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  1. Intracranial imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, M.; Cook, G.; Al-Kutoubi, A.

    1996-01-01

    This article concentrates on the imaging of intracranial structures and outlines some basic imaging strategies for common clinical presentations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:8935596

  2. The Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Yale: the first one hundred fifty years, from Nathan Smith to Lee Buxton.

    PubMed Central

    Kohorn, E. I.

    1993-01-01

    The persons who directed the academic teaching of women's health at Yale Medical School are presented by biographical sketches recounting their achievements and some of the difficulties they encountered. Three who provided particular catalysis were Nathan Smith, Herbert Thoms, and Lee Buxton. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:8303913

  3. Anaerobic orbital cellulitis: a clinical and experimental study.

    PubMed Central

    Jedrzynski, M S; Bullock, J D; McGuire, T W; Elder, B L; Bullock, J D

    1991-01-01

    In this article we have reviewed the clinical and bacteriologic aspects of anaerobic orbital cellulitis and have presented six patients to illustrate these points. Physicians who treat patients with orbital cellulitis should have a high index of suspicion for possible instances involving anaerobes, so that appropriate management can be started early. To investigate this problem further, we created an animal model of anaerobic orbital cellulitis. This model may be useful in future studies of the pathogenesis and treatment of this serious and often devastating disease. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 PMID:1808813

  4. A proposal for a standardized system of reporting human lymph node morphology in relation to immunological function

    PubMed Central

    Cottier, H.; Turk, J.; Sobin, L.

    1972-01-01

    This Memorandum proposes a standardized system of reporting the histology of human lymph nodes based on commonly used simple staining techniques. The purpose is to provide a uniform, internationally acceptable system by which the histological structure of lymph nodes can be correlated with other parameters of immunological status. The proposed protocols are intended to provide information that is not available in conventional written reports, that use such terms as “hyperplasia” or “nonspecific lymphadenitis”. ImagesFigure 22Figure 13Figure 5Figure 4Figure 3Figure 14Figure 15Figure 9Figure 21Figure 8Figure 12Figure 17Figure 16Figure 2Figure 7Figure 6Figure 20Figure 19Figure 11Figure 10Figure 18 PMID:4539822

  5. Early chiropractic education in Oregon

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Joseph C

    2002-01-01

    Chiropractic education in the northwestern United States has its origins in the Marsh School & Cure in 1904. Most of the early schools were located in Portland, Oregon, including the D.D. Palmer College of Chiropractic (1908-1910), and several of these had merged by 1912 or 1913 to form the Pacific Chiropractic College, forerunner of today's Western States College. The latter was organized as a non-profit institution during the Great Depression, and struggled not only to survive but to create a higher standard. The early broad-scope of chiropractic training in the state probably encouraged the liberal scope of practice enjoyed in Oregon to this day. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16Figure 18Figure 19Figure 20Figure 21Figure 22Figure 24

  6. Experimental lead nitrate poisoning: microscopic and ultrastructural study of the gills of tench (Tinca tinca, L.).

    PubMed Central

    Roncero, V; Vincente, J A; Redondo, E; Gãzquez, A; Duran, E

    1990-01-01

    A microscopic, ultrastructural, and morphometric study was made of the gills of tench (Tinca tinca, L.) subjected to acute experimental lead nitrate poisoning. Twenty-one adult tench were subjected to poisoning and a further 22 were used as controls. Lesions were characterized by the appearance of edema and epithelial hyperplasia and necrosis, both in cells forming part of the filtration barrier and in those in the interlamellar space. These processes developed in the course of the experiment, leading to the death of tench after 12 to 15 days of exposure to 75 ppm lead nitrate, at which point the concentrations of lead in the gills had reached their maximum. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 13. FIGURE 14. FIGURE 15. FIGURE 16. FIGURE 17. FIGURE 18. FIGURE 19. PMID:2088740

  7. Studies on the structure and permeability of the microvasculature in normal rat lymph nodes.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, A. O.; Anderson, N. D.

    1975-01-01

    The structure and permeability of the microvasculature in normal rat lymph nodes was studied by regional perfusion techniques. The results indicated that characteristic vascular units supplied each cortical lobule of lymphatic tissue. Numerous arteriovenous communications and venous sphincters innervated by unmyelinated nerve fibers were found in this vascular bed. These specialized vascular structures permitted regional control of blood flow through high endothelial venules. Lymphocytes migrated across these venular walls by moving through intercellular spaces in the endothelium and between gaps in the laminated, reticular sheath. No direct anastomoses between blood vessels and lymphatics were seen, but tracer studies with horseradish peroxidase suggested that functional lymph node-venous communications were present in the walls of high endothelial venules. Images Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 PMID:1163637

  8. Ultrastructure of human malignant diffuse mesothelioma.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Y.; Kannerstein, M.

    1976-01-01

    Eleven cases of malignant diffuse mesotheliomas, histologically classified into two groups, epithelial (5 pleural and 3 peritoneal) and biphasic or mixed (2 pleural and 1 peritoneal) forms, were stuied by electron microscopy to elucidate their ultrastructural characteristics. The neoplastic cells of the epithelial forms were varied in ultrastructure, from well differentiated (marked by polarity, micovilli, glycogen granules, junctional structures, tonofilaments, intracellular vacuoles, and a basement membrane) to poorly differentiated (which lacked some of these epithelial characteristics). In four of eight instances in epithelial type tumors, nonepithelial or mesenchymal neoplastic cells were recognized. The biphasic or mixed cases included three major cell types: epithelial, atypical epithelial, and mesenchymal. It appeared that there were transitional forms among the three cell types. The observations support the concept that the neoplastic cell of malignant mesothelioma can differentiate into a number of cell lines. Images Figures 20 and 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figures 24 and 25 Figure 26 Figure 27A Figure 27B and C Figure 28 Figure 29 Figure 30 Figure 31 Figures 32 and 33 Figure 34 Figure 35 Figure 36 Figures 1-4 Figures 5 and 6 Figure 37 Figures 7-10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figures 17 and 18 Figure 19 PMID:998721

  9. The pathogenesis of experimentally induced amebic liver abscess in the gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus).

    PubMed Central

    Chadee, K.; Meerovitch, E.

    1984-01-01

    Sequential development and pathology of experimentally induced amebic liver abscess in the gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) were studied from 1 to 60 days after inoculation. Early lesions were characterized by an acute inflammatory response, which became granulomatous at 5 days. Early granulomas were discrete, with well-defined fibrohistiocytic walls. Trophozoite dissemination as a result of fibrolysis of granuloma wall was confined to the liver parenchyma. The granulomatous cellular infiltrate (less than 20 days) was characterized by granulocytes and histiocytes; older granulomas (greater than 30 days) were composed of lymphocytic infiltrate, plasma cells, and a few granulocytes, and were characterized by the absence of epithelioid histiocytes. The degree of pathologic change adjacent to liver granulomas followed the sequential development of the amebic liver abscess. Severe changes observed were portal canal lymphocytic infiltration, the presence of foreign body giant cells, periportal fibrosis, proliferation of bile duct epithelium, and hepatocyte anisonucleosis and ballooning degeneration. The pathogenesis of the infection and the usefulness of the gerbil model for the study of human amebiasis are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 PMID:6385727

  10. The pathology of experimentally induced cecal amebiasis in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). Liver changes and amebic liver abscess formation.

    PubMed Central

    Chadee, K.; Meerovitch, E.

    1985-01-01

    The pathogenesis of experimentally induced cecal amebiasis in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) was studied from 5 to 60 days after inoculation. Ulcerative lesions were noted 10 to 60 days after inoculation. The sequential development of lesions was asynchronous and progressed from destruction of the interglandular epithelium and of glandular crypt elements to loss of mucosa and formation of granulomatous lesions in the submucosa involving the muscularis mucosae. Pathologic changes in the liver correlated with the formation of ulcerative cecal lesions. Subacute hepatic changes showed lymphocytic portal infiltrate, Kupffer cell hyperplasia, multinucleated giant cells, granuloma formation, and sinusoidal mononuclear and granulocytic infiltrates. Metastatic amebic liver abscesses occurred as early as 10 days after inoculation, and small abscesses were found in the portal areas of the right liver lobe. The sequential development and pathologic manifestation of the infection and the usefulness of the gerbil for the study of human intestinal amebiasis are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 PMID:4014436

  11. A Workstation for Interactive Display and Quantitative Analysis of 3-D and 4-D Biomedical Images

    PubMed Central

    Robb, R.A.; Heffeman, P.B.; Camp, J.J.; Hanson, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    The capability to extract objective and quantitatively accurate information from 3-D radiographic biomedical images has not kept pace with the capabilities to produce the images themselves. This is rather an ironic paradox, since on the one hand the new 3-D and 4-D imaging capabilities promise significant potential for providing greater specificity and sensitivity (i.e., precise objective discrimination and accurate quantitative measurement of body tissue characteristics and function) in clinical diagnostic and basic investigative imaging procedures than ever possible before, but on the other hand, the momentous advances in computer and associated electronic imaging technology which have made these 3-D imaging capabilities possible have not been concomitantly developed for full exploitation of these capabilities. Therefore, we have developed a powerful new microcomputer-based system which permits detailed investigations and evaluation of 3-D and 4-D (dynamic 3-D) biomedical images. The system comprises a special workstation to which all the information in a large 3-D image data base is accessible for rapid display, manipulation, and measurement. The system provides important capabilities for simultaneously representing and analyzing both structural and functional data and their relationships in various organs of the body. This paper provides a detailed description of this system, as well as some of the rationale, background, theoretical concepts, and practical considerations related to system implementation. ImagesFigure 5Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16

  12. Familial canine dermatomyositis. Initial characterization of the cutaneous and muscular lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Hargis, A. M.; Haupt, K. H.; Hegreberg, G. A.; Prieur, D. J.; Moore, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Familial canine dermatomyositis is a recently identified disease of collie dogs that resembles human juvenile dermatomyositis. The lesions in the skin and muscles obtained by biopsy from two litters of dogs were characterized for the purpose of determining the similarity of the lesions to those of human dermatomyositis. The cutaneous lesions began between 7 and 11 weeks of age and were present on the face, lips, ears, and skin over bony prominences of the limbs, feet, sternum, and tip of the tail. Histologically the cutaneous lesions frequently consisted of vesicles, pustules, and ulcers on the lips, face, and ears. Neutrophils, lymphocytes, mast cells, and macrophages were present throughout the dermis. Neutrophils and lymphocytes were also present in and around vessels. Between 13 and 19 weeks of age generalized muscle atrophy was noted. The muscle lesions consisted of interstitial lymphocyte, plasma cell, macrophage, and neutrophil accumulation; myofiber degeneration, regeneration, and atrophy; and fibrosis. Perivascular neutrophils, lymphocytes, and plasma cells were also seen. Histologically, the lesions resembled those present in human juvenile dermatomyositis; and these observations, coupled with clinical, immunologic, and clinical pathologic observations presented elsewhere, suggest that familial canine dermatomyositis is an appropriate and potentially useful model for human juvenile dermatomyositis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:6465285

  13. The ultrastructure of spontaneous coronary arterial lesions in steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri).

    PubMed Central

    House, E. W.; Benditt, E. P.

    1981-01-01

    Electron-microscopic examination of spontaneously occurring coronary arterial lesions in adult spawning steelhead trout showed them to be subendothelial accumulations of modified smooth muscle cells covered by an intact endothelium. Some of the cells in the nodules appeared highly vacuolated and seemed to be associated with varying amounts of collagen and elastin. The internal elastic lamina was often doubled with smooth muscle cells between the layers. The thickness of the internal elastica was altered and, in some lesions, penetrated by smooth muscle cells. In the smallest lesions, smooth muscle cells appeared to be penetrating the internal elastic lamina and were usually close to a highly vacuolated intimal endothelial cell. The underlying medial layer frequently exhibited altered orientation of the cells, with the frequent appearance of increased collagen and amorphous extracellular material. No lipid was present in any lesion. Although vacuolation of endothelial cells suggested some alteration in endothelial cells, at least in developed lesions, no evidence of endothelial denudation over lesions was observed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:7294154

  14. Senile cerebral amyloid. Prealbumin as a common constituent in the neuritic plaque, in the neurofibrillary tangle, and in the microangiopathic lesion.

    PubMed Central

    Shirahama, T.; Skinner, M.; Westermark, P.; Rubinow, A.; Cohen, A. S.; Brun, A.; Kemper, T. L.

    1982-01-01

    Three lesions that characterize the nosologic findings in the brain of Alzheimer's presenile dementia and senile dementia of Alzheimer type, ie, neuritic plaque, neurofibrillary tangle, and microangiopathy, all are frequently associated with amyloid deposition. There has been some question, however, as to whether these lesions share the same etiology. Moreover, the specific chemical nature of amyloid associated with these lesions has not yet been determined. In the present study, formalin-fixed paraffin sections of the affected brains were tested immunocytochemically for their reactivity against antiserum to prealbumin (recently disclosed as the major constituent of amyloid associated with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy as well as senile cardiac amyloid) and known components of other types of amyloid (AA, AP, etc.). The results demonstrated that amyloid deposits in all three lesions reacted with anti-prealbumin, suggesting that it is a common constituent of these lesions. Indeed, it is likely that prealbumin is the major constituent of amyloid associated with neuritic plaque, neurofibrillary tangle, and microangiopathy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 PMID:6950666

  15. A brief history of historical scholarship in chiropractic

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Joseph C

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides a cursory overview of attempts to discover, preserve and disseminate the history of the chiropractic profession, up to and including the organization of the Association for the History of Chiropractic (AHC). A surprisingly wide range of materials have been available for many decades, but sustained efforts at historical scholarship are more recent (past quarter century). The quality of these works has been uneven, but has improved with the emergence of chiropractic scholarly periodicals and interest from non-chiropractor investigators. Affiliates of the American-based AHC are located in Australia and Canada; organized historical scholarship in other regions of the world has yet to develop. Several substantial archival resources for historical investigations are available, and merit greater scrutiny and support within the profession. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16Figure 17Figure 18Figure 19Figure 20Figure 21Figure 22Figure 23Figure 24Figure 25p136-ap136-bp136-cp136-dp136-e

  16. In vitro astrocytic differentiation from embryoid bodies of an experimental mouse testicular teratoma.

    PubMed Central

    VandenBerg, S. R.; Ludwin, S. K.; Herman, M. M.; Bignami, A.

    1976-01-01

    Astrocytic differentiation in monolayer cultures of ascitic embryoid bodies from the experimental teratoma OTT-6050 was studied by conventional light microscopy and by indirect immunofluorescence with antisera to glial fibrillary acidic (GFA) protein, a protein specific for astorcytes. Primitive neuroepithelial cells were identified in 24-hour cultures. Within 72 hours, two cell types diverged. One cell type, with a flattened epithelial morphology in early cultures, demonstrated delicate GFA protein-positive fibrils within 48 hours. In later cultures, this type progressively displayed more typical stellate astrocytic features, with denser, more compact GFA protein-positive fluorescence in the perinuclear cytoplasm and cell processes. As indicated by GFA protein expression, the appearance of astrocytes of typical morphology therefore was preceded by biochemical differentiation. The second cell type, interpreted as neuroblastic, failed to demonstrate GFA protein and had a small perikaryon with slender bipolar processes that were argyrophilic with Bodian's protargol in late cultures. Divergent neuroepithelial differentiation occurred within mitotically active cell populations and proceeded without apparent tissue relationships to other germ layer derivatives. Images Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:776002

  17. XH1--a new cervical carcinoma cell line and xenograft model of tumour invasion, 'metastasis' and regression.

    PubMed Central

    Han, X.; Lyle, R.; Eustace, D. L.; Jewers, R. J.; Parrington, J. M.; Das, A.; Chana, T.; Dagg, B.; Money, S.; Bates, T. D.

    1991-01-01

    A new cell line, XH1, has been derived from an invasive focally keratinising adenosquamous carcinoma of the cervix in a 32 year old patient. It has been maintained in long term monolayer culture for 26 months, and passaged over 100 times (much greater than 300 population doublings). It is aneuploid with a mean chromosome number of 78. Examination using two minisatellite hypervariable DNA probes has shown it to be different from other cell lines maintained in this laboratory and from HeLa. Two sublines, XH1a and XH1b, show marked differences in monolayer culture, growth in soft agar, and xenograft formation. XH1 and XH1a cells readily form subcutaneous xenografts, and lung colonies can be established by their intravenous injection. Subcutaneous injection of XH1b cells results in rapid cell growth for a few days after which the tumour undergoes degeneration and then regresses completely. The XH1 karyotype has many rearranged chromosomes. Parental XH1 cells and both sublines show integration of HPV16 into the genome. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 PMID:1911212

  18. Clinicopathologic responses in cats with feline leukemia virus-associated leukemia-lymphoma treated with staphylococcal protein A.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, R. W.; Tyler, R. D.; Trang, L. Q.; Liu, W. T.; Good, R. A.; Day, N. K.

    1985-01-01

    Purified protein A from Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I was injected intraperitoneally or was incorporated in filters ex vivo through which plasma from cats with feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-associated leukemia-lymphoma was passed. Before treatment, 65% of the FeLV-infected cats were anemic, and 70% were thrombocytopenic. Concomitant infections, or immune-mediated disease, was common. During treatment 50% of the cats with FeLV-associated disease improved objectively with normal posttreatment hematocrits, thrombocyte and leukocyte counts, disappearance of dysplastic hematologic elements, and correction of marrow dyscrasias. A 33% response to treatment occurred in cats with unequivocal manifestations of malignant disease and was characterized by reductions in tumor size and marrow and peripheral blood neoplastic cell populations. Clearance of FeLV viremia was documented in 28% of the treated cats. The several possible mechanisms by which treatment with staphylococcal protein A causes reduction in the extent of malignant disease are considered. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:2983560

  19. THE TREATMENT OF URINARY TRACT CALCULI

    PubMed Central

    Leadbetter, Wyland F.

    1958-01-01

    From review of recent information relative to calculus formation in the kidney, the conclusion reached that we do not yet understand, despite much effort, the basic physicochemical mechanisms involved. Since this is so, it has seemed best to the author for the present to rely, in treating patients with renal stones, on simple therapeutic concepts, which, if carefully and conscientiously applied, produce good results. The concepts are the elimination of known causes such as parathyroid adenomas and obstructive lesions, elimination or at least treatment of infections, diminution of urinary components which form the basis of calculi by limiting the oral intake or absorption from the gastrointestinal tract and maintenance of a dilute urine of desired pH. A plan for preoperative study is suggested to allow planned therapy. Indications for operative removal of calculi as well as some points of technique are discussed. It is emphasized that surgical removal of a calculus is but an incident in the care of patients with calculi and that treatment during the postoperative period and followup therapy is most important if success is to be achieved. Reports of cases to illustrate the application of these concepts are presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16 PMID:13523394

  20. Surgical treatment of obesity: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Fobi, M. A. L.

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease due to excess fat storage, a genetic predisposition, and strong environmental contributions. This problem is worldwide, and the incidence is increasing daily. There are medical, physical, social, economic, and psychological comorbid conditions associated with obesity. There is no cure for obesity except possibly prevention. Nonsurgical treatment has been inadequate in providing sustained weight loss. Currently, surgery offers the only viable treatment option with longterm weight loss and maintenance for the morbidly obese. Surgeries for weight loss are called bariatric surgeries. There is no one operation that is effective for all patients. Gastric bypass operations are the most common operations currently used. Because there are inherent complications from surgeries, bariatric surgeries should be performed in a multidisciplinary setting. The laparoscopic approach is being used by some surgeons in performing the various operations. The success rate--usually defined as >50% excess weight loss that is maintained for at least five years from bariatric surgery--ranges from 40% in the simple to >70% in the complex operations. The weight loss from surgical treatment results in significant improvements and, in some cases, complete resolution of comorbid conditions associated with obesity. Patients undergoing surgery for obesity need lifelong nutritional supplements and medical monitoring. Images Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:14746355

  1. Light- and electron-microscopic histochemistry of Fabry's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Faraggiana, T.; Churg, J.; Grishman, E.; Strauss, L.; Prado, A.; Bishop, D. F.; Schuchman, E.; Desnick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A histochemical study was performed on light- and electron-microscopic level in a case of Fabry's disease. The patient underwent kidney transplantation for renal failure and died of heart failure 6 months later. Patient's tissues were studied at the light- and electron-microscopic levels with various embedding and staining techniques for lipids and carbohydrates. Two peroxidase-labeled lectins (from Ricinus communis and from Bandeiraea simplicifolia) known to have affinity for alpha- and beta-D-galactose, were strongly reactive with the storage material on frozen sections. The ultrahistochemical and extraction tests showed that the typical granules had a variable reactivity and morphologic characteristics in different cells, probably reflecting different composition. A small number of typical deposits were also observed in the transplanted kidney. This is the first reported case of recurrence of the storage disease in the allograft. Of interest was also the fact that the patient's blood inhibited normal alpha-galactosidase activity, suggesting a possible inhibitor-related mechanism in the pathogenesis of the recurrence. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 PMID:6786101

  2. The presence and possible role of monocyte infiltration in human chronic proliferative glomerulonephritides. Light microscopic, immunofluorescence, and histochemical correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Monga, G.; Mazzucco, G.; di Belgiojoso, G. B.; Busnach, G.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-seven cases of chronic glomerulonephritis with proliferative pattern (11 cases of primary mixed IgG-IgM cryoglobulinemia, 8 cases of SLE, and 8 cases of primary membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis) were studied with particular attention to the glomerular monocyte infiltration. The latter, detected by means of nonspecific esterase technique, was compared with the presence of hyaline thrombi and intraluminal immunoglobulin lumps. Monocyte infiltration was heavy and almost constant in cryoglobulinemia, less important in SLE, and practically absent in membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. By means of immunofluorescence technique on paraffin embedded material, monocytes are shown to contain IgG and IgM, suggesting a phagocytic activity on some types of immune complexes. Since monocytes are migrant cells, and therefore easily removable from the glomeruli by the bloodstream, it seems that they could be responsible for regression of glomerular hypercellularity as reported in some patients with cryoglobulinemia showing clinical improvement. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:371410

  3. Before Nugent took charge: early efforts to reform chiropractic education, 1919-1941

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Joseph C

    2003-01-01

    John J. Nugent, D.C. is remembered by many as either the “Abraham Flexner of Chiropractic” or the “anti-Christ of Chiropractic.” From 1941 until his forced retirement in 1959, the Irish-born Palmer graduate was one of the most important factors in the profession's educational reforms. Yet Nugent's work as the National Chiropractic Association's (NCA's) director of research was not the beginning of the campaign to upgrade chiropractic education. This paper looks at earlier influences and events which set the stage for Nugent's campaign. Among these were the introduction of licensure for chiropractors, the self-defeating actions of B.J. Palmer, the introduction of basic science legislation, the lethargy of the schools, and the struggle for control of education between the schools, on the one hand, and the NCA and the Council of State Chiropractic Examining Boards on the other ImagesFigure 1Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16Figure 17Figure 18Figure 19Figure 20Figure 21Figure 22Figure 23Figure 24Figure 25Figure 26Figure 28Figure 29Figure 30Figure 31Figure 32Figure 33Figure 34Figure 35Figure 36Figure 37Figure 38

  4. An experimental mouse testicular teratoma as a model for neuroepithelial neoplasia and differentiation. II. Electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Herman, M. M.; Sipe, J. C.; Rubinstein, L. J.; Vandenberg, S. R.; Spence, A. M.; Vraa-Jensen, J.

    1975-01-01

    The electron microscopic features of the stages of divergent neuroepithelial differentiation in the solid implants of a transplantable mouse testicular teratoma (OTT-6050) are presented and compared to the sequential stages of cytogenesis that have been described in the developing avian and mammalian central nervous system. Primitive neuroepithelial tumor cells showed the features of undifferentiated multipotential matrix (or ventricular) cells of the neural tube. They formed primitive medullary rosettes, from which various transitions were traced to more differentiated, cilia-containing ependymoblastomatous rosettes; the transitional features included increased granular endoplasmic reticulum and microvilli formation. Glial differentiation was characterized by the presence of mature ependymal rosettes and of astrocytes containing glial filaments. Neuronal differentiation included the development of synapses and the presence of dense-core vesicles in nerve cell processes. No intermediate cell forms were found that suggested multiple lines of differentiation occurring within a single cell. Images Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 21 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 PMID:171962

  5. A method for volume determination of the orbit and its contents by high resolution axial tomography and quantitative digital image analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, W C

    1985-01-01

    The various congenital and acquired conditions which alter orbital volume are reviewed. Previous investigative work to determine orbital capacity is summarized. Since these studies were confined to postmortem evaluations, the need for a technique to measure orbital volume in the living state is presented. A method for volume determination of the orbit and its contents by high-resolution axial tomography and quantitative digital image analysis is reported. This procedure has proven to be accurate (the discrepancy between direct and computed measurements ranged from 0.2% to 4%) and reproducible (greater than 98%). The application of this method to representative clinical problems is presented and discussed. The establishment of a diagnostic system versatile enough to expand the usefulness of computerized axial tomography and polytomography should add a new dimension to ophthalmic investigation and treatment. Images FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 A FIGURE 10 B FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 A FIGURE 26 B FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 PMID:3938582

  6. Age as a factor in the bacteriology and response to treatment of subperiosteal abscess of the orbit.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, G J

    1993-01-01

    The clinical course of SPA of the orbit is associated with the age of the patient. That association might be explained through a series of intermediate relationships: the clinical course correlates with the bacterial constituency, the bacterial constituency is related to physiologic derangement within the sinuses, the physiologic derangement may vary with the degree of obstruction of the sinus ostia, and the ostial caliber relative to the volume of the cavity that must be drained decreases with patient age into late adolescence. The controversy between pediatricians and surgeons over the appropriate indications for drainage might be resolved with the acknowledgement that each side is correct on the basis of the patient populations treated. It is hoped that recognition of the age-related variations in SPA will permit a more systematic approach to the management of this complex infectious disease. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 PMID:8140703

  7. Alignment and defect structures in oriented phosphatidylcholine multilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Asher, S A; Pershan, P S

    1979-01-01

    The alignment of dilauryl-, dimyristoyl-, and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine at various water concentrations into large oriented monodomain multilayers by annealing at elevated temperatures (Powers and Clark, 1975, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 72:840; Powers and Pershan. 1977. Biophys. J. 20:137) is accompanied by the formation and subsequent dissolution of various defect structures. Some of these defects appear similar to those observed in thermotropic and other lyotropic liquid crystals, reflecting the lamellar structure of these materials. The formation and evolution of defects during the alignment of the lipids into the defect-free, monodomain, multilamellar geometry is studied using polarized microscopy. A combination of polarized and dark-field microscopy facilitated characterization of the defects; specific structural models are proposed. A new alignment technique involving compression and dilation of the lipid, which effects sample alignment at temperatures that are lower than those required by the Powers technique, is described. Lower temperature alignment avoids thermal decomposition that will sometimes occur if the lipid is maintained at elevated temperatures for prolonged periods. With this technique, samples (80 micrometer thick) of dilaurylphosphatidylcholine with 20% water by weight were aligned at room temperature. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 PMID:263691

  8. Ultrastructural observations on experimentally produced melanin pigmentation of the corneal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, J. S.; Klintworth, G. K.

    1976-01-01

    Melanin pigmentation of the corneal epithelium was induced in pigmented guinea pigs by the topical application of colchicine to their eyes or by corneal cauterization with silver nitrate. With colchicine the pigmentation was preceded by the development of an abnormal corneal epithelium in which numerous cells became arrested in cell division. The corneal melanosis resulted largely from the migration of melanocytes into the corneal epithelium from the normally pigmented contiguous conjunctiva and to a lesser extent from the presence of melanin granules within corneal epithelial cells. In both models a leukocytic and vascular invasion of the cornea proceded and accompanied the migration of melanocytes into the corneal epithelium. Electron microscopy disclosed cells with the same morphology as conjunctival melanocytes between the epithelial cells of the cornea. Mature melanin granules were also present within some squamous epithelial cells as individual granules or as clusters. The ultrastructural findings are viewed in relation to how melanin granules are transferred from melanocytes to epithelial cells. Evidence is presented which suggests that malanin granule transfer may follow the fusion of the membranes of the melanocytes and epithelial cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:970438

  9. Autopsy pathology in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, C. M.; O'Leary, T. J.; Levens, D. L.; Simrell, C. R.; Macher, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a devastating new illness which appears to be sexually and parenterally transmissible. AIDS was first described in the male homosexual community; however, the disease has more recently been described among intravenous drug abusers, Haitians, hemophiliacs, and others. The etiologic agent is unknown. AIDS may represent an infection by a previously undescribed organism, a mutant of a known microorganism, or a multifactorial combination of environmental, immunologic, and genetic factors. As a consequence of the disease's seemingly irreversible ablation of the cell-mediated immune system, AIDS victims succumb to a variety of infections and/or unusual neoplasms. In its fully developed form, mortality approaches 100%. At autopsy the gross and microscopic pathology of the syndrome can be divided into three general categories: 1) morphologic manifestations of profound lymphoid depletion; 2) infections, usually with mixed opportunistic pathogens; and 3) unusual neoplasms, most frequently Kaposi's sarcoma or high-grade lymphomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 PMID:6311021

  10. The role of astrocytes in the formation of cartilage in gliomas. An immunohistochemical study of four cases.

    PubMed Central

    Kepes, J. J.; Rubinstein, L. J.; Chiang, H.

    1984-01-01

    The occasional presence of focal cartilage in gliomas is generally attributed to metaplasia of the mesenchymal supportive elements. While this mechanism undoubtedly exists, the present report describes a different mode of development of cartilage in four gliomas occurring in young individuals. Two of the tumors were pontine astrocytomas, one was a mixed ependymoma and astrocytoma involving the fourth ventricle and the brainstem, and one was an extraspinal malignant astrocytoma in the lumbar region of a young boy who earlier had been diagnosed as having a pontine glioma for which he received radiation treatment. In all four tumors, transitions from astrocytic to cartilaginous elements were seen, characterized by an increasing deposition of chondroid ground substance between the astrocytes and a gradual morphologic changes of the glial cells to more rounded forms with a vacuolated cytoplasm, indistinguishable from chondrocytes of mesenchymal origin. Many of these cells retained positive staining for glial fibrillary acidic protein by the immunoperoxidase method, attesting to their astrocytic nature. The production of cartilage by neoplastic astrocytes may be related to their ability to secrete, in certain circumstances and occasionally in large amounts, basement membrane material and other forms of mucopolysaccharides, which may become condensed to form a chondroid ground substance. The process appears analogous to that of cartilage formation by epithelial cells in pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands. Images Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:6391192

  11. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural analysis of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid in relation to hormone production.

    PubMed Central

    Kameya, T.; Shimosato, Y.; Adachi, I.; Abe, K.; Kasai, N.; Kimura, K.; Baba, K.

    1977-01-01

    Eighteen cases of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid were analyzed immunohistochemically for calcitonin- and ACTH-containing cells, and tumor cells in 8 cases were examined by an electron microscope and analyzed by manual and computer procedures with particular attention paid to the size and quality of secretory granules. Calcitonin- and ACTH-containing cells were found singly or in clusters in 14 and 11 tumors, respectively. In 4 cases, calcitonin-positive cell clusters and an increase in number of singly scattered C cells were seen apart from the main tumor, suggesting a multicentric nature of certain medullary carcinomas. Some ACTH-containing cells were apparently also positive for calcitonin. In a case of familial Sipple disease, follicular lining cells were replaced in areas with ACTH-containing cells. Three to five frequency distribution curves of the size of secretory granules were obtained in all of 6 cases analyzed, and at least two different types of granule matrix were identified. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 PMID:202164

  12. Reconstruction of the lids of a child with microblepharon and multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Merriam, J C; Stalnecker, M C; Merriam, G R

    1988-01-01

    The initial stages in the rehabilitation of a male child with severe microblepharon, corneal opacities, bilateral facial clefts, bilateral complete cleft lip and palate, and unilateral syndactyly are described. Review of the literature suggests that severe microblepharon is associated with other craniofacial anomalies, and often the child is stillborn or retarded. Surviving children have been abandoned because of their appearance. The child described in this case appears to be unique because his intelligence is normal, and, to our knowledge, this is the first reported case of penetrating keratoplasty after reconstruction of functional eyelids. The principal problems after corneal grafting appear to have been chronic partial exposure due to inadequate lid length and a poor Bell's reflex and the persistence of a rim of vascularized fibrous tissue around the corneal graft. Future reconstructive surgery is outlined. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 PMID:2979029

  13. Karl Schwarzschild Lecture: The Ups and Downs of the Hubble Constant (With 12 Figures)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammann, G. Andreas

    2006-01-01

    A brief history of the determination of the Hubble constant H_0 is given. Early attempts following Lemaitre (1927) gave much too high values due to errors of the magnitude scale, Malmquist bias and calibration problems. By 1962 most authors agreed that 75< H_0 <130. After 1975 a dichotomy arose with values near 100 and others around 55. The former came from apparent-magnitude-limited samples and were affected by Malmquist bias. New distance indicators were introduced; they were sometimes claimed to yield high values of H_0, but the most recent data lead to H_0 in the 60's, yet with remaining difficulties as to the zero-point of the respective distance indicators. SNe Ia with their large range and very small luminosity dispersion (avoiding Malmquist bias) offer a unique opportunity to determine the large-scale value of H_0. Their maximum luminosity can be well calibrated from 10 SNe Ia in local parent galaxies whose Cepheids have been observed with HST. An unforeseen difficulty - affecting all Cepheid distances - is that their P-L relation varies from galaxy to galaxy, presumably in function of metallicity. A proposed solution is summarized here. The conclusion is that H_0 = 63.2 +/- 1.3 (random) +/- 5.3 (systematic) on all scales. The expansion age becomes then (with Omega_m=0.3, Omega_Lambda=0.7) 15.1 Gyr.

  14. Role of Periductal and Ductular Epithelial Cells of the Adult Rat Pancreas in Pancreatic Hepatocyte Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Rao, M. Sambasiva; Dwivedi, Rama S.; Yeldandi, Anjana V.; Subbarao, V.; Tan, Xiaodi; Usman, Mohammed I.; Thangada, Shobha; Nemali, Mohan R.; Kumar, Sujata; Scarpelli, Dante G.; Reddy, Janardan K.

    1989-01-01

    Development of pancreatic hepatocytes in adult rats maintained on copper dificient diet containing 0.6% trien (CuDT) has been reported recently. To elucidate the histogenesis of hepatocytes a sequential study was undertaken using morphologic, histochemical, immunochemical, in situ hybridization, and Northern blot analysis. Male F-344 rats weighing 80 to 90 g were fed CuDT for 8 weeks and returned to normal rat chow. Beginning from 4 weeks of copper depletion, there was a progressive loss of acinar cells and by 8 weeks more than 90% of the acinar tissue was lost. During this period, there was an increase in the number of adipocytes in the interstitium, and in the number of interstitial and ductular cells. Morphologic observations were confirmed by immunoblot and Northern blot analysis, in which the amount of pancreatic proteins and their mRNAs decreased between 5 and 8 weeks. During this period, a progressive increase in the level of albumin mRNA was observed. In situ hybridization, performed at 7 weeks of copper deficiency, showed localization of albumin mRNA over interstitial and ductular cells. Pancreatic hepatocytes were identified immediately after the rats were returned to a normal diet and gradually increased in number. The hepatocytes occupied almost 60% of the pancreatic volume by 8 weeks. During the early recovery phase, hepatocytes were identified in ductules as well as in the interstitium. Based on these studies, it is concluded that both the ductular cells and interstitial cells, which resemble oval cells of liver, are capable of transforming into pancreatic hepatocytes and these cells may be considered stem-cell equivalent. ImagesFigure 9Figure 10Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16 PMID:2470253

  15. Salivary gland monomorphic adenoma. Ultrastructural, immunoperoxidase, and histogenetic aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Dardick, I.; Kahn, H. J.; Van Nostrand, A. W.; Baumal, R.

    1984-01-01

    Monomorphic adenoma of basal cell type is a salivary gland tumor believed to result from a proliferation of a single type of cell. However, ultrastructural and immunocytochemical investigations of 6 monomorphic adenomas (5 from parotid and 1 from intraoral minor salivary gland) indicate that there are two classes of these lesions, one composed of two types of tumor cells and the other wholly or predominantly made up of one type of cell (isomorphic). In the former group, the organization of the tumor cells closely mimicked that of normal and hyperplastic salivary gland intercalated ducts. Aggregates of tumor cells were arranged as an inner layer of luminal epithelial cells which were surrounded by an outer layer of cells that, in some cases, had ultrastructural and immunohistochemical features indicating myoepithelial cell differentiation. In some adenomas formed by two types of tumor cells, basal-lamina-lined extracellular spaces were identified ultrastructurally in relation to modified myoepithelial cells; such spaces had the same fine-structural features as those reported in pleomorphic adenoma and adenoid cystic carcinoma. Predominantly isomorphic adenomas were composed exclusively of luminal epithelial cells. These results indicate that despite the varied histologic patterns in the numerous subtypes of monomorphic adenoma, there is a central theme of differentiation and organization in this type of neoplasm which recapitulates the ductoacinar unit of normal salivary gland parenchyma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:6375388

  16. Ultrastructural immunohistochemical localization of virus in acute and chronic demyelinating Theiler's virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Dal Canto, M. C.; Lipton, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Mice experimentally infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) develop a persistent infection of the central nervous system (CNS). The most striking feature of this infection is the occurrence of inflammatory primary demyelination in the spinal cord white matter. The pathogenesis of myelin degeneration in this model has not been clarified, but morphologic and immunologic data suggest that the host immune response plays a major role in the production of myelin injury. Because of low virus titers in infected adult mice and of the small size of TMEV, virus particles have never been observed in this demyelinating model. Yet elucidation of the types of cells in the CNS supporting virus replication would be important for a better understanding of both virus persistence and virus-induced demyelinating pathology. The present paper is a sequential study of the localization of TMEV in the spinal cord in infected mice by ultrastructural immunohistochemical techniques. Results indicate that virus replication is mainly in neurons during the acute phase of the disease, while in the chronic phase viral inclusions are mainly found in macrophages in and around demyelinating lesions. Other cells are also infected, but to a lesser degree. In the neuronal system both axoplasmic and dendritic flow appear to facilitate the spread of virus in the CNS. In macrophages, the presence of virus particles and the association of virus with altered components of the cytoskeleton support active virus production rather than simple internalization. The macrophage appears to play an important role in both the establishment of virus persistence and in the process of demyelination in this animal model. Images Figure 1 and 2 Figure 3 and 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10-12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 and 16 PMID:6275708

  17. Acute respiratory bronchiolitis: an ultrastructural and autoradiographic study of epithelial cell injury and renewal in rhesus monkeys exposed to ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Castleman, W. L.; Dungworth, D. L.; Schwartz, L. W.; Tyler, W. S.

    1980-01-01

    The pathogenesis of acute respiratory bronchiolitis was examined in rhesus monkeys exposed to 0.8 ppm ozone fpr 4--50 hours. Epithelial injury and renewal was qualitatively and quantitatively characterized by correlated techniques of scanning and transmission electron microscopy as well as by light-microscopic autoradiography following labeling with tritiated thymidine. Extensive degeneration and necrosis of Type 1 epithelial cells occurred on the respiratory bronchiolar wall during the initial 4--12 hours of exposure. Increased numbers of labeled epithelial cells were present in this region after 18 hours of exposure, and the highest labeling index (18% was measured after 50 hours of exposure. Most (67--80%) of the labeled cells and all the mitotic epithelial cells (22) observed ultrastructurally were cuboidal bronchiolar epithelial cells. Of the labeled epithelial cells, 20--33% were Type 2 epithelial cells. After 50 hours of exposure the respiratory bronchiolar epithelium was hyperplastic. The predominant inflammatory cell in respiratory bronchiolar exudate was the alveolar macrophage. Monkeys that were exposed for 50 hours and allowed to recover in unozonized air for 7 days had incomplete resolution of respiratory bronchiolar epithelial hyperplasia. The results indicate that Type 1 epithelial cells lining respiratory bronchioles are the cell type most sensitive to injury and that both cuboidal bronchiolar epithelial cells and Type 2 epithelial cells function as stem cells in epithelial renewal. Images Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 23 Figure 24 Figure 25 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:6767409

  18. Computational functions in biochemical reaction networks.

    PubMed Central

    Arkin, A; Ross, J

    1994-01-01

    In prior work we demonstrated the implementation of logic gates, sequential computers (universal Turing machines), and parallel computers by means of the kinetics of chemical reaction mechanisms. In the present article we develop this subject further by first investigating the computational properties of several enzymatic (single and multiple) reaction mechanisms: we show their steady states are analogous to either Boolean or fuzzy logic gates. Nearly perfect digital function is obtained only in the regime in which the enzymes are saturated with their substrates. With these enzymatic gates, we construct combinational chemical networks that execute a given truth-table. The dynamic range of a network's output is strongly affected by "input/output matching" conditions among the internal gate elements. We find a simple mechanism, similar to the interconversion of fructose-6-phosphate between its two bisphosphate forms (fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and fructose-2,6-bisphosphate), that functions analogously to an AND gate. When the simple model is supplanted with one in which the enzyme rate laws are derived from experimental data, the steady state of the mechanism functions as an asymmetric fuzzy aggregation operator with properties akin to a fuzzy AND gate. The qualitative behavior of the mechanism does not change when situated within a large model of glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and the TCA cycle. The mechanism, in this case, switches the pathway's mode from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis in response to chemical signals of low blood glucose (cAMP) and abundant fuel for the TCA cycle (acetyl coenzyme A). Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 PMID:7948674

  19. Transplant arteriosclerosis in a rat aortic model.

    PubMed Central

    Isik, F. F.; McDonald, T. O.; Ferguson, M.; Yamanaka, E.; Gordon, D.

    1992-01-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) has emerged as an obstacle to the long-term survival of transplanted organs, especially cardiac transplants. The animal models that have been used to study TA have not been fully characterized with regard to features such as the time course of cell proliferation and the sequence of cell types arriving in the developing intimal lesion. We present a model of TA based on a transplanted segment of abdominal aorta that helps address these questions. Two strains of rats (PVG x DA) underwent orthotopic aortic transplantation without immunosuppression and were killed at 14, 20, 40, and 60 days after transplantation. The within-strain control group displayed minimal evidence of cellular rejection with minimal to absent intimal lesions. In contrast, the allograft group showed a linearly increasing intimal lesion, up through 60 days after transplantation. The mechanism of intimal thickening was by an increase in cell number at the earlier time points with the later deposition of extracellular matrix. The early intimal lesion consisted mostly of mononuclear inflammatory cells (45%) with gradually increasing presence of smooth muscle cells (SMC) in the intima between 20 and 60 days. Conversely, the media showed gradual infiltration by macrophage-type cells with virtual loss of all SMC from the media by 40 days. The proliferative index showed a peak of 6% and 8% at 20 days in both the intima and media, respectively, and was preceded by the presence of macrophages. In fact, most of the proliferating cells at the earlier time points were either monocytes/macrophages, or were immediately adjacent to monocyte-/macrophage-rich regions. This straight artery segment model of transplant arteriosclerosis provides an easily quantifiable system in which the effects of different interventions (e.g., immunosuppressive regimens) can be tested. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure

  20. Allylamine Cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Boor, Paul J.; Nelson, Thomas J.; Chieco, Pasquale

    1980-01-01

    . ImagesFigure 14Figure 15Figure 16Figure 17Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 9Figure 10Figure 18Figure 19Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 7Figure 8Figure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:6448005

  1. The Ultrastructure of the Human Epidermis in Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gallucci, Betty B.; Shulman, Howard M.; Sale, George E.; Lerner, Kenneth G.; Caldwell, Leslie E.; Thomas, E. Donnall

    1979-01-01

    The epidermal ultrastructure of 11 allogeneic bone marrow recipients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was compared with that of 4 recipients without chronic GVHD. This electron microscope study revealed three patterns of epidermal injury typical of chronic GVHD. The first type was a nonacantholytic (nondissecting) injury with a prominent cellular infiltrate consisting primarily of lymphocytes accompanied by a few macrophages. The second type was an acantholytic (dissecting) injury with a prominent infiltrate, while the third was a nondissecting injury with a sparse infiltrate. Broad-zone contact was observed between lymphocytes and all epidermal cell types as well as between other lymphocytes and macrophages. Point contact was only observed between lymphocytes and epidermal cells. Lymphocytes appeared to detach desmosomes from adjacent keratinocytes by isolating them with cytoplasmic projections, a phenomenon not previously described. Typical damage to the epidermal cells in the basal and spinous layers consisted of either swelling of the organelles or condensation of the cytoplasm and nucleus. In the keratinocyte, the condensation reaction resulted in the formation of colloid bodies, some of which were phagocytized by macrophages. Besides the cytolytic events, a concurrent stimulatory reaction occurred in the epidermal cells. The number of melanosomes in melanocytes and of Langerhans cell granules and dense bodies in the Langerhans cells all increased. Extensive areas of replication and disruption of the basal lamina were subjacent to areas of necrosis in the basal layer. ImagesFigure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 17Figure 18Figure 19Figure 1Figure 2Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:36763

  2. Glomerular lesions induced in the rabbit by physicochemically altered homologous IgG.

    PubMed Central

    Cavalot, F.; Miyata, M.; Vladutiu, A.; Terranova, V.; Dubiski, S.; Burlingame, R.; Tan, E.; Brentjens, J.; Milgrom, F.; Andres, G.

    1992-01-01

    Immunization of rabbits with physicochemically altered homologous or even autologous IgG induces formation of antibodies combining with IgG of rabbit and of foreign species. Cardiac but not renal lesions were reported in such animals. This study examined the nephritogenic potential of the immune response to cationized or heat-aggregated homologous IgG of b9 or b4 allotype in rabbits of the b4 allotype. Rabbits injected with either b9 or b4 cationized IgG produced antibodies reactive with rabbit and human IgG and with histones; they also developed abnormal glomerular deposits of IgG b4 and C3 corresponding to alterations of the glomerular basement membranes (GBM). Rabbits injected with either b9 or b4 aggregated IgG developed antibodies reactive with rabbit and human IgG and abnormal glomerular deposits of IgG b4 and C3 in the GBM and in the mesangium with subendothelial and mesangial electron-dense deposits. Some rabbits in both groups had proliferative and exudative glomerulonephritis and proteinuria. The results showed that immunization of rabbits with physicochemically altered homologous IgG induces an immune response to rabbit and human IgG and to histones as well as glomerular deposits of autologous IgG and C3 and other glomerular lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figure 24 Figure 25 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 29 Figure 30 PMID:1546743

  3. Ultrastructural alterations in allylamine cardiovascular toxicity. Late myocardial and vascular lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Boor, P. J.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1985-01-01

    The late myocardial and vascular ultrastructural changes in rat hearts following consumption of the cardiovascular toxin allylamine were studied. Rats were given 0.1% allylamine HCl in drinking water for 10-104 days. From 10 to 21 days, there was organization of acute myocardial necrosis by macrophages and scattered polymorphonuclear leukocytes with prominent interstitial-cell proliferation. Alterations at 21-104 days included extensive scarring with formation of dense mature collagen with scattered fibroblasts present, grossly evident left-ventricular aneurysm, and gross and microscopic changes similar to those observed in the secondary form of endocardial fibroelastosis. Areas of scar contained highly cellular foci of smooth-muscle cells, myofibroblasts, and abundant extracellular elastin. Cardiac myocytes frequently showed markedly disorganized myofilaments, bizarrely distorted mitochondria with condensed cristae, and other severe degenerative changes. Small vessels within and adjacent to scar showed proliferation of intimal smooth-muscle cells. Endothelial lesions or recent or organized thrombi were not seen. Focal endocardial metaplasia, consisting of both chondroid and osseous tissue, was found in areas of transmural scarring, or ventricular aneurysm. Chondrocytes had the overall nuclear and cellular morphology, abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, and surrounding lacunae typical of mature fibrocartilage. In some areas, the collagen matrix was undergoing calcification with the typical cross-banded pattern of calcifying connective tissue. Osteocytes were located in a densely calcified bone matrix and displayed characteristic cellular extensions into surrounding canaliculi. These findings indicate a severe myocardial, small-vessel, and endocardial injury during the course of chronic allylamine intoxication. Images Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 15 Figure

  4. The soft keratoprosthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, D R

    1997-01-01

    appearance. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 17A FIGURE 17B FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 PMID:9440192

  5. Rat hepatocarcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosodiethylamine and N-nitrosomorpholine continuously administered at low doses. From basophilic areas of hepatocytes to hepatocellular tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Cortinovis, C.; Klimek, F.; Nogueira, E.

    1991-01-01

    application of some carcinogens at high doses, they are not obligatory precursors of hepatocellular tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figure 24 PMID:1951631

  6. Eduard Jaeger's Test-Types (Schrift-Scalen) and the historical development of vision tests.

    PubMed Central

    Runge, P E

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Eduard Jaeger's original Test-Types were carefully evaluated: (1) to determine whether Jaeger had maintained a consistent standard, (2) to establish the correct Snellen equivalent for Jaeger's Test-Types, (3) to answer the question of why and how the standard was lost, and (4) to compare the visual angle of optotypes to lines of continuous text. METHODS: All original Viennese editions of Jaeger's Test-Types, as well as first generation United Kingdom (UK) and United States (US) versions, were evaluated. Data were collected objectively using a microruler with a 20X loupe and subjectively using a laser distance-measuring device. The data were analyzed using Microsoft Excel. All previous measurements of Jaeger's Test-Types, objective and subjective, collected over the past 133 years were compared to the current data and to each other. RESULTS: The correct Snellen equivalent of Jaeger's Test-Types was determined. The visual angle created from the measurement of the height of lowercase letters, without ascenders or descenders, provides an accurate method of assigning a visual angle of a line of continuous text. Comparing the typefaces used in printing first generation UK and US versions of Jaeger's Test-Types to the Viennese editions provided an explanation for the absence of a consistent standard for Jaeger's Test-Types today. CONCLUSIONS: All 10 versions of Jaeger's original Test-Types are virtually identical and established a gold standard for reading vision tests. Jaeger's standard was lost when his Test-Types were first printed in the UK and the US using local typefaces. The Jaeger standard has been re-established. Visual angles determined using continuous text are comparable to those obtained by using optotypes. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7C FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19A FIGURE 19B p409-a FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE

  7. Products of cells cultured from gliomas. VI. Immunofluorescent, morphometric, and ultrastructural characterization of two different cell types growing from explants of human gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    McKeever, P. E.; Smith, B. H.; Taren, J. A.; Wahl, R. L.; Kornblith, P. L.; Chronwall, B. M.

    1987-01-01

    cell types may increase our understanding of the mechanism of antigenic changes in gliomas and may provide clues to improved therapeutic approaches. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:3555104

  8. Variability of expert observers in evaluating the optic disc.

    PubMed Central

    Lichter, P R

    1976-01-01

    most useful disc characteristics to observe. In this regard, a C/D ratio does nothing to indicate whether a disc is normal or not. A statement as to the observer's opinion should be made for each disc evaluation in addition to recording the appearance of the disc. Images FIGURE 4 1 FIGURE 4 2 FIGURE 4 3 FIGURE 4 4 FIGURE 4 5 FIGURE 4 6 FIGURE 4 7 FIGURE 4 8 FIGURE 4 9 FIGURE 4 10 FIGURE 4 11 FIGURE 4 12 FIGURE 4 13 FIGURE 4 14 FIGURE 4 15 FIGURE 4 16 FIGURE 4 17 FIGURE 4 18 FIGURE 4 19 FIGURE 4 20 PMID:867638

  9. Tumor vascularity and hematogenous metastasis in experimental murine intraocular melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Grossniklaus, H E

    1998-01-01

    metastasizes through regional lymphatics. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 PMID:10360307

  10. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Sherif R.; Greer, Patricia w.; Coffield, Lisa M.; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Nolte, Kurt B.; Foucar, Kathy; Feddersen, Richard M.; Zumwalt, Ross E.; Miller, Gayle L.; Khan, Ali S.; Rollin, Pierre E.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Mahy, Brian W.J.; Peters, Clarence J.

    1995-01-01

    a newly recognized, often fatal disease, with a spectrum of microscopic morphological changes, which may be an important cause of severe and fatal illness presenting as adult respiratory distress syndrome. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15 PMID:7887439

  11. Histopathologic studies of ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, D L; Kerrison, J B; Green, W R

    2000-01-01

    FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 A FIGURE 24 B FIGURE 24 C FIGURE 24 D FIGURE 24 E FIGURE 24 F FIGURE 25 A FIGURE 25 B FIGURE 25 C FIGURE 25 D FIGURE 25 E FIGURE 25 F FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 PMID:11190024

  12. Nonpenetrating Clips Successfully Replacing Sutures in Base of Skull Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Wolff M.; Zhu, Yong Hua; Hardesty, Robert A.; Petti, George; Furnas, David

    1993-01-01

    Reconstructive challenges engendered by skull base surgery are critical determinants of outcome. A novel nonpenetrating, arcuate-legged clip has proven to be both technically and biologically effective for management of these difficult closures. Clips have facilitated reconstructions associated with the surgical management of eight skull base cases: leiomyosarcoma of the orbit, middle fossa, ptyergopalatine fossa, two meningiomas (petrotentorial, cavernous sinus), vagus nerve paraganglioma, complex traumatic orbital dural tear, and one basilar and two vertebral artery aneurysms. ImagesFigure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 14Figure 16Figure 17Figure 18 PMID:17170909

  13. Mammary gland neoplasia in long-term rodent studies.

    PubMed Central

    Russo, I H; Russo, J

    1996-01-01

    in cancer initiation. Comparative studies with the development of the human breast and the pathogenesis of breast cancer have contributed to validate rodent-to-human extrapolations. However, it has not been definitively established what type of information is necessary for human risk assessment, whether currently toxicity testing methodologies are sufficient for fulfilling those needs, or whether treatment-induced tumorigenic responses in rodents are predictive of potential human risk. An alternative to the traditional bioassays are mechanism-based toxicology and molecular and cellular approaches, combined with comparative in vitro systems. These approaches might allow the rapid screen of chemicals for setting priorities for further studies to determine the dose-response relationship for chemical effects at low doses, to assess effects other than mutagenesis and/or tumorigenesis, or to establish qualitative and quantitative relationships of biomarkers to toxic effects. Until there is enough information on the predictive value of mechanism-based toxicology for risk assessment, this approach should be used in conjunction with and validated by the traditional in vivo long-term bioassays. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. A Figure 7. B Figure 8. A Figure 8. B Figure 9. Figure 10. Figure 11. Figure 12. Figure 13. Figure 14. Figure 15. Figure 16. Figure 17. Figure 18. Figure 19. Figure 20. Figure 21. Figure 22. Figure 23. Figure 24. Figure 25. Figure 26. PMID:8899375

  14. The ultrastructure of conjunctival melanocytic tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobiec, F A

    1984-01-01

    melanocytes and exhibited more haphazard arrangements of the melanofilaments, which were only partially melaninized. Mitochondria were more numerous than in dendritic melanocytes, and monoribosomes predominated over polyribosomes. Cytoplasmic filaments were inconspicuous. Cells in the immediate subepithelial connective tissue zone had features identical to those of the cells within the junctional nests. Smaller, lymphocytoid cells with less numerous and more rudimentary melanosomes were found in the middle and deeper portions of the lesions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 42 FIGURE 67 FIGURE 1 FIGURE 62 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 37 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 FIGURE 34 FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 FIGURE 38 FIGURE 39 FIGURE 40 FIGURE 41 FIGURE 43 FIGURE 44 FIGURE 45 FIGURE 46 FIGURE 47 FIGURE 48 FIGURE 49 FIGURE 50 FIGURE 51 FIGURE 52 FIGURE 53 FIGURE 54 FIGURE 55 FIGURE 56 FIGURE 57 FIGURE 58 FIGURE 59 FIGURE 60 FIGURE 61 FIGURE 63 FIGURE 64 FIGURE 65 FIGURE 66 FIGURE 68 FIGURE 69 FIGURE 70 FIGURE 71 FIGURE 72 FIGURE 73 FIGURE 74 FIGURE 75 FIGURE 76 FIGURE 77 FIGURE 78 FIGURE 79 FIGURE 80 FIGURE 81 FIGURE 82 FIGURE 83 FIGURE 84 FIGURE 85 FIGURE 86 FIGURE 87 FIGURE 88 FIGURE 89 PMID:6398936

  15. Morphology of neoplastic lesions induced by 1,3-butadiene in B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R A; Boorman, G A

    1990-01-01

    . Granulosa cell tumors of the ovary were exposure-related neoplasms in both studies. Occasionally the granulosa cell tumors were malignant as evidenced by vascular invasion or pulmonary metastasis. Although there was an increased incidence of hepatocellular neoplasms in exposed females in the first study, by week 65 of the second study there was not evidence of a clear response of liver neoplasms. The preliminary results of the second study indicate there was induction of tumors similar to those seen in the first study but occurring in response to lower concentrations of 1,3-butadiene. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 13. FIGURE 14. FIGURE 15. FIGURE 16. FIGURE 17. FIGURE 18. FIGURE 19. FIGURE 20. FIGURE 21. FIGURE 22. FIGURE 23. FIGURE 24. FIGURE 25. FIGURE 26. FIGURE 27. FIGURE 28. FIGURE 29. FIGURE 30. FIGURE 31. FIGURE 32. FIGURE 33. FIGURE 34. PMID:2401271

  16. Scar remodeling after strabismus surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, I H

    1999-01-01

    limitation of versions, less separation of the tendons from sclera, and thicker appearance of the scar segments. The use of nonabsorbable sutures in the repair procedure reduced the recurrence rate. Histologic examination of the clinical stretched scar specimens showed dense connective tissue that was less well organized compared with normal tendon. In the tissue culture studies, cells cultured from the stretched scar specimens grew rapidly and were irregularly shaped. A high-molecular-weight protein was identified in the culture medium. By contrast, cells cultured from normal tendon (controls) grew more slowly and regularly, stopped growing at 4 days, and produced less total protein than cultured stretched scar specimens. In the animal model studies, the collagenase-treated sites showed elongated scars with increased collagen between the muscle and the sclera, as well as increased collagen creep rates, compared with the saline-treated controls. The use of nonabsorbable sutures in collagenase-treated animal model surgery sites was associated with shorter, thicker scars compared with similar sites sutured with absorbable sutures. CONCLUSIONS: A lengthened or stretched, remodeled scar between an operated muscle tendon and sclera is a common occurrence and is a factor contributing to the variability of outcome after strabismus repair, even years later. This abnormality may be revealed by careful exploration of previously operated muscles. Definitive repair requires firm reattachment of tendon to sclera with nonabsorbable suture support. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 FIGURE 34 FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 FIGURE 37 FIGURE 38 FIGURE 39 FIGURE 40 FIGURE 41 FIGURE 42 FIGURE 43 FIGURE 44 FIGURE 45 FIGURE 46 FIGURE 52

  17. Myocardial diseases of animals.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vleet, J. F.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1986-01-01

    seen less frequently; and, in contrast to man, coronary artery disease and myocardial ischemia are rather infrequent in animals. The present review shows clearly that the spectrum of myocardial diseases in animals is enlarging and that many newly recognized diseases are emerging and assuming considerable importance. For example, various heritable cardiomyopathies have recently been described in the KK mouse, cattle, and rats. Increasingly recognized myocardial diseases include cardiomyopathies in cats, dogs, and birds; anthracycline cardiotoxicity; furazolidone cardiotoxicity; ionophore cardiotoxicity; myocardial damage associated with central nervous system injuries; myocardial hypertrophy in Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 45 Figure 46 Figure 47 Figure 48 Figure 61 Figure 62 Figure 63 Figure 64 Figure 79 Figure 75 Figure 76 Figure 77 Figure 78 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figure 24 Figure 25 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 29 & 30 Figure 31 Figure 32 Figure 33 Figure 34 Figure 35 Figure 36 Figure 37 Figure 38 Figure 39 Figure 40 Figure 41 Figure 42 Figure 43 Figure 44 Figure 49 Figure 50 Figure 51 Figure 52 Figure 53 Figure 54 Figure 55 Figure 56 Figure 57 Figure 58 Figure 59 Figure 60 Figure 65 Figure 66 Figure 67 Figure 68 Figure 69 Figure 70 Figure 71 & 72 Figure 73 & 74 PMID:3524254

  18. Wilbrand's knee of the primate optic chiasm is an artefact of monocular enucleation.

    PubMed Central

    Horton, J C

    1997-01-01

    chiasm. It forms gradually over a period of years following monocular enucleation, presumably from shrinkage of the optic chiasm caused by atrophy of fibers from the enucleated eye. Therefore, the superior temporal hemianopia in the "other eye" seen in the anterior chiasmal syndrome cannot be due to compression of Wilbrand's Knee. I propose that it occurs from combined compression of the optic chiasm and one (or both) optic nerves. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 5A FIGURE 5B FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 7 C FIGURE 7 D FIGURE 7 E FIGURE 7 F FIGURE 7 G FIGURE 7 H FIGURE 8A FIGURE 8B FIGURE 9A FIGURE 9B FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11A FIGURE 11B FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 20 PMID:9440188

  19. Ocular explosion during cataract surgery: a clinical, histopathological, experimental, and biophysical study.

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, J D; Warwar, R E; Green, W R

    1998-01-01

    -bank eyes and the theoretical analyses of this entity show that the pressure required to produce such an injury is much more easily obtained with a 3- or 5-mL syringe than with a syringe 10 mL or larger. CONCLUSIONS: Explosion of an eyeball during the injection of anesthesia for ocular surgery is a devastating injury that may go unrecognized. The probability of an ocular explosion can be minimized by careful use of a syringe 10 mL or larger with a blunt needle, by discontinuing the injection if resistance is met, and by inspecting the globe prior to ocular massage or placement of a Honan balloon. When ocular explosion occurs, immediate referral to and intervention by a vitreoretinal surgeon is optimal. Practicing ophthalmologists should be aware of this blinding but preventable complication of ocular surgery. Images FIGURE 1 Figure 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 PMID:10360292

  20. Pulmonary mineral dust. A study of ninety patients by electron microscopy, electron microanalysis, and electron microdiffraction.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, J. P.; Henoc, P.; Galle, P.; Pariente, R.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a study of 90 patients are presented. Intrapulmonary mineral deposits were characterized by electron diffraction and electron probe microanalysis. Using this method, pneumoconioses may be distinguidhed from other pneumopathies. In cases of pneumoconiosis, there exists a specific relationship between the etiology of the dust exposure and the crystallographic characteristics of the intrapulmonary deposits. The nature of the deposits may be indicative of a specific type of pneumoconiosis. This method is particularly useful in differentiating between asbestos bodies and ferruginous bodies. The value of the method in general and its importance in the study of pneumoconiosis are discussed. Images Figure 4 Figure 13 Figure 5 Figure 14 Figure 6 Figure 15 Figure 7 Figure 16 Figure 8 Figure 17 Figure 1 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 2 Figure 11 Figure 3 Figure 12 PMID:937507

  1. ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC STUDIES OF RENAL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Latta, Harrison

    1960-01-01

    The nephrotic syndrome, glomerulonephritis, disseminated lupus erythematosus and the Fanconi syndrome show characteristic changes with electron microscopy. Experimental studies of animals were carried out to determine the significance of such changes by observing reactions that occur under carefully controlled conditions. A lesion with collagen deposition that was found in the centrolobular region of glomeruli sheds new light on the function of this region. This evidence must be considered in developing an understanding of how the production of urine is controlled. Fluid-filled compartments and various bodies associated with the ultrastructure of tubule cells can be produced under conditions which suggest that these structures play a role in tubular resorption. ImagesFigure 1, 2.Figure 3.Figure 4, 5.Figure 6, 7.Figure 8, 9.Figure 10.Figure 11, 12.Figure 13, 14.Figure 15, 16.Figure 17. PMID:13759386

  2. Histopathology of spontaneous regression in virus-induced murine leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Russo, I.; Russo, J.; Baldwin, J.; Rich, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    The histopathology of the spontaneous regression of murine leukemia induced by a particular strain of Friend leukemia virus was studied in Swiss ICR/Ha mice. Animals inoculated with the regressing strain of Friend virus exhibited an initial pathologic response identical to that induced by conventional strains of Friend virus. Unlike the fatal leukemia produced by conventional Friend virus, the pathology of the disease induced by the regressing strain of Friend virus appeared to be self-limiting. The histopathology of the two diseases is compared in this report. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:970443

  3. Brown's syndrome: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, K W

    1999-01-01

    forced duction testing by observing the pattern of strabismus including torsion. Because of the chance for spontaneous resolution, conservative management, not surgery, should be the first line of treatment for acquired Brown's syndrome. If surgery is indicated, a novel procedure, the silicone tendon expander, is an effective option with excellent long-term outcomes. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 PMID:10703149

  4. The ocular manifestations of congenital infection: a study of the early effect and long-term outcome of maternally transmitted rubella and toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, J F

    1998-01-01

    and may vary from blindness and severe mental retardation to minor retinochoroidal lesions of little consequence. Effective solutions for either the prevention or treatment of congenital toxoplasmosis have not been developed in this country but are under intensive and continuing investigation. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5A FIGURE 5B FIGURE 5C FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15A FIGURE 15B FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20A FIGURE 20B FIGURE 20C FIGURE 20D FIGURE 20E FIGURE 20F FIGURE 20G FIGURE 20H FIGURE 20J FIGURE 20K FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 A FIGURE 24B FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 PMID:10360309

  5. Transvitreal endocyclophotocoagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Haller, J A

    1996-01-01

    Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 FIGURE 34 FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 FIGURE 37 FIGURE 38 PMID:8981713

  6. Electrochemical Properties of Hydrated Cation-Selective Glass Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chin Ok; Fozzard, Harry A.

    1974-01-01

    Electrochemical properties of cation-selective glass microelectrodes made from NAS27-04 were studied. There was a marked fall in electrical resistance of the microelectrodes stored in 3 M KCl solution (aging). The resistance was in the range of 2 × 107 to 109 Ω, which were much lower than those estimated from the electrical resistivity of dry glass for the equivalent dimensions of microelectrode working tips. This fall in resistance was accompanied by an increase in microelectrode selectivity for K+. The low resistance and increased K+ selectivity are desirable features that make the microelectrode more suitable for application to biologic studies. The changes in microelectrode resistance and selectivity were interpreted to be due to hydration of the entire thickness of the glass membrane, resulting in a change in the field strength of anionic sites and formation of ionic channels in the glass membrane. Thus, the fall in resistance is explained by decrease in energy barrier, which is equivalent to the activation energy of interaction between the cations and anionic sites in the glass membrane. Some of the microelectrodes showed a transient depolarization that resembled the action potential of a biological membrane. This transient depolarization was associated with the changes in microelectrode resistance and selectivity. The transient depolarizations suggest the temporary development of wide channels in the membrane permitting free movement of hydrated cations according to the bulk electrochemical gradient. ImagesFIGURE 6FIGURE 7FIGURE 8FIGURE 13FIGURE 14FIGURE 15 PMID:4359745

  7. Pulmonary and thoracic macrophage subpopulations and clearance of particles from the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, B E

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary macrophages consist of several subpopulations that can be defined by their anatomical locations as well as by other criteria. In addition to the well-known alveolar macrophages that reside on the alveolar surface, pulmonary macrophages also occur in the conducting airways, in various pulmonary interstitial regions, and, in some mammalian species, in the lung's intravascular compartment. Other thoracic macrophages of relevance to pulmonary defense and some lung disease processes are the pleural macrophages resident in the pleural space and macrophages present in regional lymph nodes that receive lymphatic drainage from the lung. Of the above subpopulations of pulmonary and thoracic macrophages, the alveolar macrophages have received the most experimental attention in the context of the pulmonary clearance and retention of deposited particles. Accordingly, less information is currently available regarding the roles other pulmonary and thoracic populations of macrophages may play in the removal of particles from the lower respiratory tract and associated tissue compartments. This report provides an overview of the various subpopulations of pulmonary and thoracic macrophages, as defined by their anatomical locations. The known and postulated roles of macrophages in the pulmonary clearance and retention of particles are reviewed, with particular emphasis on macrophage-associated processes involved in the pulmonary clearance of relatively insoluble particles. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 14. FIGURE 15. FIGURE 16. FIGURE 17. FIGURE 18. FIGURE 19. A FIGURE 19. B FIGURE 21. FIGURE 22. PMID:1396454

  8. Chemically induced bidirectional differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Speers, W. C.; Birdwell, C. R.; Dixon, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    N,N-dimethylacetamide, hexamethylene bisacetamide, and Polybrene induced rapid and extensive differentiation in vitro in an otherwise slowly differentiating subline of embryonal carcinoma cells. The type of differentiated cell induced was dependent on the spatial organization of the stem cells during drug treatment. In monalayer culture "epithelial" cells were produced exclusively. However, treatment of aggregated suspension cultures yielded predominantly "fibroblast-like" cells. The undifferentiated embryonal carcinoma cells and the two differentiated cell types were morphologically distinct when examined by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy; and they had differences in cell surface antigens. Both differential cell types produced large amounts of fibronectin, whereas the embryonal carcinoma cells produced only minimal amounts. This system provides a convenient way to induce relatively synchronous differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells into specific differentiated cell types. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:507191

  9. Lung injury mediated by antibodies to endothelium. II. Study of the effect of repeated antigen-antibody interactions in rabbits tolerant to heterologous antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Camussi, G.; Caldwell, P. R.; Andres, G.; Brentjens, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of repeated interactions of antibodies with cell surface antigens have been examined in in vitro, but not in in vivo systems. In this study are described the results of multiple antibody-cell surface antigen interactions in vivo. Rabbits were given repeated intravenous injections of goat antibodies to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), an antigen expressed on the surface of lung endothelial cells. For prevention of anaphylactic reactions, which would have been induced by multiple injections of heterologous immune or nonimmune IgG, the rabbits were made neonatally tolerant to goat IgG. Divalent immune IgG given daily for 21 days induced chronic antigenic modulation (antigen disappearance) with resistance to antibody-mediated inflammatory lesions. The rabbits, however, developed degenerative changes of alveolar endothelial and epithelial cells. Administration of immune IgG every other day for 43 days allowed partial reexpression of ACE and was associated with intravascular, but not interstitial, inflammatory changes. In contrast, repeated administration of monovalent immune Fab did not induce antigenic modulation but caused severe, lethal, interstitial pneumonitis. Thus, in this experimental model the development of acute interstitial inflammatory changes correlates with persistence of antigen and is abrogated by disappearance of antigen induced by divalent antibodies. Further, repeated endothelial antigen antibody interactions fail to induce chronic inflammatory or sclerosing lung lesions. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:3034065

  10. Critical periods of vulnerability for the developing nervous system: evidence from humans and animal models.

    PubMed Central

    Rice, D; Barone, S

    2000-01-01

    Vulnerable periods during the development of the nervous system are sensitive to environmental insults because they are dependent on the temporal and regional emergence of critical developmental processes (i.e., proliferation, migration, differentiation, synaptogenesis, myelination, and apoptosis). Evidence from numerous sources demonstrates that neural development extends from the embryonic period through adolescence. In general, the sequence of events is comparable among species, although the time scales are considerably different. Developmental exposure of animals or humans to numerous agents (e.g., X-ray irradiation, methylazoxymethanol, ethanol, lead, methyl mercury, or chlorpyrifos) demonstrates that interference with one or more of these developmental processes can lead to developmental neurotoxicity. Different behavioral domains (e.g., sensory, motor, and various cognitive functions) are subserved by different brain areas. Although there are important differences between the rodent and human brain, analogous structures can be identified. Moreover, the ontogeny of specific behaviors can be used to draw inferences regarding the maturation of specific brain structures or neural circuits in rodents and primates, including humans. Furthermore, various clinical disorders in humans (e.g., schizophrenia, dyslexia, epilepsy, and autism) may also be the result of interference with normal ontogeny of developmental processes in the nervous system. Of critical concern is the possibility that developmental exposure to neurotoxicants may result in an acceleration of age-related decline in function. This concern is compounded by the fact that developmental neurotoxicity that results in small effects can have a profound societal impact when amortized across the entire population and across the life span of humans. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 12 Figure 14 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:10852851

  11. Characterization of indoor particle sources: A study conducted in the metropolitan Boston area.

    PubMed Central

    Abt, E; Suh, H H; Allen, G; Koutrakis, P

    2000-01-01

    An intensive particle monitoring study was conducted in homes in the Boston, Massachusetts, area during the winter and summer of 1996 in an effort to characterize sources of indoor particles. As part of this study, continuous particle size and mass concentration data were collected in four single-family homes, with each home monitored for one or two 6-day periods. Additionally, housing activity and air exchange rate data were collected. Cooking, cleaning, and the movement of people were identified as the most important indoor particle sources in these homes. These sources contributed significantly both to indoor concentrations (indoor-outdoor ratios varied between 2 and 33) and to altered indoor particle size distributions. Cooking, including broiling/baking, toasting, and barbecuing contributed primarily to particulate matter with physical diameters between 0.02 and 0.5 microm [PM((0.02-0.5))], with volume median diameters of between 0.13 and 0.25 microm. Sources of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters between 0.7 and 10 microm [PM((0.7-10))] included sautéing, cleaning (vacuuming, dusting, and sweeping), and movement of people, with volume median diameters of between 3 and 4.3 microm. Frying was associated with particles from both PM((0.02-0.5)) and PM((0.7-10)). Air exchange rates ranged between 0.12 and 24.3 exchanges/hr and had significant impact on indoor particle levels and size distributions. Low air exchange rates (< 1 exchange/hr) resulted in longer air residence times and more time for particle concentrations from indoor sources to increase. When air exchange rates were higher (> 1 exchange/hr), the impact of indoor sources was less pronounced, as indoor particle concentrations tracked outdoor levels more closely. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:10620522

  12. Immature sinus histiocytosis. Light- and electron-microscopic features, immunologic phenotype, and relationship with marginal zone lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    van den Oord, J. J.; de Wolf-Peeters, C.; De Vos, R.; Desmet, V. J.

    1985-01-01

    The light-microscopic, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical features of immature sinus histiocytosis were studied in 10 lymph nodes with the histologic picture of toxoplasmic lymphadenitis and compared with the features of lymphoid cells present in the marginal zone of the splenic white pulp. Areas of immature sinus histiocytosis consisted largely of medium-sized lymphoid cells with markedly irregular nuclei and abundant pale cytoplasm. Using a panel of monoclonal antibodies, the predominating lymphoid cells were found to carry the B-cell phenotype B1+Ba1-sIgM+sIgD-OKIa1+. Admixed were variable numbers of larger, blastic lymphoid cells, small lymphocytes, histiocytic elements, and polymorphonuclear granulocytes. The marginal zone of the splenic white pulp was composed of a similar mixture of cells, and marginal-zone lymphocytes demonstrated an analogous immunohistochemical phenotype. Our results indicate that immature sinus histiocytes are B-lymphoid cells that are closely related to marginal zone lymphocytes. As such, immature sinus histiocytes may have a role similar to that of marginal-zone lymphocytes, which have been claimed to transport antigens or immune complexes toward the follicular center or to serve as precursors of plasma cells. We suggest that immature sinus histiocytosis represents an abnormal expansion of the marginal zone, normally present at the sinusoidal pole of lymphoid follicles. The reason for this marginal-zone hyperplasia, recognized as immature sinus histiocytosis in a variety of reactive lymph node conditions, may be a maturation arrest in the normal development of immature sinus histiocytes into small, sIgM+ sIgD+ lymphocytes. Images Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:3970140

  13. Experimental extrinsic allergic alveolitis and pulmonary angiitis induced by intratracheal or intravenous challenge with Corynebacterium parvum in sensitized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Yi, E. S.; Lee, H.; Suh, Y. K.; Tang, W.; Qi, M.; Yin, S.; Remick, D. G.; Ulich, T. R.

    1996-01-01

    Extrinsic allergic alveolitis and pulmonary sarcoidosis are granulomatous diseases of the lung for which clinical presentation and anatomic site of granuloma formation differ. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis is caused by inhaled antigens, whereas the nature and source of the inciting antigen in sarcoidosis is unknown. To test the hypothesis that the route via which antigen is introduced to the lung contributes to the clinicopathological presentation of pulmonary granulomatous disease, rats immunized with intravenous (i.v.) Corynebacterium parvum were challenged after 2 weeks with either intratracheal (i.t.) or i.v. C. parvum. The granulomatous inflammation elicited by i.t. challenge predominantly involved alveolar spaces and histologically simulated extrinsic allergic alveolitis. In contrast, the inflammation induced by i.v. challenge was characterized by granulomatous angiitis and interstitial inflammation simulating sarcoidosis. Elevations of leukocyte counts and TNF levels in bronchoalveolar fluid, which reflect inflammation in the intra-alveolar compartment, were much more pronounced after i.t. than after i.v. challenge. Tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6, CC chemokine, CXC chemokine, and adhesion molecule mRNA and protein expression occurred in each model. In conclusion, i.t. or i.v. challenge with C. parvum in sensitized rats caused pulmonary granulomatous inflammation that was histologically similar to human extrinsic allergic alveolitis and sarcoidosis, respectively. Although the soluble and cellular mediators of granulomatous inflammation were qualitatively similar in both disease models, the differing anatomic source of the same antigenic challenge was responsible for differing clinicopathological presentations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 11 Figure 13 Figure 12 Figure 14 PMID:8863677

  14. Immune complex receptors on cell surfaces. II. Cytochemical evaluation of their abundance on different immune cells: distribution, uptake, and regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    McKeever, P. E.; Garvin, A. J.; Hardin, D. H.; Spicer, S. S.

    1976-01-01

    A recently developed method for ultrastructural demonstration of cell surface receptors for immune complexes is applied to evaluation of these receptors on various cell types. The method entailing incubation with a complex of horesradish peroxidase (HRP) and antibody to HRP (anti-HRP) disclosed dense foci indicative of immune complex receptors distributed at 30- to 120-mmu intervals over macrophage surfaces. Invaginations, loop-like evaginations, and pinocytotic vasicles stained prominently. The number of stained immune complex receptors averaged 200,000 per oil-induced macrophage and 120,000 per noninduced macrophage, as determined from counts of focal deposits in electron micrographs. Receptor periodicity on giant cells present in oil-induced exudates resembled that on macrophages, but the larger giant cells contained an estimated 1.5 million sites. Although receptor periodicity on eosinophils and neutrophils equaled that on macrophages, the staining was lighter and was interrupted by intervals of unstained membrane. Neutrophils averaged 28,000 and eosinophils 35,000 receptors per cell, whereas those lymphocytes with receptors averaged 3,500 per cell. Viable cells incubated with anti-HRP sequentially exhibited about half as many reactive sites as did cells incubated with immune complex. When warmed to 37 C, viable macrophages and eosinophils pinocytosed soluble immune complexes almost completely within 30 minutes and phagocytosed insoluble complexes more slowly. The endocytosed soluble immune complexes were sequestered within tubulovesicular structures in addition to the expected phagocytic vacuoles. Receptors appeared fully active on macrophages that were restained with soluble, cold immune complex after they had endocytosed immune complex in the course of a 30-minute warming interval. Images Figure 16 Figures 2 and 3 Figures 4-6 Figure 7 Figures 8-11 Figure 1 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figures 14 and 15 PMID:60883

  15. Reflex-mediated desquamation of bronchiolar epithelium in guinea pigs exposed acutely to sulfuric acid aerosol.

    PubMed Central

    Brownstein, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Terminal conducting airways are known to be vulnerable to direct injury by a variety of noxious aerosols. Sulfuric acid aerosol, a by-product of fossil fuel combustion, produces desquamation of terminal bronchiolar epithelium in guinea pigs that is believed to result from direct deep lung irritation, an effect separable from reflex airway constriction induced by sulfuric acid. To characterize desquamation of bronchiolar epithelium, 20 guinea pigs were exposed to 32.6 mg/cu m sulfuric acid aerosol with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 1.0 micron for 4 hours. The guinea pigs were killed upon termination of the exposure, or 24 hours later, and airway alterations were evaluated by light and transmission electron microscopy. To test whether the development of bronchiolar epithelial desquamation is independent of reflex airway constriction, 24 guinea pigs were exposed to an identical aerosol for 4 hours after pretreating half with 5 mg/kg atropine sulfate intraperitoneally to inhibit airway constriction. Sulfuric acid produced diffuse pulmonary hyperinflation with areas of consolidation and atelectasis. Epithelial desquamation occurred in airways supplying regions of developing atelectasis and was most extensive in terminal bronchioles. Parasympathetic effector blockade with atropine eliminated epithelial desquamation. These results indicate that sulfuric acid-produced desquamation of terminal bronchiolar epithelium is not separable from reflex airway constriction and that terminal conducting airways are vulnerable not only to direct injury by noxious aerosols but also to indirect, reflex-mediated injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:7361847

  16. Dietary Induced Atherogenesis in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Gerrity, Ross G.; Naito, Herbert K.; Richardson, Mary; Schwartz, Colin J.

    1979-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia was induced in pigs by feeding a chow diet supplemented with 1.5% cholesterol and 19.5% lard for periods up to 12 weeks. The aortic intima from areas of spontaneously differing permeability to proteins, as demarcated by their uptake of Evans blue dye, was examined using light microscopy and both scanning and transmission electron microscopy to describe the earliest detectable changes in intimal morphology induced by the diet. After 2, 4, and 6 weeks of feeding, cholesterol/lardfed pigs demonstrated monocyte adherence to the endothelium in areas of enhanced permeability (blue areas) in 86% of samples examined, as compared to 52% in areas of lesser permeability (white areas) and 17% in control animals. Similarly, the number of monocytes in the intima was higher in blue areas than in adjacent white areas or blue areas from control animals. After 12 weeks of feeding, all blue areas showed intimal monocytes, with fewer seen in white areas. Aortic endothelial cells in hypercholesterolemic pigs were normal in ultrastructural appearance, except they contained more lysosomes and cytoplasmic filaments than those from control animals. No lesions were observed at 2, 4, and 6 weeks, although plasma cholesterol levels were substantially elevated (200-400 mg/dl) at these times. A marked hyper-β-lipoproteinemia was evident from 4 weeks onward, but no elevation of serum triglycerides was evident at any stage. Plasma phospholipid concentrations increased but not in direct proportion to cholesterol levels. At 12 weeks, foam cell lesions were observed in areas of enhanced permeability but not in adjacent areas of normal permeability. Lesion foam cells appeared to be derived from the monocytes which adhered to and penetrated the endothelium at earlier stages, since no intimal involvement, or lipid engorgement, by medial smooth muscle cells was observed. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 1Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure

  17. 50 CFR Figure 13 to Part 679 - BSAI C. Opilio Tanner Crab Bycatch Limitations Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false BSAI C. Opilio Tanner Crab Bycatch Limitations Zone 13 Figure 13 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 13 Figure 13 to Part 679—BSAI C. Opilio Tanner Crab...

  18. 50 CFR Figure 13 to Part 679 - BSAI C. Opilio Tanner Crab Bycatch Limitations Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false BSAI C. Opilio Tanner Crab Bycatch Limitations Zone 13 Figure 13 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 13 Figure 13 to Part 679—BSAI C. Opilio Tanner Crab...

  19. 50 CFR Figure 13 to Part 679 - BSAI C. Opilio Tanner Crab Bycatch Limitations Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false BSAI C. Opilio Tanner Crab Bycatch Limitations Zone 13 Figure 13 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 13 Figure 13 to Part 679—BSAI C. Opilio Tanner Crab...

  20. 50 CFR Figure 13 to Part 679 - BSAI C. Opilio Tanner Crab Bycatch Limitations Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false BSAI C. Opilio Tanner Crab Bycatch Limitations Zone 13 Figure 13 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 13 Figure 13 to Part 679—BSAI C. Opilio Tanner Crab...

  1. 50 CFR Figure 13 to Part 679 - BSAI C. Opilio Tanner Crab Bycatch Limitations Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false BSAI C. Opilio Tanner Crab Bycatch Limitations Zone 13 Figure 13 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 13 Figure 13 to Part 679—BSAI C. Opilio Tanner Crab...

  2. 50 CFR Figure 13 to Part 223 - Single Grid Hard TED Escape Opening

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Single Grid Hard TED Escape Opening 13 Figure 13 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND.... 223, Fig. 13 Figure 13 to Part 223—Single Grid Hard TED Escape Opening EC01JY91.060...

  3. 16 CFR Figure 13 to Part 1633 - Labels for Imported Mattress With Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labels for Imported Mattress With Foundation 13 Figure 13 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 13 Figure...

  4. 16 CFR Figure 13 to Part 1633 - Labels for Imported Mattress With Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Labels for Imported Mattress With Foundation 13 Figure 13 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 13 Figure...

  5. 16 CFR Figure 13 to Part 1633 - Labels for Imported Mattress With Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Labels for Imported Mattress With Foundation 13 Figure 13 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 13 Figure...

  6. 50 CFR Figure 12 to Part 223 - Escape Opening & Cover Dimensions for 71-inch TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Escape Opening & Cover Dimensions for 71-inch TED 12 Figure 12 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL... ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 12 Figure 12 to Part 223—Escape Opening & Cover Dimensions for 71-inch...

  7. 50 CFR Figure 12 to Part 223 - Escape Opening & Cover Dimensions for 71-inch TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Escape Opening & Cover Dimensions for 71-inch TED 12 Figure 12 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL... ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 12 Figure 12 to Part 223—Escape Opening & Cover Dimensions for 71-inch...

  8. 16 CFR Figure 12 to Part 1633 - Labels for Domestic Mattress With Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labels for Domestic Mattress With Foundation 12 Figure 12 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 12 Figure...

  9. 16 CFR Figure 12 to Part 1633 - Labels for Domestic Mattress With Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Labels for Domestic Mattress With Foundation 12 Figure 12 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 12 Figure...

  10. 16 CFR Figure 12 to Part 1633 - Labels for Domestic Mattress With Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Labels for Domestic Mattress With Foundation 12 Figure 12 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 12 Figure...

  11. Organization Culture and Its Development in Private Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucinskas, Vytolis; Paulauskaite, Alina

    2005-01-01

    The article is intended to discuss the features, structure, functions and developmental peculiarities of organizational culture in private colleges. A summary and conclusions of empirical research into organizational culture in private colleges are presented. (Contains 6 tables and 14 figures.)

  12. Advanced Coats' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Haik, B G

    1991-01-01

    further study. Specimens from patients with intraocular hemorrhage should be viewed cautiously, since erythrocytes contain high levels of enolase. Analysis of subretinal aspirates is an extremely accurate method of confirming the diagnosis of Coats' disease. The key diagnostic findings are the presence of cholesterol crystals and pigment-laden macrophages and the absence of tumor cells on fresh preparations. The technique should be reserved for patients where retinoblastoma has been ruled out by all noninvasive means and massive subretinal drainage is anticipated. The natural progression in advanced Coats' disease is toward the development of a blind, painful eye. Spontaneous regression does rarely occur, and some eyes quietly progress to a phthisical state.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 FIGURE 34 A FIGURE 34 B FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 FIGURE 38 FIGURE 39 FIGURE 41 FIGURE 42 FIGURE 43 FIGURE 44 FIGURE 45 FIGURE 46 A FIGURE 46 B FIGURE 47 A FIGURE 47 B FIGURE 48 A FIGURE 48 B FIGURE 49 FIGURE 50 FIGURE 51 FIGURE 52 FIGURE 54 FIGURE 54 (cont.) FIGURE 55 FIGURE 57 FIGURE 58 FIGURE 59 FIGURE 60 FIGURE 61 FIGURE 62 FIGURE 63 FIGURE 64 FIGURE 65 FIGURE 66 A FIGURE 66 B FIGURE 67 A FIGURE 67 B PMID:1808814

  13. Some comments on SSC physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1985-01-01

    This talk discusses some topics of current interest with regard to SSC physics. Uncertainties in rate estimates are discussed as is the status of proposals to search for the Higgs boson. 36 references, 13 figures.

  14. Methods of and system for swing damping movement of suspended objects

    DOEpatents

    Jones, J.F.; Petterson, B.J.; Strip, D.R.

    1991-03-05

    A payload suspended from a gantry is swing damped in accordance with a control algorithm based on the periodic motion of the suspended mass or by servoing on the forces induced by the suspended mass. 13 figures.

  15. Organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, E.L.

    1981-06-01

    The organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces is defined as a function of surface crystallography and of surface composition for a set of cyclic hydrocarbons that include benzene, toluene, cyclohexadienes, cyclohexene, cyclohexane, cyclooctatetraene, cyclooctadienes, cyclooctadiene, cycloheptatriene and cyclobutane. 12 figures.

  16. A Harmonic Motion Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, P.; Krakower, Zeev

    2010-01-01

    We present a unit comprising theory, simulation and experiment for a body oscillating on a vertical spring, in which the simultaneous use of a force probe and an ultrasonic range finder enables one to explore quantitatively and understand many aspects of simple and damped harmonic motions. (Contains 14 figures.)

  17. Statistical Abstract of Higher Education in North Carolina, 1988-89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill.

    Tabular data are presented on higher education in North Carolina, as of 1988-89. Types of data presented on 83 tables and 14 figures include enrollment counts, degrees conferred, characteristics of students in various types of institutions, student costs, admission test scores, financial aid, and analyses of flow of student transfers among…

  18. Ceramic oxide powders and the formation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Katz, J.L.; Chenghung Hung.

    1993-12-07

    Ceramic oxide powders and a method for their preparation. Ceramic oxide powders are obtained using a flame process whereby two or more precursors of ceramic oxides are introduced into a counterflow diffusion flame burner wherein said precursors are converted into ceramic oxide powders. The morphology, particle size, and crystalline form of the ceramic oxide powders are determined by process conditions. 14 figures.

  19. Symmetry in Sign Language Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; Kaneko, Michiko

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the range of ways that sign languages use geometric symmetry temporally and spatially to create poetic effect. Poets use this symmetry in sign language art to highlight duality and thematic contrast, and to create symbolic representations of beauty, order and harmony. (Contains 8 tables, 14 figures and 6 notes.)

  20. 50 CFR Figure 14 to Part 679 - Sablefish Regulatory Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sablefish Regulatory Areas 14 Figure 14 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt....

  1. 16 CFR Figures 14 and 15 to Part 1633 - Label for Domestic Mattress Alone and with Foundation and Label for Imported Mattress Alone and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Label for Domestic Mattress Alone and with Foundation and Label for Imported Mattress Alone and With Foundation 14 Figures 14 and 15 to Part 1633... Domestic Mattress Alone and with Foundation and Label for Imported Mattress Alone and With...

  2. 16 CFR Figures 14 and 15 to Part 1633 - Label for Domestic Mattress Alone and with Foundation and Label for Imported Mattress Alone and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Label for Domestic Mattress Alone and with Foundation and Label for Imported Mattress Alone and With Foundation 14 Figures 14 and 15 to Part 1633... Domestic Mattress Alone and with Foundation and Label for Imported Mattress Alone and With...

  3. 16 CFR Figures 14 and 15 to Part 1633 - Label for Domestic Mattress Alone and with Foundation and Label for Imported Mattress Alone and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Label for Domestic Mattress Alone and with Foundation and Label for Imported Mattress Alone and With Foundation 14 Figures 14 and 15 to Part 1633... Domestic Mattress Alone and with Foundation and Label for Imported Mattress Alone and With...

  4. 16 CFR Figures 14 and 15 to Part 1633 - Label for Domestic Mattress Alone and with Foundation and Label for Imported Mattress Alone and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Label for Domestic Mattress Alone and with Foundation and Label for Imported Mattress Alone and With Foundation 14 Figures 14 and 15 to Part 1633... Domestic Mattress Alone and with Foundation and Label for Imported Mattress Alone and With...

  5. 16 CFR Figures 14 and 15 to Part 1633 - Label for Domestic Mattress Alone and with Foundation and Label for Imported Mattress Alone and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Label for Domestic Mattress Alone and with Foundation and Label for Imported Mattress Alone and With Foundation 14 Figures 14 and 15 to Part 1633... Domestic Mattress Alone and with Foundation and Label for Imported Mattress Alone and With...

  6. Chesapeake Bay Program: Point-Source Atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Macknis, J.

    1988-08-01

    The atlas contains pollutant loadings from Chesapeake Bay watershed municipal and industrial point sources drawn from the Chesapeake Bay Program computerized data base. Nutrient and toxic discharges are included. Effluent data are averaged for the calendar year 1985. Detailed information is presented in 23 tables and 14 figures.

  7. Understanding Academic Information Seeking Habits through Analysis of Web Server Log Files: The Case of the Teachers College Library Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asunka, Stephen; Chae, Hui Soo; Hughes, Brian; Natriello, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Transaction logs of user activity on an academic library website were analyzed to determine general usage patterns on the website. This paper reports on insights gained from the analysis, and identifies and discusses issues relating to content access, interface design and general functionality of the website. (Contains 13 figures and 8 tables.)

  8. 50 CFR Figure 13 to Part 223 - Single Grid Hard TED Escape Opening

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Single Grid Hard TED Escape Opening 13 Figure 13 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES...

  9. 50 CFR Figure 13 to Part 223 - Single Grid Hard TED Escape Opening

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Single Grid Hard TED Escape Opening 13 Figure 13 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES...

  10. Minnesota Health Statistics 1986. (36th Annual Summary Report).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Health, Minneapolis. Center for Health Statistics.

    This annual summary of vital statistics from the state of Minnesota contains technical notes on changes in the summary format, sources of data, data quality, geographic allocation, and definition of rates. A total of 63 data tables and 13 figures are provided in the areas of: (1) an overview of 1986 vital statistics; (2) live births; (3) reported…

  11. Minnesota Health Statistics 1984. [34th Annual Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Health, Minneapolis. Center for Health Statistics.

    This annual summary of vital statistics contains technical notes on changes in the summary format, sources of data, data quality, geographic allocation, and definition of rates. A total of 56 data tables and 13 figures are provided in the areas of: (1) an overview of 1984 vital statistics; (2) live births; (3) reported induced abortions; (4)…

  12. 16 CFR Figures 11, 12 and 13 to... - Hemispherical Anvil and Curbstone Anvil

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hemispherical Anvil and Curbstone Anvil 11, Figures 11, 12 and 13 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Figs. 11, 12, 13 Figures...

  13. 16 CFR Figures 11, 12 and 13 to... - Hemispherical Anvil and Curbstone Anvil

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hemispherical Anvil and Curbstone Anvil 11, Figures 11, 12 and 13 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Figs. 11, 12, 13 Figures...

  14. 16 CFR Figures 11, 12 and 13 to... - Hemispherical Anvil and Curbstone Anvil

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hemispherical Anvil and Curbstone Anvil 11, Figures 11, 12 and 13 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Figs. 11, 12, 13 Figures...

  15. 16 CFR Figures 11, 12 and 13 to... - Hemispherical Anvil and Curbstone Anvil

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hemispherical Anvil and Curbstone Anvil 11, Figures 11, 12 and 13 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Figs. 11, 12, 13 Figures...

  16. 16 CFR Figure 13 to Part 1633 - Labels for Imported Mattress With Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Labels for Imported Mattress With Foundation 13 Figure 13 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 13...

  17. 16 CFR Figure 13 to Part 1633 - Labels for Imported Mattress With Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Labels for Imported Mattress With Foundation 13 Figure 13 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 13...

  18. 16 CFR Figures 11, 12 and 13 to... - Hemispherical Anvil and Curbstone Anvil

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hemispherical Anvil and Curbstone Anvil 11, Figures 11, 12 and 13 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Figs. 11, 12, 13 Figures...

  19. Benchmarking Peer Production Mechanisms, Processes & Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Thomas; Kretschmer, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This deliverable identifies key approaches for quality management in peer production by benchmarking peer production practices and processes in other areas. (Contains 29 footnotes, 13 figures and 2 tables.)[This report has been authored with contributions of: Kaisa Honkonen-Ratinen, Matti Auvinen, David Riley, Jose Pinzon, Thomas Fischer, Thomas…

  20. Electrochemical planarization

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Contolini, R.J.

    1993-10-26

    In a process for fabricating planarized thin film metal interconnects for integrated circuit structures, a planarized metal layer is etched back to the underlying dielectric layer by electropolishing, ion milling or other procedure. Electropolishing reduces processing time from hours to minutes and allows batch processing of multiple wafers. The etched back planarized thin film interconnect is flush with the dielectric layer. 12 figures.

  1. 50 CFR Figure 12 to Part 223 - Escape Opening & Cover Dimensions for 71-inch TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Escape Opening & Cover Dimensions for 71-inch TED 12 Figure 12 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE...

  2. Software for Fermat's Principle and Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihas, Pavlos

    2012-01-01

    Fermat's principle is considered as a unifying concept. It is usually presented erroneously as a "least time principle". In this paper we present some software that shows cases of maxima and minima and the application of Fermat's principle to the problem of focusing in lenses. (Contains 12 figures.)

  3. 50 CFR Figure 12 to Part 679 - Bristol Bay Trawl Closure Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bristol Bay Trawl Closure Area 12 Figure 12 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE...

  4. Summary of beryllium electrorefining technology developed by KBI Division of Cabot Berylco Inc

    SciTech Connect

    Pistole, C.O.

    1983-05-27

    Proprietary beryllium electrorefining technology has been purchased from the KBI Division of Cabot Berylco Inc. by Rockwell International, Rocky Flats Plant, as part of a DOE beryllium option study. This technology has been reviewed and is summarized. 12 figures, 7 tables.

  5. Fission properties and production mechanisms for the heaviest known elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    Mass yields of the spontaneous fission of Fm isotopes, Cf isotopes, and /sup 259/Md are discussed. Actinide yields were measured for bombardments of /sup 248/Cm with /sup 16/O, /sup 18/O, /sup 20/Ne, and /sup 22/Ne. A superheavy product might be produced by bombarding /sup 248/Cm with /sup 48/Ca ions. 12 figures. (DLC)

  6. Method of producing a carbon coated ceramic membrane and associated product

    DOEpatents

    Liu, P.K.T.; Gallaher, G.R.; Wu, J.C.S.

    1993-11-16

    A method is described for producing a carbon coated ceramic membrane including passing a selected hydrocarbon vapor through a ceramic membrane and controlling ceramic membrane exposure temperature and ceramic membrane exposure time. The method produces a carbon coated ceramic membrane of reduced pore size and modified surface properties having increased chemical, thermal and hydrothermal stability over an uncoated ceramic membrane. 12 figures.

  7. 16 CFR Figure 12 to Part 1633 - Labels for Domestic Mattress With Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Labels for Domestic Mattress With Foundation 12 Figure 12 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 12...

  8. 16 CFR Figure 12 to Part 1633 - Labels for Domestic Mattress With Foundation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Labels for Domestic Mattress With Foundation 12 Figure 12 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 12...

  9. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1994-06-28

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figures.

  10. The status of electric industry restructuring

    SciTech Connect

    Morey, M.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation discusses current electric utility regulatory reform with a focus on the impacts of competition in the Midwest marketplace. Information and data are presented through 14 figures and 30 tables. Regulatory issues at the state and Federal levels are very briefly outlined, including reciprocity, unbundling, stranded cost recovery, and independent system operation. Graphical data on energy capacity by source, capacity additions, wholesale markets, electricity prices, and market development are also presented.

  11. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital anomalies. What can and should be done?

    PubMed Central

    Langer, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of congenital anomalies provides an opportunity to prepare and counsel parents. It can lead to pregnancy termination; to a change in timing, mode, or location of delivery; or, in some cases, to prenatal intervention. Families with an affected fetus are best managed by a cohesive medical team. This article outlines the principles used to manage these cases. Images Figures 1-3 Figures 4-5 PMID:8471905

  12. Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Bain, John

    1992-01-01

    Otitis media remains one of the least understood conditions seen by a family physician. More attention to follow up instead of widespread use of antibiotics and decongestant mixtures could improve family practice care of children with middle ear disorders. Greater selection in resorting to surgical management would be helpful. Unnecessary interference is unlikely to be of long-term benefit to either children or their families. ImagesFigures 1-3Figures 4-5 PMID:21221314

  13. Active sites in char gasification. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 January 1984-31 March 1984. [Polymers of phenol-formaldehyde family; chars produced from model compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Calo, J.M.; Suubers, E.M.; Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.

    1984-05-01

    This project is concerned with the study of the nature and behavior of active sites in gasification of chars produced from synthesized model compounds, primarily of the phenol-formaldehyde family of resins. The current technical progress report presents further developments on resin synthesis and characterization and the design of a pyro-gasifier reactor for transient kinetic studies of the chars produced from the model compounds. 7 references, 12 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Floods on Duck and Little Duck Rivers and Grindstone Hollow, Hunt, Hickory Flat, and Wolf Creeks in the vicinity of Manchester, Tennessee. [Duck River; Little Duck River

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    This flood hazard report describes the extent and severity of the flood potential along selected reaches of the Duck and Little Duck Rivers, and Grindstone Hollow, Hunt, Hickory Flat, and Wolf Creeks in the vicinity of Manchester, Tennessee. The report was prepared by TVA as a result of a request from the city of Manchester for TVA technical assistance in evaluating alternative solutions to local flood problems. 5 references, 12 figures, 12 tables.

  15. Common Pediatric Urological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Wm. Lane M.; Leung, Alexander K.C.; Boag, Graham S.

    1991-01-01

    The clinical and radiological presentations of 12 pediatric urological disorders are described. The described disorders include pyelonephritis, vesicoureteral reflux, ureteropelvic obstruction, ureterovesical obstruction, ectopic ureterocele, posterior urethral valves, multicystic dysplastic kidney, polycystic kidney disease, ectopic kidney, staghorn calculi, urethral diverticulum, and urethral meatal stenosis. ImagesFigure 1-2Figure 3Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6-7Figure 8-9Figure 10Figure 11-12 PMID:21229068

  16. Composite quarterly technical report long-term high-level-waste technology, October-December 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Cornman, W.R.

    1982-06-01

    This document summarizes work performed at participating sites on the immobilization of high-level wastes from the chemical reprocessing of reactor fuels. The plan is to develop waste form alternatives for each of the three DOE sites (SRP, ICPP, and Hanford). Progress is reported in the following areas: waste preparation; fixation in glass, concrete, tailored ceramics, and coated particles; process and equipment development; and final handling. 12 figures, 19 tables. (DLC)

  17. Distribution of radium and plutonium in human bone

    SciTech Connect

    Schlenker, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents aspects of current and recent work on the distribution of radium and plutonium near the surfaces of human bone and applications of the data. Included are sections on methods, surface deposit thickness, radium distribution near the endosteal surface, the use of alpha spectrometry in conjunction with autoradiography, radium distribution in the mastoid, and factors affecting plutonium specific activity. Emphasis is placed on the alpha spectrometry technique because of its usefulness and its recent application to problems of local dosimetry. 19 references, 14 figures, 6 tables.

  18. Microelectronic superconducting device with multi-layer contact

    DOEpatents

    Wellstood, F.C.; Kingston, J.J.; Clarke, J.

    1993-10-26

    A microelectronic component comprising a crossover is provided comprising a substrate, a first high T[sub c] superconductor thin film, a second insulating thin film comprising SrTiO[sub 3] ; and a third high T[sub c] superconducting film which has strips which crossover one or more areas of the first superconductor film. An in situ method for depositing all three films on a substrate is provided which does not require annealing steps. The photolithographic process is used to separately pattern the high T[sub c] superconductor thin films. 14 figures.

  19. Determination of three-dimensional low-resolution viral structure from solution x-ray scattering data.

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Y; Doerschuk, P C; Johnson, J E

    1995-01-01

    The capsid is modeled as a region of constant electron density located between inner and outer envelopes that exhibit icosahedral symmetry. For computational purposes the envelopes are represented as truncated sums of weighted icosahedral harmonics. Methods are described for estimating the weights from x-ray solution scattering patterns based on nonlinear least squares, and two examples of the procedure, for viruses with known atomic-resolution structures, are given. Images FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 23 PMID:8527677

  20. Exclusive processes and hadron dynamics at short distances

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Lepage, G.P.

    1980-09-01

    The predictions of perturbative QCD for a number of areas of hadron dynamics are discussed, including exclusive processes at large momentum transfer, the endpoint behavior of hadronic structure functions, and the Fock state structure of hadron wave functions, especially their behavior at short distances. New results for exclusive two-photon processes, the normalization of high-twist contributions to the meson structure function, and the calculation of the valence Fock state probability of the pion are presented. The contrasting features of QCD and parton model dynamics are reviewed. 57 references, 14 figures.

  1. Synthesis and investigation of neutron-rich transuranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1980-09-01

    Spontaneous fission activities produced in the reactions of /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N, /sup 16/O, and /sup 18/O ions with /sup 248/Cm and /sup 249/Bk targets are reported; excitation functions and half-lives of element 104 isotopes are given. Reactions that led to the formation of /sup 259/Fm are discussed in detail. The principal features of the SuperHILAC on-line isotope separator and some of the anticipated applications are described. 14 figures, 2 tables. (RWR)

  2. Monoclonal antibodies for the separate detection of halodeoxyuridines and method for their use

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, M.; Watkins, B.E.; Stanker, L.H.

    1991-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are described which have specific affinities for halogenated nucleoside analogs and are preferentially selective for one particular halogen. Such antibodies, when incorporated into immunochemical reagents, may be used to identify and independently quantify the cell division character of more than one population or subpopulation in flow cytometric measurements. Independent assessment of division activity in cell sub-populations facilitates selection of appropriate time and dose for administration of anti-proliferative agents. The hybridomas which secrete halogen selective antibodies and the method of making them are described. 14 figures.

  3. Data on macrophage mediated muscle transfection upon delivery of naked plasmid DNA with block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Vivek; Gaymalov, Zagit; Alakhova, Daria; Gupta, Richa; Zucker, Irving H; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2016-06-01

    The data contains 14 figures supporting the research article "Horizontal gene transfer from macrophages to ischemic muscles upon delivery of naked DNA with Pluronic block copolymers" [1]. The data explains the surgical procedure and histological characterization of Murine Hind Limb Ischemia. The data also shows the kinetics of luciferase gene expression, spread of GFP expression through muscle and the colocalization of GFP with cellular markers in ischemic muscles injected with pDNA alone or pDNA/Pluronic. Finally the data shows the effect of Pluronic Block Copolymer to enhance total gene expression (cmv-promoter driven luciferase gene) in coculture of DNA transfected MØs with muscle cells. PMID:27222845

  4. Enhanced photo-activated luminescence for screening polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and other related chlorinated compounds

    DOEpatents

    Tuan Vodinh.

    1993-12-21

    The presence of polychlorinated biphenyls and other chlorinated compounds in a sample is determined by treating the sample with a photo-activator and then exposing the treated sample to a UV light source. The UV light produces a photo-product complex, which is subsequently excited with UV light to cause luminescence of the complex. The luminescence is detected and characteristics of the luminescence spectra are used to determine the presence of chlorinated compounds and also the quantity of the chlorine in the compounds. 14 figures.

  5. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    DOEpatents

    Medernach, J.W.

    1994-01-11

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). 14 figures.

  6. Two-phase chromium-niobium alloys exhibiting improved mechanical properties at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Liu, C.T.; Takeyama, Masao.

    1994-02-01

    The specification discloses chromium-niobium alloys which exhibit improved mechanical properties at high temperatures in the range of 1250 C and improved room temperature ductility. The alloys contain a Cr[sub 2]Nb-rich intermetallic phase and a Cr-rich phase with an overall niobium concentration in the range of from about 5 to about 18 at. %. The high temperature strength is substantially greater than that of state of the art nickel-based superalloys for enhanced high temperature service. Further improvements in the properties of the compositions are obtained by alloying with rhenium and aluminum; and additional rare-earth and other elements. 14 figures.

  7. Physical basis for prompt-neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The technique called prompt ..gamma..-ray neutron activation analysis has been applied to rapid materials analysis. The radiation following the neutron radiation capture is prompt in the sense that the nuclear decay time is on the order of 10/sup -15/ second, and thus the technique is not strictly activation, but should be called radiation neutron capture spectroscopy or neutron capture ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy. This paper reviews the following: sources and detectors, theory of radiative capture, nonstatistical capture, giant dipole resonance, fast neutron capture, and thermal neutron capture ..gamma..-ray spectra. 14 figures.

  8. High resolution track etch autoradiography

    DOEpatents

    Solares, G.; Zamenhof, R.G.

    1994-12-27

    A detector assembly is disclosed for use in obtaining alpha-track autoradiographs, the detector assembly including a substantially boron-free substrate; a detector layer deposited on the substantially boron-free substrate, the detector layer being capable of recording alpha particle tracks and exhibiting evidence of the alpha tracks in response to being exposed to an etchant, the detector layer being less than about 2 microns thick; and a protective layer deposited on the detector layer, the protective layer being resistant to the etchant and having a thickness of about 0.5 to 1 microns. 13 figures.

  9. Microelectronic superconducting crossover and coil

    DOEpatents

    Wellstood, F.C.; Kingston, J.J.; Clarke, J.

    1994-03-01

    A microelectronic component comprising a crossover is provided comprising a substrate, a first high T[sub c] superconductor thin film, a second insulating thin film comprising SrTiO[sub 3]; and a third high T[sub c] superconducting film which has strips which crossover one or more areas of the first superconductor film. An in situ method for depositing all three films on a substrate is provided which does not require annealing steps and which can be opened to the atmosphere between depositions. 13 figures.

  10. Method of making permanent magnets

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Lograsso, B.K.; Anderson, I.E.

    1993-09-07

    A method for making an isotropic permanent magnet comprises atomizing a melt of a rare earth-transition metal alloy (e.g., an Nd--Fe--B alloy enriched in Nd and B) under conditions to produce protectively coated, rapidly solidified, generally spherical alloy particles. Wherein a majority of the particles are produced/size classified within a given size fraction (e.g., 5 to 40 microns diameter) exhibiting optimum as-atomized magnetic properties and subjecting the particles to concurrent elevated temperature and elevated isotropic pressure for a time effective to yield a densified, magnetically isotropic magnet compact having enhanced magnetic properties and mechanical properties. 13 figures.

  11. Apparatus and methods for detecting chemical permeation

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1994-12-27

    Apparatus and methods for detecting the permeation of hazardous or toxic chemicals through protective clothing are disclosed. The hazardous or toxic chemicals of interest do not possess the spectral characteristic of luminescence. The apparatus and methods utilize a spectrochemical modification technique to detect the luminescence quenching of an indicator compound which upon permeation of the chemical through the protective clothing, the indicator is exposed to the chemical, thus indicating chemical permeation. The invention also relates to the fabrication of protective clothing materials. 13 figures.

  12. Insect erythrocyte agglutinins. In vitro opsonization experiments with Clitumnus extradentatus and Periplaneta americana haemocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, A F; Ratcliffe, N A

    1980-01-01

    The effect of naturally occurring haemagglutinins on the in vitro phagocytosis of sheep erythrocytes by the blood cells (haemocytes) of Clitumnus extradentatus and Periplaneta americana was studied. The results showed that the haemagglutinins in both species failed to act as opsonins. Indeed, in some instances, incubation of erythrocytes in haemolymph resulted in less avid ingestion as compared with the saline-incubated controls. This reduced phagocytosis was probably caused by the clumping of erythrocytes on the haemocyte monolayers, leaving fewer single red cells available for uptake. The possible roles of these erythrocyte agglutinins in the host defence systems of insects are discussed. Images Figures 1-3 Figures 6-7 PMID:7000682

  13. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-11-16

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

  14. Monte Carlo 20 and 45 MeV Bremsstrahlung and dose-reduction calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Goosman, D.R.

    1984-08-14

    The SANDYL electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code has been compared with previously published experimental bremsstrahlung data at 20.9 MeV electron energy. The code was then used to calculate forward-directed spectra, angular distributions and dose-reduction factors for three practical configurations. These are: 20 MeV electrons incident on 1 mm of W + 59 mm of Be, 45 MeV electrons of 1 mm of W and 45 MeV electrons on 1 mm of W + 147 mm of Be. The application of these results to flash radiography is discussed. 7 references, 12 figures, 1 table.

  15. New drift chamber for the Mark II at SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.G.

    1984-04-01

    A new cylindrical drift chamber is being constructed for the Mark II detector for use at the new SLAC Linear Collider. The design of the new chamber is based on a multi-sense-wire cell of the jet-chamber type. In addition to drift-time measurements, pulse height measurements from the sense wires will provide electron-hadron separation by dE/dx. The design and construction of the chamber, tests of prototypes, and chamber electronics are discussed. 7 references, 12 figures.

  16. Bed-form climb models to analyze geometry and preservation potential of clastic facies and erosional surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Larue, D.K.; Martinez, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Based on a combination of Walther's Law of Facies and bed-form climb theory, the authors propose a model that explains how erosion surfaces and vertical sequences of clastic strata are preserved where deposition occurs in channelized or locally erosional environments including fluvial and submarine-channel deposits, barred beaches, and transgressive coastlines. the model considers both lateral and vertical migration of a scour surface and its associated depositional products. As in studies of bed-form climb, they recognize subcritical, critical, and supercritical climb of scour surfaces relative to adjacent depositional forms. 12 figures.

  17. System for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot

    DOEpatents

    Burry, D.B.; Williams, P.M.

    1991-02-19

    A system and method for exchanging tools and end effectors on a robot permits exchange during a programmed task. The exchange mechanism is located off the robot, thus reducing the mass of the robot arm and permitting smaller robots to perform designated tasks. A simple spring/collet mechanism mounted on the robot is used which permits the engagement and disengagement of the tool or end effector without the need for a rotational orientation of the tool to the end effector/collet interface. As the tool changing system is not located on the robot arm no umbilical cords are located on robot. 12 figures.

  18. Composite lead for conducting an electrical current between 75--80K and 4. 5K temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Negm, Y.; Zimmerman, G.O.; Powers, R.E. Jr.; McConeghy, R.J.; Kaplan, A.

    1994-12-27

    A composite lead is provided which electrically links and conducts a current between about 75-80K and liquid helium temperature of about 4.5K. The composite lead may be employed singly or in multiples concurrently to provide conduction of electrical current from normal conductors and semi-conductors at room temperature to superconductors operating at 4.5K. In addition, a variety of organizational arrangements and assemblies are provided by which the mechanical strength and electrical reliability of the composite lead is maintained. 12 figures.

  19. Temperature-insensitive phase-matched optical harmonic conversion crystal

    DOEpatents

    Barker, C.E.; Eimerl, D.; Velsko, S.P.; Roberts, D.

    1993-11-23

    Temperature-insensitive, phase-matched harmonic frequency conversion of laser light at a preferred wavelength of 1.064 microns can be achieved by use of a crystal of deuterated l-arginine phosphate. The crystal is cut and oriented so that the laser light propagates inside the crystal along one of several required directions, which correspond to a temperature-insensitive, phase-matching locus. The method of measuring and calculating the temperature-insensitive, phase-matching angles can be extended to other fundamental wavelengths and other crystal compositions. 12 figures.

  20. Influence of the geothermal waters on fishes and aquatic invertebrates, in the Plain of Banat

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu-Marinescu, V.; Elain-Talau, L.; Papadopol, M.; Nicolescu, D.; Teodorescu, L.

    1982-01-01

    Research on the effects of geothermal waters (both used and unused) on vertebrates and invertebrates made the water's toxico-lethal character obvious in waters with a normal concentration or diluted up to over 17%. Among the organisms used in the experiment, Daphnia magna (a cladoceran) and young carp (Cyprinus carpio) have proved to be more sensitive. Tubifex tubifex (an oligochaete) have proved to be more resistant. Taking in account the toxicity of geothermal waters with addition of a specific smell and taste contracted by the meat fish, their overflow into natural receivers is not recommended. 7 references, 12 figures.

  1. Automated interferometric alignment system for paraboloidal mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, L.C.

    1993-09-28

    A method is described for a systematic method of interpreting interference fringes obtained by using a corner cube retroreflector as an alignment aid when aligning a paraboloid to a spherical wavefront. This is applicable to any general case where such alignment is required, but is specifically applicable in the case of aligning an autocollimating test using a diverging beam wavefront. In addition, the method provides information which can be systematically interpreted such that independent information about pitch, yaw and focus errors can be obtained. Thus, the system lends itself readily to automation. Finally, although the method is developed specifically for paraboloids, it can be seen to be applicable to a variety of other aspheric optics when applied in combination with a wavefront corrector that produces a wavefront which, when reflected from the correctly aligned aspheric surface will produce a collimated wavefront like that obtained from the paraboloid when it is correctly aligned to a spherical wavefront. 14 figures.

  2. Plutonium-uranium separation in the Purex process using mixtures of hydroxylamine nitrate and ferrous sulfamate

    SciTech Connect

    McKibben, J.M.; Chostner, D.F.; Orebaugh, E.G.

    1983-11-01

    Laboratory studies, followed by plant operation, established that a mixture of hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) and ferrous sulfamate (FS) is superior to FS used alone as a reductant for plutonium in the Purex first cycle. FS usage has been reduced by about 70% (from 0.12 to 0.04M) compared to the pre-1978 period. This reduced the volume of neutralized waste due to FS by 194 liters/metric ton of uranium (MTU) processed. The new flowsheet also gives lower plutonium losses to waste and at least comparable fission product decontamination. To achieve satisfactory performance at this low concentration of FS, the acidity in the 1B mixer-settler was reduced by using a split-scrub - a low acid scrub in stage one and a higher acid scrub in stage three - to remove acid from the solvent exiting the 1A centrifugal contactor. 8 references, 14 figures, 1 table.

  3. Laboratory-scale evaluations of alternative plutonium precipitation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Martella, L.L.; Saba, M.T.; Campbell, G.K.

    1984-02-08

    Plutonium(III), (IV), and (VI) carbonate; plutonium(III) fluoride; plutonium(III) and (IV) oxalate; and plutonium(IV) and (VI) hydroxide precipitation methods were evaluated for conversion of plutonium nitrate anion-exchange eluate to a solid, and compared with the current plutonium peroxide precipitation method used at Rocky Flats. Plutonium(III) and (IV) oxalate, plutonium(III) fluoride, and plutonium(IV) hydroxide precipitations were the most effective of the alternative conversion methods tested because of the larger particle-size formation, faster filtration rates, and the low plutonium loss to the filtrate. These were found to be as efficient as, and in some cases more efficient than, the peroxide method. 18 references, 14 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Technology development for the design of shallow land burial facilities at arid sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhan, J.W.; Abeele, W.V.; Cokal, E.J.; Perkins, B.A.; Lane, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    The field research program involving technology development for arid shallow land burial (SLB) sites is described. Field tests of biointrusion barriers at waste disposal sites and in experimental plots at Los Alamos are reported. Results of completed and on-going experiments with migration barriers for water and contaminant movement are presented. An envelope wick experiment for subsurface water management is described, and preliminary field data are reported. An integrated field experiment was designed to test individual SLB component tests related to erosion control, biobarriers, and subsurface capillary and migration barriers, and the progress made in emplacing the experiment is presented. Efforts to utilize the field data collected to validate hydrologic models (TRACR3D) important to waste management strategies are also presented. 11 references, 14 figures, 1 table.

  5. Preparation and composition of superconducting copper oxides based on Ga-O layers

    DOEpatents

    Dabrowski, B.; Vaughey, J.T.; Poeppelmeier, K.R.

    1994-12-20

    A high temperature superconducting material with the general formula GaSr[sub 2]Ln[sub 1[minus]x]M[sub x]Cu[sub 2]O[sub 7[+-]w] wherein Ln is selected from the group consisting of La, Ce, Pt, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Y and M is selected from the group consisting of C and Sr, 0.2[<=]x[<=]0.4 and w is a small fraction of one. A method of preparing this high temperature superconducting material is provided which includes heating and cooling a mixture to produce a crystalline material which is subsequently fired, ground and annealed at high pressure and temperature in oxygen to establish superconductivity. 14 figures.

  6. Apparatus and method for servicing an elongated suspended pump motor in an electric power plant with limited access

    DOEpatents

    Chavez, R.V.; Ekeroth, D.E.; Johnson, F.T.; Matusz, J.M.

    1994-04-26

    Elongated coolant pumps suspended under steam generators within containment in a power plant with limited access space, are removed and replaced by an elongated maintenance cart with an elongated opening along one side in which the motor is received. Rollers support the cart for conveying the elongated motor in an upright position out from under the steam generator and onto an elevator. The elevator is lowered to transfer support of the cart and motor through trunnions to saddles straddling the elevator for rotation of the cart to a generally horizontal position. The elevator then raises the horizontally disposed cart carrying the motor to a higher floor where it is rolled off the elevator and out through the auxiliary equipment hatch. 14 figures.

  7. Violent tornado climatography, 1880-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Grazulis, T.P.

    1984-05-01

    All known information sources, ranging from newspaper reports to the University of Chicago (DAPPL) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA/NSSFC) data lists, were utilized to produce a self-consistent compilation and description of violent tornado occurrences in the contiguous United States for the years 1880 through 1982. The 969 F-scale 4 and 5 tornadoes comprise the most complete and rational data base available for studies elated to violent tornado risk assessment; the data provide improved bases for licensing decisions and development of standards in safety at nuclear facility sites. Reconciliation of the DAPPL and NSSFC data lists for violent tornadoes has been achieved. Analysis of the data shows geographical and temporal variability of tornado occurrences; suggestions are given to help account for nonuniform distributions, and other suggestions are made for needed future research. 32 references, 14 figures, 8 tables.

  8. Separation of alkali, alkaline earth and rare earth cations by liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Fourth progress report, 1 November 1981-31 July 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J J; Izatt, R M

    1982-07-31

    The H/sub 2/O-CHCl/sub 3/-H/sub 2/O liquid membrane system was characterized with respect to the effect on cation (K/sup +/) transport rate of salt concentration and anion type. A bulk liquid membrane cell was used. A mathematical model for cation flux is being developed for several cations, several macrocycles, and mixtures of two or three cations. Eu/sup 3 +/ was not transported by 18-crown-6, but its reduced from Eu/sup 2 +/ was. Cation transport properties of calixarenes are also being investigated. Emulsion membrane systems were studied as a way of increasing the cation transport. Pb/sup 2 +/ was found to be transported by dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 through the liquid membrane. Transport rates of metal cation nitrates were measured in a water-toluene-water emulsion membrane system. 14 figures, 7 tables. (DLC)

  9. Zuni sequence in Williston basin - evidence for Mesozoic paleotectonism

    SciTech Connect

    Shurr, G.W.; Anna, L.O.; Peterson, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Zuni sequence in the Williston basin is a largescale lithogenetic package bounded by interregional unconformities. Within the sequence, three major subdivisions are separated by unconformities or marker beds and correspond with chronostratigraphic units: (1) Middle and Upper Jurassic, (2) Lower Cretaceous, and (3) Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene. The basin has clear expression in the Jurassic subdivision, poor expression in the Lower Cretaceous, and good expression in the Upper Cretaceous. A series of seven marginal paleotectonic elements surround the basin center on the west, south, and east in the US. Five more marginal elements have been described in Canada. Occurrences of oil in the Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous and of natural gas in the Upper Cretaceous are broadly related to the pattern of marginal paleotectonic elements. 14 figures, 1 table.

  10. Middle Cenozoic depositional, tectonic, and sea level history of southern San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Decelles, P.G.

    1988-11-01

    As a prolific producer of hydrocarbons, the San Joaquin basin in south-central California has been the subject of geological research since the late nineteenth century. Much of this research has focused on the subsurface Eocene to lower Miocene succession because of its attractive reservoir potential. Although seismic and well-log data are available in profuse quantities, the complex sedimentary architecture of the basin fill, the application of local and inconsistent stratigraphic nomenclature, and the inherent limitations of subsurface data have led to much confusion concerning the middle Cenozoic history of the basin. This paper presents a sedimentological analysis of the depositional systems in the Eocene to lower Miocene strata of the San Emigdio and Tehachapi Mountains. The various depositional systems are considered within the contexts of encompassing depositional sequences to reconstruct the middle Cenozoic depositional, tectonic, and sea level history of the southern San Joaquin basin. 14 figures, 1 table.

  11. Wildlife distribution and abundance on the Utah oil shale tracts 1975-1984

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, C.V.

    1986-07-01

    Distribution and abundance of 215 amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals were monitored for 10 years on Utah's Oil Shale Tracts using line transects, mist netting, and live trapping. Wildlife monitoring was conducted in four major vegetation types and during all seasons to establish a quantitative baseline for use in impact identification during oil shale mining. Habitat preferences were established for many species in cold desert vegetation of two types of desert shrub, and juniper and riparian woodlands. Seasonal, annual, and habitat distribution of each class demonstrated a variety of adaptive responses to environmental variables. The most important environmental variables, that is, those factors resulting in a predictable change in wildlife populations, were, in descending order: weather, food resource, shelter, and competition. 31 references, 14 figures, 10 tables.

  12. Application of biasing techniques to the contributon Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Dubi, A.; Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1980-01-01

    Recently, a new Monte Carlo Method called the Contribution Monte Carlo Method was developed. The method is based on the theory of contributions, and uses a new receipe for estimating target responses by a volume integral over the contribution current. The analog features of the new method were discussed in previous publications. The application of some biasing methods to the new contribution scheme is examined here. A theoretical model is developed that enables an analytic prediction of the benefit to be expected when these biasing schemes are applied to both the contribution method and regular Monte Carlo. This model is verified by a variety of numerical experiments and is shown to yield satisfying results, especially for deep-penetration problems. Other considerations regarding the efficient use of the new method are also discussed, and remarks are made as to the application of other biasing methods. 14 figures, 1 tables.

  13. Proceedings of the Workshop on Program Options in Intermediate-Energy Physics. Keynote address: New directions in elementary particle physics - pantip from very low to very high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, M.

    1980-05-01

    The recent development of cooling techniques offers the possibility to obtain intense sources of antiprotons, stacking them as they are produced at a multi-GeV accelerator. The wide array of applications presently considered, ranging from reactions at extremely low energy in the case of p anti p atoms to reactions at hundreds of GeV in the case of head-on collisions between protons and antiprotons accelerated at the same time in a super synchrotron, is reviewed. Special emphasis is put on the present CERN program, which will reach the data-taking stage in 1981. The study of p anti p interactions is meant as an illustration of how new possibilities open new directions in elementary particle physics, whether reaching energies hitherto much beyond accelerator possibilities or developing new lower-energy beams improved tremendously over those presently available. 14 figures, 1 table.

  14. Data on macrophage mediated muscle transfection upon delivery of naked plasmid DNA with block copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Vivek; Gaymalov, Zagit; Alakhova, Daria; Gupta, Richa; Zucker, Irving H.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    The data contains 14 figures supporting the research article “Horizontal gene transfer from macrophages to ischemic muscles upon delivery of naked DNA with Pluronic block copolymers” [1]. The data explains the surgical procedure and histological characterization of Murine Hind Limb Ischemia. The data also shows the kinetics of luciferase gene expression, spread of GFP expression through muscle and the colocalization of GFP with cellular markers in ischemic muscles injected with pDNA alone or pDNA/Pluronic. Finally the data shows the effect of Pluronic Block Copolymer to enhance total gene expression (cmv-promoter driven luciferase gene) in coculture of DNA transfected MØs with muscle cells. PMID:27222845

  15. Quantum-defect functions. Interconverters of electronic and nuclear motion

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, D.; Jungen, C.

    1980-08-21

    In 1964 Mulliken systematically extended the ideas of Rydberg states and quantum defects from atoms to molecules. The key point of that extension is stated in several sentences: In molecules...all that has just been stated for atomic Rydberg states finds a parallel if one considers any one fixed nuclear configuration... However the mode of variation of the MOs and their energies as one varies the nuclear configuration is a new feature of interest. A complication...is the fact that the interaction of the molecular rotation with the l vector of the Rydberg electron changes radically as n increases in a Rydberg series. Thereby Mulliken introduced the concept of the quantum-defect function, ..mu lambda..(R), depending on nuclear configuration R and orbital-momentum projection ..lambda.. along the molecular axis. This concept has emerged as central to the understanding of the interconversion of electronic and nuclear motion in molecular systems. 13 figures.

  16. Modelling and assessment of advanced processes for integrated environmental control of coal-fired power plants. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, J.G.; Bloyd, C.N.; McMichael, F.C.; Rubin, E.S.

    1984-07-01

    The key objective of this research is the development of a computer based model for the assessment of integrated environmental control (IEC) systems for conventional and advanced coal fired power plant designs. Efforts during the period April 1-June 30, 1984 focused on, (1) testing of a preliminary integrated model linking pre-combustion and post-combustion control options for conventional plants; (2) documentation of the analytical models of existing control technology options; (3) development and preliminary testing of a second model design for the propagation and analysis of uncertainty; and (4) development of new analytical models needed for IEC assessments. Activities and accomplishments in each of these areas are described. 4 references, 13 figures, 4 tables.

  17. Portable centrifugal analyzer for the determination of rapid reaction kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; Bauer, M.L.; McCracken, R.; Mrochek, J.E.

    1980-02-01

    A portable centrifugal analyzer prototype is capable of rapidly initiating reactions and monitoring 17 optical channels as they rotate past a stationary photodetector. An advanced rotor drive permits transfer of discretely loaded sample and reagent into a cuvette within 60 ms. Various rotor designs have been employed to ensure effieicnt mixing concurrent with solution transfer, thus permitting absorbance or luminescence measurements to be made almost immediately after solution contract. Dye-dillution studies have been used to investigate transfer and mixing efficiencies. Rotor designs with parallel access for sample and reagent into the cuvette were found to promote efficient mixing during liquid transfer. The hypochlorite-luminol chemiluminescent reaction served to demonstrate the utility of the system for performing rapid kinetic analyses. Appropriate adjustment of reaction conditions allows first-order reaction half-lives as short as 0.04 s to be measured. 13 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens

    DOEpatents

    Bionta, R.M.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Skulina, K.M.

    1995-01-17

    A process is disclosed for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments in the soft x-ray region. 13 figures.

  19. Analysis of gravity anomaly over coral-reef oil field: Wilfred Pool, Sullivan County, Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Dana, S.W.

    1980-03-01

    To compare the measured and theoretical gravity anomaly of a typical coral-reef oil field, data were collected from the wilfred Pool, Sullivan County, Indiana. Densities of available core samples from the field were determined and the anomaly was calculated, taking into account the lateral and vertical variation of density and the geologic structure known from core studies and drilling-log records of lithologic types penetrated by the wells. Comparison of the theoretical and actual anomalies indicated a rough correspondence except for several sharp negative anomalies on the flanks of the measured gravity anomaly. Further studies indicated that the negative anomalies are possibly due to fluvial erosion that produced, on the surface of the youngest Pennsylvanian sediments, channels which were later filled with glacial till of lower density than the sediments. 13 figures.

  20. Radiological dose assessments of atolls in the Northern Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W.L.

    1983-11-01

    Methods and models used to estimate the radiation doses to a returning population of the atolls in the Marshall Islands are presented. In this environment natural processes have acted on source-term radionuclides for nearly 30 years. The data bases developed for the models, and the results of the radiological dose analyses at the various atolls are described. The major radionuclides in order of their contribution to the total estimated doses were /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu, /sup 241/Am, and /sup 60/Co. Exposure pathways in order of their contribution to the estimated doses were: terrestrial food chain, external ..gamma.., marine food chain, inhalation, and cistern water and ground water. 56 references, 13 figures, 16 tables.

  1. Thread gauge for tapered threads

    DOEpatents

    Brewster, A.L.

    1994-01-11

    The thread gauge permits the user to determine the pitch diameter of tapered threads at the intersection of the pitch cone and the end face of the object being measured. A pair of opposed anvils having lines of threads which match the configuration and taper of the threads on the part being measured are brought into meshing engagement with the threads on opposite sides of the part. The anvils are located linearly into their proper positions by stop fingers on the anvils that are brought into abutting engagement with the end face of the part. This places predetermined reference points of the pitch cone of the thread anvils in registration with corresponding points on the end face of the part being measured, resulting in an accurate determination of the pitch diameter at that location. The thread anvils can be arranged for measuring either internal or external threads. 13 figures.

  2. Neutron and gamma dose and spectra measurements on the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Hoots, S.; Wadsworth, D.

    1984-06-01

    The radiation-measurement team of the Weapons Engineering Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) measured neutron and gamma dose and spectra on the Little Boy replica at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in April 1983. This assembly is a replica of the gun-type atomic bomb exploded over Hiroshima in 1945. These measurements support the National Academy of Sciences Program to reassess the radiation doses due to atomic bomb explosions in Japan. Specifically, the following types of information were important: neutron spectra as a function of geometry, gamma to neutron dose ratios out to 1.5 km, and neutron attenuation in the atmosphere. We measured neutron and gamma dose/fission from close-in to a kilometer out, and neutron and gamma spectra at 90 and 30/sup 0/ close-in. This paper describes these measurements and the results. 12 references, 13 figures, 5 tables.

  3. Method for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lee, K.H.; Xie, G.Q.

    1994-12-13

    A method is described for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields, and for interpreting the electromagnetic data using ray tomography, in order to determine the earth conductivity with high accuracy and resolution. The imaging method includes the steps of placing one or more transmitters, at various positions in a plurality of transmitter holes, and placing a plurality of receivers in a plurality of receiver holes. The transmitters generate electromagnetic signals which diffuse through a medium, such as earth, toward the receivers. The measured diffusion field data H is then transformed into wavefield data U. The travel times corresponding to the wavefield data U, are then obtained, by charting the wavefield data U, using a different regularization parameter [alpha] for each transform. The desired property of the medium, such as conductivity, is then derived from the velocity, which in turn is constructed from the wavefield data U using ray tomography. 13 figures.

  4. Mozambique upper fan: origin of depositional units

    SciTech Connect

    Droz, L.; Mougenot, D.

    1987-11-01

    The upper Mozambique Fan includes a stable down-stream region, with a north-south channel flanked by thick (1.5 sec two-way traveltime) asymmetric levees, and a migrating upstream region where at least two main feeding paths have been successively dominant. From the Oligocene to early Miocene, the north-south Serpa Pinto Valley acted as the main conduit for the north Mozambique terrigenous sediments. From the middle Miocene, the west-east Zambezi Valley became the dominant path and supplied the fan with sediments transported by the Zambezi River from the central part of Mozanbique. The transfer from one sediment-feeding system to the other is related to the abandonment of the Serpa Pinto Valley because of graben formation along the Davie Ridge, which trapped the sediments, and the increase of the Zambezi River sediment supply because of the creation and erosion of the East African Rift. 13 figures.

  5. Preburn versus postburn mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of overburden and coal at the Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification site

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, R.L.; Youngberg, A.D.

    1983-12-01

    Hundreds of mineralogic and geochemical tests were done under US Department of Energy contracts on core samples taken from the Hanna underground coal gasification site. These tests included x-ray diffraction studies of minerals in coal ash, overburden rocks, and heat-altered rocks; x-ray fluorescence analyses of oxides in coal ash and heat-altered rocks; semi-quantitative spectrographic analyses of elements in coal, overburden, and heat-altered rocks; chemical analyses of elements and compounds in coal, overburden, and heat-altered rocks and ASTM proximate and ultimate analyses of coal and heat-altered coal. These data sets were grouped, averaged, and analyzed to provide preburn and postburn mineralogic and geochemical characteristics of rock units at the site. Where possible, the changes in characteristics from the preburn to the postburn state are related to underground coal gasification processes. 11 references, 13 figures, 8 tables.

  6. Results of long term ground surface measurements at the Hoe Creek III site

    SciTech Connect

    Ganow, H.C.

    1984-08-10

    Ground surface subsidence was first observed over the Hoe Creek III burn cavity 21 days after gasification ceased. It manifested itself as a small circular depression or sink and was followed five days later by the formation of a second collapse structure. Concurrently, a single large elliptically shaped depression, whose major axis parallels the experimental axis, slowly formed over the burn cavity. These features appear to represent two distinctly different deformation modes. The first mode includes discrete voids that propagate rapidly upward. The second mode is represented by the elliptically shaped classical subsidence depression that forms slowly by a strata bending. Seventeen isolation type survey monuments have been used to track both the horizontal (one dimensional) and vertical motion components intermittently over a 54 month span. The resulting data set is combined with ground surface sketches and post-burn core drilling results and provides an important case study against which numerical and centrifugation model results can be compared. 5 references, 13 figures.

  7. Global aspects of stream evolution in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.

    1984-01-01

    A spatially variable coronal expansion, when coupled with solar rotation, leads to the formation of high speed solar wind streams which evolve considerably with increasing heliocentric distance. Initially the streams steepen for simple kinematic reasons, but this steepening is resisted by pressure forces, leading eventually to the formation of forward-reverse shock pairs in the distant heliosphere. The basic physical processes responsible for stream steepening an evolution are explored and model calculations are compared with actual spacecraft observations of the process. The solar wind stream evolution problem is relatively well understood both observationally and theoretically. Tools developed in achieving this understanding should be applicable to other astrophysical systems where a spatially or temporally variable outflow is associated with a rotating object. 27 references, 13 figures.

  8. Striped bass, temperature, and eutrophication: a speculative hypothesis for environmental risk

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    The paradoxical record of striped bass distribution and abundance, including population declines in coastal waters and variable success of freshwater introductions, is analyzed for consistency with a thermal niche-dissolved oxygen-squeeze hypothesis. A commonality among diverse field and laboratory observations supports a genetic-based thermal niche for the species that changes to lower temperatures as fish age. This shift can cause local conditions, especially warm surface strata and deoxygenated deep water, to be incompatible with the success of large fish. Crowding due to temperature preferences and avoidance of low oxygen concentrations can lead to pathological symptoms and over fishing, which may contribute to population declines. Through a mixture of evidence and conjecture, the thermal niche-dissolved oxygen hypothesis is proposed as a unified perspective of the habitat requirements of the species that can aid in its study and management. 141 references, 13 figures.

  9. Coal structure vs flash pyrolysis products

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    The fast pyrolysis of coal produces tar, char and a range of low molecular weight gases in various proportions and amounts depending on the pyrolysis conditions (temperature, pressure) and the coal being pyrolyzed. Much research effort has been devoted to study of the reaction kinetics and effect of process variables, attempting thereby to elucidate the pyrolysis mechanism. Less effort has been focused on coal chemical structure and its relationship to the pyrolysis reactions and pyrolysis products. It was to attempt to better understand coal structure and its influence on pyrolysis products and pyrolysis mechanisms that this project was undertaken. This paper reports only on that portion of the work concerned with the aliphatic hydrocarbon products and particularly the light olefins. (7 tables, 12 figures, 16 refs.)

  10. SRC-water slurry rheology. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, K.C.

    1984-02-01

    SRC-water slurries exhibit properties that qualify them for use as fuel in conventional oil-fired combustion facilities. However, to date, the slurries tested have shown storage instability, which requires constant agitation and recirculation to avoid sedimentation in the storage tanks. High viscosities of the material being evaluated hampered the test performance. A program was instituted to better understand the variables responsible for viscosity and static stability of these slurries. Effective additives and concentrations were determined. This report presents laboratory data demonstrating that solid concentration, particle size distribution, additive concentration, and slurry preparation technique influence the viscosity and stability characteristics of an SRC-water slurry. 7 references, 12 figures, 11 tables.

  11. Nasal mites from birds of a Guatemalan cloud forest (Acarina: rhinonyssidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of the nasal mites from Guatemalan cloud forest birds is reported. Seventy-eight birds, representing 10 families and 18 species, were examined. Prevalence of infection was 24%. Two new species are described: Sternostoma darlingi from Mitrephanes phaeocercus (Tyrannidae) and S. pencei from Empidonax flavescens (Tyrannidae). New host records are reported for S. priangae from Chlorospingus opthalmicus (Thraupidae), S. hutsoni from Catharus dryas (Turdidae), Ptilonyssus sairae from Chlorospingus opthalmicus (Thraupidae), and Myioborus miniatus (Parulidae), P. euroturdi from Catharus dryas (Turdidae), P. tyrannus from Empidonax flavescens and Mitrephanes phaeocercus (both Tyannidae), and Tinaminyssus ixoreus from Catharus dryas (Turdidae). The subspecies Ptilonyssus euroturdi mimicola Fain and Hyland is synonymized with the nominate subspecies. Data are presented to suggest that the Rhinonyssidae may be a polyphyletic assemblage. 35 references, 12 figures, 1 table.

  12. Neutron scattering studies of the H2a-H2b and (H3-H4)/sub 2/ histone complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    Neutron scattering experiments have shown that both the (H3-H4)/sub 2/ and H2a-H2b histone complexes are quite asymmetric in solution. The (H3-H4)/sub 2/ tetramer is an oblate or flattened structure, with a radius of gyration almost as large as that of the core octamer. If the tetramer is primarily globular, it must have an axial ratio of about 1:5. It is more likely, however, that this asymmetry results in part from N-terminal arms that extend outward approximately within the major plane of the particle. If this is the case, less asymmetric models for the globular part of the tetramer, including a dislocated disk, can be made consistent with the scattering data. The H2a-H2b dimer, on the other hand, is an elongated structure. 48 references, 12 figures, 1 table.

  13. System for tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, J.W.; Teruya, A.T.; O'Brien, D.W.

    1995-01-17

    A tomographic technique is disclosed for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees form 0[degree] to 360[degree] and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment. 12 figures.

  14. Guide to plutonium isotopic measurements using gamma-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lemming, J.F.; Rakel, D.A.

    1982-08-26

    Purpose of this guide is to assist those responsible for plutonium isotopic measurements in the application of gamma-ray spectrometry. Objectives are to promote an understanding of the measurement process, including its limitations and applicability, by reviewing the general features of a plutonium spectrum and identifying the quantities which must be extracted from the data; to introduce state-of-the-art analysis techniques by reviewing four isotopic analysis packages and identifying their differences; to establish the basis for measurement control and assurance by discussing means of authenticating the performance of a measurement system; and to prepare for some specific problems encountered in plutonium isotopic analyses by providing solutions from the practical experiences of several laboratories. 29 references, 12 figures, 17 tables.

  15. Heat-pipe development for the SPAR space-power system. [100 kW(e)

    SciTech Connect

    Ranken, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    The SPAR space power system design is based on a high temperature fast spectrum nuclear reactor that furnishes heat to a thermoelectric conversion system to generate an electrical power output of 100 kW/sub (e)/. An important feature of this design is the use of alkali metal heat pipes to provide redundant, reliable, and low-loss heat transfer at high temperature. Three sets of heat pipes are used in the system. These include sodium/molybdenum heat pipes to transfer heat from the reactor core to the conversion system, potassium/niobium heat pipes to couple the conversion system to the radiator in a redundant manner, and potassium/titanium heat pipes to distribute rejected heat throughout the radiator surface. The designs of these units are discussed and fabrication methods and testing results are described. 12 figures.

  16. Steam separator latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Kobsa, I.R.

    1994-02-01

    A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof. 12 figures.

  17. Observation of living cells using the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Kasas, S; Gotzos, V; Celio, M R

    1993-01-01

    We used an atomic force microscope (AFM) to image samples immersed in a fluid in order to study the dynamic behavior of the membranes of living cells. AFM images of cultured cells immersed in a buffer were obtained without any preliminary preparation. We observed surface changes and displacements which suggest that the cells were still alive during the measurements. Some membrane details imaged with the AFM have also been observed using a scanning electron microscope and their dynamic behavior has been confirmed by microcinematography. We believe that the AFM will offer new insights into the exploration of dynamic changes affecting cell membranes. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURES 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURES 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 PMID:8457678

  18. Striped bass, temperature, and dissolved oxygen: a speculative hypothesis for environmental risk

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    Striped bass Morone saxatilis has a paradoxical record of distribution and abundance, including population declines in coastal waters and variable success of freshwater introductions. This record is analyzed for consistency with a hypothesis that striped bass are squeezed between their thermal and dissolved oxygen preferences or requirements. A commonality among diverse field and laboratory observations supports an inherent thermal niche for the species that changes to lower temperatures as fish age. This shift can cause local conditions, especially warm surface strata and deoxygenated deep water, to be incompatible with the success of large fish. Crowding due to temperature preferences alone or coupled with avoidance of low oxygen concentrations can lead to pathology and overfishing, which may contribute to population declines. Through a mixture of evidence and conjecture, the thermal niche-dissolved oxygen hypothesis is proposed as a unified perspective of the habitat requirements of the species that can aid in its study and management. 139 references, 12 figures.

  19. Northern States Power Company (NSP) Black Dog generating plant - Unit 2 emission reduction, capacity increase and life extension through atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    Jenness, B.L.; Rosendahl, S.M.; Gamble, R.L.

    1985-08-01

    The authors report on progress to date of the atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (AFBC) boiler retrofit at the Black Dog Unit 2 plant of the Northern States Power Company. Construction began in September 1984 after the completion of technical and economic feasibility studies, and initial operation is scheduled for the second quarter of 1986. The project features the largest AFBC boiler to date, a 40 MW capacity regain/upgrade, and 25-year extension of unit life, low leakage regenerative air preheater design, electrostatic precipitator performance improvement, alternate fuel co-firing capacity, and reduced emission on a per MW basis. The authors describe the management and engineering developments associated with the project. 12 figures, 4 tables.

  20. Organic-Rankine-cycle systems for waste-heat recovery in refineries and chemical process plants

    SciTech Connect

    Meacher, J.S.

    1981-09-01

    The use of organic Rankine cycles (ORC) for the recovery and conversion of low-temperature waste heat has received considerable attention during recent years. The number of demonstration systems developed and put into service is small, and only a fraction of the possible energy-conserving benefits of the concept have been realized to date. This situation is due partly to the fact that energy costs have only recently risen to the point where such units provide acceptable return on investment. A second contributing factor may be that the design of ORC equipment has not yet responded to the special needs of the dominant market for ORC systems. 2 references, 12 figures, 5 tables.

  1. Techniques for measuring the vertical hydraulic conductivity of flood basalts at the Basalt Waste Isolation Project site

    SciTech Connect

    Javandel, I.

    1983-06-01

    A regional model that can predict groundwater movement through the reference repository location and surrounding area is essential to assessing the site suitability for a nuclear waste repository. During the last two decades, several models have been developed to handle complicated flow patterns through complex geologic materials. The basic problem, however, is obtaining the data base needed to apply these models. The hydrological data needed include the spatial distribution of effective porosity, the hydraulic conductivity tensor and its variation in space, values of specific storage, the hydraulic head distribution, and the fluid properties. In this report, we discuss conventional methods of obtaining vertical hydraulic conductivity and examine their applicability to the BWIP site. 39 references, 12 figures, 4 tables.

  2. South Fork Clearwater River Habitat Enhancement, Crooked and Red Rivers : Annual Report, 1989.

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, William H.

    1990-01-01

    In 1983, the Nez Perce National Forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into an interagency agreement to enhance and improve habitat for two anadromous fish species, spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawyscha) and summer steelhead trout (Onchorhyncus mykiss), in the South Fork Clearwater River tributaries. The South Fork Clearwater River was dammed in 1927 for hydroelectric development. Anadromous fish runs were virtually eliminated until the dam was removed in 1962. To complicate the problem, upstream spawning and rearing habitats were severely impacted by dredge and hydraulic mining, road building, timber harvest, and over-grazing. Fish habitat improvement projects under the above contract are being carried out in two major tributaries to the South Fork Clearwater River. Both the Red River and the Crooked River projects began in 1983 and will be completed in 1990. 12 figures., 1 tab.

  3. Measurements of heavy quark and lepton lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1985-02-01

    The PEP/PETRA energy range has proved to be well-suited for the study of the lifetimes of hadrons containing the b and c quarks and the tau lepton for several reasons. First, these states comprise a large fraction of the total interaction rate in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation and can be cleanly identified. Second, the storage rings have operated at high luminosity and so produced these exotic states copiously. And finally, thanks to the interplay of the Fermi coupling strength, the quark and lepton masses, and the beam energy, the expected decay lengths are in the 1/2 mm range and so are comparatively easy to measure. This pleasant coincidence of cleanly identified and abundant signal with potentially large effects has made possible the first measurements of two fundamental weak couplings, tau ..-->.. nu/sub tau/W and b ..-->.. cW. These measurements have provided a sharp test of the standard model and allowed, for the first time, the full determination of the magnitudes of the quark mixing matrix. This paper reviews the lifetime studies made at PEP during the past year. It begins with a brief review of the three detectors, DELCO, MAC and MARK II, which have reported lifetime measurements. Next it discusses two new measurements of the tau lifetime, and briefly reviews a measurement of the D/sup 0/ lifetime. Finally, it turns to measurements of the B lifetime, which are discussed in some detail. 18 references, 14 figures, 1 table.

  4. Characterization of Devonian oil shales by hydrogen pulse NMR. Project report for 1983-84

    SciTech Connect

    Harrell, J.W. Jr.

    1984-09-01

    NMR and ESR measurements have been used to characterize eastern and western United States oil shales. T/sub 1/ measurements which were made at 90 MHz as a function of temperature, together with previously reported 36 MHz results, suggest that paramagnetic centers contribute strongly to the relaxation in some of the shales. A careful study of the ESR spectrum at both X-band and K-band frequencies suggests that a part of the spectrum may be due to naturally irradiated silicates in the shales. Laboratory irradiation experiments suggest a method for determining the age of the oil shale deposits. A new technique has been developed for measuring second moments of the NMR power spectrum. Measurements made on a Colorado shale show a rapid decrease with increasing temperature in the vicinity of a previously reported T/sub 1r/ minimum. Unpaired electron spin concentrations and room temperature T/sub 1/ values were measured in 60 oil shale samples from north Alabama and south Tennessee. No correlation between spin concentration and oil Fischer assay was observed except for samples from a 100 ft bore hole in Etowah Co., AL, where a linear correlation was observed. Room temperature T/sub 1/'s were found to approximately increase with increasing spin concentration, supporting the contention that relaxation due to interactions with paramagnetic centers is important. 11 references, 14 figures.

  5. Early Tertiary subsidence and sedimentary facies - Northern Sirte Basin, Libya

    SciTech Connect

    Gumati, Y.D.; Kanes, W.H.

    1985-12-01

    The subsidence curves and subsidence rate curves for the Sirte basin, constructed from the stratigraphic record, show that subsidence was continuous throughout Late Cretaceous and Tertiary times, reaching a maximum during the Paleocene and Eocene, when a major reactivation of faults occurred. Shales and carbonates were deposited during all of the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary. Abrupt lateral facies changes occur from the platform areas toward the deeper troughs along with steep downdip thickening. The absence of upper Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic sediments suggests that the area was domed, faulted, and eroded during the late Mesozoic. As a result of crustal extension during the Paleocene, a marked lithologic and structural change occurred. The Heira Shale succeeded the Kalash Limestone in the Marada trough. Reactivation of the earlier faults, accompanied by an increase in the sediment supply from the south, caused these lower Paleocene shales to cover the entire area, with the exception of the old highs where carbonate deposition continued. An intercalation of shales and carbonates provides a sensitive indicator of change of depth and sediment type. 14 figures.

  6. Evaluation of the Steel Creek ecosystem in relation to the proposed restart of the L-Reactor: interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    This interim report of findings from studies by SREL has updated information on several key components of the Steel Creek ecosystem. We have emphasized two categories of the Steel Creek biota: Endangered Species (American alligator) and species for which environmental degradation within SRP boundaries might result in changes in offsite resource abundance. Wintering waterfowl surveys in the vicinity of the Steel Creek delta have demonstrated a pattern of increased utilization over the duration of these studies (1981-83). Wood stork utilization of SRP swamp areas also appeared to be substantially increased relative to previous years. Thermal alteration of the Steel Creek delta areas will eliminate this area as wood stork foraging habitat. Anadromous fish utilization of the Steel Creek area was also substantially increased in 1983 relative to 1982. The differences in anadromous fish species utilization patterns between 1982 and 1983 are probably a result of the markedly different river flow conditions between the two years. Studies of the American alligator have continued. No further reproduction by alligators has been observed in the Steel Creek system. 24 references, 14 figures, 13 tables.

  7. Assessment of acidity of lakes and precipitation in the Sierra Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Melack, J.M.

    1983-06-01

    The east central Sierra Nevada received acid precipitation (pH 3.7 to 4.9) during the convective storms interspersed through the dry seasons of 1981 and 1982. In contrast, late autumn, winter and early spring snow (1981-1982) ranged in pH from 5.2 to 6.1 (mean 5.7) and had low ammonium, nitrate and sulfate concentrations. As of 1981 most of the alpine lakes of the Sierra Nevada remain very weakly buffered, bicarbonate lakes that receive a small loading of acid precipitation and a large annual input of snowmelt uncontaminated by strong acids. These lakes contain low concentrations of orthophosphate, nitrate and ammonium and are oligotrophic. The zooplankton communities fall into two major groups, those dominated by large-bodied species in the absence of fish, and those dominated by smaller species where fish are present. If the acidity of the precipitation increases the pH of the lakes will decrease rapidly with adverse biological impacts because the lakes and their basins have extremely low buffer capacity and the biota cannot tolerate acidic water. 65 references, 14 figures, 6 tables.

  8. Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, K.A.; Gunther, M.F.; Vengsarkar, A.M.; Claus, R.O.

    1994-04-05

    An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer. 14 figures.

  9. Paleotectonics and hydrocarbon accumulation, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Slack, P.B.

    1981-04-01

    The Belle Fourche arch, a subtle northeast-trending paleoarch, extends across the central part of the Powder River basin, Wyoming, to the Black Hills uplift. The arch is the result of differential vertical uplift, primarily during Cretaceous time, on numerous northeast-trending structural lineaments. Stratigraphic evidence suggests that the structural lineaments which form the Belle Fourche arch have rejuvenated periodically throughout the Phanerozoic. Evidence includes: (1) localization of Minnelusa Formation (Permian) hydrocarbon production along the crest of the arch; (2) localization of Dakota Formation (Cretaceous) alluvial point-bar production on the crest of the arch; (3) localization of lower Muddy Formation (Cretaceous) channel deposits parallel with, and on the downthrown sides of, lineament trends; (4) abrupt change in depositional strike of upper Muddy Formation (Cretaceous) marine bars close to the arch; (5) superposition of Turner sandstone (Cretaceous) channel deposits along the trends of Muddy channels; and (6) localization of virtually all significant Upper Cretaceous Shannon and Sussex sandstone offshore marine-bar production along the crest of the arch. Subtle uplift along the arch was persistent during at least lower Muddy through Sussex deposition, a period of about 35 m.y. 14 figures.

  10. MESOI Version 2. 0: an interactive mesoscale Lagrangian puff dispersion model with deposition and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Athey, G.F.; Glantz, C.S.

    1983-11-01

    MESOI Version 2.0 is an interactive Lagrangian puff model for estimating the transport, diffusion, deposition and decay of effluents released to the atmosphere. The model is capable of treating simultaneous releases from as many as four release points, which may be elevated or at ground-level. The puffs are advected by a horizontal wind field that is defined in three dimensions. The wind field may be adjusted for expected topographic effects. The concentration distribution within the puffs is initially assumed to be Gaussian in the horizontal and vertical. However, the vertical concentration distribution is modified by assuming reflection at the ground and the top of the atmospheric mixing layer. Material is deposited on the surface using a source depletion, dry deposition model and a washout coefficient model. The model also treats the decay of a primary effluent species and the ingrowth and decay of a single daughter species using a first order decay process. This report is divided into two parts. The first part discusses the theoretical and mathematical bases upon which MESOI Version 2.0 is based. The second part contains the MESOI computer code. The programs were written in the ANSI standard FORTRAN 77 and were developed on a VAX 11/780 computer. 43 references, 14 figures, 13 tables.

  11. Subterranean stress engineering experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.R.; Colgate, S.A.; Wheat, B.M.

    1980-01-01

    The state of stress in a subterranean rock mass has classically been assumed to be constant at best. In soil with a high clay content, preconsolidation and drainage methods can lead to more stable foundation material, but methods for engineering the stresses in large masses of rock are not well known. This paper shows the results from an experiment designed to alter the in situ rock stress field in an oil shale mine. This was done by hydrofracturing the rock by use of a packed-well injection system and then propping the crack open with a thixotropic gel, which slowly hardened to the consistency of cement. Successive hydrofracture and high-pressure grouting resulted in an overstressed region. Well-head injection pressures, surface tilts, injection rates, and subterranean strains were measured and recorded on floppy disk by a Z-80 microprocessor. The results were then transmitted to the large computer system at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). To put the data in a more useful form, computer-generated movies of the tilts and strains were made by use of computer graphics developed at LASL. The purpose of this paper is to present results from the Single Large Instrumented Test conducted in the Colony Oil Shale Mine near Rifle, Colorado. 13 figures.

  12. Configurational testing of electron beam ionization for coal fly ash precipitators. Quarterly report No. 2, November 5, 1983-February 4, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The energy-geometry matching condition reported in Quarterly Report No. 1 has been incorporated in the design of a Mark II precharger and construction is underway. By matching the energy and geometry, monopolar charging is assured by providing a charging zone outside the ionization zone. Particle charges greater than the Pauthenier limit were observed using a bi-electrode geometry. Either or both free electron charging or space-charge enhancement of the electric field may be responsible for the increase in charge above the theoretical limit for the average electric field. A separate experiment on free electron charging proceeded during this quarter and the progress is reported. To date the exhaustive experiments on resistance modification by simple electron beam irradiation have not provided evidence to support practical utilization. However, preliminary experiments do suggest that the presence of small amounts of SO/sub 2/ and the subsequent conversion of SO/sub 2/ by electron beam treatment may conductively coat high resistivity fly ash particles with a resultant reduction in resistivity. The status of the laboratory precipitator test system is reported along with the preparations for tests of the new Mark II precharger module. During this quarter a patent disclosure on a device to enhance radiation dose was submitted to the US Department of Energy. 13 figures.

  13. In vitro biology of corneal epithelium and endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Yanoff, M

    1975-01-01

    Four main areas are explored: (1) the proper culture medium for corneal tissue; (2) the effect of serum on in vitro tissue growth; (3) the in vitro interrelationships between corneal epithelium and endothelium; and (4) the biology of cultures of whole corneas (organ cultures). Modified Eagle's minimal essential medium (MEM) proved to be an excellent culture fluid. Corneal tissue could be grown in MEM without serum or clot, thus providing a defined culture medium. The in vitro biology of outgrowths of multilayered corneal epithelium and monolayered corneal endothelium are discussed. Contact inhibition between epithelium and endothelium is demonstrated in whole corneal (organ) cultures. Images FIGURE 5 A FIGURE 5 B FIGURE 10 A FIGURE 10 B FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 3 A FIGURE 3 B FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 6 A FIGURE 6 B FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 8 A FIGURE 8 B FIGURE 9 A FIGURE 9 B FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 12 A FIGURE 12 B FIGURE 12 C FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 A FIGURE 14 B FIGURE 15 A FIGURE 15 B FIGURE 16 A FIGURE 16 B FIGURE 17 A FIGURE 17 B FIGURE 17 C FIGURE 18 A FIGURE 18 B PMID:1246815

  14. Overview of the oxidation and scavenging characteristics of April rains (OSCAR) experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Easter, R.C.; Dana, M.T.; Thorp, J.M.; Busness, K.M.; Hales, J.M.; Raynor, G.S.; Benkovitz, C.M.; Tanner, R.L.; Shannon, J.D.

    1984-04-01

    The OSCAR (Oxidation and Scavenging Characteristics of April Rains) field experiment was conducted in April, 1981, as part of the MAP3S/RAINE program. The OSCAR study was designed to provide detailed characterizations of the physicochemical and dynamical features of selected cyclonic storm systems as they traversed the eastern U.S. Major experiment components included sequential precipitation chemistry measurements, aircraft measurements both in cloud and in clear air in storm inflow regions, surface-level air chemistry measurements, and supporting meteorological measurements. The precipitation chemisty network consisted of an intermediate-density network with 37 sampling sites covering the region from southern Ontario to Tennessee and from Illinois to New Hampshire, and a high-density network with 47 sampling sites located in a 100 by 100 km area in northeast Indiana. A total of four storm events were studied during the experiment. The report describes the design and operational aspects for the high-density and intermediate-density components of the experiment, and the composition of the integrated OSCAR data set which has been developed. A synoptic meteorological description of the four storm events studied during OSCAR is also provided. 17 references, 13 figures, 8 tables.

  15. Kinetics and advanced digester design for anaerobic digestion of water hyacinth and primary sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Chynoweth, D.P.; Dolenc, D.A.; Ghosh, S.; Henry, M.P.; Jerger, D.E.; Srivastava, V.J.

    1982-01-01

    A research program centered around a facility located at Walt Disney World (WDW) is in progress to evaluate the use of water hyacinth (WH) for secondary and tertiary wastewater treatment, to optimize growth of WH under these conditions, and to convert the resultant primary sludge (PS) and WH to methane via anaerobic digestion. This article describes the status of the biogasification component of this program, which includes baseline and advanced digestion experiments with individual feeds and blends and the design of an experimental test unit (ETU) to be installed at WDW. Experiments with several blends demonstrated that methane yields can be predicted from the fractional content and methane yield of each component. The process was found to adhere to the Monod kinetic model for microbial growth, and associated kinetic parameters were developed for various feed combinations. A novel upflow digester is achieving significantly higher conversion than a stirred-tank digester. Of several pretreatment techniques used, only alkaline treatment resulted in increased biodegradability. A larger scale (4.5 m/sup 3/) experimental test unit is being designed for installation at WDW in 1982. 13 figures, 4 tables.

  16. Measurements of uranium mill tailings consolidation characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Fayer, M J

    1985-02-01

    A series of experiments were conducted on uranium mill tailings from the tailings pile in Grand Junction, Colorado, to determine their consolidation characteristics. Three materials (sand, sand/slimes mix, slimes) were loaded under saturated conditions to determine their saturated consolidated behavior. During a separate experiment, samples of the slimes material were kept under a constant load while the pore pressure was increased to determine the partially saturated consolidation behavior. Results of the saturated tests compared well with published data. Sand consolidated the least, while slimes consolidated the most. As each material consolidated, the measured hydraulic conductivity decreased in a linear fashion with respect to the void ratio. Partially saturated experiments with the slimes indicated that there was little consolidation as the pore pressure was increased progressively above 7 kPa. The small amount of consolidation that did occur was only a fraction of the amount of saturated consolidation. Preliminary measurements between pore pressures of 0 and 7 kPa indicated that measurable consolidation could occur in this range of pore pressure, but only if there was no load. 13 references, 13 figures.

  17. Focus control system for stretched-membrane mirror module

    DOEpatents

    Butler, B.L.; Beninga, K.J.

    1991-05-21

    A focus control system dynamically sets and controls the focal length of a reflective membrane supported between a perimeter frame. A rear membrane is also supported between the perimeter frame rearward and spaced apart from a back side of the reflective membrane. The space between the membranes defines a plenum space into which a mass of gas at a first pressure is inserted. The pressure differential between the first pressure and an external pressure, such as the atmospheric pressure, causes the reflective membrane to assume a first curvature relative to a reference plane associated with the perimeter frame. This curvature defines the focal length of the reflective membrane. The focal length is dynamically controlled by changing the volume of the plenum space, thereby changing the first pressure. The system can be used to change or maintain the pressure differential and hence the front membrane curvature. The plenum volume is changed by pushing or pulling on a central section of the rear membrane using a suitable actuator. Sensing means continuously sense the location of the reflective membrane relative to the reference plane. This sensed position is compared to a reference position, and a resulting error signal, comprising the difference between the sensed position and reference position, drives the actuator in a direction to minimize the difference. A vent value compensates for temperature changes or leaks in the closed volume by allowing the pressure differential to be adjusted as required to center the working range of the actuator about the desired focal length. 13 figures.

  18. Handbook on surficial uranium deposits. Chapter 3. World distribution relative to climate and physical setting

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, D

    1983-01-01

    This chapter discusses regional controls which affect the world distribution of surficial chemogenic uranium deposits. The most important of these are (1) climate, (2) geomorphology, including physiographic and climatic stability, and (3) provenance, i.e., the weathering terrain from which uranium and associated substances are derived. The three economically important environments are the calcrete environment, simple evaporative environments and paludal environments. Of these three categories, the calcrete uranium environment is probably the most uniquely constrained in terms of regional climate, geomorphic setting, provenance (vanadium as well as uranium) and especially the need for long term stability of both climate and physiography. Purely evaporative deposits, though subject to some of the same kinds of constraints, can also reflect local circumstances and a wider range of climates, physiographic settings, and source terrains. The third category encompassing bogs, marshes and organic-rich playas can form under an even wider range of climates and settings provided only that organic materials accumulate in abundance and are contacted by uranium-bearing waters. For all of these reasons and also because of the great economic importance of the calcrete environment as well as its relative novelty and complexity the discussion in this chapter is focused on calcrete, dolocrete and gypcrete uranium deposits. Objective data are reviewed first follwed by inferences and suggestions. 13 figures.

  19. Carbon-bonded carbon fiber insulation for radioisotope space power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, G.C.; Robbins, J.M.

    1985-05-01

    A carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulation developed for a radioisotope heat source is made from chopped rayon fiber about 10 ..mu..m in diameter and 250 ..mu..m long, which is carbonized and bonded with phenolic resin particles. The CBCF is an excellent lightweight insulating material with a nominal density of 0.2 Mg/m/sup 3/ and a thermal conductivity of 0.24 W/(m-K) in vacuum at 2000/sup 0/C. Several attributes that make CBCF particularly suitable for the heat source application have been identified. These include light weight, low thermal conductivity, chemical compatibility, and high-temperature capabilities. The mechanical strength of CBCF insulation is satisfactory for the application. The basic fabrication technique was refined to eliminate undesirable large pores and cracks often present in materials fabricated by earlier techniques. Also, processing was scaled up to increase the fabrication rate by a factor of 10. The specific properties of the CBCF were tailored by adjusting material and processing variables to obtain the desired results. 22 references, 13 figures, 4 tables.

  20. Acoustic leak detection and ultrasonic crack detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.; Claytor, T.N.; Groenwald, R.

    1983-10-01

    A program is under way to assess the effectiveness of current and proposed techniques for acoustic leak detection (ALD) in reactor coolant systems. An ALD facility has been constructed and tests have begun on five laboratory-grown cracks (three fatigue and two thermal-fatigue and two field-induced IGSCC specimens. After ultrasonic testing revealed cracks in the Georgia Power Co. HATCH-1 BWR recirculation header, the utility installed an ALD system. Data from HATCH-1 have given an indication of the background noise level at a BWR recirculation header sweepolet weld. The HATCH leak detection system was tested to determine the sensitivity and dynamic range. Other background data have been acquired at the Watts Bar Nuclear Reactor in Tennessee. An ANL waveguide system, including transducer and electronics, was installed and tested on an accumulator safety injection pipe. The possibility of using ultrasonic wave scattering patterns to discriminate between IGSCCs and geometric reflectors has been explored. Thirteen reflectors (field IGSCCs, graphite wool IGSCCs, weld roots, and slits) were examined. Work with cast stainless steel (SS) included sound velocity and attenuation in isotropic and anisotropic cast SS. Reducing anisotropy does not help reduce attenuation in large-grained material. Large artificial flaws (e.g., a 1-cm-deep notch with a 4-cm path) could not be detected in isotropic centrifugally cast SS (1 to 2-mm grains) by longitudinal or shear waves at frequencies of 1 MHz or greater, but could be detected with 0.5-MHz shear waves. 13 figures.

  1. Estimating exploration potential in mature producing area, northwest shelf of Delaware Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, N.

    1985-11-01

    The case history presented here describes an investigation of the Northwest shelf of the Delaware basin carried out in 1979 for estimating the potential of finding new reserves and a follow-up study to measure predictions against results. A total of 191 new-field wildcats had been drilled during 1974-1979 in the study area. An analysis of target zones and success ratios showed that the best chances of drilling a successful test were in the San Andres (Permian) and Silurian-Devonian. However, cumulative frequency plots of existing fields in these two intervals showed that the chance of finding a field larger than 1 million bbl (159,000 m/sup 3/) in either of these zones was relatively low. As a result of the 1979 analysis, three prospective areas representing 8% of the total study area were high graded, or rated as having a higher potential than other parts of the study area. The 1980-1983 drilling results show that the original high-graded areas contain 52% of the 21 successful San Andres tests and the only discovery in the Silurian-Devonian. However, as predicted by the analysis, all of these discoveries appear to be small. 12 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Geophysical studies of large blind thrust, Valley and Ridge province, central Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.H.

    1989-03-01

    Possible thrust-sheet geometries in the unexposed Cambrian-Ordovician lithotectonic unit in the Nittany anticlinorium of the Valley and Ridge province in West Virginia are defined through analysis of geophysical data. Calculated gravity for different subsurface interpretations is compared with observed gravity. Comparisons of model calculations to terrain-corrected Bouguer gravity indicate that a large blind thrust of the Cambrian-Ordovician lithotectonic unit, extending across the entire width of the anticlinorium, is an acceptable subsurface interpretation. A seismic line across the anticlinorium is also presented. The seismic line reveals that a large part of the area is underlain by a double thickness of the Cambrian-Ordovician lithotectonic unit. Data can be interpreted many ways. However, the gravity data require that an acceptable model have only minor lateral density contrasts across the anticlinorium so that effectively, a double thickness of the Cambrian Ordovician lithotectonic unit exists across it. Both the gravity and seismic data indicate that the presence of separate horses beneath the major Silurian-Devonian structures exposed at the surface is unlikely. 12 figures.

  3. Research, development and demonstration of lead-acid batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1979. [165 Ah, 36. 5 Wh/kg

    SciTech Connect

    Bodamer, G.W.; Branca, G.C.; Cash, H.R.; Chrastina, J.R.; Yurick, E.M.

    1980-06-01

    Progress during the 1979 fiscal year is reported. All the tooling and capital equipment required for the pilot line production has been installed. A limited amount of plate production has been realized. A highly automated and versatile testing facility was established. The fabrication and testing of the initial calculated design is discussed. Cell component adjustments and the trade-offs associated with those changes are presented. Cells are being evaluated at the 3-hour rate. They have a capacity of 165 Ah and an energy density of 36.5 Wh/kg, and have completed 105 cycles to date. Experimental results being pursued under the advanced battery development program to enhance energy density and cycle life are presented. Data on the effects of different electrolyte specific gravity, separators, retainers, paste densities, battery additives and grid alloy composition on battery performance are presented and evaluated. Advanced battery prototype cells are under construction. Quality Assurance activities are summarized. They include monitoring the cell and battery fabrication and testing operations as well as all relevant documentation procedures. 12 figures, 28 tables.

  4. Stabilization of intermediate density states in globular proteins by homogeneous intramolecular attractive interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, I; Jernigan, R L

    1994-01-01

    On-lattice simulations of two-dimensional self-avoiding chains subject to homogeneous intramolecular attractive interactions were performed as a model for studying various density regimes in globular proteins. For short chains of less than 15 units, all conformations were generated and classified by density. The range of intramolecular interactions was found to increase uniformly with density, and the average number of topological contacts is directly proportional to density. The uniform interaction energy increases the probability of high density states but does not necessarily lead to dominance of the highest density state. Typically, several large peaks appear in the probability distribution of packing densities, their location and amplitude being determined by the balance between entropic effects enhancing more expanded conformations and attractive interactions favoring compact forms. Also, the homogeneous interaction energy affects the distribution of most probable interacting points in favor of the longer range interactions over the short range ones, but in addition it introduces some more detailed preferences even among short range interactions. There are some implications about the characteristics of the intermediate density states and also for the likelihood that the native state does not correspond completely to the lowest energy conformation. Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 PMID:8161699

  5. Open apex shaped charge-type explosive device having special disc means with slide surface thereon to influence movement of open apex shaped charge liner during collapse of same during detonation

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, M.J.

    1993-10-12

    An open apex shape charge explosive device is disclosed having an inner liner defining a truncated cone, an explosive charge surrounding the truncated inner liner, a primer charge, and a disc located between the inner liner and the primer charge for directing the detonation of the primer charge around the end edge of the disc means to the explosive materials surrounding the inner liner. The disc comprises a material having one or more of: a higher compressive strength, a higher hardness, and/or a higher density than the material comprising the inner liner, thereby enabling the disc to resist deformation until the liner collapses. The disc has a slide surface thereon on which the end edge of the inner liner slides inwardly toward the vertical axis of the device during detonation of the main explosive surrounding the inner liner, to thereby facilitate the inward collapse of the inner liner. In a preferred embodiment, the geometry of the slide surface is adjusted to further control the collapse or [beta] angle of the inner liner. 12 figures.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies to Alzheimer neurofibrillary tangles. 1. Identification of polypeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Yen, S. H.; Crowe, A.; Dickson, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    Ten monoclonal antibodies to Alzheimer neurofibrillary tangles (ANTs) were produced by immunizing mice with a brain homogenate from senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT). In methanol-fixed isolated neuronal perikarya, six of these antibodies reacted with nearly every ANT, three recognized 70-88% of ANTs, and one bound to less than 30% of ANT. In paraffin sections, three of the antibodies did not bind to tangles that had been fixed in formalin, three stained weekly, and four reacted with tangles in tissues that had been in formalin for more than a decade. Immunoblotting of brain homogenates showed that all but one antibody reacted with proteins from SDAT samples insoluble in SDS and too large to enter even the 3% polyacrylamide stacking gel. Polypeptides extractable by Tris buffer of molecular weight 58, 66, and 70 kd were detected in both normal and SDAT brains by two antibodies and only in SDAT brain by two other antibodies. One antibody did not show any reaction on the immunoblot. The results demonstrate that the epitopes recognized by these antibodies are not identical and that ANTs contain unique antigenic determinants as well as determinants in common with normal brain. Whether the unique determinants are acquired during tangle development or are essential in tangle formation remains to be investigated. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:2411142

  7. Ultrastructural alterations in the atrial myocardium of pigs with acute monensin toxicosis.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vleet, J. F.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1984-01-01

    Monensin, A Na+-selective carboxylic ionophore, produces left atrial damage in pigs given toxic doses. Eight weanling pigs were given mycelial monensin orally (40 mg/kg body weight) and were killed on days 1, 2, 4, and 16 (two animals at each time interval) for ultrastructural study of the left atrial lesions. On days 1-4, extensive necrosis with contraction bands was present. Rapid macrophagic invasion and phagocytosis of sarcoplasmic debris was seen on days 2 and 4. Missing necrotic myocytes were outlined by persistent "tubes" of external laminas. In some surviving myocytes, sublethal injury was evident on day 1 by mitochondria with condensed conformation and on days 2, 4, and 16 by moderate to marked myofibrillar lysis and sarcoplasmic vacuolation. Monensin cardiotoxicity in pigs constitutes a unique example of selective injury to atrial myocardium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:6696048

  8. Biogeochemical mass balance approach to reservoir acidification by atmospheric deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Eshleman, K.N.

    1982-01-01

    The alkalinity balance of Bickford Reservoir and its forested watershed in central Massachusetts was investigated in an experimental field study. The mass balance of all major inorganic acids and bases in the reservoir and on the watershed was determined from six months of continuous surface water monitoring and periodic chemical analyses. The results confirm that Bickford Reservoir is poorly buffered with alkalinities between 0 and 25 ..mu..eq/liter (pH 5.4-6.4). Reservoir alkalinities and pH showed significant seasonal trends. Mass balance results demonstrated that groundwater inflow to the reservoir was less than 20% of the total hydrologic flux, but groundwater alkalinity more than neutralized the mineral acidity of direct precipitation. Nitric acid neutralization through phytoplankton uptake resulted in a small, but important, internal alkalinity production. The most important neutralizing process on the watershed was aluminosilicate weathering, but nitric acid consumption by the vegetation was nearly quantitative. Nitrogen transformations produced 150 eq/ha/yr of alkalinity, while mineral weathering generated 960 eq/ha/yr. The data further suggest that neutralization of sulfuric acid by sulfate reduction may be occuring on certain subwatersheds. 74 references, 12 figures, 15 tables.

  9. Climax Granite, Nevada Test Site, as a host for a rock mechanics test facility related to the geologic disposal of high level nuclear wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F.E.

    1981-02-01

    This document discusses the potential of the Climax pluton, at the Nevada Test Site, as the host for a granite mechanics test facility related to the geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The Climax granitic pluton has been the site of three nuclear weapons effects tests: Hard Hat, Tiny Tot, and Piledriver. Geologic exploration and mapping of the granite body were performed at the occasion of these tests. Currently, it is the site Spent Fuel Test (SFT-C) conducted in the vicinity of and at the same depth as that of the Piledriver drifts. Significant exploration, mapping, and rock mechanics work have been performed and continue at this Piledriver level - the 1400 (ft) level - in the context of SFT-C. Based on our technical discussions, and on the review of the significant geological and rock mechanics work already achieved in the Climax pluton, based also on the ongoing work and the existing access and support, it is concluded that the Climax site offers great opportunities for a rock mechanics test facility. It is not claimed, however, that Climax is the only possible site or the best possible site, since no case has been made for another granite test facility in the United States. 12 figures, 3 tables.

  10. AVLIS Production Plant work breakdown structure and Dictionary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-15

    The work breakdown structure has been prepared for the AVLIS Production Plant to define, organize, and identify the work efforts and is summarized in Fig. 1-1 for the top three project levels. The work breakdown structure itself is intended to be the primary organizational tool of the AVLIS Production Plant and is consistent with the overall AVLIS Program Work Breakdown Structure. It is designed to provide a framework for definition and accounting of all of the elements that are required for the eventual design, procurement, and construction of the AVLIS Production Plant. During the present phase of the AVLIS Project, the conceptual engineering phase, the work breakdown structure is intended to be the master structure and project organizer of documents, designs, and cost estimates. As the master project organizer, the key role of the work breakdown structure is to provide the mechanism for developing completeness in AVLIS cost estimates and design development of all hardware and systems. The work breakdown structure provides the framework for tracking, on a one-to-one basis, the component design criteria, systems requirements, design concepts, design drawings, performance projections, and conceptual cost estimates. It also serves as a vehicle for contract reporting. 12 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Rehabilitation of a child with partial unilateral cryptophthalmos and multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, H; Merriam, J C; Jones, I S

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: This paper describes the surgical rehabilitation of a child with craniofacial anomalies, unilateral syndactyly, and partial unilateral cryptophthalmos associated with inferior colobomata of the iris and optic nerve and agenesis of the inferior rectus and inferior oblique muscles. The clinical presentation of cryptophthalmos is described. METHODS: The medical literature since the original description of cryptophthalmos in 1872 was reviewed to define patterns of inheritance and the incidence of associated anomalies. RESULTS: Including this patient, 149 case reports of cryptophthalmos were identified. In two families transmission from parent to child suggests dominant inheritance. None of the five dominant cases had any other anomalies, and all had bilateral complete cryptophthalmos. The incidence of cryptophthalmos in the remaining families is consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. This group includes patients with bilateral, unilateral, and partial cryptophthalmos. Other anomalies are common, including those of the ear and nose, limbs, genitourinary system, and mouth and palate. Mortality in the perinatal period is associated with renal agenesis, laryngeal atresia, and pulmonary hypoplasia. CONCLUSIONS: Cryptophthalmos is a rare congenital anomaly with two patterns of inheritance. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 PMID:8719680

  12. Heterogeneous distribution of Weibel-Palade bodies and von Willebrand factor along the porcine vascular tree.

    PubMed Central

    Gebrane-Younès, J.; Drouet, L.; Caen, J. P.; Orcel, L.

    1991-01-01

    Vessels obtained from different levels of pig vascular tree were examined by transmission electron microscope, with the aim of determining whether or not their endothelial cells contain Weibel-Palade bodies (WPB). As these organelles are known to store the von Willebrand factor (vWF), a two-step immunogold labeling of this protein also was performed. Our results showed for the first time a heterogeneous distribution of WPB along the vascular tree of the normal pig: These structures were absent from the thoracic aorta, rare in the abdominal aorta, present in myocardial capillaries, and numerous in the inferior vena cava and pulmonary artery. Atypical WPB devoid of tubules were seen in all endothelial cells. The ultrastructural labeling of vWF demonstrated its presence only in the WPB, being absent in the subendothelium, and showed the same variation in its distribution along the vascular tree as for its storage organelle. Pigs homozygous for the von Willebrand disease were found to have only the atypical WPB, and do not express the vWF. Images Figure 1 p1474-b Figure 2 p1474-d Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:1750513

  13. Movement and self-control in protein assemblies. Quasi-equivalence revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Caspar, D L

    1980-01-01

    Purposeful switching among different conformational states exerts self-control in the construction and action of protein assemblies. Quasi-equivalence, conceived to explain icosahedral virus structure, arises by differentiation of identical protein subunits into different conformations that conserve essential bonding specificity. Mechanical models designed to represent the energy distribution in the structure, rather than just the arrangement of matter, are used to explore flexibility and self-controlled movements in virus particles. Information about the assembly of bacterial flagella, actin, tobacco mosaic virus and the T4 bacteriophage tail structure show that assembly can be controlled by switching the subunits from an inactive, unsociable form to an active, associable form. Energy to drive this change is provided by the intersubunit bonding in the growing structure; this self-control of assembly by conformational switching is called "autostery", by homology with allostery. A mechanical model of the contractile T4 tail sheath has been constructed to demonstrate how self-controlled activation of a latent bonding potential can drive a purposeful movement. The gradient of quasi-equivalent conformations modelled in the contracting tail sheath has suggested a workable mechanism for self-determination of tail tube length. Concerted action by assemblies of identical proteins may often depend on individually differentiated movements. Images Figure 4 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:6894706

  14. Biochemical and cellular mechanisms of dust-induced lung fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, R J; Curtis, C G

    1984-01-01

    The sequence of cellular and biochemical events in response to the deposition of dust particles in lung tissue is described. Primary reactions at the lung surface include changes in the free cell population, the alveolar surface protein and in the quantity of pulmonary surfactant, a lipoprotein-rich material secreted by Type II cells. The relationship between these changes and lung fibrogenesis is discussed. It is suggested that such primary changes are protective mechanisms which may assist in the prevention of fibrogenesis rather than lead to an increase in collagen formation and deposition. If these primary defenses are overcome, then the interstitial fibroblastlike cell may have a prominent role in fibrogenesis. Therefore detailed observations of the interaction between lung fibroblasts and mineral dusts in vitro are described. As fibrogenesis may be arrested in vivo, or possibly reversed, and does not always progress to fibrosis, final consideration is given to the step from fibrogenesis to fibrosis. It is suggested that this step may involve other tissue proteins apart from collagen and that the irreversible nature of fibrosis can be explained by the formation of strong intermolecular crosslinks between different proteins. The types of crosslinks that may be involved are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the role of calcium-dependent transglutaminases in fibrosis, as these enzymes have hitherto received little attention. Images FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 20. FIGURE 21. FIGURE 22. FIGURE 23. PMID:6376109

  15. Ecological studies of a regulated stream: Huntington River, Emery County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Winget, R.N.

    1984-04-30

    A 36.9 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/ reservoir constructed on Huntington River, Emery County, Utah, resulted in changes in physical habitat, water quality, temperature, and flow regime. The greatest changes in physical habitat resulted from: (1) sediment additions from dam and road construction plus erosion of reservoir basin during filling; and (2) changing stream flow from a spring high runoff regime to a moderated flow regime. Elimination of spring nutrient concentration peaks and overall reduction of total dissolved nutrient availability in the river plus moderate reductions in pH were the most apparent water quality changes below the reservoir. Water temperature changes were an increased diurnal and seasonal constancy, summer depression, and winter elevation, generally limited to a 10-12 km reach below the dam. Physical and chemical changes altered macroinvertebrate community structure, with changes greatest near the dam and progressively less as distance downstream increased. Below the dam: (1) more environmentally tolerant taxa increased their dominance; (2) relative numbers of smaller sized individuals increased in relation to larger individuals; and (3) filter feeding, collector/gatherers, and scapers gained an advantage over shredders. Macroinvertebrate taxa with small instar larvae present from late summer to early fall were negatively impacted by the unnaturally high July and August flows. The reservoir became a physical barrier to downstream larval drift and upcanyon and downcanyon immigration of adults, resulting in reduced numbers of several species above and below the reservoir. 50 references, 12 figures, 3 tables.

  16. The course and nature of acinar cell death following pancreatic ligation in the guinea pig.

    PubMed Central

    Zeligs, J. D.; Janoff, A.; Dumont, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    The course and nature of acinar cell death (ACD) following pancreatic ligation in the guinea pig was studied as a possible model for human disease. Ultrastructural studies after various periods of ligation suggested a biphasic pattern of ACD. Early phase ACD involved only a small portion of acinar cells and occurred within a few hours of ligation. It was preceded by swelling and vesiculation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Morphometric measurements disclosed celular swelling at this time, and NaCl equilibration studies demonstrated a change in cellular osmoregulation. Late phase ACD, characterized by cellular wasting and autophagic vacuole formation, became prominent several days after ligation. Marked increases in lysosomal enzyme activities were found in tissue homogenates at this time, and acid phosphatase electron histochemistry localized the majority of this increased activity to lysosomes and autophagic vacuoles within the acinar cells. The etiology and nature of both phases of ACD are discussed. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 12 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:169698

  17. Management of Rotator Cuff and Impingement Injuries in the Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gerald R.; Kelley, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To review current concepts of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of rotator cuff and impingement injuries in the athlete. Data Sources: The information we present was compiled from a review of classic and recently published material regarding rotator cuff and impingement injuries. These materials were identified through a search of a personal literature database compiled by the authors, as well as by selective searching of the MEDLINE. In addition, much of the information presented represents observations and opinions of the authors developed over 8 to 10 years of treating shoulder injuries in athletes. Data Synthesis: Biomechanics of the normal shoulder and pathophysiology of rotator cuff injuries in the athletic population are discussed, followed by a summary of the important diagnostic features of rotator cuff and impingement injuries. The principles of rehabilitation are extensively presented, along with indications and important technical aspects of selected surgical procedures. General principles and specific protocols of postoperative rehabilitation are also summarized. Conclusions/Recommendations: Rotator cuff and impingement injuries in the athletic population are multifactorial in etiology, exhibiting significant overlap with glenohumeral instability. Nonoperative treatment is successful in most athletic patients with rotator cuff and impingement injuries. When nonoperative treatment fails, arthroscopic surgical techniques such as rotator cuff repair and subacromial decompression may be successful in returning the athlete to competition. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12.Figure 13. PMID:16558644

  18. Nicolas and Eel submarine fans, California continental borderland

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.; Gorsline, D.S.

    1987-04-01

    Nicolas and Eel Submarine Fans occur in the San Nicolas basin - an outer basin of the California continental borderland that has a low sedimentation rate. Nicolas Fan lies southeast of San Nicolas Island and the broad San Nicolas Bank. The upper fan is characterized by numerous channels. The midfan region may be divided into three distinct areas: a central midfan and two subfans. The central midfan deposition system is typical of Normark's suprafan. The subfans are essentially flat, sandy lobes. Eel Fan lies west of San Clemente Island and is fed by an erosional valley. Its midfan region may also be characterized as a flat, sandy lobe. Box-core data show that holocene turbidity currents have occurred on the central Nicolas Fan, whereas the subfans and Eel Fan are nearly inactive. The local tectonic regime influences these fans by determining slope trends, creating bathymetric obstacles, controlling canyon location, and triggering mass movements. Sea level changes affect sedimentation patterns of the fans by increasing the mean grain size and the amount of sediment delivered to the fan during lowstands. These changes may, in turn, affect the morphology of the fan. The characteristics of these fans represent variations of the generalized fan models described in the literature. 12 figures, 1 table.

  19. SRC-II slurry preheater technical uncertainties. Report for the technical data analysis program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    This report reviews the performance, and draws conclusions therefrom, the coal slurry preheaters of the Ft. Lewis, Washington, Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) Pilot Plant in the following areas: Coking, Erosion Corrosion, Heat transfer and pressure drop effects. Using prudent engineering judgement it postulates how such conclusions should affect the design and operability of large preheaters in future commercial scale plants. Also a recommendation is made for a small scale research and development effort that should result in a much firmer preheater design for any future facility. This report should be read in conjunction with the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) Final Report, and volumes 1 and 2 of Slurry Preheater Design, SRC-II Process and also Ft. Lewis Slurry Preheater Data Analysis, 1-1/2 Inch Coil by Gulf Science and Technology Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co.'s background is based primarily on a racetrack shaped up-flow coil and these comments pertain specifically to a commercial heater of that type of design. 5 references, 12 figures, 1 table.

  20. Effect of preparation methods on the catalytic properties of zeolite-supported ruthenium in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.W.; Wang, H.T.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr.

    1983-10-01

    Three preparation techniques (incipient wetness using a solution of ruthenium chloride (RuCl/sub 3/), vapor impregnation by the ruthenium carbonyl (Ru/sub 3/(CO)/sub 12/), and ion exchange with Ru(NH/sub 3/)/sub 6/Cl/sub 3/) have been used to prepare sodium (Na)Y zeolite-supported ruthenium catalysts. The effect of these preparation methods on the activity and product selectivity of the Ru catalysts in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was examined at temperatures in the range of 220 to 320/sup 0/C, a pressure of 1 atm, a CO/H/sub 2/ ratio of 1, and flow rates in the range GHSV = 1800 to 3600 h/sup -1/. It was found that there is a good inverse correlation of turnover numbers for CO conversion to the CO/H adsorption ratio, suggesting that the relative availability of adsorbed H/sub 2/ and CO determines catalyst activity during reaction. Selectivity in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was greatly influenced by the preparation method and metal loading. Catalysts prepared by incipient wetness produced mainly methane. Catalysts prepared by vapor impregnation had the best selectivities for higher hydrocarbons and olefins even though they had the smallest average Ru particle sizes. The observed changes in adsorption, activity, and selectivity with preparation method appear to result from differences produced in metal location in/on the zeolite, metal particle size, and zeolite-metal interactions. 12 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Production potential of biomass feedstocks. Final report. [Saltbush, Johnsongrass, Kochia, Mesquite

    SciTech Connect

    Goodin, J.R.; Newton, R.J.

    1983-08-31

    This final report summarizes biomass research on unconventional plants utilizing the concept that semi-arid lands may be advantageous and unique for biomass production because there would be little competition for irrigation water and land areas traditionally used for food and fiber production. The objectives are to: (1) evaluate the establishment and productivity potential of plant species in west Texas as influenced by rainfall, temperature and minimum cultural practices; and (2) accurately assess the present distribution and acreages inhabited by the four candidates in west Texas as well as the soil, geographical and climatic factors which govern their adaptation; and (3) provide productivity data in order to make adequate economic and sociological assessments of biomass production in west Texas. Seedlings of four biomass plant species originally screened from 2900 potential species have been established in a greenhouse and transplants of saltbush (Atriplex canescens), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), kochia (Kochia scoparia), and mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) have been planted at Brady, Big Lake, El Paso and Lubbock. Saltbush seedlings have also been established at Pecos. 35 references, 12 figures, 21 tables.

  2. Hematite at Meridiani Planum, Mars, Investigated by Simultaneous Fitting of MER Mossbauer Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischer, I.; Agresti, D. G.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Morris, Richard V.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity encountered sedimentary outcrop rocks at its landing site. Spherules with diameters in the millimeter range were found to weather from the outcrop rocks. With Opportunity s miniaturised M ssbauer spectrometer MIMOS II, hematite was detected in spherules and in the outcrop matrix [1,2]. Figure 1 shows the target Berry Bowl, where brushed outcrop and an accumulation of spherules could be investigated on sols 46 and 48 of Opportunity s mission. Hematite undergoes a transition from a weakly ferromagnetic above to an antiferromagnetic state below the Morin temperature (T(sub M) approx.265 K for chemically pure, crystalline hematite). The magnetic hyperfine splitting (B(sub hf)) shows a general decrease with increasing temperature and a drop of approx.0.8 T at T(sub M). The quadrupole splitting ((Delta)EQ) changes its sign at T(sub M), with negative values above and positive values below the transition. Crystallinity and particle size influence the magnitude and temperature dependence of the magnetic splitting and the quadrupole splitting [3].

  3. Effect of microstructure on the susceptibility of low-alloy steels to hydrogen attack

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.O.

    1981-08-01

    In an alloy steel in which one or more alloy additions stabilize the carbide phase, the carbon activity depends on the microstructure and the prior thermal history. The carbon activity is a major factor in the susceptibility of such steels to form internal methane bubbles when heated in high-pressure hydrogen. Thus one can expect to vary the susceptibility to hydrogen attack of a given steel by its prior treatment. The problem has two aspects. First, one needs to be able to calculate the equilibrium carbon activity when the steel is in internal equilibrium. A computer program in the appendix of this report takes care of part of this problem. When the thermodynamics of the mixed carbide phase is adequately modeled, then this problem can be solved. The second part is the rate of approach to equilibrium. An analysis of the rate of coarsening of carbides in such steels shows that this rate is enhanced by a fine carbide dispersion. Such a fine dispersion is also desirable for the maximum strength. Thus, we believe that under favorable circumstances the resistance to hydrogen attack can be enhanced by suitable thermal treatments of the steels used for the pressure vessels for hydrogen service. 12 figures.

  4. Attack of high-strength, oxidation-resistant alloys during in-can melting of simulated waste glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, W.N.

    1980-01-01

    The restistance of candidate canister alloys to penetration under the most severe conditions expected during in-can melting was directly proportional to the chromium content of the alloy, and inversely proportional to the Na/sub 2/O content of the glass melt. Specimens were exposed for 24 hours, which is the time required for in-can melting full-size waste-glass forms based on tests carried out at Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) and at SRL. The penetration resistance to Frit 211 at 1150/sup 0/C for 24 hours of most alloys tested was satisfactory. The amount of penetration would not affect the integrity of the waste form. Inconel 625, Hastelloy X, and Inconel 601 were penetrated < 20 mils. This was considered excellent. Incoloy 801, Type 310 stainless steel, Type 304L stainless steel, Inconel 600, and Type 347 stainless steel were penetrated < 40 mils. This was considered good. Hastelloy C-4 was penetrated > 100 mils by a glass composed of 65 wt % Frit 21 and 35 wt % composite sludge (with uranium) at 1150/sup 0/C for only 7 hours. This amount of penetration of an in-can melting canister would not be satisfactory. 12 figures.

  5. The Clinical Physiology of Water Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Weitzman, Richard E.; Kleeman, Charles R.

    1979-01-01

    Water balance is tightly regulated within a tolerance of less than 1 percent by a physiologic control system located in the hypothalamus. Body water homeostasis is achieved by balancing renal and nonrenal water losses with appropriate water intake. The major stimulus to thirst is increased osmolality of body fluids as perceived by osmoreceptors in the anteroventral hypothalamus. Hypovolemia also has an important effect on thirst which is mediated by arterial baroreceptors and by the renin-angiotensin system. Renal water loss is determined by the circulating level of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). AVP is synthesized in specialized neurosecretory cells located in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei in the hypothalamus and is transported in neurosecretory granules down elongated axons to the posterior pituitary. Depolarization of the neurosecretory neurons results in the exocytosis of the granules and the release of AVP and its carrier protein (neurophysin) into the circulation. AVP is secreted in response to a wide variety of stimuli. Change in body fluid osmolality is the most potent factor affecting AVP secretion, but hypovolemia, the renin-angiotensin system, hypoxia, hypercapnia, hyperthermia and pain also have important effects. Many drugs have been shown to stimulate the release of AVP as well. Small changes in plasma AVP concentration of from 0.5 to 4 μU per ml have major effects on urine osmolality and renal water handling. ImagesFigure 5.Figure 12.Figure 15.Figure 16. PMID:394480

  6. Influence of surface chemistry on the structural organization of monomolecular protein layers adsorbed to functionalized aqueous interfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Lösche, M; Piepenstock, M; Diederich, A; Grünewald, T; Kjaer, K; Vaknin, D

    1993-01-01

    The molecular organization of streptavidin (SA) bound to aqueous surface monolayers of biotin-functionalized lipids and binary lipid mixtures has been investigated with neutron reflectivity and electron and fluorescence microscopy. The substitution of deuterons (2H) for protons (1H), both in subphase water molecules and in the alkyl chains of the lipid surface monolayer, was utilized to determine the interface structure on the molecular length scale. In all cases studied, the protein forms monomolecular layers underneath the interface with thickness values of approximately 40 A. A systematic dependence of the structural properties of such self-assembled SA monolayers on the surface chemistry was observed: the lateral protein density depends on the length of the spacer connecting the biotin moiety and its hydrophobic anchor. The hydration of the lipid head groups in the protein-bound state depends on the dipole moment density at the interface. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE A1 PMID:8298041

  7. Exploration in Ordovician of central Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J.H.; Barratt, M.W.

    1985-12-01

    Deep wells in the central Michigan basin have provided sufficient data to define two new mappable formations - the Foster Formation and the Bruggers Formation. Recent conodont studies have corrected the age assignments of the strata containing these formations. Previously, the lower section (Foster) was classified as mostly Cambrian, and the upper unit (Bruggers) was identified as Early Ordovician. Conodont identifications indicate an Early and Middle Ordovician age for the Foster Formation and a Middle Ordovician age for the Bruggers Formation. The Michigan basin existed in embryonic form in the Late Cambrian, but the full outline of the present-day basin did not develop until Early Ordovician. Gas and condensate are produced from the Bruggers Formation as deep as 11,252 ft (3429 m). Geothermal investigations suggest that gas production is possible to the base of the Paleozoic section in the central basin (17,000 ft or 5181 m). Paleotemperatures were higher during the Paleozoic owing to 3000-4000 ft (914-1291 m) of additional sedimentary cover. Five wells are producing from the Bruggers Formation. All are deeper tests in anticlines producing from Devonian reservoirs discovered earlier. The structures are the result of vertical movements of basement fault blocks activated by regional stresses. 12 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Myth of nuclear explosions at waste disposal sites

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, W.R.

    1983-10-01

    Approximately 25 years ago, an event is said to have occurred in the plains immediately west of the southern Ural mountains of the Soviet Union that is being disputed to this very day. One person says it was an explosion of nuclear wastes buried in a waste disposal site; other people say it was an above-ground test of an atomic weapon; still others suspect that an alleged contaminated area (of unknown size or even existence) is the result of a series of careless procedures. Since the event, a number of articles about the disposal-site explosion hypothesis written by a Soviet exile living in the United Kingdom have been published. Although the Soviet scientist's training and background are in the biological sciences and his knowledge of nuclear physics or chemistry is limited, people who oppose the use of nuclear energy seem to want to believe what he says without question. The work of this Soviet biologist has received wide exposure both in the United Kingdom and the United States. This report presents arguments against the disposal-site explosion hypothesis. Included are discussions of the amounts of plutonium that would be in a disposal site, the amounts of plutonium that would be needed to reach criticality in a soil-water-plutonium mixture, and experiments and theoretical calculations on the behavior of such mixtures. Our quantitative analyses show that the postulated nuclear explosion is so improbable that it is essentially impossible and can be found only in the never-never land of an active imagination. 24 references, 14 figures, 5 tables.

  9. Precambrian to Jurassic rocks of Arabian Gulf and adjacent areas: their facies, depositional setting, and hydrocarbon habitat

    SciTech Connect

    Alsharhan, A.S.; Kendal, C.G.S.C.

    1986-08-01

    The first sediments to onlap the metamorphosed Precambrian Arabian shield were Infracambrian (Proterozoic) to Middle Cambrian carbonates, clastics, and evaporites. The oldest Arabian reservoir rocks occur in the Precambrian to lower Paleozoic Era Salt of the Huqf Group, which forms the Birba field of Oman. The Middle Cambrian sequence was followed by Late Cambrian through Early Permian marine sandstones and continental to littoral siltstones and variegated shales. The first commercial oil discovered in the Arabian Gulf region occurs in fluvial sands of the Ordovician to Permian Haima and Haushi Groups of the Marmul field in south Oman. These strata are also productive in other fields and are sealed by unconformable contact with the Al Khlata Formation or beneath shale of the Albian Nahr Umr Formation. The deeply buried kerogen sediments of the Huqf Group to the southeast are believed to be the source rocks for these fields of south Oman. The Late Permian to Triassic deposits of the Arabian Peninsula are mainly widespread carbonates and evaporites that were deposited during a period of relative tectonic stability. Their deposition on an epeiric shelf was punctuated by a series of transgressions and regressions. Significant gas reserves have been proven in deep wells in the Arabian Gulf. These wells penetrate large deep structures in the Permian Khuff shelf carbonates. These carbonates have developed secondary porosity and lie beneath interbedded shale and dolomites of the Sudair or Suwei Formation. The source of gas in the Khuff is unknown but could lie in more deeply buried formations. The large deep structures of the Khuff are considered to be among the most attractive for gas potential in the region today. 14 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Development of a predictive model for porosity distribution in the Smackover Formation of southwest Alabama. Final report, 1983-1984

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.

    1984-11-15

    The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation is the major hydrocarbon producer in the State of Alabama having produced over 69.5 million bbls of oil, 63 million bbls of condensate, and 237 million Mcf of gas since the initial Smackover discovery from Toxey Field, Choctaw County in 1967. Smackover hydrocarbon exploration is hampered in Alabama and throughout the Gulf Coast by the inability to effectively predict porosity distribution in the unit. This report represents the results of the first year of a study designed to develop a predictive model for porosity distribution in the Smackover of southwestern Alabama. This study is based on analysis of over 900 thin-sections from 70 wells in southwest Alabama. Eight lithofacies were recognized in the Smackover in the study area. These are: anhydritic mudstone, microcrystalline dolomite, oolitic grainstone, skeletal-peloidal grainstone/packstone, algal boundstone, finely-crystalline dolomite, coarsely-crystalline dolomite, and mudstone. Depositional porosity in the Smackover ranged from very high in the oolitic grainstone lithologies to very low in the mudstone lithologies. This depositional porosity, however, has been significantly modified by diagenesis. Smackover sediments have undergone a complex history of diagenetic modification which has included micritization, multi-stage cementation, multi-stage dissolution, dolomitization, and sulfate mineralization. These diagenetic processes have occluded primary porosity and, in some cases, produced secondary porosity in lithologies which lacked primary porosity. Four primary pore types have been recognized in the Smackover; primary interparticulate, oomoldic, dolomitic intercrystalline, and vuggy. The occurrence of these pore types indicates porosity distribution is controlled by paleotopography which significantly influenced depositional and diagenetic processes. 20 references, 14 figures.

  11. Development of peatlands in northern Minnesota. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, H.E. Jr.; Glaser, P.H.; Janssens, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Boreal peatlands are widely distributed across northern Minnesota, where they cover more than 20% of the regional landscape. A regional survey of these peatlands reveals a remarkable degree of uniformity among the vegetation assemblages and an exceptionally close relationship among the vegetation, water chemistry, water level, and presumed hydrology. These relationships are best integrated by the striking landform patterns that, from the air, resemble fluvial landforms such as islands, rivers, and ripple marks. The patterns instead indicate a sensitive adjustment of peat growth to local hydrology and water quality, making the landform patterns an exceptionally important tool for discerning the potential directions and controls on peatland development. A detailed investigation of the Red Lake peatland was undertaken to test a hypothesis on landform development based on an analysis of variations in the present-day landforms, vegetation, water chemistry, and inferred direction of water movement. The peat stratigraphy, based largely on an analysis of fossil bryophytes, indicates that the west-central watershed at Red Lake was overrum by an ombrotrophic bog forest approximately 2000 years ago, but that the forest was subsequently replaced by non-forested Sphagnum communities similar to the vegetation in the present-day bog drains and Sphagnum lawns. These results agree with the initial hypothesis. The stratigraphy indicates that the forested bog islands have expanded over the last 400 years, which indicates a more sensitive adjustment of the patterns to hydrological variations than predicted by the hypothesis. These results may be applicable to a much wider area because of the broad regional uniformity of the peatland patterns. 57 references, 14 figures, 6 tables.

  12. Atmospheric dispersion of ammonia: an ammonia fog model

    SciTech Connect

    Kansa, E.J.; Rodean, H.C.; Chan, S.T.; Ermak, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    A simplification to the two-phase ammonia vapor-droplet fog problem has been implemented to study the dispersion of a spill of 40 tons of ammonia. We have circumvented the necessity of adding the partial differential equations for mass, momentum, and energy for the ammonia in the liquid phase by certain assumptions. It is assumed that the ammonia fog behaves as an ideal gas including the droplets. A temperature-dependent molecular weight was introduced to simulate the transition from a vapor-droplet cloud to a pure vapor cloud of ammonia. Likewise, the vaporization of ammonia was spread out over a temperature range. Mass, momentum, energy, and total ammonia is conserved rigorously. The observed features of the ammonia spill simulation have pointed out phenomena that could not be predicted in simpler calculations. Perhaps the most obvious feature is the cloud bifurcation due to the strength of the gravity current relative to the ambient wind. The gravity spreading of the denser ammonia fog significantly perturbs the unidirectional windfield in the vicinity of the spill, setting up complex eddy patterns in the cloud which are enhanced by ground heating and warm dry air entrainment. The lower concentrations appear to lift off by a buoyancy-induced flow. The ammonia cloud, rather than being cigar shaped as assumed in simpler models, ranges from pancake shaped to pear shaped, depending upon the ambient windfield. The fact that the ammonia cloud remains cold, very low, and wide is in qualitative agreement with some of the large-scale ammonia spill accidents. 14 figures.

  13. Tropic Responses of Funaria Spores to Red Light

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, Lionel; Etzold, Helmut

    1965-01-01

    The tropic responses of Funaria hygrometrica spores to continuous illumination with red light (610 to 690 mμ) have been studied over the intensity range from 10-5 through 10+6 erg/cm2 second, using both plane polarized light and partial illumination with unpolarized light. From the relative frequency of outgrowth origin in different directions, the following is inferred. (1). The germination direction of chloronemal filaments is directly influenced by red light over this whole intensity range, while that of rhizoids tends to be opposite the chloronema. (2) Three photoreceptor systems direct chloronemal primordia: (a) A low intensity system acting from 10-5 to 10-0.5 erg/cm2 second. It favors their growth from a cell's brightest part(s). Its photoreceptors are disoriented, excited by the electric vector, and probably are dispersed phytochrome molecules. (b) A medium intensity system which acts largely alone only at 100.5 erg/cm2 second but is influential from 100 to 105 erg/cm2 second. It likewise favors growth from a cell's brightest part(s); its receptor molecules are also excited electrically, but they are tangentially oriented. (c) A high intensity system which acts alone from 105 to 106 erg/cm2 second and is influential down to 101 erg/cm2 second. It favors growth of the chloronemas from a cell's darkest part. Its receptors probably are magnetically excited and tangentially oriented. The polarotropic responses of the chloronemas resemble those directing their origins. One new feature is that under intense (106 erg/cm2 second) plane polarized and vertically directed light, many soon grow to form tight helices. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 14Figure 15 PMID:5863438

  14. Late Triassic-Jurassic paleogeography and origin of Gulf of Mexico basin

    SciTech Connect

    Salvador, A.

    1987-04-01

    The basic structural and stratigraphic framework of the Gulf of Mexico Basin was established during the Late Triassic and the Jurassic. During the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic, as the North American plate started to separate from the South American and African plates, the area of the future basin was part of an extensive landmass broken by tensional grabens that were filled by red beds and volcanics. Marine deposition was restricted to embayments of the Pacific Ocean in northwestern and central Mexico. These marine embayments persisted during the early Middle Jurassic, but seawater did not reach the future Gulf of Mexico Basin until the Callovian. Widespread salt deposits known today from two separate areas of the basin resulted from this initial flooding. During the Late Jurassic, marine conditions progressively extended over increasingly larger parts of the Gulf of Mexico Basin. However, the basin was not connected to the Atlantic Ocean until late in the Jurassic. This paleogeographic reconstruction suggests that the Gulf of Mexico Basin formed as a result of the southward drift of the Yucatan continental block away from the remainder of the North American plate. The separation began in the Late Triassic, continued slowly and sporadically during the Early and Middle Jurassic, and quickened after the Middle Jurassic salt formed. As a result, the salt deposits were split into the two segments known today, and oceanic crust formed in the center of the basin. Early in the Late Jurassic, the Yucatan platform reached its present position and the Gulf of Mexico Basin was born. 14 figures.

  15. Supermolecular structure of cellulose: stepwise decrease in LODP and particle size of cellulose hydrolyzed after chemical treatment. [Leveling-off degree of polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Yachi, T.; Hayashi, J.; Takai, M.; Shimizu, Y.

    1983-01-01

    It was observed by electron microscopy that rayons hydrolyzed with 2.4 N HCl at 100/sup 0/C for 2 h, followed by ultrasonic treatment were split into homogeneous particles having a size of about 200 A(2000A). In the previous work with rayons, crystallite length, long period, and chain length calculated from their LODP were all about 200 A(2000A), regardless of the type of rayon. The agreement between particle size and length suggested strongly that a rayon microfibril has a periodic structure along its axis at intervals of about A(2000A). Celluloses II, III, and IV and cellulose regenerated from its esters were derived both from native cellulose and rayons in the fibrous state. After hydrolysis, all the modifications derived from native cellulose showed an LODP of about 80 and rod-like fragments which showed a maximum at 400 A(2000A) in the frequency distribution of their lengths. All of the modifications, except mercerized native cellulose, showed a meridional small-angle reflection corresponding to 400 A(2000A). All the modifications from rayons showed an LODP of about 40. The esters derived from native cellulose were recrystallized by heat treatment and then saponified into cellulose II. After hydrolysis, they showed an LODP of about 40 (200 A(2000A) in chain length), a meridional reflection showing a long period of about 200 A(2000A), and a particle-like fragment having a size of about 200 A(2000A). For native cellulose, after chemical and physical treatments, the LODP, the long period, and the fragment length all decreased stepwise and by the same amounts. The steps were an integral multiple of 200 A(2000A), which is the value of the crystallite length obtained for the native and all other celluloses. The results suggest that native cellulose has a periodic structure at intervals of 200 A(2000A) in length. 40 references, 14 figures, 5 tables.

  16. Geochemical information for sites contaminated with low-level radioactive wastes. III. Weldon Spring Storage Site

    SciTech Connect

    Seeley, F.G.; Kelmers, A.D.

    1985-02-01

    The Weldon Spring Storage Site (WSSS), which includes both the chemical site and the quarry, became radioactively contaminated as the result of wastes that were being stored from operations to recover uranium from pitchblende ores in the 1940s and 1950s. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is considering various remedial action options for the WSSS. This report describes the results of geochemical investigations carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support these activities and to help quantify various remedial action options. Soil and groundwater samples were characterized, and uranium and radium sorption ratios were measured in site soil/groundwater systems by batch contact methodology. Soil samples from various locations around the raffinate pits were found to contain major amounts of silica, along with illite as the primary clay constituent. Particle sizes of the five soil samples were variable (50% distribution point ranging from 12 to 81 ..mu..m); the surface areas varied from 13 to 62 m/sup 2//g. Elemental analysis of the samples showed them to be typical of sandy clay and silty clay soils. Groundwater samples included solution from Pit 3 and well water from Well D. Anion analyses showed significant concentrations of sulfate and nitrate (>350 and >7000 mg/L, respectively) in the solution from Pit 3. These anions were also present in the well water, but in lower concentrations. Uranium sorption ratios for four of the soil samples contacted with the solution from Pit 3 were moderate to high (approx. 300 to approx. 1000 mL/g). The fifth sample had a ratio of only 12 mL/g. Radium sorption ratios for the five samples were moderate to high (approx. 600 to approx. 1000 mL/g). These values indicate that soil at the WSSS may show favorable retardation of uranium and radium in the groundwater. 13 references, 13 figures, 10 tables.

  17. Comparative assessment of TRU waste forms and processes. Volume I. Waste form and process evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.A.; Lokken, R.O.; May, R.P.; Roberts, F.P.; Timmerman, C.L.; Treat, R.L.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1982-09-01

    This study provides an assesses seven waste forms and eight processes for immobilizing transuranic (TRU) wastes. The waste forms considered are cast cement, cold-pressed cement, FUETAP (formed under elevated temperature and pressure) cement, borosilicate glass, aluminosilicate glass, basalt glass-ceramic, and cold-pressed and sintered silicate ceramic. The waste-immobilization processes considered are in-can glass melting, joule-heated glass melting, glass marble forming, cement casting, cement cold-pressing, FUETAP cement processing, ceramic cold-pressing and sintering, basalt glass-ceramic processing. Properties considered included gas generation, chemical durability, mechanical strength, thermal stability, and radiation stability. The ceramic products demonstrated the best properties, except for plutonium release during leaching. The glass and ceramic products had similar properties. The cement products generally had poorer properties than the other forms, except for plutonium release during leaching. Calculations of the Pu release indicated that the waste forms met the proposed NRC release rate limit of 1 part in 10/sup 5/ per year in most test conditions. The cast-cement process had the lowest processing cost, followed closely by the cold-pressed and FUETAP cement processes. Joule-heated glass melting had the lower cost of the glass processes. In-can melting in a high-quality canister had the highest cost, and cold-pressed and sintered ceramic the second highest. Labor and canister costs for in-can melting were identified. The major contributor to costs of disposing of TRU wastes in a defense waste repository is waste processing costs. Repository costs could become the dominant cost for disposing of TRU wastes in a commercial repository. It is recommended that cast and FUETAP cement and borosilicate glass waste-form systems be considered. 13 figures, 16 tables.

  18. Use of corn distiller's solubles from an ethanol plant for aquaculture

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, C.C.

    1984-06-01

    Wet stillage can economically be separated into two fractions: distiller's grain and distiller's solubles. Wet corn distiller's grain has shown potential as a feed supplement for ruminants, swine, and poultry. However, the soluble fraction (with suspended particles) is of little food value to terrestrial animals because of its high water content; it is not generally economically feasible to concentrate it further. The purpose of this project is to determine if the soluble by-product could potentially be used as a food source in an aquatic environment where its high water content would not necessarily pose an impediment. Studies have shown that corn distiller's solubles are not highly toxic to aquatic organisms at concentrations ranging up to 10,000 ppM. However, the high biological oxygen demand of the material requires that it be administered to ponds at rates less than 2000 ppM on a daily basis. Golden shiners were observed to actively consume the particulates of the corn distiller's solubles. Direct consumption of the particulates by fish makes the use of corn distiller's solubles in aquaculture much more attractive than if the by-product only serves to increase pond fertility. Despite the minimum amount of food material added to the ponds, production of shrimp and fish was favorable over the 4 month growing periods. Golden shiners reared in the same ponds as shrimp had production rates equivalent to 130 kg ha/sup -1/. Monoculture of shrimp at higher densities (3000 to 5000 shrimp stocked per pond versus 2000 in 1982) resulted in an average production equivalent to approximately 228 kg ha/sup -1/, with individual shrimp averaging 10.5 g. Based on estimated wholesale prices of $10.00 and $7.75 per kilogram for frozen shrimp and live fish, respectively, the gross profit margin would have exceeded $2000 ha/sup -1/ both years. 25 references, 13 figures, 13 tables.

  19. [New data on maternal mortality in India].

    PubMed

    Bhatia, J C

    1990-01-01

    A survey was carried out in urban and rural areas of the district of Anantapur, Andhra Pradesh state, India, between July 1, 1984-June 30, 1985 by a team of 6 interviewers and 1 supervisor to identify investigate, and study the causative factors/characteristics of the causes of maternal deaths. They visited each of the 15 hospitals in the district collecting information about maternal deaths that occurred in the reproductive age range of 15-49 years. 22 health centers and 50% of subcenters were also visited, registers were examined, and staff and families were also interviewed. The hospitals and centers served 569,500 people. During the 1st phase in the rural area all main village centers, 181 village subcenters, and 1192 other villages in the district with a total population of 1,090,640 were covered. During the 2nd phase all towns in the urban zones, 10 primary centers, 65 subcenters, and 135 others were visited. The maternal mortality rate was 7.9/1000 live births, well above the national average. 36% of female mortality occurred in women in reproductive age, but fewer than 1/2 of these deaths were registered and only 1/3 figured in center and subcenter records. In rural areas maternal mortality was 8.3/1000, ahead of the urban rate of 5.4/1000. 63% of 284 deaths detailed were related to live births, 14% to stillbirths, 10% to abortions, and 13% to obstructed labor. 19% of total maternal deaths occurred before birth, 12% during labor, and 69% after delivery. Among clinical causes of death sepsis accounted for 36%, hemorrhage for 12%, eclampsia for 9%, retention of placenta for 7%, and infectious hepatitis for 10%. 80% of these deaths could have been avoided by timely antenatal care, treatment of previous complaints, and medical attention and hospitalization at the right time. PMID:12179349

  20. Characteristics of α-Amylase during Germination of Two High-Sugar Sweet Corn Cultivars of Zea mays L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Sanwo, Monica M.; DeMason, Darleen A.

    1992-01-01

    The role of the scutellum and the aleurone in α-amylase production in the high-sugar sweet corn cultivars Illini X-tra Sweet (shrunken-2, sh2) and Illinois 677a (sugary, sugary enhancer; su se) was compared to that in the starchy (Su) hybrid Funks G4646 with the use of α-amylase enzyme assays, isoelectric focusing, electron microscopy, and laser scanning confocal microscopy. The scutellum of Illinois 677a had low levels of α-amylase activity compared to that of Funks G4646 through 10 days after imbibition, and the aleurone of Illini X-tra Sweet had negligible activity. On the isoelectric focusing gels, the Illinois 677a scutellum had fewer α-amylase isozymes at 7 days compared to the Funks G4646 scutellum. The Illini X-tra Sweet aleurone had no α-amylase isozymes. Funks G4646 scutellar epithelial and aleurone cells contained abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, polysomes, and dictyosomes at 5 and 7 days, respectively. The scutellar epithelial cells of Illinois 677a contained fewer of these structures by 5 days, and the Illini X-tra Sweet aleurone contained mostly lipid bodies through 7 days. Few cytoplasmic membranes and little RNA were detected with laser scanning confocal microscopy in the Illini X-tra Sweet aleurone compared to Funks G4646 at 7 days. These data suggest that the scutellum of Illinois 677a and the aleurone of Illini X-tra Sweet have impaired abilities to produce α-amylase. ImagesFigure 5-13Figure 14-19Figure 3Figure 4Figure 20-23 PMID:16668987

  1. Technical and economic feasibility of utilizing apple pomace as a boiler feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    Apple pomace or presscake, was evaluated for suitability as a boiler feedstock for Michigan firms processing apple juice. Based upon the physical and chemical characteristics of pomace, handling/direct combustion systems were selected to conform with operating parameters typical of the industry. Fresh pomace flow rates of 29,030 and 88,998 kg/day (64,000 and 194,000 lb/day) were considered as representative of small and large processors, respectively, and the material was assumed to be dried to 15% moisture content (wet basis) prior to storage and combustion. Boilers utilizing pile-burning, fluidized-bed-combustion, and suspension-firing technologies were sized for each flow rate, resulting in energy production of 2930 and 8790 kW (10 and 30 million Btu/h), respectively. A life-cycle cost analysis was performed giving Average Annual Costs for the three handling/combustion system combinations (based on the Uniform Capital Recovery factor). An investment loan at 16% interest with a 5-year payback period was assumed. The break-even period for annual costs was calculated by anticipated savings incurred through reduction of fossil-fuel costs during a 5-month processing season. Large processors, producing more than 88,998 kg pomace/day, could economically convert to a suspension-fired system substituting for fuel oil, with break-even occurring after 4 months of operation of pomace per year. Small processors, producing less than 29,030 kg/day, could not currently convert to pomace combustion systems given these economic circumstances. A doubling of electrical-utility costs and changes in interest rates from 10 to 20% per year had only slight effects on the recovery of Average Annual Costs. Increases in fossil-fuel prices and the necessity to pay for pomace disposal reduced the cost-recovery period for all systems, making some systems feasible for small processors. 39 references, 13 figures, 10 tables.

  2. Organic complexant-enhanced mobility of toxic elements in low-level wastes. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, J.L.

    1984-06-01

    The results obtained during the third quarter's activities of a project whose objective is to determine how and to what extent organic complexants affect the mobility of toxic elements in subsurface groundwaters at commercial low-level waste disposal sites are described. This project will study nonradioactive toxic elements as well as elements having radioactive isotopes of importance (e.g. /sup 63/Ni, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 241/Am). Organic complexants used in the nuclear industry are being emphasized, but others are being examined. Generic soil components (e.g. hydrous oxides, silica, clays) are being used so that the results will be broadly applicable. Substantiation of the previously indicated sorption of a Pu(IV)-EDTA complex by hydrous ferric oxide (Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/.xH/sub 2/O) was obtained by comparing the sorption of EDTA in the presence and absence of Pu. Additional data on the sorption of a Ni-EDTA complex by Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/.xH/sub 2/O were also obtained. Preliminary Ni sorption data were obtained with other complexants (picolinic acid and citric acid), and another generic soil component (TiO/sub 2/). Sorption of a Ni-EDTA complex by an anion exchange resin was observed. Complexed species are thus likely to be present in the resin wastes from certain reactor decontamination solution clean-up operations. An experimental problem that caused some erroneous results for uncomplexed Ni was discovered and corrected. The filters being used to assure good separation of solid and liquid phases were removing Ni from solution, which skewed some earlier results. 11 references, 13 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Formation of South Pole-Aitken Basin as the Result of an Oblique Impact: Implications for Melt Volume and Source of Exposed Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, N. E.

    2012-01-01

    The South Pole-Aitken Basin (SPA) is the largest, deepest, and oldest identified basin on the Moon and contains surfaces that are unique due to their age, composition, and depth of origin in the lunar crust [1-3] (Figure 1). SPA has been a target of interest as an area for robotic sample return in order to determine the age of the basin and the composition and origin of its interior [3-6]. As part of the investigation into the origin of SPA materials there have been several efforts to estimate the likely provenance of regolith material in central SPA [5, 6]. These model estimates suggest that, despite the formation of basins and craters following SPA, the regolith within SPA is dominated by locally derived material. An assumption inherent in these models has been that the locally derived material is primarily SPA impact-melt as opposed to local basement material (e.g. unmelted lower crust). However, the definitive identification of SPA derived impact melt on the basin floor, either by remote sensing [2, 7] or via photogeology [8] is extremely difficult due to the number of subsequent impacts and volcanic activity [3, 4]. In order to identify where SPA produced impact melt may be located, it is important to constrain both how much melt would have been produced in a basin forming impact and the likely source of such melted material. Models of crater and basin formation [9, 10] present clear rationale for estimating the possible volumes and sources of impact melt produced during SPA formation. However, if SPA formed as the result of an oblique impact [11, 12], the volume and depth of origin of melted material could be distinct from similar material in a vertical impact [13].

  4. Swelling and dissolution of cellulose in amine oxide/water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chanzy, H.; Noe, P.; Paillet, M.; Smith, P.

    1983-01-01

    The swelling behavior and the dissolution process of various cellulosic fibers, both native and regenerated, in N-methylmorpholine N-oxide (MMNO), dimethylethanolamine N-oxide (DMEAO), and mixtures thereof were studied in the presence of various amounts of water. The principal tools in this investigation were optical microscopy and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The two amine oxides could either dissolve or only swell cellulose, depending on the water concentration, which was found to be of critical importance. Three domains of water concentration were found important. When only a few percent water was present, cellulose fibers, such as ramie, cotton, rayon, etc., dissolved readily without noticeable swelling in the amine oxide/water system brought above its melting point. At a relatively high water concentration (e.g., 18% w/w for MMNO), the cellulose fibers exhibited an extensive swelling (up to sevenfold increase in the fiber diameter) but no dissolution. In that case, the removal of the swelling agent showed that the initial native cellulose fibers were converted into an unoriented cellulose II structure. With still greater water content (e.g., 20% and more for MMNO or 15% for DMEAO), only partial swelling was observed, and the native cellulose fibers recovered their initial oriented cellulose I structure after removal of the swelling medium. X-ray investigations provided no evidence forthe formation of cellulose/solvent complexes in the swollen fibers. A relatively large decrease of the cellulose I (110) reflection was found in the WAXS patterns of the gels. This is interpreted as due to a preferential cleavage of the cellulose crystals along the corresponding plane when the cellulose fibers are exposed to the swelling forces of the amine oxide/water systems. 29 references, 13 figures, 1 table.

  5. Report on the Oak Ridge sewage sludge land-farming experience. Part 1. Data presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Oakes, T.W.; Braunstein, H.M.; Daniels, K.L.; Ohnesorge, W.F.; Kitchings, J.T.; Alexander, W.A.

    1984-08-01

    Disposal of sludge from the City of Oak Ridge's sewage treatment facility on a 65-acre site on the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation was initiated in November 1983. On March 22, 1984, DOE and the City determined that the sludge contained radioactive materials. Application of sludge on the Reservation was suspended on March 25 and a comprehensive survey and sampling plan was instituted to radiologically characterize the disposal site. By April 1, a radiation walkover survey had been completed on the site and samples of air, water, and soil had been collected to be analyzed for the presence of radionuclides. The mean air dose rate, one meter above the ground surface, was found to be 13 ..mu..R/h with a range from about 8 ..mu..R/h, which is the usual background level in the area, to 21 ..mu..R/h. Concentrations of Cs-137 and Co-60, the principle contaminants in the soil, were essentially below the analytical detection limits in the air and water. About 350 soil samples were collected by extracting cores to a depth of 12 to 15 inches according to a systematic random sampling design. Each core was separated into three sections; the top 3 inches, a middle section, and the bottom 3 inches to represent layers on the site. The majority of the radioactivity was determined to be in the upper 3 inches of soil. A statistical treatment of the analytical results provided an estimate of the total activity at the site, the vertical distribution of the gamma activity, and the areal distribution of the primary radionuclides. A total of 170 mCi of activity was estimated as present in the top 3-inch layer of the 65-acre site, 69% of which was contributed by Co-60 and Cs-137, 23% by U-234 and Sr-90, and 8% by other minor radionuclides. 4 references, 12 figures, 43 tables.

  6. Enhancing memory for lists by grouped presentation and rehearsal: a pilot study in healthy subjects with unexpected results.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Christian; Stojanovic, Jelena; Elger, Christian E

    2009-12-01

    List learning is probably the most established paradigm for the psychometric evaluation of episodic memory deficits in different neuropsychiatric conditions including epilepsy. Strategies which are capable of increasing the test performance might be promising candidates for a therapeutic improvement of daily memory performance. Based on the classical 'temporal grouping effect' we wanted to evaluate the memory-enhancing potential of disentangling perceiving, rehearsing and encoding by temporally grouped presentation and group-wise reproduction during acquisition. According to the ethical principle of subsidiary the study was performed in healthy adolescents (N=126) before setting-up a patient study. Subjects had to learn a list of 12 semantically unrelated nouns and a list of 12 figures during two acquisition trials under one of four experimental conditions defined by the size of presented item groups (GS): GS=1 (single items, i.e., 12 x 1 item), GS=3 (4 x 3 items), GS=6 (2 x 6 items), and GS=12 (standard presentation mode, i.e., 1 x 12 items). Repeated measures MANOVA confirmed a positive effect of smaller GS on acquisition performance but the grouping condition obtained no effect on immediate and delayed free recall or on yes/no recognition. For verbal retention, GS=12 even showed a tendency toward an advantage as compared to GS=3. Although appearing reasonable and promising, facilitating acquisition during list learning by temporal grouping and grouped overt rehearsal turned out to be ineffective with regard to long-term memory encoding and retrieval. A strategy however which fails in healthy subjects is unlikely to obtain a therapeutic potential in patients with memory deficits.

  7. Simulations of the magnet misalignments, field errors and orbit correction for the SLC north arc

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, S.; Chao, A.; Jaeger, J.; Shoaee, H.

    1983-11-01

    Given the intensity of linac bunches and their repetition rate the desired luminosity of SLC 1.0 x 10/sup 30/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ requires focusing the interaction bunches to a spot size in the micrometer (..mu..m) range. The lattice that achieves this goal is obtained by careful design of both the arcs and the final focus systems. For the micrometer range of the beam spot size both the second order geometric and chromatic aberrations may be completely destructive. The concept of second order achromat proved to be extremely important in this respect and the arcs are built essentially as a sequence of such achromats. Between the end of the linac and the interaction point (IP) there are three special sections in addition to the regular structure: matching section (MS) designed for matching the phase space from the linac to the arcs, reverse bend section (RB) which provides the matching when the sign of the curvature is reversed in the arc and the final focus system (FFS). The second order calculations are done by the program TURTLE. Using the TURTLE histogram in the x-y plane and assuming identical histogram for the south arc, corresponding 'luminosity' L is found. The simulation of the misalignments and error effects have to be done simultaneously with the design and simulation of the orbit correction scheme. Even after the orbit is corrected and the beam can be transmitted through the vacuum chamber, the focusing of the beam to the desired size at the IP remains a serious potential problem. It is found, as will be elaborated later, that even for the best achieved orbit correction, additional corrections of the dispersion function and possibly transfer matrix are needed. This report describes a few of the presently conceived correction schemes and summarizes some results of computer simulations done for the SLC north arc. 8 references, 12 figures, 6 tables.

  8. Carbon dioxide measurements in tropical east African biomes

    SciTech Connect

    Schnell, R.C.; Odh, S.A.; Njau, L.N.

    1981-06-20

    From January 1977 through May 1978 atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations were measured hourly and/or continuously at bimonthly intervals over periods varying from 5 to 8 days at 10 different locations in Kenya, East Africa. During each of these periods, at least two, and in some cases five, vertical profile measurements of CO/sub 2/ concentrations were conducted above different biomes. A large diurnal CO/sub 2/ periodicity was observed over land, with daytime drawdowns to 322 ppm and nighttime buildups to more than 400 ppm observed in savannah regions. In and around tropical rain forests, drawdowns to 310 ppm and buildups to more than 400 ppm were regularly observed. On the higher reaches of Mount Kenya, the diurnal CO/sub 2/ cycle was considerably reduced in amplitude, with variations in the range of 2-6 ppm throughout the 16-month study period. On sunny days, the drawdown of CO/sub 2/ was measurable to heights of at least 4000 m above ground level. Other CO/sub 2/ measurements in air over the Indian Ocean (to distances of up to 450 km upwind of the coast) produced fairly consistent concentrations of about 328.5 ppm which did not fluctuate diurnally. The weekly mean CO/sub 2/ concentrations over Kenya appear to have a bimodal structure, with minima occurring in July and January. On the basis of the data collected during the study it appears likely that regular observations at a high-altitude station on Mount Kenya, either with flask sampling or continuous analyzer measurements, are likely to yield data useful for estimates of CO/sub 2/ concentration backgrounds and trends. Also, there is strong evidence that Mount Kenya would be a good location to measure large-scale interhemispheric CO/sub 2/ exchanges and provide a unique base from which to study the effects of the tropical biome on biogeochemical phenomena. 20 references, 12 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Hazard evaluation of chemicals that cause accumulation of alpha 2u-globulin, hyaline droplet nephropathy, and tubule neoplasia in the kidneys of male rats.

    PubMed Central

    Hard, G C; Rodgers, I S; Baetcke, K P; Richards, W L; McGaughy, R E; Valcovic, L R

    1993-01-01

    This review paper examines the relationship between chemicals inducing excessive accumulation of alpha 2u-globulin (alpha 2u-g) (CIGA) in hyaline droplets in male rat kidneys and the subsequent development of nephrotoxicity and renal tubule neoplasia in the male rat. This dose-responsive hyaline droplet accumulation distinguishes CIGA carcinogens from classical renal carcinogens. CIGA carcinogens also do not appear to react with DNA and are generally negative in short-term tests for genotoxicity, CIGA or their metabolites bind specifically, but reversibly, to male rat alpha 2u-g. The resulting complex appears to be more resistant to hydrolytic degradation in the proximal tubule than native, unbound alpha 2u-g. Single cell necrosis of the tubule epithelium, with associated granular cast formation and papillary mineralization, is followed by sustained regenerative tubule cell proliferation, foci of tubule hyperplasia in the convoluted proximal tubules, and renal tubule tumors. Although structurally similar proteins have been detected in other species, including humans, renal lesions characteristic of alpha 2u-g nephropathy have not been observed. Epidemiologic investigation has not specifically examined the CIGA hypothesis for humans. Based on cancer bioassays, hormone manipulation studies, investigations in an alpha 2u-g-deficient strain of rat, and other laboratory data, an increased proliferative response caused by chemically induced cytotoxicity appears to play a role in the development of renal tubule tumors in male rats. Thus, it is reasonable to suggest that the renal effects induced in male rats by chemicals causing alpha 2u-g accumulation are unlikely to occur in humans. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 13. PMID:7686485

  10. The morphologic characteristics of intercellular junctions between normal human liver cells and cells from patients with extrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed Central

    Robenek, H.; Herwig, J.; Themann, H.

    1980-01-01

    Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7395970

  11. Experimental study of organically contaminated water in a cooling tower

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, D.J.; Aiyegbusi, O.

    1982-12-01

    A pilot model cooling system was set up and run so as to simultaneously cool heat exchanger tubes and biologically degrade phenol in the makeup water. The cooling tower used 1 ft/sup 2/ by 3 ft high, wetted film, polygrid, PVC packing. Water was circulated at 2.5 gpm (5.6 ft/sec) through two parallel heat exchange tubes immersed in a water bath controlled at 150/sup 0/F. Total water flow was 5 gpm/ft/sup 2/ of tower. Air was forced through the tower to give a liquid to gas mass ratio of 1.3. The cooling water circulated with an average temperature rise of 10/sup 0/F and an average approach to the air wet bulb temperature of 12/sup 0/F. Conclusions of this study are: (1) The pilot cooling tower was successfully operated to simultaneously cool and biodegrade phenol in the makeup water. Operation was not difficult and the experiments were reasonably reproducible. (2) An equivalent average concentration of phenol in the makeup water of 165 ppM (300 ppM BOD) should present little problem in commercial practice. An equivalent average concentration of up to 600 ppM phenol (1200 ppM BOD) may be acceptable in practice. Concentrations higher than 600 ppM phenol will cause such rapid biofouling and such rapid production of suspended solids in the circulating water as to be impractical. (3) More than 85 percent of the phenol removed was by biodegradation. Not more than 15 percent was stripped into the atmosphere. 12 figures, 12 tables.

  12. Electronic structure of metal clusters. 4. Photoelectron spectra and molecular orbital calculations on cobalt, iron, ruthenium, and osmium sulfide nonacarbonyl clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Chesky, P.T.; Hall, M.B.

    1983-10-01

    Gas-phase, ultraviolet photoelectron (PE) spectra and molecular orbital (MO) calculations are reported for SCo/sub 3/(CO)/sub 9/, SH/sub n-//sub 1/Fe/sub n/Co/sub 3//sub -n/(CO)/sub 9/ (n = 1-3), S/sub 2/Fe/sub 3/(CO)/sub 9/, and SH/sub 2/M/sub 3/(CO)/sub 9/ (M = Fe, Ru, Os). The first PE spectra reported for mixed-metal clusters are included in this series. As Co atoms are replaced by the isoelectronic FeH unit, the spectra show the loss of a Co band and the appearance of an Fe band. This phenomenon suggests that the d bands localize upon ionization. In a comparison with the PE spectrum of M/sub 3/(CO)/sub 12/ (M = Fe, Ru, Os), the major spectral changes for SH/sub 2/M/sub 3/(CO)/sub 9/ (M = Fe, Ru, Os) are the loss of a band corresponding to direct M-M interactions and the appearance of bands due to a mixture of energy-equivalent M-H-M and M-S interactions. The spectra also show a substantial rearrangement of the bands due to the t/sub 2g/-like electrons, which are usually considered M-CO ..pi.. bonding. An antibonding interaction between a S orbital and the t/sub 2g/-like orbitals is responsible for a unique band in the spectra which occurs at high ionization energy between the M-M bonding band and the main t/sub 2//sub g/-like band. 12 figures, 9 tables

  13. Field lysimeter facility for evaluating the performance of commercial solidified low-level waste. [Shallow land burial

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, M.B.; Graham, M.J.; Gee, G.W.

    1984-11-01

    Analyzing the potential migration of radionuclides from sites containing solid low-level wastes requires knowledge of contaminant concentrations in the soil solution surrounding the waste. This soil solution concentration is generally referred to as the source term and is determined by such factors as the concentration of radionuclides in the solid waste, the rate of leachate formation, the concentration of dissolved species in the leachate, any solubility reactions occurring when the leachate contacts the soil, and the rate of water flow in the soil surrounding the waste. A field lysimeter facility established at the Hanford site is being used to determine typical source terms in arid climates for commercial low-level wastes solidifed with cement, Dow polymer (vinyl ester-styrene), and bitumen. The field lysimeter facility consists of 10, 3-m-deep by 1.8-m-dia closed-bottom lysimeters situated around a 4-m-deep by 4-m-dia central instrument caisson. Commercial cement and Dow polymer waste samples were removed from 210-L drums and placed in 8 of the lysimeters. Two bitumen samples are planned to be emplaced in the facility's remaining 2 lysimeters during 1984. The central caisson provides access to the instrumentation in the individual lysimeters and allows selective sampling of the soil and waste. Suction candles (ceramic cups) placed around the waste forms will be used to periodically collect soil-water samples for chemical analysis. Meteorological data, soil moisture content, and soil temperature are automatically monitored at the facility. Characterization of the soils and waste forms have been partially completed. These data consist of moisture release characteristics, particle-size distribution, and distributions and concentrations of radionuclides in the waste forms. 11 references, 12 figures, 5 tables.

  14. Actinide cross section program at ORELA

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbs, J. W.T.

    1980-01-01

    The actinide cross section program at ORELA, the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator, is aimed at obtaining accurate neutron cross sections (primarily fission, capture, and total) for actinide nuclides which occur in fission reactors. Such cross sections, measured as a function of neutron energy over as wide a range of energies as feasible, comprise a data base that permits calculated predictions of the formation and removal of these nuclides in reactors. The present program is funded by the Division of Basic Energy Sciences of DOE, and has components in several divisions at ORNL. For intensively ..cap alpha..-active nuclides, many of the existing fission cross section data have been provided by underground explosions. New measurement techniques, developed at ORELA, now permit linac measurements on fissionable nuclides with alpha half-lives as short as 28 years. Capture and capture-plus-fission measurements utilize scintillation detectors (of capture ..gamma.. rays and fission neutrons) in which pulse shape discrimination plays an important role. Total cross sections can be measured at ORELA on samples of only a few milligrams. A simultaneous program of chemical and isotopic analyses of samples irradiated in EBR-II is in progress to provide benchmarks for the existing differential measurements. These analyses are being studied with updated versions of ORIGEN and with sensitivity determinations. Calculations of the sensitivity to cross section changes of various aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle are also being made. Even in this relatively mature field, many cross sections still require improvements to provide an adequate data base. Examples of recent techniques and measurements are presented. 12 figures, 3 tables.

  15. Testicular obstruction: clinicopathological studies.

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, W. F.; Levison, D. A.; Parkinson, M. C.; Parslow, J. M.; Royle, M. G.

    1990-01-01

    Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 14 PMID:2241062

  16. Phase separation dynamics and lateral organization of two-component lipid membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, K; Mouritsen, O G

    1995-01-01

    The non-equilibrium dynamic ordering process of coexisting phases has been studied for two-component lipid bilayers composed of saturated di-acyl phospholipids with different acyl chain lengths, such as DC14PC-DC18PC and DC12PC-DC18PC. By means of a microscopic interaction model and computer-simulation techniques the non-equilibrium properties of these two mixtures have been determined with particular attention paid to the effects of the non-equilibrium ordering process on membrane heterogeneity in terms of local and global lateral membrane organization. The results reveal that a sudden temperature change that takes the lipid mixture from the fluid one-phase region into the gel-fluid phase-coexistence region leads to the formation of a large number of small lipid domains which slowly are growing in time. The growth of the lipid domains, which is limited by long-range diffusion of the lipid molecules within the two-dimensional membrane plane, gives rise to the existence of a highly heterogeneous percolative-like structure with a network of interfacial regions that have properties different from those of the phase-separated gel and fluid bulk phases. The results, which are discussed in relation to recent experimental observations interpreted in terms of a percolative-like membrane structure within the two phase region (Almeida, P.F.F., Vaz, W.L.C., and T.E. Thompson. 1992. Biochemistry 31:7198-7210), suggest that non-equilibrium effects may influence lipid domain formation and membrane organization on various length and time scales. Such effects might be of importance in relation to membrane processes that require molecular mobility of the membrane components in restricted geometrical environments of the compartmentalized lipid membrane. Images FIGURE 6 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 PMID:8519994

  17. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling and Analysis Plan for Calendar Year 2005

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-30

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2005 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2005 will be in accordance with DOE Order 540.1 requirements and the following goals: (1) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (2) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (3) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (4) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2005 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation (Figure A.1). Modifications to the CY 2005 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan.

  18. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling and Analysis Plan for Calendar Year 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Elvado Environmental LLC for the Environmental Compliance Department ES&H Division, Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    2003-09-30

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2004 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2004 will be in accordance with the following requirements of DOE Order 5400.1: (1) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (2) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (3) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (4) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2004 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation (Figure A.1). Modifications to the CY 2004 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells, or wells could be added or removed from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan.

  19. Evaluation of simulated acid precipitation effects on forest microcosms. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.; Strickland, R.C.; Weatherford, F.P.; Noggle, J.C.

    1984-04-01

    Microcosms were treated for a 30-month period with simulated precipitation acidified to four pH levels (5.7, 4.5, 4.0, and 3.5) to evaluate the impact of acid precipitation on foliar leaching, plant nutrient content, soil leaching, soil nutrient content, and litter decomposition. Direct effects of acid precipitation on diameter growth, bud break, leaf senescence, chlorophyll content, stomatal size, stomatal density, photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration, and cuticle erosion were evaluated on tulip poplar, white oak, and Virginia pine seedlings growing as mixed stands in the microcosms. None of the plant physiological or morphological parameters evaluated responded in a statistically significant manner as a result of treatment. A significant treatment canopy interaction was observed in the form of a 60 percent increase in calcium input in throughfall in response to the pH 3.5 treatment. Foliar nutrient content did not change in response to treatment nor did field measurements of decomposer activity. Soil analysis indicated a significantly lower concentration of exchangeable calcium and magnesium in the top 3.5 cm of the mineral soil in association with the pH 3.5 treatment. Soil leachate concentrations exhibited significant increases at both the 25 and 50 cm depths. However, at the 100 cm depth no significant response in concentration or elemental loss from the system was observed. Laboratory respiration measurements indicated a small, but statistically significant reduction in decomposer activity in the lower litter (02) horizon. This reduction was masked in the field measurements of decomposer activity due to the relatively small contribution of the 02 to total soil respiration. 38 references, 12 figures, 18 tables.

  20. Molecular dynamics investigation of the structure of a fully hydrated gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer.

    PubMed Central

    Tu, K; Tobias, D J; Blasie, J K; Klein, M L

    1996-01-01

    We report the results of a constant pressure and temperature molecular dynamics simulation of a gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer with nw = 11.8 water molecules/lipid at 19 degrees C. The results of the simulation were compared in detail with a variety of x-ray and neutron diffraction data. The average positions of specific carbon atoms along the bilayer normal and the interlamellar spacing and electron density profile were in very good agreement with neutron and x-ray diffraction results. The area per lipid and the details of the in-plane hydrocarbon chain structure were in excellent agreement with wide-angle x-ray diffraction results. The only significant deviation is that the chains met in a pleated arrangement at the bilayer center, although they should be parallel. Novel discoveries made in the present work include the observation of a bimodal headgroup orientational distribution. Furthermore, we found that there are a significant number of gauche conformations near the ends of the hydrocarbon chains and, in addition to verifying a previous suggestion that there is partial rotational ordering in the hydrocarbon chains, that the two chains in a given molecule are inequivalent with respect to rotations. Finally, we have investigated the lipid/water interface and found that the water penetrates beneath the headgroups, but not as far as the carbonyl groups, that the phosphates are strongly hydrated almost exclusively at the nonesterified oxygen atoms, and that the hydration of the ammonium groups is more diffuse, with some water molecules concentrated in the grooves between the methyl groups. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 16 PMID:8789079

  1. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling and Analysis Plan for Calendar Year 2003

    SciTech Connect

    2002-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2003 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2003 will be in accordance with the following requirements of DOE Order 5400.1: (1) to evaluate and maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (2) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (3) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (4) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2003 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation (Figure A.1). Modifications to the CY 2003 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells, or wells could be added or removed from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan.

  2. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling and Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    2001-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2002 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2002 will be in accordance with the following requirements of DOE Order 5400.1: to evaluate and maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2002 will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation (Figure A.1). Modifications to the CY 2002 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells, or wells could be added or removed from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan.

  3. Porphyrin electrode films prepared by electrooxidation of metalloprotoporphyrins

    SciTech Connect

    Macor, K.A.; Spiro, T.G.

    1983-08-24

    Electrooxidation in organic solvents of the dimethyl esters of several metalloprotoporphyrins (PP) (Ni/sup II/PP, Zn/sup II/PP, Co/sup II/PP, (Fe/sup III/PP)Cl, (Fe/sup III/PP)/sub 2/O, and (Cr/sup III/PP)/sub 2/O) leads to the deposition of thick (approx. 1000 monolayer equivalents), electroactive porphyrin films, which have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry and absorption spectroscopy on transparent SnO/sub 2/ electrodes. The films are stable toward organic solvents and aqueous acids and bases, but are removed by treatment with hot concentrated acids. The resonance Raman spectrum of the NiPP film indicates that one of the two vinyl groups is saturated on most of the porphyrin units. Deposition continues for some minutes after the current is interrupted. This evidence is consistent with a mechanism involving electroinitiated cationic vinyl polymerization. No film is formed if the metal, rather than the ring, is oxidized. Thus the first oxidation step of Co/sup II/PP, to (Co/sup III/PP)/sup +/, does not support film formation (although the potential is as high as for ring oxidation in ZnPP), but the second step, to (Co/sup III/PP)/sup 2 +/, does. Lack of film formation for (Mn/sup III/PP)Cl and (Cr/sup IV/PP)O suggests metal, rather than ring oxidation, to Mn/sup IV/ and Cr/sup V/. However, (CrPP)/sub 2/O oxidation does produce a film, suggesting ring oxidation, analogous to (FePP)/sub 2/O, which also produces a film. However, while (CrPP)/sub 2/O is incorporated intact into the film, the (FePP)/sub 2/O film contains monomer units. Incorporation of other metal ions can be accomplished by soaking a ZnPP-coated electrode in H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ followed by contact wtih a solution of the metal dihalide in refluxing DMF. The porphyrin sites are accessible to small ions, as shown by chloride coordination of ZnPP film upon soaking in chloride solution. 49 references, 13 figures, 1 table.

  4. Expanding the scope of lamellar keratoplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Rich, L F

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether applications of current technology, such as cryolathe and excimer laser, might improve outcomes and increase use of lamellar keratoplasty. METHODS: Six studies were performed, beginning with animals and progressing to human subjects. The first study compared cryolathed with hand-dissected rabbit corneas to ascertain which created a smoother donor interface. The second animal pilot study was done to determine whether thickness of donor cornea resection could be accurately predicted with the cryolathe. A prospective animal trial was then undertaken to compare lamellar keratoplasty outcomes using cryolathed versus hand-dissected tissue. The fourth work extrapolated previous animal findings to lamellar keratoplasty in human disease. Finally, two ongoing studies are described. The first explores the possibility of sutureless lamellar keratoplasty. The second utilizes the excimer laser to dissect the recipient stromal bed. RESULTS: The initial animal pilot study demonstrated a clearer stromal surface in cryolathed versus hand-dissected corneal tissue. The second pilot showed that plano-powered donor tissue could be generated to predetermined thickness. The prospective animal trial revealed that clear grafts of intended thickness could be obtained with cryolathing. Human studies suggested that lamellar keratoplasty using cryolathe-prepared donor tissue may offer superior results to free-hand dissection. Finally, one ongoing study indicates that sutureless lamellar keratoplasty is untenable, and the other shows that clear grafts can be obtained by combining cryolathed donor tissue with recipient photoablation. CONCLUSION: This body of work demonstrates that use of new lamellar keratoplasty technology may offer expanded scope and better outcomes than traditional lamellar keratoplasty techniques. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4A FIGURE 4B FIGURE 8A FIGURE 8B FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 10B FIGURE 11A FIGURE 11B FIGURE 12A FIGURE 12B FIGURE 13

  5. M6.0 South Napa Earthquake Forecasting on the basis of jet stream precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    Currently earthquake prediction research methods can be divided into the crust change, radon concentration, well water level, animal behavior, Very high frequency (VHF) signals, GPS/TEC in ionospheric variations, thermal infrared radiation (TIR) anomalies. Before major earthquakes (M> 6) occurred, jet stream in the epicenter area will interrupt or velocity flow lines cross. That meaning is that before earthquake happen, atmospheric pressure in high altitude suddenly dropped during 6~12 hours (Wu & Tikhonov, 2014). This technique has been used to predict the strong earthquakes in real time, and then pre-registered on the website. For example: M6.0 Northern California earthquake on 2014/08/24(figure1) , M6.6 Russia earthquake on 2013/10/12(figure2), As far as 2014/08/24 M6.6 earthquake in CA, USA, the front end of the 60knots speed line was at the S.F. on 2014/06/16 12:00, and then after 69 days ,M6.1 earthquake happened. We predicted that magnitude is larger than 5.5 but the period is only 30 days on 2014/07/16 . The deviation of predicted point was about 70 km. Lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere (LAI) coupling model may be explained this phenomenon : Ionization of the air produced by an increased emanation of radon at epicenter. The water molecules in the air react with these ions, and then release heat. The heat result in temperature rise in the air. They are also accompanied by a large-scale change in the atmospheric pressure and jet streams morphology.We obtain satisfactory accuracy of estimation of the epicenter location. As well we define the short alarm period. That's the positive aspects of our forecast. However, estimates of magnitude jet contain a big uncertainty.Reference:H.C Wu, I.N. Tikhonov, 2014, "Jet streams anomalies as possible short-term precursors of earthquakes with M>6.0", Research in geophysics, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4081/ rg.2014.4939 http://www.pagepress.org/journals/index.php/rg/article/view/rg.2014.4939

  6. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling and Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2008-12-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2009 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2009 will be in accordance with DOE Order 540.1 requirements and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2009 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2009 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan

  7. Calendar Year 2008 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2009-12-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2008 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2008 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2008 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2008 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the

  8. Preliminary investigation of a technique to separate fission noble metals from fission product mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mellinger, G.B.; Jensen, G.A.

    1982-08-01

    A variation of the gold-ore fire assay technique was examined as a method for recovering Pd, Rh and Ru from fission products. The mixture of fission product oxides is combined with glass-forming chemicals, a metal oxide such as PbO (scavenging agent), and a reducing agent such as charcoal. When this mixture is melted, a metal button is formed which extracts the noble metals. The remainder cools to form a glass for nuclear waste storage. Recovery depended only on reduction of the scavenger oxide to metal. When such reduction was achieved, no difference in noble metal recovery efficiency was found among the scavengers studied (PbO, SnO, CuO, Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Sb/sub 2/O/sub 3/). Not all reducing agents studied, however, were able to reduce all scavenger oxides to metal. Only graphite would reduce SnO and CuO and allow noble metal recovery. The scavenger oxides Sb/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and PbO, however, were reduced by all of the reducing agents tested. Similar noble metal recovery was found with each. Lead oxide was found to be the most promising of the potential scavengers. It was reduced by all of the reducing agents tested, and its higher density may facilitate the separation. Use of lead oxide also appeared to have no deterimental effect on the glass quality. Charcoal was identified as the preferred reducing agent. As long as a separable metal phase was formed in the melt, noble metal recovery was not dependent on the amount of reducing agent and scavenger oxide. High glass viscosities inhibited separation of the molten scavenger, while low viscosities allowed volatile loss of RuO/sub 4/. A viscosity of approx. 20 poise at the processing temperature offered a good compromise between scavenger separation and Ru recovery. Glasses in which PbO was used as the scavenging agent were homogeneous in appearance. Resistance to leaching was close to that of certain waste glasses reported in the literature. 12 figures. 7 tables.

  9. A twin study on age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, S M

    1994-01-01

    ; this included the one dizygotic pair which was discordant for basal laminar drusen. The data of this study strongly suggest a genetic predisposition to AMD. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 1 (cont.) FIGURE 2 FIGURE 2 (cont.) FIGURE 2 (cont.) FIGURE 3 FIGURE 3 (cont.) FIGURE 3 (cont.) FIGURE 3 (cont.) FIGURE 4 FIGURE 4 (cont.) FIGURE 5 FIGURE 5 (cont.) FIGURE 5 (cont.) FIGURE 6 FIGURE 6 (cont.) FIGURE 7 FIGURE 7 (cont.) FIGURE 8 FIGURE 8 (cont.) FIGURE 9 FIGURE 9 (cont.) FIGURE 9 (cont.) FIGURE 10 FIGURE 10 (cont.) FIGURE 11 FIGURE 11 (cont.) FIGURE 11 (cont.) FIGURE 12 FIGURE 12 (cont.) FIGURE 12 (cont.) PMID:7886884

  10. The Pajarito Plateau: a bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathien, Frances Joan; Allen, Craig D.; Steen, Charlie R.

    1993-01-01

    Pajarito Plateau is described as the high tableland that lies between the Jemez Mountains on the west and the Rio Grande on the east. From north to south, it extends from the Chama Valley to La Cañada de Cochiti (Hewett 1906:14)(Figure 1). Because human activity rarely stops at such definite boundaries, major ethnographic studies of Tewa (San Ildefonso and Santa Clara) and Keres (Cochiti) linguistic groups are included. (Even though most of the historic pueblos occupied by the Tewa and Keres are not located on the Pajarito Plateau, oral traditions and archaeological data suggest that these groups once occupied sites on the plateau.) Towa studies are not included because Steen believed Towa ancestors were not involved in major cultural developments of the Pajarito Plateau. In addition, a bibliography of the Jemez area (home of Towa people) has been prepared by Michael Elliott (1982) and included with his nomination of large Pueblo sites near Jemez Springs to the National Register of Historic Places that is on file at the Museum of New Mexico, Laboratory of Anthropology, in Santa Fe. Both Steen and Mathien included references to geographically and historically related material that does not focus on the Pajarito Plateau but, nonetheless, is important to understanding the area's archaeology and physical environment, for example, lithic resources available from Cerro Pedernal or in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains.

  11. Retinal photic injury in normal and scorbutic monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Tso, M O

    1987-01-01

    disruption of the blood-retinal barrier. The photo-oxidative reaction appears to linger, resulting in chronic retinal degeneration. It is hypothesized that in some forms of age-related macular degeneration, patients suffer from repeated mild photic insult throughout their lifetime. Aging has been associated with subclinical scurvy, which leads to even greater susceptibility to photic injury. Although ascorbate moderates many biochemical functions of the body and helps the retina ameliorate photo-oxidative injury, it should be regarded as a nutritional supplement to maintain health when consumed in appropriate amounts and not as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of severe insults. Images FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 3 A FIGURE 3 B FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 4 C FIGURE 4 D FIGURE 4 E FIGURE 5 A FIGURE 5 B FIGURE 5 C FIGURE 5 D FIGURE 5 E FIGURE 5 F FIGURE 6 A FIGURE 6 B FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 7 C FIGURE 7 D FIGURE 7 E FIGURE 7 F FIGURE 8 A FIGURE 8 B FIGURE 8 C FIGURE 9 A FIGURE 9 B FIGURE 9 C FIGURE 9 D FIGURE 9 E FIGURE 9 F FIGURE 10 A FIGURE 10 B FIGURE 10 C FIGURE 10 D FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 11 C FIGURE 11 D FIGURE 11 E FIGURE 11 F FIGURE 12 A FIGURE 12 B FIGURE 13 A FIGURE 13 B FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 A FIGURE 15 B FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 A FIGURE 18 B FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 A FIGURE 20 B FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 A FIGURE 22 B FIGURE 23 A FIGURE 23 B FIGURE 24 A FIGURE 24 B FIGURE 25 A FIGURE 25 B FIGURE 26 A FIGURE 26 B FIGURE 26 C FIGURE 26 D FIGURE 27 A FIGURE 27 B PMID:3447341

  12. Verification of hydrological processes using the ACRU agro-hydrological modelling system for simulating potential climate change impacts in an alpine watershed in Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemeth, M. W.; Kienzle, S. W.; Byrne, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    important to determine if outputs from the model are consistent with the behaviour of the hydrological system, and are based on comprehensive statistical analyses. Verification was done to generate confidence in the various scenarios of hydrological impacts within the UNSR watershed. After the model has been determined to be within physically meaningful ranges, different climate change scenarios will be applied to baseline data and integrated into the model to simulate the impacts of expected environmental changes. An ensemble of GCMs will be used to simulate the potential impacts of expected environmental changes, such as a decreased snowpack due to warming winter temperatures. References: Schulze, R.E.; Lorentz, S.; Kienzle, S.W.; Perks, L. 2004: Modelling the impacts of land-use and climate change on hydrological responses in the mixed underdeveloped / developed Mgeni catchment, South Africa. In: Kabat, P. et al. (Eds.): Vegetation, Water, Humans and the Climate A New Perspective on an Interactive System. BAHC-IGBP Publication, Springer, 17pp, with 14 Figures and 2 tables

  13. Adverse external ocular effects of topical ophthalmic therapy: an epidemiologic, laboratory, and clinical study.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, F M

    1983-01-01

    probable ones. Factors relating to the development of papillary contact-lens reactions were daily wear, number of days of wear, and, especially, the preservatives to which the patients were exposed. Reactions occurred more often with soft lenses than with hard ones. Of patients with drug reactions, 5.22% had two different ones simultaneously. Coexisting reactions to pharmacologically active agents were also present in 15% of patients who reacted to preservatives in contact lens solutions. The ocular tissues that were affected by each kind of drug reaction were tabulated, and the relative degrees and sequences of involvement were discussed. The frequencies with which particular drugs, physical ag Images FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 15 A FIGURE 15 B FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 5 A FIGURE 5 B FIGURE 5 C FIGURE 5 D FIGURE 6 A FIGURE 6 B FIGURE 6 C FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 8 A FIGURE 8 B FIGURE 9 A FIGURE 9 B FIGURE 9 C FIGURE 9 D FIGURE 10 A FIGURE 10 B FIGURE 10 C FIGURE 10 D FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 11 C FIGURE 11 D FIGURE 12 A FIGURE 12 B FIGURE 12 C FIGURE 12 D FIGURE 14 FIGURE 16 A FIGURE 16 B FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 A FIGURE 19 B FIGURE 20 A FIGURE 20 B FIGURE 21 A FIGURE 21 B FIGURE 22 A FIGURE 22 B FIGURE 22 C FIGURE 23 A FIGURE 23 B FIGURE 23 C FIGURE 23 D PMID:6676985

  14. Modeling the effect of active layer deepening on stocks of soil organic carbon in the Pechora River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, P.; Hugelius, G.; Marchenko, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    and more abrupt in the Continuous and discontinuous regions. References: Hugelius, G. et al.(2011), High-resolution mapping of ecosystem carbon storage and potential effects of permafrost thaw in periglacial terrain, European Russian Arctic, J. Geophys. Res., 116, G03024, doi:10.1029/2010JG001606; Hugelius, G. et al. (in press) The Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database: spatially distributed datasets of permafrost soil coverage and soil C storage in the northern permafrost regions, Earth System Science Data Discussions; Marchenko, S. et al. (2008) Numerical Modeling of Spatial Permafrost Dynamics in Alaska, In Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Permafrost, Fairbanks, Alaska, Vol. 2, pp. 1125-1130; Stendel, M. (2011) Size matters - very high resolution permafrost simulations on the 4 km scale in Northeast European Russia, Geophysical Research Abstracts 13 Figure 1. The change of the proportion of 0-100 cm Gelisol SOCC in the active layer in different permafrost extent zones.

  15. Calendar Year 2003 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-30

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2003 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2003 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The CY 2003 monitoring data were obtained under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT) and several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Data contained in this report meet applicable requirements of DOE Order 5400.1 and DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program), and address requirements of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE 2003a) regarding evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality: (1) in areas which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (DOE Order 5400.1 surveillance monitoring) and (2) in areas where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (DOE Order 5400.1 exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2003 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities in the Bear Creek, East Fork, and Chestnut Ridge Regime. Section 2 briefly describes the hydrogeologic context and generalized extent of groundwater

  16. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2009-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2010 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2010 will be in accordance with requirements of DOE Order 540.1A and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2010 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2010 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan

  17. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2007-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2008 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2008 will be in accordance with DOE Order 540.1 requirements and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2008 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation (Figure A.1). Modifications to the CY 2008 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and

  18. Calendar Year 2005 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    2006-09-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2005 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2005 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The CY 2005 monitoring data were obtained under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT) and several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Data contained in this report meet applicable requirements of DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program) regarding evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). However, detailed analysis, evaluation, and interpretation of the CY 2005 monitoring data is deferred to the ''Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium'' (BWXT 2006). For each monitoring well, spring, and surface water sampling station included in this report, the GWPP Compendium provides: (1) pertinent well installation and construction information; (2) a complete sampling history, including sampling methods and

  19. Calendar Year 2007 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2008-12-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2007 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2007 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2007 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT), and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). In December 2007, the BWXT corporate name was changed to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12), which is applied to personnel and organizations throughout CY 2007 for this report. Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2007 monitoring results fulfill requirements of

  20. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2010-12-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2011 will be in accordance with requirements of DOE Order 540.1A and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2011 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2011 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan

  1. Calendar Year 2004 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2005-09-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2004 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2004 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The CY 2004 monitoring data were obtained under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT) and several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Data contained in this report meet applicable requirements of DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program) regarding evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). However, detailed analysis, evaluation, and interpretation of the CY 2004 monitoring data is deferred to the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium (BWXT 2005). For each monitoring well, spring, and surface water sampling station included in this report, the GWPP Compendium provides: (1) pertinent well installation and construction information; (2) a complete sampling history, including sampling methods and

  2. Calendar Year 2010 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department Of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2011-12-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2010 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2010 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2010 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2010 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the

  3. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface water Sampling and Analysis Plan for Calendar Year 2006

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2006-01-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2006 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2006 will be in accordance with DOE Order 540.1 requirements and the following goals: {sm_bullet} to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; {sm_bullet} to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; {sm_bullet} to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and ! to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2006 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation (Figure A.1). Modifications to the CY 2006 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of

  4. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Elvado Environmental, LLC

    2011-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2012 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2012 is in accordance with the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2012 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. Each modification to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as an addendum to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding

  5. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 121: Storage Tanks and Miscellaneous Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-06-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 121, Storage Tanks and Miscellaneous Sites. CAU 121 is currently listed in Appendix III of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO, 1996) and consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS): CAS 12-01-01, Aboveground Storage Tank; CAS 12-01-02, Aboveground Storage Tank; and CAS 12-22-26, Drums; 2 AST's. CASs 12-01-01 and 12-01-02 are located to the west of the Area 12 Camp, and CAS 12-22-26 is located near the U-12g Tunnel, also known as G-tunnel, in Area 12 (Figure 1). The aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) present at CASs 12-01-01 and 12-01-02 will be removed and disposed of at an appropriate facility. Soil below the ASTs will be sampled to identify whether it has been impacted with chemicals or radioactivity above action levels. If impacted soil above action levels is present, the soil will be excavated and disposed of at an appropriate facility. The CAS 12-22-26 site is composed of two overlapping areas, one where drums had formerly been stored, and the other where an AST was used to dispense diesel for locomotives used at G-tunnel. This area is located above an underground radioactive materials area (URMA), and within an area that may have elevated background radioactivity because of containment breaches during nuclear tests and associated tunnel reentry operations. CAS 12-22-26 does not include the URMA or the elevated background radioactivity. An AST that had previously been used to store liquid magnesium chloride (MgCl) was properly disposed of several years ago, and releases from this tank are not an environmental concern. The diesel AST will be removed and disposed of at an appropriate facility. Soil at the former drum area and the diesel AST area will be sampled to identify whether it has been impacted by releases, from the drums or the

  6. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling and Analysis Plan for Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect

    2006-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2007 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2007 will be in accordance with DOE Order 540.1 requirements and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2007 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation (Figure A.1). Modifications to the CY 2007 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and

  7. Influence of intraocular lens material and design on postoperative intracapsular cellular reactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Apple, D J

    2000-01-01

    showed that the opacification between them (ILO) may have different forms. CONCLUSIONS: Control of postoperative intracapsular cellular proliferation is important in avoiding 3 significant clinical complications. Postoperative lens epithelial cell proliferation is involved in the pathogenesis of PCO, ACO, and ILO, the latter being a newly described form of opacification within the capsular bag related to piggyback IOL implantation. IOL material and design are important factors influencing the outcome of these complications. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2A FIGURE 2B FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4A FIGURE 4B FIGURE 5A FIGURE 5B FIGURE 5C FIGURE 5D FIGURE 5E FIGURE 5F FIGURE 5G FIGURE 5H FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8A FIGURE 8B FIGURE 9A FIGURE 9B FIGURE 10A FIGURE 10B FIGURE 10C FIGURE 10D FIGURE 10E FIGURE 10F FIGURE 10G FIGURE 10H FIGURE 11A FIGURE 11B FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13A FIGURE 13B FIGURE 14A FIGURE 14B FIGURE 15A FIGURE 15B FIGURE 16A FIGURE 16B FIGURE 17A FIGURE 17B FIGURE 18A FIGURE 18B FIGURE 18C FIGURE 18D FIGURE 18E FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 PMID:11190028

  8. Calendar Year 2006 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2007-09-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2006 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2006 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2006 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT), and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., preparing SAPs, coordinating sample collection, and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2006 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and