rock Mech. Rock Engng., 26(2), 165-182. Patriarche, D., Pili, E., Adler, P. M., and J.-F. Thovert (2007). Stereological analysis of fractures in the Roselend tunnel and permeability determination, Water Resour. Res., 43, W09421. Richon, P., Perrier, F., Sabroux, J.-C., Trique, M., Ferry, C., Voisin, V., and E. Pili (2004). Spatial and time variations of radon-222 concentration in the atmosphere of a dead-end horizontal tunnel, J. Environ. Radioact., 78, 179-198. Richon, P., Perrier, F., Pili, E., and J.-C. Sabroux (2009). Detectability and significance of the 12hr barometric tide in radon-222 signal, dripwater flow rate, air temperature and carbon dioxide

  4. NONDESTRUCTIVE ANALYSIS OF THE BRITTLE FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF CERAMIC MATERIALS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CERAMIC MATERIALS , *NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING, BRITTLENESS, DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES, DIFFUSION, ELASTIC PROPERTIES, FRACTURE (MECHANICS), IMPURITIES, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, RESONANCE, STRESSES, THERMAL DIFFUSION, THERMAL STRESSES

  5. An evaluation of the fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness properties of beryllium-copper alloy CDA172

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Henkener, Julie A.

    1990-01-01

    A series of fracture mechanics tests, using the Be-Cu alloy CDA172 in the round rod product form, was conducted in a lab air environment at room temperature. Tensile data is presented in both the L and C directions and K sub Ic data in both the C-R and C-L orientations. Fracture toughness values were derived from M(T) (center cracked), PS(T) (surface cracked) and CC01 (corner cracked) specimens of varying thickness. Fatigue crack growth data were obtained for the C-R orientation at stress ratio of 0.1, 0.4, and 0.7 and for the C-L orientation at stress ratios of 0.1, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.7.

  6. The properties and fracture behavior of ion plasma sprayed TiN coating on stainless steel substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, Dina V.; Goncharenko, Igor M.; Danilov, Vladimir I.; Lobach, Maxim I.; Danilova, Lidiya V.; Shlyakhova, Galina V.

    2015-10-01

    The wear resistance and fracture behavior of ion plasma sprayed TiN coating were studied; the results are presented. The coating was applied to the stainless steel substrate using a vacuum arc method. The samples were tested by active loading. With varying coating thickness, its characteristics were found to change. Multiple cracking would occur in the deformed sample, with fragment borders aligned normal to the extension axis.

  7. Dental resin composites containing silica-fused whiskers--effects of whisker-to-silica ratio on fracture toughness and indentation properties.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hockin H K; Quinn, Janet B; Smith, Douglas T; Antonucci, Joseph M; Schumacher, Gary E; Eichmiller, Frederick C

    2002-02-01

    Dental resin composites need to be strengthened in order to improve their performance in large stress-bearing applications such as crowns and multiple-unit restorations. Recently, silica-fused ceramic whiskers were used to reinforce dental composites, and the whisker-to-silica ratio was found to be a key microstructural parameter that determined the composite strength. The aim of this study was to further investigate the effects of whisker-to-silica ratio on the fracture toughness, elastic modulus, hardness and brittleness of the composite. Silica particles and silicon carbide whiskers were mixed at whisker:silica mass ratios of 0:1, 1:5. 1:2, 1:1, 2:1, 5:1, and 1:0. Each mixture was thermally fused, silanized and combined with a dental resin at a filler mass percentage of 60%. Fracture toughness was measured with a single-edge notched beam method. Elastic modulus and hardness were measured with a nano-indentation system. Whisker:silica ratio had significant effects on composite properties. The composite toughness (mean+/-SD; n = 9) at whisker:silica = 2:1 was (2.47+/-0.28) MPa m(1/2), significantly higher than (1.02+/-0.23) at whisker:silica = 0:1, (1.13+/-0.19) of a prosthetic composite control, and (0.95+/-0.11) of an inlay/onlay composite control (Tukey's at family confidence coefficient = 0.95). Elastic modulus increased monotonically and hardness plateaued with increasing the whisker:silica ratio. Increasing the whisker:silica ratio also decreased the composite brittleness, which became about 1/3 of that of the inlay:onlay control. Electron microscopy revealed relatively flat fracture surfaces for the controls, but much rougher ones for the whisker composites, with fracture steps and whisker pullout contributing to toughness. The whiskers appeared to be well-bonded with the matrix, probably due to the fused silica producing rough whisker surfaces. Reinforcement with silica-fused whiskers resulted in novel dental composites that possessed fracture toughness

  8. Effects of through-the-thickness stitching on impact and interlaminar fracture properties of textile graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Suresh K.; Sankar, Bhavani V.

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of through-the-thickness stitching on impact damage resistance, impact damage tolerance, and mode I and mode II fracture toughness of textile graphite/epoxy laminates. Uniweave resin-transfer-molded 48 ply graphite/epoxy (AS4/3501-6) laminates were stitched with Kevlar and glass yarns of different linear densities and stitch spacings. Delaminations were implanted during processing to simulate impact damage. Sublaminate buckling tests were performed to determine the effects of stitching on the compressive strength. The results showed outstanding improvements of up to 400 percent in the compression strength over the unstitched laminates. In impact and static indentation tests the onset of damage occurred at the same level, but the extent of damage was less in stitched laminates. Mode I fracture toughness of 24 ply Uniweave unidirectional (AS4/3501-6) stitched laminates was measured by conducting double-cantilever-beam tests. The critical strain energy release rate (G(sub Ic)) was found to be up to 30 times higher than the unstitched laminates. Mode II fracture toughness of the Uniweave laminates was measured by performing end-notched-flexure tests. Two new methods to compute the apparent G(sub IIc) are presented. The apparent G(sub IIc) was found to be at least 5-15 times higher for the stitched laminates.

  9. Application of geophysical methods for fracture characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.H.; Majer, E.L.; McEvilly, T.V. |; Morrison, H.F. |

    1990-01-01

    One of the most crucial needs in the design and implementation of an underground waste isolation facility is a reliable method for the detection and characterization of fractures in zones away from boreholes or subsurface workings. Geophysical methods may represent a solution to this problem. If fractures represent anomalies in the elastic properties or conductive properties of the rocks, then the seismic and electrical techniques may be useful in detecting and characterizing fracture properties. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Ankle fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Malleolar fracture; Tri-malleolar; Bi-malleolar; Distal tibia fracture; Distal fibula fracture; Malleolus fracture ... Some ankle fractures may require surgery when: The ends of the bone are out of line with each other (displaced). The ...

  11. Injection through fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    Tracer tests are conducted in geothermal reservoirs as an aid in forecasting thermal breakthrough of reinjection water. To interpret tracer tests, mathematical models have been developed based on the various transport mechanisms in these highly fractured reservoirs. These tracer flow models have been applied to interpret field tests. The resulting matches between the model and field data were excellent and the model parameters were used to estimate reservoir properties. However, model fitting is an indirect process and the model's ability to estimate reservoir properties cannot be judged solely on the quality of the match between field data and model predictions. The model's accuracy in determining reservoir characteristics must be independently verified in a closely controlled environment. In this study, the closely controlled laboratory environment was chosen to test the validity and accuracy of tracer flow models developed specifically for flow in fractured rocks. The laboratory tracer tests were performed by flowing potassium iodide (KI) through artificially fractured core samples. The tracer test results were then analyzed with several models to determine which best fit the measured data. A Matrix Diffusion model was found to provide the best match of the tracer experiments. The core properties, as estimated by the Matrix Diffusion model parameters generated from the indirect matching process, were then determined. These calculated core parameters were compared to the measured core properties and were found to be in agreement. This verifies the use of the Matrix Diffusion flow model in estimating fracture widths from tracer tests.

  12. Fracture permeability and seismic wave scattering--Poroelastic linear-slip interface model for heterogeneous fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L.R.

    2009-06-15

    Schoenberg's Linear-slip Interface (LSI) model for single, compliant, viscoelastic fractures has been extended to poroelastic fractures for predicting seismic wave scattering. However, this extended model results in no impact of the in-plane fracture permeability on the scattering. Recently, we proposed a variant of the LSI model considering the heterogeneity in the in-plane fracture properties. This modified model considers wave-induced, fracture-parallel fluid flow induced by passing seismic waves. The research discussed in this paper applies this new LSI model to heterogeneous fractures to examine when and how the permeability of a fracture is reflected in the scattering of seismic waves. From numerical simulations, we conclude that the heterogeneity in the fracture properties is essential for the scattering of seismic waves to be sensitive to the permeability of a fracture.

  13. Growth Kinematics of Opening-Mode Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, P.; Alzayer, Y.; Laubach, S.; Fall, A.

    2014-12-01

    Fracture aperture is a primary control on flow in fractured reservoirs of low matrix permeability including unconventional oil and gas reservoirs and most geothermal systems. Guided by principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, fracture aperture is generally assumed to be a linear function of fracture length and elastic material properties. Natural opening-mode fractures with significant preserved aperture are observed in core and outcrop indicative of fracture opening strain accommodated by permanent solution-precipitation creep. Fracture opening may thus be decoupled from length growth if the material effectively weakens after initial elastic fracture growth by either non-elastic deformation processes or changes in elastic properties. To investigate the kinematics of fracture length and aperture growth, we reconstructed the opening history of three opening-mode fractures that are bridged by crack-seal quartz cement in Travis Peak Sandstone of the SFOT-1 well, East Texas. Similar crack-seal cement bridges had been interpreted to form by repeated incremental fracture opening and subsequent precipitation of quartz cement. We imaged crack-seal cement textures for bridges sampled at varying distance from the tips using scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence, and determined the number and thickness of crack-seal cement increments as a function of position along the fracture length and height. Observed trends in increment number and thickness are consistent with an initial stage of fast fracture propagation relative to aperture growth, followed by a stage of slow propagation and pronounced aperture growth. Consistent with fluid inclusion observations indicative of fracture opening and propagation occurring over 30-40 m.y., we interpret the second phase of pronounced aperture growth to result from fracture opening strain accommodated by solution-precipitation creep and concurrent slow, possibly subcritical, fracture propagation. Similar deformation

  14. Experimental Comparison of the Effects of Nanometric and Micrometric Particulates on the Tensile Properties and Fracture Behavior of Al Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Adnan; Neely, Andrew J.; Shankar, Krishna

    2011-03-01

    This article studies the influence of nanometric (n-SiCp) and micrometric-scale SiC particulates ( μ-SiCp) on the tensile properties of the Al 7075 alloy. The unreinforced Al and its composites were synthesized using the powder metallurgy (P/M) route and were tested uniaxially in tension at both room and elevated temperatures. Aging behavior was studied to observe any effect of the reinforcement on the aging kinetics and hardness of the composites. X-ray diffraction was performed to determine the crystal structures of the raw materials and any reaction phase formed in the composites. The n-SiCp were not dispersed uniformly in the Al matrix and clustered mainly at the grain boundaries. The stiffness of the composites increased and the ductility decreased with an increase in the volume fraction of the n-SiCp. The n-SiCp proved to be a better reinforcement than the traditional μ-SiCp in terms of imparting higher ductility to the composite. Fractography and microscopy using optical, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopes were performed for failure and microstructural analysis of all the materials. At room temperature, the fracture altered from ductile in the unreinforced Al to brittle in the composites. At an elevated temperature, the fracture mechanism transformed from brittle to ductile rupture in the composites.

  15. The influence of Mg on creep properties and fracture behaviors of Mar-M247 superalloy under 1255 K/200 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bor, H. Y.; Ma, C. Y.; Chao, C. G.

    2000-05-01

    The effects of Mg microadditions on the high-temperature/low stress (1255 K/200 MPa) creep properties and fracture behavior of a Mar-M247 superalloy were investigated in this study. The results of quantitative statistical analyses showed that when Mg microadditions up to 50 ppm were made, the MC carbides located at grain boundaries (designated GB MC) were significantly refined and spheroidized and the number of MC carbides decreased. In addition, the M23C6 carbides present on GBs dramatically increased with increasing Mg contents up to 50 ppm, and the creep resistance was enhanced under the test condition of 1255 K/200 MPa. However, the creep performance of a Mar-M247 superalloy containing 80 ppm Mg deteriorated due to the formation of an extremely large amount of MC carbide and a decrease in the number of M23C6 carbides at GBs. The cracks mainly initiated and propagated along GBs in both the Mg-free and Mg-containing Mar-M247 superalloys under 1255 K/200 MPa, and the finial rupture was caused by intergranular fracture. Under the present creep condition, the optimal Mg microaddition to a Mar-M247 superalloy should be 30 to 50 ppm.

  16. Fundamentals of reservoir surface energy as related to surface properties, wettability, capillary action, and oil recovery from fractured reservoirs by spontaneous imbibition

    SciTech Connect

    Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Jason Zhengxin Tong; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the nonwetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed

  17. Fundamentals of Reservoir Surface Energy as Related to Surface Properties, Wettability, Capillary Action and Oil Recovery from Fractured Reservoirs by Spontaneous Imbibition

    SciTech Connect

    Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

    2006-12-08

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the non-wetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed

  18. Fundamentals of Reservoir Surface Energy as Related to Surface Properties, Wettability, Capillary Action, and Oil Recovery from Fractured Reservoirs by Spontaneous Imbibition

    SciTech Connect

    Norman Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Zhengxin Tong; Evren Unsal; Siluni Wickramathilaka; Shaochang Wo; Peigui Yin

    2008-06-30

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the non-wetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed

  19. Fracture Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... to hold the fracture in the correct position. • Fiberglass casting is lighter and stronger and the exterior ... with your physician if this occurs. • When a fiberglass cast is used in conjunction with a GORE- ...

  20. Hip Fracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... make older people more likely to trip and fall — one of the most common causes of hip ... Taking steps to maintain bone density and avoid falls can help prevent hip fracture. Signs and symptoms ...

  1. Lisfranc fractures.

    PubMed

    Wright, Amanda; Gerhart, Ann E

    2009-01-01

    Injuries of the tarsometatarsal, or Lisfranc, joint are rarely seen. Lisfranc fractures and fracture dislocations are among the most frequently misdiagnosed foot injuries in the emergency department. A misdiagnosed injury may have severe consequences including chronic pain and loss of foot biomechanics. Evaluation of a foot injury should include a high level of suspicion of a Lisfranc injury, and a thorough work-up is needed for correct diagnosis.

  2. Colles' fracture.

    PubMed

    Altizer, Linda L

    2008-01-01

    Many people "slip and fall", especially in the icy areas of the winter season. To prevent an injury to the head, most people put their hand out to hit the ground first, so the wrist usually gets injured. The most frequent injury from this type of "intervention" is a fracture to the distal radius and/or ulna, which is frequently called a "Colles' fracture."

  3. Ambient and elevated temperature fracture and cyclic-fatigue properties in a series of Al-containing silicon carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Rong

    2004-01-01

    A series of in situ toughened, Al, B and C containing, silicon carbide ceramics (ABC-SiC) has been examined with Al contents varying from 3 to 7 wt%. With increasing Al additions, the grain morphology in the as-processed microstructures varied from elongated to bimodal to equiaxed, with a change in the nature of the grain-boundary film from amorphous to partially crystalline to fully crystalline. Fracture toughness and cyclic fatigue tests on these microstructures revealed that although the 7 wt.% Al containing material (7ABC) was extremely brittle, the 3 and particularly 5 wt.% Al materials (3ABC and 5ABC, respectively) displayed excellent crack-growth resistance at both ambient (25°C) and elevated (1300 C) temperatures. Indeed, no evidence of creep damage, in the form of grain-boundary cavitation, was seen at temperatures at 1300°C or below. The enhanced toughness of the higher Al-containing materials was associated with extensive crack bridging from both interlocking grains (in 3ABC) and uncracked ligaments (in 5ABC); in contrast, the 7ABC SiC showed no such bridging, concomitant with a marked reduction in the volume fraction of elongated grains. Mechanistically, cyclic fatigue-crack growth in 3ABC and 5ABC SiC involved the progressive degradation of such bridging ligaments in the crack wake, with the difference in the degree of elastic vs. frictional bridging affecting the slope, i.e., Paris law exponent, of the crack-growth curve. In addition an investigation of fracture resistance in non-transforming ceramics toughened by grain bridging mechanism is presented using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). Linear superposition theorems are used for the superposition of crack opening displacements, as well as stress intensity factors, resulting from the external tractions and the internal compressive bridging stresses. Specifically weight functions are used to relate the CODs, stress intensity factors, and tractions and the bridging stress. Expressions are

  4. Boxer's fracture.

    PubMed

    Altizer, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Boxer's fracture is a common name for a fracture of the distal fifth metacarpal and received its name from one of its most common causes, punching an object with a closed fist. It can occur from a fistfight or from punching a hard object. The injury of a "Boxer's Fracture" earned the name from the way in which the injury occurred, punching an immovable object with a closed fist and no boxing mitt (Figure 1). Naturally, a "Boxer" usually punches his fist into his opponent's face or body. An angry person may perform the same action into a person, or into the wall. The third person may be performing a task and strike something with his fist with forceful action accidentally. In any event, if the closed fist "punches" into an immovable or firm object with force, the most frequent injury sustained would be a fracture of the fifth metacarpal neck. Some caregivers would also call a fourth metacarpal neck fracture a boxer's fracture.

  5. McMC-based AVAZ direct inversion for fracture weaknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xinpeng; Zhang, Guangzhi; Chen, Huaizhen; Yin, Xingyao

    2017-03-01

    Considering that wide-azimuth seismic data contains abundant azimuthal amplitude information about the fractured reservoir with obvious characteristics of amplitude variation with incident angle and azimuth (AVAZ), azimuthal seismic data can be used for the inversion of anisotropic parameters in fractured reservoir. Fractured reservoir with a single set of vertically aligned fractures embedded in a purely isotropic background medium may be considered as a long-wavelength effective transversely isotropic medium with a horizontal symmetry axis (HTI). The normal and tangential fracture weaknesses are two key parameters to the evaluation of fracture properties in HTI media, thus the inversion of fracture weaknesses may be used for characterizing the anisotropy in fractured reservoir. The elastic properties of background isotropic media without fractures, however, do not cause azimuthal changes in AVAZ data compared to the fracture anisotropic properties, therefore simultaneous inversion for the background elastic parameters and fracture anisotropic parameters may be not stable. Thus we propose a method of azimuth-difference-based AVAZ direct inversion for fracture weaknesses. First, we extract the fracture symmetry axis azimuth based on the least square ellipse fitting (LSEF) method to obtain a linear AVAZ approximation. Then we build a fractured anisotropic rock-physics model for the estimation of anisotropic well-log information, building the initial background low-frequency trend of fracture weaknesses. Finally, an AVAZ direct inversion method of normal and tangential fracture weaknesses is proposed with the nonlinear Markov chain Monte Carlo (McMC) strategy. So we can eliminate the influence of isotropic background elastic properties on the fracture weakness properties and obtain the normal and tangential fracture weaknesses more stably. Tests on both 2D over-thrust model and real data demonstrate that the normal and tangential fracture weaknesses may be estimated

  6. Fracture toughness anisotropy in shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, Michael R.; Meredith, Philip G.; Brantut, Nicolas; Crawford, Brian R.

    2016-03-01

    The use of hydraulic fracturing to recover shale gas has focused attention on the fundamental fracture properties of gas-bearing shales, but there remains a paucity of available experimental data on their mechanical and physical properties. Such shales are strongly anisotropic, so that their fracture propagation trajectories depend on the interaction between their anisotropic mechanical properties and the anisotropic in situ stress field in the shallow crust. Here we report fracture toughness measurements on Mancos shale determined in all three principal fracture orientations: Divider, Short Transverse, and Arrester, using a modified short-rod methodology. Experimental results for a range of other sedimentary and carbonate rocks are also reported for comparison purposes. Significant anisotropy is observed in shale fracture toughness measurements at ambient conditions, with values, as high as 0.72 MPa m1/2 where the crack plane is normal to the bedding, and values as low as 0.21 MPa m1/2 where the crack plane is parallel to the bedding. For cracks propagating nonparallel to bedding, we observe a tendency for deviation toward the bedding-parallel orientation. Applying a maximum energy release rate criterion, we determined the conditions under which such deviations are more or less likely to occur under more generalized mixed-mode loading conditions. We find for Mancos shale that the fracture should deviate toward the plane with lowest toughness regardless of the loading conditions.

  7. Effects of alloying elements on mechanical and fracture properties of base metals and simulated heat-affected zones of SA 508 steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangho; Lee, Sunghak; Im, Young-Roc; Lee, Hu-Chul; Oh, Yong Jun; Hong, Jun Hwa

    2001-04-01

    This study was aimed at developing low-alloy steels for nuclear reactor pressure vessels by investigating the effects of alloying elements on mechanical and fracture properties of base metals and heat-affected zones (HAZs). Four steels whose compositions were variations of the composition specification for SA 508 steel (class 3) were fabricated by vacuum-induction melting and heat treatment, and their tensile properties and Charpy impact toughness were evaluated. Microstructural analyses indicated that coarse M3C-type carbides and fine M2C-type carbides were precipitated along lath boundaries and inside laths, respectively. In the steels having decreased carbon content and increased molybdenum content, the amount of fine M2C carbides was greatly increased, while that of coarse M3C carbides was decreased, thereby leading to the improvement of tensile properties and impact toughness. Their simulated HAZs also had sufficient impact toughness after postweld heat treatment (PWHT). These findings suggested that the low-alloy steels with high strength and toughness could be processed by decreasing carbon and manganese contents and by increasing molybdenum content.

  8. Effect of argon purity on mechanical properties, microstructure and fracture mode of commercially pure (cp) Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloys for ceramometal dental prostheses.

    PubMed

    Bauer, José; Cella, Suelen; Pinto, Marcelo M; Filho, Leonardo E Rodrigues; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro D

    2009-12-01

    Provision of an inert gas atmosphere with high-purity argon gas is recommended for preventing titanium castings from contamination although the effects of the level of argon purity on the mechanical properties and the clinical performance of Ti castings have not yet been investigated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of argon purity on the mechanical properties and microstructure of commercially pure (cp) Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloys. The castings were made using either high-purity and/or industrial argon gas. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS), proportional limit (PL), elongation (EL) and microhardness (VHN) at different depths were evaluated. The microstructure of the alloys was also revealed and the fracture mode was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The data from the mechanical tests and hardness were subjected to a two-and three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). The mean values of mechanical properties were not affected by the argon gas purity. Higher UTS, PL and VHN, and lower EL were observed for Ti-6Al-4V. The microhardness was not influenced by the argon gas purity. The industrial argon gas can be used to cast cp Ti and Ti-6Al-4V.

  9. Frequency-Dependent Fracture Specific Stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Folz, M. A.; Acosta-Colon, A.

    2003-12-01

    Monitoring the hydraulic properties of fractures remotely through their seismic signatures is an important goal for field hydrology. Empirical studies have shown that the hydraulic properties of a fracture are implicitly related to the fracture specific stiffness through the amount and distribution of contact area and apertures that arise from two rough surfaces in contact. Complicating this simple picture are seismic measurements that indicate frequency-dependent stiffness, i.e., a scale-dependent fracture stiffness where the scale is set by the wavelength. Thus relating the hydraulic properties of fractures to seismic measurements becomes a scale dependent problem. We have performed laboratory experiments to examine the phenomenon of frequency dependent fracture specific stiffness to aid in the assessment of the hydraulic properties of a fracture using seismic techniques. To this end, we have developed a photolithographic technique with which we can construct synthetic fractures of known fracture geometry with feature sizes controlled over several orders of magnitude. The synthetic fracture (and the control non-fractured samples) are made from acrylic cylinders that measure 15.0 cm in diameter by 7.7 cm in height. The diameter of the samples enables us to sample the acoustic properties of the fracture using acoustic lens over regions that range in scale from 10 mm to 60 mm. A confinement cell controls the normal stress on the fracture. Seismic measurements were made with broadband compressional-mode piezoelectric transducers enabling one-order of magnitude in frequency. We found that when the wavelength is smaller than the asperity size, a linear dependence of fracture specific stiffness on frequency occurs. In this geometric ray regime the asymptotic value of the transmission function provides a direct measure of the contact area of the fracture. On the other hand, when the asperity spacing is less than an eighth of a wavelength, the fracture behaves as a

  10. Validation and psychometric properties of the Delirium Motor Subtype Scale in elderly hip fracture patients (Dutch version).

    PubMed

    Slor, Chantal J; Adamis, Dimitrios; Jansen, René W M M; Meagher, David J; Witlox, Joost; Houdijk, Alexander P J; de Jonghe, Jos F M

    2014-01-01

    The Delirium Motor Subtype Scale (DMSS) was developed to capture all the previous different approaches to delirium motor subtyping into one new instrument and emphasize disturbances of motor activity rather than associated psychomotoric symptoms. We investigated reliability and validity of the DMSS Dutch version. Elderly patients who had undergone hip fracture surgery received the DMSS and the Delirium Rating Scale Revised-98 (DRS-R-98). A diagnosis of delirium was defined according to the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM). Among 146 patients, 46 (32%) patients were diagnosed with delirium (mean age 86.3 years; SD 5.2). The internal consistency of the DMSS was acceptable (Cronbach's alpha=0.72). If an item was removed at random the internal consistency of the scale remained the same. Similarly the concurrent validity of DMSS was good (Cohen's kappa=0.73) while for each motor subtype the Cohen's kappa ranged from 0.58 to 0.85. The sensitivity and specificity of DMSS to detect each subtype ranged from 0.56 to 1 and from 0.88 to 0.98, respectively. This study suggests that the Dutch version of the DMSS is a reliable and valid instrument. The DMSS has scientific validity that could allow for greater precision in further research on motor subtypes.

  11. Kevlar fiber-epoxy adhesion and its effect on composite mechanical and fracture properties by plasma and chemical treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Shyu, S.S.; Wu, S.R.; Sheu, G.S.

    1996-12-31

    Kevlar 49 fibers were surface modified by gas (ammonia, oxygen, and water vapor) plasmas etching and chlorosulfonation and subsequent reaction with some reagents (glycine, deionized water, ethylenediamine, and 1-butanol) to improve the adhesion to epoxy resin. After these treatments, the changes in fiber topography, chemical compositions of the fiber surfaces and the surface functional groups introduced to the surface of fibers were identified by SEM XPS and static SIMS. Interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and T-peel strength between the fiber and epoxy resin were markedly improved by gas plasma and chlorosulfonation (0.1% and 0.25% ClSO{sub 3}H at 30 s). However, it is clear from the similar G{sub IC} values of the treated and untreated fiber composites that the fiber/matrix interfacial bond strength is only a minor contributor to G{sub IC}. SEM was also used to study the surface topography of the fracture surfaces of composites in T-peel test.

  12. Characterizing Hydraulic Properties and Ground-Water Chemistry in Fractured-Rock Aquifers: A User's Manual for the Multifunction Bedrock-Aquifer Transportable Testing Tool (BAT3)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, Allen M.

    2007-01-01

    packers, the submersible pump, and other downhole components to land surface. Borehole geophysical logging must be conducted prior to deploying the Multifunction BAT3 in bedrock boreholes. In particular, it is important to identify the borehole diameter as a function of depth to avoid placing the packers over rough sections of the borehole, where they may be damaged during inflation. In addition, it is advantageous to identify the location of fractures intersecting the borehole wall, for example, using an acoustic televiewer log or a borehole camera. A knowledge of fracture locations is helpful in designing the length of the test interval and the locations where hydraulic tests and geochemical sampling are to be conducted. The Multifunction BAT3 is configured to conduct both fluid-injection and fluid-withdrawal tests. Fluid-injection tests are used to estimate the hydraulic properties of low-permeability fractures intersecting the borehole. The lower limit of the transmissivity that can be estimated using the configuration of the Multifunction BAT3 described in this report is approximately 10-3 square feet per day (ft2/d). Fluid-withdrawal tests are used to collect water samples for geochemical analyses and estimate the hydraulic properties of high-permeability fractures intersecting the borehole. The Multifunction BAT3 is configured with a submersible pump that can support pumping rates ranging from approximately 0.05 to 2.5 gallons per minute, and the upper limit of the of the transmissivity that can be estimated is approximately 104 ft2/d. The Multifunction BAT3 also can be used to measure the ambient hydraulic head of a section of a bedrock borehole, and to conduct single-hole tracer tests by injecting and later withdrawing a tracer solution.

  13. Fracture types (1) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... fracture which goes at an angle to the axis Comminuted - a fracture of many relatively small fragments Spiral - a fracture which runs around the axis of the bone Compound - a fracture (also called ...

  14. Hydraulic fracturing-1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book contains papers on hydraulic fracturing. Topics covered include: An overview of recent advances in hydraulic fracturing technology; Containment of massive hydraulic fracture; and Fracturing with a high-strength proppant.

  15. Fracturing fluid characterization facility (FFCF)

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.D.; Roegiers, J.C.; Fagan, J.

    1993-12-31

    The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility project has as its main focus the design, fabrication, and construction of a high pressure simulator (HPS) and a low pressure simulator (LPS) to be used to experimentally investigate the rheological properties and transport characteristics of proppant laden fracturing fluids. A discussion of each apparatus is provided as well as the auxiliary equipment, and data acquisition and control systems associated with the simulators.

  16. Condylar fractures.

    PubMed

    Sawhney, Raja; Brown, Ryan; Ducic, Yadranko

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the basic indications for different treatments of condylar and subcondylar fractures. It also reviews the steps of different surgical approaches to access the surgical area and explains the pros and cons of each procedure.

  17. Fluid Compressibility Effects during Hydraulic Fracture: an Opportunity for Gas Fracture Revival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mighani, S.; Boulenouar, A.; Moradian, Z.; Evans, J. B.; Bernabe, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing results when internal pore pressure is increased above a critical value. As the fracture extends, the fluid flows to the crack tip. The fracturing process depends strongly on the physical properties of both the porous solid and the fluid (e.g. porosity and elastic moduli for the solid, viscosity and compressibility for the fluid). It is also affected by the in-situ stress and pore pressure conditions. Here, we focus on the effect of fluid properties on hydraulic fracturing under conventional triaxial loading. Cylinders of Solnhofen limestone (a fine-grained, low permeability rock) were prepared with a central borehole through which different pressurized fluids such as oil, water or argon, were introduced. Preliminary experiments were performed using a confining pressure of 5 MPa and axial stress of 7 MPa. Our goal was to monitor fracture extension using strain gauges, acoustic emissions (AE) recording and ultrasonic velocity measurements. We also tried to compare the data with analytical models of fracture propagation. Initial tests showed that simple bi-wing fractures form when the fracturing fluid is relatively incompressible. With argon as pore fluid, a complex fracture network was formed. We also observed that the breakdown pressure was higher with argon than with less compressible fluids. After fracturing occurred, we cycled fluid pressure for several times. During the first cycles, re-opening of the fracture was associated with additional propagation. In general, it took 4 cycles to inhibit further propagation. Analytical models suggest that initial fractures occurring with compressible fluids tend to stabilize. Hence, formation and extension of additional fractures may occur, leading to a more complex morphology. Conversely, fractures formed by incompressible fluids remain critically stressed as they extend, thus producing a simple bi-wing fracture. Using compressible fracturing fluids could be a suitable candidate for an efficient

  18. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Frauk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2001-08-15

    Research continues on characterizing and modeling the behavior of naturally fractured reservoir systems. Work has progressed on developing techniques for estimating fracture properties from seismic and well log data, developing naturally fractured wellbore models, and developing a model to characterize the transfer of fluid from the matrix to the fracture system for use in the naturally fractured reservoir simulator.

  19. Wave Propagation in Isotropic Media with Two Orthogonal Fracture Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, S.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2016-10-01

    Orthogonal intersecting fracture sets form fracture networks that affect the hydraulic and mechanical integrity of a rock mass. Interpretation of elastic waves propagated through orthogonal fracture networks is complicated by guided modes that propagate along and between fractures, by multiple internal reflections, as well as by scattering from fracture intersections. The existence of some or all of these potentially overlapping modes depends on local stress fields that can preferentially close or open either one or both sets of fractures. In this study, an acoustic wave front imaging system was used to examine the effect of bi-axial loading conditions on acoustic wave propagation in isotropic media containing two orthogonal fracture sets. From the experimental data, orthogonal intersecting fracture sets support guided waves that depend on fracture spacing and fracture-specific stiffnesses. In addition, fracture intersections have stronger effects on propagating wave fronts than merely the superposition of the effects of two independent fractures because of energy partitioning among transmitted/reflected waves, scattered waves and guided modes. Interpretation of the properties of fractures or fracture sets from seismic measurements must consider non-uniform fracture stiffnesses within and among fracture sets, as well as considering the striking effects of fracture intersections on wave propagation.

  20. Mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of C/C composites with PyC/TaC/PyC, PyC/SiC/TaC/PyC multi-interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiang; Wang, Ya-lei; Chen, Zhao-ke; Li, Guo-dong

    2009-08-01

    Carbon/carbon (C/C) composites with PyC/TaC/PyC or PyC/SiC/TaC/PyC multi-interlayers were prepared by isothermal chemical vapor infiltration, followed by Furan resin impregnation and carbonization. Microstructures, mechanical properties including flexural strength, ductile displacement, and fracture behaviors of composites were studied. Furthermore, composites were heat treated at 2000 °C to study the effects of heat treatment on mechanical properties and fracture behaviors. PyC/TaC/PyC and PyC/SiC/TaC/PyC multi-interlayers have been deposited uniformly in C/C composites. With the introduction of PyC/TaC/PyC multi-interlayers in C/C composites, the flexural strength decreases; however, the ductile displacement increases. The fracture behavior changes from brittleness (0% TaC) to pseudo-ductility (5% TaC) and high toughness (10% TaC). When PyC/SiC/TaC/PyC multi-interlayers are introduced in C/C composites, the flexural strength is improved remarkably from 270 MPa to 522 MPa, but the ductile displacement decreases obviously from 0.49 mm to 0.24 mm, and the fracture behavior becomes brittle again. After heat treatment at 2000 °C, the flexural strength decreases, but the ductile displacement increases and pseudo-ductility or high toughness can be obtained.

  1. Fracture size scaling of hydraulic fracture stimulations in shale reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbancic, T.; Baig, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    It is becoming widely evident that hydraulic fracture stimulations in shale reservoirs can result in the generation of events with magnitudes M>0. These events are of concern both to the public as potential geo-hazards possibly affecting groundwater conditions and surface infra-structure, and to engineers for optimizing productivity and engineering design. Typically, in these environments, recording bandwidth limitations has resulted in a bias towards the consideration of events with M<0. This in turn has limited the observable fracture sizes to those constrained within lithological units. By extending the recording bandwidth to lower frequencies, the dimensions of the observable fractures are also extended to include larger fractures/faults activated during the stimulation. Our observations suggest that these larger-scale events can contribute upwards of 80% of the overall seismic budget or energy release associated with the stimulation process. Effective analysis of scaling relations independent of recording further suggests that breakdowns in scaling can be related to the presence of barriers to growth such as contrasts in rock properties associated with different lithological units. Generally, detected larger-magnitude events are associated with smaller-magnitude events, M<0, suggesting that these latter events can be used to characterize aspects of the rupture process whereas their associated signals observed with the low-frequency network can be used to characterize the overall fracture/fault behavior. By accounting for the presence of larger events, additional activated fracture surface area within the reservoir results in a significant increase in surface area. In an example provided, these events account for a further ~10 km2 of additional activated fracture surface area than estimated based on only utilizing high-frequency band-limited recordings. Overall, the identification of the actual discrete fracture network over many size scales allows for a better

  2. Facial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    White, Lawrence M.; Marotta, Thomas R.; McLennan, Michael K.; Kassel, Edward E.

    1992-01-01

    Appropriate clinical radiographic investigation, together with an understanding of the normal radiographic anatomy of the facial skeleton, allows for precise delineation of facial fracutres and associated soft tissue injuries encountered in clinical practice. A combination of multiple plain radiographic views and coronal and axial computed tomographic images allow for optimal delineation of fracture patterns. This information is beneficial in the clinical and surgical management patients with facial injuries

  3. a Fractal Network Model for Fractured Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peng; Li, Cuihong; Qiu, Shuxia; Sasmito, Agus Pulung

    2016-04-01

    The transport properties and mechanisms of fractured porous media are very important for oil and gas reservoir engineering, hydraulics, environmental science, chemical engineering, etc. In this paper, a fractal dual-porosity model is developed to estimate the equivalent hydraulic properties of fractured porous media, where a fractal tree-like network model is used to characterize the fracture system according to its fractal scaling laws and topological structures. The analytical expressions for the effective permeability of fracture system and fractured porous media, tortuosity, fracture density and fraction are derived. The proposed fractal model has been validated by comparisons with available experimental data and numerical simulation. It has been shown that fractal dimensions for fracture length and aperture have significant effect on the equivalent hydraulic properties of fractured porous media. The effective permeability of fracture system can be increased with the increase of fractal dimensions for fracture length and aperture, while it can be remarkably lowered by introducing tortuosity at large branching angle. Also, a scaling law between the fracture density and fractal dimension for fracture length has been found, where the scaling exponent depends on the fracture number. The present fractal dual-porosity model may shed light on the transport physics of fractured porous media and provide theoretical basis for oil and gas exploitation, underground water, nuclear waste disposal and geothermal energy extraction as well as chemical engineering, etc.

  4. Estimating flow heterogeneity in natural fracture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckenby, Robert J.; Sanderson, David J.; Lonergan, Lidia

    2005-10-01

    Examples of small to medium scale fault systems have been mapped in Jurassic sedimentary rocks in north Somerset, England. These examples include contractional and dilational strike-slip oversteps as well as normal faults. These maps form the basis of calculations performed to investigate heterogeneity in natural fracture systems with the aim of predicting fluid flow localisation in different fault styles. As there is no way to measure fracture aperture directly, we use vein thickness to represent an integrated flow path or 'palaeo-aperture' from which we derive a representation of the flow distribution. Three different methods are used to estimate flow heterogeneity based on: (1) fracture density (the ratio of fracture length to area), (2) fracture aperture (fracture porosity) and (3) hydraulic conductance (fracture permeability normalised to the pressure gradient and fluid properties). Our results show that fracture density and hydraulic conductance are poorly correlated and that fracture density does not fully represent the natural heterogeneity of fracture systems. Fracture aperture and hydraulic conductance indicate stronger degrees of flow localisation. Different types of structures also seem to display characteristic and predictable patterns of heterogeneity. Normal fault systems show the highest magnitude of localisation along the faults rather than in the relay ramps, while contractional and dilational strike-slip systems show very strong localisation in the faults and oversteps, respectively. In all cases the amount of damage in the oversteps can modify such patterns of heterogeneity.

  5. Mechanical and transport properties of rocks at high temperatures and pressures. Task I, the physical nature of fracturing at depth. Technical progress report No. 1, 1 March 1980-30 November 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, N.L.

    1980-12-15

    Research progress is reported in the following areas: (1) the delineation of the boundary separating elastic-brittle and transient-1 semibrittle behavior of granite and of its volcanic and metamorphic equivalents, rhyolite and granite gneiss; (2) the variation of fracture permeability in Sioux Quartzite, Westerly Granite and a fine-1 grained gabbro as a function of effective pressure and hydrothermal alterations; and (3) determine the mechanical properties of selected rocks at high temperatures and pressures. (ACR)

  6. Hydrodynamics of a vertical hydraulic fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    1987-03-24

    We have developed a numerical algorithm, HUBBERT, to simulate the hydrodynamics of a propagating vertical, rectangular fracture in an elastic porous medium. Based on the IFD method, this algorithm assumes fracture geometry to be prescribed. The breakdown and the creation of the incipient fracture is carried out according to the Hubbert-Willis theory. The propagation of the fracture is based on the criterion provided by Griffith, based on energy considerations. The deformation properties of the open fracture are based on simple elasticity solutions. The fracture is assumed to have an elliptical shape to a distance equal to the fracture height, beyond which the shape is assumed to be parallel plate. A consequence of Griffith's criterion is that the fracture must propagate in discrete steps. The parametric studies carried out suggest that for a clear understanding of the hydrodynamics of the hydraulic fracture many hitherto unrecognized parameters must be better understood. Among these parameters one might mention, efficiency, aperture of the newly formed fracture, stiffness of the newly formed fracture, relation between fracture aperture and permeability, and well bore compliance. The results of the studies indicate that the patterns of pressure transients and the magnitudes of fracture length appear to conform to field observations. In particular, the discrete nature of fracture propagation as well as the relevant time scales of interest inferred from the present work seem to be corroborated by seismic monitoring in the field. The results suggest that the estimation of least principal stress can be reliably made either with shut in data or with reinjection data provided that injection rates are very small.

  7. Effect of fracture compliance on wave propagation within a fluid-filled fracture.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Seiji; Korneev, Valeri A

    2014-06-01

    Open and partially closed fractures can trap seismic waves. Waves propagating primarily within fluid in a fracture are sometimes called Krauklis waves, which are strongly dispersive at low frequencies. The behavior of Krauklis waves has previously been examined for an open, fluid-filled channel (fracture), but the impact of finite fracture compliance resulting from contacting asperities and porous fillings in the fracture (e.g., debris, proppants) has not been fully investigated. In this paper, a dispersion equation is derived for Krauklis wave propagation in a fracture with finite fracture compliance, using a modified linear-slip-interface model (seismic displacement-discontinuity model). The resulting equation is formally identical to the dispersion equation for the symmetric fracture interface wave, another type of guided wave along a fracture. The low-frequency solutions of the newly derived dispersion equations are in good agreement with the exact solutions available for an open fracture. The primary effect of finite fracture compliance on Krauklis wave propagation is to increase wave velocity and attenuation at low frequencies. These effects can be used to monitor changes in the mechanical properties of a fracture.

  8. Fracture Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-01-31

    2219 -T851 aluminum (fractures at low stresses). The parameter KF is alloy compact specimens 1 2 and demonstrate consistent a function of specimen...Congress of 20. Walker, E. K., "The Effect of Stress Ratio Applied Mechanics, 1924. During Crack Propagation and Fatigue for 2024-T3 and 7015- T6 Aluminum ...34Stress- Corrosion Cracking in 12. Kaufman, J. G., and Nelson, F. G., "More Ti-6A1-4V Titanium Alloy in Nitrogen Tetroxide," on Specimen Size Effect in 2219

  9. Radial head fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Elbow fracture - radial head - aftercare ... to 2 weeks. If you have a small fracture and your bones did not move around much, ... to see a bone doctor (orthopedic surgeon). Some fractures require surgery to: Insert pins and plates to ...

  10. Hand fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000552.htm Hand fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... need to be repaired with surgery. Types of Hand Fractures Your fracture may be in one of ...

  11. Optimizing Shear Stresses at the Tip of a Hydraulic Fracture - What Is the Ideal Orientation of Natural Fractures with respect to Hydraulic Fracture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheibani, F.; Hager, B. H.

    2015-12-01

    stimulation standpoint during different stage of hydraulic fracture propagation depends on several factors including natural fracture mechanical properties (i.e. angle of friction), operation conditions (net pressure, fracture fluid viscosity), and in-situ stress conditions.

  12. Chopart fractures.

    PubMed

    Klaue, Kaj

    2004-09-01

    The Chopart articular space was described by François Chopart (1743-1795) as a practical space for amputations in cases of distal foot necrosis. It corresponds to the limit between the anatomical hind-foot and the mid-foot. The bones involved are the talus and the calcaneus proximally, and the navicular and the cuboid distally. This space thus holds two functionally distinct entities, the anterior part of the coxa pedis (an essential functional joint) and the calcaneo-cuboidal joint,which can be considered to be an "adaptive joint" within a normal foot. Trauma to this region may cause fractures and/or dislocations and, in high energy trauma,compartment syndromes. Principles of treatment are immediate reduction of dislocations and realignment of the medial and lateral column of the foot in length and orientation. Open reduction and internal fixation of talus and navicular fractures are often indicated to restore the "coxa pedis". Open reconstruction or fusion in correct length of the calcaneo-cuboidal joint is occasionally indicated. Salvage procedures in malunions include navicular osteotomies and calcaneo-cuboidal bone block fusions. Treatment of joint destructions, especially involving the talo-navicular joint, include triple arthrodesis.

  13. Fracture mechanics validity limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Dennis M.; Ernst, Hugo A.

    1994-01-01

    Fracture behavior is characteristics of a dramatic loss of strength compared to elastic deformation behavior. Fracture parameters have been developed and exhibit a range within which each is valid for predicting growth. Each is limited by the assumptions made in its development: all are defined within a specific context. For example, the stress intensity parameters, K, and the crack driving force, G, are derived using an assumption of linear elasticity. To use K or G, the zone of plasticity must be small as compared to the physical dimensions of the object being loaded. This insures an elastic response, and in this context, K and G will work well. Rice's J-integral has been used beyond the limits imposed on K and G. J requires an assumption of nonlinear elasticity, which is not characteristic of real material behavior, but is thought to be a reasonable approximation if unloading is kept to a minimum. As well, the constraint cannot change dramatically (typically, the crack extension is limited to ten-percent of the initial remaining ligament length). Rice, et al investigated the properties required of J-type parameters, J(sub x), and showed that the time rate, dJ(sub x)/dt, must not be a function of the crack extension rate, da/dt. Ernst devised the modified-J parameter, J(sub M), that meets this criterion. J(sub M) correlates fracture data to much higher crack growth than does J. Ultimately, a limit of the validity of J(sub M) is anticipated, and this has been estimated to be at a crack extension of about 40-percent of the initial remaining ligament length. None of the various parameters can be expected to describe fracture in an environment of gross plasticity, in which case the process is better described by deformation parameters, e.g., stress and strain. In the current study, various schemes to identify the onset of the plasticity-dominated behavior, i.e., the end of fracture mechanics validity, are presented. Each validity limit parameter is developed in

  14. Natural fracture characterization using passive seismic illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.

    2003-01-08

    The presence of natural fractures in reservoir rock can significantly enhance gas production, especially in tight gas formations. Any general knowledge of the existence, location, orientation, spatial density, and connectivity of natural fractures, as well as general reservoir structure, that can be obtained prior to active seismic acquisition and drilling can be exploited to identify key areas for subsequent higher resolution active seismic imaging. Current practices for estimating fracture properties before the acquisition of surface seismic data are usually based on the assumed geology and tectonics of the region, and empirical or fracture mechanics-based relationships between stratigraphic curvature and fracturing. The objective of this research is to investigate the potential of multicomponent surface sensor arrays, and passive seismic sources in the form of local earthquakes to identify and characterize potential fractured gas reservoirs located near seismically active regions. To assess the feasibility of passive seismic fracture detection and characterization, we have developed numerical codes for modeling elastic wave propagation in reservoir structures containing multiple, finite-length fractures. This article describes our efforts to determine the conditions for favorable excitation of fracture converted waves, and to develop an imaging method that can be used to locate and characterize fractures using multicomponent, passive seismic data recorded on a surface array.

  15. San Juan Fracture Characterization Project: Status and current results

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, E.L.; Daley, T.M.; Myer, L.R.; Nihei, K.; Queen, J.; Sinton, J.; Murphy, J.; Fortuna, M.; Lynn, H.B.; Imhoff, M.A.; Wilson, R.

    2001-02-26

    The overall objectives of this report are to extend current state-of-the-art 3-D imaging to extract the optimal information for fracture quantification and to develop next generation capability in fracture imaging for true 3-D imaging of the static and dynamic fracture properties.

  16. Simulation of ceramics fracture due to high rate dynamic impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazarinov, N. A.; Bratov, V. A.; Petrov, Y. V.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper dynamic fracture process due to high-speed impact of steel plunger into ceramic sample is simulated. The developed numerical model is based on finite element method and a concept of incubation time criterion, which is proven applicable in order to predict brittle fracture under high-rate deformation. Simulations were performed for ZrO2(Y2O3) ceramic plates. To characterize fracture process quantitatively fracture surface area parameter is introduced and controlled. This parameter gives the area of new surface created during dynamic fracture of a sample and is essentially connected to energetic peculiarities of fracture process. Multiple simulations with various parameters made it possible to explore dependencies of fracture area on plunger velocity and material properties. Energy required to create unit of fracture area at fracture initiation (dynamic analogue of Griffith surface energy) was evaluated and was found to be an order of magnitude higher as comparing to its static value.

  17. Fracture and fatigue properties of Mo-Mo{sub 3}Si-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} refractory intermetallic alloys at ambient to elevated temperatures (25-1300 degrees Centigrade)

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Heeman; Schneibel, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2002-08-01

    The need for structural materials with high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance coupled with adequate lower-temperature toughness for potential use at temperatures above {approx} 1000 degrees C has remained a persistent challenge in materials science. In this work, one promising class of intermetallic alloys is examined, namely boron-containing molybdenum silicides, with compositions in the range Mo (bal), 12-17 at. percentSi, 8.5 at. percentB, processed using both ingot (I/M) and powder (P/M) metallurgy methods. Specifically, the oxidation (''pesting''), fracture toughness and fatigue-crack propagation resistance of four such alloys, which consisted of {approx}21 to 38 vol. percent a-Mo phase in an intermetallic matrix of Mo3Si and Mo5SiB2 (T2), were characterized at temperatures between 25 degrees and 1300 degrees C. The boron additions were found to confer superior ''pest'' resistance (at 400 degrees to 900 degrees C) as compared to unmodified molybdenum silicides, such as Mo5Si3. Moreover , although the fracture and fatigue properties of the finer-scale P/M alloys were only marginally better than those of MoSi2, for the I/M processed microstructures with coarse distributions of the a-Mo phase, fracture toughness properties were far superior, rising from values above 7 MPa sqrt m at ambient temperatures to almost 12 MPa sqrt m at 1300 degrees C.

  18. Optimal scaling in ductile fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokoua Djodom, Landry

    This work is concerned with the derivation of optimal scaling laws, in the sense of matching lower and upper bounds on the energy, for a solid undergoing ductile fracture. The specific problem considered concerns a material sample in the form of an infinite slab of finite thickness subjected to prescribed opening displacements on its two surfaces. The solid is assumed to obey deformation-theory of plasticity and, in order to further simplify the analysis, we assume isotropic rigid-plastic deformations with zero plastic spin. When hardening exponents are given values consistent with observation, the energy is found to exhibit sublinear growth. We regularize the energy through the addition of nonlocal energy terms of the strain-gradient plasticity type. This nonlocal regularization has the effect of introducing an intrinsic length scale into the energy. We also put forth a physical argument that identifies the intrinsic length and suggests a linear growth of the nonlocal energy. Under these assumptions, ductile fracture emerges as the net result of two competing effects: whereas the sublinear growth of the local energy promotes localization of deformation to failure planes, the nonlocal regularization stabilizes this process, thus resulting in an orderly progression towards failure and a well-defined specific fracture energy. The optimal scaling laws derived here show that ductile fracture results from localization of deformations to void sheets, and that it requires a well-defined energy per unit fracture area. In particular, fractal modes of fracture are ruled out under the assumptions of the analysis. The optimal scaling laws additionally show that ductile fracture is cohesive in nature, i.e., it obeys a well-defined relation between tractions and opening displacements. Finally, the scaling laws supply a link between micromechanical properties and macroscopic fracture properties. In particular, they reveal the relative roles that surface energy and microplasticity

  19. Experimental and Analytical Research on Fracture Processes in ROck

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert H.. Einstein; Jay Miller; Bruno Silva

    2009-02-27

    Experimental studies on fracture propagation and coalescence were conducted which together with previous tests by this group on gypsum and marble, provide information on fracturing. Specifically, different fracture geometries wsere tested, which together with the different material properties will provide the basis for analytical/numerical modeling. INitial steps on the models were made as were initial investigations on the effect of pressurized water on fracture coalescence.

  20. Analysis of well test data---Application of probabilistic models to infer hydraulic properties of fractures. [Contains list of standardized terminology or nomenclatue used in statistical models

    SciTech Connect

    Osnes, J.D. ); Winberg, A.; Andersson, J.E.; Larsson, N.A. )

    1991-09-27

    Statistical and probabilistic methods for estimating the probability that a fracture is nonconductive (or equivalently, the conductive-fracture frequency) and the distribution of the transmissivities of conductive fractures from transmissivity measurements made in single-hole injection (well) tests were developed. These methods were applied to a database consisting of over 1,000 measurements made in nearly 25 km of borehole at five sites in Sweden. The depths of the measurements ranged from near the surface to over 600-m deep, and packer spacings of 20- and 25-m were used. A probabilistic model that describes the distribution of a series of transmissivity measurements was derived. When the parameters of this model were estimated using maximum likelihood estimators, the resulting estimated distributions generally fit the cumulative histograms of the transmissivity measurements very well. Further, estimates of the mean transmissivity of conductive fractures based on the maximum likelihood estimates of the model's parameters were reasonable, both in magnitude and in trend, with respect to depth. The estimates of the conductive fracture probability were generated in the range of 0.5--5.0 percent, with the higher values at shallow depths and with increasingly smaller values as depth increased. An estimation procedure based on the probabilistic model and the maximum likelihood estimators of its parameters was recommended. Some guidelines regarding the design of injection test programs were drawn from the recommended estimation procedure and the parameter estimates based on the Swedish data. 24 refs., 12 figs., 14 tabs.

  1. Optimized Design and Use of Induced Complex Fractures in Horizontal Wellbores of Tight Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, F. H.; Guo, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    Multistage hydraulic fracturing is being increasing use in the establishment of horizontal wells in tight gas reservoirs. Connecting hydraulic fractures to natural and stress-induced fractures can further improve well productivity. This paper investigates the fracture treatment design issues involved in the establishment of horizontal wellbores, including the effects of geologic heterogeneity, perforation parameters, fracturing patterns, and construction parameters on stress anisotropy during hydraulic fracturing and on natural fractures during hydraulic fracture propagation. The extent of stress reversal and reorientation was calculated for fractures induced by the creation of one or more propped fractures. The effects of stress on alternate and sequential fracturing horizontal well and on the reservoir's mechanical properties, including the spatial extent of stress reorientation caused by the opening of fractures, were assessed and quantified. Alternate sequencing of transverse fractures was found to be an effective means of enhancing natural fracture stimulation by allowing fractures to undergo less stress contrast during propagation. The goal of this paper was to present a new approach to design that optimizes fracturing in a horizontal wellbore from the perspectives of both rock mechanics and fluid production. The new design is a modified version of alternate fracturing, where the fracture-initiation sequence was controlled by perforation parameters with a staggered pattern within a horizontal wellbore. Results demonstrated that the modified alternate fracturing performed better than original sequence fracturing and that this was because it increased the contact area and promoted more gas production in completed wells.

  2. Hydrogen fracture toughness tester completion

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Michael J.

    2015-09-30

    The Hydrogen Fracture Toughness Tester (HFTT) is a mechanical testing machine designed for conducting fracture mechanics tests on materials in high-pressure hydrogen gas. The tester is needed for evaluating the effects of hydrogen on the cracking properties of tritium reservoir materials. It consists of an Instron Model 8862 Electromechanical Test Frame; an Autoclave Engineering Pressure Vessel, an Electric Potential Drop Crack Length Measurement System, associated computer control and data acquisition systems, and a high-pressure hydrogen gas manifold and handling system.

  3. Probabilistic Simulation for Nanocomposite Fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2010-01-01

    A unique probabilistic theory is described to predict the uniaxial strengths and fracture properties of nanocomposites. The simulation is based on composite micromechanics with progressive substructuring down to a nanoscale slice of a nanofiber where all the governing equations are formulated. These equations have been programmed in a computer code. That computer code is used to simulate uniaxial strengths and fracture of a nanofiber laminate. The results are presented graphically and discussed with respect to their practical significance. These results show smooth distributions from low probability to high.

  4. Effect of low temperature on fatigue and fracture properties of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn(ELI) for use in engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, J. T.; Witzell, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the characteristics of the Ti-5Al-2.5Sn (ELI) alloy used in a fuel pump impeller at cryogenic temperatures. Tension, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack propagation data were collected determining the effect of frequency and load ratio on crack propagation. The results revealed that tensile strength increased significantly at 20 K compared to room temperature and fracture toughness was reduced at cryogenic temperatures. The fatigue crack growth rate was not sensitive to experimental conditions and there were only minimal crack orientation effects. Different frequencies produced no effect. At various temperatures and frequencies a load ratio increase resulted in higher crack growth rates. At low stress intensity levels the fatigue rate for both temperatures was the same; however, at high stress intensity levels the crack growth rate at 20 K increased because of the decrease in fracture toughness. The results correlated well with previous data.

  5. An investigation of fracture toughness, fatigue-crack growth, sustained-load flaw growth, and impact properties of three pressure vessel steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, C. M.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Lewis, P. E.

    1975-01-01

    The elastic fracture toughness of the three steels is shown to not decrease significantly with decreasing temperature from room temperature to about 244 K (-20 F.). The elastic fracture toughness of the three steels increased with increasing specimen width and thickness. The fatigue-crack-growth data for all three steels fall into relatively narrow scatter bands on plots of rate against stress-intensity range. An equation is shown to predict the upper bounds of the scatter bands reasonably well. Charpy impact energies decreased with decreasing temperature in the nominal temperature range from room temperature to 244 K (-20 F). The nil-ductility temperatures of the steels are discussed.

  6. [Periprosthetic Acetabulum Fractures].

    PubMed

    Schreiner, A J; Stuby, F; de Zwart, P M; Ochs, B G

    2016-12-01

    In contrast to periprosthetic fractures of the femur, periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are rare complications - both primary fractures and fractures in revision surgery. This topic is largely under-reported in the literature; there are a few case reports and no long term results. Due to an increase in life expectancy, the level of patients' activity and the number of primary joint replacements, one has to expect a rise in periprosthetic complications in general and periprosthetic acetabular fractures in particular. This kind of fracture can be intra-, peri- or postoperative. Intraoperative fractures are especially associated with insertion of cementless press-fit acetabular components or revision surgery. Postoperative periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are usually related to osteolysis, for example, due to polyethylene wear. There are also traumatic fractures and fractures missed intraoperatively that lead to some kind of insufficiency fracture. Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are treated conservatively if the implant is stable and the fracture is not dislocated. If surgery is needed, there are many possible different surgical techniques and challenging approaches. That is why periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum should be treated by experts in pelvic surgery as well as revision arthroplasty and the features specific to the patient, fracture and prosthetic must always be considered.

  7. A Spatial Clustering Approach for Stochastic Fracture Network Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifollahi, S.; Dowd, P. A.; Xu, C.; Fadakar, A. Y.

    2014-07-01

    Fracture network modelling plays an important role in many application areas in which the behaviour of a rock mass is of interest. These areas include mining, civil, petroleum, water and environmental engineering and geothermal systems modelling. The aim is to model the fractured rock to assess fluid flow or the stability of rock blocks. One important step in fracture network modelling is to estimate the number of fractures and the properties of individual fractures such as their size and orientation. Due to the lack of data and the complexity of the problem, there are significant uncertainties associated with fracture network modelling in practice. Our primary interest is the modelling of fracture networks in geothermal systems and, in this paper, we propose a general stochastic approach to fracture network modelling for this application. We focus on using the seismic point cloud detected during the fracture stimulation of a hot dry rock reservoir to create an enhanced geothermal system; these seismic points are the conditioning data in the modelling process. The seismic points can be used to estimate the geographical extent of the reservoir, the amount of fracturing and the detailed geometries of fractures within the reservoir. The objective is to determine a fracture model from the conditioning data by minimizing the sum of the distances of the points from the fitted fracture model. Fractures are represented as line segments connecting two points in two-dimensional applications or as ellipses in three-dimensional (3D) cases. The novelty of our model is twofold: (1) it comprises a comprehensive fracture modification scheme based on simulated annealing and (2) it introduces new spatial approaches, a goodness-of-fit measure for the fitted fracture model, a measure for fracture similarity and a clustering technique for proposing a locally optimal solution for fracture parameters. We use a simulated dataset to demonstrate the application of the proposed approach

  8. Paratrooper's Ankle Fracture: Posterior Malleolar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki Won; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Seuk; Cho, Hun Ki; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the frequency and types of ankle fractures that frequently occur during parachute landings of special operation unit personnel and analyzed the causes. Methods Fifty-six members of the special force brigade of the military who had sustained ankle fractures during parachute landings between January 2005 and April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The injury sites and fracture sites were identified and the fracture types were categorized by the Lauge-Hansen and Weber classifications. Follow-up surveys were performed with respect to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury activity. Results The patients were all males with a mean age of 23.6 years. There were 28 right and 28 left ankle fractures. Twenty-two patients had simple fractures and 34 patients had comminuted fractures. The average number of injury and fractures sites per person was 2.07 (116 injuries including a syndesmosis injury and a deltoid injury) and 1.75 (98 fracture sites), respectively. Twenty-three cases (41.07%) were accompanied by posterior malleolar fractures. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery; of these, 30 had plate internal fixations. Weber type A, B, and C fractures were found in 4, 38, and 14 cases, respectively. Based on the Lauge-Hansen classification, supination-external rotation injuries were found in 20 cases, supination-adduction injuries in 22 cases, pronation-external rotation injuries in 11 cases, tibiofibular fractures in 2 cases, and simple medial malleolar fractures in 2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 23.8 months, and the average follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 85.42. Forty-five patients (80.36%) reported excellent or good satisfaction with the outcome. Conclusions Posterior malleolar fractures occurred in 41.07% of ankle fractures sustained in parachute landings. Because most of the ankle fractures in parachute injuries were

  9. FRACGEN™ Stochastically Generates Fracture Networks Consistent with Data

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; McKoy, M.L.; Boyle, E.J.

    2006-10-01

    FRACGEN(tm) generates fracture networks for highly fractured reservoirs (< 60,000 fractures) consistent with field data (e.g., outcrop data, fmi and other logs) and a geologist’s intuition. It uses four Boolean models of increasing complexity through a Monte Carlo process that samples statistical distributions for various network attributes of each fracture set as found from the data. Three models account for hierarchical relations among fracture sets, and two generate fracture swarming. Termination/intersection frequencies may be controlled implicitly or explicitly. The code also is being upgraded to allow specification of fractal properties for the fracture network. FRACGEN provides an output file that specifies length, orientation, and effective aperture for each fracture. This output file can be used by a unique reservoir engineering code, NFFLOW, to perform reservoir engineering studies for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. This presentation describes use of FRACGEN to describe a reservoir in the Oriskany Sandstone in West Virginia.

  10. [Fractures of the forefoot].

    PubMed

    Richter, M

    2011-10-01

    Fractures of the forefoot are common and comprise approximately two thirds of all foot fractures. Forefoot fractures are caused by direct impact or the effect of indirect force. The forces exerted can range from repetitive minor load (stress fractures) to massive destructive forces (complex trauma). The clinical course in forefoot fractures is typically more favourable than in fractures of the mid- and hindfoot. The incidence of complications like infection or pseudarthrosis is low. Exceptions are rare fractures of the proximal shaft of the fifth metatarsal and the sesamoids with higher pseudarthrosis rates. Malunited metatarsal fractures can cause painful conditions that should even be treated operatively. Differences in structure and function of the different forefoot areas and specific fracture types require an adapted management of these special injuries.

  11. Management of metacarpal fractures.

    PubMed

    McNemar, Thomas B; Howell, Julianne Wright; Chang, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Fractures of the hand are the most common fractures of the human skeleton. Metacarpal fractures account for 30% to 50% of all of hand fractures. The mechanisms of these injuries vary from axial loading forces to direct blows to the dorsal hand. Resulting deformities include malrotation, angulation, and shortening. Treatment modalities vary from nonoperative reduction to open reduction and internal fixation. The treatment algorithm is guided by the location of the fracture, the stability of the fracture, and the resultant deformity. Operative procedures, although they may lead to excellent radiographic reduction of fractures, often lead to debilitating stiffness from the inflammatory reaction of the surgical procedure. Operative fixation must be employed judiciously and offered only when confident that non-operative therapy can be improved on with operative intervention. This article reviews the various types of metacarpal fractures, with the treatment options available for each fracture. The indications for each treatment modality, postoperative care, and rehabilitation are presented.

  12. Fractal analysis of fracture surfaces in ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wasen, J.; Heier, E.; Hansson, T.

    1998-02-13

    Fracture processes in metallic and ceramic systems do generally have, on the microscale, a stochastic (irregular) character resulting in an irregular fracture surface geometry. This irregularity of the fracture surface reflects the multiplicity of glide and cleavage planes as well as the variations in grain orientations in polycrystalline materials. Considerable amounts of experimental data from fracture surfaces demonstrate this kind of fracture behavior in a clear manner. This fact has inspired several investigators in the literature to apply fractal analysis on fracture surface in order to be able to interpret the fracture surface geometry in microstructural terms. Further, more or less successful attempts to connect the fractal properties of the fracture surface to the mechanical behavior of materials have been made. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate relations between geometrical parameters (the fractal dimension and the angular properties) of fracture surfaces in various ceramic materials and to study the relation between the fractal properties of the fracture surface and the fracture toughness of the materials.

  13. On material fracture criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremnev, L. S.

    2017-01-01

    Based on the nonlinear mechanics of material fracture, a model of the fracture of materials with actual (discrete) structures has been constructed. The model is supported by proofs that crack resistance K 1 c and fracture toughness G 1 c obtained from the energy conservation law without using the assumptions adopted in the linear material fracture mechanics serve as the force and energy criteria in the nonlinear fracture mechanics. It has been shown that energy criterion G 1 c in the nonlinear mechanics is much greater than G 1 c in the linear fracture mechanics.

  14. Fracture and Medium Modeling, by Analizing Hidraulic Fracturing Induced Microseismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Alba, S.; Vargas Jiménez, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is an essential technology for most unconventional hydrocarbon resources and many conventional ones as well. The primary limitation on the improvement and optimization of the fracturing process is the minimal access to observe the behavior of the fracture in the subsurface. Without direct observational evidence, hypothetical mechanisms must be assumed and then tested for their validity with indirect information such as wellbore measurements, indirect production and pressure behavior. One of the most important sources of information today is the relation made between micro seismic source mechanisms and fracture behavior. Hydraulic fractures induce some level of micro seismicity when the stress conditions in the Earth are altered by changes in stress during the operations. The result is the sudden movement between rock elements and the radiation of both compressional and shear energy in a seismic range that can be detected and recorded with sensitive receivers. The objective of this work is to provide reasonable information when applying inversion methods in order to estimate the vertical and horizontal spatial heterogeneities in medium and energy radiation distribution of microseisms while fracking operations. The method consist in record microseisms at a previous lineal array of stations (triaxial accelerometers) which are located close to the source coordinates and cover the area of study. The analysis clarify some ideas about what information can be gained from the micro seismic source data and according to the obtained results, what kind of comparisons and associations might be done to evaluate the fracking performance operation. Non uniformities in medium such as faults would be revealed by interpreted scattering coefficients. Fracture properties like distance, velocity and orientation would be also determined by analyzing energy radiation.

  15. Fracture Interface Waves in an Anisotropic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Shao, S.; Abell, B.

    2011-12-01

    fracture was oriented perpendicularly to the layers, at low stress, the sample appeared almost isotropic. When the fracture was oriented parallel to the layers, the observed shear wave velocity anisotropy increased at low stresses as the shear wave (measured perpendicular to the fracture) traveled with a velocity at or near the Rayleigh velocity. Rock masses often have competing textural and structural properties that affect interpretation of the presence of fractures. For instance, shear wave energy can couple completely into fracture guided-modes. The existence of structural guided modes, such as fracture interface waves, depends on the frequency of the signal and the specific stiffness of the fracture, which is stress sensitive. Therefore, interpretation of the presence of fractures in isotropic or anisotropic media can be unambiguously interpreted if measurements are made as a function of stress, which eliminates many fracture-generated discreet modes. Acknowledgment: The authors wish to acknowledge support of this work by the Geosciences Research Program, Office of Basic Energy Sciences US Department of Energy (DE-FG02-09ER16022).

  16. On the scale-invariance of fractures and fracture patterns in the Transscandinavian Igneous Belt, Southeast Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumbholz, M.; Burchardt, S.; Tanner, D. C.; Koyi, H.

    2012-04-01

    Fracture dimensions and their spatial distribution are of primary importance in many fields of applied geology, e.g. they determine the quality of sites for the long-term storage of hazardous waste and fractured reservoirs for e.g. hydrocarbons, CO2 sequestration, and geothermal energy. Unfortunately, the observation of fracture systems is commonly limited by the outcrop size or the resolution of the measuring method. Fractures and fracture properties are often assumed to be scale-invariant, albeit within a certain range. Therefore, knowing the fractal dimension of fracture properties allows conclusions to be drawn from one particular scale to another. We investigated fracture trace lengths and patterns at map-, outcrop- and handspecimen scale, covering a large area in the Transscandinavian Igneous Belt. The dataset comprises 11 fracture maps at three different scales containing 8641 fracture trace lengths. Analysis of the fracture trace lengths was carried out using cumulative frequency distributions, while the fracture patterns were analysed with the standard box-counting technique. Combining the three analysed scales, our results indicate that the fracture trace lengths can be considered to be scale-invariant with a fractal dimension of about 1.8. In contrast, the fractal dimension at one particular scale could not be determined, probably due to censoring and truncation effects. Analyses with the box-counting method show that the fracture patterns, in contrast to fracture trace lengths, are not scale-invariant. The box-counting dimension increases with increasing scale. It is a measure of the complexity and maturity of a fracture system, which increases with scale. Consequently, the complexity of fracture pattern is scale-variant.

  17. Numerical Investigation of Fracture Propagation in Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, P.; Borowski, E.; Major, J. R.; Eichhubl, P.

    2015-12-01

    Fracture in geomaterials is a critical behavior that affects the long-term structural response of geosystems. The processes involving fracture initiation and growth in rocks often span broad time scales and size scales, contributing to the complexity of these problems. To better understand fracture behavior, the authors propose an initial investigation comparing the fracture testing techniques of notched three-point bending (N3PB), short rod (SR), and double torsion (DT) on geomaterials using computational analysis. Linear softening cohesive fracture modeling (LCFM) was applied using ABAQUS to computationally simulate the three experimental set-ups. By applying material properties obtained experimentally, these simulations are intended to predict single-trace fracture growth. The advantages and limitations of the three testing techniques were considered for application to subcritical fracture propagation taking into account the accuracy of constraints, load applications, and modes of fracture. This work is supported as part of the Geomechanics of CO2 Reservoir Seals, a DOE-NETL funded under Award Number DE-FOA-0001037. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Simulation of Hydraulic and Natural Fracture Interaction Using a Coupled DFN-DEM Model

    SciTech Connect

    J. Zhou; H. Huang; M. Deo

    2016-03-01

    The presence of natural fractures will usually result in a complex fracture network due to the interactions between hydraulic and natural fracture. The reactivation of natural fractures can generally provide additional flow paths from formation to wellbore which play a crucial role in improving the hydrocarbon recovery in these ultra-low permeability reservoir. Thus, accurate description of the geometry of discrete fractures and bedding is highly desired for accurate flow and production predictions. Compared to conventional continuum models that implicitly represent the discrete feature, Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) models could realistically model the connectivity of discontinuities at both reservoir scale and well scale. In this work, a new hybrid numerical model that couples Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) and Dual-Lattice Discrete Element Method (DL-DEM) is proposed to investigate the interaction between hydraulic fracture and natural fractures. Based on the proposed model, the effects of natural fracture orientation, density and injection properties on hydraulic-natural fractures interaction are investigated.

  19. Towards new material biomarkers for fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, C; Clement, J; Dicken, A; Evans, J P O; Lyburn, I; Martin, R M; Rogers, K; Stone, N; Zioupos, P

    2016-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a prevalent bone condition, characterised by low bone mass and increased fracture risk. Currently, the gold standard for identifying osteoporosis and increased fracture risk is through quantification of bone mineral density (BMD) using dual energy X-ray absorption (DEXA). However, the risk of osteoporotic fracture is determined collectively by bone mass, architecture and physicochemistry of the mineral composite building blocks. Thus DEXA scans alone inevitably fail to fully discriminate individuals who will suffer a fragility fracture. This study examines trabecular bone at both ultrastructure and microarchitectural levels to provide a detailed material view of bone, and therefore provides a more comprehensive explanation of osteoporotic fracture risk. Physicochemical characterisation obtained through X-ray diffraction and infrared analysis indicated significant differences in apatite crystal chemistry and nanostructure between fracture and non-fracture groups. Further, this study, through considering the potential correlations between the chemical biomarkers and microarchitectural properties of trabecular bone, has investigated the relationship between bone mechanical properties (e.g. fragility) and physicochemical material features.

  20. Fracture mechanism of borated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.Y.; Soliman, S.E.; Baratta, A.J.; Balliett, T.A.

    2000-05-01

    The mechanical properties and fracture mechanism of irradiated and unirradiated boron containing Type 304 stainless steel are studied. Four different batches with different boron weight percentages are used. One of these batches was manufactured by a conventional wrought technique, while the others were manufactured by a powder metallurgy technique. The irradiated specimens were subjected to a fluence level of 5 x 10{sup 19} or 1 {times} 10{sup 21} n/m{sup 2}. The mechanical and fracture tests were performed at temperatures of 233, 298, and 533 K. No significant effects on the mechanical properties or fracture behavior were observed as a result of neutron irradiation and/or temperature. The ductility and toughness of the borated steel were found to decrease with increasing boron content. The effect of boride on void nucleation and linkage was found to play an important role in the fracture behavior of borated steel.

  1. Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000553.htm Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... that connect your ankle to your toes. A stress fracture is a break in the bone that ...

  2. Infant skull fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Skull fractures may occur with head injuries. Although the skull is both tough and resilient and provides excellent ... or blow can result in fracture of the skull and may be accompanied by injury to the ...

  3. Rib fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000539.htm Rib fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A rib fracture is a crack or break in one or ...

  4. Forearm Fractures in Children

    MedlinePlus

    .org Forearm Fractures in Children The forearm is the part of the arm between the wrist and the elbow. It is ... two bones: the radius and the ulna. Forearm fractures are common in childhood, accounting for more than ...

  5. Pediatric Thighbone (Femur) Fracture

    MedlinePlus

    .org Thighbone (Femur) Fractures In Children Page ( 1 ) The thighbone (femur) is the largest and strongest bone in the body. It can break ... Cause Statistics The most common cause of thighbone fractures in infants under 1 year old is child ...

  6. Nasal fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A nasal fracture is a break in the bone over the ridge of the nose. It usually results from a blunt ... and is one of the most common facial fracture. Symptoms of a broken nose include pain, blood ...

  7. Bone fracture repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100077.htm Bone fracture repair - series—Indications To use the sharing features ... Go to slide 4 out of 4 Overview Fractures of the bones are classified in a number ...

  8. Femur fracture repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000166.htm Femur fracture repair - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had a fracture (break) in the femur in your leg. It ...

  9. Lisfranc (Midfoot) Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... that disrupts multiple different joints and includes multiple fractures. Lisfranc injuries tend to damage the cartilage of ... include ligament strains and tears, as well as fractures and dislocations of bone (far right). (Le ) This ...

  10. Growth Plate Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    .org Growth Plate Fractures Page ( 1 ) The bones of children and adults share many of the same risks for injury. But because they ... to a unique injury called a growth plate fracture. Growth plates are areas of cartilage located near ...

  11. Hip fracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck fracture repair; Trochanteric fracture repair; Hip pinning surgery; Osteoarthritis-hip ... You may receive general anesthesia before this surgery. This means ... spinal anesthesia. With this kind of anesthesia, medicine is ...

  12. Percolation Theory and Modern Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, J. Q.; Turcotte, D. L.; Rundle, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    During the past few years, we have been developing a percolation model for fracking. This model provides a powerful tool for understanding the growth and properties of the complex fracture networks generated during a modern high volume hydraulic fracture stimulations of tight shale reservoirs. The model can also be used to understand the interaction between the growing fracture network and natural reservoir features such as joint sets and faults. Additionally, the model produces a power-law distribution of bursts which can easily be compared to observed microseismicity.

  13. Orbital fractures: a review

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jeffrey M; Glavas, Ioannis P

    2011-01-01

    This review of orbital fractures has three goals: 1) to understand the clinically relevant orbital anatomy with regard to periorbital trauma and orbital fractures, 2) to explain how to assess and examine a patient after periorbital trauma, and 3) to understand the medical and surgical management of orbital fractures. The article aims to summarize the evaluation and management of commonly encountered orbital fractures from the ophthalmologic perspective and to provide an overview for all practicing ophthalmologists and ophthalmologists in training. PMID:21339801

  14. [Epidemiological view of fracture risk].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2010-09-01

    Incidence of hip fracture increases exponentially with age. Women had two times higher hip fracture incidence than men. Major risk factors for the hip fracture are age, sex, bone mineral density, and previous fracture and others, but each risk factor contributes differently to development of the fracture by sites. Factors related to fall are important role in developing hip fracture.

  15. [Osteoporosis and Colles' fracture].

    PubMed

    Hindsø, K; Lauritzen, J B

    2001-10-01

    We describe the connection between osteoporosis and Colles' fractures of the distal radius from an epidemiological and aetiological point of view. In addition, the value of these fractures as markers of osteoporosis and future risk of fracture is assessed. Several studies have clearly shown an epidemiological association between osteoporosis and fractures of the distal radius, with the association strongest for women up to 65 years of age and for osteoporosis located in the forearm. The association weakens for other locations and for older women. Osteoporosis may have some aetiologic significance for the development of Colles' fractures, but several extraskeletal factors are of equal or further importance. The occurrence of a Colles' fracture in the first 10-15 years after the postmenopause indicates an increased relative risk of sustaining another fracture in the future. However the relative risk approaches one after a few years and, because of the comparatively low absolute risk in this age-group, Colles' fracture as a risk factor contributes little to an assessment of the lifetime fracture risk. In a few longitudinal studies, Colles' fractures could not predict the long-term risk of osteoporosis. The presence of a Colles' fracture should lead to considerations concerning the skeletal and extraskeletal causes of the fracture for the purpose of initiating preventive and therapeutic measures.

  16. Elbow fractures and dislocations.

    PubMed

    Little, Kevin J

    2014-07-01

    Elbow fractures are common in pediatric patients. Most injuries to the pediatric elbow are stable and require simple immobilization; however, more severe fractures can occur, often requiring operative stabilization and/or close monitoring. This article highlights the common fractures and dislocations about the pediatric elbow and discusses the history, evaluation, and treatment options for specific injuries.

  17. Poroelastic modeling of fracture-seismic wave interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Seiji

    2008-08-15

    Rock containing a compliant, fluid-filled fracture can be viewed as one case of heterogeneous poroelastic media. When this fracture is subjected to seismic waves, a strong contrast in the elastic stiffness between the fracture itself and the background can result in enhanced grain-scale local fluid flow. Because this flow--relaxing the pressure building up within the fracture--can increase the dynamic compliance of the fracture and change energy dissipation (attenuation), the scattering of seismic waves can be enhanced. Previously, for a flat, infinite fracture, we derived poroelastic seismic boundary conditions that describe the relationship between a finite jump in the stress and displacement across a fracture, expressed as a function of the stress and displacement at the boundaries. In this paper, we use these boundary conditions to determine frequency-dependent seismic wave transmission and reflection coefficients. Fluid-filled fractures with a range of mechanical and hydraulic properties are examined. From parametric studies, we found that the hydraulic permeability of a fracture fully saturated with water has little impact on seismic wave scattering. In contrast, the seismic response of a partially water-saturated fracture and a heterogeneous fracture filled with compliant liquid (e.g., supercritical CO{sub 2}) depended on the fracture permeability.

  18. Fracture Permeability and Specific Stiffness Relations Across Varying Fracture Roughness and Aperture Correlation Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Cardenas, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    The coupling between hydraulic and mechanical properties of porous and fractured geologic media are critical for many geophysical processes and practical applications. Thus, the prediction of linkage between these properties are broadly important. Here we present a parameterized model that links fracture permeability and specific stiffness with scaling coefficients dependent on fracture roughness and correlation length. The model was developed empirically from results of modeling the deformation and flow through synthetic fractures with aperture fields that follow a normal distribution. The fractures were subjected to increasing normal stress and deformed follow an elastic model. Specific stiffness was directly quantified from these numerical experiments with resultant displacement. Moreover, intrinsic permeability was estimated through calculation of the local flow field while considering effects of local fracture roughness and tortuosity through the modified Local Cubic Law. We found that fracture displacement increases non-linearly with applied normal stress, while specific stiffness is expectedly proportional to normal stress. Most importantly, permeability decreases exponentially with increasing specific stiffness following different deformation paths depending mainly on fracture roughness rather than correlation length. Based on the calculated permeability and specific stiffness, we propose an empirical model that predicts a clustered linkage between specific stiffness and permeability. The model can capture the transition from effective medium to percolation flow regimes with increasing specific stiffness.

  19. Scratching as a Fracture Process: From Butter to Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akono, A.-T.; Reis, P. M.; Ulm, F.-J.

    2011-05-01

    We present results of a hybrid experimental and theoretical investigation of the fracture scaling in scratch tests and show that scratching is a fracture dominated process. Validated for paraffin wax, cement paste, Jurassic limestone and steel, we derive a model that provides a quantitative means to relate quantities measured in scratch tests to fracture properties of materials at multiple scales. The scalability of scratching for different probes and depths opens new venues towards miniaturization of our technique, to extract fracture properties of materials at even smaller length scales.

  20. Reactivation of a Propped Hydraulic Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvaramini, E.; Garagash, D.

    2014-12-01

    The problem of massive fluid injection into a pre-existing fracture has many applications in petroleum industry including underground liquid waste disposal and waterflooding to increase recovery from a hydrocarbon reservoir. Understanding the conditions leading to the re-activation of pre-existing fractures and ensuing propagation is critical for a successful injection project design, and it may also help to mitigate potential environmental hazards, such as contamination of underground aquifers and induced seismicity. The problem of injection of a low viscosity fluid into a permeable formation can be distinguished from conventional hydraulic fracture by the mechanism of fluid leak-off. In conventional fracturing, high viscosity and cake building properties of injected fluid limit leak-off to a 1-D boundary layer incasing the crack. In the case of injection of low viscosity fluid into a fracture, leak-off and related pore fluid diffusion will take place over wider range of scales, from 1-D to 2 or 3-D. We consider a pre-existing stationary propped hydraulic fracture with constrained height into which a fluid is injected under constant flow rate. Although the net effective stress on the crack is initially compressive, the proppant keeps the crack open. It is worthwhile to note that during injection and related pressurization of a propped crack, the fracture breakdown is to be achieved prior to the fracture re-opening. Therefore, the effect of the change of the propped fracture storage on the pressurization dynamics can be neglected. The objective of this work is to study the transient pressurization and the onset of the propagation for a propped fracture. To the end, we formulate and solve a general problem of injection into a fracture accounting for viscous dissipation (i.e. non-uniform pressure distribution). We quantify how the fracture breakdown condition depends upon the rock and fluid properties, the in-situ stress and the fluid injection rate. We also

  1. A model for predicting the dynamic fracture and impact fracture resistance of tough thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Leevers, P.S.; Greenshields, C.J.

    1995-11-01

    Design against rapid crack propagation (RCP) in a pipeline requires data for the dynamic fracture resistance of its material, but most of the data available is for resistance to impact crack initiation. These properties are not simply related, and in touch thermoplastics impact fracture resistance is sensitive to impact speed and specimen geometry as well as to temperature tests. Here, a simple mechanism of crack-tip cohesive zone failure is applied to develop models of both failure modes. Impact and dynamic fracture properties of two pipe grade polyethylenes are correctly predicted from more basic properties; and their use in predicting the critical pressure for RCP failure of notched, water pressurized pipe is compared. The model supports the view that the use of impact fracture test data for quantitative design against RCP is intrinsically unsound.

  2. Constitutive modeling of fracture waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnyansky, A. D.; Romensky, E. I.; Bourne, N. K.

    2003-02-01

    A fracture wave (FW) in a brittle material is a narrow transition region (border) of a continuous fracture zone, which may be associated with the damage accumulation process initiated by propagation of shock waves. In multidimensional structures the fracture wave may behave in an unusual way. The high-speed photography of penetration of a borosilicate (Pyrex) glass block [N. K. Bourne, L. Forde, and J. E. Field, Proc. SPIE 2869, 626 (1997)] shows a visible fracture zone with an apparent flat front although the projectile is a hemispherically nosed rod. A strain-rate-sensitive model is being developed and employed for analysis of the role of the complex stress state and kinetic description of the damage accumulation to describe the process of the impact. Numerical analysis is conducted with a one-dimensional wave propagation code employing the model and with the LS-DYNA2D hydrocode in which the model has been implemented. The analysis demonstrates that (i) the second (plastic) shock wave is superseded by quicker FW relaxing stress behind the elastic precursor, and (ii) the FW front flattening is apparently caused by the change in the acoustic directional properties. This change is associated with the phase-like transition due to the damage accumulation within the FW. In particular, the FW transition separates a highly anisotropic zone of material characterized acoustically by longitudinal and shear waves in front of the FW from a nearly isotropic region of the material characterized only by bulk waves behind the FW.

  3. Proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    Price, Matthew C; Horn, Pamela L; Latshaw, James C

    2013-01-01

    Proximal humerus fractures are among the most common fractures associated with osteoporosis. With an aging population, incidence of these fractures will only increase. The proximal humerus not only forms the lateral portion of the shoulder articulation but also has significant associations with musculoskeletal and neurovascular structures. As a result, fractures of the proximal humerus can significantly impact not only the function of the shoulder joint, but the health and function of the entire upper extremity as well. Understanding of these fractures, the management options, and associated nursing care, can help reduce morbidity rate and improve functional outcomes.

  4. Stress fractures in runners.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Frank; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Provencher, Matthew T

    2012-04-01

    Stress fractures are a relatively common entity in athletes, in particular, runners. Physicians and health care providers should maintain a high index of suspicion for stress fractures in runners presenting with insidious onset of focal bone tenderness associated with recent changes in training intensity or regimen. It is particularly important to recognize “high-risk” fractures, as these are associated with an increased risk of complication. A patient with confirmed radiographic evidence of a high-risk stress fracture should be evaluated by an orthopedic surgeon. Runners may benefit from orthotics, cushioned sneakers, interval training, and vitamin/calcium supplementation as a means of stress fracture prevention.

  5. Fracture toughness of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents a study to determine the fracture toughness and to characterize fracture modes of silicon as a function of the orientation of single-crystal and polycrystalline material. It is shown that bar specimens cracked by Knoop microhardness indentation and tested to fracture under four-point bending at room temperature were used to determine the fracture toughness values. It is found that the lowest fracture toughness value of single crystal silicon was 0.82 MN/m to the 3/2 in the 111 plane type orientation, although the difference in values in the 111, 110, and 100 planes was small.

  6. [Rarely seen fractures].

    PubMed

    Subaşi, M; Kapukaya, A; Kesemenli, C; Coban, V

    2001-10-01

    Rarely seen fractures are presented in this study. One case was a calcaneal spur, 2 cases osteochondroma pedicule fractures and talus posteromedial tubercle fracture due to direct trauma. Calcaneal spur and osteochondromas were removed surgically and posteromedial tubercle was treated by short-leg cast immobilization. In conclusion, we think that fractures of osteochondroma and calcaneal spur may be treated by surgical removal which do not cause any functional disorders after this operation, but fractures like the talus posteromedial tubercle should be treated conservatively by short-leg immobilization in the early period.

  7. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-06-15

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) quantifying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture, and (c) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress on the nature of the rock and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual descriptions of the process are shown in the report while detailed analysis of the behavior of the distribution of fracture aperture is in progress. Both extensional and shear fractures are being considered. The initial multi-phase flow tests were done in extensional fractures. Several rock samples with induced shear fracture are being studied, and some of the new results are presented in this report. These samples are being scanned in order to

  8. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-06-15

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) quantifying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture, and (c) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress on the nature of the rock and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual descriptions of the process are shown in the report while detailed analysis of the behavior of the distribution of fracture aperture is in progress. Both extensional and shear fractures are being considered. The initial multi-phase flow tests were done in extensional fractures. Several rock samples with induced shear fracture are being studies, and some of the new results are presented in this report. These samples are being scanned in order to

  9. Reservoir Fracturing in the Geysers Hydrothermal System: Fact or Fallacy?

    SciTech Connect

    Hebein, Jeffrey J.

    1986-01-21

    Proper application of proven worldwide fracture determination analyses adequately aids in the detection and enhanced exploitation of reservoir fractures in The Geysers steam field. Obsolete, superficial ideas concerning fracturing in this resource have guided various malformed judgements of the actual elusive trends. Utilizing regional/local tectonics with theoretical rack mechanics and drilling statistics, offers the most favorable method of fracture comprehension. Exploitation philosophies should favor lateral drilling trends along local tensional components and under specific profound drainage/faulting manifestations to enhance high productivities. Drill core observations demonstrate various degrees of fracture filling, brecciation, strain responses, and rock fracture properties, giving the most favorable impression of subsurface reservoir conditions. Considerably more work utilizing current fracturing principles and geologic thought is required to adequately comprehend and economically exploit this huge complex resource.

  10. Subsurface fracture spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C. ); Hill, R.E. )

    1991-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to document and analyze the unique set of data on subsurface fracture characteristics, especially spacing, provided by the US Department of Energy's Slant Hole Completion Test well (SHCT-1) in the Piceance Basin, Colorado. Two hundred thirty-six (236) ft (71.9 m) of slant core and 115 ft (35.1 m) of horizontal core show irregular, but remarkably close, spacings for 72 natural fractures cored in sandstone reservoirs of the Mesaverde Group. Over 4200 ft (1280 m) of vertical core (containing 275 fractures) from the vertical Multiwell Experiment wells at the same location provide valuable information on fracture orientation, termination, and height, but only data from the SHCT-1 core allow calculations of relative fracture spacing. Within the 162-ft (49-m) thick zone of overlapping core from the vertical and deviated wellbores, only one fracture is present in vertical core whereas 52 fractures occur in the equivalent SHCT-1 core. The irregular distribution of regional-type fractures in these heterogeneous reservoirs suggests that measurements of average fracture spacing'' are of questionable value as direct input parameters into reservoir engineering models. Rather, deviated core provides data on the relative degree of fracturing, and confirms that cross fractures can be rare in the subsurface. 13 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Atraumatic sternum fracture

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamsen, Sebastian Ørskov; Madsen, Christina Friis

    2014-01-01

    The spine, pelvic bones and long bones of the lower extremities are common sites for insufficiency fractures. Cases of sternum insufficiency fractures have rarely been reported among elderly patients. Insufficiency fractures tend to occur in bones with decreased mechanical strength especially among elderly patients, in postmenopausal women and patients with underlying diseases. We describe a case of spontaneous sternum insufficiency fracture in a healthy man, with no known risk factors to fracture, or previous history of fractures. Sternum insufficiency fracture is a rare cause of chest pain. This case serves to remind the emergency physician to remain vigilant for other non-cardiac, non-pulmonary and non-traumatic causes of chest pain, especially among patients with known risk factors such as osteoporosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and patients on long-term steroid treatment. If diagnosed correctly, these patients can be discharged and treated as outpatients as this case emphasises. PMID:25326566

  12. Mechanics of Hydraulic Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detournay, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic fractures represent a particular class of tensile fractures that propagate in solid media under pre-existing compressive stresses as a result of internal pressurization by an injected viscous fluid. The main application of engineered hydraulic fractures is the stimulation of oil and gas wells to increase production. Several physical processes affect the propagation of these fractures, including the flow of viscous fluid, creation of solid surfaces, and leak-off of fracturing fluid. The interplay and the competition between these processes lead to multiple length scales and timescales in the system, which reveal the shifting influence of the far-field stress, viscous dissipation, fracture energy, and leak-off as the fracture propagates.

  13. Laminated metals composites fracture and ballistic impact behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.; Syn, C.K.; Sherby, O.D.; Wadsworth, J.

    1998-01-20

    Recent advances in the fracture and ballistic impact response of laminated metal composites (LMCs) are reviewed. The laminate structure can provide significant improvements to these properties relative to the component materials. Typical fracture and ballistic impact properties in LMCs are illustrated for systems containing Al alloys and Al matrix composites. The unique mechanisms operating in a layered structure that contribute to fracture or ballistic impact resistance are discussed. The influence of laminate architecture, component material properties and interface strength on mechanisms and properties are briefly reviewed for these Al-based LMCs.

  14. Smart magnetic markers use in hydraulic fracturing.

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Jarosław; Bogacki, Jan

    2016-11-01

    One of the main challenges and unknowns during shale gas exploration is to assess the range and efficiency of hydraulic fracturing. It is also essential to assess the distribution of proppant, which keeps the fracture pathways open. Solving these problems may considerably increase the efficiency of the shale gas extraction. Because of that, the idea of smart magnetic marker, which can be detected when added to fracturing fluid, has been considered for a long time. This study provides overview of the possibilities of magnetic marker application for shale gas extraction. The imaging methods using electromagnetic markers, are considered or developed in two directions. The first possibility is the markers' electromagnetic activity throughout the whole volume of the fracturing fluid. Thus, it can be assumed that the whole fracturing fluid is the marker. Among these type of hydraulic fracturing solutions, ferrofluid could be considered. The second possibility is marker, which is just one of many components of the fracturing fluid. In this case feedstock magnetic materials, ferrites and nanomaterials could be considered. Magnetic properties of magnetite could be too low and ferrofluids' or nanomaterials' price is unacceptably high. Because of that, ferrites, especially ZnMn ferrites seems to be the best material for magnetic marker. Because of the numerous applications in electronics, it is cheap and easily available, although the price is higher, then that of magnetite. The disadvantage of using ferrite, could be too small mechanical strength. It creates an essential need for combining magnetic marker with proppant into magnetic-ceramic composite.

  15. Rheological characterization of hydraulic fracturing slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, S.N. . Research and Engineering Dept.)

    1993-05-01

    Few studies have dealt with the flow behavior of concentrated suspensions or slurries prepared with non-Newtonian carrier fluids. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation is to present experimental results obtained by pumping various hydraulic fracturing slurries into a fracture model and gathering data on differential pressure vs. flow rate. Several concentrations of hydroxypropyl guard (HPG), a wide range of proppant concentrations, and three test temperatures were studies. The effects of such variables as polymer gelling-agent concentration, proppant concentration, test temperature, and fracture-flow shear rate on the rheological properties of slurries were investigated. The correlations for predicting the relative slurry viscosity for these HPG fluids are presented. Substantial increases in viscosity of fracturing gels were observed, and results are discussed in light of several affecting variables. Results also are compared with those available for Newtonian and non-Newtonian concentrated suspensions. Applications of these correlations to estimate the hindered particle-settling velocity in the fracture caused by the presence of surrounding particles also is discussed. The correlations presented can easily be included in any currently available 2D or 3D fracture-design simulators; thus, the information can be applied directly to predict fracture geometry and extension.

  16. Hydraulic Fracture Extending into Network in Shale: Reviewing Influence Factors and Their Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lan; Zhao, Jinzhou; Hu, Yongquan

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracture in shale reservoir presents complex network propagation, which has essential difference with traditional plane biwing fracture at forming mechanism. Based on the research results of experiments, field fracturing practice, theory analysis, and numerical simulation, the influence factors and their mechanism of hydraulic fracture extending into network in shale have been systematically analyzed and discussed. Research results show that the fracture propagation in shale reservoir is influenced by the geological and the engineering factors, which includes rock mineral composition, rock mechanical properties, horizontal stress field, natural fractures, treating net pressure, fracturing fluid viscosity, and fracturing scale. This study has important theoretical value and practical significance to understand fracture network propagation mechanism in shale reservoir and contributes to improving the science and efficiency of shale reservoir fracturing design. PMID:25032240

  17. Multi-scale approach to invasion percolation of rock fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Ali N.; Wittel, Falk K.; Araújo, Nuno A. M.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2014-11-01

    A multi-scale scheme for the invasion percolation of rock fracture networks with heterogeneous fracture aperture fields is proposed. Inside fractures, fluid transport is calculated on the finest scale and found to be localized in channels as a consequence of the aperture field. The channel network is characterized and reduced to a vectorized artificial channel network (ACN). Different realizations of ACNs are used to systematically calculate efficient apertures for fluid transport inside differently sized fractures as well as fracture intersection and entry properties. Typical situations in fracture networks are parameterized by fracture inclination, flow path length along the fracture and intersection lengths in the entrance and outlet zones of fractures. Using these scaling relations obtained from the finer scales, we simulate the invasion process of immiscible fluids into saturated discrete fracture networks, which were studied in previous works.

  18. Hydraulic fracture extending into network in shale: reviewing influence factors and their mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lan; Zhao, Jinzhou; Hu, Yongquan

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracture in shale reservoir presents complex network propagation, which has essential difference with traditional plane biwing fracture at forming mechanism. Based on the research results of experiments, field fracturing practice, theory analysis, and numerical simulation, the influence factors and their mechanism of hydraulic fracture extending into network in shale have been systematically analyzed and discussed. Research results show that the fracture propagation in shale reservoir is influenced by the geological and the engineering factors, which includes rock mineral composition, rock mechanical properties, horizontal stress field, natural fractures, treating net pressure, fracturing fluid viscosity, and fracturing scale. This study has important theoretical value and practical significance to understand fracture network propagation mechanism in shale reservoir and contributes to improving the science and efficiency of shale reservoir fracturing design.

  19. Prediction of Fracture Initiation Pressure and Fracture Geometries in Elastic Isotropic and Anisotropic Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Zou, Y. S.; Liu, S.; Liu, G. Q.; Jing, Y. Z.; Ehlig-Economides, C. A.

    2017-03-01

    Laminated formation structures in shale formations may have elastic anisotropic properties, including Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio, that impact hydraulic fracturing treatment execution. Fracture initiation pressures and geometries are affected by these properties, especially in cased and in perforated horizontal wells. After initiation, stress concentration around the wellbore may cause the creation of longitudinal fractures (LFs) in the near-wellbore zone that reorient to transverse fractures (TFs) beyond this region. In this case, severe fracture kinking may occur that may hinder the transport of proppants and reduce well productivity. We developed an analytical model based on linear fracture mechanics theory to study the effect of perforation geometries on the initiation fracture pattern. Elastic anisotropy and well deviations were incorporated into simulations. Our simulation results show that when the perforation depth is in a specific range under normal fault regime, the initiation pressures for LFs can be smaller than the maximum horizontal stress σH. This behavior is significant for a smaller σH /σv ratio, but it vanishes for a larger σH /σv ratio. With increasing formation elastic anisotropy (K_{aniso}), the initiation pressures for both LFs and TFs increase, and the critical perforation depth is decreased. Considering the well deviation, the well azimuth and inclination angles affect initiation pressures for both longitudinal and transverse fractures. Results show how perforation depth, shale elastic anisotropy, and well orientation affect fracture initiation patterns. This paper provides a framework for well completion designs and well orientation designs to minimize the fracture kinking in the near-wellbore region in shale formations.

  20. Identifying novel clinical surrogates to assess human bone fracture toughness

    PubMed Central

    Granke, Mathilde; Makowski, Alexander J; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Does, Mark D; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2015-01-01

    Fracture risk does not solely depend on strength but also on fracture toughness, i.e. the ability of bone material to resist crack initiation and propagation. Because resistance to crack growth largely depends on bone properties at the tissue level including collagen characteristics, current X-ray based assessment tools may not be suitable to identify age-, disease-, or treatment-related changes in fracture toughness. To identify useful clinical surrogates that could improve the assessment of fracture resistance, we investigated the potential of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and reference point indentation (RPI) to explain age-related variance in fracture toughness. Harvested from cadaveric femurs (62 human donors), single-edge notched beam (SENB) specimens of cortical bone underwent fracture toughness testing (R-curve method). NMR-derived bound water showed the strongest correlation with fracture toughness properties (r=0.63 for crack initiation, r=0.35 for crack growth, and r=0.45 for overall fracture toughness; p<0.01). Multivariate analyses indicated that the age-related decrease in different fracture toughness properties were best explained by a combination of NMR properties including pore water and RPI-derived tissue stiffness with age as a significant covariate (adjusted R2 = 53.3%, 23.9%, and 35.2% for crack initiation, crack growth, and overall toughness, respectively; p<0.001). These findings reflect the existence of many contributors to fracture toughness and emphasize the utility of a multimodal assessment of fracture resistance. Exploring the mechanistic origin of fracture toughness, glycation-mediated, non-enzymatic collagen crosslinks and intra-cortical porosity are possible determinants of bone fracture toughness and could explain the sensitivity of NMR to changes in fracture toughness. Assuming fracture toughness is clinically important to the ability of bone to resist fracture, our results suggest that improvements in fracture

  1. Identifying Novel Clinical Surrogates to Assess Human Bone Fracture Toughness.

    PubMed

    Granke, Mathilde; Makowski, Alexander J; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Does, Mark D; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2015-07-01

    Fracture risk does not solely depend on strength but also on fracture toughness; ie, the ability of bone material to resist crack initiation and propagation. Because resistance to crack growth largely depends on bone properties at the tissue level, including collagen characteristics, current X-ray based assessment tools may not be suitable to identify age-related, disease-related, or treatment-related changes in fracture toughness. To identify useful clinical surrogates that could improve the assessment of fracture resistance, we investigated the potential of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and reference point indentation (RPI) to explain age-related variance in fracture toughness. Harvested from cadaveric femurs (62 human donors), single-edge notched beam (SENB) specimens of cortical bone underwent fracture toughness testing (R-curve method). NMR-derived bound water showed the strongest correlation with fracture toughness properties (r = 0.63 for crack initiation, r = 0.35 for crack growth, and r = 0.45 for overall fracture toughness; p < 0.01). Multivariate analyses indicated that the age-related decrease in different fracture toughness properties were best explained by a combination of NMR properties including pore water and RPI-derived tissue stiffness with age as a significant covariate (adjusted R(2)  = 53.3%, 23.9%, and 35.2% for crack initiation, crack growth, and overall toughness, respectively; p < 0.001). These findings reflect the existence of many contributors to fracture toughness and emphasize the utility of a multimodal assessment of fracture resistance. Exploring the mechanistic origin of fracture toughness, glycation-mediated nonenzymatic collagen crosslinks and intracortical porosity are possible determinants of bone fracture toughness and could explain the sensitivity of NMR to changes in fracture toughness. Assuming fracture toughness is clinically important to the ability of bone to resist fracture

  2. Colloid Transport and Retention in Fractured Media

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.F.

    2001-02-01

    The goal of this project was to identify the chemical and physical factors that control the transport of colloids in fractured materials, and develop a generalized capability to predict colloid attachment and detachment based on hydraulic factors (head, flow rate), physical processes and structure (fracture aperture, matrix porosity), and chemical properties (surface properties of colloids, solution chemistry, and mineralogy of fracture surfaces). Both aqueous chemistry and physical structure of geologic formations influenced transport. Results of studies at all spatial scales reached consensus on the importance of several key controlling variables: (1) colloid retention is dominated by chemical conditions favoring colloid-wall interactions; (2) even in the presence of conditions favorable to colloid collection, deposited colloids are remobilized over long times and this process contributes substantially to the overall extent of transport; (3) diffusive exchange between water-conducting fractures and finer fractures and pores acts to ''buffer'' the effects of the major fracture network structure, and reduces predictive uncertainties. Predictive tools were developed that account for fundamental mechanisms of colloid dynamics in fracture geometry, and linked to larger-scale processes in networks of fractures. The results of our study highlight the key role of physical and hydrologic factors, and processes of colloid remobilization that are potentially of even greater importance to colloid transport in the vadose zone than in saturated conditions. We propose that this work be extended to focus on understanding vadose zone transport processes so that they can eventually be linked to the understanding and tools developed in our previous project on transport in saturated groundwater systems.

  3. Evaluation of permeable fractures in rock aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bok Lee, Hang

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the practical usefulness and fundamental applicability of a self-potential (SP) method for identifying the permeable fractures were evaluated by a comparison of SP methods with other geophysical logging methods and hydraulic tests. At a 10 m-shallow borehole in the study site, the candidates of permeable fractures crossing the borehole were first determined by conventional geophysical methods such as an acoustic borehole televiwer, temperature, electrical conductivity and gamma-gamma loggings, which was compared to the analysis by the SP method. Constant pressure injection and recovery tests were conducted for verification of the hydraulic properties of the fractures identified by various logging methods. The acoustic borehole televiwer and gamma-gamma loggings detected the open space or weathering zone within the borehole, but they cannot prove the possibility of a groundwater flow through the detected fractures. The temperature and electrical conductivity loggings had limitations to detect the fractured zones where groundwater in the borehole flows out to the surrounding rock aquifers. Comparison of results from different methods showed that there is a best correlation between the distribution of hydraulic conductivity and the variation of the SP signals, and the SP logging can estimate accurately the hydraulic activity as well as the location of permeable fractures. Based on the results, the SP method is recommended for determining the hydraulically-active fractures rather than other conventional geophysical loggings. This self-potential method can be effectively applied in the initial stage of a site investigation which selects the optimal location and evaluates the hydrogeological property of fractures in target sites for the underground structure including the geothermal reservoir and radioactive waste disposal.

  4. TRITIUM EFFECTS ON WELDMENT FRACTURE TOUGHNESS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M; Michael Tosten, M; Scott West, S

    2006-07-17

    The effects of tritium on the fracture toughness properties of Type 304L stainless steel and its weldments were measured. Fracture toughness data are needed for assessing tritium reservoir structural integrity. This report provides data from J-Integral fracture toughness tests on unexposed and tritium-exposed weldments. The effect of tritium on weldment toughness has not been measured until now. The data include tests on tritium-exposed weldments after aging for up to three years to measure the effect of increasing decay helium concentration on toughness. The results indicate that Type 304L stainless steel weldments have high fracture toughness and are resistant to tritium aging effects on toughness. For unexposed alloys, weldment fracture toughness was higher than base metal toughness. Tritium-exposed-and-aged base metals and weldments had lower toughness values than unexposed ones but still retained good toughness properties. In both base metals and weldments there was an initial reduction in fracture toughness after tritium exposure but little change in fracture toughness values with increasing helium content in the range tested. Fracture modes occurred by the dimpled rupture process in unexposed and tritium-exposed steels and welds. This corroborates further the resistance of Type 304L steel to tritium embrittlement. This report fulfills the requirements for the FY06 Level 3 milestone, TSR15.3 ''Issue summary report for tritium reservoir material aging studies'' for the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign (ESC). The milestone was in support of ESC L2-1866 Milestone-''Complete an annual Enhanced Surveillance stockpile aging assessment report to support the annual assessment process''.

  5. [Epidemiology of hip fracture].

    PubMed

    Hagino, Hiroshi

    2006-12-01

    Age- and gender-specific numbers of patients with hip fracture increase with age and peaked at the age 80-84; however, age- and gender-specific incidences increase exponentially with age. According to the recent nation-wide survey, the most common cause of hip fractures was a simple fall, 68.8% sustained fractures in-doors, and the incidences were higher in the winter than the summer period. More than 90% of patients with hip fracture were treated surgically and about 3/4 of patients with femoral neck fractures were treated with hemi-arthroplasty. Hip fractures for Asian people including Japanese are lower than those for Caucasians living in Northern Europe and North America; however, recent reports from the Asian area indicated an increase in the incidence with time.

  6. Dyslipidemia and sternum fracture.

    PubMed

    Can, Cagdas; Gulactı, Umut; Sarıhan, Aydin; Topacoglu, Hakan

    2013-06-01

    Tenderness over the sternum is a clue for possible sternal fracture. Sternal fractures usually occur at the body or manubrium. Lateral chest radiography could detect a sternum fracture, but the diagnosis is usually made by chest tomography. Traumatic sternum fracture considered as a marker of seriously life-threatening, high-energy injury. In hyperlipidemia, oxidized lipids accumulate in vascular tissues and trigger atherosclerosis. Such lipids also deposit in bone tissues where they may promote osteoporosis. In the literature, there is no previously reported traumatic sternal fracture due to hyperlipidemia-induced osteoporosis. Here, we report a case of a combined mixed type familial hyperlipidemia-induced osteoporosis in which the patient having seat belt on had an unexpected sternum fracture in a low-energy motor vehicle accident.

  7. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of the nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiselt, Ch. Ch.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.; Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.; Gragg, D.

    2011-10-01

    The realization of fusion power as an attractive energy source requires advanced structural materials that can cope with ultra-severe thermo-mechanical loads and high neutron fluxes experienced by fusion power plant components, such as the first wall, divertor and blanket structures. Towards this end, two variants of a 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 reduced activation ferritic (RAF-) ODS steel were produced by ball milling phase blended Fe-13Cr-1W, 0.3Y 20 3 and 0.3Ti powders in both argon and hydrogen atmospheres. The milled powders were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The as-HIPed alloys were then hot rolled into 6 mm plates. Microstructural, tensile and fracture toughness characterization of the hot rolled alloys are summarized here and compared to results previously reported for the as-HIPed condition.

  8. From Stochastic toward Deterministic Characterization of Discrete Fracture Network via Thermal Tracer Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyvari, M.; Jalali, M.; Bayer, P.; Jiménez Parras, S.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of fractures play an essential role in different disciplines, including hydrogeology, geothermal and hydrocarbon industries, as fractures introduce new pathways for flow and transport in the host rocks. Understanding the physical properties of these planar features would reduce the uncertainty of the numerical models and enhance the reliability of their results. Among the fracture properties, orientation and spacing are relatively easily estimated via borehole logs, core images, and outcrops, whereas the fracture geometry (i.e. length, width, and height) is more difficult to investigate. As the fracture geometry controls the hydraulic and thermal behavior of the fracture network through the strong dependency of the fracture conductivity with fracture aperture, it is possible to estimate these geometrical properties indirectly through hydraulic and thermal tomography investigations. To reach this goal, an innovative approach is introduced for discrete fracture network (DFN) characterization of heterogeneous fractured media via active thermal tracer testing. A synthetic DFN model is constructed based on the geological properties of an arbitrary fracture medium such as fracture orientation, length, spacing and persistency. Different realization are then constructed by considering all the above mentioned fracture properties except the length of fracture segments. Pressure and temperature fields are estimated inside the fracture network by means of an implicit upwind finite difference method, which is used to compute heat tracer travel times between injection and observation points and record the full temperature breakthrough curves at the monitoring points. A trans-dimensional inversion is then adopted to update the lengths fracture segment (add or remove) of the DFN model by comparison between proposed and observed travel times (Figure 1). The resulting assemble of the models can be used as an input geometry for deterministic simulations of fracture

  9. [Nasal fractures in adults].

    PubMed

    Sjöstedt, Sannia; Larsen, Christian Grønhøj; Bilde, Anders; von Buchwald, Christian

    2016-03-07

    The risk of complications warrants treatment of most dislocated nasal fractures. Other injuries including other facial fractures and septal haematoma must be treated if present at the initial presentation. The usual treatment for a simple nasal fracture is closed reduction in local anaesthesia after five to seven days. Complicated cases require open reduction in general anaesthesia. Later revision of the deviated nose may become necessary in patients suffering from complications such as persistent nasal stenosis and/or deformity.

  10. Pediatric Hand Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Nellans, Kate W.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Pediatric hand fractures are common childhood injuries. Identification of the fractures in the emergency room setting can be challenging owing to the physes and incomplete ossification of the carpus that are not revealed in the xrays. Most simple fractures can be treated with appropriate immobilization through buddy taping, finger splints, or casting. If correctly diagnosed, reduced and immobilized, these fractures usually result in excellent clinical outcomes. However, fractures may require operative stabilization if they have substantial angulation or rotation, extend into the joint, or cannot be held in a reduced position with splinting alone. Most fractures can be treated operatively with closed reduction and percutaneous pinning if addressed within the first week following the injury. In children, the thick, vascular-rich periosteum and bony remodeling potential make anatomic reductions and internal fixation rarely necessary. Most fractures complete bony healing in 3-4 weeks, with the scaphoid being a notable exception. Following immobilization, children rarely develop hand stiffness and formal occupational therapy is usually not necessary. Despite the high potential for excellent outcomes in pediatric hand fractures, some fractures remain difficult to diagnose and treat. PMID:24209954

  11. [Chondral and osteochondral fractures].

    PubMed

    Kayaoğlu, E Esin; Binnet, Mehmet S

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of traumatic chondral and osteochondral fractures and their role in the development of joint degeneration are not fully elucidated. While assessing traumatic knee injuries, one important criterion for the diagnosis of chondral fractures is to remember the possibility of a chondral or osteochondral fracture. Symptoms in osteochondral fractures are more obvious and cause severe pain and difficulty in movement of knee with hemarthrosis. The presence of hemarthrosis facilitates the diagnosis of an osteochondral fracture. Chondral and osteochondral fractures may be associated with other intra-articular pathologies. There are two main mechanisms of these fractures, including a direct effect causing avulsion or impaction and, a more common mechanism, flexion-rotation force to the knee, which is also the mechanism for an acute patellar dislocation. It is known that arthroscopic treatment is the best method for the diagnosis and treatment of chondral and osteochondral fractures. In osteochondral lesions, the aim of treatment is to restore the congruity of articular surfaces. In agreement with literature data, our clinical experience favors internal fixation as the most effective method for the treatment of osteochondral fractures.

  12. Natural fracture systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.; Warpinski, N.R.

    1992-09-01

    The objectives of this program are (1) to develop a basinal-analysis methodology for natural fracture exploration and exploitation, and (2) to determine the important characteristics of natural fracture systems for use in completion, stimulation, and production operations. Natural-fracture basinal analysis begins with studies of fractures in outcrop, core and logs in order to determine the type of fracturing and the relationship of the fractures to the lithologic environment. Of particular interest are the regional fracture systems that are pervasive in western US tight sand basins. A Methodology for applying this analysis is being developed, with the goal of providing a structure for rationally characterizing natural fracture systems basin-wide. Such basin-wide characterizations can then be expanded and supplemented locally, at sites where production may be favorable. Initial application of this analysis is to the Piceance basin where there is a wealth of data from the Multiwell Experiment (MWX), DOE cooperative wells, and other basin studies conducted by Sandia, CER Corporation, and the USGS (Lorenz and Finley, 1989, Lorenz et aI., 1989, and Spencer and Keighin, 1984). Such a basinal approach has been capable of explaining the fracture characteristics found throughout the southern part of the Piceance basin and along the Grand Hogback.

  13. Fracture detection logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Benzing, William M.

    1992-06-09

    A method and apparatus by which fractured rock formations are identified and their orientation may be determined includes two orthogonal motion sensors which are used in conjunction with a downhole orbital vibrator. The downhole vibrator includes a device for orienting the sensors. The output of the sensors is displayed as a lissajou figure. The shape of the figure changes when a subsurface fracture is encountered in the borehole. The apparatus and method identifies fractures rock formations and enables the azimuthal orientation of the fractures to be determined.

  14. SEGMENTAL CLAVICLE FRACTURE

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Evander Azevedo

    2015-01-01

    The aim here was to present an unusual case of segmental clavicle fracture associated with ipsilateral rib fracture. Although the clavicle is very superficial, undetected cases of both types of fracture may occur, because these patients usually suffer multiple trauma. The case of a patient with a fracture of the diaphysis and lateral extremity of the clavicle is described: the patient was treated surgically and an excellent result was achieved. Similar cases in the literature are reviewed and their management is discussed. PMID:27047835

  15. [(Impending) pathological fracture].

    PubMed

    Sutter, P M; Regazzoni, P

    2002-01-01

    Pathological fractures will be encountered in increasing frequency due to more patients with cancer, surviving a longer period. The skeleton is the third most frequent localization for metastases. Breast cancer is still the most common primary tumor, but bone metastases from lung cancer seem to be diagnosed more and more. Despite of finding metastases most often in the spinal column, fractures are seen mostly at the femoral site. A pathological fracture and, in almost all cases, an impending fracture are absolute indication for operation. An exact definition of an "impending fracture" is still lacking; it is widely accepted, that 50 per cent of bone mass must be destroyed before visualization in X-ray is possible, thus defining an impending fracture. The score system by Mirels estimates the fracture risk by means of four parameters (localization, per cent of destructed bone mass, type of metastasis, pain). Improving quality of life, relieving pain, preferably with a single operation and a short length of stay are the goals of (operative) treatment. For fractures of the proximal femur, prosthetic replacement, for fractures of the subtrochanteric region or the shaft, intramedullary nails are recommended. Postoperative radiation therapy possibly avoids tumor progression. In patient with a good long term prognosis, tumor should be removed locally aggressive.

  16. Random fracture networks: percolation, geometry and flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. M.; Thovert, J. F.; Mourzenko, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reviews some of the basic properties of fracture networks. Most of the data can only be derived numerically, and to be useful they need to be rationalized, i.e., a large set of numbers should be replaced by a simple formula which is easy to apply for estimating orders of magnitude. Three major tools are found useful in this rationalization effort. First, analytical results can usually be derived for infinite fractures, a limit which corresponds to large densities. Second, the excluded volume and the dimensionless density prove crucial to gather data obtained at intermediate densities. Finally, shape factors can be used to further reduce the influence of fracture shapes. Percolation of fracture networks is of primary importance since this characteristic controls transport properties such as permeability. Recent numerical studies for various types of fracture networks (isotropic, anisotropic, heterogeneous in space, polydisperse, mixture of shapes) are summarized; the percolation threshold rho is made dimensionless by means of the excluded volume. A general correlation for rho is proposed as a function of the gyration radius. The statistical characteristics of the blocks which are cut in the solid matrix by the network are presented, since they control transfers between the porous matrix and the fractures. Results on quantities such as the volume, surface and number of faces are given and semi empirical relations are proposed. The possible intersection of a percolating network and of a cubic cavity is also summarized. This might be of importance for the underground storage of wastes. An approximate reasoning based on the excluded volume of the percolating cluster and of the cubic cavity is proposed. Finally, consequences on the permeability of fracture networks are briefly addressed. An empirical formula which verifies some theoretical properties is proposed.

  17. Fractal characteristics of fracture roughness and aperture data

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Boernge, J.

    1991-05-01

    In this study mathematical expressions are developed for the characteristics of apertures between rough surfaces. It has shown that the correlation between the opposite surfaces influences the aperture properties and different models are presented for these different surface correlations. Fracture and apertures profiles measured from intact fractures are evaluated and it is found that they qualitatively follow the mathematically predicted trends.

  18. Analysis of zygomatic fractures.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the natural history of zygomatic fractures in 469 cases over 14 years. The medical records of patients seeking treatment for zygomatic fractures were reviewed. The zygomatic fractures were classified as monopod, dipod, or tripod fractures for most patients. The monopod fractures included (1) zygomaticofrontal, (2) zygomaticomaxillary, and (3) zygomatic arch fractures. The dipod fractures were subclassified into 3 types according to combination of the previously mentioned 3 sites, which were 1 and 2, 1 and 3, and 2 and 3. Tripod fracture included all 1, 2, and 3. Among 469 cases of zygomatic fractures, tripod fractures (n = 238, 50.7%), zygomaticomaxillary fracture (n = 121, 25.8%), and isolated fracture of the zygomatic arch (n = 98 20.9%) formed most of the cases (n = 457, 97.4%). About one-half cases were tripod fractures (n = 238, 50.7%), and another half cases were monopod fractures (n = 220, 46.9%). Only 11 cases (2.4%) were dipod fractures. Most of the monopod fractures were zygomaticomaxillary (n = 121, 25.8%) and zygomatic arch fractures (n = 98, 20.9%). Among the dipod fractures, no cases of zygomaticofrontal and zygomatic arch fractures were reported. An open reduction was performed in 73.8% (346 cases), closed reduction in 24.5% (115 cases), and conservative treatment in only 1.7%. In tripod fracture (n = 238), an open reduction and internal fixation was performed for most of the cases (n = 225, 94.5%), and closed reduction was performed in only 11 cases (4.6%). In monopod zygomaticomaxillary fracture (n = 121), internal fixation was performed for most of the cases (n = 108, 89.3%), and closed reduction was performed in only 9 cases (7.7%). However, in monopod fracture of the zygomatic arch (n = 98), most of the cases (n = 95, 96.9%) were treated with closed reduction; open reduction was performed in only 1 case (1.0%). At zygomaticofrontal area (n = 241), internal fixation was performed in most of the cases (n

  19. The Process of Hydraulic Fracturing

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hydraulic fracturing, know as fracking or hydrofracking, produces fractures in a rock formation by pumping fluids (water, proppant, and chemical additives) at high pressure down a wellbore. These fractures stimulate the flow of natural gas or oil.

  20. Compression fractures of the back

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral compression fractures ... the most common cause of this type of fracture. Osteoporosis is a disease in which bones become ... the spine, such as multiple myeloma Having many fractures of the vertebrae can lead to kyphosis . This ...

  1. Hip Fractures among Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... training for health care providers. Learn More Hip Fractures Among Older Adults Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... older. What You Can Do to Prevent Hip Fractures You can prevent hip fractures by taking steps ...

  2. Radiation-induced alterations of fracture healing biomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Pelker, R.R.; Friedlaender, G.E.; Panjabi, M.M.; Kapp, D.; Doganis, A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of irradiation on the normal temporal progression of the physical properties of healing fractures were studied in a rat model. Fractures were surgically produced in the femur, stabilized with an intramedullary pin, and irradiated. One group of rats was exposed to 2,500 rads in divided doses over 2 weeks, beginning 3 days after fracture, and compared to a control group with fractures which were not irradiated. Animals were sacrificed at periodic intervals and the bones were tested to failure in torsion. The torque, stiffness, and energy increased and the angle decreased for the nonirradiated specimens in the expected fashion. This progression was deleteriously altered in the irradiated femurs.

  3. Prediction of Colles' fracture load in human radius using cohesive finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Ural, Ani

    2009-01-05

    Osteoporotic and age-related fractures are a significant public health problem. One of the most common osteoporotic fracture sites in the aging population is distal radius. There is evidence in the literature that distal radius fractures (Colles' fracture) are an indicative of increased risk of future spine and hip fractures. In this study, a nonlinear fracture mechanics-based finite element method is applied to human radius to assess its fracture load as a function of cortical bone geometry and material properties. Seven three-dimensional finite element models of radius were created and the fracture loads were determined by using cohesive finite element modeling which explicitly represents the crack and the fracture process zone behavior. The fracture loads found in the simulations (731-6793 N) were in the range of experimental values reported in the literature. The fracture loads predicted by the simulations decreased by 4-5% per decade based only on material level changes and by 6-20% per decade when geometrical changes were also included. Cortical polar moment of inertia at 15% distal radius showed the highest correlation to fracture load (r(2)=0.97). These findings demonstrate the strength of fracture mechanics-based finite element modeling and show that combining geometrical and material properties provides a better assessment of fracture risk in human radius.

  4. Frequency-Dependent Seismic Waves in Fluid-Saturated Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, V. A.; Goloshubin, G.

    2015-12-01

    Fractures are the natural and essential elements of rock. Fracture systems are the most important features that define rock permeability and strength, as well as their anisotropy properties. Recent advancement in induced fracturing is a core part of the gas/oil shale technology, where fracture monitoring and control became a special topic of interest. Krauklis wave (K-wave) is the result of interaction between a fluid mass and elasticity of fracture walls, and it propagates primarily along the fracture systems in the fluid. At the fracture tips and fracture intersections it partially converts into the body waves. It is quite clear that incorporation of K-waves in a theory of wave propagation in fractured rock is one of the most important problems to solve for understanding of their seismic properties. One of the most fundamental properties of fractured rock is a fractal fracture distribution and it is rarely, if ever, taken into account in existing wave propagation theories. However, this property exists on a widest variety of scales and in particular reveals itself in a form of Gutenberg-Richter Law experimentally proven, starting from laboratory measurements and up to the global seismicity. We computed P and S-wave velocities of the rock containing fluid (and proppant) filled fractures, considering the effect of extremely slow and dispersive wave propagation within individual fractures. This was made possible by introducing the concept of "effective fracture-wave volume," and by evaluating the elastic constants of rock containing a complex, fractal network of fractures. These velocities were used to compute seismic waves reflected normally from a fractured reservoir. We demonstrate that by taking into account the Krauklis wave phenomenon for the fractally distributed fluid-filled fractures, it is possible to explain the observed low-frequency anomalies above the underground natural reservoirs. These anomalies include increase of amplitude and a phase delay of

  5. Vibrational modes of hydraulic fractures: Inference of fracture geometry from resonant frequencies and attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovsky, Bradley P.; Dunham, Eric M.

    2015-02-01

    Oscillatory seismic signals arising from resonant vibrations of hydraulic fractures are observed in many geologic systems, including volcanoes, glaciers and ice sheets, and hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs. To better quantify the physical dimensions of fluid-filled cracks and properties of the fluids within them, we study wave motion along a thin hydraulic fracture waveguide. We present a linearized analysis, valid at wavelengths greater than the fracture aperture, that accounts for quasi-static elastic deformation of the fracture walls, as well as fluid viscosity, inertia, and compressibility. In the long-wavelength limit, anomalously dispersed guided waves known as crack or Krauklis waves propagate with restoring force from fracture wall elasticity. At shorter wavelengths, the waves become sound waves within the fluid channel. Wave attenuation in our model is due to fluid viscosity, rather than seismic radiation from crack tips or fracture wall roughness. We characterize viscous damping at both low frequencies, where the flow is always fully developed, and at high frequencies, where the flow has a nearly constant velocity profile away from viscous boundary layers near the fracture walls. Most observable seismic signals from resonating fractures likely arise in the boundary layer crack wave limit, where fluid-solid coupling is pronounced and attenuation is minimal. We present a method to estimate the aperture and length of a resonating hydraulic fracture using both the seismically observed quality factor and characteristic frequency. Finally, we develop scaling relations between seismic moment and characteristic frequency that might be useful when interpreting the statistics of hydraulic fracture events.

  6. Mixed-Mode Fracture Behavior and Related Surface Topography Feature of a Typical Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, L.; Xie, L. Z.; Xie, H. P.; Ai, T.; He, B.

    2016-08-01

    The geo-mechanical properties of reservoirs, especially the morphology of the rock surface and the fracture properties of rocks, are of great importance in the modeling and simulation of hydraulic processes. To better understand these fundamental issues, five groups of mixed-mode fracture tests were conducted on sandstone using edge-cracked semi-circular bend specimens. Accordingly, the fracture loads, growth paths and fracture surfaces for different initial mixities of the mixed-mode loadings from pure mode I to pure mode II were then determined. A surface topography measurement for each rough fracture surface was conducted using a laser profilometer, and the fractal properties of these surfaces were then investigated. The fracture path evolution mechanism was also investigated via optical microscopy. Moreover, the mixed-mode fracture strength envelope and the crack propagation trajectories of sandstone were theoretically modeled using three widely accepted fracture criteria (i.e., the MTS, MSED and MERR criterions). The published test results in Hasanpour and Choupani (World Acad Sci Eng Tech 41:764-769, 2008) for limestone were also theoretically investigated to further examine the effectiveness of the above fracture criteria. However, none of these criteria could accurately predict the fracture envelopes of both sandstone and limestone. To better estimate the fracture strength of mixed-mode fractures, an empirical maximum tensile stress (EMTS) criterion was proposed and found to achieve good agreement with the test results. Finally, a uniformly pressurized fracture model was simulated for low pressurization rates using this criterion.

  7. [Fracture arthroplasty of femoral neck fractures].

    PubMed

    Braun, K F; Hanschen, M; Biberthaler, P

    2016-04-01

    A paradigm shift in the treatment of elderly patients has recently taken place leading to an increase in joint replacement surgery. The aim of this article is to highlight new developments and to present a treatment algorithm for femoral neck fractures. The age limit must be individually determined considering the comorbidities and perioperative risk profile. Pertrochanteric femoral fractures are nearly exclusively treated by osteosynthesis regardless of age. The situation for femoral neck fractures is more complex. Patients younger than 65 years should generally be treated by osteosynthesis but patients older than 65 years benefit from hemiarthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty. In patients aged between 65 and 75 years with high functional demands and a justifiable perioperative risk, total joint replacement is the treatment of choice. In physically less active patients older than 75 years and poor general condition, preference should be given to hemiarthroplasty.

  8. Physics-based preconditioners for flow in fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandve, T. H.; Keilegavlen, E.; Nordbotten, J. M.

    2014-02-01

    Discrete fracture models are an attractive alternative to upscaled models for flow in fractured media, as they provide a more accurate representation of the flow characteristics. A major challenge in discrete fracture simulation is to overcome the large computational cost associated with resolving the individual fractures in large-scale simulations. In this work, two characteristics of the fractured porous media are utilized to construct efficient preconditioners for the discretized flow equations. First, the preconditioners are tailored to the fracture geometry and presumed flow properties so that the dominant features are well represented there. This assures good scalability of the preconditioners in terms of problem size and permeability contrast. For fracture dominated problems, numerical examples show that such geometric preconditioners are comparable or preferable when compared to state-of-the-art algebraic multigrid preconditioners. The robustness of the physics-based preconditioner for less favorable fracture conditions is further demonstrated by a systematic degradation of the fracture hierarchy. Second, the preconditioners are physics preserving in the sense that conservative fluxes can be computed even for an inexact pressure solutions. This facilitates a scheme where accuracy in the linear solver can be traded for efficiency by terminating the iterative solvers based on error estimates, and without sacrificing basic physical modeling principles. With the combination of these two properties a novel preconditioner is obtained which bridges the gap between multiscale approximations and iterative linear solvers.

  9. Three-phase fracturing in granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, James; Sandnes, Bjornar

    2015-04-01

    There exist numerous geo-engineering scenarios involving the invasion of a gas into a water-saturated porous medium: in fracking, this may occur during the fracking process itself or during subsequent gas penetration into propant beds; the process is also at the heart of carbon dioxide sequestration. We use a bed of water-saturated glass beads confined within a Hele-Shaw cell as a model system to illuminate these processes. Depending on packing density, injection rate and other factors, air injected into this system may invade in a broad variety of patterns, including viscous fingering, capillary invasion, bubble formation and fracturing. Here we focus primarily on the latter case. Fracturing is observed when air is injected into a loosely packed bed of unconsolidated granular material. Our approach allows us to image the complete fracture pattern as it forms, and as such to study both the topographical properties of the resulting pattern (fracture density, braching frequency etc) and the dynamics of its growth. We present an overview of the fracturing phenomenon within the context of pattern formation in granular fluids as a whole. We discuss how fracturing arises from an interplay between frictional, capillary and viscous forces, and demonstrate the influence of various parameters on the result.

  10. Computational Modeling of Fluid Flow through a Fracture in Permeable Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H

    2010-01-01

    Laminar, single-phase, finite-volume solutions to the Navier–Stokes equations of fluid flow through a fracture within permeable media have been obtained. The fracture geometry was acquired from computed tomography scans of a fracture in Berea sandstone, capturing the small-scale roughness of these natural fluid conduits. First, the roughness of the two-dimensional fracture profiles was analyzed and shown to be similar to Brownian fractal structures. The permeability and tortuosity of each fracture profile was determined from simulations of fluid flow through these geometries with impermeable fracture walls. A surrounding permeable medium, assumed to obey Darcy’s Law with permeabilities from 0.2 to 2,000 millidarcies, was then included in the analysis. A series of simulations for flows in fractured permeable rocks was performed, and the results were used to develop a relationship between the flow rate and pressure loss for fractures in porous rocks. The resulting frictionfactor, which accounts for the fracture geometric properties, is similar to the cubic law; it has the potential to be of use in discrete fracture reservoir-scale simulations of fluid flow through highly fractured geologic formations with appreciable matrix permeability. The observed fluid flow from the surrounding permeable medium to the fracture was significant when the resistance within the fracture and the medium were of the same order. An increase in the volumetric flow rate within the fracture profile increased by more than 5% was observed for flows within high permeability-fractured porous media.

  11. Avulsion fractures in athletes.

    PubMed Central

    Orava, S.; Ala-Ketola, L.

    1977-01-01

    34 cases of avulsion fractures are described. Each fracture took place during athletic training or competition. Excepting six sportsmen participating in a general fitness programme, every patient was an active competitive athlete. There were six women and 28 men; their average age was 20.1 years, raised by a few middle-aged "fitness sportsmen". Most avulsion fractures took place in sprinters and hurdlers; next were middle and long distance renner, footballers, fitness joggers, skiers and ice-hockey players. The most usual location of a fracture was the anterior pelvic spines; avulsion fractures were also detected in various parts of lower limbs. There were fewer avulsion fractures in the area of the trunk and upper extremities. Roetgenologically, the diagnosis of an avulsion fracture is generally easy to make. However, the diagnosis is facilitated by knowing the mechanism of the injury, the technique of the athletic event, and some of the training methods. Generally, a fracture heals well, even if it requires both sufficient immobilisation and some delay in resuming physical exertion. PMID:884433

  12. Fracture of glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henshaw, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this educational exercise are the following: to observe and understand the fracture behavior of a brittle material; and to quantify the effects of various treatments on that material designed to modify its strength. A brief introduction to beam bending, fracture mechanics, influence of surface defects, residual stress, and static fatigue is presented. A test procedure for specimen testing is also presented.

  13. TIBIAL SHAFT FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Kodi Edson; Ferreira, Ramon Venzon

    2015-01-01

    The long-bone fractures occur most frequently in the tibial shaft. Adequate treatment of such fractures avoids consolidation failure, skewed consolidation and reoperation. To classify these fractures, the AO/OTA classification method is still used, but it is worthwhile getting to know the Ellis classification method, which also includes assessment of soft-tissue injuries. There is often an association with compartmental syndrome, and early diagnosis can be achieved through evaluating clinical parameters and constant clinical monitoring. Once the diagnosis has been made, fasciotomy should be performed. It is always difficult to assess consolidation, but the RUST method may help in this. Radiography is assessed in two projections, and points are scored for the presence of the fracture line and a visible bone callus. Today, the dogma of six hours for cleaning the exposed fracture is under discussion. It is considered that an early start to intravenous antibiotic therapy and the lesion severity are very important. The question of early or late closure of the lesion in an exposed fracture has gone through several phases: sometimes early closure has been indicated and sometimes late closure. Currently, whenever possible, early closure of the lesion is recommended, since this diminishes the risk of infection. Milling of the canal when the intramedullary nail is introduced is still a controversial subject. Despite strong personal positions in favor of milling, studies have shown that there may be some advantage in relation to closed fractures, but not in exposed fractures. PMID:27026999

  14. TIBIAL SHAFT FRACTURES.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kodi Edson; Ferreira, Ramon Venzon

    2011-01-01

    The long-bone fractures occur most frequently in the tibial shaft. Adequate treatment of such fractures avoids consolidation failure, skewed consolidation and reoperation. To classify these fractures, the AO/OTA classification method is still used, but it is worthwhile getting to know the Ellis classification method, which also includes assessment of soft-tissue injuries. There is often an association with compartmental syndrome, and early diagnosis can be achieved through evaluating clinical parameters and constant clinical monitoring. Once the diagnosis has been made, fasciotomy should be performed. It is always difficult to assess consolidation, but the RUST method may help in this. Radiography is assessed in two projections, and points are scored for the presence of the fracture line and a visible bone callus. Today, the dogma of six hours for cleaning the exposed fracture is under discussion. It is considered that an early start to intravenous antibiotic therapy and the lesion severity are very important. The question of early or late closure of the lesion in an exposed fracture has gone through several phases: sometimes early closure has been indicated and sometimes late closure. Currently, whenever possible, early closure of the lesion is recommended, since this diminishes the risk of infection. Milling of the canal when the intramedullary nail is introduced is still a controversial subject. Despite strong personal positions in favor of milling, studies have shown that there may be some advantage in relation to closed fractures, but not in exposed fractures.

  15. Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Procedures & Devices Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain Drugs, Procedures & DevicesProcedures & DevicesYour Health Resources ...

  16. Abnormality in fracture strength of polycrystalline silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Hong, Jiawang; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-09-01

    Silicene, a silicon-based homologue of graphene, arouses great interest in nano-electronic devices due to its outstanding electronic properties. However, its promising electronic applications are greatly hindered by lack of understanding in the mechanical strength of silicene. Therefore, in order to design mechanically reliable devices with silicene, it is necessary to thoroughly explore the mechanical properties of silicene. Due to current fabrication methods, graphene is commonly produced in a polycrystalline form; the same may hold for silicene. Here we perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the mechanical properties of polycrystalline silicene. First, an annealing process is employed to construct a more realistic modeling structure of polycrystalline silicene. Results indicate that a more stable structure is formed due to the breaking and reformation of bonds between atoms on the grain boundaries. Moreover, as the grain size decreases, the efficiency of the annealing process, which is quantified by the energy change, increases. Subsequently, biaxial tensile tests are performed on the annealed samples in order to explore the relation between grain size and mechanical properties, namely in-plane stiffness, fracture strength and fracture strain etc. Results indicate that as the grain size decreases, the fracture strain increases while the fracture strength shows an inverse trend. The decreasing fracture strength may be partly attributed to the weakening effect from the increasing area density of defects which acts as the reservoir of stress-concentrated sites on the grain boundary. The observed crack localization and propagation and fracture strength are well-explained by a defect-pileup model.

  17. Geological and geometrical characteristics of reservoir fracturing throughout the Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Nurmi, R. ) Akbar, M. ); Standen, E. )

    1993-09-01

    The geometry and basic characteristics (length, density/intensity, aperture, and porosity) of fractures (joints) have been defined recently for a number of Middle East reservoirs. The factors that determine the occurrence of natural, open, permeable fractures within Middle East reservoirs are nature and degree of folding and/or faulting, in-situ stresses, and changes in rock properties such as porosity, lithology, and especially shaliness. Fracture distribution and orientation within Mesozoic Arabian/Persian Gulf halo-kinetic structures is important to reservoir development and modeling, although the fractures generally only assist productivity. In the deeper Paleozoic reservoirs, fractures become increasingly important. Fractures are best developed in relatively anhydrite free, low porosity, dolomite facies, and with few exceptions their orientation is related to regional trends, only slightly modified by local tectonic features. Exploration for deep-fracture reservoirs needs to consider that the probability of uncemented fractures will be present only where the timing of hydrocarbon migration was close in timing to fracturing. Examination of fractured reservoirs in the Zagros-Bitlis orogenic belt from Turkey through Syria, Iraq, Iran and the northern Emirates demonstrates that the fracturing is dominantly related to folding, with only minor karst fracturing or fault-related fracturing, whereas the fractures in the Gulf of Suez are closely related to the faulting history with some of the most intense fracturing of the low-porosity Eocene limestones forming a fracture reservoir near fault zones. Studies of basement fracturing reveals that decreases in fracture apertures generally accompanies increases in fracture density. The distribution of fractures within the northern Sinai closely fit a wrench-tectonic model, where the greatest density and largest apertures occur in the dolomitic facies and have an orientation parallel to synthetic faulting of the wrench system.

  18. Effects of Heat Treatment on Grain-Boundary β-Mg17Al12 and Fracture Properties of Resistance Spot-Welded AZ80 Mg Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niknejad, Seyed Tirdad; Liu, Lei; Nguyen, Tam; Lee, Mok-Young; Esmaeili, Shahrzad; Zhou, Norman Y.

    2013-08-01

    The distribution and morphology of β-Mg17Al12 intermetallic phase in resistance spot-welded AZ80 Mg alloy were investigated by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The influence of intermetallic phase on mechanical strength was studied by tensile shear testing and fractography. The results showed that continuous networks of β-Mg17Al12 formed along grain boundaries in both the nugget and heat-affected zone of the spot-welded AZ80 Mg alloy. Those continuous grain-boundary β-Mg17Al12 networks acted as effective crack propagation paths, which had negative effects on the weld strength. Post-weld solution heat treatment effectively reduced the amount of β-Mg17Al12 and broke the grain-boundary intermetallic networks in both the nugget and heat-affected zone. This significantly increased the weld strength of AZ80 Mg alloy and changed the fracture mode from nugget pull-out in the as-welded condition to through-thickness after heat treatment.

  19. Transphyseal Distal Humerus Fracture.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua; Ho, Christine Ann; Ritzman, Todd F; Brighton, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Transphyseal distal humerus fractures typically occur in children younger than 3 years secondary to birth trauma, nonaccidental trauma, or a fall from a small height. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of a transphyseal distal humerus fracture is crucial for a successful outcome. Recognizing that the forearm is not aligned with the humerus on plain radiographs may aid in the diagnosis of a transphyseal distal humerus fracture. Surgical management is most commonly performed with the aid of an arthrogram. Closed reduction and percutaneous pinning techniques similar to those used for supracondylar humerus fractures are employed. Cubitus varus caused by a malunion, osteonecrosis of the medial condyle, or growth arrest is the most common complication encountered in the treatment of transphyseal distal humerus fractures. A corrective lateral closing wedge osteotomy can be performed to restore a nearly normal carrying angle.

  20. Characterizing Fractured Rock with Geo-structural and Micro-structural Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dershowitz, William

    2015-04-01

    Fracture spatial structure and hydro-mechanical properties are key to the understanding of fractured rock geomechanical stability, hydrodynamics, and solute transport. This paper presents a quantitative approach to fracture characterization to provide information useful for stability and flow analysis, and for coupled flow/geomechanics. The approach presented is based on the concept of geo-structural, hydro-mechanical, and microstructural models. This approach is applicable for data collected from exposed surfaces (mapping, LiDAR, aero-magnetics), boreholes (core, optical images, and images based on resistivity and geophysical methods), and three dimensional imaging (seismic attributes and microseismics). Examples are presented comparing the results of conventional fracture characterization procedures and the recommended procedure. Fracture characterization for geo-structural fracture models is based on the idea that the geologically based fracture spatial pattern is the key, rather than individual fracture statistics. For example, while fracture intensity statistics can useful, the three dimensional fracture pattern for a bedded sedimentary rock can be better reproduced from the combination of a mechanical bedding model and a correlation between fracture spacing and bed height. In a fracture geo-structural model, the fracture spatial pattern, orientation, and intensity should be characterized in a combination of global and local coordinate systems. While some fracture sets may be oriented relative to the regional tectonics (the global coordinate system), other fracture sets are oriented relative to bedding (a local coordinate system). Fracture hydro-mechanical models define the combination of (a) conductive fractures, (b) flow-barrier fractures, (c) fractures which provide storage porosity, (d) fractures of significance for kinematic stability, and (e) fractures of significance for rock mass strength and deformability. The hydromechanical fractures are a subset of

  1. Fracture size and transmissivity correlations: Implications for transport simulations in sparse three-dimensional discrete fracture networks following a truncated power law distribution of fracture size

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Aldrich, Garrett Allen; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Makedonska, Nataliia; Karra, Satish

    2016-08-01

    We characterize how different fracture size-transmissivity relationships influence flow and transport simulations through sparse three-dimensional discrete fracture networks. Although it is generally accepted that there is a positive correlation between a fracture's size and its transmissivity/aperture, the functional form of that relationship remains a matter of debate. Relationships that assume perfect correlation, semicorrelation, and noncorrelation between the two have been proposed. To study the impact that adopting one of these relationships has on transport properties, we generate multiple sparse fracture networks composed of circular fractures whose radii follow a truncated power law distribution. The distribution of transmissivities are selected so that the mean transmissivity of the fracture networks are the same and the distributions of aperture and transmissivity in models that include a stochastic term are also the same. We observe that adopting a correlation between a fracture size and its transmissivity leads to earlier breakthrough times and higher effective permeability when compared to networks where no correlation is used. While fracture network geometry plays the principal role in determining where transport occurs within the network, the relationship between size and transmissivity controls the flow speed. Lastly, these observations indicate DFN modelers should be aware that breakthrough times and effective permeabilities can be strongly influenced by such a relationship in addition to fracture and network statistics.

  2. Fracture size and transmissivity correlations: Implications for transport simulations in sparse three-dimensional discrete fracture networks following a truncated power law distribution of fracture size

    DOE PAGES

    Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Aldrich, Garrett Allen; Viswanathan, Hari S.; ...

    2016-08-01

    We characterize how different fracture size-transmissivity relationships influence flow and transport simulations through sparse three-dimensional discrete fracture networks. Although it is generally accepted that there is a positive correlation between a fracture's size and its transmissivity/aperture, the functional form of that relationship remains a matter of debate. Relationships that assume perfect correlation, semicorrelation, and noncorrelation between the two have been proposed. To study the impact that adopting one of these relationships has on transport properties, we generate multiple sparse fracture networks composed of circular fractures whose radii follow a truncated power law distribution. The distribution of transmissivities are selected somore » that the mean transmissivity of the fracture networks are the same and the distributions of aperture and transmissivity in models that include a stochastic term are also the same. We observe that adopting a correlation between a fracture size and its transmissivity leads to earlier breakthrough times and higher effective permeability when compared to networks where no correlation is used. While fracture network geometry plays the principal role in determining where transport occurs within the network, the relationship between size and transmissivity controls the flow speed. Lastly, these observations indicate DFN modelers should be aware that breakthrough times and effective permeabilities can be strongly influenced by such a relationship in addition to fracture and network statistics.« less

  3. On the study of crack-initiation fracture toughness of fiber glass asphalt shingles

    SciTech Connect

    Shiao, M.L.

    1999-07-01

    The fracture behavior of fiber glass asphalt shingles was examined by measuring their J-integral fracture toughness at crack initiation. The corresponding fracture mechanisms were also studied by in situ fracture observation and by scanning electron microscopy. The applicability of using J-integral fracture toughness to characterize asphalt shingles was discussed and its relationships to other mechanical properties was established. The results indicated that the fracture toughness at crack initiation can be accurately measured for fiber glass shingles and the values may be used to characterize their cracking resistance. Fracture toughness measured from various shingle samples was found to correlate to the shingle's tensile toughness and to its tear strength. Preliminary results on fracture mechanisms suggested that failure in the asphalt coatings by micro-cavitation may be the controlling event leading to crack advance. The importance of the glass fiber mat on a shingle's resistance to fracture was also discussed.

  4. Fracture of textured iron titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Michael Henry

    The bulk properties of polycrystalline ceramics are strongly influenced by crystallographic texture. Despite this, and the virtual omnipresence of texture in ceramic microstructures, few studies have examined the influence of texture on the properties of a bulk ceramic. In this work, the role of texture in determining the fracture behavior of a highly anisotropic ceramic, iron titanate, has been examined. By exploiting the anisotropy in its single crystal magnetic susceptibility, crystallographically textured and untextured iron titanate microstructures were formed by processing in the presence and absence of a strong magnetic field, respectively. The magnetic field-assisted processing imparted fiber texture, with the grains' b-axes aligning parallel to the applied field. Despite the presence of a high degree of crystallographic texture, the magnetically-processed specimens exhibited little or no morphological texture, as evidenced by stereological analysis. This allowed changes in the observed properties to be attributed to crystallographic texture alone. Residual stress was evaluated using x-ray diffraction techniques. Both triaxial residual stress and lattice parameter measurements showed that both the untextured and textured materials had undergone significant stress relaxation. Finite element simulations of residual stresses at the grain boundaries of a model microstructure showed that microcracking is still quite likely to occur in a textured material; however, the microcracks would be preferentially oriented so that their planes are parallel to the applied magnetic field. These predictions were confirmed via SANS measurements on highly textured iron titanate samples. Strength in bending and R-curve behavior were evaluated as functions of degree of texture and orientation in the magnetically-processed materials. Strengths remained on the order of that for the control material, except for one orientation, for which the strength decreased with increasing degree

  5. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Dede, Anastasia D; Tournis, Symeon; Dontas, Ismene; Trovas, George

    2014-12-01

    Increased fracture risk, traditionally associated with type 1 diabetes, has lately been of great concern in patients with type 2 diabetes. A variable increase in fracture risk has been reported, ranging from 20% to 3-fold, depending on skeletal site, diabetes duration and study design. Longer disease duration, the presence of diabetic complications, inadequate glycemic control, insulin use and increased risk for falls are all reported to increase fracture risk. Patients with type 2 diabetes display a unique skeletal phenotype with either normal or more frequently increased, bone mineral density and impaired structural and geometric properties. Recently, alterations in bone material properties seem to be the predominant defect leading to increased bone fragility. Accumulation of advanced glycation end-products and changes in collagen cross-linking along with suppression of bone turnover seem to be significant factors impairing bone strength. FRAX score has been reported to underestimate fracture risk and lumbar spine BMD is inadequate in predicting vertebral fractures. Anti-diabetic medications, apart from thiazolidinediones, appear to be safe for the skeleton, although more data are needed. Optimal strategies to reduce skeletal fragility in type 2 diabetic patients are yet to be determined.

  6. Epidemiology of hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Kannus, P; Parkkari, J; Sievänen, H; Heinonen, A; Vuori, I; Järvinen, M

    1996-01-01

    There were an estimated 1.66 million hip fractures world-wide in 1990. According to the epidemiologic projections, this worldwide annual number will rise to 6.26 million by the year 2050. This rise will be in great part due to the huge increase in the elderly population of the world. However, the age-specific incidence rates of hip fractures have also increased during the recent decades and in many countries this rise has not leveled off. In the districts where this increase has either showed or leveled off, the change seems to especially concern women's cervical fractures. In men, the increase has continued unabated almost everywhere. Reasons for the age-specific increase are not known: increase in the age-adjusted incidence of falls of the elderly individuals with accompanying deterioration in the age-adjusted bone quality (strength, mineral density) may partially explain the phenomenon. The growth of the elderly population will be more marked in Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa than in Europe and North America, and it is in the former regions that the greatest increments in hip fracture are projected so that these regions will account for over 70% of the 6.26 million hip fractures in the year 2050. The incidence rates of hip fractures vary considerably from population to population and race to race but increase exponentially with age in every group. Highest incidences have been described in the whites of Northern Europe (Scandinavia) and North America. In Finland, for example, the 1991 incidence of hip fractures was 1.1% for women and 0.7% for men over 70 years of age. Among elderly nursing home residents, the figures can be as high as 6.2% and 4.9%. The lifetime risk of a hip fracture is 16%-18% in white women and 5%-6% in white men. At the age of 80 years, every fifth woman and at the age of 90 years almost every second woman has suffered a hip fracture. Since populations are aging worldwide, the mean age of the hip fracture patients are

  7. Triaxial coreflood study of the hydraulic fracturing of Utica Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, J. W.; Frash, L.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    One of the central questions in unconventional oil and gas production research is the cause of limited recovery of hydrocarbon. There are many hypotheses including: 1) inadequate penetration of fractures within the stimulated volume; 2) limited proppant delivery; 3) multiphase flow phenomena that blocks hydrocarbon migration; etc. Underlying any solution to this problem must be an understanding of the hydrologic properties of hydraulically fractured shale. In this study, we conduct triaxial coreflood experiments using a gasket sealing mechanism to characterize hydraulic fracture development and permeability of Utica Shale samples. Our approach also includes fracture propagation with proppants. The triaxial coreflood experiments were conducted with an integrated x-ray tomography system that allows direct observation of fracture development using x-ray video radiography and x-ray computed tomography at elevated pressure. A semi-circular, fracture initiation notch was cut into an end-face of the cylindrical samples (1"-diameter with lengths from 0.375 to 1"). The notch was aligned parallel with the x-ray beam to allow video radiography of fracture growth as a function of injection pressure. The proppants included tungsten powder that provided good x-ray contrast for tracing proppant delivery and distribution within the fracture system. Fractures were propagated at injection pressures in excess of the confining pressure and permeability measurements were made in samples where the fractures propagated through the length of the sample, ideally without penetrating the sample sides. Following fracture development, permeability was characterized as a function of hydrostatic pressure and injection pressure. X-ray video radioadiography was used to study changes in fracture aperture in relation to permeability and proppant embedment. X-ray tomography was collected at steady-state conditions to fully characterize fracture geometry and proppant distribution.

  8. Spartan Release Engagement Mechanism (REM) stress and fracture analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlowe, D. S.; West, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    The revised stress and fracture analysis of the Spartan REM hardware for current load conditions and mass properties is presented. The stress analysis was performed using a NASTRAN math model of the Spartan REM adapter, base, and payload. Appendix A contains the material properties, loads, and stress analysis of the hardware. The computer output and model description are in Appendix B. Factors of safety used in the stress analysis were 1.4 on tested items and 2.0 on all other items. Fracture analysis of the items considered fracture critical was accomplished using the MSFC Crack Growth Analysis code. Loads and stresses were obtaind from the stress analysis. The fracture analysis notes are located in Appendix A and the computer output in Appendix B. All items analyzed met design and fracture criteria.

  9. Ultrasonic and numerical modeling of reflections from simulated fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen, T.; Zhu, Xiang,

    1997-10-01

    In order to develop modeling techniques for the characterization of fracture properties in tight gas sands from surface seismic reflection data we examine seismic waves scattered from anisotropic heterogeneity with laboratory data and numerical modeling. Laboratory models representing features of a fractured reservoir were constructed using Phenolite embedded in a Lucite background, and seismic surveys were gathered over these models. In parallel with laboratory measurement, finite-difference modeling of reflections from a fractured medium were carried out. Fracture zone properties were calculated using an effective medium theory, the variation of fracture density produced a heterogeneous medium. The heterogeneity was modeled with a stochastic process, characterized by a probability density function and an auto-correlation function. Results from both modeling efforts show that prestacked AVO data can contain important information describing reservoir heterogeneity.

  10. A new device for characterizing fracture networks and measuring groundwater and contaminant fluxes in fractured rock aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klammler, Harald; Hatfield, Kirk; Newman, Mark A.; Cho, Jaehyun; Annable, Michael D.; Parker, Beth L.; Cherry, John A.; Perminova, Irina

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the fundamental theory and laboratory test results on a new device that is deployed in boreholes in fractured rock aquifers to characterize vertical distributions of water and contaminant fluxes, aquifer hydraulic properties, and fracture network properties (e.g., active fracture density and orientation). The device, a fractured rock passive flux meter (FRPFM), consists of an inflatable core assembled with upper and lower packers that isolate the zone of interest from vertical gradients within the borehole. The outer layer of the core consists of an elastic fabric mesh equilibrated with a visible dye which is used to provide visual indications of active fractures and measures of fracture location, orientation, groundwater flux, and the direction of that flux. Beneath the outer layer is a permeable sorbent that is preloaded with known amounts of water soluble tracers which are eluted at rates proportional to groundwater flow. This sorbent also captures target contaminants present in intercepted groundwater. The mass of contaminant sorbed is used to quantify cumulative contaminant flux; whereas, the mass fractions of resident tracers lost are used to provide measures of water flux. In this paper, the FRPFM is bench tested over a range of fracture velocities (2-20 m/day) using a single fracture flow apparatus (fracture aperture = 0.5 mm). Test results show a discoloration in visible dye corresponding to the location of the active fracture. The geometry of the discoloration can be used to discern fracture orientation as well as direction and magnitude of flow in the fracture. Average contaminant fluxes were measured within 16% and water fluxes within 25% of known imposed fluxes.

  11. NASGRO(registered trademark): Fracture Mechanics and Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce; Shivakumar, V.; Mettu, Sambi; Beek, Joachim; Williams, Leonard; Yeh, Feng; McClung, Craig; Cardinal, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes NASGRO, which is a fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analysis software package that is used to reduce risk of fracture in Space Shuttles. The contents include: 1) Consequences of Fracture; 2) NASA Fracture Control Requirements; 3) NASGRO Reduces Risk; 4) NASGRO Use Inside NASA; 5) NASGRO Components: Crack Growth Module; 6) NASGRO Components:Material Property Module; 7) Typical NASGRO analysis: Crack growth or component life calculation; and 8) NASGRO Sample Application: Orbiter feedline flowliner crack analysis.

  12. Predicting Hip Fracture Type With Cortical Bone Mapping (CBM) in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study.

    PubMed

    Treece, Graham M; Gee, Andrew H; Tonkin, Carol; Ewing, Susan K; Cawthon, Peggy M; Black, Dennis M; Poole, Kenneth E S

    2015-11-01

    Hip fracture risk is known to be related to material properties of the proximal femur, but fracture prediction studies adding richer quantitative computed tomography (QCT) measures to dual-energy X-ray (DXA)-based methods have shown limited improvement. Fracture types have distinct relationships to predictors, but few studies have subdivided fracture into types, because this necessitates regional measurements and more fracture cases. This work makes use of cortical bone mapping (CBM) to accurately assess, with no prior anatomical presumptions, the distribution of properties related to fracture type. CBM uses QCT data to measure the cortical and trabecular properties, accurate even for thin cortices below the imaging resolution. The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study is a predictive case-cohort study of men over 65 years old: we analyze 99 fracture cases (44 trochanteric and 55 femoral neck) compared to a cohort of 308, randomly selected from 5994. To our knowledge, this is the largest QCT-based predictive hip fracture study to date, and the first to incorporate CBM analysis into fracture prediction. We show that both cortical mass surface density and endocortical trabecular BMD are significantly different in fracture cases versus cohort, in regions appropriate to fracture type. We incorporate these regions into predictive models using Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios, and logistic regression to estimate area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Adding CBM to DXA-based BMD leads to a small but significant (p < 0.005) improvement in model prediction for any fracture, with AUC increasing from 0.78 to 0.79, assessed using leave-one-out cross-validation. For specific fracture types, the improvement is more significant (p < 0.0001), with AUC increasing from 0.71 to 0.77 for trochanteric fractures and 0.76 to 0.82 for femoral neck fractures. In contrast, adding DXA-based BMD to a CBM-based predictive model

  13. Predicting Hip Fracture Type With Cortical Bone Mapping (CBM) in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Andrew H; Tonkin, Carol; Ewing, Susan K; Cawthon, Peggy M; Black, Dennis M; Poole, Kenneth ES

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hip fracture risk is known to be related to material properties of the proximal femur, but fracture prediction studies adding richer quantitative computed tomography (QCT) measures to dual‐energy X‐ray (DXA)‐based methods have shown limited improvement. Fracture types have distinct relationships to predictors, but few studies have subdivided fracture into types, because this necessitates regional measurements and more fracture cases. This work makes use of cortical bone mapping (CBM) to accurately assess, with no prior anatomical presumptions, the distribution of properties related to fracture type. CBM uses QCT data to measure the cortical and trabecular properties, accurate even for thin cortices below the imaging resolution. The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study is a predictive case‐cohort study of men over 65 years old: we analyze 99 fracture cases (44 trochanteric and 55 femoral neck) compared to a cohort of 308, randomly selected from 5994. To our knowledge, this is the largest QCT‐based predictive hip fracture study to date, and the first to incorporate CBM analysis into fracture prediction. We show that both cortical mass surface density and endocortical trabecular BMD are significantly different in fracture cases versus cohort, in regions appropriate to fracture type. We incorporate these regions into predictive models using Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios, and logistic regression to estimate area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Adding CBM to DXA‐based BMD leads to a small but significant (p < 0.005) improvement in model prediction for any fracture, with AUC increasing from 0.78 to 0.79, assessed using leave‐one‐out cross‐validation. For specific fracture types, the improvement is more significant (p < 0.0001), with AUC increasing from 0.71 to 0.77 for trochanteric fractures and 0.76 to 0.82 for femoral neck fractures. In contrast, adding DXA‐based BMD to a

  14. Geomechanically Coupled Simulation of Flow in Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C.; Moos, D.; Hartley, L.; Baxter, S.; Foulquier, L.; Holl, H.; Hogarth, R.

    2012-12-01

    Capturing the necessary and sufficient detail of reservoir hydraulics to accurately evaluate reservoir behavior remains a significant challenge to the exploitation and management of fracture-dominated geothermal reservoirs. In these low matrix permeability reservoirs, stimulation response is controlled largely by the properties of natural and induced fracture networks, which are in turn controlled by the in situ stresses, the fracture distribution and connectivity and the hydraulic behavior of the fractures. This complex interaction of fracture flow systems with the present-day stress field compounds the problem of developing an effective and efficient simulation to characterize, model and predict fractured reservoir performance. We discuss here a case study of the integration of geological, geophysical, geomechanical, and reservoir engineering data to characterize the in situ stresses, the natural fracture network and the controls on fracture permeability in geothermal reservoirs. A 3D geomechanical reservoir model includes constraints on stress magnitudes and orientations, and constraints on mechanical rock properties and the fractures themselves. Such a model is essential to understanding reservoir response to stimulation and production in low matrix permeability, fracture-dominated reservoirs. The geomechanical model for this study was developed using petrophysical, drilling, and wellbore image data along with direct well test measurements and was mapped to a 3D structural grid to facilitate coupled simulation of the fractured reservoir. Wellbore image and stimulation test data were used along with microseismic data acquired during the test to determine the reservoir fracture architecture and to provide control points for a realistic inter-connected discrete fracture network. As most fractures are stress-sensitive, their hydraulic conductivities will change with changes in bottomhole flowing and reservoir pressures, causing variations in production profiles

  15. Tibial fractures in children

    PubMed Central

    Palmu, Sauli A; Auro, Sampo; Lohman, Martina; Paukku, Reijo T; Peltonen, Jari I; Nietosvaara, Yrjänä

    2014-01-01

    Background Tibial fracture is the third most common long-bone fracture in children. Traditionally, most tibial fractures in children have been treated non-operatively, but there are no long-term results. Methods 94 children (64 boys) were treated for a tibial fracture in Aurora City Hospital during the period 1980–89 but 20 could not be included in the study. 58 of the remaining 74 patients returned a written questionnaire and 45 attended a follow-up examination at mean 27 (23–32) years after the fracture. Results 89 children had been treated by manipulation under anesthesia and cast-immobilization, 4 by skeletal traction, and 1 with pin fixation. 41 fractures had been re-manipulated. The mean length of hospital stay was 5 (1–26) days. Primary complications were recorded in 5 children. The childrens’ memories of treatment were positive in two-thirds of cases. The mean subjective VAS score (range 0–10) for function appearance was 9. Leg-length discrepancy (5–10 mm) was found clinically in 10 of 45 subjects and rotational deformities exceeding 20° in 4. None of the subjects walked with a limp. None had axial malalignment exceeding 10°. Osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee was seen in radiographs from 2 subjects. Interpretation The long-term outcome of tibial fractures in children treated non-operatively is generally good. PMID:24786903

  16. Particle Swarm Transport in Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Mackin, T.; Boomsma, E.

    2012-12-01

    Colloidal particles of many types occur in fractures in the subsurface as a result of both natural and industrial processes (e.g., environmental influences, synthetic nano- & micro-particles from consumer products, chemical and mechanical erosion of geologic material, proppants used in gas and oil extraction, etc.). The degree of localization and speed of transport of such particles depends on the transport mechanisms, the chemical and physical properties of the particles and the surrounding rock, and the flow path geometry through the fracture. In this study, we investigated the transport of particle swarms through artificial fracture networks. A synthetic fracture network was created using an Objet Eden 350V 3D printer to build a network of fractures. Each fracture in the network had a rectangular cross-sectional area with a constant depth of 7 mm but with widths that ranged from 2 mm to 11 mm. The overall dimensions of the network were 132 mm by 166 mm. The fracture network had 7 ports that were used either as the inlet or outlet for fluid flow through the sample or for introducing a particle swarm. Water flow rates through the fracture were controlled with a syringe pump, and ranged from zero flow to 6 ml/min. Swarms were composed of a dilute suspension (2% by mass) of 3 μm fluorescent polystyrene beads in water. Swarms with volumes of 5, 10, 20, 30 and 60 μl were used and delivered into the network using a second syringe pump. The swarm behavior was imaged using an optical fluorescent imaging system illuminated by green (525 nm) LED arrays and captured by a CCD camera. For fracture networks with quiescent fluids, particle swarms fell under gravity and remained localized within the network. Large swarms (30-60 μl) were observed to bifurcate at shallower depths resulting in a broader dispersal of the particles than for smaller swarm volumes. For all swarm volumes studied, particle swarms tended to bifurcate at the intersection between fractures. These

  17. Statistical Aspects of Microheterogeneous Rock Fracture: Observations and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiying; Chudnovsky, Alexander; Wong, George; Dudley, John W.

    2013-05-01

    Rocks and other geomaterials are heterogeneous materials, with a well-recognized hierarchy of defects from micro-heterogeneities on the grain level to a large-scale network of cracks and layering structures. Their nature create a challenge for determining macroscopic properties, particularly for properties that are scale dependent, complicating both the property measurement and its appropriate application in modeling. This paper discusses the concept of a "representative volume", which is commonly used in modeling microheterogeneous but statistically homogeneous material by an effective homogeneous continuum. The foundation of this concept is presented, along with its limitations in dealing with properties like strength and fracture toughness that exhibit a scale effect. This limitation is illustrated with a study of brittle fracture of a concrete where it is considered a model for statistically homogeneous rock. The study includes determining a scaling rule for the scale effect in fracture toughness, and shows that the fracture of brittle materials like rocks and concrete appears in the form of highly tortuous, stochastic paths. This reflects a complex interaction between a crack and pre-existing as well as newly formed micro-defects controlled by chance, and results in a large scatter of all fracture-related parameters. This behavior suggests a synthesis of fracture mechanics with probability and statistics, and so a brief exposition of statistical fracture mechanics (SFM) that addresses the statistical aspects of fracture is also presented. SFM is a formalism that combines fracture mechanics methods with probability theory and serves as the basis for an adequate modeling of brittle fracture.

  18. Modern Workflows for Fracture Rock Hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doe, T.

    2015-12-01

    Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) is a numerical simulation approach that represents a conducting fracture network using geologically realistic geometries and single-conductor hydraulic and transport properties. In terms of diffusion analogues, equivalent porous media derive from heat conduction in continuous media, while DFN simulation is more similar to electrical flow and diffusion in circuits with discrete pathways. DFN modeling grew out of pioneering work of David Snow in the late 1960s with additional impetus in the 1970's from the development of the development of stochastic approaches for describing of fracture geometric and hydrologic properties. Research in underground test facilities for radioactive waste disposal developed the necessary linkages between characterization technologies and simulation as well as bringing about a hybrid deterministic stochastic approach. Over the past 40 years DFN simulation and characterization methods have moved from the research environment into practical, commercial application. The key geologic, geophysical and hydrologic tools provide the required DFN inputs of conductive fracture intensity, orientation, and transmissivity. Flow logging either using downhole tool or by detailed packer testing identifies the locations of conducting features in boreholes, and image logging provides information on the geology and geometry of the conducting features. Multi-zone monitoring systems isolate the individual conductors, and with subsequent drilling and characterization perturbations help to recognize connectivity and compartmentalization in the fracture network. Tracer tests and core analysis provide critical information on the transport properties especially matrix diffusion unidentified conducting pathways. Well test analyses incorporating flow dimension boundary effects provide further constraint on the conducting geometry of the fracture network.

  19. Biomechanical Characteristics of Osteoporotic Fracture Healing in Ovariectomized Rats: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Long; Yao, Min; Cui, Xue-Jun; Xue, Chun-Chun; Wang, Yong-Jun; Shu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Biomechanical tests are widely used in animal studies on osteoporotic fracture healing. However, the biomechanical recovery process is still unknown, leading to difficulty in choosing time points for biomechanical tests and in correctly assessing osteoporotic fracture healing. To determine the biomechanical recovery process during osteoporotic fracture healing, studies on osteoporotic femur fracture healing with biomechanical tests in ovariectomized rat (OVX) models were collected from PUBMED, EMBASE, and Chinese databases. Quadratic curves of fracture healing time and maximum load were fitted with data from the analyzed studies. In the fitted curve for normal fractures, the predicted maximum load was 145.56 N, and the fracture healing time was 88.0 d. In the fitted curve for osteoporotic fractures, the predicted maximum load was 122.30 N, and the fracture healing time was 95.2 d. The maximum load of fractured femurs in OVX rats was also lower than that in sham rats at day 84 post-fracture (D84 PF). The fracture healing time was prolonged and maximum load at D84 PF decreased in OVX rats with closed fractures. The maximum load of Wister rats was higher than that of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, but the fracture healing time of SD and Wister rats was similar. Osteoporotic fracture healing was delayed in rats that were < = 12 weeks old when ovariectomized, and at D84 PF, the maximum load of rats < = 12 weeks old at ovariectomy was lower than that of rats >12 weeks old at ovariectomy. There was no significant difference in maximum load at D84 PF between rats with an osteoporosis modeling time <12 weeks and > = 12 weeks. In conclusion, fracture healing was delayed and biomechanical property decreased by osteoporosis. Time points around D95.2 PF should be considered for biomechanical tests of osteoporotic femur fracture healing in OVX rat models. Osteoporotic fracture healing in OVX rats was affected by the fracture type but not by the strain of the rat.

  20. Occult fractures of extremities.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joong Mo; El-Khoury, Georges Y

    2007-05-01

    Recent advances in cross-sectional imaging, particularly in CT and MR imaging, have given these modalities a prominent role in the diagnosis of fractures of the extremities. This article describes the clinical application and imaging features of cross-sectional imaging (CT and MR imaging) in the evaluation of patients who have occult fractures of the extremities. Although CT or MR imaging is not typically required for evaluation of acute fractures, these modalities could be helpful in the evaluation of the occult osseous injuries in which radiographic findings are equivocal or inconclusive.

  1. Haemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    patients with pelvic fractures. Ann Surg 2001;233:843–50. 12. Blackmore CC, Cummings P, Jurkovich GJ , et al. Predicting major hemorrhage in patients...with pelvic fracture. J Trauma 2006;61:346–52. 13. Blackmore CC, Jurkovich GJ , Linnau KF, et al. Assessment of volume of hemorrhage and outcome from...outcome of blunt trauma patients sustaining pelvic fractures. Injury 2000;31:677–82. 55. Haidukewych GJ , Kumar S, Prpa B. Placement of half-pins for

  2. Clinical survey of fractured teeth.

    PubMed

    Gher, M E; Dunlap, R M; Anderson, M H; Kuhl, L V

    1987-02-01

    Through a standardized procedure using clinical examination, interviews, and dental history, this 2-year study documents 100 cases of tooth fracture in 98 patients. For comparison, pertinent information was also recorded for more than 2,000 teeth in a randomly selected sample population. Two chief types of fracture were found: incomplete crown-root fractures and root fractures associated with earlier endodontic therapy.

  3. Mechanical Coal-Face Fracturer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Radial points on proposed drill bit take advantage of natural fracture planes of coal. Radial fracture points retracted during drilling and impacted by piston to fracture coal once drilling halts. Group of bits attached to array of pneumatic drivers to fracture large areas of coal face.

  4. Crack branching in carbon steel. Fracture mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syromyatnikova, A. S.; Alekseev, A. A.; Levin, A. I.; Lyglaev, A. V.

    2010-04-01

    The fracture surfaces of pressure vessels made of carbon steel that form during crack branching propagation are examined by fractography. Crack branching is found to occur at a crack velocity higher than a certain critical value V > V c . In this case, the material volume that is involved in fracture and depends on the elastoplastic properties of the material and the sample width has no time to dissipate the energy released upon crack motion via the damage mechanisms intrinsic in the material under given deformation conditions (in our case, via cracking according to intragranular cleavage).

  5. Material Characterization for Ductile Fracture Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Michael R.

    2000-01-01

    The research summarized in this document provides valuable information for structural health evaluation of NASA infrastructure. Specifically, material properties are reported which will enable calibration of ductile fracture prediction methods for three high-toughness metallic materials and one aluminum alloy which can be found in various NASA facilities. The task of investigating these materials has also served to validate an overall methodology for ductile fracture prediction is currently being employed at NASA. In facilitating the ability to incorporate various materials into the prediction scheme, we have provided data to enable demonstration of the overall generality of the approach.

  6. Fracture Toughness Prediction for MWCNT Reinforced Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the development of a micromechanics model to predict fracture toughness of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced ceramic composites to guide future experimental work for this project. The modeling work described in this report includes (i) prediction of elastic properties, (ii) development of a mechanistic damage model accounting for matrix cracking to predict the composite nonlinear stress/strain response to tensile loading to failure, and (iii) application of this damage model in a modified boundary layer (MBL) analysis using ABAQUS to predict fracture toughness and crack resistance behavior (R-curves) for ceramic materials containing MWCNTs at various volume fractions.

  7. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; H. Yasuhara; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn

    2002-10-28

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (1) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology using high-resolution x-ray microtomography, (2) modeling of fracture permeability in the presence of asperities and confining stress, and (3) simulation of two-phase fluid flow in a fracture and a layered matrix. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. The distribution of fracture aperture is a difficult issue that we are studying and developing methods of quantification. The difficulties are both numerical and conceptual. Numerically, the three-dimensional data sets include millions, and sometimes, billions of points, and pose a computational challenge. The conceptual difficulties derive from the rough nature of the fracture surfaces, and the heterogeneous nature of the rock matrix. However, the high-resolution obtained by the imaging system provides us a much needed measuring environment on rock samples that are subjected to simultaneous fluid flow and confining stress. Pilot multi-phase experiments have been performed, proving the ability to detect two phases in certain large fractures. The absolute permeability of a fracture depends on the behavior of the asperities that keep it open. A model is being developed that predicts the permeability and average aperture of a fracture as a function of time under steady flow of water including the pressure solution at the asperity contact points. Several two-phase flow experiments in the presence of a fracture tip were performed in the past. At the

  8. The effects of roughness and offset on fracture compliance ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, M.; Taleghani, A. Dahi; Sayers, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    Fractures are a source of extra compliance in the rock mass. The mechanical properties of the rock matrix as well as the propagation of seismic waves inside the rock medium are dependent on the magnitude of roughness and offset between the imperfect fracture interfaces. Fracture compliance can estimate the degree of contact between fracture faces, type of fluid filling the fracture and the fracture roughness. To characterize these fracture properties, compliance ratio, known by the ratio of normal-to-shear compliance, can be a potential tool in the subsurface studies to improve the well layout design. The focus of this study is to illustrate how the compliance ratio of a rough fracture, with or without the offset between the fracture faces, can diverge from the compliance ratio of a fracture with smooth interface. Quasi-static and dynamic methods are two common ways to calculate the compliance. The former calculates the compliance by measuring the change in the displacement with the applied stress, while the latter estimates the compliance through monitoring the changes in propagation of seismic waves. To compare the compliance ratios of fractures with imperfect and smooth interfaces in an infinite medium, a numerical finite-element model is built in commercial finite-element software. The imperfect interface of the fracture is modeled with saw-tooth-like structures where they can be partially or fully in contact. The defined saw-tooth-like structures of contact asperities impose an in-plane asymmetry in the shear direction. This asymmetry causes two different values for the compliance in shear direction, known as the soft and stiff shear compliance. Our numerical simulations suggest the increase in the degree of contact between the fracture faces increases the compliance ratio in the stiff direction more than the soft direction. The compliance ratio of the fracture with the imperfect interface is larger than the compliance ratio of the smooth fracture. We suggest

  9. Modeling of heat transport through Fractures with emphasis to roughness and aperture variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigon, Benoit; Englert, Andreas; Pascal, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Fractured media are characterized by multi-scale heterogeneities implying high spatial variability of hydraulic properties. At the fracture network scale, spatial organization of fluxes is controlled by the fracture network geometry, itself characterized by fracture connectivity, fracture density, and the respective lengths and apertures of the fractures within the network. At the fracture scale, the variability of the fluxes is mainly controlled by fracture roughness and aperture variability. The multi-scale heterogeneities of fractured rocks imply complexities for prediction of solute and heat transport in space and time, and often lead to the so-called "anomalous transport" behavior. In homogeneous media, heat transport can be described using Fourier's law opening the possibility to apply the advection-dispersion equation to predict transport behavior. However, in real fractured media a "non-Fourier transport" often dominates. The latter phenomenon, characterized by asymmetric breakthrough shape, early breakthrough and long tailing cannot be described by the classical advection-dispersion equation. In the present study, we focus on heat transport within a single fracture and we explore the respective roles of fracture roughness and aperture variability. Fracture roughness has two main effects on heat transport, flow channeling and a spatial variation of heat exchange area between fluid and rock. Fracture aperture variability controls the variability of fracture flow, and thus induces spatial variation of heat transport in a fracture. Micro- to macro-scale fracture roughness measurements will be performed in the field and the laboratory using a terrestrial LIDAR, a X-Ray CT-Scanner Alpha, and a Microscope Keyence VHX 100. Thereafter the measurements will be used to better describe fracture geometry taking in account discontinuity type. To further improve the understanding of heat transfer between fracture and matrix, we will numerically model heat transport as

  10. Fracturing and brittleness index analyses of shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhoorn, Auke; Primarini, Mutia; Houben, Maartje

    2016-04-01

    The formation of a fracture network in rocks has a crucial control on the flow behaviour of fluids. In addition, an existing network of fractures , influences the propagation of new fractures during e.g. hydraulic fracturing or during a seismic event. Understanding of the type and characteristics of the fracture network that will be formed during e.g. hydraulic fracturing is thus crucial to better predict the outcome of a hydraulic fracturing job. For this, knowledge of the rock properties is crucial. The brittleness index is often used as a rock property that can be used to predict the fracturing behaviour of a rock for e.g. hydraulic fracturing of shales. Various terminologies of the brittleness index (BI1, BI2 and BI3) exist based on mineralogy, elastic constants and stress-strain behaviour (Jin et al., 2014, Jarvie et al., 2007 and Holt et al., 2011). A maximum brittleness index of 1 predicts very good and efficient fracturing behaviour while a minimum brittleness index of 0 predicts a much more ductile shale behaviour. Here, we have performed systematic petrophysical, acoustic and geomechanical analyses on a set of shale samples from Whitby (UK) and we have determined the three different brittleness indices on each sample by performing all the analyses on each of the samples. We show that each of the three brittleness indices are very different for the same sample and as such it can be concluded that the brittleness index is not a good predictor of the fracturing behaviour of shales. The brittleness index based on the acoustic data (BI1) all lie around values of 0.5, while the brittleness index based on the stress strain data (BI2) give an average brittleness index around 0.75, whereas the mineralogy brittleness index (BI3) predict values below 0.2. This shows that by using different estimates of the brittleness index different decisions can be made for hydraulic fracturing. If we would rely on the mineralogy (BI3), the Whitby mudstone is not a suitable

  11. Interphase effect on intralaminar fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Hrivnak, J.A.; Dagastine, R.R.; McCullough, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    In fiber reinforced thermoset composites there is a growing body of experimental evidence which has pointed to a region at the fiber/matrix boundary with properties that differ from the fiber or matrix. This region extends beyond the two dimensional interface at the fiber/matrix boundary to have a finite thickness with chemical and structural property gradients. This leads to the concept of an interphase region. The interphase has a large effect on the thermal and mechanical properties of the composite such as fracture toughness, glass transition temperature and the coefficient of thermal expansion. Understanding the interphase region becomes crucial to tailoring a composite to a desired set of properties.

  12. Poroelastic modeling of seismic boundary conditions across a fracture.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Seiji; Schoenberg, Michael A

    2007-08-01

    Permeability of a fracture can affect how the fracture interacts with seismic waves. To examine this effect, a simple mathematical model that describes the poroelastic nature of wave-fracture interaction is useful. In this paper, a set of boundary conditions is presented which relate wave-induced particle velocity (or displacement) and stress including fluid pressure across a compliant, fluid-bearing fracture. These conditions are derived by modeling a fracture as a thin porous layer with increased compliance and finite permeability. Assuming a small layer thickness, the boundary conditions can be derived by integrating the governing equations of poroelastic wave propagation. A finite jump in the stress and velocity across a fracture is expressed as a function of the stress and velocity at the boundaries. Further simplification for a thin fracture yields a set of characteristic parameters that control the seismic response of single fractures with a wide range of mechanical and hydraulic properties. These boundary conditions have potential applications in simplifying numerical models such as finite-difference and finite-element methods to compute seismic wave scattering off nonplanar (e.g., curved and intersecting) fractures.

  13. Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Doug; Leggett, Jim

    2013-07-29

    The Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager project has a goal to develop a wireline ultrasonic imager that is capable of operating in temperatures up to 300°C (572°F) and depths up to 10 km (32,808 ft). This will address one of the critical needs in any EGS development of understanding the hydraulic flow paths in the reservoir. The ultrasonic imaging is well known in the oil and gas industry as one of the best methods for fracture evaluation; providing both high resolution and complete azimuthal coverage of the borehole. This enables fracture detection and characterization, both natural and induced, providing information as to their location, dip direction and dip magnitude. All of these factors are critical to fully understand the fracture system to enable the optimization of the thermal drainage through injectors and producers in a geothermal resource.

  14. Clavicle Fracture (Broken Collarbone)

    MedlinePlus

    ... risks and benefits of surgery for your clavicle fracture. There are risks associated with any surgery, including: • Infection • Bleeding • Pain • Blood clots in your leg • Damage to ...

  15. Calcaneal stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jason M; Vidt, Louis G; Gehl, Richard S; Montgomery, Travis

    2005-01-01

    The majority of plantar heel pain is diagnosed as plantar fasciitis or heel spur syndrome. When historic or physical findings are unusual or when routine treatment proves ineffective, one should consider an atypical cause of heel pain. Stress fractures of the calcaneus are a frequently unrecognized source of heel pain. In some cases they can continue to go unrecognized because the symptoms of calcaneal stress fractures sometimes improves with treatments aimed at plantar fasciitis. Calcaneal stress fractures can occur in any population of adults and even children and are common among active people, such as athletes, sports enthusiasts, and military personnel. It is likely that the number of diagnosed calcaneal stress fractures will rise among practitioners with an increased recognition of their possibility.

  16. Vertebral Compression Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... OI: Information on Vertebral Compression Fractures 804 W. Diamond Ave., Ste. 210 Gaithersburg, MD 20878 (800) 981- ... osteogenesis imperfecta contact : Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation 804 W. Diamond Avenue, Suite 210, Gaithersburg, MD 20878 Tel: 800- ...

  17. Carbonate fracture stratigraphy: An integrated outcrop and 2D discrete element modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Guy; Finch, Emma

    2013-04-01

    Constraining fracture stratigraphy is important as natural fractures control primary fluid flow in low matrix permeability naturally fractured carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs. Away from the influence of folds and faults, stratigraphic controls are known to be the major control on fracture networks. The fracture stratigraphy of carbonate nodular-chert rhythmite successions are investigated using a Discrete Element Modelling (DEM) technique and validated against observations from outcrops. Comparisons are made to the naturally fractured carbonates of the Eocene Thebes Formation exposed in the west central Sinai of Egypt, which form reservoir rocks in the nearby East Ras Budran Field. DEM allows mechanical stratigraphy to be defined as the starting conditions from which forward numerical modelling can generate fracture stratigraphy. DEM can incorporate both stratigraphic and lateral heterogeneity, and enable mechanical and fracture stratigraphy to be characterised separately. Stratally bound stratified chert nodules below bedding surfaces generate closely spaced lateral heterogeneity in physical properties at stratigraphic mechanical interfaces. This generates extra complexity in natural fracture networks in addition to that caused by bed thickness and lithological physical properties. A series of representative geologically appropriate synthetic mechanical stratigraphic models were tested. Fracture networks generated in 15 DEM experiments designed to isolate and constrain the effects of nodular chert rhythmites on carbonate fracture stratigraphy are presented. The discrete element media used to model the elastic strengths of rocks contain 72,866 individual elements. Mechanical stratigraphies and the fracture networks generated are placed in a sequence stratigraphic framework. Nodular chert rhythmite successions are shown to be a distinct type of naturally fractured carbonate reservoir. Qualitative stratigraphic rules for predicting the distribution, lengths, spacing

  18. SIZE SCALING RELATIONSHIPS IN FRACTURE NETWORKS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas H. Wilson

    2000-01-01

    The research conducted under DOE grant DE-FG26-98FT40385 provides a detailed assessment of size scaling issues in natural fracture and active fault networks that extend over scales from several tens of kilometers to less than a tenth of a meter. This study incorporates analysis of data obtained from several sources, including: natural fracture patterns photographed in the Appalachian field area, natural fracture patterns presented by other workers in the published literature, patterns of active faulting in Japan mapping at a scale of 1:100,000, and lineament patterns interpreted from satellite-based radar imagery obtained over the Appalachian field area. The complexity of these patterns is always found to vary with scale. In general,but not always, patterns become less complex with scale. This tendency may reverse as can be inferred from the complexity of high-resolution radar images (8 meter pixel size) which are characterized by patterns that are less complex than those observed over smaller areas on the ground surface. Model studies reveal that changes in the complexity of a fracture pattern can be associated with dominant spacings between the fractures comprising the pattern or roughly to the rock areas bounded by fractures of a certain scale. While the results do not offer a magic number (the fractal dimension) to characterize fracture networks at all scales, the modeling and analysis provide results that can be interpreted directly in terms of the physical properties of the natural fracture or active fault complex. These breaks roughly define the size of fracture bounded regions at different scales. The larger more extensive sets of fractures will intersect and enclose regions of a certain size, whereas smaller less extensive sets will do the same--i.e. subdivide the rock into even smaller regions. The interpretation varies depending on the number of sets that are present, but the scale breaks in the logN/logr plots serve as a guide to interpreting the

  19. Experimental Fracture Measurements of Functionally Graded Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Ray Douglas

    The primary objective of this research was to extend established fracture toughness testing methods to a new class of engineering materials known as functionally graded materials (FGMs). Secondary goals were to compare experimental results to those predicted by finite element models and to provide fracture test results as feedback toward optimizing processing parameters for the in-house synthesis of a MoSi2/SiC FGM. Preliminary experiments were performed on commercially pure (CP) Ti and uniform axial tensile tests resulted in mechanical property data including yield strength, 268 MPa, ultimate tensile strength, 470 MPa and Young's modulus, 110 GPa. Results from 3-point bending fracture experiments on CP Ti demonstrated rising R-curve behavior and experimentally determined JQ fracture toughness values ranged between 153 N/mm and 254 N/mm. Similar experimental protocols were used for fracture experiments on a 7- layered Ti/TiB FGM material obtained from Cercom in Vista, California. A novel technique for pre-cracking in reverse 4-point bending was developed for this ductile/brittle FGM material. Fracture test results exhibited rising R-curve behavior and estimated JQ fracture toughness values ranged from 0.49 N/mm to 2.63 N/mm. A 5- layered MoSi2/SiC FGM was synthesized using spark plasma sintering (SPS). Samples of this material were fracture tested and the results again exhibited a rising R-curve with KIC fracture toughness values ranging from 2.7 MPa-m1/2 to 6.0 MPa-m1/2. Finite Element Models predicted rising R-curve behavior for both of the FGM materials tested. Model results were in close agreement for the brittle MoSi2/SiC FGM. For the relatively more ductile Ti/TiB material, results were in close agreement at short crack lengths but diverged at longer crack lengths because the models accounted for fracture toughening mechanisms at the crack tip but not those acting in the crack wake.

  20. Modelling of Specimen Fracture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-23

    improve and test the software for larger dynamic problems. The following future work is recommended. 1) Multiple LS - DYNA files – for large problems...continuation of a previous study involving the implementation of a micromechanical fracture model into the LS - DYNA user-defined subroutines. Two fracture...these parameters involved parsing the output data of the selected FE code, LS - DYNA , including element stresses, strain energies, and nodal coordinates

  1. Fracture and Fatigue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    fracture. The main additional categories of crack growth are elastic-plastic crack growth, fatigue crack growth, and crack growth as affected by...FRACTURE AND FATIGUE R. 0. RITCHIE W. W. GERBERICH J. H. UNDERWOOD DTIC AM ELECTE JUL 1 11988 APRIL 1988 FH US ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND...other authorized documents. N The use of trade name(s) and/or manufacturer (s) does not constitute an official indorsement or approval. DESTRUCTION NOTICE

  2. Relative permeability through fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Diomampo, Gracel, P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of two-phase flow through fractures is of importance in understanding many geologic processes. Currently, two-phase flow through fractures is still poorly understood. In this study, nitrogen-water experiments were done on both smooth and rough parallel plates to determine the governing flow mechanism for fractures and the appropriate methodology for data analysis. The experiments were done using a glass plate to allow visualization of flow. Digital video recording allowed instantaneous measurement of pressure, flow rate and saturation. Saturation was computed using image analysis techniques. The experiments showed that gas and liquid phases flow through fractures in nonuniform separate channels. The localized channels change with time as each phase path undergoes continues breaking and reforming due to invasion of the other phase. The stability of the phase paths is dependent on liquid and gas flow rate ratio. This mechanism holds true for over a range of saturation for both smooth and rough fractures. In imbibition for rough-walled fractures, another mechanism similar to wave-like flow in pipes was also observed. The data from the experiments were analyzed using Darcy's law and using the concept of friction factor and equivalent Reynold's number for two-phase flow. For both smooth- and rough-walled fractures a clear relationship between relative permeability and saturation was seen. The calculated relative permeability curves follow Corey-type behavior and can be modeled using Honarpour expressions. The sum of the relative permeabilities is not equal one, indicating phase interference. The equivalent homogeneous single-phase approach did not give satisfactory representation of flow through fractures. The graphs of experimentally derived friction factor with the modified Reynolds number do not reveal a distinctive linear relationship.

  3. Interlaminar fracture of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.

    1984-01-01

    Fracture mechanics has been found to be a useful tool for understanding composite delamination. Analyses for calculating strain energy release rates associated with delamination growth have been developed. These analyses successfully characterized delamination onset and growth for particular sources of delamination. Low velocity impact has been found to be the most severe source of composite delamination. A variety of test methods for measuring interlaminar fracture toughness are being developed to identify new composite materials with enhanced delamination resistance.

  4. Wavefront Imaging in Fractured Transversely-Isotropic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, S.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2013-12-01

    Fractures in the Earth's crust are a source of stress-dependent mechanical anisotropy that affect seismic wave attenuation and velocity. While many theoretical and experimental studies have investigated seismic wave propagation in single or multi- fractured isotropic rocks, few studies have examined the seismic response of a fractured anisotropic medium. Fractures and layering each contribute to the mechanical anisotropy of the crust. The coexistence of these two sources of anisotropy complicates the interpretation of the seismic properties of crustal rock. In this study, laboratory wavefront imaging was performed to capture the seismic response of layered media containing multiple parallel fractures. We determined that whether the observed anisotropy is dominated by the matrix anisotropy or by the fracture orientation depends on the applied stress and that late-arriving guided-modes provide information on the orientation of the fractures. Four cubic garolite samples (~102 mm on edge) each containing 5 parallel fractures were used in this study. The fractures were oriented normal, parallel or at acute angles (30 degrees, 60 degrees) to the layering. The fracture and layer spacing were approximately 10mm and 0.5mm, respectively. An intact sample containing no fractures was used as a standard orthorhombic medium for reference. Stress was applied to the samples with a servo-controlled loading machine. Two spherically-focused water-coupled transducers (central frequency 1MHz) were used; one as a fixed-source and the other as a translating receiver. Each sample was scanned over a 60mm×60mm region in 1 mm increments to map out the arriving wavefront (i.e. 3600 signals were recorded) as a function of time. The measured wavefront in the intact reference sample (which contained no fractures) was elliptical with the major axis parallel to the layers as expected and was stress-independent. When the fracture samples were subjected to low stress (<4 MPa), the observed seismic

  5. Structural behavior of composites with progressive fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1990-01-01

    Structural characteristics such as natural frequencies and buckling loads with corresponding mode shapes were investigated during progressive fracture of multilayer, angle-plied polymer matrix composites. A computer program was used to generate the numerical results for overall mechanical response of damaged composites. Variations in structural characteristics as a function of the previously applied loading were studied. Results indicate that most of the overall structural properties were preserved throughout a significant proportion of the ultimate fracture load. For the cases studied, changes in structural behavior began to occur after 70 percent of the ultimate fracture load was applied. However, the individual nature of the structural change was rather varied depending on the laminate configuration, fiber orientation, and the boundary conditions.

  6. IPIRG programs - advances in pipe fracture technology

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.; Olson, R.; Scott, P.

    1997-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of the advances made in fracture control technology as a result of the research performed in the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program. The findings from numerous experiments and supporting analyses conducted to investigate the behavior of circumferentially flawed piping and pipe systems subjected to high-rate loading typical of seismic events are summarized. Topics to be discussed include; (1) Seismic loading effects on material properties, (2) Piping system behavior under seismic loads, (3) Advances in elbow fracture evaluations, and (4) {open_quotes}Real{close_quotes} piping system response. The presentation for each topic will be illustrated with data and analytical results. In each case, the state-of-the-art in fracture mechanics prior to the first IPIRG program will be contrasted with the state-of-the-art at the completion of the IPIRG-2 program.

  7. New proppant for deep hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Underdown, D.R.; Das, K.

    1982-01-01

    Much work has been done in the development and evaluation of various materials for use as proppants for hydraulic fracturing. Sand is most often used as a frac proppant in shallow wells. Deep wells having high closure stresses require a proppant such as sintered bauxite which will not crush under such adverse conditions. Proppants such as ceramic and zirconium oxide beads and resin coated sand have been developed for deep hydraulic fracturing; however, use of these materials has been limited. A new frac proppant has been developed which exhibits the properties necessary for use in deep hydraulic fracturing. This frac proppant is produced by precuring a specially modified phenol-formaldehyde resin onto sand. The new frac proppant maintains conductivity and resists crushing, similar to that of sintered bauxite at high closure stress. 11 references.

  8. Fracture reveals clustering in cohesive granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapia, Franco; Santucci, Stéphane; Géminard, Jean-Christophe

    2016-09-01

    We report an experimental study of the morphology of fractures in cohesive granular materials. Cohesion is introduced by equilibrating the grains with a humid atmosphere. The setup allows to produce a controlled crack in a thin layer of a glass beads assembly, and observe with an extremely high resolution the edge of the fracture at the free surface of the layer. The detailed multi-scale analysis of the fracture profile reveals the presence, in the bulk of the material, of clusters of grains whose size increases monotonically with the relative humidity. These results are important because the formation of clusters, resulting in a heterogeneity of the cohesion force, governs the mechanical properties of cohesive granular matter in contact with a humid atmosphere.

  9. Women with previous stress fractures show reduced bone material strength

    PubMed Central

    Duarte Sosa, Daysi; Fink Eriksen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Bone fragility is determined by bone mass, bone architecture, and the material properties of bone. Microindentation has been introduced as a measurement method that reflects bone material properties. The pathogenesis of underlying stress fractures, in particular the role of impaired bone material properties, is still poorly understood. Based on the hypothesis that impaired bone material strength might play a role in the development of stress fractures, we used microindentation in patients with stress fractures and in controls. Patients and methods — We measured bone material strength index (BMSi) by microindentation in 30 women with previous stress fractures and in 30 normal controls. Bone mineral density by DXA and levels of the bone markers C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type-1 collagen (CTX) and N-terminal propeptide of type-1 procollagen (P1NP) were also determined. Results — Mean BMSi in stress fracture patients was significantly lower than in the controls (SD 72 (8.7) vs. 77 (7.2); p = 0.02). The fracture subjects also had a significantly lower mean bone mineral density (BMD) than the controls (0.9 (0.02) vs. 1.0 (0.06); p = 0.03). Bone turnover—as reflected in serum levels of the bone marker CTX—was similar in both groups, while P1NP levels were significantly higher in the women with stress fractures (55 μg/L vs. 42 μg/L; p = 0.03). There was no correlation between BMSi and BMD or bone turnover. Interpretation — BMSi was inferior in patients with previous stress fracture, but was unrelated to BMD and bone turnover. The lower values of BMSi in patients with previous stress fracture combined with a lower BMD may contribute to the increased propensity to develop stress fractures in these patients. PMID:27321443

  10. Treatment of Thoracolumbar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung-Guk; Shin, Dong-Eun

    2015-01-01

    The most common fractures of the spine are associated with the thoracolumbar junction. The goals of treatment of thoracolumbar fracture are leading to early mobilization and rehabilitation by restoring mechanical stability of fracture and inducing neurologic recovery, thereby enabling patients to return to the workplace. However, it is still debatable about the treatment methods. Neurologic injury should be identified by thorough physical examination for motor and sensory nerve system in order to determine the appropriate treatment. The mechanical stability of fracture also should be evaluated by plain radiographs and computed tomography. In some cases, magnetic resonance imaging is required to evaluate soft tissue injury involving neurologic structure or posterior ligament complex. Based on these physical examinations and imaging studies, fracture stability is evaluated and it is determined whether to use the conservative or operative treatment. The development of instruments have led to more interests on the operative treatment which saves mobile segments without fusion and on instrumentation through minimal invasive approach in recent years. It is still controversial for the use of these treatments because there have not been verified evidences yet. However, the morbidity of patients can be decreased and good clinical and radiologic outcomes can be achieved if the recent operative treatments are used carefully considering the fracture pattern and the injury severity. PMID:25705347

  11. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  12. Subduction of fracture zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi; Leeman, William

    2013-04-01

    Since Wilson proposed in 1965 the existence of a new class of faults on the ocean floor, namely transform faults, the geodynamic effects and importance of fracture zone subduction is still little studied. It is known that oceanic plates are characterized by numerous fracture zones, and some of them have the potential to transport into subduction zones large volumes of water-rich serpentinite, providing a fertile water source for magma generated in subduction-related arc volcanoes. In most previous geodynamic studies, subducting plates are considered to be homogeneous, and there is no clear indication how the subduction of a fracture zone influences the melting pattern in the mantle wedge and the slab-derived fluids distribution in the subarc mantle. Here we show that subduction of serpentinized fracture zones plays a significant role in distribution of melt and fluids in the mantle wedge above the slab. Using high-resolution tree-dimensional coupled petrological-termomechanical simulations of subduction, we show that fluids, including melts and water, vary dramatically in the region where a serpentinized fracture zone enters into subduction. Our models show that substantial hydration and partial melting tend to concentrate where fracture zones are being subducted, creating favorable conditions for partially molten hydrous plumes to develop. These results are consistent with the along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes in several regions, as the Aleutian Arc, the Cascades, the Southern Mexican Volcanic Arc, and the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone.

  13. Prevention of hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Meunier, P J

    1993-11-30

    For a 50-year old Caucasian woman today, the risk of a hip fracture over her remaining life-time is about 17%. Tomorrow the situation will clearly be worse because the continuous increase in life expectancy will cause a three-fold increase in worldwide fracture incidence over the next 60 years. Through diagnostic bone mass measurements at the hip and assessment of biochemical parameters, a great deal has been learned in recent years about reduction of hip fracture risk. Preventive strategies are based on prevention of falls, use of hip protectors, and prevention of bone fragility. The latter includes the optimization of peak bone mass during childhood, postmenopausal estrogen replacement therapy, and also late prevention consisting in reversing senile secondary hyperparathyroidism, which plays an important role in the decrease of skeletal strength. This secondary hyperparathyroidism, which results from both vitamin D insufficiency and low calcium intake, is preventable with vitamin D3 and calcium supplements. They have recently been shown capable of providing effective prevention of hip fractures in elderly women living in nursing homes, with a reduction of about 25% in the number of hip fractures noted in a 3-year controlled study in 3,270 women (intention-to-treat analysis). In conclusion, it is never too early to reduce the risk of osteoporosis and never too late to prevent hip fractures.

  14. Fracture characterization and fracture-permeability estimation at the underground research laboratory in southeastern Manitoba, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.

    1988-01-01

    Various conventional geophysical well logs were obtained in conjunction with acoustic tube-wave amplitude and experimental heat-pulse flowmeter measurements in two deep boreholes in granitic rocks on the Canadian shield in southeastern Manitoba. The objective of this study is the development of measurement techniques and data processing methods for characterization of rock volumes that might be suitable for hosting a nuclear waste repository. One borehole, WRA1, intersected several major fracture zones, and was suitable for testing quantitative permeability estimation methods. The other borehole, URL13, appeared to intersect almost no permeable fractures; it was suitable for testing methods for the characterization of rocks of very small permeability and uniform thermo-mechanical properties in a potential repository horizon. Epithermal neutron , acoustic transit time, and single-point resistance logs provided useful, qualitative indications of fractures in the extensively fractured borehole, WRA1. A single-point log indicates both weathering and the degree of opening of a fracture-borehole intersection. All logs indicate the large intervals of mechanically and geochemically uniform, unfractured granite below depths of 300 m in the relatively unfractured borehole, URL13. Some indications of minor fracturing were identified in that borehole, with one possible fracture at a depth of about 914 m, producing a major acoustic waveform anomaly. Comparison of acoustic tube-wave attenuation with models of tube-wave attenuation in infinite fractures of given aperture provide permeability estimates ranging from equivalent single-fractured apertures of less than 0.01 mm to apertures of > 0.5 mm. One possible fracture anomaly in borehole URL13 at a depth of about 914 m corresponds with a thin mafic dike on the core where unusually large acoustic contrast may have produced the observed waveform anomaly. No indications of naturally occurring flow existed in borehole URL13; however

  15. Acoustic Resonance Characteristics of Rock and Concrete Containing Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Seiji

    1998-08-01

    In recent years, acoustic resonance has drawn great attention as a quantitative tool for characterizing properties of materials and detecting defects in both engineering and geological materials. In quasi-brittle materials such as rock and concrete, inherent fractures have a significant influence on their mechanical and hydraulic properties. Most of these fractures are partially open, providing internal boundaries that are visible to propagating seismic waves. Acoustic resonance occurs as a result of constructive and destructive interferences of propagating waves. Therefore the geometrical and mechanical properties of the fracture are also interrogated by the acoustic resonance characteristics of materials. The objective of this dissertation is to understand the acoustic resonance characteristics of fractured rock and concrete.

  16. Importance of greenstick lamina fractures in low lumbar burst fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ersozlu, S.; Aydinli, U.

    2006-01-01

    Lumbar burst fractures (L3–L5) represent a small percentage of all spinal fractures. The treatment of fractures involving the lumbar spine has been controversial. Lamina fractures may be complete or of the greenstick type. Dural tears and nerve root entrapment may accompany these lamina fractures. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the incidence of dural tear in patients who had lumbar burst fractures with greenstick lamina fractures and the importance of these lamina fractures when choosing the optimum treatment. Twenty-six patients with 28 lumbar burst fractures were treated from 1995 through 2002. The average follow-up was 60 months (range 32–110 months). The male to female ratio was 21:5 and the mean age was 37 years (17–64). Dural tear was detected in seven (25%) out of 28 burst fractures. The functional outcome of the entire study group was assessed using the Smiley-Webster Scale. Good to excellent results were obtained in 24 (92%) of 26 patients. Lumbar burst fractures with greenstick lamina fractures occur mostly in the L2–L4 area. In the surgical treatment, any reduction manoeuvre will close the fracture and crush the entrapped neural elements. Therefore, it may be better to explore the greenstick lamina fracture whether there is any neural entrapment or not, before any reduction manoeuvre is attempted. PMID:16501977

  17. Hydrologic mechanisms governing fluid flow in partially saturated, fractured, porous tuff at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Narasimhan, T.N.

    1984-10-01

    In contrast to the saturated zone where fluid moves rapidly along fractures, the fractures (with apertures large relative to the size of matrix pores) will desaturate first during drainage process and the bulk of fluid flow would be through interconnected pores in the matrix. Within a partially drained fracture, the presence of a relatively continuous air phase will produce practically an infinite resistance to liquid flow in the direction parallel to the fracture. The residual liquid will be held by capillary force in regions around fracture contact areas where the apertures are small. Normal to the fracture surfaces, the drained portion of the fractures will reduce the effective area for liquid flow from one matrix block to another matrix block. A general statistical theory is constructed for flow along the fracture and for flow between the matrix blocks to the fractures under partially saturated conditions. Results are obtained from an aperture distribution model for fracture saturation, hydraulic conductivity, and effective matrix-fracture flow areas as functions of pressure. Drainage from a fractured tuff column is simulated. The parameters for the simulations are deduced from fracture surface characteristics, spacings and orientations based on core analyses, and from matrix characteristics curve based on laboratory measurements. From the cases simulated for the fractured, porous column with discrete vertical and horizontal fractures and porous matrix blocks explicitly taken into account, it is observed that the highly transient changes from fully saturated conditions to partially saturated conditions are extremely sensitive to the fracture properties. However, the quasi-steady changes of the fluid flow of a partially saturated, fractured, porous system could be approximately simulated without taking the fractures into account. 22 references, 16 figures.

  18. FRACTURE-RESISTANT MONOLITHIC DENTAL CROWNS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Mai, Zhisong; Barani, Amir; Bush, Mark; Lawn, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify the splitting resistance of monolithic zirconia, lithium disilicate and nanoparticle-composite dental crowns. Methods Fracture experiments were conducted on anatomically-correct monolithic crown structures cemented to standard dental composite dies, by axial loading of a hard sphere placed between the cusps. The structures were observed in situ during fracture testing, and critical loads to split the structures were measured. Extended finite element modeling (XFEM), with provision for step-by-step extension of embedded cracks, was employed to simulate full failure evolution. Results Experimental measurements and XFEM predictions were self consistent within data scatter. In conjunction with a fracture mechanics equation for critical splitting load, the data were used to predict load-sustaining capacity for crowns on actual dentin substrates and for loading with a sphere of different size. Stages of crack propagation within the crown and support substrate were quantified. Zirconia crowns showed the highest fracture loads, lithium disilicate intermediate, and dental nanocomposite lowest. Dental nanocomposite crowns have comparable fracture resistance to natural enamel. Significance The results confirm that monolithic crowns are able to sustain high bite forces. The analysis indicates what material and geometrical properties are important in optimizing crown performance and longevity. PMID:26792623

  19. Computer Simulation of Fracture in Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2006-01-01

    Aerogels are of interest to the aerospace community primarily for their thermal properties, notably their low thermal conductivities. While the gels are typically fragile, recent advances in the application of conformal polymer layers to these gels has made them potentially useful as lightweight structural materials as well. In this work, we investigate the strength and fracture behavior of silica aerogels using a molecular statics-based computer simulation technique. The gels' structure is simulated via a Diffusion Limited Cluster Aggregation (DLCA) algorithm, which produces fractal structures representing experimentally observed aggregates of so-called secondary particles, themselves composed of amorphous silica primary particles an order of magnitude smaller. We have performed multi-length-scale simulations of fracture in silica aerogels, in which the interaction b e e n two secondary particles is assumed to be described by a Morse pair potential parameterized such that the potential range is much smaller than the secondary particle size. These Morse parameters are obtained by atomistic simulation of models of the experimentally-observed amorphous silica "bridges," with the fracture behavior of these bridges modeled via molecular statics using a Morse/Coulomb potential for silica. We consider the energetics of the fracture, and compare qualitative features of low-and high-density gel fracture.

  20. Coupling Hydraulic Fracturing Propagation and Gas Well Performance for Simulation of Production in Unconventional Shale Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Winterfeld, P. H.; Wu, Y. S.; Wang, Y.; Chen, D.; Yin, C.; Pan, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing combined with horizontal drilling has made it possible to economically produce natural gas from unconventional shale gas reservoirs. An efficient methodology for evaluating hydraulic fracturing operation parameters, such as fluid and proppant properties, injection rates, and wellhead pressure, is essential for the evaluation and efficient design of these processes. Traditional numerical evaluation and optimization approaches are usually based on simulated fracture properties such as the fracture area. In our opinion, a methodology based on simulated production data is better, because production is the goal of hydraulic fracturing and we can calibrate this approach with production data that is already known. This numerical methodology requires a fully-coupled hydraulic fracture propagation and multi-phase flow model. In this paper, we present a general fully-coupled numerical framework to simulate hydraulic fracturing and post-fracture gas well performance. This three-dimensional, multi-phase simulator focuses on: (1) fracture width increase and fracture propagation that occurs as slurry is injected into the fracture, (2) erosion caused by fracture fluids and leakoff, (3) proppant subsidence and flowback, and (4) multi-phase fluid flow through various-scaled anisotropic natural and man-made fractures. Mathematical and numerical details on how to fully couple the fracture propagation and fluid flow parts are discussed. Hydraulic fracturing and production operation parameters, and properties of the reservoir, fluids, and proppants, are taken into account. The well may be horizontal, vertical, or deviated, as well as open-hole or cemented. The simulator is verified based on benchmarks from the literature and we show its application by simulating fracture network (hydraulic and natural fractures) propagation and production data history matching of a field in China. We also conduct a series of real-data modeling studies with different combinations of

  1. Tempering Effects for Lower Bainite, Martensite, and Mixed Microstructures on Impact, Fracture, and Related Mechanical Properties of ASTM A723 Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    TABLE IV. CHARPY V-NOTCHED TRANSITION TEMPERATURES FOR A723 STEEL TEMPERED AT 593*C Treatment Microstructure DBTT * °C OF 8360 to 300°C, 2% hrs bainite...RELATED MECHANICAL & PROPERTIES OF ASTM A723 STEEL J. M. BARRANCO P. J. coltJ. .KPPDTIC . ELECTE AUG1-0 19! ii ,,.5 " .:-"• . I JUNE 1992 US ARMY...by cooling ASTM A723 steel from 8301C (1526*F) to lower temperawres, notably at 2100 and 250C (410r aid 4820P). which aro below the itart of the

  2. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    Several court cases involving acquisition, use, and disposal of property by institutions of higher education are briefly summarized in this chapter. Cases discussed touch on such topics as municipal annexation of university property; repurchase of properties temporarily allocated to faculty members; implications of zoning laws and zoning board…

  3. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarad; H. Yasuhara; A. Alajmi

    2002-04-20

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multi-phase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (1) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (2) modeling of fracture permeability in the presence of asperities and confining stress, and (3) simulation of two-phase fluid flow in a fracture and a layered matrix. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. The distribution of fracture aperture is a difficult issue that we are studying and developing methods of quantification. The difficulties are both numerical and conceptual. Numerically, the three-dimensional data sets include millions, and sometimes, billions of points, and pose a computational challenge. The conceptual difficulties derive from the rough nature of the fracture surfaces, and the heterogeneous nature of the rock matrix. However, the high-resolution obtained by the imaging system provides us a much needed measuring environment on rock samples that are subjected to simultaneous fluid flow and confining stress. The absolute permeability of a fracture depends on the behavior of the asperities that keep it open. A model is being developed that predicts the permeability and average aperture of a fracture as a function of time under steady flow of water including the pressure solution at the asperity contact points. Several two-phase flow experiments in the presence of a fracture tip were performed in the past. At the present time, we are developing an inverse process using a simulation model to understand the fluid flow patterns in

  4. In Vitro Fracture of Human Cortical Bone: Local Fracture Criteria and Toughening Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, R; Stolken, J; Kinney, J; Ritchie, R

    2004-08-18

    A micro-mechanistic understanding of bone fracture that encompasses how cracks interact with the underlying microstructure and defines their local failure mode is lacking, despite extensive research on the response of bone to a variety of factors like aging, loading, and/or disease. Micro-mechanical models for fracture incorporating such local failure criteria have been widely developed for metallic and ceramic materials systems; however, few such deliberations have been undertaken for the fracture of bone. In fact, although the fracture event in mineralized tissues such as bone is commonly believed to be locally strain controlled, until recently there has been little experimental evidence to support this widely held belief. In the present study, a series of in vitro experiments involving a double-notch bend test geometry are performed in order to shed further light on the nature of the local cracking events that precede catastrophic fracture in bone and to define their relationship to the microstructure. Specifically, crack-microstructure interactions are examined to determine the salient toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone and to characterize how these may affect the anisotropy in fracture properties. Based on preliminary micro-mechanical models of these processes, in particular crack deflection and uncracked ligament bridging, the relative importance of these toughening mechanisms is established.

  5. Analysis of fracture patterns and local stress field variations in fractured reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckert, Hagen; Drews, Michael; Fremgen, Dominik; Wellmann, J. Florian

    2010-05-01

    A meaningful qualitative evaluation of permeabilities in fractured reservoirs in geothermal or hydrocarbon industry requires the spatial description of the existing discontinuity pattern within the area of interest and an analysis how these fractures might behave under given stress fields. This combined information can then be used for better estimating preferred fluid pathway directions within the reservoir, which is of particular interest for defining potential drilling sites. A description of the spatial fracture pattern mainly includes the orientation of rock discontinuities, spacing relationships between single fractures and their lateral extent. We have examined and quantified fracture patterns in several outcrops of granite at the Costa Brava, Spain, and in the Black Forest, Germany, for describing reservoir characteristics. For our analysis of fracture patterns we have used photogrammetric methods to create high-resolution georeferenced digital 3D images of outcrop walls. The advantage of this approach, compared to conventional methods for fracture analysis, is that it provides a better 3D description of the fracture geometry as the entity of position, extent and orientation of single fractures with respect to their surrounding neighbors is conserved. Hence for instance, the method allows generating fracture density maps, which can be used for a better description of the spatial distribution of discontinuities in a given outcrop. Using photogrammetric techniques also has the advantage to acquire very large data sets providing statistically sound results. To assess whether the recorded discontinuities might act as fluid pathways information on the stress field is needed. A 3D model of the regional tectonic structure was created and the geometry of the faults was put into a mechanical 3D Boundary Element (BE) Model. The model takes into account the elastic material properties of the geological units and the orientation of single fault segments. The

  6. Geothermal energy enhancement by thermal fracture. [REX (Rock Energy Extraction)

    SciTech Connect

    Demuth, R.B.; Harlow, F.H.

    1980-12-01

    A large, vertical, circular fracture created deep within hot rock is connected to the surface through two holes. The inlet provides a source of cold water and the outlet extracts heated water. Cooling of the rock produces thermal stresses that fracture the rock adjacent to the primary crack, thereby enhancing the heat extraction rate by means of convective transport. The properties of the thermal fracture network vary with position and time. The REX code for high-speed computer was written and used to study the coupled processes of primary-crack flow and lateral thermal fracture heat transport. Calculations for elapsed times of 100 y show that thermal fracture enhancement can double the heat extraction rate over the results from conduction alone. Long-term enhancement predictions depend on data from rock-mechanics studies, which the REX code is prepared to accept as they become available.

  7. Stress distribution and fracture behavior of beryllium compact tension specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ruiwen Dong Ping; Wang Xiaolin

    2008-02-15

    Compact tension specimens of beryllium (Be) were designed to study fracture behavior and mechanical properties. The local stress distribution near a notch in a compact tension specimen was measured in situ by the combination of an X-ray stress analysis and a custom-designed load device. The fracture morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The result showed that the local stresses near the notch tip are much higher than in other areas, and cracking occurs first in that area. The load-crack opening displacement curve of the Be compact tension specimen was obtained, and used to calculate the fracture toughness as 15.7 MPa{radical}m. The compact tension specimen fracture surfaces were mainly characterized by cleavage fracture over three different areas. Cleavage micro-cracks along the basal slip plane were formed at the crack tip, and their growth was controlled by the primary stress after reaching a critical length.

  8. Analysis of Fracture in Cores from the Tuff Confining Unit beneath Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Lance Prothro

    2008-03-01

    The role fractures play in the movement of groundwater through zeolitic tuffs that form the tuff confining unit (TCU) beneath Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, is poorly known. This is an important uncertainty, because beneath most of Yucca Flat the TCU lies between the sources of radionuclide contaminants produced by historic underground nuclear testing and the regional carbonate aquifer. To gain a better understanding of the role fractures play in the movement of groundwater and radionuclides through the TCU beneath Yucca Flat, a fracture analysis focusing on hydraulic properties was performed on conventional cores from four vertical exploratory holes in Area 7 of Yucca Flat that fully penetrate the TCU. The results of this study indicate that the TCU is poorly fractured. Fracture density for all fractures is 0.27 fractures per vertical meter of core. For open fractures, or those observed to have some aperture, the density is only 0.06 fractures per vertical meter of core. Open fractures are characterized by apertures ranging from 0.1 to 10 millimeter, and averaging 1.1 millimeter. Aperture typically occurs as small isolated openings along the fracture, accounting for only 10 percent of the fracture volume, the rest being completely healed by secondary minerals. Zeolite is the most common secondary mineral occurring in 48 percent of the fractures observed.

  9. Modelling of fracture behaviour in biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Ichim, I; Li, Q; Li, W; Swain, M V; Kieser, J

    2007-03-01

    One of the most frequent causes of degradation and failure of quasi-brittle biomaterials is fracture. Mechanical breakdown, even when not catastrophic, is of particular importance in the area of biomaterials, as there are many clinical situations where it opens the path for biologically mediated failures. Over the past few decades the materials/biomaterials community has developed a number of numerical models, but only with limited incorporation of brittle failure phenomena. This article investigates the ability of a non-linear elastic fracture mechanics (NLEFM) model to reliably predict failure of biomaterials with a specific focus on the clinical settings of restorative dentistry. The approach enables one to predict fracture initiation and propagation in a complex biomechanical status based on the intrinsic material properties of the components. In this paper, we consider five examples illustrating the versatility of the present approach, which range from the failure of natural biomaterials, namely dentine and enamel, to a restored tooth, a three unit all ceramic bridge structure and contact-induced damage in the restorative layered materials systems. It is anticipated that this approach will have ramifications not only to model fracture events but also for the design and optimisation of the mechanical properties of biomaterials for specific clinically determined requirements.

  10. Thrower's fracture of the humerus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew; Dodson, Christopher C; Ilyas, Asif M

    2014-10-01

    Thrower's fractures are spiral fractures of the humerus caused by forceful throwing of a ball. Although these fractures have been cited in the literature, little research exists regarding the significance of stress fractures and fatigue injuries that may precede these injuries. This article presents 3 cases of middle-aged recreational baseball pitchers who sustained mid to distal third spiral humerus fractures, reviews the biomechanics of a thrower's fracture, and provides a detailed review of the literature to help better understand this condition and guide treatment.

  11. [Humeral shaft fractures].

    PubMed

    Schittko, A

    2004-08-01

    Since Lorenz Böhler postulated in his 1964 summary with the title "Against the operative treatment of fresh humeral shaft fractures" that the operative treatment is the exception in the therapy of humeral fractures times have changed. In the last years a conservative treatment of a humeral fracture is the exception and only used after straight indications. The operative therapy nowadays is the gold standard because of the development of new intramedullar and rotation stable implants in addition to the classical osteosynthesis with the plate. But even the external fixator for primary stabilisation in polytrauma patients or as rescue procedure after complications should be in repertory of every orthopedic surgeon. Attention should be put on the avoidance of primary and the correct treatment of secondary nerval lesions, esp. of the radial nerve. Here we are tending to the operative revision of the nerve in indistinct cases. In the treatment of the seldom humeral shaft fracture of the child conservative treatment is to prefer; in complications a resolute shift to a final operative stabilisation of the fracture is necessary.

  12. Frontal bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Marinheiro, Bruno Henrique; de Medeiros, Eduardo Henrique Pantosso; Sverzut, Cássio Edvard; Trivellato, Alexandre Elias

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the epidemiology, treatment, and complications of frontal bone fractures associated, or not, with other facial fractures. This evaluation also sought to minimize the influence of the surgeon's skills and the preference for any rigid internal fixation system. The files from 3758 patients who attended the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, from March 2004 to November 2011 and presented with facial trauma were scanned, and 52 files were chosen for the review. Eleven (21.15%) of these patients had pure fractures of the frontal bone, and trauma incidence was more prevalent in men (92.3%), whites (61.53%), and adults (50%). Despite the use of helmets at the moment of the trauma, motorcycle crashes were the most common etiological factor (32.69%). Fracture of the anterior wall of the frontal sinus with displacement was the main injury observed (54.9%), and the most common treatment was internal fixation with a plate and screws (45.09%). Postoperative complications were observed in 35.29% of the cases. The therapy applied was effective in handling this type of fracture, and the success rate was comparable to that reported in other published studies.

  13. Direct Measurement of Changes to a Sheared Shale Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadleman, M.; Bromhal, G. S.; Moore, J.; Gill, M.; Crandall, D.

    2015-12-01

    Shales are of particular interest both for their energy production potential and their ability to provide seals for sequestered CO2. It is imperative to understand the processes that influence fracture properties in order to accurately predict subsurface behavior. In order to evaluate the coupled hydrologic and geometric changes to a fracture undergoing shear displacement, a novel apparatus was used to produce real-time shearing of fractured shale at elevated pressures. Intermittent computed tomography (CT) scans were performed during each shearing event and transmissivity measurements taken to characterize both the mechanical evolution as well as the hydrodynamic response of the fracture. The initial fractures examined had small apertures and high resistance to flow, with most aperture values below the resolution of the CT scanner and low transmissivities. Initial shearing events, with total displacement less than two mm, minimally increased the aperture and increased the transmissivity. Further shearing resulted in fracture apertures that were large with pressure differentials across the core below the detection limit of the pressure measurement equipment. Flow models using the complex fracture geometries obtained from the CT scanning was performed to examine the micro-scale impacts of fracture evolution on the flow field that were not apparent in the bulk data. These results showed strong flow channelization within the larger aperture regions and showed that hydraulic aperture was significantly different than average mechanical apertures. Fracture aperture evolution due to shearing was characterized with the resulting mechanical and hydrologic responses. Apertures showed increases after each shearing event. Additionally, this increased aperture resulted in increased transmissivity and subsequent increases in hydraulic aperture. Coupling the experimental work with computational analysis provided further insight into the evolution of fracture flow properties.

  14. Reduced relative risk of fractures among users of lithium.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, P; Rejnmark, L; Mosekilde, L

    2005-07-01

    Lithium has been shown to inhibit bone resorption and to interact with W nt signaling, potentially pointing to bone anabolic properties. We, therefore, studied the effects of lithium on fracture risk using a case-control study design. Cases were all subjects including children with any fracture sustained during the year 2000 (n=124,655). For each case, three controls (n=373,962) matched according to age and gender was randomly drawn from the background population. Adjustments were made for use of other psychotropic drugs (neuroleptics, antidepressants, and anxiolytics/sedatives), psychiatric disease (manic depressive states, schizophrenia, and other psychoses), and other confounders. The effect of dose was examined by stratifying for cumulated dose (DDD, defined daily dose). In the crude analysis, there was a decreasing relative risk of any fracture with increasing accumulated dose of lithium. After adjustment for psychotropic drug use, the risk of any fracture was decreased (odds ratio [OR] 0.74, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.60--0.92 for 250--849 DDD, and OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.55--0.81 for >or= 850 DDD of lithium). For Colles' fractures and spine fractures, a significant decrease was seen with >or= 850 DDD (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.35--0.94 for Colles' fracture and OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.11--0.95 for spine fractures). For hip fractures, a nonsignificant trend toward a decrease was seen; however, without a dose-response relationship. Adjustment for further confounders did not change the results. Lithium treatment was associated with a decreased risk of fractures potentially pointing at bone anabolic properties.

  15. Fracture behaviour of functionally graded materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marur, Prabhakar R.

    Functionally graded materials (FGMs) are special composites consisting of two constituent phases whose composition change continuously along one direction. The gradual transition in material properties alleviates thermal mismatch problems experienced by cladded and coated components. The microstructure of FGM is usually heterogenous and the dominant failure mode of FGM is the crack initiation and propagation from the inclusions. Hence, the knowledge of crack growth and propagation is important in designing components involving FGM. The interface crack problem is studied by examining the asymptotic behavior of stress and displacement fields around the crack in FGM, and by comparing the results with known solutions for bimaterial systems. The, focus is on characterizing the influence of material nonhomogeneity on the fracture parameters, and determining the fracture strength of FGM under quasi-static and dynamic loading. The numerical and experimental techniques developed in this study are unified for both bimaterial and FGM, permitting direct comparison of fracture parameters and test results obtained for different material types. A crack opening displacement (COD) extrapolation technique is developed for the numerical computation of the fracture parameters from finite element analysis, and a new strain gage technique is devised for complex SIF measurement in both bimaterial and FGM. A simple and highly repeatable FGM manufacturing process has been established, and the continuous variation of material properties is evaluated using a novel technique involving ultrasonic wave velocity and local contact stiffness measurements. The nature of singular field around the crack in FGM is studied by varying material gradient, the position of the crack in the graded region and the crack length. The various fracture parameters are compared with that computed for homogenous and bimaterial counterparts. The numerical results show that the crack in FGM, regardless of the position

  16. Multi-Phase Fracture-Matrix Interactions Under Stress Changes

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarao; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-12-07

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multi-phase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) counter-current fluid transport between the matrix and the fracture, (c) studying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture and two-phase flow, and (d) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress, on the nature of the rock, and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual and detailed descriptions of the process are shown in the report. Both extensional and shear fractures have been considered. A series of water imbibition tests were conducted in which water was injected into a fracture and its migration into the matrix was monitored with CT and DR x-ray techniques. The objective was to understand the impact of the

  17. [Fracture of macroporous hydroxyapatite prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Adetchessi, A T; Pech-Gourg, G; Metellus, P; Fuentes, S

    2012-12-01

    Different prosthesis implants are offered to perform a cranioplasty after a decompressive craniectomy when autologous bone graft cannot be used. The authors report the case of a 25-year-old man who benefited a unilateral decompressive craniectomy after a severe head trauma. Seven months later, a cranioplasty using custom macroporous hydroxyapatite prosthesis was performed. The postoperative course was marked by a generalized seizure leading to a traumatic head injury. The CT-scan showed a comminutive fracture of the prosthesis and an extradural hematoma. The patient underwent a removal of the fractured prosthesis and an evacuation of the extradural clot. The postoperative course was uneventful with a Glasgow outcome scale score at 5. A second cranioplasty using a polyether ether ketone (PEEK) implant was performed. Among cranioplasty prosthesis solutions, hydroxyapatite implants seem to have similar property to the bone. However, its weak mechanic resistance is an actual problem in patients susceptible to present generalized seizures with consecutive head impact. Hence, in patients with decompressive craniectomy who are exposed to potential brain injury, we favor the use of more resistant implant as PEEK prosthesis.

  18. Freeze fracture and freeze etching.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Douglas E; Sharp, William P

    2014-01-01

    Freeze fracture depends on the property of frozen tissues or cells, when cracked open, to split along the hydrophobic interior of membranes, thus revealing broad panoramas of membrane interior. These large panoramas reveal the three-dimensional contours of membranes making the methods well suited to studying changes in membrane architecture. Freshly split membrane faces are visualized by platinum or tungsten shadowing and carbon backing to form a replica that is then cleaned of tissue and imaged by TEM. Etching, i.e., removal of ice from the frozen fractured specimen by sublimation prior to shadowing, can also reveal the true surfaces of the membrane as well as the extracellular matrix and cytoskeletal networks that contact the membranes. Since the resolution of detail in the metal replicas formed is 1-2 nm, these methods can also be used to visualize macromolecules or macromolecular assemblies either in situ or displayed on a mica surface. These methods are available for either specimens that have been chemically fixed or specimens that have been rapidly frozen without chemical intervention.

  19. Transstyloid, transscaphoid, transcapitate fracture: a variant of scaphocapitate fractures

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Neil G; Cosgrave, Ciaran H; O'Neill, Barry James; Kelly, Eamonn P

    2014-01-01

    Transstyloid, transscaphoid, transcapitate fractures are uncommon. We report the case of a 28-year-old man who sustained this fracture following direct trauma. The patient was successfully treated by open reduction internal fixation of the scaphoid and proximal capitate fragment, with a good clinical outcome at 1-year follow-up. This pattern is a new variant of scaphocapitate fracture as involves a fracture of the radial styloid as well. PMID:24686808

  20. Deformation and Fracture of Shale at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, K. C.; Borja, R. I.

    2013-12-01

    The deformation and fracture properties of shales depend on the mechanical properties of their basic constituents, including the solid clay particles, inclusions such as silt and organics, and the multi-scale porosity comprised of existing micro-fractures and the nano-scale porosity of the porous clay matrix. A great deal of understanding of the overall macroscopic (field scale) mechanical properties of shales can be gained by studying the deformation and fracture properties of these constituents along with their composite behavior, i.e., the mechanisms of deformation and fracture of shale. This project builds upon our recently acquired ability to image with fixed ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) the 3D geometry of a porous shale sample to nanometer resolution, as well as to test this sample on a nanoindenter at both the particle and composite scales, in order to develop a 3D mechanistic model to interpret the results of nanoindentation tests. The pore-scale study considers the intrinsic deformation and fracture properties of clay particles, and the effect of silt inclusions and particle packing into an anisotropic composite matrix. The analysis accounts for anisotropic and heterogeneous shale elasticity, plasticity, damage, and fissility. A finite element (FE) model is being developed which uses a recently developed finite deformation crystal plasticity algorithm and an enhanced FE method for capturing strong discontinuity. The model aims to capture the effects of the particle elasticity, plastic yielding, and the damage induced by the indenter, including the fracturing and chipping within the mineral grains and around the perimeter of the indent. Anisotropy of fracture properties is examined with respect to delamination of the clay matrix in the bed-parallel direction and to breaking of plate-like clay particles. The ultimate goal of this research is to establish a framework for investigating the poromechanical properties of shale at the nano

  1. Possible benefits of strontium ranelate in complicated long bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Alegre, Duarte Nuno; Ribeiro, Costa; Sousa, Carlos; Correia, João; Silva, Luís; de Almeida, Luís

    2012-02-01

    Osteoporosis drugs are prescribed to prevent fragility fractures, which is the principal aim of the management of osteoporosis. However, if fracture does occur, then it is also important to promote a fast and uneventful healing process. Despite this, little is known about the effect of osteoporosis drugs on bone healing in humans. Strontium ranelate is an osteoporosis agent that increases bone formation and reduces bone resorption and may therefore be beneficial in fracture healing. We report four cases of fracture non-union for up to 20 months. Treatment with strontium ranelate (2 g/day) for between 6 weeks and 6 months appeared to contribute to bone consolidation in the four cases. Animal studies support beneficial effects of strontium ranelate on bone healing via improvement of bone material properties and microarchitecture in the vicinity of the fracture. The clinical cases described herein provide new information on these effects, in the absence of randomized controlled studies on the clinical efficacy of pharmacological treatments in osteoporosis in fracture repair. Further studies are necessary. Fracture healing is an important topic in orthopedic research and is also a concern for patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Evidence from case reports and animal studies suggests that strontium ranelate improves bone microarchitecture and accelerates fracture healing. A positive effect of osteoporosis treatments on bone healing is an interesting possibility and merits further clinical research.

  2. Fracture mechanics expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, E.; Elfer, N.; Casadaban, C.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to fracture mechanics, an analytical method used extensively in the National Space Transportation System to conservatively predict the remaining service life of an article when a flaw or a material defect is detected. These analyses are performed on hardware containing material defects that have been detected by various nondestructive inspection techniques. An expert system being developed to streamline the process so that hardware dispositions may be obtained in a timely and consistent manner is discussed. The expert system reduces the potential for errors due to the manual transcription between the various software programs involved in completing a fracture mechanics analysis. NEXPERT Object, the expert system development shell selected for this purpose, allows the various software programs used in fracture mechanics analyses to be accessed and manipulated from the same platform.

  3. Geometrically Frustrated Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Noah; Koning, Vinzenz; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-03-01

    When a flat elastic sheet is forced to conform to a surface with Gaussian curvature, stresses arise in the sheet. The mismatch between initial and final metrics gives rise to new fracture behavior which cannot be achieved by boundary loading alone. Using experiments of PDMS sheets frustrated on 3D-printed surfaces and a linearized analytical model, we demonstrate the ability of curvature to govern the sheets' fracture phenomenology. In this talk, we first show that curvature can both stimulate and suppress fracture initiation, depending on the position and orientation of the initial slit. Secondly, we show that curvature can steer the path of a crack as it propagates through the material. Lastly, the curvature can arrest cracks which would otherwise continue to propagate.

  4. DEM Particle Fracture Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Boning; Herbold, Eric B.; Homel, Michael A.; Regueiro, Richard A.

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive particle fracture model in poly-ellipsoidal Discrete Element Method is developed. The poly-ellipsoidal particle will break into several sub-poly-ellipsoids by Hoek-Brown fracture criterion based on continuum stress and the maximum tensile stress in contacts. Also Weibull theory is introduced to consider the statistics and size effects on particle strength. Finally, high strain-rate split Hopkinson pressure bar experiment of silica sand is simulated using this newly developed model. Comparisons with experiments show that our particle fracture model can capture the mechanical behavior of this experiment very well, both in stress-strain response and particle size redistribution. The effects of density and packings o the samples are also studied in numerical examples.

  5. Oblique shear fractures of the lunate.

    PubMed

    Freeland, Alan E; Ahmad, Nawaiz

    2003-08-01

    Traumatic fractures of the lunate are rare. This article presents two patients who had displaced oblique lunate fractures and distal radius fractures. Both fractures achieved union; however, transient avascular necrosis occurred in the proximal healing of one patient.

  6. Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine

    MedlinePlus

    .org Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Page ( 1 ) Spinal fractures can vary widely in severity. While some fractures are very serious injuries that require emergency treatment, other fractures can ...

  7. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldblatt, Steven M.; Piele, Philip K.

    This chapter reviews 1982 cases related to school property. Cases involving citizen efforts to overturn school board decisions to close schools dominate the property chapter, and courts continue to uphold school board authority to close schools, transfer students, and sell or lease the buildings. Ten cases involving detachment and attachment of…

  8. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickel, Robert D.; Zeller, Trisha A.

    A number of cases related to property issues involving institutions of higher education are examined in this chapter. Cases discussed touch on such topics as funding for property and equipment acquisition; opposition to building construction or demolition; zoning issues; building construction and equipment contracts; and lease agreements. Current…

  9. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.; Johnson, Margaret M.

    This chapter deals with 1981 cases involving disputes over property. Cases involving the detachment and attachment of land continue to dominate the property chapter with 11 cases reported, the same number summarized in last year's chapter. One case involving school board referenda raised the interesting question of whether or not a state could…

  10. Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    Chapter 7 of a book on school law, this chapter deals with 1979 cases involving disputes over property. Cases involving taxpayer attempts to prevent the construction of school buildings dominate this year's property chapter, as they did last year's. Yet, paradoxically, there is also a significant increase in cases in which taxpayers tried to…

  11. Multi-scale modeling of inter-granular fracture in UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Zhang, Yongfeng; Tonks, Michael R.; Biner, S. Bulent

    2015-03-01

    A hierarchical multi-scale approach is pursued in this work to investigate the influence of porosity, pore and grain size on the intergranular brittle fracture in UO2. In this approach, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to obtain the fracture properties for different grain boundary types. A phase-field model is then utilized to perform intergranular fracture simulations of representative microstructures with different porosities, pore and grain sizes. In these simulations the grain boundary fracture properties obtained from molecular dynamics simulations are used. The responses from the phase-field fracture simulations are then fitted with a stress-based brittle fracture model usable at the engineering scale. This approach encapsulates three different length and time scales, and allows the development of microstructurally informed engineering scale model from properties evaluated at the atomistic scale.

  12. On the fracture toughness of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-11-24

    Few engineering materials are limited by their strength; rather they are limited by their resistance to fracture or fracture toughness. It is not by accident that most critical structures, such as bridges, ships, nuclear pressure vessels and so forth, are manufactured from materials that are comparatively low in strength but high in toughness. Indeed, in many classes of materials, strength and toughness are almost mutually exclusive. In the first instance, such resistance to fracture is a function of bonding and crystal structure (or lack thereof), but can be developed through the design of appropriate nano/microstructures. However, the creation of tough microstructures in structural materials, i.e., metals, polymers, ceramics and their composites, is invariably a compromise between resistance to intrinsic damage mechanisms ahead of the tip of a crack (intrinsic toughening) and the formation of crack-tip shielding mechanisms which principally act behind the tip to reduce the effective 'crack-driving force' (extrinsic toughening). Intrinsic toughening is essentially an inherent property of a specific microstructure; it is the dominant form of toughening in ductile (e.g., metallic) materials. However, for most brittle (e.g., ceramic) solids, and this includes many biological materials, it is largely ineffective and toughening conversely must be developed extrinsically, by such shielding mechanisms as crack bridging. From a fracture mechanics perspective, this results in toughening in the form of rising resistance-curve behavior where the fracture resistance actually increases with crack extension. The implication of this is that in many biological and high-strength advanced materials, toughness is developed primarily during crack growth and not for crack initiation. This is an important realization yet is still rarely reflected in the way that toughness is measured, which is invariably involves the use of single-value (crack-initiation) parameters such as the

  13. Fracture toughness of dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Ilie, Nicoleta; Hickel, Reinhard; Valceanu, Anca Silvia; Huth, Karin Christine

    2012-04-01

    The ability of a restorative material to withstand fracture is of crucial importance especially in stress-bearing area. Therefore, the study aims to analyse the fracture toughness of a large number of dental restorative materials categories. The fracture toughness (K(IC)) of 69 restorative materials belonging to ten materials categories-micro-hybrid, nanofilled, microfilled, packable, ormocer-based, and flowable resin-based composites (RBC), compomers and flowable compomers, as well as glass ionomer cements (GIC) and resin-modified GIC was measured by means of the single-edge notched-beam method after storing the samples (n = 8) for 24 h in distilled water. Data were analyzed with the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Tukey's test and partial eta-squared statistics (p < 0.05). Large variations between the tested materials within a material category were found. The lowest fracture toughness was reached in the GIC group, followed by the microfilled RBCs, resin-modified GIC, and flowable compomers, which do not differ significantly among each other as a material group. The ormocer-based, packable, and micro-hybrid RBCs performed statistically similar, reaching the highest fracture toughness values. Between the two categories of flowables-composites and compomers-no differences were measured. The correlation between K(IC) and filler volume (0.34) and respective filler weight (0.40) was low. K(IC) increased with the volume fraction of fillers until a critical value of 57%, following with a plateau, with constant values until ca. 65% volume fraction. Above this value, K(IC) decreased slightly. Due to the very large variability of the fracture toughness within a material type, the selection of a suitable restorative material should have not been done with respect to a specific material category, especially in stress-bearing areas, but by considering the individual measured material properties.

  14. Unified tensile fracture criterion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z F; Eckert, J

    2005-03-11

    We find that the classical failure criteria, i.e., maximum normal stress criterion, Tresca criterion, Mohr-Coulomb criterion, and von Mises criterion, cannot satisfactorily explain the tensile fracture behavior of the bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials. For a better description, we propose an ellipse criterion as a new failure criterion to unify the four classical criteria above and apply it to exemplarily describe the tensile fracture behavior of BMGs as well as a variety of other materials. It is suggested that each of the classical failure criteria can be unified by the present ellipse criterion depending on the difference of the ratio alpha=tau(0)/sigma(0).

  15. Fractured Petroleum Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Firoozabadi, Dr. Abbas

    2000-01-18

    In this report the results of experiments of water injection in fractured porous media comprising a number of water-wet matrix blocks are reported for the first time. The blocks experience an advancing fracture-water level (FWL). Immersion-type experiments are performed for comparison; the dominant recovery mechanism changed from co-current to counter-current imbibition when the boundary conditions changed from advancing FWL to immersion-type. Single block experiments of co-current and counter-current imbibition was performed and co-current imbibition leads to more efficient recovery was found.

  16. Abraham Colles: Colles' fracture.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2012-08-01

    Every reader of this journal will be all too familiar with Colles' fracture; either seeing patients with it in A & E, helping with its reduction and splinting or being part of the anaesthetics team involved in its management. On an icy winter's day there might be half a dozen patients with this injury in your accident unit, mostly elderly ladies. Yet it was not until 1814 that Abraham Colles accurately described this injury and its treatment in his paper 'On the fracture of the carpal extremity of the radius', published in the Edinburgh Medical and Surgical Journal of that year.

  17. Complications of mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Barry E

    2009-03-01

    Before any definitive treatment of mandibular fractures, the patient needs to be evaluated for more potentially life-threatening injuries. Complications can and do occur with treatment of mandibular fractures and can occur during any of the phases of treatment. The development of an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan is vital in achieving optimal success and decreasing complications. Knowledge of the anatomy and the principles of bone healing is also an important factor in preventing complications. To limit long-term untoward effects, complications should be recognized early and the appropriate treatment should be started before a minor complication becomes a complex one that is more difficult to manage.

  18. Large-strain deformation and fracture of tough hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Rebecca; Miquelard, Guillaume; Creton, Costantino; Gong, Jian Ping

    2006-03-01

    Highly-swollen, chemically-crosslinked hydrogels generally behave in a very brittle manner, fracturing suddenly after a small amount of reversible deformation. Because of their importance as biomaterials, it is useful to control and augment the resistance to fracture of these materials. Tougher, stronger hydrogels are emerging, and it is important to understand the structural origins of strength in these relatively robust, highly-swollen, polymer systems. We have investigated the rheological, mechanical and fracture properties of tough hydrogels, using novel testing techniques and focusing on the high-strain compression and tension behavior. Results from large-strain and fracture experiments were correlated to the chemical structure of the hydrogels. Because we believe that the mechanical properties of these tough hydrogels are due to the presence of dissipative mechanisms at the molecular level, we have explored several methods of synthesis to create these materials.

  19. Fracture After Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... er Total Hip Replacement cont. • Dislocation • Limb length inequality • Poor fracture healing • Repeat fracture • Lack of in- ... Surgeons (AAOS). To learn more about your orthopaedic health, please visit orthoinfo.org. Page ( 5 ) AAOS does ...

  20. Preventing Falls and Related Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... increases your fracture risk. Catching yourself so you land on your hands or grabbing onto an object as you fall can prevent a hip fracture. Protective responses, such as reflexes and changes in posture that break the fall, can reduce ...

  1. Colles wrist fracture – aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21228899 . Prawer A. Radius and ulna fractures. In: Eiff MP, Hatch RL, eds. Fracture Management for Primary Care . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap ...

  2. Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2008-01-01

    A new approach is described for evaluating fracture in composite structures. This approach is independent of classical fracture mechanics parameters like fracture toughness. It relies on computational simulation and is programmed in a stand-alone integrated computer code. It is multiscale, multifunctional because it includes composite mechanics for the composite behavior and finite element analysis for predicting the structural response. It contains seven modules; layered composite mechanics (micro, macro, laminate), finite element, updating scheme, local fracture, global fracture, stress based failure modes, and fracture progression. The computer code is called CODSTRAN (Composite Durability Structural ANalysis). It is used in the present paper to evaluate the global fracture of four composite shell problems and one composite built-up structure. Results show that the composite shells and the built-up composite structure global fracture are enhanced when internal pressure is combined with shear loads.

  3. Scaphoid Fracture of the Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    .org Scaphoid Fracture of the Wrist Page ( 1 ) The scaphoid is one of the small bones in the wrist. It is ... that the scaphoid is injured. Cause A scaphoid fracture is usually caused by a fall on an ...

  4. Advanced Glycation End-products and Bone Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Bone does not turn over uniformly, and becomes susceptible to post-translational modification by non-enzymatic glycation (NEG). NEG of bone causes the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and this process is accelerated with aging, diabetes and antiresorptive postmenopausal osteoporosis therapy. Due to the elevated incidence of fracture associated with aging and diabetes, several studies have attempted to measure and evaluate AGEs as biomarkers for fracture risk. Here current methods of estimating AGEs in bone by liquid chromatography and fluorometric assay are summarized and the relationships between AGEs and fracture properties at whole bone, apparent tissue and matrix levels are discussed. PMID:27158323

  5. Correlation of Hip Fracture with Other Fracture Types: Toward a Rational Composite Hip Fracture Endpoint

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen; Pieper, Carl F.; Grubber, Janet; Van Scoyoc, Lynn; Schnell, Merritt L; Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Pearson, Megan; Lafleur, Joanne; Lyles, Kenneth W.; Adler, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose With ethical requirements to the enrollment of lower risk subjects, osteoporosis trials are underpowered to detect reduction in hip fractures. Different skeletal sites have different levels of fracture risk and response to treatment. We sought to identify fracture sites which cluster with hip fracture at higher than expected frequency; if these sites respond to treatment similarly, then a composite fracture endpoint could provide a better estimate of hip fracture reduction. Methods Cohort study using Veterans Affairs and Medicare administrative data. Male Veterans (n=5,036,536) aged 50-99 years receiving VA primary care between1999-2009 were included. Fractures were ascertained using ICD9 and CPT codes and classified by skeletal site. Pearson correlation coefficients, logistic regression and kappa statistics, were used to describe the correlation between each fracture type and hip fracture within individuals, without regards to the timing of the events. Results 595,579 (11.8%) men suffered 1 or more fractures and 179,597 (3.6%) suffered 2 or more fractures during the time under study. Of those with one or more fractures, rib was the most common site (29%), followed by spine (22%), hip (21%) and femur (20%). The fracture types most highly correlated with hip fracture were pelvic/acetabular (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.25, p<0.0001), femur (0.15, p<0.0001), and shoulder (0.11, p<0.0001). Conclusions Pelvic, acetabular, femur, and shoulder fractures cluster with hip fractures within individuals at greater than expected frequency. If we observe similar treatment risk reductions within that cluster, subsequent trials could consider use of a composite endpoint to better estimate hip fracture risk. PMID:26151123

  6. Ballistic Fracturing of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Sehmus; Machado, Leonardo D; Tiwary, ChandraSekhar; Autreto, Pedro A S; Vajtai, Robert; Barrera, Enrique V; Galvao, Douglas S; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-09-21

    Advanced materials with multifunctional capabilities and high resistance to hypervelocity impact are of great interest to the designers of aerospace structures. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with their lightweight and high strength properties are alternative to metals and/or metallic alloys conventionally used in aerospace applications. Here we report a detailed study on the ballistic fracturing of CNTs for different velocity ranges. Our results show that the highly energetic impacts cause bond breakage and carbon atom rehybridizations, and sometimes extensive structural reconstructions were also observed. Experimental observations show the formation of nanoribbons, nanodiamonds, and covalently interconnected nanostructures, depending on impact conditions. Fully atomistic reactive molecular dynamics simulations were also carried out in order to gain further insights into the mechanism behind the transformation of CNTs. The simulations show that the velocity and relative orientation of the multiple colliding nanotubes are critical to determine the impact outcome.

  7. Hydraulic and solute-transport properties and simulated advective transport of contaminated ground water in a fractured rock aquifer at the Naval Air Warfare Center, West Trenton, New Jersey, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis-Brown, Jean C.; Carleton, Glen B.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds, predominantly trichloroethylene and its degradation products, have been detected in ground water at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, New Jersey. An air-stripping pump-and-treat system has been in operation at the NAWC since 1998. An existing ground-water-flow model was used to evaluate the effect of a change in the configuration of the network of recovery wells in the pump-and-treat system on flow paths of contaminated ground water. The NAWC is underlain by a fractured-rock aquifer composed of dipping layers of sedimentary rocks of the Lockatong and Stockton Formations. Hydraulic and solute-transport properties of the part of the aquifer composed of the Lockatong Formation were measured using aquifer tests and tracer tests. The heterogeneity of the rocks causes a wide range of values of each parameter measured. Transmissivity ranges from 95 to 1,300 feet squared per day; the storage coefficient ranges from 9 x 10-5 to 5 x 10-3; and the effective porosity ranges from 0.0003 to 0.002. The average linear velocity of contaminated ground water was determined for ambient conditions (when no wells at the site are pumped) using an existing ground-water-flow model, particle-tracking techniques, and the porosity values determined in this study. The average linear velocity of flow paths beginning at each contaminated well and ending at the streams where the flow paths terminate ranges from 0.08 to 130 feet per day. As a result of a change in the pump-and-treat system (adding a 165-foot-deep well pumped at 5 gallons per minute and reducing the pumping rate at a nearby 41-foot-deep well by the same amount), water in the vicinity of three 100- to 165-foot-deep wells flows to the deep well rather than the shallower well.

  8. Atypical subtrochanteric femoral shaft fractures: role for mechanics and bone quality.

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, Marjolein C H; Boskey, Adele L

    2012-08-29

    Bisphosphonates are highly effective agents for reducing osteoporotic fractures in women and men, decreasing fracture incidence at the hip and spine up to 50%. In a small subset of patients, however, these agents have recently been associated with 'atypical femoral fractures' (AFFs) in the subtrochanteric region or the diaphysis. These fractures have several atypical characteristics, including occurrence with minimal trauma; younger age than typical osteoporotic fractures; occurrence at cortical, rather than cancellous sites; early radiographic appearance similar to that of a stress fracture; transverse fracture pattern rather than the familiar spiral or transverse-oblique morphologies; initiation on the lateral cortex; and high risk of fracture on the contralateral side, at the same location as the initial fracture. Fracture is a mechanical phenomenon that occurs when the loads applied to a structure such as a long bone exceed its load-bearing capacity, either due to a single catastrophic overload (traumatic failure) or as a result of accumulated damage and crack propagation at sub-failure loads (fatigue failure). The association of AFFs with no or minimal trauma suggests a fatigue-based mechanism that depends on cortical cross-sectional geometry and tissue material properties. In the case of AFFs, bisphosphonate treatment may alter cortical tissue properties, as these agents are known to alter bone remodeling. This review discusses the use of bisphosphonates, their effects on bone remodeling, mechanics and tissue composition, their significance as an effective therapy for osteoporosis, and why these agents may increase fracture risk in a small population of patients.

  9. Penis Fracture: Is It Possible?

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Sexual health Is it possible to fracture your penis? Answers from Landon Trost, M.D. Yes. Although rare, penis fracture ... Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/sexual-health/expert-answers/penis-fracture/faq-20058154 . Mayo Clinic ...

  10. Transmissivity and conductivity of single fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. M.; Thovert, J. F.; Mourzenko, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    A fracture can be seen as a void space between two rough surfaces in partial contact. Transmissivity and conductivity can be determined numerically by solving the Stokes and Laplace equations between these two surfaces. These problems were first solved and published by the same authors between 1995 and 2001. Updated, more complete and precise results are presented here. Each surface of a fracture can be schematized as a random surface oscillating around an average plane, characterized by the probability density and autocorrelation function C(u) of the heights; their standard deviation is the roughness sigma. The two surfaces are separated by a mean distance b_m and their heights are correlated with an intercorrelation coefficient theta. The two major classes for C(u), namely the Gaussian and the self-affine autocorrelations with Hurst exponent H, are both characterized by a length scale l_c, which is a typical scale for the surface features in the Gaussian case and a cut-off length in the self-affine case. Gaussian surfaces are statistically homogeneous while the mean properties in the self-affine case are size-dependent. Systematic calculations were performed for these two classes, with recent emphasis put on the Gaussian fractures. The results are modeled as functions of b_m/sigma, l_c/sigma and theta. Cubic law applies for large b_m/sigma in terms of the aperture reduced by the hydraulic thickness of the surface rugosity. Another cubic law applies in the opposite limit of tight fractures with an offset depending on theta and a prefactor which depends on theta and l_c. A transition takes place between these two regimes. It is also shown that the Reynolds approximation may overestimate the true transmissivity by almost an order of magnitude. Similar calculations were performed for conductivity. The whole work is summarized by a series of master curves and models which can be used to estimate the properties of real fractures.

  11. Stress Analysis and Fracture in Nanolaminate Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2008-01-01

    A stress analysis is performed on a nanolaminate subjected to bending. A composite mechanics computer code that is based on constituent properties and nanoelement formulation is used to evaluate the nanolaminate stresses. The results indicate that the computer code is sufficient for the analysis. The results also show that when a stress concentration is present, the nanolaminate stresses exceed their corresponding matrix-dominated strengths and the nanofiber fracture strength.

  12. Integrated remodeling-to-fracture finite element model of human proximal femur behavior.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha; Lespessailles, Eric; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop an integrated remodeling-to-fracture finite element model allowing for the combined simulation of (i) simulation of a human proximal femur remodeling under a given boundary conditions, (ii) followed by the simulation of its fracture behavior (force-displacement curve and fracture pattern) under quasi-static load. The combination of remodeling and fracture simulation into one unified model consists in considering that the femur properties resulting from the remodeling simulation correspond to the initial state for the fracture prediction. The remodeling model is based on phenomenological one based on a coupled strain and fatigue damage stimulus. The fracture model is based on continuum damage mechanics in order to predict the progressive fracturing process which allows to predict the fracture pattern and the complete force-displacement curve under quasi-static load. To prevent mesh-dependence that generally affects the damage propagation rate, regularization technique was applied in the current work. To investigate the potential of the proposed unified remodeling-to-fracture model, we performed remodeling simulations on a 3D proximal femur model for a duration of 365 days under five different daily loading conditions followed by a side fall fracture simulation reproducing previously published experimental tests (de Bakker et al. (2009), case C, male, 72 years old). We show here that the implementation of an integrated remodeling-to-fracture model provides more realistic prediction strategy to assess the bone remodeling effects on the fracture risk of bone.

  13. The Effects of Multiple Interacting Fractures on Surface Deformation and Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, B. H.

    2015-12-01

    In a number of topical contexts, the response of fluid-filled fractures is of fundamental importance. For example, hydraulic fracturing operations typically generate multiple sub-parallel fractures that may, in turn, interact with families of preexisting natural fractures. At the In Salah carbon sequestration site, space geodetic observations of surface deformation suggested opening of a fracture and leakage of fluids into the caprock. And hydrocarbon production is often facilitated by naturally occurring fractures that are typically depressurized through production or pressurized to enhance oil recovery. Both the surface deformation and the fluid flow resulting from pressure variations in a fractured medium are qualitatively different for a fractured medium compared to a medium with isotropic properties. It is straightforward to calculate the responses of a medium with a single fracture, with analytical solutions available for simple geometries. Also, in the limit of very high fracture density, continuum representations of anisotropic poroelasticity can be used. However, as in the examples above, there are many applications where a finite number of fractures are spaced closely enough that their stress fields interact. I investigate this regime numerically. Observations of both surface deformation and inferences of permeability can be effective in constraining estimates of fracture density and aperture.

  14. Prediction of fracture toughness of ceramic composites as function of microstructure: I. Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Zhou, Min

    2013-02-01

    The evaluation of macroscopic material parameters such as fracture toughness as functions of microstructural attributes is a fundamental issue in material science. The task requires the quantification of both microstructure and material response. Currently, no systematic approach other than experiments exists for establishing microstructure-fracture toughness relations for materials. In this paper, we present a multi-scale computational framework based on the cohesive finite element method (CFEM) for predicting fracture toughness of materials as a function of microstructure. This framework provides a means for evaluating fracture toughness through explicit simulation of fracture processes in microstructures. The approach uses the J-integral, allowing fracture toughness to be calculated for microstructures with random heterogeneous phase distributions and fracture processes with arbitrary crack paths or micro-crack patterns. Calculations carried out concern two-phase Al2O3/TiB2 ceramic composites and focus on the effects of constitute behavior, phase morphology, phase distribution, phase size scale, and interphase bonding on fracture toughness. Results show that microstructure and constituent properties can significantly influence fracture behavior and combine to determine the overall fracture toughness through the activation of different fracture mechanisms. In particular, a combination of fine microstructure size scale, rounded reinforcement morphology, appropriately balanced interphase bonding strength and compliance can best promote desirable crack-reinforcement interactions and lead to enhanced fracture toughness.

  15. Tibia (Shinbone) Shaft Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... fractures in patients who are less healthy. • Early motion. Many doctors encourage leg motion early in the recovery period. For example, if ... will help you restore normal muscle strength, joint motion, and flexibility. AAOS does not endorse any treatments, ...

  16. Calcaneus (Heel Bone) Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calcaneus (Heel Bone) Fractures cont. Page ( 5 ) • Early motion. Many doctors encourage motion of the foot and ankle early in the ... therapy. Specific exercises can improve the range of motion in your foot and ankle, and strengthen supporting ...

  17. Infiltration into Fractured Bedrock

    SciTech Connect

    Salve, Rohit; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Jones, Robert

    2007-09-01

    One potential consequence of global climate change and rapid changes in land use is an increased risk of flooding. Proper understanding of floodwater infiltration thus becomes a crucial component of our preparedness to meet the environmental challenges of projected climate change. In this paper, we present the results of a long-term infiltration experiment performed on fractured ash flow tuff. Water was released from a 3 x 4 m{sup 2} infiltration plot (divided into 12 square subplots) with a head of {approx}0.04 m, over a period of {approx}800 days. This experiment revealed peculiar infiltration patterns not amenable to current infiltration models, which were originally developed for infiltration into soils over a short duration. In particular, we observed that in part of the infiltration plot, the infiltration rate abruptly increased a few weeks into the infiltration tests. We suggest that these anomalies result from increases in fracture permeability during infiltration, which may be caused by swelling of clay fillings and/or erosion of infill debris. Interaction of the infiltration water with subsurface natural cavities (lithophysal cavities) could also contribute to such anomalies. This paper provides a conceptual model that partly describes the observed infiltration patterns in fractured rock and highlights some of the pitfalls associated with direct extension of soil infiltration models to fractured rock over a long period.

  18. Metatarsal fracture (acute) - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 88. Richter M, Kwon JY, DiGiovanni CW. Foot injuries. In: Browner BD, Jupiter JB, Krettek C, Anderson ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Foot Injuries and Disorders Fractures Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  19. Statistical Physics of Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Alava, Mikko; Nukala, Phani K; Zapperi, Stefano

    2006-05-01

    Disorder and long-range interactions are two of the key components that make material failure an interesting playfield for the application of statistical mechanics. The cornerstone in this respect has been lattice models of the fracture in which a network of elastic beams, bonds, or electrical fuses with random failure thresholds are subject to an increasing external load. These models describe on a qualitative level the failure processes of real, brittle, or quasi-brittle materials. This has been particularly important in solving the classical engineering problems of material strength: the size dependence of maximum stress and its sample-to-sample statistical fluctuations. At the same time, lattice models pose many new fundamental questions in statistical physics, such as the relation between fracture and phase transitions. Experimental results point out to the existence of an intriguing crackling noise in the acoustic emission and of self-affine fractals in the crack surface morphology. Recent advances in computer power have enabled considerable progress in the understanding of such models. Among these partly still controversial issues, are the scaling and size-effects in material strength and accumulated damage, the statistics of avalanches or bursts of microfailures, and the morphology of the crack surface. Here we present an overview of the results obtained with lattice models for fracture, highlighting the relations with statistical physics theories and more conventional fracture mechanics approaches.

  20. Bipartite patella fracture.

    PubMed

    Canizares, George H; Selesnick, F Harlan

    2003-02-01

    Bipartite patella fracture is an uncommon injury that has rarely been described in the literature. It can be quite debilitating in the competitive athlete and is often overlooked by the treating physician. A bone scan can be helpful in confirming the diagnosis, and appropriate treatment often results in a successful outcome.

  1. Laser-based excitation and diagnostics of planar fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, T. E.; Van Wijk, K.; Snieder, R.; Willis, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    Faults are of interest not only to earth science, but also at different scales in the non-destructive testing (NDT) community. Remote sensing of faults is of interest to both communities, with the idea of inverting for the fracture properties in a non-invasive way. Alternatively, the wave field directly excited at the fracture is of interest to both communities because the waves thus radiated are equivalent to those emitted by acoustic emissions or micro-earthquakes. Much can be learned from recording of elastic waves excited at the the fracture. Based on technology developed for NDT, we use laser ultrasonics in the laboratory to excite and detect elastic waves, in order to determine the properties of fractures or faults in laboratory rock and synthetic samples. We show examples of wave propagation in a clear Poly(methyl methacrylate) cylinder. By focusing a high power infrared (IR) laser inside the cylinder we create a visible single disk-shaped fracture near the center of the sample. The laser generates a short pulse (~20 ns) of infrared light that is absorbed by the sample material at the focal point and is converted into heat. The sudden thermal expansion generates stress and forms a fracture parallel to the cylindrical axis. We excite elastic waves at the surface of the sample using the same high-power pulsed laser, but at a much lower energy setting, and with an unfocused beam. We measure the direct and scattered wave field from the fracture with a laser interferometer, and also excite the fracture directly with a fraction of the source laser energy impinging directly on the fracture. A comparison of the direct excitation and the elastic scattered wavefields, including studies of the tip diffractions from the fracture, shows strong agreement. The measured tip diffractions carry information about the stress concentration near the crack tips, which is crucial for understanding rupture processes. This novel laboratory technique allows us to measure the source

  2. Entablature: fracture types and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, A. E. S.; Blake, S.; Tuffen, H.

    2014-05-01

    Entablature is the term used to describe zones or tiers of irregular jointing in basaltic lava flows. It is thought to form when water from rivers dammed by the lava inundates the lava flow surface, and during lava-meltwater interaction in subglacial settings. A number of different fracture types are described in entablature outcrops from the Búrfell lava and older lava flows in Þjórsárdalur, southwest Iceland. These are: striae-bearing, column-bounding fractures and pseudopillow fracture systems that themselves consist of two different fracture types—master fractures with dimpled surface textures and subsidiary fractures with curved striae. The interaction of pseudopillow fracture systems and columnar jointing in the entablature produces the chevron fracture patterns that are commonly observed in entablature. Cube-jointing is a more densely fractured version of entablature, which likely forms when more coolant enters the hot lava. The entablature tiers display closely spaced striae and dendritic crystal shapes which indicate rapid cooling. Master fracture surfaces show a thin band with an evolved composition at the fracture surface; mineral textures in this band also show evidence of quenching of this material. This is interpreted as gas-driven filter pressing of late-stage residual melt that is drawn into an area of low pressure immediately preceding or during master fracture formation by ductile extensional fracture of hot, partially crystallised lava. This melt is then quenched by an influx of water and/or steam when the master fracture fully opens. Our findings suggest that master fractures are the main conduit for coolant entering the lava flow during entablature formation.

  3. Accelerated fracture healing in mice lacking the 5-lipoxygenase gene

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) promotes inflammation by synthesizing pro-inflammatory prostaglandins from arachidonic acid. Inflammation is an early response to bone fracture, and ablation of COX-2 activity impairs fracture healing. Arachidonic acid is also converted into leukotrienes by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO). We hypothesized that 5-LO is a negative regulator of fracture healing and that in the absence of COX-2, excess leukotrienes synthesized by 5-LO will impair fracture healing. Methods Fracture healing was assessed in mice with a targeted 5-LO mutation (5-LOKO mice) and control mice by radiographic and histological observations, and measured by histomorphometry and torsional mechanical testing. To assess effects on arachidonic acid metabolism, prostaglandin E2, F2α, and leukotriene B4 levels were measured in the fracture calluses of control, 5-LOKO COX-1KO, and COX-2KO mice by enzyme linked immunoassays. Results Femur fractures in 5-LOKO mice rapidly developed a cartilaginous callus that was replaced with bone to heal fractures faster than in control mice. Femurs from 5-LOKO mice had substantially better mechanical properties after 1 month of healing than did control mice. Callus leukotriene levels were 4-fold higher in mice homozygous for a targeted mutation in the COX-2 gene (COX-2KO), which indicated that arachidonic acid was shunted into the 5-LO pathway in the absence of COX-2. Interpretation These experiments show that 5-LO negatively regulates fracture healing and that shunting of arachidonic acid into the 5-LO pathway may account, at least in part, for the impaired fracture healing response observed in COX-2KO mice. PMID:21067431

  4. Comprehensive evaluation of fracture parameters by dual laterolog data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboorian-Jooybari, Hadi; Dejam, Morteza; Chen, Zhangxin; Pourafshary, Peyman

    2016-08-01

    Reservoir quality and productivity of tight formations depend heavily on the degree of fracture development. In fact, hard and dense carbonate formations may not be considered as net pay without the presence of fractures that convey fluids towards the wellbore. The evaluation of fractures is key to effective reservoir characterization for purposes like well drilling and completion as well as development and simulation of fractured reservoirs. Although imaging technologies such as Formation Micro-Scanners and Imagers (FMS and FMI) provide useful information about fracture properties (i.e., dip angle, porosity, aperture, and permeability), they are very expensive and may not be available in all wells. In this work, fracture parameters are estimated using conventional dual laterolog (DLL) resistivity which includes shallow (LLS) and deep (LLD) responses. This technique is based on electrical resistivity anomalies resulting from the separation of shallow and deep laterolog curves. Fracture parameters that can be calculated by DLL include dip angle, aperture, porosity, permeability, and cementation factor. The accuracy of the parameters calculated using DLL data is validated by the results of FMI in a well in one of the Iranian fractured reservoirs. Contrary to the image logs, the conventional DLL is run routinely in all drilled wells. Therefore, if a reservoir has limited and insufficient data of image logs, as it is often the case, the DLLs can be used as a reliable replacement in the construction of fracture models. Furthermore, DLL has an advantage of deeper evaluation of fractures in comparison with the immediate borehole investigation of image logs.

  5. Variability and Anisotropy of Fracture Toughness of Cortical Bone Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Wahab, Adel; Nordin, Norhaziqah; Silberschmidt, Vadim

    2012-08-01

    Bones form protective and load-bearing framework of the body. Therefore, their structural integrity is vital for the quality of life. Unfortunately, bones can only sustain a load until a certain limit, beyond which they fail. Therefore, it is essential to study their mechanical and fracture behaviours in order to get an in-depth understanding of the origins of its fracture resistance that, in turn, can assist diagnosis and prevention of bone's trauma. This can be achieved by studying mechanical properties of bone, such as its fracture toughness. Generally, most of bone fractures occur for long bones that consist mostly of cortical bone. Therefore, in this study, only a cortical bone tissue was studied. Since this tissue has an anisotropic behaviour and possesses hierarchical and complex structure, in this paper, an experimental analysis for the fracture toughness of cortical bone tissue is presented in terms of J-integral. The data was obtained using single-edge-notch bending (SENB) cortical specimens of bone tested in a three-point bending setup. Variability of values of fracture toughness was investigated by testing specimens cut from different cortex positions of bovine femur called anterior, posterior, medial, and lateral. In addition, anisotropy ratios of fracture toughness were considered by examining specimens cut from three different orientations: longitudinal, transverse and radial. Moreover, in order to link cortical bone fracture mechanisms with its underlying microstructure, fracture surfaces of specimens from different cortices and along different orientations were studied. Experimental results of this study provide a clear understanding of both variability and anisotropy of cortical bone tissue with regard to its fracture toughness.

  6. Triplane fractures in the hand.

    PubMed

    Garcia Mata, S; Hidalgo Ovejero, A; Martinez Grande, M

    1999-02-01

    Two new cases of triplane fracture of the distal tibia are reported in the proximal phalanx of the thumb and the distal radius, respectively, of a 12-year-old girl and a 13-year-old boy. Neither fracture showed any displacement, achieving healing at 4 weeks of external immobilization. Triplane fractures can occur across growth plates other than the distal tibia. Because of the rapid physiologic physeal arrest, the potential for growth deformity is null. In cases without displacement, these fractures should be treated conservatively by external immobilization, as one would treat a one-plane fracture.

  7. Phalangeal fractures: displaced/nondisplaced.

    PubMed

    Gaston, R Glenn; Chadderdon, Christopher

    2012-08-01

    Nonsurgical management is the preferred treatment of stable, extra-articular fractures of the proximal and middle phalanx, most distal phalanx fractures, and, rarely, nondisplaced intraarticular fractures in elite athletes. Techniques that afford maximal strength with minimal dissection, thus allowing earlier return to play, are ideal. Open reduction with internal fixation with plate fixation is most often chosen for unstable phalangeal shaft fractures in high-demand athletes to provide rigid internal fixation and allow immediate range of motion and more rapid return to sport. It is our practice to routinely treat unicondylar fractures with surgery with percutaneous headless compression screws in elite athletes.

  8. Colloid transport in dolomite rock fractures: effects of fracture characteristics, specific discharge, and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Pulin K; Sleep, Brent E

    2012-09-18

    The effects of fracture characteristics, specific discharge, and ionic strength on microsphere transport in variable-aperture dolomite rock fractures were studied in a laboratory-scale system. Fractures with different aperture distributions and mineral compositions were artificially created in two dolomite rock blocks. Transport tests were conducted with bromide and carboxylate-modified latex microspheres (20, 200, and 500 nm diameter). Under overall unfavorable attachment conditions, there was significant retention of the 20 nm microsphere and minimal retention of the 500 nm microsphere for all conditions examined. Aperture variability produced significant spatial variation in colloid transport. Flushing with low ionic strength solution (1 mM) following microsphere transport at 12 mM ionic strength solution produced a spike in effluent microsphere concentrations, consistent with retention of colloids in secondary energy minima. Surface roughness and charge heterogeneity effects may have also contributed to the effect of microsphere size on retention. Matrix diffusion influenced bromide tran