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Sample records for 12s rrna gene

  1. Molecular detection of adulteration in chicken products based on mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Abuzinadah, Osama H A; Yacoub, Haitham Ahmed; El Ashmaoui, Hassan M; Ramadan, Hassan A I

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study is to detect the fraudulent in chicken products constitutes in order to protect consumers in Saudi Arabia from illegal substitutions. Two different approaches were used in this study, direct sequencing of specific fragments of amplified mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in addition to species-specific PCR primers for confirmation of the obtained Blast search results. The results showed that all processed chicken products were identified as chicken (Gallus gallus) by 90-98% homology depending on obtained sequence quality. Samples labeled with chicken luncheon (samples tested in this study) were identified as turkey meat (Meleagris gallopavo) by 98% homology, suggesting adulteration with inedible parts of turkey in chicken luncheon ingredients. The results showed also that not only chicken luncheon was mixed with inedible parts of turkey but also all chicken products tested in this study (chicken balls, chicken burger, chicken sausage and chicken mined meat) contained this turkey meat. Applying methods used in this study could be useful for accurate and rapid identification of commercial processed meat.

  2. Phylogenetic relationships within caniform carnivores based on analyses of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Ledje, C; Arnason, U

    1996-12-01

    The complete 12S rRNA gene of 32 carnivore species, including four feliforms and 28 caniforms, was sequenced. The sequences were aligned on the basis of their secondary structures and used in phylogenetic analyses that addressed several evolutionary relationships within the Caniformia. The analyses showed an unresolved polytomy of the basic caniform clades; pinnipeds, mustelids, procyonids, skunks, Ailurus (lesser panda), ursids, and canids. The polytomy indicates a major diversification of caniforms during a relatively short period of time. The lesser panda was distinct from other caniforms, suggesting its inclusion in a monotypic family, Ailuridae. The giant panda and the bears were joined on the same branch. The skunks are traditionally included in the family Mustelidae. The present analysis, however, showed a less close molecular relationship between the skunks and the remaining Mustelidae (sensu stricto) than between Mustelidae (sensu stricto) and Procyonidae, making Mustelidae (sensu lato) paraphyletic. The results suggest that the skunks should be included in a separate family, Mephitidae. Within the Pinnipedia, the grouping of walrus, sea lions, and fur seals was strongly supported. Analyses of a combined set of 12S rRNA and cytochrome b data were generally consistent with the findings based on each gene. PMID:8995061

  3. Mutational analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes in Tunisian patients with nonsyndromic hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna . E-mail: emna_mkaouar@mail2world.com; Tlili, Abdelaziz; Masmoudi, Saber; Louhichi, Nacim; Charfeddine, Ilhem; Amor, Mohamed Ben; Lahmar, Imed; Driss, Nabil; Drira, Mohamed; Ayadi, Hammadi; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2006-02-24

    We explored the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and the tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes in 100 Tunisian families affected with NSHL and in 100 control individuals. We identified the mitochondrial A1555G mutation in one out of these 100 families and not in the 100 control individuals. Members of this family harbouring the A1555G mutation showed phenotypic heterogeneity which could be explained by an eventual nuclear-mitochondrial interaction. So, we have screened three nuclear genes: GJB2, GJB3, and GJB6 but we have not found correlation between the phenotypic heterogeneity and variants detected in these genes. We explored also the entire mitochondrial 12S rRNA and the tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes. We detected five novel polymorphisms: T742C, T794A, A813G, C868T, and C954T, and 12 known polymorphisms in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene. None of the 100 families or the 100 controls were found to carry mutations in the tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} gene. We report here First mutational screening of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and the tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes in the Tunisian population which describes the second family harbouring the A1555G mutation in Africa and reveals novel polymorphisms in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene.

  4. New polymorphic mtDNA restriction site in the 12S rRNA gene detected in Tunisian patients with non-syndromic hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna Tlili, Abdelaziz; Masmoudi, Saber; Charfeddine, Ilhem; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2008-05-09

    The 12S rRNA gene was shown to be a hot spot for aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss since several deafness-associated mtDNA mutations were identified in this gene. Among them, we distinguished the A1555G, the C1494T and the T1095C mutations and C-insertion or deletion at position 961. One hundred Tunisian patients with non-syndromic hearing loss and 100 hearing individuals were analysed in this study. A PCR-RFLP analysis with HaeIII restriction enzyme showed the presence of the A1555G mutation in the 12S rRNA gene in only one out of the 100 patients. In addition, PCR-RFLP and radioactive PCR revealed the presence of a new HaeIII polymorphic restriction site in the same gene of 12S rRNA site in 4 patients with non-syndromic hearing loss. UVIDOC-008-XD analyses showed the presence of this new polymorphic restriction site with a variable heteroplasmic rates at position +1517 of the human mitochondrial genome. On the other hand, direct sequencing of the entire mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in the 100 patients and in 100 hearing individuals revealed the presence of the A750G and A1438G polymorphisms and the absence of the C1494T, T1095C and 961insC mutations in all the tested individuals. Sequencing of the whole mitochondrial genome in the 4 patients showing the new HaeIII polymorphic restriction site revealed only the presence of the A8860G transition in the MT-ATP6 gene and the A4769G polymorphism in the ND2 gene.

  5. [Differentiation of Bos grunniens, Bos Taurus, and Bubalus from meat products mixture based on mitochondrion 12S rRNA gene].

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Bai, Fan; Zhou, Ming-Liang; Zhang, Xiang-Yu; Wu, Deng-Jun

    2008-08-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequence is highly conserved within species. Gene 12S rRNA is able to endure degeneration and high temperature, which allows identification of feedstuff, fresh meat, processed meat, and traceability. In the present study, three unique restriction sites were detected in the fragments of mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene regions amplified with universal primer, which were able to distinguish Bos grunniens, Bos. taurus, and Bubalus in fresh meat and processed meat mixture. The fragment of yak was digested to 134 bp and 318 bp, scalper 134 bp and 318 bp, and buffalo 86 bp and 367 bp. The specific locus and digestion were verified by sequencing analysis. There was no difference between PCR amplification products from various treatments at different temperatures (i.e., 100, 120, 140, 160, and 180). However, the sig-nal was weak at 120 and above. This method is simple, fast and cheap in identification of fresh meat and processed meat.

  6. Further involvement of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in aminoglycoside-induced deafness: A novel type of heteroplasmy

    SciTech Connect

    Bacino, C.; Prezant, T.R.; Bu, X.

    1994-09-01

    Aminoglycoside-induced deafness has been linked recently to a predisposing mutation in the 3{prime} end of the small ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of human mitochondria (1555 A{yields}G) that makes the mitochondrial rRNA structurally more similar to its bacterial counterpart. This mutation was found in Chinese families in which the susceptibility to develop ototoxic deafness was inherited through the maternal lineage. However, the 1555 A{yields}G mutation was rarely found in sporadic patients in China, where aminoglycosides are commonly used. To further characterize the mutations predisposing to aminoglycoside ototoxicity, we analyzed the 12S rRNA gene in 35 sporadic patients without the 1555 mutation. Using single stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, heteroduplex (HD) analysis, sequencing, and allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization, we found that 3 of 35 sporadic patients had unique sequence changes in the 12S rRNA gene. Two of these changes were homoplasmic. One of the patients displayed a novel type of heteroplasmy, which we term multiplasmy, with one base deletion at nt 961 and different populations of mitochondrial DNA with varying numbers of inserted cytosines at that site.

  7. Phylogenetic relationships of the five extant Rhinoceros species (Rhinocerotidae, Perissodactyla) based on mitochondrial cytochrome b and 12S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Tougard, C; Delefosse, T; Hänni, C; Montgelard, C

    2001-04-01

    A major question in rhinocerotid phylogenetics concerns the position of the Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) with regard to the other extant Asian (Rhinoceros unicornis and R. sondaicus) and African (Diceros bicornis and Ceratotherium simum) species. We have examined this particular question through the phylogenetic analysis of the complete sequences of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and cytochrome b genes. Three additional perissodactyls (one tapir and two equids) plus several outgroup cetartiodactyls were included in the analysis. The analysis identified a basal rhinocerotid divergence between the African and the Asian species, with the Sumatran rhinoceros forming the sister group of the genus Rhinoceros. We estimate the Asian and African lineages to have diverged at about 26 million years before present.

  8. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the wolf spiders (Araneae: Lycosidae) using sequences from the 12S rRNA, 28S rRNA, and NADH1 genes: implications for classification, biogeography, and the evolution of web building behavior.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Nicholas P; Framenau, Volker W; Donnellan, Stephen C; Harvey, Mark S; Park, Yung-Chul; Austin, Andrew D

    2006-03-01

    Current knowledge of the evolutionary relationships amongst the wolf spiders (Araneae: Lycosidae) is based on assessment of morphological similarity or phylogenetic analysis of a small number of taxa. In order to enhance the current understanding of lycosid relationships, phylogenies of 70 lycosid species were reconstructed by parsimony and Bayesian methods using three molecular markers; the mitochondrial genes 12S rRNA, NADH1, and the nuclear gene 28S rRNA. The resultant trees from the mitochondrial markers were used to assess the current taxonomic status of the Lycosidae and to assess the evolutionary history of sheet-web construction in the group. The results suggest that a number of genera are not monophyletic, including Lycosa, Arctosa, Alopecosa, and Artoria. At the subfamilial level, the status of Pardosinae needs to be re-assessed, and the position of a number of genera within their respective subfamilies is in doubt (e.g., Hippasa and Arctosa in Lycosinae and Xerolycosa, Aulonia and Hygrolycosa in Venoniinae). In addition, a major clade of strictly Australasian taxa may require the creation of a new subfamily. The analysis of sheet-web building in Lycosidae revealed that the interpretation of this trait as an ancestral state relies on two factors: (1) an asymmetrical model favoring the loss of sheet-webs and (2) that the suspended silken tube of Pirata is directly descended from sheet-web building. Paralogous copies of the nuclear 28S rRNA gene were sequenced, confounding the interpretation of the phylogenetic analysis and suggesting that a cautionary approach should be taken to the further use of this gene for lycosid phylogenetic analysis.

  9. Ancient specimens and DNA contamination: a case study from the 12S rRNA gene sequence of the "Linh Duong" bovid ( Pseudonovibos spiralis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanin, Alexandre

    2002-03-01

    In 1993, several unusual horn sheaths, collected in the South of Vietnam, were regarded as evidence for a new mammal species, Pseudonovibos spiralis. However, the taxonomic status of P. spiralis remains a highly controversial subject: firstly, it has been related to three different groups of the family Bovidae: Antilopini (gazelles), Bovini (oxen, bisons, and buffaloes), and Caprini sensu lato (goats, sheep and allies). Secondly, certain horns have been shown to be faked. Most recently, it has been suggested, on the basis of 12S rRNA gene sequences, that P. spiralis was a new species of buffalo. I demonstrate here that this conclusion was inaccurate, and base this on the grounds that: (1) the putative sequence of P. spiralis is shown to be a chimera obtained from three different species: Bos taurus, Bubalus bubalis and Saiga tatarica, and (2) several factors indicate that the specimen used was not authentic. This new study confirms earlier suggestions that the horns used to formally describe P. spiralis were bogus and were in fact derived from the horns of domesticated cattle ( Bos taurus). The data suggest that P. spiralis never existed.

  10. Correspondence regarding Ballana et al., "Mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene mutations affect RNA secondary structure and lead to variable penetrance in hearing impairment".

    PubMed

    Abreu-Silva, R S; Batissoco, A C; Lezirovitz, K; Romanos, J; Rincon, D; Auricchio, M T B M; Otto, P A; Mingroni-Netto, R C

    2006-05-12

    Ballana et al. [E. Ballana, E. Morales, R. Rabionet, B. Montserrat, M. Ventayol, O. Bravo, P. Gasparini, X. Estivill, Mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene mutations affect RNA secondary structure and lead to variable penetrance in hearing impairment, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 341 (2006) 950-957] detected a T1291C mutation segregating in a Cuban pedigree with hearing impairment. They interpreted it as probably pathogenic, based on family history, RNA conformation prediction and its absence in a control group of 95 Spanish subjects. We screened a sample of 203 deaf subjects and 300 hearing controls (110 "European-Brazilians" and 190 "African-Brazilians") for the mitochondrial mutations A1555G and T1291C. Five deaf subjects had the T1291C substitution, three isolated cases and two familial cases. In the latter, deafness was paternally inherited or segregated with the A1555G mutation. This doesn't support the hypothesis of T1291C mutation being pathogenic. Two "African-Brazilian" controls also had the T1291C substitution. Six of the seven T1291C-carriers (five deaf and two controls) had mitochondrial DNA of African origin, belonging to macrohaplogroup L1/L2. Therefore, these data point to T1291C substitution as most probably an African non-pathogenic polymorphism.

  11. Ancient specimens and DNA contamination: a case study from the 12S rRNA gene sequence of the "Linh Duong" bovid (Pseudonovibos spiralis).

    PubMed

    Hassanin, Alexandre

    2002-03-01

    In 1993, several unusual horn sheaths, collected in the South of Vietnam, were regarded as evidence for a new mammal species, Pseudonovibos spiralis. However, the taxonomic status of P. spiralis remains a highly controversial subject: firstly, it has been related to three different groups of the family Bovidae: Antilopini (gazelles), Bovini (oxen, bisons, and buffaloes), and Caprini sensu lato (goats, sheep and allies). Secondly, certain horns have been shown to be faked. Most recently, it has been suggested, on the basis of 12S rRNA gene sequences, that P. spiralis was a new species of buffalo. I demonstrate here that this conclusion was inaccurate, and base this on the grounds that: (1) the putative sequence of P. spiralis is shown to be a chimera obtained from three different species: Bos taurus, Bubalus bubalis and Saiga tatarica, and (2) several factors indicate that the specimen used was not authentic. This new study confirms earlier suggestions that the horns used to formally describe P. spiralis were bogus and were in fact derived from the horns of domesticated cattle (Bos taurus). The data suggest that P. spiralis never existed. PMID:12046628

  12. Human TRMU encoding the mitochondrial 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate-methyltransferase is a putative nuclear modifier gene for the phenotypic expression of the deafness-associated 12S rRNA mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Qingfeng; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Li Ronghua; Mengesha, Emebet; Shohat, Mordechai; Estivill, Xavier; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@chmcc.org

    2006-04-21

    Nuclear modifier genes have been proposed to modulate the phenotypic manifestation of human mitochondrial 12S rRNA A1491G mutation associated with deafness in many families world-wide. Here we identified and characterized the putative nuclear modifier gene TRMU encoding a highly conserved mitochondrial protein related to tRNA modification. A 1937 bp TRMU cDNA has been isolated and the genomic organization of TRMU has been elucidated. The human TRMU gene containing 11 exons encodes a 421 residue protein with a strong homology to the TRMU-like proteins of bacteria and other homologs. TRMU is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, but abundantly in tissues with high metabolic rates including heart, liver, kidney, and brain. Immunofluorescence analysis of human 143B cells expressing TRMU-GFP fusion protein demonstrated that the human Trmu localizes and functions in mitochondrion. Furthermore, we show that in families with the deafness-associated 12S rRNA A1491G mutation there is highly suggestive linkage and linkage disequilibrium between microsatellite markers adjacent to TRMU and the presence of deafness. These observations suggest that human TRMU may modulate the phenotypic manifestation of the deafness-associated mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations.

  13. Relationships between parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Opiinae), fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) and their host plants based on 16S rRNA, 12S rRNA, and ND1 gene sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, N. J.; Md-Zain, B. M.; Yaakop, S.

    2013-11-01

    Opiinae is among the l0 largest subfamilies under the family Braconidae. Opiines species have great potential as natural enemies against fruit fly pests. Before using them as a biological control agent, construction of the phylogenetic trees could facilitate in the molecular identification of individual species and their relationships among members of the Opiines, as well as between Opiines and their host plants. Larval specimens of tephritids were collected from four crop species at five localities throughout the Peninsular Malaysia. A total of 44 specimens of opiines had successfully emerged from the hosts, fruit fly larvae. The DNA sequences of 12S and 16S rRNA were obtained for the braconids while the mitochondrial ND1 sequences were obtained for the tephritids species through polymerase chain reaction. Maximum Parsimony and Bayesian trees were constructed by using PAUP 4.0b10 and MrBayes 3.1.2 to identify the relationships among the taxa. This study illustrates the phylogenetic relationships among parasitoid opiines collected and reared from parasitized fruit flies. The phylogenetic trees constructed based on the mitochondrial 12S and 16S rRNA sequences exhibited similar topology and sequence divergence. The opiines were divided into several clades and subclades according to the genus and species. Each clade also was supported by the similar host plants with high support values. However, their pests were not specific, except for Bactrocera cucurbitae. This study has reconfirmed the associations between Opiinae, tephritids, and host plants based on molecular data.

  14. Identification of meats from red deer (Cervus elaphus), fallow deer (Dama dama), and roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) using polymerase chain reaction targeting specific sequences from the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, V; González, I; López-Calleja, I; Martín, I; Rojas, M; Hernández, P E; García, T; Martín, Rosario

    2007-06-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on oligonucleotide primers targeting the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene was applied to the specific identification of meats from red deer (Cervus elaphus), fallow deer (Dama dama), and roe deer (Capreolus capreolus). The use of a common reverse primer, together with forward specific primers for red deer, fallow deer, and roe deer, allowed the selective amplification of the desired cervid sequences. The specificity of each primer pair was verified by PCR analysis of DNA from various game and domestic meats. The assay can be useful for the accurate identification of meats from cervid species, avoiding mislabeling or fraudulent species substitution in meat products.

  15. Molecular evolution of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA in Ungulata (mammalia).

    PubMed

    Douzery, E; Catzeflis, F M

    1995-11-01

    The complete 12S rRNA gene has been sequenced in 4 Ungulata (hoofed eutherians) and 1 marsupial and compared to 38 available mammalian sequences in order to investigate the molecular evolution of the mitochondrial small-subunit ribosomal RNA molecule. Ungulata were represented by one artiodactyl (the collared peccary, Tayassu tajacu, suborder Suiformes), two perissodactyls (the Grevy's zebra, Equus grevyi, suborder Hippomorpha; the white rhinoceros, Ceratotherium simum, suborder Ceratomorpha), and one hyracoid (the tree hyrax, Dendrohyrax dorsalis). The fifth species was a marsupial, the eastern gray kangaroo (Macropus giganteus). Several transition/transversion biases characterized the pattern of changes between mammalian 12S rRNA molecules. A bias toward transitions was found among 12S rRNA sequences of Ungulata, illustrating the general bias exhibited by ribosomal and protein-encoding genes of the mitochondrial genome. The derivation of a mammalian 12S rRNA secondary structure model from the comparison of 43 eutherian and marsupial sequences evidenced a pronounced bias against transversions in stems. Moreover, transversional compensatory changes were rare events within double-stranded regions of the ribosomal RNA. Evolutionary characteristics of the 12S rRNA were compared with those of the nuclear 18S and 28S rRNAs. From a phylogenetic point of view, transitions, transversions and indels in stems as well as transversional and indels events in loops gave congruent results for comparisons within orders. Some compensatory changes in double-stranded regions and some indels in single-stranded regions also constituted diagnostic events. The 12S rRNA molecule confirmed the monophyly of infraorder Pecora and order Cetacea and demonstrated the monophyly of the suborder Ruminantia was not supported and the branching pattern between Cetacea and the artiodacytyl suborders Ruminantia and Suiformes was not established. The monophyly of the order Perissodactyla was evidenced

  16. Molecular and clinical characterisation of three Spanish families with maternally inherited non‐syndromic hearing loss caused by the 1494C→T mutation in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez‐Ballesteros, M; Olarte, M; Aguirre, L A; Galán, F; Galán, R; Vallejo, L A; Navas, C; Villamar, M; Moreno‐Pelayo, M A; Moreno, F; del Castillo, I

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the 12S rRNA gene of the mitochondrial genome are responsible for maternally inherited non‐syndromic hearing loss (NSHL), and for increased susceptibility to the ototoxicity of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Among these mutations, 1555A→G is the most prevalent in all populations tested so far. Recently, the 1494C→T mutation was reported in two large Chinese pedigrees with maternally inherited NSHL. In this study, sequencing of the 12S rRNA gene in a Spanish family with maternally inherited NSHL showed the presence of the 1494C→T mutation. An additional screening of 1339 unrelated Spanish patients with NSHL allowed the authors to find two other families with the mutation. Audiological data were obtained from 17 confirmed 1494C→T carriers, which showed that the hearing loss was sensorineural, bilateral and symmetrical, with a remarkable variability in age of onset and severity. Three carriers were asymptomatic. Three affected carriers had a history of treatment with aminoglycoside antibiotics. The mitochondrial genome of one affected person from each of these three families was entirely sequenced, and it was established that they belong to different mitochondrial haplogroups (H, U5b, U6a). The study results further support the pathogenic role of 1494C→T on hearing, and show that this mutation can be found in different Caucasian mitochondrial DNA backgrounds. PMID:17085680

  17. GJB2 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA susceptibility mutations in sudden deafness.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaitian; Sun, Liang; Zong, Ling; Wu, Xuan; Zhan, Yuan; Dong, Chang; Cao, Hui; Tang, Haocheng; Jiang, Hongyan

    2016-06-01

    Genetic susceptibility may play an important role in the pathogenesis of sudden deafness. However, the specific genes involved are largely unknown. We sought to explore the frequency of GJB2 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA susceptibility mutations in patients with sudden deafness. Between September 2011 and May 2012, 62 consecutive patients with sudden deafness were seen. In 50 of these, no etiological factors for sudden deafness were found. We detected GJB2 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA variants by direct sequencing in these 50 patients and in 53-aged matched controls with normal hearing. In addition, we undertook functional analyses of the mitochondrial mutations which we detected, applying structural and phylogenetic analysis. GJB2 sequencing identified six mutations, including three pathogenic mutations (c.235delC, c.299-300delAT, c.109G>A) and three polymorphisms, in the study participants, giving an allele frequency of 15.0 %. A homozygous c.109G>A mutation was detected in two participants. A total of 16 variants in mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene were identified in the participants. No significant differences were found in GJB2 heterozygosity or in mitochondrial 12S rRNA variants between patients with sudden deafness and in controls. Our results suggest that the homozygous GJB2 c.109G>A mutation may be a cause of sudden deafness involving both ears. This finding should increase awareness of the likely role of genetic factors in the etiology of sudden deafness in general.

  18. MRPS18CP2 alleles and DEFA3 absence as putative chromosome 8p23.1 modifiers of hearing loss due to mtDNA mutation A1555G in the 12S rRNA gene

    PubMed Central

    Ballana, Ester; Mercader, Josep Maria; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Estivill, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations account for at least 5% of cases of postlingual, nonsyndromic hearing impairment. Among them, mutation A1555G is frequently found associated with aminoglycoside-induced and/or nonsyndromic hearing loss in families presenting with extremely variable clinical phenotypes. Biochemical and genetic data have suggested that nuclear background is the main factor involved in modulating the phenotypic expression of mutation A1555G. However, although a major nuclear modifying locus was located on chromosome 8p23.1 and regardless intensive screening of the region, the gene involved has not been identified. Methods With the aim to gain insights into the factors that determine the phenotypic expression of A1555G mutation, we have analysed in detail different genetic and genomic elements on 8p23.1 region (DEFA3 gene absence, CLDN23 gene and MRPS18CP2 pseudogene) in a group of 213 A1555G carriers. Results Family based association studies identified a positive association for a polymorphism on MRPS18CP2 and an overrepresentation of DEFA3 gene absence in the deaf group of A1555G carriers. Conclusion Although none of the factors analysed seem to have a major contribution to the phenotype, our findings provide further evidences of the involvement of 8p23.1 region as a modifying locus for A1555G 12S rRNA gene mutation. PMID:18154640

  19. Characteristics of the nuclear (18S, 5.8S, 28S and 5S) and mitochondrial (12S and 16S) rRNA genes of Apis mellifera (Insecta: Hymenoptera): structure, organization, and retrotransposable elements

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, J J; Johnston, J S; Cannone, J J; Gutell, R R

    2006-01-01

    As an accompanying manuscript to the release of the honey bee genome, we report the entire sequence of the nuclear (18S, 5.8S, 28S and 5S) and mitochondrial (12S and 16S) ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-encoding gene sequences (rDNA) and related internally and externally transcribed spacer regions of Apis mellifera (Insecta: Hymenoptera: Apocrita). Additionally, we predict secondary structures for the mature rRNA molecules based on comparative sequence analyses with other arthropod taxa and reference to recently published crystal structures of the ribosome. In general, the structures of honey bee rRNAs are in agreement with previously predicted rRNA models from other arthropods in core regions of the rRNA, with little additional expansion in non-conserved regions. Our multiple sequence alignments are made available on several public databases and provide a preliminary establishment of a global structural model of all rRNAs from the insects. Additionally, we provide conserved stretches of sequences flanking the rDNA cistrons that comprise the externally transcribed spacer regions (ETS) and part of the intergenic spacer region (IGS), including several repetitive motifs. Finally, we report the occurrence of retrotransposition in the nuclear large subunit rDNA, as R2 elements are present in the usual insertion points found in other arthropods. Interestingly, functional R1 elements usually present in the genomes of insects were not detected in the honey bee rRNA genes. The reverse transcriptase products of the R2 elements are deduced from their putative open reading frames and structurally aligned with those from another hymenopteran insect, the jewel wasp Nasonia (Pteromalidae). Stretches of conserved amino acids shared between Apis and Nasonia are illustrated and serve as potential sites for primer design, as target amplicons within these R2 elements may serve as novel phylogenetic markers for Hymenoptera. Given the impending completion of the sequencing of the Nasonia genome

  20. Prevalence of Mitochondrial 12S rRNA Mutations Associated with Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guan, Min-Xin

    2005-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 12S rRNA is a hot spot for mutations associated with both aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss. Of those, the homoplasmic A1555G and C1494T mutations at a highly conserved decoding region of the 12S rRNA have been associated with hearing loss. These two mutations account for a significant number of…

  1. Mitochondrial 12S rRNA A827G mutation is involved in the genetic susceptibility to aminoglycoside ototoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Guangqian; Chen Zhibin; Wei Qinjun; Tian Huiqin; Li Xiaolu; Zhou Aidong; Bu Xingkuan; Cao Xin . E-mail: caoxin@njmu.edu.cn

    2006-08-11

    We have analyzed the clinical and molecular characterization of a Chinese family with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing impairment. Clinical evaluations revealed that only those family members who had a history of exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics subsequently developed hearing loss, suggesting mitochondrial genome involvement. Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes led to the identification of a homoplasmic A827G mutation in all maternal relatives, a mutation that was identified previously in a few sporadic patients and in another Chinese family with non-syndromic deafness. The pathogenicity of the A827G mutation is strongly supported by the occurrence of the same mutation in two independent families and several genetically unrelated subjects. The A827G mutation is located at the A-site of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene which is highly conserved in mammals. It is possible that the alteration of the tertiary or quaternary structure of this rRNA by the A827G mutation may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, thereby playing a role in the pathogenesis of hearing loss and aminoglycoside hypersensitivity. However, incomplete penetrance of hearing impairment indicates that the A827G mutation itself is not sufficient to produce clinical phenotype but requires the involvement of modifier factors for the phenotypic expression. Indeed, aminoglycosides may contribute to the phenotypic manifestation of the A827G mutation in this family. In contrast with the congenital or early-onset hearing impairment in another Chinese family carrying the A827G mutation, three patients in this pedigree developed hearing loss only after use of aminoglycosides. This discrepancy likely reflects the difference of genetic backgrounds, either mitochondrial haplotypes or nuclear modifier genes, between two families.

  2. Mitochondrial 12S rRNA variants in 1642 Han Chinese pediatric subjects with aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianxin; Li, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Yi; Yang, Aifen; Li, Ronghua; Zheng, Jing; Cai, Qin; Peng, Guanghua; Zheng, Wuwei; Tang, Xiaowen; Chen, Bobei; Chen, Jianfu; Liao, Zhisu; Yang, Li; Li, Yongyan; You, Junyan; Ding, Yu; Yu, Hong; Wang, Jindan; Sun, Dongmei; Zhao, Jianyue; Xue, Ling; Wang, Jieying; Guan, Min-Xin

    2010-01-01

    In this report, we investigated the frequency and spectrum of mitochondrial 12S rRNA variants in a large cohort of 1642 Han Chinese pediatric subjects with aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss. Mutational analysis of 12S rRNA gene in these subjects identified 68 (54 known and 14 novel) variants. The frequencies of known 1555A>G and 1494C>T mutations were 3.96% and 0.18%, respectively, in this cohort with nonsyndromic and aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. Prevalence of other putative deafness-associated mutation at positions 1095 and 961 were 0.61% and 1.7% in this cohort, respectively. Furthermore, the 745A>G, 792C>T, 801A>G, 839A>G, 856A>G, 1027A>G, 1192C>T, 1192C>A, 1310C>T, 1331A>G, 1374A>G and 1452T>C variants conferred increased sensitivity to ototoxic drugs or nonsyndromic deafness as they were absent in 449 Chinese controls and localized at highly conserved nucleotides of this rRNA. However, other variants appeared to be polymorphisms. Moreover, 65 Chinese subjects carrying the 1555A>G mutation exhibited bilateral and sensorineural hearing loss. A wide range of severity, age-of-onset and audiometric configuration was observed among these subjects. In particular, the sloping and flat shaped patterns were the common audiograms in individuals carrying the 1555A>G mutation. The phenotypic variability in subjects carrying these 12S rRNA mutations indicated the involvement of nuclear modifier genes, mitochondrial haplotypes, epigenetic and environmental factors in the phenotypic manifestation of these mutations. Therefore, our data demonstrated that mitochondrial 12S rRNA is the hot spot for mutations associated with aminoglycoside ototoxicity. PMID:20100600

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of oryx species using partial sequences of mitochondrial rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Khan, H A; Arif, I A; Al Farhan, A H; Al Homaidan, A A

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a comparative evaluation of 12S rRNA and 16S rRNA genes of the mitochondrial genome for molecular differentiation among three oryx species (Oryx leucoryx, Oryx dammah and Oryx gazella) with respect to two closely related outgroups, addax and roan. Our findings showed the failure of 12S rRNA gene to differentiate between the genus Oryx and addax, whereas a 342-bp partial sequence of 16S rRNA accurately grouped all five taxa studied, suggesting the utility of 16S rRNA segment for molecular phylogeny of oryx at the genus and possibly species levels. PMID:19048493

  4. Chicken rRNA Gene Cluster Structure

    PubMed Central

    Dyomin, Alexander G.; Koshel, Elena I.; Kiselev, Artem M.; Saifitdinova, Alsu F.; Galkina, Svetlana A.; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Kostareva, Anna A.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, whose activity results in nucleolus formation, constitute an extremely important part of genome. Despite the extensive exploration into avian genomes, no complete description of avian rRNA gene primary structure has been offered so far. We publish a complete chicken rRNA gene cluster sequence here, including 5’ETS (1836 bp), 18S rRNA gene (1823 bp), ITS1 (2530 bp), 5.8S rRNA gene (157 bp), ITS2 (733 bp), 28S rRNA gene (4441 bp) and 3’ETS (343 bp). The rRNA gene cluster sequence of 11863 bp was assembled from raw reads and deposited to GenBank under KT445934 accession number. The assembly was validated through in situ fluorescent hybridization analysis on chicken metaphase chromosomes using computed and synthesized specific probes, as well as through the reference assembly against de novo assembled rRNA gene cluster sequence using sequenced fragments of BAC-clone containing chicken NOR (nucleolus organizer region). The results have confirmed the chicken rRNA gene cluster validity. PMID:27299357

  5. Allele-specific PCR for detecting the deafness-associated mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu; Xia, Bo-Hou; Liu, Qi; Li, Mei-Ya; Huang, Shui-Xian; Zhuo, Guang-Chao

    2016-10-10

    Mutations in mitochondrial 12S rRNA (MT-RNR1) are the important causes of sensorineural hearing loss. Of these mutations, the homoplasmic m.1555A>G or m.1494C>T mutation in the highly conserved A-site of MT-RNR1 gene has been found to be associated with both aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss in many families worldwide. Since the m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations are sensitive to ototoxic drugs, therefore, screening for the presence of these mutations is important for early diagnosis and prevention of deafness. For this purpose, we recently developed a novel allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) which is able to simultaneously detect these mutations. To assess its accuracy, in this study, we employed this method to screen the frequency of m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T mutations in 200 deafness patients and 120 healthy subjects. Consequently, four m.1555A>G and four m.1494C>T mutations were identified; among these, only one patient with the m.1494C>T mutation had an obvious family history of hearing loss. Strikingly, clinical evaluation showed that this family exhibited a high penetrance of hearing loss. In particular, the penetrances of hearing loss were 80% with the aminoglycoside included and 20% when excluded. PCR-Sanger sequencing of the mitochondrial genomes confirmed the presence of the m.1494C>T mutation and identified a set of polymorphisms belonging to mitochondrial haplogroup A. However, the lack of functional variants in mitochondrial and nuclear modified genes (GJB2 and TRMU) in this family indicated that mitochondrial haplogroup and nuclear genes may not play important roles in the phenotypic expression of the m.1494C>T mutation. Thus, other modification factors, such as environmental factor, aminoglycosides or epigenetic modification may have contributed to the high penetrance of hearing loss in this family. Taken together, our data showed that this assay is an effective approach that could be used for detection the deafness-associated MT-RNR1

  6. Mitochondrial tRNAArg T10454C variant may not influence the clinical expression of deafness associated 12S rRNA A1555G mutation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhiyi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examined the "pathogenic" role of the T10454C mutation in mitochondrial tRNA(Arg) gene in deafness expression as increasing reports provided an active role of this mutation in clinical manifestation of deafness associated 12S rRNA A1555G mutation. For this purpose, we reanalyzed the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data containing the T10454C mutation. Moreover, we analyzed the reported "polymorphisms" of mtDNA in the proband using the phylogentic approach. To our surprise, other mutations which occurred at protein-coding genes played more important roles in resulting mitochondrial dysfunctions by using the bioinformatic tool. In addition, evolutionary conservation analysis of the T10454C mutation indicated that this mutation was not conserved between different species. To our knowledge, this is the first report that the T10454C variant may not modulate the phenotypic expression of the deafness associated A1555G mutation.

  7. Prevalence of the A1555G (12S rRNA) and tRNASer(UCN) mitochondrial mutations in hearing-impaired Brazilian patients.

    PubMed

    Abreu-Silva, R S; Lezirovitz, K; Braga, M C C; Spinelli, M; Pirana, S; Della-Rosa, V A; Otto, P A; Mingroni-Netto, R C

    2006-02-01

    Mitochondrial mutations are responsible for at least 1% of the cases of hereditary deafness, but the contribution of each mutation has not yet been defined in African-derived or native American genetic backgrounds. A total of 203 unselected hearing-impaired patients were screened for the presence of the mitochondrial mutation A1555G in the 12S rRNA gene and mutations in the tRNASer(UCN) gene in order to assess their frequency in the ethnically admixed Brazilian population. We found four individuals with A1555G mutation (2%), which is a frequency similar to those reported for European-derived populations in unselected samples. On the other hand, complete sequencing of the tRNASer(UCN) did not reveal reported pathogenic substitutions, namely A7445G, 7472insC, T7510C, or T7511C. Instead, other rare substitutions were found such as T1291C, A7569G, and G7444A. To evaluate the significance of these findings, 110 "European-Brazilians" and 190 "African-Brazilians" unrelated hearing controls were screened. The T1291C, A7569G and G7444A substitutions were each found in about 1% (2/190) of individuals of African ancestry, suggesting that they are probably polymorphic. Our results indicate that screening for the A1555G mutation is recommended among all Brazilian deaf patients, while testing for mutations in the tRNASer(UCN) gene should be considered only when other frequent deafness-causing mutations have been excluded or in the presence of a maternal transmission pattern.

  8. Interaction of ribosomal proteins S5, S6, S11, S12, S18 and S21 with 16 S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Stern, S; Powers, T; Changchien, L M; Noller, H F

    1988-06-20

    We have examined the effects of assembly of ribosomal proteins S5, S6, S11, S12, S18 and S21 on the reactivities of residues in 16 S rRNA towards chemical probes. The results show that S6, S18 and S11 interact with the 690-720 and 790 loop regions of 16 S rRNA in a highly co-operative manner, that is consistent with the previously defined assembly map relationships among these proteins. The results also indicate that these proteins, one of which (S18) has previously been implicated as a component of the ribosomal P-site, interact with residues near some of the recently defined P-site (class II tRNA protection) nucleotides in 16 S rRNA. In addition, assembly of protein S12 has been found to result in the protection of residues in both the 530 stem/loop and the 900 stem regions; the latter group is closely juxtaposed to a segment of 16 S rRNA recently shown to be protected from chemical probes by streptomycin. Interestingly, both S5 and S12 appear to protect, to differing degrees, a well-defined set of residues in the 900 stem/loop and 5'-terminal regions. These observations are discussed in terms of the effects of S5 and S12 on streptomycin binding, and in terms of the class III tRNA protection found in the 900 stem of 16 S rRNA. Altogether these results show that many of the small subunit proteins, which have previously been shown to be functionally important, appear to be associated with functionally implicated segments of 16 S rRNA.

  9. Coexistence of mitochondrial 12S rRNA C1494T and CO1/tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} G7444A mutations in two Han Chinese pedigrees with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Huijun; Chen Jing; Liu Xin; Cheng Jing; Wang Xinjian; Yang Li; Yang Shuzhi; Cao Juyang; Kang Dongyang; Dai Pu; Zha, Suoqiang; Han Dongyi Young Wieyen Guan Minxin

    2007-10-12

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA are one of the important causes of hearing loss. We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of two Han Chinese pedigrees with maternally transmitted aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic bilateral hearing loss. Clinical evaluation revealed the wide range of severity, age-at-onset, and audiometric configuration of hearing impairment in matrilineal relatives in these families. The penetrances of hearing loss in these pedigrees were 20% and 18%, when aminoglycoside-induced deafness was included. When the effect of aminoglycosides was excluded, the penetrances of hearing loss in these seven pedigrees were 10% and 15%. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the presence of the deafness-associated 12S rRNA C1494T and CO1/tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} G7444A mutations. Their distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism belonged to Eastern Asian haplogroup C4a1, while other previously identified six Chinese mitochondrial genomes harboring the C1494T mutation belong to haplogroups D5a2, D, R, and F1, respectively. This suggested that the C1494T or G7444A mutation occurred sporadically and multiplied through evolution of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The absence of functionally significant mutations in tRNA and rRNAs or secondary LHON mutations in their mtDNA suggest that these mtDNA haplogroup-specific variants may not play an important role in the phenotypic expression of the 12S rRNA C1494T and CO1/tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} G7444A mutations in those Chinese families. However, aminoglycosides and other nuclear modifier genes play a modifying role in the phenotypic manifestation of the C1494T mutation in these Chinese families.

  10. Extremely low penetrance of deafness associated with the mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutation in 16 Chinese families: Implication for early detection and prevention of deafness

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Pu; Liu Xin; Han Dongyi . E-mail: hdy301@263.net; Qian Yaping; Huang Deliang; Yuan Huijun; Li Weiming; Yu Fei; Zhang Ruining; Lin Hongyan; He Yong; Yu Youjun; Sun Quanzhu; Qin Huaiyi; Li Ronghua; Zhang Xin; Kang Dongyang; Cao Juyang; Young Wieyen . E-mail: ywy301@163.net; Guan Minxin |. E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org

    2006-02-03

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been found to be associated with sensorineural hearing loss. We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of 16 Chinese pedigrees (a total of 246 matrilineal relatives) with aminoglycoside-induced impairment. Clinical evaluation revealed the variable phenotype of hearing impairment including audiometric configuration in these subjects, although these subjects share some common features: being bilateral and sensorineural hearing impairment. Strikingly, these Chinese pedigrees exhibited extremely low penetrance of hearing loss, ranging from 4% to 18%, with an average of 8%. In particular, nineteen of 246 matrilineal relatives in these pedigrees had aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. Mutational analysis of the mtDNA in these pedigrees showed the presence of homoplasmic 12S rRNA A1555G mutation, which has been associated with hearing impairment in many families worldwide. The extremely low penetrance of hearing loss in these Chinese families carrying the A1555G mutation strongly supports the notion that the A1555G mutation itself is not sufficient to produce the clinical phenotype. Children carrying the A1555G mutation are susceptible to the exposure of aminoglycosides, thereby inducing or worsening hearing impairment, as in the case of these Chinese families. Using those genetic and molecular approaches, we are able to diagnose whether children carry the ototoxic mtDNA mutation. Therefore, these data have been providing valuable information and technology to predict which individuals are at risk for ototoxicity, to improve the safety of aminoglycoside therapy, and eventually to decrease the incidence of deafness.

  11. Phylogenetic relationships among Japanese species of the family Sciuridae (Mammalia, Rodentia), inferred from nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Oshida, T; Masuda, R; Yoshida, M C

    1996-08-01

    In order to investigate phylogenetic relationships of the family Sciuridae living in Japan, we sequenced partial regions (379 bases) of mitochondrial 12S rRNA genes in six species of Japanese and other Asian squirrels. Phylogenetic trees constructed by sequence data indicated that two genera of flying squirrels (Petaurista and Pteromys) were clustered in a group distinct from non-flying squirrels, suggesting a possible monophyletic relationships of these flying squirrels. The evolutionary distance between the Japanese squirrel (Sciurus lis) from Honshu island and the Eurasian red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris) from Hokkaido island was comparable to intraspecific distances of the remaining species examined. PMID:8940915

  12. The coexistence of mitochondrial ND6 T14484C and 12S rRNA A1555G mutations in a Chinese family with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Qiping; Zhou Xiangtian; Yang Li; Sun Yanhong; Zhou Jian; Li Guang; Jiang, Robert; Lu Fan; Qu Jia . E-mail: jqu@wzmc.net; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org

    2007-06-15

    We report here the clinical, genetic and molecular characterization of one three-generation Han Chinese family with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and hearing loss. Four of 14 matrilineal relatives exhibited the moderate central vision loss at the average age of 12.5 years. Of these, one subject exhibited both LHON and mild hearing impairment. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in the pedigree showed the presence of homoplasmic LHON-associated ND6 T14484C mutation, deafness-associated 12S rRNA A1555 mutation and 47 other variants belonging to Eastern Asian haplogroup H2. None of other mitochondrial variants was evolutionarily conserved and functional significance. Therefore, the coexistence of the A1555G mutation and T14484C mutations in this Chinese family indicate that the A1555G mutation may play a synergistic role in the phenotypic manifestation of LHON associated ND6 T14484C mutation. However, the incomplete penetrance of vision and hearing loss suggests the involvement of nuclear modifier genes and environmental factors in the phenotypic expression of these mtDNA mutations.

  13. The mitochondrial 12S gene is a suitable marker of populations of Sarcoptes scabiei from wombats, dogs and humans in Australia.

    PubMed

    Skerratt, L F; Campbell, N J H; Murrell, A; Walton, S; Kemp, D; Barker, S C

    2002-04-01

    We sequenced part of the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene of 23 specimens of Sarcoptes scabiei from eight wombats, one dog and three humans. Twelve of the 326 nucleotide positions varied among these mites and there were nine haplotypes (sequences) that differed by 1-8 nucleotides. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that these mites were from two lineages: (1) mites from wombats from Victoria, Australia, and mites from the humans and dog from the Northern Territory, Australia (haplotypes 1-4, 9); and (2) mites from the humans and dog from the Northern Territory (haplotypes 5-8). Mites from the three different hosts (wombats, a dog and humans) had not diverged phylogenetically; rather, these mites had similar 12S sequences. Thus, we conclude that these mites from wombats, humans and a dog are closely related, and that they diverged from a common ancestor relatively recently. This conclusion is consistent with the argument that people and/or their dogs introduced to Australia the S. scabiei mites that infect wombats in Australia . So, S. scabiei, which has been blamed for the extinction of populations of wombats in Australia, may be a parasitic mite that was introduced to Australia with people and/or their dogs. These data show that the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene may be a suitable population marker of S. scabiei from wombats, dogs and humans in Australia. PMID:11999028

  14. The mitochondrial 12S gene is a suitable marker of populations of Sarcoptes scabiei from wombats, dogs and humans in Australia.

    PubMed

    Skerratt, L F; Campbell, N J H; Murrell, A; Walton, S; Kemp, D; Barker, S C

    2002-04-01

    We sequenced part of the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene of 23 specimens of Sarcoptes scabiei from eight wombats, one dog and three humans. Twelve of the 326 nucleotide positions varied among these mites and there were nine haplotypes (sequences) that differed by 1-8 nucleotides. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that these mites were from two lineages: (1) mites from wombats from Victoria, Australia, and mites from the humans and dog from the Northern Territory, Australia (haplotypes 1-4, 9); and (2) mites from the humans and dog from the Northern Territory (haplotypes 5-8). Mites from the three different hosts (wombats, a dog and humans) had not diverged phylogenetically; rather, these mites had similar 12S sequences. Thus, we conclude that these mites from wombats, humans and a dog are closely related, and that they diverged from a common ancestor relatively recently. This conclusion is consistent with the argument that people and/or their dogs introduced to Australia the S. scabiei mites that infect wombats in Australia . So, S. scabiei, which has been blamed for the extinction of populations of wombats in Australia, may be a parasitic mite that was introduced to Australia with people and/or their dogs. These data show that the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene may be a suitable population marker of S. scabiei from wombats, dogs and humans in Australia.

  15. Intraspecific 16S rRNA gene diversity among clinical isolates of Neisseria species.

    PubMed

    Mechergui, Arij; Achour, Wafa; Hassen, Assia Ben

    2014-05-01

    In the present work, nearly the entire 16S rRNA gene sequences of 46 clinical samples of Neisseria spp. were determined, and the aligned sequences were analyzed to investigate the diversity of 16S rRNA genes in each commensal Neisseria species. Two 16S rRNA types were identified in two Neisseria sicca strains, three 16S rRNA types in five Neisseria macacae strains, fourteen 16S rRNA types in twenty Neisseria flavescens isolates, and fourteen 16S rRNA types in nineteen Neisseria mucosa isolates. The number of nucleotides that were different between 16S rRNA sequences within specie ranged from 1 to 15. We found high intraspecific sequence variation in 16S rRNA genes of Neisseria spp. strains.

  16. Transformation of tetrahymena thermophila with hypermethylated rRNA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Karrer, K.M.; Yao, M.C.

    1988-04-01

    The extrachromosomal rRNA genes (rDNA) of Tetrahymena thermophila contain 0.4% N/sup 6/-methyladenine. C3 strain rDNA was isolated, hypermethylated in vitro, and microinjected into B strain host cells. Clonal cell lines were established, and transformants were selected on the basis of resistance to paromomycin, conferred by the injected rDNA. The effects of methylation by three enzymes which methylate the sequence 5'-NAT-3'', the dam, EcoRI, and ClaI methylases, were tested. Hypermethylation of the injected rDNA had no effect on transformation efficiency relative to mock-methylated controls. The injected C3 strain rDNA efficiently replaced host rDNA as the major constituent of the population of rDNA molecules. Hypermethylation of the injected DNA was not maintained through 20 to 25 cell generations.

  17. Multiple independent insertions of 5S rRNA genes in the spliced-leader gene family of trypanosome species.

    PubMed

    Beauparlant, Marc A; Drouin, Guy

    2014-02-01

    Analyses of the 5S rRNA genes found in the spliced-leader (SL) gene repeat units of numerous trypanosome species suggest that such linkages were not inherited from a common ancestor, but were the result of independent 5S rRNA gene insertions. In trypanosomes, 5S rRNA genes are found either in the tandemly repeated units coding for SL genes or in independent tandemly repeated units. Given that trypanosome species where 5S rRNA genes are within the tandemly repeated units coding for SL genes are phylogenetically related, one might hypothesize that this arrangement is the result of an ancestral insertion of 5S rRNA genes into the tandemly repeated SL gene family of trypanosomes. Here, we use the types of 5S rRNA genes found associated with SL genes, the flanking regions of the inserted 5S rRNA genes and the position of these insertions to show that most of the 5S rRNA genes found within SL gene repeat units of trypanosome species were not acquired from a common ancestor but are the results of independent insertions. These multiple 5S rRNA genes insertion events in trypanosomes are likely the result of frequent founder events in different hosts and/or geographical locations in species having short generation times.

  18. Tetrathiobacter kashmirensis Strain CA-1 16S rRNA gene complete sequence.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study used 1326 base pair 16S rRNA gene sequence methods to confirm the identification of a bacterium as Tetrathiobacter kashmirensis. Morphological, biochemical characteristics, and fatty acid profiles are consistent with the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification of the bacterium. The isolate...

  19. The Regulation of rRNA Gene Transcription during Directed Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong; Zhao, Rui; Giles, Keith E.

    2016-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that proper cellular control of pluripotency and differentiation is related to the regulation of rRNA synthesis. To further our understanding of the role that the regulation of rRNA synthesis has in pluripotency we monitored rRNA synthesis during the directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We discovered that the rRNA synthesis rate is reduced ~50% within 6 hours of ACTIVIN A treatment. This precedes reductions in expression of specific stem cell markers and increases in expression of specific germ layer markers. The reduction in rRNA synthesis is concomitant with dissociation of the Pol I transcription factor, UBTF, from the rRNA gene promoter and precedes any increase to heterochromatin throughout the rRNA gene. To directly investigate the role of rRNA synthesis in pluripotency, hESCs were treated with the Pol I inhibitor, CX-5461. The direct reduction of rRNA synthesis by CX-5461 induces the expression of markers for all three germ layers, reduces the expression of pluripotency markers, and is overall similar to the ACTIVIN A induced changes. This work indicates that the dissociation of UBTF from the rRNA gene, and corresponding reduction in transcription, represent early regulatory events during the directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:27299313

  20. Sequence and conservation of a rRNA and tRNAVal mitochondrial gene fragment from Penaeus californiensis and comparison with Penaeus vannamei and Penaeus stylirostris.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Millán, Luis Enrique; Peregrino-Uriarte, Alma Beatriz; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio; Vargas-Albores, Francisco; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria

    2002-09-01

    Penaeus californiensis is an important species for shrimp fisheries in the Pacific Ocean and has recently been described as a potential cultured species, mainly through the winter season in subtropical regions. A fragment of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA-tRNAVal-16S rRNA genes from P. californiensis was sequenced and compared with the corresponding regions from Penaeus vannamei and Penaeus stylirostris. Purified mitochondrial DNA was used for polymerase chain reaction amplification with primers for 12S and 16S rRNA genes. A 1379 +/- 1-bp fragment was obtained, including 90% 16S rRNA, tRNAVal, and a portion of 12S rRNA, cloned, and sequenced. Genetic distances were calculated according to the Kimura 2-parameter distance model, and maximum-likelihood analysis was applied with 1000 bootstrap replications. Sequence identity of P. californiensis with both P. vannamei and P. stylirostris was 0.88, while for P. vannamei and P. stylirostris the identity was 0.92. Maximum-likelihood analysis grouped P. vannamei and P. stylirostris separately from P. californiensis.

  1. 5S rRNA gene arrangements in protists: a case of nonadaptive evolution.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Guy; Tsang, Corey

    2012-06-01

    Given their high copy number and high level of expression, one might expect that both the sequence and organization of eukaryotic ribosomal RNA genes would be conserved during evolution. Although the organization of 18S, 5.8S and 28S ribosomal RNA genes is indeed relatively well conserved, that of 5S rRNA genes is much more variable. Here, we review the different types of 5S rRNA gene arrangements which have been observed in protists. This includes linkages to the other ribosomal RNA genes as well as linkages to ubiquitin, splice-leader, snRNA and tRNA genes. Mapping these linkages to independently derived phylogenies shows that these diverse linkages have repeatedly been gained and lost during evolution. This argues against such linkages being the primitive condition not only in protists but also in other eukaryote species. Because the only characteristic the diverse genes with which 5S rRNA genes are found linked with is that they are tandemly repeated, these arrangements are unlikely to provide any selective advantage. Rather, the observed high variability in 5S rRNA genes arrangements is likely the result of the fact that 5S rRNA genes contain internal promoters, that these genes are often transposed by diverse recombination mechanisms and that these new gene arrangements are rapidly homogenized by unequal crossingovers and/or by gene conversions events in species with short generation times and frequent founder events.

  2. Sequence arrangement of the rRNA genes of the dipteran Sarcophaga bullata.

    PubMed

    French, C K; Fouts, D L; Manning, J E

    1981-06-11

    Velocity sedimentation studies of RNA of Sarcophaga bullata show that the major rRNA species have sedimentation values of 26S and 18S. Analysis of the rRNA under denaturing conditions indicates that there is a hidden break centrally located in the 26S rRNA species. Saturation hybridization studies using total genomic DNA and rRNA show that 0.08% of the nuclear DNA is occupied by rRNA coding sequences and that the average repetition frequency of these coding sequences is approximately 144. The arrangement of the rRNA genes and their spacer sequences on long strands of purified rDNA was determined by the examination of the structure of rRNa:DNA hybrids in the electron microscope. Long DNA strands contain several gene sets (18S + 26S) with one repeat unit containing the following sequences in order given: (a) An 18S gene of length 2.12 kb, (b) an internal transcribed spacer of length 2.01 kb, which contains a short sequence that may code for a 5.8S rRNA, (c) A 26S gene of length 4.06 kb which, in 20% of the cases, contains an intron with an average length of 5.62 kb, and (d) an external spacer of average length of 9.23 kb.

  3. Compilation of 5S rRNA and 5S rRNA gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Thomas; Wolters, Jörn; Erdmann, Volker A.

    1990-01-01

    The BERLIN RNA DATABANK as of Dezember 31, 1989, contains a total of 667 sequences of 5S rRNAs or their genes, which is an increase of 114 new sequence entries over the last compilation (1). It covers sequences from 44 archaebacteria, 267 eubacteria, 20 plastids, 6 mitochondria, 319 eukaryotes and 11 eukaryotic pseudogenes. The hardcopy shows only the list (Table 1) of those organisms whose sequences have been determined. The BERLIN RNA DATABANK uses the format of the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Data Library complemented by a Sequence Alignment (SA) field including secondary structure information. PMID:1692116

  4. Diversity of 5S rRNA genes within individual prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Pei, Anna; Li, Hongru; Oberdorf, William E; Alekseyenko, Alexander V; Parsons, Tamasha; Yang, Liying; Gerz, Erika A; Lee, Peng; Xiang, Charlie; Nossa, Carlos W; Pei, Zhiheng

    2012-10-01

    We examined intragenomic variation of paralogous 5S rRNA genes to evaluate the concept of ribosomal constraints. In a dataset containing 1161 genomes from 779 unique species, 96 species exhibited > 3% diversity. Twenty-seven species with > 10% diversity contained a total of 421 mismatches between all pairs of the most dissimilar copies of 5S rRNA genes. The large majority (401 of 421) of the diversified positions were conserved at the secondary structure level. The high diversity was associated with partial rRNA operon, split operon, or spacer length-related divergence. In total, these findings indicated that there are tight ribosomal constraints on paralogous 5S rRNA genes in a genome despite of the high degree of diversity at the primary structure level.

  5. Yersinia spp. Identification Using Copy Diversity in the Chromosomal 16S rRNA Gene Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuhuang; Liu, Chang; Xiao, Yuchun; Li, Xu; Su, Mingming; Jing, Huaiqi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    API 20E strip test, the standard for Enterobacteriaceae identification, is not sufficient to discriminate some Yersinia species for some unstable biochemical reactions and the same biochemical profile presented in some species, e.g. Yersinia ferderiksenii and Yersinia intermedia, which need a variety of molecular biology methods as auxiliaries for identification. The 16S rRNA gene is considered a valuable tool for assigning bacterial strains to species. However, the resolution of the 16S rRNA gene may be insufficient for discrimination because of the high similarity of sequences between some species and heterogeneity within copies at the intra-genomic level. In this study, for each strain we randomly selected five 16S rRNA gene clones from 768 Yersinia strains, and collected 3,840 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene from 10 species, which were divided into 439 patterns. The similarity among the five clones of 16S rRNA gene is over 99% for most strains. Identical sequences were found in strains of different species. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the five 16S rRNA gene sequences for each strain where the phylogenetic classifications are consistent with biochemical tests; and species that are difficult to identify by biochemical phenotype can be differentiated. Most Yersinia strains form distinct groups within each species. However Yersinia kristensenii, a heterogeneous species, clusters with some Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ferderiksenii/intermedia strains, while not affecting the overall efficiency of this species classification. In conclusion, through analysis derived from integrated information from multiple 16S rRNA gene sequences, the discrimination ability of Yersinia species is improved using our method. PMID:26808495

  6. Yersinia spp. Identification Using Copy Diversity in the Chromosomal 16S rRNA Gene Sequence.

    PubMed

    Hao, Huijing; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran; Chen, Yuhuang; Liu, Chang; Xiao, Yuchun; Li, Xu; Su, Mingming; Jing, Huaiqi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    API 20E strip test, the standard for Enterobacteriaceae identification, is not sufficient to discriminate some Yersinia species for some unstable biochemical reactions and the same biochemical profile presented in some species, e.g. Yersinia ferderiksenii and Yersinia intermedia, which need a variety of molecular biology methods as auxiliaries for identification. The 16S rRNA gene is considered a valuable tool for assigning bacterial strains to species. However, the resolution of the 16S rRNA gene may be insufficient for discrimination because of the high similarity of sequences between some species and heterogeneity within copies at the intra-genomic level. In this study, for each strain we randomly selected five 16S rRNA gene clones from 768 Yersinia strains, and collected 3,840 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene from 10 species, which were divided into 439 patterns. The similarity among the five clones of 16S rRNA gene is over 99% for most strains. Identical sequences were found in strains of different species. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the five 16S rRNA gene sequences for each strain where the phylogenetic classifications are consistent with biochemical tests; and species that are difficult to identify by biochemical phenotype can be differentiated. Most Yersinia strains form distinct groups within each species. However Yersinia kristensenii, a heterogeneous species, clusters with some Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ferderiksenii/intermedia strains, while not affecting the overall efficiency of this species classification. In conclusion, through analysis derived from integrated information from multiple 16S rRNA gene sequences, the discrimination ability of Yersinia species is improved using our method. PMID:26808495

  7. Yersinia spp. Identification Using Copy Diversity in the Chromosomal 16S rRNA Gene Sequence.

    PubMed

    Hao, Huijing; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran; Chen, Yuhuang; Liu, Chang; Xiao, Yuchun; Li, Xu; Su, Mingming; Jing, Huaiqi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    API 20E strip test, the standard for Enterobacteriaceae identification, is not sufficient to discriminate some Yersinia species for some unstable biochemical reactions and the same biochemical profile presented in some species, e.g. Yersinia ferderiksenii and Yersinia intermedia, which need a variety of molecular biology methods as auxiliaries for identification. The 16S rRNA gene is considered a valuable tool for assigning bacterial strains to species. However, the resolution of the 16S rRNA gene may be insufficient for discrimination because of the high similarity of sequences between some species and heterogeneity within copies at the intra-genomic level. In this study, for each strain we randomly selected five 16S rRNA gene clones from 768 Yersinia strains, and collected 3,840 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene from 10 species, which were divided into 439 patterns. The similarity among the five clones of 16S rRNA gene is over 99% for most strains. Identical sequences were found in strains of different species. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the five 16S rRNA gene sequences for each strain where the phylogenetic classifications are consistent with biochemical tests; and species that are difficult to identify by biochemical phenotype can be differentiated. Most Yersinia strains form distinct groups within each species. However Yersinia kristensenii, a heterogeneous species, clusters with some Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ferderiksenii/intermedia strains, while not affecting the overall efficiency of this species classification. In conclusion, through analysis derived from integrated information from multiple 16S rRNA gene sequences, the discrimination ability of Yersinia species is improved using our method.

  8. Dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence inferred from the gene sequence: Evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Herzog, M; Maroteaux, L

    1986-11-01

    We present the complete sequence of the nuclear-encoded small-ribosomal-subunit RNA inferred from the cloned gene sequence of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. The dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence of 1798 nucleotides is contained in a family of 200 tandemly repeated genes per haploid genome. A tentative model of the secondary structure of P. micans 17S rRNA is presented. This sequence is compared with the small-ribosomal-subunit rRNA of Xenopus laevis (Animalia), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Fungi), Zea mays (Planta), Dictyostelium discoideum (Protoctista), and Halobacterium volcanii (Monera). Although the secondary structure of the dinoflagellate 17S rRNA presents most of the eukaryotic characteristics, it contains sufficient archaeobacterial-like structural features to reinforce the view that dinoflagellates branch off very early from the eukaryotic lineage.

  9. Dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence inferred from the gene sequence: Evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Michel; Maroteaux, Luc

    1986-01-01

    We present the complete sequence of the nuclear-encoded small-ribosomal-subunit RNA inferred from the cloned gene sequence of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. The dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence of 1798 nucleotides is contained in a family of 200 tandemly repeated genes per haploid genome. A tentative model of the secondary structure of P. micans 17S rRNA is presented. This sequence is compared with the small-ribosomal-subunit rRNA of Xenopus laevis (Animalia), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Fungi), Zea mays (Planta), Dictyostelium discoideum (Protoctista), and Halobacterium volcanii (Monera). Although the secondary structure of the dinoflagellate 17S rRNA presents most of the eukaryotic characteristics, it contains sufficient archaeobacterial-like structural features to reinforce the view that dinoflagellates branch off very early from the eukaryotic lineage. PMID:16578795

  10. Dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence inferred from the gene sequence: Evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Herzog, M; Maroteaux, L

    1986-11-01

    We present the complete sequence of the nuclear-encoded small-ribosomal-subunit RNA inferred from the cloned gene sequence of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. The dinoflagellate 17S rRNA sequence of 1798 nucleotides is contained in a family of 200 tandemly repeated genes per haploid genome. A tentative model of the secondary structure of P. micans 17S rRNA is presented. This sequence is compared with the small-ribosomal-subunit rRNA of Xenopus laevis (Animalia), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Fungi), Zea mays (Planta), Dictyostelium discoideum (Protoctista), and Halobacterium volcanii (Monera). Although the secondary structure of the dinoflagellate 17S rRNA presents most of the eukaryotic characteristics, it contains sufficient archaeobacterial-like structural features to reinforce the view that dinoflagellates branch off very early from the eukaryotic lineage. PMID:16578795

  11. Chromosome-specific NOR inactivation explains selective rRNA gene silencing and dosage control in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekhara, Chinmayi; Mohannath, Gireesha; Blevins, Todd; Pontvianne, Frederic; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, scores of excess ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are silenced by repressive chromatin modifications. Given the near sequence identity of rRNA genes within a species, it is unclear how specific rRNA genes are reproducibly chosen for silencing. Using Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype (strain) Col-0, a systematic search identified sequence polymorphisms that differ between active and developmentally silenced rRNA gene subtypes. Recombinant inbred mapping populations derived from three different ecotype crosses were then used to map the chromosomal locations of silenced and active RNA gene subtypes. Importantly, silenced and active rRNA gene subtypes are not intermingled. All silenced rRNA gene subtypes mapped to the nucleolus organizer region (NOR) on chromosome 2 (NOR2). All active rRNA gene subtypes mapped to NOR4. Using an engineered A. thaliana line in which a portion of Col-0 chromosome 4 was replaced by sequences of another ecotype, we show that a major rRNA gene subtype silenced at NOR2 is active when introgressed into the genome at NOR4. Collectively, these results reveal that selective rRNA gene silencing is not regulated gene by gene based on mechanisms dependent on subtle gene sequence variation. Instead, we propose that a subchromosomal silencing mechanism operates on a multimegabase scale to inactivate NOR2. PMID:26744421

  12. A yeast transcription system for the 5S rRNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    van Keulen, H; Thomas, D Y

    1982-01-01

    A cell-free extract of yeast nuclei that can specifically transcribe cloned yeast 5S rRNA genes has been developed. Optima for transcription of 5S rDNA were determined and conditions of extract preparation leading to reproducible activities and specificities established. The major in vitro product has the same size and oligonucleotide composition as in vivo 5S rRNA. The in vitro transcription extract does not transcribe yeast tRNA genes. The extract does increase the transcription of tRNA genes packaged in chromatin. Images PMID:7145700

  13. Bacterial metabarcoding by 16S rRNA gene ion torrent amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Elio; Gianese, Giulio; Giuliano, Giovanni; Fiore, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Ion Torrent is a next generation sequencing technology based on the detection of hydrogen ions produced during DNA chain elongation; this technology allows analyzing and characterizing genomes, genes, and species. Here, we describe an Ion Torrent procedure applied to the metagenomic analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons to study the bacterial diversity in food and environmental samples. PMID:25343859

  14. Bacterial metabarcoding by 16S rRNA gene ion torrent amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Elio; Gianese, Giulio; Giuliano, Giovanni; Fiore, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Ion Torrent is a next generation sequencing technology based on the detection of hydrogen ions produced during DNA chain elongation; this technology allows analyzing and characterizing genomes, genes, and species. Here, we describe an Ion Torrent procedure applied to the metagenomic analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons to study the bacterial diversity in food and environmental samples.

  15. Clinical and molecular analysis of a four-generation Chinese family with aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss associated with the mitochondrial 12S rRNA C1494T mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiuju; Li Qingzhong; Han Dongyi . E-mail: hdy301@263.net; Zhao Yali; Zhao Lidong; Qian Yaping; Yuan Hu; Li Ronghua; Zhai Suoqiang; Young Wieyen . E-mail: ywy301@263.net; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@chmcc.org

    2006-02-10

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of a four-generation Chinese family with aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss. Five of nine matrilineal relatives had aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. These matrilineal relatives exhibited variable severity and audiometric configuration of hearing impairment, despite sharing some common features: being bilateral and having sensorineural hearing impairment. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the pedigree identified 16 variants and the homoplasmic 12S rRNA C1494T mutation, which was associated with hearing loss in the other large Chinese family. In fact, the occurrence of the C1494T mutation in these genetically unrelated pedigrees affected by hearing impairment strongly indicated that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss. However, incomplete penetrance of hearing loss indicated that the C1494T mutation itself is not sufficient to produce a clinical phenotype but requires the involvement of modifier factors for the phenotypic expression. Those mtDNA variants, showing no evolutional conservation, may not have a potential modifying role in the pathogenesis of the C1494T mutation. However, nuclear background seems to contribute to the phenotypic variability of matrilineal relatives in this family. Furthermore, aminoglycosides modulate the expressivity and penetrance of deafness associated with the C1494T mutation in this family.

  16. Analysis of 23S rRNA genes in metagenomes - a case study from the Global Ocean Sampling Expedition.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Pelin; Kottmann, Renzo; Pruesse, Elmar; Quast, Christian; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2011-09-01

    As an evolutionary marker, 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) offers more diagnostic sequence stretches and greater sequence variation than 16S rRNA. However, 23S rRNA is still not as widely used. Based on 80 metagenome samples from the Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) Expedition, the usefulness and taxonomic resolution of 23S rRNA were compared to those of 16S rRNA. Since 23S rRNA is approximately twice as large as 16S rRNA, twice as many 23S rRNA gene fragments were retrieved from the GOS reads than 16S rRNA gene fragments, with 23S rRNA gene fragments being generally about 100bp longer. Datasets for 16S and 23S rRNA sequences revealed similar relative abundances for major marine bacterial and archaeal taxa. However, 16S rRNA sequences had a better taxonomic resolution due to their significantly larger reference database. Reevaluation of the specificity of previously published PCR amplification primers and group specific fluorescence in situ hybridization probes on this metagenomic set of non-amplified 23S rRNA sequences revealed that out of 16 primers investigated, only two had more than 90% target group coverage. Evaluations of two probes, BET42a and GAM42a, were in accordance with previous evaluations, with a discrepancy in the target group coverage of the GAM42a probe when evaluated against the GOS metagenomic dataset.

  17. Taxonomic Resolutions Based on 18S rRNA Genes: A Case Study of Subclass Copepoda

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shu; Xiong, Jie; Yu, Yuhe

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity studies are commonly conducted using 18S rRNA genes. In this study, we compared the inter-species divergence of variable regions (V1–9) within the copepod 18S rRNA gene, and tested their taxonomic resolutions at different taxonomic levels. Our results indicate that the 18S rRNA gene is a good molecular marker for the study of copepod biodiversity, and our conclusions are as follows: 1) 18S rRNA genes are highly conserved intra-species (intra-species similarities are close to 100%); and could aid in species-level analyses, but with some limitations; 2) nearly-whole-length sequences and some partial regions (around V2, V4, and V9) of the 18S rRNA gene can be used to discriminate between samples at both the family and order levels (with a success rate of about 80%); 3) compared with other regions, V9 has a higher resolution at the genus level (with an identification success rate of about 80%); and 4) V7 is most divergent in length, and would be a good candidate marker for the phylogenetic study of Acartia species. This study also evaluated the correlation between similarity thresholds and the accuracy of using nuclear 18S rRNA genes for the classification of organisms in the subclass Copepoda. We suggest that sample identification accuracy should be considered when a molecular sequence divergence threshold is used for taxonomic identification, and that the lowest similarity threshold should be determined based on a pre-designated level of acceptable accuracy. PMID:26107258

  18. Taxonomic resolutions based on 18S rRNA genes: a case study of subclass copepoda.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu; Xiong, Jie; Yu, Yuhe

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity studies are commonly conducted using 18S rRNA genes. In this study, we compared the inter-species divergence of variable regions (V1-9) within the copepod 18S rRNA gene, and tested their taxonomic resolutions at different taxonomic levels. Our results indicate that the 18S rRNA gene is a good molecular marker for the study of copepod biodiversity, and our conclusions are as follows: 1) 18S rRNA genes are highly conserved intra-species (intra-species similarities are close to 100%); and could aid in species-level analyses, but with some limitations; 2) nearly-whole-length sequences and some partial regions (around V2, V4, and V9) of the 18S rRNA gene can be used to discriminate between samples at both the family and order levels (with a success rate of about 80%); 3) compared with other regions, V9 has a higher resolution at the genus level (with an identification success rate of about 80%); and 4) V7 is most divergent in length, and would be a good candidate marker for the phylogenetic study of Acartia species. This study also evaluated the correlation between similarity thresholds and the accuracy of using nuclear 18S rRNA genes for the classification of organisms in the subclass Copepoda. We suggest that sample identification accuracy should be considered when a molecular sequence divergence threshold is used for taxonomic identification, and that the lowest similarity threshold should be determined based on a pre-designated level of acceptable accuracy.

  19. Diagnostic assay for Helicobacter hepaticus based on nucleotide sequence of its 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Battles, J K; Williamson, J C; Pike, K M; Gorelick, P L; Ward, J M; Gonda, M A

    1995-01-01

    Conserved primers were used to PCR amplify 95% of the Helicobacter hepaticus 16S rRNA gene. Its sequence was determined and aligned to those of related bacteria, enabling the selection of primers to highly diverged regions of the 16S rRNA gene and an oligonucleotide probe for the development of a PCR-liquid hybridization assay. This assay was shown to be both sensitive and specific for H. hepaticus 16S rRNA gene sequences. PMID:7542270

  20. Rare Events of Intragenus and Intraspecies Horizontal Transfer of the 16S rRNA Gene.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ren-Mao; Cai, Lin; Zhang, Wei-Peng; Cao, Hui-Luo; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-07-27

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of operational genes has been widely reported in prokaryotic organisms. However, informational genes such as those involved in transcription and translation processes are very difficult to be horizontally transferred, as described by Woese's complexity hypothesis. Here, we analyzed all of the completed prokaryotic genome sequences (2,143 genomes) in the NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) database, scanned for genomes with high intragenomic heterogeneity of 16S rRNA gene copies, and explored potential HGT events of ribosomal RNA genes based on the phylogeny, genomic organization, and secondary structures of the ribosomal RNA genes. Our results revealed 28 genomes with relatively high intragenomic heterogeneity of multiple 16S rRNA gene copies (lowest pairwise identity <98.0%), and further analysis revealed HGT events and potential donors of the heterogeneous copies (such as HGT from Chlamydia suis to Chlamydia trachomatis) and mutation events of some heterogeneous copies (such as Streptococcus suis JS14). Interestingly, HGT of the 16S rRNA gene only occurred at intragenus or intraspecies levels, which is quite different from the HGT of operational genes. Our results improve our understanding regarding the exchange of informational genes.

  1. Prosthetic joint infection due to Lysobacter thermophilus diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, B; Sebastian, S; Malhotra, R; Kapil, A; Gautam, D

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of prosthetic joint infection caused by Lysobacter thermophilus which was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Removal of prosthesis followed by antibiotic treatment resulted in good clinical outcome. This case illustrates the use of molecular diagnostics to detect uncommon organisms in suspected prosthetic infections.

  2. Nucleolin Is Required for DNA Methylation State and the Expression of rRNA Gene Variants in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Pontvianne, Frédéric; Abou-Ellail, Mohamed; Douet, Julien; Comella, Pascale; Matia, Isabel; Chandrasekhara, Chinmayi; DeBures, Anne; Blevins, Todd; Cooke, Richard; Medina, Francisco J.; Tourmente, Sylvette; Pikaard, Craig S.; Sáez-Vásquez, Julio

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays in copy numbers ranging from several hundred to several thousand in plants. Although it is clear that not all copies are transcribed under normal growth conditions, the molecular basis controlling the expression of specific sets of rRNA genes remains unclear. Here, we report four major rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, while transcription of one of these rRNA variants is induced, the others are either repressed or remain unaltered in A. thaliana plants with a disrupted nucleolin-like protein gene (Atnuc-L1). Remarkably, the most highly represented rRNA gene variant, which is inactive in WT plants, is reactivated in Atnuc-L1 mutants. We show that accumulated pre–rRNAs originate from RNA Pol I transcription and are processed accurately. Moreover, we show that disruption of the AtNUC-L1 gene induces loss of symmetrical DNA methylation without affecting histone epigenetic marks at rRNA genes. Collectively, these data reveal a novel mechanism for rRNA gene transcriptional regulation in which the nucleolin protein plays a major role in controlling active and repressed rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis. PMID:21124873

  3. Novel essential gene Involved in 16S rRNA processing in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Tatsuaki; Nakanishi, Shinobu; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Taoka, Masato; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Isobe, Toshiaki; Kato, Jun-ichi

    2015-02-27

    Biogenesis of ribosomes is a complex process mediated by many factors. While its transcription proceeds, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) folds itself into a characteristic three-dimensional structure through interaction with ribosomal proteins, during which its ends are processed. Here, we show that the essential protein YqgF, a RuvC family protein with an RNase-H-like motif, is involved in the processing of pre-16S rRNA during ribosome maturation. Indeed, pre-16S rRNA accumulated in cells of a temperature-sensitive yqgF mutant (yqgF(ts)) cultured at a non-permissive temperature. In addition, purified YqgF was shown to process the 5' end of pre-16S rRNA within 70S ribosomes in vitro. Mass spectrometry analysis of the total proteins in the yqgF(ts) mutant cells showed that the expression of genes containing multiple Shine-Dalgarno-like sequences was observed to be lower than in wild type. These results are interpreted to indicate that YqgF is involved in a novel enzymic activity necessary for the processing of pre-16S rRNA, thereby affecting elongation of translation.

  4. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of SSU rRNA gene of five microsporidia.

    PubMed

    Dong, ShiNan; Shen, ZhongYuan; Xu, Li; Zhu, Feng

    2010-01-01

    The complete small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) gene sequences of five microsporidia including Nosema heliothidis, and four novel microsporidia isolated from Pieris rapae, Phyllobrotica armta, Hemerophila atrilineata, and Bombyx mori, respectively, were obtained by PCR amplification, cloning, and sequencing. Two phylogenetic trees based on SSU rRNA sequences had been constructed by using Neighbor-Joining of Phylip software and UPGMA of MEGA4.0 software. The taxonomic status of four novel microsporidia was determined by analysis of phylogenetic relationship, length, G+C content, identity, and divergence of the SSU rRNA sequences. The results showed that the microsporidia isolated from Pieris rapae, Phyllobrotica armta, and Hemerophila atrilineata have close phylogenetic relationship with the Nosema, while another microsporidium isolated from Bombyx mori is closely related to the Endoreticulatus. So, we temporarily classify three novel species of microsporidia to genus Nosema, as Nosema sp. PR, Nosema sp. PA, Nosema sp. HA. Another is temporarily classified into genus Endoreticulatus, as Endoreticulatus sp. Zhenjiang. The result indicated as well that it is feasible and valuable to elucidate phylogenetic relationships and taxonomic status of microsporidian species by analyzing information from SSU rRNA sequences of microsporidia. PMID:19768503

  5. A tool kit for quantifying eukaryotic rRNA gene sequences from human microbiome samples.

    PubMed

    Dollive, Serena; Peterfreund, Gregory L; Sherrill-Mix, Scott; Bittinger, Kyle; Sinha, Rohini; Hoffmann, Christian; Nabel, Christopher S; Hill, David A; Artis, David; Bachman, Michael A; Custers-Allen, Rebecca; Grunberg, Stephanie; Wu, Gary D; Lewis, James D; Bushman, Frederic D

    2012-07-03

    Eukaryotic microorganisms are important but understudied components of the human microbiome. Here we present a pipeline for analysis of deep sequencing data on single cell eukaryotes. We designed a new 18S rRNA gene-specific PCR primer set and compared a published rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene primer set. Amplicons were tested against 24 specimens from defined eukaryotes and eight well-characterized human stool samples. A software pipeline https://sourceforge.net/projects/brocc/ was developed for taxonomic attribution, validated against simulated data, and tested on pyrosequence data. This study provides a well-characterized tool kit for sequence-based enumeration of eukaryotic organisms in human microbiome samples.

  6. A renaissance for the pioneering 16S rRNA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, Susannah; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-09-07

    Culture-independent molecular surveys using the 16S rRNA gene have become a mainstay for characterizing microbial community structure over the last quarter century. More recently this approach has been overshadowed by metagenomics, which provides a global overview of a community's functional potential rather than just an inventory of its inhabitants. However, the pioneering 16S rRNA gene is making a comeback in its own right thanks to a number of methodological advancements including higher resolution (more sequences), analysis of multiple related samples (e.g. spatial and temporal series) and improved metadata and use of metadata. The standard conclusion that microbial ecosystems are remarkably complex and diverse is now being replaced by detailed insights into microbial ecology and evolution based only on this one historically important marker gene.

  7. Comparative analysis of dinoflagellate chloroplast genomes reveals rRNA and tRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Barbrook, Adrian C; Santucci, Nicole; Plenderleith, Lindsey J; Hiller, Roger G; Howe, Christopher J

    2006-01-01

    Background Peridinin-containing dinoflagellates have a highly reduced chloroplast genome, which is unlike that found in other chloroplast containing organisms. Genome reduction appears to be the result of extensive transfer of genes to the nuclear genome. Unusually the genes believed to be remaining in the chloroplast genome are found on small DNA 'minicircles'. In this study we present a comparison of sets of minicircle sequences from three dinoflagellate species. Results PCR was used to amplify several minicircles from Amphidinium carterae so that a homologous set of gene-containing minicircles was available for Amphidinium carterae and Amphidinium operculatum, two apparently closely related peridinin-containing dinoflagellates. We compared the sequences of these minicircles to determine the content and characteristics of their chloroplast genomes. We also made comparisons with minicircles which had been obtained from Heterocapsa triquetra, another peridinin-containing dinoflagellate. These in silico comparisons have revealed several genetic features which were not apparent in single species analyses. The features include further protein coding genes, unusual rRNA genes, which we show are transcribed, and the first examples of tRNA genes from peridinin-containing dinoflagellate chloroplast genomes. Conclusion Comparative analysis of minicircle sequences has allowed us to identify previously unrecognised features of dinoflagellate chloroplast genomes, including additional protein and RNA genes. The chloroplast rRNA gene sequences are radically different from those in other organisms, and in many ways resemble the rRNA genes found in some highly reduced mitochondrial genomes. The retention of certain tRNA genes in the dinoflagellate chloroplast genome has important implications for models of chloroplast-mitochondrion interaction. PMID:17123435

  8. Analysis of a marine picoplankton community by 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, T M; DeLong, E F; Pace, N R

    1991-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of an oligotrophic marine picoplankton community was examined by analyzing the sequences of cloned ribosomal genes. This strategy does not rely on cultivation of the resident microorganisms. Bulk genomic DNA was isolated from picoplankton collected in the north central Pacific Ocean by tangential flow filtration. The mixed-population DNA was fragmented, size fractionated, and cloned into bacteriophage lambda. Thirty-eight clones containing 16S rRNA genes were identified in a screen of 3.2 x 10(4) recombinant phage, and portions of the rRNA gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The resulting sequences were used to establish the identities of the picoplankton by comparison with an established data base of rRNA sequences. Fifteen unique eubacterial sequences were obtained, including four from cyanobacteria and eleven from proteobacteria. A single eucaryote related to dinoflagellates was identified; no archaebacterial sequences were detected. The cyanobacterial sequences are all closely related to sequences from cultivated marine Synechococcus strains and with cyanobacterial sequences obtained from the Atlantic Ocean (Sargasso Sea). Several sequences were related to common marine isolates of the gamma subdivision of proteobacteria. In addition to sequences closely related to those of described bacteria, sequences were obtained from two phylogenetic groups of organisms that are not closely related to any known rRNA sequences from cultivated organisms. Both of these novel phylogenetic clusters are proteobacteria, one group within the alpha subdivision and the other distinct from known proteobacterial subdivisions. The rRNA sequences of the alpha-related group are nearly identical to those of some Sargasso Sea picoplankton, suggesting a global distribution of these organisms. Images PMID:2066334

  9. Transcriptional Activity of rRNA Genes in Barley Cells after Mutagenic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the combination of the micronucleus test with analysis of the activity of the rRNA genes in mutagen-treated Hordeum vulgare (barley) by maleic hydrazide (MH) cells was performed. Simultaneously fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 25S rDNA as probes and an analysis of the transcriptional activity of 35S rRNA genes with silver staining were performed. The results showed that transcriptional activity is always maintained in the micronuclei although they are eliminated during the next cell cycle. The analysis of the transcriptional activity was extended to barley nuclei. MH influenced the fusion of the nucleoli in barley nuclei. The silver staining enabled detection of the nuclear bodies which arose after MH treatment. The results confirmed the usefulness of cytogenetic techniques in the characterization of micronuclei. Similar analyses can be now extended to other abiotic stresses to study the response of plant cells to the environment. PMID:27257817

  10. Greengenes: Chimera-checked 16S rRNA gene database and workbenchcompatible in ARB

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, T.Z.; Hugenholtz, P.; Larsen, N.; Rojas, M.; Brodie,E.L; Keller, K.; Huber, T.; Dalevi, D.; Hu, P.; Andersen, G.L.

    2006-02-01

    A 16S rRNA gene database (http://greengenes.lbl.gov) addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera-screening, standard alignments and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was revealed that incongruent taxonomic nomenclature exists among curators even at the phylum-level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3% of environmental sequences and 0.2% of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages within the Archaea and Bacteria.

  11. Development of a dual-internal-reference technique to improve accuracy when determining bacterial 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio with application to Escherichia coli liquid and aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Huajun; Krumins, Valdis; Fennell, Donna E; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2015-10-01

    Accurate enumeration of rRNA content in microbial cells, e.g. by using the 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio, is critical to properly understand its relationship to microbial activities. However, few studies have considered possible methodological artifacts that may contribute to the variability of rRNA analysis results. In this study, a technique utilizing genomic DNA and 16S rRNA from an exogenous species (Pseudomonas fluorescens) as dual internal references was developed to improve accuracy when determining the 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of a target organism, Escherichia coli. This technique was able to adequately control the variability in sample processing and analysis procedures due to nucleic acid (DNA and RNA) losses, inefficient reverse transcription of RNA, and inefficient PCR amplification. The measured 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of E. coli increased by 2-3 fold when E. coli 16S rRNA gene and 16S rRNA quantities were normalized to the sample-specific fractional recoveries of reference (P. fluorescens) 16S rRNA gene and 16S rRNA, respectively. In addition, the intra-sample variation of this ratio, represented by coefficients of variation from replicate samples, decreased significantly after normalization. This technique was applied to investigate the temporal variation of 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of E. coli during its non-steady-state growth in a complex liquid medium, and to E. coli aerosols when exposed to particle-free air after their collection on a filter. The 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of E. coli increased significantly during its early exponential phase of growth; when E. coli aerosols were exposed to extended filtration stress after sample collection, the ratio also increased. In contrast, no significant temporal trend in E. coli 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio was observed when the determined ratios were not normalized based on the recoveries of dual references. The developed technique could be widely applied in studies of relationship between

  12. Development of a dual-internal-reference technique to improve accuracy when determining bacterial 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio with application to Escherichia coli liquid and aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Huajun; Krumins, Valdis; Fennell, Donna E; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2015-10-01

    Accurate enumeration of rRNA content in microbial cells, e.g. by using the 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio, is critical to properly understand its relationship to microbial activities. However, few studies have considered possible methodological artifacts that may contribute to the variability of rRNA analysis results. In this study, a technique utilizing genomic DNA and 16S rRNA from an exogenous species (Pseudomonas fluorescens) as dual internal references was developed to improve accuracy when determining the 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of a target organism, Escherichia coli. This technique was able to adequately control the variability in sample processing and analysis procedures due to nucleic acid (DNA and RNA) losses, inefficient reverse transcription of RNA, and inefficient PCR amplification. The measured 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of E. coli increased by 2-3 fold when E. coli 16S rRNA gene and 16S rRNA quantities were normalized to the sample-specific fractional recoveries of reference (P. fluorescens) 16S rRNA gene and 16S rRNA, respectively. In addition, the intra-sample variation of this ratio, represented by coefficients of variation from replicate samples, decreased significantly after normalization. This technique was applied to investigate the temporal variation of 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of E. coli during its non-steady-state growth in a complex liquid medium, and to E. coli aerosols when exposed to particle-free air after their collection on a filter. The 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio of E. coli increased significantly during its early exponential phase of growth; when E. coli aerosols were exposed to extended filtration stress after sample collection, the ratio also increased. In contrast, no significant temporal trend in E. coli 16S rRNA:16S rRNA gene ratio was observed when the determined ratios were not normalized based on the recoveries of dual references. The developed technique could be widely applied in studies of relationship between

  13. Use of 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, and gyrB gene sequence analysis to determine phylogenetic relationships of Bacillus cereus group.

    SciTech Connect

    Bayvkin, S. G.; Lysov, Y. P.; Zakhariev, V.; Kelly, J. J.; Jackman, J.; Stahl, D. A.; Cherni, A.; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Loyola Univ.; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Univ. of Washington

    2004-08-01

    In order to determine if variations in rRNA sequence could be used for discrimination of the members of the Bacillus cereus group, we analyzed 183 16S rRNA and 74 23S rRNA sequences for all species in the B. cereus group. We also analyzed 30 gyrB sequences for B. cereus group strains with published 16S rRNA sequences. Our findings indicated that the three most common species of the B. cereus group, B. cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus mycoides, were each heterogeneous in all three gene sequences, while all analyzed strains of Bacillus anthracis were found to be homogeneous. Based on analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA sequence variations, the microorganisms within the B. cereus group were divided into seven subgroups, Anthracis, Cereus A and B, Thuringiensis A and B, and Mycoides A and B, and these seven subgroups were further organized into two distinct clusters. This classification of the B. cereus group conflicts with current taxonomic groupings, which are based on phenotypic traits. The presence of B. cereus strains in six of the seven subgroups and the presence of B. thuringiensis strains in three of the subgroups do not support the proposed unification of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis into one species. Analysis of the available phenotypic data for the strains included in this study revealed phenotypic traits that may be characteristic of several of the subgroups. Finally, our results demonstrated that rRNA and gyrB sequences may be used for discriminating B. anthracis from other microorganisms in the B. cereus group.

  14. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 12S ribosomal RNA characterization of Coenurus cerebralis from sheep in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Sima; Salavati, Reza; Beech, Robin N; Sharbatkhori, Mitra; Babaei, Zahra; Saedi, Sadegh; Harandi, Majid Fasihi

    2013-10-18

    Taenia multiceps is a widely distributed zoonotic tapeworm of canids. The larval stage of the parasite (Coenurus) occurs in sheep, goat and cattle and has been rarely reported from humans. This study investigated genetic variability of two mitochondrial genes in 102 isolates of T. multiceps. Metacestodes were collected from brains and hearts of sheep in Tehran and Qom provinces of Iran. DNA of each isolate was extracted and used for PCR amplification of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (CO1) and 12S ribosomal DNA (12S rRNA) genes. All amplicons were sequenced and the sequence data were analyzed using NCBI Blast and BioEdit. Phylogenetic trees and pairwise calculations were obtained by using Mega5 software. In total 7 and 25 representative haplotypes were differentiated for CO1 and 12S rRNA genes, respectively. For CO1 sequences 11 segregation sites within 7 haplotypes were observed. For 12S rRNA sequences a total of 32 segregation sites were observed in 25 haplotypes. CO1 gene displayed lower diversity than 12S rRNA gene with an overall nucleotide variation of 3.0% for CO1 vs. 7.2% for 12S rRNA. Pairwise comparisons among 7 haplotypes in CO1 and 12S rRNA genes showed the level of nucleotide differences 0.3-2.5% and 0.2-4.0%, respectively. A high degree of genetic variation was found in the isolates of T. multiceps in Iran. Additional molecular studies are required on the parasite from other intermediate hosts. PMID:23890823

  15. Characterization of Xanthomonas campestris Pathovars by rRNA Gene Restriction Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Berthier, Yvette; Verdier, Valérie; Guesdon, Jean-Luc; Chevrier, Danièle; Denis, Jean-Baptiste; Decoux, Guy; Lemattre, Monique

    1993-01-01

    Genomic DNA of 191 strains of the family Pseudomonadaceae, including 187 strains of the genus Xanthomonas, was cleaved by EcoRI endonuclease. After hybridization of Southern transfer blots with 2-acetylamino-fluorene-labelled Escherichia coli 16+23S rRNA probe, 27 different patterns were obtained. The strains are clearly distinguishable at the genus, species, and pathovar levels. The variability of the rRNA gene restriction patterns was determined for four pathovars of Xanthomonas campestris species. The 16 strains of X. campestris pv. begoniae analyzed gave only one pattern. The variability of rRNA gene restriction patterns of X. campestris pv. manihotis strains could be related to ecotypes. In contrast, the variability of patterns observed for X. campestris pv. malvacearum was not correlated with pathogenicity or with the geographical origins of the strains. The highest degree of variability of DNA fingerprints was observed within X. campestris pv. dieffenbachiae, which is pathogenic to several hosts of the Araceae family. In this case, variability was related to both host plant and pathogenicity. Images PMID:16348894

  16. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A; Mann, Allison E; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T; Brandt, Bernd W; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A; MacDonald, Sandy J; Thomas, Gavin H; Collins, Matthew J; Lewis, Cecil M; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-01-01

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341-534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions. PMID:26563586

  17. Efficient Nucleic Acid Extraction and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Bacterial Community Characterization.

    PubMed

    Anahtar, Melis N; Bowman, Brittany A; Kwon, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the role of microbial communities as critical modulators of human health and disease. High throughput sequencing technologies have allowed for the rapid and efficient characterization of bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene sequencing from a variety of sources. Although readily available tools for 16S rRNA sequence analysis have standardized computational workflows, sample processing for DNA extraction remains a continued source of variability across studies. Here we describe an efficient, robust, and cost effective method for extracting nucleic acid from swabs. We also delineate downstream methods for 16S rRNA gene sequencing, including generation of sequencing libraries, data quality control, and sequence analysis. The workflow can accommodate multiple samples types, including stool and swabs collected from a variety of anatomical locations and host species. Additionally, recovered DNA and RNA can be separated and used for other applications, including whole genome sequencing or RNA-seq. The method described allows for a common processing approach for multiple sample types and accommodates downstream analysis of genomic, metagenomic and transcriptional information. PMID:27168460

  18. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification

    PubMed Central

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A.; Mann, Allison E.; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T.; Brandt, Bernd W.; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C.; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A.; MacDonald, Sandy J.; Thomas, Gavin H.; Collins, Matthew J.; Lewis, Cecil M.; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-01-01

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341–534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions. PMID:26563586

  19. Efficient Nucleic Acid Extraction and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Bacterial Community Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Anahtar, Melis N.; Bowman, Brittany A.; Kwon, Douglas S.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the role of microbial communities as critical modulators of human health and disease. High throughput sequencing technologies have allowed for the rapid and efficient characterization of bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene sequencing from a variety of sources. Although readily available tools for 16S rRNA sequence analysis have standardized computational workflows, sample processing for DNA extraction remains a continued source of variability across studies. Here we describe an efficient, robust, and cost effective method for extracting nucleic acid from swabs. We also delineate downstream methods for 16S rRNA gene sequencing, including generation of sequencing libraries, data quality control, and sequence analysis. The workflow can accommodate multiple samples types, including stool and swabs collected from a variety of anatomical locations and host species. Additionally, recovered DNA and RNA can be separated and used for other applications, including whole genome sequencing or RNA-seq. The method described allows for a common processing approach for multiple sample types and accommodates downstream analysis of genomic, metagenomic and transcriptional information. PMID:27168460

  20. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A; Mann, Allison E; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T; Brandt, Bernd W; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A; MacDonald, Sandy J; Thomas, Gavin H; Collins, Matthew J; Lewis, Cecil M; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-11-13

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341-534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions.

  1. Design and Experimental Application of a Novel Non-Degenerate Universal Primer Set that Amplifies Prokaryotic 16S rRNA Genes with a Low Possibility to Amplify Eukaryotic rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Fumito; Kato, Hiromi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Dozono, Ayumi; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Yuji; Fujiyama, Asao; Tsuda, Masataka; Kurokawa, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The deep sequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified by universal primers has revolutionized our understanding of microbial communities by allowing the characterization of the diversity of the uncultured majority. However, some universal primers also amplify eukaryotic rRNA genes, leading to a decrease in the efficiency of sequencing of prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes with possible mischaracterization of the diversity in the microbial community. In this study, we compared 16S rRNA gene sequences from genome-sequenced strains and identified candidates for non-degenerate universal primers that could be used for the amplification of prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes. The 50 identified candidates were investigated to calculate their coverage for prokaryotic and eukaryotic rRNA genes, including those from uncultured taxa and eukaryotic organelles, and a novel universal primer set, 342F-806R, covering many prokaryotic, but not eukaryotic, rRNA genes was identified. This primer set was validated by the amplification of 16S rRNA genes from a soil metagenomic sample and subsequent pyrosequencing using the Roche 454 platform. The same sample was also used for pyrosequencing of the amplicons by employing a commonly used primer set, 338F-533R, and for shotgun metagenomic sequencing using the Illumina platform. Our comparison of the taxonomic compositions inferred by the three sequencing experiments indicated that the non-degenerate 342F-806R primer set can characterize the taxonomic composition of the microbial community without substantial bias, and is highly expected to be applicable to the analysis of a wide variety of microbial communities. PMID:24277737

  2. Design and experimental application of a novel non-degenerate universal primer set that amplifies prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes with a low possibility to amplify eukaryotic rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Fumito; Kato, Hiromi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Dozono, Ayumi; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Yuji; Fujiyama, Asao; Tsuda, Masataka; Kurokawa, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The deep sequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified by universal primers has revolutionized our understanding of microbial communities by allowing the characterization of the diversity of the uncultured majority. However, some universal primers also amplify eukaryotic rRNA genes, leading to a decrease in the efficiency of sequencing of prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes with possible mischaracterization of the diversity in the microbial community. In this study, we compared 16S rRNA gene sequences from genome-sequenced strains and identified candidates for non-degenerate universal primers that could be used for the amplification of prokaryotic 16S rRNA genes. The 50 identified candidates were investigated to calculate their coverage for prokaryotic and eukaryotic rRNA genes, including those from uncultured taxa and eukaryotic organelles, and a novel universal primer set, 342F-806R, covering many prokaryotic, but not eukaryotic, rRNA genes was identified. This primer set was validated by the amplification of 16S rRNA genes from a soil metagenomic sample and subsequent pyrosequencing using the Roche 454 platform. The same sample was also used for pyrosequencing of the amplicons by employing a commonly used primer set, 338F-533R, and for shotgun metagenomic sequencing using the Illumina platform. Our comparison of the taxonomic compositions inferred by the three sequencing experiments indicated that the non-degenerate 342F-806R primer set can characterize the taxonomic composition of the microbial community without substantial bias, and is highly expected to be applicable to the analysis of a wide variety of microbial communities.

  3. The Role of 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing in Confirmation of Suspected Neonatal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    El Gawhary, Somaia; El-Anany, Mervat; Hassan, Reem; Ali, Doaa; El Gameel, El Qassem

    2016-02-01

    Different molecular assays for the detection of bacterial DNA in the peripheral blood represented a diagnostic tool for neonatal sepsis. We targeted to evaluate the role of 16S rRNA gene sequencing to screen for bacteremia to confirm suspected neonatal sepsis (NS) and compare with risk factors and septic screen testing. Sixty-two neonates with suspected NS were enrolled. White blood cells count, I/T ratio, C-reactive protein, blood culture and 16S rRNA sequencing were performed. Blood culture was positive in 26% of cases, and PCR was positive in 26% of cases. Evaluation of PCR for the diagnosis of NS showed sensitivity 62.5%, specificity 86.9%, PPV 62.5%, NPV 86.9% and accuracy of 79.7%. 16S rRNA PCR increased the sensitivity of detecting bacterial DNA in newborns with signs of sepsis from 26 to 35.4%, and its use can be limited to cases with the most significant risk factors and positive septic screen.

  4. Analysis, optimization and verification of Illumina-generated 16S rRNA gene amplicon surveys.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michael C; Morrison, Hilary G; Benjamino, Jacquelynn; Grim, Sharon L; Graf, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    The exploration of microbial communities by sequencing 16S rRNA genes has expanded with low-cost, high-throughput sequencing instruments. Illumina-based 16S rRNA gene sequencing has recently gained popularity over 454 pyrosequencing due to its lower costs, higher accuracy and greater throughput. Although recent reports suggest that Illumina and 454 pyrosequencing provide similar beta diversity measures, it remains to be demonstrated that pre-existing 454 pyrosequencing workflows can transfer directly from 454 to Illumina MiSeq sequencing by simply changing the sequencing adapters of the primers. In this study, we modified 454 pyrosequencing primers targeting the V4-V5 hyper-variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene to be compatible with Illumina sequencers. Microbial communities from cows, humans, leeches, mice, sewage, and termites and a mock community were analyzed by 454 and MiSeq sequencing of the V4-V5 region and MiSeq sequencing of the V4 region. Our analysis revealed that reference-based OTU clustering alone introduced biases compared to de novo clustering, preventing certain taxa from being observed in some samples. Based on this we devised and recommend an analysis pipeline that includes read merging, contaminant filtering, and reference-based clustering followed by de novo OTU clustering, which produces diversity measures consistent with de novo OTU clustering analysis. Low levels of dataset contamination with Illumina sequencing were discovered that could affect analyses that require highly sensitive approaches. While moving to Illumina-based sequencing platforms promises to provide deeper insights into the breadth and function of microbial diversity, our results show that care must be taken to ensure that sequencing and processing artifacts do not obscure true microbial diversity. PMID:24722003

  5. Analysis, Optimization and Verification of Illumina-Generated 16S rRNA Gene Amplicon Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michael C.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Benjamino, Jacquelynn; Grim, Sharon L.; Graf, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    The exploration of microbial communities by sequencing 16S rRNA genes has expanded with low-cost, high-throughput sequencing instruments. Illumina-based 16S rRNA gene sequencing has recently gained popularity over 454 pyrosequencing due to its lower costs, higher accuracy and greater throughput. Although recent reports suggest that Illumina and 454 pyrosequencing provide similar beta diversity measures, it remains to be demonstrated that pre-existing 454 pyrosequencing workflows can transfer directly from 454 to Illumina MiSeq sequencing by simply changing the sequencing adapters of the primers. In this study, we modified 454 pyrosequencing primers targeting the V4-V5 hyper-variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene to be compatible with Illumina sequencers. Microbial communities from cows, humans, leeches, mice, sewage, and termites and a mock community were analyzed by 454 and MiSeq sequencing of the V4-V5 region and MiSeq sequencing of the V4 region. Our analysis revealed that reference-based OTU clustering alone introduced biases compared to de novo clustering, preventing certain taxa from being observed in some samples. Based on this we devised and recommend an analysis pipeline that includes read merging, contaminant filtering, and reference-based clustering followed by de novo OTU clustering, which produces diversity measures consistent with de novo OTU clustering analysis. Low levels of dataset contamination with Illumina sequencing were discovered that could affect analyses that require highly sensitive approaches. While moving to Illumina-based sequencing platforms promises to provide deeper insights into the breadth and function of microbial diversity, our results show that care must be taken to ensure that sequencing and processing artifacts do not obscure true microbial diversity. PMID:24722003

  6. Greengenes, a Chimera-checked 16S rRNA gene database and workbenchcompatible with ARB

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, Todd Z.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Larsen, Neils; Rojas,Mark; Brodie, Eoin L.; Keller, Keith; Huber, Thomas; Dalevi, Daniel; Hu,Ping; Andersen, Gary L.

    2006-04-10

    A 16S rRNA gene database (http://greengenes.lbl.gov) addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera-screening, standard alignments and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies. It was revealed that in congruent taxonomic nomenclature exists among curators even at the phylum-level. Putative chimeras were identified in 3 percent of environmental sequences and 0.2 percent of records derived from isolates. Environmental sequences were classified into 100 phylum-level lineages within the Archaea and Bacteria.

  7. Evolutionary diversity of eukaryotic small-subunit rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Sogin, M L; Elwood, H J; Gunderson, J H

    1986-03-01

    The small-subunit rRNA gene sequences of the flagellated protists Euglena gracilis and Trypanosoma brucei were determined and compared to those of other eukaryotes. A phylogenetic tree was constructed in which the earliest branching among the eukaryotes is represented by E. gracilis. The E. gracilis divergence far antedates a period of massive evolutionary radiation that gave rise to the plants, animals, fungi, and certain groups of protists such as ciliates and the acanthamoebae. The genetic diversity in this collection of eukaryotes is seen to exceed that displayed within either the eubacterial or the archaebacterial lines of descent.

  8. Novel Acanthamoeba 18S rRNA gene sequence type from an environmental isolate.

    PubMed

    Magnet, A; Henriques-Gil, N; Galván-Diaz, A L; Izquiedo, F; Fenoy, S; del Aguila, C

    2014-08-01

    The free-living amoebae, Acanthamoeba, can act as opportunistic parasites on a wide range of vertebrates and are becoming a serious threat to human health due to the resistance of their cysts to harsh environmental conditions, disinfectants, some water treatment practices, and their ubiquitous distribution. Subgenus classification based on morphology is being replaced by a classification based on the sequences of the 18S rRNA gene with a total of 18 different genotypes (T1-T18). A new environmental strain of Acanthamoeba isolated from a waste water treatment plant is presented in this study as a candidate for the description of the novel genotype T19 after phylogenetic analysis.

  9. PCR-based diversity estimates of artificial and environmental 18S rRNA gene libraries.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Marianne; Lovejoy, Connie

    2009-01-01

    Environmental clone libraries constructed using small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) or other gene-specific primers have become the standard molecular approach for identifying microorganisms directly from their environment. This technique includes an initial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification step of a phylogenetically useful marker gene using universal primers. Although it is acknowledged that such primers introduce biases, there have been few studies if any to date systematically examining such bias in eukaryotic microbes. We investigated some implications of such bias by constructing clone libraries using several universal primer pairs targeting rRNA genes. Firstly, we constructed artificial libraries using a known mix of small cultured pelagic arctic algae with representatives from five major lineages and secondly we investigated environmental samples using several primer pairs. No primer pair retrieved all of the original algae in the artificial clone libraries and all showed a favorable bias toward the dinoflagellate Polarella glacialis and a bias against the prasinophyte Micromonas and a pennate diatom. Several other species were retrieved by only one primer pair tested. Despite this, sequences from nine environmental libraries were diverse and contained representatives from all major eukaryotic clades expected in marine samples. Further, libraries from the same sample grouped together using Bray-Curtis clustering, irrespective of primer pairs. We conclude that environmental PCR-based techniques are sufficient to compare samples, but the total diversity will probably always be underestimated and relative abundance estimates should be treated with caution.

  10. Mechanistic study on the nuclear modifier gene MSS1 mutation suppressing neomycin sensitivity of the mitochondrial 15S rRNA C1477G mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiyin; Wang, Wei; He, Xiangyu; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Shen, Yaoyao; Yu, Zhe; Wang, Xuexiang; Qi, Xuchen; Zhang, Xuan; Fan, Mingjie; Dai, Yu; Yang, Shuxu; Yan, Qingfeng

    2014-01-01

    The phenotypic manifestation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations can be modulated by nuclear genes and environmental factors. However, neither the interaction among these factors nor their underlying mechanisms are well understood. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae mtDNA 15S rRNA C1477G mutation (PR) corresponds to the human 12S rRNA A1555G mutation. Here we report that a nuclear modifier gene mss1 mutation suppresses the neomycin-sensitivity phenotype of a yeast C1477G mutant in fermentable YPD medium. Functional assays show that the mitochondrial function of the yeast C1477G mutant was impaired severely in YPD medium with neomycin. Moreover, the mss1 mutation led to a significant increase in the steady-state level of HAP5 (heme activated protein), which greatly up-regulated the expression of glycolytic transcription factors RAP1, GCR1, and GCR2 and thus stimulated glycolysis. Furthermore, the high expression of the key glycolytic enzyme genes HXK2, PFK1 and PYK1 indicated that enhanced glycolysis not only compensated for the ATP reduction from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in mitochondria, but also ensured the growth of the mss1(PR) mutant in YPD medium with neomycin. This study advances our understanding of the phenotypic manifestation of mtDNA mutations.

  11. Mechanistic Study on the Nuclear Modifier Gene MSS1 Mutation Suppressing Neomycin Sensitivity of the Mitochondrial 15S rRNA C1477G Mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qiyin; Wang, Wei; He, Xiangyu; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Shen, Yaoyao; Yu, Zhe; Wang, Xuexiang; Qi, Xuchen; Zhang, Xuan; Fan, Mingjie; Dai, Yu; Yang, Shuxu; Yan, Qingfeng

    2014-01-01

    The phenotypic manifestation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations can be modulated by nuclear genes and environmental factors. However, neither the interaction among these factors nor their underlying mechanisms are well understood. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae mtDNA 15S rRNA C1477G mutation (PR) corresponds to the human 12S rRNA A1555G mutation. Here we report that a nuclear modifier gene mss1 mutation suppresses the neomycin-sensitivity phenotype of a yeast C1477G mutant in fermentable YPD medium. Functional assays show that the mitochondrial function of the yeast C1477G mutant was impaired severely in YPD medium with neomycin. Moreover, the mss1 mutation led to a significant increase in the steady-state level of HAP5 (heme activated protein), which greatly up-regulated the expression of glycolytic transcription factors RAP1, GCR1, and GCR2 and thus stimulated glycolysis. Furthermore, the high expression of the key glycolytic enzyme genes HXK2, PFK1 and PYK1 indicated that enhanced glycolysis not only compensated for the ATP reduction from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in mitochondria, but also ensured the growth of the mss1(PR) mutant in YPD medium with neomycin. This study advances our understanding of the phenotypic manifestation of mtDNA mutations. PMID:24595024

  12. Analysis of a 5S rRNA gene cloned from Euplotes eurstomus

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, A.E.; Wolffe, A.; Olins, D.E.

    1987-05-01

    The macronucleus of the hypotrichous ciliated protozoan Euplotes eurystomus lends itself to the study of eukaryotic gene and chromatin structure because native macronuclear DNA exists as linear, gene-sized fragments between 400 and 20,000 bp in length. The macronuclear chromatin, while arranged in a typical nucleosomal structure, is freely soluble in low ionic strength buffers without treatment by nucleases. Thus, specific genes may be enriched as native, intact chromatin molecules. The 5S rRNA gene from Euplotes has been cloned to facilitate investigation of 5S gene-chromatin following characterization of the gene at the DNA level. It has been demonstrated that the gene, while in circular or linear form, can be transcribed in vitro by a Xenopus oocyte nuclear extract. The transcript generated in vitro is 120 nucleotides in length and is synthesized by RNA polymerase III. Anti-Xenopus TFIIIA antibodies recognize a Euplotes macronuclear chromatin-associated protein which is approx. 80 KD in size. It has been established that the sequence of the telomere flanking the 5S gene in Euplotes eurystomus is the same telomeric sequence published for Euplotes aediculatus.

  13. Phylogeny of the Centrohelida inferred from SSU rRNA, tubulins, and actin genes.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Miako; Nakayama, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Inouye, Isao

    2005-12-01

    Amoeboid protists are major targets of recent molecular phylogeny in connection with reconstruction of global phylogeny of eukaryotes as well as the search for the root of eukaryotes. The Centrohelida are one of the major groups of Heliozoa, classified in the Actinopodida, whose evolutionary position is not well understood. To clarify the relationships between the Centrohelida and other eukaryotes, we sequenced SSU rRNA, alpha-tubulin, and beta-tubulin genes from a centroheliozoan protist, Raphidiophrys contractilis. The SSU rRNA phylogeny showed that the Centrohelida are not closely related to other heliozoan groups, Actinophryida, Desmothoracida, or Taxopodida. Maximum likelihood analyses of the combined phylogeny using a concatenate model for an alpha- + beta-tubulin + actin data set, and a separate model for SSU rRNA, alpha- and beta-tubulin, and actin gene data sets revealed the best tree, in which the Centrohelida have a closer relationship to Rhodophyta than to other major eukaryotic groups. However, both weighted Shimodaira-Hasegawa and approximately unbiased tests for the concatenate protein phylogeny did not reject alternative trees in which Centrohelida were constrained to be sisters to the Amoebozoa. Moreover, alternative trees in which Centrohelida were placed at the node branching before and after Amoebozoa or Viridiplantae were not rejected by the WSH tests. These results narrowed the possibilities for the position of Centrohelida to a sister to the Rhodophyta, to the Amoebozoa, or to an independent branch between the branchings of Amoebozoa and Rhodophyta (or possibly Plantae) at the basal position within the bikonts clade in the eukaryotic tree.

  14. Predictive functional profiling of microbial communities using 16S rRNA marker gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Langille, Morgan G. I.; Zaneveld, Jesse; Caporaso, J. Gregory; McDonald, Daniel; Knights, Dan; Reyes, Joshua A.; Clemente, Jose C.; Burkepile, Deron E.; Vega Thurber, Rebecca L.; Knight, Rob; Beiko, Robert G.; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    Profiling phylogenetic marker genes, such as the 16S rRNA gene, is a key tool for studies of microbial communities but does not provide direct evidence of a community’s functional capabilities. Here we describe PICRUSt (Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States), a computational approach to predict the functional composition of a metagenome using marker gene data and a database of reference genomes. PICRUSt uses an extended ancestral-state reconstruction algorithm to predict which gene families are present and then combines gene families to estimate the composite metagenome. Using 16S information, PICRUSt recaptures key findings from the Human Microbiome Project and accurately predicts the abundance of gene families in host-associated and environmental communities, with quantifiable uncertainty. Our results demonstrate that phylogeny and function are sufficiently linked that this ‘predictive metagenomic’ approach should provide useful insights into the thousands of uncultivated microbial communities for which only marker gene surveys are currently available. PMID:23975157

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of the Listeria monocytogenes based on sequencing of 16S rRNA and hlyA genes.

    PubMed

    Soni, Dharmendra Kumar; Dubey, Suresh Kumar

    2014-12-01

    The discrimination between Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria species has been detected. The 16S rRNA and hlyA were PCR amplified with set of oligonucleotide primers with flank 1,500 and 456 bp fragments, respectively. Based on the differences in 16S rRNA and hlyA genes, a total 80 isolates from different environmental, food and clinical samples confirmed it to be L. monocytogenes. The 16S rRNA sequence similarity suggested that the isolates were similar to the previously reported ones from different habitats by others. The phylogenetic interrelationships of the genus Listeria were investigated by sequencing of 16S rRNA and hlyA gene. The 16S rRNA sequence indicated that genus Listeria is comprised of following closely related but distinct lines of descent, one is the L. monocytogenes species group (including L. innocua, L. ivanovii, L. seeligeri and L. welshimeri) and other, the species L. grayi, L. rocourtiae and L. fleischmannii. The phylogenetic tree based on hlyA gene sequence clearly differentiates between the L. monocytogenes, L. ivanovii and L. seeligeri. In the present study, we identified 80 isolates of L. monocytogenes originating from different clinical, food and environmental samples based on 16S rRNA and hlyA gene sequence similarity.

  16. Comparison of two approaches for the classification of 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Chatellier, Sonia; Mugnier, Nathalie; Allard, Françoise; Bonnaud, Bertrand; Collin, Valérie; van Belkum, Alex; Veyrieras, Jean-Baptiste; Emler, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    The use of 16S rRNA gene sequences for microbial identification in clinical microbiology is accepted widely, and requires databases and algorithms. We compared a new research database containing curated 16S rRNA gene sequences in combination with the lca (lowest common ancestor) algorithm (RDB-LCA) to a commercially available 16S rDNA Centroid approach. We used 1025 bacterial isolates characterized by biochemistry, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS and 16S rDNA sequencing. Nearly 80 % of isolates were identified unambiguously at the species level by both classification platforms used. The remaining isolates were mostly identified correctly at the genus level due to the limited resolution of 16S rDNA sequencing. Discrepancies between both 16S rDNA platforms were due to differences in database content and the algorithm used, and could amount to up to 10.5 %. Up to 1.4 % of the analyses were found to be inconclusive. It is important to realize that despite the overall good performance of the pipelines for analysis, some inconclusive results remain that require additional in-depth analysis performed using supplementary methods.

  17. Uniting the classification of cultured and uncultured bacteria and archaea using 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Yarza, Pablo; Yilmaz, Pelin; Pruesse, Elmar; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Schleifer, Karl-Heinz; Whitman, William B; Euzéby, Jean; Amann, Rudolf; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon

    2014-09-01

    Publicly available sequence databases of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene, also known as 16S rRNA in bacteria and archaea, are growing rapidly, and the number of entries currently exceeds 4 million. However, a unified classification and nomenclature framework for all bacteria and archaea does not yet exist. In this Analysis article, we propose rational taxonomic boundaries for high taxa of bacteria and archaea on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence identities and suggest a rationale for the circumscription of uncultured taxa that is compatible with the taxonomy of cultured bacteria and archaea. Our analyses show that only nearly complete 16S rRNA sequences give accurate measures of taxonomic diversity. In addition, our analyses suggest that most of the 16S rRNA sequences of the high taxa will be discovered in environmental surveys by the end of the current decade.

  18. An unusual Y chromosome of Drosophila simulans carrying amplified rDNA spacer without rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Lohe, A R; Roberts, P A

    1990-06-01

    The X and Y chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster each contain a cluster of several hundred ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA). A nontranscribed spacer region separates adjacent rRNA genes and contains tandem copies of 240 bp repeats that include the initiation site for RNA polymerase I transcription. We show here that Drosophila simulans, a sibling species of D. melanogaster, contains few, if any, rRNA genes on its Y chromosome but carries instead a large block (3,000 kb or 12,500 copies) of 240 bp nontranscribed spacer repeats. The repeats are located at the tip of the long arm of the simulans Y chromosome, in contrast to their location among rRNA genes on the short arm of the Y chromosome of D. melanogaster. The bobbed mutation in homozygous females of D. melanogaster shortens and thins the bristles, owing to a partial deletion of rRNA genes on the X chromosome. The bristles of bobbed/Y males are normal owing to the presence of a full complement of rRNA genes on the Y chromosome. Peculiarly, in bobbed/Y males of D. simulans the short bristle phenotype does not return to normal but is enhanced by the presence of the Y chromosome. We propose that the 12,500 nontranscribed spacer repeats on the Y chromosome are responsible for this biological effect by competition for a protein factor(s) essential for normal levels of rDNA transcription at the X-linked locus.

  19. Virtual metagenome reconstruction from 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Shujiro; Tsuchiya, Yuki; Kiriyama, Chiho; Itoh, Masumi; Morisaki, Hisao

    2012-01-01

    Microbial ecologists have investigated roles of species richness and diversity in a wide variety of ecosystems. Recently, metagenomics have been developed to measure functions in ecosystems, but this approach is cost-intensive. Here we describe a novel method for the rapid and efficient reconstruction of a virtual metagenome in environmental microbial communities without using large-scale genomic sequencing. We demonstrate this approach using 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis, mapped to fully sequenced genomes, to reconstruct virtual metagenome-like organizations. Furthermore, we validate a virtual metagenome using a published metagenome for cocoa bean fermentation samples, and show that metagenomes reconstructed from biofilm formation samples allow for the study of the gene pool dynamics that are necessary for biofilm growth.

  20. rRNA Gene Expression of Abundant and Rare Activated-Sludge Microorganisms and Growth Rate Induced Micropollutant Removal.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Regnery, Julia; Li, Dong; Jones, Zackary L; Holloway, Ryan W; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-06-21

    The role of abundant and rare taxa in modulating the performance of wastewater-treatment systems is a critical component of making better predictions for enhanced functions such as micropollutant biotransformation. In this study, we compared 16S rRNA genes (rDNA) and rRNA gene expression of taxa in an activated-sludge-treatment plant (sequencing batch membrane bioreactor) at two solids retention times (SRTs): 20 and 5 days. These two SRTs were used to influence the rates of micropollutant biotransformation and nutrient removal. Our results show that rare taxa (<1%) have disproportionally high ratios of rRNA to rDNA, an indication of higher protein synthesis, compared to abundant taxa (≥1%) and suggests that rare taxa likely play an unrecognized role in bioreactor performance. There were also significant differences in community-wide rRNA expression signatures at 20-day SRT: anaerobic-oxic-anoxic periods were the primary driver of rRNA similarity. These results indicate differential expression of rRNA at high SRTs, which may further explain why high SRTs promote higher rates of micropollutant biotransformation. An analysis of micropollutant-associated degradation genes via metagenomics and direct measurements of a suite of micropollutants and nutrients further corroborates the loss of enhanced functions at 5-day SRT operation. This work advances our knowledge of the underlying ecosystem properties and dynamics of abundant and rare organisms associated with enhanced functions in engineered systems. PMID:27196630

  1. Discordant 16S and 23S rRNA gene phylogenies for the genus Helicobacter: implications for phylogenetic inference and systematics.

    PubMed

    Dewhirst, Floyd E; Shen, Zeli; Scimeca, Michael S; Stokes, Lauren N; Boumenna, Tahani; Chen, Tsute; Paster, Bruce J; Fox, James G

    2005-09-01

    Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences has become the primary method for determining prokaryotic phylogeny. Phylogeny is currently the basis for prokaryotic systematics. Therefore, the validity of 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic analyses is of fundamental importance for prokaryotic systematics. Discrepancies between 16S rRNA gene analyses and DNA-DNA hybridization and phenotypic analyses have been noted in the genus Helicobacter. To clarify these discrepancies, we sequenced the 23S rRNA genes for 55 helicobacter strains representing 41 taxa (>2,700 bases per sequence). Phylogenetic-tree construction using neighbor-joining, parsimony, and maximum likelihood methods for 23S rRNA gene sequence data yielded stable trees which were consistent with other phenotypic and genotypic methods. The 16S rRNA gene sequence-derived trees were discordant with the 23S rRNA gene trees and other data. Discrepant 16S rRNA gene sequence data for the helicobacters are consistent with the horizontal transfer of 16S rRNA gene fragments and the creation of mosaic molecules with loss of phylogenetic information. These results suggest that taxonomic decisions must be supported by other phylogenetically informative macromolecules, such as the 23S rRNA gene, when 16S rRNA gene-derived phylogeny is discordant with other credible phenotypic and genotypic methods. This study found Wolinella succinogenes to branch with the unsheathed-flagellum cluster of helicobacters by 23S rRNA gene analyses and whole-genome comparisons. This study also found intervening sequences (IVSs) in the 23S rRNA genes of strains of 12 Helicobacter species. IVSs were found in helices 10, 25, and 45, as well as between helices 31' and 27'. Simultaneous insertion of IVSs at three sites was found in H. mesocricetorum. PMID:16109952

  2. Investigation of histone H4 hyperacetylation dynamics in the 5S rRNA genes family by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay.

    PubMed

    Burlibașa, Liliana; Suciu, Ilinca

    2015-12-01

    Oogenesis is a critical event in the formation of female gamete, whose role in development is to transfer genomic information to the next generation. During this process, the gene expression pattern changes dramatically concomitant with genome remodelling, while genomic information is stably maintained. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of H4 acetylation of the oocyte and somatic 5S rRNA genes in Triturus cristatus, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay (ChIP). Our findings suggest that some epigenetic mechanisms such as histone acetylation could be involved in the transcriptional regulation of 5S rRNA gene families.

  3. An improved amplification and sequencing strategy for phylogenetic studies using the mitochondrial large subunit rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Parker, A; Kornfield, I

    1996-08-01

    Numerous molecular systematic studies have employed variation in the mitochondrial large subunit (16s) rRNA gene to infer patterns of relationship among species and higher taxa. The primers most commonly employed in 16s rRNA amplification and sequencing bracket an approximately 600 bp portion of this gene. However, most of the informative variation occurs within a 200 bp subset of this segment. We describe a novel primer pair designed to amplify this variable region in a wide range of taxa, allowing broader application and considerable streamlining of data acquisition for studies using this gene.

  4. Characterization of the 18S rRNA gene for designing universal eukaryote specific primers.

    PubMed

    Hadziavdic, Kenan; Lekang, Katrine; Lanzen, Anders; Jonassen, Inge; Thompson, Eric M; Troedsson, Christofer

    2014-01-01

    High throughput sequencing technology has great promise for biodiversity studies. However, an underlying assumption is that the primers used in these studies are universal for the prokaryotic or eukaryotic groups of interest. Full primer universality is difficult or impossible to achieve and studies using different primer sets make biodiversity comparisons problematic. The aim of this study was to design and optimize universal eukaryotic primers that could be used as a standard in future biodiversity studies. Using the alignment of all eukaryotic sequences from the publicly available SILVA database, we generated a full characterization of variable versus conserved regions in the 18S rRNA gene. All variable regions within this gene were analyzed and our results suggested that the V2, V4 and V9 regions were best suited for biodiversity assessments. Previously published universal eukaryotic primers as well as a number of self-designed primers were mapped to the alignment. Primer selection will depend on sequencing technology used, and this study focused on the 454 pyrosequencing GS FLX Titanium platform. The results generated a primer pair yielding theoretical matches to 80% of the eukaryotic and 0% of the prokaryotic sequences in the SILVA database. An empirical test of marine sediments using the AmpliconNoise pipeline for analysis of the high throughput sequencing data yielded amplification of sequences for 71% of all eukaryotic phyla with no isolation of prokaryotic sequences. To our knowledge this is the first characterization of the complete 18S rRNA gene using all eukaryotes present in the SILVA database, providing a robust test for universal eukaryotic primers. Since both in silico and empirical tests using high throughput sequencing retained high inclusion of eukaryotic phyla and exclusion of prokaryotes, we conclude that these primers are well suited for assessing eukaryote diversity, and can be used as a standard in biodiversity studies.

  5. Characterization of the 18S rRNA Gene for Designing Universal Eukaryote Specific Primers

    PubMed Central

    Hadziavdic, Kenan; Lekang, Katrine; Lanzen, Anders; Jonassen, Inge; Thompson, Eric M.; Troedsson, Christofer

    2014-01-01

    High throughput sequencing technology has great promise for biodiversity studies. However, an underlying assumption is that the primers used in these studies are universal for the prokaryotic or eukaryotic groups of interest. Full primer universality is difficult or impossible to achieve and studies using different primer sets make biodiversity comparisons problematic. The aim of this study was to design and optimize universal eukaryotic primers that could be used as a standard in future biodiversity studies. Using the alignment of all eukaryotic sequences from the publicly available SILVA database, we generated a full characterization of variable versus conserved regions in the 18S rRNA gene. All variable regions within this gene were analyzed and our results suggested that the V2, V4 and V9 regions were best suited for biodiversity assessments. Previously published universal eukaryotic primers as well as a number of self-designed primers were mapped to the alignment. Primer selection will depend on sequencing technology used, and this study focused on the 454 pyrosequencing GS FLX Titanium platform. The results generated a primer pair yielding theoretical matches to 80% of the eukaryotic and 0% of the prokaryotic sequences in the SILVA database. An empirical test of marine sediments using the AmpliconNoise pipeline for analysis of the high throughput sequencing data yielded amplification of sequences for 71% of all eukaryotic phyla with no isolation of prokaryotic sequences. To our knowledge this is the first characterization of the complete 18S rRNA gene using all eukaryotes present in the SILVA database, providing a robust test for universal eukaryotic primers. Since both in silico and empirical tests using high throughput sequencing retained high inclusion of eukaryotic phyla and exclusion of prokaryotes, we conclude that these primers are well suited for assessing eukaryote diversity, and can be used as a standard in biodiversity studies. PMID:24516555

  6. Intragenomic heterogeneity and intergenomic recombination among Vibrio parahaemolyticus 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Harth, Erika; Romero, Jaime; Torres, Rafael; Espejo, Romilio T

    2007-08-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a marine bacterium bearing 11 copies of ribosomal operons. In some strains, such as RIMD2210633, the genome includes identical copies of 16S rRNA genes (rrs). However, it is known that other strains of the species, such as strains ATCC 17802 and RIMD2210856, show conspicuous intragenomic rrs heterogeneity. The extent and diversity of the rrs heterogeneity in V. parahaemolyticus were studied in further detail by characterization of the rrs copies in environmental isolates belonging to 21 different genotype groups. Thirteen of these groups showed intragenomic heterogeneity, containing altogether 16 sequences differing within a 25 bp segment of their rrs. These sequences grouped into four clusters differing in at least four nucleotide sites. Some isolates contained rrs alleles from up to three different clusters. Each segment sequence conserved the stem-loop characteristic of the 16S rRNA structure of this 25 bp sequence. The double-stranded stem sequence was quite variable, but almost every variation had a compensatory change to maintain seven to eight paired bases. Conversely, the single-strand loop sequence was conserved. The results may be explained as a consequence of recombination among rrs evolving in different bacteria. The results suggest that intergenomic rrs recombination is very high in V. parahaemolyticus and that it occurs solely among Vibrio species. This high rrs homologous intergenomic recombination could be an effective mechanism to maintain intragenomic rrs cohesion, mediating the dispersal of the most abundant rrs version among the 11 intragenomic loci. PMID:17660428

  7. International interlaboratory study comparing single organism 16S rRNA gene sequencing data: Beyond consensus sequence comparisons.

    PubMed

    Olson, Nathan D; Lund, Steven P; Zook, Justin M; Rojas-Cornejo, Fabiola; Beck, Brian; Foy, Carole; Huggett, Jim; Whale, Alexandra S; Sui, Zhiwei; Baoutina, Anna; Dobeson, Michael; Partis, Lina; Morrow, Jayne B

    2015-03-01

    This study presents the results from an interlaboratory sequencing study for which we developed a novel high-resolution method for comparing data from different sequencing platforms for a multi-copy, paralogous gene. The combination of PCR amplification and 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA) sequencing has revolutionized bacteriology by enabling rapid identification, frequently without the need for culture. To assess variability between laboratories in sequencing 16S rRNA, six laboratories sequenced the gene encoding the 16S rRNA from Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933 and Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b strain NCTC11994. Participants performed sequencing methods and protocols available in their laboratories: Sanger sequencing, Roche 454 pyrosequencing(®), or Ion Torrent PGM(®). The sequencing data were evaluated on three levels: (1) identity of biologically conserved position, (2) ratio of 16S rRNA gene copies featuring identified variants, and (3) the collection of variant combinations in a set of 16S rRNA gene copies. The same set of biologically conserved positions was identified for each sequencing method. Analytical methods using Bayesian and maximum likelihood statistics were developed to estimate variant copy ratios, which describe the ratio of nucleotides at each identified biologically variable position, as well as the likely set of variant combinations present in 16S rRNA gene copies. Our results indicate that estimated variant copy ratios at biologically variable positions were only reproducible for high throughput sequencing methods. Furthermore, the likely variant combination set was only reproducible with increased sequencing depth and longer read lengths. We also demonstrate novel methods for evaluating variable positions when comparing multi-copy gene sequence data from multiple laboratories generated using multiple sequencing technologies. PMID:27077030

  8. International interlaboratory study comparing single organism 16S rRNA gene sequencing data: Beyond consensus sequence comparisons.

    PubMed

    Olson, Nathan D; Lund, Steven P; Zook, Justin M; Rojas-Cornejo, Fabiola; Beck, Brian; Foy, Carole; Huggett, Jim; Whale, Alexandra S; Sui, Zhiwei; Baoutina, Anna; Dobeson, Michael; Partis, Lina; Morrow, Jayne B

    2015-03-01

    This study presents the results from an interlaboratory sequencing study for which we developed a novel high-resolution method for comparing data from different sequencing platforms for a multi-copy, paralogous gene. The combination of PCR amplification and 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA) sequencing has revolutionized bacteriology by enabling rapid identification, frequently without the need for culture. To assess variability between laboratories in sequencing 16S rRNA, six laboratories sequenced the gene encoding the 16S rRNA from Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933 and Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b strain NCTC11994. Participants performed sequencing methods and protocols available in their laboratories: Sanger sequencing, Roche 454 pyrosequencing(®), or Ion Torrent PGM(®). The sequencing data were evaluated on three levels: (1) identity of biologically conserved position, (2) ratio of 16S rRNA gene copies featuring identified variants, and (3) the collection of variant combinations in a set of 16S rRNA gene copies. The same set of biologically conserved positions was identified for each sequencing method. Analytical methods using Bayesian and maximum likelihood statistics were developed to estimate variant copy ratios, which describe the ratio of nucleotides at each identified biologically variable position, as well as the likely set of variant combinations present in 16S rRNA gene copies. Our results indicate that estimated variant copy ratios at biologically variable positions were only reproducible for high throughput sequencing methods. Furthermore, the likely variant combination set was only reproducible with increased sequencing depth and longer read lengths. We also demonstrate novel methods for evaluating variable positions when comparing multi-copy gene sequence data from multiple laboratories generated using multiple sequencing technologies.

  9. Origin of the Mesozoa inferred from 18S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, J; Montoya-Burgos, J I; Fahrni, J F; Wüest, J; Zaninetti, L

    1996-10-01

    The phylum Mesozoa comprises small, simply organized wormlike parasites of marine invertebrates and is composed of two classes, the Rhombozoa and the Orthonectida. The origin of Mesozoa is uncertain; they are classically considered either as degenerate turbellarians or as primitive multicellular animals related to ciliated protists. In order to precisely determine the phylogenetic position of this group we sequenced the complete 18S rRNA gene of one rhombozoid, Dicyema sp., and one orthonectid, Rhopalura ophiocomae. The sequence analysis shows that the Mesozoa branch early in the animal evolution, closely to nematodes and myxozoans. Our data indicate probably separate origins of rhombozoids and orthonectids, suggesting that their placement in the same phylum needs to be revised.

  10. Identification of the microbiota in carious dentin lesions using 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Obata, Junko; Takeshita, Toru; Shibata, Yukie; Yamanaka, Wataru; Unemori, Masako; Akamine, Akifumi; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    While mutans streptococci have long been assumed to be the specific pathogen responsible for human dental caries, the concept of a complex dental caries-associated microbiota has received significant attention in recent years. Molecular analyses revealed the complexity of the microbiota with the predominance of Lactobacillus and Prevotella in carious dentine lesions. However, characterization of the dentin caries-associated microbiota has not been extensively explored in different ethnicities and races. In the present study, the bacterial communities in the carious dentin of Japanese subjects were analyzed comprehensively with molecular approaches using the16S rRNA gene. Carious dentin lesion samples were collected from 32 subjects aged 4-76 years, and the 16S rRNA genes, amplified from the extracted DNA with universal primers, were sequenced with a pyrosequencer. The bacterial composition was classified into clusters I, II, and III according to the relative abundance (high, middle, low) of Lactobacillus. The bacterial composition in cluster II was composed of relatively high proportions of Olsenella and Propionibacterium or subdominated by heterogeneous genera. The bacterial communities in cluster III were characterized by the predominance of Atopobium, Prevotella, or Propionibacterium with Streptococcus or Actinomyces. Some samples in clusters II and III, mainly related to Atopobium and Propionibacterium, were novel combinations of microbiota in carious dentin lesions and may be characteristic of the Japanese population. Clone library analysis revealed that Atopobium sp. HOT-416 and P. acidifaciens were specific species associated with dentinal caries among these genera in a Japanese population. We summarized the bacterial composition of dentinal carious lesions in a Japanese population using next-generation sequencing and found typical Japanese types with Atopobium or Propionibacterium predominating. PMID:25083880

  11. Identification of the Microbiota in Carious Dentin Lesions Using 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Obata, Junko; Takeshita, Toru; Shibata, Yukie; Yamanaka, Wataru; Unemori, Masako; Akamine, Akifumi; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    While mutans streptococci have long been assumed to be the specific pathogen responsible for human dental caries, the concept of a complex dental caries-associated microbiota has received significant attention in recent years. Molecular analyses revealed the complexity of the microbiota with the predominance of Lactobacillus and Prevotella in carious dentine lesions. However, characterization of the dentin caries-associated microbiota has not been extensively explored in different ethnicities and races. In the present study, the bacterial communities in the carious dentin of Japanese subjects were analyzed comprehensively with molecular approaches using the16S rRNA gene. Carious dentin lesion samples were collected from 32 subjects aged 4–76 years, and the 16S rRNA genes, amplified from the extracted DNA with universal primers, were sequenced with a pyrosequencer. The bacterial composition was classified into clusters I, II, and III according to the relative abundance (high, middle, low) of Lactobacillus. The bacterial composition in cluster II was composed of relatively high proportions of Olsenella and Propionibacterium or subdominated by heterogeneous genera. The bacterial communities in cluster III were characterized by the predominance of Atopobium, Prevotella, or Propionibacterium with Streptococcus or Actinomyces. Some samples in clusters II and III, mainly related to Atopobium and Propionibacterium, were novel combinations of microbiota in carious dentin lesions and may be characteristic of the Japanese population. Clone library analysis revealed that Atopobium sp. HOT-416 and P. acidifaciens were specific species associated with dentinal caries among these genera in a Japanese population. We summarized the bacterial composition of dentinal carious lesions in a Japanese population using next-generation sequencing and found typical Japanese types with Atopobium or Propionibacterium predominating. PMID:25083880

  12. Identification of a novel 16S rRNA gene variant of Actinomyces funkei from six patients with purulent infections.

    PubMed

    Hinić, V; Straub, C; Schultheiss, E; Kaempfer, P; Frei, R; Goldenberger, D

    2013-07-01

    Little is known about the clinical significance and laboratory diagnosis of Actinomyces funkei. In this report we describe six clinical cases where A. funkei was isolated from purulent, polymicrobial infections. Conventional identification procedures were compared with molecular methods including matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry technique. Analysis of the full 16S rRNA gene sequence of the six investigated strains revealed differences from the A. funkei type strain. DNA-DNA hybridization showed that the clinical strains represent a novel 16S rRNA gene variant within the species of A. funkei.

  13. Escherichia coli Vertebral Osteomyelitis Diagnosed According to Broad-range 16S rRNA Gene Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Shibata, Satoshi; Tanizaki, Ryutaro; Watanabe, Koji; Makabe, Kenta; Shoda, Naoki; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Nagamatsu, Maki; Oka, Shinichi; Ohmagari, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the causative agent of pyogenic osteomyelitis is often challenging, especially when antibiotics are administered before a biopsy. We herein present a case of osteomyelitis in the cervical vertebrae presenting with progressive paralytic symptoms, in which we successfully identified Escherichia coli from a biopsy specimen using broad-range 16S rRNA gene polymerase chain reaction (PCR) even though sensitive antibiotics had been used for more than 50 days before the biopsy. Broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR is a useful diagnostic method, especially when prebiopsy antibiotics are unavoidably used for a clinically unstable state.

  14. Assessing the Fecal Microbiota: An Optimized Ion Torrent 16S rRNA Gene-Based Analysis Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Foroni, Elena; Duranti, Sabrina; Turroni, Francesca; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Sanchez, Borja; Martín, Rebeca; Gueimonde, Miguel; van Sinderen, Douwe; Margolles, Abelardo; Ventura, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the distribution of 16S rRNA gene sequences within a biological sample represents the current state-of-the-art for determination of human gut microbiota composition. Advances in dissecting the microbial biodiversity of this ecosystem have very much been dependent on the development of novel high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies, like the Ion Torrent. However, the precise representation of this bacterial community may be affected by the protocols used for DNA extraction as well as by the PCR primers employed in the amplification reaction. Here, we describe an optimized protocol for 16S rRNA gene-based profiling of the fecal microbiota. PMID:23869230

  15. Karyotypic diversification in Mytilus mussels (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) inferred from chromosomal mapping of rRNA and histone gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mussels of the genus Mytilus present morphologically similar karyotypes that are presumably conserved. The absence of chromosome painting probes in bivalves makes difficult verifying this hypothesis. In this context, we comparatively mapped ribosomal RNA and histone gene families on the chromosomes of Mytilus edulis, M. galloprovincialis, M. trossulus and M. californianus by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Results Major rRNA, core and linker histone gene clusters mapped to different chromosome pairs in the four taxa. In contrast, minor rRNA gene clusters showed a different behavior. In all Mytilus two of the 5S rDNA clusters mapped to the same chromosome pair and one of them showed overlapping signals with those corresponding to one of the histone H1 gene clusters. The overlapping signals on mitotic chromosomes became a pattern of alternate 5S rRNA and linker histone gene signals on extended chromatin fibers. Additionally, M. trossulus showed minor and major rDNA clusters on the same chromosome pair. Conclusion The results obtained suggest that at least some of the chromosomes bearing these sequences are orthologous and that chromosomal mapping of rRNA and histone gene clusters could be a good tool to help deciphering some of the many unsolved questions in the systematic classification of Mytilidae. PMID:25023072

  16. Phylogenetic relationships within the family Halomonadaceae based on comparative 23S and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    de la Haba, Rafael R; Arahal, David R; Márquez, M Carmen; Ventosa, Antonio

    2010-04-01

    A phylogenetic study of the family Halomonadaceae was carried out based on complete 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA gene sequences. Several 16S rRNA genes of type strains were resequenced, and 28 new sequences of the 23S rRNA gene were obtained. Currently, the family includes nine genera (Carnimonas, Chromohalobacter, Cobetia, Halomonas, Halotalea, Kushneria, Modicisalibacter, Salinicola and Zymobacter). These genera are phylogenetically coherent except Halomonas, which is polyphyletic. This genus comprises two clearly distinguished clusters: group 1 includes Halomonas elongata (the type species) and the species Halomonas eurihalina, H. caseinilytica, H. halmophila, H. sabkhae, H. almeriensis, H. halophila, H. salina, H. organivorans, H. koreensis, H. maura and H. nitroreducens. Group 2 comprises the species Halomonas aquamarina, H. meridiana, H. axialensis, H. magadiensis, H. hydrothermalis, H. alkaliphila, H. venusta, H. boliviensis, H. neptunia, H. variabilis, H. sulfidaeris, H. subterranea, H. janggokensis, H. gomseomensis, H. arcis and H. subglaciescola. Halomonas salaria forms a cluster with Chromohalobacter salarius and the recently described genus Salinicola, and their taxonomic affiliation requires further study. More than 20 Halomonas species are phylogenetically not within the core constituted by the Halomonas sensu stricto cluster (group 1) or group 2 and, since their positions on the different phylogenetic trees are not stable, they cannot be recognized as additional groups either. In general, there is excellent agreement between the phylogenies based on the two rRNA gene sequences, but the 23S rRNA gene showed higher resolution in the differentiation of species of the family Halomonadaceae.

  17. Active community profiling via capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of amplified 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Hiibel, Sage R; Pruden, Amy; Crimi, Barbara; Reardon, Kenneth F

    2010-12-01

    Here, we report the validation and advancement of a high-throughput method for fingerprinting the active members of a microbial community. This method, termed active community profiling (ACP), provides information about both the composition and the activity of mixed microbial cultures via comparative measurements of amplified 16S rRNA (RNA) and 16S rRNA genes (DNA). Capillary electrophoresis is used to resolve single-strand conformation polymorphisms of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) products, producing electropherograms representative of the community structure. Active members of the community are distinguished by elevated RNA:DNA peak area ratios. Chemostat experiments with defined populations were conducted to validate the ACP approach. Using a pure culture of Escherichia coli, a direct correlation was found between the growth rate and the RNA:DNA peak ratio. In a second validation experiment, a binary culture of E. coli and Pseudomonas putida was subjected to a controlled environmental change consisting of a shift to anaerobic conditions. ACP revealed the expected cessation of growth of P. putida, an obligate aerobe, while the corresponding DNA-only analysis indicated no change in the culture. Finally, ACP was applied to a complex microbial community, and a novel binning approach was demonstrated for integrating the RNA and DNA electropherograms. ACP thus represents a significant advance from traditional DNA-based profiling techniques, which do not distinguish active from inactive or dead cells, and is well suited for high-throughput community analysis.

  18. The feline oral microbiome: a provisional 16S rRNA gene based taxonomy with full-length reference sequences.

    PubMed

    Dewhirst, Floyd E; Klein, Erin A; Bennett, Marie-Louise; Croft, Julie M; Harris, Stephen J; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V

    2015-02-25

    The human oral microbiome is known to play a significant role in human health and disease. While less well studied, the feline oral microbiome is thought to play a similarly important role. To determine roles oral bacteria play in health and disease, one first has to be able to accurately identify bacterial species present. 16S rRNA gene sequence information is widely used for molecular identification of bacteria and is also useful for establishing the taxonomy of novel species. The objective of this research was to obtain full 16S rRNA gene reference sequences for feline oral bacteria, place the sequences in species-level phylotypes, and create a curated 16S rRNA based taxonomy for common feline oral bacteria. Clone libraries were produced using "universal" and phylum-selective PCR primers and DNA from pooled subgingival plaque from healthy and periodontally diseased cats. Bacteria in subgingival samples were also cultivated to obtain isolates. Full-length 16S rDNA sequences were determined for clones and isolates that represent 171 feline oral taxa. A provisional curated taxonomy was developed based on the position of each taxon in 16S rRNA phylogenetic trees. The feline oral microbiome curated taxonomy and 16S rRNA gene reference set will allow investigators to refer to precisely defined bacterial taxa. A provisional name such as "Propionibacterium sp. feline oral taxon FOT-327" is an anchor to which clone, strain or GenBank names or accession numbers can point. Future next-generation-sequencing studies of feline oral bacteria will be able to map reads to taxonomically curated full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences. PMID:25523504

  19. The feline oral microbiome: a provisional 16S rRNA gene based taxonomy with full-length reference sequences.

    PubMed

    Dewhirst, Floyd E; Klein, Erin A; Bennett, Marie-Louise; Croft, Julie M; Harris, Stephen J; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V

    2015-02-25

    The human oral microbiome is known to play a significant role in human health and disease. While less well studied, the feline oral microbiome is thought to play a similarly important role. To determine roles oral bacteria play in health and disease, one first has to be able to accurately identify bacterial species present. 16S rRNA gene sequence information is widely used for molecular identification of bacteria and is also useful for establishing the taxonomy of novel species. The objective of this research was to obtain full 16S rRNA gene reference sequences for feline oral bacteria, place the sequences in species-level phylotypes, and create a curated 16S rRNA based taxonomy for common feline oral bacteria. Clone libraries were produced using "universal" and phylum-selective PCR primers and DNA from pooled subgingival plaque from healthy and periodontally diseased cats. Bacteria in subgingival samples were also cultivated to obtain isolates. Full-length 16S rDNA sequences were determined for clones and isolates that represent 171 feline oral taxa. A provisional curated taxonomy was developed based on the position of each taxon in 16S rRNA phylogenetic trees. The feline oral microbiome curated taxonomy and 16S rRNA gene reference set will allow investigators to refer to precisely defined bacterial taxa. A provisional name such as "Propionibacterium sp. feline oral taxon FOT-327" is an anchor to which clone, strain or GenBank names or accession numbers can point. Future next-generation-sequencing studies of feline oral bacteria will be able to map reads to taxonomically curated full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  20. Case of Localized Recombination in 23S rRNA Genes from Divergent Bradyrhizobium Lineages Associated with Neotropical Legumes

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Matthew A.

    2001-01-01

    Enzyme electrophoresis and rRNA sequencing were used to analyze relationships of Bradyrhizobium sp. nodule bacteria from four papilionoid legumes (Clitoria javitensis, Erythrina costaricensis, Rhynchosia pyramidalis, and Desmodium axillare) growing on Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama. Bacteria with identical multilocus allele profiles were commonly found in association with two or more legume genera. Among the 16 multilocus genotypes (electrophoretic types [ETs]) detected, six ETs formed a closely related cluster that included isolates from all four legume taxa. Bacteria from two other BCI legumes (Platypodium and Machaerium) sampled in a previous study were also identical to certain ETs in this group. Isolates from different legume genera that had the same ET had identical nucleotide sequences for both a 5′ portion of the 23S rRNA and the nearly full-length 16S rRNA genes. These results suggest that Bradyrhizobium genotypes with low host specificity may be prevalent in this tropical forest. Parsimony analysis of 16S rRNA sequence variation indicated that most isolates were related to Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110, although one ET sampled from C. javitensis had a 16S rRNA gene highly similar to that of Bradyrhizobium elkanii USDA 76. However, this isolate displayed a mosaic structure within the 5′ 23S rRNA region: one 84-bp segment was identical to that of BCI isolate Pe1-3 (a close relative of B. japonicum USDA 110, based on 16S rRNA data), while an adjacent 288-bp segment matched that of B. elkanii USDA 76. This mosaic structure is one of the first observations suggesting recombination in nature between Bradyrhizobium isolates related to B. japonicum versus B. elkanii. PMID:11319084

  1. Case of localized recombination in 23S rRNA genes from divergent bradyrhizobium lineages associated with neotropical legumes.

    PubMed

    Parker, M A

    2001-05-01

    Enzyme electrophoresis and rRNA sequencing were used to analyze relationships of Bradyrhizobium sp. nodule bacteria from four papilionoid legumes (Clitoria javitensis, Erythrina costaricensis, Rhynchosia pyramidalis, and Desmodium axillare) growing on Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama. Bacteria with identical multilocus allele profiles were commonly found in association with two or more legume genera. Among the 16 multilocus genotypes (electrophoretic types [ETs]) detected, six ETs formed a closely related cluster that included isolates from all four legume taxa. Bacteria from two other BCI legumes (Platypodium and Machaerium) sampled in a previous study were also identical to certain ETs in this group. Isolates from different legume genera that had the same ET had identical nucleotide sequences for both a 5' portion of the 23S rRNA and the nearly full-length 16S rRNA genes. These results suggest that Bradyrhizobium genotypes with low host specificity may be prevalent in this tropical forest. Parsimony analysis of 16S rRNA sequence variation indicated that most isolates were related to Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110, although one ET sampled from C. javitensis had a 16S rRNA gene highly similar to that of Bradyrhizobium elkanii USDA 76. However, this isolate displayed a mosaic structure within the 5' 23S rRNA region: one 84-bp segment was identical to that of BCI isolate Pe1-3 (a close relative of B. japonicum USDA 110, based on 16S rRNA data), while an adjacent 288-bp segment matched that of B. elkanii USDA 76. This mosaic structure is one of the first observations suggesting recombination in nature between Bradyrhizobium isolates related to B. japonicum versus B. elkanii.

  2. Diversity of Archaea in Icelandic hot springs based on 16S rRNA and chaperonin genes.

    PubMed

    Mirete, Salvador; de Figueras, Carolina G; González-Pastor, Jose E

    2011-07-01

    The diversity of archaeal communities growing in four hot springs (65-90 °C, pH 6.5) was assessed with 16S rRNA gene primers specific for the domain Archaea. Overall, mainly uncultured members of the Desulfurococcales, the Thermoproteales and the Korarchaeota, were identified. Based on this diversity, a set of chaperonin heat-shock protein (Hsp60) gene sequences from different archaeal species were aligned to design two degenerate primer sets for the amplification of the chaperonin gene: Ths and Kor (which can also detect the korarchaeotal chaperonin gene from one of the samples). A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the chaperonin sequences retrieved and other sequences from cultured representatives. The Alpha and Beta paralogs of the chaperonin gene were observed within the main clades and orthologs among them. Cultivated representatives from these clades were assigned to either paralog in the chaperonin tree. Uncultured representatives observed in the 16S rRNA gene analysis were found to be related to the Desulfurococcales. The topologies of the 16S rRNA gene and chaperonin phylogenetic trees were compared, and similar phylogenetic relationships were observed. Our results suggest that the chaperonin Hsp60 gene may be used as a phylogenetic marker for the clades found in this extreme environment.

  3. Selective phylogenetic analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes of hyperthermophilic archaea in the deep-subsurface hot biosphere.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Masuda, Harue; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2007-04-01

    International drilling projects for the study of microbial communities in the deep-subsurface hot biosphere have been expanded. Core samples obtained by deep drilling are commonly contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, making it difficult to examine the microbial community by 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate mesophilic organism contamination, we previously developed a new method (selective phylogenetic analysis [SePA]) based on the strong correlation between the guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) contents of the 16S rRNA genes and the optimal growth temperatures of prokaryotes, and we verified the method's effectiveness (H. Kimura, M. Sugihara, K. Kato, and S. Hanada, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72:21-27, 2006). In the present study we ascertained SePA's ability to eliminate contamination by archaeal rRNA genes, using deep-sea hydrothermal fluid (117 degrees C) and surface seawater (29.9 degrees C) as substitutes for deep-subsurface geothermal samples and drilling fluid, respectively. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene fragments, PCR amplified from the surface seawater, were denatured at 82 degrees C and completely digested with exonuclease I (Exo I), while gene fragments from the deep-sea hydrothermal fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84 degrees C because of their high G+C contents. An examination using mixtures of DNAs from the two environmental samples showed that denaturation at 84 degrees C and digestion with Exo I completely eliminated archaeal 16S rRNA genes from the surface seawater. Our method was quite useful for culture-independent community analysis of hyperthermophilic archaea in core samples recovered from deep-subsurface geothermal environments.

  4. Accurate, rapid taxonomic classification of fungal large-subunit rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuan-Liang; Porras-Alfaro, Andrea; Kuske, Cheryl R; Eichorst, Stephanie A; Xie, Gary

    2012-03-01

    Taxonomic and phylogenetic fingerprinting based on sequence analysis of gene fragments from the large-subunit rRNA (LSU) gene or the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region is becoming an integral part of fungal classification. The lack of an accurate and robust classification tool trained by a validated sequence database for taxonomic placement of fungal LSU genes is a severe limitation in taxonomic analysis of fungal isolates or large data sets obtained from environmental surveys. Using a hand-curated set of 8,506 fungal LSU gene fragments, we determined the performance characteristics of a naïve Bayesian classifier across multiple taxonomic levels and compared the classifier performance to that of a sequence similarity-based (BLASTN) approach. The naïve Bayesian classifier was computationally more rapid (>460-fold with our system) than the BLASTN approach, and it provided equal or superior classification accuracy. Classifier accuracies were compared using sequence fragments of 100 bp and 400 bp and two different PCR primer anchor points to mimic sequence read lengths commonly obtained using current high-throughput sequencing technologies. Accuracy was higher with 400-bp sequence reads than with 100-bp reads. It was also significantly affected by sequence location across the 1,400-bp test region. The highest accuracy was obtained across either the D1 or D2 variable region. The naïve Bayesian classifier provides an effective and rapid means to classify fungal LSU sequences from large environmental surveys. The training set and tool are publicly available through the Ribosomal Database Project.

  5. Distinct Ectomycorrhizospheres Share Similar Bacterial Communities as Revealed by Pyrosequencing-Based Analysis of 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Oger, P.; Morin, E.; Frey-Klett, P.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences generated from Xerocomus pruinatus and Scleroderma citrinum ectomycorrhizospheres revealed that similar bacterial communities inhabited the two ectomycorrhizospheres in terms of phyla and genera, with an enrichment of the Burkholderia genus. Compared to the bulk soil habitat, ectomycorrhizospheres hosted significantly more Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria. PMID:22307291

  6. An intramolecular recombination mechanism for the formation of the rRNA gene palindrome of Tetrahymena thermophila

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, D.K.; Yasuda, L.E.; Yao, Meng-Chao

    1995-12-01

    This report discusses the formation of rRNA gene palindrome in Tetrahymena thermophila and the involvement of intramolecular recombination. This, along with the authors` previous study, is the first to define a molecular pathway of palindrome formation. 48 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Comparison of gull-specific assays targeting 16S rRNA gene of Catellicoccus marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gulls have been implicated as a source of fecal contamination in inland and coastal waters. Only one gull-specific assay is currently available (i.e., gull2 qPCR assay). This assay is based on the 16S rRNA gene of Catellicocclls marimammalium and has showed a high level of host-s...

  8. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and relevance to genomovar assignment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to th...

  9. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and standard protocol for genomovar assignment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to th...

  10. Phylogenetic Analysis of Bacteroidales 16S rRNA Genes Unveils Sequences Specific to Diverse Swine Fecal Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two of the currently available methods to assess swine fecal pollution (Bac1 and PF163) target Bacteroidales 16S rRNA genes. However, these assays have been shown to exhibit poor host-specificity and low detection limits in environmental waters, in part due to the limited number...

  11. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and standard protocol for genomovar assignment.

    PubMed

    LaFrentz, B R; Waldbieser, G C; Welch, T J; Shoemaker, C A

    2014-07-01

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare, and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing of this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to the lack of a formal description of the expected number and sizes of DNA fragments generated for each of the described genomovars. In this study, partial 16S rRNA gene sequences (ca. 1250-bp fragment) from isolates representing each described genomovar and isolates generating unique restriction patterns were cloned and sequenced. The results demonstrated that some isolates contained up to three different 16S rRNA genes whose sequences generate different RFLP patterns due to intragenomic heterogeneity within HaeIII restriction sites. The occurrence of HaeIII restriction sites within the portion of the 16S rRNA gene used for typing the F. columnare isolates and intragenomic heterogeneity within these sites explained the restriction patterns observed following RFLP analyses. This research provides a standard protocol for typing isolates of F. columnare by RFLP and a formal description of the expected restriction patterns for the previously described genomovars I, II, II-B and III. Additionally, we describe a new genomovar, I/II.

  12. Direct evidence for redundant segmental replacement between multiple 18S rRNA genes in a single Prototheca strain.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Ryohei; Huss, Volker A R; Urano, Naoto; Watabe, Shugo

    2007-11-01

    Informational genes such as those encoding rRNAs are related to transcription and translation, and are thus considered to be rarely subject to lateral gene transfer (LGT) between different organisms, compared to operational genes having metabolic functions. However, several lines of evidence have suggested or confirmed the occurrence of LGT of DNA segments encoding evolutionarily variable regions of rRNA genes between different organisms. In the present paper, we show, for the first time to our knowledge, that variable regions of the 18S rRNA gene are segmentally replaced by multiple copies of different sequences in a single strain of the green microalga Prototheca wickerhamii, resulting in at least 17 genotypes, nine of which were actually transcribed. Recombination between different 18S rRNA genes occurred in seven out of eight variable regions (V1-V5 and V7-V9) of eukaryotic small subunit (SSU) rRNAs. While no recombination was observed in V1, one to three different recombination loci were demonstrated for the other regions. Such segmental replacement was also implicated for helix H37, which is defined as V6 of prokaryotic SSU rRNAs. Our observations provide direct evidence for redundant recombination of an informational gene, which encodes a component of mature ribosomes, in a single strain of one organism.

  13. A Neurospora crassa ribosomal protein gene, homologous to yeast CRY1, contains sequences potentially coordinating its transcription with rRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, B M; Harrison, K

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated and sequenced a Neurospora crassa ribosomal protein gene (designated crp-2) strongly homologous to the rp59 gene (CRY1) of yeast and the S14 ribosomal protein gene of mammals. The inferred sequence of the crp-2 protein is more homologous (83%) to the mammalian S14 sequence than to the yeast rp59 sequence (69%). The gene has three intervening sequences (IVSs) two of which are offset 7 bp from the position of IVSs in the mammalian genes. None correspond to the position of the IVS in the yeast gene. Crp-2 was mapped by RFLP analysis to the right arm of linkage group III. The 5' region of the gene contains three copies of a sequence, the Ribo box, previously shown to be required for transcription of both 5S and 40S rRNA genes. We speculate that the Ribo box may coordinate ribosomal protein and rRNA gene transcription. Images PMID:1977135

  14. Differential rRNA genes expression in bread wheat and its inheritance.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana; Polanco, Carlos; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique; Lima-Brito, José

    2013-09-01

    The expression of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes from rye, located within the nucleolus organizer regions (NORs), is repressed by cytosine methylation in wheat x rye hybrids and in triticale, as consequence of nucleolar dominance. Our previous study revealed that bread wheat cultivars with a maximum number of four Ag-NORs presented high level of rDNA cytosine methylation when compared to others with a maximum of six Ag-NORs. In order to evaluate the inheritance of the Ag-NORs number and NOR methylation patterns, we produced F1 hybrids between bread wheat cultivars with four Ag-NORs and bread wheat cultivars with six Ag-NORs (in the direct and reciprocal senses). The F2 progenies of these F1 hybrids were also evaluated for the NOR number and methylation patterns. Parent bread wheat cultivars with a maximum of four Ag-NORs after treated with 5-azacytidine evidenced a maximum of six Ag-NORs per metaphase cell and a maximum of six nucleoli per interphase nucleus, confirming that the expression of the rRNA genes in bread wheat is related to cytosine methylation. Most of the F1 hybrids showed a maximum number of four or six Ag-NORs, similarly to that of the female parent suggesting a non-mendelian inheritance, while other hybrids presented four or six Ag-NORs in both senses of the cross. The F1 NOR methylation patterns showed some fragments common to their parents but also novel fragments suggesting genomic and/or chromosome rearrangements after hybridization. Despite the different NOR patterns among the parents, an invariable NOR pattern was found among the F1 plants suggesting a tendency to stability, which was also transmitted to the F2. The F2 progenies showed plants with a maximum of four, five and/or six Ag-NORs. The ratio of plants with four, five and/or six Ag-NORs per F2 progeny was variable and did not follow any specific mendelian proportion. These results allowed us to suggest that the inheritance of the number of Ag-NORs by the F1 and F2 plants did not

  15. Changes in the Composition of Drinking Water Bacterial Clone Libraries Introduced by Using Two Different 16S rRNA Gene PCR Primers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries is a popular tool used to describe the composition of natural microbial communities. Commonly, clone libraries are developed by direct cloning of 16S rRNA gene PCR products. Different primers are often employed in the initial amp...

  16. Changes in the Composition of Drinking Water Bacterial Clone Libraries Introduced by Using Two Different 16S rRna Gene PCR Primers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries is a popular tool used to describe the composition of natural microbial communities. Commonly, clone libraries are developed by direct cloning of 16S rRNA gene PCR products. Different primers are often employed in the initial amp...

  17. Two Cases of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia with A2063G Mutation in the 23S rRNA Gene in Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Joo Hee; Chun, Jin Kyong; Oh, Ki Jin; Kim, Juwon; Yoon, Kap Jun

    2013-01-01

    We describe 2 cases of pneumonia caused by the same macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae in siblings. M. pneumoniae was identified using real-time PCR. Direct sequence analysis of the 23S rRNA gene revealed a point mutation in V domain (A2063G) of the 23S rRNA gene. PMID:23301225

  18. Chromosomal localization of 5S rRNA gene loci and the implications for relationships within the Allium complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Do, G S; Seo, B B

    1999-01-01

    Chromosomal localizations and distribution patterns of the 5S rRNA genes by means of fluorescence in-situ hybridization in diploid Allium species could help to classify species into chromosome types and aid in determining relationships among genomes. All eleven diploid species were classified into five types, A to E. Species of type A showed a pair of 5S rRNA signals on the short arm of chromosome 5 and two pairs of signals on both arms of chromosome 7. Species of types B and C showed one pair and two pairs of signals on the short arm of chromosome 7, respectively. Type D species showed two pairs of signals on the satellite region of the short arm and a pair of signals on the long arm of chromosome 7. Type E species showed three distinct 5S rRNA gene loci signals on the short arm of chromosome 7. Information on chromosomal localization of 5S rRNA gene loci and distribution patterns within chromosomes in diploid Allium species could help to infer the pathway of origin of the three kinds of alloploid species. Data indicate that A. wakegi is an allopolyploid with genomes of types B and C, and A. deltoide-fistulosum is an allotetraploid derived from a natural hybridization between different species within chromosome type A. Results indicate that A. senescens is an allopolyploid with type B chromosomes and an unidentified chromosomal type. PMID:10328620

  19. 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing for the differentiation and molecular subtyping of Listeria species.

    PubMed

    Hellberg, Rosalee S; Martin, Keely G; Keys, Ashley L; Haney, Christopher J; Shen, Yuelian; Smiley, R Derike

    2013-12-01

    Use of 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing within the regulatory workflow could greatly reduce the time and labor needed for confirmation and subtyping of Listeria monocytogenes. The goal of this study was to build a 16S rRNA partial gene reference library for Listeria spp. and investigate the potential for 16S rRNA molecular subtyping. A total of 86 isolates of Listeria representing L. innocua, L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri, and L. monocytogenes were obtained for use in building the custom library. Seven non-Listeria species and three additional strains of Listeria were obtained for use in exclusivity and food spiking tests. Isolates were sequenced for the partial 16S rRNA gene using the MicroSeq ID 500 Bacterial Identification Kit (Applied Biosystems). High-quality sequences were obtained for 84 of the custom library isolates and 23 unique 16S sequence types were discovered for use in molecular subtyping. All of the exclusivity strains were negative for Listeria and the three Listeria strains used in food spiking were consistently recovered and correctly identified at the species level. The spiking results also allowed for differentiation beyond the species level, as 87% of replicates for one strain and 100% of replicates for the other two strains consistently matched the same 16S type.

  20. Ribosomal RNA genes of Trypanosoma brucei. Cloning of a rRNA gene containing a mobile element.

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, G; Turner, M J; Cordingley, J S

    1982-01-01

    An ordered restriction map of the ribosomal RNA genes of Trypanosoma brucei brucei is presented. Bgl II fragments of T.b.brucei genomic DNA were cloned into pAT 153, and the clones containing rDNA identified. Restriction maps were established and the sense strands identified. One clone was shown by heteroduplex mapping to contain a 1.1 kb inserted sequence which was demonstrated to be widely distributed throughout the genomes of members of the subgenus Trypanozoon. However, in two other subgenera of Trypanosoma, Nannomonas and Schizotrypanum, the sequence is far less abundant. Analysis of the genomic DNA from two serodemes of T.b.brucei showed that the sequence was present in the rRNA of only one of them, implying that the sequence is a mobile element and that its appearance in rDNA is a comparitively recent occurrence. Images PMID:6294613

  1. Identification of aquatic Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia by hybridization with species-specific rRNA gene probes

    SciTech Connect

    Leff, L.G.; Kernan, R.M.; McArthur, J.V.

    1995-04-01

    Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia is a common environmental bacterium which can be pathogenic for plants and humans. In this study, four strategies were used to identify aquatic isolates: API test strips, hybridization with species-specific DNA probes for the 16S and 23S rRNA genes, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles, and growth on selective medium (TB-T agar [C. Hagedorn, W.D. Gould, T.R. Bardinelli, and D.R. Gustarson, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 53:2265-2268, 1987]). Only 59% of the isolates identified as B. cepacia with the API test strips were confirmed as B. cepacia by using fatty acids profiles. The 23S rRNA probe generated a few false-positive results but dramatically underestimated the number of B. cepacia isolates (i.e., 40% of the colonies that did not hybridize to the probe were B. cepacia, as determined by FAME). The 16S rRNA probe generated more false-positive results than the 23S rRNA probe but was effective in identifying the majority of the B. cepacia isolates. The selective medium was only partially successful in recovering B. cepacia. Use of the B. cepacia-specific 16S rRNA probe was the most efficient and accurate way of identifying B. cepacia. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. [Strategy of selecting 16S rRNA hypervariable regions for metagenome-phylogenetic marker genes based analysis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-yi; Zhu, Bing-chuan; Xu, Chao; Ding, Xiao; Li, Jun-feng; Zhang, Xue-gong; Lu, Zu-hong

    2015-11-01

    The advent of next generation sequencing technology enables parallel analysis of the whole microbial community from multiple samples. Particularly, sequencing 16S rRNA hypervariable tags has become the most efficient and cost-effective method for assessing microbial diversity. Due to its short read length of the 2nd-generation sequencing methods that cannot cover the full 16S rRNA genomic region, specific hypervariable regions or V-regions must be selected to act as the proxy. Over the past decade, selection of V-regions has not been consistent in assessing microbial diversity. Here we evaluated the current strategies of selecting 16S rRNA hypervariable regions for surveying microbial diversity. The environmental condition was considered as one of the important factors for selection of 16S rRNA hypervariable regions. We suggested that a pilot study to test different V-regions is required in bacterial diversity studies based on 16S rRNA genes.

  3. Phylogenetic Relationship of Phosphate Solubilizing Bacteria according to 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Javadi Nobandegani, Mohammad Bagher; Saud, Halimi Mohd; Yun, Wong Mui

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB) can convert insoluble form of phosphorous to an available form. Applications of PSB as inoculants increase the phosphorus uptake by plant in the field. In this study, isolation and precise identification of PSB were carried out in Malaysian (Serdang) oil palm field (University Putra Malaysia). Identification and phylogenetic analysis of 8 better isolates were carried out by 16S rRNA gene sequencing in which as a result five isolates belong to the Beta subdivision of Proteobacteria, one isolate was related to the Gama subdivision of Proteobacteria, and two isolates were related to the Firmicutes. Bacterial isolates of 6upmr, 2upmr, 19upmnr, 10upmr, and 24upmr were identified as Alcaligenes faecalis. Also, bacterial isolates of 20upmnr and 17upmnr were identified as Bacillus cereus and Vagococcus carniphilus, respectively, and bacterial isolates of 31upmr were identified as Serratia plymuthica. Molecular identification and characterization of oil palm strains as the specific phosphate solubilizer can reduce the time and cost of producing effective inoculate (biofertilizer) in an oil palm field. PMID:25632387

  4. Molecular identification of adulteration in mutton based on mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Mengru; Wen, Yuanju; Xie, Tao; He, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Yongfeng; Cao, Suizhong; Niu, Lili; Zhang, Hongping; Zhong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to set up a protocol for identification of the adulteration in mutton based on mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene. The multiplex polymerase chain reaction (multi-PCR) assay was carried out to trace the impure DNA in mutton. A universal primer pair yielded an approximate 610 bp fragment in mutton, pork, duck, chicken, horse and cat meats. The amplicons of multi-PCR assay represented the species-specific products, which could be discriminated by the size ranging from 106 bp to 532 bp. Subsequently, the authentication of each fragment was also confirmed by sequencing. Random analyses of adulterants with various meats yielded the identical results to their components, showing the suitability of the multi-PCR assay for tracing of adulterant meats with high-accuracy and precision. This assay was sensitive to detect the species-specific DNA in different proportional mixtures of mutton and duck/pork (9.1%-90.9%). In conclusion, this multi-PCR assay successfully discriminated the double-, triple-, quadruple-, and quintuple-mixtures containing variant counterparts. This method will be particularly useful in the detection of mutton adulteration in processed foods further. PMID:24739005

  5. Two distinct promoter elements in the human rRNA gene identified by linker scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Haltiner, M M; Smale, S T; Tjian, R

    1986-01-01

    A cell-free RNA polymerase I transcription system was used to evaluate the transcription efficiency of 21 linker scanning mutations that span the human rRNA gene promoter. Our analysis revealed the presence of two major control elements, designated the core and upstream elements, that affect the level of transcription initiation. The core element extends from -45 to +18 relative to the RNA start site, and transcription is severely affected (up to 100-fold) by linker scanning mutations in this region. Linker scanning and deletion mutations in the upstream element, located between nucleotides -156 and -107, cause a three- to fivefold reduction in transcription. Under certain reaction conditions, such as the presence of a high ratio of protein to template or supplementation of the reaction with partially purified protein fractions, sequences upstream of the core element can have an even greater effect (20- to 50-fold) on RNA polymerase I transcription. Primer extension analysis showed that RNA synthesized from all of these mutant templates is initiated at the correct in vivo start site. To examine the functional relationship between the core and the upstream region, mutant promoters were constructed that alter the orientation, distance, or multiplicity of these control elements relative to each other. The upstream control element appears to function in only one orientation, and its position relative to the core is constrained within a fairly narrow region. Moreover, multiple core elements in close proximity to each other have an inhibitory effect on transcription. Images PMID:3785147

  6. Phylogenetic relationships of Indian caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona) inferred from mitochondrial rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Mark; A Sheps, Jonathan; Oommen, Oommen V; Cohen, Bernard L

    2002-06-01

    India has a diverse caecilian fauna, including representatives of three of the six currently recognized families, the Caeciliidae, Ichthyophiidae, the endemic Uraeotyphlidae, but previous molecular phylogenetic studies of caecilians have not included sequences for any Indian caecilians. Partial 12S and 16S mitochondrial gene sequences were obtained for a single representative of each of the caecilian families found in India and aligned against previously reported sequences for 13 caecilian species. The resulting alignment (16 taxa, 1200 sites, of which 288 cannot be aligned unambiguously) was analyzed using parsimony, maximum-likelihood, and distance methods. As judged by bootstrap proportions, decay indices, and leaf stabilities, well-supported relationships of the Indian caecilians are recovered from the alignment. The data (1) corroborate the hypothesis, based on morphology, that the Uraeotyphlidae and Ichthyophiidae are sister taxa, (2) recover a monophyletic Ichthyophiidae, including Indian and South East Asian representatives, and (3) place the Indian caeciliid Gegeneophis ramaswamii as the sister group of the caeciliid caecilians of the Seychelles. Rough estimates of divergence times suggest an origin of the Uraeotyphlidae and Ichthyophiidae while India was isolated from Laurasia and Africa and are most consistent with an Indian origin of these families and subsequent dispersal of ichthyophiids into South East Asia.

  7. Phylogenetic relationships of Indian caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona) inferred from mitochondrial rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Mark; A Sheps, Jonathan; Oommen, Oommen V; Cohen, Bernard L

    2002-06-01

    India has a diverse caecilian fauna, including representatives of three of the six currently recognized families, the Caeciliidae, Ichthyophiidae, the endemic Uraeotyphlidae, but previous molecular phylogenetic studies of caecilians have not included sequences for any Indian caecilians. Partial 12S and 16S mitochondrial gene sequences were obtained for a single representative of each of the caecilian families found in India and aligned against previously reported sequences for 13 caecilian species. The resulting alignment (16 taxa, 1200 sites, of which 288 cannot be aligned unambiguously) was analyzed using parsimony, maximum-likelihood, and distance methods. As judged by bootstrap proportions, decay indices, and leaf stabilities, well-supported relationships of the Indian caecilians are recovered from the alignment. The data (1) corroborate the hypothesis, based on morphology, that the Uraeotyphlidae and Ichthyophiidae are sister taxa, (2) recover a monophyletic Ichthyophiidae, including Indian and South East Asian representatives, and (3) place the Indian caeciliid Gegeneophis ramaswamii as the sister group of the caeciliid caecilians of the Seychelles. Rough estimates of divergence times suggest an origin of the Uraeotyphlidae and Ichthyophiidae while India was isolated from Laurasia and Africa and are most consistent with an Indian origin of these families and subsequent dispersal of ichthyophiids into South East Asia. PMID:12099794

  8. Plastid 16S rRNA gene diversity among eukaryotic picophytoplankton sorted by flow cytometry from the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao Li; Lepère, Cécile; Scanlan, David J; Vaulot, Daniel

    2011-04-28

    The genetic diversity of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes was investigated in the South East Pacific Ocean. Genetic libraries of the plastid 16S rRNA gene were constructed on picoeukaryote populations sorted by flow cytometry, using two different primer sets, OXY107F/OXY1313R commonly used to amplify oxygenic organisms, and PLA491F/OXY1313R, biased towards plastids of marine algae. Surprisingly, the two sets revealed quite different photosynthetic picoeukaryote diversity patterns, which were moreover different from what we previously reported using the 18S rRNA nuclear gene as a marker. The first 16S primer set revealed many sequences related to Pelagophyceae and Dictyochophyceae, the second 16S primer set was heavily biased toward Prymnesiophyceae, while 18S sequences were dominated by Prasinophyceae, Chrysophyceae and Haptophyta. Primer mismatches with major algal lineages is probably one reason behind this discrepancy. However, other reasons, such as DNA accessibility or gene copy numbers, may be also critical. Based on plastid 16S rRNA gene sequences, the structure of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes varied along the BIOSOPE transect vertically and horizontally. In oligotrophic regions, Pelagophyceae, Chrysophyceae, and Prymnesiophyceae dominated. Pelagophyceae were prevalent at the DCM depth and Chrysophyceae at the surface. In mesotrophic regions Pelagophyceae were still important but Chlorophyta contribution increased. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a new clade of Prasinophyceae (clade 16S-IX), which seems to be restricted to hyper-oligotrophic stations. Our data suggest that a single gene marker, even as widely used as 18S rRNA, provides a biased view of eukaryotic communities and that the use of several markers is necessary to obtain a complete image.

  9. Plastid 16S rRNA Gene Diversity among Eukaryotic Picophytoplankton Sorted by Flow Cytometry from the South Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao Li; Lepère, Cécile; Scanlan, David J.; Vaulot, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The genetic diversity of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes was investigated in the South East Pacific Ocean. Genetic libraries of the plastid 16S rRNA gene were constructed on picoeukaryote populations sorted by flow cytometry, using two different primer sets, OXY107F/OXY1313R commonly used to amplify oxygenic organisms, and PLA491F/OXY1313R, biased towards plastids of marine algae. Surprisingly, the two sets revealed quite different photosynthetic picoeukaryote diversity patterns, which were moreover different from what we previously reported using the 18S rRNA nuclear gene as a marker. The first 16S primer set revealed many sequences related to Pelagophyceae and Dictyochophyceae, the second 16S primer set was heavily biased toward Prymnesiophyceae, while 18S sequences were dominated by Prasinophyceae, Chrysophyceae and Haptophyta. Primer mismatches with major algal lineages is probably one reason behind this discrepancy. However, other reasons, such as DNA accessibility or gene copy numbers, may be also critical. Based on plastid 16S rRNA gene sequences, the structure of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes varied along the BIOSOPE transect vertically and horizontally. In oligotrophic regions, Pelagophyceae, Chrysophyceae, and Prymnesiophyceae dominated. Pelagophyceae were prevalent at the DCM depth and Chrysophyceae at the surface. In mesotrophic regions Pelagophyceae were still important but Chlorophyta contribution increased. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a new clade of Prasinophyceae (clade 16S-IX), which seems to be restricted to hyper-oligotrophic stations. Our data suggest that a single gene marker, even as widely used as 18S rRNA, provides a biased view of eukaryotic communities and that the use of several markers is necessary to obtain a complete image. PMID:21552558

  10. The Identification of Discriminating Patterns from 16S rRNA Gene to Generate Signature for Bacillus Genus.

    PubMed

    More, Ravi P; Purohit, Hemant J

    2016-08-01

    The 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene has been widely used for the taxonomic classification of bacteria. A molecular signature is a set of nucleotide patterns, which constitute a regular expression that is specific to each particular taxon. Our main goal was to identify discriminating nucleotide patterns in 16S rRNA gene and then to generate signatures for taxonomic classification. To demonstrate our approach, we used the phylum Firmicutes as a model using representative taxa Bacilli (class), Bacillales (order), Bacillaceae (family), and Bacillus (genus), according to their dominance at each hierarchical taxonomic level. We applied combined composite vector and multiple sequence alignment approaches to generate gene-specific signatures. Further, we mapped all the patterns into the different hypervariable regions of 16S rRNA gene and confirmed the most appropriate distinguishing region as V3-V4 for targeted taxa. We also examined the evolution in discriminating patterns of signatures across taxonomic levels. We assessed the comparative classification accuracy of signatures with other methods (i.e., RDP Classifier, KNN, and SINA). Results revealed that the signatures for taxa Bacilli, Bacillales, Bacillaceae, and Bacillus could correctly classify isolate sequences with sensitivity of 0.99, 0.97, 0.94, and 0.89, respectively, and specificity close to 0.99. We developed signature-based software DNA Barcode Identification (DNA BarID) for taxonomic classification that is available at website http://www.neeri.res.in/DNA_BarID.htm . This pattern-based study provides a deeper understanding of taxon-specific discriminating patterns in 16S rRNA gene with respect to taxonomic classification.

  11. Filtering and ranking techniques for automated selection of high-quality 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Wim; De Loof, Karel; De Vos, Paul; Dawyndt, Peter; De Baets, Bernard

    2013-12-01

    StrainInfo has augmented its type strain and species/subspecies passports with a recommendation for a high-quality 16S rRNA gene sequence available from the public sequence databases. These recommendations are generated by an automated pipeline that collects all candidate 16S rRNA gene sequences for a prokaryotic type strain, filters out low-quality sequences and retains a high-quality sequence from the remaining pool. Due to thorough automation, recommendations can be renewed daily using the latest updates of the public sequence databases and the latest species descriptions. We discuss the quality criteria constructed to filter and rank available 16S rRNA gene sequences, and show how a partially ordered set (poset) ranking algorithm can be applied to solve the multi-criteria ranking problem of selecting the best candidate sequence. The proof of concept of the recommender system is validated by comparing the results of automated selection with an expert selection made in the All-Species Living Tree Project. Based on these validation results, the pipeline may reliably be applied for non-type strains and developed further for the automated selection of housekeeping genes.

  12. Absolute Quantification of Enterococcal 23S rRNA Gene Using Digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Yamahara, Kevan M; Cao, Yiping; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the ability of chip-based digital PCR (dPCR) to quantify enterococci, the fecal indicator recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) for water-quality monitoring. dPCR uses Poisson statistics to estimate the number of DNA fragments in a sample with a specific sequence. Underestimation may occur when a gene is redundantly encoded in the genome and multiple copies of that gene are on one DNA fragment. When genomic DNA (gDNA) was extracted using two commercial DNA extraction kits, we confirmed that dPCR could discern individual copies of the redundant 23s rRNA gene in the enterococcal genome. dPCR quantification was accurate when compared to the nominal concentration inferred from fluorometer measurements (linear regression slope = 0.98, intercept = 0.03, R(2) = 0.99, and p value <0.0001). dPCR quantification was also consistent with quantitative PCR (qPCR) measurements as well as cell counts for BioBall reference standard and 24 environmental water samples. qPCR and dPCR quantification of enterococci in the 24 environmental samples were significantly correlated (linear regression slope =1.08, R(2) of 0.96, and p value <0.0001); the group mean of the qPCR measurements was 0.19 log units higher than that of the dPCR measurements. At environmentally relevant concentrations, dPCR quantification was more precise (i.e., had narrower 95% confidence intervals than qPCR quantification). We observed that humic acid caused a similar level of inhibition in both dPCR and qPCR, but calcium inhibited dPCR to a lesser degree than qPCR. Inhibition of dPCR was partially relieved when the number of thermal cycles was increased. Based on these results, we conclude that dPCR is a viable option for enumerating enterococci in ambient water. PMID:26903207

  13. rrnDB: documenting the number of rRNA and tRNA genes in bacteria and archaea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Zarraz May-Ping; Bussema, Carl; Schmidt, Thomas M

    2009-01-01

    A dramatic exception to the general pattern of single-copy genes in bacterial and archaeal genomes is the presence of 1-15 copies of each ribosomal RNA encoding gene. The original version of the Ribosomal RNA Database (rrnDB) cataloged estimates of the number of 16S rRNA-encoding genes; the database now includes the number of genes encoding each of the rRNAs (5S, 16S and 23S), an internally transcribed spacer region, and the number of tRNA genes. The rrnDB has been used largely by microbiologists to predict the relative rate at which microbial populations respond to favorable growth conditions, and to interpret 16S rRNA-based surveys of microbial communities. To expand the functionality of the rrnDB (http://ribosome.mmg.msu.edu/rrndb/index.php), the search engine has been redesigned to allow database searches based on 16S rRNA gene copy number, specific organisms or taxonomic subsets of organisms. The revamped database also computes average gene copy numbers for any collection of entries selected. Curation tools now permit rapid updates, resulting in an expansion of the database to include data for 785 bacterial and 69 archaeal strains. The rrnDB continues to serve as the authoritative, curated source that documents the phylogenetic distribution of rRNA and tRNA genes in microbial genomes.

  14. The inconstant gut microbiota of Drosophila species revealed by 16S rRNA gene analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Adam C-N; Chaston, John M; Douglas, Angela E

    2013-01-01

    The gut microorganisms in some animals are reported to include a core microbiota of consistently associated bacteria that is ecologically distinctive and may have coevolved with the host. The core microbiota is promoted by positive interactions among bacteria, favoring shared persistence; its retention over evolutionary timescales is evident as congruence between host phylogeny and bacterial community composition. This study applied multiple analyses to investigate variation in the composition of gut microbiota in drosophilid flies. First, the prevalence of five previously described gut bacteria (Acetobacter and Lactobacillus species) in individual flies of 21 strains (10 Drosophila species) were determined. Most bacteria were not present in all individuals of most strains, and bacterial species pairs co-occurred in individual flies less frequently than predicted by chance, contrary to expectations of a core microbiota. A complementary pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from the gut microbiota of 11 Drosophila species identified 209 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs), with near-saturating sampling of sequences, but none of the OTUs was common to all host species. Furthermore, in both of two independent sets of Drosophila species, the gut bacterial community composition was not congruent with host phylogeny. The final analysis identified no common OTUs across three wild and four laboratory samples of D. melanogaster. Our results yielded no consistent evidence for a core microbiota in Drosophila. We conclude that the taxonomic composition of gut microbiota varies widely within and among Drosophila populations and species. This is reminiscent of the patterns of bacterial composition in guts of some other animals, including humans. PMID:23719154

  15. The inconstant gut microbiota of Drosophila species revealed by 16S rRNA gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Adam C-N; Chaston, John M; Douglas, Angela E

    2013-10-01

    The gut microorganisms in some animals are reported to include a core microbiota of consistently associated bacteria that is ecologically distinctive and may have coevolved with the host. The core microbiota is promoted by positive interactions among bacteria, favoring shared persistence; its retention over evolutionary timescales is evident as congruence between host phylogeny and bacterial community composition. This study applied multiple analyses to investigate variation in the composition of gut microbiota in drosophilid flies. First, the prevalence of five previously described gut bacteria (Acetobacter and Lactobacillus species) in individual flies of 21 strains (10 Drosophila species) were determined. Most bacteria were not present in all individuals of most strains, and bacterial species pairs co-occurred in individual flies less frequently than predicted by chance, contrary to expectations of a core microbiota. A complementary pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from the gut microbiota of 11 Drosophila species identified 209 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs), with near-saturating sampling of sequences, but none of the OTUs was common to all host species. Furthermore, in both of two independent sets of Drosophila species, the gut bacterial community composition was not congruent with host phylogeny. The final analysis identified no common OTUs across three wild and four laboratory samples of D. melanogaster. Our results yielded no consistent evidence for a core microbiota in Drosophila. We conclude that the taxonomic composition of gut microbiota varies widely within and among Drosophila populations and species. This is reminiscent of the patterns of bacterial composition in guts of some other animals, including humans.

  16. 16S rRNA Gene Survey of Microbial Communities in Winogradsky Columns

    PubMed Central

    Rundell, Ethan A.; Banta, Lois M.; Ward, Doyle V.; Watts, Corey D.; Birren, Bruce; Esteban, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A Winogradsky column is a clear glass or plastic column filled with enriched sediment. Over time, microbial communities in the sediment grow in a stratified ecosystem with an oxic top layer and anoxic sub-surface layers. Winogradsky columns have been used extensively to demonstrate microbial nutrient cycling and metabolic diversity in undergraduate microbiology labs. In this study, we used high-throughput 16s rRNA gene sequencing to investigate the microbial diversity of Winogradsky columns. Specifically, we tested the impact of sediment source, supplemental cellulose source, and depth within the column, on microbial community structure. We found that the Winogradsky columns were highly diverse communities but are dominated by three phyla: Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. The community is structured by a founding population dependent on the source of sediment used to prepare the columns and is differentiated by depth within the column. Numerous biomarkers were identified distinguishing sample depth, including Cyanobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria as biomarkers of the soil-water interface, and Clostridia as a biomarker of the deepest depth. Supplemental cellulose source impacted community structure but less strongly than depth and sediment source. In columns dominated by Firmicutes, the family Peptococcaceae was the most abundant sulfate reducer, while in columns abundant in Proteobacteria, several Deltaproteobacteria families, including Desulfobacteraceae, were found, showing that different taxonomic groups carry out sulfur cycling in different columns. This study brings this historical method for enrichment culture of chemolithotrophs and other soil bacteria into the modern era of microbiology and demonstrates the potential of the Winogradsky column as a model system for investigating the effect of environmental variables on soil microbial communities. PMID:25101630

  17. Analysis of rRNA Gene Methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana by CHEF-Conventional 2D Gel Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Mohannath, Gireesha; Pikaard, Craig S

    2016-01-01

    Contour-clamped homogenous electric field (CHEF) gel electrophoresis, a variant of Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), is a powerful technique for resolving large fragments of DNA (10 kb-9 Mb). CHEF has many applications including the physical mapping of chromosomes, artificial chromosomes, and sub-chromosomal DNA fragments, etc. Here, we describe the use of CHEF and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to analyze rRNA gene methylation patterns within the two ~4 million base pair nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) of Arabidopsis thaliana. The method involves CHEF gel electrophoresis of agarose-embedded DNA following restriction endonuclease digestion to cut the NORs into large but resolvable segments, followed by digestion with methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases and conventional (or CHEF) gel electrophoresis, in a second dimension. Resulting products are then detected by Southern blotting or PCR analyses capable of discriminating rRNA gene subtypes. PMID:27576719

  18. Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed Spacer and 18S rRNA gene sequences from Lonar lake sediment, India.

    PubMed

    Dudhagara, Pravin; Ghelani, Anjana; Bhavsar, Sunil; Bhatt, Shreyas

    2015-09-01

    The data in this article contains the sequences of fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) and 18S rRNA gene from a metagenome of Lonar soda lake, India. Sequences were amplified using fungal specific primers, which amplified the amplicon lined between the 18S and 28S rRNA genes. Data were obtained using Fungal tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (fTEFAP) technique and used to analyze fungal profile by the culture-independent method. Primary analysis using PlutoF 454 pipeline suggests the Lonar lake mycobiome contained the 29 different fungal species. The raw sequencing data used to perform this analysis along with FASTQ file are located in the NCBI Sequence Read Archive (SRA) under accession No. SRX889598 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sra/SRX889598).

  19. [Phylogeny of protostome moulting animals (Ecdysozoa) inferred from 18 and 28S rRNA gene sequences].

    PubMed

    Petrov, N B; Vladychenskaia, N S

    2005-01-01

    Reliability of reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships within a group of protostome moulting animals was evaluated by means of comparison of 18 and 28S rRNA gene sequences sets both taken separately and combined. Reliability of reconstructions was evaluated by values of the bootstrap support of major phylogenetic tree nodes and by degree of congruence of phylogenetic trees inferred by various methods. By both criteria, phylogenetic trees reconstructed from the combined 18 and 28S rRNA gene sequences were better than those inferred from 18 and 28S sequences taken separately. Results obtained are consistent with phylogenetic hypothesis separating protostome animals into two major clades, moulting Ecdysozoa (Priapulida + Kinorhyncha, Nematoda + Nematomorpha, Onychophora + Tardigrada, Myriapoda + Chelicerata, Crustacea + Hexapoda) and unmoulting Lophotrochozoa (Plathelminthes, Nemertini, Annelida, Mollusca, Echiura, Sipuncula). Clade Cephalorhyncha does not include nematomorphs (Nematomorpha). Conclusion was taken that it is necessary to use combined 18 and 28S data in phylogenetic studies. PMID:16083008

  20. Assessing hog lagoon waste contamination in the Cape Fear Watershed using Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Arfken, Ann M; Song, Bongkeun; Mallin, Michael A

    2015-09-01

    Hog lagoons can be major sources of waste and nutrient contamination to watersheds adjacent to pig farms. Fecal source tracking methods targeting Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA genes in pig fecal matter may underestimate or fail to detect hog lagoon contamination in riverine environments. In order to detect hog lagoon wastewater contamination in the Cape Fear Watershed, where a large number of hog farms are present, we conducted pyrosequencing analyses of Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA genes in hog lagoon waste and identified new hog lagoon-specific marker sequences. Additional pyrosequencing analyses of Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA genes were conducted with surface water samples collected at 4 sites during 5 months in the Cape Fear Watershed. Using an operational taxonomic unit (OTU) identity cutoff value of 97 %, these newly identified hog lagoon markers were found in 3 of the river samples, while only 1 sample contained the pig fecal marker. In the sample containing the pig fecal marker, there was a relatively high percentage (14.1 %) of the hog lagoon markers and a low pig fecal marker relative abundance of 0.4 % in the Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene sequences. This suggests that hog lagoon contamination must be somewhat significant in order for pig fecal markers to be detected, and low levels of hog lagoon contamination cannot be detected targeting only pig-specific fecal markers. Thus, new hog lagoon markers have a better detection capacity for lagoon waste contamination, and in conjunction with a pig fecal marker, provide a more comprehensive and accurate detection of hog lagoon waste contamination in susceptible watersheds. PMID:26189016

  1. Assessing hog lagoon waste contamination in the Cape Fear Watershed using Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Arfken, Ann M; Song, Bongkeun; Mallin, Michael A

    2015-09-01

    Hog lagoons can be major sources of waste and nutrient contamination to watersheds adjacent to pig farms. Fecal source tracking methods targeting Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA genes in pig fecal matter may underestimate or fail to detect hog lagoon contamination in riverine environments. In order to detect hog lagoon wastewater contamination in the Cape Fear Watershed, where a large number of hog farms are present, we conducted pyrosequencing analyses of Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA genes in hog lagoon waste and identified new hog lagoon-specific marker sequences. Additional pyrosequencing analyses of Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA genes were conducted with surface water samples collected at 4 sites during 5 months in the Cape Fear Watershed. Using an operational taxonomic unit (OTU) identity cutoff value of 97 %, these newly identified hog lagoon markers were found in 3 of the river samples, while only 1 sample contained the pig fecal marker. In the sample containing the pig fecal marker, there was a relatively high percentage (14.1 %) of the hog lagoon markers and a low pig fecal marker relative abundance of 0.4 % in the Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene sequences. This suggests that hog lagoon contamination must be somewhat significant in order for pig fecal markers to be detected, and low levels of hog lagoon contamination cannot be detected targeting only pig-specific fecal markers. Thus, new hog lagoon markers have a better detection capacity for lagoon waste contamination, and in conjunction with a pig fecal marker, provide a more comprehensive and accurate detection of hog lagoon waste contamination in susceptible watersheds.

  2. Phylogenetic diversity of bacterial symbionts of Solemya hosts based on comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, D M; Cavanaugh, C M

    1997-01-01

    The bacterial endosymbionts of two species of the bivalve genus Solemya from the Pacific Ocean, Solemya terraeregina and Solemya pusilla, were characterized. Prokaryotic cells resembling gram-negative bacteria were observed in the gills of both host species by transmission electron microscopy. The ultrastructure of the symbiosis in both host species is remarkably similar to that of all previously described Solemya spp. By using sequence data from 16S rRNA, the identity and evolutionary origins of the S. terraeregina and S. pusilla symbionts were also determined. Direct sequencing of PCR-amplified products from host gill DNA with primers specific for Bacteria 16S rRNA genes gave a single, unambiguous sequence for each of the two symbiont species. In situ hybridization with symbiont-specific oligonucleotide probes confirmed that these gene sequences belong to the bacteria residing in the hosts gills. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene sequences by both distance and parsimony methods identify the S. terraeregina and S. pusilla symbionts as members of the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria. In contrast to symbionts of other bivalve families, which appear to be monophyletic, the S. terraeregina and S. pusilla symbionts share a more recent common ancestry with bacteria associating endosymbiotically with bivalves of the superfamily Lucinacea than with other Solemya symbionts (host species S. velum, S. occidentalis, and S. reidi). Overall, the 16S rRNA gene sequence data suggest that the symbionts of Solemya hosts represent at least two distinct bacterial lineages within the gamma-Proteobacteria. While it is increasingly clear that all extant species of Solemya live in symbiosis with specific bacteria, the associations appear to have multiple evolutionary origins. PMID:8979342

  3. Uncultivated microbial eukaryotic diversity: a method to link ssu rRNA gene sequences with morphology.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Marissa B; Kita, Kelley N; Dawson, Scott C

    2011-01-01

    Protists have traditionally been identified by cultivation and classified taxonomically based on their cellular morphologies and behavior. In the past decade, however, many novel protist taxa have been identified using cultivation independent ssu rRNA sequence surveys. New rRNA "phylotypes" from uncultivated eukaryotes have no connection to the wealth of prior morphological descriptions of protists. To link phylogenetically informative sequences with taxonomically informative morphological descriptions, we demonstrate several methods for combining whole cell rRNA-targeted fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with cytoskeletal or organellar immunostaining. Either eukaryote or ciliate-specific ssu rRNA probes were combined with an anti-α-tubulin antibody or phalloidin, a common actin stain, to define cytoskeletal features of uncultivated protists in several environmental samples. The eukaryote ssu rRNA probe was also combined with Mitotracker® or a hydrogenosomal-specific anti-Hsp70 antibody to localize mitochondria and hydrogenosomes, respectively, in uncultivated protists from different environments. Using rRNA probes in combination with immunostaining, we linked ssu rRNA phylotypes with microtubule structure to describe flagellate and ciliate morphology in three diverse environments, and linked Naegleria spp. to their amoeboid morphology using actin staining in hay infusion samples. We also linked uncultivated ciliates to morphologically similar Colpoda-like ciliates using tubulin immunostaining with a ciliate-specific rRNA probe. Combining rRNA-targeted FISH with cytoskeletal immunostaining or stains targeting specific organelles provides a fast, efficient, high throughput method for linking genetic sequences with morphological features in uncultivated protists. When linked to phylotype, morphological descriptions of protists can both complement and vet the increasing number of sequences from uncultivated protists, including those of novel lineages

  4. Uncultivated microbial eukaryotic diversity: a method to link ssu rRNA gene sequences with morphology.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Marissa B; Kita, Kelley N; Dawson, Scott C

    2011-01-01

    Protists have traditionally been identified by cultivation and classified taxonomically based on their cellular morphologies and behavior. In the past decade, however, many novel protist taxa have been identified using cultivation independent ssu rRNA sequence surveys. New rRNA "phylotypes" from uncultivated eukaryotes have no connection to the wealth of prior morphological descriptions of protists. To link phylogenetically informative sequences with taxonomically informative morphological descriptions, we demonstrate several methods for combining whole cell rRNA-targeted fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with cytoskeletal or organellar immunostaining. Either eukaryote or ciliate-specific ssu rRNA probes were combined with an anti-α-tubulin antibody or phalloidin, a common actin stain, to define cytoskeletal features of uncultivated protists in several environmental samples. The eukaryote ssu rRNA probe was also combined with Mitotracker® or a hydrogenosomal-specific anti-Hsp70 antibody to localize mitochondria and hydrogenosomes, respectively, in uncultivated protists from different environments. Using rRNA probes in combination with immunostaining, we linked ssu rRNA phylotypes with microtubule structure to describe flagellate and ciliate morphology in three diverse environments, and linked Naegleria spp. to their amoeboid morphology using actin staining in hay infusion samples. We also linked uncultivated ciliates to morphologically similar Colpoda-like ciliates using tubulin immunostaining with a ciliate-specific rRNA probe. Combining rRNA-targeted FISH with cytoskeletal immunostaining or stains targeting specific organelles provides a fast, efficient, high throughput method for linking genetic sequences with morphological features in uncultivated protists. When linked to phylotype, morphological descriptions of protists can both complement and vet the increasing number of sequences from uncultivated protists, including those of novel lineages

  5. Description of an unusual Neisseria meningitidis isolate containing and expressing Neisseria gonorrhoeae-Specific 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Walcher, Marion; Skvoretz, Rhonda; Montgomery-Fullerton, Megan; Jonas, Vivian; Brentano, Steve

    2013-10-01

    An apparently rare Neisseria meningitidis isolate containing one copy of a Neisseria gonorrhoeae 16S rRNA gene is described herein. This isolate was identified as N. meningitidis by biochemical identification methods but generated a positive signal with Gen-Probe Aptima assays for the detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Direct 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the purified isolate revealed mixed bases in signature regions that allow for discrimination between N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae. The mixed bases were resolved by sequencing individually PCR-amplified single copies of the genomic 16S rRNA gene. A total of 121 discrete sequences were obtained; 92 (76%) were N. meningitidis sequences, and 29 (24%) were N. gonorrhoeae sequences. Based on the ratio of species-specific sequences, the N. meningitidis strain seems to have replaced one of its four intrinsic 16S rRNA genes with the gonococcal gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes specific for meningococcal and gonococcal rRNA were used to demonstrate the expression of the rRNA genes. Interestingly, the clinical isolate described here expresses both N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae 16S rRNA genes, as shown by positive FISH signals with both probes. This explains why the probes for N. gonorrhoeae in the Gen-Probe Aptima assays cross-react with this N. meningitidis isolate. The N. meningitidis isolate described must have obtained N. gonorrhoeae-specific DNA through interspecies recombination.

  6. New screening software shows that most recent large 16S rRNA gene clone libraries contain chimeras.

    PubMed

    Ashelford, Kevin E; Chuzhanova, Nadia A; Fry, John C; Jones, Antonia J; Weightman, Andrew J

    2006-09-01

    A new computer program, called Mallard, is presented for screening entire 16S rRNA gene libraries of up to 1,000 sequences for chimeras and other artifacts. Written in the Java computer language and capable of running on all major operating systems, the program provides a novel graphical approach for visualizing phylogenetic relationships among 16S rRNA gene sequences. To illustrate its use, we analyzed most of the large libraries of cloned bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences submitted to the public repository during 2005. Defining a large library as one containing 100 or more sequences of 1,200 bases or greater, we screened 25 of the 28 libraries and found that all but three contained substantial anomalies. Overall, 543 anomalous sequences were found. The average anomaly content per clone library was 9.0%, 4% higher than that previously estimated for the public repository overall. In addition, 90.8% of anomalies had characteristic chimeric patterns, a rise of 25.4% over that found previously. One library alone was found to contain 54 chimeras, representing 45.8% of its content. These figures far exceed previous estimates of artifacts within public repositories and further highlight the urgent need for all researchers to adequately screen their libraries prior to submission. Mallard is freely available from our website at http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/biosi/research/biosoft/.

  7. Clinical Fusobacterium mortiferum Isolates Cluster with Undifferentiated Clostridium rectum Species Based on 16S rRNA Gene Phylogenetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yangsoon; Eun, Chang Soo; Han, Dong Soo

    2016-05-01

    The most commonly encountered clinical Fusobacterium species are F. nucleatum and F. necrophorum; other Fusobacteria, such as F. mortiferum and F. varium, have occasionally been isolated from human specimens. Clostridium rectum is a gram-positive species characterized as a straight bacillus with oval sub-terminal spores. The close 16S rRNA gene sequence relationship of C. rectum with the genus Fusobacterium is unexpected given their very different phenotypic characteristics. Between 2014 and 2015, a total of 19 Fusobacterium isolates were recovered from the colonic tissue of 10 patients at a university hospital. All isolates were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The phylogenetic relationship among these isolates was estimated using the neighbor-joining method and the Molecular Evolutionary Genetic Analysis (MEGA) version 6. Based on phylogenetic analysis, the F. mortiferum isolates clustered into two groups - F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) and F. mortiferum ATCC 25557 (group II) - even though they are of the same species. Furthermore, the F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) showed a close phylogenetic relationship with C. rectum, even though C. rectum is classified as a gram-positive spore-producing bacillus. C. rectum is clearly unrelated to the genus Clostridium as it shows highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with species from the genus Fusobacterium Therefore, additional methods such as Gram staining and other biochemical methods should be performed for Fusobacterium identification. PMID:27312552

  8. The B chromosomes of the African cichlid fish Haplochromis obliquidens harbour 18S rRNA gene copies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Diverse plant and animal species have B chromosomes, also known as accessory, extra or supernumerary chromosomes. Despite being widely distributed among different taxa, the genomic nature and genetic behavior of B chromosomes are still poorly understood. Results In this study we describe the occurrence of B chromosomes in the African cichlid fish Haplochromis obliquidens. One or two large B chromosome(s) occurring in 39.6% of the analyzed individuals (both male and female) were identified. To better characterize the karyotype and assess the nature of the B chromosomes, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed using probes for telomeric DNA repeats, 18S and 5S rRNA genes, SATA centromeric satellites, and bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) enriched in repeated DNA sequences. The B chromosomes are enriched in repeated DNAs, especially non-active 18S rRNA gene-like sequences. Conclusion Our results suggest that the B chromosome could have originated from rDNA bearing subtelo/acrocentric A chromosomes through formation of an isochromosome, or by accumulation of repeated DNAs and rRNA gene-like sequences in a small proto-B chromosome derived from the A complement. PMID:20051104

  9. Testing evolutionary models to explain the process of nucleotide substitution in gut bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Mazcorro, Jose F

    2013-09-01

    The 16S rRNA gene has been widely used as a marker of gut bacterial diversity and phylogeny, yet we do not know the model of evolution that best explains the differences in its nucleotide composition within and among taxa. Over 46 000 good-quality near-full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences from five bacterial phyla were obtained from the ribosomal database project (RDP) by study and, when possible, by within-study characteristics (e.g. anatomical region). Using alignments (RDPX and MUSCLE) of unique sequences, the FINDMODEL tool available at http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ was utilized to find the model of character evolution (28 models were available) that best describes the input sequence data, based on the Akaike information criterion. The results showed variable levels of agreement (from 33% to 100%) in the chosen models between the RDP-based and the MUSCLE-based alignments among the taxa. Moreover, subgroups of sequences (using either alignment method) from the same study were often explained by different models. Nonetheless, the different representatives of the gut microbiota were explained by different proportions of the available models. This is the first report using evolutionary models to explain the process of nucleotide substitution in gut bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences. PMID:23808388

  10. Clinical Fusobacterium mortiferum Isolates Cluster with Undifferentiated Clostridium rectum Species Based on 16S rRNA Gene Phylogenetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yangsoon; Eun, Chang Soo; Han, Dong Soo

    2016-05-01

    The most commonly encountered clinical Fusobacterium species are F. nucleatum and F. necrophorum; other Fusobacteria, such as F. mortiferum and F. varium, have occasionally been isolated from human specimens. Clostridium rectum is a gram-positive species characterized as a straight bacillus with oval sub-terminal spores. The close 16S rRNA gene sequence relationship of C. rectum with the genus Fusobacterium is unexpected given their very different phenotypic characteristics. Between 2014 and 2015, a total of 19 Fusobacterium isolates were recovered from the colonic tissue of 10 patients at a university hospital. All isolates were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The phylogenetic relationship among these isolates was estimated using the neighbor-joining method and the Molecular Evolutionary Genetic Analysis (MEGA) version 6. Based on phylogenetic analysis, the F. mortiferum isolates clustered into two groups - F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) and F. mortiferum ATCC 25557 (group II) - even though they are of the same species. Furthermore, the F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) showed a close phylogenetic relationship with C. rectum, even though C. rectum is classified as a gram-positive spore-producing bacillus. C. rectum is clearly unrelated to the genus Clostridium as it shows highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with species from the genus Fusobacterium Therefore, additional methods such as Gram staining and other biochemical methods should be performed for Fusobacterium identification.

  11. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for 16S rRNA methylase genes in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Mitsuaki; Kaku, Mitsuo; Kamachi, Kazunari; Shibayama, Keigo; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Yamaguchi, Keizo; Ishii, Yoshikazu

    2014-10-01

    Using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method, we developed a rapid assay for detection of 16S rRNA methylase genes (rmtA, rmtB, and armA), and investigated 16S rRNA methylase-producing strains among clinical isolates. Primer Explorer V3 software was used to design the LAMP primers. LAMP primers were prepared for each gene, including two outer primers (F3 and B3), two inner primers (FIP and BIP), and two loop primers (LF and LB). Detection was performed with the Loopamp DNA amplification kit. For all three genes (rmtA, rmtB, and armA), 10(2) copies/tube could be detected with a reaction time of 60 min. When nine bacterial species (65 strains saved in National Institute of Infectious Diseases) were tested, which had been confirmed to possess rmtA, rmtB, or armA by PCR and DNA sequencing, the genes were detected correctly in these bacteria with no false negative or false positive results. Among 8447 clinical isolates isolated at 36 medical institutions, the LAMP method was conducted for 191 strains that were resistant to aminoglycosides based on the results of antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Eight strains were found to produce 16S rRNA methylase (0.09%), with rmtB being identified in three strains (0.06%) of 4929 isolates of Enterobacteriaceae, rmtA in three strains (0.10%) of 3284 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and armA in two strains (0.85%) of 234 isolates of Acinetobacter spp. At present, the incidence of strains possessing 16S rRNA methylase genes is very low in Japan. However, when Gram-negative bacteria showing high resistance to aminoglycosides are isolated by clinical laboratories, it seems very important to investigate the status of 16S rRNA methylase gene-harboring bacilli and monitor their trends among Japanese clinical settings.

  12. Diversity and depth-specific distribution of SAR11 cluster rRNA genes from marine planktonic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Field, K G; Gordon, D; Wright, T; Rappé, M; Urback, E; Vergin, K; Giovannoni, S J

    1997-01-01

    Small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene clusters are phylogenetically related sets of SSU rRNA genes, commonly encountered in genes amplified from natural populations. Genetic variability in gene clusters could result from artifacts (polymerase error or PCR chimera formation), microevolution (variation among rrn copies within strains), or macroevolution (genetic divergence correlated with long-term evolutionary divergence). To better understand gene clusters this study assessed genetic diversity and distribution of a single environmental SSU rDNA gene cluster, the SAR11 cluster. SAR11 cluster genes, from an uncultured group of the alpha subclass of the class Proteobacteria, have been recovered from coastal and midoceanic waters of the North Atlantic and Pacific. We cloned and bidirectionally sequenced 23 new SAR11 cluster 16S rRNA genes, from 80 and 250 m in the Sargasso Sea and from surface coastal waters of the Atlantic and Pacific, and analyzed them with previously published sequences. Two SAR11 genes were obviously PCR chimeras, but the biological (nonchimeric) origins of most subgroups within the cluster were confirmed by independent recovery from separate gene libraries. Using group-specific oligonucleotide probes, we analyzed depth profiles of nucleic acids, targeting both amplified rDNAs and bulk RNAs. Two subgroups within the SAR11 cluster showed different highly depth-specific distributions. We conclude that some of the genetic diversity within the SAR11 gene cluster represents macroevolutionary divergence correlated with niche specialization. Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility for marine microbial ecology of oligonucleotide probes based on gene sequences amplified from natural populations and show that a detailed knowledge of sequence variability may be needed to effectively design these probes. PMID:8979340

  13. Diversity and depth-specific distribution of SAR11 cluster rRNA genes from marine planktonic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Field, K.G.; Gordon, D.; Wright, T.

    1997-01-01

    Small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene clusters are phylogenetically related sets of SSU rRNA genes, commonly encountered in genes amplified from natural populations. Genetic variability in gene clusters could result form artifacts (polymerase error or PCR chimera formation), microevolution (variation among rrn copies within strains), or macroevolution (genetic divergence correlated with long-term evolutionary divergence). To better understand gene clusters, this study assessed genetic diversity and distribution of a single environmental SSU rDNA gene cluster, the SAR11 cluster. SAR11 cluster genes, from an uncultured group of the {alpha} subclass of the class Proteobacteria, have been recovered from coastal and midoceanic waters of the North Atlantic and Pacific. We cloned and bidirectionally sequenced 23 new SAR11 cluster 16S rRNA genes, from 80 and 250 m im the Sargasso Sea and from surface coastal waters of the Atlantic and Pacific, and analyzed them with previously published sequences. Two SAR11 genes were obviously PCR chimeras, but the biological (nonchimeric) origins of most subgroups within the cluster were confirmed by independent recovery from separate gene libraries. Using group-specific oligonucleotide probes, we analyzed depth profiles of nucleic acids, targeting both amplified rDNAs and bulk RNAs. Two subgroups within the SAR11 cluster showed different highly depth-specific distributions. We conclude that some of the genetic diversity within the SAR11 gene cluster represents macroevolutionary divergence correlated with niche specialization. Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility for marine microbial ecology of oligonucleotide probes based on gene sequences amplified from natural populations and show that a detailed knowledge of sequence variability may be needed to effectively design these probes. 48 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Direct PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from single microbial cells isolated from an Antarctic iceberg using laser microdissection microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagihara, Katsuhiko; Niki, Hironori; Baba, Tomoya

    2011-09-01

    Here, we describe a technique that allows the genetic linage analysis of 16S rRNA genes in bacteria observed under a microscope. The technique includes the isolation of microbial cells using a laser microdissection microscope, lysis of the cells, and amplification of the 16S rRNA genes in the isolated cells without interference by bacterial DNA contamination from the experimental environment or reagents. Using this technique, we successfully determined 15 16S rRNA gene sequences in cells isolated from an Antarctic iceberg. These sequences showed 94%-100% identity to their closest strains, which included bacteria that occur in aqueous, marine, and soil environments.

  15. Complete ecological isolation and cryptic diversity in Polynucleobacter bacteria not resolved by 16S rRNA gene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Martin W; Jezberová, Jitka; Koll, Ulrike; Saueressig-Beck, Tanja; Schmidt, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation experiments and genome comparisons were used to determine if lineages of planktonic Polynucleobacter almost indistinguishable by their 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences differ distinctively in their ecophysiological and genomic traits. The results of three transplantation experiments differing in complexity of biotic interactions revealed complete ecological isolation between some of the lineages. This pattern fits well to the previously detected environmental distribution of lineages along chemical gradients, as well as to differences in gene content putatively providing adaptation to chemically distinct habitats. Patterns of distribution of iron transporter genes across 209 Polynucleobacter strains obtained from freshwater systems and representing a broad pH spectrum further emphasize differences in habitat-specific adaptations. Genome comparisons of six strains sharing ⩾99% 16S rRNA similarities suggested that each strain represents a distinct species. Comparison of sequence diversity among genomes with sequence diversity among 240 cultivated Polynucleobacter strains indicated a large cryptic species complex not resolvable by 16S rRNA sequences. The revealed ecological isolation and cryptic diversity in Polynucleobacter bacteria is crucial in the interpretation of diversity studies on freshwater bacterioplankton based on ribosomal sequences. PMID:26943621

  16. Complete ecological isolation and cryptic diversity in Polynucleobacter bacteria not resolved by 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Martin W; Jezberová, Jitka; Koll, Ulrike; Saueressig-Beck, Tanja; Schmidt, Johanna

    2016-07-01

    Transplantation experiments and genome comparisons were used to determine if lineages of planktonic Polynucleobacter almost indistinguishable by their 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences differ distinctively in their ecophysiological and genomic traits. The results of three transplantation experiments differing in complexity of biotic interactions revealed complete ecological isolation between some of the lineages. This pattern fits well to the previously detected environmental distribution of lineages along chemical gradients, as well as to differences in gene content putatively providing adaptation to chemically distinct habitats. Patterns of distribution of iron transporter genes across 209 Polynucleobacter strains obtained from freshwater systems and representing a broad pH spectrum further emphasize differences in habitat-specific adaptations. Genome comparisons of six strains sharing ⩾99% 16S rRNA similarities suggested that each strain represents a distinct species. Comparison of sequence diversity among genomes with sequence diversity among 240 cultivated Polynucleobacter strains indicated a large cryptic species complex not resolvable by 16S rRNA sequences. The revealed ecological isolation and cryptic diversity in Polynucleobacter bacteria is crucial in the interpretation of diversity studies on freshwater bacterioplankton based on ribosomal sequences. PMID:26943621

  17. Further resolving the phylogeny of Myxogastria (slime molds) based on COI and SSU rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q Sh; Yan, Sh Zh; Chen, Sh L

    2015-01-01

    To date, molecular systematics of Myxogastria has been based primarily on small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) and elongation factor 1-alpha (EF-1α) genes. To establish a natural classification system for the organisms, we examined phylogenetic relationships among myxogastrian species using cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COL) and SSU rRNA genes. Twenty new sequences were obtained, including 10 COI and 10 SSU rRNA sequences, were compared with sequences of related species from GenBank in order to construct phylogenic trees. The analysis of the two data sets supported the modern phylogeny of myxogastria: orders Liceida and Trichiida formed a sister group at the most basal clade, while orders Stemonitida and Physarida formed a close group, and order Echinostelida was a sister group to Stemonitida and Physarida. However, the partial COI sequences were too conserved to resolve of the branches in Stemonitida and Physarida. In addition, we also deemed the specific edited mRNA events of COI sequences in myxogastrian species.

  18. Further resolving the phylogeny of Myxogastria (slime molds) based on COI and SSU rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q Sh; Yan, Sh Zh; Chen, Sh L

    2015-01-01

    To date, molecular systematics of Myxogastria has been based primarily on small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) and elongation factor 1-alpha (EF-1α) genes. To establish a natural classification system for the organisms, we examined phylogenetic relationships among myxogastrian species using cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COL) and SSU rRNA genes. Twenty new sequences were obtained, including 10 COI and 10 SSU rRNA sequences, were compared with sequences of related species from GenBank in order to construct phylogenic trees. The analysis of the two data sets supported the modern phylogeny of myxogastria: orders Liceida and Trichiida formed a sister group at the most basal clade, while orders Stemonitida and Physarida formed a close group, and order Echinostelida was a sister group to Stemonitida and Physarida. However, the partial COI sequences were too conserved to resolve of the branches in Stemonitida and Physarida. In addition, we also deemed the specific edited mRNA events of COI sequences in myxogastrian species. PMID:25857192

  19. Complete ecological isolation and cryptic diversity in Polynucleobacter bacteria not resolved by 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Martin W; Jezberová, Jitka; Koll, Ulrike; Saueressig-Beck, Tanja; Schmidt, Johanna

    2016-07-01

    Transplantation experiments and genome comparisons were used to determine if lineages of planktonic Polynucleobacter almost indistinguishable by their 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences differ distinctively in their ecophysiological and genomic traits. The results of three transplantation experiments differing in complexity of biotic interactions revealed complete ecological isolation between some of the lineages. This pattern fits well to the previously detected environmental distribution of lineages along chemical gradients, as well as to differences in gene content putatively providing adaptation to chemically distinct habitats. Patterns of distribution of iron transporter genes across 209 Polynucleobacter strains obtained from freshwater systems and representing a broad pH spectrum further emphasize differences in habitat-specific adaptations. Genome comparisons of six strains sharing ⩾99% 16S rRNA similarities suggested that each strain represents a distinct species. Comparison of sequence diversity among genomes with sequence diversity among 240 cultivated Polynucleobacter strains indicated a large cryptic species complex not resolvable by 16S rRNA sequences. The revealed ecological isolation and cryptic diversity in Polynucleobacter bacteria is crucial in the interpretation of diversity studies on freshwater bacterioplankton based on ribosomal sequences.

  20. 16S-23S rRNA Gene Intergenic Spacer Region Variability Helps Resolve Closely Related Sphingomonads.

    PubMed

    Tokajian, Sima; Issa, Nahla; Salloum, Tamara; Ibrahim, Joe; Farah, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonads comprise a physiologically versatile group many of which appear to be adapted to oligotrophic environments, but several also had features in their genomes indicative of host associations. In this study, the extent variability of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS) sequences of 14 ATCC reference sphingomonad strains and 23 isolates recovered from drinking water was investigated through PCR amplification and sequencing. Sequencing analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS region revealed that the ITS sizes for all studied isolates varied between 415 and 849 bp, while their G+C content was 42.2-57.9 mol%. Five distinct ITS types were identified: ITS(none) (without tRNA genes), ITS(Ala(TGC)), ITS(Ala(TGC)+Ile(GAT)), ITS(Ile(GAT)+Ala(TGC)), and ITS (Ile(GAT)+Pseudo). All of the identified tRNA(Ala(TGC)) molecules consisted of 73 bases, and all of the tRNA(Ile(GAT)) molecules consisted of 74 bases. We also detected striking variability in the size of the ITS region among the various examined isolates. Highest variability was detected within the ITS-2. The importance of this study is that this is the first comparison of the 16S-23S rDNA ITS sequence similarities and tRNA genes from sphingomonads. Collectively the data obtained in this study revealed the heterogeneity and extent of variability within the ITS region compared to the 16S rRNA gene within closely related isolates. Sequence and length polymorphisms within the ITS region along with the ITS types (tRNA-containing or lacking and the type of tRNA) and ITS-2 size and sequence similarities allowed us to overcome the limitation we previously encountered in resolving closely related isolates based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence.

  1. 16S-23S rRNA Gene Intergenic Spacer Region Variability Helps Resolve Closely Related Sphingomonads.

    PubMed

    Tokajian, Sima; Issa, Nahla; Salloum, Tamara; Ibrahim, Joe; Farah, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonads comprise a physiologically versatile group many of which appear to be adapted to oligotrophic environments, but several also had features in their genomes indicative of host associations. In this study, the extent variability of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS) sequences of 14 ATCC reference sphingomonad strains and 23 isolates recovered from drinking water was investigated through PCR amplification and sequencing. Sequencing analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS region revealed that the ITS sizes for all studied isolates varied between 415 and 849 bp, while their G+C content was 42.2-57.9 mol%. Five distinct ITS types were identified: ITS(none) (without tRNA genes), ITS(Ala(TGC)), ITS(Ala(TGC)+Ile(GAT)), ITS(Ile(GAT)+Ala(TGC)), and ITS (Ile(GAT)+Pseudo). All of the identified tRNA(Ala(TGC)) molecules consisted of 73 bases, and all of the tRNA(Ile(GAT)) molecules consisted of 74 bases. We also detected striking variability in the size of the ITS region among the various examined isolates. Highest variability was detected within the ITS-2. The importance of this study is that this is the first comparison of the 16S-23S rDNA ITS sequence similarities and tRNA genes from sphingomonads. Collectively the data obtained in this study revealed the heterogeneity and extent of variability within the ITS region compared to the 16S rRNA gene within closely related isolates. Sequence and length polymorphisms within the ITS region along with the ITS types (tRNA-containing or lacking and the type of tRNA) and ITS-2 size and sequence similarities allowed us to overcome the limitation we previously encountered in resolving closely related isolates based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence. PMID:26904019

  2. 16S–23S rRNA Gene Intergenic Spacer Region Variability Helps Resolve Closely Related Sphingomonads

    PubMed Central

    Tokajian, Sima; Issa, Nahla; Salloum, Tamara; Ibrahim, Joe; Farah, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonads comprise a physiologically versatile group many of which appear to be adapted to oligotrophic environments, but several also had features in their genomes indicative of host associations. In this study, the extent variability of the 16S–23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS) sequences of 14 ATCC reference sphingomonad strains and 23 isolates recovered from drinking water was investigated through PCR amplification and sequencing. Sequencing analysis of the 16S–23S rRNA gene ITS region revealed that the ITS sizes for all studied isolates varied between 415 and 849 bp, while their G+C content was 42.2–57.9 mol%. Five distinct ITS types were identified: ITSnone (without tRNA genes), ITSAla(TGC), ITSAla(TGC)+Ile(GAT), ITSIle(GAT)+Ala(TGC), and ITS Ile(GAT)+Pseudo. All of the identified tRNAAla(TGC) molecules consisted of 73 bases, and all of the tRNAIle(GAT) molecules consisted of 74 bases. We also detected striking variability in the size of the ITS region among the various examined isolates. Highest variability was detected within the ITS-2. The importance of this study is that this is the first comparison of the 16S–23S rDNA ITS sequence similarities and tRNA genes from sphingomonads. Collectively the data obtained in this study revealed the heterogeneity and extent of variability within the ITS region compared to the 16S rRNA gene within closely related isolates. Sequence and length polymorphisms within the ITS region along with the ITS types (tRNA-containing or lacking and the type of tRNA) and ITS-2 size and sequence similarities allowed us to overcome the limitation we previously encountered in resolving closely related isolates based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence. PMID:26904019

  3. Mechanisms underlying the evolution and maintenance of functionally heterogeneous 18S rRNA genes in Apicomplexans.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Alejandro P

    2004-09-01

    In many species of the protist phylum Apicomplexa, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene copies are structurally and functionally heterogeneous, owing to distinct requirements for rRNA-expression patterns at different developmental stages. The genomic mechanisms underlying the maintenance of this system over long-term evolutionary history are unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate what processes underlie the long-term evolution of apicomplexan 18S genes in representative species. The results show that these genes evolve according to a birth-and-death model under strong purifying selection, thereby explaining how divergent 18S genes are generated over time while continuing to maintain their ability to produce fully functional rRNAs. In addition, it was found that Cryptosporidium parvum undergoes a rapid form of birth-and-death evolution that may facilitate host-specific adaptation, including that of type I and II strains found in humans. This represents the first case in which an rRNA gene family has been found to evolve under the birth-and-death model. PMID:15175411

  4. Nearly complete rRNA genes from 371 Animalia: updated structure-based alignment and detailed phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Mallatt, Jon; Craig, Catherine Waggoner; Yoder, Matthew J

    2012-09-01

    This study presents a manually constructed alignment of nearly complete rRNA genes from most animal clades (371 taxa from ~33 of the ~36 metazoan phyla), expanded from the 197 sequences in a previous study. This thorough, taxon-rich alignment, available at http://www.wsu.edu/~jmallatt/research/rRNAalignment.html and in the Dryad Repository (doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.1v62kr3q), is based rigidly on the secondary structure of the SSU and LSU rRNA molecules, and is annotated in detail, including labeling of the erroneous sequences (contaminants). The alignment can be used for future studies of the molecular evolution of rRNA. Here, we use it to explore if the larger number of sequences produces an improved phylogenetic tree of animal relationships. Disappointingly, the resolution did not improve, neither when the standard maximum-likelihood method was used, nor with more sophisticated methods that partitioned the rRNA into paired and unpaired sites (stem, loop, bulge, junction), or accounted for the evolution of the paired sites. For example, no doublet model of paired-site substitutions (16-state, 16A and 16B, 7A-F, or 6A-C models) corrected the placement of any rogue taxa or increased resolution. The following findings are from the simplest, standard, ML analysis. The 371-taxon tree only imperfectly supported the bilaterian clades of Lophotrochozoa and Ecdysozoa, and this problem remained after 17 taxa with unstably positioned sequences were omitted from the analysis. The problem seems to stem from base-compositional heterogeneity across taxa and from an overrepresentation of highly divergent sequences among the newly added taxa (e.g., sequences from Cephalopoda, Rotifera, Acoela, and Myxozoa). The rogue taxa continue to concentrate in two locations in the rRNA tree: near the base of Arthropoda and of Bilateria. The approximately uncertain (AU) test refuted the monophyly of Mollusca and of Chordata, probably due to long-branch attraction of the highly

  5. A 5 S rRNA gene is present in the mitochondrial genome of the protist Reclinomonas americana but is absent from red algal mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Lang, B F; Goff, L J; Gray, M W

    1996-09-01

    Except in the case of land plants, mitochondrial ribosomes apparently lack a 5 S rRNA species, even though this small RNA is a component of all prokaryotic, chloroplast and eukaryotic cytosol ribosomes. In plants, the mitochondrial 5 S rRNA is encoded by mtDNA and differs in sequence from the 5 S rRNA specified by plant nuclear and chloroplast genomes. A distinctive 5 S rRNA component has not been found in the mitochondrial ribosomes of non-plant eukaryotes and, with the notable exception of the chlorophycean alga, Prototheca wickerhamii, a 5 S rRNA gene has not been identified in those non-plant mtDNAs characterized to date. Here, we report the presence of a 5 S rRNA gene in the mtDNA of the heterotrophic flagellate Reclinomonas americana. This unicellular eukaryote is a member of the jakobid flagellates, an early-diverging group of protists that share ultrastructural characteristics with the retortamonads, primitive protists that lack mitochondria. We report sequence data from the mtDNAs of the red algae Porphyra purpurea and Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis, which we use to evaluate a recent claim that a 5 S rRNA gene exists in the mtDNA of a third rhodophyte alga, Chondrus crispus. Our results lead us to the opposite conclusion: that a 5 S rRNA gene is not encoded by red algal mtDNA. In view of the accumulating evidence favoring a monophyletic origin of the mitochondrial genome, it is likely that a 5 S rRNA gene was present in an ancestral proto-mitochondrial genome, and that contemporary mtDNA-encoded 5 S rRNA genes have all descended from this ancestral gene. Considering the highly restricted phylogenetic distribution of identified mtDNA-encoded 5 S rRNA genes, it follows that the mitochondrial 5 S rRNA gene must have been lost multiple times during evolutionary diversification of the eukaryotic lineage.

  6. Comparison of 16S rRNA and protein-coding genes as molecular markers for assessing microbial diversity (Bacteria and Archaea) in ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Roux, Simon; Enault, François; Bronner, Gisèle; Debroas, Didier

    2011-12-01

    PCR amplification of the rRNA gene is the most popular method for assessing microbial diversity. However, this molecular marker is often present in multiple copies in cells presenting, in addition, an intragenomic heterogeneity. In this context, housekeeping genes may be used as taxonomic markers for ecological studies. However, the efficiency of these protein-coding genes compared to 16S rRNA genes has not been tested on environmental data. For this purpose, five protein marker genes for which primer sets are available, were selected (rplB, pyrG, fusA, leuS and rpoB) and compared with 16S rRNA gene results from PCR amplification or metagenomic data from aquatic ecosystems. Analysis of the major groups found in these ecosystems, such as Actinobacteria, Bacteroides, Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria, showed good agreement between the protein markers and the results given by 16S rRNA genes from metagenomic reads. However, with the markers it was possible to detect minor groups among the microbial assemblages, providing more details compared to 16S rRNA results from PCR amplification. In addition, the use of a set of protein markers made it possible to deduce a mean copy number of rRNA operons. This average estimate is essentially lower than the one estimated in sequenced genomes. PMID:22066608

  7. Phylogenetic positions of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Kuhnert, P; Capaul, S E; Nicolet, J; Frey, J

    1996-10-01

    The sequences of the 16S rRNA genes (rrs genes) of Clostridium chauvoei, the causative agent of blackleg in cattle, and the phenotypically related organism Clostridium septicum were determined. After amplification of 1,507-bp PCR fragments from the corresponding rrs genes, the sequences were determined in a single round of sequencing by using conserved region primers. A sequence similarity analysis of the sequences revealed the close phylogenetic relationship of C. chauvoei and C. septicum in Clostridium cluster I (M. D. Collins, P. A. Lawson, A. Willems, J. J. Cordoba, J. Fernandez-Garayzabal, P. Garcia, J. Cai, H. Hippe, and J. A. E. Farrow, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 44:812-826, 1994), which includes Clostridium carnis, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium botulinum, and Clostridium tetani. We found that 99.3% of the nucleotides in the genes of C. chauvoei and C. septicum are identical.

  8. Identification of nine sequence types of the 16S rRNA genes of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni isolated from broilers

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Ingrid; Persson, Marianne; Svensson, Linda; Engvall, Eva Olsson; Johansson, Karl-Erik

    2008-01-01

    Background Campylobacter is the most commonly reported bacterial cause of enteritis in humans in the EU Member States and other industrialized countries. One significant source of infection is broilers and consumption of undercooked broiler meat. Campylobacter jejuni is the Campylobacter sp. predominantly found in infected humans and colonized broilers. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene is very useful for identification of bacteria to genus and species level. The objectives in this study were to determine the degree of intraspecific variation in the 16S rRNA genes of C. jejuni and C. coli and to determine whether the 16S rRNA sequence types correlated with genotypes generated by PFGE analysis of SmaI restricted genomic DNA of the strains. Methods The 16S rRNA genes of 45 strains of C. jejuni and two C. coli strains isolated from broilers were sequenced and compared with 16S rRNA sequences retrieved from the Ribosomal Database Project or GenBank. The strains were also genotyped by PFGE after digestion with SmaI. Results Sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA genes revealed nine sequence types of the Campylobacter strains and the similarities between the different sequence types were in the range 99.6–99.9%. The number of nucleotide substitutions varied between one and six among the nine 16S rRNA sequence types. One of the nine 16S rRNA sequence profiles was common to 12 of the strains from our study and two of these were identified as Campylobacter coli by PCR/REA. The other 10 strains were identified as Campylobacter jejuni. Five of the nine sequence types were also found among the Campylobacter sequences deposited in GenBank. The three 16S rRNA genes in the analysed strains were identical within each individual strain for all 47 strains. Conclusion C. jejuni and C. coli seem to lack polymorphisms in their 16S rRNA gene, but phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA sequences was not always sufficient for differentiation between C. jejuni and C. coli. The strains

  9. Localization of rRNA genes in the nuclear space of Calliphora erythrocephala Mg. nurse cells during polytenization.

    PubMed

    Kokhanenko, Alina; Anan'ina, Tatyana; Stegniy, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Multicolor 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to study arrangement of rRNA genes in Calliphora erythrocephala nurse cell nuclei with different levels of polyteny. It has been shown that the rRNA genes are exclusively localized to chromosome 6, suggesting that chromosome 6 is the only C. erythrocephala chromosome responsible for nucleolar formation. We have also described changes in localization of ribosomal genes within the chromosome territory during polytenization, namely, that rDNA signals are detected in the peripheral region of chromosome territory starting from the stage of polytene chromosomes. In addition, it has emerged that large nucleolus associated with chromosome 6 starts to develop in the central nuclear region in the C. erythrocephala nurse cell nuclei at the stage of a primary reticular structure. The central position and nucleolar structure are retained at the stages when chromosome 6 occupies the central position, that is, at the stages of polytene and bloblike chromosomes. When the nucleus restores a reticular structure but at a higher polyteny level, the displacement of chromosome 6 to the nuclear periphery is accompanied by disruption of the large nucleolus into micronucleoli. The micronucleoli are distributed in the nuclear space retaining their association with the nucleolar-organizing regions of chromosome 6. Thus, our data suggest that the large-scale alterations in the organization of chromosome 6 and the nucleolus during polytenization are the correlated processes directly dependent on the rRNA gene activity. The earlier described dynamics of nucleolar-organizing chromosome territory and nucleolus in the nuclear space is likely to be associated with the change in the total expression activity of the nucleus, which complies with the hypothesis on the correlation between spatial nuclear organization and expression regulation of genetic material.

  10. Phylogeny of intestinal ciliates, including Charonina ventriculi, and comparison of microscopy and 18S rRNA gene pyrosequencing for rumen ciliate community structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Kittelmann, Sandra; Devente, Savannah R; Kirk, Michelle R; Seedorf, Henning; Dehority, Burk A; Janssen, Peter H

    2015-04-01

    The development of high-throughput methods, such as the construction of 18S rRNA gene clone or pyrosequencing libraries, has allowed evaluation of ciliate community composition in hundreds of samples from the rumen and other intestinal habitats. However, several genera of mammalian intestinal ciliates have been described based only on morphological features and, to date, have not been identified using molecular methods. Here, we isolated single cells of one of the smallest but widely distributed intestinal ciliates, Charonina ventriculi, and sequenced its 18S rRNA gene. We verified the sequence in a full-cycle rRNA approach using fluorescence in situ hybridization and thereby assigned an 18S rRNA gene sequence to this species previously known only by its morphology. Based on its full-length 18S rRNA gene sequence, Charonina ventriculi was positioned within the phylogeny of intestinal ciliates in the subclass Trichostomatia. The taxonomic framework derived from this phylogeny was used for taxonomic assignment of trichostome ciliate 18S rRNA gene sequence data stemming from high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing of rumen-derived DNA samples. The 18S rRNA gene-based ciliate community structure was compared to that obtained from microscopic counts using the same samples. Both methods allowed identification of dominant members of the ciliate communities and classification of the rumen ciliate community into one of the types first described by Eadie in 1962. Notably, each method is associated with advantages and disadvantages. Microscopy is a highly accurate method for evaluation of total numbers or relative abundances of different ciliate genera in a sample, while 18S rRNA gene pyrosequencing represents a valuable alternative for comparison of ciliate community structure in a large number of samples from different animals or treatment groups.

  11. Phylogeny of Intestinal Ciliates, Including Charonina ventriculi, and Comparison of Microscopy and 18S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing for Rumen Ciliate Community Structure Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Devente, Savannah R.; Kirk, Michelle R.; Seedorf, Henning; Dehority, Burk A.

    2015-01-01

    The development of high-throughput methods, such as the construction of 18S rRNA gene clone or pyrosequencing libraries, has allowed evaluation of ciliate community composition in hundreds of samples from the rumen and other intestinal habitats. However, several genera of mammalian intestinal ciliates have been described based only on morphological features and, to date, have not been identified using molecular methods. Here, we isolated single cells of one of the smallest but widely distributed intestinal ciliates, Charonina ventriculi, and sequenced its 18S rRNA gene. We verified the sequence in a full-cycle rRNA approach using fluorescence in situ hybridization and thereby assigned an 18S rRNA gene sequence to this species previously known only by its morphology. Based on its full-length 18S rRNA gene sequence, Charonina ventriculi was positioned within the phylogeny of intestinal ciliates in the subclass Trichostomatia. The taxonomic framework derived from this phylogeny was used for taxonomic assignment of trichostome ciliate 18S rRNA gene sequence data stemming from high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing of rumen-derived DNA samples. The 18S rRNA gene-based ciliate community structure was compared to that obtained from microscopic counts using the same samples. Both methods allowed identification of dominant members of the ciliate communities and classification of the rumen ciliate community into one of the types first described by Eadie in 1962. Notably, each method is associated with advantages and disadvantages. Microscopy is a highly accurate method for evaluation of total numbers or relative abundances of different ciliate genera in a sample, while 18S rRNA gene pyrosequencing represents a valuable alternative for comparison of ciliate community structure in a large number of samples from different animals or treatment groups. PMID:25616800

  12. Sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments using the PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing system

    PubMed Central

    Jenior, Matthew L.; Koumpouras, Charles C.; Westcott, Sarah L.; Highlander, Sarah K.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, microbial ecologists have largely abandoned sequencing 16S rRNA genes by the Sanger sequencing method and have instead adopted highly parallelized sequencing platforms. These new platforms, such as 454 and Illumina’s MiSeq, have allowed researchers to obtain millions of high quality but short sequences. The result of the added sequencing depth has been significant improvements in experimental design. The tradeoff has been the decline in the number of full-length reference sequences that are deposited into databases. To overcome this problem, we tested the ability of the PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing platform to generate sequence reads from the 16S rRNA gene. We generated sequencing data from the V4, V3–V5, V1–V3, V1–V5, V1–V6, and V1–V9 variable regions from within the 16S rRNA gene using DNA from a synthetic mock community and natural samples collected from human feces, mouse feces, and soil. The mock community allowed us to assess the actual sequencing error rate and how that error rate changed when different curation methods were applied. We developed a simple method based on sequence characteristics and quality scores to reduce the observed error rate for the V1–V9 region from 0.69 to 0.027%. This error rate is comparable to what has been observed for the shorter reads generated by 454 and Illumina’s MiSeq sequencing platforms. Although the per base sequencing cost is still significantly more than that of MiSeq, the prospect of supplementing reference databases with full-length sequences from organisms below the limit of detection from the Sanger approach is exciting. PMID:27069806

  13. Microbial Dark Matter: Unusual intervening sequences in 16S rRNA genes of candidate phyla from the deep subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Jarett, Jessica; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Kieft, Thomas; Onstott, Tullis; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-03-17

    The Microbial Dark Matter project has sequenced genomes from over 200 single cells from candidate phyla, greatly expanding our knowledge of the ecology, inferred metabolism, and evolution of these widely distributed, yet poorly understood lineages. The second phase of this project aims to sequence an additional 800 single cells from known as well as potentially novel candidate phyla derived from a variety of environments. In order to identify whole genome amplified single cells, screening based on phylogenetic placement of 16S rRNA gene sequences is being conducted. Briefly, derived 16S rRNA gene sequences are aligned to a custom version of the Greengenes reference database and added to a reference tree in ARB using parsimony. In multiple samples from deep subsurface habitats but not from other habitats, a large number of sequences proved difficult to align and therefore to place in the tree. Based on comparisons to reference sequences and structural alignments using SSU-ALIGN, many of these ?difficult? sequences appear to originate from candidate phyla, and contain intervening sequences (IVSs) within the 16S rRNA genes. These IVSs are short (39 - 79 nt) and do not appear to be self-splicing or to contain open reading frames. IVSs were found in the loop regions of stem-loop structures in several different taxonomic groups. Phylogenetic placement of sequences is strongly affected by IVSs; two out of three groups investigated were classified as different phyla after their removal. Based on data from samples screened in this project, IVSs appear to be more common in microbes occurring in deep subsurface habitats, although the reasons for this remain elusive.

  14. Sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments using the PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing system.

    PubMed

    Schloss, Patrick D; Jenior, Matthew L; Koumpouras, Charles C; Westcott, Sarah L; Highlander, Sarah K

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, microbial ecologists have largely abandoned sequencing 16S rRNA genes by the Sanger sequencing method and have instead adopted highly parallelized sequencing platforms. These new platforms, such as 454 and Illumina's MiSeq, have allowed researchers to obtain millions of high quality but short sequences. The result of the added sequencing depth has been significant improvements in experimental design. The tradeoff has been the decline in the number of full-length reference sequences that are deposited into databases. To overcome this problem, we tested the ability of the PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing platform to generate sequence reads from the 16S rRNA gene. We generated sequencing data from the V4, V3-V5, V1-V3, V1-V5, V1-V6, and V1-V9 variable regions from within the 16S rRNA gene using DNA from a synthetic mock community and natural samples collected from human feces, mouse feces, and soil. The mock community allowed us to assess the actual sequencing error rate and how that error rate changed when different curation methods were applied. We developed a simple method based on sequence characteristics and quality scores to reduce the observed error rate for the V1-V9 region from 0.69 to 0.027%. This error rate is comparable to what has been observed for the shorter reads generated by 454 and Illumina's MiSeq sequencing platforms. Although the per base sequencing cost is still significantly more than that of MiSeq, the prospect of supplementing reference databases with full-length sequences from organisms below the limit of detection from the Sanger approach is exciting. PMID:27069806

  15. Phylogenetic affiliation of SSU rRNA genes generated by massively parallel sequencing: new insights into the freshwater protist diversity.

    PubMed

    Taib, Najwa; Mangot, Jean-François; Domaizon, Isabelle; Bronner, Gisèle; Debroas, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies spur progress in determining the microbial diversity in various ecosystems by highlighting, for example, the rare biosphere. Currently, high-throughput pyrotag sequencing of PCR-amplified SSU rRNA gene regions is mainly used to characterize bacterial and archaeal communities, and rarely to characterize protist communities. In addition, although taxonomic assessment through phylogeny is considered as the most robust approach, similarity and probabilistic approaches remain the most commonly used for taxonomic affiliation. In a first part of this work, a tree-based method was compared with different approaches of taxonomic affiliation (BLAST and RDP) of 18S rRNA gene sequences and was shown to be the most accurate for near full-length sequences and for 400 bp amplicons, with the exception of amplicons covering the V5-V6 region. Secondly, the applicability of this method was tested by running a full scale test using an original pyrosequencing dataset of 18S rRNA genes of small lacustrine protists (0.2-5 µm) from eight freshwater ecosystems. Our results revealed that i) fewer than 5% of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) identified through clustering and phylogenetic affiliation had been previously detected in lakes, based on comparison to sequence in public databases; ii) the sequencing depth provided by the NGS coupled with a phylogenetic approach allowed to shed light on clades of freshwater protists rarely or never detected with classical molecular ecology approaches; and iii) phylogenetic methods are more robust in describing the structuring of under-studied or highly divergent populations. More precisely, new putative clades belonging to Mamiellophyceae, Foraminifera, Dictyochophyceae and Euglenida were detected. Beyond the study of protists, these results illustrate that the tree-based approach for NGS based diversity characterization allows an in-depth description of microbial communities

  16. Sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments using the PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing system.

    PubMed

    Schloss, Patrick D; Jenior, Matthew L; Koumpouras, Charles C; Westcott, Sarah L; Highlander, Sarah K

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, microbial ecologists have largely abandoned sequencing 16S rRNA genes by the Sanger sequencing method and have instead adopted highly parallelized sequencing platforms. These new platforms, such as 454 and Illumina's MiSeq, have allowed researchers to obtain millions of high quality but short sequences. The result of the added sequencing depth has been significant improvements in experimental design. The tradeoff has been the decline in the number of full-length reference sequences that are deposited into databases. To overcome this problem, we tested the ability of the PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing platform to generate sequence reads from the 16S rRNA gene. We generated sequencing data from the V4, V3-V5, V1-V3, V1-V5, V1-V6, and V1-V9 variable regions from within the 16S rRNA gene using DNA from a synthetic mock community and natural samples collected from human feces, mouse feces, and soil. The mock community allowed us to assess the actual sequencing error rate and how that error rate changed when different curation methods were applied. We developed a simple method based on sequence characteristics and quality scores to reduce the observed error rate for the V1-V9 region from 0.69 to 0.027%. This error rate is comparable to what has been observed for the shorter reads generated by 454 and Illumina's MiSeq sequencing platforms. Although the per base sequencing cost is still significantly more than that of MiSeq, the prospect of supplementing reference databases with full-length sequences from organisms below the limit of detection from the Sanger approach is exciting.

  17. Application of SmartGene IDNS software to partial 16S rRNA gene sequences for a diverse group of bacteria in a clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Simmon, Keith E; Croft, Ann C; Petti, Cathy A

    2006-12-01

    Laboratories often receive clinical isolates for bacterial identification that have ambiguous biochemical profiles by conventional testing. With the emergence of 16S rRNA gene sequencing as an identification tool, we evaluated the usefulness of SmartGene IDNS, a 16S rRNA sequence database and software program for microbial identification. Identification by conventional methods of a diverse group of bacterial clinical isolates was compared with gene sequences interrogated by the SmartGene and MicroSeq databases. Of 300 isolates, SmartGene identified 295 (98%) to the genus level and 262 (87%) to the species level, with 5 (2%) being inconclusive. MicroSeq identified 271 (90%) to the genus level and 223 (74%) to the species level, with 29 (10%) being inconclusive. SmartGene and MicroSeq agreed on the genus for 233 (78%) isolates and the species for 212 (71%) isolates. Conventional methods identified 291 (97%) isolates to the genus level and 208 (69%) to the species level, with 9 (3%) being inconclusive. SmartGene, MicroSeq, and conventional identifications agreed for 193 (64%) of the results. Twenty-seven microorganisms were not represented in MicroSeq, compared to only 2 not represented in SmartGene. Overall, SmartGene IDNS provides comprehensive and accurate identification of a diverse group of bacteria and has the added benefit of being a user-friendly program that can be modified to meet the unique needs of clinical laboratories.

  18. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiling of bacterial 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Catherine A

    2014-01-01

    T-RFLP profiling is a very effective method for comparing many samples in an environmental microbiology study, because fingerprints of microbial diversity can be generated in a sensitive, reproducible, and cost-effective manner. This protocol describes the steps required to generate T-RFLP profiles of the dominant members of a bacterial community, by PCR amplification of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes and three restriction endonuclease digests to generate three different profiles for each sample. The generation of multiple profiles per sample provides enough information to confidently differentiate rich environmental bacterial communities.

  19. Effect of condensed tannins on bovine rumen protist diversity based on 18S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui Yin; Sieo, Chin Chin; Abdullah, Norhani; Liang, Juan Boo; Huang, Xiao Dan; Ho, Yin Wan

    2013-01-01

    Molecular diversity of protists from bovine rumen fluid incubated with condensed tannins of Leucaena leucocephala hybrid-Rendang at 20 mg/500 mg dry matter (treatment) or without condensed tannins (control) was investigated using 18S rRNA gene library. Clones from the control library were distributed within nine genera, but clones from the condensed tannin treatment clone library were related to only six genera. Diversity estimators such as abundance-based coverage estimation and Chao1 showed significant differences between the two libraries, although no differences were found based on Shannon-Weaver index and Libshuff.

  20. Effect of condensed tannins on bovine rumen protist diversity based on 18S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui Yin; Sieo, Chin Chin; Abdullah, Norhani; Liang, Juan Boo; Huang, Xiao Dan; Ho, Yin Wan

    2013-01-01

    Molecular diversity of protists from bovine rumen fluid incubated with condensed tannins of Leucaena leucocephala hybrid-Rendang at 20 mg/500 mg dry matter (treatment) or without condensed tannins (control) was investigated using 18S rRNA gene library. Clones from the control library were distributed within nine genera, but clones from the condensed tannin treatment clone library were related to only six genera. Diversity estimators such as abundance-based coverage estimation and Chao1 showed significant differences between the two libraries, although no differences were found based on Shannon-Weaver index and Libshuff. PMID:23205499

  1. Massively parallel rRNA gene sequencing exacerbates the potential for biased community diversity comparisons due to variable library sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Gihring, Thomas; Green, Stefan; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2011-01-01

    Technologies for massively parallel sequencing are revolutionizing microbial ecology and are vastly increasing the scale of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene studies. Although pyrosequencing has increased the breadth and depth of possible rRNA gene sampling, one drawback is that the number of reads obtained per sample is difficult to control. Pyrosequencing libraries typically vary widely in the number of sequences per sample, even within individual studies, and there is a need to revisit the behaviour of richness estimators and diversity indices with variable gene sequence library sizes. Multiple reports and review papers have demonstrated the bias in non-parametric richness estimators (e.g. Chao1 and ACE) and diversity indices when using clone libraries. However, we found that biased community comparisons are accumulating in the literature. Here we demonstrate the effects of sample size on Chao1, ACE, CatchAll, Shannon, Chao-Shen and Simpson's estimations specifically using pyrosequencing libraries. The need to equalize the number of reads being compared across libraries is reiterated, and investigators are directed towards available tools for making unbiased diversity comparisons.

  2. Formation of nucleolar polymorphisms in trisomic chickens and subsequent microevolution of rRNA gene clusters in diploids.

    PubMed

    Delany, M E; Muscarella, D E; Bloom, S E

    1991-01-01

    Variations in nucleolar size are common in animals and man, yet the basis and significance of this variation are not well understood. In this report, we describe the generation de novo of individuals that express nucleolar size variations (polymorphisms) and the underlying basis for this phenotype in a vertebrate animal system (Gallus domesticus). Individuals that express nucleolar size polymorphisms were produced from mating chickens trisomic for the nucleolar organizer (NO) chromosome; 10%-18% of progeny demonstrated nucleolar polymorphisms. These progeny were incorporated into a diploid genetic line in which the polymorphic trait was observed to segregate in Mendelian fashion. An even more dramatic nucleolar size polymorphism (one macro- plus one micronucleolus) evolved in one diploid family over the course of only two generations. These individuals were used to ascertain that the polymorphic-nucleoli phenotype was expressed in tissues derived from the three primary embryonic cell layers in embryos and neonates. Image analysis was conducted on cells of these birds to quantitate the size differences between macro- and micronucleoli (5 mu2 versus 1 mu2, respectively). Finally, these birds were studied with the technique of in situ hybridization, which showed that gene number differences between homologous NO chromosomes (i.e., heterozygosity for rRNA gene copy number), underlies the polymorphic-nucleoli phenotype. Thus, the chicken emerges as an experimental system through which heterozygosity for the rRNA gene copy number can be induced, easily identified, transmitted, and expressed in all somatic tissues.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2061593

  3. Human Nopp140, Which Interacts with RNA Polymerase I: Implications for rRNA Gene Transcription and Nucleolar Structural Organization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hung-Kai; Pai, Chi-Yun; Huang, Jing-Yi; Yeh, Ning-Hsing

    1999-01-01

    Nopp140 is thought to shuttle between nucleolus and cytoplasm. However, the predominant nucleolar localization of Nopp140 homologues from different species suggests that Nopp140 is also involved in events occurring within the nucleolus. In this study, we demonstrated that the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I, RPA194, was coimmunoprecipitated with the human Nopp140 (hNopp140). Such an interaction is mediated through amino acids 204 to 382 of hNopp140. By double immunofluorescence, hNopp140 was colocalized with RNA polymerase I at the rDNA (rRNA genes) transcription active foci in the nucleolus. These results suggest that Nopp140 can interact with RNA polymerase I in vivo. Transfected cells expressing the amino-terminal half of hNopp140, hNopp140N382 (amino acids 1 to 382), displayed altered nucleoli with crescent-shaped structures. This phenotype is reminiscent of the segregated nucleoli induced by actinomycin D treatment, which is known to inhibit rRNA synthesis. Consistently, the hNopp140N382 protein mislocalized the endogenous RNA polymerase I and shut off cellular rRNA gene transcription as revealed by an in situ run-on assay. These dominant negative effects of the mutant hNopp140N382 suggest that Nopp140 plays an essential role in rDNA transcription. Interestingly, ectopic expression of hNopp140 to a very high level caused the formation of a transcriptionally inactive spherical structure occupying the entire nucleolar area which trapped the RNA polymerase I, fibrillarin, and hNopp140 but excluded the nucleolin. The mislocalizations of these nucleolar proteins after hNopp140 overexpression imply that Nopp140 may also play roles in maintenance of nucleolar integrity. PMID:10567578

  4. Selective Phylogenetic Analysis Targeted at 16S rRNA Genes of Thermophiles and Hyperthermophiles in Deep-Subsurface Geothermal Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Sugihara, Maki; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Deep-subsurface samples obtained by deep drilling are likely to be contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, and this could affect determination of the community structure of the geothermal microflora using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate possible contamination by PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes from mesophiles, a combined thermal denaturation and enzyme digestion method, based on a strong correlation between the G+C content of the 16S rRNA gene and the optimum growth temperatures of most known prokaryotic cultures, was used prior to clone library construction. To validate this technique, hot spring fluid (76°C) and river water (14°C) were used to mimic a deep-subsurface sample contaminated with drilling fluid. After DNA extraction and PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes from individual samples separately, the amplified products from river water were observed to be denatured at 82°C and completely digested by exonuclease I (Exo I), while the amplified products from hot spring fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84°C and enzyme digestion with Exo I. DNAs extracted from the two samples were mixed and used as a template for amplification of the 16S rRNA genes. The amplified rRNA genes were denatured at 84°C and digested with Exo I before clone library construction. The results indicated that the 16S rRNA gene sequences from the river water were almost completely eliminated, whereas those from the hot spring fluid remained. PMID:16391020

  5. Selective phylogenetic analysis targeted at 16S rRNA genes of thermophiles and hyperthermophiles in deep-subsurface geothermal environments.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Sugihara, Maki; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Deep-subsurface samples obtained by deep drilling are likely to be contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, and this could affect determination of the community structure of the geothermal microflora using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate possible contamination by PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes from mesophiles, a combined thermal denaturation and enzyme digestion method, based on a strong correlation between the G+C content of the 16S rRNA gene and the optimum growth temperatures of most known prokaryotic cultures, was used prior to clone library construction. To validate this technique, hot spring fluid (76 degrees C) and river water (14 degrees C) were used to mimic a deep-subsurface sample contaminated with drilling fluid. After DNA extraction and PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes from individual samples separately, the amplified products from river water were observed to be denatured at 82 degrees C and completely digested by exonuclease I (Exo I), while the amplified products from hot spring fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84 degrees C and enzyme digestion with Exo I. DNAs extracted from the two samples were mixed and used as a template for amplification of the 16S rRNA genes. The amplified rRNA genes were denatured at 84 degrees C and digested with Exo I before clone library construction. The results indicated that the 16S rRNA gene sequences from the river water were almost completely eliminated, whereas those from the hot spring fluid remained.

  6. Selective phylogenetic analysis targeted at 16S rRNA genes of thermophiles and hyperthermophiles in deep-subsurface geothermal environments.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Sugihara, Maki; Kato, Kenji; Hanada, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Deep-subsurface samples obtained by deep drilling are likely to be contaminated with mesophilic microorganisms in the drilling fluid, and this could affect determination of the community structure of the geothermal microflora using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. To eliminate possible contamination by PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes from mesophiles, a combined thermal denaturation and enzyme digestion method, based on a strong correlation between the G+C content of the 16S rRNA gene and the optimum growth temperatures of most known prokaryotic cultures, was used prior to clone library construction. To validate this technique, hot spring fluid (76 degrees C) and river water (14 degrees C) were used to mimic a deep-subsurface sample contaminated with drilling fluid. After DNA extraction and PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes from individual samples separately, the amplified products from river water were observed to be denatured at 82 degrees C and completely digested by exonuclease I (Exo I), while the amplified products from hot spring fluid remained intact after denaturation at 84 degrees C and enzyme digestion with Exo I. DNAs extracted from the two samples were mixed and used as a template for amplification of the 16S rRNA genes. The amplified rRNA genes were denatured at 84 degrees C and digested with Exo I before clone library construction. The results indicated that the 16S rRNA gene sequences from the river water were almost completely eliminated, whereas those from the hot spring fluid remained. PMID:16391020

  7. Spatiotemporal analysis of bacterial diversity in sediments of Sundarbans using parallel 16S rRNA gene tag sequencing.

    PubMed

    Basak, Pijush; Majumder, Niladri Shekhar; Nag, Sudip; Bhattacharyya, Anish; Roy, Debojyoti; Chakraborty, Arpita; SenGupta, Sohan; Roy, Arunava; Mukherjee, Arghya; Pattanayak, Rudradip; Ghosh, Abhrajyoti; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Bhattacharyya, Maitree

    2015-04-01

    The influence of temporal and spatial variations on the microbial community composition was assessed in the unique coastal mangrove of Sundarbans using parallel 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The total sediment DNA was extracted and subjected to the 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, which resulted in 117 Mbp of data from three experimental stations. The taxonomic analysis of the pyrosequencing data was grouped into 24 different phyla. In general, Proteobacteria were the most dominant phyla with predominance of Deltaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria within the sediments. Besides Proteobacteria, there are a number of sequences affiliated to the following major phyla detected in all three stations in both the sampling seasons: Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Nitrospira, and Firmicutes. Further taxonomic analysis revealed abundance of micro-aerophilic and anaerobic microbial population in the surface layers, suggesting anaerobic nature of the sediments in Sundarbans. The results of this study add valuable information about the composition of microbial communities in Sundarbans mangrove and shed light on possible transformations promoted by bacterial communities in the sediments. PMID:25256302

  8. Identification and phylogeny of Arabian snakes: Comparison of venom chromatographic profiles versus 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Al Asmari, Abdulrahman; Manthiri, Rajamohammed Abbas; Khan, Haseeb Ahmad

    2014-11-01

    Identification of snake species is important for various reasons including the emergency treatment of snake bite victims. We present a simple method for identification of six snake species using the gel filtration chromatographic profiles of their venoms. The venoms of Echis coloratus, Echis pyramidum, Cerastes gasperettii, Bitis arietans, Naja arabica, and Walterinnesia aegyptia were milked, lyophilized, diluted and centrifuged to separate the mucus from the venom. The clear supernatants were filtered and chromatographed on fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). We obtained the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the above species and performed phylogenetic analysis using the neighbor-joining method. The chromatograms of venoms from different snake species showed peculiar patterns based on the number and location of peaks. The dendrograms generated from similarity matrix based on the presence/absence of particular chromatographic peaks clearly differentiated Elapids from Viperids. Molecular cladistics using 16S rRNA gene sequences resulted in jumping clades while separating the members of these two families. These findings suggest that chromatographic profiles of snake venoms may provide a simple and reproducible chemical fingerprinting method for quick identification of snake species. However, the validation of this methodology requires further studies on large number of specimens from within and across species. PMID:25313278

  9. Quantitatively evaluating mistaken clone assignments by RFLP analysis of 16S rRNA genes: a case study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han-Bo; Xu, Chan-Wen; Wang, Miao-Miao; Li, Tao; Zhao, Zhi-Wei

    2008-06-01

    We quantitatively evaluated the errors of clone assignment based on the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) pattern of 16S rRNA genes. Eighty clones were randomly selected from a 16S rRNA gene library and were categorized into 35 operational taxonomic units (OTU) based on their indistinguishable enzyme restriction patterns of 3 tetrameric restriction enzymes RsaI, BsuRI, and HinfI. All of these clones were then sequenced and were reassigned into 36-53 OTUs using the DOTUR program when sequence similarities of 95%-100% were used. The number of the identically assigned clones ranged from 53 to 61 and the percentage varied from 66.3% to 76.3%. The Shannon-Weaver index for the bacterial community observed by RFLP analysis was 2.75, equal to that estimated by DOTUR at a 97% sequence similarity. Compared with clones assigned with the DOTUR program at a 97% sequence similarity, only 61 clones (76.3%) were correctly assigned by RFLP analysis. Six clones (7.5%) were assigned mistakenly at the phylum level, and the positions of 13 clones (16.2%) were phylogenetically different at a lower taxonomic rank. PMID:18535634

  10. Identification of bacteria associated with underground parts of Crocus sativus by 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Ambardar, Sheetal; Sangwan, Naseer; Manjula, A; Rajendhran, J; Gunasekaran, P; Lal, Rup; Vakhlu, Jyoti

    2014-10-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L), an autumn-flowering perennial sterile plant, reproduces vegetatively by underground corms. Saffron has biannual corm-root cycle that makes it an interesting candidate to study microbial dynamics in its rhizosphere and cormosphere (area under influence of corm). Culture independent 16S rRNA gene metagenomic study of rhizosphere and cormosphere of Saffron during flowering stage revealed presence of 22 genera but none of the genus was common in all the three samples. Bulk soil bacterial community was represented by 13 genera with Acidobacteria being dominant. In rhizosphere, out of eight different genera identified, Pseudomonas was the most dominant genus. Cormosphere bacteria comprised of six different genera, dominated by the genus Pantoea. This study revealed that the bacterial composition of all the three samples is significantly different (P < 0.05) from each other. This is the first report on the identification of bacteria associated with rhizosphere, cormosphere and bulk soil of Saffron, using cultivation independent 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomic approach.

  11. 16S rRNA gene phylogenesis of culturable predominant bacteria from diseased Apostichopus japonicus (Holothuroidea, Echinodermata)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Haiyan; Jiang, Guoliang; Wu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xin

    2009-06-01

    Cultured Apostichopus japonicus in China suffers from a kind of skin ulceration disease that has caused severe economic loss in recent years. The disease, pathogens of which are supposed to be bacteria by most researchers, is highly infectious and can often cause all individuals in the same culture pool to die in a very short time. The 16S rRNA gene phylogenesis of the culturable bacteria from the lesions of diseased individuals was conducted to study the biodiversity of the bacterial communities in the lesions and to identify probable pathogen(s) associated with this kind of disease. S. japonica samples were selected from a hatchery located in the eastern part of Qingdao, China. Bacterial universal primers GM5F and DS907R were used to amplify the 16S rRNA gene of bacteria colonies, and touchdown PCR was performed to amplify the target sequences. The results suggest that γ- proteobacteria (Alteromonadales and Vibrionales) of CFB group, many strains of which have been also determined as pathogens in other marine species, are the predominant bacterial genera of the diseased Apostichopus japonicus individuals.

  12. Variability in abundance of the Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA and amoA genes in water columns of northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Yang, C.; Chen, S.; Xie, W.; Wang, P.; Zhang, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in marine microbial ecology have shown that ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) are more abundant than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), although total Bacteria are more abundant than total Archaea in marine environments. This study aimed to examine the spatial distribution and abundance of planktonic archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA- and amoA genes in the northern South China Sea. Water samples were collected at different depths at six stations (maximum depth ranging from 1800 m to 3200 m)with four stations (B2, B3, B6, B7) located along a transect from the northeastern continental slope to the Bashi Strait and the other two (D3, D5) located southwest of this transect. Quantitative PCR of the 16S rRNA- and amoA genes was used to estimate the abundances of total Archaea, total Bacteria, and AOA and AOB, respectively. At the B series stations, the abundance of bacterial 16S rRNA gene was twofold to 36fold higher than that of the archaeal 16S rRNA gene while fivefold lower to sixfold higher at the two D stations, with both genes showing peak values slightly below sea surface (5-75 m depths) at all stations. The archaeal amoA gene had similar variations with the archaeal 16S rRNA gene, but was 1-4 orders of magnitude lower than the archaeal 16S rRNA gene at all stations. Bacterial amoA gene was below the detection at all stations. Our results also show the difference in depth profiles among these stations, which may be caused by the difference in water movement between these regions. The non-detection of bacterial amoA gene indicates that ammonia-oxidizing Archaea are the dominant group of microorganisms in nitrification of the South China Sea, which is consistent with observations in other oceans.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of Pomacea canaliculata isolates collected from rice fields in different origins of China by combined mitochondrial 12S and 16S genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Yan; Bian, Qing-Qing; Zhao, Guang-Hui

    2015-02-01

    To study the genetic relationships of Pomacea canaliculata collected from rice fields in China, the mitochondrial (mt) 12S and 16S of 9 P. canaliculata isolates from 5 southern provinces in China were sequenced and analyzed. The intra-specific sequence variations of P. canaliculata were 0-1.1% for 12S and 0--0.6% for 16S, while the inter-specific variations among common Pomacea species in mt 12S and 16S were 3.0-11.7% and 2.3-10.1%, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on combined sequences of mt 12S and 16S revealed complex genetic structure of P. canaliculata in China. Two phylogenetic groups of P. canaliculata were indicated in China with one group sistered to P. canaliculata isolates from USA, and two groups were even found in the same province. The phylogenetic relationships of Pomacea spp. also could be effectively inferred by combined sequences of mt 12S and 16S. These findings provided basic information for further study of population genetics and diffusion pattern of P. canaliculata in China as well as in the world. PMID:23876192

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of Pomacea canaliculata isolates collected from rice fields in different origins of China by combined mitochondrial 12S and 16S genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Yan; Bian, Qing-Qing; Zhao, Guang-Hui

    2015-02-01

    To study the genetic relationships of Pomacea canaliculata collected from rice fields in China, the mitochondrial (mt) 12S and 16S of 9 P. canaliculata isolates from 5 southern provinces in China were sequenced and analyzed. The intra-specific sequence variations of P. canaliculata were 0-1.1% for 12S and 0--0.6% for 16S, while the inter-specific variations among common Pomacea species in mt 12S and 16S were 3.0-11.7% and 2.3-10.1%, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on combined sequences of mt 12S and 16S revealed complex genetic structure of P. canaliculata in China. Two phylogenetic groups of P. canaliculata were indicated in China with one group sistered to P. canaliculata isolates from USA, and two groups were even found in the same province. The phylogenetic relationships of Pomacea spp. also could be effectively inferred by combined sequences of mt 12S and 16S. These findings provided basic information for further study of population genetics and diffusion pattern of P. canaliculata in China as well as in the world.

  15. [Composition of the oil-slime microbial community determined by analysis of the 16S rRNA gene].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, T V; Laĭkov, A V; Rizvanov, A A; Il'inskaia, O N; Naumova, R P

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the 16S rRNA genes of the cultured microorganisms of industrial oil-slime revealed predominance (-85-90%) of the Gammaproteobacteria in the community of aerobic heterotrophs and specific oil-slime degraders. Relation of the isolated strains with members of the genera Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, and Enterobacter was established. Analysis of the same gene in the total DNA from the oil-slime revealed greater microbial diversity (-20 operative taxonomic units determined by T-RFLP) than in the cultured part of the community, which included -12 different colony types. Three major restriction fragments were found, with their total area -50%. These results demonstrated the low morphological and phylogenetic diversity of the oil-slime bacterial community.

  16. Origin and evolution of paralogous rRNA gene clusters within the flatworm family Dugesiidae (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida).

    PubMed

    Carranza, S; Baguñà, J; Riutort, M

    1999-08-01

    Analysis of the 18S rDNA sequences of five species of the family Dugesiidae (phylum Platyhelminthes, suborder Tricladida, infraorder Paludicola) and eight species belonging to families Dendrocoelidae and Planaridae and to the infraorder Maricola showed that members of the family Dugesiidae have two types of 18S rDNA genes, while the rest of the species have only one. The duplication event also affected the ITS-1, 5.8S, ITS-2 region and probably the 28S gene. The mean divergence value between the type I and the type II sequences is 9% and type II 18S rDNA genes are evolving 2.3 times more rapidly than type I. The evolutionary rates of type I and type II genes were calibrated from biogeographical data, and an approximate date for the duplication event of 80-120 million years ago was calculated. The type II gene was shown, by RT-PCR, to be transcribed in adult individuals of Schmidtea polychroa, though at very low levels. This result, together with the fact that most of the functionally important positions for small-subunit rRNA in prokaryotes have been conserved, indicates that the type II gene is probably functional.

  17. Phylogenetic diversity of ultraplankton plastid small-subunit rRNA genes recovered in environmental nucleic acid samples from the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of the United States.

    PubMed

    Rappé, M S; Suzuki, M T; Vergin, K L; Giovannoni, S J

    1998-01-01

    The scope of marine phytoplankton diversity is uncertain in many respects because, like bacteria, these organisms sometimes lack defining morphological characteristics and can be a challenge to grow in culture. Here, we report the recovery of phylogenetically diverse plastid small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene (rDNA) clones from natural plankton populations collected in the Pacific Ocean off the mouth of Yaquina Bay, Oreg. (OCS clones), and from the eastern continental shelf of the United States off Cape Hatteras, N.C. (OM clones). SSU rRNA gene clone libraries were prepared by amplifying rDNAs from nucleic acids isolated from plankton samples and cloning them into plasmid vectors. The PCR primers used for amplification reactions were designed to be specific for bacterial SSU rRNA genes; however, plastid genes have a common phylogenetic origin with bacteria and were common in both SSU rRNA gene clone libraries. A combination of restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses, nucleic acid sequencing, and taxon-specific oligonucleotide probe hybridizations revealed that 54 of the 116 OCS gene clones were of plastid origin. Collectively, clones from the OCS and OM libraries formed at least eight unique lineages within the plastid radiation, including gene lineages related to the classes Bacillariophyceae, Cryptophyceae, Prymnesiophyceae, Chrysophyceae, and Prasinophyceae; for a number of unique clones, no close phylogenetic neighbors could be identified with confidence. Only a group of two OCS rRNA gene clones showed close identity to the plastid SSU rRNA gene sequence of a cultured organism [Emiliania huxleyi (Lohmann) Hay and Mohler; 99.8% similar]. The remaining clones could not be identified to the genus or species level. Although cryptic species are not as prevalent among phytoplankton as they are among their bacterial counterparts, this genetic survey nonetheless uncovered significant new information about phytoplankton diversity. PMID:9435081

  18. Decoupled distance-decay patterns between dsrA and 16S rRNA genes among salt marsh sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Angermeyer, Angus; Crosby, Sarah C; Huber, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    In many habitats, microorganisms exhibit significant distance-decay patterns as determined by analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and various other genetic elements. However, there have been few studies that examine how the similarities of both taxonomic and functional genes co-vary over geographic distance within a group of ecologically related microbes. Here, we determined the biogeographic patterns of the functional dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) and the 16S rRNA gene in sulfate-reducing bacterial communities of US East Coast salt marsh sediments. Distance-decay, ordination and statistical analyses revealed that the distribution of 16S rRNA genes is strongly influenced by geographic distance and environmental factors, whereas the dsrA gene is not. Together, our results indicate that 16S rRNA genes are likely dispersal limited and under environmental selection, whereas dsrA genes appear randomly distributed and not selected for by any expected environmental variables. Selection, drift, dispersal and mutation are all factors that may help explain the decoupled biogeographic patterns for the two genes. These data suggest that both the taxonomic and functional elements of microbial communities should be considered in future studies of microbial biogeography to aid in our understanding of the diversity, distribution and function of microorganisms in the environment. PMID:25727503

  19. Decoupled distance-decay patterns between dsrA and 16S rRNA genes among salt marsh sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Angermeyer, Angus; Crosby, Sarah C; Huber, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    In many habitats, microorganisms exhibit significant distance-decay patterns as determined by analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and various other genetic elements. However, there have been few studies that examine how the similarities of both taxonomic and functional genes co-vary over geographic distance within a group of ecologically related microbes. Here, we determined the biogeographic patterns of the functional dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) and the 16S rRNA gene in sulfate-reducing bacterial communities of US East Coast salt marsh sediments. Distance-decay, ordination and statistical analyses revealed that the distribution of 16S rRNA genes is strongly influenced by geographic distance and environmental factors, whereas the dsrA gene is not. Together, our results indicate that 16S rRNA genes are likely dispersal limited and under environmental selection, whereas dsrA genes appear randomly distributed and not selected for by any expected environmental variables. Selection, drift, dispersal and mutation are all factors that may help explain the decoupled biogeographic patterns for the two genes. These data suggest that both the taxonomic and functional elements of microbial communities should be considered in future studies of microbial biogeography to aid in our understanding of the diversity, distribution and function of microorganisms in the environment.

  20. Novelty in phylogeny of gastrotricha: evidence from 18S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Wirz, A; Pucciarelli, S; Miceli, C; Tongiorgi, P; Balsamo, M

    1999-11-01

    Gastrotricha form a phylum which is crucial for defining the origin of pseudocoelomates, in that they share a number of characters with Rotifera and Nematoda but also with acoelomates, and even the evolutionary relationships within the phylum are anything but defined. For this reason the first extensive molecular data on Gastrotricha from the 18S rRNA sequences of both orders have been obtained and analyzed. Sequence analyses show that the phylum Gastrotricha is strictly monophyletic along an evolutionary line quite distinct from that of both Rotifera and Nematoda. A new view of the evolutionary history of the phylum Gastrotricha is put forward, in which Chaetonotida, and not Macrodasyida, are the most primitive forms of the group, contrary to the commonly held view. A polyphyletic origin of aschelminthes is supported, and the misleading term pseudocoelomates should be discarded. PMID:10603259

  1. Phylogeny of the bodonid flagellates (Kinetoplastida) based on small-subunit rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Dolezel, D; Jirků, M; Maslov, D A; Lukes, J

    2000-09-01

    The phylogeny of kinetoplastid flagellates was investigated by determining the sequences of the small-subunit (18S) rRNA from Bodo designis, Bodo saltans K, Bodo saltans P, Bodo sorokini, Bodo sp. (cf. uncinatus), Cruzella marina, Cryptobia helicis, Dimastigella mimosa and Parabodo nitrophilus and analysing these data together with several previously obtained sequences. The root of the kinetoplastid tree was tentatively determined to be attached to the branch of B. designis and/or Cruzella marina. Within this topology, the suborder Trypanosomatina appears as a late-emerging monophyletic group, while the suborder Bodonina is paraphyletic. Within the bodonid subtree, the branches of parasitic organisms were intermingled with free-living ones, implying multiple transitions to parasitism. The tree indicates that the genera Cryptobia and Bodo are artificial taxa. In addition, the separation of the fish cryptobias and Trypanoplasma borreli as different genera was not supported.

  2. Novelty in phylogeny of gastrotricha: evidence from 18S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Wirz, A; Pucciarelli, S; Miceli, C; Tongiorgi, P; Balsamo, M

    1999-11-01

    Gastrotricha form a phylum which is crucial for defining the origin of pseudocoelomates, in that they share a number of characters with Rotifera and Nematoda but also with acoelomates, and even the evolutionary relationships within the phylum are anything but defined. For this reason the first extensive molecular data on Gastrotricha from the 18S rRNA sequences of both orders have been obtained and analyzed. Sequence analyses show that the phylum Gastrotricha is strictly monophyletic along an evolutionary line quite distinct from that of both Rotifera and Nematoda. A new view of the evolutionary history of the phylum Gastrotricha is put forward, in which Chaetonotida, and not Macrodasyida, are the most primitive forms of the group, contrary to the commonly held view. A polyphyletic origin of aschelminthes is supported, and the misleading term pseudocoelomates should be discarded.

  3. Coamplification of eukaryotic DNA with 16S rRNA gene-based PCR primers: possible consequences for population fingerprinting of complex microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Huys, Geert; Vanhoutte, Tom; Joossens, Marie; Mahious, Amal S; De Brandt, Evie; Vermeire, Severine; Swings, Jean

    2008-06-01

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate the specificity of three commonly used 16S rRNA gene-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer sets for bacterial community analysis of samples contaminated with eukaryotic DNA. The specificity of primer sets targeting the V3, V3-V5, and V6-V8 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene was investigated in silico and by community fingerprinting of human and fish intestinal samples. Both in silico and PCR-based analysis revealed cross-reactivity of the V3 and V3-V5 primers with the 18S rRNA gene of human and sturgeon. The consequences of this primer anomaly were illustrated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiling of microbial communities in human feces and mixed gut of Siberian sturgeon. DGGE profiling indicated that the cross-reactivity of 16S rRNA gene primers with nontarget eukaryotic DNA might lead to an overestimation of bacterial biodiversity. This study has confirmed previous sporadic indications in literature indicating that several commonly applied 16S rRNA gene primer sets lack specificity toward bacteria in the presence of eukaryotic DNA. The phenomenon of cross-reactivity is a potential source of systematic error in all biodiversity studies where no subsequent analysis of individual community amplicons by cloning and sequencing is performed.

  4. Identification by 16S rRNA gene sequencing of an Actinomyces hongkongensis isolate recovered from a patient with pelvic actinomycosis.

    PubMed

    Flynn, A N; Lyndon, C A; Church, D L

    2013-08-01

    A case of Actinomyces hongkongensis pelvic actinomycosis in an adult woman is described. Conventional phenotypic tests failed to identify the Gram-positive bacillus isolated from a fluid aspirate of a pelvic abscess. The bacterium was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and analysis using the SmartGene Integrated Database Network System software.

  5. A comparison of primer sets for detecting 16S rRNA and hydrazine oxidoreductase genes of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Hong, Yiguo; Klotz, Martin Gunter; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2010-03-01

    Published polymerase chain reaction primer sets for detecting the genes encoding 16S rRNA gene and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo) in anammox bacteria were compared by using the same coastal marine sediment samples. While four previously reported primer sets developed to detect the 16S rRNA gene showed varying specificities between 12% and 77%, an optimized primer combination resulted in up to 98% specificity, and the recovered anammox 16S rRNA gene sequences were >95% sequence identical to published sequences from anammox bacteria in the Candidatus "Scalindua" group. Furthermore, four primer sets used in detecting the hzo gene of anammox bacteria were highly specific (up to 92%) and efficient, and the newly designed primer set in this study amplified longer hzo gene segments suitable for phylogenetic analysis. The optimized primer set for the 16S rRNA gene and the newly designed primer set for the hzo gene were successfully applied to identify anammox bacteria from marine sediments of aquaculture zone, coastal wetland, and deep ocean where the three ecosystems form a gradient of anthropogenic impact. Results indicated a broad distribution of anammox bacteria with high niche-specific community structure within each marine ecosystem. PMID:20107988

  6. Rapid Detection of Mutations in the 23S rRNA Gene of Helicobacter pylori That Confers Resistance to Clarithromycin Treatment to the Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Masayuki; Hikiba, Yoko; Ogura, Keiji; Togo, Goichi; Tsukuda, Izumi; Ushikawa, Kenji; Shiratori, Yasushi; Omata, Masao

    2001-01-01

    We developed a new method capable of detecting point mutations in the 23S rRNA gene of Helicobacter pylori using a LightCycler. Our method can detect a mutation in this gene in less than 1 h and can process many samples at once, thereby contributing to the selection of patients suitable for clarithromycin-based therapy. PMID:11158129

  7. Differential gene expression in Neurospora crassa cell types: heterogeneity and multiple copies of rRNA genes. Annual progress report, July 1981-June 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    The significant results obtained were as follows: (I) Multiple copies of isolated rRNA genes from N. crassa were tested for heterogeneity by rRNA: rDNA reassociation kinetics. More than 90% of rDNA copies were identical. The possible heterogeneity of a small fraction of rDNAs could not be attributed to inclusion of any tDNA sequences. (II) Two approaches to study gross differences between rRNA genes from N. crassa cell types-conidia, germinated conidia, and mycelia were undertaken. No difference was seen in either the restriction patterns nor the autoradiographs. Either gross differences between rDNAS of N. crassa cell types were not present or they were not detected by these two approaches. (III) Using similar DNA restriction analysis procedures, differences between closely related heterothallic and homothallic species of Neurospora were detected. (IV) Successful sequencing of 317 bases of the N. crassa slime mutant pMF2 clone which includes the 5.8S rDNA and it's flanking internal spacer regions was achieved. (ERB)

  8. Sequence heterogeneity in the 18S rRNA gene in Theileria equi from horses presented in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Meli, Marina L; Zhang, Yi; Meili, Theres; Stirn, Martina; Riond, Barbara; Weibel, Beatrice; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2016-05-15

    A reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was adapted and applied for equine blood samples collected at the animal hospital of the University of Zurich to determine the presence of piroplasms in horses in Switzerland. A total of 100 equine blood samples were included in the study. The V4 hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and analyzed using the RLB assay. Samples from seven horses hybridized to a Theileria/Babesia genus-specific and a Theileria genus-specific probe. Of these, two hybridized also to the Theileria equi-specific probe. The other five positive samples did not hybridize to any of the species-specific probes, suggesting the presence of unrecognized Theileria variants or genotypes. The 18S rRNA gene of the latter five samples were sequenced and found to be closely related to T. equi isolated from horses in Spain (AY534822) and China (KF559357) (≥98.4% identity). Four of the seven horses that tested positive had a documented travel history (France, Italy, and Spain) or lived abroad (Hungary). The present study adds new insight into the presence and sequence heterogeneity of T. equi in Switzerland. The results prompt that species-specific probes must be designed in regions of the gene unique to T. equi. Of note, none of the seven positive horses were suspected of having Theileria infection at the time of presentation to the clinic. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of equine piroplasma infections outside of endemic areas and in horses without signs of piroplasmosis. PMID:27084467

  9. First description of heterogeneity in 18S rRNA genes in the haploid genome of Cryptosporidium andersoni Kawatabi type.

    PubMed

    Ikarashi, Makoto; Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Honma, Hajime; Kasai, Kenji; Kaneta, Yoshiyasu; Nakai, Yutaka

    2013-09-01

    The Apicomplexan Cryptosporidium andersoni, is a species of gastric Cryptosporidium, is frequently detected in older calves and adult cattle. Genotyping analyses based on 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequences have been performed on a novel C. andersoni genotype, namely the Kawatabi type, and the oocysts were classified into two distinct groups genotypically: Type A (the sequence in GenBank) and Type B (with a thymine nucleotide insertion not in Type A). This study analyzed 3775 cattle at a slaughterhouse and 310 cattle at a farm using microscopy and found 175 Cryptosporidium-positive animals: 171 from the slaughterhouse and four from the farm, and all infecting parasites were determined to be C. andersoni from 18S rRNA gene sequences determined from fecal DNA. In genotyping analyses with single isolated oocysts, about a half of analyzed ones were clearly classified into well known two genotypes (Type A and B). In addition to these two known genotypes, we have detected some oocysts showing mixed signals of Types A and B in the electropherogram from the automated sequencer (the Type C genotype). To determine the genotypic composition of sporozoites carried by the Type C oocysts, we analyzed their 18S rRNA gene sequences using a single sporozoite isolation procedure. Some sporozoites were classified as either Type A or Type B. However, more than half of the analyzed isolated sporozoites showed a mixed signal identical to that of Type C oocysts, and both the Type A and B signals were surely detectable from such sporozoites after a cloning procedure. In conclusion, C. andersoni carries two different genotypes heterogeneously in its haploid genome.

  10. Sequence heterogeneity in the 18S rRNA gene in Theileria equi from horses presented in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Meli, Marina L; Zhang, Yi; Meili, Theres; Stirn, Martina; Riond, Barbara; Weibel, Beatrice; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2016-05-15

    A reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was adapted and applied for equine blood samples collected at the animal hospital of the University of Zurich to determine the presence of piroplasms in horses in Switzerland. A total of 100 equine blood samples were included in the study. The V4 hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and analyzed using the RLB assay. Samples from seven horses hybridized to a Theileria/Babesia genus-specific and a Theileria genus-specific probe. Of these, two hybridized also to the Theileria equi-specific probe. The other five positive samples did not hybridize to any of the species-specific probes, suggesting the presence of unrecognized Theileria variants or genotypes. The 18S rRNA gene of the latter five samples were sequenced and found to be closely related to T. equi isolated from horses in Spain (AY534822) and China (KF559357) (≥98.4% identity). Four of the seven horses that tested positive had a documented travel history (France, Italy, and Spain) or lived abroad (Hungary). The present study adds new insight into the presence and sequence heterogeneity of T. equi in Switzerland. The results prompt that species-specific probes must be designed in regions of the gene unique to T. equi. Of note, none of the seven positive horses were suspected of having Theileria infection at the time of presentation to the clinic. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of equine piroplasma infections outside of endemic areas and in horses without signs of piroplasmosis.

  11. Pyrosequencing of mcrA and archaeal 16S rRNA genes reveals diversity and substrate preferences of methanogen communities in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, David; Lu, Xiao-Ying; Shen, Zhiyong; Chen, Jiapeng; Lee, Patrick K H

    2015-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea play a key role in biogas-producing anaerobic digestion and yet remain poorly taxonomically characterized. This is in part due to the limitations of low-throughput Sanger sequencing of a single (16S rRNA) gene, which in the past may have undersampled methanogen diversity. In this study, archaeal communities from three sludge digesters in Hong Kong and one wastewater digester in China were examined using high-throughput pyrosequencing of the methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) and 16S rRNA genes. Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales, and Methanosarcinales were detected in each digester, indicating that both hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis was occurring. Two sludge digesters had similar community structures, likely due to their similar design and feedstock. Taxonomic classification of the mcrA genes suggested that these digesters were dominated by acetoclastic methanogens, particularly Methanosarcinales, while the other digesters were dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales. The proposed euryarchaeotal order Methanomassiliicoccales and the uncultured WSA2 group were detected with the 16S rRNA gene, and potential mcrA genes for these groups were identified. 16S rRNA gene sequencing also recovered several crenarchaeotal groups potentially involved in the initial anaerobic digestion processes. Overall, the two genes produced different taxonomic profiles for the digesters, while greater methanogen richness was detected using the mcrA gene, supporting the use of this functional gene as a complement to the 16S rRNA gene to better assess methanogen diversity. A significant positive correlation was detected between methane production and the abundance of mcrA transcripts in digesters treating sludge and wastewater samples, supporting the mcrA gene as a biomarker for methane yield.

  12. Band smearing of PCR amplified bacterial 16S rRNA genes: dependence on initial PCR target diversity.

    PubMed

    Zrimec, Jan; Kopinč, Rok; Rijavec, Tomaž; Zrimec, Tatjana; Lapanje, Aleš

    2013-11-01

    Band smearing in agarose gels of PCR amplified bacterial 16S rRNA genes is understood to comprise amplicons of varying sizes arising from PCR errors, and requires elimination. We consider that with amplified heterogeneous DNA, delayed electro-migration is caused not by PCR errors but by dsDNA structures that arise from imperfect strand pairing. The extent of band smearing was found to be proportional to the sequence heterogeneity in 16S rRNA variable regions. Denaturing alkaline gels showed that all amplified DNA was of the correct size. A novel bioinformatic approach was used to reveal that band smearing occurred due to imperfectly paired strands of the amplified DNA. Since the smear is a structural fraction of the correct size PCR product, it carries important information on richness and diversity of the target DNA. For accurate analysis, the origin of the smear must first be identified before it is eliminated by examining the amplified DNA in denaturing alkaline gels.

  13. Silenced rRNA genes are activated and substitute for partially eliminated active homeologs in the recently formed allotetraploid, Tragopogon mirus (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Dobešová, E; Malinská, H; Matyášek, R; Leitch, A R; Soltis, D E; Soltis, P S; Kovařík, A

    2015-03-01

    To study the relationship between uniparental rDNA (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S ribosomal RNA) silencing (nucleolar dominance) and rRNA gene dosage, we studied a recently emerged (within the last 80 years) allotetraploid Tragopogon mirus (2n=24), formed from the diploid progenitors T. dubius (2n=12, D-genome donor) and T. porrifolius (2n=12, P-genome donor). Here, we used molecular, cytogenetic and genomic approaches to analyse rRNA gene activity in two sibling T. mirus plants (33A and 33B) with widely different rRNA gene dosages. Plant 33B had ~400 rRNA genes at the D-genome locus, which is typical for T. mirus, accounting for ~25% of total rDNA. We observed characteristic expression dominance of T. dubius-origin genes in all organs. Its sister plant 33A harboured a homozygous macrodeletion that reduced the number of T. dubius-origin genes to about 70 copies (~4% of total rDNA). It showed biparental rDNA expression in root, flower and callus, but not in leaf where D-genome rDNA dominance was maintained. There was upregulation of minor rDNA variants in some tissues. The RNA polymerase I promoters of reactivated T. porrifolius-origin rRNA genes showed reduced DNA methylation, mainly at symmetrical CG and CHG nucleotide motifs. We hypothesise that active, decondensed rDNA units are most likely to be deleted via recombination. The silenced homeologs could be used as a 'first reserve' to ameliorate mutational damage and contribute to evolutionary success of polyploids. Deletion and reactivation cycles may lead to bidirectional homogenisation of rRNA arrays in the long term. PMID:25537492

  14. Escherichia coli cafA gene encodes a novel RNase, designated as RNase G, involved in processing of the 5' end of 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Wachi, M; Umitsuki, G; Shimizu, M; Takada, A; Nagai, K

    1999-06-01

    We found that the Escherichia coli cafA::cat mutant accumulated a precursor of 16S rRNA. This precursor migrated to the same position with 16.3S precursor found in the BUMMER strain that is known to be deficient in the 5' end processing of 16S rRNA. Accumulation of 16. 3S rRNA in the BUMMER mutant was complemented by introduction of a plasmid carrying the cafA gene. The mutant type cafA gene cloned from the BUMMER strain had a 11-bp deletion in its coding region. A small amount of the mature 16S rRNA was still formed in the cafA::cat mutant. This residual activity was found to be due to RNase E encoded by the rne/ams gene by rifampicin-chase experiments of the cafA::cat ams1 double mutant. These results indicated that the cafA gene encodes a novel RNase responsible for processing of the 5' end of 16S rRNA. PMID:10362534

  15. [Identification of Hydrocarbon-Oxidizing Dietzia Bacteria from Petroleum Reservoirs Based on Phenotypic Properties and Analysis of the 16S rRNA and gyrB Genes].

    PubMed

    Nazina, T N; Shumkova, E S; Sokolova, D Sh; Babich, T L; Zhurina, M V; Xue, Yan-Fen; Osipov, G A; Poltaraus, A B; Tourova, T P

    2015-01-01

    The taxonomic position of hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacterial strains 263 and 32d isolated from formation water of the Daqing petroleum reservoir (PRC) was determined by polyphasic taxonomy techniques, including analysis of the 16S rRNA and the gyrB genes. The major chemotaxonomic characteristics of both strains, including the IV type cell wall, composition of cell wall fatty acids, mycolic acids, and menaquinones, agreed with those typical of Dietzia strains. The DNA G+C content of strains 263 and 32d were 67.8 and 67.6 mol%, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of strain 32d revealed 99.7% similarity to the gene of D. maris, making it possible to identify strain 32d as belonging to this species. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain 263 exhibited 99.7 and 99.9% similarity to those of D. natronolimnaea and D. cercidiphylli YIM65002(T), respectively. Analysis of the gyrB genes of the subterranean isolates and of a number of Dietzia type strains confirmed classiffication of strain 32d as a D. maris strain and of strain 263, as a D. natronolimnaea strain. A conclusion was made concerning higher resolving power of phylogenetic analysis of the gyrB gene compared to the 16S rRNA gene analysis in the case of determination of the species position of Dietzia isolates.

  16. Technical considerations in the use of 18s rRNA in gene expression studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene expression analysis is now commonly used in ecotoxicological studies to indicate exposure of an organism to xenobiotics. For example, the vitellogenin gene is used to diagnose exposure of fish to environmental estrogens. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PC...

  17. Confidence intervals for similarity values determined for clonedSSU rRNA genes from environmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, M.W.; Schryver, J.C.; Brandt, C.C.; Yan, T.; Zhou, J.Z.; Palumbo, A.V.

    2007-04-02

    The goal of this research was to investigate the influenceof the error rate of sequence determination on the differentiation ofcloned SSU rRNA gene sequences for assessment of community structure. SSUrRNA cloned sequences from groundwater samples that represent differentbacterial divisions were sequenced multiple times with the samesequencing primer. From comparison of sequence alignments with unediteddata, confidence intervals were obtained from both a adouble binomial Tmodel of sequence comparison and by non-parametric methods. The resultsindicated that similarity values below 0.9946 arelikely derived fromdissimilar sequences at a confidence level of 0.95, and not sequencingerrors. The results confirmed that screening by direct sequencedetermination could be reliably used to differentiate at the specieslevel. However, given sequencing errors comparable to those seen in thisstudy, sequences with similarities above 0.9946 should be treated as thesame sequence if a 95 percent confidence is desired.

  18. [Cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene of Phytoplasma CWB1 strain associated with cactus witches' broom].

    PubMed

    Cai, H; Li, F; Kong, B; Chen, H

    2001-12-01

    A 1.5 kb DNA fragment was amplified in DNA samples extracted from Opuntia salmiana porm showed witches'-broom symptom. The result indicates the existence of phytoplasma associated with this disease and this phytoplasma was designated as CWB1. The amplified fragment was ligated to pGEM-T easy vector and then transformed into JM109 strain of E. coli. Cloned DNA fragments were verified by PCR, restriction endonuclease (EcoRI) digestion and sequence analysis. The result revealed that the 16S rRNA gene of CWB1 consists of 1489 bp and shared 99.7% homology with Faba bean phyllody which belongs to phytoplasma 16S rII-C subgroup. So we can classify this strain into phytoplasma 16S rII-C subgroup. PMID:12552825

  19. Identification of Atypical Rhodococcus-Like Clinical Isolates as Dietzia spp. by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing▿

    PubMed Central

    Pilares, Lilian; Agüero, Jesús; Vázquez-Boland, José A.; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Navas, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi and Dietzia spp. are closely related actinomycetes that show similar phenotypic properties. In humans, R. equi is an opportunistic pathogen associated with severe immunodeficiency. Dietzia spp. are environmental bacteria that have been isolated recently from clinical material and are presumptively associated with human infections. During the last 5 years, 15 bacterial isolates from human clinical samples collected at the Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain, were identified as R. equi by the API Coryne test. 16S rRNA gene sequencing confirmed seven isolates to be true R. equi strains, whereas the other eight were identified as members of the genus Dietzia, including Dietzia maris (four isolates), Dietzia natronolimnaea (two isolates), and Dietzia timorensis and Dietzia sp. (one isolate each). The eight Dietzia isolates were highly sensitive to 12 antimicrobial compounds. PMID:20220156

  20. Analysis of 18S rRNA gene sequences suggests significant molecular differences between Macrodasyida and Chaetonotida (Gastrotricha).

    PubMed

    Manylov, Oleg G; Vladychenskaya, Natalia S; Milyutina, Irina A; Kedrova, Olga S; Korokhov, Nikolai P; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady A; Aleshin, Vladimir V; Petrov, Nikolai B

    2004-03-01

    Partial 18S rRNA gene sequences of four macrodasyid and one chaetonotid gastrotrichs were obtained and compared with the available sequences of other gastrotrich species and representatives of various metazoan phyla. Contrary to the earlier molecular data, the gastrotrich sequences did not comprise a monophyletic group but formed two distinct clades, corresponding to the Macrodasyida and Chaetonotida, with the basal position occupied by the sequences of Tetranchyroderma sp. and Xenotrichula sp., respectively. Depending on the taxon sampling and methods of analysis, the two clades were separated by various combinations of clades Rotifera, Gnathostomulida, and Platyhelminthes, and never formed a clade with Nematoda. Thus, monophyly of the Gastrotricha is not confirmed by analysis of the presently available molecular data. PMID:15012964

  1. Molecular diversity of eukaryotes in municipal wastewater treatment processes as revealed by 18S rRNA gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Kengo; Kubota, Kengo; Harada, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic communities involved in sewage treatment processes have been investigated by morphological identification, but have not yet been well-characterized using molecular approaches. In the present study, eukaryotic communities were characterized by constructing 18S rRNA gene clone libraries. The phylogenetic affiliations of a total of 843 clones were Alveolata, Fungi, Rhizaria, Euglenozoa, Stramenopiles, Amoebozoa, and Viridiplantae as protozoans and Rotifera, Gastrotricha, and Nematoda as metazoans. Sixty percent of the clones had <97% sequence identity to described eukaryotes, indicating the greater diversity of eukaryotes than previously recognized. A core OTU closely related to Epistylis chrysemydis was identified, and several OTUs were shared by 4-8 libraries. Members of the uncultured lineage LKM11 in Cryptomycota were predominant fungi in sewage treatment processes. This comparative study represents an initial step in furthering understanding of the diversity and role of eukaryotes in sewage treatment processes. PMID:25491751

  2. Molecular diversity of eukaryotes in municipal wastewater treatment processes as revealed by 18S rRNA gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Kengo; Kubota, Kengo; Harada, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic communities involved in sewage treatment processes have been investigated by morphological identification, but have not yet been well-characterized using molecular approaches. In the present study, eukaryotic communities were characterized by constructing 18S rRNA gene clone libraries. The phylogenetic affiliations of a total of 843 clones were Alveolata, Fungi, Rhizaria, Euglenozoa, Stramenopiles, Amoebozoa, and Viridiplantae as protozoans and Rotifera, Gastrotricha, and Nematoda as metazoans. Sixty percent of the clones had <97% sequence identity to described eukaryotes, indicating the greater diversity of eukaryotes than previously recognized. A core OTU closely related to Epistylis chrysemydis was identified, and several OTUs were shared by 4-8 libraries. Members of the uncultured lineage LKM11 in Cryptomycota were predominant fungi in sewage treatment processes. This comparative study represents an initial step in furthering understanding of the diversity and role of eukaryotes in sewage treatment processes.

  3. Molecular Diversity of Eukaryotes in Municipal Wastewater Treatment Processes as Revealed by 18S rRNA Gene Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Kengo; Kubota, Kengo; Harada, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic communities involved in sewage treatment processes have been investigated by morphological identification, but have not yet been well-characterized using molecular approaches. In the present study, eukaryotic communities were characterized by constructing 18S rRNA gene clone libraries. The phylogenetic affiliations of a total of 843 clones were Alveolata, Fungi, Rhizaria, Euglenozoa, Stramenopiles, Amoebozoa, and Viridiplantae as protozoans and Rotifera, Gastrotricha, and Nematoda as metazoans. Sixty percent of the clones had <97% sequence identity to described eukaryotes, indicating the greater diversity of eukaryotes than previously recognized. A core OTU closely related to Epistylis chrysemydis was identified, and several OTUs were shared by 4–8 libraries. Members of the uncultured lineage LKM11 in Cryptomycota were predominant fungi in sewage treatment processes. This comparative study represents an initial step in furthering understanding of the diversity and role of eukaryotes in sewage treatment processes. PMID:25491751

  4. Analysis of 18S rRNA gene sequences suggests significant molecular differences between Macrodasyida and Chaetonotida (Gastrotricha).

    PubMed

    Manylov, Oleg G; Vladychenskaya, Natalia S; Milyutina, Irina A; Kedrova, Olga S; Korokhov, Nikolai P; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady A; Aleshin, Vladimir V; Petrov, Nikolai B

    2004-03-01

    Partial 18S rRNA gene sequences of four macrodasyid and one chaetonotid gastrotrichs were obtained and compared with the available sequences of other gastrotrich species and representatives of various metazoan phyla. Contrary to the earlier molecular data, the gastrotrich sequences did not comprise a monophyletic group but formed two distinct clades, corresponding to the Macrodasyida and Chaetonotida, with the basal position occupied by the sequences of Tetranchyroderma sp. and Xenotrichula sp., respectively. Depending on the taxon sampling and methods of analysis, the two clades were separated by various combinations of clades Rotifera, Gnathostomulida, and Platyhelminthes, and never formed a clade with Nematoda. Thus, monophyly of the Gastrotricha is not confirmed by analysis of the presently available molecular data.

  5. Comparison of MALDI-TOF MS, Housekeeping Gene Sequencing, and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Identification of Aeromonas Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hee Bong; Yoon, Jihoon; Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Myung Sook

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The genus Aeromonas is a pathogen that is well known to cause severe clinical illnesses, ranging from gastroenteritis to sepsis. Accurate identification of A. hydrophila, A. caviae, and A. veronii is important for the care of patients. However, species identification remains difficult using conventional methods. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of different methods of identifying Aeromonas at the species level: a biochemical method, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry-time of flight (MALDI-TOF MS), 16S rRNA sequencing, and housekeeping gene sequencing (gyrB, rpoB). Materials and Methods We analyzed 65 Aeromonas isolates recovered from patients at a university hospital in Korea between 1996 and 2012. The isolates were recovered from frozen states and tested using the following four methods: a conventional biochemical method, 16S rRNA sequencing, housekeeping gene sequencing with phylogenetic analysis, and MALDI-TOF MS. Results The conventional biochemical method and 16S rRNA sequencing identified Aeromonas at the genus level very accurately, although species level identification was unsatisfactory. MALDI-TOF MS system correctly identified 60 (92.3%) isolates at the species level and an additional four (6.2%) at the genus level. Overall, housekeeping gene sequencing with phylogenetic analysis was found to be the most accurate in identifying Aeromonas at the species level. Conclusion The most accurate method of identification of Aeromonas to species level is by housekeeping gene sequencing, although high cost and technical difficulty hinder its usage in clinical settings. An easy-to-use identification method is needed for clinical laboratories, for which MALDI-TOF MS could be a strong candidate. PMID:25684008

  6. 16S rRNA gene sequencing is a non-culture method of defining the specific bacterial etiology of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Xia, Li-Ping; Bian, Long-Yan; Xu, Min; Liu, Ying; Tang, Ai-Ling; Ye, Wen-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is an acquired respiratory tract infection following tracheal intubation. The most common hospital-acquired infection among patients with acute respiratory failure, VAP is associated with a mortality rate of 20-30%. The standard bacterial culture method for identifying the etiology of VAP is not specific, timely, or accurate in identifying the bacterial pathogens. This study used 16S rRNA gene metagenomic sequencing to identify and quantify the pathogenic bacteria in lower respiratory tract and oropharyngeal samples of 55 VAP patients. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene has served as a valuable tool in bacterial identification, particularly when other biochemical, molecular, or phenotypic identification techniques fail. In this study, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was performed in parallel with the standard bacterial culture method to identify and quantify bacteria present in the collected patient samples. Sequence analysis showed the colonization of multidrug-resistant strains in VAP secretions. Further, this method identified Prevotella, Proteus, Aquabacter, and Sphingomonas bacterial genera that were not detected by the standard bacterial culture method. Seven categories of bacteria, Streptococcus, Neisseria, Corynebacterium, Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas and Klebsiella, were detectable by both 16S rRNA gene sequencing and standard bacterial culture methods. Further, 16S rRNA gene sequencing had a significantly higher sensitivity in detecting Streptococcus and Pseudomonas when compared to standard bacterial culture. Together, these data present 16S rRNA gene sequencing as a novel VAP diagnosis tool that will further enable pathogen-specific treatment of VAP.

  7. Use of 16S rRNA gene for identification of a broad range of clinically relevant bacterial pathogens

    DOE PAGES

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; MacKichan, Joanna; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Miller, Steve; Nadarajan, Rohan; Brodie, Eoin L.; Lynch, Susan V.; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2015-02-06

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n =more » 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci.« less

  8. Lyme disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi with two homeologous 16S rRNA genes: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sin Hang

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease (LD), the most common tick-borne disease in North America, is believed to be caused exclusively by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and is usually diagnosed by clinical evaluation and serologic assays. As reported previously in a peer-reviewed article, a 13-year-old boy living in the Northeast of the USA was initially diagnosed with LD based on evaluation of his clinical presentations and on serologic test results. The patient was treated with a course of oral doxycycline for 28 days, and the symptoms resolved. A year later, the boy developed a series of unusual symptoms and did not attend school for 1 year. A LD specialist reviewed the case and found the serologic test band patterns nondiagnostic of LD. The boy was admitted to a psychiatric hospital. After discharge from the psychiatric hospital, a polymerase chain reaction test performed in a winter month when the boy was 16 years old showed a low density of B. burgdorferi sensu lato in the blood of the patient, confirmed by partial 16S rRNA (ribosomal RNA) gene sequencing. Subsequent DNA sequencing analysis presented in this report demonstrated that the spirochete isolate was a novel strain of B. burgdorferi with two homeologous 16S rRNA genes, which has never been reported in the world literature. This case report shows that direct DNA sequencing is a valuable tool for reliable molecular diagnosis of Lyme and related borrelioses, as well as for studies of the diversity of the causative agents of LD because LD patients infected by a rare or novel borrelial variant may produce an antibody pattern that can be different from the pattern characteristic of an infection caused by a typical B. burgdorferi sensu stricto strain. PMID:27186082

  9. Distribution of 5-methylcytosine residues in 5S rRNA genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Secale cereale.

    PubMed

    Fulnecek, J; Matyásek, R; Kovarík, A

    2002-12-01

    Bisulfite genomic sequencing was used to localise 5-methylcytosine residues (mC) in 5S rRNA genes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Secale cereale. The maps of mC distribution were compared with the previously published map of the corresponding region in Nicotiana tabacum. In all three species, the level of methylation of 5S rRNA genes was generally higher than the average for the entire genome. The ratio of 5S rDNA methylation to average overall methylation was 44%/30-33% for N. tabacum, 27%/4-6% for A. thaliana and 24%/20-22% for S. cereale. With the exception of one clone from S. cereale, no methylation-free 5S rDNA was detected. The level of methylation at different sequence motifs in 5S rDNA was calculated for N. tabacum/A. thaliana/ S. cereale, and this analysis yielded the following values (expressed as a percentage of total C): mCG 90%/78%/85%, mCWG 89%/41%/53%, mCmCG 72%/32%/16%, mCCG 4%/2%/0%, mCHH 15%/6%/1%, where W=A or T, and H=A or C or T. Non-symmetrical methylation was almost negligible in the large genome of S. cereale but relatively frequent in N. tabacum and A. thaliana, suggesting that the strict correlation between genome size and cytosine methylation might be violated for this type of methylation. Among non-symmetrical motifs the mCWA triplets were significantly over-represented in Arabidopsis, while in tobacco this preference was not as pronounced. The differences in methylation levels in different sequence contexts might be of phylogenetic significance, but further species in related and different taxa need to be studied before firm conclusions can be drawn. PMID:12471448

  10. Use of 16S rRNA gene for identification of a broad range of clinically relevant bacterial pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; MacKichan, Joanna; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Miller, Steve; Nadarajan, Rohan; Brodie, Eoin L.; Lynch, Susan V.; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2015-02-06

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n = 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci.

  11. Lyme disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi with two homeologous 16S rRNA genes: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sin Hang

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease (LD), the most common tick-borne disease in North America, is believed to be caused exclusively by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and is usually diagnosed by clinical evaluation and serologic assays. As reported previously in a peer-reviewed article, a 13-year-old boy living in the Northeast of the USA was initially diagnosed with LD based on evaluation of his clinical presentations and on serologic test results. The patient was treated with a course of oral doxycycline for 28 days, and the symptoms resolved. A year later, the boy developed a series of unusual symptoms and did not attend school for 1 year. A LD specialist reviewed the case and found the serologic test band patterns nondiagnostic of LD. The boy was admitted to a psychiatric hospital. After discharge from the psychiatric hospital, a polymerase chain reaction test performed in a winter month when the boy was 16 years old showed a low density of B. burgdorferi sensu lato in the blood of the patient, confirmed by partial 16S rRNA (ribosomal RNA) gene sequencing. Subsequent DNA sequencing analysis presented in this report demonstrated that the spirochete isolate was a novel strain of B. burgdorferi with two homeologous 16S rRNA genes, which has never been reported in the world literature. This case report shows that direct DNA sequencing is a valuable tool for reliable molecular diagnosis of Lyme and related borrelioses, as well as for studies of the diversity of the causative agents of LD because LD patients infected by a rare or novel borrelial variant may produce an antibody pattern that can be different from the pattern characteristic of an infection caused by a typical B. burgdorferi sensu stricto strain.

  12. Nucleotide sequence of the 16S - 23S spacer region in an rRNA gene cluster from tobacco chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Takaiwa, F; Sugiura, M

    1982-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a spacer region between 16S and 23S rRNA genes from tobacco chloroplasts has been determined. The spacer region is 2080 bp long and encodes tRNAIle and tRNAAla genes which contain intervening sequences of 707 bp and 710 bp, respectively. Strong homology between the two intervening sequences is observed. These spacer tRNAs are synthesized as part of an 8.2 kb precursor molecule containing 16S and 23S rRNA sequences. Images PMID:6281739

  13. Composition of fecal microbiota of laboratory mice derived from Japanese commercial breeders using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries.

    PubMed

    Nozu, Ryoko; Ueno, Masami; Hayashimoto, Nobuhito

    2016-07-01

    The fecal microbiota of six mice derived from three Japanese commercial breeders was analyzed by using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries to construct a database for analyzing the gut microbiota of laboratory mice. The 566 clones were obtained from the clone libraries generated from the fecal DNA samples derived from BALB/c, C57BL/6N, DBA/2 and ICR mice. Among these 566 clones, there were 446 unique 16S rRNA gene sequences. When grouped at the 98% similarity level, the 446 unique sequences consisted of 103 Clostridiales, 43 Bacteroidales, 5 Lactobacillus and 3 Erysipelotricaceae, as well as sequences from 11 other phyla.

  14. Bacteroides isolated from four mammalian hosts lack host-specific 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and carbon and nitrogen utilization patterns*

    PubMed Central

    Atherly, Todd; Ziemer, Cherie J

    2014-01-01

    One-hundred-and-three isolates of Bacteroides ovatus,B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. xylanisolvens were recovered from cow, goat, human, and pig fecal enrichments with cellulose or xylan/pectin. Isolates were compared using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR), and phenotypic microarrays. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed high sequence identity in these Bacteroides; with distinct phylogenetic groupings by bacterial species but not host origin. Phenotypic microarray analysis demonstrated these Bacteroides shared the ability to utilize many of the same carbon substrates, without differences due to species or host origin, indicative of their broad carbohydrate fermentation abilities. Limited nitrogen substrates were utilized; in addition to ammonia, guanine, and xanthine, purine derivatives were utilized by most isolates followed by a few amino sugars. Only rep-PCR analysis demonstrated host-specific patterns, indicating that genomic changes due to coevolution with host did not occur by mutation in the 16S rRNA gene or by a gain or loss of carbohydrate utilization genes within these Bacteroides. This is the first report to indicate that host-associated genomic differences are outside of 16S rRNA gene and carbohydrate utilization genes and suggest conservation of specific bacterial species with the same functionality across mammalian hosts for this Bacteroidetes clade. PMID:24532571

  15. Bacteroides isolated from four mammalian hosts lack host-specific 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and carbon and nitrogen utilization patterns.

    PubMed

    Atherly, Todd; Ziemer, Cherie J

    2014-04-01

    One-hundred-and-three isolates of Bacteroides ovatus, B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. xylanisolvens were recovered from cow, goat, human, and pig fecal enrichments with cellulose or xylan/pectin. Isolates were compared using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR), and phenotypic microarrays. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed high sequence identity in these Bacteroides; with distinct phylogenetic groupings by bacterial species but not host origin. Phenotypic microarray analysis demonstrated these Bacteroides shared the ability to utilize many of the same carbon substrates, without differences due to species or host origin, indicative of their broad carbohydrate fermentation abilities. Limited nitrogen substrates were utilized; in addition to ammonia, guanine, and xanthine, purine derivatives were utilized by most isolates followed by a few amino sugars. Only rep-PCR analysis demonstrated host-specific patterns, indicating that genomic changes due to coevolution with host did not occur by mutation in the 16S rRNA gene or by a gain or loss of carbohydrate utilization genes within these Bacteroides. This is the first report to indicate that host-associated genomic differences are outside of 16S rRNA gene and carbohydrate utilization genes and suggest conservation of specific bacterial species with the same functionality across mammalian hosts for this Bacteroidetes clade.

  16. Gram-positive bacteria with a high DNA G+C content are characterized by a common insertion within their 23S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Roller, C; Ludwig, W; Schleifer, K H

    1992-06-01

    An insertion of about 100 bases within the central part of the 23S rRNA genes was found to be a phylogenetic marker for the bacterial line of descent of Gram-positive bacteria with a high DNA G + C content. The insertion was present in 23S rRNA genes of 64 strains representing the major phylogenetic groups of Gram-positive bacteria with a high DNA G+C content, whereas it was not found in 23S rRNA genes of 55 (eu)bacteria representing Gram-positive bacteria with a low DNA G + C content and all other known (eu)bacterial phyla. The presence of the insertion could be easily demonstrated by comparative gel electrophoretic analysis of in vitro-amplified 23S rDNA fragments, which contained the insertion. The nucleotide sequences of the amplified fragments were determined and sequence similarities of at least 44% were found. The overall similarity values are lower than those of 16S and 23S rRNA sequences of the particular organism. Northern hybridization experiments indicated the presence of the insertion within the mature 23S rRNA of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis and the evolution of the 18S rRNA gene typing system of Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Fuerst, Paul A; Booton, Gregory C; Crary, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Species of Acanthamoeba were first described using morphological characters including cyst structure and cytology of nuclear division. More than 20 nominal species were proposed using these methods. Morphology, especially cyst shape and size, has proven to be plastic and dependent upon culture conditions. The DNA sequence of the nuclear small-subunit (18S) rRNA, the Rns gene, has become the most widely accepted method for rapid diagnosis and classification of Acanthamoeba. The Byers-Fuerst lab first proposed an Rns typing system in 1996. Subsequent refinements, with an increasing DNA database and analysis of diagnostic fragments within the gene, have become widely accepted by the Acanthamoeba research community. The development of the typing system, including its current state of implementation is illustrated by three cases: (i) the division between sequence types T13 and T16; (ii) the diversity within sequence supertype T2/T6, and (iii) verification of a new sequence type, designated T20. Molecular studies make clear the disconnection between phylogenetic relatedness and species names, as applied for the genus Acanthamoeba. Future reconciliation of genetic types with species names must become a priority, but the possible shortcomings of the use of a single gene when reconstructing the evolutionary history of the acanthamoebidae must also be resolved. PMID:25284310

  18. Phylogenetic analysis and the evolution of the 18S rRNA gene typing system of Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Fuerst, Paul A; Booton, Gregory C; Crary, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Species of Acanthamoeba were first described using morphological characters including cyst structure and cytology of nuclear division. More than 20 nominal species were proposed using these methods. Morphology, especially cyst shape and size, has proven to be plastic and dependent upon culture conditions. The DNA sequence of the nuclear small-subunit (18S) rRNA, the Rns gene, has become the most widely accepted method for rapid diagnosis and classification of Acanthamoeba. The Byers-Fuerst lab first proposed an Rns typing system in 1996. Subsequent refinements, with an increasing DNA database and analysis of diagnostic fragments within the gene, have become widely accepted by the Acanthamoeba research community. The development of the typing system, including its current state of implementation is illustrated by three cases: (i) the division between sequence types T13 and T16; (ii) the diversity within sequence supertype T2/T6, and (iii) verification of a new sequence type, designated T20. Molecular studies make clear the disconnection between phylogenetic relatedness and species names, as applied for the genus Acanthamoeba. Future reconciliation of genetic types with species names must become a priority, but the possible shortcomings of the use of a single gene when reconstructing the evolutionary history of the acanthamoebidae must also be resolved.

  19. Seasonal dynamics of anammox bacteria in estuarial sediment of the Mai Po Nature Reserve revealed by analyzing the 16S rRNA and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo) genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Cao, Huiluo; Hong, Yi-Guo; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2011-01-01

    The community and population dynamics of anammox bacteria in summer (wet) and winter (dry) seasons in estuarial mudflat sediment of the Mai Po Nature Reserve were investigated by 16S rRNA and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo) genes. 16S rRNA phylogenetic diversity showed that sequences related to 'Kuenenia' anammox bacteria were presented in summer but not winter while 'Scalindua' anammox bacteria occurred in both seasons and could be divided into six different clusters. Compared to the 16S rRNA genes, the hzo genes revealed a relatively uniform seasonal diversity, with sequences relating to 'Scalindua', 'Anammoxoglobus', and planctomycete KSU-1 found in both seasons. The seasonal specific bacterial groups and diversity based on the 16S rRNA and hzo genes indicated strong seasonal community structures in estuary sediment of this site. Furthermore, the higher abundance of hzo genes in summer than winter indicates clear seasonal population dynamics. Combining the physicochemical characteristics of estuary sediment in the two seasons and their correlations with anammox bacteria community structure, we proposed the strong seasonal dynamics in estuary sediment of Mai Po to be due to the anthropogenic and terrestrial inputs, especially in summer, which brings in freshwater anammox bacteria, such as 'Kuenenia', interacting with the coastal marine anammox bacteria 'Scalindua'. PMID:21487198

  20. Seasonal dynamics of anammox bacteria in estuarial sediment of the Mai Po Nature Reserve revealed by analyzing the 16S rRNA and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo) genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Cao, Huiluo; Hong, Yi-Guo; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2011-01-01

    The community and population dynamics of anammox bacteria in summer (wet) and winter (dry) seasons in estuarial mudflat sediment of the Mai Po Nature Reserve were investigated by 16S rRNA and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo) genes. 16S rRNA phylogenetic diversity showed that sequences related to 'Kuenenia' anammox bacteria were presented in summer but not winter while 'Scalindua' anammox bacteria occurred in both seasons and could be divided into six different clusters. Compared to the 16S rRNA genes, the hzo genes revealed a relatively uniform seasonal diversity, with sequences relating to 'Scalindua', 'Anammoxoglobus', and planctomycete KSU-1 found in both seasons. The seasonal specific bacterial groups and diversity based on the 16S rRNA and hzo genes indicated strong seasonal community structures in estuary sediment of this site. Furthermore, the higher abundance of hzo genes in summer than winter indicates clear seasonal population dynamics. Combining the physicochemical characteristics of estuary sediment in the two seasons and their correlations with anammox bacteria community structure, we proposed the strong seasonal dynamics in estuary sediment of Mai Po to be due to the anthropogenic and terrestrial inputs, especially in summer, which brings in freshwater anammox bacteria, such as 'Kuenenia', interacting with the coastal marine anammox bacteria 'Scalindua'.

  1. Prevalence of 16S rRNA methylase, modifying enzyme, and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase genes among Acinetobacter baumannii isolates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenru; Ling, Baodong; Zhou, Liming

    2015-08-01

    Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has become a worldwide problem, and methylation of 16S rRNA has recently emerged as a new mechanism of resistance to aminoglycosides, which is mediated by a newly recognized group of 16S rRNA methylases. 16S rRNA methylase confers a high-level resistance to all 4,6-substituted deoxystreptamine aminoglycosides that are currently used in clinical practice. Some of the A. baumannii isolates have been found to coproduce extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs), contributing to their multidrug resistance. The aim of this study was to detect the determinants of the 16S rRNA methylase genes armA, rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, rmtD, rmtE, and npmA, the modifying enzyme genes aac(6')-Ib, ant(3″)-Ia, aph(3')-I, and the extended-spectrum beta-lactamase genes bla(TEM), bla(SHV), and bla(CTX-M-3) among A. baumannii isolates in northeastern Sichuan, China. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 21 different antimicrobial agents against the A. baumannii isolates were determined. The clinical isolates showed a high level of resistance (MIC≧256 μg/ml) to aminoglycosides, which ranged from 50·1 to 83·8%. The resistances to meropenem and imipenem, two of the beta-lactam antibiotics and the most active antibiotics against A. baumannii, were 9·1 and 8·2%, respectively. Among 60 amikacin-resistant isolates, only the 16S rRNA methylase gene armA was found to be prevalent (66·7%), but the other 16S rRNA methylase genes rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, rmtD, rmtE, and npmA were not detected. The prevalences of the modifying enzyme genes aac (6')-Ib, ant (3″)-Ia, and aph (3')-I were 51·7, 81·7, and 58·3%, respectively, which are different from a previous study in which the occurrences of these genes were 3, 64, and 72%, respectively. Among the 40 isolates that were armA-positive, the prevalences of bla(TEM), bla(SHV), and bla(CTX-M-3) genes were detected for the first time in China, and their occurrences were 45, 65, and 52·5%, respectively. In all, A

  2. Nearly complete 28S rRNA gene sequences confirm new hypotheses of sponge evolution.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Robert W; Hill, April L; Hill, Malcolm S; Redmond, Niamh E; Collins, Allen G; Morrow, Christine C; Spicer, Lori; Carmack, Cheryl A; Zappe, Megan E; Pohlmann, Deborah; Hall, Chelsea; Diaz, Maria C; Bangalore, Purushotham V

    2013-09-01

    The highly collaborative research sponsored by the NSF-funded Assembling the Porifera Tree of Life (PorToL) project is providing insights into some of the most difficult questions in metazoan systematics. Our understanding of phylogenetic relationships within the phylum Porifera has changed considerably with increased taxon sampling and data from additional molecular markers. PorToL researchers have falsified earlier phylogenetic hypotheses, discovered novel phylogenetic alliances, found phylogenetic homes for enigmatic taxa, and provided a more precise understanding of the evolution of skeletal features, secondary metabolites, body organization, and symbioses. Some of these exciting new discoveries are shared in the papers that form this issue of Integrative and Comparative Biology. Our analyses of over 300 nearly complete 28S ribosomal subunit gene sequences provide specific case studies that illustrate how our dataset confirms new hypotheses of sponge evolution. We recovered monophyletic clades for all 4 classes of sponges, as well as the 4 major clades of Demospongiae (Keratosa, Myxospongiae, Haploscleromorpha, and Heteroscleromorpha), but our phylogeny differs in several aspects from traditional classifications. In most major clades of sponges, families within orders appear to be paraphyletic. Although additional sampling of genes and taxa are needed to establish whether this pattern results from a lack of phylogenetic resolution or from a paraphyletic classification system, many of our results are congruent with those obtained from 18S ribosomal subunit gene sequences and complete mitochondrial genomes. These data provide further support for a revision of the traditional classification of sponges. PMID:23748742

  3. Nearly Complete 28S rRNA Gene Sequences Confirm New Hypotheses of Sponge Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Robert W.; Hill, April L.; Hill, Malcolm S.; Redmond, Niamh E.; Collins, Allen G.; Morrow, Christine C.; Spicer, Lori; Carmack, Cheryl A.; Zappe, Megan E.; Pohlmann, Deborah; Hall, Chelsea; Diaz, Maria C.; Bangalore, Purushotham V.

    2013-01-01

    The highly collaborative research sponsored by the NSF-funded Assembling the Porifera Tree of Life (PorToL) project is providing insights into some of the most difficult questions in metazoan systematics. Our understanding of phylogenetic relationships within the phylum Porifera has changed considerably with increased taxon sampling and data from additional molecular markers. PorToL researchers have falsified earlier phylogenetic hypotheses, discovered novel phylogenetic alliances, found phylogenetic homes for enigmatic taxa, and provided a more precise understanding of the evolution of skeletal features, secondary metabolites, body organization, and symbioses. Some of these exciting new discoveries are shared in the papers that form this issue of Integrative and Comparative Biology. Our analyses of over 300 nearly complete 28S ribosomal subunit gene sequences provide specific case studies that illustrate how our dataset confirms new hypotheses of sponge evolution. We recovered monophyletic clades for all 4 classes of sponges, as well as the 4 major clades of Demospongiae (Keratosa, Myxospongiae, Haploscleromorpha, and Heteroscleromorpha), but our phylogeny differs in several aspects from traditional classifications. In most major clades of sponges, families within orders appear to be paraphyletic. Although additional sampling of genes and taxa are needed to establish whether this pattern results from a lack of phylogenetic resolution or from a paraphyletic classification system, many of our results are congruent with those obtained from 18S ribosomal subunit gene sequences and complete mitochondrial genomes. These data provide further support for a revision of the traditional classification of sponges. PMID:23748742

  4. [Molecular phylogeny of gastrotricha based on 18S rRNA genes comparison: rejection of hypothesis of relatedness with nematodes].

    PubMed

    Petrov, N B; Pegova, A N; Manylov, O G; Vladychenskaia, N S; Miuge, N S; Aleshin, V V

    2007-01-01

    Gastrotrichs are meiobenthic free-living aquatic worms whose phylogenetic and intra-group relationships remain unclear despite some attempts to resolve them on the base of morphology or molecules. In this study we analysed complete sequences of the 18S rRNA gene of 15 taxa (8 new and 7 published) to test numerous hypotheses on gastrotrich phylogeny and to verify whether controversial interrelationships from previous molecular data could be due to the short region available for analysis and the poor taxa sampling. Data were analysed using both maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference. Results obtained suggest that gastrotrichs, together with Gnathostomulida, Plathelminthes, Syndermata (Rotifera + Acanthocephala), Nemertea and Lophotrochozoa, comprise a clade Spiralia. Statistical tests reject phylogenetic hypotheses regarding Gastrotricha as close relatives of Nematoda and other Ecdysozoa or placing them at the base of bilaterian tree close to acoels and nemertodermatides. Within Gastrotricha, Chaetonotida and Macrodasyida comprise two well supported clades. Our analysis confirmed the monophyly of the Chaetonotidae and Xenotrichulidae within Chaetonida as well as Turbanellidae and Thaumastodermatidae within Macrodasyida. Mesodasys is a sister group of the Turbanellidae, and Lepidodasyidae appears to be a polyphyletic group as Cephalodasys forms a separate lineage at the base of macrodasyids, whereas Lepidodasys groups with Neodasys between Thaumastodermatidae and Turbanellidae. To infer a more reliable Gastrotricha phylogeny many species and additional genes should be involved in future analyses. PMID:17685227

  5. [Molecular phylogeny of gastrotricha based on 18S rRNA genes comparison: rejection of hypothesis of relatedness with nematodes].

    PubMed

    Petrov, N B; Pegova, A N; Manylov, O G; Vladychenskaia, N S; Miuge, N S; Aleshin, V V

    2007-01-01

    Gastrotrichs are meiobenthic free-living aquatic worms whose phylogenetic and intra-group relationships remain unclear despite some attempts to resolve them on the base of morphology or molecules. In this study we analysed complete sequences of the 18S rRNA gene of 15 taxa (8 new and 7 published) to test numerous hypotheses on gastrotrich phylogeny and to verify whether controversial interrelationships from previous molecular data could be due to the short region available for analysis and the poor taxa sampling. Data were analysed using both maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference. Results obtained suggest that gastrotrichs, together with Gnathostomulida, Plathelminthes, Syndermata (Rotifera + Acanthocephala), Nemertea and Lophotrochozoa, comprise a clade Spiralia. Statistical tests reject phylogenetic hypotheses regarding Gastrotricha as close relatives of Nematoda and other Ecdysozoa or placing them at the base of bilaterian tree close to acoels and nemertodermatides. Within Gastrotricha, Chaetonotida and Macrodasyida comprise two well supported clades. Our analysis confirmed the monophyly of the Chaetonotidae and Xenotrichulidae within Chaetonida as well as Turbanellidae and Thaumastodermatidae within Macrodasyida. Mesodasys is a sister group of the Turbanellidae, and Lepidodasyidae appears to be a polyphyletic group as Cephalodasys forms a separate lineage at the base of macrodasyids, whereas Lepidodasys groups with Neodasys between Thaumastodermatidae and Turbanellidae. To infer a more reliable Gastrotricha phylogeny many species and additional genes should be involved in future analyses.

  6. Comparison of Gull Feces-specific Assays Targeting the 16S rRNA Gene of Catellicoccus Marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two novel gull-specific qPCR assays were developed using 16S rRNA gene sequences from gull fecal clone libraries: a SYBR-green-based assay targeting Streptococcus spp. (i.e., gull3) and a TaqMan qPCR assay targeting Catellicoccus marimammalium (i.e., gull4). The main objectives ...

  7. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  8. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  9. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from DNA extracts of 12 samples and compared to clone libraries previously generated using RNA extracts from the same samples. Phylogenetic analysis of 761 DNA-based ...

  10. Identification of bacterial species associated with the sheep scab mite (Psoroptes ovis) by using amplified genes coding for 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Hogg, J C; Lehane, M J

    1999-09-01

    This was the first molecular study of the bacterial flora of the sheep scab mite (Psoroptes ovis). A sequence analysis of genes coding for 16S rRNA revealed that Serratia marcescens and bacteria closely related to Staphylococcus intermedius or Staphylococcus chromogens and Alloiococcus otitidis were present. These bacteria were associated with skin lesions, dermatitis, and otitis media caused by P. ovis.

  11. 18S rRNA gene sequencing identifies a novel species of Henneguya parasitizing the gills of the channel catfish (Ictaluridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the southeastern United States, the channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus is a host to at least eight different species of myxozoan parasites belonging to the genus Henneguya, four of which have been characterized molecularly using sequencing of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rRNA). Howe...

  12. Analysis of partial sequences of genes coding for 16S rRNA of actinomycetes isolated from Casuarina equisetifolia nodules in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Niner, B M; Brandt, J P; Villegas, M; Marshall, C R; Hirsch, A M; Valdés, M

    1996-01-01

    Filamentous bacteria isolated from surface-sterilized nodules of Casuarina equisetifolia trees in México were capable of reducing acetylene, a diagnostic test for nitrogenase, but were unable to nodulate their host. Analysis of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences suggests that the Mexican isolates are not Frankia strains but members of a novel clade. PMID:8702297

  13. Avoidance and Potential Remedy Solutions of Chimeras in Reconstructing the Phylogeny of Aphids Using the 16S rRNA Gene of Buchnera: A Case in Lachninae (Hemiptera).

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Jing; Qiao, Ge-Xia

    2015-08-25

    It is known that PCR amplification of highly homologous genes from complex DNA mixtures can generate a significant proportion of chimeric sequences. The 16S rRNA gene is not only widely used in estimating the species diversity of endosymbionts in aphids but also used to explore the co-diversification of aphids and their endosymbionts. Thus, chimeric sequences may lead to the discovery of non-existent endosymbiont species and mislead Buchnera-based phylogenetic analysis that lead to false conclusions. In this study, a high probability (6.49%) of chimeric sequence occurrence was found in the amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences of endosymbionts from aphid species in the subfamily Lachninae. These chimeras are hybrid products of multiple parent sequences from the dominant species of endosymbionts in each corresponding host. It is difficult to identify the chimeric sequences of a new or unidentified species due to the high variability of their main parent, Buchnera aphidicola, and because the chimeric sequences can confuse the phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. These chimeras present a challenge to Buchnera-based phylogenetic research in aphids. Thus, our study strongly suggests that using appropriate methods to detect chimeric 16S rRNA sequences may avoid some false conclusions in endosymbiont-based aphid research.

  14. A method for high precision sequencing of near full-length 16S rRNA genes on an Illumina MiSeq

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Aaron E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The bacterial 16S rRNA gene has historically been used in defining bacterial taxonomy and phylogeny. However, there are currently no high-throughput methods to sequence full-length 16S rRNA genes present in a sample with precision. Results We describe a method for sequencing near full-length 16S rRNA gene amplicons using the high throughput Illumina MiSeq platform and test it using DNA from human skin swab samples. Proof of principle of the approach is demonstrated, with the generation of 1,604 sequences greater than 1,300 nt from a single Nano MiSeq run, with accuracy estimated to be 100-fold higher than standard Illumina reads. The reads were chimera filtered using information from a single molecule dual tagging scheme that boosts the signal available for chimera detection. Conclusions This method could be scaled up to generate many thousands of sequences per MiSeq run and could be applied to other sequencing platforms. This has great potential for populating databases with high quality, near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences from under-represented taxa and environments and facilitates analyses of microbial communities at higher resolution. PMID:27688981

  15. A method for high precision sequencing of near full-length 16S rRNA genes on an Illumina MiSeq

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Aaron E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The bacterial 16S rRNA gene has historically been used in defining bacterial taxonomy and phylogeny. However, there are currently no high-throughput methods to sequence full-length 16S rRNA genes present in a sample with precision. Results We describe a method for sequencing near full-length 16S rRNA gene amplicons using the high throughput Illumina MiSeq platform and test it using DNA from human skin swab samples. Proof of principle of the approach is demonstrated, with the generation of 1,604 sequences greater than 1,300 nt from a single Nano MiSeq run, with accuracy estimated to be 100-fold higher than standard Illumina reads. The reads were chimera filtered using information from a single molecule dual tagging scheme that boosts the signal available for chimera detection. Conclusions This method could be scaled up to generate many thousands of sequences per MiSeq run and could be applied to other sequencing platforms. This has great potential for populating databases with high quality, near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences from under-represented taxa and environments and facilitates analyses of microbial communities at higher resolution.

  16. Constitutive and Inducible Expression of the rRNA Methylase Gene erm(B) in Campylobacter

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fengru; Shen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Maojun; Wu, Congming

    2015-01-01

    Macrolides are the antimicrobials of choice for treating human campylobacteriosis. The recent emergence of erm(B) in Campylobacter bacteria threatens the utility of this class of antibiotics. Here we report the constitutive and inducible expression of erm(B) in Campylobacter isolates derived from diarrheal patients and food-producing animals. Constitutive expression of erm(B) was associated with insertion and deletion in the regulatory region of the gene, providing the first documentation of the differential expression of erm(B) in Campylobacter bacteria. PMID:26259800

  17. Detection and identification of Entamoeba gingivalis by specific amplification of rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Kikuta, N; Yamamoto, A; Goto, N

    1996-12-01

    A pair of oligonucleotide primers were designed from the nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SrRNA) of the oral protozoan parasite Entamoeba gingivalis. The primers amplified a 1.4-kb DNA fragment by polymerase chain reaction and were specific for Entamoeba gingivalis but not for other protozoa, oral protists and bacteria, or human leukocytes. With this method, the DNA from as few as 30 cells of Entamoeba gingivalis could be detected. These results suggest that this approach is applicable to the detection and identification of Entamoeba gingivalis in the human oral cavity.

  18. Comparison of potential diatom 'barcode' genes (the 18S rRNA gene and ITS, COI, rbcL) and their effectiveness in discriminating and determining species taxonomy in the Bacillariophyta.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liliang; Sui, Zhenghong; Zhang, Shu; Ren, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Diatoms form an enormous group of photoautotrophic micro-eukaryotes and play a crucial role in marine ecology. In this study, we evaluated typical genes to determine whether they were effective at different levels of diatom clustering analysis to assess the potential of these regions for barcoding taxa. Our test genes included nuclear rRNA genes (the nuclear small-subunit rRNA gene and the 5.8S rRNA gene+ITS-2), a mitochondrial gene (cytochrome c-oxidase subunit 1, COI), a chloroplast gene [ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit (rbcL)] and the universal plastid amplicon (UPA). Calculated genetic divergence was highest for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS; 5.8S+ITS-2) (p-distance of 1.569, 85.84% parsimony-informative sites) and COI (6.084, 82.14%), followed by the 18S rRNA gene (0.139, 57.69%), rbcL (0.120, 42.01%) and UPA (0.050, 14.97%), which indicated that ITS and COI were highly divergent compared with the other tested genes, and that their nucleotide compositions were variable within the whole group of diatoms. Bayesian inference (BI) analysis showed that the phylogenetic trees generated from each gene clustered diatoms at different phylogenetic levels. The 18S rRNA gene was better than the other genes in clustering higher diatom taxa, and both the 18S rRNA gene and rbcL performed well in clustering some lower taxa. The COI region was able to barcode species of some genera within the Bacillariophyceae. ITS was a potential marker for DNA based-taxonomy and DNA barcoding of Thalassiosirales, while species of Cyclotella, Skeletonema and Stephanodiscus gathered in separate clades, and were paraphyletic with those of Thalassiosira. Finally, UPA was too conserved to serve as a diatom barcode.

  19. DNA-based classification and sequence heterogeneities in the 16S rRNA genes of Lactobacillus casei/paracasei and related species.

    PubMed

    Vásquez, Alejandra; Molin, Göran; Pettersson, Bertil; Antonsson, Martin; Ahrné, Siv

    2005-07-01

    The sequence differences within the 16S rRNA genes of Lactobacillus casei/paracasei and related species, Lactobacillus zeae and Lactobacillus rhamnosus, were investigated. Thirty-seven strains of mostly human or cheese origin were grouped by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) of the total chromosomal DNA and by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments. REA verified that all strains were genomically unique and singled out three major clusters, one L. rhamnosus-cluster and two clusters containing L. paracasei strains. The groups obtained by TTGE corresponded with one exception to the REA-clusters. In the TTGE clustering all L. paracasei strains formed one general group with one TTGE-band in common, and this group was sub-divided into five subgroups due to the presence of more than one TTGE-band in four of the subgroups. The occurrence of multiple TTGE-bands was investigated by amplifying and cloning of the 16S rRNA genes from the strains showing this phenomenon, thereby 12 clones from each strain were sequenced, demonstrating polymorphisms in almost all the cases. Subjecting the clones displaying sequence variations to TTGE as well as sequencing of 16S rDNA revealed by ribotyping of the strains, verified the presence of polymorphisms within the 16S rRNA genes. The migration characteristic of amplified DNA from a single clone corresponded to a specific band in the TTGE-pattern of the strain from which the clone originated. Southern blot hybridisation with a 16S rDNA probe demonstrated the presence of at least five 16S rRNA genes in L. casei/paracasei. A higher degree of variable positions than previously reported was observed in the 16S rRNA gene fragments of the members in the complex. Sequence comparison between the 16S rRNA gene copies of L. casei (CCUG 21451T) and L. zeae (CCUG 35515T) demonstrated that the two species shared almost the same sequence in some copies while the others were more different

  20. Improved Bacterial 16S rRNA Gene (V4 and V4-5) and Fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer Marker Gene Primers for Microbial Community Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Walters , William; Hyde, Embriette R.; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Ackermann, Gail; Humphrey, Greg; Parada , Alma; Gilbert, Jack A.; Jansson, Janet K.; Caporaso, Greg; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Apprill, Amy; Knight, Rob

    2015-12-22

    Designing primers for PCR-based taxonomic surveys that amplify a broad range of phylotypes in varied community samples is a difficult challenge, and the comparability of datasets amplified with varied primers requires attention. Here we examine the performance of modified 16S rRNA gene and ITS primers for archaea/bacteria and fungi, respectively, with non-aquatic samples. We moved primer barcodes to the 5’-end, allowing for a range of different 3’ primer pairings, such as the 515f/926r primer pair, which amplifies variable regions 4-5 of the 16S rRNA gene. We additionally demonstrate that modifications to the 515f/806r (variable region 4) 16S primer pair, which improves detection of Thaumarchaeota and SAR11 in marine samples, do not degrade performance on taxa already amplified effectively by the original primer set. Alterations to the fungal ITS primers did result in differential but overall improved performance compared to the original primers. In both cases, the improved primers should be widely adopted for amplicon studies.

  1. Comparison of restriction enzyme pattern analysis and full gene sequencing of 16S rRNA gene for Nocardia species identification, the first report of Nocardia transvalensis isolated of sputum from Iran, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fatahi-Bafghi, Mehdi; Heidarieh, Parvin; Rasouli-Nasab, Masoumeh; Habibnia, Shadi; Hashemi-Shahraki, Abdorazagh; Eshraghi, Seyyed Saeed

    2016-10-01

    Nocardial infections occur in different organs of the body and are common in immune disorder diseases of individuals. The aim of this study was to assess Nocardia species identification by phenotypic tests and molecular techniques applied to nocardiosis in Iranian patients. In the current study, various clinical samples were collected and cultured on conventional media and using the paraffin baiting method. Various phenotypic tests were performed. For accurate identification at the species level, restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) in the hsp65 and partial 16S rRNA genes and full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene were used. Twenty-seven Nocardia spp. were isolated and analysis of phenotypic tests results showed Nocardia asteroides complex, Nocardia otitidiscaviarum, Nocardia nova, and Nocardia spp. New RFLP patterns of Nocardia strains with hsp65 and partial 16S rRNA genes were obtained. Full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified Nocardia cyriacigeorgica, N. otitidiscaviarum, Nocardia farcinica, Nocardia transvalensis, and N. nova. Nocardia infections are rarely reported and this genus is the cause of various illnesses. Accurate identification of Nocardia spp. is important for epidemiology studies and treatment. It should also be noted that some species may have similar RFLP patterns; therefore, full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene is necessary for confirmation.

  2. Comparison of restriction enzyme pattern analysis and full gene sequencing of 16S rRNA gene for Nocardia species identification, the first report of Nocardia transvalensis isolated of sputum from Iran, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fatahi-Bafghi, Mehdi; Heidarieh, Parvin; Rasouli-Nasab, Masoumeh; Habibnia, Shadi; Hashemi-Shahraki, Abdorazagh; Eshraghi, Seyyed Saeed

    2016-10-01

    Nocardial infections occur in different organs of the body and are common in immune disorder diseases of individuals. The aim of this study was to assess Nocardia species identification by phenotypic tests and molecular techniques applied to nocardiosis in Iranian patients. In the current study, various clinical samples were collected and cultured on conventional media and using the paraffin baiting method. Various phenotypic tests were performed. For accurate identification at the species level, restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) in the hsp65 and partial 16S rRNA genes and full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene were used. Twenty-seven Nocardia spp. were isolated and analysis of phenotypic tests results showed Nocardia asteroides complex, Nocardia otitidiscaviarum, Nocardia nova, and Nocardia spp. New RFLP patterns of Nocardia strains with hsp65 and partial 16S rRNA genes were obtained. Full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified Nocardia cyriacigeorgica, N. otitidiscaviarum, Nocardia farcinica, Nocardia transvalensis, and N. nova. Nocardia infections are rarely reported and this genus is the cause of various illnesses. Accurate identification of Nocardia spp. is important for epidemiology studies and treatment. It should also be noted that some species may have similar RFLP patterns; therefore, full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene is necessary for confirmation. PMID:27613736

  3. Evolutionary origin of Plasmodium and other Apicomplexa based on rRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Escalante, A A; Ayala, F J

    1995-01-01

    We have explored the evolutionary history of the Apicomplexa and two related protistan phyla, Dinozoa and Ciliophora, by comparing the nucleotide sequences of small subunit ribosomal RNA genes. We conclude that the Plasmodium lineage, to which the malarial parasites belong, diverged from other apicomplexan lineages (piroplasmids and coccidians) several hundred million years ago, perhaps even before the Cambrian. The Plasmodium radiation, which gave rise to several species parasitic to humans, occurred approximately 129 million years ago; Plasmodium parasitism of humans has independently arisen several times. The origin of apicomplexans (Plasmodium), dinoflagellates, and ciliates may be > 1 billion years old, perhaps older than the three multicellular kingdoms of animals, plants, and fungi. Digenetic parasitism independently evolved several times in the Apicomplexa. PMID:7597031

  4. Highly divergent 18S rRNA gene paralogs in a Cryptosporidium genotype from eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus)1

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, Brianna L.S.; Clark, Mark E.; Kváč, Martin; Khan, Eakalak; Giddings, Catherine W.; Dyer, Neil W.; Schultz, Jessie L.; McEvoy, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an apicomplexan parasite that causes the disease cryptosporidiosis in humans, livestock, and other vertebrates. Much of the knowledge on Cryptosporidium diversity is derived from 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) phylogenies. Eukaryote genomes generally have multiple 18S rDNA copies that evolve in concert, which is necessary for the accurate inference of phylogenetic relationships. However, 18S rDNA copies in some genomes evolve by a birth-and-death process that can result in sequence divergence among copies. Most notably, divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in the apicomplexan Plasmodium share only 89–95% sequence similarity, encode structurally distinct rRNA molecules, and are expressed at different life cycle stages. In the present study, Cryptosporidium 18S rDNA was amplified from 28/72 (38.9%) eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus). Phylogenetic analyses showed the co-occurrence of two 18S rDNA types, Type A and Type B, in 26 chipmunks, and Type B clustered with a sequence previously identified as Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Types A and B had a sister group relationship but shared less than 93% sequence similarity. In contrast, actin and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences were homogeneous in samples with both Types A and B present. It was therefore concluded that Types A and B are divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Substitution patterns in Types A and B were consistent with functionally constrained evolution; however, Type B evolved more rapidly than Type A and had a higher G+C content (46.3% versus 41.0%). Oocysts of Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II measured 4.17 μm (3.73–5.04 μm) × 3.94 μm (3.50–4.98 μm) with a length-to-width ratio of 1.06 ± 0.06 μm, and infection occurred naturally in the jejunum, cecum, and colon of eastern chipmunks. The findings of this study have implications for the use of 18S rDNA sequences to infer phylogenetic relationships. PMID:25772204

  5. Highly divergent 18S rRNA gene paralogs in a Cryptosporidium genotype from eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus).

    PubMed

    Stenger, Brianna L S; Clark, Mark E; Kváč, Martin; Khan, Eakalak; Giddings, Catherine W; Dyer, Neil W; Schultz, Jessie L; McEvoy, John M

    2015-06-01

    Cryptosporidium is an apicomplexan parasite that causes the disease cryptosporidiosis in humans, livestock, and other vertebrates. Much of the knowledge on Cryptosporidium diversity is derived from 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) phylogenies. Eukaryote genomes generally have multiple 18S rDNA copies that evolve in concert, which is necessary for the accurate inference of phylogenetic relationships. However, 18S rDNA copies in some genomes evolve by a birth-and-death process that can result in sequence divergence among copies. Most notably, divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in the apicomplexan Plasmodium share only 89-95% sequence similarity, encode structurally distinct rRNA molecules, and are expressed at different life cycle stages. In the present study, Cryptosporidium 18S rDNA was amplified from 28/72 (38.9%) eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus). Phylogenetic analyses showed the co-occurrence of two 18S rDNA types, Type A and Type B, in 26 chipmunks, and Type B clustered with a sequence previously identified as Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Types A and B had a sister group relationship but shared less than 93% sequence similarity. In contrast, actin and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences were homogeneous in samples with both Types A and B present. It was therefore concluded that Types A and B are divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Substitution patterns in Types A and B were consistent with functionally constrained evolution; however, Type B evolved more rapidly than Type A and had a higher G+C content (46.3% versus 41.0%). Oocysts of Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II measured 4.17 μm (3.73-5.04 μm) × 3.94 μm (3.50-4.98 μm) with a length-to-width ratio of 1.06 ± 0.06 μm, and infection occurred naturally in the jejunum, cecum, and colon of eastern chipmunks. The findings of this study have implications for the use of 18S rDNA sequences to infer phylogenetic relationships.

  6. New Primers Targeting Full-Length Ciliate 18S rRNA Genes and Evaluation of Dietary Effect on Rumen Ciliate Diversity in Dairy Cows.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Shengguo; Zhang, Yangdong; Sun, Peng; Bu, Dengpan; Wang, Jiaqi

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of the full-length 18S rRNA gene sequences of rumen ciliates is more reliable for taxonomical classification and diversity assessment than the analysis of partial hypervariable regions only. The objective of this study was to develop new oligonucleotide primers targeting the full-length 18S rRNA genes of rumen ciliates, and to evaluate the effect of different sources of dietary fiber (corn stover or a mixture of alfalfa hay and corn silage) and protein (mixed rapeseed, cottonseed, and/or soybean meals) on rumen ciliate diversity in dairy cows. Primers were designed based on a total of 137 previously reported ciliate 18S rRNA gene sequences. The 3'-terminal sequences of the newly designed primers, P.1747r_2, P.324f, and P.1651r, demonstrated >99% base coverage. Primer pair D (P.324f and P.1747r_2) was selected for the cloning and sequencing of ciliate 18S rRNA genes because it produced a 1423-bp amplicon, and did not amply the sequences of other eukaryotic species, such as yeast. The optimal species-level cutoff value for distinguishing between the operational taxonomic units of different ciliate species was 0.015. The phylogenetic analysis of full-length ciliate 18S rRNA gene sequences showed that distinct ciliate profiles were induced by the different sources of dietary fiber and protein. Dasytricha and Entodinium were the predominant genera in the ruminal fluid of dairy cattle, and Dasytricha was significantly more abundant in cows fed with corn stover than in cows fed with alfalfa hay and corn silage. PMID:26319789

  7. Automated Identification of Medically Important Bacteria by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing Using a Novel Comprehensive Database, 16SpathDB▿

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Teng, Jade L. L.; Yeung, Juilian M. Y.; Tse, Herman; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2011-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of 16S rRNA gene sequencing, interpretation of 16S rRNA gene sequence results is one of the most difficult problems faced by clinical microbiologists and technicians. To overcome the problems we encountered in the existing databases during 16S rRNA gene sequence interpretation, we built a comprehensive database, 16SpathDB (http://147.8.74.24/16SpathDB) based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences of all medically important bacteria listed in the Manual of Clinical Microbiology and evaluated its use for automated identification of these bacteria. Among 91 nonduplicated bacterial isolates collected in our clinical microbiology laboratory, 71 (78%) were reported by 16SpathDB as a single bacterial species having >98.0% nucleotide identity with the query sequence, 19 (20.9%) were reported as more than one bacterial species having >98.0% nucleotide identity with the query sequence, and 1 (1.1%) was reported as no match. For the 71 bacterial isolates reported as a single bacterial species, all results were identical to their true identities as determined by a polyphasic approach. For the 19 bacterial isolates reported as more than one bacterial species, all results contained their true identities as determined by a polyphasic approach and all of them had their true identities as the “best match in 16SpathDB.” For the isolate (Gordonibacter pamelaeae) reported as no match, the bacterium has never been reported to be associated with human disease and was not included in the Manual of Clinical Microbiology. 16SpathDB is an automated, user-friendly, efficient, accurate, and regularly updated database for 16S rRNA gene sequence interpretation in clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:21389154

  8. New Primers Targeting Full-Length Ciliate 18S rRNA Genes and Evaluation of Dietary Effect on Rumen Ciliate Diversity in Dairy Cows.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Shengguo; Zhang, Yangdong; Sun, Peng; Bu, Dengpan; Wang, Jiaqi

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of the full-length 18S rRNA gene sequences of rumen ciliates is more reliable for taxonomical classification and diversity assessment than the analysis of partial hypervariable regions only. The objective of this study was to develop new oligonucleotide primers targeting the full-length 18S rRNA genes of rumen ciliates, and to evaluate the effect of different sources of dietary fiber (corn stover or a mixture of alfalfa hay and corn silage) and protein (mixed rapeseed, cottonseed, and/or soybean meals) on rumen ciliate diversity in dairy cows. Primers were designed based on a total of 137 previously reported ciliate 18S rRNA gene sequences. The 3'-terminal sequences of the newly designed primers, P.1747r_2, P.324f, and P.1651r, demonstrated >99% base coverage. Primer pair D (P.324f and P.1747r_2) was selected for the cloning and sequencing of ciliate 18S rRNA genes because it produced a 1423-bp amplicon, and did not amply the sequences of other eukaryotic species, such as yeast. The optimal species-level cutoff value for distinguishing between the operational taxonomic units of different ciliate species was 0.015. The phylogenetic analysis of full-length ciliate 18S rRNA gene sequences showed that distinct ciliate profiles were induced by the different sources of dietary fiber and protein. Dasytricha and Entodinium were the predominant genera in the ruminal fluid of dairy cattle, and Dasytricha was significantly more abundant in cows fed with corn stover than in cows fed with alfalfa hay and corn silage.

  9. Sequence variation identified in the 18S rRNA gene of Theileria mutans and Theileria velifera from the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Chaisi, Mamohale E; Collins, Nicola E; Potgieter, Fred T; Oosthuizen, Marinda C

    2013-01-16

    The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is a natural reservoir host for both pathogenic and non-pathogenic Theileria species. These often occur naturally as mixed infections in buffalo. Although the benign and mildly pathogenic forms do not have any significant economic importance, their presence could complicate the interpretation of diagnostic test results aimed at the specific diagnosis of the pathogenic Theileria parva in cattle and buffalo in South Africa. The 18S rRNA gene has been used as the target in a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for the detection of T. parva infections. However, the extent of sequence variation within this gene in the non-pathogenic Theileria spp. of the Africa buffalo is not well known. The aim of this study was, therefore, to characterise the full-length 18S rRNA genes of Theileria mutans, Theileria sp. (strain MSD) and T. velifera and to determine the possible influence of any sequence variation on the specific detection of T. parva using the 18S rRNA qPCR. The reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was used to select samples which either tested positive for several different Theileria spp., or which hybridised only with the Babesia/Theileria genus-specific probe and not with any of the Babesia or Theileria species-specific probes. The full-length 18S rRNA genes from 14 samples, originating from 13 buffalo and one bovine from different localities in South Africa, were amplified, cloned and the resulting recombinants sequenced. Variations in the 18S rRNA gene sequences were identified in T. mutans, Theileria sp. (strain MSD) and T. velifera, with the greatest diversity observed amongst the T. mutans variants. This variation possibly explained why the RLB hybridization assay failed to detect T. mutans and T. velifera in some of the analysed samples.

  10. First report on the bacterial diversity in the distal gut of dholes (Cuon alpinus) by using 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Honghai; Liu, Guangshuai; Sha, Weilai

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial community in the distal gut of dholes (Cuon alpinus) based on the analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences. Fecal samples were collected from five healthy unrelated dholes captured from Qilian Mountain in Gansu province of China. The diversity of the fecal bacteria community was investigated by constructing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified 16S rRNA gene clone library. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene was amplified by using universal bacterial primers 27F and 1492R. A total of 275 chimera-free near full length 16S rRNA gene sequences were collected, and 78 non-redundant bacteria phylotypes (operational taxonomical units, OTUs) were identified according to the 97 % sequence similarity. Forty-two OTUs (53.8 %) showed less than 98 % sequence similarity to 16S rRNA gene sequences reported previously. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that dhole bacterial community comprised five different phyla, with the majority of sequences being classified within the phylum Bacteroidetes (64.7 %), followed by Firmicutes (29.8 %), Fusobacteria (4.7 %),Proteobacteria (0.4 %), and Actinobacteria (0.4 %). The only order Bacteroidales in phylum Bacteroidetes was the most abundant bacterial group in the intestinal bacterial community of dholes. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were the two most diverse bacterial phyla with 46.2 and 44.9 % of OTUs contained, respectively. Bacteroidales and Clostridiales were the two most diverse bacterial orders that contained 44.9 and 39.7 % of OTUs, respectively. PMID:26423781

  11. First report on the bacterial diversity in the distal gut of dholes (Cuon alpinus) by using 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Honghai; Liu, Guangshuai; Sha, Weilai

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial community in the distal gut of dholes (Cuon alpinus) based on the analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences. Fecal samples were collected from five healthy unrelated dholes captured from Qilian Mountain in Gansu province of China. The diversity of the fecal bacteria community was investigated by constructing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified 16S rRNA gene clone library. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene was amplified by using universal bacterial primers 27F and 1492R. A total of 275 chimera-free near full length 16S rRNA gene sequences were collected, and 78 non-redundant bacteria phylotypes (operational taxonomical units, OTUs) were identified according to the 97 % sequence similarity. Forty-two OTUs (53.8 %) showed less than 98 % sequence similarity to 16S rRNA gene sequences reported previously. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that dhole bacterial community comprised five different phyla, with the majority of sequences being classified within the phylum Bacteroidetes (64.7 %), followed by Firmicutes (29.8 %), Fusobacteria (4.7 %),Proteobacteria (0.4 %), and Actinobacteria (0.4 %). The only order Bacteroidales in phylum Bacteroidetes was the most abundant bacterial group in the intestinal bacterial community of dholes. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were the two most diverse bacterial phyla with 46.2 and 44.9 % of OTUs contained, respectively. Bacteroidales and Clostridiales were the two most diverse bacterial orders that contained 44.9 and 39.7 % of OTUs, respectively.

  12. Combined Analyses of the ITS Loci and the Corresponding 16S rRNA Genes Reveal High Micro- and Macrodiversity of SAR11 Populations in the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Ngugi, David Kamanda; Stingl, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the SAR11 clade are among the most abundant prokaryotes in the pelagic zone of the ocean. 16S rRNA gene-based analyses indicate that they constitute up to 60% of the bacterioplankton community in the surface waters of the Red Sea. This extremely oligotrophic water body is further characterized by an epipelagic zone, which has a temperature above 24°C throughout the year, and a remarkable uniform temperature (∼22°C) and salinity (∼41 psu) from the mixed layer (∼200 m) to the bottom at over 2000 m depth. Despite these conditions that set it apart from other marine environments, the microbiology of this ecosystem is still vastly understudied. Prompted by the limited phylogenetic resolution of the 16S rRNA gene, we extended our previous study by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of SAR11 in different depths of the Red Sea’s water column together with the respective 16S fragment. The overall diversity captured by the ITS loci was ten times higher than that of the corresponding 16S rRNA genes. Moreover, species estimates based on the ITS showed a highly diverse population of SAR11 in the mixed layer that became diminished in deep isothermal waters, which was in contrast to results of the related 16S rRNA genes. While the 16S rRNA gene-based sequences clustered into three phylogenetic subgroups, the related ITS fragments fell into several phylotypes that showed clear depth-dependent shifts in relative abundances. Blast-based analyses not only documented the observed vertical partitioning and universal co-occurrence of specific phylotypes in five other distinct oceanic provinces, but also highlighted the influence of ecosystem-specific traits (e.g., temperature, nutrient availability, and concentration of dissolved oxygen) on the population dynamics of this ubiquitous marine bacterium. PMID:23185592

  13. Pseudomonas sp. strain CA5 (a selenite-reducing bacterium) 16S rRNA gene complete sequence. National Institute of Health, National Center for Biotechnology Information, GenBank sequence. Accession FJ422810.1.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study used 1321 base pair 16S rRNA gene sequence methods to confirm the phylogenetic position of a soil isolate as a bacterium belonging to the genus Pesudomonas sp. Morphological, biochemical characteristics, and fatty acid profiles are consistent with the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification...

  14. Identification of the gene encoding the 5S ribosomal RNA maturase in Bacillus subtilis: mature 5S rRNA is dispensable for ribosome function.

    PubMed Central

    Condon, C; Brechemier-Baey, D; Beltchev, B; Grunberg-Manago, M; Putzer, H

    2001-01-01

    Over 25 years ago, Pace and coworkers described an activity called RNase M5 in Bacillus subtilis cell extracts responsible for 5S ribosomal RNA maturation (Sogin & Pace, Nature, 1974, 252:598-600). Here we show that RNase M5 is encoded by a gene of previously unknown function that is highly conserved among the low G + C gram-positive bacteria. We propose that the gene be named rnmV. The rnmV gene is nonessential. B. subtilis strains lacking RNase M5 do not make mature 5S rRNA, indicating that this process is not necessary for ribosome function. 5S rRNA precursors can, however, be found in both free and translating ribosomes. In contrast to RNase E, which cleaves the Escherichia coli 5S precursor in a single-stranded region, which is then trimmed to yield mature 5S RNA, RNase M5 cleaves the B. subtilis equivalent in a double-stranded region to yield mature 5S rRNA in one step. For the most part, eubacteria contain one or the other system for 5S rRNA production, with an imperfect division along gram-negative and gram-positive lines. A potential correlation between the presence of RNase E or RNase M5 and the single- or double-stranded nature of the predicted cleavage sites is explored. PMID:11233981

  15. Intragenomic diversity of the V1 regions of 16S rRNA genes in high-alkaline protease-producing Bacillus clausii spp.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Yasushi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Shimamura, Shigeru; Nishi, Shinro; Nogi, Yuichi; Uchimura, Kohsuke; Kobayashi, Tohru; Hitomi, Jun; Ozaki, Katsuya; Kawai, Shuji; Ito, Susumu; Horikoshi, Koki

    2007-07-01

    Alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. strain KSM-K16, which produces high-alkaline M-protease, was characterized phenotypically, biochemically and genetically. This strain was identified as Bacillus clausii based on the results of taxonomic studies, including sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and DNA-DNA hybridization. Seven rRNA operons in the genome were identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA genes revealed two distinct types of variable region V1. Moreover, some cloned 16S rRNA genes in some of the reference strains of B. clausii had a V1 region of yet another type. The B. clausii strains could clearly be divided into at least two subgroups based on the frequencies of the types of cloned V1 sequence. Bacillus sp. strain KSM-K16 was found to be in a different phylogenetic position from other high-alkaline protease-producing strains of B. clausii. PMID:17429572

  16. A standard operating procedure for phylogenetic inference (SOPPI) using (rRNA) marker genes.

    PubMed

    Peplies, Jörg; Kottmann, Renzo; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2008-09-01

    Phylogenetic analysis is currently used worldwide for taxonomic classification and identification of microorganisms. However, despite the countless trees that have been reconstructed and published in recent decades, so far, no user-friendly compilation of recommendations to standardize the data analysis and tree reconstruction process has been published. Consequently, this standard operating procedure for phylogenetic inference (SOPPI) offers a helping hand for working through the process from sampling in the field to phylogenetic tree reconstruction and publication. It is not meant to be authoritative or comprehensive, but should help to make phylogenetic inference and diversity analysis more reliable and comparable between different laboratories. It is mainly focused on using the ribosomal RNA as a universal phylogenetic marker, but the principles and recommendations can be applied to any valid marker gene. Feedback and suggestions from the scientific community are welcome in order to improve these guidelines further. Any updates will be made available on the SILVA webpage at http://www.arb-silva.de/projects/soppi.

  17. 16S rRNA Gene Mutations Associated with Decreased Susceptibility to Tetracycline in Mycoplasma bovis

    PubMed Central

    Amram, E.; Mikula, I.; Schnee, C.; Ayling, R. D.; Nicholas, R. A. J.; Rosales, R. S.; Harrus, S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis isolates with decreased susceptibilities to tetracyclines are increasingly reported worldwide. The acquired molecular mechanisms associated with this phenomenon were investigated in 70 clinical isolates of M. bovis. Sequence analysis of the two 16S rRNA-encoding genes (rrs3 and rrs4 alleles) containing the primary binding pocket for tetracycline (Tet-1 site) was performed on isolates with tetracycline hydrochloride MICs of 0.125 to 16 μg/ml. Mutations at positions A965T, A967T/C (Escherichia coli numbering) of helix 31, U1199C of helix 34, and G1058A/C were identified. Decreased susceptibilities to tetracycline (MICs, ≥2 μg/ml) were associated with mutations present at two (A965 and A967) or three positions (A965, A967, and G1058) of the two rrs alleles. No tet(M), tet(O), or tet(L) determinants were found in the genome of any of the 70 M. bovis isolates. The data presented correlate (P < 0.0001) the mutations identified in the Tet-1 site of clinical isolates of M. bovis with decreased susceptibility to tetracycline. PMID:25403668

  18. Pyrosequencing of plastid 23S rRNA genes reveals diverse and dynamic cyanobacterial and algal populations in two eutrophic lakes.

    PubMed

    Steven, Blaire; McCann, Sage; Ward, Naomi L

    2012-12-01

    Pyrosequencing of plastid 23S rRNA genes was performed to determine the usefulness of this methodology for describing spatial and temporal patterns of algal diversity in two eutrophic lakes. The majority of the sequences were identified as known cyanobacteria or eukaryotic algae (> 70% of sequence reads), indicating this approach can specifically recover algal sequences from complex communities. Furthermore, estimated coverage of the data sets indicated that the majority of the 23S rRNA genetic diversity was recovered in these surveys. Communities from algal mats could be clearly distinguished from algae in the water column, and the communities could be readily differentiated between the two lakes, suggesting that the plastid 23S rRNA sequencing was able to distinguish niche and biogeographic partitioning of algal communities. Within the sequence data sets, the ratio of cyanobacteria to eukaryotic algae fluctuated over the course of sampling, with cyanobacteria 23S rRNA sequences being more abundant in later samples. In addition, the eukaryotic algae communities showed large shifts in composition over the course of sampling. Taken together, these data demonstrate the usefulness of targeted plastid 23S rRNA sequencing for describing the structure and dynamics of complex algal communities.

  19. Characterization of Mycobacterium leprae Genotypes in China--Identification of a New Polymorphism C251T in the 16S rRNA Gene.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Youhua; Wen, Yan; You, Yuangang; Xing, Yan; Li, Huanying; Weng, Xiaoman; Wu, Nan; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Shanshan; Zhang, Wenhong; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy continues to be prevalent in some mountainous regions of China, and genotypes of leprosy strains endemic to the country are not known. Mycobacterium lepromatosis is a new species that was discovered in Mexico in 2008, and it remains unclear whether this species exists in China. Here, we conducted PCR- restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis to classify genotypes of 85 DNA samples collected from patients from 18 different provinces. All 171 DNA samples from skin biopsies of leprosy patients were tested for the presence of Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium lepromatosis by amplifying the 16S rRNA gene using nested PCR, followed by DNA sequencing. The new species M. lepromatosis was not found among the 171 specimens from leprosy patients in 22 provinces in China. However, we found three SNP genotypes among 85 leprosy patients. A mutation at C251T in the 16S rRNA gene was found in 76% of the strains. We also found that the strains that showed the 16S rRNA C251T mutation belonged to SNP type 3, whereas strains without the point mutation belonged to SNP type 1. The SNP type 3 leprosy strains were observed in patients from both the inner and coastal regions of China, but the SNP type 1 strains were focused only in the coastal region. This indicated that the SNP type 3 leprosy strains were more prevalent than the SNP type 1 strains in China. In addition, the 16S rRNA gene sequence mutation at C251T also indicated a difference in the geographical distribution of the strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a new polymorphism in 16S rRNA gene in M. leprae in China. Our findings shed light on the prevalent genotypes and provide insight about leprosy transmission that are important for leprosy control in China.

  20. Extremely acidophilic protists from acid mine drainage host Rickettsiales-lineage endosymbionts that have intervening sequences in their 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Baker, Brett J; Hugenholtz, Philip; Dawson, Scott C; Banfield, Jillian F

    2003-09-01

    During a molecular phylogenetic survey of extremely acidic (pH < 1), metal-rich acid mine drainage habitats in the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain, Calif., we detected 16S rRNA gene sequences of a novel bacterial group belonging to the order Rickettsiales in the Alphaproteobacteria. The closest known relatives of this group (92% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity) are endosymbionts of the protist Acanthamoeba. Oligonucleotide 16S rRNA probes were designed and used to observe members of this group within acidophilic protists. To improve visualization of eukaryotic populations in the acid mine drainage samples, broad-specificity probes for eukaryotes were redesigned and combined to highlight this component of the acid mine drainage community. Approximately 4% of protists in the acid mine drainage samples contained endosymbionts. Measurements of internal pH of the protists showed that their cytosol is close to neutral, indicating that the endosymbionts may be neutrophilic. The endosymbionts had a conserved 273-nucleotide intervening sequence (IVS) in variable region V1 of their 16S rRNA genes. The IVS does not match any sequence in current databases, but the predicted secondary structure forms well-defined stem loops. IVSs are uncommon in rRNA genes and appear to be confined to bacteria living in close association with eukaryotes. Based on the phylogenetic novelty of the endosymbiont sequences and initial culture-independent characterization, we propose the name "Candidatus Captivus acidiprotistae." To our knowledge, this is the first report of an endosymbiotic relationship in an extremely acidic habitat.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of Theileria annulata and identification of 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions sequences variants in apparently healthy buffaloes and cattle in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Kasib; He, Lan; Hussain, Altaf; Azam, Sabita; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Wang, Li-Xia; Zhang, Qing-Li; Hu, Min; Zhou, Yan-Qin; Zhao, Junlong

    2013-01-01

    A molecular epidemiological survey was conducted to determine the prevalence of piroplasms in buffaloes and cattle from Sheikhupura and Okara districts of Punjab, Pakistan using reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay. The genetic diversity within 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions sequences of various obtained Theileria species (spp.) was also investigated. Briefly, 102 blood samples from buffaloes and cattle in the study districts were collected on blood collection cards and brought to the laboratory. DNA was extracted; the V4 hypervariable region of 18S rRNA was amplified and analyzed using RLB. Out of total samples analyzed, 61 (59.8%) were hybridized with Babesia/Theileria (B/T) genus-specific probe. Only one species of piroplasm was detected in buffaloes and cattle in study districts, i.e. Theileria (T.) annulata. Six samples only hybridized with B/T genus-specific and Theileria genus-specific probes but not with any species-specific probe indicating the presence of novel species or variants. The sequences of 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions of these six samples revealed the presence of T. annulata variants as confirmed through sequence identity estimation and phylogenetic analyses. Meanwhile, an unexpected sequence variation was observed within the 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions sequences of T. annulata identified in the present study. This is the first report on the simultaneous detection of species of piroplasms infecting buffaloes and cattle in Pakistan and molecular characterization of T. annulata 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions. The present study may address the new insights into the epidemiology of theileriosis which will help researches in designing control strategies and developing various molecular diagnostic tools at national level.

  2. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing reveals alterations of mouse intestinal microbiota after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Jinu; Park, Soo-Je

    2015-06-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract harbors a highly complex microbial community that comprises hundreds of different types of bacterial cells. The gastrointestinal microbiota plays an important role in the function of the host intestine. Most cancer patients undergoing pelvic irradiation experience side effects such as diarrhea; however, little is currently known about the effects of irradiation on the microorganisms colonizing the mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of gamma irradiation on the compositions of the large and small intestinal microbiotas. The gut microbiotas in control mice and mice receiving irradiation treatment were characterized by high-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Irradiation treatment induced significant alterations in the bacterial compositions of the large and small intestines at the genus level. Unexpectedly, irradiation treatment increased the number of operational taxonomic units in the small intestine but not the large intestine. In particular, irradiation treatment increased the level of the genera Alistipes in the large intestine and increased the level of the genus Corynebacterium in the small intestine. By contrast, compared with that in the corresponding control group, the level of the genera Prevotella was lower in the irradiated large intestine, and the level of the genera Alistipes was lower in the irradiated small intestine. Overall, the data presented here reveal the potential microbiological effects of pelvic irradiation on the gastrointestinal tracts of cancer patients.

  3. Bacterial Community Diversity of Oil-Contaminated Soils Assessed by High Throughput Sequencing of 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Mu; Zi, Xiaoxue; Wang, Qiuyu

    2015-01-01

    Soil bacteria play a major role in ecological and biodegradable function processes in oil-contaminated soils. Here, we assessed the bacterial diversity and changes therein in oil-contaminated soils exposed to different periods of oil pollution using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. No less than 24,953 valid reads and 6246 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from all five studied samples. OTU richness was relatively higher in contaminated soils than clean samples. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria were the dominant phyla among all the soil samples. The heatmap plot depicted the relative percentage of each bacterial family within each sample and clustered five samples into two groups. For the samples, bacteria in the soils varied at different periods of oil exposure. The oil pollution exerted strong selective pressure to propagate many potentially petroleum degrading bacteria. Redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated that organic matter was the highest determinant factor for explaining the variations in community compositions. This suggests that compared to clean soils, oil-polluted soils support more diverse bacterial communities and soil bacterial community shifts were mainly controlled by organic matter and exposure time. These results provide some useful information for bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soil in the future. PMID:26404329

  4. 16S rRNA gene-based detection of tetrachloroethene-dechlorinating Desulfuromonas and Dehalococcoides species

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, F.E.; Sun, Q.; Li, J.; Tiedje, J.M.

    2000-03-01

    Members of the genera Desulfuromonas and Dehalococcoides reductively dechlorinate tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene. Two primer pairs specific to hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA genes of the Dehalococcoides group (comprising Dehalococcoides ethenogenes and Dehalococcoides sp. strain FL2) and the acetate-oxidizing, PCE-dechlorinating Desulfuromonas group (comprising Desulfuromonas sp. strain BB1 and Desulfuromonas chloroethenica) were designed. The detection threshold of a nested PCR approach using universal bacterial primers followed by a second PCR with the Desulfuromonas dechlorinator-targeted primer pair was 1 x 10{sup 3} BB1 cells added per gram (wet weight) of sandy aquifer material. Total community DNA isolated from sediments of three Michigan rivers and six different chloroethene-contaminated aquifer samples was used as template in nested PCR. All river sediment samples yielded positive signals with the BB1- and the Dehalococcoides-targeted primers. One chloroethene-contaminated aquifer tested positive with the Dehalococcoides-targeted primers, and another contaminated aquifer tested positive with the Desulfuromonas dechlorinator-targeted primer pair. Restriction fragment analysis of the amplicons could discriminate strain BB1 from other known Desulfuromonas species. Microcosm studies confirmed the presence of PCE-dechlorinating, acetate-oxidizing Desulfuromonas and hydrogenotrophic Dehalococcoides species in samples yielding positive PCR signals with the specific primers.

  5. Potential applications of next generation DNA sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons in microbial water quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Vierheilig, J; Savio, D; Ley, R E; Mach, R L; Farnleitner, A H; Reischer, G H

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of next generation DNA sequencing (NGS) methods for water quality assessment has so far not been broadly investigated. This study set out to evaluate the potential of an NGS-based approach in a complex catchment with importance for drinking water abstraction. In this multi-compartment investigation, total bacterial communities in water, faeces, soil, and sediment samples were investigated by 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons to assess the capabilities of this NGS method for (i) the development and evaluation of environmental molecular diagnostics, (ii) direct screening of the bulk bacterial communities, and (iii) the detection of faecal pollution in water. Results indicate that NGS methods can highlight potential target populations for diagnostics and will prove useful for the evaluation of existing and the development of novel DNA-based detection methods in the field of water microbiology. The used approach allowed unveiling of dominant bacterial populations but failed to detect populations with low abundances such as faecal indicators in surface waters. In combination with metadata, NGS data will also allow the identification of drivers of bacterial community composition during water treatment and distribution, highlighting the power of this approach for monitoring of bacterial regrowth and contamination in technical systems. PMID:26606090

  6. First microbiota assessments of children's paddling pool waters evaluated using 16S rRNA gene-based metagenome analysis.

    PubMed

    Sawabe, Toko; Suda, Wataru; Ohshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Sawabe, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient chloric sterilization of children's paddling pool waters increases the risk of diarrheal illness. Therefore, we investigated the microbiota changes after children use pools. First, we applied 16S rRNA gene-based metagenome analysis to understand the dynamics of microbiota in pool water, especially with respect to the bio-contamination by potential pathogens. Proteobacteria were major taxa detected in every pool water sample after children spent time in the pool. In more detail, Gammaproteobacteria comprised the dominant class, which was followed by Betaproteobacteria. Five phyla, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Deinococcus-Thermus phyla were minor groups. The pool water microbiota are likely to be a consortium of intestinal and skin microbiota from humans. Interestingly, the ratio of Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria differed according to the age of the children who used the pool, which means the pool water was additionally contaminated by soil microbiota as a result of the children's behavior. Furthermore, potential pathogens, such as Campylobacter spp., Comamonas testosteroni and Burkholderia pseudomallei, were also found. Considering the standard plate counts, the abundances of these human pathogens are unlikely to be a sufficiently infectious dose. We suggest the importance of sanitary measures in paddling pool waters to reduce bio-contamination from both humans and the environment. PMID:26671497

  7. Bacterial diversity assessment of pristine mangrove microbial community from Dhulibhashani, Sundarbans using 16S rRNA gene tag sequencing.

    PubMed

    Basak, Pijush; Pramanik, Arnab; Sengupta, Sohan; Nag, Sudip; Bhattacharyya, Anish; Roy, Debojyoti; Pattanayak, Rudradip; Ghosh, Abhrajyoti; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Bhattacharyya, Maitree

    2016-03-01

    The global knowledge of microbial diversity and function in Sundarbans ecosystem is still scarce, despite global advancement in understanding the microbial diversity. In the present study, we have analyzed the diversity and distribution of bacteria in the tropical mangrove sediments of Sundarbans using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Metagenome is comprised of 1,53,926 sequences with 108.8 Mbp data and with 55 ± 2% G + C content. Metagenome sequence data are available at NCBI under the Bioproject database with accession no. PRJNA245459. Bacterial community metagenome sequences were analyzed by MG-RAST software representing the presence of 56,547 species belonging to 44 different phyla. The taxonomic analysis revealed the dominance of phyla Proteobacteria within our dataset. Further taxonomic analysis revealed abundance of Bacteroidetes, Acidobactreia, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Nitrospirae, Cyanobacteria, Planctomycetes and Fusobacteria group as the predominant bacterial assemblages in this largely pristine mangrove habitat. The distribution of different community datasets obtained from four sediment samples originated from one sampling station at two different depths providing better understanding of the sediment bacterial diversity and its relationship to the ecosystem dynamics of this pristine mangrove sediment of Dhulibhashani in, Sundarbans.

  8. First microbiota assessments of children's paddling pool waters evaluated using 16S rRNA gene-based metagenome analysis.

    PubMed

    Sawabe, Toko; Suda, Wataru; Ohshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Sawabe, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient chloric sterilization of children's paddling pool waters increases the risk of diarrheal illness. Therefore, we investigated the microbiota changes after children use pools. First, we applied 16S rRNA gene-based metagenome analysis to understand the dynamics of microbiota in pool water, especially with respect to the bio-contamination by potential pathogens. Proteobacteria were major taxa detected in every pool water sample after children spent time in the pool. In more detail, Gammaproteobacteria comprised the dominant class, which was followed by Betaproteobacteria. Five phyla, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Deinococcus-Thermus phyla were minor groups. The pool water microbiota are likely to be a consortium of intestinal and skin microbiota from humans. Interestingly, the ratio of Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria differed according to the age of the children who used the pool, which means the pool water was additionally contaminated by soil microbiota as a result of the children's behavior. Furthermore, potential pathogens, such as Campylobacter spp., Comamonas testosteroni and Burkholderia pseudomallei, were also found. Considering the standard plate counts, the abundances of these human pathogens are unlikely to be a sufficiently infectious dose. We suggest the importance of sanitary measures in paddling pool waters to reduce bio-contamination from both humans and the environment.

  9. Bacterial community composition of anthropogenic biochar and Amazonian anthrosols assessed by 16S rRNA gene 454 pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Taketani, Rodrigo Gouvêa; Lima, Amanda Barbosa; da Conceição Jesus, Ederson; Teixeira, Wenceslau Geraldes; Tiedje, James M; Tsai, Siu Mui

    2013-08-01

    Biochar (BC) is a common minor constituent of soils and is usually derived from the burning of wood materials. In the case of Amazonian dark earth (ADE) soils, the increased amount of this material is believed to be due to anthropogenic action by ancient indigenous populations. In this study, we use 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to assess the bacterial diversity observed in the BC found in ADEs as well as in the dark earth itself and the adjacent Acrisol. Samples were taken from two sites, one cultivated with manioc and one with secondary forest cover. Analyses revealed that the community structure found in each sample had unique features. At a coarse phylogenetic resolution, the most abundant phyla in all sequence libraries were Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Proteobacteria that were present in similar relative abundance across all samples. However, the class composition varied between them highlighting the difference between the Acrisol and the remaining samples. This result was also corroborated by the comparison of the OTU composition (at 97 % identity). Also, soil coverage has shown an effect over the community structure observed in all samples. This pattern was found to be significant through unweighted UniFrac as well as P tests. These results indicate that, although the ADEs are found in patches within the Acrisols, the contrasting characteristics found between them led to the development of significantly different communities. PMID:23743632

  10. Bacterial Community Diversity of Oil-Contaminated Soils Assessed by High Throughput Sequencing of 16S rRNA Genes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mu; Zi, Xiaoxue; Wang, Qiuyu

    2015-09-24

    Soil bacteria play a major role in ecological and biodegradable function processes in oil-contaminated soils. Here, we assessed the bacterial diversity and changes therein in oil-contaminated soils exposed to different periods of oil pollution using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. No less than 24,953 valid reads and 6246 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from all five studied samples. OTU richness was relatively higher in contaminated soils than clean samples. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria were the dominant phyla among all the soil samples. The heatmap plot depicted the relative percentage of each bacterial family within each sample and clustered five samples into two groups. For the samples, bacteria in the soils varied at different periods of oil exposure. The oil pollution exerted strong selective pressure to propagate many potentially petroleum degrading bacteria. Redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated that organic matter was the highest determinant factor for explaining the variations in community compositions. This suggests that compared to clean soils, oil-polluted soils support more diverse bacterial communities and soil bacterial community shifts were mainly controlled by organic matter and exposure time. These results provide some useful information for bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soil in the future.

  11. Potential applications of next generation DNA sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons in microbial water quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Vierheilig, J; Savio, D; Ley, R E; Mach, R L; Farnleitner, A H; Reischer, G H

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of next generation DNA sequencing (NGS) methods for water quality assessment has so far not been broadly investigated. This study set out to evaluate the potential of an NGS-based approach in a complex catchment with importance for drinking water abstraction. In this multi-compartment investigation, total bacterial communities in water, faeces, soil, and sediment samples were investigated by 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons to assess the capabilities of this NGS method for (i) the development and evaluation of environmental molecular diagnostics, (ii) direct screening of the bulk bacterial communities, and (iii) the detection of faecal pollution in water. Results indicate that NGS methods can highlight potential target populations for diagnostics and will prove useful for the evaluation of existing and the development of novel DNA-based detection methods in the field of water microbiology. The used approach allowed unveiling of dominant bacterial populations but failed to detect populations with low abundances such as faecal indicators in surface waters. In combination with metadata, NGS data will also allow the identification of drivers of bacterial community composition during water treatment and distribution, highlighting the power of this approach for monitoring of bacterial regrowth and contamination in technical systems.

  12. Characterization of the Fecal Microbial Communities of Duroc Pigs Using 16S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Pajarillo, Edward Alain B; Chae, Jong Pyo; Balolong, Marilen P; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Seo, Kang-Seok; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2015-04-01

    This study characterized the fecal bacterial community structure and inter-individual variation in 30-week-old Duroc pigs, which are known for their excellent meat quality. Pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA genes generated 108,254 valid reads and 508 operational taxonomic units at a 95% identity cut-off (genus level). Bacterial diversity and species richness as measured by the Shannon diversity index were significantly greater than those reported previously using denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis; thus, this study provides substantial information related to both known bacteria and the untapped portion of unclassified bacteria in the population. The bacterial composition of Duroc pig fecal samples was investigated at the phylum, class, family, and genus levels. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes predominated at the phylum level, while Clostridia and Bacteroidia were most abundant at the class level. This study also detected prominent inter-individual variation starting at the family level. Among the core microbiome, which was observed at the genus level, Prevotella was consistently dominant, as well as a bacterial phylotype related to Oscillibacter valericigenes, a valerate producer. This study found high bacterial diversity and compositional variation among individuals of the same breed line, as well as high abundance of unclassified bacterial phylotypes that may have important functions in the growth performance of Duroc pigs.

  13. Bacterial community variations in an alfalfa-rice rotation system revealed by 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Ana R; Manaia, Célia M; Nunes, Olga C

    2014-03-01

    Crop rotation is a practice harmonized with the sustainable rice production. Nevertheless, the implications of this empirical practice are not well characterized, mainly in relation to the bacterial community composition and structure. In this study, the bacterial communities of two adjacent paddy fields in the 3rd and 4th year of the crop rotation cycle and of a nonseeded subplot were characterized before rice seeding and after harvesting, using 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Although the phyla Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes predominated in all the samples, there were variations in relative abundance of these groups. Samples from the 3rd and 4th years of the crop rotation differed on the higher abundance of groups of presumable aerobic bacteria and of presumable anaerobic and acidobacterial groups, respectively. Members of the phylum Nitrospira were more abundant after rice harvest than in the previously sampled period. Rice cropping was positively correlated with the abundance of members of the orders Acidobacteriales and 'Solibacterales' and negatively with lineages such as Chloroflexi 'Ellin6529'. Studies like this contribute to understand variations occurring in the microbial communities in soils under sustainable rice production, based on real-world data.

  14. Characterization and evolution of cell division and cell wall synthesis genes in the bacterial phyla Verrucomicrobia, Lentisphaerae, Chlamydiae, and Planctomycetes and phylogenetic comparison with rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Pilhofer, Martin; Rappl, Kristina; Eckl, Christina; Bauer, Andreas Peter; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Schleifer, Karl-Heinz; Petroni, Giulio

    2008-05-01

    In the past, studies on the relationships of the bacterial phyla Planctomycetes, Chlamydiae, Lentisphaerae, and Verrucomicrobia using different phylogenetic markers have been controversial. Investigations based on 16S rRNA sequence analyses suggested a relationship of the four phyla, showing the branching order Planctomycetes, Chlamydiae, Verrucomicrobia/Lentisphaerae. Phylogenetic analyses of 23S rRNA genes in this study also support a monophyletic grouping and their branching order--this grouping is significant for understanding cell division, since the major bacterial cell division protein FtsZ is absent from members of two of the phyla Chlamydiae and Planctomycetes. In Verrucomicrobia, knowledge about cell division is mainly restricted to the recent report of ftsZ in the closely related genera Prosthecobacter and Verrucomicrobium. In this study, genes of the conserved division and cell wall (dcw) cluster (ddl, ftsQ, ftsA, and ftsZ) were characterized in all verrucomicrobial subdivisions (1 to 4) with cultivable representatives (1 to 4). Sequence analyses and transcriptional analyses in Verrucomicrobia and genome data analyses in Lentisphaerae suggested that cell division is based on FtsZ in all verrucomicrobial subdivisions and possibly also in the sister phylum Lentisphaerae. Comprehensive sequence analyses of available genome data for representatives of Verrucomicrobia, Lentisphaerae, Chlamydiae, and Planctomycetes strongly indicate that their last common ancestor possessed a conserved, ancestral type of dcw gene cluster and an FtsZ-based cell division mechanism. This implies that Planctomycetes and Chlamydiae may have shifted independently to a non-FtsZ-based cell division mechanism after their separate branchings from their last common ancestor with Verrucomicrobia.

  15. Guidelines for interpretation of 16S rRNA gene sequence-based results for identification of medically important aerobic Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Teng, Jade L L; Wu, Jeff K L; Leung, Fion P S; Tse, Herman; Fung, Ami M Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2009-08-01

    This study is believed to be the first to provide guidelines for facilitating interpretation of results based on full and 527 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing and MicroSeq databases used for identifying medically important aerobic Gram-positive bacteria. Overall, full and 527 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing can identify 24 and 40 % of medically important Gram-positive cocci (GPC), and 21 and 34 % of medically important Gram-positive rods (GPR) confidently to the species level, whereas the full-MicroSeq and 500-MicroSeq databases can identify 15 and 34 % of medically important GPC and 14 and 25 % of medically important GPR confidently to the species level. Among staphylococci, streptococci, enterococci, mycobacteria, corynebacteria, nocardia and members of Bacillus and related taxa (Paenibacillus, Brevibacillus, Geobacillus and Virgibacillus), the methods and databases are least useful for identification of staphylococci and nocardia. Only 0-2 and 2-13 % of staphylococci, and 0 and 0-10 % of nocardia, can be confidently and doubtfully identified, respectively. However, these methods and databases are most useful for identification of Bacillus and related taxa, with 36-56 and 11-14 % of Bacillus and related taxa confidently and doubtfully identified, respectively. A total of 15 medically important GPC and 18 medically important GPR that should be confidently identified by full 16S rRNA gene sequencing are not included in the full-MicroSeq database. A total of 9 medically important GPC and 21 medically important GPR that should be confidently identified by 527 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing are not included in the 500-MicroSeq database. 16S rRNA gene sequence results of Gram-positive bacteria should be interpreted with basic phenotypic tests results. Additional biochemical tests or sequencing of additional gene loci are often required for definitive identification. To improve the usefulness of the MicroSeq databases, bacterial species that can be confidently identified by 16S rRNA

  16. Phylogenetic relationships among Linguatula serrata isolates from Iran based on 18S rRNA and mitochondrial cox1 gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed Ali; Tavassoli, Mousa; Peters, Andrew; Shamsi, Shokoofeh; Hajipour, Naser

    2016-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among seven Linguatula serrata (L. serrata) isolates collected from cattle, goats, sheep, dogs and camels in different geographical locations of Iran were investigated using partial 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene sequences. The nucleotide sequences were analysed in order to determine the phylogenetic relationships between the isolates. Higher sequence diversity and intraspecies variation was observed in the cox1 gene compared to 18S rRNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the cox1 gene placed all L. serrata isolates in a sister clade to L. arctica. The Mantel regression analysis revealed no association between genetic variations and host species or geographical location, perhaps due to the small sample size. However, genetic variations between L. serrata isolates in Iran and those isolated in other parts of the world may exist and could reveal possible evolutionary relationships.

  17. Two genetic clusters in swine hemoplasmas revealed by analyses of the 16S rRNA and RNase P RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yusaku; Fujihara, Masatoshi; Obara, Hisato; Nagai, Kazuya; Harasawa, Ryô

    2011-12-01

    Only two hemoplasma species, Eperythrozoon parvum and Mycoplasma suis, have been recognized in pigs. Here we demonstrate the genetic variations among six hemoplasma strains detected from pigs, by analyzing the 16S rRNA and RNase P RNA (rnpB) genes, and propose a novel hemoplasma taxon that has not been described previously. Phylogenetic trees based on the nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that these six hemoplasmas were divided into two clusters representing M. suis and a novel taxon. We further examined the primary and secondary structures of the nucleotide sequences of the rnpB gene of the novel taxon, and found it distinct from that of M. suis. In conclusion, we unveiled a genetic cluster distinct from M. suis, suggesting a new swine hemoplasma species or E. parvum. Our findings also suggest that this novel cluster should be included in the genus Mycoplasma.

  18. Phylogenetic relationships among Linguatula serrata isolates from Iran based on 18S rRNA and mitochondrial cox1 gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed Ali; Tavassoli, Mousa; Peters, Andrew; Shamsi, Shokoofeh; Hajipour, Naser

    2016-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among seven Linguatula serrata (L. serrata) isolates collected from cattle, goats, sheep, dogs and camels in different geographical locations of Iran were investigated using partial 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene sequences. The nucleotide sequences were analysed in order to determine the phylogenetic relationships between the isolates. Higher sequence diversity and intraspecies variation was observed in the cox1 gene compared to 18S rRNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the cox1 gene placed all L. serrata isolates in a sister clade to L. arctica. The Mantel regression analysis revealed no association between genetic variations and host species or geographical location, perhaps due to the small sample size. However, genetic variations between L. serrata isolates in Iran and those isolated in other parts of the world may exist and could reveal possible evolutionary relationships. PMID:27149706

  19. Pyrosequencing 16S rRNA genes of bacteria associated with wild tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Minard, Guillaume; Tran, Florence-Hélène; Dubost, Audrey; Tran-Van, Van; Mavingui, Patrick; Moro, Claire Valiente

    2014-01-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito Aedes (Stegomya) albopictus is an invasive species that has spread across the world in the last two decades, showing a great capacity to adapt to contrasting climates and environments. While demonstrated in many insects, the contribution of bacterial symbionts in Aedes ecology is a challenging aspect that needs to be investigated. Also some bacterial species have already been identified in Ae. albopictus using classical methods, but a more accurate survey of mosquito-associated bacterial diversity is needed to decipher the potential biological functions of bacterial symbionts in mediating or constraining insect adaptation. We surveyed the bacteria associated with field populations of Ae. albopictus from Madagascar by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Different aspects of amplicon preparation and sequencing depth were tested to optimize the breadth of bacterial diversity identified. The results revealed that all mosquitoes collected from different sites have a bacterial microbiota dominated by a single taxon, Wolbachia pipientis, which accounted for about 99% of all 92,615 sequences obtained. As Ae. albopictus is known to harbor two Wolbachia strains (wAlbA and wAlbB), a quantitative PCR was used to estimate the relative densities, (i.e., the bacteria-to-host gene ratios) of each strains in individual mosquitoes. Relative densities were between 6.25 × 10(0.01) and 5.47 × 10(0.1) for wAlbA and between 2.03 × 10(0.1) and 1.4 × 10(1) for wAlbB. Apart from Wolbachia, a total of 31 bacterial taxa were identified at the genus level using different method variations. Diversity index values were low and probably underestimated the true diversity due to the high abundance of Wolbachia sequences vastly outnumbering sequences from other taxa. Further studies should implement alternative strategies to specifically discard from analysis any sequences from Wolbachia, the dominant endosymbiotic bacterium in Ae. albopictus from this area.

  20. Characterization of Hafnia alvei by biochemical tests, random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR, and partial sequencing of 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ridell, J; Siitonen, A; Paulin, L; Lindroos, O; Korkeala, H; Albert, M J

    1995-01-01

    Hafnia alvei strains which possess the attachment-effacement gene (eaeA) may have clinical importance as new diarrhea-causing pathogens and should therefore be differentiated from other H. alvei strains. We characterized diarrheal H. alvei strains, which were positive in the PCR test for the eaeA gene, using biochemical tests not routinely used for identification of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, and compared them with eaeA-negative strains isolated from different clinical and nonclinical sources to find characteristics useful for identification. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR and partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene were utilized to study the genetic diversity of the isolates. The eaeA-positive strains were found to have many characteristic biochemical properties. Negative reactions in the 2-ketogluconate and histidine assimilation tests and a positive reaction in the 3-hydroxybenzoate assimilation test may be useful in routine diagnostics. Nearly identical RAPD-PCR profiles and identical 353-bp fragments of the 16S rRNA genes indicated little genetic diversity among the eaeA-positive strains. The low level of homology (92%) in the partial 16S rRNA genes of eaeA-positive and -negative H. alvei strains raises questions about the taxonomic positioning of eaeA-positive H. alvei. PMID:7494030

  1. Comparative analyses of phenotypic methods and 16S rRNA, khe, rpoB genes sequencing for identification of clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    He, Yanxia; Guo, Xianguang; Xiang, Shifei; Li, Jiao; Li, Xiaoqin; Xiang, Hui; He, Jinlei; Chen, Dali; Chen, Jianping

    2016-07-01

    The present work aimed to evaluate 16S rRNA, khe and rpoB gene sequencing for the identification of Klebsiella pneumoniae in comparison with phenotypic methods. Fifteen clinical isolates were examined, which were initially identified as K. pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae using the automated VITEK 32 system in two hospitals in Enshi City, China. Their identity was further supported by conventional phenotypic methods on the basis of morphological and biochemical characteristics. Using Bayesian phylogenetic analyses and haplotypes network reconstruction, 13 isolates were identified as K. pneumoniae, whereas the other two isolates (K19, K24) were classified as Shigella sp. and Enterobacter sp., respectively. Of the three genes, 16S rRNA and khe gene could discriminate the clinical isolates at the genus level, whereas rpoB could discriminate Klebsiella at the species and even subspecies level. Overall, the gene tree based on rpoB is more compatible with the currently accepted classification of Klebsiella than those based on 16S rRNA and khe genes, showing that rpoB can be a powerful tool for identification of K. pneumoniae isolates. Above all, our study challenges the utility of khe as a species-specific marker for identification of K. pneumoniae.

  2. Identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from ovine milk samples by PCR-RFLP of 16S rRNA and gap genes.

    PubMed

    Onni, T; Sanna, G; Cubeddu, G P; Marogna, G; Lollai, S; Leori, G; Tola, S

    2010-08-26

    The identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) causing ovine infections remains problematic, although these bacteria are considered the main etiologic agents of subclinical mastitis in sheep and goats. In this study, 226 CNS isolates were collected from 2201 milking sarda sheep belonging to 15 flocks with high somatic cell count scores. All isolates were subjected to identification with the API Staph ID test, and then to the amplification of staphylococcal 16S rRNA and gap genes by PCR assays. The gap gene was subjected to restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis with the restriction endonuclease AluI, whereas the 16S rRNA gene was subjected to ribosomal fingerprinting with the restriction endonucleases RsaI, PstI and AluI. When PCR-RFLP patterns of CNS isolates were different from those of their reference strains, gap gene amplicons were sequenced for definitive identification. The API Staph ID test, in alternative to the genotypic identification method, produced considerably different results in terms of species identified within each group. Using the PCR-RFLP assay, most of the isolates clustered together with the Staphylococcus epidermidis type strain (131, corresponding to 57.9%), followed by S. caprae (34, corresponding to 15%) and S. chromogenes (30, corresponding to 13.2%). In conclusion, the PCR-RFLP assay of 16S rRNA and gap genes is a more reliable and reproducible method than the API Staph ID test for the identification of CNS causing sheep mastitis. PMID:20167442

  3. Characterization of the Two Intra-Individual Sequence Variants in the 18S rRNA Gene in the Plant Parasitic Nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis

    PubMed Central

    Nyaku, Seloame T.; Sripathi, Venkateswara R.; Kantety, Ramesh V.; Gu, Yong Q.; Lawrence, Kathy; Sharma, Govind C.

    2013-01-01

    The 18S rRNA gene is fundamental to cellular and organismal protein synthesis and because of its stable persistence through generations it is also used in phylogenetic analysis among taxa. Sequence variation in this gene within a single species is rare, but it has been observed in few metazoan organisms. More frequently it has mostly been reported in the non-transcribed spacer region. Here, we have identified two sequence variants within the near full coding region of 18S rRNA gene from a single reniform nematode (RN) Rotylenchulus reniformis labeled as reniform nematode variant 1 (RN_VAR1) and variant 2 (RN_VAR2). All sequences from three of the four isolates had both RN variants in their sequences; however, isolate 13B had only RN variant 2 sequence. Specific variable base sites (96 or 5.5%) were found within the 18S rRNA gene that can clearly distinguish the two 18S rDNA variants of RN, in 11 (25.0%) and 33 (75.0%) of the 44 RN clones, for RN_VAR1 and RN_VAR2, respectively. Neighbor-joining trees show that the RN_VAR1 is very similar to the previously existing R. reniformis sequence in GenBank, while the RN_VAR2 sequence is more divergent. This is the first report of the identification of two major variants of the 18S rRNA gene in the same single RN, and documents the specific base variation between the two variants, and hypothesizes on simultaneous co-existence of these two variants for this gene. PMID:23593343

  4. Diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase genes in the rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria isolated from PAH-contaminated sites

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Anping; Liu, Juan; Ling, Wanting; Chen, Zeyou; Gao, Yanzheng

    2015-01-01

    This is the first investigation of the diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase (PHE) genes in endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria of plants at sites contaminated with different levels of PAHs. Ten PAHs at concentrations from 34.22 to 55.29 and 45.79 to 97.81 mg·kg−1 were measured in rhizosphere soils of Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L., respectively. The diversity of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere soils or plants changed with varying PAH pollution levels, as shown based on PCR-DGGE data. Generally, higher Shannon-Weiner indexes were found in mild or moderate contaminated areas. A total of 82 different bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to five phyla; namely, Acfinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanophyta, and Bacteroidetes, were obtained from rhizosphere soils. For the 57 identified PHE gene sequences, 18 were excised from rhizosphere bacteria and 39 from endophytic bacteria. The copy numbers of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria varied from 3.83 × 103 to 2.28 × 106 and 4.17 × 102 to 1.99 × 105, respectively. The copy numbers of PHE genes in rhizosphere bacteria were significantly higher than in endophytic bacteria. Results increase our understanding of the diversity of rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria from plants grown in PAH-contaminated sites. PMID:26184609

  5. Characterization of the two intra-individual sequence variants in the 18S rRNA gene in the plant parasitic nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis.

    PubMed

    Nyaku, Seloame T; Sripathi, Venkateswara R; Kantety, Ramesh V; Gu, Yong Q; Lawrence, Kathy; Sharma, Govind C

    2013-01-01

    The 18S rRNA gene is fundamental to cellular and organismal protein synthesis and because of its stable persistence through generations it is also used in phylogenetic analysis among taxa. Sequence variation in this gene within a single species is rare, but it has been observed in few metazoan organisms. More frequently it has mostly been reported in the non-transcribed spacer region. Here, we have identified two sequence variants within the near full coding region of 18S rRNA gene from a single reniform nematode (RN) Rotylenchulus reniformis labeled as reniform nematode variant 1 (RN_VAR1) and variant 2 (RN_VAR2). All sequences from three of the four isolates had both RN variants in their sequences; however, isolate 13B had only RN variant 2 sequence. Specific variable base sites (96 or 5.5%) were found within the 18S rRNA gene that can clearly distinguish the two 18S rDNA variants of RN, in 11 (25.0%) and 33 (75.0%) of the 44 RN clones, for RN_VAR1 and RN_VAR2, respectively. Neighbor-joining trees show that the RN_VAR1 is very similar to the previously existing R. reniformis sequence in GenBank, while the RN_VAR2 sequence is more divergent. This is the first report of the identification of two major variants of the 18S rRNA gene in the same single RN, and documents the specific base variation between the two variants, and hypothesizes on simultaneous co-existence of these two variants for this gene.

  6. Diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase genes in the rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria isolated from PAH-contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Peng, Anping; Liu, Juan; Ling, Wanting; Chen, Zeyou; Gao, Yanzheng

    2015-07-17

    This is the first investigation of the diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase (PHE) genes in endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria of plants at sites contaminated with different levels of PAHs. Ten PAHs at concentrations from 34.22 to 55.29 and 45.79 to 97.81 mg·kg(-1) were measured in rhizosphere soils of Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L., respectively. The diversity of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere soils or plants changed with varying PAH pollution levels, as shown based on PCR-DGGE data. Generally, higher Shannon-Weiner indexes were found in mild or moderate contaminated areas. A total of 82 different bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to five phyla; namely, Acfinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanophyta, and Bacteroidetes, were obtained from rhizosphere soils. For the 57 identified PHE gene sequences, 18 were excised from rhizosphere bacteria and 39 from endophytic bacteria. The copy numbers of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria varied from 3.83 × 10(3) to 2.28 × 10(6) and 4.17 × 10(2) to 1.99 × 10(5), respectively. The copy numbers of PHE genes in rhizosphere bacteria were significantly higher than in endophytic bacteria. Results increase our understanding of the diversity of rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria from plants grown in PAH-contaminated sites.

  7. Identification of Bacillus Probiotics Isolated from Soil Rhizosphere Using 16S rRNA, recA, rpoB Gene Sequencing and RAPD-PCR.

    PubMed

    Mohkam, Milad; Nezafat, Navid; Berenjian, Aydin; Mobasher, Mohammad Ali; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-03-01

    Some Bacillus species, especially Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus groups, have highly similar 16S rRNA gene sequences, which are hard to identify based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis. To conquer this drawback, rpoB, recA sequence analysis along with randomly amplified polymorphic (RAPD) fingerprinting was examined as an alternative method for differentiating Bacillus species. The 16S rRNA, rpoB and recA genes were amplified via a polymerase chain reaction using their specific primers. The resulted PCR amplicons were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis was employed by MEGA 6 software. Identification based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing was underpinned by rpoB and recA gene sequencing as well as RAPD-PCR technique. Subsequently, concatenation and phylogenetic analysis showed that extent of diversity and similarity were better obtained by rpoB and recA primers, which are also reinforced by RAPD-PCR methods. However, in one case, these approaches failed to identify one isolate, which in combination with the phenotypical method offsets this issue. Overall, RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA along with concatenated genes sequence analysis discriminated closely related Bacillus species, which highlights the significance of the multigenic method in more precisely distinguishing Bacillus strains. This research emphasizes the benefit of RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA sequence analysis superior to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for suitable and effective identification of Bacillus species as recommended for probiotic products.

  8. Identification of Bacillus Probiotics Isolated from Soil Rhizosphere Using 16S rRNA, recA, rpoB Gene Sequencing and RAPD-PCR.

    PubMed

    Mohkam, Milad; Nezafat, Navid; Berenjian, Aydin; Mobasher, Mohammad Ali; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-03-01

    Some Bacillus species, especially Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus groups, have highly similar 16S rRNA gene sequences, which are hard to identify based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis. To conquer this drawback, rpoB, recA sequence analysis along with randomly amplified polymorphic (RAPD) fingerprinting was examined as an alternative method for differentiating Bacillus species. The 16S rRNA, rpoB and recA genes were amplified via a polymerase chain reaction using their specific primers. The resulted PCR amplicons were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis was employed by MEGA 6 software. Identification based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing was underpinned by rpoB and recA gene sequencing as well as RAPD-PCR technique. Subsequently, concatenation and phylogenetic analysis showed that extent of diversity and similarity were better obtained by rpoB and recA primers, which are also reinforced by RAPD-PCR methods. However, in one case, these approaches failed to identify one isolate, which in combination with the phenotypical method offsets this issue. Overall, RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA along with concatenated genes sequence analysis discriminated closely related Bacillus species, which highlights the significance of the multigenic method in more precisely distinguishing Bacillus strains. This research emphasizes the benefit of RAPD fingerprinting, rpoB and recA sequence analysis superior to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis for suitable and effective identification of Bacillus species as recommended for probiotic products. PMID:26898909

  9. Contrasting evolutionary patterns of 28S and ITS rRNA genes reveal high intragenomic variation in Cephalenchus (Nematoda): Implications for species delimitation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Tiago José; Baldwin, James Gordon

    2016-05-01

    Concerted evolution is often assumed to be the evolutionary force driving multi-family genes, including those from ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeat, to complete homogenization within a species, although cases of non-concerted evolution have been also documented. In this study, sequence variation of 28S and ITS ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes in the genus Cephalenchus is assessed at three different levels, intragenomic, intraspecific, and interspecific. The findings suggest that not all Cephalenchus species undergo concerted evolution. High levels of intraspecific polymorphism, mostly due to intragenomic variation, are found in Cephalenchus sp1 (BRA-01). Secondary structure analyses of both rRNA genes and across different species show a similar substitution pattern, including mostly compensatory (CBC) and semi-compensatory (SBC) base changes, thus suggesting the functionality of these rRNA copies despite the variation found in some species. This view is also supported by low sequence variation in the 5.8S gene in relation to the flanking ITS-1 and ITS-2 as well as by the existence of conserved motifs in the former gene. It is suggested that potential cross-fertilization in some Cephalenchus species, based on inspection of female reproductive system, might contribute to both intragenomic and intraspecific polymorphism of their rRNA genes. These results reinforce the potential implications of intragenomic and intraspecific genetic diversity on species delimitation, especially in biodiversity studies based solely on metagenetic approaches. Knowledge of sequence variation will be crucial for accurate species diversity estimation using molecular methods.

  10. Diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase genes in the rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria isolated from PAH-contaminated sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Anping; Liu, Juan; Ling, Wanting; Chen, Zeyou; Gao, Yanzheng

    2015-07-01

    This is the first investigation of the diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase (PHE) genes in endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria of plants at sites contaminated with different levels of PAHs. Ten PAHs at concentrations from 34.22 to 55.29 and 45.79 to 97.81 mg·kg-1 were measured in rhizosphere soils of Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L., respectively. The diversity of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere soils or plants changed with varying PAH pollution levels, as shown based on PCR-DGGE data. Generally, higher Shannon-Weiner indexes were found in mild or moderate contaminated areas. A total of 82 different bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to five phyla; namely, Acfinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanophyta, and Bacteroidetes, were obtained from rhizosphere soils. For the 57 identified PHE gene sequences, 18 were excised from rhizosphere bacteria and 39 from endophytic bacteria. The copy numbers of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria varied from 3.83 × 103 to 2.28 × 106 and 4.17 × 102 to 1.99 × 105, respectively. The copy numbers of PHE genes in rhizosphere bacteria were significantly higher than in endophytic bacteria. Results increase our understanding of the diversity of rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria from plants grown in PAH-contaminated sites.

  11. Differentiation of non-pylori Helicobacter species based on PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the 23S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Yadegar, Abbas; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Lawson, Andy J; Mirzaei, Tabassom; Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, Ehsan; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2014-06-01

    Phenotypic identification of non-pylori Helicobacter species has always been problematic and time-consuming in comparison with many other bacteria. We developed a rapid two-step identification assay based on PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of the 23S rRNA gene for differentiating between non-pylori Helicobacter species. A new genus-specific primer pair based on all available complete and partial 23S rRNA sequences of Helicobacter species was designed. In silico restriction analysis of variable regions of the 23S rRNA gene suggested SmaI and HindIII endonucleases would provide a good level of differentiation. Analysis of the obtained 23S rRNA RFLP patterns divided all Helicobacter study strains into three species groups (groups A-C) and 12 unique restriction patterns. Wolinella succinogenes also gave a unique pattern. Our proposed PCR-RFLP method was found to be as a valuable tool for routine identification of non-pylori Helicobacter species from human or animal samples.

  12. UV light-induced DNA lesions cause dissociation of yeast RNA polymerases-I and establishment of a specialized chromatin structure at rRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Maxime; Charton, Romain; Wittner, Manuel; Levasseur, Geneviève; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Conconi, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of UV light-induced DNA lesions results from their interference with transcription and replication. DNA lesions arrest elongating RNA polymerases, an event that triggers transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair. Since arrested RNA polymerases reduce the accessibility of repair factors to DNA lesions, they might be displaced. The fate of arrested RNA polymerases-II at DNA lesions has been extensively studied, yielding partially contradictory results. Considerably less is known about RNA polymerases-I that transcribe nucleosomes-depleted rRNA genes at very high rate. To investigate the fate of arrested RNA polymerases-I at DNA lesions, chromatin-immunoprecipitation, electron microscopy, transcription run-on, psoralen-cross-linking and chromatin-endogenous cleavage were employed. We found that RNA polymerases-I density increased at the 5′-end of the gene, likely due to continued transcription initiation followed by elongation and pausing/release at the first DNA lesion. Most RNA polymerases-I dissociated downstream of the first DNA lesion, concomitant with chromatin closing that resulted from deposition of nucleosomes. Although nucleosomes were deposited, the high mobility group-box Hmo1 (component of actively transcribed rRNA genes) remained associated. After repair of DNA lesions, Hmo1 containing chromatin might help to restore transcription elongation and reopening of rRNA genes chromatin. PMID:24097442

  13. Evaluation of the 23S rRNA gene as target for qPCR based quantification of Frankia in soils.

    PubMed

    Samant, Suvidha; Amann, Rudolf I; Hahn, Dittmar

    2014-05-01

    The 23S rRNA gene was evaluated as target for the development of Sybr Green-based quantitative PCR (qPCR) for the analysis of nitrogen-fixing members of the genus Frankia or subgroups of these in soil. A qPCR with a primer combination targeting all nitrogen-fixing frankiae (clusters 1, 2 and 3) resulted in numbers similar to those obtained with a previously developed qPCR using nifH gene sequences, both with respect to introduced and indigenous Frankia populations. Primer combinations more specifically targeting three subgroups of the Alnus host infection group (cluster 1) or members of the Elaeagnus host infection group (cluster 3) were specific for introduced strains of the target group, with numbers corresponding to those obtained by quantification of nitrogen-fixing frankiae with both the 23S rRNA and nifH genes as target. Method verification on indigenous Frankia populations in soils, i.e. in depth profiles from four sites at an Alnus glutinosa stand, revealed declining numbers in the depth profiles, with similar abundance of all nitrogen-fixing frankiae independent of 23S rRNA or nifH gene targets, and corresponding numbers of one group of frankiae of the Alnus host infection only, with no detections of frankiae representing the Elaeagnus, Casuarina, or a second subgroup of the Alnus host infection groups. PMID:24315016

  14. Internal Transcribed Spacer rRNA Gene-Based Phylogenetic Reconstruction Using Algorithms with Local and Global Sequence Alignment for Black Yeasts and Their Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Caligiorne, R. B.; Licinio, P.; Dupont, J.; de Hoog, G. S.

    2005-01-01

    Sequences of rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of a standard set of black yeast-like fungal pathogens were compared using two methods: local and global alignments. The latter is based on DNA-walk divergence analysis. This method has become recently available as an algorithm (DNAWD program) which converts sequences into three-dimensional walks. The walks are compared with, or fit to, each other generating global alignments. The DNA-walk geometry defines a proper metric used to create a distance matrix appropriated for phylogenetic reconstruction. In this work, the analyses were carried out for species currently classified in Capronia, Cladophialophora, Exophiala, Fonsecaea, Phialophora, and Ramichloridium. Main groups were verified by small-subunit rRNA gene data. DNAWD applied to ITS2 alone enabled species recognition as well as phylogenetic reconstruction reflecting clades discriminated in small-subunit rRNA gene phylogeny, which was not possible with any other algorithm using local alignment for the same data set. It is concluded that DNAWD provides rapid insight into broader relationships between groups using genes that otherwise would be hardly usable for this purpose. PMID:15956403

  15. Combining flow cytometry and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing: a promising approach for drinking water monitoring and characterization.

    PubMed

    Prest, E I; El-Chakhtoura, J; Hammes, F; Saikaly, P E; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-10-15

    The combination of flow cytometry (FCM) and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data was investigated for the purpose of monitoring and characterizing microbial changes in drinking water distribution systems. High frequency sampling (5 min intervals for 1 h) was performed at the outlet of a treatment plant and at one location in the full-scale distribution network. In total, 52 bulk water samples were analysed with FCM, pyrosequencing and conventional methods (adenosine-triphosphate, ATP; heterotrophic plate count, HPC). FCM and pyrosequencing results individually showed that changes in the microbial community occurred in the water distribution system, which was not detected with conventional monitoring. FCM data showed an increase in the total bacterial cell concentrations (from 345 ± 15 × 10(3) to 425 ± 35 × 10(3) cells mL(-1)) and in the percentage of intact bacterial cells (from 39 ± 3.5% to 53 ± 4.4%) during water distribution. This shift was also observed in the FCM fluorescence fingerprints, which are characteristic of each water sample. A similar shift was detected in the microbial community composition as characterized with pyrosequencing, showing that FCM and genetic fingerprints are congruent. FCM and pyrosequencing data were subsequently combined for the calculation of cell concentration changes for each bacterial phylum. The results revealed an increase in cell concentrations of specific bacterial phyla (e.g., Proteobacteria), along with a decrease in other phyla (e.g., Actinobacteria), which could not be concluded from the two methods individually. The combination of FCM and pyrosequencing methods is a promising approach for future drinking water quality monitoring and for advanced studies on drinking water distribution pipeline ecology.

  16. Comparison of 16S rRNA Gene PCR and BACTEC 9240 for Detection of Neonatal Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, J. A.; Durso, M. B.

    2000-01-01

    Ten percent of infants born in the United States are admitted to neonatal intensive care units (NICU) annually. Approximately one-half of these admissions are from term infants (>34 weeks of gestation) at risk for systemic infection. Most of the term infants are not infected but rather have symptoms consistent with other medical conditions that mimic sepsis. The current standard of care for evaluating bacterial sepsis in the newborn is performing blood culturing and providing antibiotic therapy while awaiting the 48-h preliminary result of culture. Implementing a more rapid means of ruling out sepsis in term newborns could result in shorter NICU stays and less antibiotic usage. The purpose of this feasibility study was to compare the utility of PCR to that of conventional culture. To this end, a total of 548 paired blood samples collected from infants admitted to the NICU for suspected sepsis were analyzed for bacterial growth using the BACTEC 9240 instrument and for the bacterial 16S rRNA gene using a PCR assay which included a 5-h preamplification culturing step. The positivity rates by culture and PCR were 25 (4.6%) and 27 (4.9%) positive specimens out of a total of 548 specimens, respectively. The comparison revealed sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 96.0, 99.4, 88.9, and 99.8%, respectively, for PCR. In summary, this PCR-based approach, requiring as little as 9 h of turnaround time and blood volumes as small as 200 μl, correlated well with conventional blood culture results obtained for neonates suspected of having bacterial sepsis. PMID:10878046

  17. Bacterial diversity of a Carolina Bay as determined by 16S rRNA gene analysis: Confirmation of novel taxa

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.G.; Shimkets, L.J.; McArthur, J.V.

    1997-04-01

    Carolina bays are naturally occurring shallow elliptical depressions largely fed by rain and shallow ground water. To identify members of the domain Bacteria which inhabit such an environment, we used PCR to construct a library of 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNAs) cloned from DNA extracted from the sediments of Rainbow Bay, located on the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, S.C. Oligonucleotides complementary to conserved regions of 16S rDNA were used as primers for PCR, and gel-purified PCR products were cloned into vector pGEM-T. Partial sequencing of the cloned 16S rDNAs revealed an extensive amount of phylogenetic diversity within this system. Of the 35 clones sequenced, 32 were affiliated with five bacterial groups: 11 clustered with the Proteobacteria division (including members of the alpha, beta, and delta subdivisions), 8 clustered with the Acidobacterium subdivision of the Fibrobacter division (as categorized by the Ribosomal Database Project`s taxonomic scheme, version 5.0), 7 clustered with the Verrucomicrobium subdivision of the Planctomyces division, 3 clustered with the gram-positive bacteria (Clostridium and relatives subdivision), and 3 clustered with the green nonsulfur bacteria. One sequence branched very deeply from the Bacteria and was found not to be associated with any of the major divisions when phylogenetic trees were constructed. Two clones did not consistently cluster with specific groups and may be chimeric sequences. None of the clones exhibited an exact match to any of the 16S rDNA sequences deposited in the databases, suggesting that most of the bacteria in Rainbow Bay are novel species. In particular, the clones related to the Acidobacterium subdivision and the Verrucomicrobium subdivision confirm the presence of novel taxa discovered previously in other molecular surveys of this type. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Bacterial diversity of a Carolina bay as determined by 16S rRNA gene analysis: confirmation of novel taxa.

    PubMed Central

    Wise, M G; McArthur, J V; Shimkets, L J

    1997-01-01

    Carolina bays are naturally occurring shallow elliptical depressions largely fed by rain and shallow ground water. To identify members of the domain Bacteria which inhibit such an environment, we used PCR to construct a library of 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNAs) cloned from DNA extracted from the sediments of Rainbow bay, located on the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, S.C. Oligonucleotides complementary to conserved regions of 16S rDNA were used as primers for PCR, and gel-purified PCR products were cloned into vector pGEM-T. Partial sequencing of the cloned 16S rDNAs revealed an extensive amount of phylogenetic diversity within this system. Of the 35 clones sequenced, 32 were affiliated with five bacterial groups: 11 clustered with the Proteobacteria division (including members of the alpha, beta, and delta subdivisions), 8 clustered with the Acidobacterium subdivision of the Fibrobacter division (as categorized by the Ribosomal Database Project's taxonomic scheme, version 5.0), 7 clustered with the Verrucomicrobium subdivision of the Planctomyces division, 3 clustered with the gram-positive bacteria (Clostridium and relatives subdivision), and 3 clustered with the green nonsulfur bacteria. One sequence branched very deeply from the Bacteria and was found not to be associated with any of the major divisions when phylogenetic trees were constructed. Two clones did not consistently cluster with specific groups and may be chimeric sequences. None of the clones exhibited an exact match to any of the 16S rDNA sequences deposited in the databases, suggesting that most of the bacteria in Rainbow Bay are novel species. In particular, the clones related to the Acidobacterium subdivision and the Verrucomicrobium subdivision confirm the presence of novel taxa discovered previously in other molecular surveys of this type. PMID:9097448

  19. Strategy for microbiome analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis on the Illumina sequencing platform.

    PubMed

    Ram, Jeffrey L; Karim, Aos S; Sendler, Edward D; Kato, Ikuko

    2011-06-01

    Understanding the identity and changes of organisms in the urogenital and other microbiomes of the human body may be key to discovering causes and new treatments of many ailments, such as vaginosis. High-throughput sequencing technologies have recently enabled discovery of the great diversity of the human microbiome. The cost per base of many of these sequencing platforms remains high (thousands of dollars per sample); however, the Illumina Genome Analyzer (IGA) is estimated to have a cost per base less than one-fifth of its nearest competitor. The main disadvantage of the IGA for sequencing PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes is that the maximum read-length of the IGA is only 100 bases; whereas, at least 300 bases are needed to obtain phylogenetically informative data down to the genus and species level. In this paper we describe and conduct a pilot test of a multiplex sequencing strategy suitable for achieving total reads of > 300 bases per extracted DNA molecule on the IGA. Results show that all proposed primers produce products of the expected size and that correct sequences can be obtained, with all proposed forward primers. Various bioinformatic optimization of the Illumina Bustard analysis pipeline proved necessary to extract the correct sequence from IGA image data, and these modifications of the data files indicate that further optimization of the analysis pipeline may improve the quality rankings of the data and enable more sequence to be correctly analyzed. The successful application of this method could result in an unprecedentedly deep description (800,000 taxonomic identifications per sample) of the urogenital and other microbiomes in a large number of samples at a reasonable cost per sample. PMID:21361774

  20. Role of Universal 16S rRNA Gene PCR and Sequencing in Diagnosis of Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Lechuz, J. M.; Alonso, P.; Villanueva, M.; Alcalá, L.; Gimeno, M.; Cercenado, E.; Sánchez-Somolinos, M.; Radice, C.; Bouza, E.

    2012-01-01

    The etiological diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) requires the isolation of microorganisms from periprosthetic samples. Microbiological cultures often yield false-positive and false-negative results. 16S rRNA gene PCR combined with sequencing (16SPCR) has proven useful for diagnosing various infections. We performed a prospective study to compare the utility of this approach with that of culture to diagnose PJI using intraoperative periprosthetic samples. We analyzed 176 samples from 40 patients with PJI and 321 samples from 82 noninfected patients using conventional culture and 16SPCR. Three statistical studies were undertaken following a previously validated mathematical model: sample-to-sample analysis, calculation of the number of samples to be studied, and calculation of the number of positive samples necessary to diagnose PJI. When only the number of positive samples is taken into consideration, a 16SPCR-positive result in one sample has good specificity and positive predictive value for PJI (specificity, 96.3%; positive predictive value, 91.7%; and likelihood ratio [LR], 22), while 3 positive cultures with the same microorganism are necessary to achieve similar specificity. The best combination of results for 16SPCR was observed when 5 samples were studied and the same microorganism was detected in 2 of them (sensitivity, 94%; specificity, 100%; and LR, 69.62). The results for 5 samples with 2 positive cultures were 96% and 82%, respectively, and the likelihood ratio was 1.06. 16SPCR is more specific and has a better positive predictive value than culture for diagnosis of PJI. A positive 16SPCR result is largely suggestive of PJI, even when few samples are analyzed; however, culture is generally more sensitive. PMID:22170934

  1. Dancing together and separate again: gymnosperms exhibit frequent changes of fundamental 5S and 35S rRNA gene (rDNA) organisation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, S; Kovařík, A

    2013-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the 5S rRNA genes occur in tandem units and are arranged either separately (S-type arrangement) or linked to other repeated genes, in most cases to rDNA locus encoding 18S–5.8S–26S genes (L-type arrangement). Here we used Southern blot hybridisation, PCR and sequencing approaches to analyse genomic organisation of rRNA genes in all large gymnosperm groups, including Coniferales, Ginkgoales, Gnetales and Cycadales. The data are provided for 27 species (21 genera). The 5S units linked to the 35S rDNA units occur in some but not all Gnetales, Coniferales and in Ginkgo (∼30% of the species analysed), while the remaining exhibit separate organisation. The linked 5S rRNA genes may occur as single-copy insertions or as short tandems embedded in the 26S–18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS). The 5S transcript may be encoded by the same (Ginkgo, Ephedra) or opposite (Podocarpus) DNA strand as the 18S–5.8S–26S genes. In addition, pseudogenised 5S copies were also found in some IGS types. Both L- and S-type units have been largely homogenised across the genomes. Phylogenetic relationships based on the comparison of 5S coding sequences suggest that the 5S genes independently inserted IGS at least three times in the course of gymnosperm evolution. Frequent transpositions and rearrangements of basic units indicate relatively relaxed selection pressures imposed on genomic organisation of 5S genes in plants. PMID:23512008

  2. Dancing together and separate again: gymnosperms exhibit frequent changes of fundamental 5S and 35S rRNA gene (rDNA) organisation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, S; Kovařík, A

    2013-07-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the 5S rRNA genes occur in tandem units and are arranged either separately (S-type arrangement) or linked to other repeated genes, in most cases to rDNA locus encoding 18S-5.8S-26S genes (L-type arrangement). Here we used Southern blot hybridisation, PCR and sequencing approaches to analyse genomic organisation of rRNA genes in all large gymnosperm groups, including Coniferales, Ginkgoales, Gnetales and Cycadales. The data are provided for 27 species (21 genera). The 5S units linked to the 35S rDNA units occur in some but not all Gnetales, Coniferales and in Ginkgo (∼30% of the species analysed), while the remaining exhibit separate organisation. The linked 5S rRNA genes may occur as single-copy insertions or as short tandems embedded in the 26S-18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS). The 5S transcript may be encoded by the same (Ginkgo, Ephedra) or opposite (Podocarpus) DNA strand as the 18S-5.8S-26S genes. In addition, pseudogenised 5S copies were also found in some IGS types. Both L- and S-type units have been largely homogenised across the genomes. Phylogenetic relationships based on the comparison of 5S coding sequences suggest that the 5S genes independently inserted IGS at least three times in the course of gymnosperm evolution. Frequent transpositions and rearrangements of basic units indicate relatively relaxed selection pressures imposed on genomic organisation of 5S genes in plants.

  3. Phylogenetic affinities of Diplonema within the Euglenozoa as inferred from the SSU rRNA gene and partial COI protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Maslov, D A; Yasuhira, S; Simpson, L

    1999-03-01

    In order to shed light on the phylogenetic position of diplonemids within the phylum Euglenozoa, we have sequenced small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) genes from Diplonema (syn. Isonema) papillatum and Diplonema sp. We have also analyzed a partial sequence of the mitochondrial gene for cytochrome c oxidase subunit I from D. papillatum. With both markers, the maximum likelihood method favored a closer grouping of diplonemids with kinetoplastids, while the parsimony and distance suggested a closer relationship of diplonemids with euglenoids. In each case, the differences between the best tree and the alternative trees were small. The frequency of codon usage in the partial D. papillatum COI was different from both related groups; however, as is the case in kinetoplastids but not in Euglena, both the non-canonical UGA codon and the canonical UGG codon were used to encode tryptophan in Diplonema. PMID:10724517

  4. PAGE analysis of the heteroduplexes formed between PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes: estimation of sequence similarity and rDNA complexity.

    PubMed

    Espejo, R T; Feijóo, C G; Romero, J; Vásquez, M

    1998-06-01

    Analysis of the 16S rRNA genes retrieved directly from different environments has proven to be a powerful tool that has greatly expanded our knowledge of microbial diversity and phylogeny. It is shown here that sequence similarity between 80 and 100% among 16S rDNAs can be estimated by the electrophoretic migration of their heteroduplexes. This was measured by hybridization and electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels of the product obtained after PCR amplification of almost the entire 16S rRNA gene from different bacterial species. These heteroduplexes were also observed after amplification of samples containing DNA from two or more bacterial species and a procedure was applied to identify reliably heteroduplexes among the amplification products. The electrophoretic migration of the heteroduplexes observed after PCR was used to detect the presence of 16S rDNAs with different sequences in DNA extracted from both a mixture of two bacterial species and samples containing a natural bacterial community.

  5. Identification of Lactobacillus Isolates from the Gastrointestinal Tract, Silage, and Yoghurt by 16S-23S rRNA Gene Intergenic Spacer Region Sequence Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Tannock, G. W.; Tilsala-Timisjarvi, A.; Rodtong, S.; Ng, J.; Munro, K.; Alatossava, T.

    1999-01-01

    Lactobacillus isolates were identified by PCR amplification and sequencing of the region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes (spacer region). The sequences obtained from the isolates were compared to those of reference strains held in GenBank. A similarity of 97.5% or greater was considered to provide identification. To check the reliability of the method, the V2-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced in the case of isolates whose spacer region sequences were less than 99% similar to that of a reference strain. Confirmation of identity was obtained in all instances. Spacer region sequencing provided rapid and accurate identification of Lactobacillus isolates obtained from gastrointestinal, yoghurt, and silage samples. It had an advantage over 16S V2-V3 sequence comparisons because it distinguished between isolates of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus. PMID:10473450

  6. Community Structure and Diversity of Biofilms from a Beer Bottling Plant as Revealed Using 16S rRNA Gene Clone Libraries†

    PubMed Central

    Timke, Markus; Wang-Lieu, Ngoc Quynh; Altendorf, Karlheinz; Lipski, André

    2005-01-01

    The microbial composition of biofilms from a beer bottling plant was analyzed by a cultivation independent analysis of the 16S rRNA genes. Clone libraries were differentiated by amplified 16S rRNA gene restriction analysis and representative clones from each group were sequenced. The diversity of the clone libraries was comparable with the diversity found for environmental samples. No evidences for the presence of strictly anaerobic taxa or important beer spoilers were found, indicating that biofilms developed for more than 6 months at the plant formed no appropriate habitat for those microorganisms. The genus Methylobacterium was one of the dominating groups of the clone libraries. The size of this population was assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and fatty acid analysis. In addition, considerable numbers of clones were assigned to uncultivated organisms. PMID:16204578

  7. Community structure and diversity of biofilms from a beer bottling plant as revealed using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries.

    PubMed

    Timke, Markus; Wang-Lieu, Ngoc Quynh; Altendorf, Karlheinz; Lipski, André

    2005-10-01

    The microbial composition of biofilms from a beer bottling plant was analyzed by a cultivation independent analysis of the 16S rRNA genes. Clone libraries were differentiated by amplified 16S rRNA gene restriction analysis and representative clones from each group were sequenced. The diversity of the clone libraries was comparable with the diversity found for environmental samples. No evidences for the presence of strictly anaerobic taxa or important beer spoilers were found, indicating that biofilms developed for more than 6 months at the plant formed no appropriate habitat for those microorganisms. The genus Methylobacterium was one of the dominating groups of the clone libraries. The size of this population was assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and fatty acid analysis. In addition, considerable numbers of clones were assigned to uncultivated organisms. PMID:16204578

  8. Mapping of the human gene for a melanocyte protein Pmel 17 (D12S53E) to chromosome 12q13-q14

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Ryo; Wang, Yimin; Minoshima, Shinsei

    1995-03-20

    We have isolated several new cDNA clones that are differentially expressed in retina from a human retina cDNA library using a new combined method of subtractive hybridization and differential hybridization. Among these cDNAs, we found that cDNA clone BA7 was identical to the previously reported Pmel 17 cDNA in its nucleotide sequence. Pmel 17 mRNA is preferentially expressed in melanocytes, and the protein expressed in Escherichia coli cross-reacts with anti-tyrosinase antibodies. The mouse Pmel 17 gene was mapped to the pter-q21 region of human chromosome 12. In this paper, we present evidence precisely locating the human Pmel 17 gene to chromosome 12q13-q14. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Leader peptides of inducible chloramphenicol resistance genes from gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria bind to yeast and Archaea large subunit rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Harrod, R; Lovett, P S

    1997-01-01

    catA86 is the second gene in a constitutively transcribed, two-gene operon cloned from Bacillus pumilus . The region that intervenes between the upstream gene, termed the leader, and the catA86 coding sequence contains a pair of inverted repeat sequences which cause sequestration of the catA86 ribosome binding site in mRNA secondary structure. As a consequence, the catA86 coding sequence is untranslatable in the absence of inducer. Translation of the catA86 coding sequence is induced by chloramphenicol in Gram-positives and induction requires a function of the leader coding sequence. The leader-encoded peptide has been proposed to instruct its translating ribosome to pause at leader codon 6, enabling chloramphenicol to stall the ribosome at that site. Ribosome stalling causes destabilization of the RNA secondary structure, exposing the catA86 ribosome binding site, allowing activation of its translation. A comparable mechanism of induction by chloramphenicol has been proposed for the regulated cmlA gene from Gram-negative bacteria. The catA86 and cmlA leader-encoded peptides are in vitro inhibitors of peptidyl transferase, which is thought to be the basis for selection of the site of ribosome stalling. Both leader-encoded peptides have been shown to alter the secondary structure of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA in vitro. All peptide-induced changes in rRNA conformation are within domains IV and V, which contains the peptidyl transferase center. Here we demonstrate that the leader peptides alter the conformation of domains IV and V of large subunit rRNA from yeast and a representative of the Archaea. The rRNA target for binding the leader peptides is therefore conserved across kingdoms. PMID:9108153

  10. Identification of Bacteria in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Heart Valve Tissue via 16S rRNA Gene Nucleotide Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Imrit, Kavita; Goldfischer, Michael; Wang, Jie; Green, Jaime; Levine, Jerome; Lombardo, Joseph; Hong, Tao

    2006-01-01

    We applied 16S rRNA gene sequencing to identify bacterial species present in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded heart valve tissue. In 40% (12/30) of the cases, we were able to identify the bacterium to the species-genus level. For more recent cases (≤4 years), the success rate was significantly improved, to 70% (P < 0.001). PMID:16825394

  11. Comparison of Traditional Phenotypic Identification Methods with Partial 5′ 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Species-Level Identification of Nonfermenting Gram-Negative Bacilli▿

    PubMed Central

    Cloud, Joann L.; Harmsen, Dag; Iwen, Peter C.; Dunn, James J.; Hall, Gerri; LaSala, Paul Rocco; Hoggan, Karen; Wilson, Deborah; Woods, Gail L.; Mellmann, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Correct identification of nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli (NFB) is crucial for patient management. We compared phenotypic identifications of 96 clinical NFB isolates with identifications obtained by 5′ 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Sequencing identified 88 isolates (91.7%) with >99% similarity to a sequence from the assigned species; 61.5% of sequencing results were concordant with phenotypic results, indicating the usability of sequencing to identify NFB. PMID:20164273

  12. Evaluation of 16S rRNA Gene PCR Sensitivity and Specificity for Diagnosis of Prosthetic Joint Infection: a Prospective Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Plouzeau, Chloé; Tande, Didier; Léger, Julie; Giraudeau, Bruno; Valentin, Anne Sophie; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Vincent, Pascal; Corvec, Stéphane; Gibaud, Sophie; Juvin, Marie Emmanuelle; Héry-Arnaud, Genevieve; Lemarié, Carole; Kempf, Marie; Bret, Laurent; Quentin, Roland; Coffre, Carine; de Pinieux, Gonzague; Bernard, Louis; Burucoa, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    There is no standard method for the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection (PJI). The contribution of 16S rRNA gene PCR sequencing on a routine basis remains to be defined. We performed a prospective multicenter study to assess the contributions of 16S rRNA gene assays in PJI diagnosis. Over a 2-year period, all patients suspected to have PJIs and a few uninfected patients undergoing primary arthroplasty (control group) were included. Five perioperative samples per patient were collected for culture and 16S rRNA gene PCR sequencing and one for histological examination. Three multicenter quality control assays were performed with both DNA extracts and crushed samples. The diagnosis of PJI was based on clinical, bacteriological, and histological criteria, according to Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines. A molecular diagnosis was modeled on the bacteriological criterion (≥1 positive sample for strict pathogens and ≥2 for commensal skin flora). Molecular data were analyzed according to the diagnosis of PJI. Between December 2010 and March 2012, 264 suspected cases of PJI and 35 control cases were included. PJI was confirmed in 215/264 suspected cases, 192 (89%) with a bacteriological criterion. The PJIs were monomicrobial (163 cases [85%]; staphylococci, n = 108; streptococci, n = 22; Gram-negative bacilli, n = 16; anaerobes, n = 13; others, n = 4) or polymicrobial (29 cases [15%]). The molecular diagnosis was positive in 151/215 confirmed cases of PJI (143 cases with bacteriological PJI documentation and 8 treated cases without bacteriological documentation) and in 2/49 cases without confirmed PJI (sensitivity, 73.3%; specificity, 95.5%). The 16S rRNA gene PCR assay showed a lack of sensitivity in the diagnosis of PJI on a multicenter routine basis. PMID:25056331

  13. Evaluation of 16S rRNA gene PCR sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection: a prospective multicenter cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Bémer, Pascale; Plouzeau, Chloé; Tande, Didier; Léger, Julie; Giraudeau, Bruno; Valentin, Anne Sophie; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Vincent, Pascal; Corvec, Stéphane; Gibaud, Sophie; Juvin, Marie Emmanuelle; Héry-Arnaud, Genevieve; Lemarié, Carole; Kempf, Marie; Bret, Laurent; Quentin, Roland; Coffre, Carine; de Pinieux, Gonzague; Bernard, Louis; Burucoa, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    There is no standard method for the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection (PJI). The contribution of 16S rRNA gene PCR sequencing on a routine basis remains to be defined. We performed a prospective multicenter study to assess the contributions of 16S rRNA gene assays in PJI diagnosis. Over a 2-year period, all patients suspected to have PJIs and a few uninfected patients undergoing primary arthroplasty (control group) were included. Five perioperative samples per patient were collected for culture and 16S rRNA gene PCR sequencing and one for histological examination. Three multicenter quality control assays were performed with both DNA extracts and crushed samples. The diagnosis of PJI was based on clinical, bacteriological, and histological criteria, according to Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines. A molecular diagnosis was modeled on the bacteriological criterion (≥ 1 positive sample for strict pathogens and ≥ 2 for commensal skin flora). Molecular data were analyzed according to the diagnosis of PJI. Between December 2010 and March 2012, 264 suspected cases of PJI and 35 control cases were included. PJI was confirmed in 215/264 suspected cases, 192 (89%) with a bacteriological criterion. The PJIs were monomicrobial (163 cases [85%]; staphylococci, n = 108; streptococci, n = 22; Gram-negative bacilli, n = 16; anaerobes, n = 13; others, n = 4) or polymicrobial (29 cases [15%]). The molecular diagnosis was positive in 151/215 confirmed cases of PJI (143 cases with bacteriological PJI documentation and 8 treated cases without bacteriological documentation) and in 2/49 cases without confirmed PJI (sensitivity, 73.3%; specificity, 95.5%). The 16S rRNA gene PCR assay showed a lack of sensitivity in the diagnosis of PJI on a multicenter routine basis.

  14. [Characterizing Beijing's Airborne Bacterial Communities in PM2.5 and PM1 Samples During Haze Pollution Episodes Using 16S rRNA Gene Analysis Method].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bu-ying; Lang, Ji-dong; Zhang, Li-na; Fang, Jian-huo; Cao, Chen; Hao, Ji-ming; Zhu, Ting; Tian, Geng; Jiang, Jing-kun

    2015-08-01

    During 8th-14th Jan., 2013, severe particulate matter (PM) pollution episodes happened in Beijing. These air pollution events lead to high risks for public health. In addition to various PM chemical compositions, biological components in the air may also impose threaten. Little is known about airborne microbial community in such severe air pollution conditions. PM2.5 and PM10 samples were collected during that 7-day pollution period. The 16S rRNA gene V3 amplification and the MiSeq sequencing were performed for analyzing these samples. It is found that there is no significant difference at phylum level for PM2.5 bacterial communities during that 7-day pollution period both at phylum and at genus level. At genus level, Arthrobacter and Frankia are the major airborne microbes presented in Beijing winter.samples. At genus level, there are 39 common genera (combined by first 50 genera bacterial of the two analysis) between the 16S rRNA gene analysis and those are found by Metagenomic analysis on the same PM samples. Frankia and Paracoccus are relatively more abundant in 16S rRNA gene data, while Kocuria and Geodermatophilus are relatively more abundant in Meta-data. PM10 bacterial communities are similar to those of PM2.5 with some noticeable differences, i.e., at phylum level, more Firmicutes and less Actinobacteria present in PM10 samples than in PM2.5 samples, while at genus level, more Clostridium presents in PM10 samples. The findings in Beijing were compared with three 16S rRNA gene studies in other countries. Although the sampling locations and times are different from each other, compositions of bacterial community are similar for those sampled at the ground atmosphere. Airborne microbial communities near the ground surface are different from those sampled in the upper troposphere. PMID:26591997

  15. Ecotypes of planktonic actinobacteria with identical 16S rRNA genes adapted to thermal niches in temperate, subtropical, and tropical freshwater habitats.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Martin W; Pöckl, Matthias

    2005-02-01

    Seven strains with identical 16S rRNA genes affiliated with the Luna2 cluster (Actinobacteria) were isolated from six freshwater habitats located in temperate (Austria and Australia), subtropical (People's Republic of China), and tropical (Uganda) climatic zones. The isolates had sequence differences at zero to five positions in a 2,310-nucleotide fragment of the ribosomal operon, including part of the intergenic spacer upstream of the 16S rRNA gene, the complete 16S rRNA gene, the complete 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS1), and a short part of the 23S rRNA gene. Most of the few sequence differences found were located in the internal transcribed spacer sequences. Two isolates obtained from habitats in Asia and Europe, as well as two isolates obtained from different habitats in the People's Republic of China, had identical sequences for the entire fragment sequenced. In spite of minimal sequence differences in the part of the ribosomal operon investigated, the strains exhibited significant differences in their temperature response curves (with one exception), as well as pronounced differences in their temperature optima (25.0 to 35.6 degrees C). The observed differences in temperature adaptation were generally in accordance with the thermal conditions in the habitats where the strains were isolated. Strains obtained from temperate zone habitats had the lowest temperature optima, strains from subtropical habitats had intermediate temperature optima, and a strain from a tropical habitat had the highest temperature optimum. Based on the observed temperature responses, we concluded that the strains investigated are well adapted to the thermal conditions in their home habitats. Consequently, these closely related strains represent different ecotypes adapted to different thermal niches.

  16. [Characterizing Beijing's Airborne Bacterial Communities in PM2.5 and PM1 Samples During Haze Pollution Episodes Using 16S rRNA Gene Analysis Method].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bu-ying; Lang, Ji-dong; Zhang, Li-na; Fang, Jian-huo; Cao, Chen; Hao, Ji-ming; Zhu, Ting; Tian, Geng; Jiang, Jing-kun

    2015-08-01

    During 8th-14th Jan., 2013, severe particulate matter (PM) pollution episodes happened in Beijing. These air pollution events lead to high risks for public health. In addition to various PM chemical compositions, biological components in the air may also impose threaten. Little is known about airborne microbial community in such severe air pollution conditions. PM2.5 and PM10 samples were collected during that 7-day pollution period. The 16S rRNA gene V3 amplification and the MiSeq sequencing were performed for analyzing these samples. It is found that there is no significant difference at phylum level for PM2.5 bacterial communities during that 7-day pollution period both at phylum and at genus level. At genus level, Arthrobacter and Frankia are the major airborne microbes presented in Beijing winter.samples. At genus level, there are 39 common genera (combined by first 50 genera bacterial of the two analysis) between the 16S rRNA gene analysis and those are found by Metagenomic analysis on the same PM samples. Frankia and Paracoccus are relatively more abundant in 16S rRNA gene data, while Kocuria and Geodermatophilus are relatively more abundant in Meta-data. PM10 bacterial communities are similar to those of PM2.5 with some noticeable differences, i.e., at phylum level, more Firmicutes and less Actinobacteria present in PM10 samples than in PM2.5 samples, while at genus level, more Clostridium presents in PM10 samples. The findings in Beijing were compared with three 16S rRNA gene studies in other countries. Although the sampling locations and times are different from each other, compositions of bacterial community are similar for those sampled at the ground atmosphere. Airborne microbial communities near the ground surface are different from those sampled in the upper troposphere.

  17. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence-Based Identification of Bacteria in Automatically Incubated Blood Culture Materials from Tropical Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Hahn, Andreas; Boahen, Kennedy; Sarpong, Nimako; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Halbgewachs, Eva; Marks, Florian; von Kalckreuth, Vera; Poppert, Sven; Loderstaedt, Ulrike; May, Jürgen; Hagen, Ralf Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Background The quality of microbiological diagnostic procedures depends on pre-analytic conditions. We compared the results of 16S rRNA gene PCR and sequencing from automatically incubated blood culture materials from tropical Ghana with the results of cultural growth after automated incubation. Methods Real-time 16S rRNA gene PCR and subsequent sequencing were applied to 1500 retained blood culture samples of Ghanaian patients admitted to a hospital with an unknown febrile illness after enrichment by automated culture. Results Out of all 1500 samples, 191 were culture-positive and 98 isolates were considered etiologically relevant. Out of the 191 culture-positive samples, 16S rRNA gene PCR and sequencing led to concordant results in 65 cases at species level and an additional 62 cases at genus level. PCR was positive in further 360 out of 1309 culture-negative samples, sequencing results of which suggested etiologically relevant pathogen detections in 62 instances, detections of uncertain relevance in 50 instances, and DNA contamination due to sample preparation in 248 instances. In two instances, PCR failed to detect contaminants from the skin flora that were culturally detectable. Pre-analytical errors caused many Enterobacteriaceae to be missed by culture. Conclusions Potentially correctable pre-analytical conditions and not the fastidious nature of the bacteria caused most of the discrepancies. Although 16S rRNA gene PCR and sequencing in addition to culture led to an increase in detections of presumably etiologically relevant blood culture pathogens, the application of this procedure to samples from the tropics was hampered by a high contamination rate. Careful interpretation of diagnostic results is required. PMID:26270631

  18. Evaluation of 16S rRNA gene PCR sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection: a prospective multicenter cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Bémer, Pascale; Plouzeau, Chloé; Tande, Didier; Léger, Julie; Giraudeau, Bruno; Valentin, Anne Sophie; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Vincent, Pascal; Corvec, Stéphane; Gibaud, Sophie; Juvin, Marie Emmanuelle; Héry-Arnaud, Genevieve; Lemarié, Carole; Kempf, Marie; Bret, Laurent; Quentin, Roland; Coffre, Carine; de Pinieux, Gonzague; Bernard, Louis; Burucoa, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    There is no standard method for the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection (PJI). The contribution of 16S rRNA gene PCR sequencing on a routine basis remains to be defined. We performed a prospective multicenter study to assess the contributions of 16S rRNA gene assays in PJI diagnosis. Over a 2-year period, all patients suspected to have PJIs and a few uninfected patients undergoing primary arthroplasty (control group) were included. Five perioperative samples per patient were collected for culture and 16S rRNA gene PCR sequencing and one for histological examination. Three multicenter quality control assays were performed with both DNA extracts and crushed samples. The diagnosis of PJI was based on clinical, bacteriological, and histological criteria, according to Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines. A molecular diagnosis was modeled on the bacteriological criterion (≥ 1 positive sample for strict pathogens and ≥ 2 for commensal skin flora). Molecular data were analyzed according to the diagnosis of PJI. Between December 2010 and March 2012, 264 suspected cases of PJI and 35 control cases were included. PJI was confirmed in 215/264 suspected cases, 192 (89%) with a bacteriological criterion. The PJIs were monomicrobial (163 cases [85%]; staphylococci, n = 108; streptococci, n = 22; Gram-negative bacilli, n = 16; anaerobes, n = 13; others, n = 4) or polymicrobial (29 cases [15%]). The molecular diagnosis was positive in 151/215 confirmed cases of PJI (143 cases with bacteriological PJI documentation and 8 treated cases without bacteriological documentation) and in 2/49 cases without confirmed PJI (sensitivity, 73.3%; specificity, 95.5%). The 16S rRNA gene PCR assay showed a lack of sensitivity in the diagnosis of PJI on a multicenter routine basis. PMID:25056331

  19. Identification of Theileria parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo) 18S rRNA gene sequence variants in the African Buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Chaisi, Mamohale E; Sibeko, Kgomotso P; Collins, Nicola E; Potgieter, Fred T; Oosthuizen, Marinda C

    2011-12-15

    Theileria parva is the causative agent of Corridor disease in cattle in South Africa. The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is the reservoir host, and, as these animals are important for eco-tourism in South Africa, it is compulsory to test and certify them disease free prior to translocation. A T. parva-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test based on the small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene is one of the tests used for the diagnosis of the parasite in buffalo and cattle in South Africa. However, because of the high similarity between the 18S rRNA gene sequences of T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo), the latter is also amplified by the real-time PCR primers, although it is not detected by the T. parva-specific hybridization probes. Preliminary sequencing studies have revealed a small number of sequence differences within the 18S rRNA gene in both species but the extent of this sequence variation is unknown. The aim of the current study was to sequence the 18S rRNA genes of T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo), and to determine whether all identified genotypes can be correctly detected by the real-time PCR assay. The reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was used to identify T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo) positive samples from buffalo blood samples originating from the Kruger National Park, Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, the Greater Limpopo Transfrontier Park, and a private game ranch in the Hoedspruit area. T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo) were identified in 42% and 28%, respectively, of 252 samples, mainly as mixed infections. The full-length 18S rRNA gene of selected samples was amplified, cloned and sequenced. From a total of 20 sequences obtained, 10 grouped with previously published T. parva sequences from GenBank while 10 sequences grouped with a previously published Theileria sp. (buffalo) sequence. All these formed a monophyletic group with known pathogenic Theileria species. Our phylogenetic analyses confirm the

  20. Phylogeny and evolutionary genetics of Frankia strains based on 16S rRNA and nifD-K gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Arun Kumar; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Singh, Prashant; Singh, Anumeha; Singh, Satya Shila; Srivastava, Amrita; Srivastava, Alok Kumar; Sarma, Hridip Kumar

    2015-08-01

    16S rRNA and nifD-nifK sequences were used to study the molecular phylogeny and evolutionary genetics of Frankia strains isolated from Hippöphae salicifolia D. Don growing at different altitudes (ecologically classified as riverside and hillside isolates) of the Eastern Himalayan region of North Sikkim, India. Genetic information for the small subunit rRNA (16S rRNA) revealed that the riverside Frankia isolates markedly differed from the hillside isolates suggesting that the riverside isolates are genetically compact. Further, for enhanced resolutions, the partial sequence of nifD (3' end), nifK (5' end) and nifD-K IGS region have been investigated. The sequences obtained, failed to separate riverside isolates and hillside isolates, thus suggesting a possible role of genetic transfer events either from hillside to riverside or vice versa. The evolutionary genetic analyses using evogenomic extrapolations of gene sequence data obtained from 16S rRNA and nifD-K provided differing equations with the pace of evolution being more appropriately, intermediate. Values of recombination frequency (R), nucleotide diversity per site (Pi), and DNA divergence estimates supported the existence of an intermixed zone where spatial isolations occurred in sync with the temporal estimates. J. Basic Microbiol. 2015, 54, 1-9. PMID:25871924

  1. Phylogeny and evolutionary genetics of Frankia strains based on 16S rRNA and nifD-K gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Arun Kumar; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Singh, Prashant; Singh, Anumeha; Singh, Satya Shila; Srivastava, Amrita; Srivastava, Alok Kumar; Sarma, Hridip Kumar

    2015-08-01

    16S rRNA and nifD-nifK sequences were used to study the molecular phylogeny and evolutionary genetics of Frankia strains isolated from Hippöphae salicifolia D. Don growing at different altitudes (ecologically classified as riverside and hillside isolates) of the Eastern Himalayan region of North Sikkim, India. Genetic information for the small subunit rRNA (16S rRNA) revealed that the riverside Frankia isolates markedly differed from the hillside isolates suggesting that the riverside isolates are genetically compact. Further, for enhanced resolutions, the partial sequence of nifD (3' end), nifK (5' end) and nifD-K IGS region have been investigated. The sequences obtained, failed to separate riverside isolates and hillside isolates, thus suggesting a possible role of genetic transfer events either from hillside to riverside or vice versa. The evolutionary genetic analyses using evogenomic extrapolations of gene sequence data obtained from 16S rRNA and nifD-K provided differing equations with the pace of evolution being more appropriately, intermediate. Values of recombination frequency (R), nucleotide diversity per site (Pi), and DNA divergence estimates supported the existence of an intermixed zone where spatial isolations occurred in sync with the temporal estimates. J. Basic Microbiol. 2015, 54, 1-9.

  2. In silico analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of endophytic bacteria, isolated from the aerial parts and seeds of important agricultural crops.

    PubMed

    Bredow, C; Azevedo, J L; Pamphile, J A; Mangolin, C A; Rhoden, S A

    2015-08-19

    Because of human population growth, increased food production and alternatives to conventional methods of biocontrol and development of plants such as the use of endophytic bacteria and fungi are required. One of the methods used to study microorganism diversity is sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, which has several advantages, including universality, size, and availability of databases for comparison. The objective of this study was to analyze endophytic bacterial diversity in agricultural crops using published papers, sequence databases, and phylogenetic analysis. Fourteen papers were selected in which the ribosomal 16S rRNA gene was used to identify endophytic bacteria, in important agricultural crops, such as coffee, sugar cane, beans, corn, soybean, tomatoes, and grapes, located in different geographical regions (America, Europe, and Asia). The corresponding 16S rRNA gene sequences were selected from the NCBI database, aligned using the Mega 5.2 program, and phylogenetic analysis was undertaken. The most common orders present in the analyzed cultures were Bacillales, Enterobacteriales, and Actinomycetales and the most frequently observed genera were Bacillus, Pseudomonas, and Microbacterium. Phylogenetic analysis showed that only approximately 1.56% of the total sequences were not properly grouped, demonstrating reliability in the identification of microorganisms. This study identified the main genera found in endophytic bacterial cultures from plants, providing data for future studies on improving plant agriculture, biotechnology, endophytic bacterium prospecting, and to help understand relationships between endophytic bacteria and their interactions with plants.

  3. First experience of a multicenter external quality assessment of molecular 16S rRNA gene detection in bone and joint infections.

    PubMed

    Plouzeau, Chloé; Bémer, Pascale; Valentin, Anne Sophie; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève; Tandé, Didier; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Vincent, Pascal; Kempf, Marie; Lemarié, Carole; Guinard, Jérôme; Bret, Laurent; Cognée, Anne Sophie; Gibaud, Sophie; Burucoa, Christophe; Corvec, Stéphane

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the performance of seven French laboratories for 16S rRNA gene detection by real-time PCR in the diagnosis of bone and joint infection (BJI) to validate a large multicenter study. External quality control (QC) was required owing to the differences in extraction procedures and the molecular equipment used in the different laboratories. Three proficiency sets were organized, including four bacterial DNA extracts and four bead mill-pretreated osteoarticular specimens. Extraction volumes, 16S rRNA gene primers, and sequencing interpretation rules were standardized. In order to assess each laboratory's ability to achieve the best results, scores were assigned, and each QC series was classified as optimal, acceptable, or to be improved. A total of 168 QCs were sent, and 160 responses were analyzed. The expected results were obtained for 93.8%, with the same proportion for extracts (75/80) and clinical specimens (75/80). For the specimens, there was no significant difference between manual and automated extraction. This QC demonstrated the ability to achieve good and homogeneous results using the same 16S rRNA gene PCR with different equipment and validates the possibility of high-quality multicenter studies using molecular diagnosis for BJI.

  4. First Experience of a Multicenter External Quality Assessment of Molecular 16S rRNA Gene Detection in Bone and Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bémer, Pascale; Valentin, Anne Sophie; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève; Tandé, Didier; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Vincent, Pascal; Kempf, Marie; Lemarié, Carole; Guinard, Jérôme; Bret, Laurent; Cognée, Anne Sophie; Gibaud, Sophie; Burucoa, Christophe; Corvec, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the performance of seven French laboratories for 16S rRNA gene detection by real-time PCR in the diagnosis of bone and joint infection (BJI) to validate a large multicenter study. External quality control (QC) was required owing to the differences in extraction procedures and the molecular equipment used in the different laboratories. Three proficiency sets were organized, including four bacterial DNA extracts and four bead mill-pretreated osteoarticular specimens. Extraction volumes, 16S rRNA gene primers, and sequencing interpretation rules were standardized. In order to assess each laboratory's ability to achieve the best results, scores were assigned, and each QC series was classified as optimal, acceptable, or to be improved. A total of 168 QCs were sent, and 160 responses were analyzed. The expected results were obtained for 93.8%, with the same proportion for extracts (75/80) and clinical specimens (75/80). For the specimens, there was no significant difference between manual and automated extraction. This QC demonstrated the ability to achieve good and homogeneous results using the same 16S rRNA gene PCR with different equipment and validates the possibility of high-quality multicenter studies using molecular diagnosis for BJI. PMID:25411177

  5. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of 16S rRNA gene clones (Clone-FISH) for probe validation and screening of clone libraries.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Andreas; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Nielsen, Jeppe L; Tonolla, Mauro; Stahl, David A

    2002-11-01

    A method is presented for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of 16S rRNA gene clones targeting in vivo transcribed plasmid inserts (Clone-FISH). Several different cloning approaches and treatments to generate target-rRNA in the clones were compared. Highest signal intensities of Clone-FISH were obtained using plasmids with a T7 RNA polymerase promoter and host cells with an IPTG-inducible T7 RNA polymerase. Combined IPTG-induction and chloramphenicol treatment of those clones resulted in FISH signals up to 2.8-fold higher than signals of FISH with probe EUB338 to cells of Escherichia coli. Probe dissociation curves for three oligonucleotide probes were compared for reference cells containing native (FISH) or cloned (Clone-FISH) target sequences. Melting behaviour and calculated T(d) values were virtually identical for clones and cells, providing a format to use 16S rRNA gene clones instead of pure cultures for probe validation and optimization of hybridization conditions. The optimized Clone-FISH protocol was also used to screen an environmental clone library for insert sequences of interest. In this application format, 13 out of 82 clones examined were identified to contain sulphate-reducing bacterial rRNA genes. In summary, Clone-FISH is a simple and fast technique, compatible with a wide variety of cloning vectors and hosts, that should have general utility for probe validation and screening of clone libraries. PMID:12460279

  6. Evaluation of PCR primer selectivity and phylogenetic specificity by using amplification of 16S rRNA genes from betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Junier, Pilar; Kim, Ok-Sun; Hadas, Ora; Imhoff, Johannes F; Witzel, Karl-Paul

    2008-08-01

    The effect of primer specificity for studying the diversity of ammonia-oxidizing betaproteobacteria (betaAOB) was evaluated. betaAOB represent a group of phylogenetically related organisms for which the 16S rRNA gene approach is especially suitable. We used experimental comparisons of primer performance with water samples, together with an in silico analysis of published sequences and a literature review of clone libraries made with four specific PCR primers for the betaAOB 16S rRNA gene. With four aquatic samples, the primers NitA/NitB produced the highest frequency of ammonia-oxidizing-bacterium-like sequences compared to clone libraries with products amplified with the primer combinations betaAMOf/betaAMOr, betaAMOf/Nso1255g, and NitA/Nso1225g. Both the experimental examination of ammonia-oxidizing-bacterium-specific 16S rRNA gene primers and the literature search showed that neither specificity nor sensitivity of primer combinations can be evaluated reliably only by sequence comparison. Apparently, the combination of sequence comparison and experimental data is the best approach to detect possible biases of PCR primers. Although this study focused on betaAOB, the results presented here more generally exemplify the importance of primer selection and potential primer bias when analyzing microbial communities in environmental samples.

  7. Bacterial characterization of Beijing drinking water by flow cytometry and MiSeq sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Kong, Weiwen; Chen, Nan; Zhu, Jing; Wang, Jingqi; He, Xiaoqing; Jin, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing data are commonly used to monitor and characterize microbial differences in drinking water distribution systems. In this study, to assess microbial differences in drinking water distribution systems, 12 water samples from different sources water (groundwater, GW; surface water, SW) were analyzed by FCM, heterotrophic plate count (HPC), and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. FCM intact cell concentrations varied from 2.2 × 10(3) cells/mL to 1.6 × 10(4) cells/mL in the network. Characteristics of each water sample were also observed by FCM fluorescence fingerprint analysis. 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that Proteobacteria (76.9-42.3%) or Cyanobacteria (42.0-3.1%) was most abundant among samples. Proteobacteria were abundant in samples containing chlorine, indicating resistance to disinfection. Interestingly, Mycobacterium, Corynebacterium, and Pseudomonas, were detected in drinking water distribution systems. There was no evidence that these microorganisms represented a health concern through water consumption by the general population. However, they provided a health risk for special crowd, such as the elderly or infants, patients with burns and immune-compromised people exposed by drinking. The combined use of FCM to detect total bacteria concentrations and sequencing to determine the relative abundance of pathogenic bacteria resulted in the quantitative evaluation of drinking water distribution systems. Knowledge regarding the concentration of opportunistic pathogenic bacteria will be particularly useful for epidemiological studies.

  8. Identification of Entamoeba polecki with Unique 18S rRNA Gene Sequences from Celebes Crested Macaques and Pigs in Tangkoko Nature Reserve, North Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Tuda, Josef; Feng, Meng; Imada, Mihoko; Kobayashi, Seiki; Cheng, Xunjia; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Unique species of macaques are distributed across Sulawesi Island, Indonesia, and the details of Entamoeba infections in these macaques are unknown. A total of 77 stool samples from Celebes crested macaques (Macaca nigra) and 14 stool samples from pigs were collected in Tangkoko Nature Reserve, North Sulawesi, and the prevalence of Entamoeba infection was examined by PCR. Entamoeba polecki was detected in 97% of the macaques and all of the pigs, but no other Entamoeba species were found. The nucleotide sequence of the 18S rRNA gene in E. polecki from M. nigra was unique and showed highest similarity with E. polecki subtype (ST) 4. This is the first case of identification of E. polecki ST4 from wild nonhuman primates. The sequence of the 18S rRNA gene in E. polecki from pigs was also unique and showed highest similarity with E. polecki ST1. These results suggest that the diversity of the 18S rRNA gene in E. polecki is associated with differences in host species and geographic localization, and that there has been no transmission of E. polecki between macaques and pigs in the study area.

  9. Targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the 16S rRNA gene to detect and differentiate Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila species.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiao-Yong; Hu, Chao-Hui; Zhu, Qing-Yi

    2016-08-01

    A PCR-based method targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 16S rRNA gene was developed for differential identification of Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila. Based on the bioinformatics analysis for 176 Legionella 16S rRNA gene fragments of 56 different Legionella species, a set of SNPs, A(628)C(629) was found to be highly specific to L. pneumophila strains. A multiplex assay was designed that was able to distinguish sites with limited sequence heterogeneity between L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila in the targeted 16S rRNA gene. The assay amplified a 261-bp amplicon for Legionella spp. and a set of 203- and 97-bp amplicons only specific to L. pneumophila species. Among 49 ATCC strains and 284 Legionella isolates from environmental water and clinical samples, 100 % of L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila strains were correctly identified and differentiated by this assay. The assay presents a more rapid, sensitive and alternative method to the currently available PCR-sequencing detection and differentiation method.

  10. First experience of a multicenter external quality assessment of molecular 16S rRNA gene detection in bone and joint infections.

    PubMed

    Plouzeau, Chloé; Bémer, Pascale; Valentin, Anne Sophie; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève; Tandé, Didier; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Vincent, Pascal; Kempf, Marie; Lemarié, Carole; Guinard, Jérôme; Bret, Laurent; Cognée, Anne Sophie; Gibaud, Sophie; Burucoa, Christophe; Corvec, Stéphane

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the performance of seven French laboratories for 16S rRNA gene detection by real-time PCR in the diagnosis of bone and joint infection (BJI) to validate a large multicenter study. External quality control (QC) was required owing to the differences in extraction procedures and the molecular equipment used in the different laboratories. Three proficiency sets were organized, including four bacterial DNA extracts and four bead mill-pretreated osteoarticular specimens. Extraction volumes, 16S rRNA gene primers, and sequencing interpretation rules were standardized. In order to assess each laboratory's ability to achieve the best results, scores were assigned, and each QC series was classified as optimal, acceptable, or to be improved. A total of 168 QCs were sent, and 160 responses were analyzed. The expected results were obtained for 93.8%, with the same proportion for extracts (75/80) and clinical specimens (75/80). For the specimens, there was no significant difference between manual and automated extraction. This QC demonstrated the ability to achieve good and homogeneous results using the same 16S rRNA gene PCR with different equipment and validates the possibility of high-quality multicenter studies using molecular diagnosis for BJI. PMID:25411177

  11. In silico analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of endophytic bacteria, isolated from the aerial parts and seeds of important agricultural crops.

    PubMed

    Bredow, C; Azevedo, J L; Pamphile, J A; Mangolin, C A; Rhoden, S A

    2015-01-01

    Because of human population growth, increased food production and alternatives to conventional methods of biocontrol and development of plants such as the use of endophytic bacteria and fungi are required. One of the methods used to study microorganism diversity is sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, which has several advantages, including universality, size, and availability of databases for comparison. The objective of this study was to analyze endophytic bacterial diversity in agricultural crops using published papers, sequence databases, and phylogenetic analysis. Fourteen papers were selected in which the ribosomal 16S rRNA gene was used to identify endophytic bacteria, in important agricultural crops, such as coffee, sugar cane, beans, corn, soybean, tomatoes, and grapes, located in different geographical regions (America, Europe, and Asia). The corresponding 16S rRNA gene sequences were selected from the NCBI database, aligned using the Mega 5.2 program, and phylogenetic analysis was undertaken. The most common orders present in the analyzed cultures were Bacillales, Enterobacteriales, and Actinomycetales and the most frequently observed genera were Bacillus, Pseudomonas, and Microbacterium. Phylogenetic analysis showed that only approximately 1.56% of the total sequences were not properly grouped, demonstrating reliability in the identification of microorganisms. This study identified the main genera found in endophytic bacterial cultures from plants, providing data for future studies on improving plant agriculture, biotechnology, endophytic bacterium prospecting, and to help understand relationships between endophytic bacteria and their interactions with plants. PMID:26345903

  12. Sequence determination of rRNA genes of pathogenic Vibrio species and whole-cell identification of Vibrio vulnificus with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Aznar, R; Ludwig, W; Amann, R I; Schleifer, K H

    1994-04-01

    A comparative analysis of seven new 16S rRNA gene sequences of pathogenic Vibrio species with previously published vibrio sequences confirmed that Vibrio vulnificus represents a group that is not closely related to the core organisms of the genus Vibrio. In addition, we found that V. vulnificus, Listonella (Vibrio) anguillarum and Vibrio diazotrophicus branch off separately from the core group. A comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of V. vulnificus strains belonging to biotypes 1 and 2 revealed that the sequences of all but four biotype 1 strains were identical to each other but slightly different (17 bases) from the sequences of the rest of the V. vulnificus strains investigated. In addition, the sequences of variable regions of the 23S rRNA genes of Vibrio fluvialis, Vibrio furnissii, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio cholerae, and V. vulnificus C7184 and TW1 were determined, aligned, and compared with all available bacterial 23S rRNA sequences in order to search for specific target sites. As a result, four oligonucleotide probes specific for V. vulnificus were synthesized, and the specificities of these probes were evaluated by dot blot hybridization to membrane-bound RNAs from 21 V. vulnificus strains, 13 strains belonging to other Vibrio species, 61 strains belonging to species that are members of the alpha, beta, and gamma subclasses of the Proteobacteria, and 3 eucaryotic microorganisms. Two probes hybridized with all of the V. vulnificus strains tested, and the other two probes distinguished V. vulnificus biotype 1 strains from all other organisms. In situ identification of V. vulnificus by using tetramethylrhodamine- or fluorescein-labelled oligonucleotides is now possible.

  13. Comparison of bacterial communities in the Solimões and Negro River tributaries of the Amazon River based on small subunit rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, J C C; Leomil, L; Souza, J V; Peixoto, F B S; Astolfi-Filho, S

    2011-01-01

    The microbiota of the Amazon River basin has been little studied. We compared the structure of bacterial communities of the Solimões and Negro Rivers, the main Amazon River tributaries, based on analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Water was sampled with a 3-L Van Dorn collection bottle; samples were collected at nine different points/depths totaling 27 L of water from each river. Total DNA was extracted from biomass retained by a 0.22-μm filter after sequential filtration of the water through 0.8- and 0.22-μm filters. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced, and the sequences were analyzed with the PHYLIP and DOTUR programs to obtain the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and to calculate the diversity and richness indices using the SPADE program. Taxonomic affiliation was determined using the naive Bayesian rRNA Classifier of the RDP II (Ribosomal Database Project). We recovered 158 sequences from the Solimões River grouped into 103 OTUs, and 197 sequences from the Negro River library grouped into 90 OTUs by the DOTUR program. The Solimões River was found to have a greater diversity of bacterial genera, and greater estimated richness of 446 OTUs, compared with 242 OTUs from the Negro River, as calculated by ACE estimator. The Negro River has less bacterial diversity, but more 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to the bacterial genus Polynucleobacter were detected; 56 sequences from this genus were found (about 30% of the total sequences). We suggest that a more in-depth investigation be made to elucidate the role played by these bacteria in the river environment. These differences in bacterial diversity between Solimões and Negro Rivers could be explained by differences in organic matter content and pH of the rivers. PMID:22183948

  14. Characterization of the rDNA unit and sequence analysis of the small subunit rRNA and 5.8S rRNA genes from Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, D; Dame, J B; Gutell, R R; Yowell, C A

    1992-05-01

    The ribosomal RNA gene unit of the protozoan parasite Tritrichomonas foetus has been cloned and analyzed. Southern blot analysis of the genomic DNA showed that the ribosomal RNA gene unit is organized as a tandem head to tail repeat with a unit length of 6 kb. By Northern analysis a primary transcript of 5.8 kb was detected. Copy number analysis showed the presence of 12 copies of the ribosomal RNA gene unit. The lengths of the small subunit ribosomal RNA and 5.8S ribosomal RNA are 1571 bp and 159 bp, respectively, as determined by sequence analysis. The T. foetus small subunit ribosomal RNA sequence is one of the shortest eukaryotic small subunit rRNA sequences, similar in length to those from 2 other amitochondrial protists. Although shorter than the majority of the eukaryotic small subunit ribosomal RNAs, this sequence maintains the primary and secondary structure common to all eukaryotic small subunit ribosomal RNA structures, while truncating sequences found within the eukaryotic variable regions. The length of the large subunit ribosomal RNA was measured at 2.5 kb.

  15. Persistent spread of the rmtB 16S rRNA methyltransferase gene among Escherichia coli isolates from diseased food-producing animals in China.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jing; Sun, Jian; Cheng, Ke; Li, Liang; Fang, Liang-Xing; Zou, Meng-Ting; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-05-30

    A total of 963 non-duplicate Escherichia coli strains isolated from food-producing animals between 2002 and 2012 were screened for the presence of the 16S rRNA methyltransferase genes. Among the positive isolates, resistance determinants to extended spectrum β-lactamases, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes as well as floR and fosA/A3/C2 were detected using PCR analysis. These isolates were further subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, molecular typing, PCR-based plasmid replicon typing and plasmid analysis. Of the 963 E. coli isolates, 173 (18.0%), 3 (0.3%) and 2 (0.2%) were rmtB-, armA- and rmtE-positive strains, respectively. All the 16S rRNA methyltransferase gene-positive isolates were multidrug resistant and over 90% of them carried one or more type of resistance gene. IncF (especially IncFII) and non-typeable plasmids played the main role in the dissemination of rmtB, followed by the IncN plasmids. Plasmids that harbored rmtB ranged in size from 20kb to 340kb EcoRI-RFLP testing of the 109 rmtB-positive plasmids from different years and different origins suggested that horizontal (among diverse animals) and vertical transfer of IncF, non-typeable and IncN-type plasmids were responsible for the spread of rmtB gene. In summary, our findings highlight that rmtB was the most prevalent 16S rRNA methyltransferase gene, which present persistent spread in food-producing animals in China and a diverse group of plasmids was responsible for rmtB dissemination. PMID:27139028

  16. Persistent spread of the rmtB 16S rRNA methyltransferase gene among Escherichia coli isolates from diseased food-producing animals in China.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jing; Sun, Jian; Cheng, Ke; Li, Liang; Fang, Liang-Xing; Zou, Meng-Ting; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-05-30

    A total of 963 non-duplicate Escherichia coli strains isolated from food-producing animals between 2002 and 2012 were screened for the presence of the 16S rRNA methyltransferase genes. Among the positive isolates, resistance determinants to extended spectrum β-lactamases, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes as well as floR and fosA/A3/C2 were detected using PCR analysis. These isolates were further subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, molecular typing, PCR-based plasmid replicon typing and plasmid analysis. Of the 963 E. coli isolates, 173 (18.0%), 3 (0.3%) and 2 (0.2%) were rmtB-, armA- and rmtE-positive strains, respectively. All the 16S rRNA methyltransferase gene-positive isolates were multidrug resistant and over 90% of them carried one or more type of resistance gene. IncF (especially IncFII) and non-typeable plasmids played the main role in the dissemination of rmtB, followed by the IncN plasmids. Plasmids that harbored rmtB ranged in size from 20kb to 340kb EcoRI-RFLP testing of the 109 rmtB-positive plasmids from different years and different origins suggested that horizontal (among diverse animals) and vertical transfer of IncF, non-typeable and IncN-type plasmids were responsible for the spread of rmtB gene. In summary, our findings highlight that rmtB was the most prevalent 16S rRNA methyltransferase gene, which present persistent spread in food-producing animals in China and a diverse group of plasmids was responsible for rmtB dissemination.

  17. Prevalence of Lysogeny among Soil Bacteria and Presence of 16S rRNA and trzN Genes in Viral-Community DNA▿

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Dhritiman; Roy, Krishnakali; Williamson, Kurt E.; White, David C.; Wommack, K. Eric; Sublette, Kerry L.; Radosevich, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophages are very abundant in the biosphere, and viral infection is believed to affect the activity and genetic diversity of bacterial communities in aquatic environments. Lysogenic conversion, for example, can improve host fitness and lead to phage-mediated horizontal gene transfer. However, little is known about lysogeny and transduction in the soil environment. In this study we employed atrazine-impregnated Bio-Sep beads (a cell immobilization matrix) to sample active microbiota from soils with prior pesticide exposure history. Once recovered from soil, the bead communities were induced with mitomycin C (MC), and viral and bacterial abundances were determined to evaluate the incidence of inducible prophage in soil bacteria. The inducible fraction calculated within bead communities was high (ca. 85%) relative to other studies in aquatic and sedimentary environments. Moreover, the bacterial genes encoding 16S rRNA and trzN, a chlorohydrolase gene responsible for dehalogenation of atrazine, were detected by PCR in the viral DNA fraction purified from MC-induced bead communities. A diverse collection of actinobacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences occurred within the viral DNA fraction of induced, water-equilibrated beads. Similar results were observed in induced atrazine-equilibrated beads, where 77% of the cloned sequences were derived from actinobacterial lineages. Heterogeneous 16S rRNA gene sequences consisting of fragments from two different taxa were detected in the clone libraries. The results suggest that lysogeny is a prevalent reproductive strategy among soil bacteriophages and that the potential for horizontal gene transfer via transduction is significant in soil microbial communities. PMID:17993550

  18. Identification of Clinically Relevant Fungi and Prototheca Species by rRNA Gene Sequencing and Multilocus PCR Coupled with Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-Ying; Li, Li; Cao, Ya-Hui; Chen, Yan-Qiong; Zhao, Hua-Zhen; Zhang, Qiang-Qiang; Wu, Ji-Qin; Weng, Xin-Hua; Cheng, Xun-Jia; Zhu, Li-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Background Multilocus PCR coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) is a new strategy for pathogen identification, but information about its application in fungal identification remains sparse. Methods One-hundred and twelve strains and isolates of clinically important fungi and Prototheca species were subjected to both rRNA gene sequencing and PCR/ESI-MS. Three regions of the rRNA gene were used as targets for sequencing: the 5′ end of the large subunit rRNA gene (D1/D2 region), and the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 (ITS1 and ITS2 regions). Microbial identification (Micro ID), acquired by combining results of phenotypic methods and rRNA gene sequencing, was used to evaluate the results of PCR/ESI-MS. Results For identification of yeasts and filamentous fungi, combined sequencing of the three regions had the best performance (species-level identification rate of 93.8% and 81.8% respectively). The highest species-level identification rate was achieved by sequencing of D1/D2 for yeasts (92.2%) and ITS2 for filamentous fungi (75.8%). The two Prototheca species could be identified to species level by D1/D2 sequencing but not by ITS1 or ITS2. For the 102 strains and isolates within the coverage of PCR/ESI-MS identification, 87.3% (89/102) achieved species-level identification, 100% (89/89) of which were concordant to Micro ID on species/complex level. The species-level identification rates for yeasts and filamentous fungi were 93.9% (62/66) and 75% (27/36) respectively. Conclusions rRNA gene sequencing provides accurate identification information, with the best results obtained by a combination of ITS1, ITS2 and D1/D2 sequencing. Our preliminary data indicated that PCR/ESI-MS method also provides a rapid and accurate identification for many clinical relevant fungi. PMID:24835205

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of Euthyneura (Gastropoda) by means of the 16S rRNA gene: use of a 'fast' gene for 'higher-level' phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    Thollesson, M.

    1999-01-01

    The phylogeny of Euthyneura is analysed by using DNA sequences of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene. Despite the common notion that this gene is too variable to provide useful information at high taxonomic levels, such as in the present study, bootstrap proportions are high for several clades in the study. This indicates that there is a useful amount of variation despite the noise due to multiple substitutions. The analyses furthermore indicate that (i) Gymnosomata (represented by Clione) is not a part of Euthyneura, but Clione forms a clade with the caenogastropods; (ii) Acteon is the sister group to the remaining euthyneuran taxa in the study; (iii) the nudibranch taxa form two clades, one comprising Dendronotoidea, Arminoidea and Aeolidoidea (together Cladobranchia) with Notaspidea (represented by Berthella) as sister group, while the fourth nudibranch taxon, Doridoidea, forms a separate clade; (iv) Cephalaspidea s.s. and Anaspidea form clades that are each other's sister groups (together Pleurocoela). Finally, there is no clade present in the analyses corresponding to the taxon Opisthobranchia in the traditional sense, and the use of this name is probably better abandoned altogether.

  20. Detection of the new cosmopolitan genus Thermoleptolyngbya (Cyanobacteria, Leptolyngbyaceae) using the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S ITS region.

    PubMed

    Sciuto, Katia; Moro, Isabella

    2016-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are widespread prokaryotes that are able to live in extreme conditions such as thermal springs. Strains attributable to the genus Leptolyngbya are among the most common cyanobacteria sampled from thermal environments. Leptolyngbya is a character-poor taxon that was demonstrated to be polyphyletic based on molecular analyses. The recent joining of 16S rRNA gene phylogenies with 16S-23S ITS secondary structure analysis is a useful approach to detect new cryptic taxa and has led to the separation of new genera from Leptolyngbya and to the description of new species inside this genus and in other related groups. In this study, phylogenetic investigations based on both the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S ITS region were performed alongside 16S rRNA and 16S-23S ITS secondary structure analyses on cyanobacteria of the family Leptolyngbyaceae. These analyses focused on filamentous strains sampled from thermal springs with a morphology ascribable to the genus Leptolyngbya. The phylogenetic reconstructions showed that the Leptolyngbya-like thermal strains grouped into a monophyletic lineage that was distinct from Leptolyngbya. The 16S-23S ITS secondary structure results supported the separation of this cluster. A new genus named Thermoleptolyngbya was erected to encompass these strains, and two species were described inside this new taxon: T. albertanoae and T. oregonensis. PMID:27546720

  1. Detection of the new cosmopolitan genus Thermoleptolyngbya (Cyanobacteria, Leptolyngbyaceae) using the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S ITS region.

    PubMed

    Sciuto, Katia; Moro, Isabella

    2016-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are widespread prokaryotes that are able to live in extreme conditions such as thermal springs. Strains attributable to the genus Leptolyngbya are among the most common cyanobacteria sampled from thermal environments. Leptolyngbya is a character-poor taxon that was demonstrated to be polyphyletic based on molecular analyses. The recent joining of 16S rRNA gene phylogenies with 16S-23S ITS secondary structure analysis is a useful approach to detect new cryptic taxa and has led to the separation of new genera from Leptolyngbya and to the description of new species inside this genus and in other related groups. In this study, phylogenetic investigations based on both the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S ITS region were performed alongside 16S rRNA and 16S-23S ITS secondary structure analyses on cyanobacteria of the family Leptolyngbyaceae. These analyses focused on filamentous strains sampled from thermal springs with a morphology ascribable to the genus Leptolyngbya. The phylogenetic reconstructions showed that the Leptolyngbya-like thermal strains grouped into a monophyletic lineage that was distinct from Leptolyngbya. The 16S-23S ITS secondary structure results supported the separation of this cluster. A new genus named Thermoleptolyngbya was erected to encompass these strains, and two species were described inside this new taxon: T. albertanoae and T. oregonensis.

  2. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and functional tfdA gene distribution in thirty-one different 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid degraders.

    PubMed

    Baelum, Jacob; Jacobsen, Carsten S; Holben, William E

    2010-03-01

    31 different bacterial strains isolated using the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) as the sole source of carbon, were investigated for their ability to mineralize 2,4-D and the related herbicide 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA). Most of the strains mineralize 2,4-D considerably faster than MCPA. Three novel primer sets were developed enabling amplification of full-length coding sequences (CDS) of the three known tfdA gene classes known to be involved in phenoxy acid degradation. 16S rRNA genes were also sequenced; and in order to investigate possible linkage between tfdA gene classes and bacterial species, tfdA and 16S rRNA gene phylogeny was compared. Three distinctly different classes of tfdA genes were observed, with class I tfdA sequences further partitioned into the two sub-classes I-a and I-b based on more subtle differences. Comparison of phylogenies derived from 16S rRNA gene sequences and tfdA gene sequences revealed that most class II tfdA genes were encoded by Burkholderia sp., while class I-a, I-b and III genes were found in a more diverse array of bacteria.

  3. Microbial rRNA: rDNA gene ratios may be unexpectedly low due to extracellular DNA preservation in soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We tested a method of estimating the activity of detectable individual bacterial and archaeal OTUs within a community by calculating ratios of absolute 16S rRNA to rDNA copy numbers. We investigated phylogenetically coherent patterns of activity among soil prokaryotes in non-growing soil communitie...

  4. First report of neonatal bacteremia caused by "Haemophilus quentini" diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, Italy.

    PubMed

    Giufrè, Maria; Cardines, Rita; Degl'Innocenti, Roberto; Cerquetti, Marina

    2015-10-01

    We report the first case of neonatal bacteremia caused by a "Haemophilus quentini" isolate in Italy. The isolate was differentiated from H. influenzae by 16S rRNA sequencing and was characterized by comparison with the wild-type "H. quentini" CCUG 36167. Both isolates carried substitutions in penicillin-binding protein 3 but were susceptible to aminopenicillins.

  5. 23S rRNA gene mutations contributing to macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Operon specific 23S rRNA mutations affecting minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of macrolides (erythromycin [ERY], azithromycin [AZM], tylosin [TYL]) and a lincosamide (clindamycin [CLI]) were examined in a collection of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli isolates. The three copies of the Campy...

  6. Emergence of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci resistant to linezolid with rRNA gene C2190T and G2603T mutations.

    PubMed

    Cidral, Thiago André; Carvalho, Maria Cícera; Figueiredo, Agnes Marie Sá; de Melo, Maria Celeste Nunes

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this article were to determinate the mechanism of linezolid resistance in coagulase-negative methicillin-resistant staphylococci from hospitals in the northeast of Brazil. We identified the isolates using VITEK(®) 2 and MALDI-TOF. Susceptibility to antibiotics was measured by the disk-diffusion method and by Etest(®) . Extraction of the whole genome DNA was performed, followed by screening of all the strains for the presence of mecA and cfr genes. The domain V region of 23S rRNA gene was sequenced and then aligned with a linezolid-susceptible reference strain. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) macro-restriction analysis was performed. Three linezolid-resistant Staphylococcus hominis and two linezolid-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis strains were analyzed. The isolates showed two point mutations in the V region of the 23S rRNA gene (C2190T and G2603T). We did not detect the cfr gene in any isolate by PCR. The S. hominis showed the same pulsotype, while the S. epidermidis did not present any genetic relation to each other. In conclusion, this study revealed three S. hominis and two S. epidermidis strains with resistance to linezolid due to a double mutation (C2190T and G2603T) in the domain V of the 23S rRNA gene. For the first time, the mutation of C2190T in S. epidermidis is described. This study also revealed the clonal spread of a S. hominis pulsotype between three public hospitals in the city of Natal, Brazil. These findings highlight the importance of continued vigilance of linezolid resistance in staphylococci.

  7. Identification of the forensically important beetles Nicrophorus japonicus, Ptomascopus plagiatus and Silpha carinata (Coleoptera: Silphidae) based on 16S rRNA gene in China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Z C; Guo, Y D; Zhang, X W; Shi, J; Yang, K T; Li, X L; Chen, Y Q; Cai, J F

    2012-09-01

    Sarcophagous beetles play an important role in estimating postmortem interval time (PMI) in the later stages decomposition of carcasses. However, the morphological similarity of beetles usually poses a challenge for forensic scientists within their routine work. As a supplementary to traditional morphological method, molecular genetics identification is simple and time-saving. A molecular identification method involving a 288-bp segment of the 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene from 15 beetles of Silphidae (Coleoptera), collected from 5 locations in 4 Chinese provinces, was evaluated. Phenogram analysis of the sequenced segments by the unweighted pairgroup method analysis (UPGMA) method showed that all specimens were properly assigned into four species with strong similarity, which indicated the possibility of separation congeneric species with the short 16S rRNA fragment. These results will be instrumental for implementation of the Chinese database of forensically relevant beetles.

  8. Chromosomal mapping of rRNA genes, core histone genes and telomeric sequences in Brachidontes puniceus and Brachidontes rodriguezi (Bivalvia, Mytilidae)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chromosome rearrangements are an important part of the speciation process in many taxa. The study of chromosome evolution in bivalves is hampered by the absence of clear chromosomal banding patterns and the similarity in both chromosome size and morphology. For this reason, obtaining good chromosome markers is essential for reliable karyotypic comparisons. To begin this task, the chromosomes of the mussels Brachidontes puniceus and B. rodriguezi were studied by means of fluorochrome staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Results Brachidontes puniceus and B. rodriguezi both have 2n = 32 chromosomes but differing karyotype composition. Vertebrate-type telomeric sequences appear at both ends of every single chromosome. B. puniceus presents a single terminal major rRNA gene cluster on a chromosome pair while B. rodriguezi shows two. Both mussels present two 5S rDNA and two core histone gene clusters intercalary located on the long arms of two chromosome pairs. Double and triple-FISH experiments demonstrated that one of the 5S rDNA and one of the major rDNA clusters appear on the same chromosome pair in B. rodriguezi but not in B. puniceus. On the other hand, the second 5S rDNA cluster is located in one of the chromosome pairs also bearing one of the core histone gene clusters in the two mussel species. Conclusion Knowledge of the chromosomal distribution of these sequences in the two species of Brachidontes is a first step in the understanding of the role of chromosome changes on bivalve evolution. PMID:21143946

  9. Evaluation of bacterial communities by bacteriome analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes and quantitative analysis of ammonia monooxygenase gene in different types of compost.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Rika; Ishii, Kazuo; Maeda, Isamu; Kozaki, Toshinori; Iwabuchi, Kazunori; Saito, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Biofiltration technology based on microbial degradation and assimilation is used for the removal of malodorous compounds, such as ammonia. Microbes that degrade malodorous and/or organic substances are involved in composting and are retained after composting; therefore, mature composts can serve as an ideal candidate for a biofilter medium. In this study, we focused on different types of raw compost materials, as these are important factors determining the bacterial community profile and the chemical component of the compost. Therefore, bacterial community profiles, the abundance of the bacterial ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA), and the quantities of chemical components were analyzed in composts produced from either food waste or cattle manure. The community profiles with the lowest beta diversity were obtained from single type of cattle manure compost. However, cattle manure composts showed greater alpha diversity, contained higher amounts of various rRNA gene fragments than those of food waste composts and contained the amoA gene by relative quantification, and Proteobacteria were abundantly found and nitrifying bacteria were detected in it. Nitrifying bacteria are responsible for ammonia oxidation and mainly belong to the Proteobacteria or Nitrospira phyla. The quantities of chemical components, such as salt, phosphorus, and nitrogen, differed between the cattle manure and food waste composts, indicating that the raw materials provided different fermentation environments that were crucial for the formation of different community profiles. The results also suggest that cattle manure might be a more suitable raw material for the production of composts to be used in the biofiltration of ammonia.

  10. Evaluation of bacterial communities by bacteriome analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes and quantitative analysis of ammonia monooxygenase gene in different types of compost.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Rika; Ishii, Kazuo; Maeda, Isamu; Kozaki, Toshinori; Iwabuchi, Kazunori; Saito, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Biofiltration technology based on microbial degradation and assimilation is used for the removal of malodorous compounds, such as ammonia. Microbes that degrade malodorous and/or organic substances are involved in composting and are retained after composting; therefore, mature composts can serve as an ideal candidate for a biofilter medium. In this study, we focused on different types of raw compost materials, as these are important factors determining the bacterial community profile and the chemical component of the compost. Therefore, bacterial community profiles, the abundance of the bacterial ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA), and the quantities of chemical components were analyzed in composts produced from either food waste or cattle manure. The community profiles with the lowest beta diversity were obtained from single type of cattle manure compost. However, cattle manure composts showed greater alpha diversity, contained higher amounts of various rRNA gene fragments than those of food waste composts and contained the amoA gene by relative quantification, and Proteobacteria were abundantly found and nitrifying bacteria were detected in it. Nitrifying bacteria are responsible for ammonia oxidation and mainly belong to the Proteobacteria or Nitrospira phyla. The quantities of chemical components, such as salt, phosphorus, and nitrogen, differed between the cattle manure and food waste composts, indicating that the raw materials provided different fermentation environments that were crucial for the formation of different community profiles. The results also suggest that cattle manure might be a more suitable raw material for the production of composts to be used in the biofiltration of ammonia. PMID:26111599

  11. Simultaneous DNA-RNA Extraction from Coastal Sediments and Quantification of 16S rRNA Genes and Transcripts by Real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Tatti, Enrico; McKew, Boyd A; Whitby, Corrine; Smith, Cindy J

    2016-01-01

    Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction also known as quantitative PCR (q-PCR) is a widely used tool in microbial ecology to quantify gene abundances of taxonomic and functional groups in environmental samples. Used in combination with a reverse transcriptase reaction (RT-q-PCR), it can also be employed to quantify gene transcripts. q-PCR makes use of highly sensitive fluorescent detection chemistries that allow quantification of PCR amplicons during the exponential phase of the reaction. Therefore, the biases associated with 'end-point' PCR detected in the plateau phase of the PCR reaction are avoided. A protocol to quantify bacterial 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from coastal sediments via real-time PCR is provided. First, a method for the co-extraction of DNA and RNA from coastal sediments, including the additional steps required for the preparation of DNA-free RNA, is outlined. Second, a step-by-step guide for the quantification of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from the extracted nucleic acids via q-PCR and RT-q-PCR is outlined. This includes details for the construction of DNA and RNA standard curves. Key considerations for the use of RT-q-PCR assays in microbial ecology are included. PMID:27341629

  12. Simultaneous DNA-RNA Extraction from Coastal Sediments and Quantification of 16S rRNA Genes and Transcripts by Real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Tatti, Enrico; McKew, Boyd A.; Whitby, Corrine; Smith, Cindy J.

    2016-01-01

    Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction also known as quantitative PCR (q-PCR) is a widely used tool in microbial ecology to quantify gene abundances of taxonomic and functional groups in environmental samples. Used in combination with a reverse transcriptase reaction (RT-q-PCR), it can also be employed to quantify gene transcripts. q-PCR makes use of highly sensitive fluorescent detection chemistries that allow quantification of PCR amplicons during the exponential phase of the reaction. Therefore, the biases associated with 'end-point' PCR detected in the plateau phase of the PCR reaction are avoided. A protocol to quantify bacterial 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from coastal sediments via real-time PCR is provided. First, a method for the co-extraction of DNA and RNA from coastal sediments, including the additional steps required for the preparation of DNA-free RNA, is outlined. Second, a step-by-step guide for the quantification of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from the extracted nucleic acids via q-PCR and RT-q-PCR is outlined. This includes details for the construction of DNA and RNA standard curves. Key considerations for the use of RT-q-PCR assays in microbial ecology are included. PMID:27341629

  13. Simultaneous DNA-RNA Extraction from Coastal Sediments and Quantification of 16S rRNA Genes and Transcripts by Real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Tatti, Enrico; McKew, Boyd A; Whitby, Corrine; Smith, Cindy J

    2016-06-11

    Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction also known as quantitative PCR (q-PCR) is a widely used tool in microbial ecology to quantify gene abundances of taxonomic and functional groups in environmental samples. Used in combination with a reverse transcriptase reaction (RT-q-PCR), it can also be employed to quantify gene transcripts. q-PCR makes use of highly sensitive fluorescent detection chemistries that allow quantification of PCR amplicons during the exponential phase of the reaction. Therefore, the biases associated with 'end-point' PCR detected in the plateau phase of the PCR reaction are avoided. A protocol to quantify bacterial 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from coastal sediments via real-time PCR is provided. First, a method for the co-extraction of DNA and RNA from coastal sediments, including the additional steps required for the preparation of DNA-free RNA, is outlined. Second, a step-by-step guide for the quantification of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from the extracted nucleic acids via q-PCR and RT-q-PCR is outlined. This includes details for the construction of DNA and RNA standard curves. Key considerations for the use of RT-q-PCR assays in microbial ecology are included.

  14. Differential gene expression in neurospora crassa cell types: amplification of rRNA genes. Progress report, July 1979-30 June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    The significant results obtained during 1979 to 1980 of the current research program are as follows: (1) the differential rRNA gene amplification in germinated conidia of N.crassa was confirmed. N.crassa rDNAs showed differences in degrees of homology with isolated DNAs from other Neurospora species which could be due to heterogeneity in internal spacers. Studies with N.crassa rDNA clones were initiated to study their heterogeneities. The organization of the Institutional Biohazard Committee (IBC) for Recombinant DNA research was completed and necessary certifications for the laboratory and the workers were obtained in accordance with the P/sub 2/EK/sub 1/ containment regulation of N.I.H. Known 17S and 26S N.crassa rDNA probes are being used to detect differences, if any, in restriction cleavage sites in rDNAs of different cell types and developmental mutants of N.crassa. DNAs from these N.crassa cells are restricted with EcoR/sub 1/ and Hind III and cleaved fragments separated by gel electrophoresis are transferred into nitrocellulose papers. Experiments are underway now to see if there are any changes in cleavage sites by annealing with /sup 32/P or /sup 3/H-17S or 26S rDNA probes followed by autoradiography.

  15. Prevalence of 16S rRNA Methylase Gene rmtB Among Escherichia coli Isolated from Bovine Mastitis in Ningxia, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ting; He, Tao; Yao, Hong; Zhang, Jin-Bao; Li, Xiao-Na; Zhang, Rong-Ming; Wang, Gui-Qin

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the prevalence and molecular characterization of 16S rRNA methylase gene, rmtB, among Escherichia coli strains isolated from bovine mastitis in China. A total of 245 E. coli isolates were collected from bovine mastitis in China between 2013 and 2014 and were screened for 16S rRNA methylase genes (armA, rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, rmtD, rmtE, and npmA) by polymerase chain reaction. About 5.3% (13/245) of the isolates carried the rmtB gene; the isolates were highly resistant to amikacin. Thirteen rmtB-positive strains were analyzed for the presence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase genes (bla(TEM), bla(CTX-M), bla(OXA), and bla(SHV)). All the isolates harbored both bla(TEM-1) and bla(CTX-M-15) genes and two of the isolates were also positive for bla(OXA-1). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis indicated that the nine rmtB-positive strains belonging to ST10 from one farm showed the similar PFGE pattern, indicating a clonal expansion in this farm. S1-PFGE and Southern blotting showed that 12 isolates harbored the rmtB gene in plasmids of two different sizes (≈45 kb [n=10] and ≈48 kb [n=2]), while only 1 strain harbored the rmtB gene in the chromosome. These plasmids were transferable by conjugation studies, and two isolates from two respective farms carried the same size of plasmid, suggesting that the horizontal transmission of plasmids also contributed to the spread of rmtB gene. This is the first report of prevalence of the 16S rRNA methylase gene rmtB among E. coli isolated from bovine mastitis in China, and rmtB-carrying E. coli may pose a threat to the treatment of bovine mastitis.

  16. An evolutionary conserved pattern of 18S rRNA sequence complementarity to mRNA 5' UTRs and its implications for eukaryotic gene translation regulation.

    PubMed

    Pánek, Josef; Kolár, Michal; Vohradský, Jirí; Shivaya Valásek, Leos

    2013-09-01

    There are several key mechanisms regulating eukaryotic gene expression at the level of protein synthesis. Interestingly, the least explored mechanisms of translational control are those that involve the translating ribosome per se, mediated for example via predicted interactions between the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and mRNAs. Here, we took advantage of robustly growing large-scale data sets of mRNA sequences for numerous organisms, solved ribosomal structures and computational power to computationally explore the mRNA-rRNA complementarity that is statistically significant across the species. Our predictions reveal highly specific sequence complementarity of 18S rRNA sequences with mRNA 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) forming a well-defined 3D pattern on the rRNA sequence of the 40S subunit. Broader evolutionary conservation of this pattern may imply that 5' UTRs of eukaryotic mRNAs, which have already emerged from the mRNA-binding channel, may contact several complementary spots on 18S rRNA situated near the exit of the mRNA binding channel and on the middle-to-lower body of the solvent-exposed 40S ribosome including its left foot. We discuss physiological significance of this structurally conserved pattern and, in the context of previously published experimental results, propose that it modulates scanning of the 40S subunit through 5' UTRs of mRNAs.

  17. Use of Universal 16S rRNA Gene PCR as a Diagnostic Tool for Venous Access Port-Related Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Marín, M.; Martín-Rabadán, P.; Echenagusia, A.; Camúñez, F.; Rodríguez-Rosales, G.; Simó, G.; Echenagusia, M.; Bouza, E.

    2013-01-01

    Amplification of the universal 16S rRNA gene using PCR has improved the diagnostic yield of microbiological samples. However, no data have been reported on the reliability of this technique with venous access ports (VAPs). We assessed the utility of 16S rRNA PCR for the prediction of VAP-related bloodstream infection (VAP-RBSI). During a 2-year period, we prospectively received all VAPs removed by interventional radiologists. PCR and conventional cultures were performed using samples from the different VAP sites. We compared the results of PCR with those of conventional culture for patients with confirmed VAP-RBSI. We collected 219 VAPs from 219 patients. Conventional VAP culture revealed 15 episodes of VAP-RBSI. PCR revealed a further 4 episodes in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy which would have gone undetected using conventional culture. Moreover, it had a negative predictive value of 97.8% for the prediction of VAP-RBSI when it was performed using biofilm from the internal surface of the port. In conclusion, universal 16S rRNA PCR performed with samples from the inside of VAPs proved to be a useful tool for the diagnosis of VAP-RBSI. It increased detection of VAP-RBSI episodes by 21.1% in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy whose episodes would have gone undetected using conventional culture. Therefore, we propose a new application of 16S rRNA PCR as a useful tool for the diagnosis of VAP-RBSI in patients receiving antibiotic therapy. PMID:23254136

  18. Low prevalence of clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori isolates with A2143G point mutation in the 23S rRNA gene in North India.

    PubMed

    Gehlot, Valentina; Mahant, Shweta; Mukhopadhyay, Asish Kumar; Das, Kunal; Alam, Jawed; Ghosh, Prachetash; Das, Rajashree

    2016-09-01

    Resistance of Helicobacter pylori to clarithromycin is associated with a single base substitution in the 23S rRNA gene. In this study, clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori isolates were analysed for the presence of 23S rRNA gene mutations. H. pylori were isolated from 68 patients suffering from various gastroduodenal diseases in North India. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by the agar dilution method, and point mutations in clarithromycin-resistant strains were identified by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and DNA sequencing. Clarithromycin resistance was observed in 11.8% (8/68) of the H. pylori isolates in North India. The A2143G point mutation in the 23S rRNA gene was found in 87.5% (7/8) of the clarithromycin-resistant strains, and the A2142G mutation in association with the T2182C mutation was found in 12.5% (1/8). In conclusion, the continued high prevalence of clarithromycin-sensitive H. pylori strains (88.2%) observed in this study allows the use of the triple-therapy regimen for the treatment of H. pylori infection in this region. Surveillance studies need to be conducted at regular intervals for clarithromycin resistance in the population. To our knowledge, this is the first study in India to report that point mutations at position A2143G and at A2142G in association with T2182C are associated with clarithromycin resistance, confirming reports from other parts of the world. PMID:27530837

  19. Polymorphism of genes coding for nuclear 18S rRNA indicates genetic distinctiveness of anastomosis group 10 from other groups in the Rhizoctonia solani species complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z L; Domier, L L; Sinclair, J B

    1995-07-01

    DNA polymorphism in the 18S nuclear rRNA gene region was investigated by using 11 restriction endonucleases for 161 isolates of 25 intraspecific groups (ISGs) representing 11 reported anastomosis groups (AGs) of Rhizoctonia solani. A PCR-based restriction mapping method in which enzymatically amplified DNA fragments and subfragments were digested with one or two restriction enzymes was employed. Four types of DNA restriction maps of this region were constructed for these 25 ISGs. Map type I of the 18S rDNA region was represented by isolates of a majority of R. solani ISGs. Map types II and III, represented by ISG 2E and 9 isolates and 5C isolates, respectively, differed from map I by the absence of one (map type II) or two (map type III) restriction sites. Map type IV, represented by ISG 10A and B (or AG 10) isolates, showed significant restriction site variations, with five enzymes in this region compared with those of the remaining ISGs or AGs. Ten of the 25 restriction sites in the 18S rRNA gene region were informative and selected for analysis. Previously reported restriction maps of the 5.8S rRNA gene region, including the internal transcribed spacers, were aligned with each other, and 12 informative restriction sites were identified. These data were used alone and in combination to evaluate group relationships. Analyses derived from these data sets by maximum parsimony and likelihood methods showed that AG 10 isolates were distinct and distantly related to the majority isolates of the other AGs of this species complex.

  20. The genetic diversity of genus Bacillus and the related genera revealed by 16s rRNA gene sequences and ardra analyses isolated from geothermal regions of turkey

    PubMed Central

    Cihan, Arzu Coleri; Tekin, Nilgun; Ozcan, Birgul; Cokmus, Cumhur

    2012-01-01

    Previously isolated 115 endospore-forming bacilli were basically grouped according to their temperature requirements for growth: the thermophiles (74%), the facultative thermophiles (14%) and the mesophiles (12%). These isolates were taken into 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses, and they were clustered among the 7 genera: Anoxybacillus, Aeribacillus, Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Geobacillus, Paenibacillus, and Thermoactinomycetes. Of these bacilli, only the thirty two isolates belonging to genera Bacillus (16), Brevibacillus (13), Paenibacillus (1) and Thermoactinomycetes (2) were selected and presented in this paper. The comparative sequence analyses revealed that the similarity values were ranged as 91.4–100 %, 91.8- 99.2 %, 92.6- 99.8 % and 90.7 - 99.8 % between the isolates and the related type strains from these four genera, respectively. Twenty nine of them were found to be related with the validly published type strains. The most abundant species was B. thermoruber with 9 isolates followed by B. pumilus (6), B. lichenformis (3), B. subtilis (3), B. agri (3), B. smithii (2), T. vulgaris (2) and finally P. barengoltzii (1). In addition, isolates of A391a, B51a and D295 were proposed as novel species as their 16S rRNA gene sequences displayed similarities ≤ 97% to their closely related type strains. The AluI-, HaeIII- and TaqI-ARDRA results were in congruence with the 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. The ARDRA results allowed us to differentiate these isolates, and their discriminative restriction fragments were able to be determined. Some of their phenotypic characters and their amylase, chitinase and protease production were also studied and biotechnologically valuable enzyme producing isolates were introduced in order to use in further studies. PMID:24031834

  1. Phylogenetic characterization of 16S rRNA gene clones from deep-groundwater microorganisms that pass through 0.2-micrometer-pore-size filters.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Tatsuo; Iwatsuki, Teruki; Naganuma, Takeshi

    2005-02-01

    A total of 247 clones of 16S rRNA genes from microorganisms captured by 0.2- and 0.1-microm-pore-size filters from sedimentary and granite rock aquifers were amplified and yielded 37 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Fifteen OTUs captured by 0.1-microm-pore-size filters were affiliated with the candidate divisions OD1 and OP11, representing novel lineages. On the other hand, OTUs captured by 0.2-microm-pore-size filters were largely affiliated with Betaproteobacteria.

  2. Western immunoblot analysis of Haemobartonella muris and comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences of H. muris, H. felis, and Eperythrozoon suis.

    PubMed Central

    Rikihisa, Y; Kawahara, M; Wen, B; Kociba, G; Fuerst, P; Kawamori, F; Suto, C; Shibata, S; Futohashi, M

    1997-01-01

    Infectious agents were isolated from the spleens of three wild mice (Apodemus argenteus) by intraperitoneal inoculation of the spleen homogenate into laboratory mice. The laboratory mice developed clinical signs and splenomegaly, and three isolates were maintained by passage in mice. Tetracyclines were effective in preventing infection of mice with these agents, but streptomycin and penicillin were ineffective. The agents did not grow in bacterial growth media or chicken embryos. In smears of blood from infected mice stained by the Giemsa or the indirect immunofluorescence method, numerous organisms were found on the surfaces of erythrocytes. Electron microscopy revealed cell wall-less pleomorphic cocci of 350 to 700 nm in diameter. On the basis of these results, the isolates were identified as Haemobartonella muris. There was no antigenic cross-reactivity with Rickettsia or Ehrlichia spp. or other related organisms. Western immunoblot analysis of three strains of H. muris with mouse antisera to H. muris revealed identical major antigens of 118, 65, 53, 45, and 40 kDa. By heteroduplex analysis of the three PCR-amplified segments of the 16S rRNA genes, the three strains of H. muris were found to be identical. The 16S rRNA genes of one of the H. muris strains, four strains of H. felis, and two strains of Eperythrozoon suis were sequenced and compared. The sequences of two strains of H. felis from cats in California were identical, as were the sequences of a strain from a cat in Ohio and a strain from a cat in Florida, but the similarity of sequences between the California and the Ohio-Florida strains was only 85%. The sequence of an H. muris strain was unique and was more closely related to that of the Ohio-Florida strain of H. felis (89%) than to that of the California strain of H. felis (84%). The sequence of E. suis from a pig in Illinois was identical to that from another pig from Taiwan. The similarity of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of E. suis with those of three

  3. Evaluations of Different Hypervariable Regions of Archaeal 16S rRNA Genes in Profiling of Methanogens by Archaea-Specific PCR and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis▿

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhongtang; García-González, Rubén; Schanbacher, Floyd L.; Morrison, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Different hypervariable (V) regions of the archaeal 16S rRNA gene (rrs) were compared systematically to establish a preferred V region(s) for use in Archaea-specific PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The PCR products of the V3 region produced the most informative DGGE profiles and permitted identification of common methanogens from rumen samples from sheep. This study also showed that different methanogens might be detected when different V regions are targeted by PCR-DGGE. Dietary fat appeared to transiently stimulate Methanosphaera stadtmanae but inhibit Methanobrevibacter sp. strain AbM4 in rumen samples. PMID:18083874

  4. Phylogenetic relationships of Blepharisma americanum and Colpoda inflata within the phylum ciliophora inferred from complete small subunit rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, S J; Schlegel, M; Sogin, M L; Lynn, D H

    1991-01-01

    The complete small subunit rRNA gene sequences of the heterotrich Blepharisma americanum and the colpodid Colpoda inflata were determined to be 1719 and 1786 nucleotides respectively. The phylogeny produced by comparisons with other ciliates indicated that C. inflata is allied more closely with the nassophoreans and oligohymenophoreans than the spirotrichs. This is consistent with the placement of the colpodids in the Class Copodea. Blepharisma americanum was not grouped with the hypotrichs but instead was placed as the earliest branching ciliate. The distinct separation of B. americanum supports the elevation to class status given the heterotrichs based on morphological characters.

  5. Nature of polymorphisms in 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic transcribed spacer fingerprinting of Bacillus and related genera.

    PubMed

    Daffonchio, Daniele; Cherif, Ameur; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Rizzi, Aurora; Mora, Diego; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Borin, Sara

    2003-09-01

    The intergenic transcribed spacers (ITS) between the 16S and 23S rRNA genetic loci are frequently used in PCR fingerprinting to discriminate bacterial strains at the species and intraspecies levels. We investigated the molecular nature of polymorphisms in ITS-PCR fingerprinting of low-G+C-content spore-forming bacteria belonging to the genera Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Geobacillus, and Paenibacillus: We found that besides the polymorphisms in the homoduplex fragments amplified by PCR, heteroduplex products formed during PCR between amplicons from different ribosomal operons, with or without tRNA genes in the ITS, contribute to the interstrain variability in ITS-PCR fingerprinting patterns obtained in polyacrylamide-based gel matrices. The heteroduplex nature of the discriminating bands was demonstrated by fragment separation in denaturing polyacrylamide gels, by capillary electrophoresis, and by cloning, sequencing, and recombination of purified short and tRNA gene-containing long ITS. We also found that heteroduplex product formation is enhanced by increasing the number of PCR cycles. Homoduplex-heteroduplex polymorphisms (HHP) in a conserved region, such as the 16S and 23S rRNA gene ITS, allowed discrimination of closely related strains and species undistinguishable by other methods, indicating that ITS-HHP analysis is an easy and reproducible additional tool for strain typing.

  6. Vertical Distribution of Bacterial Communities in the Indian Ocean as Revealed by Analyses of 16S rRNA and nasA Genes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuexia; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria play an important role in the marine biogeochemical cycles. However, research on the bacterial community structure of the Indian Ocean is scarce, particularly within the vertical dimension. In this study, we investigated the bacterial diversity of the pelagic, mesopelagic and bathypelagic zones of the southwestern Indian Ocean (50.46°E, 37.71°S). The clone libraries constructed by 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that most phylotypes retrieved from the Indian Ocean were highly divergent from those retrieved from other oceans. Vertical differences were observed based on the analysis of natural bacterial community populations derived from the 16S rRNA gene sequences. Based on the analysis of the nasA gene sequences from GenBank database, a pair of general primers was developed and used to amplify the bacterial nitrate-assimilating populations. Environmental factors play an important role in mediating the bacterial communities in the Indian Ocean revealed by canonical correlation analysis. PMID:27407295

  7. Vertical Distribution of Bacterial Communities in the Indian Ocean as Revealed by Analyses of 16S rRNA and nasA Genes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuexia; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria play an important role in the marine biogeochemical cycles. However, research on the bacterial community structure of the Indian Ocean is scarce, particularly within the vertical dimension. In this study, we investigated the bacterial diversity of the pelagic, mesopelagic and bathypelagic zones of the southwestern Indian Ocean (50.46°E, 37.71°S). The clone libraries constructed by 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that most phylotypes retrieved from the Indian Ocean were highly divergent from those retrieved from other oceans. Vertical differences were observed based on the analysis of natural bacterial community populations derived from the 16S rRNA gene sequences. Based on the analysis of the nasA gene sequences from GenBank database, a pair of general primers was developed and used to amplify the bacterial nitrate-assimilating populations. Environmental factors play an important role in mediating the bacterial communities in the Indian Ocean revealed by canonical correlation analysis.

  8. Bacterial diversity in a finished compost and vermicompost: differences revealed by cultivation-independent analyses of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Fracchia, Letizia; Dohrmann, Anja B; Martinotti, Maria Giovanna; Tebbe, Christoph C

    2006-08-01

    Bacterial communities are important catalysts in the production of composts. Here, it was analysed whether the diversity of bacteria in finished composts is stable and specific for the production process. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) based on polymerase chain reaction amplified partial 16S rRNA genes was used to profile and analyse bacterial communities found in total DNA extracted from finished composts. Different batches of compost samples stored over a period of 12 years and a 1-year-old vermicompost were compared to each other. According to digital image analysis, clear differences could be detected between the profiles from compost and vermicompost. Differences between three different periods of compost storage and between replicate vermicompost windrows were only minor. A total of 41 different 16S rRNA genes were identified from the SSCP profiles by DNA sequencing, with the vast majority related to yet-uncultivated bacteria. Sequences retrieved from compost mainly belonged to the phyla Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. In contrast, vermicompost was dominated by bacteria related to uncultured Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Gemmatimonadetes. The differences were underscored with specific gene probes and Southern blot hybridizations. The results confirmed that different substrates and composting processes selected for specific bacterial communities in the finished products. The specificity and consistency of the bacterial communities inhabiting the compost materials suggest that cultivation-independent bacterial community analysis is a potentially useful indicator to characterize the quality of finished composts in regard to production processes and effects of storage conditions.

  9. Nature of polymorphisms in 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic transcribed spacer fingerprinting of Bacillus and related genera.

    PubMed

    Daffonchio, Daniele; Cherif, Ameur; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Rizzi, Aurora; Mora, Diego; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Borin, Sara

    2003-09-01

    The intergenic transcribed spacers (ITS) between the 16S and 23S rRNA genetic loci are frequently used in PCR fingerprinting to discriminate bacterial strains at the species and intraspecies levels. We investigated the molecular nature of polymorphisms in ITS-PCR fingerprinting of low-G+C-content spore-forming bacteria belonging to the genera Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Geobacillus, and Paenibacillus: We found that besides the polymorphisms in the homoduplex fragments amplified by PCR, heteroduplex products formed during PCR between amplicons from different ribosomal operons, with or without tRNA genes in the ITS, contribute to the interstrain variability in ITS-PCR fingerprinting patterns obtained in polyacrylamide-based gel matrices. The heteroduplex nature of the discriminating bands was demonstrated by fragment separation in denaturing polyacrylamide gels, by capillary electrophoresis, and by cloning, sequencing, and recombination of purified short and tRNA gene-containing long ITS. We also found that heteroduplex product formation is enhanced by increasing the number of PCR cycles. Homoduplex-heteroduplex polymorphisms (HHP) in a conserved region, such as the 16S and 23S rRNA gene ITS, allowed discrimination of closely related strains and species undistinguishable by other methods, indicating that ITS-HHP analysis is an easy and reproducible additional tool for strain typing. PMID:12957895

  10. Phylogenetic relationships of the marine Haplosclerida (Phylum Porifera) employing ribosomal (28S rRNA) and mitochondrial (cox1, nad1) gene sequence data.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Niamh E; Raleigh, Jean; van Soest, Rob W M; Kelly, Michelle; Travers, Simon A A; Bradshaw, Brian; Vartia, Salla; Stephens, Kelly M; McCormack, Grace P

    2011-01-01

    The systematics of the poriferan Order Haplosclerida (Class Demospongiae) has been under scrutiny for a number of years without resolution. Molecular data suggests that the order needs revision at all taxonomic levels. Here, we provide a comprehensive view of the phylogenetic relationships of the marine Haplosclerida using many species from across the order, and three gene regions. Gene trees generated using 28S rRNA, nad1 and cox1 gene data, under maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches, are highly congruent and suggest the presence of four clades. Clade A is comprised primarily of species of Haliclona and Callyspongia, and clade B is comprised of H. simulans and H. vansoesti (Family Chalinidae), Amphimedon queenslandica (Family Niphatidae) and Tabulocalyx (Family Phloeodictyidae), Clade C is comprised primarily of members of the Families Petrosiidae and Niphatidae, while Clade D is comprised of Aka species. The polyphletic nature of the suborders, families and genera described in other studies is also found here.

  11. [Identification of new conserved and variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene of acetic acid bacteria and acetobacteraceae family].

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, S; Sarkar, S; Gachhui, R

    2015-01-01

    The Acetobacteraceae family of the class Alpha Proteobacteria is comprised of high sugar and acid tolerant bacteria. The Acetic Acid Bacteria are the economically most significant group of this family because of its association with food products like vinegar, wine etc. Acetobacteraceae are often hard to culture in laboratory conditions and they also maintain very low abundances in their natural habitats. Thus identification of the organisms in such environments is greatly dependent on modern tools of molecular biology which require a thorough knowledge of specific conserved gene sequences that may act as primers and or probes. Moreover unconserved domains in genes also become markers for differentiating closely related genera. In bacteria, the 16S rRNA gene is an ideal candidate for such conserved and variable domains. In order to study the conserved and variable domains of the 16S rRNA gene of Acetic Acid Bacteria and the Acetobacteraceae family, sequences from publicly available databases were aligned and compared. Near complete sequences of the gene were also obtained from Kombucha tea biofilm, a known Acetobacteraceae family habitat, in order to corroborate the domains obtained from the alignment studies. The study indicated that the degree of conservation in the gene is significantly higher among the Acetic Acid Bacteria than the whole Acetobacteraceae family. Moreover it was also observed that the previously described hypervariable regions V1, V3, V5, V6 and V7 were more or less conserved in the family and the spans of the variable regions are quite distinct as well.

  12. Sampling of intestinal microbiota and targeted amplification of bacterial 16S rRNA genes for microbial ecologic analysis.

    PubMed

    Tong, Maomeng; Jacobs, Jonathan P; McHardy, Ian H; Braun, Jonathan

    2014-11-03

    Dysbiosis of host-associated commensal microbiota is emerging as an important factor in risk and phenotype of immunologic, metabolic, and behavioral diseases. Accurate analysis of microbial composition and functional state in humans or mice requires appropriate collection and pre-processing of biospecimens. Methods to sample luminal and mucosal microbiota from human or mouse intestines and to profile microbial phylogenetic composition using 16S rRNA sequencing are presented here. Data generated using the methods in this unit can be used for downstream quantitative analysis of microbial ecology.

  13. Sampling of intestinal microbiota and targeted amplification of bacterial 16S rRNA genes for microbial ecologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Maomeng; Jacobs, Jonathan P.; McHardy, Ian H.; Braun, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Dysbiosis of host-associated commensal microbiota is emerging as an important factor in risk and phenotype of immunologic, metabolic, and behavioral diseases. Appropriate collection and pre-processing of biospecimens from humans or mice is necessary for accurate analysis of microbial composition and functional state. Methods to sample intestinal luminal and mucosal microbiota from humans and mice, and to profile microbial phylogenetic composition using 16S rRNA sequencing are presented here. Data generated using this protocol can be used for downstream quantitative analysis of microbial ecology. PMID:25367129

  14. High-level azithromycin resistance occurs in Neisseria gonorrhoeae as a result of a single point mutation in the 23S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Stephanie A; Dave, Jayshree; Ison, Catherine A

    2010-09-01

    High-level azithromycin resistance (AZM-HR), defined as a MIC of > or = 256 mg/liter, emerged in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the United Kingdom in 2004. To determine the mechanism of this novel phenotype, isolates from the United Kingdom that were AZM-HR (n, 19), moderately AZM resistant (MICs, 2 to 8 mg/liter) (n, 26), or sensitive (MICs, 0.12 to 0.25 mg/liter) (n, 4) were screened for methylase (erm) genes and for mutations in the mtrR promoter region, associated with efflux pump upregulation. All AZM-resistant isolates and 12 sensitive isolates were screened for mutations in domain V of each 23S rRNA allele. All AZM-HR isolates contained the A2059G mutation (Escherichia coli numbering) in three (3 isolates) or four (16 isolates) 23S rRNA alleles. Most (22/26) moderately AZM resistant isolates contained the C2611T mutation in at least 3/4 alleles. The remainder contained four wild-type alleles, as did 8/12 sensitive isolates, while one allele was mutated in the remaining four sensitive isolates. Serial passage of AZM-sensitive colonies on an erythromycin-containing medium selected AZM-HR if the parent strain already contained mutation A2059G in one 23S rRNA allele. The resultant AZM-HR strains contained four mutated alleles. Eight isolates (five moderately AZM resistant and three AZM-HR) contained mutations in the mtrR promoter. No methylase genes were detected. This is the first evidence that AZM-HR in gonococci may result from a single point mutation (A2059G) in the peptidyltransferase loop in domain V of the 23S rRNA gene. Mutation of a single allele is insufficient to confer AZM-HR, but AZM-HR can develop under selection pressure. The description of a novel resistance mechanism will aid in screening for the AZM-HR phenotype. PMID:20585125

  15. Differential gene expression in Neurospora crassa cell types: heterogeneity and amplification of rRNA genes. Progress report, July 1980-June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.

    1981-01-01

    The significant results obtained during 1980-1981 year of the current research program are as follows: I. Studies on heterogeneity of multiple copies of rDNAs from N. crassa cell types are being continued, such as: (1) Autoradiographs of Southern transfers of EcoR/sub 1/ restricted fragments of nuclear DNA from conidia, germinated conidia (sprouts) and mycelia of N. crassa were compared after hybridization with /sup 32/P-rDNA probe. The nuclear DNA of two hours sprout and of 16 hours mycelia gave similar hybridization patterns with EcoR/sub 1/ digest, but no such hybridization pattern was evident in conidial DNA digest; (2) Procedure for concentration of rDNAs from Neurospora species and cell types was standardized; restriction analysis of purified rDNAs is being done; (3) 35S total rDNA clone, 17S rDNA clone and 26S rDNA subclone are being used to see gross differences in the precursor rRNAs of different cell types; (4) Comparison of DNA:DNA homologies of rRNA genes with different Neurospora species. II. Post-mitochondrial DNAs of N. crassa are found to be rDNA-like and were further characterized by electron microscopic studies and are found to be approximately twice the size of SV-40 DNAs. These N. crassa post-mitochondrial DNAs hybridized with /sup 32/P-labeled N. crassa nuclear DNAs. III. Previous studies on differential RNase sensitive DNA polymerase activity in N. Crassa cell types and on evolution of sexual morphogenesis in the genus Neurospora are completed and published. RNase sensitive DNA polymerase activity is found to be in the post-mitochondrial fraction. Heterothallism in the genus Neurospora is evolved from homothallism.

  16. Detection and discovery of crustacean parasites in blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) by using 18S rRNA gene-targeted denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Troedsson, Christofer; Lee, Richard F; Walters, Tina; Stokes, Vivica; Brinkley, Karrie; Naegele, Verena; Frischer, Marc E

    2008-07-01

    Recently, we described a novel denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) approach useful for initial detection and identification of crustacean parasites. Because this approach utilizes general primers targeted to conserved regions of the 18S rRNA gene, a priori genetic sequence information on eukaryotic parasites is not required. This distinction provides a significant advantage over specifically targeted PCR assays that do not allow for the detection of unknown or unsuspected parasites. However, initial field evaluations of the DHPLC assay suggested that because of PCR-biased amplification of dominant host genes it was not possible to detect relatively rare parasite genes in infected crab tissue. Here, we describe the use of a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) PCR hybridization blocking probe in association with DHPLC (PNA-PCR DHPLC) to overcome inherent PCR bias associated with amplification of rare target genes by use of generic primers. This approach was utilized to detect infection of blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) by the parasitic dinoflagellate Hematodinium sp. Evaluation of 76 crabs caught in Wassaw Sound, GA, indicated a 97% correspondence between detection of the parasite by use of a specific PCR diagnostic assay and that by use of PNA-PCR DHPLC. During these studies, we discovered one crab with an association with a previously undescribed protist symbiont. Phylogenetic analysis of the amplified symbiont 18S rRNA gene indicated that it is most closely related to the free-living kinetoplastid parasite Procryptobia sorokini. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this parasite group in a decapod crab and of this organism exhibiting a presumably parasitic life history.

  17. High-throughput amplicon sequencing of rRNA genes requires a copy number correction to accurately reflect the effects of management practices on soil nematode community structure.

    PubMed

    Darby, B J; Todd, T C; Herman, M A

    2013-11-01

    Nematodes are abundant consumers in grassland soils, but more sensitive and specific methods of enumeration are needed to improve our understanding of how different nematode species affect, and are affected by, ecosystem processes. High-throughput amplicon sequencing is used to enumerate microbial and invertebrate communities at a high level of taxonomic resolution, but the method requires validation against traditional specimen-based morphological identifications. To investigate the consistency between these approaches, we enumerated nematodes from a 25-year field experiment using both morphological and molecular identification techniques in order to determine the long-term effects of annual burning and nitrogen enrichment on soil nematode communities. Family-level frequencies based on amplicon sequencing were not initially consistent with specimen-based counts, but correction for differences in rRNA gene copy number using a genetic algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. Multivariate analysis of corrected sequence-based abundances of nematode families was consistent with, but not identical to, analysis of specimen-based counts. In both cases, herbivores, fungivores and predator/omnivores generally were more abundant in burned than nonburned plots, while bacterivores generally were more abundant in nonburned or nitrogen-enriched plots. Discriminate analysis of sequence-based abundances identified putative indicator species representing each trophic group. We conclude that high-throughput amplicon sequencing can be a valuable method for characterizing nematode communities at high taxonomic resolution as long as rRNA gene copy number variation is accounted for and accurate sequence databases are available. PMID:24103081

  18. Diversity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Associated with Fish and the Fish Farm Environment, Established by Amplified rRNA Gene Restriction Analysis▿

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Christian; Pelletier, Claire; Boussaha, Mekki; Douet, Diane-Gaëlle; Lautraite, Armand; Tailliez, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have become a major source of concern for aquaculture in recent decades. In addition to true pathogenic species of worldwide significance, such as Streptococcus iniae and Lactococcus garvieae, several species have been reported to produce occasional fish mortalities in limited geographic areas, and many unidentifiable or ill-defined isolates are regularly isolated from fish or fish products. To clarify the nature and prevalence of different fish-associated bacteria belonging to the lactic acid bacterium group, a collection of 57 isolates of different origins was studied and compared with a set of 22 type strains, using amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis (ARDRA). Twelve distinct clusters were delineated on the basis of ARDRA profiles and were confirmed by sequencing of sodA and 16S rRNA genes. These clusters included the following: Lactococcus raffinolactis, L. garvieae, Lactococcus l., S. iniae, S. dysgalactiae, S. parauberis, S. agalactiae, Carnobacterium spp., the Enterococcus “faecium” group, a heterogeneous Enterococcus-like cluster comprising indiscernible representatives of Vagococcus fluvialis or the recently recognized V. carniphilus, V. salmoninarum, and Aerococcus spp. Interestingly, the L. lactis and L. raffinolactis clusters appeared to include many commensals of fish, so opportunistic infections caused by these species cannot be disregarded. The significance for fish populations and fish food processing of three or four genetic clusters of uncertain or complex definition, namely, Aerococcus and Enterococcus clusters, should be established more accurately. PMID:17337536

  19. Analysis of 16S rRNA and mxaF genes revealing insights into Methylobacterium niche-specific plant association

    PubMed Central

    Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Conti, Raphael; Araújo, Janete Magali; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2012-01-01

    The genus Methylobacterium comprises pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophic (PPFM) bacteria, known to be an important plant-associated bacterial group. Species of this group, described as plant-nodulating, have the dual capacity of producing cytokinin and enzymes, such as pectinase and cellulase, involved in systemic resistance induction and nitrogen fixation under specific plant environmental conditions. The aim hereby was to evaluate the phylogenetic distribution of Methylobacterium spp. isolates from different host plants. Thus, a comparative analysis between sequences from structural (16S rRNA) and functional mxaF (which codifies for a subunit of the enzyme methanol dehydrogenase) ubiquitous genes, was undertaken. Notably, some Methylobacterium spp. isolates are generalists through colonizing more than one host plant, whereas others are exclusively found in certain specific plant-species. Congruency between phylogeny and specific host inhabitance was higher in the mxaF gene than in the 16S rRNA, a possible indication of function-based selection in this niche. Therefore, in a first stage, plant colonization by Methylobacterium spp. could represent generalist behavior, possibly related to microbial competition and adaptation to a plant environment. Otherwise, niche-specific colonization is apparently impelled by the host plant. PMID:22481887

  20. Design and evaluation of universal 16S rRNA gene primers for high-throughput sequencing to simultaneously detect DAMO microbes and anammox bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong-Ze; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Ding, Jing; Fu, Liang; Zeng, Raymond J

    2015-12-15

    To develop universal 16S rRNA gene primers for high-throughput sequencing for the simultaneous detection of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) archaea, DAMO bacteria, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria, four published primer sets (PS2-PS5) were modified. The overall coverage of the four primer pairs was evaluated in silico with the Silva SSU r119 dataset. Based on the virtual evaluation, the two best primer pairs (PS4 and PS5) were selected for further verification. Illumina MiSeq sequencing of a freshwater sediment and a culture from a DAMO-anammox reactor using these two primer pairs revealed that PS5 (341b4F-806R) was the most promising universal primer pair. This pair of primers detected both archaea and bacteria with less bias than PS4. Furthermore, an anaerobic fermentation culture and a wastewater treatment plant culture were used to verify the accuracy of PS5. More importantly, it detected DAMO archaea, DAMO bacteria, and anammox bacteria simultaneously with no false positives appeared. This universal 16S rRNA gene primer pair extends the existing molecular tools for studying the community structures and distributions of DAMO microbes and their potential interactions with anammox bacteria in different environments. PMID:26454634

  1. FISH and AgNor mapping of the 45S and 5S rRNA genes in wild and cultivated species of Capsicum (Solananceae).

    PubMed

    Scaldaferro, Marisel A; da Cruz, M Victoria Romero; Cecchini, Nicolás M; Moscone, Eduardo A

    2016-02-01

    Chromosome number and position of rDNA were studied in 12 wild and cultivated species of the genus Capsicum with chromosome numbers x = 12 and x = 13 (22 samples). For the first time in these species, the 5S and 45S rRNA loci were localized and physically mapped using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization and AgNOR banding. We focused on the comparison of the results obtained with both methods with the aim of accurately revealing the real functional rRNA genes. The analyzes were based on a previous work that reported that the 18S-5.8S-25S loci mostly coincide with GC-rich heterochromatic regions and likely have given rise to satellite DNAs, which are not active genes. These data show the variability of rDNA within karyotypes of the genus Capsicum, providing anchor points for (comparative) genetic maps. In addition, the obtained information might be useful for studies on evolution of repetitive DNA. PMID:26853884

  2. E sub 1 BF is an essential RNA polymerase I transcription factor with an intrinsic protein kinase activity that can modulate rRNA gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Zhang; Huifeng Niu; Jacob, S.T. )

    1991-10-01

    The authors previously described the purification and characterization of E{sub 1}BF, a rat rRNA gene core promoter-binding factor that consists of two polypeptides of 89 and 79 kDa. When this factor was incubated in the absence of any exogenous protein kinase under conditions optimal for protein phosphorylation, the 79-kDa polypeptide of E{sub 1}BF was selectively phosphorylated. The labeled phosphate could be removed from the E{sub 1}BF polypeptide by treatment with calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase or potato acid phosphatase. Elution of the protein from the E{sub 1}BF-promoter complex formed in an electrophoretic mobility-shift assay followed by incubation of the concentrated eluent with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP resulted in the selective labeling o the 79-kDa band. The E{sub 1}BF-associated protein kinase did not phosphorylate casein or histone H1. These data demonstrate that (1) polymerase I promoter-binding factor E{sub 1}BF contains an intrinsic substrate-specific protein kinase and (2) E{sub 1}BF is an essential polymerase I transcription factor that can modulate rRNA gene transcription by protein phosphorylation. Further, these studies have provided a direct means to identify a protein kinase or any other enzyme that can interact with a specific DNA sequence.

  3. Source Bioaerosol Concentration and rRNA Gene-Based Identification of Microorganisms Aerosolized at a Flood Irrigation Wastewater Reuse Site

    PubMed Central

    Paez-Rubio, Tania; Viau, Emily; Romero-Hernandez, Socorro; Peccia, Jordan

    2005-01-01

    Reuse of partially treated domestic wastewater for agricultural irrigation is a growing practice in arid regions throughout the world. A field sampling campaign to determine bioaerosol concentration, culturability, and identity at various wind speeds was conducted at a flooded wastewater irrigation site in Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico. Direct fluorescent microscopy measurements for total microorganisms, culture-based assays for heterotrophs and gram-negative enteric bacteria, and small-subunit rRNA gene-based cloning were used for microbial characterizations of aerosols and effluent wastewater samples. Bioaerosol results were divided into two wind speed regimens: (i) below 1.9 m/s, average speed 0.5 m/s, and (ii) above 1.9 m/s, average speed 4.5 m/s. Average air-borne concentration of total microorganisms, culturable heterotrophs, and gram-negative enteric bacteria were, respectively, 1.1, 4.2, and 6.2 orders of magnitude greater during the high-wind-speed regimen. Small-subunit rRNA gene clone libraries processed from samples from air and the irrigation effluent wastewater during a high-wind sampling event indicate that the majority of air clone sequences were more than 98% similar to clone sequences retrieved from the effluent wastewater sample. Overall results indicate that wind is a potential aerosolization mechanism of viable wastewater microorganisms at flood irrigation sites. PMID:15691934

  4. Chloroplast development at low temperatures requires a homolog of DIM1, a yeast gene encoding the 18S rRNA dimethylase.

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhisa, J G; Vijayan, P; Feldmann, K A; Browse, J A

    1998-01-01

    Poikilothermic organisms require mechanisms that allow survival at chilling temperatures (2 to 15 degreesC). We have isolated chilling-sensitive mutants of Arabidopsis, a plant that is very chilling resistant, and are characterizing them to understand the genes involved in chilling resistance. The T-DNA-tagged mutant paleface1 (pfc1) grows normally at 22 degrees C but at 5 degrees C exhibits a pattern of chilling-induced chlorosis consistent with a disruption of chloroplast development. Genomic DNA flanking the T-DNA was cloned and used to isolate wild-type genomic and cDNA clones. The PFC1 transcript is present at a low level in wild-type plants and was not detected in pfc1 plants. Wild-type Arabidopsis expressing antisense constructs of PFC1 grew normally at 22 degrees C but showed chilling-induced chlorosis, confirming that the gene is essential for low-temperature development of chloroplasts. The deduced amino acid sequence of PFC1 has identity with rRNA methylases found in bacteria and yeast that modify specific adenosines of pre-rRNA transcripts. The pfc1 mutant does not have these modifications in the small subunit rRNA of the plastid. PMID:9596631

  5. 23S rRNA gene-based enterococci community signatures in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, USA, following urban runoff inputs after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hee-Sung; Hou, Aixin

    2013-02-01

    Little is known about the impacts of fecal polluted urban runoff inputs on the structure of enterococci communities in estuarine waters. This study employed a 23S rRNA gene-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay with newly designed genus-specific primers, Ent127F-Ent907R, to determine the possible impacts of Hurricane Katrina floodwaters via the 17th Street Canal discharge on the community structure of enterococci in Lake Pontchartrain. A total of 94 phylotypes were identified through the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) screening of 494 clones while only 8 phylotypes occurred among 88 cultivated isolates. Sequence analyses of representative phylotypes and their temporal and spatial distribution in the lake and the canal indicated the Katrina floodwater input introduced a large portion of Enterococcus flavescens, Enterococcus casseliflavus, and Enterococcus dispar into the lake; typical fecal groups Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus durans, Enterococcus hirae, and Enterococcus mundtii were detected primarily in the floodwater-impacted waters. This study provides a global picture of enterococci in estuarine waters impacted by Hurricane Katrina-derived urban runoff. It also demonstrates the culture-independent PCR approach using 23S rRNA gene as a molecular marker could be a good alternative in ecological studies of enterococci in natural environments to overcome the limitation of conventional cultivation methods.

  6. New record of Apoholosticha sinica (Ciliophora, Urostylida) from the UK: morphology, 18S rRNA gene phylogeny and notes on morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaozhong; Fan, Yangbo; Warren, Alan

    2015-08-01

    The benthic urostylid ciliate Apoholosticha sinicaFan et al., 2014 was isolated from a salt marsh at Blakeney, UK, and reinvestigated using light microscopy and small-subunit rRNA gene sequencing. Morphologically, it corresponds well with the original description. Several stages of divisional morphogenesis and physiological reorganization were also observed from which the following could be deduced: (i) the oral apparatus is completely newly built in the proter; (ii) frontal-ventral-transverse cirral anlage II does not produce a buccal cirrus; (iii) each of the posteriormost three or four anlagen contributes one transverse cirrus at its posterior end; (iv) a row of frontoterminal cirri originates from the rearmost frontal-ventral-transverse cirral anlage; (v) the last midventral row is formed from the penultimate frontal-ventral-transverse cirral anlage. Based on new data, two diagnostic features were added to the genus definition: (i) the midventral complex is composed of midventral pairs and midventral row and (ii) pretransverse ventral cirri are absent. Based on a combination of morphological and morphogenetic data, the genus Apoholosticha is assigned to the recently erected subfamily Nothoholostichinae Paiva et al., 2014, which is consistent with sequence comparison and phylogenetic analyses based on SSU rRNA gene data. It is also concluded that this benthic species, previously reported only from China, is not an endemic form. PMID:25948616

  7. Design and evaluation of universal 16S rRNA gene primers for high-throughput sequencing to simultaneously detect DAMO microbes and anammox bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong-Ze; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Ding, Jing; Fu, Liang; Zeng, Raymond J

    2015-12-15

    To develop universal 16S rRNA gene primers for high-throughput sequencing for the simultaneous detection of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) archaea, DAMO bacteria, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria, four published primer sets (PS2-PS5) were modified. The overall coverage of the four primer pairs was evaluated in silico with the Silva SSU r119 dataset. Based on the virtual evaluation, the two best primer pairs (PS4 and PS5) were selected for further verification. Illumina MiSeq sequencing of a freshwater sediment and a culture from a DAMO-anammox reactor using these two primer pairs revealed that PS5 (341b4F-806R) was the most promising universal primer pair. This pair of primers detected both archaea and bacteria with less bias than PS4. Furthermore, an anaerobic fermentation culture and a wastewater treatment plant culture were used to verify the accuracy of PS5. More importantly, it detected DAMO archaea, DAMO bacteria, and anammox bacteria simultaneously with no false positives appeared. This universal 16S rRNA gene primer pair extends the existing molecular tools for studying the community structures and distributions of DAMO microbes and their potential interactions with anammox bacteria in different environments.

  8. FISH and AgNor mapping of the 45S and 5S rRNA genes in wild and cultivated species of Capsicum (Solananceae).

    PubMed

    Scaldaferro, Marisel A; da Cruz, M Victoria Romero; Cecchini, Nicolás M; Moscone, Eduardo A

    2016-02-01

    Chromosome number and position of rDNA were studied in 12 wild and cultivated species of the genus Capsicum with chromosome numbers x = 12 and x = 13 (22 samples). For the first time in these species, the 5S and 45S rRNA loci were localized and physically mapped using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization and AgNOR banding. We focused on the comparison of the results obtained with both methods with the aim of accurately revealing the real functional rRNA genes. The analyzes were based on a previous work that reported that the 18S-5.8S-25S loci mostly coincide with GC-rich heterochromatic regions and likely have given rise to satellite DNAs, which are not active genes. These data show the variability of rDNA within karyotypes of the genus Capsicum, providing anchor points for (comparative) genetic maps. In addition, the obtained information might be useful for studies on evolution of repetitive DNA.

  9. 23S rRNA gene-based enterococci community signatures in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, USA, following urban runoff inputs after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hee-Sung; Hou, Aixin

    2013-02-01

    Little is known about the impacts of fecal polluted urban runoff inputs on the structure of enterococci communities in estuarine waters. This study employed a 23S rRNA gene-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay with newly designed genus-specific primers, Ent127F-Ent907R, to determine the possible impacts of Hurricane Katrina floodwaters via the 17th Street Canal discharge on the community structure of enterococci in Lake Pontchartrain. A total of 94 phylotypes were identified through the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) screening of 494 clones while only 8 phylotypes occurred among 88 cultivated isolates. Sequence analyses of representative phylotypes and their temporal and spatial distribution in the lake and the canal indicated the Katrina floodwater input introduced a large portion of Enterococcus flavescens, Enterococcus casseliflavus, and Enterococcus dispar into the lake; typical fecal groups Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus durans, Enterococcus hirae, and Enterococcus mundtii were detected primarily in the floodwater-impacted waters. This study provides a global picture of enterococci in estuarine waters impacted by Hurricane Katrina-derived urban runoff. It also demonstrates the culture-independent PCR approach using 23S rRNA gene as a molecular marker could be a good alternative in ecological studies of enterococci in natural environments to overcome the limitation of conventional cultivation methods. PMID:23269456

  10. Assessment of fecal pollution sources in a small northern-plains watershed using PCR and phylogenetic analyses of Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamendella, R.; Domingo, J.W.S.; Oerther, D.B.; Vogel, J.R.; Stoeckel, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy, sensitivity, host-specificity, and spatial/temporal dynamics of human- and ruminant-specific 16S rRNA gene Bacteroidetes markers used to assess the sources of fecal pollution in a fecally impacted watershed. Phylogenetic analyses of 1271 fecal and environmental 16S rRNA gene clones were also performed to study the diversity of Bacteroidetes in this watershed. The host-specific assays indicated that ruminant feces were present in 28-54% of the water samples and in all sampling seasons, with increasing frequency in downstream sites. The human-targeted assays indicated that only 3-5% of the water samples were positive for human fecal signals, although a higher percentage of human-associated signals (19-24%) were detected in sediment samples. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that 57% of all water clones clustered with yet-to-be-cultured Bacteroidetes species associated with sequences obtained from ruminant feces, further supporting the prevalence of ruminant contamination in this watershed. However, since several clusters contained sequences from multiple sources, future studies need to consider the potential cosmopolitan nature of these bacterial populations when assessing fecal pollution sources using Bacteroidetes markers. Moreover, additional data is needed in order to understand the distribution of Bacteroidetes host-specific markers and their relationship to water quality regulatory standards. ?? 2006 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  11. The utility of diversity profiling using Illumina 18S rRNA gene amplicon deep sequencing to detect and discriminate Toxoplasma gondii among the cyst-forming coccidia.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Madalyn K; Phalen, David N; Donahoe, Shannon L; Rose, Karrie; Šlapeta, Jan

    2016-01-30

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has the capacity to screen a single DNA sample and detect pathogen DNA from thousands of host DNA sequence reads, making it a versatile and informative tool for investigation of pathogens in diseased animals. The technique is effective and labor saving in the initial identification of pathogens, and will complement conventional diagnostic tests to associate the candidate pathogen with a disease process. In this report, we investigated the utility of the diversity profiling NGS approach using Illumina small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene amplicon deep sequencing to detect Toxoplasma gondii in previously confirmed cases of toxoplasmosis. We then tested the diagnostic approach with species-specific PCR genotyping, histopathology and immunohistochemistry of toxoplasmosis in a Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus) to systematically characterise the disease and associate causality. We show that the Euk7A/Euk570R primer set targeting the V1-V3 hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene can be used as a species-specific assay for cyst-forming coccidia and discriminate T. gondii. Overall, the approach is cost-effective and improves diagnostic decision support by narrowing the differential diagnosis list with more certainty than was previously possible. Furthermore, it supplements the limitations of cryptic protozoan morphology and surpasses the need for species-specific PCR primer combinations.

  12. New record of Apoholosticha sinica (Ciliophora, Urostylida) from the UK: morphology, 18S rRNA gene phylogeny and notes on morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaozhong; Fan, Yangbo; Warren, Alan

    2015-08-01

    The benthic urostylid ciliate Apoholosticha sinicaFan et al., 2014 was isolated from a salt marsh at Blakeney, UK, and reinvestigated using light microscopy and small-subunit rRNA gene sequencing. Morphologically, it corresponds well with the original description. Several stages of divisional morphogenesis and physiological reorganization were also observed from which the following could be deduced: (i) the oral apparatus is completely newly built in the proter; (ii) frontal-ventral-transverse cirral anlage II does not produce a buccal cirrus; (iii) each of the posteriormost three or four anlagen contributes one transverse cirrus at its posterior end; (iv) a row of frontoterminal cirri originates from the rearmost frontal-ventral-transverse cirral anlage; (v) the last midventral row is formed from the penultimate frontal-ventral-transverse cirral anlage. Based on new data, two diagnostic features were added to the genus definition: (i) the midventral complex is composed of midventral pairs and midventral row and (ii) pretransverse ventral cirri are absent. Based on a combination of morphological and morphogenetic data, the genus Apoholosticha is assigned to the recently erected subfamily Nothoholostichinae Paiva et al., 2014, which is consistent with sequence comparison and phylogenetic analyses based on SSU rRNA gene data. It is also concluded that this benthic species, previously reported only from China, is not an endemic form.

  13. Bacterial diversity from the source to the tap: a comparative study based on 16S rRNA gene-DGGE and culture-dependent methods.

    PubMed

    Vaz-Moreira, Ivone; Egas, Conceição; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed to assess the influence of water treatment and distribution on the bacterial communities with particular emphasis on tap water. Samples from the water treatment plant, the bulk supply distribution system and household taps, supplied by the same drinking water treatment plant, were analyzed using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. Water treatment imposed alterations in the composition of the bacterial community, although this effect was more evident in the cultivable bacteria rather than among the total community assessed by 16S rRNA gene-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiling. Water disinfection, mainly chlorination, promoted a reduction on bacterial diversity and cultivability, with a shift in the pattern of cultivable bacteria from predominantly Gram-negative to predominately Gram-positive and acid-fast. Downstream of the chlorination stages, tap water, in comparison with raw water, presented higher diversity indices and cultivability percentages. From the source to the tap, members of the Alpha-, Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria were the predominant lineages identified using 16S rRNA gene-DGGE analysis. Although with a lower coverage, the DGGE-based lineage identifications were in agreement with those found using 454-pyrosequencing analysis. Despite the effectiveness of water treatment to eliminate or inactivate most of the bacteria, Proteobacteria such as Acinetobacter, Bosea and Sphingomonadaceae may successfully colonize tap water.

  14. Diversity and distribution of subterranean bacteria in groundwater at Oklo in Gabon, Africa, as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, K; Arlinger, J; Hallbeck, L; Pettersson, C

    1996-06-01

    This paper describes how ground water was sampled, DNA extracted, amplified and cloned and how information available in the ribosomal 16S rRNA gene was used for mapping diversity and distribution of subterranean bacteria in groundwater at the Bangombé site in the Oklo region. The results showed that this site was inhabited by a diversified population of bacteria. Each borehole was dominated by species that did not dominate in any of the other boreholes; a result that probably reflects documented differences in the geochemical environment. Two of the sequences obtained were identified at genus level to represent Acinetobacter and Zoogloea, but most of the 44 sequences found were only distantly related to species in the DNA database. The deepest borehole, BAX01 (105 m), had the highest number of bacteria and also total organic carbon (TOC). This borehole harboured only Proteobacteria beta group sequences while sequences related to Proteobacteria beta, gamma and delta groups and Gram-positive bacteria were found in the other four boreholes. Two of the boreholes, BAX02 (34 m) and BAX04 (10 m) had many 16S rRNA gene sequences in common and also had similar counts of bacteria, content of TOC, pH and equal conductivity, suggesting a hydraulic connection between them.

  15. High-throughput amplicon sequencing of rRNA genes requires a copy number correction to accurately reflect the effects of management practices on soil nematode community structure.

    PubMed

    Darby, B J; Todd, T C; Herman, M A

    2013-11-01

    Nematodes are abundant consumers in grassland soils, but more sensitive and specific methods of enumeration are needed to improve our understanding of how different nematode species affect, and are affected by, ecosystem processes. High-throughput amplicon sequencing is used to enumerate microbial and invertebrate communities at a high level of taxonomic resolution, but the method requires validation against traditional specimen-based morphological identifications. To investigate the consistency between these approaches, we enumerated nematodes from a 25-year field experiment using both morphological and molecular identification techniques in order to determine the long-term effects of annual burning and nitrogen enrichment on soil nematode communities. Family-level frequencies based on amplicon sequencing were not initially consistent with specimen-based counts, but correction for differences in rRNA gene copy number using a genetic algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. Multivariate analysis of corrected sequence-based abundances of nematode families was consistent with, but not identical to, analysis of specimen-based counts. In both cases, herbivores, fungivores and predator/omnivores generally were more abundant in burned than nonburned plots, while bacterivores generally were more abundant in nonburned or nitrogen-enriched plots. Discriminate analysis of sequence-based abundances identified putative indicator species representing each trophic group. We conclude that high-throughput amplicon sequencing can be a valuable method for characterizing nematode communities at high taxonomic resolution as long as rRNA gene copy number variation is accounted for and accurate sequence databases are available.

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of Histoplasma capsulatum based on partial sequence of the D1/D2 region of the 28S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Komori, Takashi; Sano, Ayako; Yarita, Kyoko; Kitagawa, Teruyuki; Kamei, Katsuhiko; Nishimura, Kazuko

    2005-01-01

    In order to confirm the phylogenetic relationships of Histoplasma capsulatum, the partial sequences of large subunit (28S) ribosomal gene (D1/D2 region) of 49 isolates were studied. The similarity values of the 49 isolates were more than 99.0% across 617 base pairs, however, the 49 isolates were divided into 9 groups. These 9 groups were independent of 3 varieties, var. capsulatum, var. farciminosum and var. duboisii. These results showed that analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the 28S rRNA gene was very effective for identification of H. capsulatum and that three varieties of H. capsulatum should be reclassified according to the phylogenetic relationship established from analysis of the D1/D2 region sequences. PMID:16282973

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of Lactococcus lactis subspecies based on decoding the sequence of the pepT tripeptidase gene, the pepV dipeptidase gene and 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Mori, Sumiko; Mori, Katsumi; Suzuki, Ichirou; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2004-08-01

    Tripeptidase (PepT) and dipeptidase (PepV), the enzymes located in the final stage of the intracellular proteolytic system, were demonstrated to be distributed widely in lactic acid bacteria, especially in lactococci. Both the tripeptidase genes (pepT) and dipeptidase genes (pepV) of 15 lactococcal strains consisting of the type and domestic strains were cloned and sequenced using normal and TAIL PCR methods. Amino acid sequences of these enzymes were highly conserved among strains. Evolutionary distance trees based on the sequence of 1239 nucleotides of pepT and 1416 nucleotide of pepV showed a similar cluster as that obtained from the 1499 fragment of the 16S rRNA. Based on this profile, the species Lactococcus lactis is reasonably divided into three subspecies groups, subsp. lactis, cremoris, and hordniae, as in the current classification. Figure of trees from pepT and pepV were essentially identical to each other and slightly more intricate than that from 16S rRNA. The K nuc values obtained from pepT and pepV genes were approximately ten times as high as that from 16S rRNA. Considering these results, phylogenetic analysis based on pepT and pepV genes may aid in a more precise index of classification of L. lactis subspecies. PepT and PepV seem to have evolved in similar directions in lactococci.

  18. Vibrio salilacus sp. nov., a new member of the Anguillarum clade with six alleles of the 16S rRNA gene from a saline lake.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Ying; Liu, Hong-Can; Wang, Fang; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2015-08-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, catalase- and oxidase-positive, facultatively aerobic bacterium, strain DSG-S6T, was isolated from Dasugan Lake (salinity 3.1%, w/w), China. Its taxonomic position was determined by using a polyphasic approach. Cells of strain DSG-S6T were non-spore-forming, slightly bent rods, and motile by means of a single polar flagellum. Growth occurred in the presence of 0-7.0% (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 2.0%), at 4-35 °C (optimum, 30 °C) and at pH 6.0-10.5 (optimum, pH 8.0-8.5). C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω7c and C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c were the major fatty acids. Six alleles of the 16S rRNA gene sharing 98.9-99.9  % similarity were detected in strain DSG-S6T, which showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Vibrio aestuarianus ATCC 35048T (97.7 %), then to Vibrio pacinii LMG 19999T (97.6%) and Vibrio metschnikovii CIP 69.14T (96.8%). Multilocus sequence analysis of four housekeeping genes and 16S rRNA genes clearly clustered it as a member of the Anguillarum clade. Mean DNA-DNA relatedness between strain DSG-S6T and V. aestuarianus NBRC 15629T, V. pacinii CGMCC 1.12557T and V. metschnikovii JCM 21189T was 20.6 ± 2.3, 38.1 ± 3.5 and 24.2 ± 2.8%, respectively. The DNA G+C content was 46.8 mol% (Tm). Based on the data, it is concluded that strain DSG-S6T represents a novel species of the genus Vibrio, for which the name Vibrio salilacus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DSG-S6T ( = CGMCC 1.12427T = JCM 19265T).

  19. Chromosomal localization of the 18S-28S and 5S rRNA genes and (TTAGGG)n sequences of butterfly lizards (Leiolepis belliana belliana and Leiolepis boehmei, Agamidae, Squamata).

    PubMed

    Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Uno, Yoshinobu; Matsubara, Kazumi; Thongpan, Amara; Suputtitada, Saowanee; Apisitwanich, Somsak; Nishida, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2011-10-01

    Chromosomal mapping of the butterfly lizards Leiolepis belliana belliana and L. boehmei was done using the 18S-28S and 5S rRNA genes and telomeric (TTAGGG)n sequences. The karyotype of L. b. belliana was 2n = 36, whereas that of L. boehmei was 2n = 34. The 18S-28S rRNA genes were located at the secondary constriction of the long arm of chromosome 1, while the 5S rRNA genes were found in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 6 in both species. Hybridization signals for the (TTAGGG)n sequence were observed at the telomeric ends of all chromosomes, as well as interstitially at the same position as the 18S-28S rRNA genes in L. boehmei. This finding suggests that in L. boehmei telomere-to-telomere fusion probably occurred between chromosome 1 and a microchromosome where the 18S-28S rRNA genes were located or, alternatively, at the secondary constriction of chromosome 1. The absence of telomeric sequence signals in chromosome 1 of L. b. belliana suggested that its chromosomes may have only a few copies of the (TTAGGG)n sequence or that there may have been a gradual loss of the repeat sequences during chromosomal evolution.

  20. Evidence for an early gene duplication event in the evolution of the mitochondrial transcription factor B family and maintenance of rRNA methyltransferase activity in human mtTFB1 and mtTFB2.

    PubMed

    Cotney, Justin; Shadel, Gerald S

    2006-11-01

    Most metazoans have two nuclear genes encoding orthologues of the well-characterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial transcription factor B (sc-mtTFB). This class of transcription factors is homologous to the bacterial KsgA family of rRNA methyltransferases, which in Escherichia coli dimethylates adjacent adenine residues in a stem-loop of the 16S rRNA. This posttranscriptional modification is conserved in most metazoan cytoplasmic and mitochondrial rRNAs. Homo sapiens mitochondrial transcription factor B1 (h-mtTFB1) possesses this enzymatic activity, implicating it as a dual-function protein involved in mitochondrial transcription and translation. Here we demonstrate that h-mtTFB2 also has rRNA methyltransferase activity but is a less efficient enzyme than h-mtTFB1. In contrast, sc-mtTFB has no detectable rRNA methyltransferase activity, correlating with the lack of the corresponding modification in the mitochondrial rRNA of budding yeast. Based on these results, and reports that Drosophila melanogaster mtTFB1 and mtTFB2 do not have completely overlapping functions, we propose a model for human mtDNA regulation that takes into account h-mtTFB1 and h-mtTFB2 likely having partially redundant transcription factor and rRNA methyltransferase functions. Finally, phylogenetic analyses of this family of proteins strongly suggest that the presence of two mtTFB homologues in metazoans is the result of a gene duplication event that occurred early in eukaryotic evolution prior to the divergence of fungi and metazoans. This model suggests that, after the gene duplication event, differential selective pressures on the rRNA methyltransferase and transcription factor activities of mtTFB genes occurred, with extreme cases culminating in the loss of one of the paralogous genes in certain species.

  1. Regulation of the rplY gene encoding 5S rRNA binding protein L25 in Escherichia coli and related bacteria.

    PubMed

    Aseev, Leonid V; Bylinkina, Natalia S; Boni, Irina V

    2015-05-01

    Ribosomal protein (r-protein) L25 is one of the three r-proteins (L25, L5, L18) that interact with 5S rRNA in eubacteria. Specific binding of L25 with a certain domain of 5S r-RNA, a so-called loop E, has been studied in detail, but information about regulation of L25 synthesis has remained totally lacking. In contrast to the rplE (L5) and rplR (L18) genes that belong to the polycistronic spc-operon and are regulated at the translation level by r-protein S8, the rplY (L25) gene forms an independent transcription unit. The main goal of this work was to study the regulation of the rplY expression in vivo. We show that the rplY promoter is down-regulated by ppGpp and its cofactor DksA in response to amino acid starvation. At the level of translation, the rplY expression is subjected to the negative feedback control. The 5'-untranslated region of the rplY mRNA comprises specific sequence/structure features, including an atypical SD-like sequence, which are highly conserved in a subset of gamma-proteobacterial families. Despite the lack of a canonical SD element, the rplY'-'lacZ single-copy reporter showed unusually high translation efficiency. Expression of the rplY gene in trans decreased the translation yield, indicating the mechanism of autogenous repression. Site-directed mutagenesis of the rplY 5' UTR revealed an important role of the conserved elements in the translation control. Thus, the rplY expression regulation represents one more example of regulatory pathways that control ribosome biogenesis in Escherichia coli and related bacteria.

  2. Regulation of the rplY gene encoding 5S rRNA binding protein L25 in Escherichia coli and related bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Aseev, Leonid V.; Bylinkina, Natalia S.; Boni, Irina V.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal protein (r-protein) L25 is one of the three r-proteins (L25, L5, L18) that interact with 5S rRNA in eubacteria. Specific binding of L25 with a certain domain of 5S r-RNA, a so-called loop E, has been studied in detail, but information about regulation of L25 synthesis has remained totally lacking. In contrast to the rplE (L5) and rplR (L18) genes that belong to the polycistronic spc-operon and are regulated at the translation level by r-protein S8, the rplY (L25) gene forms an independent transcription unit. The main goal of this work was to study the regulation of the rplY expression in vivo. We show that the rplY promoter is down-regulated by ppGpp and its cofactor DksA in response to amino acid starvation. At the level of translation, the rplY expression is subjected to the negative feedback control. The 5′-untranslated region of the rplY mRNA comprises specific sequence/structure features, including an atypical SD-like sequence, which are highly conserved in a subset of gamma-proteobacterial families. Despite the lack of a canonical SD element, the rplY’-‘lacZ single-copy reporter showed unusually high translation efficiency. Expression of the rplY gene in trans decreased the translation yield, indicating the mechanism of autogenous repression. Site-directed mutagenesis of the rplY 5′ UTR revealed an important role of the conserved elements in the translation control. Thus, the rplY expression regulation represents one more example of regulatory pathways that control ribosome biogenesis in Escherichia coli and related bacteria. PMID:25749694

  3. Differentiation of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua by 16S rRNA genes and intraspecies discrimination of Listeria monocytogenes strains by random amplified polymorphic DNA polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Czajka, J; Bsat, N; Piani, M; Russ, W; Sultana, K; Wiedmann, M; Whitaker, R; Batt, C A

    1993-01-01

    Differences in the 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNA) which can be used to discriminate Listeria monocytogenes from Listeria innocua have been detected. The 16S rDNA were amplified by polymerase chain reaction with a set of oligonucleotide primers which flank a 1.5-kb fragment. Sequence differences were observed in the V2 region of the 16S rDNA both between L. monocytogenes Scott A and L. innocua and between different L. monocytogenes serotypes. Although L. monocytogenes SLCC2371 had the same V2 region sequence as L. innocua, the two species were different within the V9 region at nucleotides 1259 and 1292, in agreement with previous studies (R.-F. Wang, W.-W. Cao, and M.G. Johnson, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:3666-3670, 1991). Intraspecies discrimination of L. monocytogenes strains was achieved by using the patterns generated by random amplified polymorphic DNA primers. Although some distinction can be made within the L. monocytogenes species by their 16S rDNA sequence, a far greater discrimination within species could be made by generating random amplified polymorphic DNA patterns from chromosomal DNA. By using a number of 10-bp primers, unique patterns for each isolate which in all cases examined differentiate between various L. monocytogenes serotypes, even though they may have the same 16S rRNA sequences, could be generated. Images PMID:8439157

  4. Development of a universal microarray based on the ligation detection reaction and 16S rrna gene polymorphism to target diversity of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Castiglioni, Bianca; Rizzi, Ermanno; Frosini, Andrea; Sivonen, Kaarina; Rajaniemi, Pirjo; Rantala, Anne; Mugnai, Maria Angela; Ventura, Stefano; Wilmotte, Annick; Boutte, Christophe; Grubisic, Stana; Balthasart, Pierre; Consolandi, Clarissa; Bordoni, Roberta; Mezzelani, Alessandra; Battaglia, Cristina; De Bellis, Gianluca

    2004-12-01

    The cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes of significant ecological and biotechnological interest, since they strongly contribute to primary production and are a rich source of bioactive compounds. In eutrophic fresh and brackish waters, their mass occurrences (water blooms) are often toxic and constitute a high potential risk for human health. Therefore, rapid and reliable identification of cyanobacterial species in complex environmental samples is important. Here we describe the development and validation of a microarray for the identification of cyanobacteria in aquatic environments. Our approach is based on the use of a ligation detection reaction coupled to a universal array. Probes were designed for detecting 19 cyanobacterial groups including Anabaena/Aphanizomenon, Calothrix, Cylindrospermopsis, Cylindrospermum, Gloeothece, halotolerants, Leptolyngbya, Palau Lyngbya, Microcystis, Nodularia, Nostoc, Planktothrix, Antarctic Phormidium, Prochlorococcus, Spirulina, Synechococcus, Synechocystis, Trichodesmium, and Woronichinia. These groups were identified based on an alignment of over 300 cyanobacterial 16S rRNA sequences. For validation of the microarrays, 95 samples (24 axenic strains from culture collections, 27 isolated strains, and 44 cloned fragments recovered from environmental samples) were tested. The results demonstrated a high discriminative power and sensitivity to 1 fmol of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene. Accurate identification of target strains was also achieved with unbalanced mixes of PCR amplicons from different cyanobacteria and an environmental sample. Our universal array method shows great potential for rapid and reliable identification of cyanobacteria. It can be easily adapted to future development and could thus be applied both in research and environmental monitoring. PMID:15574913

  5. Quantitative detection of the nosZ gene, encoding nitrous oxide reductase, and comparison of the abundances of 16S rRNA, narG, nirK, and nosZ genes in soils.

    PubMed

    Henry, S; Bru, D; Stres, B; Hallet, S; Philippot, L

    2006-08-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas in the troposphere controlling ozone concentration in the stratosphere through nitric oxide production. In order to quantify bacteria capable of N2O reduction, we developed a SYBR green quantitative real-time PCR assay targeting the nosZ gene encoding the catalytic subunit of the nitrous oxide reductase. Two independent sets of nosZ primers flanking the nosZ fragment previously used in diversity studies were designed and tested (K. Kloos, A. Mergel, C. Rösch, and H. Bothe, Aust. J. Plant Physiol. 28:991-998, 2001). The utility of these real-time PCR assays was demonstrated by quantifying the nosZ gene present in six different soils. Detection limits were between 10(1) and 10(2) target molecules per reaction for all assays. Sequence analysis of 128 cloned quantitative PCR products confirmed the specificity of the designed primers. The abundance of nosZ genes ranged from 10(5) to 10(7) target copies g(-1) of dry soil, whereas genes for 16S rRNA were found at 10(8) to 10(9) target copies g(-1) of dry soil. The abundance of narG and nirK genes was within the upper and lower limits of the 16S rRNA and nosZ gene copy numbers. The two sets of nosZ primers gave similar gene copy numbers for all tested soils. The maximum abundance of nosZ and nirK relative to 16S rRNA was 5 to 6%, confirming the low proportion of denitrifiers to total bacteria in soils.

  6. 18S rRNA gene sequencing identifies a novel species of Henneguya parasitizing the gills of the channel catfish (Ictaluridae).

    PubMed

    Rosser, Thomas G; Griffin, Matt J; Quiniou, Sylvie M A; Khoo, Lester H; Pote, Linda M

    2014-12-01

    In the southeastern USA, the channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus is a host to at least eight different species of myxozoan parasites belonging to the genus Henneguya, four of which have been characterized molecularly using sequencing of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene. However, only two of these have confirmed life cycles that involve the oligochaete Dero digitata as the definitive host. During a health screening of farm-raised channel catfish, several fish presented with deformed primary lamellae. Lamellae harbored large, nodular, white pseudocysts 1.25 mm in diameter, and upon rupturing, these pseudocysts released Henneguya myxospores, with a typical lanceolate-shaped spore body, measuring 17.1 ± 1.0 μm (mean ± SD; range = 15.0-19.3 μm) in length and 4.8 ± 0.4 μm (3.7-5.6 μm) in width. Pyriform-shaped polar capsules were 5.8 ± 0.3 μm in length (5.1-6.4 μm) and 1.7 ± 0.1 μm (1.4-1.9 μm) in width. The two caudal processes were 40.0 ± 5.1 μm in length (29.5-50.0 μm) with a spore length of 57.2 ± 4.7 (46.8-66.8 μm). The contiguous SSU rRNA gene sequence obtained from myxospores of five excised cysts did not match any Henneguya sp. in GenBank. The greatest sequence homology (91% over 1,900 bp) was with Henneguya pellis, associated with blister-like lesions on the skin of blue catfish Ictalurus furcatus. Based on the unique combination of pseudocyst and myxospore morphology, tissue location, host, and SSU rRNA gene sequence data, we report this isolate to be a previously unreported species, Henneguya bulbosus sp. nov.

  7. Further use of nearly complete 28S and 18S rRNA genes to classify Ecdysozoa: 37 more arthropods and a kinorhynch.

    PubMed

    Mallatt, Jon; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2006-09-01

    This work expands on a study from 2004 by Mallatt, Garey, and Shultz [Mallatt, J.M., Garey, J.R., Shultz, J.W., 2004. Ecdysozoan phylogeny and Bayesian inference: first use of nearly complete 28S and 18S rRNA gene sequences to classify the arthropods and their kin. Mol. Phylogenet. Evol. 31, 178-191] that evaluated the phylogenetic relationships in Ecdysozoa (molting animals), especially arthropods. Here, the number of rRNA gene-sequences was effectively doubled for each major group of arthropods, and sequences from the phylum Kinorhyncha (mud dragons) were also included, bringing the number of ecdysozoan taxa to over 80. The methods emphasized maximum likelihood, Bayesian inference and statistical testing with parametric bootstrapping, but also included parsimony and minimum evolution. Prominent findings from our combined analysis of both genes are as follows. The fundamental subdivisions of Hexapoda (insects and relatives) are Insecta and Entognatha, with the latter consisting of collembolans (springtails) and a clade of proturans plus diplurans. Our rRNA-gene data provide the strongest evidence to date that the sister group of Hexapoda is Branchiopoda (fairy shrimps, tadpole shrimps, etc.), not Malacostraca. The large, Pancrustacea clade (hexapods within a paraphyletic Crustacea) divided into a few basic subclades: hexapods plus branchiopods; cirripedes (barnacles) plus malacostracans (lobsters, crabs, true shrimps, isopods, etc.); and the basally located clades of (a) ostracods (seed shrimps) and (b) branchiurans (fish lice) plus the bizarre pentastomids (tongue worms). These findings about Pancrustacea agree with a recent study by Regier, Shultz, and Kambic that used entirely different genes [Regier, J.C., Shultz, J.W., Kambic, R.E., 2005a. Pancrustacean phylogeny: hexapods are terrestrial crustaceans and maxillopods are not monophyletic. Proc. R. Soc. B 272, 395-401]. In Malacostraca, the stomatopod (mantis shrimp) was not at the base of the eumalacostracans

  8. Further use of nearly complete 28S and 18S rRNA genes to classify Ecdysozoa: 37 more arthropods and a kinorhynch.

    PubMed

    Mallatt, Jon; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2006-09-01

    This work expands on a study from 2004 by Mallatt, Garey, and Shultz [Mallatt, J.M., Garey, J.R., Shultz, J.W., 2004. Ecdysozoan phylogeny and Bayesian inference: first use of nearly complete 28S and 18S rRNA gene sequences to classify the arthropods and their kin. Mol. Phylogenet. Evol. 31, 178-191] that evaluated the phylogenetic relationships in Ecdysozoa (molting animals), especially arthropods. Here, the number of rRNA gene-sequences was effectively doubled for each major group of arthropods, and sequences from the phylum Kinorhyncha (mud dragons) were also included, bringing the number of ecdysozoan taxa to over 80. The methods emphasized maximum likelihood, Bayesian inference and statistical testing with parametric bootstrapping, but also included parsimony and minimum evolution. Prominent findings from our combined analysis of both genes are as follows. The fundamental subdivisions of Hexapoda (insects and relatives) are Insecta and Entognatha, with the latter consisting of collembolans (springtails) and a clade of proturans plus diplurans. Our rRNA-gene data provide the strongest evidence to date that the sister group of Hexapoda is Branchiopoda (fairy shrimps, tadpole shrimps, etc.), not Malacostraca. The large, Pancrustacea clade (hexapods within a paraphyletic Crustacea) divided into a few basic subclades: hexapods plus branchiopods; cirripedes (barnacles) plus malacostracans (lobsters, crabs, true shrimps, isopods, etc.); and the basally located clades of (a) ostracods (seed shrimps) and (b) branchiurans (fish lice) plus the bizarre pentastomids (tongue worms). These findings about Pancrustacea agree with a recent study by Regier, Shultz, and Kambic that used entirely different genes [Regier, J.C., Shultz, J.W., Kambic, R.E., 2005a. Pancrustacean phylogeny: hexapods are terrestrial crustaceans and maxillopods are not monophyletic. Proc. R. Soc. B 272, 395-401]. In Malacostraca, the stomatopod (mantis shrimp) was not at the base of the eumalacostracans

  9. Ptc6 Is Required for Proper Rapamycin-Induced Down-Regulation of the Genes Coding for Ribosomal and rRNA Processing Proteins in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    González, Asier; Casado, Carlos; Ariño, Joaquín; Casamayor, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Ptc6 is one of the seven components (Ptc1-Ptc7) of the protein phosphatase 2C family in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to other type 2C phosphatases, the cellular role of this isoform is poorly understood. We present here a comprehensive characterization of this gene product. Cells lacking Ptc6 are sensitive to zinc ions, and somewhat tolerant to cell-wall damaging agents and to Li+. Ptc6 mutants are sensitive to rapamycin, albeit to lesser extent than ptc1 cells. This phenotype is not rescued by overexpression of PTC1 and mutation of ptc6 does not reproduce the characteristic genetic interactions of the ptc1 mutation with components of the TOR pathway, thus suggesting different cellular roles for both isoforms. We show here that the rapamycin-sensitive phenotype of ptc6 cells is unrelated to the reported role of Pt6 in controlling pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. Lack of Ptc6 results in substantial attenuation of the transcriptional response to rapamycin, particularly in the subset of repressed genes encoding ribosomal proteins or involved in rRNA processing. In contrast, repressed genes involved in translation are Ptc6-independent. These effects cannot be attributed to the regulation of the Sch9 kinase, but they could involve modulation of the binding of the Ifh1 co-activator to specific gene promoters. PMID:23704987

  10. Expression of 5 S rRNA genes linked to 35 S rDNA in plants, their epigenetic modification and regulatory element divergence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In plants, the 5 S rRNA genes usually occur as separate tandems (S-type arrangement) or, less commonly, linked to 35 S rDNA units (L-type). The activity of linked genes remains unknown so far. We studied the homogeneity and expression of 5 S genes in several species from family Asteraceae known to contain linked 35 S-5 S units. Additionally, their methylation status was determined using bisulfite sequencing. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was applied to reveal the sub-nuclear positions of rDNA arrays. Results We found that homogenization of L-type units went to completion in most (4/6) but not all species. Two species contained major L-type and minor S-type units (termed Ls-type). The linked genes dominate 5 S rDNA expression while the separate tandems do not seem to be expressed. Members of tribe Anthemideae evolved functional variants of the polymerase III promoter in which a residing C-box element differs from the canonical angiosperm motif by as much as 30%. On this basis, a more relaxed consensus sequence of a plant C-box: (5’-RGSWTGGGTG-3’) is proposed. The 5 S paralogs display heavy DNA methylation similarly as to their unlinked counterparts. FISH revealed the close association of 35 S-5 S arrays with nucleolar periphery indicating that transcription of 5 S genes may occur in this territory. Conclusions We show that the unusual linked arrangement of 5 S genes, occurring in several plant species, is fully compatible with their expression and functionality. This extraordinary 5 S gene dynamics is manifested at different levels, such as variation in intrachromosomal positions, unit structure, epigenetic modification and considerable divergence of regulatory motifs. PMID:22716941

  11. Bacterial community structure in the intestinal ecosystem of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) as revealed by pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Etyemez, Miray; Balcázar, José Luis

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we determined the diversity and composition of bacterial communities within the intestinal ecosystem of farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Healthy rainbow trout, weighing between 520 and 750 g, were fed a commercial diet. Subsequently, genomic DNA was isolated from the intestinal mucus (n = 16 fish samples) and combined into groups of four fish samples each for pyrosequencing analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. The results revealed that the most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were affiliated to the genera Acinetobacter, Cetobacterium, Pseudomonas, and Psychrobacter, and to a lesser extent, the genera Aeromonas, Clostridium, Deefgea, Flavobacterium, Neptuniibacter, and Mycoplasma. These findings could be used as a baseline for further studies about the role of bacterial communities in normal and altered host physiological states. PMID:25843896

  12. Protist 18S rRNA gene Sequence Analysis Reveals Multiple Sources of Organic Matter Contributing to Turbidity Maxima of the Columbia River Estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Herfort, Lydie; Peterson, Tawnya D.; McCue, Lee Ann; Zuber, Peter A.

    2011-10-05

    The Columbia River estuary is traditionally considered a detritus-based ecosystem fueled in summer by organic matter (OM) from expired freshwater diatoms. Since Estuarine Turbidity Maxima (ETM) are sites of accumulation and transformation of this phytoplankton-derived OM, to further characterize the ETM protist assemblage, we collected in August 2007 bottom waters throughout an ETM event, as well as surface water during the peak of bottom turbidity, and performed biogeochemical, microscopic and molecular (18S rRNA gene clone libraries) analyses. These data confirmed that the majority of the particulate OM in ETMs is derived from chlorophyll a-poor particulate organic carbon tagged by DNA too damaged to be detected by molecular analysis.

  13. Identification of Raoultella terrigena as a Rare Causative Agent of Subungual Abscess Based on 16S rRNA and Housekeeping Gene Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Jiang, Xiawei; Xu, Zemin; Ying, Chaoqun; Yu, Wei; Xiao, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    A 63-year-old-man was admitted to our hospital with severe subungual abscess. Bacteria were isolated from pus samples, and an inconsistent identification was shown by VITEK 2 system and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry as Raoultella planticola and Raoultella terrigena, respectively. Molecular identification by 16S rRNA sequencing suggested that the isolate is R. terrigena, and this was further demonstrated by sequencing three housekeeping genes (rpoB, gyrA, and parC) with phylogenetic analysis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of subungual abscess caused by R. terrigena, a rare case of human infection due to soil bacterium. Our study highlights the technique importance on this pathogen identification. PMID:27379169

  14. Identification of Raoultella terrigena as a Rare Causative Agent of Subungual Abscess Based on 16S rRNA and Housekeeping Gene Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Jiang, Xiawei; Xu, Zemin; Ying, Chaoqun; Yu, Wei; Xiao, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    A 63-year-old-man was admitted to our hospital with severe subungual abscess. Bacteria were isolated from pus samples, and an inconsistent identification was shown by VITEK 2 system and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry as Raoultella planticola and Raoultella terrigena, respectively. Molecular identification by 16S rRNA sequencing suggested that the isolate is R. terrigena, and this was further demonstrated by sequencing three housekeeping genes (rpoB, gyrA, and parC) with phylogenetic analysis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of subungual abscess caused by R. terrigena, a rare case of human infection due to soil bacterium. Our study highlights the technique importance on this pathogen identification.

  15. Study of anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacterial community in the aged refuse bioreactor with 16S rRNA gene library technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Xie, Bing; Han, Lu; Xu, Xiaofan

    2013-10-01

    In order to investigate the anaerobic ammonium-oxidation (Anammox) nitrogen removal pathway of the aged refuse bioreactor treating landfill leachate, a lab-scale bioreactor was established and run for 35 weeks, the performance of the bioreactor and its bacterial community structure of Planctomycetes were analyzed. The results showed that the average TN removal rate of landfill leachate could be reached to 89%. 16S rRNA gene library of Planctomycetes revealed that Anammox sequences accounted for 28.3% of the total Planctomycetes sequences in the bioreactor, and previously recognized Anammox bacterium Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis was the only detected Anammox species in the reactor. It was also found that Anammox bacteria distributed at different sites of the bioreactor while mostly concentrated in the middle and low-middle part. Results above confirmed that Anammox process could happen in aged refuse bioreactor treating landfill leachate and provided an alternative nitrogen removal pathway in practical landfills.

  16. Primers to block the amplification of symbiotic apostome ciliate 18S rRNA gene in a PCR-based copepod diet study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Guangxing

    2014-05-01

    Pelagic copepods play an important role in the marine food web. However, a full understanding of the ecological status of this zooplankton group depends on the careful study of their natural diets. In previous PCR-based copepod diet studies, we found many apostome ciliates that live symbiotically under the exoskeleton of the copepods, and their sequences were often over-represented in the 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) libraries. As a first step to address this issue, we designed three apostome ciliate 18S rDNA blocking primers, and tested their blocking efficiency against apostome ciliate 18s rDNA under various PCR conditions. Using a semi-quantitative PCR method, we optimized the conditions to efficiently amplify the 18S rDNA of the prey while simultaneously excluding the symbiotic apostome ciliates. This technique will facilitate PCR-based diet studies of copepods and other zooplankton in their natural environments.

  17. Complete Sequences of Multidrug Resistance Plasmids Bearing rmtD1 and rmtD2 16S rRNA Methyltransferase Genes.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Maria Fernanda C; Francisco, Gabriela R; de Oliveira Garcia, Doroti; Doi, Yohei

    2016-01-04

    Complete nucleotide sequences were determined for two plasmids bearing rmtD group 16S rRNA methyltransferase genes. pKp64/11 was 78 kb in size, belonged to the IncL/M group, and harbored blaTEM-1b, sul1, qacEΔ1, dfrA22, and rmtD1 across two multidrug resistance regions (MRRs). pKp368/10 was 170 kb in size, belonged to the IncA/C group, and harbored acrB, sul1, qacEΔ1, ant(3″)-Ia, aac(6')-Ib, cat, rmtD2, and blaCTX-M-8 across three MRRs. The rmtD-containing regions shared a conserved motif, suggesting a common origin for the two rmtD alleles.

  18. Complete Sequences of Multidrug Resistance Plasmids Bearing rmtD1 and rmtD2 16S rRNA Methyltransferase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Maria Fernanda C.; Francisco, Gabriela R.; de Oliveira Garcia, Doroti

    2016-01-01

    Complete nucleotide sequences were determined for two plasmids bearing rmtD group 16S rRNA methyltransferase genes. pKp64/11 was 78 kb in size, belonged to the IncL/M group, and harbored blaTEM-1b, sul1, qacEΔ1, dfrA22, and rmtD1 across two multidrug resistance regions (MRRs). pKp368/10 was 170 kb in size, belonged to the IncA/C group, and harbored acrB, sul1, qacEΔ1, ant(3″)-Ia, aac(6′)-Ib, cat, rmtD2, and blaCTX-M-8 across three MRRs. The rmtD-containing regions shared a conserved motif, suggesting a common origin for the two rmtD alleles. PMID:26729503

  19. Use of 16S rRNA Gene-Targeted Group-Specific Primers for Real-Time PCR Analysis of Predominant Bacteria in Mouse Feces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun-Wen; Chen, Mang-Kun; Yang, Bing-Ya; Huang, Xian-Jie; Zhang, Xue-Rui; He, Liang-Qiang; Zhang, Jing; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2015-10-01

    Mouse models are widely used for studying gastrointestinal (GI) tract-related diseases. It is necessary and important to develop a new set of primers to monitor the mouse gut microbiota. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-targeted group-specific primers for Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Deferribacteres, "Candidatus Saccharibacteria," Verrucomicrobia, Tenericutes, and Proteobacteria were designed and validated for quantification of the predominant bacterial species in mouse feces by real-time PCR. After confirmation of their accuracy and specificity by high-throughput sequencing technologies, these primers were applied to quantify the changes in the fecal samples from a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis mouse model. Our results showed that this approach efficiently predicted the occurrence of colitis, such as spontaneous chronic inflammatory bowel disease in transgenic mice. The set of primers developed in this study provides a simple and affordable method to monitor changes in the intestinal microbiota at the phylum level. PMID:26187967

  20. Diagnosis and follow-up of Whipple's disease by amplification of the 16S rRNA gene of Tropheryma whippelii.

    PubMed

    Pron, B; Poyart, C; Abachin, E; Fest, T; Belanger, C; Bonnet, C; Capelle, P; Bretagne, J F; Fabianek, A; Girard, L; Hagège, H; Berche, P

    1999-01-01

    Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene of Tropheryma whippelii was performed in eight patients with Whipple's disease and 34 control patients to confirm a diagnosis of Whipple's disease and to monitor the course of disease. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests were positive before treatment in 13 of 15 tissue samples from Whipple's disease patients (gut 8/8; lymph nodes 2/2; bone marrow 1/2; peripheral blood 2/3), in contrast to none of 54 tissue samples from controls. PCR tests converted to negative within 4-6 months in six of the Whipple's disease patients undergoing therapy. These results show that PCR is a reliable and useful tool for diagnosis of Whipple's disease and for monitoring bacterial elimination during antibiotic therapy.

  1. Diversity of endophytic bacteria in Malaysian plants as revealed by 16S rRNA encoding gene sequence based method of bacterial identification☆

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Chye Ying; Tan, Yin Yin; Rohani, Rahim; Weber, Jean-Frédéric F.; Bhore, Subhash Janardhan

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial endophytes do have several potential applications in pharmacy, medicine and agricultural biotech industry. The main objective of this study was to understand types of bacterial endophytes associated with dicotyledonous (dicot) and monocotyledonous (monocot) plant species. Isolation of the endophytic bacteria was performed using surface-sterilized various tissue samples, and identification of the endophytic bacterial isolates (EBIs) was completed using 16S rRNA encoding gene sequence similarity based method. In total, 996 EBIs were isolated and identified from 1055 samples of 31 monocot and 65 dicot plant species from Peninsular Malaysia. The 996 EBIs represented 71 different types of bacterial species. Twelve (12) out of 71 species are reported as endophytes for the first time. We conclude that diverse types of bacterial endophytes are associated with dicot and monocot plants, and could be useful in pharmacy, medicine and agricultural biotechnology for various potential applications. PMID:24396249

  2. Toolbox Approaches Using Molecular Markers and 16S rRNA Gene Amplicon Data Sets for Identification of Fecal Pollution in Surface Water

    PubMed Central

    Staley, C.; Sadowsky, M. J.; Gyawali, P.; Sidhu, J. P. S.; Palmer, A.; Beale, D. J.; Toze, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, host-associated molecular markers and bacterial 16S rRNA gene community analysis using high-throughput sequencing were used to identify the sources of fecal pollution in environmental waters in Brisbane, Australia. A total of 92 fecal and composite wastewater samples were collected from different host groups (cat, cattle, dog, horse, human, and kangaroo), and 18 water samples were collected from six sites (BR1 to BR6) along the Brisbane River in Queensland, Australia. Bacterial communities in the fecal, wastewater, and river water samples were sequenced. Water samples were also tested for the presence of bird-associated (GFD), cattle-associated (CowM3), horse-associated, and human-associated (HF183) molecular markers, to provide multiple lines of evidence regarding the possible presence of fecal pollution associated with specific hosts. Among the 18 water samples tested, 83%, 33%, 17%, and 17% were real-time PCR positive for the GFD, HF183, CowM3, and horse markers, respectively. Among the potential sources of fecal pollution in water samples from the river, DNA sequencing tended to show relatively small contributions from wastewater treatment plants (up to 13% of sequence reads). Contributions from other animal sources were rarely detected and were very small (<3% of sequence reads). Source contributions determined via sequence analysis versus detection of molecular markers showed variable agreement. A lack of relationships among fecal indicator bacteria, host-associated molecular markers, and 16S rRNA gene community analysis data was also observed. Nonetheless, we show that bacterial community and host-associated molecular marker analyses can be combined to identify potential sources of fecal pollution in an urban river. This study is a proof of concept, and based on the results, we recommend using bacterial community analysis (where possible) along with PCR detection or quantification of host-associated molecular markers to provide information on

  3. Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. in rainwater tank samples: comparison of culture-based methods and 23S rRNA gene quantitative PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, W; Richardson, K; Sidhu, J P S; Toze, S

    2012-10-16

    In this study, culture-based methods and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were compared with each other for the measurement of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. in water samples collected from rainwater tanks in Southeast Queensland, Australia. Among the 50 rainwater tank samples tested, 26 (52%) and 46 (92%) samples yielded E. coli numbers as measured by EPA Method 1603 and E. coli 23S rRNA gene qPCR assay, respectively. Similarly, 49 (98%) and 47 (94%) samples yielded Enterococcus spp. numbers as measured by EPA Method 1600 and Enterococcus spp. 23S rRNA gene qPCR assay, respectively. The mean E. coli (2.49 ± 0.85) log(10) and Enterococcus spp. (2.72 ± 0.32) log(10) numbers as measured by qPCR assays were significantly (P < 0001) different than E. coli (0.91 ± 0.80) log(10) and Enterococcus spp. (1.86 ± 0.60) log(10) numbers as measured by culture-based method. Weak but significant correlations were observed between both EPA Method 1603 and the E. coli qPCR assay (r = 0.47, P = 0.0009), and EPA Method 1600 and the Enterococcus spp. qPCR assay (r = 0.42, P = 0.002). Good qualitative agreement was found between the culture-based method and the Enterococcus spp. qPCR assay in terms of detecting fecal pollution in water samples from the studied rainwater tanks. More research studie