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Sample records for 13-week studies doses

  1. A 13-week dermal repeat-dose neurotoxicity study of hydrodesulfurized kerosene in rats.

    PubMed

    Breglia, Rudolph; Bui, Quang; Burnett, Donald; Koschier, Francis; Lapadula, Elizabeth; Podhasky, Paula; Schreiner, Ceinwen; White, Russell

    2014-01-01

    A 13-week dermal repeat-dose toxicity study was conducted with hydrodesulfurized (HDS) kerosene, a test material that also met the commercial specifications for aviation turbine fuel (jet A). The objectives were to assess the potential for target organ toxicity and neurotoxicity. The HDS kerosene was applied to the shaved backs of Sprague-Dawley CD rats, 12/sex/group, 6 h/d, 5 d/wk in doses of 0 (vehicle control), 165 mg/kg (20% HDS kerosene), 330 mg/kg (40% HDS kerosene), or 495 mg/kg (60% HDS kerosene). Additional rats (12/sex) from the control and the high-dose groups were held without treatment for 4 weeks to assess recovery. Standard parameters of toxicity were investigated during the in-life phase. At necropsy, organs were weighed and selected tissues were processed for microscopic evaluation. Neurobehavioral evaluations included tests of motor activity and functional observations that were conducted pretest, at intervals during the exposure period and after recovery. No test substance-related effects on mortality, clinical observations (except dermal irritation), body weight, or clinical chemistry values were observed. A dose-related increase in skin irritation, confirmed histologically as minimal, was evident at the dosing site. The only statistically significant change considered potentially treatment related was an increase in the neutrophil count in females at 13 weeks. No test article-related effects were observed in the neurobehavioral assessments or gross or microscopic findings in the peripheral or central nervous system tissues in any of the dose groups. Excluding skin irritation, the no observed adverse effect level value for all effects was considered 495 mg/kg/d. PMID:24351872

  2. 13-week repeated dose toxicity study of l-tyrosine in rats by daily oral administration.

    PubMed

    Shibui, Yusuke; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Kodama, Terutaka; Gonsho, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the potential toxicity of l-tyrosine, 4 groups of Crl:CD(SD) rats of both sexes were administered l-tyrosine in water suspension by gavage once daily for 13 weeks at doses of 0 (vehicle), 200, 600 or 2000 mg/kg bw/day. Findings related to l-tyrosine administration were as follows. Edema of the cornified layer at the limiting ridge or forestomach was seen in 600 mg/kg bw/day female group and in both sexes of 2000 mg/kg bw/day group. In the liver, increased weight and hypertrophy of centrilobular hepatocytes were seen in both sexes at 2000 mg/kg bw/day, associated with slight increases in ALT and AST. Regarding the kidney morphology and function, increased hyaline droplets in the proximal tubules and increased urinary protein were seen in the 2000 mg/kg bw/day male group. In addition, increased kidney weight was also observed in both sexes of the 2000 mg/kg bw/day group, although the histological changes attributable to the weight increase remained unclear. As for blood chemistry, increases in triglycerides, total cholesterol, phospholipids, potassium ion, calcium, total protein, and α1 globulin were also seen in both sexes at 2000 mg/kg bw/day. Thus, in this study the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of l-tyrosine was considered to be 600 mg/kg bw/day for males and 200 mg/kg bw/day for females. PMID:26646752

  3. A 4-week Repeated dose Oral Toxicity Study of Mecasin in Sprague-Dawley Rats to Determine the Appropriate Doses for a 13-week, Repeated Toxicity Test

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Eunhye; Lee, Jongchul; Lee, Seongjin; Park, Manyong; Song, Inja; Son, Ilhong; Song, Bong-Keun; Kim, Dongwoung; Lee, Jongdeok

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In this study, we investigated the 4-week repeated-dose oral toxicity of gami-jakyak gamcho buja decoction (Mecasin) to develop safe treatments. Methods: In order to investigate the 4-week oral toxicity of Mecasin, we administered Mecasin orally to rats. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into four groups of five male and five female animals per group: group 1 being the control group and groups 2, 3, and 4 being the experimental groups. Doses of Mecasin of 500, 1,000, and 2,000 mg/kg of body weight were administered to the experimental groups, and a dose of normal saline solution of 10 mL/kg was administered to the control group. We examined the survival rate, weight, clinical signs, and gross findings for four weeks. This study was conducted under the approval of the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee. Results: No deaths occurred in any of the four groups. No significant changes in weights or food consumption between the control group and the experimental groups were observed. Serum biochemistry revealed that some groups showed significant decrease in inorganic phosphorus (IP) (P < 0.05). During necropsy on the rats, one abnormal macroscopic feature, a slight loss of fur, was observed in the mid dosage (1,000 mg/ kg) male group. No abnormalities were observed in any other rats. In histopathological findings, the tubular basophilia and cast of the kidney and extramedullary hematopoiesis of the spleen were found. However, those changes were minimal and had occurred naturally or sporadically. No other organ abnormalities were observed. Conclusion: During this 4-week, repeated, oral toxicity test of Mecasin in SD rats, no toxicity changes due to Mecasin were observed in any of the male or the female rats in the high dosage group. Thus, we suggest that the doses in a 13-week, repeated test should be 0, 500, 1,000, and 2,000 mg/kg respectively. PMID:26998389

  4. 13-week oral toxicity study of vinyl laurate in rats.

    PubMed

    Lina, Ben A R; Messinger, Horst; Bär, Albert

    2015-02-01

    Vinyl laurate (VL) is used as a monomer in the production of polyvinyl acetate vinyl laurate copolymer, a component of chewing gum base. The safety of VL was examined in a 13-week oral toxicity study in Wistar rats. VL was administered in corn coil by daily gavage (5 ml/kg bw/d) to four main groups (10 rats/sex) at doses of 0 (vehicle only), 50, 250 and 1000 mg/kg bw/d, respectively. The control and high-dose group comprised an additional 5 rats/sex which were kept untreated for a further 4 weeks until sacrifice (recovery groups). In addition to standard parameters, male and female fertility parameters were determined as well. There were no mortalities and treatment-related clinical signs. Neurobehavioral observations and motor activity assessment, ophthalmoscopic examinations, body weights, feed and water intakes, blood cell counts, coagulation time, standard clinical chemical parameters and urinalyses, absolute and relative organ weights at the end of the treatment as well as macroscopic examination at necropsy and microscopic examination of standard organs and tissues did not show any treatment-related changes. Female and male fertility parameters (estrus cyclicity, testicular and epididymal sperm counts, sperm motility and morphology) were not affected by the treatment. Accordingly, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for VL was determined to be 1000 mg/kg bw/d, i.e. the highest dose level tested. PMID:25445296

  5. Nutrition Composition and Single, 14-Day and 13-Week Repeated Oral Dose Toxicity Studies of the Leaves and Stems of Rubus coreanus Miquel.

    PubMed

    Om, Ae-Son; Song, Yu-Na; Noh, GeonMin; Kim, HaengRan; Choe, JeongSook

    2016-01-01

    The leaves and stems of the plant Rubus coreanus Miquel (RCMLS) are rich in vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals which have antioxidant, anti-hemolytic, anti-inflammatory, anti-fatigue and anti-cancer effects. However, RCMLS is not included in the Korean Food Standards Codex due to the lack of safety assurance concerning RCMLS. We evaluated single and repeated oral dose toxicity of RCMLS in Sprague-Dawley rats. RCMLS did not induce any significant toxicological changes in both male and female rats at a single doses of 2500 mg/kg/day. Repeated oral dose toxicity studies showed no adverse effects in clinical signs, body weight, food consumption, ophthalmic examination, urinalysis, hematology, serum biochemistry, necropsy findings, organ weight, and histopathology at doses of 625, 1250, and 2500 mg/kg/day. The LD50 and LOAEL of RCMLS might be over 2500 mg/kg body weight/day and no target organs were identified. Therefore, this study revealed that single and repeated oral doses of RCMLS are safe. PMID:26760987

  6. A 13-week toxicity study of acrylamide administered in drinking water to hamsters.

    PubMed

    Imai, Toshio; Kitahashi, Tsukasa

    2014-01-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is known to induce tumors in various organs/tissues in rats and mice. Epidemiological studies of oral exposure have generated controversial results but mortality studies of people who work with AA have indicated increased rates of pancreatic cancer. In the present study, for dose selection for chronic toxicity/carcinogenicity studies, 13-week toxicity of AA was evaluated in Syrian hamsters, which are sensitive to induction of pancreatic ductal carcinogenesis, at concentrations required to provide doses of 0 (control), 20, 30 and 50 mg kg(-1) body weight in drinking water. Treatment with AA caused abnormal gait advancing to hind limb paralysis in all males and females at 50 mg kg(-1). Body weights in 30 and 50 mg kg(-1) males and 50 mg kg(-1) females were lower than in the controls. At termination of the study, red blood cells (RBC) and hemoglobin (Hb) were decreased or showed a tendency for a decrease at 20 and 30 mg kg(-1) in females. Microscopically, axonal/myelin degeneration of sciatic nerves was observed in all AA-treated groups with dose dependence. No obvious changes were found in pancreatic ducts/ductules in any groups of animal. These results indicated the maximum tolerated dose for long-term studies of AA to be 20 mg kg(-1) or less in both male and female Syrian hamsters. PMID:23129233

  7. Studies of the toxicological potential of capsinoids: VIII. A 13-week toxicity study of commercial-grade dihydrocapsiate in rats.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eri; Kodama, Terutaka; Masuyama, Takeshi; Tsubuku, Shoji; Otabe, Akira; Mochizuki, Masahiro; Bernard, Bruce K

    2008-01-01

    Dihydrocapsiate, (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl 8-methylnona- noate; CAS No. 205687-03-2) is a naturally occurring capsinoid compound found in nonpungent chili peppers. Although the safety of synthetically produced dihydrocapsiate has been previously evaluated, the purpose of this 13-week gavage toxicity study is to evaluate dihydrocapsiate produced with a slightly modified manufacturing process. Sprague-Dawley rats, 10 rats/sex/group, 6 weeks of age at study initiation, were administered the dihydrocapsiate daily by gavage at dose levels of 0 (vehicle), 100, 300, or 1000 mg/kg/day. The rats were observed for antimortem and postmortem signs of toxicity, including changes in clinical signs, body weights, food consumption, water intake, ophthalmology, clinical pathology (clinical chemistry, hematology, urinalysis), tissue findings (macroscopic and microscopic examination), as well as organ weights. There were no changes observed in clinical signs, body weight, food consumption, water intake, ophthalmology, urinalysis, hematology, or blood chemistry that were attributable to the administration of dihydrocapsiate. The only change observed attributable to the dihydrocapsiate administration involved the liver and that change occurred only at the high dose (1000 mg/kg). Both sexes had an increase in organ weights, but this increase correlated with a change in histopathology (i.e., hepatocyte hypertrophy) only in the males. No dihydrocapsiate-related histopathological changes were observed in males at doses < or = 300 mg/kg or in females at any of the doses tested (< or = 1000 mg/kg). It was concluded that the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of dihydrocapsiate was 300 mg/kg/day for male rats and 1000 mg/kg/day for female rats in this 13 week gavage study. PMID:19037802

  8. Metabolic effects of a 13-weeks lifestyle intervention in older adults: The Growing Old Together Study

    PubMed Central

    Stassen, Stephanie A.M.; van den Akker, Erik B.; van Heemst, Diana; Dibbets-Schneider, Petra; van Dipten-van der Veen, Regina. A.; Kelderman, Milou; Hankemeier, Thomas; Mooijaart, Simon P.; van der Grond, Jeroen; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Beekman, Marian; Feskens, Edith J.M.; Slagboom, P. Eline

    2016-01-01

    For people in their 40s and 50s, lifestyle programs have been shown to improve metabolic health. For older adults, however, it is not clear whether these programs are equally healthy. In the Growing Old Together study, we applied a 13-weeks lifestyle program, with a target of 12.5% caloric restriction and 12.5% increase in energy expenditure through an increase in physical activity, in 164 older adults (mean age=63.2 years; BMI=23-35 kg/m2). Mean weight loss was 4.2% (SE=2.8%) of baseline weight, which is comparable to a previous study in younger adults. Fasting insulin levels, however, showed a much smaller decrease (0.30 mU/L (SE=3.21)) and a more heterogeneous response (range=2.0-29.6 mU/L). Many other parameters of metabolic health, such as blood pressure, and thyroid, glucose and lipid metabolism improved significantly. Many 1H-NMR metabolites changed in a direction previously associated with a low risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease and partially independently of weight loss. In conclusion, 25% reduction in energy balance for 13 weeks induced a metabolic health benefit in older adults, monitored by traditional and novel metabolic markers. PMID:26824634

  9. Studies of the toxicological potential of capsinoids: VII. A 13-week toxicity study of dihydrocapsiate in rats.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Terutaka; Watanabe, Eri; Tsubuku, Shoji; Otabe, Akira; Mochizuki, Masahiro; Masuyama, Takeshi; Bernard, Bruce K

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the safety of dihydrocapsiate (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl 8-methylnonanoate; CAS No. 205687-03-2), a 13-week gavage toxicity study was conducted in Sprague-Dawley rats (10/sex/group). Test subjects received either dihydrocapsiate, 100, 300, or 1000 mg/kg/day, or vehicle by gavage and were observed for antemortem and postmortem signs of toxicity, which included changes in clinical signs, body weights, food consumption, water intake, ophthalmology, clinical pathology (clinical chemistry, hematology, urinalysis), tissue findings (macroscopic and microscopic examination), as well as organ weights. No changes attributable to the test article were observed in clinical signs, body weights, food consumption, water intake, ophthalmology, urinalysis, hematology, or histopathology. A number of sporadic blood chemistry differences were observed at the high dose between treated and controls, but were not of toxicological significance and were not attributable to the test article. These included increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity in males; increased total protein in males and females; increased calcium, percentage of albumin fraction, and A/G (albumin/globulin) ratio and decreased percentage of gamma-globulin fraction in female rats. An effect, which was attributable to the test article, was increases in both absolute and relative liver weights in the high dose (both sexes). In the absence of histopathological changes attributable to the test article, the liver weight changes were considered adaptive (physiological) in nature and not of toxicological significance. It was concluded that the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of dihydrocapsiate was 1000 mg/kg/day for both male and female rats in this 13-week gavage study. PMID:19037801

  10. GENE EXPRESSION DOSE-RESPONSE IN THE BLADDERS OF MICE EXPOSED TO ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER FOR 13 WEEKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The association between drinking water exposures to inorganic arsenic and life-threatening tumors in the human is strongest for bladder cancer. To investigate the mode of action for inorganic arsenic carcinogenicity in the bladder, a study was conducted to characterize the dose-r...

  11. Acute, 2-week, and 13-week inhalation toxicity studies on dimethylethoxysilane vapor in Fischer 344 rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodd, D. E.; Stuart, B. O.; Rothenberg, S. J.; Kershaw, M.; Mann, P. C.; James, J. T.; Lam, C. W.

    1994-01-01

    Dimethylethoxysilane (DMES), a volatile liquid, is used by NASA to waterproof the heat-protective silica tiles and blankets on the Space Shuttle. Acute, 2-wk, and 13-wk inhalation exposures to DMES vapor were conducted in male and female Fischer 344 rats. In the acute study, rats were exposed to 4000, 2000, 1000, 500, or 0 (control) ppm DMES for 4 h and observed for 14 days. There were no deaths. Narcosis and ataxia were observed in rats of the two highest concentrations only. These signs disappeared within 1 h following exposure. There were no DMES-related gross or microscopic tissue lesions in rats of all exposure groups. In the 2-wk study, rats were exposed for 6 h/day, 5 days/wk to 3000, 1000, 300, 100, or 0 ppm DMES. During exposure, narcosis was observed in rats of the 3000 and 1000 ppm groups. There was a mild decrease in body weight gain in rats of the 3000 ppm group. A decrease in platelet count, an increase in bile acids, and reduced weights of the thymus, testis, and liver were observed in rats of the 3000 ppm group. Microscopically, hypospermatogenesis and spermatid giant cells were observed in the seminiferous tubules of the testes of rats exposed to 3000 ppm DMES. In the 13-wk study, rats were exposed 6 h/day, 5 days/wk to 2000, 600, 160, 40, or 0 ppm DMES. During exposure, rats of the 2000 ppm group exhibited mild narcosis and loss of startle reflex. Recovery from these central nervous system signs was rapid. Body weights were mildly decreased for rats of the 2000 ppm group. There were no exposure-related effects in hematology, serum chemistry, or urinalysis. Female rats of the 2000 ppm group had delayed estrous cycles (6 days compared to 5 days in control rats). Noteworthy organ weight changes in rats of the 2000 ppm group included decreases in thymus, liver, and testicular weights; however, pathologic lesions were observed in the testes only. Sperm motility, epididymal sperm count, and testicular spermatid count were dramatically reduced

  12. Osilodrostat (LCI699), a potent 11β-hydroxylase inhibitor, administered in combination with the multireceptor-targeted somatostatin analog pasireotide: A 13-week study in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Li; Vashisht, Kapil; Boisclair, Julie; Li, Wenkui; Lin, Tsu-han; Schmid, Herbert A.; Kluwe, William; Schoenfeld, Heidi; Hoffmann, Peter

    2015-08-01

    The somatostatin analog pasireotide and the 11β-hydroxylase inhibitor osilodrostat (LCI699) reduce cortisol levels by distinct mechanisms of action. There exists a scientific rationale to investigate the clinical efficacy of these two agents in combination. This manuscript reports the results of a toxicology study in rats, evaluating different doses of osilodrostat and pasireotide alone and in combination. Sixty male and 60 female rats were randomized into single-sex groups to receive daily doses of pasireotide (0.3 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously), osilodrostat (20 mg/kg/day, orally), osilodrostat/pasireotide in combination (low dose, 1.5/0.03 mg/kg/day; mid-dose, 5/0.1 mg/kg/day; or high dose, 20/0.3 mg/kg/day), or vehicle for 13 weeks. Mean body-weight gains from baseline to Week 13 were significantly lower in the pasireotide-alone and combined-treatment groups compared to controls, and were significantly higher in female rats receiving osilodrostat monotherapy. Osilodrostat and pasireotide monotherapies were associated with significant changes in the histology and mean weights of the pituitary and adrenal glands, liver, and ovary/oviduct. Osilodrostat alone was associated with adrenocortical hypertrophy and hepatocellular hypertrophy. In combination, osilodrostat/pasireotide did not exacerbate any target organ changes and ameliorated the liver and adrenal gland changes observed with monotherapy. C{sub max} and AUC{sub 0–24h} of osilodrostat and pasireotide increased in an approximately dose-proportional manner. In conclusion, the pasireotide and osilodrostat combination did not exacerbate changes in target organ weight or toxicity compared with either monotherapy, and had an acceptable safety profile; addition of pasireotide to the osilodrostat regimen may attenuate potential adrenal gland hyperactivation and hepatocellular hypertrophy, which are potential side effects of osilodrostat monotherapy. - Highlights: • We examined the target organ toxicity of SOM230

  13. An Investigative Study of Pancreatic Exocrine Biomarkers, Histology, and Histomorphometry in Male Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) Rats Given Dulaglutide by Subcutaneous Injection Twice Weekly for 13 Weeks.

    PubMed

    Usborne, Amy; Byrd, Richard A; Meehan, James; Blackbourne, Jamie L; Sullivan, John; Poitout-Belissent, Florence; Prefontaine, Annick; Martin, Jennifer A; Vahle, John L

    2015-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist therapy has been implicated as a possible risk factor for acute pancreatitis in patients with type 2 diabetes. Dulaglutide is a long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist in development for treatment of type 2 diabetes. The effects of dulaglutide were evaluated in male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats to examine whether dulaglutide may induce or modulate pancreatitis. Rats were randomized to dose groups receiving twice-weekly subcutaneously administered dulaglutide 0.5, 1.5, and 5.0 mg/kg/dose (corresponding human plasma exposures following twice-weekly dosing are 3-, 8-, and 30-fold, respectively) for 13 weeks or to vehicle control. Following termination, serially trimmed sections of pancreases were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or co-stained with an epithelial marker and a marker of either proliferation or apoptosis. Efficacious reductions in glucose and hemoglobin A1c occurred at all dulaglutide doses. Lipase activity was unaffected, and there were modest increases in total and pancreatic amylase activities at all doses without individual microscopic inflammatory correlates. Microscopic dulaglutide-related pancreatic changes included increased interlobular ductal epithelium without ductal cell proliferation (≥0.5 mg/kg), increased acinar atrophy with/without inflammation (≥1.5 mg/kg), and increased incidence/severity of neutrophilic acinar pancreatic inflammation (5.0 mg/kg). In summary, dulaglutide treatment was associated with mild alterations in ductal epithelium and modest exacerbation of spontaneous lesions of the exocrine pancreas typically found in the ZDF rat model. PMID:26269615

  14. Results of a 13-week safety assurance study with rats fed grain from corn rootworm-protected, glyphosate-tolerant MON 88017 corn.

    PubMed

    Healy, C; Hammond, B; Kirkpatrick, J

    2008-07-01

    Presented are the results of a 13-week rat feeding study with grain from MON 88017 corn (brand name YieldGard VT Rootworm/RR2), protected from feeding damage caused by corn rootworm and tolerant to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup agricultural herbicides. Corn rootworm protection is accomplished through the introduction of cryBb1 coding sequence from Bacillus thuringiensis into the corn genome for in planta production of a bioactive form of Cry3Bb1 protein. Also included in the genome is the coding sequence for the CP4 EPSPS protein from Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4 that confers glyphosate herbicidal tolerance. MON 88017 was formulated into rodent diets at 11 or 33% (w/w) levels with its near isogenic control at a level of 33% (w/w). Additionally, six diets containing grain from different conventional (non-biotechnology-derived), reference hybrids were formulated, each at 33% (w/w) levels of one of six reference grains. All diets were nutritionally balanced and conformed to PMI specifications for Certified LabDiet 5002 (PMI Certified LabDiet 5002 is a registered trademark of Purina Mills, Inc.). The responses of rats fed diets containing MON 88017 were comparable to those of rats fed a diet containing grain from its near isogenic control. This study complements extensive agronomic, compositional, and farm animal feeding studies with MON 88017 grain, confirming that it is as safe and nutritious as grain from existing commercial corn hybrids. PMID:18492601

  15. Acute and subchronic (13-week) toxicity of fermented Acanthopanax koreanum extracts in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Cho, MyoungLae; Shin, Gi-Hae; Kim, Jae-Min; Lee, Jin-Ha; Park, Sun-Ok; Lee, Sang-Jong; Shin, HyunMu; Lee, Boo-Yong; Kang, Il-Jun; Lee, Ok-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    The biological fermentation of plants is usually used to improve their product properties, including their biological activity. Acanthopanax koreanum is a plant indigenous to Jeju, Korea; however, fermented A. koreanum (FAK) has not been guaranteed to be safe. Therefore, in this study, a safety evaluation of aqueous extracts of FAK was performed using Sprague Dawley rats. The acute toxicity of FAK did not influence animal mortality, body weight changes or the animals' clinical appearance at a concentration of 5000 mg/kg body weight. Using doses of 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg/day in a subchronic (13-week) toxicity study, the administration of FAK in male rats increased their body weight, food consumption, absolute liver weight, liver-associated enzymes and total cholesterol content. However, these effects of FAK were not considered toxic because the changes were not accompanied by any evidence of clinical signs or any change in the histopathological examination. On the other hand, the FAK-treated female rats did not exhibit significant changes in their body weight, food consumption, absolute and relative organ weights or liver enzymes. These results suggest that the acute oral administration of FAK is non-toxic to rats, and 13 weeks of repeated dosing demonstrated no FAK-related toxicity at a concentration of 2000 mg/kg. Therefore, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of FAK was determined to be 2000 mg/kg/day for both male and female rats. PMID:26925497

  16. Toxicity of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) following exposure of Wistar Rats for 13 weeks or one year via drinking water.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Edilberto; Willson, Gabrielle; Parkinson, Horace; Dodd, Darol

    2012-09-01

    Thirteen-week and one-year toxicity studies of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) administered in drinking water to Wistar rats were conducted. Male and female rats were exposed to MTBE in drinking water at 0.5, 3, 7.5 and 15 mg ml(-1) for 13 weeks and at 0.5, 3 and 7.5 (males) or 0.5, 3 and 15 mg ml(-1) (females) for 1 year. Body weights were reduced only in males following 13 weeks of exposure. Reduced water consumption and urine output were observed in males and females exposed to MTBE. Kidney cell replication and α(2u)-globulin levels in males were increased at 1 and 4 weeks of MTBE exposure and tubular cell regeneration was increased in male kidneys exposed to MTBE concentrations of 7.5 mg ml(-1) or greater for 13 weeks. Wet weights of male kidneys were increased following 13 weeks, 6 months and 1 year of exposure to MTBE concentrations of 7.5 mg ml(-1) or greater. Kidney wet weights were increased in females at MTBE concentrations of 15 mg ml(-1) for 13 weeks. Tertiary-butyl alcohol blood levels increased linearly with dose in males and females following 1 year of exposure. Chronic progressive nephropathy (CPN), of minimal to mild severity, increased in males, but not females, with 1 year of MTBE exposure. In summary, exposure of Wistar rats to MTBE in the drinking water resulted in minimal exposure-related effects including limited renal changes in male rats suggestive of α(2u)-globulin nephropathy following 13 weeks of exposure and an exacerbation of CPN in males at the end of 1 year of exposure. PMID:22833177

  17. Single-walled carbon nanotubes disturbed the immune and metabolic regulation function 13-weeks after a single intratracheal instillation.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Hong, Young-Shick; Lee, Byoung-Seok; Yoon, Cheolho; Jeong, Uiseok; Kim, Younghun

    2016-07-01

    Due to their unique physicochemical properties, the potential health effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have attracted continuous attention together with their extensive application. In this study, we aimed to identify local and systemic health effects following pulmonary persistence of SWCNTs. As expected, SWCNTs remained in the lung for 13 weeks after a single intratracheal instillation (50, 100, and 200μg/kg). In the lung, the total number of cells and the percentages of lymphocytes and neutrophils significantly increased at 200μg/kg compared to the control, and the Th1-polarized immune response was induced accompanying enhanced expression of tissue damage-related genes and increased release of chemokines. Additionally, SWCNTs enhanced the expression of antigen presentation-related proteins on the surface of antigen-presenting cells, however, maturation of dendritic cells was inhibited by their persistence. As compared to the control, a significant increase in the percentage of neutrophils and a remarkable decrease of BUN and potassium level were observed in the blood of mice treated with the highest dose. This was accompanied by the down-regulation of the expression of antigen presentation-related proteins on splenocytes. Moreover, protein and glucose metabolism were disturbed with an up-regulation of fatty acid β-oxidation. Taken together, we conclude that SWCNTs may induce adverse health effects by disturbing immune and metabolic regulation functions in the body. Therefore, careful application of SWCNTs is necessary for the enforcement of safety in nano-industries. PMID:27078092

  18. Toluene inhalation exposure for 13 weeks causes persistent changes in electroretinograms of Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Boyes, William K; Bercegeay, Mark; Degn, Laura; Beasley, Tracey E; Evansky, Paul A; Mwanza, Jean Claude; Geller, Andrew M; Pinckney, Charles; Nork, T Michael; Bushnell, Philip J

    2016-03-01

    Studies of humans chronically exposed to volatile organic solvents have reported impaired visual functions, including low contrast sensitivity and reduced color discrimination. These reports, however, lacked confirmation from controlled laboratory experiments. To address this question experimentally, we examined visual function by recording visual evoked potentials (VEP) and/or electroretinograms (ERG) from four sets of rats exposed repeatedly to toluene. In addition, eyes of the rats were examined with an ophthalmoscope and some of the retinal tissues were evaluated for rod and M-cone photoreceptor immunohistochemistry. The first study examined rats following exposure to 0, 10, 100 or 1000ppm toluene by inhalation (6hr/d, 5d/wk) for 13 weeks. One week after the termination of exposure, the rats were implanted with chronically indwelling electrodes and the following week pattern-elicited VEPs were recorded. VEP amplitudes were not significantly changed by toluene exposure. Four to five weeks after completion of exposure, rats were dark-adapted overnight, anesthetized, and several sets of electroretinograms (ERG) were recorded. In dark-adapted ERGs recorded over a 5-log (cd-s/m(2)) range of flash luminance, b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced at high stimulus luminance values in rats previously exposed to 1000ppm toluene. A second set of rats, exposed concurrently with the first set, was tested approximately one year after the termination of 13 weeks of exposure to toluene. Again, dark-adapted ERG b-wave amplitudes were reduced at high stimulus luminance values in rats previously exposed to 1000ppm toluene. A third set of rats was exposed to the same concentrations of toluene for only 4 weeks, and a fourth set of rats exposed to 0 or 1000ppm toluene for 4 weeks were tested approximately 1year after the completion of exposure. No statistically significant reductions of ERG b-wave amplitude were observed in either set of rats exposed for 4 weeks. No

  19. Low-Dose Carcinogenicity Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the major deficiencies of cancer risk assessments is the lack of low-dose carcinogenicity data. Most assessments require extrapolation from high to low doses, which is subject to various uncertainties. Only 4 low-dose carcinogenicity studies and 5 low-dose biomarker/pre-n...

  20. Eating Order: A 13-Week Trust Model Class for Dieting Casualties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Elizabeth G.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic dieting distorts eating behaviors and causes weight escalation. Desperation about losing weight results in pursuit of extreme weight loss measures. Instead of offering yet another diet, nutrition educators can teach chronic dieters (dieting casualties) to develop eating competence. Eating Order, a 13-week class for chronic dieters based on…

  1. Three-dimensional reconstruction and morphologic measurements of human embryonic hearts: a new diagnostic and quantitative method applicable to fetuses younger than 13 weeks of gestation

    PubMed Central

    Schleich, Jean-Marc; Dillenseger, Jean-Louis; Loeuillet, Laurence; Moulinoux, Jacques-Philippe; Almange, Claude

    2005-01-01

    Improvements in the diagnosis of congenital malformations explain the increasing early termination of pregnancies. Before 13 weeks of gestation, an accurate in vivo anatomical diagnosis cannot currently be made in all fetuses with the imaging instrumentation available. Anatomo-pathological examinations remain the gold standard to make accurate diagnoses, although they reach limits between 9 and 13 weeks of gestation. We present the first results of a methodology that can be applied routinely, using standard histological section, enabling the reconstruction, visual estimate and quantitative analysis of 13 weeks of age human embryonic cardiac structures. The cardiac blocks were fixed, included in paraffin and entirely sliced by a microtome. One slice out of 10 was topographically colored and digitized on an optical microscope. The cardiac volume was recovered by a semi-automatic realignment of the sections. Another semi-automatic procedure allowed extracting and labeling of the cardiac structures from the volume. The structures were studied with display tools, disclosing the internal and external cardiac components, and enabling the determination of size, thickness and precise position of the ventricles, atria and large vessels. This pilot study confirmed that a new 3-D reconstruction and visualization method enabled to make accurate diagnoses, including in embryos <13 weeks old. Its implementation at earlier stages of embryogenesis will provide a clearer view of cardiac development. PMID:16211458

  2. Differential display in rat livers treated for 13 weeks with phenobarbital implicates a role for metabolic and oxidative stress in nongenotoxic carcinogenicity.

    PubMed

    Elrick, Mollisa M; Kramer, Jeffrey A; Alden, Carl L; Blomme, Eric A G; Bunch, Roderick T; Cabonce, Marc A; Curtiss, Sandra W; Kier, Larry D; Kolaja, Kyle L; Rodi, Charles P; Morris, Dale L

    2005-01-01

    Hepatic enzyme inducers such as phenobarbital are often nongenotoxic rodent hepatocarcinogens. Currently, nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens can only be definitively identified through costly and extensive long-term, repeat-dose studies (e.g., 2-year rodent carcinogenicity assays). Although liver tumors caused by these compounds are often not found to be relevant to human health, the mechanism(s) by which they cause carcinogenesis are not well understood. Toxicogenomic technologies represent a new approach to understanding the molecular bases of toxicological liabilities such asnongenotoxic carcinogenicity early in the drug discovery/development process. Microarrays have been used to identify mechanistic molecular markers of nongenotoxic rodent hepatocarcinogenesis in short-term, repeat-dose preclinical safety studies. However, the initial "noise" of early adaptive changes may confound mechanistic interpretation of transcription profiling data from short-term studies, and the molecular processes triggered by treatment with a xenobiotic agent are likely to change over the course of long-term treatment. Here, we describe the use of a differential display technology to understand the molecular mechanisms related to 13 weeks of dosing with the prototype rodent nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogen, phenobarbital. These findings implicate a continuing role for oxidative stress in nongenotoxic carcinogenicity.An Excel data file containing raw data is available in full at http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0192-6233. Click on the issue link for 33(1), then select this article. A download option appears at the bottom of this abstract. The file contains raw data for all gene changes detected by AFLP, including novel genes and genes of unknown function; sequences of detected genes; and animal body and liver weight ratios. In order to access the full article online, you must either have an individual subscription or a member subscription accessed through

  3. Efficacy and tolerability of olanzapine in patients with schizophrenia in lithuania: A 13-week, multicenter, open-label, nonrandomized study☆

    PubMed Central

    Maciulis, Valentinas; Bitter, Istvan; Milasiunas, Raimundas; Dembinskas, Algirdas; Radavicius, Liaudminas; Kaunas, Algirdas; Dossenbach, Martin; Walker, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Background: The atypical antipsychotic olanzapine has been approved for the treatment of schizophrenia in Europe since 1996 but has been used primarily as a second-line treatment to the less expensive typical agents. However, similar to other atypical antipsychotic drugs, olanzapine has a lower risk of inducing extrapyramidal symptoms, tardive dyskinesia, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and sexual dysfunction compared with the typical antipsychotic drugs. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether patients with schizophrenia who have a poor response to their present antipsychotic therapy would show improvement when switched to olanzapine. Methods: This 13-week, multicenter, open-label, nonrandomized trial was conducted at 5 centers in Lithuania. Patients were started on oral olanzapine 10-mg tablets once daily, which could be adjusted by 5 mg/d in the dosing range of 5 to 20 mg/d. The primary efficacy measure was the total score on the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), which was extracted from the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Efficacy response rate was defined a priori as the percentage of patients achieving ≥40% improvement in the BPRS total score. Secondary assessments included the PANSS total and BPRS and PANSS subscales and scores on the Clinical Global Impression-Severity of Illness (CGI-S), the CGI-Global Improvement (CGI-I), and the Patient Global Impression-Improvement (PGI-I) tests. Tolerability was primarily measured by assessing the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) according to the Udvalg fuer Kliniske Undersogelser (UKU) Side Effect Rating Scale and laboratory analyses. Results: Twenty-four patients (13 men [54.2%]; mean [SD] age, 32.4 [8.1] years) entered the study. Twenty-three (95.8%) of the 24 patients completed the study. The mean (SD) daily dosage of olanzapine was 11.40 (2.18) mg/d. The total mean (SD) BPRS score improved significantly from 37.8 (7.9) to 19.5 (13.7) (P < 0.001). The

  4. Evaluation of Acute 13-Week Subchronic Toxicity and Genotoxicity of the Powdered Root of Tongkat Ali (Eurycoma longifolia Jack)

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Liao, Po-Lin; Huang, Wei-Kuang; Tse, Ling-Shan; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Kang, Jaw-Jou; Cheng, Yu-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Tongkat Ali (Eurycoma longifolia) is an indigenous traditional herb in Southern Asia. Its powdered root has been processed to produce health supplements, but no detailed toxicology report is available. In this study, neither mutagenicity nor clastogenicity was noted, and acute oral LD50 was more than 6 g/kg b.w. After 4-week subacute and 13-week subchronic exposure paradigms (0, 0.6, 1.2, and 2 g/kg b.w./day), adverse effects attributable to test compound were not observed with respect to body weight, hematology, serum biochemistry, urinalysis, macropathology, or histopathology. However, the treatment significantly reduced prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine phosphate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and cholesterol levels, especially in males (P < 0.05). These changes were judged as pharmacological effects, and they are beneficial to health. The calculated acceptable daily intake (ADI) was up to 1.2 g/adult/day. This information will be useful for product development and safety management. PMID:24062779

  5. No evidence of drug-induced pancreatitis in rats treated with exenatide for 13 weeks

    PubMed Central

    Tatarkiewicz, K; Belanger, P; Gu, G; Parkes, D; Roy, D

    2013-01-01

    Aims The potential association of glucagon-like peptide receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) with the development of pancreatitis or pancreatic malignancies in patients with diabetes has been suggested. This study evaluated the long-term effects of the GLP-1RA exenatide on pancreatic exocrine structure and function in the Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat model of type 2 diabetes. Methods Rats received subcutaneous twice-daily injections of 0 (control), 6, 40 and 250 µg/kg/day exenatide for 3 months. Clinical signs, body and pancreas weight, food consumption, HbA1c, fasting serum amylase, lipase, glucose and insulin concentrations were evaluated during treatment and after a 28-day off-drug period to assess the reversibility of any observed effects. Morphometric analysis of pancreatic ductal cell proliferation and apoptosis were performed. Results Plasma exenatide concentrations were several-fold higher than therapeutic levels observed in humans. No exenatide-related effects were observed on clinical signs, lipase concentration, pancreatic weight, pancreatic histology, ductal cell proliferation or apoptosis. Exenatide improved animal survival, physical condition, glucose concentrations and HbA1c, decreased food intake, and increased serum insulin concentration. Total amylase concentrations, although within normal ranges, were slightly higher in exenatide-treated rats; following the off-drug period, total amylase concentrations were comparable in treated and untreated rats. Exenatide-related minimal-to-moderate islet hypertrophy was observed at doses ≥6 µg/kg/day, with dose-related increases in incidence and degree. These changes were still present after the off-drug period. Conclusions Chronic administration of exenatide in ZDF rats resulted in the expected metabolic benefits and improved animal survival, with no adverse effects noted on pancreatic exocrine structure and function. PMID:23163898

  6. A dose error evaluation study for 4D dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milz, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J.; Ullrich, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that respiration induced motion is not negligible for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. The intrafractional breathing induced motion influences the delivered dose distribution on the underlying patient geometry such as the lung or the abdomen. If a static geometry is used, a planning process for these indications does not represent the entire dynamic process. The quality of a full 4D dose calculation approach depends on the dose coordinate transformation process between deformable geometries. This article provides an evaluation study that introduces an advanced method to verify the quality of numerical dose transformation generated by four different algorithms. The used transformation metric value is based on the deviation of the dose mass histogram (DMH) and the mean dose throughout dose transformation. The study compares the results of four algorithms. In general, two elementary approaches are used: dose mapping and energy transformation. Dose interpolation (DIM) and an advanced concept, so called divergent dose mapping model (dDMM), are used for dose mapping. The algorithms are compared to the basic energy transformation model (bETM) and the energy mass congruent mapping (EMCM). For evaluation 900 small sample regions of interest (ROI) are generated inside an exemplary lung geometry (4DCT). A homogeneous fluence distribution is assumed for dose calculation inside the ROIs. The dose transformations are performed with the four different algorithms. The study investigates the DMH-metric and the mean dose metric for different scenarios (voxel sizes: 8 mm, 4 mm, 2 mm, 1 mm 9 different breathing phases). dDMM achieves the best transformation accuracy in all measured test cases with 3-5% lower errors than the other models. The results of dDMM are reasonable and most efficient in this study, although the model is simple and easy to implement. The EMCM model also achieved suitable results, but the approach requires a more complex

  7. Paediatric personnel extremity dose study.

    PubMed

    Gallet, J M C; Reed, M H

    2002-03-01

    Concern has been expressed in paediatric radiology regarding the magnitude of the extremity dose received by attending personnel during routine fluoroscopic procedures and CT. Common procedures that may be of short duration in adults can be quite the opposite in paediatric patients. The extremities of attending personnel are more likely to be exposed to the primary beam and for a longer period of time owing to a variety of reasons such as assisting in the procedure or physically restraining the patient during the examination. During the period mid 1998 to mid 2000, two paediatric radiologists, four senior radiographers and two paediatric nurses were monitored using ring thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). Each participant wore the ring TLD on either the left or right ring finger, depending on which hand the individual favoured. Left/right asymmetrical studies were not conducted, nor were records kept of whether an examination used a grid or gridless technique. Initial apprehension about higher paediatric fluoroscopic and CT extremity doses was dispelled as a result of this quantitative dosimetric study. PMID:11932219

  8. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease induced by 13-week oral administration of 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Fang, Baochen; Ren, Mengrou; Huang, Guoren; Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Yi; Deng, Xuming; Guan, Shuang

    2015-05-01

    1,3-Dichloro-2-propanol (1,3-DCP) is a food born chloropropanol contaminant that has been detected during the production process of a wide range of foods. In this study, we investigated the effect of 1,3-DCP on lipid metabolism of mice after 13-week subchronic exposure. The data showed that 1,3-DCP (0.05-0.5mg/kg/day) could induce nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in C57BL/6J mice and the NOAEL was 0.01mg/kg/day. In addition, we studied the signaling pathway to see how 1,3-DCP worked. The data showed that NAFLD induced by 1,3-DCP was due to the dysregulation of AMPK signaling pathway. As far as we are aware, this is the first study to use 13-week subchronic toxicology to investigate the effect of 1,3-DCP on the development of NAFLD in mice. Our study provided evidence for diet contaminants in the development of NAFLD and furthered the safety evaluation of 1,3-DCP through subchronic exposure. PMID:25910858

  9. Dietary administration of diquat for 13 weeks does not result in a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Minnema, Daniel J; Travis, Kim Z; Breckenridge, Charles B; Sturgess, Nicholas C; Butt, Mark; Wolf, Jeffrey C; Zadory, Dan; Herberth, Mark T; Watson, Scott L; Cook, Andrew R; Botham, Philip A

    2016-03-01

    Male and female C57BL/6J mice were administered diquat dibromide (DQ∙Br2) in their diets at concentrations of 0 (control), 12.5 and 62.5 ppm for 13 weeks to assess the potential effects of DQ on the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system. Achieved dose levels at 62.5 ppm were 6.4 and 7.6 mg DQ (ion)/kg bw/day for males and females, respectively. A separate group of mice was administered 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) ip as a positive control. The comparative effects of DQ and MPTP on the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and/or striatum were assessed using neurochemical, neuropathological and stereological endpoints. Morphological and stereological assessments were performed by investigators who were "blinded" to dose group. DQ had no effect on striatal dopamine concentration or dopamine turnover. There was no evidence of neuronal degeneration, astrocytic or microglial activation, or a reduction in the number of tyrosine hydroxylase positive (TH(+)) neurons in the SNpc or neuronal processes in the striatum of DQ-treated mice. These results are consistent with the rapid clearance of DQ from the brain following a single dose of radiolabeled DQ. In contrast, MPTP-treated mice exhibited decreased striatal dopamine concentration, reduced numbers of TH(+) neurons in the SNpc, and neuropathological changes, including neuronal necrosis, as well as astrocytic and microglial activation in the striatum and SNpc. PMID:26683030

  10. Achondrogenesis type I diagnosed by transvaginal ultrasonography at 13 weeks' gestation.

    PubMed

    Meizner, I; Barnhard, Y

    1995-11-01

    We present the first transvaginal first-trimester diagnosis of achondrogenesis type I confirmed by radiographic and histologic studies. The ultrasonographic signs included severe short limb mesomelic dwarfism, large head with decreased ossification, and lack of vertebral ossification. PMID:7503212

  11. Toluene Inhalation Exposure for 13 Weeks Causes Persistent Changes in Electroretinograms of Long-Evans Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies of humans chronically exposed to volatile organic solvents have reported impaired visual functions, including low contrast sensitivity and reduced color discrimination. These reports, however, lacked confirmation from controlled laboratory experiments. To addre...

  12. BEHAVIORAL ASSESSMENTS OF LONG EVANS RATS FOLLOWING A 13 WEEK SUBCHRONIC TOLUENE EXPOSURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Whereas the acute effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are relatively well understood, there is some controversy regarding the potential for persistent effects following long-term exposure. The current study sought to develop an animal model of subchronic exposure to VOCs...

  13. BEHAVIORAL ASSESSMENTS OF LONG EVANS RATS FOLLOWING A 13-WEEK SUBCHRONIC TOLUENE EXPOSURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current study sought to develop an animal model of the neurotoxicity of long-term exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which may be used to predict the effects of chronic exposure to VOCs on public health. The effects of Subchronic inhalation exposure to toluene (0,...

  14. Decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of gamma and alpha motoneurons in mouse spinal cords following 13 weeks of exposure to microgravity.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Akihiko; Nagatomo, Fumiko; Fujino, Hidemi; Kondo, Hiroyo; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2013-10-01

    Cell body size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of motoneurons in the dorsolateral region of the ventral horn in the lumbar and cervical segments of the mouse spinal cord were assessed after long-term exposure to microgravity and compared with those of ground-based controls. Mice were housed in a mouse drawer system on the International Space Station for 13 weeks. The mice were transported to the International Space Station by the Space Shuttle Discovery and returned to Earth by the Space Shuttle Atlantis. No changes in the cell body size of motoneurons were observed in either segment after exposure to microgravity, but succinate dehydrogenase activity of small-sized (<300 μm(2)) gamma and medium-sized (300-700 μm(2)) alpha motoneurons, which have higher succinate dehydrogenase activity than large-sized (>700 μm(2)) alpha motoneurons, in both segments was lower than that of ground-based controls. We concluded that exposure to microgravity for longer than 3 months induced decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of both gamma and slow-type alpha motoneurons. In particular, the decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of gamma motoneurons was observed only after long-term exposure to microgravity. PMID:23943522

  15. Effect on morphology, oxidative stress and energy metabolism enzymes in the testes of mice after a 13-week oral administration of melamine and cyanuric acid combination.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yingjun; Liu, Zhijun; Tian, Yujie; Chen, Hongbo

    2013-03-01

    Cases of pet poisoning and infant renal calculus have attracted much attention to the toxicity of melamine and its derivatives, such as cyanuric acid. Although individually melamine and cyanuric acid have low toxicity, their simultaneous presence can cause severe damage. Little is known about their adverse effects on the reproductive system. In this study, mice were orally administrated 1, 5 or 25 mg/kg/d of both melamine and cyanuric acid for 13 weeks. Lethargy, rough hair, and reduction of food and water intake and of body and testis weight were found after exposure to the combination, and pathological changes were found in the morphology of the testes, such as disruption of the seminiferous tubule structure, decrease of the spermatogenic cell series and coagulation necrosis. Total antioxidant capacity and superoxide dismutase activities and glutathione concentration was lower and malondialdehyde concentration was higher than in control mice. The activities of malate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase were also lower in combination treated mice than in control mice. These results indicate that the combined exposure to both melamine and cyanuric acid damaged testes in mice by either a direct or indirect effect, which may be related to renal failure and secondary anorexia. Oxidative stress and lower energy production levels both contributed to the testicular damage. PMID:23220542

  16. Effects of polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG 400) following 13 weeks of gavage treatment in Fischer-344 rats.

    PubMed

    Hermansky, S J; Neptun, D A; Loughran, K A; Leung, H W

    1995-02-01

    Fischer-344 rats (10/group/sex) were administered polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG 400) by gavage at 1.0, 2.5 or 5.0 ml/kg (1.1, 2.8 and 5.6 g/kg, respectively) body weight/day 5 days/wk for 13 wk. Animals in the control group received water by gavage (5.0 ml/kg body weight/treatment day). An additional 10 rats/sex/group were assigned to the control and high-dose groups for a 6-wk recovery period. Evaluation of potential renal toxicity was identified as a primary objective. There was no mortality or changes in haematology or clinical chemistry measurements attributed to PEG 400 toxicity. Loose faeces in the mid- and/or high-dose group of both sexes were attributed to bulk cathartic effects of PEG 400. Slight decreases in food consumption and body weights in the mid- and/or high-dose group of male rats and female rats were attributed to the physical presence of PEG 400 in the intestinal tract. However, a direct effect of PEG 400 on the intestinal tract was not ruled out. Increased water consumption was attributed to a possible increase in serum osmolality due to the absorption of the PEG 400 or a reflection of the water dosing received by the control animals. Increased urinary concentration and decreased urinary pH were at least partially attributed to absorption, possible metabolism, and urinary excretion of PEG 400. Small increases in absolute and/or relative kidney weights observed in many dose groups, were attributed to the osmotic effect of the test substance and/or metabolites in the urine. The significance of a slight increase in relative kidney weights in female rats following the recovery period was unknown. Although no microscopic changes were observed in the kidneys or urinary bladder, a slight, reversible renal toxicity may have resulted in male rats treated by gavage with 2.5 ml/kg/day and rats of both sexes treated by gavage with 5.0 ml PEG 400 kg/day. This was based on the increased concentration of protein and bilirubin, urinary vascular cell findings

  17. Georgia fishery study: implications for dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Turcotte, M.D.S.

    1983-03-28

    Fish consumption will contribute a major portion of the estimated individual and population doses from L-Reactor liquid releases and Cs-137 remobilization in Steel Creek. It is therefore important that the values for fish consumption used in dose calculations be as realistic as possible. Since publication of the L-Reactor Environmental Information Document (EID), data have become available on sport fishing in the Savannah River. These data provide SRP with site-specific sport fish harvest and consumption values for use in dose calculations. The Georgia fishery data support the total population fish consumption and calculated dose reported in the EID. The data indicate, however, that both the EID average and maximum individual fish consumption have been underestimated, although each to a different degree. The average fish consumption value used in the EID is approximately 3% below the lower limit of the fish consumption range calculated using the Georgia data. A fish consumption value of 11.3 kg/yr should be used to recalculate dose to the average individual from L-Reactor restart. Maximum fish consumption in the EID has been underestimated by approximately 60%, and doses to the maximum individual should also be recalculated. Future dose calculations should utilize an average fish consumption value of 11.3 kg/yr, and a maximum fish consumption value of 34 kg/yr.

  18. Dried blood spot analysis of donepezil in support of a GLP 3-month dose-range finding study in rats.

    PubMed

    Meier-Davis, Susan R; Meng, Min; Yuan, Weiwei; Diehl, Lisa; Arjmand, Fatima M; Lucke, Rebecca M; Huang, Betsy; Wen, Jianye; Shudo, Jutaro; Nagata, Tetsuto

    2012-01-01

    Donepezil hydrochloride is a reversible acetyl cholinesterase inhibitor approved for Alzheimer disease treatment. As an alternate therapy, a donepezil hydrochloride transdermal patch is in development. Recommended nonclinical safety studies include a 3-month Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) dose-range finding (DRF) study prior to conducting the 2-year dermal carcinogenicity study in rats. Demonstration of systemic exposure is necessary to interpret the in vivo data. Previous nonclinical reports supporting oral dosing have utilized liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) to quantify donepezil concentrations in plasma. Smaller species with limited blood volumes do not allow serial sampling to derive the full pharmacokinetic profile from a single animal. Therefore, the option of another analytical method requiring decreased sample volumes is desirable as it would decrease the required number of animals while obtaining the complete profile. The dried blood spot (DBS) technique allows drug level measurement from a few microliters; however, the method is still not widely utilized in GLP studies. Because donepezil plasma levels are known by the oral route, DBS was used to bridge the previous oral data and to support a 13-week GLP DRF study for repeated topical application in rats, comparing oral administration with 4 topical formulations. The DBS method was validated and demonstrated robustness and reproducibility for application to the DRF study. The assay results were comparable to a previously reported plasma LC/MS/MS assay-derived pharmacokinetic profile and provided justification for selection of the topical formulation and dose levels for the subsequent dermal carcinogenicity study. PMID:22705881

  19. A 13-WEEK COMPARISON OF PASSIVE AND CONTINUOUS OZONE MONITORS AT FORESTED SITES IN NORTH-CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ogawa passive 03 samplers were used in a 13-233k study (June 1-September 1, 1999) involving 11 forested and mountaintop sites in north-central Pennsylvania. Four of the sites were collocated with TECO model 49 O3 analyzers. A significant correlation (p<0.0001) was found for 2...

  20. Frontomaxillary facial angle in chromosomally normal Thai foetuses at 11 to 13 weeks 6 days ’ gestation.

    PubMed

    Pranpanus, S; Kor-anantakul, O; Suntharasaj, T; Suwanrath, C; Leetanaporn, R; Hanprasertpong, T; Pruksanusak, N

    2016-01-01

    Frontomaxillary facial (FMF) angle is the angle between upper part of the anterior end of the maxillary bone and the line along the frontal bone in the midfacial profile view. Based on several previous studies, FMF angle can be useful in screening Down syndrome foetuses, in which FMF angle is significantly larger than that in euploid foetuses. However, racial factors can influence the FMF angle as seen in the different normal ranges among ethnicities. Therefore, before the clinical application of the FMF angle, a reference range for its own population should firstly be developed. In this study, a Thai reference range of FMF angle has been established. The mean FMF angle in euploid foetuses with a 60-mm crown – rump length (CRL) was 81.07 °, with 0.23 ° increase for each mm increase in CRL, consistent with those observed in Caucasian and Chinese populations. The measurement of FMF angle has good reproducibility. PMID:26215856

  1. High-Dose-Rate 192Ir Brachytherapy Dose Verification: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Nikoofar, Alireza; Hoseinpour, Zohreh; Rabi Mahdavi, Seied; Hasanzadeh, Hadi; Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: The high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy might be an effective tool for palliation of dysphagia. Because of some concerns about adverse effects due to absorbed radiation dose, it is important to estimate absorbed dose in risky organs during this treatment. Objectives: This study aimed to measure the absorbed dose in the parotid, thyroid, and submandibular gland, eye, trachea, spinal cord, and manubrium of sternum in brachytherapy in an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods: To measure radiation dose, eye, parotid, thyroid, and submandibular gland, spine, and sternum, an anthropomorphic phantom was considered with applicators to set thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs). A specific target volume of about 23 cm3 in the upper thoracic esophagus was considered as target, and phantom planned computed tomography (CT) for HDR brachytherapy, then with a micro-Selectron HDR (192Ir) remote after-loading unit. Results: Absorbed doses were measured with calibrated TLDs and were expressed in centi-Gray (cGy). In regions far from target (≥ 16 cm) such as submandibular, parotid and thyroid glands, mean measured dose ranged from 1.65 to 5.5 cGy. In closer regions (≤ 16 cm), the absorbed dose might be as high as 113 cGy. Conclusions: Our study showed similar depth and surface doses; in closer regions, the surface and depth doses differed significantly due to the role of primary radiation that had imposed a high-dose gradient and difference between the plan and measurement, which was more severe because of simplifications in tissue inhomogeneity, considered in TPS relative to phantom. PMID:26413250

  2. Misonidazole with dexamethasone rescue: an escalating dose toxicity study

    SciTech Connect

    Tanasichuk, H.; Urtasun, R.C.; Fulton, D.S.; Raleigh, J.

    1984-09-01

    Neurotoxicity induced by misonidazole (MISO) and desmethylmisonidazole (DMM) has become the dose limiting factor in clinical work. In 1981, the authors reported a preliminary study suggestive that Dexamethasone (DEXA) does have a protective effect against peripheral neuropathies (PN) resulting from toxicity of misonidazole. The authors are presently investigating the use of DEXA, with escalating doses of MISO in an attempt to modify its neurotoxicity. To date, 16 patients have been registered to receive total doses of MISO given in 9 equally divided doses over 3 weeks. DEXA is given 3 days prior to the first dose and continues for the duration of therapy. All patients receive palliative radiation. No toxicity was seen at the total dose of 13.5 gm/M/sub 2/. One grade I PN occurred in the first four patients receiving 15.5 gm/M/sub 2/. Six additional patients were entered at this dose level and no further incidence of PN was observed.

  3. Low-dose radiation epidemiology studies: status and issues.

    PubMed

    Shore, Roy E

    2009-11-01

    Although the Japanese atomic bomb study and radiotherapy studies have clearly documented cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposures, radiation risk assessment groups have long recognized that protracted or low exposures to low-linear energy transfer radiations are key radiation protection concerns because these are far more common than high-exposure scenarios. Epidemiologic studies of human populations with low-dose or low dose-rate exposures are one approach to addressing those concerns. A number of large studies of radiation workers (Chernobyl clean-up workers, U.S. and Chinese radiological technologists, and the 15-country worker study) or of persons exposed to environmental radiation at moderate to low levels (residents near Techa River, Semipalatinsk, Chernobyl, or nuclear facilities) have been conducted. A variety of studies of medical radiation exposures (multiple-fluoroscopy, diagnostic (131)I, scatter radiation doses from radiotherapy, etc.) also are of interest. Key results from these studies are summarized and compared with risk estimates from the Japanese atomic bomb study. Ideally, one would like the low-dose and low dose-rate studies to guide radiation risk estimation regarding the shape of the dose-response curve, DDREF (dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor), and risk at low doses. However, the degree to which low-dose studies can do so is subject to various limitations, especially those pertaining to dosimetric uncertainties and limited statistical power. The identification of individuals who are particularly susceptible to radiation cancer induction also is of high interest in terms of occupational and medical radiation protection. Several examples of studies of radiation-related cancer susceptibility are discussed, but none thus far have clearly identified radiation-susceptible genotypes. PMID:19820457

  4. A randomized, placebo-controlled study to assess the efficacy and safety of 3 doses of paliperidone palmitate in adults with acutely exacerbated schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pandina, Gahan J; Lindenmayer, Jean-Pierre; Lull, Julia; Lim, Pilar; Gopal, Srihari; Herben, Virginie; Kusumakar, Vivek; Yuen, Eric; Palumbo, Joseph

    2010-06-01

    This study assessed the efficacy and the safety of a dosing regimen that was revised from earlier studies for the investigational injectable atypical antipsychotic paliperidone palmitate (approved in the USA, August 2009) for adult patients with acutely exacerbated schizophrenia. The patients (N = 652) were randomly assigned (1:1:1:1) to paliperidone palmitate at 25, 100, or 150 mg eq. or placebo in this 13-week double-blind study. The patients received an injection of paliperidone palmitate at 150 mg eq. or placebo in the deltoid muscle on day 1 and the assigned fixed dose or placebo in the deltoid or gluteal [corrected] on day 8 and then once monthly (days 36 and 64). No oral supplementation was used. Target plasma levels were achieved by day 8 in all paliperidone palmitate groups. The mean change in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total score from baseline to end point improved significantly (P < or = 0.034) in all the paliperidone palmitate dose-groups versus placebo. Paliperidone palmitate treatment with this revised dosing regimen led to the achievement of rapid and consistent therapeutically effective plasma levels that were maintained by once-monthly dosing in either the deltoid or gluteal muscle. Common treatment-emergent adverse events (> or =2% of patients in any of the treatment groups) that occurred more frequently in the total paliperidone palmitate group versus the placebo group (with > or =1% difference) were injection-site pain (7.6% vs 3.7%), dizziness (2.5% vs 1.2%), sedation (2.3% vs 0.6%), pain in the extremity (1.6% vs 0.0%), and myalgia (1.0% vs 0.0%). The paliperidone palmitate treatment was efficacious and generally tolerated across the dose range (25, 100, or 150 mg eq.) in adult patients with acutely exacerbated schizophrenia. PMID:20473057

  5. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-01

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm3. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm3. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  6. Role of sulfite additives in wine induced asthma: single dose and cumulative dose studies

    PubMed Central

    Vally, H; Thompson, P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Wine appears to be a significant trigger for asthma. Although sulfite additives have been implicated as a major cause of wine induced asthma, direct evidence is limited. Two studies were undertaken to assess sulfite reactivity in wine sensitive asthmatics. The first study assessed sensitivity to sulfites in wine using a single dose sulfited wine challenge protocol followed by a double blind, placebo controlled challenge. In the second study a cumulative dose sulfited wine challenge protocol was employed to establish if wine sensitive asthmatics as a group have an increased sensitivity to sulfites.
METHODS—In study 1, 24 asthmatic patients with a strong history of wine induced asthma were screened. Subjects showing positive responses to single blind high sulfite (300 ppm) wine challenge were rechallenged on separate days in a double blind, placebo controlled fashion with wines of varying sulfite levels to characterise their responses to these drinks. In study 2, wine sensitive asthmatic patients (n=12) and control asthmatics (n=6) were challenged cumulatively with wine containing increasing concentrations of sulfite in order to characterise further their sensitivity to sulfites in wine.
RESULTS—Four of the 24 self-reporting wine sensitive asthmatic patients were found to respond to sulfite additives in wine when challenged in a single dose fashion (study 1). In the double blind dose-response study all four had a significant fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (>15% from baseline) following exposure to wine containing 300 ppm sulfite, but did not respond to wines containing 20, 75 or 150 ppm sulfite. Responses were maximal at 5 minutes (mean (SD) maximal decline in FEV1 28.7 (13)%) and took 15-60 minutes to return to baseline levels. In the cumulative dose-response study (study 2) no significant difference was observed in any of the lung function parameters measured (FEV1, peak expiratory flow (PEF), mid phase forced expiratory

  7. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    SciTech Connect

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-30

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm{sup 3}. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm{sup 3}. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  8. Monte Carlo Study of Radiation Dose Enhancement by Gadolinium in Megavoltage and High Dose Rate Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Daniel G.; Feygelman, Vladimir; Moros, Eduardo G.; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey G.

    2014-01-01

    MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd)-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF) and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL) would be needed. PMID:25275550

  9. A study evaluating the dependence of the patient dose on the CT dose change in a SPECT/CT scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Ho-Sung; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Shin, Jae-Woo

    2012-07-01

    This study assessed ways of reducing the patient dose by examining the dependence of the patient dose on the CT (computed tomography) dose in a SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT scan. To measure the patient dose, we used Precedence 16 SPECT/CT along with a phantom for the CT dose measurement (CT dose phantom kit for adult's head and body, Model 76-414-4150), a 100-mm ionization chamber (CT Ion Chamber) and an X-ray detector (Victoreen Model 4000M+). In addition, the patient dose was evaluated under conditions similar to those for an actual examination using an ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) dosimetry calculator in the Monte Carlo simulation method. The experimental method involved the use of a CT dose phantom to measure the patient dose under different CT conditions (kVp and mAs) to determine the CTDI (CT dose index) under each condition. An ImPACT dosimetry calculator was also used to measure CTDIw (CT dose index water ), CTDIv (CT dose index volume ), DLP (dose-length product), and effective dose. According to the patient dose measurements using the CT dose phantom, the CTDI showed an approximately 54 fold difference between when the maximum (140 kVp and 250 mAs) and the minimum dose (90 kVp and 25 mAs) was used. The CTDI showed a 4.2 fold difference between the conditions (120 kVp and 200 mAs) used mainly in a common CT scan and the conditions (120 kVp and 50 mAs) used mainly in a SPECT/CT scan. According to the measurement results using the dosimetry calculator, the effective dose showed an approximately 35 fold difference between the conditions for the maximum and the minimum doses, as in the case with the CT dose phantom. The effective dose showed a 4.1 fold difference between the conditions used mainly in a common CT scan and those used mainly in a SPECT/CT scan. This study examined the patient dose by reducing the CT dose in a SPECT/CT scan. As various examinations can be conducted due to the development of

  10. Hypoxia Dose Painting by Numbers: A Planning Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thorwarth, Daniela . E-mail: daniela.thorwarth@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Eschmann, Susanne-Martina; Paulsen, Frank; Alber, Markus

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of different hypoxia dose painting strategies in head-and-neck radiotherapy; the potential benefit was limited by the stipulation of isotoxicity with respect to the conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment. Methods and Materials: Thirteen head-and-neck cancer patients were included into the planning study. For each patient, three different treatment plans were created: a conventional IMRT plan, an additional uniform dose escalation (uniDE) of 10% to the fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positive volume, and a plan in which dose painting by numbers (DPBN) was implemented. Dose painting by numbers was realized according to a map of dose-escalation factors calculated from dynamic [{sup 18}F]-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) positron emission tomography data. Results: Both dose-escalation approaches were shown to be feasible under the constraint of limiting normal tissue doses to the level of conventional IMRT. For DPBN, the prescriptions could be fulfilled in larger regions of the target than for uniDE. Fluorodeoxyglucose-positive volumes had sizes up to 94 cm{sup 3}. In contrast, regions receiving comparable dose levels with DPBN presented volumes in the range of 0-2.7 cm{sup 3}. Overtreatment of the target was observed with uniDE in most of the cases, whereas some regions did not receive the required dose to overcome hypoxia-induced radiation insensitivity. Tumor control probability increased from 55.9% with conventional IMRT to 57.7% for the uniDE method in the patient group. For DPBN, a potential increase in tumor control probability from 55.9% to 70.2% was determined. Therefore, DPBN seems to result in higher benefits for the patients. Conclusion: Dose painting by numbers delivers the dose more effectively than an additional uniform boost to the FDG-positive area. If hypoxia could be adequately quantified with a simple imaging technique like FMISO positron emission tomography, DPBN in head-and-neck cancer could

  11. Intra-voxel heterogeneity influences the dose prescription for dose-painting with radiotherapy: a modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    F Petit, Steven; Dekker, André L. A. J.; Seigneuric, Renaud; Murrer, Lars; van Riel, Natal A. W.; Nordsmark, Marianne; Overgaard, Jens; Lambin, Philippe; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to increase the potential of dose redistribution by incorporating estimates of oxygen heterogeneity within imaging voxels for optimal dose determination. Cellular oxygen tension (pO2) distributions were estimated for imaging-size-based voxels by solving oxygen diffusion-consumption equations around capillaries placed at random locations. The linear-quadratic model was used to determine cell survival in the voxels as a function of pO2 and dose. The dose distribution across the tumour was optimized to yield minimal survival after 30 × 2 Gy fractions by redistributing the dose based on differences in oxygen levels. Eppendorf data of a series of 69 tumours were used as a surrogate of what might be expected from oxygen imaging datasets. Dose optimizations were performed both taking into account cellular heterogeneity in oxygenation within voxels and assuming a homogeneous cellular distribution of oxygen. Our simulations show that dose redistribution based on derived cellular oxygen distributions within voxels result in dose distributions that require less total dose to obtain the same degree of cell kill as dose distributions that were optimized with a model that considered voxels as homogeneous with respect to oxygen. Moderately hypoxic tumours are expected to gain most from dose redistribution. Incorporating cellular-based distributions of radiosensitivity into dose-planning algorithms theoretically improves the potential gains from dose redistribution algorithms.

  12. Experimentally studied dynamic dose interplay does not meaningfully affect target dose in VMAT SBRT lung treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Stambaugh, Cassandra; Nelms, Benjamin E.; Dilling, Thomas; Stevens, Craig; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The effects of respiratory motion on the tumor dose can be divided into the gradient and interplay effects. While the interplay effect is likely to average out over a large number of fractions, it may play a role in hypofractionated [stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT)] treatments. This subject has been extensively studied for intensity modulated radiation therapy but less so for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), particularly in application to hypofractionated regimens. Also, no experimental study has provided full four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction in this scenario. The authors demonstrate how a recently described motion perturbation method, with full 4D dose reconstruction, is applied to describe the gradient and interplay effects during VMAT lung SBRT treatments.Methods: VMAT dose delivered to a moving target in a patient can be reconstructed by applying perturbations to the treatment planning system-calculated static 3D dose. Ten SBRT patients treated with 6 MV VMAT beams in five fractions were selected. The target motion (motion kernel) was approximated by 3D rigid body translation, with the tumor centroids defined on the ten phases of the 4DCT. The motion was assumed to be periodic, with the period T being an average from the empirical 4DCT respiratory trace. The real observed tumor motion (total displacement ≤8 mm) was evaluated first. Then, the motion range was artificially increased to 2 or 3 cm. Finally, T was increased to 60 s. While not realistic, making T comparable to the delivery time elucidates if the interplay effect can be observed. For a single fraction, the authors quantified the interplay effect as the maximum difference in the target dosimetric indices, most importantly the near-minimum dose (D{sub 99%}), between all possible starting phases. For the three- and five-fractions, statistical simulations were performed when substantial interplay was found.Results: For the motion amplitudes and periods obtained from

  13. Radiation dose study in nuclear medicine using GATE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguwa, Kasarachi

    Dose as a result of radiation exposure is the notion generally used to disclose the imparted energy in a volume of tissue to a potential biological effect. The basic unit defined by the international system of units (SI system) is the radiation absorbed dose, which is expressed as the mean imparted energy in a mass element of the tissue known as "gray" (Gy) or J/kg. The procedure for ascertaining the absorbed dose is complicated since it involves the radiation transport of numerous types of charged particles and coupled photon interactions. The most precise method is to perform a full 3D Monte Carlo simulation of the radiation transport. There are various Monte Carlo toolkits that have tool compartments for dose calculations and measurements. The dose studies in this thesis were performed using the GEANT4 Application for Emission Tomography (GATE) software (Jan et al., 2011) GATE simulation toolkit has been used extensively in the medical imaging community, due to the fact that it uses the full capabilities of GEANT4. It also utilizes an easy to-learn GATE macro language, which is more accessible than learning the GEANT4/C++ programming language. This work combines GATE with digital phantoms generated using the NCAT (NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom) toolkit (Segars et al., 2004) to allow efficient and effective estimation of 3D radiation dose maps. The GATE simulation tool has developed into a beneficial tool for Monte Carlo simulations involving both radiotherapy and imaging experiments. This work will present an overview of absorbed dose of common radionuclides used in nuclear medicine and serve as a guide to a user who is setting up a GATE simulation for a PET and SPECT study.

  14. Oral Toxicity Study and Skin Sensitization Test of a Cricket.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hyeon Yeol; Lee, Somin; Ahn, Kyu Sup; Kim, Hye Jin; Lee, Sang Sik; Ko, Hyuk Ju; Lee, Jin Kyu; Cho, Myung-Haing; Ahn, Mi Young; Kim, Eun Mi; Lim, Jeong Ho; Song, Kyung Seuk

    2016-04-01

    Crickets have been attracting considerable interest in the field of nutrition and toxicology due to the global exhaustion of food resulting from a growing population. The cricket is normally eaten in several countries after roasting, similar to the grasshopper; however, safety evaluation data on cricket powder is limited. Here, we performed general toxicity studies of cricket powder including a single, 2-week repeated dose range evaluation test, a 13-week repeated oral dose toxicity test in Sprague-Dawley rats, a single oral dose toxicity test in Beagle dogs, and a skin sensitization test in guinea pigs following the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development test guidelines 406 and 408 in addition to Good Laboratory Practice. To investigate the NOAEL and target organs of cricket powder, Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to 4 groups: vehicle control, 1,250 mg/kg, 2,500 mg/kg, 5,000 mg/kg dose test groups and cricket powder was administered over 13 weeks after single dose and dose range finding studies in rats based on the results of the single oral administration toxicity study in rats and Beagle dogs. The results of the study showed that the NOAEL of cricket powder was over 5,000 mg/kg for both sexes of rats without adverse effects in a 13-week repeated oral toxicity study and there was no skin hypersensitivity reaction. Therefore, our results reveal that crickets can be widely used as a new substitute food or nutrient resource. PMID:27123167

  15. Oral Toxicity Study and Skin Sensitization Test of a Cricket

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyeon Yeol; Lee, Somin; Ahn, Kyu Sup; Kim, Hye Jin; Lee, Sang Sik; Ko, Hyuk Ju; Lee, Jin Kyu; Cho, Myung-Haing; Ahn, Mi Young; Kim, Eun Mi; Lim, Jeong Ho; Song, Kyung Seuk

    2016-01-01

    Crickets have been attracting considerable interest in the field of nutrition and toxicology due to the global exhaustion of food resulting from a growing population. The cricket is normally eaten in several countries after roasting, similar to the grasshopper; however, safety evaluation data on cricket powder is limited. Here, we performed general toxicity studies of cricket powder including a single, 2-week repeated dose range evaluation test, a 13-week repeated oral dose toxicity test in Sprague-Dawley rats, a single oral dose toxicity test in Beagle dogs, and a skin sensitization test in guinea pigs following the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development test guidelines 406 and 408 in addition to Good Laboratory Practice. To investigate the NOAEL and target organs of cricket powder, Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to 4 groups: vehicle control, 1,250 mg/kg, 2,500 mg/kg, 5,000 mg/kg dose test groups and cricket powder was administered over 13 weeks after single dose and dose range finding studies in rats based on the results of the single oral administration toxicity study in rats and Beagle dogs. The results of the study showed that the NOAEL of cricket powder was over 5,000 mg/kg for both sexes of rats without adverse effects in a 13-week repeated oral toxicity study and there was no skin hypersensitivity reaction. Therefore, our results reveal that crickets can be widely used as a new substitute food or nutrient resource. PMID:27123167

  16. Dose-response relationship of fibrous dusts in intraperitoneal studies.

    PubMed Central

    Roller, M; Pott, F; Kamino, K; Althoff, G H; Bellmann, B

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between the number of fibers injected intraperitoneally and the occurrence of peritoneal mesotheliomas in rats was investigated using data from a series of carcinogenicity studies with several fibrous dusts. Based on observed tumor incidences ranging between 10 and 90%, the hypothesis of a common slope of dose-response relationships (parallel probit lines in probit analysis) cannot be rejected. In general, parallelism of probit lines is considered an indication of a common mode of action. Analysis of the shape of the dose-response relationship, with one apparent exception, shows virtually linear or superlinear behavior, i.e., from these data, there is no indication of a decrease in carcinogenic potency of an elementary carcinogenic unit at lower doses. PMID:9400733

  17. A Case Study of a "Double-Dose" Mathematics Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratofil, Michelle Dahlsten

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to discover and describe the components of a "double-dose" math intervention that resulted in increased mathematics achievement for high school Algebra I intervention participants in an effort to inform local decisions regarding program improvements and to provide insight to other educators…

  18. Monte Carlo dose enhancement studies in microbeam radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Rovira, I.; Prezado, Y.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: A radical radiation therapy treatment for gliomas requires extremely high absorbed doses resulting in subsequent deleterious side effects in healthy tissue. Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is an innovative technique based on the fact that normal tissue can withstand high radiation doses in small volumes without any significant damage. The synchrotron-generated x-ray beam is collimated and delivered to an array of narrow micrometer-sized planar rectangular fields. Several preclinical experiments performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) confirmed that MRT yields a higher therapeutic index than nonsegmented beams of the same characteristics. This index can be greatly improved by loading the tumor with high atomic number (Z) contrast agents. The aim of this work is to find the high-Z element that provides optimum dose enhancement. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations (PENELOPE/penEasy) were performed to assess the peak and valley doses as well as their ratio (PVDR) in healthy tissue and in the tumor, loaded with different contrast agents. The optimization criteria used were maximization of the ratio between the PVDR values in healthy tissue respect to the PVDR in the tumor and minimization of bone and brain valley doses. Results: Dose enhancement factors, PVDR, and valley doses were calculated for different high-Z elements. A significant decrease of PVDR values in the tumor, accompanied by a gain in the valley doses, was found in the presence of high-Z elements. This enables the deposited dose in the healthy tissue to be reduced. The optimum high-Z element depends on the irradiation configuration. As a general trend, the best outcome is provided by the highest Z contrast agents considered, i.e., gold and thallium. However, lanthanides (especially Lu) and hafnium also offer a satisfactory performance. Conclusions: The remarkable therapeutic index in microbeam radiation therapy can be further

  19. Summary of Dose-Response Modeling for Developmental Toxicity Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Daniel L.; Rai, Shesh N.; Li, Chin-Shang

    2008-01-01

    Developmental toxicity studies are an important area in the field of toxicology. Endpoints measured on fetuses include weight and indicators of death and malformation. Binary indicator measures are typically summed over the litter and a discrete distribution is assumed to model the number of adversely affected fetuses. Additionally, there is noticeable variation in the litter responses within dose groups that should be taken into account when modeling. Finally, the dose-response pattern in these studies exhibits a threshold effect. The threshold dose-response model is the default model for non-carcinogenic risk assessment, according to the USEPA, and is encouraged by the agency for the use in the risk assessment process. Two statistical models are proposed to estimate dose-response pattern of data from the developmental toxicity study: the threshold model and the spline model. The models were applied to two data sets. The advantages and disadvantages of these models, potential other models, and future research possibilities will be summarized. PMID:19088901

  20. Dose Reconstruction for the Million Worker Study: Status and Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Bouville, André; Toohey, Richard E.; Boice, John D.; Beck, Harold L.; Dauer, Larry T.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Hagemeyer, Derek; Leggett, Richard W.; Mumma, Michael T.; Napier, Bruce; Pryor, Kathy H.; Rosenstein, Marvin; Schauer, David A.; Sherbini, Sami; Stram, Daniel O.; Thompson, James L.; Till, John E.; Yoder, Craig; Zeitlin, Cary

    2015-02-01

    The primary aim of the epidemiologic study of one million U.S. radiation workers and veterans (the Million-Worker study) is to provide scientifically valid information on the level of radiation risk when exposures are received gradually over time, and not acutely as was the case for Japanese atomic bomb survivors. The primary outcome of the epidemiological study is cancer mortality but other causes of death such as cardiovascular disease and cerebrovascular disease will be evaluated. The success of the study is tied to the validity of the dose reconstruction approaches to provide unbiased estimates of organ-specific radiation absorbed doses and their accompanying uncertainties. The dosimetry aspects for the Million-Worker study are challenging in that they address diverse exposure scenarios for diverse occupational groups being studied over a period of up to 70 years. The dosimetric issues differ among the varied exposed populations that are considered: atomic veterans, DOE workers exposed to both penetrating radiation and intakes of radionuclides, nuclear power plant workers, medical radiation workers, and industrial radiographers. While a major source of radiation exposure to the study population comes from external gamma-ray or x-ray sources, for certain of the study groups there is a meaningful component of radionuclide intakes that require internal radiation dosimetry measures. Scientific Committee 6-9 has been established by NCRP to produce a report on the comprehensive organ dose assessment (including uncertainty analysis) for the Million-Worker study. The Committee’s report will cover the specifics of practical dose reconstruction for the ongoing epidemiologic studies with uncertainty analysis discussions and will be a specific application of the guidance provided in NCRP Reports 158, 163, 164, and 171. The main role of the Committee is to provide guidelines to the various groups of dosimetrists involved in the various components of the Million

  1. Dose Reconstruction for the Million Worker Study: Status and Guidelines

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bouville, André; Toohey, Richard E.; Boice, John D.; Beck, Harold L.; Dauer, Larry T.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Hagemeyer, Derek; Leggett, Richard W.; Mumma, Michael T.; Napier, Bruce; et al

    2015-02-01

    The primary aim of the epidemiologic study of one million U.S. radiation workers and veterans (the Million-Worker study) is to provide scientifically valid information on the level of radiation risk when exposures are received gradually over time, and not acutely as was the case for Japanese atomic bomb survivors. The primary outcome of the epidemiological study is cancer mortality but other causes of death such as cardiovascular disease and cerebrovascular disease will be evaluated. The success of the study is tied to the validity of the dose reconstruction approaches to provide unbiased estimates of organ-specific radiation absorbed doses and theirmore » accompanying uncertainties. The dosimetry aspects for the Million-Worker study are challenging in that they address diverse exposure scenarios for diverse occupational groups being studied over a period of up to 70 years. The dosimetric issues differ among the varied exposed populations that are considered: atomic veterans, DOE workers exposed to both penetrating radiation and intakes of radionuclides, nuclear power plant workers, medical radiation workers, and industrial radiographers. While a major source of radiation exposure to the study population comes from external gamma-ray or x-ray sources, for certain of the study groups there is a meaningful component of radionuclide intakes that require internal radiation dosimetry measures. Scientific Committee 6-9 has been established by NCRP to produce a report on the comprehensive organ dose assessment (including uncertainty analysis) for the Million-Worker study. The Committee’s report will cover the specifics of practical dose reconstruction for the ongoing epidemiologic studies with uncertainty analysis discussions and will be a specific application of the guidance provided in NCRP Reports 158, 163, 164, and 171. The main role of the Committee is to provide guidelines to the various groups of dosimetrists involved in the various components of the Million

  2. Dose fractionation and single subject studies in PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Karthikayan

    Conventional positron emission tomography (PET) for cognitive brain studies typically relies on information collected from the distribution of decays following an injection of 15O-labeled water. The number of injections that can be administered to the subject are constrained by radiation dose to the subject and total length of the PET scan. The standard protocol involves 8--10 injections of H152O separated by approximately 5--7 half-lives of 15O. The number of activation conditions that can be realistically studied in a standard PET session is between 8 and 10. This work investigates the physiological response of a simulated subject to H152O injections that are administered in small doses (1--5 mCi) with short inter-injection intervals (40--180 seconds). A larger number of activation conditions are presented to the subject with a wider variation in the activation paradigm. Repeat conditions are studies. Signal averaging methods are feasible with this method of dose administration. Sinograms from scans with similar activation conditions are summed together before reconstruction. The signal in the primary activation region of the brain is shown to increase while suppressing the contribution of secondary activation regions in the brain. The contrast of the final image is similarly increased which leads to easier identification of the primary activation region. An automated H152O -production unit controlled by a PC running LabView software was developed to produce the dose required for the injection sequence by controlling the flow of H152O -vapor that diffuses across a semi-permeable membrane into saline. The unit is capable of producing H152O rapidly for both the standard and the proposed dose administration methods. The system also detects the bolus arrival time at the subject's lungs using a small external plastic detector. Activation sequence commences with the rise in radioactivity observed by the detector. The simulations indicate that inter-injection intervals

  3. Towards more reliable automated multi-dose dispensing: retrospective follow-up study on medication dose errors and product defects.

    PubMed

    Palttala, Iida; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Honkanen, Outi; Suominen, Risto; Antikainen, Osmo; Hirvonen, Jouni; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2013-03-01

    To date, little is known on applicability of different types of pharmaceutical dosage forms in an automated high-speed multi-dose dispensing process. The purpose of the present study was to identify and further investigate various process-induced and/or product-related limitations associated with multi-dose dispensing process. The rates of product defects and dose dispensing errors in automated multi-dose dispensing were retrospectively investigated during a 6-months follow-up period. The study was based on the analysis of process data of totally nine automated high-speed multi-dose dispensing systems. Special attention was paid to the dependence of multi-dose dispensing errors/product defects and pharmaceutical tablet properties (such as shape, dimensions, weight, scored lines, coatings, etc.) to profile the most suitable forms of tablets for automated dose dispensing systems. The relationship between the risk of errors in dose dispensing and tablet characteristics were visualized by creating a principal component analysis (PCA) model for the outcome of dispensed tablets. The two most common process-induced failures identified in the multi-dose dispensing are predisposal of tablet defects and unexpected product transitions in the medication cassette (dose dispensing error). The tablet defects are product-dependent failures, while the tablet transitions are dependent on automated multi-dose dispensing systems used. The occurrence of tablet defects is approximately twice as common as tablet transitions. Optimal tablet preparation for the high-speed multi-dose dispensing would be a round-shaped, relatively small/middle-sized, film-coated tablet without any scored line. Commercial tablet products can be profiled and classified based on their suitability to a high-speed multi-dose dispensing process. PMID:22458299

  4. DOSE RECONSTRUCTION FOR THE MILLION WORKER STUDY: STATUS AND GUIDELINES

    PubMed Central

    Bouville, André; Toohey, Richard E.; Boice, John D.; Beck, Harold L.; Dauer, Larry T.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Hagemeyer, Derek; Leggett, Richard W.; Mumma, Michael T.; Napier, Bruce; Pryor, Kathy H.; Rosenstein, Marvin; Schauer, David A.; Sherbini, Sami; Stram, Daniel O.; Thompson, James L.; Till, John E.; Yoder, Craig; Zeitlin, Cary

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of the epidemiologic study of one million U.S. radiation workers and veterans [the Million Worker Study (MWS)] is to provide scientifically valid information on the level of radiation risk when exposures are received gradually over time, and not within seconds as was the case for Japanese atomic-bomb survivors. The primary outcome of the epidemiologic study is cancer mortality but other causes of death such as cardiovascular disease and cerebrovascular disease will be evaluated. The success of the study is tied to the validity of the dose reconstruction approaches to provide realistic estimates of organ-specific radiation absorbed doses that are as accurate and precise as possible and to properly evaluate their accompanying uncertainties. The dosimetry aspects for the MWS are challenging in that they address diverse exposure scenarios for diverse occupational groups being studied over a period of up to 70 y. The dosimetric issues differ among the varied exposed populations that are considered: atomic veterans, U.S. Department of Energy workers exposed to both penetrating radiation and intakes of radionuclides, nuclear power plant workers, medical radiation workers, and industrial radiographers. While a major source of radiation exposure to the study population comes from external gamma- or x-ray sources, for some of the study groups there is a meaningful component of radionuclide intakes that require internal radiation dosimetry assessments. Scientific Committee 6–9 has been established by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) to produce a report on the comprehensive organ dose assessment (including uncertainty analysis) for the MWS. The NCRP dosimetry report will cover the specifics of practical dose reconstruction for the ongoing epidemiologic studies with uncertainty analysis discussions and will be a specific application of the guidance provided in NCRP Report Nos. 158, 163, 164, and 171. The main role of the

  5. Dose reconstruction for the million worker study: status and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bouville, André; Toohey, Richard E; Boice, John D; Beck, Harold L; Dauer, Larry T; Eckerman, Keith F; Hagemeyer, Derek; Leggett, Richard W; Mumma, Michael T; Napier, Bruce; Pryor, Kathy H; Rosenstein, Marvin; Schauer, David A; Sherbini, Sami; Stram, Daniel O; Thompson, James L; Till, John E; Yoder, Craig; Zeitlin, Cary

    2015-02-01

    The primary aim of the epidemiologic study of one million U.S. radiation workers and veterans [the Million Worker Study (MWS)] is to provide scientifically valid information on the level of radiation risk when exposures are received gradually over time and not within seconds, as was the case for Japanese atomic bomb survivors. The primary outcome of the epidemiologic study is cancer mortality, but other causes of death such as cardiovascular disease and cerebrovascular disease will be evaluated. The success of the study is tied to the validity of the dose reconstruction approaches to provide realistic estimates of organ-specific radiation absorbed doses that are as accurate and precise as possible and to properly evaluate their accompanying uncertainties. The dosimetry aspects for the MWS are challenging in that they address diverse exposure scenarios for diverse occupational groups being studied over a period of up to 70 y. The dosimetric issues differ among the varied exposed populations that are considered: atomic veterans, U.S. Department of Energy workers exposed to both penetrating radiation and intakes of radionuclides, nuclear power plant workers, medical radiation workers, and industrial radiographers. While a major source of radiation exposure to the study population comes from external gamma- or x-ray sources, for some of the study groups, there is a meaningful component of radionuclide intakes that requires internal radiation dosimetry assessments. Scientific Committee 6-9 has been established by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) to produce a report on the comprehensive organ dose assessment (including uncertainty analysis) for the MWS. The NCRP dosimetry report will cover the specifics of practical dose reconstruction for the ongoing epidemiologic studies with uncertainty analysis discussions and will be a specific application of the guidance provided in NCRP Report Nos. 158, 163, 164, and 171. The main role of the

  6. Preliminary dose comparisons for the MRS Systems Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pelto, P.J.; Lavender, J.C.

    1989-04-01

    This report provides preliminary information on the radiological doses to the public and the workers for alternative system configurations proposed in the MRS Systems Study. Information published in the MRS Environmental Assessment (DOE 1986) was used as a basis for this analysis. The risk differences between alternative configurations were found to be small and should not be viewed as a major factor in selecting alternative configurations. 1 ref.

  7. Pediatric Computed Tomography. Radiation Dose in Abdominal Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, X.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Buenfil, A. E.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Dies, P.

    2008-08-01

    Computed tomography is one of the most popular medical imaging modalities used in the last years. However, because is one of the techniques that delivered a considerable radiation dose, precautions should be taken into account. Pediatric patients are more radiosensitive than adults, and the probability that no desirable biological effects can occur is greater. To this, also it adds the probability that they will need more radiological studies in the future. The work consisted in determining the received dose by the pediatric patients undergoing abdominal studies in a multislice computed tomograph, according to the dosimetric quantities established by a Code of Practice published by the International Atomic Energy Agency; using a ionization chamber and a phantom that simulates the abdomen of a pediatric patient. The weighted air kerma index (Cw) was 14.3±0.4 mGy, this value is lower than the published by the American College of Radiology, 25 mGy. The multiple scan average dose (MSAD), which is a quantity established by the NOM-229-SSA1-2002 was determined, finding a value of 14.2±0.1 mGy, it is also below the value established, 25 mGy for an adult study.

  8. Pediatric Computed Tomography. Radiation Dose in Abdominal Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, X.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Buenfil, A. E.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Dies, P

    2008-08-11

    Computed tomography is one of the most popular medical imaging modalities used in the last years. However, because is one of the techniques that delivered a considerable radiation dose, precautions should be taken into account. Pediatric patients are more radiosensitive than adults, and the probability that no desirable biological effects can occur is greater. To this, also it adds the probability that they will need more radiological studies in the future. The work consisted in determining the received dose by the pediatric patients undergoing abdominal studies in a multislice computed tomograph, according to the dosimetric quantities established by a Code of Practice published by the International Atomic Energy Agency; using a ionization chamber and a phantom that simulates the abdomen of a pediatric patient. The weighted air kerma index (C{sub w}) was 14.3{+-}0.4 mGy, this value is lower than the published by the American College of Radiology, 25 mGy. The multiple scan average dose (MSAD), which is a quantity established by the NOM-229-SSA1-2002 was determined, finding a value of 14.2{+-}0.1 mGy, it is also below the value established, 25 mGy for an adult study.

  9. Association of achieved dialysis dose with mortality in the hemodialysis study: an example of "dose-targeting bias".

    PubMed

    Greene, Tom; Daugirdas, John; Depner, Thomas; Allon, Michael; Beck, Gerald; Chumlea, Cameron; Delmez, James; Gotch, Frank; Kusek, John W; Levin, Nathan; Owen, William; Schulman, Gerald; Star, Robert; Toto, Robert; Eknoyan, Garabed

    2005-11-01

    In the intention-to-treat analysis of the Hemodialysis Study, all-cause mortality did not differ significantly between the high versus standard hemodialysis dose groups. The association of mortality with delivered dose within each of the two randomized treatment groups was examined, and implications for observational studies were considered. Time-dependent Cox regression was used to relate the relative risk (RR) for mortality to the running mean of the achieved equilibrated Kt/V (eKt/V) over the preceding 4 mo. eKt/V was categorized by quintiles within each dose group. Analyses were controlled for case-mix factors and baseline anthropometric volume. Within each randomized dose group, mortality was elevated markedly when achieved eKt/V was in the lowest quintile (RR, 1.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.40 to 2.66; P < 0.0001 in the standard-dose group; RR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.50 to 2.76; P < 0.0001 in the high-dose group; RR relative to the middle quintiles). The mortality rate in the lowest eKt/V quintile of the high-dose group was higher than in the full standard-dose group (RR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.29 to 1.96; P < 0.0001). Each 0.1 eKt/V unit below the group median was associated with a 58% higher mortality in the standard-dose group (P < 0.001) and a 37% higher mortality in the high-dose group (P < 0.001). The magnitude of these dose-mortality effects was seven- to 12-fold higher than the upper limit of the 95% CI from the intention-to-treat analysis. The effects were attenuated in lagged analyses but did not disappear. When dialysis dose is targeted closely, as under the controlled conditions of the Hemodialysis Study, patients with the lowest achieved dose relative to their target dose experience markedly increased mortality, to a degree that is not compatible with a biologic effect of dose. The possibility of similar (albeit smaller) biases should be considered when analyzing observational data sets relating mortality to achieved dose of dialysis. PMID:16192421

  10. Acute and subchronic toxicity studies of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) disodium salt (BioPQQ™) in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masahiko; Takahashi, Hisaaki; Koura, Seiko; Chung, Catherine; Tafazoli, Shahrzad; Roberts, Ashley

    2014-10-01

    The potential use of pyrroloquinoline quinone disodium salt (BioPQQ™), as a supplemental food ingredient, was evaluated in a range of oral toxicity studies in rats including an acute study, a 14-day preliminary and a 28-day repeated-dose study, and a 13-week subchronic study. The median lethal dose of BioPQQ™ was shown to be 1000-2000mg/kg body weight (bw) in male and 500-1000mg/kgbw in female rats. In the 14-day study, high doses of BioPQQ™ resulted in increases in relative kidney weights with associated histopathology in female rats only, while a follow-up 28-day study in female animals resulted in increases in urinary protein and crystals. These findings were reversible, and resolved during the recovery period. In the 13-week study, a number of clinical chemistry findings and histopathological changes were noted, which were deemed to be of no toxicological significance, as the levels were within the historical control range, were not dose-dependent, occurred at a similar frequency in control groups, or only occurred in the control group. Based on these findings, a no-observed-adverse-effect level of 100mg/kgbw/day was determined for BioPQQ™ in rats, the highest dose tested in the 13-week study. PMID:24995591

  11. Bayesian multimodel inference for dose-response studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.; Albers, P.H.

    2007-01-01

    Statistical inference in dose?response studies is model-based: The analyst posits a mathematical model of the relation between exposure and response, estimates parameters of the model, and reports conclusions conditional on the model. Such analyses rarely include any accounting for the uncertainties associated with model selection. The Bayesian inferential system provides a convenient framework for model selection and multimodel inference. In this paper we briefly describe the Bayesian paradigm and Bayesian multimodel inference. We then present a family of models for multinomial dose?response data and apply Bayesian multimodel inferential methods to the analysis of data on the reproductive success of American kestrels (Falco sparveriuss) exposed to various sublethal dietary concentrations of methylmercury.

  12. Biological equivalent dose studies for dose escalation in the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy clinical trials

    SciTech Connect

    Prezado, Y.; Fois, G.; Edouard, M.; Nemoz, C.; Renier, M.; Requardt, H.; Esteve, F.; Adam, JF.; Elleaume, H.; Bravin, A.

    2009-03-15

    Synchrotron radiation is an innovative tool for the treatment of brain tumors. In the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy (SSRT) technique a radiation dose enhancement specific to the tumor is obtained. The tumor is loaded with a high atomic number (Z) element and it is irradiated in stereotactic conditions from several entrance angles. The aim of this work was to assess dosimetric properties of the SSRT for preparing clinical trials at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). To estimate the possible risks, the doses received by the tumor and healthy tissues in the future clinical conditions have been calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations (PENELOPE code). The dose enhancement factors have been determined for different iodine concentrations in the tumor, several tumor positions, tumor sizes, and different beam sizes. A scheme for the dose escalation in the various phases of the clinical trials has been proposed. The biological equivalent doses and the normalized total doses received by the skull have been calculated in order to assure that the tolerance values are not reached.

  13. A correlation study of eye lens dose and personal dose equivalent for interventional cardiologists.

    PubMed

    Farah, J; Struelens, L; Dabin, J; Koukorava, C; Donadille, L; Jacob, S; Schnelzer, M; Auvinen, A; Vanhavere, F; Clairand, I

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the dosimetry part of the European ELDO project, funded by the DoReMi Network of Excellence, in which a method was developed to estimate cumulative eye lens doses for past practices based on personal dose equivalent values, H(p)(10), measured above the lead apron at several positions at the collar, chest and waist levels. Measurement campaigns on anthropomorphic phantoms were carried out in typical interventional settings considering different tube projections and configurations, beam energies and filtration, operator positions and access routes and using both mono-tube and biplane X-ray systems. Measurements showed that eye lens dose correlates best with H(p)(10) measured on the left side of the phantom at the level of the collar, although this correlation implicates high spreads (41 %). Nonetheless, for retrospective dose assessment, H(p)(10) records are often the only option for eye dose estimates and the typically used chest left whole-body dose measurement remains useful. PMID:23858492

  14. Modeling Effective Dosages in Hormetic Dose-Response Studies

    PubMed Central

    Belz, Regina G.; Piepho, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Two hormetic modifications of a monotonically decreasing log-logistic dose-response function are most often used to model stimulatory effects of low dosages of a toxicant in plant biology. As just one of these empirical models is yet properly parameterized to allow inference about quantities of interest, this study contributes the parameterized functions for the second hormetic model and compares the estimates of effective dosages between both models based on 23 hormetic data sets. Based on this, the impact on effective dosage estimations was evaluated, especially in case of a substantially inferior fit by one of the two models. Methodology/Principal Findings The data sets evaluated described the hormetic responses of four different test plant species exposed to 15 different chemical stressors in two different experimental dose-response test designs. Out of the 23 data sets, one could not be described by any of the two models, 14 could be better described by one of the two models, and eight could be equally described by both models. In cases of misspecification by any of the two models, the differences between effective dosages estimates (0–1768%) greatly exceeded the differences observed when both models provided a satisfactory fit (0–26%). This suggests that the conclusions drawn depending on the model used may diverge considerably when using an improper hormetic model especially regarding effective dosages quantifying hormesis. Conclusions/Significance The study showed that hormetic dose responses can take on many shapes and that this diversity can not be captured by a single model without risking considerable misinterpretation. However, the two empirical models considered in this paper together provide a powerful means to model, prove, and now also to quantify a wide range of hormetic responses by reparameterization. Despite this, they should not be applied uncritically, but after statistical and graphical assessment of their adequacy. PMID

  15. The Importance of Carotenoid Dose in Supplementation Studies with Songbirds.

    PubMed

    Koch, Rebecca E; Wilson, Alan E; Hill, Geoffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoid coloration is the one of the most frequently studied ornamental traits in animals. Many studies of carotenoid coloration test the associations between carotenoid coloration and measures of performance, such as immunocompetence and oxidative state, proceeding from the premise that carotenoids are limited resources. Such studies commonly involve supplementing the diets of captive birds with carotenoids. In many cases, however, the amount of carotenoid administered is poorly justified, and even supposedly carotenoid-limited diets may saturate birds' systems. To quantify the relationships among the amount of carotenoids administered in experiments, levels of circulating carotenoids, and quantities of carotenoids deposited into colored ornaments, we performed a meta-analysis of 15 published studies that supplemented carotenoids to one of seven songbird species. We used allometric scaling equations to estimate the per-gram carotenoid consumption of each study's subjects, and we used meta-regression to evaluate the effects of this carotenoid dose on differences in coloration and plasma carotenoid levels between supplemented and control groups of birds. After accounting for supplementation duration and species, we observed a significant positive correlation between carotenoid intake and response of plasma carotenoid level to supplementation. The presence of supplemental carotenoids also tended to increase the expression of ornamental coloration, but the magnitude of the carotenoid dose did not significantly affect how strongly coloration changed with supplementation. Further, coloration effect sizes had no significant relationship with plasma carotenoid effect sizes. We also found significant heterogeneity in responses among studies and species, and the parameters used to measure color significantly affected response to supplementation. Our results emphasize the importance of performing dosage trials to determine what supplementation levels provide limited

  16. Chemoradiation of Hepatic Malignancies: Prospective, Phase 1 Study of Full-Dose Capecitabine With Escalating Doses of Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, Ryan; Mulcahy, Mary F.; Lewandowski, Robert J.; Gates, Vanessa L.; Vouche, Michael; Habib, Ali; Kircher, Sheetal; Newman, Steven; Nimeiri, Halla; Benson, Al B.; Salem, Riad

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Radiosensitizing chemotherapy improves the outcomes in comparison with radiation alone for gastrointestinal cancers. The delivery of radiation therapy with yttrium90 ({sup 90}Y) radioembolization, in combination with the radiosensitizing chemotherapeutic agent capecitabine, provides the opportunity to enhance the effects of radiation on hepatic malignancies. This phase 1 study sought to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of {sup 90}Y plus capecitabine in patients with cholangiocarcinoma or liver metastases confined to the liver. Methods and Materials: Patients were given initial treatment at full-dose capecitabine during days 1 to 14 of a 21-day cycle. At days 1 to 7 of the second cycle, whole-liver {sup 90}Y was given at the test dose, after which time capecitabine was continued. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was determined 6 weeks after {sup 90}Y infusion. If a DLT was not observed, the {sup 90}Y dose was escalated. The planned dose cohorts were 110, 130, 150, and 170 Gy. The primary endpoint was to determine the MTD of {sup 90}Y with full-dose capecitabine. Results: Sixteen patients were treated according to the study protocol. Two patients experienced DLTs. Nine patients required capecitabine dose reduction as a result of toxicities attributable to capecitabine alone. The criteria for establishing {sup 90}Y MTD were not met, indicating an MTD of >170 Gy. Conclusion: The MTD of {sup 90}Y delivered in conjunction with capecitabine in the setting of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma or metastatic disease confined to the liver exceeds 170 Gy. This is the highest {sup 90}Y dose reported to date and has important implications on combined therapy with the radiosensitizing oral chemotherapeutic capecitabine. Further studies are under way.

  17. NTP technical report on toxicity studies of O-, M-, and P-nitrotoluenes (CAS Nos. : 88-72-2, 99-08-1, 99-99-0) aministered in dosed feed to f344/n rats and b6c3f1 mice. Toxicity report series

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnick, J.K.

    1992-11-01

    Nitrotoluenes are high production volume chemicals used in the synthesis of agricultural and rubber chemicals and in various dyes. Because of differences in the metabolism of the 3 isomers and their capability to bind to DNA, comparative toxicity studies of o-, m-, or p-nitrotoluene were conducted in F344 rats and B6C3F1 mice. Animals were evaluated for histopathology, clinical pathology, and toxicity to the reproductive system. The nitrotoluenes were also studied in several in vitro and in vivo assays for genetic toxicity. The 3 nitrotoluene isomers were toxic to the kidney, spleen and/or reproductive system in rats; o-nitrotoluene also caused lesions in the liver of male rats. The extent of the toxicity was most severe with o-isomer in both rats and mice. o-Nitrotoluene was carcinogenic in male rats in 13-week studies, based on the occurrence of mesothelioma and mesothelial cell hyperplasia in dosed groups.

  18. Efficacy and safety of flexibly dosed paliperidone palmitate in Chinese patients with acute schizophrenia: an open-label, single-arm, prospective, interventional study

    PubMed Central

    Si, Tianmei; Zhang, Kerang; Tang, Jisheng; Fang, Maosheng; Li, Keqing; Zhuo, Jianmin; Feng, Yu

    2015-01-01

    This open-label, single-arm, multicenter, 13-week, prospective study explored the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of paliperidone palmitate (150 milligram equivalents [mg eq] [day 1], 100 mg eq [day 8], both deltoid injections; 75–150 mg eq, deltoid/gluteal injection) in Chinese patients with acute schizophrenia (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale [PANSS] total score ≥70), who previously had unsatisfactory therapeutic effect following oral antipsychotic treatment (without washout period). Primary efficacy endpoint was percentage of patients with ≥30% improvement in the PANSS total score at the end of 13 weeks. Secondary efficacy endpoints included change from baseline to end of week 13 in PANSS total score, PANSS subscale scores, Marder factor scores, Clinical Global Impressions–Severity score, and Personal and Social Performance Scale scores. Overall, 477/610 enrolled patients (full analysis set, 78.2%) completed the study (men: 55.1%; women: 44.9%; mean age: 31.5 years). Total, 443/610 (72.6%, full analysis set) patients achieved primary endpoint (mean [standard deviation] change from baseline: –30.9 [19.51]). All secondary endpoints demonstrated significant improvement at the end of 13 weeks. One death occurred during this acute phase. The most common (>5%) treatment-emergent adverse events were extrapyramidal disorders (8.4%). The efficacy and safety data are consistent with other short-term, placebo-controlled studies of paliperidone palmitate conducted in similar populations. PMID:26150719

  19. Dose proportionality and pharmacokinetics of carvedilol sustained-release formulation: a single dose-ascending 10-sequence incomplete block study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yo Han; Choi, Hee Youn; Noh, Yook-Hwan; Lee, Shi Hyang; Lim, Hyeong-Seok; Kim, Chin; Bae, Kyun-Seop

    2015-01-01

    Background Carvedilol is a third-generation β-blocker indicated for congestive heart failure and high blood pressure. The aim of this study was to investigate the dose proportionality of the carvedilol sustained-release (SR) formulation in healthy male subjects. Methods An open-label, single dose-ascending, 10-sequence, 3-period balanced incomplete block study was performed using healthy male subjects. In varying sequences, each subject received three of five carvedilol SR formulations (8, 16, 32, 64, or 128 mg once). The treatment periods were separated by a washout period of 7 days. Serial blood samples were collected up to 48 h after dosing. The plasma concentrations of carvedilol were determined by using validated liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic parameters including the area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC) from time 0 to the last measurable time (AUClast), AUC extrapolated to infinity (AUCinf), and the measured peak plasma concentration (Cmax) were obtained by noncompartmental analysis. Dose proportionality was evaluated if the ln–ln plots of AUClast, AUCinf, and Cmax versus dose were linear and the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) of the slopes were within 0.9195 and 1.0805. Tolerability was assessed by vital signs, electrocardiogram, clinical laboratory tests, and monitoring of adverse events (AEs) throughout the study. Results A total of 31 subjects were enrolled, and 30 completed the study. The assessment of dose proportionality meets the statistical criteria; the point estimates of slope were 1.0104 (90% CI: 0.9849–1.0359) for AUClast, 1.0003 (90% CI: 0.9748–1.0258) for AUCinf, and 0.9901 (90% CI: 0.9524–1.0277) for Cmax, respectively. All AEs were mild, and none of the subjects dropped out due to AEs. Conclusion In this study, exposure to carvedilol was proportional over the therapeutic dose range of 8–128 mg. The carvedilol SR formulation was well tolerated. PMID:26089641

  20. Analysis of repeated low-dose challenge studies.

    PubMed

    Nolen, Tracy L; Hudgens, Michael G; Senb, Pranab K; Koch, Gary G

    2015-05-30

    Preclinical evaluation of candidate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines entails challenge studies whereby non-human primates such as macaques are vaccinated with either an active or control vaccine and then challenged (exposed) with a simian-version of HIV. Repeated low-dose challenge (RLC) studies in which each macaque is challenged multiple times (either until infection or some maximum number of challenges is reached) are becoming more common in an effort to mimic natural exposure to HIV in humans. Statistical methods typically employed for the testing for a vaccine effect in RLC studies include a modified version of Fisher's exact test as well as large sample approaches such as the usual log-rank test. Unfortunately, these methods are not guaranteed to provide a valid test for the effect of vaccination. On the other hand, valid tests for vaccine effect such as the exact log-rank test may not be easy to implement using software available to many researchers. This paper details which statistical approaches are appropriate for the analysis of RLC studies, and how to implement these methods easily in SAS or R. PMID:25752266

  1. DOSE-DEPENDENT TRANSITIONS IN MECHANISMS OF TOXICITY: CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experience with dose response and mechanisms of toxicity has shown that multiple mechanisms may exist for a single agent along the continuum of the full dose-response curve. It is highly likely that critical, limiting steps in any given mechanistic pathway may become overwhelmed ...

  2. Sibutramine in weight control: a dose-ranging, efficacy study.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, M; Rubio, A; Golik, A; Byrne, L; Scheinbaum, M L

    1991-09-01

    We tested the safety and efficacy of sibutramine, 5 and 20 mg, and placebo on weight loss. Medication was added to caloric restriction, behavior modification, and exercise in a parallel-group, double-blind clinical trial. Participants were 130% to 180% of ideal body weight and in good health. The study lasted 12 weeks over Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day. Weight loss during 8 weeks of study medication was: placebo, 1.4 +/- 2.1 kg (n = 19); 5 mg sibutramine, 2.9 +/- 2.3 kg (n = 18); and 20 mg sibutramine, 5.0 +/- 2.7 kg (n = 18) (p less than 0.05 sibutramine, 5 and 20 mg, versus placebo; p less than 0.05 sibutramine, 20 mg versus 5 mg). There is a significant dose-effect relationship. Five participants left the study before completion, all because of adverse events; placebo (one patient), 5 mg sibutramine (one patient), and 20 mg sibutramine (three patients). Sleep difficulties were noted by eight participants (20 mg sibutramine, seven patients; 5 mg, one patient; and placebo, no patients). Six of 21 participants receiving 20 mg complained of irritability, unusual impatience, or "excitation." Sibutramine, 5 and 20 mg, added to a multimodal program assisted participants in losing weight. PMID:1914367

  3. Dose-response in case-control studies.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, G

    1980-01-01

    The evidence provided by a case-control study on the association between a disease and some factor is strengthened if the extent of exposure to the factor is categorised into several groups or measured on a continuous scale. Then dose-response relationships can be estimated. The methods available are illustrated by application to data on lung cancer and chrysotile asbestos exposure from Quebec in which there were three matched controls for each case. Regression-type models were fitted assuming that the relative risk of lung cancer was linearly related to an exposure measure; a covariate, smoking, was also included in the analysis. The data were first analysed ignoring the matching and secondly taking account of the matching. The methodology for the latter analysis has only recently been developed; formerly, matched studies were of necessity analysed as unmatched. Although, in this particular example, the unmatched and matched analyses gave similar results, this is not always the case and it is argued that, now that the methodology is available, matched case-control studies should be analysed taking proper account of the matching. PMID:7441145

  4. {alpha}/{beta} ratio: A dose range dependence study

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Lourdes M. . E-mail: logarcia@ottawahospital.on.ca; Wilkins, David E.; Raaphorst, Gijsbert P.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dependence of the {alpha}/{beta} ratio determined from in vitro survival curves on the dose ranges. Methods: Detailed clonogenic cell survival experiments were used to determine the least squares estimators for the linear quadratic model for different dose ranges. The cell lines used were CHO AA8, a Chinese hamster fibroblast cell line; U-373 MG, a human glioblastoma cell line; and CP3 and DU-145, two human prostate carcinoma cell lines. The {alpha}, {beta}, and {alpha}/{beta} ratio behaviors, combined with a goodness-of-fit analysis and Monte Carlo simulation of the experiments, were assessed within different dose regions. Results: Including data from the low-dose region has a significant influence on the determination of the {alpha}, {beta}, and {alpha}/{beta} ratio from in vitro survival curve data. In this region, the values are poorly determined and have significant variability. The mid-dose region is characterized by more precise and stable values and is in agreement with the linear quadratic model. The high-dose region shows relatively small statistical error in the fitted parameters but the goodness-of-fit and Monte Carlo analyses showed poor quality fits. Conclusion: The dependence of the fitted {alpha} and {beta} on the dose range has an impact on the {alpha}/{beta} ratio determined from the survival data. The low-dose region had a significant influence that could be a result of a strong linear, rather than quadratic, component, hypersensitivity, and adaptive responses. This dose dependence should be interpreted as a caution against using inadequate in vitro cell survival data for {alpha}/{beta} ratio determination.

  5. Study on examinee's dose delivered in computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Cheung, T; Cheng, Q; Feng, D; Stokes, M J

    2001-03-01

    Dose profiles are presented resulting from computed tomography (CT). The profiles are positioned at the central axis, 1 cm away from the outer surface of the phantom, for single and multiple scans. A Hitachi W-1000 scanner is used with a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD), and standard dosimetry head and trunk phantoms. Regression equations are found linking the dose resulting from scattered radiation associated with a single scan to the distance from the scanning centre. The impact on the CT dose index value (CTDI) for varying integrating lengths is analysed. Some problems associated with CT dose measurement are noted, which may assist in the practical application of IBSS (International Basic Standard of Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources) guide levels. PMID:11277227

  6. STUDIES OF ECHOVIRUS-12 IN VOLUNTEERS: DETERMINATION OF MINIMAL INFECTIOUS DOSE AND THE EFFECT OF PREVIOUS INFECTION ON INFECTIOUS DOSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two-part study of echovirus-12 was done in volunteers. In the first part the human infectious dose of the virus was determined in 149 healthy adults with undetectable serum antibody, each of whom drank 0-330,000 plaque-forming units (pfu) of virus in 100 ml of nonchlorinated wa...

  7. Georgia fishery study: implications for dose calculations. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Turcotte, M.D.S.

    1983-08-05

    Fish consumption will contribute a major portion of the estimated individual and population doses from L-Reactor liquid releases and Cs-137 remobilization in Steel Creek. It is therefore important that the values for fish consumption used in dose calculations be as realistic as possible. Since publication of the L-Reactor Environmental Information Document (EID), data have become available on sport fishing in the Savannah River. These data provide SRP with a site-specific sport fish harvest and consumption values for use in dose calculations. The Georgia fishery data support the total population fish consumption and calculated dose reported in the EID. The data indicate, however, that both the EID average and maximum individual fish consumption have been underestimated, although each to a different degree. The average fish consumption value used in the EID is approximately 3% below the lower limit of the fish consumption range calculated using the Georgia data. Maximum fish consumption in the EID has been underestimated by approximately 60%, and doses to the maximum individual should also be recalculated. Future dose calculations should utilize an average adult fish consumption value of 11.3 kg/yr, and a maximum adult fish consumption value of 34 kg/yr. Consumption values for the teen and child age groups should be increased proportionally: (1) teen average = 8.5; maximum = 25.9 kg/yr; and (2) child average = 3.6; maximum = 11.2 kg/yr. 8 refs.

  8. Dose calculation accuracies in whole breast radiotherapy treatment planning: a multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Shogo; Miyabe, Yuki; Tohyama, Naoki; Kumazaki, Yu; Kurooka, Masahiko; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Tachibana, Hidenobu; Kito, Satoshi; Wakita, Akihisa; Ohotomo, Yuko; Ikagawa, Hiroyuki; Ishikura, Satoshi; Nozaki, Miwako; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Nishio, Teiji

    2015-07-01

    Our objective in this study was to evaluate the variation in the doses delivered among institutions due to dose calculation inaccuracies in whole breast radiotherapy. We have developed practical procedures for quality assurance (QA) of radiation treatment planning systems. These QA procedures are designed to be performed easily at any institution and to permit comparisons of results across institutions. The dose calculation accuracy was evaluated across seven institutions using various irradiation conditions. In some conditions, there was a >3 % difference between the calculated dose and the measured dose. The dose calculation accuracy differs among institutions because it is dependent on both the dose calculation algorithm and beam modeling. The QA procedures in this study are useful for verifying the accuracy of the dose calculation algorithm and of the beam model before clinical use for whole breast radiotherapy. PMID:25646770

  9. What can be learned from epidemiologic studies of persons exposed to low doses of radiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1993-04-01

    The main objective of radiation risk assessment is to determine the risk of various adverse health effects associated with exposure to low doses and low dose rates. Extrapolation of risks from studies of persons exposed at high doses (generally exceeding 1 Sv) and dose rates has been the primary approach used to achieve this objective. The study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has played an especially important role in risk assessment efforts. A direct assessment of the dose-response function based on studies of persons exposed at low doses and dose rates is obviously desirable. This paper focuses on the potential of both current and future nuclear workers studies for investigating the dose-response functions at low doses, and also discusses analyses making use of the low dose portion of the atomic bomb survivor data. Difficulties in using these data are the statistical imprecision of estimated dose-response parameters, and potential bias resulting from confounding factors and from uncertainties in dose estimates.

  10. Biokinetics in repeated-dosing in vitro drug toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Nynke I; Di Consiglio, Emma; Blaauboer, Bas J; Testai, Emanuela

    2015-12-25

    The aim of the EU FP7 Predict-IV project was to improve the predictivity of in vitro assays for unwanted effects of drugs after repeated dosing. The project assessed the added benefit of integrating long-lived in vitro organotypic cell systems with 'omics' technologies and in silico modelling, including systems biology and pharmacokinetic assessments. RPTEC/TERT1 kidney cells, primary rat and human hepatocytes, HepaRG liver cells and 2D and 3D primary brain cultures were dosed daily or every other day for 14 days to a selection of drugs varying in their mechanism of pharmacological action. Since concentration-effect relationships not only depend on the activity of the drug or the sensitivity of the target, but also on the distribution of compounds in the in vitro system, the concentration of a selection of drugs in cells, microtitre plate plastic and medium was measured over time. Results, reviewed in this paper, indicate that lipophilic drugs bind significantly to plastic labware. A few drugs, including less lipophilic drugs, bind to cell-attachment matrices. Chemicals that reach high concentrations in cells, including cyclosporin A and amiodarone, significantly accumulate over time after repeated dosing, partly explaining their increased toxicity after repeated dosing, compared to a single dose. PMID:26362508

  11. Dosimetric Study of a Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Arzamendi, S.; Díaz-Perches, R.

    Carcinoma of the cervix is the most common malignancy - in terms of both incidence and mortality - in Mexican women. Low dose rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy is normally prescribed for the treatment of this disease to the vast majority of patients attending public hospitals in our country. However, most treatment planning systems being used in these hospitals still rely on Sievert integral dose calculations. Moreover, experimental verification of dose distributions are hardly ever done. In this work we present a dosimetric characterisation of the Amersham CDCS-J 137Cs source, an LDR brachytherapy source commonly used in Mexican hospitals. To this end a Monte Carlo simulation was developed, that includes a realistic description of the internal structure of the source embedded in a scattering medium. The Monte Carlo results were compared to experimental measurements of dose distributions. A lucite phantom with the same geometric characteristics as the one used in the simulation was built. Dose measurements were performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters together with commercial RadioChromic dye film. A comparison between our Monte Carlo simulation, the experimental data, and results reported in the literature is presented.

  12. Radiation dose to positron emission tomography technologists during quantitative versus qualitative studies.

    PubMed

    McCormick, V A; Miklos, J A

    1993-05-01

    Positron emission tomography technologists were monitored with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) during qualitative and quantitative studies. Doses to technologists during specific tasks were also measured. The technologists received at least twice as much radiation during the quantitative as the qualitative studies. The average dose per study for qualitative studies was 0.017 mSv (1.7 mrem) shallow and 0.014 mSv (1.4 mrem) deep. The average dose per study for the quantitative studies was 0.05 mSv (5 mrem) shallow and 0.04 mSv (4 mrem) deep. The average dose per study was based on the TLD dose accumulated over studies conducted over four 2-mo and one 1-mo intervals. The dose incurred by the technologists each time they drew a radioactive dose was 0.002 mSv (0.2 mrem) shallow and 0.001 mSv (0.1 mrem) deep. The doses received during injection were 0.014 mSv (1.4 mrem) shallow and 0.007 mSv (0.7 mrem) deep. Doses received during blood sampling were 0.016 mSv (1.6 mrem) shallow and 0.014 mSv (1.4 mrem) deep. During quantitative studies, the technologist received a much greater dose than during its qualitative counterpart due to the blood sampling process and increased time in the room with the radioactive patient. PMID:8478709

  13. Dosing study of massage for chronic neck pain: protocol for the dose response evaluation and analysis of massage [DREAM] trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the growing popularity of massage, its effectiveness for treating neck pain remains unclear, largely because of the poor quality of research. A major deficiency of previous studies has been their use of low “doses” of massage that massage therapists consider inadequate. Unfortunately, the number of minutes per massage session, sessions per week, or weeks of treatment necessary for massage to have beneficial or optimal effects are not known. This study is designed to address these gaps in our knowledge by determining, for persons with chronic neck pain: 1) the optimal combination of number of treatments per week and length of individual treatment session, and 2) the optimal number of weeks of treatment. Methods/design In this study, 228 persons with chronic non-specific neck pain will be recruited from primary health care clinics in a large health care system in the Seattle area. Participants will be randomized to a wait list control group or 4 weeks of treatment with one of 5 different dosing combinations (2 or 3 30-min treatments per week or 1, 2, or 3 60-min treatments per week). At the end of this 4-week primary treatment period, participants initially receiving each of the 5 dosing combinations will be randomized to a secondary treatment period of either no additional treatment or 6 weekly 60-min massages. The primary outcomes, neck-related dysfunction and pain, will be assessed by blinded telephone interviewers 5, 12, and 26 weeks post-randomization. To better characterize the trajectory of treatment effects, these interview data will be supplemented with outcomes data collected by internet questionnaire at 10, 16, 20 and 39 weeks. Comparisons of outcomes for the 6 groups during the primary treatment period will identify the optimal weekly dose, while comparisons of outcomes during the secondary treatment period will determine if 10 weeks of treatment is superior to 4 weeks. Discussion A broad dosing schedule was included in this trial

  14. Study of UV radiation dose received by the Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Gurrea, Gonzalo; Cañada, Javier

    2007-01-01

    Excess exposure to UV radiation can affect our health by causing sunburn, skin cancer, etc. It is therefore useful to determine the UV dosage received by people as a way of protecting them from the possible negative effects that this kind of radiation can cause. In this work, the personal outdoor percentage, which shows the time spent in outdoor activities, as well as personal UV doses, has been calculated by means of global UV radiation on a horizontal plane. A database of average daily UVB radiation on the horizontal plane given by the National Institute of Meteorology has been used. In this work we evaluate the standard erythema dose of the Spanish population throughout the year. PMID:18028210

  15. Estimation of the Dose of Radiation Received by Patient and Physician During a Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Study.

    PubMed

    Morishima, Yoshiaki; Chida, Koichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) is considered the standard diagnostic imaging technique to investigate swallowing disorders and dysphagia. Few studies have been reported concerning the dose of radiation a patient receives and the scattering radiation dose received by a physician during VFSS. In this study, we investigated the dose of radiation (entrance skin dose, ESD) estimated to be received by a patient during VFSS using a human phantom (via a skin-dose monitor sensor placed on the neck of the human phantom). We also investigated the effective dose (ED) and dose equivalent (DE) received by a physician (wearing two personal dosimeters) during an actual patient procedure. One dosimeter (whole body) was worn under a lead apron at the chest, and the other (specially placed to measure doses received by the lens of the eye) outside the lead apron on the neck collar to monitor radiation doses in parts of the body not protected by the lead apron. The ESD for the patient was 7.8 mGy in 5 min. We estimated the average patient dose at 12.79 mGy per VFSS procedure. The physician ED and DE during VFSS were 0.9 mSv/year and 2.3 mSv/year, respectively. The dose of radiation received by the physician in this study was lower than regulatory dose limits. However, in accordance with the principle that radiation exposure should be as low as reasonably achievable, every effort should be made (e.g., wearing lead glasses) to reduce exposure doses. PMID:27318941

  16. Normalized dose data for upper gastrointestinal tract contrast studies performed to infants.

    PubMed

    Damilakis, John; Stratakis, John; Raissaki, Maria; Perisinakis, Kostas; Kourbetis, Nikiforos; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2006-04-01

    The aim of the current study was to (a) provide normalized dose data for the estimation of the radiation dose from upper gastrointestinal tract contrast (UGIC) studies carried out to infants and (b) estimate the average patient dose and risks associated with radiation from UGIC examinations performed in our institution. Organ and effective doses, normalized to entrance skin dose (ESD) and dose area product (DAP) were estimated for UGIC procedures utilizing the Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) transport code and two mathematical phantoms, one corresponding to the size of a newborn and one to the size of a 1-year-old child. The validity of the MCNP results was verified by comparison with dose data obtained in physical anthropomorphic phantoms simulating a newborn and a 1-year-old infant using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). Data were also collected from 25 consecutive UGIC examinations performed to infants. Study participants were (a) 12 infants aged from 0.5 to 5.9 months (group 1) and (b) 13 infants aged from 6 to 15 months (group 2). For each examination, ESD and dose to comforters were measured using TLD. Patient effective doses were estimated using normalized dose data obtained in the simulation study. The risk for fatal cancer induction was estimated using appropriate coefficients. The results consist of tabulated dose data normalized to ESD or DAP for the estimation of patient dose. Conversion coefficients were estimated for various tube potentials and beam filtration values. The mean total fluoroscopy time was 1.26 and 1.62 min for groups 1 and 2, respectively. The average effective dose was 1.6 mSv for group 1 and 1.9 mSv for group 2. The risk of cancer attributable to the radiation exposure associated with a typical UGIC study was found to be up to 3 per 10 000 infants undergoing an UGIC examination. The mean radiation dose absorbed by the hands of comforters was 47 microGy. In conclusion, estimation of radiation doses associated with UGIC studies

  17. Normalized dose data for upper gastrointestinal tract contrast studies performed to infants

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, John; Stratakis, John; Raissaki, Maria; Perisinakis, Kostas; Kourbetis, Nikiforos; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2006-04-15

    The aim of the current study was to (a) provide normalized dose data for the estimation of the radiation dose from upper gastrointestinal tract contrast (UGIC) studies carried out to infants and (b) estimate the average patient dose and risks associated with radiation from UGIC examinations performed in our institution. Organ and effective doses, normalized to entrance skin dose (ESD) and dose area product (DAP) were estimated for UGIC procedures utilizing the Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) transport code and two mathematical phantoms, one corresponding to the size of a newborn and one to the size of a 1-year-old child. The validity of the MCNP results was verified by comparison with dose data obtained in physical anthropomorphic phantoms simulating a newborn and a 1-year-old infant using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). Data were also collected from 25 consecutive UGIC examinations performed to infants. Study participants were (a) 12 infants aged from 0.5 to 5.9 months (group 1) and (b) 13 infants aged from 6 to 15 months (group 2). For each examination, ESD and dose to comforters were measured using TLD. Patient effective doses were estimated using normalized dose data obtained in the simulation study. The risk for fatal cancer induction was estimated using appropriate coefficients. The results consist of tabulated dose data normalized to ESD or DAP for the estimation of patient dose. Conversion coefficients were estimated for various tube potentials and beam filtration values. The mean total fluoroscopy time was 1.26 and 1.62 min for groups 1 and 2, respectively. The average effective dose was 1.6 mSv for group 1 and 1.9 mSv for group 2. The risk of cancer attributable to the radiation exposure associated with a typical UGIC study was found to be up to 3 per 10 000 infants undergoing an UGIC examination. The mean radiation dose absorbed by the hands of comforters was 47 {mu}Gy. In conclusion, estimation of radiation doses associated with UGIC studies performed

  18. Quantifying tumor-selective radiation dose enhancements using gold nanoparticles: a monte carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sean X; Gao, Junfang; Buchholz, Thomas A; Wang, Zhonglu; Salehpour, Mohammad R; Drezek, Rebekah A; Yu, Tse-Kuan

    2009-08-01

    Gold nanoparticles can enhance the biological effective dose of radiation delivered to tumors, but few data exist to quantify this effect. The purpose of this project was to build a Monte Carlo simulation model to study the degree of dose enhancement achievable with gold nanoparticles. A Monte Carlo simulation model was first built using Geant4 code. An Ir-192 brachytherapy source in a water phantom was simulated and the calculation model was first validated against previously published data. We then introduced up to 10(13) gold nanospheres per cm(3) into the water phantom and examined their dose enhancement effect. We compared this enhancement against a gold-water mixture model that has been previously used to attempt to quantify nanoparticle dose enhancement. In our benchmark test, dose-rate constant, radial dose function, and two-dimensional anisotropy function calculated with our model were within 2% of those reported previously. Using our simulation model we found that the radiation dose was enhanced up to 60% with 10(13) gold nanospheres per cm(3) (9.6% by weight) in a water phantom selectively around the nanospheres. The comparison study indicated that our model more accurately calculated the dose enhancement effect and that previous methodologies overestimated the dose enhancement up to 16%. Monte Carlo calculations demonstrate that biologically-relevant radiation dose enhancement can be achieved with the use of gold nanospheres. Selective tumor labeling with gold nanospheres may be a strategy for clinically enhancing radiation effects. PMID:19381816

  19. A pre–postintervention study to evaluate the impact of dose calculators on the accuracy of gentamicin and vancomycin initial doses

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Anas; Cavell, Gillian; Hinton, James; Wade, Paul; Whittlesea, Cate

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Gentamicin and vancomycin are narrow-therapeutic-index antibiotics with potential for high toxicity requiring dose individualisation and continuous monitoring. Clinical decision support (CDS) tools have been effective in reducing gentamicin and vancomycin dosing errors. Online dose calculators for these drugs were implemented in a London National Health Service hospital. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these calculators on the accuracy of gentamicin and vancomycin initial doses. Methods The study used a pre–postintervention design. Data were collected using electronic patient records and paper notes. Random samples of gentamicin and vancomycin initial doses administered during the 8 months before implementation of the calculators were assessed retrospectively against hospital guidelines. Following implementation of the calculators, doses were assessed prospectively. Any gentamicin dose not within ±10% and any vancomycin dose not within ±20% of the guideline-recommended dose were considered incorrect. Results The intranet calculator pages were visited 721 times (gentamicin=333; vancomycin=388) during the 2-month period following the calculators’ implementation. Gentamicin dose errors fell from 61.5% (120/195) to 44.2% (95/215), p<0.001. Incorrect vancomycin loading doses fell from 58.1% (90/155) to 32.4% (46/142), p<0.001. Incorrect vancomycin first maintenance doses fell from 55.5% (86/155) to 33.1% (47/142), p<0.001. Loading and first maintenance vancomycin doses were both incorrect in 37.4% (58/155) of patients before and 13.4% (19/142) after calculator implementation, p<0.001. Conclusions This study suggests that gentamicin and vancomycin dose calculators significantly improved the prescribing of initial doses of these agents. Therefore, healthcare organisations should consider using such CDS tools to support the prescribing of these high-risk drugs. PMID:26044758

  20. Effect of the bone heterogeneity on the dose prescription in orthovoltage radiotherapy: A Monte Carlo study

    PubMed Central

    Chow, James C.L.; Grigorov, Grigor N.

    2011-01-01

    Background In orthovoltage radiotherapy, since the dose prescription at the patient's surface is based on the absolute dose calibration using water phantom, deviation of delivered dose is found as the heterogeneity such as bone present under the patient's surface. Aim This study investigated the dosimetric impact due to the bone heterogeneity on the surface dose in orthovoltage radiotherapy. Materials and methods A 220 kVp photon beam with field size of 5 cm diameter, produced by a Gulmay D3225 orthovoltage X-ray machine was modeled by the BEAMnrc. Phantom containing water (thickness = 1–5 mm) on top of a bone (thickness = 1 cm) was irradiated by the 220 kVp photon beam. Percentage depth dose (PDD), surface dose and photon energy spectrum were determined using Monte Carlo simulations (the BEAMnrc code). Results PDD results showed that the maximum bone dose was about 210% higher than the surface dose in the phantoms with different thicknesses of water. Surface dose was found to be increased in the range of 2.5–3.7%, when the distance between the phantom surface and bone was increased in the range of 1–5 mm. The increase of surface dose was found not to follow the increase of water thickness, and the maximum increase of surface dose was found at the thickness of water equal to 3 mm. Conclusions For the accepted total orthovoltage radiation treatment uncertainty of 5%, a neglected consideration of the bone heterogeneity during the dose prescription in the sites of forehead, chest wall and kneecap with soft tissue thickness = 1–5 mm would cause more than two times of the bone dose, and contribute an uncertainty of about 2.5–3.7% to the total uncertainty in the dose delivery. PMID:24376995

  1. Distribution of the radiation dose in multislice computer tomography of the chest – phantom study

    PubMed Central

    Gorycki, Tomasz; Kamiński, Kamil; Studniarek, Michał; Szlęzak, Przemysław; Szumska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The most commonly used form of reporting doses in multislice computed tomography involves a CT dose index per slice and dose-length product for the whole series. The purpose of this study was to analyze the actual dose distribution in routine chest CT examination protocols using an antropomorphic phantom. Material/Methods We included in the analysis readings from a phantom filled with thermoluminescent detectors (Art Phantom Canberra) during routine chest CT examinations (64 MDCT TK LIGHT SPEED GE Medical System) performed using three protocols: low-dose, helical and angio-CT. Results Mean dose values (mSv) reported from anterior parts of the phantom sections in low-dose/helical/angio-CT protocols were as follows: 3.74; 16.95; 30.17; from central parts: 3.18; 14.15; 26.71; from posterior parts: 3.01; 12.47; 24.98 respectively. Correlation coefficients for mean doses registered in anterior parts of the phantom between low-dose/helical, low-dose/angio-CT and helical/angio-CT protocols were 0.49; 0.63; 0.36; from central parts: 0.73; 0.66; 0.83, while in posterior parts values were as follows: 0.06; 0.21; 0.57. Conclusions The greatest doses were recorded in anterior parts of all phantom sections in all protocols in reference to largest doses absorbed in the anterior part of the chest during CT examination. The doses were decreasing from anterior to posterior parts of all sections. In the long axis of the phantom, in all protocols, lower doses were measured in the upper part of the phantom and at the very lowest part. PMID:24744819

  2. A Bayesian Estimation Framework for Pharmacogenomics Driven Warfarin Dosing: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Öztaner, Serdar Murat; Temizel, Tuğba Taşkaya; Erdem, S Remzi; Özer, Mahmut

    2015-09-01

    The incorporation of pharmacogenomics information into the drug dosing estimation formulations has been shown to increase the accuracy in drug dosing and decrease the frequency of adverse drug effects in many studies in the literature. In this paper, an estimation framework based on the Bayesian structural equation modeling, which is driven by pharmacogenomics, is proposed. The results show that the model compares favorably with the linear models in terms of prediction and explaining the variations in warfarin dosing. PMID:25020183

  3. Randomized study of low-dose versus standard-dose chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (JCOG0303)

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Masayuki; Ando, Nobutoshi; Kato, Ken; Ishikura, Satoshi; Kato, Hoichi; Tsubosa, Yasuhiro; Minashi, Keiko; Okabe, Hiroshi; Kimura, Yusuke; Kawano, Tatsuyuki; Kosugi, Shin-Ichi; Toh, Yasushi; Nakamura, Kenichi; Fukuda, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    Low-dose cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (LDPF) chemotherapy with daily radiotherapy (RT) is used as an alternative chemoradiotherapy regimen for locally advanced esophageal carcinoma. We evaluated whether RT plus LDPF chemotherapy had an advantage in terms of survival and/or toxicity over RT plus standard-dose cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (SDPF) chemotherapy in this study. This multicenter trial included esophageal cancer patients with clinical T4 disease and/or unresectable regional lymph node metastasis. Patients were randomly assigned to receive RT (2 Gy/fraction, total dose of 60 Gy) with SDPF (arm A) or LDPF (arm B) chemotherapy. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). A total of 142 patients (arm A/B, 71/71) from 41 institutions were enrolled between April 2004 and September 2009. The OS hazard ratio in arm B versus arm A was 1.05 (80% confidence interval, 0.78–1.41). There were no differences in toxicities in either arm. Arm B was judged as not promising for further evaluation in the phase III setting. Thus, the Data and Safety Monitoring Committee recommended that the study be terminated. In the updated analyses, median OS and 3-year OS were 13.1 months and 25.9%, respectively, for arm A and 14.4 months and 25.7%, respectively, for arm B. Daily RT plus LDPF chemotherapy did not qualify for further evaluation as a new treatment option for patients with locally advanced unresectable esophageal cancer. This study was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000000861. PMID:25640628

  4. A method for converting dose-to-medium to dose-to-tissue in Monte Carlo studies of gold nanoparticle-enhanced radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koger, B.; Kirkby, C.

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have shown potential in recent years as a means of therapeutic dose enhancement in radiation therapy. However, a major challenge in moving towards clinical implementation is the exact characterisation of the dose enhancement they provide. Monte Carlo studies attempt to explore this property, but they often face computational limitations when examining macroscopic scenarios. In this study, a method of converting dose from macroscopic simulations, where the medium is defined as a mixture containing both gold and tissue components, to a mean dose-to-tissue on a microscopic scale was established. Monte Carlo simulations were run for both explicitly-modeled GNPs in tissue and a homogeneous mixture of tissue and gold. A dose ratio was obtained for the conversion of dose scored in a mixture medium to dose-to-tissue in each case. Dose ratios varied from 0.69 to 1.04 for photon sources and 0.97 to 1.03 for electron sources. The dose ratio is highly dependent on the source energy as well as GNP diameter and concentration, though this effect is less pronounced for electron sources. By appropriately weighting the monoenergetic dose ratios obtained, the dose ratio for any arbitrary spectrum can be determined. This allows complex scenarios to be modeled accurately without explicitly simulating each individual GNP.

  5. Development of an online automatic computed radiography dose data mining program: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Ng, Curtise K C; Sun, Zhonghua

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have reported the computed radiography (CR) dose creep problem and therefore the need to have monitoring processes in place in clinical departments. The objective of this study is to provide a better technological solution to implement a regular CR dose monitoring process. An online automatic CR dose data mining program which can be applied to different systems was developed based on freeware and existing softwares in the Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) server. The program was tested with 69 CR images. This preliminary study shows that the program addresses the major weaknesses of some existing studies including involvement of manual procedures in the monitoring process and being only applicable to a single manufacturer's CR images. The proposed method provides an efficient and effective solution to implement a CR dose monitoring program regularly in busy clinical departments to regulate the dose creep problem so as to reinforce the 'As Low As Reasonably Achievable' (ALARA) principle. PMID:19640604

  6. Study of the dose rate effect of 180 nm nMOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bao-Ping; Yao, Zhi-Bin; Sheng, Jiang-Kun; Wang, Zu-Jun; Huang, Shao-Yan; Liu, Min-Bo; Xiao, Zhi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Radiation induced offstate leakage in the shallow trench isolation regions of SIMC 0.18 μm nMOSFETs is studied as a function of dose rate. A “true” dose rate effect (TDRE) is observed. Increased damage is observed at low dose rate (LDR) than at high dose rate (HDR) when annealing is taken into account. A new method of simulating radiation induced degradation in shallow trench isolation (STI) is presented. A comparison of radiation induced offstate leakage current in test nMOSFETs between total dose irradiation experiments and simulation results exhibits excellent agreement. The investigation results imply that the enhancement of the leakage current may be worse for the dose rate encountered in the environment of space.

  7. Computed Tomography Angiography of Carotid Arteries and Vertebrobasilar System: A Simulation Study for Radiation Dose Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Manuel; Ellmann, Stephan; Allmendinger, Thomas; Eller, Achim; Kammerer, Ferdinand; May, Matthias S; Baigger, João F; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M

    2015-07-01

    Computed tomography angiography (CTA) of carotid arteries and vertebrobasilar system is a standardized procedure with excellent image quality, but radiation exposure remains a matter of concern. The aim of this study is to examine to what extent radiation dose can be lowered in relation to a standard protocol by simulating examinations with lower tube currents applying a dedicated software.Lower tube current was simulated by a dedicated noise insertion and reconstruction software (ReconCT). In a phantom study, true scans were performed with different dose protocols and compared to the results of simulated dose reductions of the same degree, respectively. In a patient study, 30 CTAs of supra-aortic vessels were reconstructed at a level of 100%, 75%, 50%, and 25% of the initial dose. Objective and subjective image analyses were performed.No significant noise differences between true scans and simulated scans of mimicked contrasted vessels were found. In the patient study, the quality scores of the 4 dose groups differed statistically significant; this difference vanished for the comparison of the 100% and 75% datasets after dichotomization into the categories of diagnostic and nondiagnostic image quality (P = .50).This study suggests an easy-to-implement method of simulating CTAs of carotid arteries and vertebrobasilar system with lower tube current for dose reduction by artificially adding noise to the original raw data. Lowering the radiation dose in a moderate extent to 75% of the original dose levels does not significantly alter the diagnostic image quality. PMID:26131822

  8. Dose Reduction versus Dose-interval Prolongation in Eribulin Mesilate Monotherapy in Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer: A Retrospective Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Toshinori; Oshima, Yumiko; Mishima, Etsuko; Ban, Akiko; Katsuragawa, Kenji; Nagamatsu, Hidetsugu; Yoshioka, Yuki; Tsukiyama, Ikuto; Hisada, Tatsuya; Itakura, Yukari; Mizutani, Mitsuhiro

    2016-07-01

    It is often necessary to modify the dose or schedule of eribulin mesilate (Eri) because of adverse events. Therefore, we retrospectively investigated the optimal approach for Eri dose adjustment and/or dosage interval adjustment. Patients who received Eri at the institutions affiliated with the Division of Oncology of the Aichi Prefectural Society of Hospital Pharmacists between July 2011 and November 2013 were enrolled in this study. We compared the group that underwent dose reduction without changes to their dosage interval (dose reduction group) with the group that had a change in their dosage interval (dose-interval prolongation group). The primary end-point was time to treatment failure (TTF), and the secondary end-points were overall survival (OS), overall response rate (ORR), clinical benefit rate (CBR), and adverse events. The TTF and OS of the dose reduction group were approximately two times longer than those of the dose-interval prolongation group. In addition, the dose reduction group had significantly improved ORR and CBR, which together indicate an antitumor effect (p=0.013 and 0.002, respectively). Although peripheral neuropathy occurred significantly more frequently in the patients in the dose reduction group (p=0.026), it was grade 1 and controllable in most of the cases. There were no differences in the occurrence of other adverse effects between the two groups. Therefore, we suggest that dose reduction with maintenance of the dosage interval is the preferred treatment approach in cases where Eri dose or schedule modification is necessary. PMID:27040459

  9. Dose Response Effects of Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate Treatment in Adults with ADHD: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faraone, Stephen V.; Spencer, Thomas J.; Kollins, Scott H.; Glatt, Stephen J.; Goodman, David

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore dose-response effects of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) treatment for ADHD. Method: This was a 4-week, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, forced-dose titration study in adult participants, aged 18 to 55 years, meeting "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.)…

  10. ANALYSIS OF UNCERTAINTIES IN DOSE RECONSTRUCTION FROM BIOMARKERS: IMPACT ON STUDY DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The absorbed dose is defined as the quantity which has passed through the barriers (skin, GI tract, The absorbed dose of a pesticide can be estimated from its established urinary biomarker. ungs). For an exposure study, there are several options for biomarker collection, each w...

  11. LARGE SCALE CARCINOGEN DOSE RESPONSE STUDIES WITH JAPANESE MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES)

    EPA Science Inventory

    To investigate the responses to low carcinogen doses in animal models, large sample sizes are needed and it is an advantage if the model has a low spontaneous tumor rate. Three large scale dose response studies were conducted using Japanese medaka and the carcinogen diethylnitros...

  12. Study of dose perturbation parameters for eye shielding in megavoltage photon beam therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Das, I.J.; Kase, K.R.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Ligon, D.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Shielding blocks are frequently used to minimize dose and shield sensitive organs in radiation therapy. The blocks, which are made of high atomic number materials, produce significant dose perturbations in megavoltage photon beams. The effects of these perturbations are studied with special interest in the eye shielding in the treatment of head and neck malignancies. Optimum parameters for the treatment are suggested.

  13. Phase I study of multiple-dose cefprozil and comparison with cefaclor.

    PubMed

    Barbhaiya, R H; Shukla, U A; Gleason, C R; Shyu, W C; Wilber, R B; Martin, R R; Pittman, K A

    1990-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the safety and tolerance of cefprozil, to characterize the pharmacokinetics of cefprozil after administration of multiple doses of the drug, and to compare these pharmacokinetic parameters with those obtained with cefaclor. The volunteers received 28 doses of 250, 500, or 1,000 mg of cefprozil or 500 mg of cefaclor every 8 h for 10 days. Serial blood samples and the total volume of urine voided by each individual were collected for pharmacokinetic evaluation on days 1, 5, and 10. Both cephalosporins were well tolerated after multiple oral dosing. The peak levels in plasma (Cmax) of cefprozil ranged from 5.7 to 18.3 micrograms/ml after oral administration of 250- to 1,000-mg doses. The regression analysis of Cmax on cefprozil dose showed a dose-linear response. The mean Cmax of cefaclor ranged from 15.2 to 16.7 micrograms/ml and did not change significantly on multiple dosing. The overall mean terminal half-life of cefprozil was 1.2 h and was invariant with respect to dose or duration of dosing. The area under the plasma-concentration-versus-time curve from 0 h to infinity (AUC0-infinity) of cefprozil increased in a dose-proportional manner with an increase in dose. The overall urinary recovery (61% of dose) and renal clearance values of cefprozil were generally invariant with respect to dose and duration of dosing. While cefprozil was apparently absorbed less rapidly and achieved lower Cmax values than cefaclor, the AUC0-infinity of cefprozil was nearly twofold greater than that of cefaclor. The half-life of cefprozil was also twofold longer than that observed for cefaclor. Although the urinary recovery of cefaclor (75% of dose) was significantly higher than that of cefprozil (61% of dose), the concentrations of cefprozil in urine remained significantly higher than those of cefaclor from 2 to 8 h postdosing. If the therapeutic concept is maintained that levels of beta-lactam antibiotics in plasma should exceed the MIC for

  14. Multiple dose study of the combined radiosensitizers Ro 03-8799 (pimonidazole) and SR 2508 (etanidazole)

    SciTech Connect

    Bleehen, N.M.; Newman, H.F.; Maughan, T.S.; Workman, P.

    1989-04-01

    The hypoxic cell radiosensitizers Ro 03-8799 and SR 2508 have different clinical toxicities. The former produces an acute but transient central nervous system syndrome, whereas the latter produces cumulative peripheral neuropathy. Following single dose studies, an escalating multiple dose schedule using both drugs in combination showed no unexpected adverse reactions at lower doses. This study identifies the clinical tolerance and pharmacokinetics when doses in the region of the maximal tolerated dose are given to 26 patients receiving infusions of 0.75 g/m2 Ro 03-8799 and 2 g/m2 SR 2508 three times per week. At 15 doses, 3/4 patients experienced WHO grade 2 peripheral neuropathy, whereas at 12 doses 1/9 developed grade 2 and 6/9 developed grade 1 neuropathies. This represents a lower dose of SR 2508 than can be given alone suggesting that some interaction between the two drugs does exist in terms of chronic peripheral neurotoxicity. Pharmacokinetic studies show no adverse interactions between the two drugs and minimal inter-patient variation. From bivariate analysis, cumulative AUC for Ro 03-8799 has the most significant correlation with the development of peripheral neuropathy. Tumor drug concentrations normalized to the administered dose show mean values of 34 micrograms/g Ro 03-8799 and 76 micrograms/g SR 2508 30 minutes after infusion. These could be expected to produce a single dose sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.5. The combination of the two sensitizers at the maximum tolerable dose may be expected to give an increased therapeutic efficacy over either drug alone.

  15. Implications of Intercellular Signaling for Radiation Therapy: A Theoretical Dose-Planning Study

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Stephen J.; McGarry, Conor K.; Butterworth, Karl T.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Recent in vitro results have shown significant contributions to cell killing from signaling effects at doses that are typically used in radiation therapy. This study investigates whether these in vitro observations can be reconciled with in vivo knowledge and how signaling may have an impact on future developments in radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer treatment plans were generated for a series of 10 patients using 3-dimensional conformal therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy techniques. These plans were evaluated using mathematical models of survival following modulated radiation exposures that were developed from in vitro observations and incorporate the effects of intercellular signaling. The impact on dose–volume histograms and mean doses were evaluated by converting these survival levels into “signaling-adjusted doses” for comparison. Results: Inclusion of intercellular communication leads to significant differences between the signalling-adjusted and physical doses across a large volume. Organs in low-dose regions near target volumes see the largest increases, with mean signaling-adjusted bladder doses increasing from 23 to 33 Gy in IMRT plans. By contrast, in high-dose regions, there is a small decrease in signaling-adjusted dose due to reduced contributions from neighboring cells, with planning target volume mean doses falling from 74 to 71 Gy in IMRT. Overall, however, the dose distributions remain broadly similar, and comparisons between the treatment modalities are largely unchanged whether physical or signaling-adjusted dose is compared. Conclusions: Although incorporating cellular signaling significantly affects cell killing in low-dose regions and suggests a different interpretation for many phenomena, their effect in high-dose regions for typical planning techniques is comparatively small. This indicates that the significant signaling effects observed in vitro

  16. A dose-reconstruction study of the 1997 Sarov criticality accident using animated dosimetry techniques.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Justin A; Ding, Aiping; Haley, Thomas; Caracappa, Peter F; Xu, X George

    2014-05-01

    Most computational human phantoms are static, representing a standing individual. There are, however, cases when these phantoms fail to represent accurately the detailed effects on dose that result from considering varying human posture and even whole sequences of motion. In this study, the feasibility of a dynamic and deformable phantom is demonstrated with the development of the Computational Human for Animated Dosimetry (CHAD) phantom. Based on modifications to the limb structure of the previously developed RPI Adult Male, CHAD's posture is adjustable using an optical motion capture system that records real-life human movement. To demonstrate its ability to produce dose results that reflect the changes brought about by posture-deformation, CHAD is employed to perform a dose-reconstruction analysis of the 1997 Sarov criticality accident, and a simulated total body dose of 13.3 Gy is observed, with the total body dose rate dropping from 1.4 Gy s to 0.25 Gy s over the first 4 s of retreat time. Additionally, dose measurements are calculated for individual organs and body regions, including a 36.8-Gy dose to the breast tissue, a 3.8-Gy dose to the bladder, and a 31.1-Gy dose to the thyroid, as well as the changes in dose rates for the individual organs over the course of the accident sequence. Comparison of results obtained using CHAD in an animated dosimetry simulation with reported information on dose and the medical outcome of the case shows that the consideration of posture and movement in dosimetry simulation allows for more detailed and precise analysis of dosimetry information, consideration of the evolution of the dose profile over time in the course of a given scenario, and a better understanding of the physiological impacts of radiation exposure for a given set of circumstances. PMID:24670906

  17. Efficacy of Extended-Interval Dosing of Micafungin Evaluated Using a Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study with Humanized Doses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lepak, A.; Marchillo, K.; VanHecker, J.; Azie, N.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) characteristics of the echinocandins favor infrequent administration of large doses. The in vivo investigation reported here tested the utility of a range of humanized dose levels of micafungin using a variety of prolonged dosing intervals for the prevention and therapy of established disseminated candidiasis. Humanized doses of 600 mg administered every 6 days prevented fungal growth in prophylaxis. Humanized doses of 300 to 1,000 mg administered every 6 days demonstrated efficacy for established infections. PMID:26552968

  18. NTP technical report on toxicity studies of diethanolamine (CAS No. 111-42-2) administered topically and in drinking water to F344/n rats and B6C3F1 mice. Toxicity report series

    SciTech Connect

    Melnick, R.L.

    1992-10-01

    Diethanolamine is a high-production chemical used in cosmetics, in cutting fluids, as a dispersing agent for agricultural chemicals, and as an absorbent for acidic gases. Toxicology studies of diethanolamine were conducted in F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice of both sexes for 2 weeks (5/sex/species/dose) and 13 weeks (10/sex/species/dose) to characterize and compare the effects of oral and dermal exposure. In addition to histopathology, evaluations included clinical pathology, urinalyses, and sperm morphology or vaginal cytology. In vitro genetic toxicity studies included assessments of mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium and mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells, analysis of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchange in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and determination of micronuclei formed in mice during the 13 week dermal exposure study. In the 13-week drinking water study in mice, nephropathy and tubular necrosis were observed in males, and degeneration of cardiac myocytes, and hepatocellular necrosis were seen in males and females. Cytologic alteration in the submandibular salivary gland was noted in male and female mice. Hepatocyte cytologic alteration also was noted in all dosed groups of mice.

  19. Mouse Single Oral Dose Toxicity Study of DHU001, a Polyherbal Formula

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Seong-Soo

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to obtain acute information of the oral dose toxicity of DHU001, a polyherbal formula in male and female mice. In order to calculated 50% lethal dose (LD50) and approximate lethal dose (LD) , test material was once orally administered to male and female ICR mice at dose levels of 2000, 1000, 500, 250 and 0 (vehicle control) ml/kg (body weight) . The mortality and changes on body weight, clinical signs, gross observation, organ weight and histopathology of principle organs were monitored 14 days after treatment with DHU001. We could not find any mortalities, DHU001 treatment-related clinical signs, changes on the body and organ weights, gross and histopathological findings. The results obtained in this study suggest that LD50 and approximate LD in mice after single oral dose of DHU001 were considered over 2000 mg/kg in both female and male mice. PMID:24278506

  20. Reconstruction of Organ Dose for External Radiotherapy Patients in Retrospective Epidemiologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choonik; Jung, Jae Won; Pelletier, Christopher; Pyakuryal, Anil; Lamart, Stephanie; Kim, Jongoh; Lee, Choonsik

    2015-01-01

    Organ dose estimation for retrospective epidemiological studies of late effects in radiotherapy patients involves two challenges: radiological images to represent patient anatomy are not usually available for patient cohorts who were treated years ago, and efficient dose reconstruction methods for large-scale patient cohorts are not well established. In the current study, we developed methods to reconstruct organ doses for radiotherapy patients by using a series of computational human phantoms coupled with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) and a radiotherapy-dedicated Monte Carlo transport code, and performed illustrative dose calculations. First, we developed methods to convert the anatomy and organ contours of the pediatric and adult hybrid computational phantom series to Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM)-image and DICOM-structure files, respectively. The resulting DICOM files were imported to a commercial TPS for simulating radiotherapy and dose calculation for in-field organs. The conversion process was validated by comparing electron densities relative to water and organ volumes between the hybrid phantoms and the DICOM files imported in TPS, which showed agreements within 0.1% and 2%, respectively. Second, we developed a procedure to transfer DICOM-RT files generated from the Eclipse system directly to a Monte Carlo transport code, X-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) for more accurate dose calculations. Third, to illustrate the performance of the established methods, we simulated a whole brain treatment for the 10-year-old male phantom and a prostate treatment for the adult male phantom. Radiation doses to selected organs were calculated using the Eclipse and XVMC, and compared to each other. Organ average doses from the two methods matched within 7%, whereas maximum and minimum point doses differed up to 45%. The dosimetry methods and procedures established in this study will be useful for the reconstruction of organ dose to

  1. Reconstruction of organ dose for external radiotherapy patients in retrospective epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choonik; Jung, Jae Won; Pelletier, Christopher; Pyakuryal, Anil; Lamart, Stephanie; Kim, Jong Oh; Lee, Choonsik

    2015-03-21

    Organ dose estimation for retrospective epidemiological studies of late effects in radiotherapy patients involves two challenges: radiological images to represent patient anatomy are not usually available for patient cohorts who were treated years ago, and efficient dose reconstruction methods for large-scale patient cohorts are not well established. In the current study, we developed methods to reconstruct organ doses for radiotherapy patients by using a series of computational human phantoms coupled with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) and a radiotherapy-dedicated Monte Carlo transport code, and performed illustrative dose calculations. First, we developed methods to convert the anatomy and organ contours of the pediatric and adult hybrid computational phantom series to Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM)-image and DICOM-structure files, respectively. The resulting DICOM files were imported to a commercial TPS for simulating radiotherapy and dose calculation for in-field organs. The conversion process was validated by comparing electron densities relative to water and organ volumes between the hybrid phantoms and the DICOM files imported in TPS, which showed agreements within 0.1 and 2%, respectively. Second, we developed a procedure to transfer DICOM-RT files generated from the TPS directly to a Monte Carlo transport code, x-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) for more accurate dose calculations. Third, to illustrate the performance of the established methods, we simulated a whole brain treatment for the 10 year-old male phantom and a prostate treatment for the adult male phantom. Radiation doses to selected organs were calculated using the TPS and XVMC, and compared to each other. Organ average doses from the two methods matched within 7%, whereas maximum and minimum point doses differed up to 45%. The dosimetry methods and procedures established in this study will be useful for the reconstruction of organ dose to support

  2. Reconstruction of organ dose for external radiotherapy patients in retrospective epidemiologic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choonik; Jung, Jae Won; Pelletier, Christopher; Pyakuryal, Anil; Lamart, Stephanie; Kim, Jong Oh; Lee, Choonsik

    2015-03-01

    Organ dose estimation for retrospective epidemiological studies of late effects in radiotherapy patients involves two challenges: radiological images to represent patient anatomy are not usually available for patient cohorts who were treated years ago, and efficient dose reconstruction methods for large-scale patient cohorts are not well established. In the current study, we developed methods to reconstruct organ doses for radiotherapy patients by using a series of computational human phantoms coupled with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) and a radiotherapy-dedicated Monte Carlo transport code, and performed illustrative dose calculations. First, we developed methods to convert the anatomy and organ contours of the pediatric and adult hybrid computational phantom series to Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM)-image and DICOM-structure files, respectively. The resulting DICOM files were imported to a commercial TPS for simulating radiotherapy and dose calculation for in-field organs. The conversion process was validated by comparing electron densities relative to water and organ volumes between the hybrid phantoms and the DICOM files imported in TPS, which showed agreements within 0.1 and 2%, respectively. Second, we developed a procedure to transfer DICOM-RT files generated from the TPS directly to a Monte Carlo transport code, x-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) for more accurate dose calculations. Third, to illustrate the performance of the established methods, we simulated a whole brain treatment for the 10 year-old male phantom and a prostate treatment for the adult male phantom. Radiation doses to selected organs were calculated using the TPS and XVMC, and compared to each other. Organ average doses from the two methods matched within 7%, whereas maximum and minimum point doses differed up to 45%. The dosimetry methods and procedures established in this study will be useful for the reconstruction of organ dose to support

  3. Radiation Doses of Various CT Protocols: a Multicenter Longitudinal Observation Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Emerging concerns regarding the hazard from medical radiation including CT examinations has been suggested. The purpose of this study was to observe the longitudinal changes of CT radiation doses of various CT protocols and to estimate the long-term efforts of supervising radiologists to reduce medical radiation. Radiation dose data from 11 representative CT protocols were collected from 12 hospitals. Attending radiologists had collected CT radiation dose data in two time points, 2007 and 2010. They collected the volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) of each phase, number of phases, dose length product (DLP) of each phase, and types of scanned CT machines. From the collected data, total DLP and effective dose (ED) were calculated. CTDIvol, total DLP, and ED of 2007 and 2010 were compared according to CT protocols, CT machine type, and hospital. During the three years, CTDIvol had significantly decreased, except for dynamic CT of the liver. Total DLP and ED were significantly decreased in all 11 protocols. The decrement was more evident in newer CT scanners. However, there was substantial variability of changes of ED during the three years according to hospitals. Although there was variability according to protocols, machines, and hospital, CT radiation doses were decreased during the 3 years. This study showed the effects of decreased CT radiation dose by efforts of radiologists and medical society. PMID:26908984

  4. Patient doses in {gamma}-intracoronary radiotherapy: The Radiation Burden Assessment Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thierens, Hubert . E-mail: hubert.thierens@Ughent.be; Reynaert, Nick; Bacher, Klaus; Eijkeren, Marc van; Taeymans, Yves

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: To determine accurately the radiation burden of both patients and staff from intracoronary radiotherapy (IRT) with {sup 192}Ir and to investigate the importance of IRT in the patient dose compared with interventional X-rays. Methods and materials: The Radiation Burden Assessment Study (RABAS) population consisted of 9 patients undergoing {gamma}-IRT after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and 14 patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty only as the control group. For each patient, the dose to the organs and tissues from the internal and external exposure was determined in detail by Monte Carlo N-particle simulations. Patient skin dose measurements with thermoluminescence dosimeters served as verification. Staff dosimetry was performed with electronic dosimeters, thermoluminescence dosimeters, and double film badge dosimetry. Results: With respect to the patient dose from IRT, the critical organs are the thymus (58 mGy), lungs (31 mGy), and esophagus (27 mGy). The mean effective dose from IRT was 8 mSv. The effective dose values from interventional X-rays showed a broad range (2-28 mSv), with mean values of 8 mSv for the IRT patients and 13 mSv for the control group. The mean dose received by the radiotherapist from IRT was 4 {mu}Sv/treatment. The doses to the other staff members were completely negligible. Conclusion: Our results have shown that the patient and personnel doses in {gamma}-IRT remain at an acceptable level. The patient dose from IRT was within the variations in dose from the accompanying interventional X-rays.

  5. A study of silicon-on-insulator structures formed by heavy-dose nitrogen implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Polchlopek, S.W.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon substrates were implanted with heavy doses of high-energy nitrogen. After implantation, the substrates underwent high-temperature annealing. The resulting substrates were studied in an effort to determine the processing parameters necessary to create the optimum-buried silicon nitride insulating layer. Atomic concentration depth profiles were obtained with the use of Auger Electron Spectroscopy. The van der Pauw technique was used to determine carrier Hall mobility, dopant activation, and sheet resistivity in the top layer. Buried-layer leakage was studied using both electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) analysis and direct front-to-back current-voltage measurements. Implant parameters studied include dose, temperature, and energy. Annealing conditions studied include time and temperature. Samples implanted with lower doses of nitrogen (dose < 1.4 {times} 10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}2}) possess very leaky buried layers. Higher-dose implants (dose = 1.4 {times} 10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}2} or greater) produce substrates with good-quality buried dielectrics. It is discovered that very-high-dose nitrogen implantation is necessary to produce good-quality buried insulators.

  6. Mapping of dose distribution from IMRT onto MRI-guided high dose rate brachytherapy using deformable image registration for cervical cancer treatments: preliminary study with commercially available software

    PubMed Central

    Huq, M. Saiful; Houser, Chris; Beriwal, Sushil; Michalski, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Purpose For patients undergoing external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy, recommendations for target doses and constraints are based on calculation of the equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) from each phase. At present, the EBRT dose distribution is assumed to be uniform throughout the pelvis. We performed a preliminary study to determine whether deformable dose distribution mapping from the EBRT onto magnetic resonance (MR) images for the brachytherapy would yield differences in doses for organs at risk (OARs) and high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV). Material and methods Nine cervical cancer patients were treated to a total dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), followed by MRI-based 3D high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Retrospectively, the IMRT planning CT images were fused with the MR image for each fraction of brachytherapy using deformable image registration. The deformed IMRT dose onto MR images were converted to EQD2 and compared to the uniform dose assumption. Results For all patients, the EQD2 from the EBRT phase was significantly higher with deformable registration than with the conventional uniform dose distribution assumption. The mean EQD2 ± SD for HR-CTV D90 was 45.7 ± 0.7 Gy vs. 44.3 Gy for deformable vs. uniform dose distribution, respectively (p < 0.001). The dose to 2 cc of the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid was 46.4 ± 1.2 Gy, 46.2 ± 1.0 Gy, and 48.0 ± 2.5 Gy, respectively with deformable dose distribution, and was significantly higher than with uniform dose distribution (43.2 Gy for all OAR, p < 0.001). Conclusions This study reveals that deformed EBRT dose distribution to HR-CTV and OARs in MR images for brachytherapy is technically feasible, and achieves differences compared to a uniform dose distribution. Therefore, the assumption that EBRT contributes the same dose value may need to be carefully investigated further based on deformable image registration. PMID:25097559

  7. Renal and cardiovascular effects of caffeine: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Passmore, A P; Kondowe, G B; Johnston, G D

    1987-06-01

    The effects of increasing oral doses of caffeine (45, 90, 180 and 360 mg) on effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), plasma renin activity (PRA), serum electrolytes, plasma noradrenaline, blood pressure and heart rate were studied in eight healthy male volunteers. Urine volume was increased by 360 mg of caffeine only. At caffeine doses greater than 90 mg urinary sodium excretion was significantly increased. There were no changes in ERPF. Serum potassium was significantly reduced by 360 mg of caffeine. Caffeine increased systolic pressure in a dose related manner. Diastolic pressure was also increased, but not in relation to dose. A 360 mg dose of caffeine produced a late increase in heart rate. These changes were not associated with any alterations in PRA or in plasma noradrenaline. PMID:3297472

  8. Feasibility study for the assessment of the exposed dose with TENORM added in consumer products.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Do Hyeon; Lee, Hyun Cheol; Shin, Wook-Geun; Ha, Wi-Ho; Yoo, Jae Ryong; Yoon, Seok-Won; Lee, Jiyon; Choi, Won-Chul; Min, Chul Hee

    2015-11-01

    Consumer products including naturally occurring radioactive material have been distributed widely in human life. The potential hazard of the excessively added technically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) in consumer products should be assessed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the organ equivalent dose and the annual effective dose with the usage of the TENORM added in paints. The activities of gammas emitted from natural radionuclides in the five types of paints were measured with the high-purity germanium detector, and the annual effective dose was assessed with the computational human phantom and the Monte Carlo method. The results show that uranium and thorium series were mainly measured over the five paints. Based on the exposure scenario of the paints in the room, the highest effective dose was evaluated as <1 mSv y(-1) of the public dose limit. PMID:25956783

  9. The Two-Dimensional Monte Carlo: A New Methodologic Paradigm for Dose Reconstruction for Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Steven L.; Hoffman, F. Owen; Hofer, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Retrospective dose estimation, particularly dose reconstruction that supports epidemiological investigations of health risk, relies on various strategies that include models of physical processes and exposure conditions with detail ranging from simple to complex. Quantification of dose uncertainty is an essential component of assessments for health risk studies since, as is well understood, it is impossible to retrospectively determine the true dose for each person. To address uncertainty in dose estimation, numerical simulation tools have become commonplace and there is now an increased understanding about the needs and what is required for models used to estimate cohort doses (in the absence of direct measurement) to evaluate dose response. It now appears that for dose-response algorithms to derive the best, unbiased estimate of health risk, we need to understand the type, magnitude and interrelationships of the uncertainties of model assumptions, parameters and input data used in the associated dose estimation models. Heretofore, uncertainty analysis of dose estimates did not always properly distinguish between categories of errors, e.g., uncertainty that is specific to each subject (i.e., unshared error), and uncertainty of doses from a lack of understanding and knowledge about parameter values that are shared to varying degrees by numbers of subsets of the cohort. While mathematical propagation of errors by Monte Carlo simulation methods has been used for years to estimate the uncertainty of an individual subject’s dose, it was almost always conducted without consideration of dependencies between subjects. In retrospect, these types of simple analyses are not suitable for studies with complex dose models, particularly when important input data are missing or otherwise not available. The dose estimation strategy presented here is a simulation method that corrects the previous deficiencies of analytical or simple Monte Carlo error propagation methods and is

  10. Estimated radiation dose to the newborn in FDG-PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ruotsalainen, U.; Suhonen-Polvi, H.; Eronen, E.; Kinnala, A.

    1996-02-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the radiation dose due to intravenous injection of 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) for infants studied with PET. The radioactivity concentration in the brain and bladder content was measured with PET to determine the cumulated activity in these organs in 21 infant FDG studies. The individual organ masses were estimated according to the whole-body and brain masses, and they were used to calculate the absorbed dose per unit cumulated activity (S values). For organs other than brain and bladder, the cumulated activity was defined from adult studies. For each individual patient, the absorbed dose to the brain, bladder wall and selected organs were calculated. An estimation of the effective dose was determined. Whole-body distribution of FDG in the infants differed from adults: a greater proportion of the injected activity accumulated into the brain (9% versus 7%) and less was excreted to urine (7% versus 20% respectively). The measured cumulated activity in the brain was 0.25 MBq {center_dot} h/MBq and in the bladder content 0.04 MBq {center_dot}h/MBq with a large individual variation in latter. The calculated absorbed dose was 0.24 mGy/MBq to the brain and 1.03 mGy/MBq to the bladder wall. The estimated effective dose was 0.43 mSv/MBq. The dose to the bladder wall was lower in infants as compared to adults with ordinary amounts of injected activity. The greater amount of activity remaining in the body may increase the dose to other organs. The effective dose was lower compared to adults and conventional nuclear medicine studies of infants. PET can be a valuable tool in pediatric nuclear medicine because of good resolution images, sensitive radiation measurement and a variety of tracers labeled with short-lived isotopes. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Dose profile measurements during respiratory-gated lung stereotactic radiotherapy: A phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong, W. L.; Wong, J. H. D.; Ng, K. H.; Ung, N. M.

    2016-03-01

    During stereotactic body radiotherapy, high radiation dose (∼60 Gy) is delivered to the tumour in small fractionation regime. In this study, the dosimetric characteristics were studied using radiochromic film during respiratory-gated and non-gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Specifically, the effect of respiratory cycle and amplitude, as well as gating window on the dosimetry were studied. In this study, the dose profiles along the irradiated area were measured. The dose profiles for respiratory-gated radiation delivery with different respiratory or tumour motion amplitudes, gating windows and respiratory time per cycle were in agreement with static radiation delivery. The respiratory gating system was able to deliver the radiation dose accurately (±1.05 mm) in the longitudinal direction. Although the treatment time for respiratory-gated SBRT was prolonged, this approach can potentially reduce the margin for internal tumour volume without compromising the tumour coverage. In addition, the normal tissue sparing effect can be improved.

  12. NOTE: Scattered dose to thyroid from prophylactic cranial irradiation during childhood: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Varveris, Haris; Kachris, Stefanos; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the scattered dose to thyroid from prophylactic cranial irradiation during childhood. The MCNP transport code and mathematical phantoms representing the average individual at ages 3, 5, 10, 15 and 18 years old were employed to simulate cranial radiotherapy using two lateral opposed fields. The mean radiation dose received by the thyroid gland was calculated. A 10 cm thick lead block placed on the patient's couch to shield the thyroid was simulated by MCNP code. The Monte Carlo model was validated by measuring the scattered dose to the unshielded and shielded thyroid using three different humanoid phantoms and thermoluminescense dosimetry. For a cranial dose of 18 Gy, the thyroid dose obtained by Monte Carlo calculations varied from 47 to 79 cGy depending upon the age of the child. Appropriate placement of the couch block resulted in a thyroid dose reduction by 39 to 54%. Thyroid dose values at all possible positions of the radiosensitive gland with respect to the inferior field edge at five different patient ages were found. The mean difference between Monte Carlo results and thyroid dose measurements was 9.6%.

  13. Scattered dose to thyroid from prophylactic cranial irradiation during childhood: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Varveris, Haris; Kachris, Stefanos; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2006-04-21

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the scattered dose to thyroid from prophylactic cranial irradiation during childhood. The MCNP transport code and mathematical phantoms representing the average individual at ages 3, 5, 10, 15 and 18 years old were employed to simulate cranial radiotherapy using two lateral opposed fields. The mean radiation dose received by the thyroid gland was calculated. A 10 cm thick lead block placed on the patient's couch to shield the thyroid was simulated by MCNP code. The Monte Carlo model was validated by measuring the scattered dose to the unshielded and shielded thyroid using three different humanoid phantoms and thermoluminescense dosimetry. For a cranial dose of 18 Gy, the thyroid dose obtained by Monte Carlo calculations varied from 47 to 79 cGy depending upon the age of the child. Appropriate placement of the couch block resulted in a thyroid dose reduction by 39 to 54%. Thyroid dose values at all possible positions of the radiosensitive gland with respect to the inferior field edge at five different patient ages were found. The mean difference between Monte Carlo results and thyroid dose measurements was 9.6%. PMID:16585835

  14. Dose-escalation study of octanoic acid in patients with essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    Voller, Bernhard; Lines, Emily; McCrossin, Gayle; Tinaz, Sule; Lungu, Codrin; Grimes, George; Starling, Judith; Potti, Gopal; Haubenberger, Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Recently, 1-octanol has been shown to have efficacy in treating patients with essential tremor (ET). The primary metabolite of 1-octanol is octanoic acid (OA), which is now thought to be the active substance that mediates tremor suppression. Our aim was to describe the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of oral OA in patients with ET and assess the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) profile of OA. METHODS. The MTD was studied using an open-label, single-ascending 3 + 3 dose–escalation design. Predefined single doses ranged from 8 to 128 mg/kg, with grade 2 adverse events (AEs) defined as dose-limiting toxicity. Tremor was assessed using accelerometry, digital spiral analysis, and a standard clinical rating scale at baseline and up to 600 minutes after intake. Safety assessments and PK sampling were also performed. RESULTS. Dose-limiting toxicity was not reached. The most frequent AE was mild abdominal discomfort. Exposure (AUC) increased linearly with the dose. Secondary efficacy measures suggested a dose-dependent reduction of tremor. Accordingly, a single unified PK/PD model with an effect compartment and sigmoid maximum effect (Emax) response could be built that accounted well for the time profiles of plasma concentrations as well as effects on tremor severity across the 5 dose levels. CONCLUSION. Although our trial did not reach an MTD, a dose-dependent effect was demonstrated in the PK/PD model as well as in secondary efficacy outcomes. Future studies are needed to explore the safety in higher dose ranges and to confirm dose-dependent efficacy in a placebo-controlled design. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01468948 FUNDING. NINDS Intramural Research Program; TG Therapeutics Inc. PMID:26927672

  15. Feasibility study of dose reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis using non-local denoising algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Marcelo A. C.; de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Nunes, Polyana F.; Borges, Lucas R.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Barufaldi, Bruno; Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2015-03-01

    The main purpose of this work is to study the ability of denoising algorithms to reduce the radiation dose in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) examinations. Clinical use of DBT is normally performed in "combo-mode", in which, in addition to DBT projections, a 2D mammogram is taken with the standard radiation dose. As a result, patients have been exposed to radiation doses higher than used in digital mammography. Thus, efforts to reduce the radiation dose in DBT examinations are of great interest. However, a decrease in dose leads to an increased quantum noise level, and related decrease in image quality. This work is aimed at addressing this problem by the use of denoising techniques, which could allow for dose reduction while keeping the image quality acceptable. We have studied two "state of the art" denoising techniques for filtering the quantum noise due to the reduced dose in DBT projections: Non-local Means (NLM) and Block-matching 3D (BM3D). We acquired DBT projections at different dose levels of an anthropomorphic physical breast phantom with inserted simulated microcalcifications. Then, we found the optimal filtering parameters where the denoising algorithms are capable of recovering the quality from the DBT images acquired with the standard radiation dose. Results using objective image quality assessment metrics showed that BM3D algorithm achieved better noise adjustment (mean difference in peak signal to noise ratio < 0.1dB) and less blurring (mean difference in image sharpness ~ 6%) than the NLM for the projections acquired with lower radiation doses.

  16. Phase I study of idarubicin dose escalation for remission induction therapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mark Hong; Kim, Sung-Yong

    2016-10-01

    The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of idarubicin should be reevaluated in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the era of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and better supportive care. We conducted a phase I study to investigate the safety of escalating doses of idarubicin in combination with cytarabine 100 mg/m(2)/day for seven days for previously untreated AML. The starting dose of idarubicin was 12 mg/m(2)/day for three days with dose escalations by 3 mg/m(2)/day up to 18 mg/m(2)/day. The study design was adopted from traditional 3 + 3 design for phase I cancer clinical trials. The grade 4 hematologic toxicities were observed at all dose levels; however, these toxicities did not meet the criteria of the hematologic dose-limiting toxicities as defined in this study. There were no instances of grade 4 non-hematologic toxicities at any dose levels. The MTD of idarubicin was not reached in this trial. PMID:26750985

  17. A food effect study and dose proportionality study to assess the pharmacokinetics and safety of bardoxolone methyl in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Teuscher, Nathan S; Kelley, Richard J; Dumas, Emily O; Klein, Cheri Enders; Awni, Walid M; Meyer, Colin J

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of food on the plasma pharmacokinetics of bardoxolone methyl, an antioxidant inflammation modulator, at a 20 mg dose, and the dose proportionality of bardoxolone methyl pharmacokinetics from 20 to 80 mg. It was a single-dose study conducted at a single center in 32 healthy volunteers aged 18-45 years using an amorphous spray-dried dispersion formulation of bardoxolone methyl. In Part A, 16 subjects received single 20 mg doses of bardoxolone methyl under fasting and non-fasting conditions. In Part B, 16 subjects received a single 60 or 80 mg dose of bardoxolone methyl and a matching placebo dose under fasting conditions. Blood samples for pharmacokinetic analysis were taken over 120 hours following dose administration. Single dose administration of 20, 60, and 80 mg bardoxolone methyl was safe and well-tolerated in healthy volunteers. Total bardoxolone methyl exposure was unchanged in the presence of food. However, doses of bardoxolone methyl above 20 mg appear to have a saturated dissolution or absorption process and are associated with less than proportional increases in drug exposure. PMID:27128838

  18. Probiotics reduce symptoms of antibiotic use in a hospital setting: a randomized dose response study.

    PubMed

    Ouwehand, Arthur C; DongLian, Cai; Weijian, Xu; Stewart, Morgan; Ni, Jiayi; Stewart, Tad; Miller, Larry E

    2014-01-16

    Probiotics are known to reduce antibiotic associated diarrhea (AAD) and Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD) risk in a strain-specific manner. The aim of this study was to determine the dose-response effect of a four strain probiotic combination (HOWARU(®) Restore) on the incidence of AAD and CDAD and severity of gastrointestinal symptoms in adult in-patients requiring antibiotic therapy. Patients (n=503) were randomized among three study groups: HOWARU(®) Restore probiotic 1.70×10(10) CFU (high-dose, n=168), HOWARU(®) Restore probiotic 4.17×10(9) CFU (low-dose, n=168), or placebo (n=167). Subjects were stratified by gender, age, and duration of antibiotic treatment. Study products were administered daily up to 7 days after the final antibiotic dose. The primary endpoint of the study was the incidence of AAD. Secondary endpoints included incidence of CDAD, diarrhea duration, stools per day, bloody stools, fever, abdominal cramping, and bloating. A significant dose-response effect on AAD was observed with incidences of 12.5, 19.6, and 24.6% with high-dose, low-dose, and placebo, respectively (p=0.02). CDAD was the same in both probiotic groups (1.8%) but different from the placebo group (4.8%; p=0.04). Incidences of fever, abdominal pain, and bloating were lower with increasing probiotic dose. The number of daily liquid stools and average duration of diarrhea decreased with higher probiotic dosage. The tested four strain probiotic combination appears to lower the risk of AAD, CDAD, and gastrointestinal symptoms in a dose-dependent manner in adult in-patients. PMID:24291194

  19. Study on GEANT4 code applications to dose calculation using imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Ok; Kang, Jeong Ku; Kim, Jhin Kee; Kwon, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo; Kim, Bu Gil; Jeong, Dong Hyeok

    2015-07-01

    The use of the GEANT4 code has increased in the medical field. Various studies have calculated the patient dose distributions by users the GEANT4 code with imaging data. In present study, Monte Carlo simulations based on DICOM data were performed to calculate the dose absorb in the patient's body. Various visualization tools are installed in the GEANT4 code to display the detector construction; however, the display of DICOM images is limited. In addition, to displaying the dose distributions on the imaging data of the patient is difficult. Recently, the gMocren code, a volume visualization tool for GEANT4 simulation, was developed and has been used in volume visualization of image files. In this study, the imaging based on the dose distributions absorbed in the patients was performed by using the gMocren code. Dosimetric evaluations with were carried out by using thermo luminescent dosimeter and film dosimetry to verify the calculated results.

  20. A radioluminescence study of spectral and dose characteristics of common luminophors.

    PubMed

    Erfurt, G; Krbetschek, M R

    2002-01-01

    Many synthetic materials are used as thermoluminescence dosemeters for the measurement of the absorbed dose from ionising radiation sources. A part of the absorbed energy leads to a prompt luminescence (radioluminescence, abbreviated RL) which dose behaviour mainly corresponds with the densitity of charge carriers in the respective traps or recombination sites. The RL reported in this study was stimulated using two 137Cs sources with activities of 3.7 MBq (spectral measurements) or 5 MBq (dosimetry studies), respectively, and was recorded steadily during stimulation. This presentation gives a comprehensive survey of the spectral and dose dependent RL properties of a number of luminescent materials like LiF:Mg,Ti, Al2O3:C, CaSO4:Dy, CaF2:Mn, Li2B4O7:Mn, BeO and ZnS:Ag. The spectral and dose dependent results were compared with thermoluminescence as well as other RL studies. PMID:12382908

  1. A Monte Carlo study on dose distribution evaluation of Flexisource 192Ir brachytherapy source

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Majid; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Haghparast, Abbas; Zare, Naser; Ahmadi Moghaddas, Toktam

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to evaluate the dose distribution of the Flexisource 192Ir source. Background Dosimetric evaluation of brachytherapy sources is recommended by task group number 43 (TG. 43) of American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). Materials and methods MCNPX code was used to simulate Flexisource 192Ir source. Dose rate constant and radial dose function were obtained for water and soft tissue phantoms and compared with previous data on this source. Furthermore, dose rate along the transverse axis was obtained by simulation of the Flexisource and a point source and the obtained data were compared with those from Flexiplan treatment planning system (TPS). Results The values of dose rate constant obtained for water and soft tissue phantoms were equal to 1.108 and 1.106, respectively. The values of the radial dose function are listed in the form of tabulated data. The values of dose rate (cGy/s) obtained are shown in the form of tabulated data and figures. The maximum difference between TPS and Monte Carlo (MC) dose rate values was 11% in a water phantom at 6.0 cm from the source. Conclusion Based on dosimetric parameter comparisons with values previously published, the accuracy of our simulation of Flexisource 192Ir was verified. The results of dose rate constant and radial dose function in water and soft tissue phantoms were the same for Flexisource and point sources. For Flexisource 192Ir source, the results of TPS calculations in a water phantom were in agreement with the simulations within the calculation uncertainties. Furthermore, the results from the TPS calculation for Flexisource and MC calculation for a point source were practically equal within the calculation uncertainties. PMID:25949224

  2. Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Low and High Doxycycline Doses: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Di Caprio, Roberta; Di Costanzo, Luisa; Monfrecola, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Doxycycline is used to treat infective diseases because of its broadspectrum efficacy. High dose administration (100 or 200 mg/day) is often responsible for development of bacterial resistances and endogenous flora alterations, whereas low doses (20–40 mg/day) do not alter bacteria susceptibility to antibiotics and exert anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we wanted to assess the efficacy of both low and high doxycycline doses in modulating IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-6 gene expression in HaCaT cells stimulated with LPS. Three experimental settings were used, differing in the timing of doxycycline treatment in respect to the insult induced by LPS: pretreatment, concomitant, and posttreatment. Low doses were more effective than high doses in modulating gene expression of LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines (IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-6), when added before (pretreatment) or after (posttreatment) LPS stimulation. This effect was not appreciated when LPS and doxycycline were simultaneously added to cell cultures: in this case high doses were more effective. In conclusion, our in vitro study suggests that low doxycycline doses could be safely used in chronic or acute skin diseases in which the inflammatory process, either constantly in progress or periodically recurring, has to be prevented or controlled. PMID:25977597

  3. Ascending-dose study of noribogaine in healthy volunteers: pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety, and tolerability.

    PubMed

    Glue, Paul; Lockhart, Michelle; Lam, Fred; Hung, Noelyn; Hung, Cheung-Tak; Friedhoff, Lawrence

    2015-02-01

    Noribogaine is the active metabolite of the naturally occurring psychoactive substance ibogaine, and may help suppress withdrawal symptoms in opioid-dependent subjects. The objectives of this Phase I study were to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic profiles of noribogaine. In this ascending single-dose, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study in 36 healthy drug-free male volunteers, 4 cohorts (n = 9) received oral doses of 3, 10, 30, or 60 mg or matching placebo, with intensive safety and pharmacokinetic assessments out to 216 hours, along with pharmacodynamic assessments sensitive to the effects of mu-opioid agonists. Noribogaine was rapidly absorbed, with peak concentrations occurring 2-3 hours after oral dosing, and showed dose-linear increases of area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) and Cmax between 3 and 60 mg. The drug was slowly eliminated, with mean half-life estimates of 28-49 hours across dose groups. Apparent volume of distribution was high (mean 1417-3086 L across dose groups). No safety or tolerability issues were identified in any cohort. No mu-opioid agonist pharmacodynamic effects were noted in pupillometry or cold-pressor testing. Single oral doses of noribogaine 3-60 mg were safe and well tolerated in healthy volunteers. PMID:25279818

  4. Dose-response studies with ethylene dibromide. [Hydra oligactis

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.A.

    1987-04-01

    This study represents the first of a series of Descriptive-Reproductive-Toxicology Studies currently underway in the authors laboratory. Ethylene Dibromide (EDB) is suspected of causing infertility (especially in males), carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, and possibly teratogenesis. Coupling the suspected undesirable effects of EDB exposure with the fact that the chemical has broad utility (soil fumigant, fruit and grain fumigant, gasoline additive, etc.), EDB is an important agricultural and industrial toxin. In this study Hydra oligactis are exposed to EDB in an attempt to determine the acute toxicity of the chemical. Since Hydra is organized at the tissue level only, the toxin can be applied as a component of an artificial pond water (APW) medium. The EDB stock solution is 19:1 Acetone (emulsifier): EDB. Direct dilutions are made and exposures are continuous. The medium is exchanged daily after feeding. The LC50 at 48 hours incubation with EDb is 70 mgL . Compared to the LC50's for two common commercial PCB mixtures, Aroclors 1254 and 1016, EDb is shown to be a highly toxic chemical. The respective LC50's for the PCB's are 20 mgL (Aroclor 1254) and 5 mgL (Aroclor 1016) at 72 hrs. Sublethal EDB toxicity is currently being studied.

  5. A Randomized, Open-Label, Dose-Response Study of Losartan in Hypertensive Children

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Thomas G.; Shahinfar, Shahnaz; Massaad, Rachid; Dankner, Wayne M.; Lam, Chun; Santoro, Emanuela Palumbo; McCrary Sisk, Christine; Blaustein, Robert O.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Once-daily losartan reduces BP in a dose-dependent manner and is well tolerated in hypertensive children aged 6–16 years. This study assessed the dose-response relationship, safety, and tolerability of losartan in hypertensive children aged 6 months to 6 years. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This was a 12-week, randomized, open-label, dose-ranging study, with a 2-year extension. Patients were randomized to losartan at the following dosages: 0.1 mg/kg per day (low), 0.3 mg/kg per day (medium), or 0.7 mg/kg per day (high). Losartan was titrated to the next dose level (to a 1.4 mg/kg per day maximum dosage, not exceeding 100 mg/d, which was not one of the three original doses offered at randomization) at weeks 3, 6, and 9 for patients who did not attain their goal BP and were not taking the highest dose. Dose response was evaluated by analyzing the slope of change in sitting systolic BP (SBP; primary end point) and diastolic BP (DBP; secondary end point) after 3 weeks compared with baseline. Adverse events (AEs) were recorded throughout. Results Of the 101 patients randomized, 99 were included in the analysis (low dose, n=32; medium dose, n=34; and high dose, n=33). Mean sitting BP decreased from baseline in the low-, medium-, and high-dose groups by 7.3, 7.6, and 6.7 mmHg, respectively, for SBP and 8.2, 5.1, and 6.7 mmHg, respectively, for DBP after 3 weeks. No dose-response relationship was established by the slope analysis on SBP (P=0.75) or DBP (P=0.64). The BP-lowering effect was observed throughout the 2-year extension. The incidence of AEs was low and comparable between groups. Conclusions Hypertensive children aged 6 months to 6 years treated with losartan 0.1–0.7 mg/kg per day had clinically significant decreases from baseline in SBP and DBP, yet no dose-response relationship was evident. Losartan, at a dosage up to 1.4 mg/kg per day, was well tolerated. PMID:24875194

  6. The haemotoxicity of mitomycin in a repeat dose study in the female CD-1 mouse

    PubMed Central

    Molyneux, Gemma; Gibson, Frances M; Gordon-Smith, Edward C; Pilling, Andrew M; Liu, Kai Chiu; Rizzo, Sian; Sulsh, Susan; Turton, John A

    2005-01-01

    Mitomycin (MMC), like many antineoplastic drugs, induces a predictable, dose-related, bone marrow depression in man and laboratory animals; this change is generally reversible. However, there is evidence that MMC may also cause a late-stage or residual bone marrow injury. The present study in female CD-1 mice investigated the haematological and bone marrow changes induced by MMC in a repeat dose study lasting 50 days. Control and MMC-treated mice were dosed intraperitoneally on eight occasions over 18 days with vehicle, or MMC at 2.5 mg/kg, autopsied (n = 6–12) at 1, 7, 14, 28, 42 and 50 days after the final dose and haematological changes investigated. Femoral nucleated bone marrow cell counts and levels of apoptosis were also evaluated and clonogenic assays carried out; serum levels of FLT3 ligand (FL) were assessed. At day 1 post-dosing, MMC induced significant reductions in RBC, Hb and haematocrit (HCT) values, and there were decreases in reticulocyte, platelet, and femoral nucleated cell counts (FNCC); neutrophil, lymphocyte and monocyte values were also significantly reduced. On days 7 and 14 post-dosing, all haematological parameters showed evidence of a return towards normal values, but at these times, and at day 28, values for RBC and FNCC remained significantly reduced in comparison with controls. At days 42 and 50 post-dosing, many haematological parameters in MMC-treated mice had returned to control levels; however, there remained evidence of late-stage effects on RBC, Hb and HCT values, and FNCC also continued to be significantly decreased. Results for granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units and erythroid colonies showed a profound decrease immediately post-dosing, but a return to normal values was evident at day 50. Serum FL concentrations demonstrated very significant increases in the immediate post-dosing period, but a return to normal was seen at day 50 post-dosing; a relatively similar pattern was seen in the number of apoptotic femoral

  7. Pulmonary function in asbestos cement workers: a dose-response study.

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, M

    1986-01-01

    This study has found that residence time weighted exposure (asbestos dose) may be used to model the risk and extent of pulmonary function abnormalities in a cohort of asbestos cement workers. This parameter, which incorporates both exposure concentration and latency, had previously proved useful for modelling the risk of radiographic abnormalities in this cohort. Asbestos dose and smoking were independent and additive contributors to decreased pulmonary function. It was also found that lung function results could be used as surrogates for dose in the assessment of mortality risk in this cohort. PMID:3718885

  8. [Phantom Study on Dose Reduction Using Iterative Reconstruction in Low-dose Computed Tomography for Lung Cancer Screening].

    PubMed

    Minehiro, Kaori; Takata, Tadanori; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Sakuda, Keita; Nunome, Haruka; Kawashima, Hiroko; Sanada, Shigeru

    2015-12-01

    We investigated dose reduction ability of an iterative reconstruction technology for low-dose computed tomography (CT) for lung cancer screening. The Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) provided in a multi slice CT system, Somatom Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare) was used. An anthropomorphic chest phantom (N-1, Kyoto Kagaku) was scanned at volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) of 0.50-11.86 mGy with 120 kV. For noise (standard deviation) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) measurements, CTP486 and CTP515 modules in the Catphan (The Phantom Laboratory) were scanned. Radiological technologists were participated in the perceptual comparison. SAFIRE reduced the SD values by approximately 50% compared with filter back projection (FBP). The estimated dose reduction rates by SAFIRE determined from the perceptual comparison was approximately 23%, while 75% dose reduction rate was expected from the SD value reduction of 50%. PMID:26685831

  9. Interactive dose shaping part 2: proof of concept study for six prostate patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamerling, Cornelis Ph; Ziegenhein, Peter; Sterzing, Florian; Oelfke, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Recently we introduced interactive dose shaping (IDS) as a new IMRT planning strategy. This planning concept is based on a hierarchical sequence of local dose modification and recovery operations. The purpose of this work is to provide a feasibility study for the IDS planning strategy based on a small set of six prostate patients. The IDS planning paradigm aims to perform interactive local dose adaptations of an IMRT plan without compromising already established valuable dose features in real-time. Various IDS tools were developed in our in-house treatment planning software Dynaplan and were utilized to create IMRT treatment plans for six patients with an adeno-carcinoma of the prostate. The sequenced IDS treatment plans were compared to conventionally optimized clinically approved plans (9 beams, co-planar). For each patient, several IDS plans were created, with different trade-offs between organ sparing and target coverage. The reference dose distributions were imported into Dynaplan. For each patient, the IDS treatment plan with a similar or better trade-off between target coverage and OAR sparing was selected for plan evaluation, guided by a physician. For this initial study we were able to generate treatment plans for prostate geometries in 15-45 min. Individual local dose adaptations could be performed in less than one second. The average differences compared to the reference plans were for the mean dose: 0.0 Gy (boost) and 1.2 Gy (PTV), for {{D}98%}:-1.1 Gy and for {{D}2%}:1.1 Gy (both target volumes). The dose-volume quality indicators were well below the Quantec constraints. However, we also observed limitations of our currently implemented approach. Most prominent was an increase of the non-tumor integral dose by 16.4% on average, demonstrating that further developments of our planning strategy are required.

  10. Carbon-11-cocaine binding compared at subpharmacological and pharmacological doses: A PET study

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J. |

    1995-07-01

    The authors have characterized cocaine binding in the brain to a high-affinity site on the dopamine transporter using PET and tracer doses of [{sup 11}C]cocaine in the baboon in vivo. The binding pattern, however, of cocaine at tracer (subpharmacological) doses may differ from that observed when the drug is taken in behaviorally active doses, particularly since in vitro studies have shown that cocaine also binds to low affinity binding sites. PET was used to compare and characterize [{sup 11}C]cocaine binding in the baboon brain at low subpharmacological (18 {mu}g average dose) and at pharmacological (8000 {mu}g) doses. Serial studies on the same day in the same baboon were used to assess the reproducibility of repeated measures and to assess the effects of drugs which inhibit the dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin transporters. Time-activity curves from brain and the arterial plasma input function were used to calculate the steady-state distribution volume (DV). At subpharmacological doses, [{sup 11}C]cocaine had a more homogeneous distribution. Bmax/Kd for sub-pharmacological [{sup 11}C]cocaine corresponded to 0.5-0.6 and for pharmacological [{sup 11}C]cocaine it corresponded to 0.1-0.2. Two-point Scatchard analysis gave Bmax = 2300 pmole/g and Kd = 3600 nM. Bmax/Kd for sub-pharmacological doses of [{sup 11}C]cocaine was decreased by cocaine and drugs that inhibit the dopamine transporter, to 0.1-0.2, but not by drugs that inhibit the serotonin or the norepinephrine transporter. None of these drugs changed Bmax/Kd for a pharmacological dose of [{sup 11}C]cocaine. At subpharmacological doses, [{sup 11}C]cocaine binds predominantly to a high-affinity site on the dopamine transporter. 36 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Interactive dose shaping part 2: proof of concept study for six prostate patients.

    PubMed

    Ph Kamerling, Cornelis; Ziegenhein, Peter; Sterzing, Florian; Oelfke, Uwe

    2016-03-21

    Recently we introduced interactive dose shaping (IDS) as a new IMRT planning strategy. This planning concept is based on a hierarchical sequence of local dose modification and recovery operations. The purpose of this work is to provide a feasibility study for the IDS planning strategy based on a small set of six prostate patients. The IDS planning paradigm aims to perform interactive local dose adaptations of an IMRT plan without compromising already established valuable dose features in real-time. Various IDS tools were developed in our in-house treatment planning software Dynaplan and were utilized to create IMRT treatment plans for six patients with an adeno-carcinoma of the prostate. The sequenced IDS treatment plans were compared to conventionally optimized clinically approved plans (9 beams, co-planar). For each patient, several IDS plans were created, with different trade-offs between organ sparing and target coverage. The reference dose distributions were imported into Dynaplan. For each patient, the IDS treatment plan with a similar or better trade-off between target coverage and OAR sparing was selected for plan evaluation, guided by a physician. For this initial study we were able to generate treatment plans for prostate geometries in 15-45 min. Individual local dose adaptations could be performed in less than one second. The average differences compared to the reference plans were for the mean dose: 0.0 Gy (boost) and 1.2 Gy (PTV), for D98% : -1.1 Gy and for D2% : 1.1 Gy (both target volumes). The dose-volume quality indicators were well below the Quantec constraints. However, we also observed limitations of our currently implemented approach. Most prominent was an increase of the non-tumor integral dose by 16.4% on average, demonstrating that further developments of our planning strategy are required. PMID:26948274

  12. Dose-Escalation Study for Cardiac Radiosurgery in a Porcine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blanck, Oliver; Bode, Frank; Gebhard, Maximilian; Hunold, Peter; Brandt, Sebastian; Bruder, Ralf; Grossherr, Martin; Vonthein, Reinhard; Rades, Dirk; Dunst, Juergen

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To perform a proof-of-principle dose-escalation study to radiosurgically induce scarring in cardiac muscle tissue to block veno-atrial electrical connections at the pulmonary vein antrum, similar to catheter ablation. Methods and Materials: Nine mini-pigs underwent pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of heart function and electrophysiology assessment by catheter measurements in the right superior pulmonary vein (RSPV). Immediately after examination, radiosurgery with randomized single-fraction doses of 0 and 17.5-35 Gy in 2.5-Gy steps were delivered to the RSPV antrum (target volume 5-8 cm{sup 3}). MRI and electrophysiology were repeated 6 months after therapy, followed by histopathologic examination. Results: Transmural scarring of cardiac muscle tissue was noted with doses ≥32.5 Gy. However, complete circumferential scarring of the RSPV was not achieved. Logistic regressions showed that extent and intensity of fibrosis significantly increased with dose. The 50% effective dose for intense fibrosis was 31.3 Gy (odds ratio 2.47/Gy, P<.01). Heart function was not affected, as verified by MRI and electrocardiogram evaluation. Adjacent critical structures were not damaged, as verified by pathology, demonstrating the short-term safety of small-volume cardiac radiosurgery with doses up to 35 Gy. Conclusions: Radiosurgery with doses >32.5 Gy in the healthy pig heart can induce circumscribed scars at the RSPV antrum noninvasively, mimicking the effect of catheter ablation. In our study we established a significant dose-response relationship for cardiac radiosurgery. The long-term effects and toxicity of such high radiation doses need further investigation in the pursuit of cardiac radiosurgery for noninvasive treatment of atrial fibrillation.

  13. Acute and repeated dose toxicity studies of different β-cyclodextrin-based nanosponge formulations.

    PubMed

    Shende, Pravin; Kulkarni, Yogesh A; Gaud, R S; Deshmukh, Kiran; Cavalli, Roberta; Trotta, Francesco; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2015-05-01

    Nanosponges (NS) show promising results in different fields such as medicine, agriculture, water purification, fire engineering and so on. The present study was designed to evaluate toxicity of different NS formulations (namely, S1-S6) synthesized with different cross-linking agents such as carbonyl diimidazole, pyromellitic dianhydride and hexamethylene diisocynate; and preparation methods in experimental animals. Acute and repeated dose toxicity studies of formulations were carried out as per OECD guidelines 423 and 407, respectively. For acute toxicity study, formulations were administered to female rats at doses of 300 and 2000 mg/kg orally. The general behaviour of the rats was continuously monitored for 1 h after dosing, periodically during the first 24 h and daily thereafter for a total of 14 days. On day 14, animals were fasted overnight, weighed, and sacrificed. After sacrification, animals were subjected to necropsy. For repeated dose toxicity study, rats of either sex were orally administered with formulations at the dose of 300 mg/kg per day for a period of 28 days. The maximally tolerated dose of all formulations was found to be 2000 mg/kg. Repeated administration of formulations for 28 days did not show any significant changes in haematological and biochemical parameters in experimental animals. These results indicate that the formulations are safe, when tested in experimental animals. PMID:25754724

  14. 131 iodine gamma dose determination in the thyroid gland using two geometrical shapes: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betka, A.; Bentabet, A.; Azbouche, A.; Fenineche, N.; Adjiri, A.; Dib, A.

    2015-05-01

    In order to study the internal gamma dose, we used a Monte Carlo code ‘Penelope’ simulation with two geometrical models (cylindrical and spherical). The deposited energy was determined via the loss of energy calculated from the quantum theory for inelastic collisions based on the first-order (plane-wave) Born approximation for charged particles with individual atoms and molecules. Our results show that the cylindrical geometry is more suitable for carrying out such a study. Moreover, we developed an analytical expression for the 131 iodine gamma dose (the energy deposited per photon absorbed dose). This latter could be considered as an important tool for evaluating the gamma dose without going through stochastic models.

  15. A study on the correlation between patients' physical characteristics and effective dose of liver computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Joo, Young-Cheol; Lim, Chung-Hwan; Lee, Chun-Yong; Jung, Hong-Ryang

    2014-01-01

    This suggests indicators to be considered in the protocol for setting up equipment and minimizing patient doses by identifying the effective dose and correlations of each equipment company according to a patient's body characteristics in liver CT. The study was conducted with 445 patients who went to the hospital and received liver CT at the diagnostic radiology department of S medical center from 2010 January to June. As the statistical methods, t-test, one-way ANOVA, and Pearson's correlation analysis were used. The study results show that as height, weight, and BMI increased, the effective dose increased with all equipment vendors. Correlations between a patient's body characteristics and the effective dose were shown to be positive with all equipment vendors in regard to weight, BMI, and height, in order. PMID:24704655

  16. Assessment of ambient gamma dose rate around a prospective uranium mining area of South India - A comparative study of dose by direct methods and soil radioactivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunakara, N.; Yashodhara, I.; Sudeep Kumara, K.; Tripathi, R. M.; Menon, S. N.; Kadam, S.; Chougaonkar, M. P.

    Indoor and outdoor gamma dose rates were evaluated around a prospective uranium mining region - Gogi, South India through (i) direct measurements using a GM based gamma dose survey meter, (ii) integrated measurement days using CaSO4:Dy based thermo luminescent dosimeters (TLDs), and (iii) analyses of 273 soil samples for 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K activity concentration using HPGe gamma spectrometry. The geometric mean values of indoor and outdoor gamma dose rates were 104 nGy h-1 and 97 nGy h-1, respectively with an indoor to outdoor dose ratio of 1.09. The gamma dose rates and activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K varied significantly within a small area due to the highly localized mineralization of the elements. Correlation study showed that the dose estimated from the soil radioactivity is better correlated with that measured directly using the portable survey meter, when compared to that obtained from TLDs. This study showed that in a region having localized mineralization in situ measurements using dose survey meter provide better representative values of gamma dose rates.

  17. The immune tolerance induction (ITI) dose debate: does the International ITI Study provide a clearer picture?

    PubMed

    Ettingshausen, C Escuriola; Kreuz, W

    2013-01-01

    Among the proposed predictors for immune tolerance induction (ITI) outcome, the therapeutic regimen - specifically the dose and frequency of administered factor VIII (FVIII) as well as FVIII product type - is intensely debated. Are there any advantages for low-dose regimens (50 IU FVIII kg(-1) three times a week) over high-dose regimens (200 IU FVIII kg day(-1)) or vice versa? Are von Willebrand factor (VWF)-containing plasma-derived concentrates superior to recombinant FVIII concentrates for tolerance induction? A review of the available literature indicates that patients with good prognostic factors can achieve success with either low-dose or high-dose ITI regimens. Retrospective data suggest that patient characteristics such as maximum historical inhibitor titres and pre-ITI inhibitor titres are better predictors of treatment success than dose. Results of the prospective International ITI Study have recently become available. In inhibitor patients with good prognosis, success rates were similar between low-dose (50 IU FVIII kg(-1) three times a week) and high-dose (200 IU FVIII kg(-1) daily) regimens. However, patients receiving low-dose ITI took longer to achieve various ITI milestones and had a significantly higher bleed rate per month compared with the high-dose group (0.62 vs. 0.28; P = 0.00024), findings with important clinical implications. Inhibitor patients with poor prognostic features should be treated with a high-dose protocol. This conclusion is supported by a meta-analysis of the International Immune Tolerance Registry and North American Immune Tolerance Registry and by data from Germany showing good success rates with the high-dose, high-frequency Bonn protocol in poor prognosis patients. Type of concentrate also appears to have an influence on ITI success rates in this patient subgroup, with evidence suggesting an advantage for VWF-containing plasma-derived FVIII concentrates over recombinant or VWF-free concentrates. The ongoing prospective

  18. [Study on the dose distribution of 8-MeV bremsstrahlung in mantle field techniques (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Nemec, H W; Walther, E

    1979-08-01

    The dose distribution within the patient was studied with 8-MeV bremsstrahlung from a linear accelerator during mantle field irradiation using molded shielding blocks. Doses and dose distributions in the different layers of a modified Alderson phantom were measured by means of film dosimetry and related to the dose in the central ray beam at the middle of the body. Dose distribution within unshielded regions perpendicular to the central ray beam generally being relatively homogeneous, the highest relative doses, amounting to ca. 115%, are found in the region of the mandibular angle and in the supraclavicular region; the dose to superficial lymph nodes at the supraclavicular region reaches 100% of the dose in the central ray beam. As a cause for these important doses near the surface of the body are discussed the extension of mantle fields as well as the increased exit dose of the opposed field and the oblique incidence of radiation. PMID:473255

  19. A dosimetric study on the Ir-192 high dose rate flexisource.

    PubMed

    Granero, D; Pérez-Calatayud, J; Casal, E; Ballester, F; Venselaar, J

    2006-12-01

    In this work, the dose rate distribution of a new Ir-192 high dose rate source (Flexisource used in the afterloading Flexitron system, Isodose Control, Veenendaal, The Netherlands) is studied by means of Monte Carlo techniques using the GEANT4 code. The dosimetric parameters of the Task Group No. 43 Report (TG43) formalism and two-dimensional rectangular look-up tables have been obtained. PMID:17278809

  20. A dosimetric study on the Ir-192 high dose rate Flexisource

    SciTech Connect

    Granero, D.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Casal, E.; Ballester, F.; Venselaar, J.

    2006-12-15

    In this work, the dose rate distribution of a new Ir-192 high dose rate source (Flexisource used in the afterloading Flexitron system, Isodose Control, Veenendaal, The Netherlands) is studied by means of Monte Carlo techniques using the GEANT4 code. The dosimetric parameters of the Task Group No. 43 Report (TG43) formalism and two-dimensional rectangular look-up tables have been obtained.

  1. Low-dose ionising radiation and cardiovascular diseases--Strategies for molecular epidemiological studies in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Michaela; Auvinen, Anssi; Cardis, Elisabeth; Hall, Janet; Jourdain, Jean-Rene; Laurier, Dominique; Little, Mark P; Peters, Annette; Raj, Ken; Russell, Nicola S; Tapio, Soile; Zhang, Wei; Gomolka, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that high-dose ionising radiation causes cardiovascular diseases. In contrast, the evidence for a causal relationship between long-term risk of cardiovascular diseases after moderate doses (0.5-5 Gy) is suggestive and weak after low doses (<0.5 Gy). However, evidence is emerging that doses under 0.5 Gy may also increase long-term risk of cardiovascular disease. This would have major implications for radiation protection with respect to medical use of radiation for diagnostic purposes and occupational or environmental radiation exposure. Therefore, it is of great importance to gain information about the presence and possible magnitude of radiation-related cardiovascular disease risk at doses of less than 0.5 Gy. The biological mechanisms implicated in any such effects are unclear and results from epidemiological studies are inconsistent. Molecular epidemiological studies can improve the understanding of the pathogenesis and the risk estimation of radiation-induced circulatory disease at low doses. Within the European DoReMi (Low Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration) project, strategies to conduct molecular epidemiological studies in this field have been developed and evaluated. Key potentially useful European cohorts are the Mayak workers, other nuclear workers, uranium miners, Chernobyl liquidators, the Techa river residents and several diagnostic or low-dose radiotherapy patient cohorts. Criteria for informative studies are given and biomarkers to be investigated suggested. A close collaboration between epidemiology, biology and dosimetry is recommended, not only among experts in the radiation field, but also those in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26041268

  2. Split dose studies on the erythropoietic effects of cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, G.R.; Razniak, S.L.

    1992-06-01

    The processes of red blood cell production and release, i.e., erythropoiesis, are complex and involve a series of cell divisions and maturation phases during which hemoglobin is synthesized. The formation of hemoglobin is an integral process and functions as one of the factors that control the rate and extent of erythropoiesis. Therefore, exogenous and endogenous factors which affect the synthesis of hemoglobin would secondarily affect the rate and extent of the erythropoietic process. Incorporation of radioactively labeled iron ({sup 59}Fe) into the hemoglobin of erythrocyte precursor cells in the process of hemoglobin production, is a precise measurement of erythropoiesis. Another widely used indicator of the rate and extent of hemoglobin synthesis, and thus, erythropoiesis, is the activity level of the enzyme, delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD). This enzyme plays a crucial role in hemoglobin formation by promoting the condensation of two moles of aminolevulinic acid to form one mole of porphobilinogen. The degree of ALAD activity and/or its availability to perform its coupling function would, of course, affect the synthesis of hemoglobin which in turn would influence the total erythropoietic progression. The purposes of the studies here were to compare the erythropoietic effects of a single dosage of cadmium to split dosages. 19 refs., 21 figs.

  3. Dual-energy computed tomography of the head: a phantom study assessing axial dose distribution, eye lens dose, and image noise level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Kosuke; Kawashima, Hiroki; Hamaguchi, Takashi; Takata, Tadanori; Kobayashi, Masanao; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Koshida, Kichiro

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a calibration method for small dosimeters to measure absorbed doses during dual- source dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) and to compare the axial dose distribution, eye lens dose, and image noise level between DE and standard, single-energy (SE) head CT angiography. Three DE (100/Sn140 kVp 80/Sn140 kVp, and 140/80 kVp) and one SE (120 kVp) acquisitions were performed using a second-generation dual-source CT device and a female head phantom, with an equivalent volumetric CT dose index. The axial absorbed dose distribution at the orbital level and the absorbed doses for the eye lens were measured using radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters. CT attenuation numbers were obtained in the DE composite images and the SE images of the phantom at the orbital level. The doses absorbed at the orbital level and in the eye lens were lower and standard deviations for the CT attenuation numbers were slightly higher in the DE acquisitions than those in the SE acquisition. The anterior surface dose was especially higher in the SE acquisition than that in the DE acquisitions. Thus, DE head CT angiography can be performed with a radiation dose lower than that required for a standard SE head CT angiography, with a slight increase in the image noise level. The 100/Sn140 kVp acquisition revealed the most balanced axial dose distribution. In addition, our proposed method was effective for calibrating small dosimeters to measure absorbed doses in DECT.

  4. MO-G-BRF-09: Investigating Magnetic Field Dose Effects in Mice: A Monte Carlo Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A; Guindani, M; Followill, D; Melancon, A; Hazle, J; Court, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In MRI-linac treatments, radiation dose distributions are affected by magnetic fields, especially at high-density/low-density interfaces. Radiobiological consequences of magnetic field dose effects are presently unknown; therefore, preclinical studies are needed to ensure the safe clinical use of MRI-linacs. This study investigates the optimal combination of beam energy and magnetic field strength needed for preclinical murine studies. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNP6 was used to simulate the effects of a magnetic field when irradiating a mouse-sized lung phantom with a 1.0cmx1.0cm photon beam. Magnetic field effects were examined using various beam energies (225kVp, 662keV[Cs-137], and 1.25MeV[Co-60]) and magnetic field strengths (0.75T, 1.5T, and 3T). The resulting dose distributions were compared to Monte Carlo results for humans with various field sizes and patient geometries using a 6MV/1.5T MRI-linac. Results: In human simulations, the addition of a 1.5T magnetic field caused an average dose increase of 49% (range:36%–60%) to lung at the soft tissue-to-lung interface and an average dose decrease of 30% (range:25%–36%) at the lung-to-soft tissue interface. In mouse simulations, the magnetic fields had no effect on the 225kVp dose distribution. The dose increases for the Cs-137 beam were 12%, 33%, and 49% for 0.75T, 1.5T, and 3.0T magnetic fields, respectively while the dose decreases were 7%, 23%, and 33%. For the Co-60 beam, the dose increases were 14%, 45%, and 41%, and the dose decreases were 18%, 35%, and 35%. Conclusion: The magnetic field dose effects observed in mouse phantoms using a Co-60 beam with 1.5T or 3T fields and a Cs-137 beam with a 3T field compare well with those seen in simulated human treatments with an MRI-linac. These irradiator/magnet combinations are suitable for preclinical studies investigating potential biological effects of delivering radiation therapy in the presence of a magnetic field. Partially funded by Elekta.

  5. Missing Doses in the Life Span Study of Japanese Atomic Bomb Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, David B.; Wing, Steve; Cole, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    The Life Span Study of atomic bomb survivors is an important source of risk estimates used to inform radiation protection and compensation. Interviews with survivors in the 1950s and 1960s provided information needed to estimate radiation doses for survivors proximal to ground zero. Because of a lack of interview or the complexity of shielding, doses are missing for 7,058 of the 68,119 proximal survivors. Recent analyses excluded people with missing doses, and despite the protracted collection of interview information necessary to estimate some survivors' doses, defined start of follow-up as October 1, 1950, for everyone. We describe the prevalence of missing doses and its association with mortality, distance from hypocenter, city, age, and sex. Missing doses were more common among Nagasaki residents than among Hiroshima residents (prevalence ratio = 2.05; 95% confidence interval: 1.96, 2.14), among people who were closer to ground zero than among those who were far from it, among people who were younger at enrollment than among those who were older, and among males than among females (prevalence ratio = 1.22; 95% confidence interval: 1.17, 1.28). Missing dose was associated with all-cancer and leukemia mortality, particularly during the first years of follow-up (all-cancer rate ratio = 2.16, 95% confidence interval: 1.51, 3.08; and leukemia rate ratio = 4.28, 95% confidence interval: 1.72, 10.67). Accounting for missing dose and late entry should reduce bias in estimated dose-mortality associations. PMID:23429722

  6. Missing doses in the life span study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Richardson, David B; Wing, Steve; Cole, Stephen R

    2013-03-15

    The Life Span Study of atomic bomb survivors is an important source of risk estimates used to inform radiation protection and compensation. Interviews with survivors in the 1950s and 1960s provided information needed to estimate radiation doses for survivors proximal to ground zero. Because of a lack of interview or the complexity of shielding, doses are missing for 7,058 of the 68,119 proximal survivors. Recent analyses excluded people with missing doses, and despite the protracted collection of interview information necessary to estimate some survivors' doses, defined start of follow-up as October 1, 1950, for everyone. We describe the prevalence of missing doses and its association with mortality, distance from hypocenter, city, age, and sex. Missing doses were more common among Nagasaki residents than among Hiroshima residents (prevalence ratio = 2.05; 95% confidence interval: 1.96, 2.14), among people who were closer to ground zero than among those who were far from it, among people who were younger at enrollment than among those who were older, and among males than among females (prevalence ratio = 1.22; 95% confidence interval: 1.17, 1.28). Missing dose was associated with all-cancer and leukemia mortality, particularly during the first years of follow-up (all-cancer rate ratio = 2.16, 95% confidence interval: 1.51, 3.08; and leukemia rate ratio = 4.28, 95% confidence interval: 1.72, 10.67). Accounting for missing dose and late entry should reduce bias in estimated dose-mortality associations. PMID:23429722

  7. Dose-response study of vigabatrin in children with refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Herranz, J L; Arteaga, R; Farr, I N; Valdizan, E; Beaumont, D; Armijo, J A

    1991-01-01

    Twenty children aged 2 months to 18 years were included in a dose-response study of vigabatrin as add-on therapy to preexisting antiepileptic drugs (up to two per patient). All children had severe refractory epilepsy: partial seizures with or without secondary generalization in 19, and myoclonic seizures in one. After a 2-month observation period and a 1-month add-on placebo period, a fixed dose of add-on vigabatrin was given for 2 months: 1, 1.5, or 2 g/day, according to body weight (mean dose, 60 mg/kg/day). Three patients (15%) became seizure free, and nine (45%) showed a 50% to 99% reduction in seizure frequency. In the 17 patients whose seizures were not totally suppressed, vigabatrin dose was increased for a further 2 months, and in 7 patients who still showed less than 50% reduction in seizure frequency, vigabatrin dose was increased again. Efficacy appeared unchanged by these higher doses. During a 9-month follow-up phase, no tolerance to the effects of vigabatrin was observed, with three children seizure free and 13 (65%) reporting a 50% to 99% reduction in seizure frequency. During the study, adverse effects were recorded in three children (15%), namely drowsiness, constipation, fatigue, and apathy. These effects were generally transient, being observed during the dose-modification phase and disappearing either spontaneously or on reduction of vigabatrin dose. Clinical and laboratory tolerability to vigabatrin appeared to be very good, with no patients having withdrawn from the study because of side effects. A slight reduction in red blood cell count and hemoglobin levels was noted but was of doubtful clinical significance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1940124

  8. Comprehensive assessment of radiation dose estimates for the CORE320 study.

    PubMed

    Rybicki, Frank J; Mather, Richard T; Kumamaru, Kanako K; Brinker, Jeffrey; Chen, Marcus Y; Cox, Christopher; Matheson, Matthew B; Dewey, Marc; DiCarli, Marcelo F; Miller, Julie M; Geleijns, Jacob; George, Richard T; Paul, Narinder; Texter, John; Vavere, Andrea; Yaw, Tan Swee; Lima, Joao A C; Clouse, Melvin E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively study estimated radiation doses for subjects included in the main analysis of the Combined Non-invasive Coronary Angiography and Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Using 320 Detector Computed Tomography (CORE320) study ( ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00934037), a clinical trial comparing combined CT angiography (CTA) and perfusion CT with the reference standard catheter angiography plus myocardial perfusion SPECT. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Prospectively acquired data on 381 CORE320 subjects were analyzed in four groups of testing related to radiation exposure. Radiation dose estimates were compared between modalities for combined CTA and perfusion CT with respect to covariates known to influence radiation exposure and for the main clinical outcomes defined by the trial. The final analysis assessed variations in radiation dose with respect to several factors inherent to the trial. RESULTS. The mean radiation dose estimate for the combined CTA and perfusion CT protocol (8.63 mSv) was significantly (p < 0.0001 for both) less than the average dose delivered from SPECT (10.48 mSv) and the average dose from diagnostic catheter angiography (11.63 mSv). There was no significant difference in estimated CTA-perfusion CT radiation dose for subjects who had false-positive or false-negative results in the CORE320 main analyses in a comparison with subjects for whom the CTA-perfusion CT findings were in accordance with the reference standard SPECT plus catheter angiographic findings. CONCLUSION. Radiation dose estimates from CORE320 support clinical implementation of a combined CT protocol for assessing coronary anatomy and myocardial perfusion. PMID:25539270

  9. Feasibility study of a simple approximation algorithm for in-vivo dose reconstruction by using the transit dose measured using an EPID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Ui-Jung; Song, Mi Hee; Baek, Tae Seong; Chung, Eun Ji; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to verify the accuracy of the dose delivered to the patient during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) by using in-vivo dosimetry and to avoid accidental exposure to healthy tissues and organs close to tumors. The in-vivo dose was reconstructed by back projection of the transit dose with a simple approximation that considered only the percent depth dose and inverse square law. While the average gamma index for comparisons of dose distributions between the calculated dose map and the film measurement was less than the one for 96.3% of all pixels with the homogeneous phantom, the passing rate was reduced to 92.8% with the inhomogeneous phantom, suggesting that the reduction was apparently due to the inaccuracy of the reconstruction algorithm for inhomogeneity. The proposed method of calculating the dose inside a phantom was of comparable or better accuracy than the treatment planning system, suggesting that it can be used to verify the accuracy of the dose delivered to the patient during treatment.

  10. Using a dose-area product for absolute measurements in small fields: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Dufreneix, S; Ostrowsky, A; Le Roy, M; Sommier, L; Gouriou, J; Delaunay, F; Rapp, B; Daures, J; Bordy, J-M

    2016-01-21

    To extend the dosimetric reference system to field sizes smaller than 2 cm × 2 cm, the LNE-LNHB laboratory is studying an approach based on a new dosimetric quantity named the dose-area product instead of the commonly used absorbed dose at a point. A graphite calorimeter and a plane parallel ion chamber with a sensitive surface of 3 cm diameter were designed and built for measurements in fields of 2, 1 and 0.75 cm diameter. The detector surface being larger than the beam section, most of the issues linked with absolute dose measurements at a point could be avoided. Calibration factors of the plane parallel ionization chamber were established in terms of dose-area product in water for small fields with an uncertainty smaller than 0.9%. PMID:26690271

  11. The features of radiation dose variations onboard ISS and Mir space station: comparative study.

    PubMed

    Tverskaya, L V; Panasyuk, M I; Reizman, S Ya; Sosnovets, E N; Teltsov, M V; Tsetlin, V V

    2004-01-01

    The dynamics of the ISS-measured radiation dose variations since August 2000 is studied. Use is made of the data obtained with the R-16 instrument, which consists of two ionization chambers behind different shielding thicknesses. The doses recorded during solar energetic particle (SEP) events are compared with the data obtained also by R-16 on Mir space station. The SEP events in the solar maximum of the current cycle make a much smaller contribution to the radiation dose compared with the October 1989 event recorded on Mir space station. In the latter event, the proton intensity was peaking during a strong magnetic storm. The storm-time effect of solar proton geomagnetic cutoff decreases on dose variations is estimated. The dose variations on Mir space stations due to formation of a new radiation belt of high-energy protons and electrons during a sudden commencement of March 24, 1991 storm are also studied. It was for the first time throughout the ISS and Mir dose measurement period that the counting rates recorded by both R-16 channels on ISS in 2001-2002 were nearly the same during some time intervals. This effect may arise from the decreases of relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. PMID:15881786

  12. A radiation dose study based on analysis of primary color chrominance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianyue; Li, Jianhong; Li, Jianwei; Jin, Jian; Li, Yu; Bao, Xiaolu; Chen, Zhilong

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of measuring radiation dose based on primary color chrominance in chemical solutions. Methods: We used an aqueous solution with different concentrations of Alphaurine A and Tracid Brilliant Red B. This was irradiated by 1.5-13.5 kGy 60Co γ radiation. Data were collected by an instrument that can detect information on the three primary colors. Data were analyzed and manipulated for each experiment. Results and conclusions: The result shows that three primary colors chrominance in the aqueous solutions change with different doses of 60Co γ-rays and different concentrations of Alphaurine A and Tracid Brilliant Red B. For Alphaurine A, the red chrominance is gradually reduced as a function of radiation dose. The blue chrominance gradually increases concurrently. The red and green chrominance changes obviously and inversely, but the green chrominance changes little. In Tracid Brilliant Red B solution, the red chrominance gradually decreases as the radiation dose increases. The green chrominance gradually increases concurrently. The red and green chrominance changes are obvious and inverted. The blue chrominance changes little. Our experiments demonstrate that radiation dose can be studied based on three primary colors chrominance. This may be a new tool to measure the radiation dose.

  13. Applicability of dose conversion coefficients of ICRP 74 to Asian adult males: Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Choonik; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2007-05-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reported comprehensive dose conversion coefficients for adult population, which is exposed to external photon sources in the Publication 74. However, those quantities were calculated from so-called stylized (or mathematical) phantoms composed of simplified mathematical surface equations so that the discrepancy between the phantoms and real human anatomy has been investigated by several authors using Caucasian-based voxel phantoms. To address anatomical and racial limitations of the stylized phantoms, several Asian-based voxel phantoms have been developed by Korean and Japanese investigators, independently. In the current study, photon dose conversion coefficients of ICRP 74 were compared with those from a total of five Asian-based male voxel phantoms, whose body dimensions were almost identical. Those of representative radio-sensitive organs (testes, red bone marrow, colon, lungs, and stomach), and effective dose conversion coefficients were obtained for comparison. Even though organ doses for testes, colon and lungs, and effective doses from ICRP 74 agreed well with those from Asian voxel phantoms within 10%, absorbed doses for red bone marrow and stomach showed significant discrepancies up to 30% which was mainly attributed to difference of phantom description between stylized and voxel phantoms. This study showed that the ICRP 74 dosimetry data, which have been reported to be unrealistic compared to those from Caucasian-based voxel phantoms, are also not appropriate for Asian population. PMID:17337194

  14. Omitted doses as an unintended consequence of a hospital restricted antibacterial system: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Neil; Franklin, Bryony Dean; Jacklin, Ann; Wilcock, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of omitted doses of antibacterial agents and explore a number of risk factors, including the effect of a restricted antibacterial system. Methods Antibacterial data were extracted from a hospital electronic prescribing and medication administration system for the period 1 January to 30 April 2014. Percentage dose omission rates were calculated. Omission rates for the first dose of antibacterial courses were analysed using logistic regression to identify any correlation between first dose omission rates and potential risk factors, including the antibacterials' restriction status and whether or not they were ward stock. Results The study included 90 761 antibacterial doses. Of these, 6535 (7.2%) were documented as having been omitted; omission of 847 (0.9% of 90 761) was due to medication being unavailable. Non-restricted, ward stock antibacterials had the lowest frequency of omission, with 6.2% (271 of 4391) first doses omitted. The prevalence was 10.4% (27 of 260) for restricted, ward-stock antibacterials (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.0–2.4, P = 0.027) and 15.5% (53 of 341) for non-restricted, non-ward stock antibacterials (OR = 2.7, 95% CI = 2.0–3.7, P < 0.001). Restricted, non-ward stock antibacterials had the highest frequency (30.7%, 71 of 231; OR = 6.2, 95% CI = 4.5–8.4, P < 0.001). Conclusions Antibacterials not stocked in clinical areas were significantly more likely to be omitted. The prevalence of omitted doses increased further if the antibiotic was also restricted. To achieve safe, effective antimicrobial use, a balance is needed between promoting antimicrobial stewardship and preventing unintended omitted doses. PMID:26316382

  15. Optimal experimental designs for dose-response studies with continuous endpoints.

    PubMed

    Holland-Letz, Tim; Kopp-Schneider, Annette

    2015-11-01

    In most areas of clinical and preclinical research, the required sample size determines the costs and effort for any project, and thus, optimizing sample size is of primary importance. An experimental design of dose-response studies is determined by the number and choice of dose levels as well as the allocation of sample size to each level. The experimental design of toxicological studies tends to be motivated by convention. Statistical optimal design theory, however, allows the setting of experimental conditions (dose levels, measurement times, etc.) in a way which minimizes the number of required measurements and subjects to obtain the desired precision of the results. While the general theory is well established, the mathematical complexity of the problem so far prevents widespread use of these techniques in practical studies. The paper explains the concepts of statistical optimal design theory with a minimum of mathematical terminology and uses these concepts to generate concrete usable D-optimal experimental designs for dose-response studies on the basis of three common dose-response functions in toxicology: log-logistic, log-normal and Weibull functions with four parameters each. The resulting designs usually require control plus only three dose levels and are quite intuitively plausible. The optimal designs are compared to traditional designs such as the typical setup of cytotoxicity studies for 96-well plates. As the optimal design depends on prior estimates of the dose-response function parameters, it is shown what loss of efficiency occurs if the parameters for design determination are misspecified, and how Bayes optimal designs can improve the situation. PMID:25155192

  16. Methods for analyzing combined data from studies of workers exposed to low doses of radiation.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, E S; Fry, S A; Wiggs, L D; Voelz, G L; Cragle, D L; Petersen, G R

    1990-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies of workers exposed occupationally to protracted low doses of radiation provide a direct assessment of health effects resulting from such exposure and thus supplement information provided by studies of populations exposed at high doses of radiation and high dose rates. Analyses based on combined data from several studies can be expected to provide a more thorough assessment of low dose occupational studies and more precise risk estimates than can be obtained from any single study. Statistical methods for conducting such combined analyses are discussed, and different approaches, such as basing analyses on various levels of aggregation of exposure data, are compared and evaluated. Emphasis is given to methods for obtaining risk estimates and confidence limits that can be appropriately compared with estimates that form the basis for current radiation protection standards; these estimates have been obtained through extrapolation from high dose data. Methods are illustrated using combined data on workers at three US Department of Energy facilities: the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee; and the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant, Denver, Colorado. PMID:2321632

  17. A Prospective Study to Assess Vancomycin Serum Concentrations inPediatric Patients with Current Dosing Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Arfa, Peyman; Karimi, Abdollah; Rafiei Tabatabaei, Sedigheh; Fahimzad, Alireza; Armin, Shahnaz; Sistanizad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about increasing bacterial resistance to vancomycin, have caused the adult treatment guidelines to recommend higher trough concentrations based on the type and location of infectious disease. Although these recommendations are not specific to children, the values can be extrapolated. This prospective study was designed to evaluate efficacy of current vancomycin dosing recommendations to achieve therapeutic trough serum concentration in pediatric patients. Laboratory data, vancomycin dosing and subsequent serum concentrations of children in a community teaching pediatrics hospital were collected and analyzed. Trough serum levels were determined at steady state and compared with Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) 2011 guidelines for the treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) infections. In a prospective observational, cross-sectional study in a university medical center in Tehran, Iran, 50 patients, who received vancomycin for more than 4 doses, were recruited and their trough vancomycin level was determined. The mean age and creatinine clearance of patients were 5.47 ± 4.24 and 87.5 ± 31.25, respectively. Eleven (22%) patients received vancomycin at 40 mg/kg/day (low dose) and 39 (78%) at 60 mg/kg/day (high dose). Considering trough goals of 10-14 and 15-20 mg/L in low and high dose groups, serum levels in 91% (73% sub- therapeutics) and 85% (69% sub-therapeutics) of patients were not in recommended therapeutic range, respectively. This study has shown that current recommended vancomycin dosing regimens in pediatric patients (40-60 mg/kg/day), resulted in sub-therapeutic serum concentrations in our study population. PMID:27610175

  18. Correction for FDG PET dose extravasations: Monte Carlo validation and quantitative evaluation of patient studies

    SciTech Connect

    Silva-Rodríguez, Jesús Aguiar, Pablo; Sánchez, Manuel; Mosquera, Javier; Luna-Vega, Víctor; Cortés, Julia; Garrido, Miguel; Pombar, Miguel; Ruibal, Álvaro

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Current procedure guidelines for whole body [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) state that studies with visible dose extravasations should be rejected for quantification protocols. Our work is focused on the development and validation of methods for estimating extravasated doses in order to correct standard uptake value (SUV) values for this effect in clinical routine. Methods: One thousand three hundred sixty-seven consecutive whole body FDG-PET studies were visually inspected looking for extravasation cases. Two methods for estimating the extravasated dose were proposed and validated in different scenarios using Monte Carlo simulations. All visible extravasations were retrospectively evaluated using a manual ROI based method. In addition, the 50 patients with higher extravasated doses were also evaluated using a threshold-based method. Results: Simulation studies showed that the proposed methods for estimating extravasated doses allow us to compensate the impact of extravasations on SUV values with an error below 5%. The quantitative evaluation of patient studies revealed that paravenous injection is a relatively frequent effect (18%) with a small fraction of patients presenting considerable extravasations ranging from 1% to a maximum of 22% of the injected dose. A criterion based on the extravasated volume and maximum concentration was established in order to identify this fraction of patients that might be corrected for paravenous injection effect. Conclusions: The authors propose the use of a manual ROI based method for estimating the effectively administered FDG dose and then correct SUV quantification in those patients fulfilling the proposed criterion.

  19. A Prospective Study to Assess Vancomycin Serum Concentrations inPediatric Patients with Current Dosing Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Arfa, Peyman; Karimi, Abdollah; Rafiei Tabatabaei, Sedigheh; Fahimzad, Alireza; Armin, Shahnaz; Sistanizad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about increasing bacterial resistance to vancomycin, have caused the adult treatment guidelines to recommend higher trough concentrations based on the type and location of infectious disease. Although these recommendations are not specific to children, the values can be extrapolated. This prospective study was designed to evaluate efficacy of current vancomycin dosing recommendations to achieve therapeutic trough serum concentration in pediatric patients. Laboratory data, vancomycin dosing and subsequent serum concentrations of children in a community teaching pediatrics hospital were collected and analyzed. Trough serum levels were determined at steady state and compared with Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) 2011 guidelines for the treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) infections. In a prospective observational, cross-sectional study in a university medical center in Tehran, Iran, 50 patients, who received vancomycin for more than 4 doses, were recruited and their trough vancomycin level was determined. The mean age and creatinine clearance of patients were 5.47 ± 4.24 and 87.5 ± 31.25, respectively. Eleven (22%) patients received vancomycin at 40 mg/kg/day (low dose) and 39 (78%) at 60 mg/kg/day (high dose). Considering trough goals of 10-14 and 15-20 mg/L in low and high dose groups, serum levels in 91% (73% sub- therapeutics) and 85% (69% sub-therapeutics) of patients were not in recommended therapeutic range, respectively. This study has shown that current recommended vancomycin dosing regimens in pediatric patients (40-60 mg/kg/day), resulted in sub-therapeutic serum concentrations in our study population. PMID:27610175

  20. Evidence-based treatment for opioid disorders: a 23-year national study of methadone dose levels.

    PubMed

    D'Aunno, Thomas; Pollack, Harold A; Frimpong, Jemima A; Wuchiett, David

    2014-10-01

    Effective treatment for patients with opioid use problems is as critical as ever given the upsurge in heroin and prescription opioid abuse. Yet, results from prior studies show that the majority of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) programs in the US have not provided dose levels that meet evidence-based standards. Thus, this paper examines the extent to which US MMT programs have made changes in the past 23 years to provide adequate methadone doses; we also identify factors associated with variation in program performance. Program directors and clinical supervisors of nationally-representative methadone treatment programs were surveyed in 1988 (n=172), 1990 (n=140), 1995 (n=116), 2000 (n=150), 2005 (n=146), and 2011 (n=140). Results show that the proportion of patients who received doses below 60 mg/day-the minimum recommended-declined from 79.5 to 22.8% in a 23-year span. Results from random effects models show that programs that serve a higher proportion of African-American or Hispanic patients were more likely to report low-dose care. Programs with Joint Commission accreditation were more likely to provide higher doses, as were a program that serves a higher proportion of unemployed and older patients. Efforts to improve methadone treatment practices have made substantial progress, but 23% of patients across the nation are still receiving doses that are too low to be effective. PMID:25012549

  1. Dose Ranging, Expanded Acute Toxicity and Safety Pharmacology Studies for Intravenously Administered Functionalized Graphene Nanoparticle Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Kanakia, Shruti; Toussaint, Jimmy; Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Tembulkar, Tanuf; Lee, Stephen; Jiang, Ya-Ping; Lin, Richard Z.; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Moore, William; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-01-01

    Graphene nanoparticles dispersions show immense potential as multifunctional agents for in vivo biomedical applications. Herein, we follow regulatory guidelines for pharmaceuticals that recommend safety pharmacology assessment at least 10 – 100 times higher than the projected therapeutic dose, and present comprehensive single dose response, expanded acute toxicology, toxicokinetics, and respiratory/cardiovascular safety pharmacology results for intravenously administered dextran-coated graphene oxide nanoplatelet (GNP-Dex) formulations to rats at doses between 1–500 mg/kg. Our results indicate that the maximum tolerable dose (MTD) of GNP-Dex is between 50 mg/kg ≤ MTD < 125 mg/kg, blood half-life < 30 minutes, and majority of nanoparticles excreted within 24 hours through feces. Histopathology changes were noted at ≥ 250 mg/kg in the heart, liver, lung, spleen, and kidney; we found no changes in the brain and no GNP-Dex related effects in the cardiovascular parameters or hematological factors (blood, lipid, and metabolic panels) at doses < 125 mg/kg. The results open avenues for pivotal preclinical single and repeat dose safety studies following good laboratory practices (GLP) as required by regulatory agencies for investigational new drug (IND) application. PMID:24854092

  2. A comparative study of space radiation organ doses and associated cancer risks using PHITS and HZETRN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadori, Amir A.; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Slaba, Tony C.; Shavers, Mark R.; Semones, Edward J.; Van Baalen, Mary; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2013-10-01

    NASA currently uses one-dimensional deterministic transport to generate values of the organ dose equivalent needed to calculate stochastic radiation risk following crew space exposures. In this study, organ absorbed doses and dose equivalents are calculated for 50th percentile male and female astronaut phantoms using both the NASA High Charge and Energy Transport Code to perform one-dimensional deterministic transport and the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System to perform three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Two measures of radiation risk, effective dose and risk of exposure-induced death (REID) are calculated using the organ dose equivalents resulting from the two methods of radiation transport. For the space radiation environments and simplified shielding configurations considered, small differences (<8%) in the effective dose and REID are found. However, for the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) boundary condition, compensating errors are observed, indicating that comparisons between the integral measurements of complex radiation environments and code calculations can be misleading. Code-to-code benchmarks allow for the comparison of differential quantities, such as secondary particle differential fluence, to provide insight into differences observed in integral quantities for particular components of the GCR spectrum.

  3. A Monte Carlo Study for Photoneutron Dose Estimations around the High-Energy Linacs

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, N; Miri-Hakimabad, S H; Rafat-Motavalli, L

    2014-01-01

    Background: High-energy linear accelerator (linac) is a valuable tool and the most commonly used device for external beam radiation treatments in cancer patients. In the linac head, high-energy photons with energies above the threshold of (γ,n) interaction produce photoneutrons. These photoneutrons deliver the extra dose to the patients undergoing radiation treatment and increase the risk of secondary cancer. Objective: In this study, a simplified model of the linac head was simulated and photoneutron dose equivalent was calculated at the isocenter and maze in the sphere detector. In addition, the absorbed and equivalent dose of photoneutron were estimated in the some organs of the phantom. Methods: The simulations were made using the Monte Carlo code. The ICRP reference adult male voxel phantom was used as the human body model for dosimetry calculations. Results: The results of dose calculations at the isocenter and maze showed that photoneutron dose decreases as the function of distance from the isocenter and increases with increasing the distance from the entrance maze. Conclusion: It is concluded that the simplified model of linac head is a useful and reliable method in dosimetry calculations. Calculations illustrated that the photoneutron dose is not negligible and duo to its harmful biological effects on body, it should be considered in the treatment plans. PMID:25599059

  4. Pharmacokinetics of pholcodine in healthy volunteers: single and chronic dosing studies.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z R; Bochner, F; Somogyi, A

    1988-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of pholcodine after two single doses and after chronic administration were studied in healthy human volunteers. 2. Six subjects received single oral doses of 20 and 60 mg of pholcodine according to a balanced cross-over design with an interval of 3 weeks between the two treatments. Blood and saliva samples and all urine were collected over 168 h after each dosage administration. Subsequently, the same subjects received 20 mg pholcodine 8 hourly orally for 10 days. Blood and saliva samples and all urine were collected during an 8 h dosing interval after the last dose on day 11. 3. Plasma, saliva and urine concentrations of pholcodine were determined by a high performance liquid chromatographic assay. 4. After the single doses, pholcodine was absorbed rapidly (tmax = 1.6 +/- 1.2 h) and eliminated slowly with a mean half-life of 50.1 +/- 4.1 h. The renal clearance of pholcodine was 137 +/- 34 ml min-1 and was inversely correlated with urine pH (r = 0.60) but not with urine flow rate. 26.2 +/- 3.3% of the dose was excreted as unchanged pholcodine after both doses. The concentration of pholcodine in saliva was 3.6 times higher than in plasma. 5. After chronic administration, the pharmacokinetics of pholcodine were not statistically different from the single dose parameters. 6. Pholcodine did not appear to undergo conjugation. The plasma protein binding was 23.5%. Morphine, in unconjugated or conjugated form, was not detected in the urine of any subject after pholcodine administration. PMID:3190994

  5. Dose site reactions and related findings after vaccine administration in safety studies.

    PubMed

    Baldrick, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Potential new human vaccines undergo toxicology testing to evaluate local reactogenicity and systemic toxicity. A review of 30 recently published and in-house repeat dose toxicity studies with a variety of vaccines was performed. Species tested were generally rat or rabbit, usually by intramuscular (although occasionally subcutaneous) injection. Results showed no unexpected findings indicating vaccine toxicity, but classic signs of enhanced acute and/or chronic inflammation at the dose site compared with that seen in injected control animals, often accompanied by changes in draining lymph nodes and the spleen (lymphoid hyperplasia and/or increased weight). Other associated signs of a response to vaccine dosing were altered clinical pathology parameters (commonly raised blood neutrophil count and altered globulin level). No obvious difference in dose site or systemic reaction was seen across vaccine, species or the dose route used. A non-dose recovery period of 2 to 4 weeks was sufficient to show evidence of reversibility of dose site effects. Injection site, lymphoid tissue and clinical pathological changes can be interpreted as related to an expected reaction after vaccine dosing, with generation of an immune response largely as a result of the presence of adjuvant, although direct vaccine antigen involvement was also occasionally demonstrated by the presence of a slightly increased inflammatory response seen over adjuvant treatment only. Overall, the need for toxicity testing of vaccines is in line with current regulatory guideline requirements and has proven to be a valuable part of the safety evaluation process prior to human use. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26968331

  6. Feasibility study of the neutron dose for real-time image-guided proton therapy: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Sung; Shin, Jung Suk; Kim, Daehyun; Shin, Eunhyuk; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungkoo; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Ju, Sanggyu; Chung, Yoonsun; Jung, Sang Hoon; Han, Youngyih

    2015-07-01

    Two full rotating gantries with different nozzles (multipurpose nozzle with MLC, scanning dedicated nozzle) for a conventional cyclotron system are installed and being commissioned for various proton treatment options at Samsung Medical Center in Korea. The purpose of this study is to use Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, for X-ray imaging equipment under various treatment conditions. At first, we investigated the H/D for various modifications of the beamline devices (scattering, scanning, multi-leaf collimator, aperture, compensator) at the isocenter and at 20, 40 and 60 cm distances from the isocenter, and we compared our results with those of other research groups. Next, we investigated the neutron dose at the X-ray equipment used for real-time imaging under various treatment conditions. Our investigation showed doses of 0.07 ~ 0.19 mSv/Gy at the X-ray imaging equipment, depending on the treatment option and interestingly, the 50% neutron dose reduction was observed due to multileaf collimator during proton scanning treatment with the multipurpose nozzle. In future studies, we plan to measure the neutron dose experimentally and to validate the simulation data for X-ray imaging equipment for use as an additional neutron dose reduction method.

  7. SU-E-T-215: Interactive Dose Shaping: Proof of Concept Study for Six Prostate Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kamerling, CP; Ziegenhein, P; Oelfke, U; Sterzing, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To provide a proof of concept study for IMRT treatment planning through interactive dose shaping (IDS) by utilising the respective tools to create IMRT treatment plans for six prostate patients. Methods: The IDS planning paradigm aims to perform interactive local dose adaptations of an IMRT plan without compromising already established valuable dose features in real-time. Various IDS tools are available in our in-house treatment planning software Dynaplan and were utilised to create IMRT treatment plans for six patients with an adeno-carcinoma of the prostate. The sequenced IDS treatment plans were compared to conventionally optimised clinically approved plans (9 beams, co-planar). The starting point consisted of open fields. The IDS tools were utilised to sculpt dose out of the rectum and bladder. For each patient, several IDS plans were created, with different trade-offs between organ sparing and target coverage. The reference dose distributions were imported into Dynaplan. For each patient, the IDS treatment plan with a similar or better trade-off between target coverage and OAR sparing was selected for plan evaluation, guided by a physician. Pencil beam dose calculation was performed on a grid with a voxel size of 1.95×1.95×2.0 mm{sup 3}. D98%, D2%, mean dose and dose-volume indicators as specified by Quantec were calculated for plan evaluation. Results: It was possible to utilise the software prototype to generate treatment plans for prostate patient geometries in 15–45 minutes. Individual local dose adaptations could be performed in less than one second. The average differences compared to the reference plans were for the mean dose: 0.0 Gy (boost) and 1.2 Gy (CTV), for D98%: −1.1 Gy and for D2%: 1.1 Gy (both target volumes). The dose-volume quality indicators were well below the Quantec constraints. Conclusion: Real-time treatment planning utilising IDS is feasible and has the potential to be implemented clinically. Research at The Institute of

  8. Beyond Gaussians: a study of single-spot modeling for scanning proton dose calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yupeng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Anand, Aman; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2012-02-01

    Active spot scanning proton therapy is becoming increasingly adopted by proton therapy centers worldwide. Unlike passive-scattering proton therapy, active spot scanning proton therapy, especially intensity-modulated proton therapy, requires proper modeling of each scanning spot to ensure accurate computation of the total dose distribution contributed from a large number of spots. During commissioning of the spot scanning gantry at the Proton Therapy Center in Houston, it was observed that the long-range scattering protons in a medium may have been inadequately modeled for high-energy beams by a commercial treatment planning system, which could lead to incorrect prediction of field size effects on dose output. In this study, we developed a pencil beam algorithm for scanning proton dose calculation by focusing on properly modeling individual scanning spots. All modeling parameters required by the pencil beam algorithm can be generated based solely on a few sets of measured data. We demonstrated that low-dose halos in single-spot profiles in the medium could be adequately modeled with the addition of a modified Cauchy-Lorentz distribution function to a double-Gaussian function. The field size effects were accurately computed at all depths and field sizes for all energies, and good dose accuracy was also achieved for patient dose verification. The implementation of the proposed pencil beam algorithm also enabled us to study the importance of different modeling components and parameters at various beam energies. The results of this study may be helpful in improving dose calculation accuracy and simplifying beam commissioning and treatment planning processes for spot scanning proton therapy

  9. Beyond Gaussians: a study of single spot modeling for scanning proton dose calculation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yupeng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Anand, Aman; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    Active spot scanning proton therapy is becoming increasingly adopted by proton therapy centers worldwide. Unlike passive-scattering proton therapy, active spot scanning proton therapy, especially intensity-modulated proton therapy, requires proper modeling of each scanning spot to ensure accurate computation of the total dose distribution contributed from a large number of spots. During commissioning of the spot scanning gantry at the Proton Therapy Center in Houston, it was observed that the long-range scattering protons in a medium may have been inadequately modeled for high-energy beams by a commercial treatment planning system, which could lead to incorrect prediction of field-size effects on dose output. In the present study, we developed a pencil-beam algorithm for scanning-proton dose calculation by focusing on properly modeling individual scanning spots. All modeling parameters required by the pencil-beam algorithm can be generated based solely on a few sets of measured data. We demonstrated that low-dose halos in single-spot profiles in the medium could be adequately modeled with the addition of a modified Cauchy-Lorentz distribution function to a double-Gaussian function. The field-size effects were accurately computed at all depths and field sizes for all energies, and good dose accuracy was also achieved for patient dose verification. The implementation of the proposed pencil beam algorithm also enabled us to study the importance of different modeling components and parameters at various beam energies. The results of this study may be helpful in improving dose calculation accuracy and simplifying beam commissioning and treatment planning processes for spot scanning proton therapy. PMID:22297324

  10. Commercial production and distribution of fresh fruits and vegetables: A scoping study on the importance of produce pathways to dose. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, T.L.; Anderson, D.M.; Farris, W.T.; Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1992-09-01

    This letter report summarizes a scoping study that examined the potential importance of fresh fruit and vegetable pathways to dose. A simple production index was constructed with data collected from the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA), the United States Bureau of the Census, and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project staff from Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, in cooperation with members of the Technical Steering Panel (TSP), selected lettuce and spinach as the produce pathways most likely to impact dose. County agricultural reports published in 1956 provided historical descriptions of the predominant distribution patterns of fresh lettuce and spinach from production regions to local population centers. Pathway rankings and screening dose estimates were calculated for specific populations living in selected locations within the HEDR study area.

  11. Pharmacokinetic study of low- versus high-dose medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in women.

    PubMed

    Ohtsu, T; Fujii, H; Wakita, H; Igarashi, T; Itoh, K; Imoto, S; Kohagura, M; Sasaki, Y

    1998-01-01

    The present study was conducted to compare the pharmacokinetics (PK) of low-dose versus high-dose medroxyprogesterone (MPA) as a once-daily oral administration. Of 32 patients, all women, enrolled in this PK study, 18 received 600 mg MPA daily and 14 received 1200 mg daily. Detailed PK data were obtained on day 1 and after more than 4 weeks of MPA treatment. In addition, multiple data for the minimum steady-state concentration (Css min) were analyzed. The MPA serum concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Wide interpatient variability was found in the PK parameters obtained both on day 1 and after more than 4 weeks. There were no clear relationships between the oral dose and the MPA peak concentration (Cmax), area under the time versus concentration curve (AUC), or mean Css min. Weight gains of 10% or more were demonstrated more frequently in the high-dose group (P < 0.01). Liver dysfunction (n = 5) did not influence the PK of MPA. Five patients demonstrated extremely low AUC and Cmax (< 10 ng/ml) values on day 1. Phenobarbital, dexamethasone and betamethasone were being taken concomitantly with the MPA each by one patient. The serum MPA concentrations were markedly increased after the discontinuation of phenobarbital in that patient, suggesting a drug interaction. At present we cannot recommend the high dose of MPA, except in clinical studies, from a PK or a pharmacodynamic points of view. PMID:9619751

  12. Inclusion of Safety Pharmacology Endpoints in Repeat-Dose Toxicity Studies.

    PubMed

    Redfern, Will S

    2015-01-01

    Whereas pharmacological responses tend to be fairly rapid in onset and are therefore detectable after a single dose, some diminish on repeated dosing, and others increase in magnitude and therefore can be missed or underestimated in single-dose safety pharmacology studies. Safety pharmacology measurements can be incorporated into repeat-dose toxicity studies, either routinely or on an ad hoc basis. Drivers for this are both scientific (see above) and regulatory (e.g. ICH S6, S7, S9). There are inherent challenges in achieving this: the availability of suitable technical and scientific expertise in the test facility, unsuitable laboratory conditions, use of simultaneous (as opposed to staggered) dosing, requirement for toxicokinetic sampling, unsuitability of certain techniques (e.g. use of anaesthesia, surgical implantation, food restriction), equipment availability at close proximity and sensitivity of the methods to detect small, clinically relevant, changes. Nonetheless, 'fit-for-purpose' data can still be acquired without requiring additional animals. Examples include assessment of behaviour, sensorimotor, visual and autonomic functions, ambulatory ECG and blood pressure, echocardiography, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic function. This is entirely achievable if the safety pharmacology measurements are relatively unobtrusive, both with respect to the animals and to the toxicology study itself. Careful pharmacological validation of any methods used, and establishing their detection sensitivity, is vital to ensure the credibility of generated data. PMID:26091647

  13. Dose Dependent Effect of Iso-Octane on HaCaT: A Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Das, Lopamudra; Das, Soumen; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Improved understanding of cytotoxicity under chemical assaults may be achieved by multimodal analysis of cellular morphology, viability, molecular expressions, and biophysical properties. Materials and Methods: In this study dose-dependent effects of an organic solvent (OS), iso-octane (IO), known to cause skin irritation, has been explored multimodally for understanding its effect on structural and functional profile of normal epithelial cell population in vitro. Results: Under IO exposures, after 5 h there was a sharp decrease in viability of HaCaT with increasing doses which may be due to disruption in cellular association noted via immunocytochemical study and was further supported by the decreased expression of E-cadherin at transcriptomic level. Dislocation of E-cadherin from membrane to the cytoplasm occurred with increasing doses. The dose-dependent changes in varied aspects of bioelectrical properties, having plausible correlation with cellular viability, association, and adherence were noteworthy at 5 h of IO exposure. Evaluation of biomechanical properties by micropipette aspiration showed a distinct change in cellular stiffness in terms of increase in suction force and post-suction alteration in cellular shape. The cells became stiffer and fragile with increasing IO doses. Conclusion: Present study explicated dose–dependent cytotoxicity of IO on HaCaT and explored the usefulness of this approach to develop in vitro model system to evaluate epithelial toxicity with level-free markers. PMID:26862266

  14. SU-E-J-260: Dose Recomputation Versus Dose Deformation for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Lung Tumors: A Dosimetric Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, M; Flynn, R; Xia, J; Bayouth, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric accuracy between recomputed dose and deformed dose for stereotactic body radiation therapy in lung tumors. Methods: Two non-small-cell lung cancer patients were analyzed in this study, both of whom underwent 4D-CT and breath-hold CT imaging. Treatment planning was performed using the breath-hold CT images for the dose calculation and the 4D-CT images for determining internal target volumes. 4D-CT images were reconstructed with ten breathing amplitude for each patient. Maximum tumor motion was 13 mm for patient 1, and 7 mm for patient 2. The delivered dose was calculated using the 4D-CT images and using the same planning parameters as for the breath-hold CT. The deformed dose was computed by deforming the planning dose using the deformable image registration between each binned CT and the breath-hold CT. Results: For patient 1, the difference between recomputed dose and deformed mean lung dose (MLD) ranged from 11.3%(0.5 Gy) to 1.1%(0.06 Gy), mean tumor dose (MTD) ranged from 0.4%(0.19 Gy) to −1.3%(−0.6 Gy), lung V20 ranged from +0.74% to −0.33%. The differences in all three dosimetric criteria remain relatively invariant to target motion. For patient 2, V20 ranged from +0.42% to −2.41%, MLD ranged from −0.2%(−0.05 Gy) to −10.4%(−2.12 Gy), and MTD ranged from −0.5%(−0.31 Gy) to −5.3%(−3.24 Gy). The difference between recomputed dose and deformed dose shows strong correlation with tumor motion in all three dosimetric measurements. Conclusion: The correlation between dosimetric criteria and tumor motion is patient-specific, depending on the tumor locations, motion pattern, and deformable image registration accuracy. Deformed dose can be a good approximation for recalculated dose when tumor motion is small. This research is supported by Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc and Iowa Center for Research By Undergraduates.

  15. Cobalt-60 tomotherapy: Clinical treatment planning and phantom dose delivery studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanesar, Sandeep; Darko, Johnson; Joshi, Chandra P.; Kerr, Andrew; John Schreiner, L.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Investigations have shown that a Cobalt-60 (Co-60) radioactive source has the potential to play a role in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In this paper, Co-60 tomotherapy's conformal dose delivery potential is evaluated by delivering conformal dose plans on a cylindrical homogeneous phantom containing clinical structures similar to those found in a typical head and neck (H and N) cancer. Also, the clinical potential of Co-60 tomotherapy is investigated by generating 2D clinical treatment plans for H and N and prostate anatomical regions. These plans are compared with the 6 MV based treatment plans for modalities such as linear accelerator-based tomotherapy and broad beam IMRT, and 15 MV based 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT).Methods: For experimental validation studies, clinical and nonclinical conformal dose patterns were delivered on circular, homogeneous phantoms containing GafChromic film. For clinical planning study, dose calculations were performed with the EGSnrc Monte Carlo program, where a Theratronics 780C Co-60 unit and a 6 MV linear accelerator were modeled with a MIMiC binary multileaf collimator. An inhouse inverse treatment planning system was used to optimize tomotherapy plans using the same optimization parameters for both Co-60 and 6 MV beams. The IMRT and 3DCRT plans for the clinical cases were generated entirely in the Eclipse treatment planning system based on inhouse IMRT and 3DCRT site specific protocols.Results: The doses delivered to the homogeneous phantoms agreed with the calculations, indicating that it is possible to deliver highly conformal doses with the Co-60 unit. The dose distributions for Co-60 tomotherapy clinical plans for both clinical cases were similar to those obtained with 6 MV based tomotherapy and IMRT, and much more conformal compared to 3DCRT plans. The dose area histograms showed that the Co-60 plans achieve the dose objectives for the targets and organs at risk.Conclusions: These results

  16. [A comparative study between low-dose and high-dose medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in the treatment of advanced and recurrent breast cancer--in relation to dose, serum concentration and response. Osaka Breast Cancer Research Group].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, J; Yayoi, E; Takatsuka, Y; Aikawa, T; Maeura, Y; Kobayashi, T; Miyauchi, K; Kotsuma, Y

    1997-05-01

    A prospective randomized study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of MPA in the treatment of breast cancer by comparing low dose (600 mg/day) with high dose (1,200 mg/day) of MPA. In 35 evaluable cases, the response rate to treatment was 40.0% (8/20) with low dose MPA and 26.7% (4/15) with high dose MPA. There was no significant difference between the two groups. The serum MPA concentration measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay was 23.2 +/- 17.6 ng/ml in the low-dose group and 89.5 +/- 56.7 ng/ml in the high-dose group. Intrapatient variability in serum MPA concentration was relatively stable, but interpatient variability was large. No correlation was found between the response rate and serum MPA concentration. The above results indicate that a low dose of MPA (600 mg/day) is a useful treatment with high effectiveness and safety in advanced and recurrent breast cancer patients. Though no exact data on the optimal serum concentration could not be obtained, it was obvious that a successful response cannot be expected from a serum MPA concentration of less than 17 ng/ml, which was the average serum concentration in NC and PD patients of the low-dose group. PMID:9170519

  17. Bioavailability of ambroxol sustained release preparations. Part II: Single and multiple oral dose studies in man.

    PubMed

    Janssen, T J; Guelen, P J; Vree, T B; Botterblom, M H; Valducci, R

    1988-01-01

    The bioavailability of a new ambroxol sustained release preparation (75 mg) based on a dialyzing membrane for controlled release was studied in healthy volunteers after single and multiple oral dose in comparison with a standard sustained release formulation in a cross-over study under carefully controlled conditions. Plasma concentrations of ambroxol were measured by means of a HPLC method. Based on AUC data both preparations are found to be bioequivalent, but show different plasma concentration profiles. The test preparation showed a more pronounced sustained release profile than the reference preparation (single dose) resulting in significantly higher steady state plasma levels. PMID:3365282

  18. A Raman spectroscopic study of cell response to clinical doses of ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Harder, Samantha J; Matthews, Quinn; Isabelle, Martin; Brolo, Alexandre G; Lum, Julian J; Jirasek, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The drive toward personalized radiation therapy (RT) has created significant interest in determining patient-specific tumor and normal tissue responses to radiation. Raman spectroscopy (RS) is a non-invasive and label-free technique that can detect radiation response through assessment of radiation-induced biochemical changes in tumor cells. In the current study, single-cell RS identified specific radiation-induced responses in four human epithelial tumor cell lines: lung (H460), breast (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231), and prostate (LNCaP), following exposure to clinical doses of radiation (2-10 Gy). At low radiation doses (2 Gy), H460 and MCF-7 cell lines showed an increase in glycogen-related spectral features, and the LNCaP cell line showed a membrane phospholipid-related radiation response. In these cell lines, only spectral information from populations receiving 10 Gy or less was required to identify radiation-related features using principal component analysis (PCA). In contrast, the MDA-MB-231 cell line showed a significant increase in protein relative to nucleic acid and lipid spectral features at doses of 6 Gy or higher, and high-dose information (30, 50 Gy) was required for PCA to identify this biological response. The biochemical nature of the radiation-related changes occurring in cells exposed to clinical doses was found to segregate by status of p53 and radiation sensitivity. Furthermore, the utility of RS to identify a biological response in human tumor cells exposed to therapeutic doses of radiation was found to be governed by the extent of the biochemical changes induced by a radiation response and is therefore cell line specific. The results of this study demonstrate the utility and effectiveness of single-cell RS to identify and measure biological responses in tumor cells exposed to standard radiotherapy doses. PMID:25588147

  19. Phase II dose-finding study of balugrastim in breast cancer patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gladkov, Oleg; Moiseyenko, Vladimir; Bondarenko, Igor N; Shparyk, Yaroslav; Barash, Steven; Adar, Liat; Bias, Peter; Avisar, Noa

    2015-06-01

    Balugrastim is a once-per-cycle, fixed-dose recombinant protein comprising human serum albumin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor under development for prevention of severe neutropenia in cancer patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. This phase II, multicenter, active-controlled, dose-finding pilot study evaluated balugrastim safety and efficacy versus pegfilgrastim in breast cancer patients scheduled to receive myelosuppressive chemotherapy and investigated two doses with similar efficacy to pegfilgrastim for a subsequent phase III study. Patients received four cycles of doxorubicin/docetaxel chemotherapy and with each successive cycle were randomized sequentially to escalating doses of balugrastim [30 (n = 11), 40 (n = 21), or 50 mg (n = 20)] or a fixed dose of pegfilgrastim [6 mg (n = 26)] post-chemotherapy. Balugrastim doses were escalated as planned. The incidence of adverse events was similar among the balugrastim groups and between all balugrastim doses and pegfilgrastim. The most frequently reported adverse events were neutropenia, alopecia, and nausea. During cycle 1, severe neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count of <0.5 × 10(9)/L) occurred in 40, 67, and 50 % and febrile neutropenia occurred in 20.0, 9.5, and 10.0 % of patients receiving balugrastim 30, 40, and 50 mg, respectively; in patients receiving pegfilgrastim, 48 % experienced severe neutropenia and 8 % experienced febrile neutropenia. Duration of severe neutropenia (DSN) for each treatment group was 0.9, 1.6, 1.1, and 0.9 days, respectively. In the remaining three chemotherapy cycles, DSN was ≤1 day across all treatment groups. Balugrastim 50 mg was comparable to pegfilgrastim in terms of safety and overall efficacy in breast cancer patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. PMID:25966791

  20. Pilot Study on Image Quality and Radiation Dose of CT Colonography with Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction Three-Dimensional

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hesong; Liang, Dan; Luo, Mingyue; Duan, Chaijie; Cai, Wenli; Zhu, Shanshan; Qiu, Jianping; Li, Wenru

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate image quality and radiation dose of CT colonography (CTC) with adaptive iterative dose reduction three-dimensional (AIDR3D). Methods Ten segments of porcine colon phantom were collected, and 30 pedunculate polyps with diameters ranging from 1 to 15 mm were simulated on each segment. Image data were acquired with tube voltage of 120 kVp, and current doses of 10 mAs, 20 mAs, 30 mAs, 40 mAs, 50 mAs, respectively. CTC images were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and AIDR3D. Two radiologists blindly evaluated image quality. Quantitative evaluation of image quality included image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Qualitative image quality was evaluated with a five-score scale. Radiation dose was calculated based on dose-length product. Ten volunteers were examined supine 50 mAs with FBP and prone 20 mAs with AIDR3D, and image qualities were assessed. Paired t test was performed for statistical analysis. Results For 20 mAs with AIDR3D and 50 mAs with FBP, image noise, SNRs and CNRs were (16.4 ± 1.6) HU vs. (16.8 ± 2.6) HU, 1.9 ± 0.2 vs. 1.9 ± 0.4, and 62.3 ± 6.8 vs. 62.0 ± 6.2, respectively; qualitative image quality scores were 4.1 and 4.3, respectively; their differences were all not statistically significant. Compared with 50 mAs with FBP, radiation dose (1.62 mSv) of 20 mAs with AIDR3D was decreased by 60.0%. There was no statistically significant difference in image noise, SNRs, CNRs and qualitative image quality scores between prone 20 mAs with AIDR3D and supine 50 mAs with FBP in 10 volunteers, the former reduced radiation dose by 61.1%. Conclusion Image quality of CTC using 20 mAs with AIDR3D could be comparable to standard 50 mAs with FBP, radiation dose of the former reduced by about 60.0% and was only 1.62 mSv. PMID:25635839

  1. United States-assisted studies on dose reconstruction in the former Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Bouville, A.

    1995-12-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident, the US and the USSR entered into an agreement to work on the safety of civilian nuclear reactors; one aspect of that work was to study the environmental transport and health effects of radionuclides released by the accident. After the break-up of the USSR separate agreements were established between the US and Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia to continue work on dose reconstruction and epidemiologic studies of health effects from exposure to external radiation and the incorporation of radionuclides. Studies in Belarus and Ukraine related to the Chernobyl accident now emphasize epidemiologic: studies of childhood-thyroid cancer and leukemia, and eye-lens-cataract formation in liquidators. Supporting studies on dose reconstruction emphasize a variety of ecological, physical, and biological techniques. Studies being conducted in Russia currently emphasize health effects in the workers and the population around the Mayak Industrial Association. As this production complex is an analogue of the US Hanford Works, advantage is being taken of the US experience in conducting a similar, recently completed dose-reconstruction study. In all cases the primary work on dose reconstruction is being performed by scientists from the former Soviet Union. US assistance is in the form of expert consultation and participation, exchange visits, provision of supplies and equipment, and other forms of local assistance.

  2. The impact of low-Z and high-Z metal implants in IMRT: A Monte Carlo study of dose inaccuracies in commercial dose algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Spadea, Maria Francesca; Verburg, Joost Mathias; Seco, Joao; Baroni, Guido

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the dosimetric impact of low-Z and high-Z metallic implants on IMRT plans. Methods: Computed tomography (CT) scans of three patients were analyzed to study effects due to the presence of Titanium (low-Z), Platinum and Gold (high-Z) inserts. To eliminate artifacts in CT images, a sinogram-based metal artifact reduction algorithm was applied. IMRT dose calculations were performed on both the uncorrected and corrected images using a commercial planning system (convolution/superposition algorithm) and an in-house Monte Carlo platform. Dose differences between uncorrected and corrected datasets were computed and analyzed using gamma index (Pγ{sub <1}) and setting 2 mm and 2% as distance to agreement and dose difference criteria, respectively. Beam specific depth dose profiles across the metal were also examined. Results: Dose discrepancies between corrected and uncorrected datasets were not significant for low-Z material. High-Z materials caused under-dosage of 20%–25% in the region surrounding the metal and over dosage of 10%–15% downstream of the hardware. Gamma index test yielded Pγ{sub <1}>99% for all low-Z cases; while for high-Z cases it returned 91% < Pγ{sub <1}< 99%. Analysis of the depth dose curve of a single beam for low-Z cases revealed that, although the dose attenuation is altered inside the metal, it does not differ downstream of the insert. However, for high-Z metal implants the dose is increased up to 10%–12% around the insert. In addition, Monte Carlo method was more sensitive to the presence of metal inserts than superposition/convolution algorithm. Conclusions: The reduction in terms of dose of metal artifacts in CT images is relevant for high-Z implants. In this case, dose distribution should be calculated using Monte Carlo algorithms, given their superior accuracy in dose modeling in and around the metal. In addition, the knowledge of the composition of metal inserts improves the accuracy of

  3. Progesterone in experimental permanent stroke: a dose-response and therapeutic time-window study.

    PubMed

    Wali, Bushra; Ishrat, Tauheed; Won, Soonmi; Stein, Donald G; Sayeed, Iqbal

    2014-02-01

    Currently, the only approved treatment for ischaemic stroke is tissue plasminogen activator, a clot-buster. This treatment can have dangerous consequences if not given within the first 4 h after stroke. Our group and others have shown progesterone to be beneficial in preclinical studies of stroke, but a progesterone dose-response and time-window study is lacking. We tested male Sprague-Dawley rats (12 months old) with permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion or sham operations on multiple measures of sensory, motor and cognitive performance. For the dose-response study, animals received intraperitoneal injections of progesterone (8, 16 or 32 mg/kg) at 1 h post-occlusion, and subcutaneous injections at 6 h and then once every 24 h for 7 days. For the time-window study, the optimal dose of progesterone was given starting at 3, 6 or 24 h post-stroke. Behavioural recovery was evaluated at repeated intervals. Rats were killed at 22 days post-stroke and brains extracted for evaluation of infarct volume. Both 8 and 16 mg/kg doses of progesterone produced attenuation of infarct volume compared with the placebo, and improved functional outcomes up to 3 weeks after stroke on locomotor activity, grip strength, sensory neglect, gait impairment, motor coordination and spatial navigation tests. In the time-window study, the progesterone group exhibited substantial neuroprotection as late as 6 h after stroke onset. Compared with placebo, progesterone showed a significant reduction in infarct size with 3- and 6-h delays. Moderate doses (8 and 16 mg/kg) of progesterone reduced infarct size and improved functional deficits in our clinically relevant model of stroke. The 8 mg/kg dose was optimal in improving motor, sensory and memory function, and this effect was observed over a large therapeutic time window. Progesterone shows promise as a potential therapeutic agent and should be examined for safety and efficacy in a clinical trial for ischaemic stroke. PMID:24374329

  4. Pilot study of patient and phantom breast dose measurements in Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramova-Cholakova, Simona; Vassileva, Jenia

    2008-01-01

    A pilot study of breast dose measurements on two mammography units in Bulgaria was conducted. The mean glandular doses (MGDs) to samples of approximately 60 women per unit were measured. MGD with a standard PMMA phantom was measured as well. The MGDs were calculated according to the European protocol on dosimetry in mammography as well as to the European protocol for the quality control of the physical and technical aspects of mammography screening. The measured women's MGDs were divided into three groups depending on the compressed breast thicknesses. The results for the group of thicknesses in the interval 40-60 mm were compared with the results from the measurements on the standard 45 mm PMMA phantom. Some differences were found which could be due to errors in breast thickness measurements, differences in breast and phantom densities and other factors. A standardized procedure was elaborated for patient dose measurement and calculation both from patient and phantom studies.

  5. Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study of moniliformin in rats.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Martina; Atosuo, Janne; Jestoi, Marika; Nathanail, Alexis V; Kokkonen, Ulla-Maija; Anttila, Marjukka; Koivisto, Pertti; Lilius, Esa-Matti; Peltonen, Kimmo

    2015-02-17

    Moniliformin is a Fusarium mycotoxin mainly produced by several species infecting grains in different climatic conditions. According to our previous studies, it is acutely toxic to rats, with an LD50 cut-off value of 25mg/kg b.w. To further assess the possible health risks of low dose exposure to moniliformin, a subacute oral toxicity study was conducted in Sprague-Dawley rats, adapting OECD guideline 407. Five dose groups and two satellite groups, each consisting of five male rats, were daily exposed to moniliformin by gavage. Two rats in the highest dose group, showed decreased activity followed by acute heart failure and death. The rats of the lower doses (<9mg/kg b.w.) showed no signs of toxicity. The daily intake of moniliformin strongly reduced the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in all dose groups. The decrease continued in the satellite group during the follow-up period, indicating a severe impact on the immune system and a LOAEL value of 3mg/kg b.w. for moniliformin. Moniliformin was rapidly excreted into urine, ranging between 20.2 and 31.5% daily and showed no signs of accumulation. The concentration of moniliformin in faeces was less than 2%, which suggests efficient absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25482064

  6. Dose ranging study of cefpimizole (U-63196E) for treatment of uncomplicated gonorrhea in men.

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, E T; Pegram, P S; Roddy, R E; Handsfield, H H; Hampton, K D; Shafran, K M; Hook, E W

    1986-01-01

    We conducted a two-center dose ranging study to evaluate the efficacy, tolerance, and toxicity of cefpimizole, a new cephalosporin, in the treatment of uncomplicated gonorrhea in 96 males. Twelve patients at each center were treated intramuscularly with single doses of 1.0, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.125 g of cefpimizole. All urethral infections were cured at the highest dose, but lower doses produced progressively decreasing cure rates of 90% (0.5 g), 83% (0.25 g), and 71% (0.125 g). Treatment failures of rectal and pharyngeal infections occurred at the highest dose level. Geometric mean MICs for cefpimizole for successfully and unsuccessfully treated volunteers were 0.088 and 0.282 micrograms/ml, respectively. A prominent adverse effect was clinically significant pain at the injection site, which occurred in 57 (59%) of 96 patients. Results of the study demonstrate that cefpimizole offers no advantage over currently available antibiotics in the treatment of uncomplicated gonorrhea in men. PMID:3089142

  7. Dose estimation for atomic bomb survivor studies: its evolution and present status.

    PubMed

    Cullings, Harry M; Fujita, Shoichiro; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Grant, Eric J; Kerr, George D; Preston, Dale L

    2006-07-01

    In the decade after the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, several large cohorts of survivors were organized for studies of radiation health effects. The U.S. Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) and its U.S./Japan successor, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), have performed continuous studies since then, with extensive efforts to collect data on survivor locations and shielding and to create systems to estimate individual doses from the bombs' neutrons and gamma rays. Several successive systems have been developed by extramural working groups and collaboratively implemented by ABCC and RERF investigators. We describe the cohorts and the history and evolution of dose estimation from early efforts through the newest system, DS02, emphasizing the technical development and use of DS02. We describe procedures and data developed at RERF to implement successive systems, including revised rosters of survivors, development of methods to calculate doses for some classes of persons not fitting criteria of the basic systems, and methods to correct for bias arising from errors in calculated doses. We summarize calculated doses and illustrate their change and elaboration through the various systems for a hypothetical example case in each city. We conclude with a description of current efforts and plans for further improvements. PMID:16808610

  8. A Pilot Study of the Impact of Double-Dose Robust Vocabulary Instruction on Children's Vocabulary Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Ann M.; Davis, Dawn L.

    2016-01-01

    Double-dose instruction, in which instructional lessons are supplemented to provide additional instructional time, is a mechanism used in some schools for boosting outcomes in certain academic areas. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of double-dose vocabulary instruction, relative to single-dose and business-as-usual control…

  9. Dose dependence of mass and microcalcification detection in digital mammography: Free response human observer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ruschin, Mark; Timberg, Pontus; Ba ring th, Magnus; Hemdal, Bengt; Svahn, Tony; Saunders, Rob S.; Samei, Ehsan; Andersson, Ingvar; Mattsson, Soeren; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Tingberg, Anders

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dose reduction in digital mammography on the detection of two lesion types--malignant masses and clusters of microcalcifications. Two free-response observer studies were performed--one for each lesion type. Ninety screening images were retrospectively selected; each image was originally acquired under automatic exposure conditions, corresponding to an average glandular dose of 1.3 mGy for a standard breast (50 mm compressed breast thickness with 50% glandularity). For each study, one to three simulated lesions were added to each of 40 images (abnormals) while 50 were kept without lesions (normals). Two levels of simulated system noise were added to the images yielding two new image sets, corresponding to simulated dose levels of 50% and 30% of the original images (100%). The manufacturer's standard display processing was subsequently applied to all images. Four radiologists experienced in mammography evaluated the images by searching for lesions and marking and assigning confidence levels to suspicious regions. The search data were analyzed using jackknife free-response (JAFROC) methodology. For the detection of masses, the mean figure-of-merit (FOM) averaged over all readers was 0.74, 0.71, and 0.68 corresponding to dose levels of 100%, 50%, and 30%, respectively. These values were not statistically different from each other (F=1.67, p=0.19) but showed a decreasing trend. In contrast, in the microcalcification study the mean FOM was 0.93, 0.67, and 0.38 for the same dose levels and these values were all significantly different from each other (F=109.84, p<0.0001). The results indicate that lowering the present dose level by a factor of two compromised the detection of microcalcifications but had a weaker effect on mass detection.

  10. Indoor terrestrial gamma dose rate mapping in France: a case study using two different geostatistical models.

    PubMed

    Warnery, E; Ielsch, G; Lajaunie, C; Cale, E; Wackernagel, H; Debayle, C; Guillevic, J

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma dose rates show important spatial variations in France. Previous studies resulted in maps of arithmetic means of indoor terrestrial gamma dose rates by "departement" (French district). However, numerous areas could not be characterized due to the lack of data. The aim of our work was to obtain more precise estimates of the spatial variability of indoor terrestrial gamma dose rates in France by using a more recent and complete data base and geostatistics. The study was based on the exploitation of 97,595 measurements results distributed in 17,404 locations covering all of France. Measurements were done by the Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) using RPL (Radio Photo Luminescent) dosimeters, exposed during several months between years 2011 and 2012 in French dentist surgeries and veterinary clinics. The data used came from dosimeters which were not exposed to anthropic sources. After removing the cosmic rays contribution in order to study only the telluric gamma radiation, it was decided to work with the arithmetic means of the time-series measurements, weighted by the time-exposure of the dosimeters, for each location. The values varied between 13 and 349 nSv/h, with an arithmetic mean of 76 nSv/h. The observed statistical distribution of the gamma dose rates was skewed to the right. Firstly, ordinary kriging was performed in order to predict the gamma dose rate on cells of 1*1 km(2), all over the domain. The second step of the study was to use an auxiliary variable in estimates. The IRSN achieved in 2010 a classification of the French geological formations, characterizing their uranium potential on the bases of geology and local measurement results of rocks uranium content. This information is georeferenced in a map at the scale 1:1,000,000. The geological uranium potential (GUP) was classified in 5 qualitative categories. As telluric gamma rays mostly come from the progenies of the (238)Uranium series present in rocks, this

  11. Rethinking Dosing Regimen Selection of Piperaquine for Malaria Chemoprevention: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Sambol, Nancy C.; Tappero, Jordan W.; Arinaitwe, Emmanuel; Parikh, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Background The combination of short-acting dihydroartemisinin and long-acting piperaquine (DP) is among the first-line therapies for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Population pharmacokinetic models of piperaquine (PQ) based on data from acute treatment of young children can be used to predict exposure profiles of piperaquine under different DP chemoprevention regimens. The purpose of our study was to make such predictions in young children. Methods Based on a prior population pharmacokinetic model of PQ in young Ugandan children, we simulated capillary plasma concentration-time profiles (including their variability) of candidate chemoprevention regimens for a reference population of 1–2 year olds weighing at least 11 kg. Candidate regimens that were tested included monthly administration of standard therapeutic doses, bimonthly dosing, and weekly dosing (with and without a loading dose). Results Once daily doses of 320 mg for three days (960 mg total) at the beginning of each month are predicted to achieve an average steady-state trough capillary piperaquine concentration of 35 ng/mL, with 60% achieving a level of 30 ng/mL or higher. In contrast, weekly dosing of 320 mg (i.e., 33% higher amount per month) is predicted to approximately double the average steady-state trough concentration, increase the percent of children predicted to achieve 30 ng/mL or higher (94%), while at the same time lowering peak concentrations. Exposure at steady-state, reached at approximately 3 months of multiple dosing, is expected to be approximately 2-fold higher than exposure following initial dosing, due to accumulation. A loading dose improves early exposure, thereby reducing the risk of breakthrough infections at the initiation of chemoprevention. Conclusions Once weekly chemoprevention of DP predicts favourable exposures with respect to both trough and peak concentrations. These predictions need to be verified, as well as safety evaluated, in field

  12. Development and characterization of a novel variable low-dose rate irradiator for in vivo mouse studies

    PubMed Central

    Olipitz, Werner; Hembrador, Sheena; Davidson, Matthew; Yanch, Jacquelyn C.; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation exposure of humans generally results in low doses delivered at low dose-rate. Our limited knowledge of the biological effects of low dose radiation is mainly based on data from the atomic bomb long-term survivor study (LSS) cohort. However, the total doses and dose-rates in the LSS cohort are still higher than most environmental and occupational exposures in humans. Importantly, the dose-rate is a critical determinant of health risks stemming from radiation exposure. Understanding the shape of the dose-rate response curve for different biological outcomes is thus crucial for projecting the biological hazard from radiation in different environmental and man-made conditions. A significant barrier to performing low dose-rate studies is the difficulty in creating radiation source configurations compatible with long-term cellular or animal experiments. In this study the design and characterization of a large area, 125I-based irradiator is described. The irradiator allows continuous long-term exposure of mice at variable dose-rates and can be sited in standard animal care facilities. The dose-rate is determined by the level of 125I activity added to a large NaOH filled, rectangular phantom. The desired dose rate is maintained at essentially constant levels by weekly additions of 125I to compensate for decay. Dosimetry results for long-term animal irradiation at targeted dose rates of 0.00021 and 0.0021 cGy min−1 are presented. PMID:20386202

  13. The OECD program to validate the rat uterotrophic bioassay. Phase 2: dose-response studies.

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Jun; Onyon, Lesley; Peddada, Shyamal; Ashby, John; Jacob, Elard; Owens, William

    2003-01-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development has completed phase 2 of an international validation program for the rodent uterotrophic bioassay. The purpose of the validation program was to demonstrate the performance of two versions of the uterotrophic bioassay, the immature female rat and the adult ovariectomized rat, in four standardized protocols. This article reports the dose-response studies of the validation program; the coded single-dose studies are reported in an accompanying paper. The dose-response study design used five selected weak estrogen agonists, bisphenol A, genistein, methoxychlor, nonylphenol, and o,p -DDT. These weak agonists were administered in a prescribed series of doses to measure the performance and reproducibility of the protocols among the participating laboratories. All protocols successfully detected increases in uterine weights when the weak agonists were administered. Within each protocol, there was good agreement and reproducibility of the dose response among laboratories with each substance. Substance-specific variations were observed in the influence of the route of administration on the uterine response, the potency as related to the dose producing the first statistically significant increase in uterine weights, and the maximum increase in uterine weight. Substantive performance differences were not observed between the uterotrophic bioassay versions or among the standardized protocols, and these were judged to be qualitatively equivalent. It is noteworthy that these results were reproducible under a variety of different experimental conditions (e.g., animal strain, diet, housing, bedding, vehicle, animal age), indicating that the bioassay's performance as a screen is robust. In conclusion, both the intact, immature, and adult OVX versions, and all protocols appear to be reproducible and transferable across laboratories and are able to detect weak estrogen agonists. PMID:12948896

  14. Antigen dose escalation study of a VEGF-based therapeutic cancer vaccine in non human primates.

    PubMed

    Morera, Yanelys; Bequet-Romero, Mónica; Ayala, Marta; Pérez, Pedro Puente; Castro, Jorge; Sánchez, Javier; Alba, José Suárez; Ancízar, Julio; Cosme, Karelia; Gavilondo, Jorge V

    2012-01-01

    CIGB-247 is a cancer therapeutic, based on recombinant modified human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as antigen, in combination with the oil free adjuvant VSSP (very small sized proteoliposomes of Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane). Our previous experimental studies in mice with CIGB-247 have shown that the vaccine has both anti-tumoral and anti-metastatic activity, and produces both antibodies that block VEGF-VEGF receptor interaction, and a specific T-cell cytotoxic response against tumor cells. CIGB-247, with an antigen dose of 100 μg, has been characterized by an excellent safety profile in mice, rats, rabbits, and non human primates. In this article we extend the immunogenicity and safety studies of CIGB-247 in non human primates, scaling the antigen dose from 100 μg to 200 and 400 μg/vaccination. Our results indicate that such dose escalation did not affect animal behavior, clinical status, and blood parameters and biochemistry. Also, vaccination did not interfere with skin deep skin wound healing. Anti-VEGF IgG antibodies and specific T-cell mediated responses were documented at all three studied doses. Antigen dose apparently did not determine differences in maximum antibody titer during the 8 weekly immunization induction phase, or the subsequent increase in antibodies seen for monthly boosters delivered afterwards. Higher antigen doses had a positive influence in antibody titer maintenance, after cessation of immunizations. Boosters were important to achieve maximum antibody VEGF blocking activity, and specific T-cell responses in all individuals. Purified IgG from CIGB-247 immunized monkey sera was able to impair proliferation and formation of capillary-like structures in Matrigel, for HMEC cells in culture. Altogether, these results support the further clinical development of the CIGB-247 therapeutic cancer vaccine, and inform on the potential mechanisms involved in its effect. PMID:22075086

  15. Degradation and annealing studies on gamma rays irradiated COTS PPD CISs at different dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zujun; Ma, Yingwu; Liu, Jing; Xue, Yuan; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo; Sheng, Jiangkun

    2016-06-01

    The degradation and annealing studies on Colbalt-60 gamma-rays irradiated commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors (CISs) at the various dose rates are presented. The irradiation experiments of COTS PPD CISs are carried out at 0.3, 3.0 and 30.0 rad(Si)/s. The COTS PPD CISs are manufactured using a standard 0.18-μm CMOS technology with four-transistor pixel PPD architecture. The behavior of the tested CISs shows a remarkable degradation after irradiation and differs in the dose rates. The dark current, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), random noise, saturation output, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and dynamic range (DR) versus the total ionizing dose (TID) at the various dose rates are investigated. The tendency of dark current, DSNU, and random noise increase and saturation output, SNR, and DR to decrease at 3.0 rad(Si)/s are far greater than those at 0.3 and 30.0 rad(Si)/s. The damage mechanisms caused by TID irradiation at the various dose rates are also analyzed. The annealing tests are carried out at room temperature with unbiased conditions after irradiation.

  16. A comparative study of adaptive dose-finding designs for phase I oncology trials of combination therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Akihiro; Wages, Nolan A.; Sato, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the relative performance of competing model-based dose-finding methods for combination phase I trials. In this study, we focused on five model-based dose-finding methods that have been recently developed. We compared the recommendation rates for true maximum-tolerated dose combinations (MTDCs) and over-dose combinations among these methods under 16 scenarios for 3 × 3, 4 × 4, 2 × 4, and 3 × 5 dose combination matrices. We found that performance of the model-based dose-finding methods varied depending on (1) whether the dose combination matrix is square or not; (2) whether the true MTDCs exist within the same group along the diagonals of the dose combination matrix; and (3) the number of true MTDCs. We discuss the details of the operating characteristics and the advantages and disadvantages of the five methods compared. PMID:25974405

  17. Phase I Dose-Escalation Study of Nimustine in Tumor-Bearing Dogs

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Masashi; GOTO-KOSHINO, Yuko; FUKUSHIMA, Kenjiro; KANEMOTO, Hideyuki; NAKASHIMA, Ko; FUJINO, Yasuhito; OHNO, Koichi; ENDO, Yasuyuki; TSUJIMOTO, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nimustine (ACNU) is an alkylating agent of the nitrosourea and can be an antineoplastic agent in dogs. But, there has been no report on its dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) in dogs. This study was a phase I dose-escalation clinical trial to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and DLT of ACNU in tumor-bearing dogs. The starting dosage was 25 mg/m2, and subsequent dosages were administered in increments of 5 mg/m2 in cohort of 3 dogs. Eight dogs were included, the MTD was determined to be 25 mg/m2, DLT was neutropenia, and the optimal interval was considered to be 21 days. The data herein provide a basis for the subsequent phase II trial of ACNU in dogs. PMID:24521794

  18. Clinical application of Chamomilla recutita in phlebitis: dose response curve study.

    PubMed

    Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz Dos; Carvalho, Emilia Campos de; Bueno, Paula Carolina Pires; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp

    2011-01-01

    This experimental and dose-response curve study aimed to carry out the quality control of the Chamomilla recutita sample, as well as to estimate the ideal dose, for anti-inflammatory effect, of the extract of its capitula, in patients with phlebitis due to peripheral intravenous infusion of antineoplastic chemotherapy and to evaluate the toxicity of this extract in human beings. The therapeutic efficacy, concerning the anti-inflammatory potential, of different doses of Chamomilla recutita extract were analyzed and compared in 25 patients. The time of regression of phlebitis was shorter for groups with 2.5% concentration (mean=29.2h, standard deviation = 8.98) and 5% concentration (mean = 38.8h, standard deviation = 17.47). Local toxicity was almost not observed. This research contributes to the innovation of the nursing clinical practice, since it suggests an alternative for the treatment of phlebitis through the clinical use of phytotherapeutic drugs. PMID:21412623

  19. Single high dose intraoperative electrons for advanced stage pancreatic cancer: Phase I pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Goldson, A.L.; Ashaveri, E.; Espinoza, M.C.

    1981-07-01

    Phase I toxicity studies with intraoperative radiotherapy proved to be a feasible adjunct to surgery for unresectable malignancies of the pancreas at Howard University Hospital. There have been minimal side effects or complications related to the combination of limited surgical decompression and intraoperative radiotherapy alone. The toxic effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on normal tissues is being assessed on a dose volume basis. Doses of 2000 to 2500 rad in a single exposure to include the pancreas, regional nodes and duodenum are acceptable if the total treatment volume is less than or equal to 100 cm. The tumoricidal effects on the cancer are demonstratable when one reviews the pathological specimens that illustrate massive tumor necrosis and fibros replacement, but in all cases reviewed, viable cancer was noted. Intraoperative radiotherapy, therefore, represents a significant boost dose for resectable, partially resectable or non-resectable tumors when added to conventional external beam irradiation and/or chemotherapy. Preliminary clinical data and minimal toxicity justifies further investigation.

  20. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents. 799.9305 Section 799.9305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS Health...

  1. THYROID INSUFFICIENCY AND GENE EXPRESSION IN DEVELOPING RAT BRAIN: A DOSE RESPONSE STUDY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid Insufficiency and Gene Expression in Developing Rat Brain: A Dose Response Study. JE Royland and ME Gilbert, Neurotox. Div., U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, USA. Endocrine disruption is an area of major concern in environmental neurotoxicity. Deficits in thyroid hormone (TH) levels h...

  2. RESPIRATORY DOSE TO SUSCEPTIBLE POPULATIONS ASSESSED BY EXPOSURE AND DOSIMETRY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Respiratory Dose to Susceptible Populations Assessed by Exposure and Dosimetry Studies

    Chong Kim1 and Ronald Williams2, 1USEPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory and 2USEPA National Exposure Research Laboratory, RTP, NC.

    Rationale: Parti...

  3. SU-E-T-416: VMAT Dose Calculations Using Cone Beam CT Images: A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S; Sehgal, V; Kuo, J; Daroui, P; Ramsinghani, N; Al-Ghazi, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) images have been used routinely for patient positioning throughout the treatment course. However, use of CBCT for dose calculation is still investigational. The purpose of this study is to assess the utility of CBCT images for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) plan dose calculation. Methods: A CATPHAN 504 phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) was used to compare the dosimetric and geometric accuracy between conventional CT and CBCT (in both full and half fan modes). Hounsfield units (HU) profiles at different density areas were evaluated. A C shape target that surrounds a central avoidance structure was created and a VMAT plan was generated on the CT images and copied to the CBCT phantom images. Patient studies included three brain patients, and one head and neck (H'N) patient. VMAT plans generated on the patients treatment planning CT was applied to CBCT images obtained during the first treatment. Isodose distributions and dosevolume- histograms (DVHs) were compared. Results: For the phantom study, the HU difference between CT and CBCT is within 100 (maximum 96 HU for Teflon CBCT images in full fan mode). The impact of these differences on the calculated dose distributions was clinically insignificant. In both phantom and patient studies, target DVHs based on CBCT images were in excellent agreement with those based on planning CT images. Mean, Median, near minimum (D98%), and near maximum (D2%) doses agreed within 0-2.5%. A slightly larger discrepancy is observed in the patient studies compared to that seen in the phantom study, (0-1% vs. 0 - 2.5%). Conclusion: CBCT images can be used to accurately predict dosimetric results, without any HU correction. It is feasible to use CBCT to evaluate the actual dose delivered at each fraction. The dosimetric consequences resulting from tumor response and patient geometry changes could be monitored.

  4. Resolving discrepancies among studies: the influence of dose on effect size.

    PubMed

    Hertz-Picciotto, I; Neutra, R R

    1994-03-01

    In conducting reviews or meta-analyses, epidemiologists frequently must reconcile conflicting results. This paper addresses heterogeneity in nonexperimental studies. The emphasis is on simple exploratory methods rather than formal approaches. Five examples illustrate how quantitative concordance among studies is possible, even when measured effects appear discrepant. The examples concern ethylene oxide and leukemias, methylene chloride and liver cancer, saccharin and bladder cancer, prenatal lead exposure and birthweight, and aspirin and bleeding tendencies in labor and delivery. Data examined here indicate that differences in dose levels frequently explain heterogeneous effect measures, often outweighing other sources of variability among studies. We present simple methods for combining dose information from the study of interest with dose-response data from other epidemiologic studies or animal studies to derive plausible hypothesized effect levels. These plausible effect sizes are the measures of association that would be predicted, for the actual exposures, by extrapolating from other studies with possibly differing exposure levels. Post hoc power calculations and comparisons of confidence intervals for overlap to reconcile "positive" and "null" studies may be misleading, since these approaches assume a uniform true association obscured by random fluctuations only. Whenever it can be estimated, a plausible effect size should be the starting point to assess findings of either positive or null studies. Without such calculations, comparisons among conflicting studies may not be meaningful. PMID:8172990

  5. What is desirable and feasible in dose reconstruction for application in epidemiological studies?

    SciTech Connect

    Bouville, A.; Beebe, G.W.; Anspaugh, L.

    1996-02-01

    Epidemiological studies of populations are of two general forms, monitoring or formal, and serve several possible purposes. Monitoring studies inform members of potentially affected population groups of the nature and magnitude of the risks that might have been imposed on them. Formal epidemiological studies can increase scientific knowledge about the quantitative risk that attends exposure. Risks of human health due to radiation exposure are most appropriately estimated by means of formal epidemiological studies. Dosimetric data are essential for any epidemiological study, but the detail and accuracy needed depend on the purposes to be served. If the need is for a monitoring study, then general information about doses will suffice. However, a formal study that is expected to contribute to scientific information about quantitative radiation risk requires careful individual dose estimation. This paper is devoted to the discussion of dosimetric data needed for formal epidemiological studies of populations exposed as a result of nuclear power operations. The recommendations made by the National Research Council have largely been followed. The examples used in this paper are relevant to the Chernobyl accident, which caused a large number of people to be exposed at relatively high doses and provided an opportunity for formal epidemiological studies to be initiated. The studies that are singled out are those of thyroid cancer among children who resided in Belarus and in Ukraine at the time of the accident, and those of leukemia among workers involved in the mitigation of the accident and in clean-up operations.

  6. Hyperbaric spinal anesthesia with ropivacaine coadministered with sufentanil for cesarean delivery: a dose-response study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dongyue; Wu, Guowei; Qin, Peishun; Ji, Bin; Ye, Lisha; Shi, Tong; Huang, Huang; Jin, Lexiao

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant sufentanil could achieve effective spinal anesthesia with low dose of hyperbaric ropivacaine for cesarean delivery. Two previous studies had calculated the 50% effective dose (ED50) of intrathecal ropivacaine coadministered with sufentanil for cesarean delivery. However, the 95% effective dose (ED95) of intrathecal hyperbaric ropivacaine coadministered with sufentanil for cesarean delivery remains uncertain. This study determined the ED95 of intrathecal hyperbaric ropivacaine coadministered with sufentanil for cesarean delivery. 80 ASA physical status I or II parturients undergoing elective cesarean delivery were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, double-blind investigation. A combined spinal and epidural anesthesia was performed at the L3-L4 interspace. Patients received a dose of spinal ropivacaine coadministered with sufentanil 5 μg diluted to 3.0 ml with normal saline and 0.5 ml of 10% dextrose: 7.5 mg (n = 20), 9.0 mg (n = 20), 10.5 mg (n = 20), or 12 mg (n = 20). An effective dose was defined as a dose that provided bilateral sensory block to T7 within 10 min after intrathecal drug administration and required no epidural top-up for surgery to be completed. The ED50 and ED95 values for successful anesthesia were determined using a logistic regression model. The ED50 (95% confidence interval [CI]) for successful anesthesia was 8.4 (4.0-9.8) mg and the ED95 (95% CI) was 11.4 (9.7-13.9) mg. The results show that the ED95 of intrathecal hyperbaric ropivacaine coadministered with sufentanil 5 μg for cesarean delivery was 11.4 mg. The addition of sufentanil could significantly reduce the dosage of ropivacaine. PMID:26131159

  7. Repeated dose titration versus age-based method in electroconvulsive therapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aten, Jan Jaap; Oudega, Mardien; van Exel, Eric; Stek, Max L; van Waarde, Jeroen A

    2015-06-01

    In electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), a dose titration method (DTM) was suggested to be more individualized and therefore more accurate than formula-based dosing methods. A repeated DTM (every sixth session and dose adjustment accordingly) was compared to an age-based method (ABM) regarding treatment characteristics, clinical outcome, and cognitive functioning after ECT. Thirty-nine unipolar depressed patients dosed using repeated DTM and 40 matched patients treated with ABM were compared. Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were assessed at baseline and at the end of the index course, as well as the total number of ECT sessions. Both groups were similar regarding age, sex, psychotic features, mean baseline MADRS, and median baseline MMSE. At the end of the index course, the two methods showed equal outcome (mean end MADRS, 11.6 ± 8.3 in DTM and 9.5 ± 7.6 in ABM (P = 0.26); median end MMSE, 28 (25-29) and 28 (25-29.8), respectively (P = 0.81). However, the median number of all ECT sessions differed 16 (11-22) in DTM versus 12 (10-14.8) in ABM; P = 0.02]. Using regression analysis, dosing method and age were independently associated with the total number of ECT sessions, with less sessions needed in ABM (P = 0.02) and in older patients (P = 0.001). In this comparative cohort study, ABM and DTM showed equal outcome for depression and cognition. However, the median ECT course duration in repeated DTM appeared longer. Additionally, higher age was associated with shorter ECT courses regardless of the dosing method. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:25804765

  8. Bleeding Risk with Long-Term Low-Dose Aspirin: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    García Rodríguez, Luis A.; Martín-Pérez, Mar; Hennekens, Charles H.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Lanas, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose aspirin has proven effectiveness in secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events, but is also associated with an increased risk of major bleeding events. For primary prevention, this absolute risk must be carefully weighed against the benefits of aspirin; such assessments are currently limited by a lack of data from general populations. Methods Systematic searches of Medline and Embase were conducted to identify observational studies published between 1946 and 4 March 2015 that reported the risks of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding or intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) with long-term, low-dose aspirin (75–325 mg/day). Pooled estimates of the relative risk (RR) for bleeding events with aspirin versus non-use were calculated using random-effects models, based on reported estimates of RR (including odds ratios, hazard ratios, incidence rate ratios and standardized incidence ratios) in 39 articles. Findings The incidence of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin was 0.48–3.64 cases per 1000 person-years, and the overall pooled estimate of the RR with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2–1.7). For upper and lower GI bleeding, the RRs with low-dose aspirin were 2.3 (2.0–2.6) and 1.8 (1.1–3.0), respectively. Neither aspirin dose nor duration of use had consistent effects on RRs for upper GI bleeding. The estimated RR for ICH with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (1.2–1.7) overall. Aspirin was associated with increased bleeding risks when combined with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, clopidogrel and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors compared with monotherapy. By contrast, concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors decreased upper GI bleeding risks relative to aspirin monotherapy. Conclusions The risks of major bleeding with low-dose aspirin in real-world settings are of a similar magnitude to those reported in randomized trials. These data will help inform clinical judgements regarding the use of low-dose aspirin

  9. A comparative study on the CT effective dose for various positions of the patient's arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Ji-Hye; Park, Soon-Ki; Kim, Jung-Sun; Jung, Woo-Young; Kim, Ho-Sung; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Cho, Young-Kuk

    2012-10-01

    In a whole body PET/CT (positron emission tomography/computed tomography) scan, lifting the patient's arm to improve the image quality is natural. On the other hand, the arms should be placed lower when the lesion is located in the head and neck. This study compared the CT effective dose for each arm position after applying AEC (automatic exposure control). Forty-five patients who had undergone an 18F-FDG (fluorine-18-fluoro deoxy glucose) whole body PET/CT scan were examined using Biograph Truepoint 40, Biograph Sensation 16, and Discovery STe 8 systems. The CT effective dose of 15 patients for each set of equipment was measured and analyzed comparatively in both the arm-lifted and arm-lowered positions. The ImPACT Ver. 1.0 program was used to measure the CT effective dose. A paired t-test (SPSS 18.0 statistic program) was applied for statistical analysis. In the case of the arm-lifted position, the CT effective dose measured for Biograph 40, Biograph 16, and DSTe 8 systems were 6.33 ± 0.93 mSv, 8.01 ± 1.34 mSv, and 9.69 ± 2.32 mSv, respectively. When the arms were located in the lower position, the respective CT effective doses were 6.97 ± 0.76 mSv, 8.95 ± 1.85 mSv, and 13.07 ± 2.87 mSv, respectively. These results revealed 9.2%, 10.5%, and 25.9% improvement in the CT effective doses for the Biograph 40, Biograph 16 and DSTe 8 systems, respectively, when the arms were raised compared to that when they were lowered (p < 0.05). For the whole body PET/CT case, the CT effective dose applying AEC showed a mean 15.2% decrease in the radiation exposure of the patients when the arm was lifted. The patient with no lesion in the head and neck would show fewer artifacts in the objective part and a lower CT effective dose. For a patient with a lesion in the head and neck, the artifacts in the objective part can be reduced by putting the arms down. The fact that the CT effective dose is increased in a whole-body PET/CT scan should be a concern.

  10. Photosensitivity of murine skin greatly depends on the genetic background: clinically relevant dose as a new measure to replace minimal erythema dose in mouse studies.

    PubMed

    Gyöngyösi, Nóra; Lőrincz, Kende; Keszeg, András; Haluszka, Dóra; Bánvölgyi, András; Tátrai, Erika; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Wikonkál, Norbert M

    2016-07-01

    Artificial UV irradiation of murine skin is a frequently used method for testing photosensitivity, study carcinogenesis and photoprotective effects of different compounds. However, doses of UV radiation and mouse strains used in experiments vary greatly. The genetic background of mice may influence the photosensitivity as melanin content, pigmentation and hair cycle parameters are dissimilar. Doses of UV are often expressed in relation to the minimal erythema dose (MED) that was not necessarily determined for the given strain. We set out to standardize the method of measuring photosensitivity in three commonly used mouse strains, C57BL/6N, Balb/c and SKH-1. We found that MED may not be determined for some strains as erythema development in mice with diverse genotypes differs greatly. We measured the oedema response in vivo and ex vivo by using OCT. Given the strain-specific variability of erythema, we introduced Clinically Relevant Dose (CRD) as a new term to replace MED in experiments, to describe the lowest dose that triggers a perceptible skin reaction in mice. Not only the CRD but the proportion of erythema and oedema were different in strains examined. C57BL/6N mice display skin reactions at the lowest UVB dose, while SKH-1 hairless mice show changes, mostly oedema, after higher doses of UVB. The cellular composition and skin thickness were examined by histopathology. IL-1beta and IL-6 levels in skin correlated with the increasing doses of UVB. Despite the variations in the degree of erythema and oedema, no major differences in cytokine expressions were seen among various strains of mice. PMID:26910301

  11. Dose correction for post-contrast T1 mapping of the heart: the MESA study.

    PubMed

    Gai, Neville D; Sandfort, Veit; Liu, Songtao; Lima, João A C; Bluemke, David A

    2016-02-01

    Post-contrast myocardial T1 (T1(myo,c)) values have been shown to be sensitive to myocardial fibrosis. Recent studies have shown differences in results obtained from T1(myo,c) and extracellular volume fraction (ECV) with respect to percentage fibrosis. By exploring the relationship between blood plasma volume and T1(myo,c), the underlying basis for the divergence can be explained. Furthermore, dose administration based on body mass index (BMI), age and gender can mitigate the divergence in results. Inter-subject comparison of T1(myo,c) required adjustment for dose (in mmol/kg), time and glomerular filtration rate. Further adjustment for effective dose based on lean muscle mass reflected by blood/plasma volume was performed. A test case of 605 subjects from the MESA study who had undergone pre- and post-contrast T1 mapping was studied. T1(myo,c) values were compared between subjects with and without metabolic syndrome (MetS), between smoking and non-smoking subjects, and subjects with and without impaired glucose tolerance, before and after dose adjustment based on plasma volume. Comparison with ECV (which is dose independent), pre-contrast myocardial T1 and blood normalized myocardial T1 values was also performed to validate the correction. There were significant differences in T1(myo,c) (post plasma volume correction) and ECV between current and former smokers (p value 0.017 and 0.01, respectively) but not T1(myo,c) prior to correction (p = 0.12). Prior to dose adjustment for plasma volume, p value was <0.001 for T1(myo,c) between MetS and non-MetS groups and was 0.13 between subjects with and without glucose intolerance; after adjustment for PV, p value was 0.63 and 0.99. Corresponding ECV p values were 0.44 and 0.99, respectively. Overall, ECV results showed the best agreement with PV corrected T1(myo,c) (mean absolute difference in p values = 0.073) and pre-contrast myocardial T1 in comparison with other measures (T1(myo,c( prior to correction, blood/plasma T1

  12. Correlation-study about the ambient dose rate and the weather conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Masato; Hatano, Yuko; Aoyama, Tomoo; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Kita, Kazuyuki; Ishizuka, Masahide

    2016-04-01

    The long-term radiation risks are believed to be heavily affected by the resuspension process. We therefore focus on the surface-atmosphere exchange process of released radioactive materials in this study. Radioactive materials were deposited on the soil and float in the air, and such complicated process are influenced by the weather conditions deeply. We need to reveal the correlation between the weather conditions and the ambient dose rate. In this study, we study the correlation between the weather conditions and the ambient dose rate with the correction of the decrease due to the radioactive decay. We found that there is a negative correlation between the ambient dose rate and the soil water content by the correlation coefficient. Using this result, we reconstruct the ambient dose rate from the weather conditions by the multiple regression analysis and found that the reconstructed data agree with the observation very well. Using Kalman filter, which can be sequentially updates the state estimate, we obtained such a good agreement.

  13. Effect of standard-dose Betahistine on endolymphatic hydrops: an MRI pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gürkov, R; Flatz, W; Keeser, D; Strupp, M; Ertl-Wagner, B; Krause, E

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to assess whether standard-dose Betahistine (48 mg daily) exerts an effect upon the degree of endolymphatic hydrops in patients with Menière's disease using a retrospective case series in the setting of a tertiary neurotology referral centre. In six patients with definite unilateral Menière's disease, the degree of cochlear and vestibular endolymphatic hydrops was assessed before and after treatment with a standard dose of Betahistine (48 mg daily), using high-resolution 3 T MR imaging after intratympanic contrast medium application. The treatment duration was 3-7 months (mean 5 months), and the patients were followed-up for 6-29 months (mean 11 months). In the study cohort, the standard dose of Betahistine did not have an MR morphologically measurable beneficial effect on the degree of endolymphatic hydrops. The results indicated no effect of standard-dose Betahistine on endolymphatic hydrops found on high-resolution MR imaging. Possible explanations are: (1) insufficient dosage or duration of treatment with betahistine, (2) insufficient resolution of the MR imaging technique, and (3) insufficient length of follow-up. Further studies addressing these issues are warranted. PMID:22760844

  14. Subanesthetic doses of ketamine transiently decrease serotonin transporter activity: a PET study in conscious monkeys.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shigeyuki; Ohba, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Shingo; Harada, Norihiro; Kakiuchi, Takeharu; Tsukada, Hideo; Domino, Edward F

    2013-12-01

    Subanesthetic doses of ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) antagonist, have a rapid antidepressant effect which lasts for up to 2 weeks. However, the neurobiological mechanism regarding this effect remains unclear. In the present study, the effects of subanesthetic doses of ketamine on serotonergic systems in conscious monkey brain were investigated. Five young monkeys underwent four positron emission tomography measurements with [(11)C]-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethyl-phenylsulfanyl)benzonitrile ([(11)C]DASB) for the serotonin transporter (SERT), during and after intravenous infusion of vehicle or ketamine hydrochloride in a dose of 0.5 or 1.5 mg/kg for 40 min, and 24 h post infusion. Global reduction of [(11)C]DASB binding to SERT was observed during ketamine infusion in a dose-dependent manner, but not 24 h later. The effect of ketamine on the serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A-R) and dopamine transporter (DAT) was also investigated in the same subjects studied with [(11)C]DASB. No significant changes were observed in either 5-HT1A-R or DAT binding after ketamine infusion. Microdialysis analysis indicated that ketamine infusion transiently increased serotonin levels in the extracellular fluid of the prefrontal cortex. The present study demonstrates that subanesthetic ketamine selectively enhanced serotonergic transmission by inhibition of SERT activity. This action coexists with the rapid antidepressant effect of subanesthetic doses of ketamine. Further studies are needed to investigate whether the transient combination of SERT and NMDA reception inhibition enhances each other's antidepressant actions. PMID:23880871

  15. An Experimental Toxoplasma gondii Dose Response Challenge Model to Study Therapeutic or Vaccine Efficacy in Cats

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Jan B. W. J.; van der Giessen, Joke W. B.; Takumi, Katsuhisa; Teunis, Peter F. M.; Wisselink, Henk J.

    2014-01-01

    High numbers of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in the environment are a risk factor to humans. The environmental contamination might be reduced by vaccinating the definitive host, cats. An experimental challenge model is necessary to quantitatively assess the efficacy of a vaccine or drug treatment. Previous studies have indicated that bradyzoites are highly infectious for cats. To infect cats, tissue cysts were isolated from the brains of mice infected with oocysts of T. gondii M4 strain, and bradyzoites were released by pepsin digestion. Free bradyzoites were counted and graded doses (1000, 100, 50, 10), and 250 intact tissue cysts were inoculated orally into three cats each. Oocysts shed by these five groups of cats were collected from faeces by flotation techniques, counted microscopically and estimated by real time PCR. Additionally, the number of T. gondii in heart, tongue and brains were estimated, and serology for anti T. gondii antibodies was performed. A Beta-Poisson dose-response model was used to estimate the infectivity of single bradyzoites and linear regression was used to determine the relation between inoculated dose and numbers of oocyst shed. We found that real time PCR was more sensitive than microscopic detection of oocysts, and oocysts were detected by PCR in faeces of cats fed 10 bradyzoites but by microscopic examination. Real time PCR may only detect fragments of T. gondii DNA without the presence of oocysts in low doses. Prevalence of tissue cysts of T. gondii in tongue, heart and brains, and anti T. gondii antibody concentrations were all found to depend on the inoculated bradyzoite dose. The combination of the experimental challenge model and the dose response analysis provides a suitable reference for quantifying the potential reduction in human health risk due to a treatment of domestic cats by vaccination or by therapeutic drug application. PMID:25184619

  16. Effects of X-Ray Dose On Rhizosphere Studies Using X-Ray Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zappala, Susan; Helliwell, Jonathan R.; Tracy, Saoirse R.; Mairhofer, Stefan; Sturrock, Craig J.; Pridmore, Tony; Bennett, Malcolm; Mooney, Sacha J.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a non-destructive imaging technique originally designed for diagnostic medicine, which was adopted for rhizosphere and soil science applications in the early 1980s. X-ray CT enables researchers to simultaneously visualise and quantify the heterogeneous soil matrix of mineral grains, organic matter, air-filled pores and water-filled pores. Additionally, X-ray CT allows visualisation of plant roots in situ without the need for traditional invasive methods such as root washing. However, one routinely unreported aspect of X-ray CT is the potential effect of X-ray dose on the soil-borne microorganisms and plants in rhizosphere investigations. Here we aimed to i) highlight the need for more consistent reporting of X-ray CT parameters for dose to sample, ii) to provide an overview of previously reported impacts of X-rays on soil microorganisms and plant roots and iii) present new data investigating the response of plant roots and microbial communities to X-ray exposure. Fewer than 5% of the 126 publications included in the literature review contained sufficient information to calculate dose and only 2.4% of the publications explicitly state an estimate of dose received by each sample. We conducted a study involving rice roots growing in soil, observing no significant difference between the numbers of root tips, root volume and total root length in scanned versus unscanned samples. In parallel, a soil microbe experiment scanning samples over a total of 24 weeks observed no significant difference between the scanned and unscanned microbial biomass values. We conclude from the literature review and our own experiments that X-ray CT does not impact plant growth or soil microbial populations when employing a low level of dose (<30 Gy). However, the call for higher throughput X-ray CT means that doses that biological samples receive are likely to increase and thus should be closely monitored. PMID:23840640

  17. First-dose effects of fingolimod: Pooled safety data from three phase 3 studies.

    PubMed

    DiMarco, John P; O'Connor, Paul; Cohen, Jeffrey A; Reder, Anthony T; Zhang-Auberson, Lixin; Tang, Dejun; Collins, William; Kappos, Ludwig

    2014-09-01

    Fingolimod treatment initiation is associated with a transient slowing of heart rate and atrioventricular conduction. This report presents first-dose fingolimod effects (0.5mg or 1.25mg) on cardiac parameters using phase 3 FREEDOMS, FREEDOMS II and TRANSFORMS pooled study data (n=3635 patients). Vital signs were recorded hourly for ≥6h; 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) was obtained at baseline and at 6h post-dose. Clinical events were graded at the first-dose administrator׳s discretion. At screening, on day 1 and at month 3, 1073 patients underwent 24-h ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring. A transient decrease in mean measured heart rate occurred 4-5h after the first dose, with a maximum reduction of 8 (fingolimod 0.5mg) and 11 beats per minute (fingolimod 1.25mg) below baseline. Symptomatic bradycardia at treatment initiation was reported in 0.6% (fingolimod 0.5mg) and 2.1% (fingolimod 1.25mg) of patients; events were typically mild or moderate in severity, and most resolved spontaneously. Atrioventricular (AV) conduction delays were observed in a few patients (Wenckebach (Mobitz type I) second-degree AV block, fingolimod 0.5mg, 0.2%; 1.25mg, 1%: 2:1 AV block fingolimod, 0.5mg, 0%; 1.25mg, 0.2% on ECG 6-h post-dose). These were usually well tolerated and first occurred within 6h of dosing. Consistent with its effects on atrial myocytes, fingolimod treatment initiation induced a transient slowing of heart rate and AV conduction. However, symptomatic bradycardia and second-degree AV block were uncommon and did not require intervention. PMID:26265275

  18. An experimental Toxoplasma gondii dose response challenge model to study therapeutic or vaccine efficacy in cats.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Jan B W J; van der Giessen, Joke W B; Takumi, Katsuhisa; Teunis, Peter F M; Wisselink, Henk J

    2014-01-01

    High numbers of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in the environment are a risk factor to humans. The environmental contamination might be reduced by vaccinating the definitive host, cats. An experimental challenge model is necessary to quantitatively assess the efficacy of a vaccine or drug treatment. Previous studies have indicated that bradyzoites are highly infectious for cats. To infect cats, tissue cysts were isolated from the brains of mice infected with oocysts of T. gondii M4 strain, and bradyzoites were released by pepsin digestion. Free bradyzoites were counted and graded doses (1000, 100, 50, 10), and 250 intact tissue cysts were inoculated orally into three cats each. Oocysts shed by these five groups of cats were collected from faeces by flotation techniques, counted microscopically and estimated by real time PCR. Additionally, the number of T. gondii in heart, tongue and brains were estimated, and serology for anti T. gondii antibodies was performed. A Beta-Poisson dose-response model was used to estimate the infectivity of single bradyzoites and linear regression was used to determine the relation between inoculated dose and numbers of oocyst shed. We found that real time PCR was more sensitive than microscopic detection of oocysts, and oocysts were detected by PCR in faeces of cats fed 10 bradyzoites but by microscopic examination. Real time PCR may only detect fragments of T. gondii DNA without the presence of oocysts in low doses. Prevalence of tissue cysts of T. gondii in tongue, heart and brains, and anti T. gondii antibody concentrations were all found to depend on the inoculated bradyzoite dose. The combination of the experimental challenge model and the dose response analysis provides a suitable reference for quantifying the potential reduction in human health risk due to a treatment of domestic cats by vaccination or by therapeutic drug application. PMID:25184619

  19. Phase I 3D Conformal Radiation Dose Escalation Study in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma: RTOG 9803

    PubMed Central

    Tsien, Christina; Moughan, Jennifer; Michalski, Jeff M; Gilbert, Mark R.; Purdy, James; Simpson, Joseph; Kresel, John J.; Curran, Walter J.; Diaz, A.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Phase I trial to evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of dose escalated 3DCRT concurrent with chemotherapy in patients with primary supratentorial GBM. Materials/Methods 209 patients were enrolled. All received 46 Gy in 2 Gy fractions to PTV1, defined as GTV plus 1.8 cm. Subsequent boost was given to PTV2, defined as GTV plus 0.3 cm. Patients were stratified into two groups (gp): (Gp 1: PTV2 < 75 cc, and Gp 2: PTV2≥75 cc). Four RT dose levels were evaluated: 66, 72 ,78 and 84 Gy. BCNU 80 mg/m2 was given during RT, then q 8 weeks for 6 cycles. Pre-treatment characteristics were well balanced. Results Acute and late grade (Gr) 3/4 RT-related toxicities were no more frequent at higher RT dose or with larger tumors. There were no DLTs (acute ≥ Gr 3 irreversible CNS toxicities) observed on any dose level in either group. Based on the absence of DLTs, dose was escalated to 84 Gy in both groups. Late RT necrosis was noted at 66 (1 pt), 72 (2), 78 (2) and 84 Gy (3) in Group 1. In Group 2, late RT necrosis was noted at 78 (1 pt) and 84 Gy (2). Median time to RT necrosis was 8.8 months (range: 5.1–12.5). Median survival in Group 1: 11.8–19.3 months. Median survival in Group 2: 8.2–13.9 months. Conclusions Our study shows the feasibility of delivering higher than standard (60 Gy) RT dose with concurrent chemotherapy for primary GBM with an acceptable risk of late CNS toxicity. PMID:18723297

  20. Review of methods of dose estimation for epidemiological studies of the radiological impact of nevada test site and global fallout.

    PubMed

    Beck, Harold L; Anspaugh, Lynn R; Bouville, André; Simon, Steven L

    2006-07-01

    Methods to assess radiation doses from nuclear weapons test fallout have been used to estimate doses to populations and individuals in a number of studies. However, only a few epidemiology studies have relied on fallout dose estimates. Though the methods for assessing doses from local and regional compared to global fallout are similar, there are significant differences in predicted doses and contributing radionuclides depending on the source of the fallout, e.g. whether the nuclear debris originated in Nevada at the U.S. nuclear test site or whether it originated at other locations worldwide. The sparse historical measurement data available are generally sufficient to estimate external exposure doses reasonably well. However, reconstruction of doses to body organs from ingestion and inhalation of radionuclides is significantly more complex and is almost always more uncertain than are external dose estimates. Internal dose estimates are generally based on estimates of the ground deposition per unit area of specific radionuclides and subsequent transport of radionuclides through the food chain. A number of technical challenges to correctly modeling deposition of fallout under wet and dry atmospheric conditions still remain, particularly at close-in locations where sizes of deposited particles vary significantly over modest changes in distance. This paper summarizes the various methods of dose estimation from weapons test fallout and the most important dose assessment and epidemiology studies that have relied on those methods. PMID:16808609

  1. Chrysin, a flavonoid attenuates histological changes of hyperammonemic rats: A dose dependent study.

    PubMed

    Renuka, Mani; Vijayakumar, Natesan; Ramakrishnan, Arumugam

    2016-08-01

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) is a major component of some traditional medicinal herbs present in honey, propolis and many plant extracts. The study was aimed to illuminate the effect of chrysin in the pathogenesis of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) induced hyperammonemic rat model in a dose dependent manner. Rats were injected with NH4Cl (100mg/kg b.w.) by intraperitonially (i.p) thrice a week for 8 consecutive weeks for the induction of experimental hyperammonemia. Hyperammonemic rats were treated with chrysin by orally at a dose of 25, 50 & 100mg/kg b.w. respectively. Protective effect of chrysin against hyperammonemia was evaluated by performing biochemical estimations and morphopathological investigations of hematoxylin and eosin stained sections of liver, brain and kidney tissues. Supplementation of chrysin reinstated the levels of blood ammonia, plasma urea, uric acid, total bilirubin, creatinine, brain glutamate, glutamine, nitric oxide (NO) and the activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, and liver marker enzymes. On the other hand increased level of plasma urea was observed in chrysin treated rats as compared with hyperammonemic rats. Chrysin administration caused distortion of hepatic, brain and kidney architecture as shown by histological examination. Chrysin at a dose (100mg/kg b.w.) showed an utmost decline in the level of all biochemical estimations. Both biochemical and morphological studies clearly revealed that chrysin protects against cell injury induced by ammonia intoxication in a dose-response manner with respect to endogenous antioxidants and hypoammonemic effects. PMID:27470372

  2. Monte Carlo dosimetric study of the medium dose rate CSM40 source.

    PubMed

    Vijande, J; Granero, D; Perez-Calatayud, J; Ballester, F

    2013-12-01

    The (137)Cs medium dose rate (MDR) CSM40 source model (Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG, Germany) is in clinical use but no dosimetric dataset has been published. This study aims to obtain dosimetric data for the CSM40 source for its use in clinical practice as required by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO). Penelope2008 and Geant4 Monte Carlo codes were used to characterize this source dosimetrically. It was located in an unbounded water phantom with composition and mass density as recommended by AAPM and ESTRO. Due to the low photon energies of (137)Cs, absorbed dose was approximated by collisional kerma. Additional simulations were performed to obtain the air-kerma strength, sK. Mass-energy absorption coefficients in water and air were consistently derived and used to calculate collisional kerma. Results performed with both radiation transport codes showed agreement typically within 0.05%. Dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function are provided for the CSM40 and compared with published data for other commercially available (137)Cs sources. An uncertainty analysis has been performed. The data provided by this study can be used as input data and verification in the treatment planning systems. PMID:24121444

  3. Acute and repeated dose (28 days) oral safety studies of ALIBIRD in rats.

    PubMed

    Anadón, Arturo; Martínez, María A; Ares, Irma; Castellano, Victor; Martínez-Larrañaga, Maria R; Corzo, Nieves; Olano, Agustin; Montilla, Antonia; Recio, Isidra; Martínez-Maqueda, Daniel; Miralles, Beatriz; Fornari, Tiziana; García-Risco, Mónica R; Gonzalez, Monserrat; Reglero, Guillermo

    2013-07-01

    ALIBIRD, a test substance composed of oligosaccharides derived from lactulose, a hydrolysate of a whey protein concentrate, and a supercritical extract of rosemary (1:0.5:0.05), was prepared in the laboratory and evaluated for its safety as a multifunctional food additive. In oral toxicity studies (acute and 28 days repeated dose) using Wistar rats, ALIBIRD was administered in a single oral gavage dose of 2,000 mg/kg of body weight and resulted in no adverse events or mortality; a daily dose of 2,000 mg/kg of body weight for 28 days by gavage also resulted in no adverse effects or mortality. No abnormal clinical signs, behavioral changes, body weight changes, or changes in food and water consumption occurred in either study. There were no changes in hematological and serum chemistry values, organ weights, or gross or histological characteristics. Based on test results, it is concluded that ALIBIRD is well tolerated in rats at an acute and subchronic (28 days) dose of 2,000 mg/kg of body weight. PMID:23834798

  4. In vitro study of cell survival following dynamic MLC intensity-modulated radiation therapy dose delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseenko, Vitali; Duzenli, Cheryl; Durand, Ralph E.

    2007-04-15

    The possibility of reduced cell kill following intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compared to conventional radiation therapy has been debated in the literature. This potential reduction in cell kill relates to prolonged treatment times typical of IMRT dose delivery and consequently increased repair of sublethal lesions. While there is some theoretical support to this reduction in cell kill published in the literature, direct experimental evidence specific to IMRT dose delivery patterns is lacking. In this study we present cell survival data for three cell lines: Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts, human cervical carcinoma, SiHa and colon adenocarcinoma, WiDr. Cell survival was obtained for 2.1 Gy delivered as acute dose with parallel-opposed pair (POP), irradiation time 75 s, which served as a reference; regular seven-field IMRT, irradiation time 5 min; and IMRT with a break for multiple leaf collimator (MLC) re-initialization after three fields were delivered, irradiation time 10 min. An actual seven-field dynamic MLC IMRT plan for a head and neck patient was used. The IMRT plan was generated for a Varian EX or iX linear accelerator with 120 leaf Millenium MLC. Survival data were also collected for doses 1x, 2x, 3x, 4x, and 5x 2.1 Gy to establish parameters of the linear-quadratic equation describing survival following acute dose delivery. Cells were irradiated inside an acrylic cylindrical phantom specifically designed for this study. Doses from both IMRT and POP were validated using ion chamber measurements. A reproducible increase in cell survival was observed following IMRT dose delivery. This increase varied from small for V79, with a surviving fraction of 0.8326 following POP vs 0.8420 following uninterrupted IMRT, to very pronounced for SiHa, with a surviving fraction of 0.3903 following POP vs 0.5330 for uninterrupted IMRT. When compared to IMRT or IMRT with a break for MLC initialization, cell survival following acute dose delivery was

  5. Immunotoxicity of silver nanoparticles in an intravenous 28-day repeated-dose toxicity study in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nanosilver is used in a variety of medical and consumer products because of its antibacterial activity. This wide application results in an increased human exposure. Knowledge on the systemic toxicity of nanosilver is, however, relatively scarce. In a previous study, the systemic toxicity of 20 nm silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) was studied in a 28-day repeated-dose toxicity study in rats. Ag-NP were intravenously administered with a maximum dose of 6 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day. Several immune parameters were affected: reduced thymus weight, increased spleen weight and spleen cell number, a strongly reduced NK cell activity, and reduced IFN-γ production were observed. Methods Prompted by these affected immune parameters, we wished to assess exposure effects on the functional immune system. Therefore, in the present study the T-cell dependent antibody response (TDAR) to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) was measured in a similar 28-day intravenous repeated-dose toxicity study. In addition, a range of immunological parameters was measured. Data obtained using the benchmark dose (BMD) approach were analyzed by fitting dose-response models to the parameters measured. Results A reduction in KLH-specific IgG was seen, with a lowest 5% lower confidence bound of the BMD (BMDL) of 0.40 mg/kg bw/day. This suggests that Ag-NP induce suppression of the functional immune system. Other parameters sensitive to Ag-NP exposure were in line with our previous study: a reduced thymus weight with a BMDL of 0.76 mg/kg bw/day, and an increased spleen weight, spleen cell number, and spleen cell subsets, with BMDLs between 0.36 and 1.11 mg/kg bw/day. Because the effects on the spleen are not reflected by increased KLH-specific IgG, they, however, do not suggest immune stimulation. Conclusions Intravenous Ag-NP administration in a 28-day repeated-dose toxicity study induces suppression of the functional immune system. This finding underscores the importance to study the TDAR to

  6. Phase II dose escalation study of image-guided adaptive radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Use of dose-volume constraints to achieve rectal isotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L.; Krauss, Daniel; Lockman, David M.; Brabbins, Donald S.; Martinez, Alvaro A. . E-mail: amartinez@beaumont.edu

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: In our Phase II prostate cancer Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART) study, the highest possible dose was selected on the basis of normal tissue tolerance constraints. We analyzed rectal toxicity rates in different dose levels and treatment groups to determine whether equivalent toxicity rates were achieved as hypothesized when the protocol was started. Methods and Materials: From 1999 to 2002, 331 patients with clinical stage T1 to T3, node-negative prostate cancer were prospectively treated with three-dimensional conformal adaptive RT. A patient-specific confidence-limited planning target volume was constructed on the basis of 5 CT scans and 4 sets of electronic portal images after the first 4 days of treatment. For each case, the rectum (rectal solid) was contoured in its entirety. The rectal wall was defined by use of a 3-mm wall thickness (median volume: 29.8 cc). The prescribed dose level was chosen using the following rectal wall dose constraints: (1) Less than 30% of the rectal wall volume can receive more than 75.6 Gy. (2) Less than 5% of the rectal wall can receive more than 82 Gy. Low-risk patients (PSA < 10, Stage {<=} T2a, Gleason score < 7) were treated to the prostate alone (Group 1). All other patients, intermediate and high risk, where treated to the prostate and seminal vesicles (Group 2). The risk of chronic toxicity (NCI Common Toxicity Criteria 2.0) was assessed for the different dose levels prescribed. HIC approval was acquired for all patients. Median follow-up was 1.6 years. Results: Grade 2 chronic rectal toxicity was experienced by 34 patients (10%) (9% experienced rectal bleeding, 6% experienced proctitis, 3% experienced diarrhea, and 1% experienced rectal pain) at a median interval of 1.1 year. Nine patients (3%) experienced grade 3 or higher chronic rectal toxicity (1 Grade 4) at a median interval of 1.2 years. The 2-year rates of Grade 2 or higher and Grade 3 or higher chronic rectal toxicity were 17% and 3%, respectively. No

  7. Performance evaluation of iterative reconstruction algorithms for achieving CT radiation dose reduction - a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Cristina T; Tamm, Eric P; Cody, Dianna D; Liu, Xinming; Jensen, Corey T; Wei, Wei; Kundra, Vikas; Rong, John

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize image quality and dose performance with GE CT iterative reconstruction techniques, adaptive statistical iterative recon-struction (ASiR), and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), over a range of typical to low-dose intervals using the Catphan 600 and the anthropomorphic Kyoto Kagaku abdomen phantoms. The scope of the project was to quantitatively describe the advantages and limitations of these approaches. The Catphan 600 phantom, supplemented with a fat-equivalent oval ring, was scanned using a GE Discovery HD750 scanner at 120 kVp, 0.8 s rotation time, and pitch factors of 0.516, 0.984, and 1.375. The mA was selected for each pitch factor to achieve CTDIvol values of 24, 18, 12, 6, 3, 2, and 1 mGy. Images were reconstructed at 2.5 mm thickness with filtered back-projection (FBP); 20%, 40%, and 70% ASiR; and MBIR. The potential for dose reduction and low-contrast detectability were evaluated from noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) measurements in the CTP 404 module of the Catphan. Hounsfield units (HUs) of several materials were evaluated from the cylinder inserts in the CTP 404 module, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) was calculated from the air insert. The results were con-firmed in the anthropomorphic Kyoto Kagaku abdomen phantom at 6, 3, 2, and 1mGy. MBIR reduced noise levels five-fold and increased CNR by a factor of five compared to FBP below 6mGy CTDIvol, resulting in a substantial improvement in image quality. Compared to ASiR and FBP, HU in images reconstructed with MBIR were consistently lower, and this discrepancy was reversed by higher pitch factors in some materials. MBIR improved the conspicuity of the high-contrast spatial resolution bar pattern, and MTF quantification confirmed the superior spatial resolution performance of MBIR versus FBP and ASiR at higher dose levels. While ASiR and FBP were relatively insensitive to changes in dose and pitch, the spatial resolution for MBIR

  8. Safety Evaluation of Oral Toxicity of Carica papaya Linn. Leaves: A Subchronic Toxicity Study in Sprague Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Zakiah; Halim, Siti Zaleha; Abdullah, Noor Rain; Afzan, Adlin; Abdul Rashid, Badrul Amini; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    The subchronic toxicity effect of the leaf extract of Carica papaya Linn. in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats was investigated in this study. The extract was prepared by dissolving the freeze dried extract of the leaves in distilled water and was administered orally to SD rats (consisted of 10 rats/sex/group) at 0 (control), 0.01, 0.14, and 2 g/kg body weight (BW) for 13 weeks. General observation, mortality, and food and water intake were monitored throughout the experimental period. Hematological and biochemical parameters, relative organ weights, and histopathological changes were evaluated. The study showed that leaf extract when administered for 13 weeks did not cause any mortality and abnormalities of behavior or changes in body weight as well as food and water intake. There were no significant differences observed in hematology parameters between treatment and control groups; however significant differences were seen in biochemistry values, for example, LDH, creatinine, total protein, and albumin. However, these changes were not associated with histopathological changes. In conclusion, the results suggested that daily oral administration of rats with C. papaya leaf extract for 13 weeks at a dose up to fourteen times the levels employed in traditional medicine practice did not cause any significant toxic effect. PMID:25530788

  9. Safety Evaluation of Oral Toxicity of Carica papaya Linn. Leaves: A Subchronic Toxicity Study in Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Zakiah; Abdullah, Noor Rain; Abdul Rashid, Badrul Amini; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    The subchronic toxicity effect of the leaf extract of Carica papaya Linn. in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats was investigated in this study. The extract was prepared by dissolving the freeze dried extract of the leaves in distilled water and was administered orally to SD rats (consisted of 10 rats/sex/group) at 0 (control), 0.01, 0.14, and 2 g/kg body weight (BW) for 13 weeks. General observation, mortality, and food and water intake were monitored throughout the experimental period. Hematological and biochemical parameters, relative organ weights, and histopathological changes were evaluated. The study showed that leaf extract when administered for 13 weeks did not cause any mortality and abnormalities of behavior or changes in body weight as well as food and water intake. There were no significant differences observed in hematology parameters between treatment and control groups; however significant differences were seen in biochemistry values, for example, LDH, creatinine, total protein, and albumin. However, these changes were not associated with histopathological changes. In conclusion, the results suggested that daily oral administration of rats with C. papaya leaf extract for 13 weeks at a dose up to fourteen times the levels employed in traditional medicine practice did not cause any significant toxic effect. PMID:25530788

  10. Dose Reconstruction for the Million Worker Epidemiologic Study: Status and Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Bouville, A.; Toohey, Richard E.; Boice, John; Beck, Harold L.; Dauer, Lawrence T.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Hagemeyer, Derek A.; Leggett, Richard W.; Miller, Donald L.; Mumma, Michael T.; Napier, Bruce A.; Pryor, Kathryn H.; Rosenstein, Marvin; Schauer, David A.; Sherbini, Sami; Stram, Daniel; Thompson, James L.; Till, John E.; Yoder, Craig; Zeitlin, Cary

    2015-02-16

    The primary aim of the epidemiologic study of one million U.S. radiation workers and veterans (the Million-Worker study) is to provide scientifically valid information on the level of radiation risk when exposures are received gradually over time, and not acutely as was the case for Japanese atomic bomb survivors. The primary outcome of the epidemiological study is cancer mortality but other causes of death such as cardiovascular disease and cerebrovascular disease will be evaluated. The success of the study is tied to the validity of the dose reconstruction approaches to provide unbiased estimates of organ-specific radiation absorbed doses and their accompanying uncertainties. The dosimetry aspects for the Million-Worker study are challenging in that they address diverse exposure scenarios for diverse occupational groups being studied over a period of up to 70 years. The dosimetric issues differ among the varied exposed populations that are considered: atomic veterans, DOE workers exposed to both penetrating radiation and intakes of radionuclides, nuclear power plant workers, medical radiation workers, and industrial radiographers. While a major source of radiation exposure to the study population comes from external gamma-ray or x-ray sources, for certain of the study groups there is a meaningful component of radionuclide intakes that require internal radiation dosimetry measures. Scientific Committee 6-9 has been established by NCRP to produce a report on the comprehensive organ dose assessment (including uncertainty analysis) for the Million-Worker study. The Committee’s report will cover the specifics of practical dose reconstruction for the ongoing epidemiologic studies with uncertainty analysis discussions and will be a specific application of the guidance provided in NCRP Reports 158, 163, 164, and 171. The main role of the Committee is to provide guidelines to the various groups of dosimetrists involved in the various components of the Million

  11. Complete dataset for 2-treatment, 2-sequence, 2-period efavirenz bioequivalence study conducted with nightly dosing.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Manuel; Magallanes, Laura; Lorier, Marianela; Vázquez, Marta; Fagiolino, Pietro

    2016-06-01

    The efavirenz pharmacokinetic raw data presented in this article was obtained in an average bioequivalence study between a local brand and Stocrin (Merck Sharp & Dohme, purchased from Australia, batch H009175, expiration date November 2013). Dose was administered at night (9:00 p.m.) two hours after food intake. Fourteen healthy subjects, 8 women and 6 men, completed the study. For each subject, 15 data points until 96 h post-administration are included. Subject demographic characteristics and sequences of administration are provided along with individual pharmacokinetic profiles of efavirenz obtained for both formulations after a single oral dose of 600 mg. This data provides information in support of the research article "Sex-by-formulation interaction assessed through a bioequivalence study of efavirenz tablets" [1]. PMID:27054190

  12. Complete dataset for 2-treatment, 2-sequence, 2-period efavirenz bioequivalence study conducted with nightly dosing

    PubMed Central

    Ibarra, Manuel; Magallanes, Laura; Lorier, Marianela; Vázquez, Marta; Fagiolino, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The efavirenz pharmacokinetic raw data presented in this article was obtained in an average bioequivalence study between a local brand and Stocrin (Merck Sharp & Dohme, purchased from Australia, batch H009175, expiration date November 2013). Dose was administered at night (9:00 p.m.) two hours after food intake. Fourteen healthy subjects, 8 women and 6 men, completed the study. For each subject, 15 data points until 96 h post-administration are included. Subject demographic characteristics and sequences of administration are provided along with individual pharmacokinetic profiles of efavirenz obtained for both formulations after a single oral dose of 600 mg. This data provides information in support of the research article “Sex-by-formulation interaction assessed through a bioequivalence study of efavirenz tablets” [1]. PMID:27054190

  13. Alcohol dose effects on brain circuits during simulated driving: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Meda, Shashwath A; Calhoun, Vince D; Astur, Robert S; Turner, Beth M; Ruopp, Kathryn; Pearlson, Godfrey D

    2009-04-01

    Driving while intoxicated remains a major public health hazard. Driving is a complex task involving simultaneous recruitment of multiple cognitive functions. The investigators studied the neural substrates of driving and their response to different blood alcohol concentrations (BACs), using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a virtual reality driving simulator. We used independent component analysis (ICA) to isolate spatially independent and temporally correlated driving-related brain circuits in 40 healthy, adult moderate social drinkers. Each subject received three individualized, separate single-blind doses of beverage alcohol to produce BACs of 0.05% (moderate), 0.10% (high), or 0% (placebo). 3 T fMRI scanning and continuous behavioral measurement occurred during simulated driving. Brain function was assessed and compared using both ICA and a conventional general linear model (GLM) analysis. ICA results replicated and significantly extended our previous 1.5T study (Calhoun et al. [2004a]: Neuropsychopharmacology 29:2097-2017). GLM analysis revealed significant dose-related functional differences, complementing ICA data. Driving behaviors including opposite white line crossings and mean speed independently demonstrated significant dose-dependent changes. Behavior-based factors also predicted a frontal-basal-temporal circuit to be functionally impaired with alcohol dosage across baseline scaled, good versus poorly performing drivers. We report neural correlates of driving behavior and found dose-related spatio-temporal disruptions in critical driving-associated regions including the superior, middle and orbito frontal gyri, anterior cingulate, primary/supplementary motor areas, basal ganglia, and cerebellum. Overall, results suggest that alcohol (especially at high doses) causes significant impairment of both driving behavior and brain functionality related to motor planning and control, goal directedness, error monitoring, and memory. PMID:18571794

  14. Radiation shielding and patient organ dose study for an accelerator- based BNCT Facility at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Costes, S.V.; Vujic, J.; Donahue, R.J.

    1996-10-24

    This study considers the radiation safety aspects of several designs discussed in a previous report of an accelerator-based source of neutrons, based on the [sup 7]Li(p,n) reaction, for a Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). determines the optimal radiation shield thicknesses for the patient treatment room. Since this is an experimental facility no moderator or reflector is considered in the bulk wall shield design. This will allow the flexibility of using any postulated moderator/reflector design and assumes sufficient shielding even in the absence of a moderator/reflector. In addition the accelerator is assumed to be capable of producing 100 mA of 2.5 MeV proton beam current. The addition of 1% and 2% [sup 10]B (by weight) to the concrete is also investigated. The second part of this paper determines the radiation dose to the major organs of a patient during a treatment. Simulations use the MIRD 5 anthropomorphic phantom to calculate organ doses from a 20 mA proton beam assuming various envisioned moderator/reflector in place. Doses are tabulated by component and for a given uniform [sup 10]B loading in all organs. These are presented in for a BeO moderator and for an Al/AlF[sub 3] moderator. Dose estimates for different [sup 10]B loadings may be scaled.

  15. Liposomal Bupivacaine as a Single-Injection Peripheral Nerve Block: A Dose-Response Study

    PubMed Central

    Ilfeld, Brian M.; Malhotra, Nisha; Furnish, Timothy J.; Donohue, Michael C.; Madison, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently available local anesthetics approved for single-injection peripheral nerve blocks have a maximum duration less than 24 hours. A liposomal bupivacaine formulation (EXPAREL®, Pacira Pharmaceuticals, Inc., San Diego, California), releasing bupivacaine over 96 hours, recently gained Food and Drug Administration approval exclusively for wound infiltration, but not peripheral nerve blocks. Methods Bilateral single-injection femoral nerve blocks were administered in healthy volunteers (n=14). For each block, liposomal bupivacaine (0–80 mg) was mixed with normal saline to produce 30 mL of study fluid. Each subject received two different doses, one on each side, applied randomly in a double-masked fashion. The end points included the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the quadriceps femoris muscle and tolerance to cutaneous electrical current in the femoral nerve distribution. Measurements were performed from baseline until quadriceps MVIC returned to 80% of baseline bilaterally. Results There were statistically significant dose responses in MVIC (0.09% / mg, SE = 0.03, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.14, p = 0.002) and tolerance to cutaneous current (−0.03 mA / mg, SE = 0.01, 95% CI −0.04 to 0.02, p < 0.001), however, in the opposite direction than expected (the higher the dose, the lower the observed effect). This inverse relationship is biologically implausible, and most likely due to the limited sample size and the subjective nature of the measurement instruments. While peak effects occurred within 24 hours after block administration in 75% of cases (95% CI 43 to 93%), block duration usually lasted much longer: for bupivacaine doses above 40 mg, tolerance to cutaneous current did not return to within 20% above baseline until after 24 h in 100% of subjects (95% CI 56 to 100). MVIC did not consistently return to within 20% of baseline until after 24 hours in 90% of subjects (95% CI 54 to 100%). Motor block duration was not correlated with

  16. Radrue method for reconstruction of external photon doses for Chernobyl liquidators in epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Kryuchkov, Victor; Chumak, Vadim; Maceika, Evaldas; Anspaugh, Lynn R; Cardis, Elisabeth; Bakhanova, Elena; Golovanov, Ivan; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Luckyanov, Nickolas; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Voillequé, Paul; Bouville, André

    2009-10-01

    Between 1986 and 1990, several hundred thousand workers, called "liquidators" or "clean-up workers," took part in decontamination and recovery activities within the 30-km zone around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine, where a major accident occurred in April 1986. The Chernobyl liquidators were mainly exposed to external ionizing radiation levels that depended primarily on their work locations and the time after the accident when the work was performed. Because individual doses were often monitored inadequately or were not monitored at all for the majority of liquidators, a new method of photon (i.e., gamma and x rays) dose assessment, called "RADRUE" (Realistic Analytical Dose Reconstruction with Uncertainty Estimation), was developed to obtain unbiased and reasonably accurate estimates for use in three epidemiologic studies of hematological malignancies and thyroid cancer among liquidators. The RADRUE program implements a time-and-motion dose-reconstruction method that is flexible and conceptually easy to understand. It includes a large exposure rate database and interpolation and extrapolation techniques to calculate exposure rates at places where liquidators lived and worked within approximately 70 km of the destroyed reactor. The RADRUE technique relies on data collected from subjects' interviews conducted by trained interviewers, and on expert dosimetrists to interpret the information and provide supplementary information, when necessary, based upon their own Chernobyl experience. The RADRUE technique was used to estimate doses from external irradiation, as well as uncertainties, to the bone marrow for 929 subjects and to the thyroid gland for 530 subjects enrolled in epidemiologic studies. Individual bone marrow dose estimates were found to range from less than one muGy to 3,300 mGy, with an arithmetic mean of 71 mGy. Individual thyroid dose estimates were lower and ranged from 20 muGy to 507 mGy, with an arithmetic mean of 29 mGy. The

  17. RADRUE METHOD FOR RECONSTRUCTION OF EXTERNAL PHOTON DOSES TO CHERNOBYL LIQUIDATORS IN EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES

    PubMed Central

    Kryuchkov, Victor; Chumak, Vadim; Maceika, Evaldas; Anspaugh, Lynn R.; Cardis, Elisabeth; Bakhanova, Elena; Golovanov, Ivan; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Luckyanov, Nickolas; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Voillequé, Paul; Bouville, André

    2010-01-01

    Between 1986 and 1990, several hundred thousand workers, called “liquidators” or “clean-up workers”, took part in decontamination and recovery activities within the 30-km zone around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine, where a major accident occurred in April 1986. The Chernobyl liquidators were mainly exposed to external ionizing radiation levels that depended primarily on their work locations and the time after the accident when the work was performed. Because individual doses were often monitored inadequately or were not monitored at all for the majority of liquidators, a new method of photon (i.e. gamma and x-rays) dose assessment, called “RADRUE” (Realistic Analytical Dose Reconstruction with Uncertainty Estimation) was developed to obtain unbiased and reasonably accurate estimates for use in three epidemiologic studies of hematological malignancies and thyroid cancer among liquidators. The RADRUE program implements a time-and-motion dose reconstruction method that is flexible and conceptually easy to understand. It includes a large exposure rate database and interpolation and extrapolation techniques to calculate exposure rates at places where liquidators lived and worked within ~70 km of the destroyed reactor. The RADRUE technique relies on data collected from subjects’ interviews conducted by trained interviewers, and on expert dosimetrists to interpret the information and provide supplementary information, when necessary, based upon their own Chernobyl experience. The RADRUE technique was used to estimate doses from external irradiation, as well as uncertainties, to the bone-marrow for 929 subjects and to the thyroid gland for 530 subjects enrolled in epidemiologic studies. Individual bone-marrow dose estimates were found to range from less than one μGy to 3,300 mGy, with an arithmetic mean of 71 mGy. Individual thyroid dose estimates were lower and ranged from 20 μGy to 507 mGy, with an arithmetic mean of 29 mGy. The

  18. Use of cassette dosing to enhance the throughput of rat brain microdialysis studies.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Gauri; Sun, Kefeng; Liederer, Bianca M; Ding, Xiao; Liu, Xingrong

    2015-07-01

    This study was designed to increase the throughput of rat brain microdialysis studies by administration of compounds as a cassette as opposed to discrete study. Eight compounds (carbamazepine, citalopram, desmethylclozapine, diphenhydramine, gabapentin, metoclopramide, naltrexone, and stavudine) were selected and administered as an intravenous bolus dose at 0.5-3.3 mg/kg each followed by an intravenous infusion at 1 mg/kg per hour for 6 hours in rats in a cassette or discrete dosing. The dialysate, plasma, brain, and cerebrospinal fluid were collected and analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The microdialysis probe recovery was determined by an in vitro gain method. The recovery between the cassette and discrete dosing was similar, with an average of 1.0 ± 0.10-fold difference. The stavudine interstitial fluid (ISF) concentration, as measured by brain microdialysis, was below the low limit of quantitation and was excluded from the analyses. The ratios of ISF concentration to unbound plasma concentration were within 2-fold for six of the remaining seven compounds, with an average of 0.92 ± 0.51-fold difference between the cassette and discrete methods. The ratios of ISF concentration to unbound brain concentration, as measured by the brain homogenate method, were also similar, with a 1.1 ± 0.7-fold difference. In addition, the ratios of ISF to cerebrospinal fluid concentrations were similar, with a 1.5 ± 0.6-fold difference. The results from this study support the use of a cassette dosing approach to enhance the throughput of rat brain microdialysis studies in drug discovery. PMID:25943358

  19. Image quality and dose efficiency of high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging: Phantom studies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this preliminary study was to perform an image quality comparison of high energy phase sensitive imaging with low energy conventional imaging at similar radiation doses. The comparison was performed with the following phantoms: American College of Radiology (ACR), contrast-detail (CD), acrylic edge and tissue-equivalent. Visual comparison of the phantom images indicated comparable or improved image quality for all phantoms. Quantitative comparisons were performed through ACR and CD observer studies, both of which indicated higher image quality in the high energy phase sensitive images. The results of this study demonstrate the ability of high energy phase sensitive imaging to overcome existing challenges with the clinical implementation of phase contrast imaging and improve the image quality for a similar radiation dose as compared to conventional imaging near typical mammography energies. In addition, the results illustrate the capability of phase sensitive imaging to sustain the image quality improvement at high x-ray energies and for – breast – simulating phantoms, both of which indicate the potential to benefit fields such as mammography. Future studies will continue to investigate the potential for dose reduction and image quality improvement provided by high energy phase sensitive contrast imaging. PMID:24865208

  20. [Study on radiation dose estimation and monitor in TBI using an anthropomorphic phantom].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y B; Yang, Y

    2001-11-01

    Absorbed doses and the dose distributions at important tissues and organs in an anthropomorphic phantom are measured using TLD under the TBI conditions. The dose for each tissue or organ is also estimated and monitored for TBI treatment. PMID:12583267

  1. Lymphoid cell kinetics under continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation: A comparison study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    A comparison study was conducted of the effects of continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation on cell population kinetics of lymphoid tissue (white pulp) of the mouse spleen with findings as they relate to the mouse thymus. Experimental techniques employed included autoradiography and specific labeling with tritiated thymidine (TdR-(h-3)). The problem studied involved the mechanism of cell proliferation of lymphoid tissue of the mouse spleen and thymus under the stress of continuous irradiation at a dose rate of 10 roentgens (R) per day for 105 days (15 weeks). The aim was to determine whether or not a steady state or near-steady state of cell population could be established for this period of time, and what compensatory mechanisms of cell population were involved.

  2. Population Pharmacokinetics Study of Recommended Zidovudine Doses in HIV-1-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Frange, Pierre; Urien, Saik; Foissac, Frantz; Bouazza, Naim; Benaboud, Sihem; Blanche, Stephane; Hirt, Déborah

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the pharmacokinetics of zidovudine (ZDV) and its biotransformation to its metabolite, 3*-azido-3*-deoxy-5*-glucuronylthymidine (G-ZDV), in HIV-infected children, to identify factors that influence the pharmacokinetics of ZDV, and to compare and evaluate the doses recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). ZDV concentrations in 782 samples and G-ZDV concentrations in 554 samples from 247 children ranging in age from 0.5 to 18 years were retrospectively measured. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed with NONMEM software (version 6.2), and the pharmacokinetics of ZDV were best described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. The effect of body weight on the apparent elimination clearance and volume of distribution was significant. The mean population parameter estimates were as follows: absorption rate, 2.86 h−1; apparent elimination clearance, 89.7 liters · h−1 (between-subject variability, 0.701 liters · h−1); apparent volume of distribution, 229 liters (between-subject variability, 0.807 liters); metabolic formation rate constant, 12.6 h−1 (between-subject variability, 0.352 h−1); and elimination rate constant of G-ZDV, 2.27 h−1. On the basis of simulations with FDA and WHO dosing recommendations, the probabilities of observing efficient exposures (doses resulting in exposures of between 3 and 5 mg/liter · h) with less adverse events (doses resulting in exposures below 8.4 mg/liter · h) were higher when the FDA recommendations than when the WHO recommendations were followed. In order to improve the FDA recommendations, ZDV doses should be reconsidered for the weight band (WB) of 20 to 40 kg. The most appropriate doses should be decreased from 9 to 8 mg/kg of body weight twice a day (BID) for the WB from 20 to 29.9 kg and from 300 to 250 mg BID for the WB from 30 to 39.9 kg. The highest dose, 300 mg BID, should be

  3. Spatial fractionation of the dose using neon and heavier ions: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Peucelle, C.; Martínez-Rovira, I.; Prezado, Y.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: This work explores a new radiation therapy approach which might trigger a renewed use of neon and heavier ions to treat cancers. These ions were shown to be extremely efficient in radioresistant tumor killing. Unfortunately, the efficient region also extends into the normal tissue in front of the tumor. The strategy the authors propose is to profit from the well-established sparing effect of thin spatially fractionated beams, so that the impact on normal tissues might be minimized while a high tumor control is achieved. The main goal of this work is to provide a proof of concept of this new approach. With that aim, a dosimetric study was carried out as a first step to evaluate the interest of further explorations of this avenue. Methods: The GATE/GEANT4 v.6.1 Monte Carlo simulation platform was employed to simulate arrays of rectangular minibeams (700 μm × 2 cm) of four ions (Ne, Si, Ar, and Fe). The irradiations were performed with a 2 cm-long spread-out Bragg peak centered at 7 cm-depth. Dose distributions in a water phantom were scored considering two minibeams center-to-center distances: 1400 and 3500 μm. Peak and valley doses, peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDRs), beam penumbras, and relative contribution of nuclear fragments and electromagnetic processes were assessed as figures of merit. In addition, the type and proportion of the secondary nuclear fragments were evaluated in both peak and valley regions. Results: Extremely high PVDR values (>100) and low valley doses were obtained. The higher the atomic number (Z) of the primary ion is, the lower the valleys and the narrower the penumbras. Although the yield of secondary nuclear products increases with Z, the actual dose being deposited by the secondary nuclear fragments in the valleys starts to be the dominant contribution at deeper points, helping in the sparing of proximal normal tissues. Additionally, a wider center-to-center distance leads to a minimized contribution of heavier secondary

  4. A Monte Carlo study on dose distribution validation of GZP6 60Co stepping source

    PubMed Central

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Abdollahi, Maliheh; Ghorbani, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    Aim Stepping source in brachytherapy systems is used to treat a target lesion longer than the effective treatment length of the source. Cancerous lesions in the cervix, esophagus and rectum are examples of such a target lesion. Background In this study, the stepping source of a GZP6 afterloading intracavitary brachytherapy unit was simulated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and the results were used for the validation of the GZP6 treatment planning system (TPS). Materials and methods The stepping source was simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Dose distributions in the longitudinal plane were obtained by using a matrix shift method for esophageal tumor lengths of 8 and 10 cm. A mesh tally has been employed for the absorbed dose calculation in a cylindrical water phantom. A total of 5 × 108 photon histories were scored and the MC statistical error obtained was at the range of 0.008–3.5%, an average of 0.2%. Results The acquired MC and TPS isodose curves were compared and it was shown that the dose distributions in the longitudinal plane were relatively coincidental. In the transverse direction, a maximum dose difference of 7% and 5% was observed for tumor lengths of 8 and 10 cm, respectively. Conclusion Considering that the certified source activity is given with ±10% uncertainty, the obtained difference is reasonable. It can be concluded that the accuracy of the dose distributions produced by GZP6 TPS for the stepping source is acceptable for its clinical applications. PMID:24416537

  5. Impact of low-dose CT scan in dual timepoint investigations: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheelsen, M. A.; Jensen, M.

    2011-09-01

    Dual timepoint FDG takeup investigations have a potential for separating malignant lymph nodes from non-malignant in certain cases of suspected lung cancer. One hour seems to be the optimal time interval between the two scans (50-120 min). Many of the new PET scanners benefit from image fusion with a CT image and also use the CT for attenuation correction. In any practical hospital setting, 1 hour is too long to occupy the scanner bed and a second CT procedure thus becomes necessary. This study tries to validate to what extent the dose/quality of the second CT scan can be lowered, without compromising attenuation correction, lesion detection and quantification. Using a standard NEMA phantom with the GE Discovery PET/CT scanner, taken in and out between scan sessions, we have tried to find the minimal CT dose necessary for the second scan while still reaching tissue activity quantification within predetermined error limits. For a hot sphere to background activity concentration ratio of 1:5, the average uptake (normalised by the time corrected input activity concentration) in a sphere of 6 cm3 was found to be 0.90 ± 0.08 for the standard scan, yielding a dose of 5.5 mGy, and 0.90 ± 0.14 for a scan with lowest possible mAs product and lowest possible kV, yielding a dose of 0.65 mGy. With an insignificant increase in the uncertainty in the uptake measurement, we can get an order of magnitude reduction for the CT dose.

  6. A study of the shape of dose-response curves for acute lethality at low response: a megadaphnia study'

    SciTech Connect

    Sebaugh, J.L.; Wilson, J.D.; Tucker, M.W.; Adams, W.J. )

    1991-12-01

    Dose-response curves were developed for the immobilization response in Daphnia magna to four toxicants. The purpose of this work was to study the effect of the form of the model and the number of concentration levels used on the estimates of typical low-dose effective concentrations (1%, 5%, 10%). The generalized four-parameter logistic model was used as the reference. When using 12 concentration levels, one of the logistic family two- or three-parameter models was shown reliably to represent each of these various sets of dose-response data, and to provide adequate estimates of EC01 and EC05, as well as EC10 and EC50. For two of the toxicants, an asymmetric model was required. When reducing the number of concentrations to five, the EC10 and EC50 were well estimated by the probit model, with acceptable results at the EC05 level.

  7. A multiple dose powder inhaler (Turbuhaler) compared with a conventional aerosol. An acceptance study in asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Osterman, K; Norborg, A M; Stähl, E

    1989-05-01

    Nineteen patients with asthma completed an open, randomized, crossover study in which 0.5 mg terbutaline sulphate was administered either via Turbuhaler or via the metered dose inhaler (MDI) for 2-week periods. The clinical effect of the two treatment forms was comparable; both provided adequate bronchodilator therapy. Patients also considered Turbuhaler and MDI equally effective, with a small preference for the MDI. Turbuhaler seems to be a valuable alternative to bronchodilator MDI therapy. PMID:2735519

  8. A large-scale multicentre study in Belgium of dose area product values and effective doses in interventional cardiology using contemporary X-ray equipment.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, E; Bacher, K; Thierens, H

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a large-scale multicentre patient dose study performed in eight Belgian interventional cardiology departments is presented. Effective dose (E) was calculated based on a detailed dose-area product (DAP)-registration during each procedure and by using conversion coefficients generated by the Monte Carlo-based computer program PCXMC. Conversion coefficients were found to be 0.177 mSv Gycm(-2) for systems that do not use any additional copper filtration in cineradiography and 0.207 mSv Gycm(-2) for systems that use additional copper filtration in cineradiography. Mean E values of 9.6 and 15.3 mSv for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, respectively, were obtained. DAP distributions were investigated in order to derive dose reference levels: 71 and 106 Gycm2 for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, respectively, are proposed. Significant differences were observed in DAP distributions taking into account whether additional copper filtration was used in the cineradiography mode. Apart from the skin, the organs most at risk are lungs and heart. The probability of fatal cancer for the studied population amounted to 1.1x10(-4) and 2.1x10(-4) for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, respectively, for the age distribution of the patients considered in this multicentre study. PMID:17681964

  9. Radiation doses in volume-of-interest breast computed tomography—A Monte Carlo simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Chao-Jen Zhong, Yuncheng; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Cone beam breast computed tomography (breast CT) with true three-dimensional, nearly isotropic spatial resolution has been developed and investigated over the past decade to overcome the problem of lesions overlapping with breast anatomical structures on two-dimensional mammographic images. However, the ability of breast CT to detect small objects, such as tissue structure edges and small calcifications, is limited. To resolve this problem, the authors proposed and developed a volume-of-interest (VOI) breast CT technique to image a small VOI using a higher radiation dose to improve that region’s visibility. In this study, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations to estimate average breast dose and average glandular dose (AGD) for the VOI breast CT technique. Methods: Electron–Gamma-Shower system code-based Monte Carlo codes were used to simulate breast CT. The Monte Carlo codes estimated were validated using physical measurements of air kerma ratios and point doses in phantoms with an ion chamber and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. The validated full cone x-ray source was then collimated to simulate half cone beam x-rays to image digital pendant-geometry, hemi-ellipsoidal, homogeneous breast phantoms and to estimate breast doses with full field scans. 13-cm in diameter, 10-cm long hemi-ellipsoidal homogeneous phantoms were used to simulate median breasts. Breast compositions of 25% and 50% volumetric glandular fractions (VGFs) were used to investigate the influence on breast dose. The simulated half cone beam x-rays were then collimated to a narrow x-ray beam with an area of 2.5 × 2.5 cm{sup 2} field of view at the isocenter plane and to perform VOI field scans. The Monte Carlo results for the full field scans and the VOI field scans were then used to estimate the AGD for the VOI breast CT technique. Results: The ratios of air kerma ratios and dose measurement results from the Monte Carlo simulation to those from the physical

  10. Eltoprazine counteracts l-DOPA-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease: a dose-finding study.

    PubMed

    Svenningsson, Per; Rosenblad, Carl; Af Edholm Arvidsson, Karolina; Wictorin, Klas; Keywood, Charlotte; Shankar, Bavani; Lowe, David A; Björklund, Anders; Widner, Håkan

    2015-04-01

    In advanced stages of Parkinson's disease, serotonergic terminals take up L-DOPA and convert it to dopamine. Abnormally released dopamine may participate in the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias. Simultaneous activation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors effectively blocks L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias in animal models of dopamine depletion, justifying a clinical study with eltoprazine, a 5-HT1A/B receptor agonist, against L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias in patients with Parkinson's disease. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled and dose-finding phase I/IIa study was conducted. Single oral treatment with placebo or eltoprazine, at 2.5, 5 and 7.5 mg, was tested in combination with a suprathreshold dose of L-DOPA (Sinemet®) in 22 patients with Parkinson's disease (16 male/six female; 66.6 ± 8.8 years old) with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias. A Wilcoxon Signed Ranked Test was used to compare each eltoprazine dose level to paired randomized placebo on the prespecified primary efficacy variables; area under the curve scores on Clinical Dyskinesia Rating Scale for 3 h post-dose and maximum change of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III for 3 h post-dose. Secondary objectives included effects on maximum Clinical Dyskinesia Rating Scale score, area under the curve of Rush Dyskinesia Rating Scale score for 3 h post-dose, mood parameters measured by Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale and Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale along with the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability profile of eltoprazine. A mixed model repeated measures was used for post hoc analyses of the area under the curve and peak Clinical Dyskinesia Rating Scale scores. It was found that serum concentrations of eltoprazine increased in a dose-proportional manner. Following levodopa challenge, 5 mg eltoprazine caused a significant reduction of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias on area under the curves of Clinical Dyskinesia Rating Scale [-1.02(1.49); P = 0.004] and Rush Dyskinesia Rating

  11. Introduction of section II and overview of dose reconstruction: lessons learned from studies in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L. R, LLNL

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of dose reconstruction with an emphasis on the lessons learned from work in the United States. Several major dose reconstructions have been undertaken in the United States, particularly in reference to Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Some of these activities have now been completed and these are indicated in the upper part of Table 2. The first major activity took place at the Nevada Test Site (NTS),where researchers have considered several different specific populations. The activities began with an analysis of hypothetical individuals, which was followed by an analysis of the collective dose to all exposed individuals within the surrounding region. Later, the University of Utah undertook some specific epidemiologic studies and calculated doses to specific individuals. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Study has completed its results for hypothetical individuals. The Hanford researchers did not report collective dose. Long-Term Radiation Contamination in Chelyabinsk, Russia

  12. Risk of cancer after low doses of ionising radiation: retrospective cohort study in 15 countries

    PubMed Central

    Cardis, E; Vrijheid, M; Blettner, M; Gilbert, E; Hakama, M; Hill, C; Howe, G; Kaldor, J; Muirhead, C R; Schubauer-Berigan, M; Yoshimura, T; Bermann, F; Cowper, G; Fix, J; Hacker, C; Heinmiller, B; Marshall, M; Thierry-Chef, I; Utterback, D; Ahn, Y-O; Amoros, E; Ashmore, P; Auvinen, A; Bae, J-M; Solano, J Bernar; Biau, A; Combalot, E; Deboodt, P; Sacristan, A Diez; Eklof, M; Engels, H; Engholm, G; Gulis, G; Habib, R; Holan, K; Hyvonen, H; Kerekes, A; Kurtinaitis, J; Malker, H; Martuzzi, M; Mastauskas, A; Monnet, A; Moser, M; Pearce, M S; Richardson, D B; Rodriguez-Artalejo, F; Rogel, A; Tardy, H; Telle-Lamberton, M; Turai, I; Usel, M; Veress, K

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To provide direct estimates of risk of cancer after protracted low doses of ionising radiation and to strengthen the scientific basis of radiation protection standards for environmental, occupational, and medical diagnostic exposures. Design Multinational retrospective cohort study of cancer mortality. Setting Cohorts of workers in the nuclear industry in 15 countries. Participants 407 391 workers individually monitored for external radiation with a total follow-up of 5.2 million person years. Main outcome measurements Estimates of excess relative risks per sievert (Sv) of radiation dose for mortality from cancers other than leukaemia and from leukaemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, the main causes of death considered by radiation protection authorities. Results The excess relative risk for cancers other than leukaemia was 0.97 per Sv, 95% confidence interval 0.14 to 1.97. Analyses of causes of death related or unrelated to smoking indicate that, although confounding by smoking may be present, it is unlikely to explain all of this increased risk. The excess relative risk for leukaemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukaemia was 1.93 per Sv (< 0 to 8.47). On the basis of these estimates, 1-2% of deaths from cancer among workers in this cohort may be attributable to radiation. Conclusions These estimates, from the largest study of nuclear workers ever conducted, are higher than, but statistically compatible with, the risk estimates used for current radiation protection standards. The results suggest that there is a small excess risk of cancer, even at the low doses and dose rates typically received by nuclear workers in this study. PMID:15987704

  13. Development of a method to estimate thyroid dose from fallout radioiodine in a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Simon, S L; Lloyd, R D; Till, J E; Hawthorne, H A; Gren, D C; Rallison, M L; Stevens, W

    1990-11-01

    A cohort of 4831 persons aged 11-18 y in 1965 was identified among students in the schools of Washington County, UT; Lincoln County, NV; and Graham County, AZ. These children who had potentially been exposed to radioiodine from atomic weapons test fallout from the Nevada Test Site during 1951-1962 were selected for participation in a study of thyroid disease. The entire cohort was first examined during 1965-1968 for thyroid abnormalities. A total of 3,085 of these people were again reexamined during 1985-1986 to determine any subsequent occurrence of thyroid disease. In order to determine the relationship of the radiation dose to the thyroid with incidence of thyroid disease, we have developed a suite of models to calculate estimates of the internal dose received by the thyroid from fallout radioiodines. For completeness, the exposure to the thyroid from external radiation is also estimated. Dose estimates are made specific to each individual in the study using individual residential histories, the locality-specific exposure rate and radionuclide deposition, descriptions of dairy management for identified milk producers, and the subjects' sources of foods and intake rates of milk and leafy vegetables determined by interview. Other data such as the relationship of radioiodine deposition to measured exposure rate, environmental transfer parameters, and age-dependent factors for the conversion of radioiodine intake to thyroid dose were taken from work of other investigators. Dairy management information, milk distribution practices, the milk source for each study subject, as well as age-specific intake rates of milk and leafy vegetables, were determined by interview. PMID:2211123

  14. The haemotoxicity of azathioprine in repeat dose studies in the female CD-1 mouse

    PubMed Central

    Molyneux, Gemma; Gibson, Frances M; Chen, Christabelle M; Marway, Harpal K; McKeag, Sean; Mifsud, Charles V J; Pilling, Andrew M; Whayman, Matthew J; Turton, John A

    2008-01-01

    Azathioprine (AZA) is a cytotoxic immunosuppressive drug used in the prevention of rejection in organ transplants and the treatment of auto-immune diseases. However, AZA is haemotoxic causing significant bone marrow depression. The present studies were to characterize the haemotoxicity of AZA in the female CD-1 mouse. In Experiment 1, a dose-ranging study, with AZA gavaged daily for 10 days, clinical evidence of toxicity was evident at 125 mg/kg and above. Experiment 2 was a dose–response study with AZA gavaged daily for 10 days at 40–120 mg/kg. At day 1 after the final dose, AZA induced a dose-related pancytopaenia, reduced femoral marrow cellularity, increases in serum levels of the cytokine fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand, reduction in granulocyte-monocyte colony-forming units and erythroid colonies, and increased bone marrow apoptosis. Histology demonstrated hepatocyte hypertrophy, thymic atrophy, reduced splenic extramedullary haemopoiesis, and reduced cellularity of sternal bone marrow. In Experiment 3, AZA was dosed for 10 days at 100 mg/kg with autopsies at 1, 3, 9, 22, 29, 43 and 57 days postdosing. At 1, 3 and 9 days, haematological parameters reflected changes in Experiment 2. At 22/29 days, many blood parameters were returning towards normal; at 43/57 days, most parameters compared with controls. However, there was some evidence of a persistent (i.e. residual/late-stage) mild reduction in RBC and erythroid progenitor cell counts at day 43/57. We conclude that the CD-1 mouse provides an acceptable model for the haemotoxicity of AZA in man. PMID:18336531

  15. SU-D-204-06: Dose and Image Quality Evaluation of a Low-Dose Slot-Scanning X-Ray System for Pediatric Orthopedic Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z; Hoerner, M; Lamoureux, R; Rill, L; Arreola, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Children in early teens with scoliosis require repeated radiographic exams over a number of years. The EOS (EOS imaging S.A., Paris, France) is a novel low-dose slot-scanning digital radiographic system designed to produce full-spine images of a free-standing patient. The radiation dose and image quality characteristics of the EOS were evaluated relative to those of a Computed Radiography (CR) system for scoliosis imaging. Methods: For dose evaluation, a full-torso anthropomorphic phantom was scanned five times using the default standard clinical protocols for both the EOS and a CR system, which include both posteroanterior and lateral full-spine views. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs), also known as nanoDots™ (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL), were placed on the phantom’s surface to measure entrance skin dose. To assess image quality, MTF curves were generated from sampling the noise levels within the high-contrast regions of a line-pair phantom. Vertical and horizontal distortions were measured for the square line-pair phantom with the EOS system to evaluate the effects of geometric magnification and misalignment with the indicated imaging plane. Results: The entrance skin dose was measured to be 0.4 to 1.1 mGy for the EOS, and 0.7 to 3.6 mGy for the CR study. MTF comparison shows that CR greatly outperforms the EOS, despite both systems having a limiting resolution at 1.8 line-pairs per mm. Vertical distortion was unaffected by phantom positioning, because of the EOS slot-scanning geometry. Horizontal distortion increased linearly with miscentering distance. Conclusion: The EOS system resulted in approximately 70% lower radiation dose than CR for full-spine images. Image quality was found to be inferior to CR. Further investigation is required to see if EOS system is an acceptable modality for performing clinically diagnostic scoliosis examinations.

  16. A comparative study of folate receptor-targeted doxorubicin delivery systems: dosing regimens and therapeutic index.

    PubMed

    Scomparin, Anna; Salmaso, Stefano; Eldar-Boock, Anat; Ben-Shushan, Dikla; Ferber, Shiran; Tiram, Galia; Shmeeda, Hilary; Landa-Rouben, Natalie; Leor, Jonathan; Caliceti, Paolo; Gabizon, Alberto; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit

    2015-06-28

    Ligand-receptor mediated targeting may affect differently the performance of supramolecular drug carriers depending on the nature of the nanocarrier. In this study, we compare the selectivity, safety and activity of doxorubicin (Dox) entrapped in liposomes versus Dox conjugated to polymeric nanocarriers in the presence or absence of a folic acid (FA)-targeting ligand to cancer cells that overexpress the folate receptor (FR). Two pullulan (Pull)-based conjugates of Dox were synthesized, (FA-PEG)-Pull-(Cyst-Dox) and (NH2-PEG)-Pull-(Cyst-Dox). The other delivery systems are Dox loaded PEGylated liposomes (PLD, Doxil®) and the FR-targeted version (PLD-FA) obtained by ligand post-insertion into the commercial formulation. Both receptor-targeted drug delivery systems (DDS) were shown to interact in vitro specifically with cells via the folate ligand. Treatment of FR-overexpressing human cervical carcinoma KB tumor-bearing mice with three-weekly injections resulted in slightly enhanced anticancer activity of PLD-FA compared to PLD and no activity for both pullulan-based conjugates. When the DDS were administered intravenously every other day, the folated-Pull conjugate and the non-folated-Pull conjugate displayed similar and low antitumor activity as free Dox. At this dosing regimen, the liposome-based formulations displayed enhanced antitumor activity with an advantage to the non-folated liposome. However, both liposomal formulations suffered from toxicity that was reversible following treatment discontinuation. Using a daily dosing schedule, with higher cumulative dose, the folated-Pull conjugate strongly inhibited tumor growth while free Dox was toxic at this regimen. For polymeric constructs, increasing dose intensity and cumulative dose strongly affects the therapeutic index and reveals a major therapeutic advantage for the FR-targeted formulation. All DDS were able to abrogate doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. This study constitutes the first side

  17. Study of the impact of artificial articulations on the dose distribution under medical irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffard, E.; Gschwind, R.; Makovicka, L.; Martin, E.; Meunier, C.; David, C.

    2005-02-01

    Perturbations due to the presence of high density heterogeneities in the body are not correctly taken into account in the Treatment Planning Systems currently available for external radiotherapy. For this reason, the accuracy of the dose distribution calculations has to be improved by using Monte Carlo simulations. In a previous study, we established a theoretical model by using the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc [I. Kawrakow, D.W.O. Rogers, The EGSnrc code system: MC simulation of electron and photon transport. Technical Report PIRS-701, NRCC, Ottawa, Canada, 2000] in order to obtain the dose distributions around simple heterogeneities. These simulations were then validated by experimental results obtained with thermoluminescent dosemeters and an ionisation chamber. The influence of samples composed of hip prostheses materials (titanium alloy and steel) and a substitute of bone were notably studied. A more complex model was then developed with the Monte Carlo code BEAMnrc [D.W.O. Rogers, C.M. MA, G.X. Ding, B. Walters, D. Sheikh-Bagheri, G.G. Zhang, BEAMnrc Users Manual. NRC Report PPIRS 509(a) rev F, 2001] in order to take into account the hip prosthesis geometry. The simulation results were compared to experimental measurements performed in a water phantom, in the case of a standard treatment of a pelvic cancer for one of the beams passing through the implant. These results have shown the great influence of the prostheses on the dose distribution.

  18. Dose response study of subarachnoid diamorphine for analgesia after elective caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Skilton, R W; Kinsella, S M; Smith, A; Thomas, T A

    1999-10-01

    Subarachnoid diamorphine provides excellent analgesia after elective caesarean section but the optimum dose is still uncertain. We therefore investigated the effects of three regimens of subarachnoid diamorphine. Forty parturients were assigned to one of four groups. A control group received no diamorphine in their subarachnoid bupivacaine and three study groups received 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg or 0.3 mg diamorphine added to 12.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% in a semi-blind randomised design study. All women received a 100 mg diclofenac suppository at the end of the caesarean section and were provided with morphine patient controlled analgesia (PCA) postoperatively. The patients were assessed for pain, morphine usage and side-effects at 2, 4, 8 and 24 h after the subarachnoid injection. Postoperative visual analogue scores for pain and PCA morphine consumption were significantly lower, and mean time to first use of morphine was significantly longer in the 0.3 mg diamorphine group. The mean (SD) dose of PCA morphine used over 24 h was 39.4 (14.7), 25.6 (16.5), 21.6 (15.9) and 3.1 (3.6) mg, and mean time to first use of morphine was 1.6 (0.5), 3.0 (1.4), 3.4 (2.4) and 14.1 (9.4) h, in the 0, 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg and 0.3 mg groups respectively. Side-effects of pruritus, nausea and vomiting were dependent on the dose of spinal diamorphine but did not require treatment in any patients. We conclude that 0.3 mg subarachnoid diamorphine provides significantly better postoperative pain relief than the smaller doses with an acceptable increase in side-effects. PMID:15321116

  19. Treatment of Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria with a Single Dose of Omalizumab: A Study of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniyan, Radhakrishnan; Chopra, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) has a detrimental effect on patients’ emotional and physical quality of life. Omalizumab, an anti-immunoglobulin E humanized monoclonal antibody, has been shown to be very effective in the treatment of refractory chronic urticaria patients but may not be an economically viable option for all CSU patients. However, we present a case series where a single dose of omalizumab gave sustained relief of symptoms in patients with CSU, which may be an economical option. Aims: The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of a single dose of omalizumab in the treatment of CSU. Materials and Methods: Four patients of CSU whose disease was not controlled with four times the licensed dose of tablet fexofenadine 180 mg were exhibited one subcutaneous injection of omalizumab and were followed up at 4 weekly intervals for 24 weeks for Weekly Urticaria Activity Score 7 (UAS7) and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Results: A sharp decline in UAS7 and DLQI was documented in 7–10 days. The decline was maintained up to 16 weeks in one case and 20 weeks in the other three cases. Both the scores at the end of the follow-up period of 24 weeks were better than the pre-omalizumab scores. Conclusion: The results of this case series indicate the efficacy of a single-dose omalizumab in treating moderate to severe refractory CSU. Further studies are required to identify the minimum frequency of administering omalizumab to effectively control CSU. This would greatly reduce the cost of this novel therapy. PMID:27512204

  20. CYTE-I-HD: phase I dose finding and tolerability study of cysteamine (Cystagon) in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Dubinsky, Richard; Gray, Carolyn

    2006-04-01

    Cystamine, an inhibitor of transglutaminases, slows progression of Huntington's disease in the murine model by approximately 20%. Cysteamine, the dimer of cystamine, is an orphan drug approved for the treatment of nephropathic cystinosis and has a similar benefit in the murine model but with a narrower therapeutic window. In a single-center open-label study, we determined the maximum tolerable dose (MTD) and side effects of cysteamine in people with Huntington's disease. Cysteamine was started at a dose of 10 mg/kg per day, divided into four doses, and increased by 10 mg/kg per day weekly until the development of intolerable side effects or a maximum dose of 70 mg/kg per day. Of the 9 subjects, 1 had an MTD of 10 mg/kg per day, 1 had an MTD of 20 mg/kg per day, the maximum dose was 30 mg/kg per day for 2, 40 mg/kg per day for 2, and 50 mg/kg per day for 3. Dose-limiting side effects were motoric impairment in 5 and nausea in 4. The dose found tolerable by 8 of the subjects was 20 mg/kg per day. All had a noticeable hydrogen sulfide odor at doses of 40 mg/kg per day or higher. We conclude that, at a dose of 20 mg/kg per day, cysteamine was tolerable in people with Huntington's disease. Nausea and motoric impairment were the dose-limiting side effects. PMID:16258942

  1. A pharmacometric case study regarding the sensitivity of structural model parameter estimation to error in patient reported dosing times.

    PubMed

    Knights, Jonathan; Rohatagi, Shashank

    2015-12-01

    Although there is a body of literature focused on minimizing the effect of dosing inaccuracies on pharmacokinetic (PK) parameter estimation, most of the work centers on missing doses. No attempt has been made to specifically characterize the effect of error in reported dosing times. Additionally, existing work has largely dealt with cases in which the compound of interest is dosed at an interval no less than its terminal half-life. This work provides a case study investigating how error in patient reported dosing times might affect the accuracy of structural model parameter estimation under sparse sampling conditions when the dosing interval is less than the terminal half-life of the compound, and the underlying kinetics are monoexponential. Additional effects due to noncompliance with dosing events are not explored and it is assumed that the structural model and reasonable initial estimates of the model parameters are known. Under the conditions of our simulations, with structural model CV % ranging from ~20 to 60 %, parameter estimation inaccuracy derived from error in reported dosing times was largely controlled around 10 % on average. Given that no observed dosing was included in the design and sparse sampling was utilized, we believe these error results represent a practical ceiling given the variability and parameter estimates for the one-compartment model. The findings suggest additional investigations may be of interest and are noteworthy given the inability of current PK software platforms to accommodate error in dosing times. PMID:26209956

  2. Dose of fluphenazine, familial expressed emotion, and outcome in schizophrenia. Results of a two-year controlled study.

    PubMed

    Hogarty, G E; McEvoy, J P; Munetz, M; DiBarry, A L; Bartone, P; Cather, R; Cooley, S J; Ulrich, R F; Carter, M; Madonia, M J

    1988-09-01

    Issues regarding the side effects of antipsychotic medication and the possible contribution of the environment to dose requirements led to a two-year controlled dosage study of maintenance antipsychotic medication and familial environment among recently discharged schizophrenic patients. Seventy stable patients, living in high- or low-expressed emotion (EE) households, were randomized, double blind, to receive a standard dose of fluphenazine decanoate (average, 25 mg every two weeks) or a minimal dose representing 20% of the dose prescribed (average, 3.8 mg every two weeks). No differences in relapse were observed among dose, EE, or dose and EE. Patients in the minimal dose/high-EE condition experienced more minor but aborted episodes in year 2. Side effects were fewer on the minimal dose after one year, and low-EE patients were better adjusted than high-EE patients. Over time, minimal-dose recipients were significantly more improved in their instrumental and interpersonal role performance than were standard-dose recipients. PMID:3415422

  3. Dose variations caused by setup errors in intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: a PRESAGE study.

    PubMed

    Teng, Kieyin; Gagliardi, Frank; Alqathami, Mamdooh; Ackerly, Trevor; Geso, Moshi

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) requires tight margins around the tumor, thus producing a steep dose gradient between the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissue. Any setup errors might become clinically significant. To date, no study has been performed to evaluate the dosimetric variations caused by setup errors with a 3-dimensional dosimeter, the PRESAGE. This research aimed to evaluate the potential effect that setup errors have on the dose distribution of intracranial SRT. Computed tomography (CT) simulation of a CIRS radiosurgery head phantom was performed with 1.25-mm slice thickness. An ideal treatment plan was generated using Brainlab iPlan. A PRESAGE was made for every treatment with and without errors. A prescan using the optical CT scanner was carried out. Before treatment, the phantom was imaged using Brainlab ExacTrac. Actual radiotherapy treatments with and without errors were carried out with the Novalis treatment machine. Postscan was performed with an optical CT scanner to analyze the dose irradiation. The dose variation between treatments with and without errors was determined using a 3-dimensional gamma analysis. Errors are clinically insignificant when the passing ratio of the gamma analysis is 95% and above. Errors were clinically significant when the setup errors exceeded a 0.7-mm translation and a 0.5° rotation. The results showed that a 3-mm translation shift in the superior-inferior (SI), right-left (RL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions and 2° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 53.1%. Translational and rotational errors of 1.5mm and 1°, respectively, generated a passing ratio of 62.2%. Translation shift of 0.7mm in the directions of SI, RL, and AP and a 0.5° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 96.2%. Preventing the occurrences of setup errors in intracranial SRT treatment is extremely important as errors greater than 0.7mm and 0.5° alter the dose distribution. The geometrical displacements affect dose delivery to

  4. Analgesia dose prescribing and estimated glomerular filtration rate decline: a general practice database linkage cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nderitu, Paul; Doos, Lucy; Strauss, Vicky Y; Lambie, Mark; Davies, Simon J; Kadam, Umesh T

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to quantify the short-term effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin and paracetamol analgesia dose prescribing on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decline in the general practice population. Design A population-based longitudinal clinical data linkage cohort study. Setting Two large general practices in North Staffordshire, UK. Participants Patients aged 40 years and over with ≥2 eGFR measurements spaced ≥90 days apart between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2010 were selected. Exposure Using WHO Defined Daily Dose standardised cumulative analgesia prescribing, patients were categorised into non-user, normal and high-dose groups. Outcome measure The primary outcome was defined as a >5 mL/min/1.73 m2/year eGFR decrease between the first and last eGFR. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate risk, adjusting for sociodemographics, comorbidity, baseline chronic kidney disease (CKD) status, renin-angiotensin-system inhibitors and other analgesia prescribing. Results There were 4145 patients (mean age 66 years, 55% female) with an analgesia prescribing prevalence of 17.2% for NSAIDs, 39% for aspirin and 22% for paracetamol and stage 3–5 CKD prevalence was 16.1% (n=667). Normal or high-dose NSAID and paracetamol prescribing was not significantly associated with eGFR decline. High-dose aspirin prescribing was associated with a reduced risk of eGFR decline in patients with a baseline (first) eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2; OR=0.52 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.77). Conclusions NSAID, aspirin and paracetamol prescribing over 2 years did not significantly affect eGFR decline with a reduced risk of eGFR decline in high-dose aspirin users with well-preserved renal function. However, the long-term effects of analgesia use on eGFR decline remain to be determined. PMID:25138808

  5. Dose variations caused by setup errors in intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: A PRESAGE study

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Kieyin; Gagliardi, Frank; Alqathami, Mamdooh; Ackerly, Trevor; Geso, Moshi

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) requires tight margins around the tumor, thus producing a steep dose gradient between the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissue. Any setup errors might become clinically significant. To date, no study has been performed to evaluate the dosimetric variations caused by setup errors with a 3-dimensional dosimeter, the PRESAGE. This research aimed to evaluate the potential effect that setup errors have on the dose distribution of intracranial SRT. Computed tomography (CT) simulation of a CIRS radiosurgery head phantom was performed with 1.25-mm slice thickness. An ideal treatment plan was generated using Brainlab iPlan. A PRESAGE was made for every treatment with and without errors. A prescan using the optical CT scanner was carried out. Before treatment, the phantom was imaged using Brainlab ExacTrac. Actual radiotherapy treatments with and without errors were carried out with the Novalis treatment machine. Postscan was performed with an optical CT scanner to analyze the dose irradiation. The dose variation between treatments with and without errors was determined using a 3-dimensional gamma analysis. Errors are clinically insignificant when the passing ratio of the gamma analysis is 95% and above. Errors were clinically significant when the setup errors exceeded a 0.7-mm translation and a 0.5° rotation. The results showed that a 3-mm translation shift in the superior-inferior (SI), right-left (RL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions and 2° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 53.1%. Translational and rotational errors of 1.5 mm and 1°, respectively, generated a passing ratio of 62.2%. Translation shift of 0.7 mm in the directions of SI, RL, and AP and a 0.5° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 96.2%. Preventing the occurrences of setup errors in intracranial SRT treatment is extremely important as errors greater than 0.7 mm and 0.5° alter the dose distribution. The geometrical displacements affect dose delivery

  6. AbobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport) dosing in cervical dystonia: an exploratory analysis of two large open-label extension studies.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Robert A; Truong, Daniel; Hubble, Jean; Coleman, Chandra; Beffy, Jean-Luc; Chang, Stephen; Picaut, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    Treatment with botulinum toxin-A is recommended as first-line treatment for cervical dystonia (CD). In clinical practice many factors appear to influence dose adjustment and the retreatment regimen; however, there is little information available in the literature regarding the evolution of dosing over treatment cycles. We report on two similarly designed, long-term, multicenter, open-label extension studies of Dysport for the treatment of CD, which followed 500 U fixed-dose placebo-controlled trials. Both studies specified a fixed 500 U dose for the first open-label treatment cycle, with dose adjustment in subsequent treatment cycles according to the clinical response. These analyses include 218 patients who entered the two studies; doses in the subsequent treatment cycles ranged between 250 and 1,000 U. During open-label treatment, all treatment cycles resulted in improvements in mean Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) total scores. However, increasing the dose of Dysport above the initial 500 U dose was not observed to result in an incremental improvement in response as measured by the TWSTRS. No individual patient characteristic was found to reliably predict the use of higher doses at each treatment cycle. Dysport was generally well tolerated with no major differences in the incidence of adverse events (AEs) observed with different doses. Dysphagia was considered an AE of special interest and dysphagia data from the open-label studies were combined with two Phase II studies. Analysis of this enhanced database indicates that unilateral injections of >150 U into the sternocleidomastoid muscle is associated with a higher dysphagia risk. Thus, limiting the dose in the sternocleidomastoid may help reduce the incidence of dysphagia. PMID:22878514

  7. Acute phase response in toxicity studies. I. Survey of beagle dogs subjected to single-dose toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Hoshiya, T; Watanabe, D; Akagi, K; Mizoguchi, Y; Kamiya, K; Mizuguchi, H; Kumahara, M; Toya, H; Nagashima, Y; Okaniwa, A

    2001-05-01

    In the field of routine single-dose toxicity studies, we occasionally meet with transient leukocytosis associated with an increase in fibrinogen in beagle dogs within a few days after treatment with the test article. Only a little is known, however, about the toxicological significance of these changes. However, these changes were thought to belong to the category of "Acute Phase Response, APR," which has been known for a long time in connection with injury, trauma or infection. Aiming at proper understanding of these experiences, we surveyed 25 single-dose toxicity studies (7 intravenous bolus, 5 intravenous infusion, 12 oral and 1 subcutaneous treatment, hereafter referred to simply as i.v. bolus, i.v. infusion, oral and s.c.) in beagle dogs, provided with data from hematological examinations. We set the following criteria as a positive response in the present survey: increases of 50% or more in either or both WBC or fibrinogen compared to the predosing value, transiently from Day 1 to Day 3 of the study. Among 25 studies surveyed, about 1/2 of the studies exhibited increases of 50% or more in either or both fibrinogen or WBC counts compared to the predosing values showing dose-dependency transiently on Day 1 or Day 2. These changes were remarkable after intravenous application. Oral application produced similar effects, although the incidence and severity were low compared to the i.v. routes. Regarding blood chemical and hematological changes other than changes in fibrinogen and WBC counts, there were no essential differences between the groups of studies with and without the changes in fibrinogen and WBC counts. These changes were thought to be characteristic and to have occurred as incidents unrelated to other changes. The reported changes seen in single-dose toxicity studies may belong to the category of APR as the non-specific mechanism of living bodies as stated by Burns et al. (1996). PMID:11429972

  8. Study of the Phototransference in GR-200 Dosimetric Material and its Convenience for Dose Re-estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Baly, L.; Otazo, M. R.; Molina, D.; Pernas, R.

    2006-09-08

    A study of the phototransference of charges from deep to dosimetric traps in GR-200 material is presented and its convenience for dose re-estimation in the dose range between 2 and 100mSv is also analyzed. The recovering coefficient (RC) defined as the ratio between the phototransferred thermoluminescence (PTTL) and the original thermoluminescence (TL) of the dosimetric trap was used to evaluate the ratio of phototransferred charges from deep traps and the original charges in the dosimetric traps. The results show the convenience of this method for dose re-estimation for this material in the selected range of doses.

  9. Single dose toxicity study of IRDye 800CW in Sprague-Dawley rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Milton V.; Draney, Daniel; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Olive, D. Michael

    2010-02-01

    Fluorophore-labeled contrast imaging agents are moving toward clinical use as aids in nodal staging and intraoperative resection of tumors. Near-infrared fluorophores with defined toxicity properties will be needed before these agents can be translated to the clinic. The near-infrared dye IRDye 800CW is frequently used in its N-hydroxysuccinamide (NHS) ester form for labeling these agents. Following conjugation or breakdown of a labeled ligand, excess NHS ester is converted to the carboxylate form. We report here the results of a preliminary toxicity study on IRDye 800CW carboxylate in preparation for its use as a labeling moiety for targeted contrast agents. Male and female Sprague Dawley rats were given a single intravenous or intradermal administration of IRDye 800CW carboxylate; indocyanine green was used as a comparative control. Following administration of varying doses of either the dyes or saline, animals were observed for up to fourteen days during which time, hematological, clinical chemistry, enzymological, and histological testing was performed on animal subgroups. Under the conditions tested, a single administration of IRDye 800CW carboxylate intravenously at dose levels of 1, 5 and 20 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg intradermally produced no pathological evidence of toxicity. A dose of 20 mg/kg was identified as the NOAEL (no observed adverse effect level) following IV or ID routes of administration of IRDye 800CW.

  10. Dimension of model parameter space and operating characteristics in adaptive dose-finding studies.

    PubMed

    Iasonos, Alexia; Wages, Nolan A; Conaway, Mark R; Cheung, Ken; Yuan, Ying; O'Quigley, John

    2016-09-20

    Adaptive, model-based, dose-finding methods, such as the continual reassessment method, have been shown to have good operating characteristics. One school of thought argues in favor of the use of parsimonious models, not modeling all aspects of the problem, and using a strict minimum number of parameters. In particular, for the standard situation of a single homogeneous group, it is common to appeal to a one-parameter model. Other authors argue for a more classical approach that models all aspects of the problem. Here, we show that increasing the dimension of the parameter space, in the context of adaptive dose-finding studies, is usually counter productive and, rather than leading to improvements in operating characteristics, the added dimensionality is likely to result in difficulties. Among these are inconsistency of parameter estimates, lack of coherence in escalation or de-escalation, erratic behavior, getting stuck at the wrong level, and, in almost all cases, poorer performance in terms of correct identification of the targeted dose. Our conclusions are based on both theoretical results and simulations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27090197

  11. Monte Carlo dosimetric study of the Flexisource Co-60 high dose rate source

    PubMed Central

    Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Recently, a new HDR 60Co brachytherapy source, Flexisource Co-60, has been developed (Nucletron B.V. Veenendaal, The Netherlands). This study aims to obtain dosimetric data for this source for its use in clinical practice as required by AAPM and ESTRO. Material and methods Two Monte Carlo radiation transport codes were used: Penelope2008 and GEANT4. The source was centrally-positioned in a 100 cm radius water phantom. Absorbed dose and collisional kerma were obtained using 0.01 cm (close) and 0.1 cm (far) sized voxels to provide high-resolution dosimetry near (far from) the source. Dose rate distributions obtained with the two Monte Carlo codes were compared. Results and Discussion Simulations performed with those two radiation transport codes showed an agreement typically within 0.2% for r > 0.8 cm and up to 2% closer to the source. Detailed results of dose distributions are being made available. Conclusions Dosimetric data are provided for the new Flexisource Co-60 source. These data are meant to be used in treatment planning systems in clinical practice. PMID:23346138

  12. A 4-week Repeated Dose Toxicity Study of Glycine in Rats by Gavage Administration

    PubMed Central

    Shibui, Yusuke; Miwa, Tadashi; Yamashita, Mayumi; Chin, Keigi; Kodama, Terutaka

    2013-01-01

    In order to examine the toxicity profile of glycine, an authorized food additive, a solution of glycine in water for injection was administered orally (via gavage) to male SD rats (Crl:CD(SD)) once daily for 4 weeks at doses of 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg/day in a volume of 10 mL/kg. Control animals received vehicle only. No animals died, and no glycine-related changes were observed in body weight, food consumption, water consumption, hematology, organ weight, gross pathological examination or histopathological examination. In urinalysis, daily urinary volume and urinary Cl excretion were significantly higher in the 2000 mg/kg/day dose group, and urine pH and urinary protein showed lower trends in the glycine-treated groups. However, these changes were considered to be of little toxicological significance, because there were no histopathological changes in the kidneys or urinary bladder and no changes in other urinary parameters. As regards blood chemistry, phospholipids were significantly higher in the 2000 mg/kg/day dose group. However, the increase was small and was not considered to be toxicologically significant. In conclusion, none of the animals in any of the glycine-treated groups showed changes that were considered toxicologically significant. Therefore, the no-observed-adverse-effect level of glycine was estimated to be at least 2000 mg/kg/day under the conditions of this study. PMID:24526813

  13. A 4-week Repeated Dose Toxicity Study of Glycine in Rats by Gavage Administration.

    PubMed

    Shibui, Yusuke; Miwa, Tadashi; Yamashita, Mayumi; Chin, Keigi; Kodama, Terutaka

    2013-12-01

    In order to examine the toxicity profile of glycine, an authorized food additive, a solution of glycine in water for injection was administered orally (via gavage) to male SD rats (Crl:CD(SD)) once daily for 4 weeks at doses of 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg/day in a volume of 10 mL/kg. Control animals received vehicle only. No animals died, and no glycine-related changes were observed in body weight, food consumption, water consumption, hematology, organ weight, gross pathological examination or histopathological examination. In urinalysis, daily urinary volume and urinary Cl excretion were significantly higher in the 2000 mg/kg/day dose group, and urine pH and urinary protein showed lower trends in the glycine-treated groups. However, these changes were considered to be of little toxicological significance, because there were no histopathological changes in the kidneys or urinary bladder and no changes in other urinary parameters. As regards blood chemistry, phospholipids were significantly higher in the 2000 mg/kg/day dose group. However, the increase was small and was not considered to be toxicologically significant. In conclusion, none of the animals in any of the glycine-treated groups showed changes that were considered toxicologically significant. Therefore, the no-observed-adverse-effect level of glycine was estimated to be at least 2000 mg/kg/day under the conditions of this study. PMID:24526813

  14. Image quality and dose assessment in digital breast tomosynthesis: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, M.; Di Maria, S.; Oliveira, N.; Matela, N.; Janeiro, L.; Almeida, P.; Vaz, P.

    2014-11-01

    Mammography is considered a standard technique for the early detection of breast cancer. However, its sensitivity is limited essentially due to the issue of the overlapping breast tissue. This limitation can be partially overcome, with a relatively new technique, called digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). For this technique, optimization of acquisition parameters which maximize image quality, whilst complying with the ALARA principle, continues to be an area of considerable research. The aim of this work was to study the best quantum energies that optimize the image quality with the lowest achievable dose in DBT and compare these results with the digital mammography (DM) ones. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the state-of-the-art computer program MCNPX 2.7.0 in order to generate several 2D cranio-caudal (CC) projections obtained during an acquisition of a standard DBT examination. Moreover, glandular absorbed doses and photon flux calculations, for each projection image, were performed. A homogeneous breast computational phantom with 50%/50% glandular/adipose tissue composition was used and two compressed breast thicknesses were evaluated: 4 cm and 8 cm. The simulated projection images were afterwards reconstructed with an algebraic reconstruction tool and the signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) was calculated in order to evaluate the image quality in DBT and DM. Finally, a thorough comparison between the results obtained in terms of SDNR and dose assessment in DBT and DM was performed.

  15. An Exploratory Study of Responses to Low-Dose Lithium in African Americans and Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Jodi Gonzalez; Salcedo, Stephanie; Ketter, Terrence A.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Rabideau, Dustin J.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Bazan, Melissa; Leon, Andrew C.; Friedman, Edward S.; Iosifescu, Dan; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Ostacher, Michael; Thase, Michael; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A.; Bowden, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Few prospective studies examine the impact of ethnicity or race on outcomes with lithium for bipolar disorder. This exploratory study examines differences in lithium response and treatment outcomes in Hispanics, African Americans, and non-Hispanic Whites with bipolar disorder in the Lithium Treatment Moderate Dose Use Study (LiTMUS). Methods LiTMUS was a six-site randomized controlled trial of low-dose lithium added to optimized treatment (OPT; personalized, evidence-based pharmacotherapy) versus OPT alone in outpatients with bipolar disorder. Of 283 participants, 47 African Americans, 39 Hispanics, and 175 non-Hispanic whites were examined. We predicted minority groups would have more negative medication attitudes and higher attrition rates, but better clinical outcomes. Results African Americans in the lithium group improved more on depression and life functioning compared to whites over the 6 month study. African Americans in the OPT only group had marginal improvement on depression symptoms. For Hispanics, satisfaction with life did not significantly improve in the OPT only group, in contrast to whites and African Americans who improved over time on all measures. Attitudes toward medications did not differ across ethnic/racial groups. Conclusions African Americans show some greater improvements with lithium than non-Hispanic whites, and Hispanics showed more consistent improvements in the lithium group. The impact of low-dose lithium should be studied in a larger sample as there may be particular benefit for African Americans and Hispanics. Given that the control group (regardless of ethnicity/race) had significant improvements, optimized treatment may be beneficial for any ethnic group. PMID:25827507

  16. Education and Risk of Dementia: Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Tan, Lan; Wang, Hui-Fu; Tan, Meng-Shan; Tan, Lin; Li, Jie-Qiong; Zhao, Qing-Fei; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2016-07-01

    Educational level has been regarded as one of the most widely accepted risk factors in the epidemiological studies for dementia, despite with discordant qualitative results. However, the dose-response relation between education and incident dementia was still unknown. To quantitatively evaluate the association between exposure level to high and low education and risk of dementia, we searched PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library up to November 2014 and references of retrieved literatures. Specific prospective cohort studies, in which educational attainment was categorized into at least three levels, were included. Newcastle-Ottawa scale was used to assess the quality of included studies. Fifteen prospective cohort studies with 55655 for low education and eight prospective cohort studies with 20172 for high education were included. In the qualitative analysis, both low and high education showed a dose-response trend with risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the quantitative analysis, the dementia risk was reduced by 7 % for per year increase in education (RR, 0.93; 95 % CI, 0.92-0.94; p for overall trend = 0.000; p for nonlinearity = 0.0643). Nonetheless, we did not find statistically significant association between per year decrease in education and dementia (RR, 1.03; 95 % CI, 0.96-1.10; p for overall trend = 0.283; p for nonlinearity = 0.0041) or AD (RR, 1.03; 95 % CI, 0.97-1.10; p for overall trend = 0.357; p for nonlinearity = 0.0022). Both low and high education showed a trend of dose-response relation with risk of dementia and AD. The dementia risk was reduced by 7 % for per year increase in education. PMID:25983035

  17. Second Solid Cancers After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review of the Epidemiologic Studies of the Radiation Dose-Response Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Gilbert, Ethel; Curtis, Rochelle; Inskip, Peter; Kleinerman, Ruth; Morton, Lindsay; Rajaraman, Preetha; Little, Mark P.

    2013-06-01

    Rapid innovations in radiation therapy techniques have resulted in an urgent need for risk projection models for second cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposure, because direct observation of the late effects of newer treatments will require patient follow-up for a decade or more. However, the patterns of cancer risk after fractionated high-dose radiation are much less well understood than those after lower-dose exposures (0.1-5 Gy). In particular, there is uncertainty about the shape of the dose-response curve at high doses and about the magnitude of the second cancer risk per unit dose. We reviewed the available evidence from epidemiologic studies of second solid cancers in organs that received high-dose exposure (>5 Gy) from radiation therapy where dose-response curves were estimated from individual organ-specific doses. We included 28 eligible studies with 3434 second cancer patients across 11 second solid cancers. Overall, there was little evidence that the dose-response curve was nonlinear in the direction of a downturn in risk, even at organ doses of ≥60 Gy. Thyroid cancer was the only exception, with evidence of a downturn after 20 Gy. Generally the excess relative risk per Gray, taking account of age and sex, was 5 to 10 times lower than the risk from acute exposures of <2 Gy among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, the magnitude of the reduction in risk varied according to the second cancer. The results of our review provide insights into radiation carcinogenesis from fractionated high-dose exposures and are generally consistent with current theoretical models. The results can be used to refine the development of second solid cancer risk projection models for novel radiation therapy techniques.

  18. Choosing populations to study the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, N A; Loughlin, J E; Friedlander, E R; Clapp, R W; Fahey, F H

    1981-01-01

    In January 1978, the United States Congress requested information about the utility of additional epidemiologic studies for quantifying the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. In our judgment, no single population can be recommended for study on purely scientific grounds, since the largest group offers only a small chance to obtain a definitive result. On the other hand, if social pressures and regulatory agencies mandate that such studies be attempted, we would recommend prospective cohort studies of occupational populations. We propose that a national worker registry be developed using ionizing radiation as the prototype for studying other occupational exposures. The problems related to studying low-level radiation are not unique, but apply equally to investigations dealing with a great variety of toxic agents. A national plan for collecting information on workers' exposure and health could provide a cost-efficient means to answer public health questions posed by the Congress, scientists and the public. PMID:7294269

  19. NTP Toxicity Studies of Sodium Cyanide (CAS No. 143-33-9) Administered by Dosed Water to F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice.

    PubMed

    1993-11-01

    Cyanide and its salts are used extensively in industry and manufacturing and are found in water and food consumed by humans. Chronic exposure to low levels of cyanide is suspected to be responsible for various neuropathic and thyrotoxic conditions in humans. Data in the literature indicate that long-term exposure to near-lethal concentrations of cyanide may produce lesions in rodents similar to those linked to chronic cyanide exposure in humans. However, few data are available on the effects of subchronic exposure to cyanide concentrations that are not acutely toxic. To address this lack of data, 13-week toxicity studies on cyanide were conducted with male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice administered low doses of sodium cyanide in drinking water. Animals were evaluated for histopathology, clinical chemistry, hematology, urine chemistry, and reproductive toxicity. In addition, the mutagenicity of sodium cyanide was assessed in Salmonella typhimurium. Groups of 10 rats and 10 mice per sex were administered sodium cyanide in drinking water at concentrations of 0, 3, 10, 30, 100, and 300 ppm for 13 weeks. No deaths attributed to sodium cyanide administration occurred in either species. In animals exposed to 300 ppm, male rats had slightly lower final mean body weights and mean body weight gains and female mice had slightly lower final mean body weights than the respective controls. Water consumption by rats and mice in the 100 and 300 ppm groups was 10% to 30% lower than that by the controls; however, no clinical signs attributable to sodium cyanide administration or to dehydration were observed. No gross or microscopic changes specifically related to cyanide toxicity occurred at any site in males or females of either species. In particular, no lesions were found in the brain or thyroid gland. Differences between absolute and relative organ weights of exposed and control animals were minor and sporadic and were not exposure concentration dependent; these

  20. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy using low-dose weekly gemcitabine versus low-dose weekly paclitaxel in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: a phase III study.

    PubMed

    Halim, Amal Ahmed-Fouad; Wahba, Hanan Ahmed; El-Hadaad, Hend Ahmed; Abo-Elyazeed, Ahmed

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare concomitant chemoradiotherapy based on weekly low-dose gemcitabine versus weekly low-dose paclitaxel in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Previously, untreated patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were randomly assigned to one of the two concomitant chemoradiation regimens: (1) weekly gemcitabine at a dose of 100 mg/m(2) over 30 min 1-2 h before radiotherapy and (2) weekly paclitaxal at a dose of 20 mg/m(2) over 60 min 4-6 h before radiotherapy. The planned radiotherapy dose was 65 Gy over 6.5 weeks in 32 settings. Two hundred and sixteen patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: group A (110 patients) and group B (106 patients) who received concomitant weekly low-dose gemcitabine and low-dose paclitaxal, respectively, with the radiotherapy protocol. The hematological toxicity was generally mild. On the contrary, non-hematologic toxicities were severe. Grade III mucositis occurred in 36% in group A and in 24% in group B (P = 0.04). Moreover, grade III dermatitis were encountered in 24% in group A and 13% in group B (P = 0.049). Thirty-two (29%) of group A and 18(17%) of group B patients required enteral or parenteral feeding (P = 0.01). Sixteen (15%) of group A and 6 (6%) of group B required enteral or parenteral feeding that lasted for 6 months (P = 0.03). Regarding the late effect on swallowing, 8% of patients in group A and 2% of patients in group B required enteral or parenteral feeding for more than 6 months (P = 0.035). Response rates were 78 and 89% in groups A and B, respectively (P = 0.038). The 2-year progression-free survival figures were 54 and 64% of groups A and B, respectively; however, the 2-year overall survival figures were 56 and 67%, respectively. On the other hand, the 3-year progression-free survival figures were 39 and 48% for groups A and B, respectively, while the 3-year overall survival figures were 45 and 49%, respectively (P = 0

  1. Expanded Studies of the Pharmacokinetics and Clinical Effects of Multi-dose Sublingual Triazolam in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Pickrell, Jacqueline E.; Hosaka, Kazuo; Jackson, Douglass L.; Heima, Masahiro; Kharasch, Evan; Milgrom, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Previous work described the pharmacokinetics and clinical effects of multi-dose sublingual (SL) triazolam (Halcion®). This laboratory study evaluated the hypothesis that incremental dosing of triazolam produces dose-dependent central nervous system (CNS) depression that is profound and long lasting. Forty-nine healthy adults 21–39 years, not receiving dental treatment, were randomly assigned to placebo (n=12), or 1-of-3 triazolam groups (0.25 mg single dose, n=12; 0.5 mg divided between 2 equal doses over 60 minutes, n=12; or 0.75 mg divided among 3 doses over 90 minutes, n=13). Plasma triazolam concentrations were determined. Bispectral index (BIS) and the Observer Assessment of Alertness/Sedation (OAA/S) were used to assess sedation. Plasma triazolam concentrations increased with time in all subjects, with Tmax and Cmax both increasing dose-dependently. Compared to placebo, all dosing paradigms produced dose-dependent BIS suppression and sedation. The single dose of 0.25 mg reached its peak BIS suppression at 90 minutes (81±7) and sedation at 120 minutes (3.6±0.5), and returned to baseline before 360 minutes. In contrast, incremental dosing of 0.5 and 0.75 mg produced profound and long-lasting BIS suppression and sedation that did not plateau until either 180 or 210 minutes measured by BIS (67±14 and 60±16 at 0.5 and 0.75 mg, respectively) and 150 minutes measured by OAA/S (3.2±1.0 and 2.7±0.4 at 0.5 and 0.75 mg, respectively). These data more fully characterize the effects of incremental dosing with SL triazolam and provide additional insight for discharge safety recommendations. PMID:19745641

  2. Nut intake and stroke risk: A dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chuan; Tang, Hui; Zhao, Wei; He, Jianquan

    2016-01-01

    We aim to quantify the effects of nut intake on risk of stroke by a dose-response meta-analysis with a random-effects model. Two databases (PubMed and Emabse) were searched for prospective cohort studies regarding nut intake and stroke risk. Studies were included if they fulfilled the predefined criteria. Eleven articles encompassing fourteen cohort studies were included in final analysis. The pooled relative risk (RR) of stroke for the highest versus (vs.) lowest category of nut intake was 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80-0.97). The power to detect a RR of 0.88 for the highest versus vs. lowest category of nut intake was 86.2%. In multiple subset analyses by gender, location, and stroke subtype, the inverse association was only found in women (RR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.73–0.96) and Asia (RR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.67–0.93). In the dose-response meta-analysis, evidence for a nonlinear association between nut intake and stroke risk was observed and a RR of 0.86 was conferred for 12 g/day. Based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system, the quality of evidence was moderate. In conclusions, finding from current meta-analysis of fourteen cohort studies indicates that nut intake may be related to decreased risk of stroke. PMID:27469072

  3. Nut intake and stroke risk: A dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Shao, Chuan; Tang, Hui; Zhao, Wei; He, Jianquan

    2016-01-01

    We aim to quantify the effects of nut intake on risk of stroke by a dose-response meta-analysis with a random-effects model. Two databases (PubMed and Emabse) were searched for prospective cohort studies regarding nut intake and stroke risk. Studies were included if they fulfilled the predefined criteria. Eleven articles encompassing fourteen cohort studies were included in final analysis. The pooled relative risk (RR) of stroke for the highest versus (vs.) lowest category of nut intake was 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80-0.97). The power to detect a RR of 0.88 for the highest versus vs. lowest category of nut intake was 86.2%. In multiple subset analyses by gender, location, and stroke subtype, the inverse association was only found in women (RR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.73-0.96) and Asia (RR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.67-0.93). In the dose-response meta-analysis, evidence for a nonlinear association between nut intake and stroke risk was observed and a RR of 0.86 was conferred for 12 g/day. Based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system, the quality of evidence was moderate. In conclusions, finding from current meta-analysis of fourteen cohort studies indicates that nut intake may be related to decreased risk of stroke. PMID:27469072

  4. Miltefosine Lipid Nanocapsules for Single Dose Oral Treatment of Schistosomiasis Mansoni: A Preclinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Eissa, Maha M.; El-Moslemany, Riham M.; Ramadan, Alyaa A.; Amer, Eglal I.; El-Azzouni, Mervat Z.; El-Khordagui, Labiba K.

    2015-01-01

    Miltefosine (MFS) is an alkylphosphocholine used for the local treatment of cutaneous metastases of breast cancer and oral therapy of visceral leishmaniasis. Recently, the drug was reported in in vitro and preclinical studies to exert significant activity against different developmental stages of schistosomiasis mansoni, a widespread chronic neglected tropical disease (NTD). This justified MFS repurposing as a potential antischistosomal drug. However, five consecutive daily 20 mg/kg doses were needed for the treatment of schistosomiasis mansoni in mice. The present study aims at enhancing MFS efficacy to allow for a single 20mg/kg oral dose therapy using a nanotechnological approach based on lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) as oral nanovectors. MFS was incorporated in LNCs both as membrane-active structural alkylphospholipid component and active antischistosomal agent. MFS-LNC formulations showed high entrapment efficiency (EE%), good colloidal properties, sustained release pattern and physical stability. Further, LNCs generally decreased MFS-induced erythrocyte hemolytic activity used as surrogate indicator of membrane activity. While MFS-free LNCs exerted no antischistosomal effect, statistically significant enhancement was observed with all MFS-LNC formulations. A maximum effect was achieved with MFS-LNCs incorporating CTAB as positive charge imparting agent or oleic acid as membrane permeabilizer. Reduction of worm load, ameliorated liver pathology and extensive damage of the worm tegument provided evidence for formulation-related efficacy enhancement. Non-compartmental analysis of pharmacokinetic data obtained in rats indicated independence of antischistosomal activity on systemic drug exposure, suggesting possible gut uptake of the stable LNCs and targeting of the fluke tegument which was verified by SEM. The study findings put forward MFS-LNCs as unique oral nanovectors combining the bioactivity of MFS and biopharmaceutical advantages of LNCs, allowing targeting

  5. Simulation study of dose enhancement in a cell due to nearby carbon and oxygen in particle radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Ik; Cho, Ilsung; Cho, Sungho; Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Yongkeun; Jung, Won-Gyun; Yoo, SeungHoon; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Yoon, Myonggeun; Incerti, S.´ebastian; Geso, Moshi; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the dose-deposition enhancement due to alpha-particle irradiation in a cellular model by using the carbon and the oxygen chemical compositions. A simulation study was performed to study dose enhancement due to carbon and oxygen for a human cell where the Geant4 code used for alpha-particle irradiation of a cellular phantom. The characteristics of the dose enhancements based on the concentrations of carbon and oxygen in the nucleus and cytoplasm by the alpha-particle radiation was investigated and was compared with those obtained by gold and gadolinium. The results showed that both the carbon- and the oxygen-induced dose enhancements were more effective than those of gold and gadolinium. We found that the dose enhancement effect was more dominant in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm if the carbon or the oxygen were uniformly distributed in the whole cell. For the condition that the added chemical composition was inserted only into the cytoplasm, the effect of the dose enhancement in the nucleus was weak. We showed that high-stopping-power materials offer a more effective dose enhancement efficacy and suggest that carbon nanotubes and oxygenation are promising candidates for dose enhancement tools in particle therapy.

  6. Computer simulation dose studies in heterogeneous media for electron and proton beam radiotherapy of static and moving targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae Kyu

    The energy-dependent electron loss model (ELM) and proton loss model (PLM) have been developed to predict dose deposition in heterogeneous slab media. Predictions of dose deposition in heterogeneous slab media are compared to the Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements. Slab media studied comprised water/bone/water and water/lung/water and incident beam energies between 10MeV and 18MeV for electron beams and 100MeV and 160MeV for proton beams. Dose discrepancies at large depths beyond the interface were within 5% of maximum dose. This error may be attributed to the assumption of a Gaussian energy distribution for the charge particles at depth. The computational cost is low compared to Monte Carlo simulations making the ELM and PLM attractive as a fast dose engine for dose optimization algorithms. To simulate a more realistic and challenging clinical treatment, a mathematical 3-D phantom was defined to simulate inferior-superior motion of a lung tumor target. Lung size and density change during the breathing cycle was modeled from full inspiration to full expiration. Sensitivity to dose error due to the respiratory motion of the target and the right lung, defined as the organ at risk (OAR), was studied for intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT). Effects of rotational or lateral setup error on the dose distribution were studied independently and simultaneously with breathing.

  7. A study of dose-response relationships for asbestos associated disease.

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, M M

    1985-01-01

    The risk of an asbestos worker developing small irregular opacities on the chest radiograph is related to cumulative exposure to asbestos dust, latency, and smoking habit. In this study the use of residence-time weighted exposure as a "dose metric" was explored in a cohort of asbestos cement workers. It was found that this parameter, which incorporates both exposure concentration and latency, is useful for modelling the risk of small opacities and might also be useful for modelling the risk of mesothelioma. PMID:3845816

  8. Phase I Study of Conformal Radiotherapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine With Erlotinib for Unresected Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, John M.; Margolis, Jeffrey; Jury, Robert P.; Balaraman, Savitha; Cotant, Matthew B.; Ballouz, Samer; Boxwala, Iqbal G.; Jaiyesimi, Ishmael A.; Nadeau, Laura; Hardy-Carlson, Maria; Marvin, Kimberly S.; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the recommended dose of radiotherapy when combined with full-dose gemcitabine and erlotinib for unresected pancreas cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresected pancreatic cancer (Zubrod performance status 0-2) were eligible for the present study. Gemcitabine was given weekly for 7 weeks (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) with erlotinib daily for 8 weeks (100 mg). A final toxicity assessment was performed in Week 9. Radiotherapy (starting at 30 Gy in 2-Gy fractions, 5 d/wk) was given to the gross tumor plus a 1-cm margin starting with the first dose of gemcitabine. A standard 3 plus 3 dose escalation (an additional 4 Gy within 2 days for each dose level) was used, except for the starting dose level, which was scheduled to contain 6 patients. In general, Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal toxicity was considered a dose-limiting toxicity, except for Grade 3 anorexia or Grade 3 fatigue alone. Results: A total of 20 patients were treated (10 men and 10 women). Nausea, vomiting, and infection were significantly associated with the radiation dose (p = .01, p = .03, and p = .03, respectively). Of the 20 patients, 5 did not complete treatment and were not evaluable for dose-escalation purposes (3 who developed progressive disease during treatment and 2 who electively discontinued it). Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in none of 6 patients at 30 Gy, 2 of 6 at 34 Gy, and 1 of 3 patients at 38 Gy. Conclusion: The results of the present study have indicated that the recommended Phase II dose is 30 Gy in 15 fractions.

  9. Inter-comparison study between human and cow teeth enamel for low dose measurement using ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, G. M.; Aboelezz, E.; El-Khodary, A.; Eissa, H. M.

    2010-07-01

    Human and cow teeth enamel samples were separated and irradiated with γ-ray to study radiation-induced radicals as dosimetric material with electron spin resonance (ESR). The enamel spectrum is characterized by two main g-factors g|| = 1.9976 and g⊥ = 2.0019. The dosimetric signal for enamel at g = 2.0019 is ascribed to CO2- radicals. The dose response was studied in the range from 200 mGy to 2 Gy. Power dependence, energy dependence and thermal stability had been studied also to determine the optimum conditions for ESR measurements and stability of the signal at room temperature as well. Radical formation efficiency ( G-value) of 0.44 ± 0.09 and 0.65 ± 0.13 was obtained for human enamel and cow enamel, respectively. The life time for human enamel and cow enamel were estimated from Arrhenius plot to be 1.1 × 10 7 years and 7 × 10 6 years, respectively. The activation energy for human enamel and cow enamel were also calculated from Arrhenius plot to be 1.23 eV and 1.15 eV, respectively. The dose conversion factors for enamel in water and air were calculated to be 0.901 Dwater and 0.998 Dair. The combined and expanded uncertainties accompanying these measurements are ±5.79% and ±11.58%, respectively.

  10. Sludge reduction at low ozone doses: predictive effects and full-scale study.

    PubMed

    Romero, P; Coello, M D; Aragón, C A; Eusebi, A L

    2015-01-01

    The activated sludge process is the most widely used wastewater treatment. The main drawback of this technology is the excess sludge production (ESP). The ozonation of sludge of the recirculation line is used to reduce the ESP. In this study, ozonation was applied on a fraction of sludge of the recirculation line in a full-scale plant (50,000 population equivalent) at a lower-specific ozone dose (SOD) compared to previous studies. The results of batch tests to predict the main effect of the technology on the biomass activities are reported. Specifically, tests at 0.7-5 g O₃/kg MLVSS (mixed liquor volatile suspended solids) doses were made to evaluate the changes of the nitrification and denitrification rates, the population of phosphate-accumulating organisms and the gravitational properties. A certain reduction of the impact of ozonation on the kinetic parameters of sludge for values of SOD over 2 g O₃/kg MLVSS was found. The present study highlights also the use of the ratio of ozonated biomass to total biomass as an important operative parameter for ozonation in full-scale plants. Reduction in ESP in the wastewater treatment plant was equal to 10% as dry solids applying a SOD from 1.03 to 1.63 g O₃/kg MLVSS. An analysis of the economic cost of the technique is also reported. PMID:25633941

  11. A Longitudinal Low Dose μCT Analysis of Bone Healing in Mice: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Di, Lu-Zhao; Couture, Vanessa; Leblanc, Elisabeth; Alinejad, Yasaman; Beaudoin, Jean-François; Lecomte, Roger; Berthod, François; Faucheux, Nathalie; Balg, Frédéric; Grenier, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Low dose microcomputed tomography (μCT) is a recently matured technique that enables the study of longitudinal bone healing and the testing of experimental treatments for bone repair. This imaging technique has been used for studying craniofacial repair in mice but not in an orthopedic context. This is mainly due to the size of the defects (approximately 1.0 mm) in long bone, which heal rapidly and may thus negatively impact the assessment of the effectiveness of experimental treatments. We developed a longitudinal low dose μCT scan analysis method combined with a new image segmentation and extraction software using Hounsfield unit (HU) scores to quantitatively monitor bone healing in small femoral cortical defects in live mice. We were able to reproducibly quantify bone healing longitudinally over time with three observers. We used high speed intramedullary reaming to prolong healing in order to circumvent the rapid healing typical of small defects. Bone healing prolongation combined with μCT imaging to study small bone defects in live mice thus shows potential as a promising tool for future preclinical research on bone healing. PMID:25431676

  12. Efficacy of dose escalation on TCP, recurrence and second cancer risks: a mathematical study

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, A; Kohandel, M; Sivaloganathan, S

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the effects of conventional and hypofractionation protocols by modelling tumour control probability (TCP) and tumour recurrence time, and examined their impact on second cancer risks. The main objectives of this study include the following: (a) incorporate tumour recurrence time and second cancer risks into the TCP framework and analyse the effects of variable doses and (b) investigate an efficient protocol to reduce the risk of a secondary malignancy while maximizing disease-free survival and tumour control. Methods: A generalized mathematical formalism was developed that incorporated recurrence and second cancer risk models into the TCP dynamics. Results: Our results suggest that TCP and relapse time are almost identical for conventional and hypofractionated regimens; however, second cancer risks resulting from hypofractionation were reduced by 22% when compared with the second cancer risk associated with a conventional protocol. The hypofractionated regimen appears to be sensitive to dose escalation and the corresponding impact on tumour recurrence time and reduction in second cancer risks. The reduction in second cancer risks is approximately 20% when the dose is increased from 60 to 72 Gy in a hypofractionated protocol. Conclusion: Our results suggest that hypofractionation may be a more efficient regimen in the context of TCP, relapse time and second cancer risks. Overall, our study demonstrates the importance of including a second cancer risk model in designing an efficient radiation regimen. Advances in knowledge: The impact of various fractionation protocols on TCP and relapse in conjunction with second cancer risks is an important clinical question that is as yet unexplored PMID:25210783

  13. Phase II study of low-dose recombinant leukocyte A interferon in disseminated malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Creagan, E T; Ahmann, D L; Green, S J; Long, H J; Frytak, S; O'Fallon, J R; Itri, L M

    1984-09-01

    Thirty patients with disseminated malignant melanoma received intramuscular recombinant leukocyte A interferon (rIFN-alpha A), 12 X 10(6) U/m2, three times weekly for a planned treatment duration of three months. This dose was selected in view of our prior phase II data indicating that 50 X 10(6) U/m2 three times weekly produced excessive toxicity. In this current trial we observed three objective partial regressions (20%) among the 15 better-risk patients (performance score 0, 1, and no prior chemotherapy) with times to disease progression of 1.9, 9.6, and 12.9+ months. There were also three regressions (one complete and two partial) among the 15 poor-risk patients (performance score 2, 3, or prior chemotherapy) with progression times of 3, 3.2, and 9.6+ months. For all patients, the median survival time was 4.2 months. One half of the patients were observed to have progressive disease within one month of commencing treatment. Responding metastatic lesions were limited to soft tissue, although one patient also had a partial response of a lung nodule. The most substantial toxicities were moderate-to-severe myalgias (27%), nausea (33%), anorexia (47%), and fatigue (50%). Among the 22 patients with weight loss, the median was 2.3 kg (range, 0.6 to 8.4 kg). Hematologic and hepatic toxicity was transient and of little clinical significance. Our study indicates that rIFN-alpha A in the dose and schedule that we used is clinically tolerable and has antitumor activity in malignant melanoma. The response rate was similar to results observed in our previous study of a higher dose regimen. PMID:6470751

  14. Ovulation induction with minimal dose of follitropin alfa: a case series study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gonadotropins are used in ovulation induction (OI) for patients with anovulatory infertility. Pharmacologic OI is associated with risks of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and multiple pregnancy. Treatment protocols that minimize these risks by promoting monofollicular development are required. A starting dose of 37.5 IU/day follitropin alfa has been used in OI, particularly among women at high risk of multifollicular development and multiple pregnancy. A retrospective case series study was performed to evaluate rates of monofollicular development and singleton pregnancy following standard treatment with 37.5 IU/day follitropin alfa. Methods Spanish centers that had performed at least five OI cycles during 2008 using 37.5 IU/day follitropin alfa as a starting dose were invited to participate. Data could be provided from any cycle performed in 2008 (up to a maximum of 12 consecutive cycles per site). Case report forms were collected during April-November 2009 and reviewed centrally. Descriptive statistics were obtained from all cases, and follicular development and clinical pregnancy rates assessed. Potential associations of age and body mass index with follicular development and clinical pregnancy were assessed using univariate correlation analyses. Results Thirty centers provided data on 316 cycles of OI using a starting dose of 37.5 IU/day follitropin alfa. Polycystic ovary syndrome was the cause of anovulatory infertility in 217 (68.7%) cases. Follitropin alfa at 37.5 IU/day was sufficient to achieve ovarian stimulation in 230 (72.8%) cycles. A single follicle ≥16 mm in diameter developed in 193 cycles (61.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 55.7-66.4%). Seventy-eight women (24.7%; 95% CI 19.9-29.5%) became pregnant: 94.9% singleton and 5.1% twin pregnancies. Fourteen started cycles (4.4%) were cancelled, mainly due to poor response. Univariate correlation analyses detected weak associations. Conclusions Monofollicular growth rate was comparable with

  15. A multicenter phase I/II dose escalation study of single-dose cidofovir gel for treatment of recurrent genital herpes.

    PubMed

    Sacks, S L; Shafran, S D; Diaz-Mitoma, F; Trottier, S; Sibbald, R G; Hughes, A; Safrin, S; Rudy, J; McGuire, B; Jaffe, H S

    1998-11-01

    A randomized, double-blind, clinic-initiated, sequential dose-escalation pilot study was performed to compare the safety and efficacy of single applications of 1, 3, and 5% cidofovir gel with placebo in the treatment of early, lesional, recurrent genital herpes at five Canadian outpatient sites. Ninety-six patients began treatment within 12 h of lesion appearance and were evaluated twice daily until healing of the lesion occurred. Cidofovir gel at all strengths significantly decreased the median time to negative virus culture in a dose-dependent fashion (3.0 days in the placebo group versus 2.2, 1.3, and 1.1 days in the 1, 3, and 5% cidofovir gel treatment groups, respectively; P = 0.02, 0.0001, and 0.0003, respectively). A trend toward a reduction in the median time to complete healing in association with treatment was present, but the differences were not statistically significant (5.0 days in the placebo group versus 4.3, 4.1, and 4.6 days in the 1, 3, and 5% cidofovir gel treatment groups, respectively). Application site reactions occurred in 3, 5, 19, and 22% of the patients in these four groups, respectively. Treatment-associated lesion recrudescence with delayed healing, which is suggestive of local toxicity, was observed in three patients treated with 5% cidofovir gel and one patient treated with 3% cidofovir gel. In summary, single-dose application of cidofovir gel confers a significant antiviral effect on lesions of recurrent genital herpes. Additional studies are warranted to further identify the optimal efficacious dose of cidofovir in association with the maximum gel strength that can be tolerated. PMID:9797239

  16. Milk production and distribution in low-dose counties for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmel, J.G.; Beck, D.M.

    1992-06-01

    This report identifies sources of milk consumed by residents of Ferry, Okanogan, and Stevens Counties. This information will be used by the Hanford thyroid Disease Study to determine whether thyroid disease has been increased among people exposed to past iodine--131 emissions from Hanford Site Facilities.

  17. Dose titration study of tinzaparin, a low molecular weight heparin, in patients on chronic hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Egfjord, M; Rosenlund, L; Hedegaard, B; Buchardt, H L; Stengel, C; Gardar, P; Andersen, L; Andersen, L

    1998-08-01

    The minimal necessary dose of Innohep (IH) (MNDI) (Innohep [tinzaparin], Leo Pharmaceutical Corp., Ballerup, Denmark) was examined in 40 patients switched from conventional heparin ([CH], Leo Pharmaceutical Corp.) to IH and in 13 patients already treated with IH. Clotting in the venous chamber and in the dialyzer was evaluated on a 4 point scale by visual inspection. IH was administrated as a bolus injection into the arterial side of the dialyzer at the beginning of dialysis sessions. The initial dose of IH was 50% of the total dose of CH used before the study (in respective IU). According to clotting in the venous chamber or dialyzer, the dose of IH was titrated by stepwise changes of 500 IU to the lowest possible dose until 3 subsequent dialysis sessions without clotting were obtained. The total dose of CH (bolus and infusion) before switching was 6,162 +/- 2,100 IU. The bleeding time from the cannulation site after dialysis, in 24 patients with A-V fistulas, was 7.1 +/- 2.8 min(triplicates). Eight patients were excluded before achieving the MNDI, 3 due to bleeding not clearly related to heparinization (1 due to gingival bleeding, 1 to epistaxis, and 1 to sugillations), 1 due to alopecia, 2 due to a need of more than 10,000 IU of IH, and 2 patients due to cessation of treatment resulting from anxiety. After switching over, the MNDI amounted to 66 +/- 26% in respective IU. The conversion IH/CH ratio correlated significantly to the blood flow rate and the type of dialyzer. When compared on 3 subsequent sessions before and after switching to IH, no differences were found in the bleeding time after decannulation and in clotting in the venous chamber while dialyzer clotting fell on the visual scale from an average of 0.36 to 0.19 (p < 0.01). No total clot formation was observed during the study. The MNDI correlated positively to the body weight, blood flow rate, and time on dialysis (with the respective coefficients of correlation of r being 0.58, 0.44, and 0.30, p

  18. Low-intensity laser therapy to treat dentin hypersensitivity: comparative clinical study using different light doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarelli, Rosane F. Z.; Mazzetto, Marcello O.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2001-04-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is the most common patient's complain related to pain. In fact, this is a challenge to treat specially if conventional techniques are used. The possibility to treat pain through a low intensity laser gives us an opportunity to solve this important clinical problem without promote a discomfort to patient. The main point here is not if this kind of treatment is anti- inflammatory to pulp and/or biostimulatory to production of irregular secondary dentin. The most important point here is to understand how much energy is necessary to reach conditions where to tooth become insensible to external stimulus. Our double-blinded study compared a group without laser (Placebo) with five other groups where different doses at 660 nm low intensity laser were employed. The final conclusion is that for 660 nm laser therapy, the doses from 0.13 to 2.0 J/cm2 were more efficiency than the others. The follow up care in this study was of 45 days.

  19. Potential dose to nuclear medicine technologists from 99mTc-DTPA aerosol lung studies.

    PubMed

    Achey, Bryan; Miller, Ken; Erdman, Mike; King, Steve

    2004-05-01

    Air sampling performed during 190 Tc-labeled DTPA aerosol lung ventilation studies indicated that the maximum airborne concentration to which the nuclear medicine technologists might be exposed was 7.1 x 10(-1) Bq mL(-1) (1.9 x 10(-5) microCi mL(-1)). If a single technologist performed ALL the aerosol studies, at this maximum airborne concentration, based on the Annual Limit on Intake (ALI), the resulting dose equivalents could be either 1 mSv (100 mrem) to the lungs or 0.1 mSv (10 mrem) to the total body. However, the procedures are shared by the technical staff, the times of exposure are represented by only a fraction of the overall procedure time, and the average airborne concentrations were found to be more than an order of magnitude lower than the maximum. This resulted in a projected average annual dose equivalent of 7.0 x 10(-3) mSv (0.7 mrem) to the lungs or 7.0 x 10(-4) mSv (0.07 mrem) to the whole body from the performance of these procedures. PMID:15069295

  20. Privacy in Pharmacogenetics: An End-to-End Case Study of Personalized Warfarin Dosing

    PubMed Central

    Fredrikson, Matthew; Lantz, Eric; Jha, Somesh; Lin, Simon; Page, David; Ristenpart, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We initiate the study of privacy in pharmacogenetics, wherein machine learning models are used to guide medical treatments based on a patient’s genotype and background. Performing an in-depth case study on privacy in personalized warfarin dosing, we show that suggested models carry privacy risks, in particular because attackers can perform what we call model inversion: an attacker, given the model and some demographic information about a patient, can predict the patient’s genetic markers. As differential privacy (DP) is an oft-proposed solution for medical settings such as this, we evaluate its effectiveness for building private versions of pharmacogenetic models. We show that DP mechanisms prevent our model inversion attacks when the privacy budget is carefully selected. We go on to analyze the impact on utility by performing simulated clinical trials with DP dosing models. We find that for privacy budgets effective at preventing attacks, patients would be exposed to increased risk of stroke, bleeding events, and mortality. We conclude that current DP mechanisms do not simultaneously improve genomic privacy while retaining desirable clinical efficacy, highlighting the need for new mechanisms that should be evaluated in situ using the general methodology introduced by our work. PMID:27077138

  1. Study on application of high doses plasmodium berghei in cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, L. M.; De Santis, M.; Davila, J.; Foinquinos, A.; Salcedo, E.; Sajo-Bohus, L.

    2012-02-01

    Malaria, one of the most important infection disease problems in the world, is caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium. This disease is responsible for hundreds of the millions of clinical cases and more than one million deaths per year, for this reason, malaria is a priority and the WHO estimates that half of the world population is at risk. In this work we study how the absorbed dose inactivates the parasite (Plasmodium berghei) in rodent model (BALB/c mice), by applying X-ray irradiation. The dose was increased from 10 to 50 Gy in parasitized red blood cells (PRBC) with merozoite stage using in vitro short cultures. Also the reduction of the irradiation effect was determined by intra-peritoneal inoculations of irradiated parasites. Afterwards, the parasitaemia was assessed daily on smears made from tail blood and stained with Giemsa's reagent. Besides, the effect of irradiation was evaluated using an immunological test as indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The results of this study showed that the most effective radiation for inactivation of parasites is about 50 Gy and the immunofluorescence pattern showed a different distribution of the fluorescence on parasites. These results showed direct correlation between the effect of irradiated parasites and parasitaemia in the group of mice infected with RBC after 50 Gy irradiation. Our results indicated that the threshold is between 30 to 50 Gy to inactivate the parasites.

  2. Comparative study between paracetamol and two different doses of pregabalin on postoperative pain in laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Esmat, Ibrahim M.; Farag, Hanan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain is the primary reason for prolonged hospital stay after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This study compared the effect of a single oral preoperative administration of paracetamol (1 g) with 2 different doses of pregabalin (150 or 300 mg) for attenuating postoperative pain and analgesic consumption. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five patients, aged 18-60 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists’ physical status I and II undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included in this randomized controlled study. Patients were divided into three groups, 25 each to receive either oral paracetamol 1 g (group I, control group) or pregabalin 150 (group II) or 300 mg (group III), 2 h before surgery. Postoperative pain was evaluated based on visual analog scale over a period of 6 h and 1st time for rescue analgesia. Postoperative sedation, hemodynamic changes, serum cortisol level, and side effects were also evaluated. Results: There was a significant decrease in mean heart rate, mean systolic blood pressure, sedation score, pain score, and delayed the first request for analgesics postoperatively in group (II) and group (III) compared to group (I) 2 h postoperatively. There was no significant difference in group (III) compared to group (II) postoperatively. The incidence of postoperative side effects was more in group (III). Conclusion: The single oral preoperative dose administration of pregabalin had significant opioid-sparing effect in the first 6 h after surgery, whereas side effects were more common with administration of pregabalin 300 mg. PMID:26543452

  3. Use of toxicokinetics to support chemical evaluation: Informing high dose selection and study interpretation.

    PubMed

    Creton, Stuart; Saghir, Shakil A; Bartels, Michael J; Billington, Richard; Bus, James S; Davies, Will; Dent, Matthew P; Hawksworth, Gabrielle M; Parry, Simon; Travis, Kim Z

    2012-03-01

    Toxicokinetic (TK) information can substantially enhance the value of the data generated from toxicity testing, and is an integral part of pharmaceutical safety assessment. It is less widely used in the chemical, agrochemical and consumer products industries, but recognition of its value is growing, as reflected by increased reference to the use of TK information in new and draft OECD test guidelines. To help promote increased consideration of the important role TK can play in chemical risk assessment, we have gathered practical examples from the peer-reviewed literature, as well as in-house industry data, that highlight opportunities for the use of TK in the selection of dose levels. Use of TK can help to ensure studies are designed to be of most relevance to assessing potential risk in humans, and avoid the use of excessively high doses that could result in unnecessary suffering in experimental animals. Greater emphasis on the potential contribution of TK in guiding study design and interpretation should be incorporated in regulatory data requirements and associated guidance. PMID:22198561

  4. Phase I Dose-Escalation Study of Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil Combination Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Satomura, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Masanobu; Sasaki, Kinro; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Domeki, Yasushi; Takahashi, Masakazu; Muroi, Hiroto; Kubo, Tsukasa; Kikuchi, Maiko; Otomo, Haruka; Ihara, Keisuke; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    A dose-escalation study of docetaxel (DOC), cisplatin (CDDP), and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; DCF combination regimen) was performed to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), recommended dose (RD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) in advanced esophageal carcinoma. Eighteen patients with esophageal carcinoma were enrolled and received DCF combination therapy at different dose levels. DLTs included febrile neutropenia and oral mucositis. DLT occurred in 2 out of 6 patients at level 2 and 3. The study proceeded to level 4, according to the protocol. The level 4 dose was defined as the MTD and the level 3 dose was defined as the RD. The RD for DCF combination chemotherapy for advanced esophageal carcinoma in the present study was 70 mg/m2 DOC plus 70 mg/m2 CDDP on day 1 plus 700 mg/m2 5-FU on days 1–5 at 4-week intervals. This regimen was tolerable and highly active. A phase II study has been started. PMID:26414837

  5. Sucrose-Formulated Recombinant Factor VIII Dosing Flexibility in Prophylaxis Regimens: Experience from Postmarketing Surveillance Studies

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Thomas J.; Rauchensteiner, Stephan; Tückmantel, Claudia; Pieper, Alexander; Maas Enriquez, Monika; Mathew, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Prophylaxis regimens for severe hemophilia A allowing more flexible dosing while maintaining efficacy may improve adherence and decrease the cost of prophylaxis. Here, we compared the clinical effectiveness of once- or twice-weekly versus ≥3-times-weekly prophylaxis with sucrose-formulated recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII-FS) in a “real-world” practice setting. Methods. Data from 3 postmarketing studies were pooled. Patients with severe hemophilia A receiving ≥1 prophylaxis infusion/wk of rFVIII-FS for ≥80% of a prophylaxis observation period (≥5 months) were included. Patients were categorized based on physician-assigned treatment regimens of 1-2 prophylaxis injections/wk (n = 63) or ≥3 prophylaxis injections/wk (n = 76). Descriptive statistics were determined for annualized bleeding rates (ABRs). Results. Median (quartile 1; quartile 3) ABR for all bleeds was 2.0 (0; 4.0) in the 1-2 prophylaxis injections/wk group and 3.9 (1.5; 9.3) in the ≥3 prophylaxis injections/wk group. Median ABRs for joint, spontaneous, and trauma-related bleeds were numerically lower with 1-2 prophylaxis injections/wk. As an estimate of prophylaxis success, 63% (≥3 prophylaxis injections/wk) to 84% of patients (1-2 prophylaxis injections/wk) had ≤4 annualized joint bleeds. Conclusions. Dosing flexibility and successful prophylaxis with rFVIII-FS were demonstrated. Very good bleeding control was achieved with both once-twice-weekly and ≥3-times-weekly prophylaxis dosing regimens. PMID:26356675

  6. Exercise Dose, Exercise Adherence, and Associated Health Outcomes in the TIGER Study

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Fred L.; O’Connor, Daniel P.; Herring, Matthew P.; Sailors, Mary H.; Jackson, Andrew S.; Dishman, Rodney K.; Bray, Molly S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To effectively evaluate activity-based interventions for weight management and disease risk reduction, objective and accurate measures of exercise dose are needed. This study examined cumulative exercise exposure defined by heart rate-based intensity, duration, and frequency as a measure of compliance with a prescribed exercise program and a predictor of health outcomes. Methods 1,150 adults (21.3 ± 2.7 yrs) completed a 15-week exercise protocol consisting of 30 min/day, three days/wk at 65–85% maximum heart rate reserve (HRR). Computerized HR monitor data were recorded at every exercise session (33,473 valid sessions). To quantify total exercise dose, duration for each session was adjusted for average exercise intensity (%HRR) to create a measure of intensity-minutes for each workout, which were summed over all exercise sessions to formulate a heart rate physical activity score (HRPAS). Regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between HRPAS and physiological responses to exercise training. Compliance with the exercise protocol based on achievement of the minimum prescribed HRPAS was compared to adherence defined by attendance. Results Using HRPAS, 868 participants were empirically defined as compliant, and 282 were non-compliant. HRPAS-based and attendance-based classifications of compliance and adherence differed for approximately 9% of participants. Higher HRPAS was associated with significant positive changes in body mass (p<0.001), BMI (p<0.001), waist and hip circumferences (p<0.001), percent body fat (%Fat, p<0.001), systolic blood pressure (p<0.011), resting heart rate (RHR, p<0.003), fasting glucose (p<0.001), and total cholesterol (p<.02). Attendance-based adherence was associated with body mass, hip circumference, %Fat, RHR, and cholesterol (p<0.05). Conclusions The HRPAS is a quantifiable measure of exercise dose associated with improvement in health indicators beyond that observed when adherence is defined as session

  7. In vitro study of acute toxic effects of high iodide doses in human thyroid follicles.

    PubMed

    Many, M C; Mestdagh, C; van den Hove, M F; Denef, J F

    1992-08-01

    The acute effects of increasing doses of sodium iodide were studied on human thyroid follicles isolated from normal paranodular tissue. After 24 h incubation in culture medium, follicles isolated from most thyroids maintained their capacity for 125I accumulation and organification and a normal cellular ultrastructure. 125I accumulation was significantly increased after addition of TSH, whereas 125I organification was not affected. In presence of TSH, numerous follicles had large empty-looking follicular lumina unlabeled on autoradiographies. Follicles incubated for 24 h in the presence of a low concentration (10(-7) M) of iodide retained their function and morphology. However, incubation with a high dose of iodide (10(-3) M) caused marked inhibition of 125I accumulation and organification reaching values similar to those obtained in presence of inhibitors of iodide trapping and organification. At high doses, iodide induced necrosis of thyroid epithelial cells: the percentage of necrotic cells was significantly increased with 10(-5) M and doubled with 10(-3) M as compared to values measured at 10(-7) M. Ultrastructural lesions such as apical blebbing, cytoplasmic fragments desquamation, endoplasmic reticulum vesiculation, and accumulation of lipofuscin in secondary lysosomes were also present. The necrotic effect and the ultrastructural alterations also occurred in the presence of TSH but were prevented by the addition of inhibitors of iodide trapping or organification. These results demonstrate a direct acute toxic effect of iodide in human thyroid cells. The nature of the ultrastructural alterations is in agreement with a mechanism of toxicity involving a free radical attack and lipid peroxidation as observed in other tissues. PMID:1639011

  8. Dosimetric study and in-vivo dose verification for conformal avoidance treatment of anal adenocarcinoma using helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Han Chunhui . E-mail: chan@coh.org; Chen Yijen; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2007-04-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of using helical tomotherapy for conformal avoidance treatment of anal adenocarcinoma. We retrospectively generated step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (sIMRT) plans and helical tomotherapy plans for two anal cancer patients, one male and one female, who were treated by the sIMRT technique. Dose parameters for the planning target volume (PTV) and the organs-at-risk (OARs) were compared between the sIMRT and the helical tomotherapy plans. The helical tomotherapy plans showed better dose homogeneity in the PTV, better dose conformity around the PTV, and, therefore, better sparing of nearby OARs compared with the sIMRT plans. In-vivo skin dose measurements were performed during conformal avoidance helical tomotherapy treatment of an anal cancer patient to verify adequate delivery of skin dose and sparing of OARs.

  9. Comparison and Efficacy of Low-Dose and Standard-Dose Tamsulosin and Alfuzosin in Medical Expulsive Therapy for Lower Ureteral Calculi: Prospective, Randomized, Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Woo Heon; Choi, Jae Duck; Seo, Young Jin; Lee, Kyungseop

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Typically in Korea, for a standard dose (0.4 mg) of tamsulosin, two low doses (0.2 mg) are administered. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of tamsulosin (0.2 mg and 0.4 mg) and alfuzosin (10 mg) in the treatment of lower ureteral stones. Materials and Methods A total of 141 patients presenting with a single 4- to 10-mm sized lower ureteral stone were randomly assigned to 4 groups. Patients in group 1 (n=41) and group 2 (n=30) received an oral dose of 0.2 mg tamsulosin once and twice daily, respectively, and patients in group 3 (n=36) received a daily oral dose of 10 mg alfuzosin. Patients in group 4 (n=34) received trospium chloride only. The spontaneous passage of stones, the stone expulsion time, and adverse effects were evaluated. Results There were no significant differences in patient background, including age, sex, BMI, stone size, stone side, and symptom duration. The spontaneous stone passage rate through the ureter was higher and the stone expulsion time was faster in groups 1, 2, and 3 than in group 4. There were no statistically different changes in groups 1, 2, and 3. The adverse effects observed in all groups were comparable and were mild. Conclusions Tamsulosin at 0.2 mg and 0.4 mg and alfuzosin (10 mg) proved to be safe and effective. A first cycle of medical expulsive therapy with tamsulosin 0.2 mg could be considered as an option in the management of single lower ureteral stone. PMID:22670195

  10. Lung cancer and internal lung doses among plutonium workers at the Rocky Flats Plant: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Brown, Shannon C; Schonbeck, Margaret F; McClure, David; Barón, Anna E; Navidi, William C; Byers, Tim; Ruttenber, A James

    2004-07-15

    The authors conducted a nested case-control study of the association between lung cancer mortality and cumulative internal lung doses among a cohort of workers employed at the Rocky Flats Plant in Colorado from 1951 to 1989. Cases (n = 180) were individually matched with controls (n = 720) on age, sex, and birth year. Annual doses to the lung from plutonium, americium, and uranium isotopes were calculated for each worker with an internal dosimetry model. Lung cancer risk was elevated among workers with cumulative internal lung doses of more than 400 mSv in several different analytical models. The dose-response relation was not consistent at high doses. Restricting analysis to those employed for 15-25 years produced a statistically significant linear trend with dose (chi-square = 67.2, p < 0.001), suggesting a strong healthy worker survivor effect. The association between age at first internal lung dose and lung cancer mortality was statistically significant (odds ratio = 1.05, 95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.10). No associations were found between lung cancer mortality and cumulative external penetrating radiation dose or cumulative exposures to asbestos, beryllium, hexavalent chromium, or nickel. PMID:15234938

  11. Effectiveness of pharmacist dosing adjustment for critically ill patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Sai-Ping; Zhu, Zheng-Yi; Wu, Xiao-Liang; Lu, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Xing-Guo; Wu, Bao-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) on drug removal is complicated; pharmacist dosing adjustment for these patients may be advantageous. This study aims to describe the development and implementation of pharmacist dosing adjustment for critically ill patients receiving CRRT and to examine the effectiveness of pharmacist interventions. Methods A comparative study was conducted in an intensive care unit (ICU) of a university-affiliated hospital. Patients receiving CRRT in the intervention group received specialized pharmacy dosing service from pharmacists, whereas patients in the no-intervention group received routine medical care without pharmacist involvement. The two phases were compared to evaluate the outcome of pharmacist dosing adjustment. Results The pharmacist carried out 233 dosing adjustment recommendations for patients receiving CRRT, and 212 (90.98%) of the recommendations were well accepted by the physicians. Changes in CRRT-related variables (n=144, 61.81%) were the most common risk factors for dosing errors, whereas antibiotics (n=168, 72.10%) were the medications most commonly associated with dosing errors. Pharmacist dosing adjustment resulted in a US$2,345.98 ICU cost savings per critically ill patient receiving CRRT. Suspected adverse drug events in the intervention group were significantly lower than those in the preintervention group (35 in 27 patients versus [vs] 18 in eleven patients, P<0.001). However, there was no significant difference between length of ICU stay and mortality after pharmacist dosing adjustment, which was 8.93 days vs 7.68 days (P=0.26) and 30.10% vs 27.36% (P=0.39), respectively. Conclusion Pharmacist dosing adjustment for patients receiving CRRT was well accepted by physicians, and was related with lower adverse drug event rates and ICU cost savings. These results may support the development of strategies to include a pharmacist in the multidisciplinary ICU team. PMID:24940066

  12. Probabilistic dose-response modeling: case study using dichloromethane PBPK model results.

    PubMed

    Marino, Dale J; Starr, Thomas B

    2007-12-01

    A revised assessment of dichloromethane (DCM) has recently been reported that examines the influence of human genetic polymorphisms on cancer risks using deterministic PBPK and dose-response modeling in the mouse combined with probabilistic PBPK modeling in humans. This assessment utilized Bayesian techniques to optimize kinetic variables in mice and humans with mean values from posterior distributions used in the deterministic modeling in the mouse. To supplement this research, a case study was undertaken to examine the potential impact of probabilistic rather than deterministic PBPK and dose-response modeling in mice on subsequent unit risk factor (URF) determinations. Four separate PBPK cases were examined based on the exposure regimen of the NTP DCM bioassay. These were (a) Same Mouse (single draw of all PBPK inputs for both treatment groups); (b) Correlated BW-Same Inputs (single draw of all PBPK inputs for both treatment groups except for bodyweights (BWs), which were entered as correlated variables); (c) Correlated BW-Different Inputs (separate draws of all PBPK inputs for both treatment groups except that BWs were entered as correlated variables); and (d) Different Mouse (separate draws of all PBPK inputs for both treatment groups). Monte Carlo PBPK inputs reflect posterior distributions from Bayesian calibration in the mouse that had been previously reported. A minimum of 12,500 PBPK iterations were undertaken, in which dose metrics, i.e., mg DCM metabolized by the GST pathway/L tissue/day for lung and liver were determined. For dose-response modeling, these metrics were combined with NTP tumor incidence data that were randomly selected from binomial distributions. Resultant potency factors (0.1/ED(10)) were coupled with probabilistic PBPK modeling in humans that incorporated genetic polymorphisms to derive URFs. Results show that there was relatively little difference, i.e., <10% in central tendency and upper percentile URFs, regardless of the case

  13. Tumorigenesis in high-dose total body irradiated rhesus monkeys--a life span study.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Carel F; Zurcher, Chris; Broerse, Johan J

    2003-01-01

    In the early sixties, studies have been performed at the TNO-Institutes for Health Research on acute effects of high dose total body irradiation (TBI) with X-rays and fission neutrons in Rhesus monkeys and the protective effect of autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The surviving animals of this study were kept to investigate late radiation effects, ie, tumorigenesis. TBI in combination with chemotherapy, followed by rescue with BMT is increasingly used for the treatment of hematological malignancies and refractory autoimmune disease. The risk of radiation carcinogenesis after this treatment is of growing concern in man. Studies on tumor induction in nonhuman primates are of relevance in this context since the response of this species to radiation does not differ much from that in man. The group of long-term surviving monkeys comprised nine neutron irradiated animals (average total body dose 3A Gy, range 2.3-4.4 Gy) and 20 X-irradiated monkeys (average total body dose 7.1 Gy, range 2.8-8.6 Gy). A number of 21 age-matched nonirradiated Rhesus monkeys served as a control-group. All animals wereregularly screened for the occurrence of tumors. Complete necropsies were performed after natural death or euthanasia. At postirradiation intervals of 4-21 years an appreciable number of malignant tumors was observed. In the neutron irradiated group eight out of nine animals died with 1 or more malignant tumors. In the X-irradiated group this fraction was 10 out of 20. The tumors in the control group, in seven out of 21 animals, appeared at much older age compared with those in the irradiated cohorts. The histogenesis of the malignant tumors was diverse, as was the case for benign tumors. The observed shortening of latency periods and life span, as well as, the increase of mean number of tumors per tumor bearing animal for benign neoplasms parallels the trend observed for malignant tumors. The results of this study were compared to other radiation late effects after

  14. Cerebral vascular effects of loading dose of dexmedetomidine: A Transcranial Color Doppler study

    PubMed Central

    Arulvelan, Appavoo; Manikandan, Sethuraman; Easwer, Hari Venkat; Krishnakumar, Kesavapisharady

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dexmedetomidine has been widely used in critical care settings because of its property of maintaining stable hemodynamics and inducing conscious sedation. The use of dexmedetomidine is in increasing trend particularly in patients with neurological disorders. Very few studies have focused on the cerebral hemodynamic effects of dexmedetomidine. This study is aimed to address this issue. Methods: Thirty patients without any intracranial pathology were included in this study. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity obtained from transcranial color Doppler was used to assess the cerebral hemodynamic indices. Mean flow velocity (mFV), pulsatility index (PI), cerebral vascular resistant index (CVRi), estimated cerebral perfusion pressure (eCPP), and zero flow pressure (ZFP) were calculated bilaterally at baseline and after infusion of injection Dexmedetomidine 1 mcg/Kg over 10 min. Results: Twenty-six patients completed the study protocol. After administration of loading dose of dexmedetomidine, mFV and eCPP values were significantly decreased in both hemispheres (P < 0.05); PI, CVRi, and ZFP values showed significant increase (P < 0.05) after dexmedetomidine infusion. Conclusion: Increase in PI, CVRi, and ZFP suggests that there is a possibility of an increase in distal cerebral vascular resistance (CVR) with loading dose of dexmedetomidine. Decrease in mFV and eCPP along with an increase in CVR may lead to a decrease in cerebral perfusion. This effect can be exaggerated in patients with preexisting neurological illness. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of dexmedetomidine on various other pathological conditions involving brain like traumatic brain injury and vascular malformations. PMID:26955211

  15. RECONSTRUCTION OF INDIVIDUAL RADIATION DOSES FOR A CASE-CONTROL STUDY OF THYROID CANCER IN FRENCH POLYNESIA

    PubMed Central

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Bouville, André; Doyon, Françoise; Brindel, Pauline; Cardis, Elisabeth; de Vathaire, Florent

    2014-01-01

    Forty-one atmospheric nuclear weapons tests (plus five safety tests) were conducted in French Polynesia between 1966 and 1974. To evaluate the potential role of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing on a high incidence of thyroid cancer observed since 1985 in French Polynesia, a population-based case-control study was performed. The study included 602 subjects, either cases or controls, all aged less than 40 y at the end of nuclear weapons testing in 1974. Radiation doses to the thyroids of the study subjects were assessed based on the available historical results of radiation measurements. These were mainly found in the annual reports on the radiological situation in French Polynesia that had been sent to the UNSCEAR Secretariat. For each atmospheric nuclear weapons test that contributed substantially to the local deposition of radionuclides, the radiation dose to the thyroid from 131I intake was estimated. In addition, thyroid doses from the intake of short-lived radioiodines (132I, 133I, 135I) and 132Te, external exposure from gamma-emitted radionuclides deposited on the ground, and ingestion of long-lived 137Cs were reconstructed. The mean thyroid dose among the study subjects was found to be around 3 mGy while the highest dose was estimated to be around 40 mGy. Doses from short-lived iodine and tellurium isotopes ranged up to 10 mGy. Thyroid doses from external exposure ranged up to 3 mGy, while those from internal exposure due to cesium ingestion did not exceed 1 mGy. The dose estimates that have been obtained are based on a rather limited number of radiation measurements performed on a limited number of islands and are highly uncertain. A thorough compilation of the results of all radiation monitoring that was performed in French Polynesia in 1966–1974 would be likely to greatly improve the reliability and the precision of the dose estimates. PMID:18403963

  16. Dose-response fallacy in human reproductive studies of toxic exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Selevan, S.G.; Lemasters, G.K.

    1987-01-01

    The manner in which exposure is defined can affect the findings of reproductive studies of toxic exposures. The individual end points potentially examined, such as fetal loss, subfertility, and congenital malformations observed at birth, are on a continuum by severity of effect: the most extreme effects of the three being infertility because no pregnancy is possible, and the least extreme, congenital malformations recognized at birth. End points observed at birth are survivors of a long and complex process. The process yielding one of these adverse end points may result from a number of factors, including level of exposure could result in early fetal loss, whereas a lower one might result in a congenital malformation observed at birth. If the probability of a less-severe end point falls due to increasing probability of more-severe end points with increasing exposure, then a nontraditional dose-response relationship may be observed in the study of one type of outcome.

  17. Dose-response fallacy in human reproductive studies of toxic exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Selevan, S.G.; Lemasters, G.K.

    1987-05-01

    The manner in which exposure is defined can affect the findings of reproductive studies of toxic exposures. The individual end points potentially examined, such as fetal loss, subfertility, and congenital malformations observed at birth, are on a continuum by severity of effect: The most extreme effect of the three being infertility because no pregnancy is possible, and the least extreme, congenital malformations recognized at birth. End points observed at birth are survivors of a long and complex process. The process yielding one of these adverse end points may result from a number of factors, including level of exposure. For example, a very high exposure could result in early fetal loss, whereas a lower one might result in a congenital malformation observed at birth. If the probability of a less severe end point falls due to increasing probability of more severe end points with increasing exposure, then a nontraditional dose-response relationship may be observed in the study of one type of outcome.

  18. Low-dose aspirin in polycythaemia vera: a pilot study. Gruppo Italiano Studio Policitemia (GISP).

    PubMed

    1997-05-01

    In this pilot study, aimed at exploring the feasibility of a large-scale trial of low-dose aspirin in polycythaemia vera (PV), 112 PV patients (42 females, 70 males. aged 17-80 years) were selected for not having a clear indication for, or contraindication to, aspirin treatment and randomized to receive oral aspirin (40 mg/d) or placebo. Follow-up duration was 16 +/- 6 months. Measurements of thromboxane A2 production during whole blood clotting demonstrated complete inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase activity in patients receiving aspirin. Aspirin administration was not associated with any bleeding complication. Within the limitations of the small sample size, this study indicates that a biochemically effective regimen of antiplatelet therapy is well tolerated in patients with polycythaemia vera and that a large-scale placebo-controlled trial is feasible. PMID:9163613

  19. Invited commentary: missing doses in the life span study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Ozasa, K; Grant, E J; Cullings, H M; Shore, R E

    2013-03-15

    The Life Span Study is a long-term epidemiologic cohort study of survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. In this issue of the Journal, Richardson et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2013;177(6):562-568) suggest that those who died in the earliest years of follow-up were more likely to have a missing dose of radiation exposure assigned, leading to a bias in the radiation risk estimates. We show that nearly all members of the cohort had shielding information recorded before the beginning of follow-up and that much of the alleged bias that Richardson et al. describe simply reflects the geographic distribution of shielding conditions for which reliable dosimetry was impossible. PMID:23429724

  20. Radiation doses in cone-beam breast computed tomography: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Ying; Lai, Chao-Jen; Han Tao; Zhong Yuncheng; Shen Youtao; Liu Xinming; Ge Shuaiping; You Zhicheng; Wang Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: In this article, we describe a method to estimate the spatial dose variation, average dose and mean glandular dose (MGD) for a real breast using Monte Carlo simulation based on cone beam breast computed tomography (CBBCT) images. We present and discuss the dose estimation results for 19 mastectomy breast specimens, 4 homogeneous breast models, 6 ellipsoidal phantoms, and 6 cylindrical phantoms. Methods: To validate the Monte Carlo method for dose estimation in CBBCT, we compared the Monte Carlo dose estimates with the thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements at various radial positions in two polycarbonate cylinders (11- and 15-cm in diameter). Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 19 mastectomy breast specimens, obtained with a bench-top experimental scanner, were segmented and used to construct 19 structured breast models. Monte Carlo simulation of CBBCT with these models was performed and used to estimate the point doses, average doses, and mean glandular doses for unit open air exposure at the iso-center. Mass based glandularity values were computed and used to investigate their effects on the average doses as well as the mean glandular doses. Average doses for 4 homogeneous breast models were estimated and compared to those of the corresponding structured breast models to investigate the effect of tissue structures. Average doses for ellipsoidal and cylindrical digital phantoms of identical diameter and height were also estimated for various glandularity values and compared with those for the structured breast models. Results: The absorbed dose maps for structured breast models show that doses in the glandular tissue were higher than those in the nearby adipose tissue. Estimated average doses for the homogeneous breast models were almost identical to those for the structured breast models (p=1). Normalized average doses estimated for the ellipsoidal phantoms were similar to those for the structured breast models (root mean square (rms

  1. Study of natural radionuclide and absorbed gamma dose in Ukhimath area of Garhwal Himalaya, India.

    PubMed

    Rautela, B S; Yadav, M; Bourai, A A; Joshi, V; Gusain, G S; Ramola, R C

    2012-11-01

    Natural radiation is the largest contributor to the collective radiation dose of the world population. It is widely distributed in different geological formations such as soil, rocks, air and groundwater. In the present investigation, (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were measured in soil samples of the Ukhimath region of Garhwal Himalaya, India using NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectrometry. The activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were found to vary from 38.4 ± 6.1 to 141.7 ± 11.9 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 80.5 Bq kg(-1), 57.0 ± 7.5 to 155.9 ± 12.4 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 118.9 Bq kg(-1) and 9.0 ± 3.0 to 672.8 ± 25.9 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 341 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The total absorbed gamma dose rate varies from 70.4 to 169.1 nGy h(-1) with an average of 123.4 nGy h(-1). This study is important to generate a baseline data of radiation exposure in the area. Health hazard effects due to natural radiation exposure are discussed in details. PMID:22908360

  2. Preliminary studies of PQS PET detector module for dose verification of carbon beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.-I.; An, S. Jung; Lee, C. Y.; Jo, W. J.; Min, E.; Lee, K.; Kim, Y.; Joung, J.; Chung, Y. H.

    2014-05-01

    PET imaging can be used to verify dose distributions of therapeutic particle beams such as carbon ion beams. The purpose of this study was to develop a PET detector module which was designed for an in-beam PET scanner geometry integrated into a carbon beam therapy system, and to evaluate its feasibility as a monitoring system of patient dose distribution. A C-shaped PET geometry was proposed to avoid blockage of the carbon beam by the detector modules. The proposed PET system consisted of 14 detector modules forming a bore with 30.2 cm inner diameter for brain imaging. Each detector module is composed of a 9 × 9 array of 4.0 mm × 4.0 mm × 20.0 mm LYSO crystal module optically coupled with four 29 mm diameter PMTs using Photomultiplier-quadrant-sharing (PQS) technique. Because the crystal pixel was identified based upon the distribution of scintillation lights of four PMTs, the design of the reflector between crystal elements should be well optimized. The optical design of reflectors was optimized using DETECT2000, a Monte Carlo code for light photon transport. A laser-cut reflector set was developed using the Enhanced Specular Reflector (ESR, 3M Co.) mirror-film with a high reflectance of 98% and a thickness of 0.064 mm. All 81 crystal elements of detector module were identified. Our result demonstrates that the C-shaped PET system is under development and we present the first reconstructed image.

  3. Palonosetron-A Single-Dose Antiemetic Adjunct for Hepatic Artery Radioembolization: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqi, Nasir H.; Khan, Atif J.; Devlin, Phillip M.

    2009-01-15

    Nausea and vomiting may occur in a significant minority of patients following hepatic artery embolization with yttrium-90 spheres (K. T. Sato et al. Radiology 247:507-515, 2008). This encumbers human and economic resources and undercuts the assertion that it is as a well-tolerated outpatient treatment. A single intravenous dose of palonosetron HCl was administered before hepatic artery embolization with yttrium-90 spheres to ameliorate posttreatment nausea and vomiting, in 23 consecutive patients. The patients were discharged the day of procedure on oral antiemetics, steroids, and blockers of gastric acid release. All patients had clinical and laboratory evaluation at 2 weeks after the procedure. The data were gathered and reviewed retrospectively. At 2-week follow-up, none reported significant nausea, vomiting, additional antiemetic use, need for parenteral therapy, hospital readmission, or palonosetron-related side effects. All patients recovered from postembolization symptoms within a week after treatment. In conclusion, this retrospective study suggests that single-dose palonosetron is feasible, safe, and effective for acute and delayed nausea and vomiting in this group of patients. The added cost may be offset by benefits.

  4. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose study to determine the baseline for environmental radiological health practices in Melaka state, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Sahrone, Sallehudin; Wagiran, Husin

    2005-12-01

    Environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates were measured throughout Melaka, Malaysia, over a period of two years, with the objective of establishing baseline data on the background radiation level. Results obtained are shown in tabular, graphic and cartographic form. The values of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate vary significantly over different soil types and for different underlying geological characteristics present in the study area. The values ranged from 54 +/- 5 to 378 +/- 38 nGy h(-1). The highest terrestrial gamma dose rates were measured over soil types of granitic origin and in areas with underlying geological characteristics of an acid intrusive (undifferentiated) type. An isodose map of terrestrial gamma dose rate in Melaka was drawn by using the GIS application 'Arc View'. This was based on data collected using a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector survey meter. The measurements were taken at 542 locations. Three small 'hot spots' were found where the dose rates were more than 350 nGy h(-1). The mean dose rates in the main population areas in the mukims (parishes) of Bukit Katil, Sungai Udang, Batu Berendam, Bukit Baru and Bandar Melaka were 154 +/- 15, 161 +/- 16, 160 +/- 16, 175 +/- 18 and 176 +/- 18 nGy h(-1), respectively. The population-weighted mean dose rate throughout Melaka state is 172 +/- 17 nGy h(-1). This is lower than the geographical mean dose rate of 183 +/- 54 nGy h(-1). The lower value arises from the fact that most of the population lives in the central area of the state where the lithology is dominated by sedimentary rocks consisting of shale, mudstone, phyllite, slate, hornfels, sandstone and schist of Devonian origin which have lower associated dose rates. The mean annual effective dose to the population from outdoor terrestrial gamma radiation was estimated to be 0.21 mSv. This value is higher than the world average of 0.07 mSv. PMID:16340071

  5. RECONSTRUCTION OF RADIATION DOSES IN A CASE-CONTROL STUDY OF THYROID CANCER FOLLOWING THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT

    PubMed Central

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Khrouch, Valeri; Maceika, Evaldas; Zvonova, Irina; Vlasov, Oleg; Bratilova, Angelica; Gavrilin, Yury; Goulko, Guennadi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Shinkarev, Sergey; Tenet, Vanessa; Cardis, Elisabeth; Bouville, Andre

    2010-01-01

    A population-based case-control study of thyroid cancer was carried out in contaminated regions of Belarus and Russia among persons who were exposed during childhood and adolescence to fallout from the Chernobyl accident. For each study subject, individual thyroid doses were reconstructed for the following pathways of exposure: (1) intake of 131I via inhalation and ingestion; (2) intake of short-lived radioiodines (132I, 133I, and 135I) and radiotelluriums (131mTe, 132Te) via inhalation and ingestion; (3) external dose from radionuclides deposited on the ground; and (4) ingestion of 134Cs and 137Cs. A series of intercomparison exercises validated the models used for reconstruction of average doses to populations of specific age groups as well as of individual doses. Median thyroid doses from all factors for study subjects were estimated to be 0.37 and 0.034 Gy in Belarus and Russia, respectively. The highest individual thyroid doses among the subjects were 10.2 Gy in Belarus and 5.3 Gy in Russia. Iodine-131 intake was the main pathway for thyroid exposure. Estimated doses from short-lived radioiodines and radiotelluriums ranged up to 0.53 Gy. Reconstructed individual thyroid doses from external exposure ranged up to 0.1 Gy, while those from internal exposure due to ingested cesium did not exceed 0.05 Gy. The uncertainty of the reconstructed individual thyroid doses, characterized by the geometric standard deviation, varies from 1.7 to 4.0 with a median of 2.2. PMID:20539120

  6. Dose validation of PhIP hair level as a biomarker of heterocyclic aromatic amines exposure: a feeding study.

    PubMed

    Le Marchand, Loïc; Yonemori, Kim; White, Kami K; Franke, Adrian A; Wilkens, Lynne R; Turesky, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Hair measurement of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is a promising biomarker of exposure to this carcinogen formed in cooked meats. However, the dose relationship between normal range intake and hair levels and the modulating effects of CYP1A2 metabolism and hair melanin need to be evaluated. We conducted a randomized, cross-over feeding study among 41 non-smokers using ground beef cooked to two different levels of doneness, 5 days a week for 1 month. PhIP was measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry in food (mean low dose = 0.72 µg/serving; mean high dose = 2.99 µg/serving), and change in PhIP hair level was evaluated. CYP1A2 activity was assessed in urine with the caffeine challenge test and head hair melanin was estimated by UV spectrophotometry. We observed a strong dose-dependent increase in hair PhIP levels. This increase was highly correlated with dose received (ρ = 0.68, P < 0.0001). CYP1A2 activity and normalizing for hair melanin did not modify the response to the intervention. Consumption of PhIP at doses similar to those in the American diet results in a marked dose-dependent accumulation of PhIP in hair. Hair PhIP levels may be used as a biomarker of dietary exposure in studies investigating disease risk. PMID:27207666

  7. Dose-dependent neuroprotective effect of caffeine on a rotenone-induced rat model of parkinsonism: A histological study.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Amira M; Fathalla, Ahmed M; Moustafa, Ahmed A

    2016-06-01

    Several lines of evidence have demonstrated an inverse relationship between caffeine utilization and Parkinson's disease (PD) progression. Caffeine is a methylxanthine known as a non-specific inhibitor of adenosine (A2A and A1) receptors in the cerebrum and demonstrated to be a neuroprotective medication. In this study, the neuroprotective efficacy of two different doses of caffeine ranging above the usual consumption dose and below the toxic dose was investigated using histopathological and immunohistochemical methods. Thirty-two male rats were randomly divided into 4 groups, with 8 in each group: vehicle control (1ml/kg/48h for 12 days), rotenone (1.5mg/kg/48h, s.c. for 12 days), low-dose Caffeine-treated: (10mg/kg IP. daily for 12 days), high-dose Caffeine-treated (20mg IP daily for 12 days). Twenty-four hours after the last rotenone injection, animals were sacrificed and brains were sectioned and prepared for histopathological staining with hematoxylinand eosin, cresyl violet and Mallory's phosphotungestic acid haematoxylinand for immunohistochemical staining of tyrosine hydroxylase. Our study showed that the treatment with caffeine improved histopathological degeneration in the substantia nigra parts compacta (SNpc) neurons and hindered the reduction in dopamine concentration caused by rotenone. We also found that a higher dose of caffeine was more effective against histopathological degeneration. These results suggest that caffeine has a dose-dependent neuroprotective effect. PMID:27132082

  8. A phantom study on bladder and rectum dose measurements in brachytherapy of cervix cancer using FBX aqueous chemical dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Anil K; Semwal, Manoj K; Arora, Deepak; Sharma, D N; Julka, P K; Rath, G K

    2013-06-01

    The ferrous sulphate-benzoic acid-xylenol orange (FBX) chemical dosimeter, due to its aqueous form can measure average volume doses and hence may overcome the limitations of point dosimetry. The present study was undertaken to validate the use of FBX dosimeter for rectum and bladder dose measurement during intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) and transperineal interstitial brachytherapy (TIB). We filled cylindrical polypropylene tubes (PT) and Foley balloons (FB) with FBX solution and used them as substitutes for rectum and bladder dose measurements respectively. A water phantom was fabricated with provision to place the Fletcher-type ICBT and MUPIT template applicators, and FBX filled PT and FB within the phantom. The phantom was then CT scanned for treatment planning and subsequent irradiation. Our results show that the average difference between DVH derived dose value and FBX measured dose is 3.5% (PT) and 13.7% (FB) for ICBT, and 9% (PT) and 9.9% (FB) for TIB. We believe that the FBX system should be able to provide accuracy and precision sufficient for routine quality assurance purposes. The advantage of the FBX system is its water equivalent composition, average volume dose measuring capability, and energy and temperature independent response as compared to TLD or semiconductor dosimeters. However, detailed studies will be needed with regards to its safety before actual in-vivo dose measurements are possible with the FBX dosimeter. PMID:22687710

  9. Dosimetric impact of applicator displacement during high dose rate (HDR) Cobalt-60 brachytherapy for cervical cancer: A planning study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, J. S.; Ung, N. M.; Jamalludin, Z.; Malik, R. A.; Wong, J. H. D.; Liew, Y. M.; Ng, K. H.

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the dosimetric impact of applicator displacement on dose specification during high dose rate (HDR) Cobalt-60 (Co-60) brachytherapy for cervical cancer through a planning study. Eighteen randomly selected HDR full insertion plans were restrospectively studied. The tandem and ovoids were virtually shifted translationally and rotationally in the x-, y- and z-axis directions on the treatment planning system. Doses to reference points and volumes of interest in the plans with shifted applicators were compared with the original plans. The impact of dose displacement on 2D (point-based) and 3D (volume-based) treatment planning techniques was also assessed. A ±2 mm translational y-axis applicator shift and ±4° rotational x-axis applicator shift resulted in dosimetric changes of more than 5% to organs at risk (OAR) reference points. Changes to the maximum doses to 2 cc of the organ (D2cc) in 3D planning were statistically significant and higher than the reference points in 2D planning for both the rectum and bladder (p<0.05). Rectal D2cc was observed to be the most sensitive to applicator displacement among all dose metrics. Applicator displacement that is greater than ±2 mm translational y-axis and ±4° rotational x-axis resulted in significant dose changes to the OAR. Thus, steps must be taken to minimize the possibility of applicator displacement during brachytherapy.

  10. A prospective study on radiation doses to organs at risk (OARs) during intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guan-Qun; Zhang, Wang-Jian; Xu, Lin; Wang, Xiao-Ju; Lin, Li; Ma, Jun; Sun, Ying

    2016-01-01

    This study is to investigate the dose distribution of organs at risk (OARs) in cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). From July 2013 to October 2014, a prospective cohort study involving 148 patients was carried out at our center. OARs surrounding the nasopharynx were contoured on axial CT planning images in all patients. Dose-volume histograms of OARs and gross tumor volumes (GTV) were calculated. Multivariate analysis showed that radiation dose to OARs was associated with T stage and, especially, GTV. Seven OARs, including the spinal cord, eye and mandible, easily tolerated radiation doses in all patients; six OARs including the brain stem, chiasm and temporal lobe easily tolerated radiation doses in patients with a small GTV, but with difficulty when GTV was large; and other nine OARs including the parotid gland, cochlea and tympanic cavity met tolerance doses with difficulty in all patients. According to the patterns of radiation doses to OARs, it may help us to further reduce subsequent complications by improving the efficiency of plan optimization and evaluation. PMID:26942881

  11. A Feasibility Study of Fricke Dosimetry as an Absorbed Dose to Water Standard for 192Ir HDR Sources

    PubMed Central

    deAlmeida, Carlos Eduardo; Ochoa, Ricardo; de Lima, Marilene Coelho; David, Mariano Gazineu; Pires, Evandro Jesus; Peixoto, José Guilherme; Salata, Camila; Bernal, Mario Antônio

    2014-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) using 192Ir sources is well accepted as an important treatment option and thus requires an accurate dosimetry standard. However, a dosimetry standard for the direct measurement of the absolute dose to water for this particular source type is currently not available. An improved standard for the absorbed dose to water based on Fricke dosimetry of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources is presented in this study. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate the potential usefulness of the Fricke dosimetry technique for the standardization of the quantity absorbed dose to water for 192Ir sources. A molded, double-walled, spherical vessel for water containing the Fricke solution was constructed based on the Fricke system. The authors measured the absorbed dose to water and compared it with the doses calculated using the AAPM TG-43 report. The overall combined uncertainty associated with the measurements using Fricke dosimetry was 1.4% for k = 1, which is better than the uncertainties reported in previous studies. These results are promising; hence, the use of Fricke dosimetry to measure the absorbed dose to water as a standard for HDR 192Ir may be possible in the future. PMID:25521914

  12. Bioequivalence study of two imatinib formulations after single-dose administration in healthy Korean male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Jung, J A; Kim, N; Yang, J-S; Kim, T-e; Kim, J-R; Song, G-S; Kim, H; Ko, J W; Huh, W

    2014-12-01

    Imatinib mesylate is effective for chronic myeloid leukaemia and gastrointestinal tumours. We aimed to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of a 200-mg imatinib tablet compared to 2×100-mg imatinib tablets in order to meet the regulatory requirements for marketing in Korea.An open-label, randomized, single-dose, 2-period, 2-treatment cross-over study was conducted in 28 healthy Korean male volunteers. Subjects were administered a 200-mg imatinib tablet and 2×100-mg imatinib tablets under a fasting state according to a randomly assigned order with a 2-week wash-out period. Serial blood samples were collected up to 72 h post-dose. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using non-compartmental methods.A total of 28 subjects were enrolled and 23 subjects completed the study. There were no serious adverse events during the study. 23 mild to moderate adverse events were reported (11 events with 200-mg imatinib vs. 12 events with 2×100-mg imatinib) and subjects recovered without sequelae. The Cmax value was 922.8±318.8 μg/L at 3.15 h for 200-mg imatinib tablet, and 986.3±266.0 μg/L at 2.91 h for the 2×100-mg imatinib tablet. The AUClast of 200-mg and 2×100-mg tablets were 13 084.3±39.1 and 14 131.7±3 826.2 h · μg/L, respectively. The geometric mean ratios (90% confidence intervals) for Cmax and AUClast were 0.9121 (0.8188, 1.0161) and 0.9558 (0.8685, 1.0519), respectively.A newly developed 200-mg imatinib tablet was bioequivalent to 2×100-mg imatinib tablets in healthy Korean subjects. A single-dose of either of the 2 formulations was generally well tolerated. PMID:24549963

  13. High-Dose Weekly AmBisome Antifungal Prophylaxis in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Pharmacokinetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Parinda; Vinks, Alexander; Filipovich, Alexandra; Vaughn, Gretchen; Fearing, Deborah; Sper, Christine; Davies, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated fungal infection causes significant morbidity and mortality in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The widespread use of prophylactic oral triazoles has limitations of poor absorption, interindividual variability in metabolism, and hepatic toxicity. AmBisome (amphotericin B liposomal complex) has a better safety profile than the parent drug amphotericin B and produces higher plasma and tissue concentrations. We hypothesized that once-weekly high-dose AmBisome therapy could provide adequate fungal prophylaxis for immunocompromised children undergoing HSCT. We performed a pharmacokinetic pilot study to determine whether once-weekly high-dose AmBisome administration would result in effective concentrations throughout the dosing interval. A total of 14 children (median age, 3 years, 1 month; range, 4.5 months–9 years, 9 months) undergoing HSCT received once-weekly intravenous AmBisome prophylaxis (10 mg/kg as a 2-hour infusion). Blood samples for pharmacokinetic measurements were drawn around the first and the fourth weekly doses. The concentration of non–lipid-complexed amphotericin in plasma was determined by a validated bioassay. Pharmacokinetic parameters after single doses and during steady state were calculated using standard noncompartmental methods. AmBisome was well tolerated at this dose. Complete pharmacokinetic profiles for weeks 1 and 4 were obtained in 12 patients. The half-life calculated in this pediatric population was shorter on average than reported in adults (45 hours vs 152 hours). The volume of distribution correlated best with body weight (R2 = .55), and clearance was best predicted by initial serum creatinine level (R2 = .19). Mean (± standard deviation) individual plasma trough concentrations were 0.23 (0.13) mg/L after single doses and 0.47 (0.41) mg/L after multiple doses. Mean steady-state area under the curve was higher at week 4 than after a single dose (P < .05). Single-dose and steady

  14. Experimental and clinical studies on dose reduction effects of spacers in interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the mobile tongue.

    PubMed

    Fujita, M; Tamamoto, M; Hirokawa, Y; Kashiwado, K; Akagi, Y; Kashimoto, K; Wada, T

    1993-12-01

    The difference of radiation dose reduction effect with spacers of different materials, a heat-curing denture base resin and a silicon impression material, was examined experimentally and clinically. Radium needles and iridium hairpins were used as radioactive sources. In both studies, it was revealed that a dose reduction effect of silicon impression material was greater than that of denture base resin. Silicon impression material was thought to be a better material for spacers because of its larger radiation dose reduction effect and the time saving to produce the spacer. PMID:8284088

  15. A computer simulation method for low-dose CT images by use of real high-dose images: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Takenaga, Tomomi; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Goto, Makoto; Hatemura, Masahiro; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Shiraishi, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Practical simulations of low-dose CT images have a possibility of being helpful means for optimization of the CT exposure dose. Because current methods reported by several researchers are limited to specific vendor platforms and generally rely on raw sinogram data that are difficult to access, we have developed a new computerized scheme for producing simulated low-dose CT images from real high-dose images without use of raw sinogram data or of a particular phantom. Our computerized scheme for low-dose CT simulation was based on the addition of a simulated noise image to a real high-dose CT image reconstructed by the filtered back-projection algorithm. First, a sinogram was generated from the forward projection of a high-dose CT image. Then, an additional noise sinogram resulting from use of a reduced exposure dose was estimated from a predetermined noise model. Finally, a noise CT image was reconstructed with a predetermined filter and was added to the real high-dose CT image to create a simulated low-dose CT image. The noise power spectrum and modulation transfer function of the simulated low-dose images were very close to those of the real low-dose images. In order to confirm the feasibility of our method, we applied this method to clinical cases which were examined with the high dose initially and then followed with a low-dose CT. In conclusion, our proposed method could simulate the low-dose CT images from their real high-dose images with sufficient accuracy and could be used for determining the optimal dose setting for various clinical CT examinations. PMID:26290269

  16. Rationale and study design of the Adaptive study of IL-2 dose on regulatory T cells in type 1 diabetes (DILT1D): a non-randomised, open label, adaptive dose finding trial

    PubMed Central

    Waldron-Lynch, Frank; Kareclas, Paula; Irons, Kathryn; Walker, Neil M; Mander, Adrian; Wicker, Linda S; Todd, John A; Bond, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction CD4 T regulatory cells (Tregs) are crucial for the maintenance of self-tolerance and are deficient in many common autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes (T1D). Interleukin 2 (IL-2) plays a major role in the activation and function of Tregs and treatment with ultra-low dose (ULD) IL-2 could increase Treg function to potentially halt disease progression in T1D. However, prior to embarking on large phase II/III clinical trials it is critical to develop new strategies for determining the mechanism of action of ULD IL-2 in participants with T1D. In this mechanistic study we will combine a novel trial design with a clinical grade Treg assay to identify the best doses of ULD IL-2 to induce targeted increases in Tregs. Method and analysis Adaptive study of IL-2 dose on regulatory T cells in type 1 diabetes (DILT1D) is a single centre non-randomised, single dose, open label, adaptive dose-finding trial. The primary objective of DILT1D is to identify the best doses of IL-2 to achieve a minimal or maximal Treg increase in participants with T1D (N=40). The design has an initial learning phase where pairs of participants are assigned to five preassigned doses followed by an interim analysis to determine the two Treg targets for the reminder of the trial. This will then be followed by an adaptive phase which is fully sequential with an interim analysis after each participant is observed to determine the choice of dose based on the optimality criterion to minimise the determinant of covariance of the estimated target doses. A dose determining committee will review all data available at the interim(s) and then provide decisions regarding the choice of dose to administer to subsequent participants. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval for the study was granted on 18 February 2013. Results The results of this study will be reported through peer-reviewed journals, conference presentations and an internal organisational report. Trial registration numbers NCT

  17. Electron dose distributions caused by the contact-type metallic eye shield: Studies using Monte Carlo and pencil beam algorithms.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Hwang, Taejin; Park, Soah; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Han, Tae Jin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Me-Yeon; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Bae, Hoonsik

    2015-01-01

    A metallic contact eye shield has sometimes been used for eyelid treatment, but dose distribution has never been reported for a patient case. This study aimed to show the shield-incorporated CT-based dose distribution using the Pinnacle system and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for 3 patient cases. For the artifact-free CT scan, an acrylic shield machined as the same size as that of the tungsten shield was used. For the MC calculation, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc were used for the 6-MeV electron beam of the Varian 21EX, in which information for the tungsten, stainless steel, and aluminum material for the eye shield was used. The same plan was generated on the Pinnacle system and both were compared. The use of the acrylic shield produced clear CT images, enabling delineation of the regions of interest, and yielded CT-based dose calculation for the metallic shield. Both the MC and the Pinnacle systems showed a similar dose distribution downstream of the eye shield, reflecting the blocking effect of the metallic eye shield. The major difference between the MC and the Pinnacle results was the target eyelid dose upstream of the shield such that the Pinnacle system underestimated the dose by 19 to 28% and 11 to 18% for the maximum and the mean doses, respectively. The pattern of dose difference between the MC and the Pinnacle systems was similar to that in the previous phantom study. In conclusion, the metallic eye shield was successfully incorporated into the CT-based planning, and the accurate dose calculation requires MC simulation. PMID:25724475

  18. Electron dose distributions caused by the contact-type metallic eye shield: Studies using Monte Carlo and pencil beam algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Hwang, Taejin; Park, Soah; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Jin Han, Tae; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Me-Yeon; Ju Kim, Kyoung Bae, Hoonsik

    2015-10-01

    A metallic contact eye shield has sometimes been used for eyelid treatment, but dose distribution has never been reported for a patient case. This study aimed to show the shield-incorporated CT-based dose distribution using the Pinnacle system and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for 3 patient cases. For the artifact-free CT scan, an acrylic shield machined as the same size as that of the tungsten shield was used. For the MC calculation, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc were used for the 6-MeV electron beam of the Varian 21EX, in which information for the tungsten, stainless steel, and aluminum material for the eye shield was used. The same plan was generated on the Pinnacle system and both were compared. The use of the acrylic shield produced clear CT images, enabling delineation of the regions of interest, and yielded CT-based dose calculation for the metallic shield. Both the MC and the Pinnacle systems showed a similar dose distribution downstream of the eye shield, reflecting the blocking effect of the metallic eye shield. The major difference between the MC and the Pinnacle results was the target eyelid dose upstream of the shield such that the Pinnacle system underestimated the dose by 19 to 28% and 11 to 18% for the maximum and the mean doses, respectively. The pattern of dose difference between the MC and the Pinnacle systems was similar to that in the previous phantom study. In conclusion, the metallic eye shield was successfully incorporated into the CT-based planning, and the accurate dose calculation requires MC simulation.

  19. Results of the Phase I Dose-Escalating Study of Motexafin Gadolinium With Standard Radiotherapy in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Judith M. Seiferheld, Wendy; Alger, Jeffrey R.; Wu, Genevieve; Endicott, Thyra J.; Mehta, Minesh; Curran, Walter; Phan, See-Chun

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is a putative radiation enhancer initially evaluated in patients with brain metastases. This Phase I trial studied the safety and tolerability of a 2-6-week course (10-22 doses) of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: A total of 33 glioblastoma multiforme patients received one of seven MGd regimens starting at 10 doses of 4 mg/kg/d MGd and escalating to 22 doses of 5.3 mg/kg/d MGd (5 or 10 daily doses then three times per week). The National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program toxicity and stopping rules were applied. Results: The maximal tolerated dose was 5.0 mg/kg/d MGd (5 d/wk for 2 weeks, then three times per week) for 22 doses. The dose-limiting toxicity was reversible transaminase elevation. Adverse reactions included rash/pruritus (45%), chills/fever (30%), and self-limiting vesiculobullous rash of the thumb and fingers (42%). The median survival of 17.6 months prompted a case-matched analysis. In the case-matched analysis, the MGd patients had a median survival of 16.1 months (n = 31) compared with the matched Radiation Therapy Oncology Group database patients with a median survival of 11.8 months (hazard ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.94). Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme in this study was 5 mg/kg/d for 22 doses (daily for 2 weeks, then three times weekly). The baseline survival calculations suggest progression to Phase II trials is appropriate, with the addition of MGd to radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide.

  20. Neutrophil-guided dosing of anthracycline-cyclophosphamide-containing chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Drooger, Jan C; van Pelt-Sprangers, Johanna M; Leunis, Corry; Jager, Agnes; de Jongh, Felix E

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether neutrophil-guided dose escalation of anthracycline-cyclophosphamide-containing chemotherapy (ACC) for breast cancer is feasible, in order to optimize outcome. Breast cancer patients planned for 3-weekly ACC were enrolled in this study. The first treatment cycle was administered in a standard BSA-adjusted dose. The absolute neutrophil count was measured at baseline and at day 8, 11 and 15 after administration of ACC. For patients with none or mild (CTC grade 0-2) neutropenia and no other dose-limiting toxicity, we performed a 10-25 % dose escalation of the second cycle with the opportunity to a further 10-25 % dose escalation of the third cycle. Thirty patients were treated in the adjuvant setting with either FE100C (n = 23) or AC (n = 4), or in the palliative setting with FAC (n = 3). Two out of 23 patients (9 %) treated with FEC did not develop grade 3-4 neutropenia after the first treatment cycle. Dose escalation was performed in these two patients (30 % in one and 15 % in the other patient). During dose escalation, there were no complications like febrile neutropenia. No patients treated with FAC or AC could be escalated, since all of them developed grade 3-4 neutropenia. We conclude that asymptomatic grade 3-4 neutropenia is likely to be achieved in the majority of patients with breast cancer treated with ACC according to presently advocated BSA-based dose levels. Escalation of currently advocated ACC doses without G-CSF, with a target of grade 3-4 neutropenia, is feasible, but only possible in a small proportion of patients. EudraCT 2010-020309-33. PMID:25772511

  1. Strengths and limitations of using repeat-dose toxicity studies to predict effects on fertility.

    PubMed

    Dent, M P

    2007-08-01

    The upcoming European chemicals legislation REACH (Registration, Evaluation, and Authorisation of Chemicals) will require the risk assessment of many thousands of chemicals. It is therefore necessary to develop intelligent testing strategies to ensure that chemicals of concern are identified whilst minimising the testing of chemicals using animals. Xenobiotics may perturb the reproductive cycle, and for this reason several reproductive studies are recommended under REACH. One of the endpoints assessed in this battery of tests is mating performance and fertility. Animal tests that address this endpoint use a relatively large number of animals and are also costly in terms of resource, time, and money. If it can be shown that data from non-reproductive studies such as in-vitro or repeat-dose toxicity tests are capable of generating reliable alerts for effects on fertility then some animal testing may be avoided. Available rat sub-chronic and fertility data for 44 chemicals that have been classified by the European Union as toxic to fertility were therefore analysed for concordance of effects. Because it was considered appropriate to read across data for some chemicals these data sets were considered relevant for 73 of the 102 chemicals currently classified as toxic to reproduction (fertility) under this system. For all but 5 of these chemicals it was considered that a well-performed sub-chronic toxicity study would have detected pathology in the male, and in some cases, the female reproductive tract. Three showed evidence of direct interaction with oestrogen or androgen receptors (linuron, nonylphenol, and fenarimol). The remaining chemicals (quinomethionate and azafenidin) act by modes of action that do not require direct interaction with steroid receptors. However, both these materials caused in-utero deaths in pre-natal developmental toxicity studies, and the relatively low NOAELs and the nature of the hazard identified in the sub-chronic tests provides an alert

  2. Microsatellite allele dose and configuration establishment (MADCE): an integrated approach for genetic studies in allopolyploids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic studies in allopolyploid plants are challenging because of the presence of similar sub-genomes, which leads to multiple alleles and complex segregation ratios. In this study, we describe a novel method for establishing the exact dose and configuration of microsatellite alleles for any accession of an allopolyploid plant species. The method, named Microsatellite Allele Dose and Configuration Establishment (MADCE), can be applied to mapping populations and pedigreed (breeding) germplasm in allopolyploids. Results Two case studies are presented to demonstrate the power and robustness of the MADCE method. In the mapping case, five microsatellites were analysed. These microsatellites amplified 35 different alleles based on size. Using MADCE, we uncovered 30 highly informative segregating alleles. A conventional approach would have yielded only 19 fully informative and six partially informative alleles. Of the ten alleles that were present in all progeny (and thereby ignored or considered homozygous when using conventional approaches), six were found to segregate by dosage when analysed with MADCE. Moreover, the full allelic configuration of the mapping parents could be established, including null alleles, homozygous loci, and alleles that were present on multiple homoeologues. In the second case, 21 pedigreed cultivars were analysed using MADCE, resulting in the establishment of the full allelic configuration for all 21 cultivars and a tracing of allele flow over multiple generations. Conclusions The procedure described in this study (MADCE) enhances the efficiency and information content of mapping studies in allopolyploids. More importantly, it is the first technique to allow the determination of the full allelic configuration in pedigreed breeding germplasm from allopolyploid plants. This enables pedigree-based marker-trait association studies the use of algorithms developed for diploid crops, and it may increase the effectiveness of LD

  3. Treatment of tattoos by Q-switched ruby laser. A dose-response study

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.R.; Gange, R.W.; Dover, J.S.; Flotte, T.J.; Gonzalez, E.; Michaud, N.; Anderson, R.R. )

    1990-07-01

    Tattoo treatment with Q-switched ruby laser pulses (694 nm, 40 to 80 nanoseconds) was studied by clinical assessment and light and electron microscopy. Fifty-seven blue-black tattoos or portions thereof (35 amateur and 22 professional) were irradiated with 1.5 to 8.0 J/cm2 at a mean interval of 3 weeks. Substantial lightening or total clearing occurred in 18 (78%) of 23 amateur tattoos and 3 (23%) of 13 professional tattoos in which the protocol was completed. Response was related to exposure dose. Scarring occurred in one case, and persistent confettilike hypopigmentation was frequent. Optimal fluence was 4 to 8 J/cm2. Clinicohistologic correlation was poor. Q-switched ruby laser pulses can provide an effective treatment for tattoos.

  4. Lymphoid cell kinetics under continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation: A comparison study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanism of cell proliferation is studied in the lymphoid tissue of the mouse spleen under the stress of continuous irradiation at a dose-rate of 10 roentgens per day for 105 days. Autoradiography and specific labeling with tritiated thymidine were utilized. It was found that at least four compensatory mechanisms maintained a near-steady state of cellular growth: (1) an increase in the proportion of PAS-positive cells which stimulate mitotic activity, (2) maturation arrest of proliferating and differentiating cells which tend to replenish the cells damaged or destroyed by irradiation, (3) an increase in the proportion of cells proliferating, and (4) an increase in the proportion of precursor cells. The results are compared to previous findings observed in the thymus.

  5. Severity of killer whale behavioral responses to ship noise: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Rob; Erbe, Christine; Ashe, Erin; Beerman, Amber; Smith, Jodi

    2014-02-15

    Critical habitats of at-risk populations of northeast Pacific "resident" killer whales can be heavily trafficked by large ships, with transits occurring on average once every hour in busy shipping lanes. We modeled behavioral responses of killer whales to ship transits during 35 "natural experiments" as a dose-response function of estimated received noise levels in both broadband and audiogram-weighted terms. Interpreting effects is contingent on a subjective and seemingly arbitrary decision about severity threshold indicating a response. Subtle responses were observed around broadband received levels of 130 dB re 1 μPa (rms); more severe responses are hypothesized to occur at received levels beyond 150 dB re 1 μPa, where our study lacked data. Avoidance responses are expected to carry minor energetic costs in terms of increased energy expenditure, but future research must assess the potential for reduced prey acquisition, and potential population consequences, under these noise levels. PMID:24373666

  6. Commercial production and distribution of fresh fruits and vegetables: A scoping study on the importance of produce pathways to dose

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, T.L.; Anderson, D.M.; Farris, W.T.; Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1992-09-01

    This letter report summarizes a scoping study that examined the potential importance of fresh fruit and vegetable pathways to dose. A simple production index was constructed with data collected from the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA), the United States Bureau of the Census, and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project staff from Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, in cooperation with members of the Technical Steering Panel (TSP), selected lettuce and spinach as the produce pathways most likely to impact dose. County agricultural reports published in 1956 provided historical descriptions of the predominant distribution patterns of fresh lettuce and spinach from production regions to local population centers. Pathway rankings and screening dose estimates were calculated for specific populations living in selected locations within the HEDR study area.

  7. Low Dose Studies with Focused X-Rays in cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kathy Held; Kevin Prise; Barry Michael; Melvyn Folkard

    2002-12-14

    The management of the risks of exposure of people to ionizing radiation is important in relation to its uses in industry and medicine, also to natural and man-made radiation in the environment. The vase majority of exposures are at a very low level of radiation dose. The risks are of inducing cancer in the exposed individuals and a smaller risk of inducing genetic damage that can be indicate that they are low. As a result, the risks are impossible to detect in population studies with any accuracy above the normal levels of cancer and genetic defects unless the dose levels are high. In practice, this means that our knowledge depends very largely on the information gained from the follow-up of the survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Japanese cities. The risks calculated from these high-dose short-duration exposures then have to be projected down to the low-dose long-term exposures that apply generally. Recent research using cells in culture has revealed that the relationship between high- and low-dose biological damage may be much more complex than had previously been thought. The aims of this and other projects in the DOE's Low-Dose Program are to gain an understanding of the biological actions of low-dose radiation, ultimately to provide information that will lead to more accurate quantification of low-dose risk. Our project is based on the concept that the processes by which radiation induces cancer start where the individual tracks of radiation impact on cells and tissues. At the dose levels of most low-dose exposures, these events are rare and any individual cells only ''sees'' radiation tracks at intervals averaging from weeks to years apart. This contrasts with the atomic bomb exposures where, on average, each cell was hit by hundreds of tracks instantaneously. We have therefore developed microbeam techniques that enable us to target cells in culture with any numbers of tracks, from one upwards. This approach enables us to study the biological ha sis of

  8. A Phase 2 Randomized Dose-Finding Study With Esmirtazapine in Patients With Primary Insomnia.

    PubMed

    Ruwe, Frank; IJzerman-Boon, Pieta; Roth, Thomas; Zammit, Gary; Ivgy-May, Neely

    2016-10-01

    The antidepressant mirtazapine is an alternative to classical hypnotics, and this study investigated the efficacy and safety of esmirtazapine (Org 50081, the maleic acid salt of S-mirtazapine) in patients given a diagnosis of primary insomnia after acute (2-day) treatment. Patients aged 18 to 65 years with primary insomnia were randomized to receive placebo or 1.5-, 3.0-, or 4.5-mg esmirtazapine in a balanced 4-way crossover study; 2 sleep laboratory nights with polysomnography were separated by 5-day, single-blind placebo washout periods. Polysomnography-determined total sleep time (primary end point) and patient-reported total sleep time improved by at least 25 minutes with all 3 doses of esmirtazapine (P ≤ 0.001 vs placebo). Polysomnography-measured wake time after sleep onset (P ≤ 0.0001) and latency to persistent sleep also improved vs placebo (P ≤ 0.01, 3.0 and 4.5 mg). Patient-reported sleep quality improved with 3.0- and 4.5-mg esmirtazapine (P ≤ 0.01 and P ≤ 0.05, respectively, vs placebo). Morning alertness and contentment were not altered after esmirtazapine, and calmness increased with 4.5-mg esmirtazapine vs placebo. Evening questionnaires showed no difference in duration of daytime naps but reduced energy and ability to work/function after esmirtazapine treatment periods vs placebo (P < 0.05), although this effect was limited to the first night of each 2-night period. There were few adverse events, no serious adverse events, or clinically relevant treatment differences in vital signs, laboratory values, or electrocardiogram. Esmirtazapine doses of 1.5 to 4.5 mg/day significantly improved quantity and quality of sleep and were generally well tolerated, with no evidence of safety concerns or consistent pattern of residual effects. PMID:27482970

  9. A computational dosimetry tool for the study of tumor doses and skin toxicities in BNCT.

    PubMed

    Gossio, Sebastián; Carando, Daniel G; González, Sara J

    2009-07-01

    A Matlab-based computational tool, named SPHERE, was developed that helps determining tumor and skin doses in BNCT treatments. It was especially designed for cutaneous melanoma treatments and, among its features, it provides a guide for the location and delineation of tumors and a visual representation of superficial dose distributions (for both tumor and normal tissues). It also generates cumulative dose-volume histograms for different volumes of interest and dose-area histograms for skin. A description of the tool is presented, as well as examples of its application. PMID:19386508

  10. Study of the effect of dose-rate on radiation-induced damage to human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokosz, Anita; Koziczak, Renata; Gonciarz, Marta; Szweda-Lewandowska, Zofia

    2006-01-01

    Human erythrocytes suspended in an isotonic Na-phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 (hematocrit of 2%) were irradiated with γ-rays at three dose-rates of 66.7, 36.7, 25 Gy min -1 in order to investigate the influence of the dose-rate on radiation-induced membrane damage, hemoglobin oxidation and loss of reduced glutathione. The obtained results showed that such processes as erythrocyte hemolysis, lipid and protein destruction depend on the radiation dose-rate. The parameter values describing these processes showed an inverse dose-rate effect.

  11. No protection by oral terbutaline against exercise-induced asthma in children: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Fuglsang, G; Hertz, B; Holm, E B

    1993-04-01

    We wanted to assess the protective effects on exercise-induced asthma as well as the clinical efficacy and safety of increasing doses of a new sustained-release formulation of terbutaline sulphate, in 17 asthmatic children aged 6-12 yrs (mean 9 yrs). Placebo, 2, 4 and 6 mg terbutaline were given b.i.d. for 14 days, in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. At the end of each two week period, an exercise test was performed and plasma terbutaline was measured. Compared with placebo, no significant effect was seen on asthma symptoms monitored at home, or on exercise-induced asthma. The percentage falls in FEV1 after the exercise test were 36, 35, 27 and 28%, after placebo, 4, 8 and 12 mg terbutaline.day-1, respectively. There was no correlation between plasma terbutaline and dose of terbutaline. A small but statistically significant dose-related increase in morning and evening peak expiratory flow (PEF) recordings occurred, but the incidence of side-effects also increased with the dose given. There was a trend towards more side-effects when the high doses were used, and two patients withdrew from the study because of side-effects at this dose. It is concluded that continuous treatment, even with high doses of oral terbutaline, does not offer clinically useful protection against exercise-induced asthma. PMID:8491302

  12. Increased Computed Tomography Dose Due to Miscentering With Use of Automated Tube Voltage Selection: Phantom and Patient Study.

    PubMed

    Filev, Peter D; Mittal, Pardeep K; Tang, Xiangyang; Duong, Phuong-Anh; Wang, Xiaojing; Small, William C; Applegate, Kimberly; Moreno, Courtney C

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to determine if miscentering affected dose with use of automated tube voltage selection software. An anthropomorphic phantom was imaged at different table heights (centered in the computed tomography [CT] gantry, and -6, -3, +3, and +5.7cm relative to the centered position). Topogram magnification, tube voltage selection, and dose were assessed. Effect of table height on dose also was assessed retrospectively in human subjects (n = 50). When the CT table was positioned closer to the x-ray source, subjects appeared up to 33% magnified in topogram images. When subjects appeared magnified in topogram images, automated software selected higher tube potentials and tube currents that were based on the magnified size of the subject rather than the subject׳s true size. Table height strongly correlated with CT dose index (r = 0.98, P < 0.05) and dose length product (r = 0.98, P < 0.05) in the phantom study. Transverse dimension in the topogram highly correlated with dose in human subjects (r = 0.75-0.87, P <0.05). Miscentering results in increased dose due to topogram magnification with automated voltage selection software. PMID:26810714

  13. Dose-response studies on the spermatogonial stem cells of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) after X irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    van Alphen, M.M.; van de Kant, H.J.; Davids, J.A.; Warmer, C.J.; Bootsma, A.L.; de Rooij, D.G. )

    1989-09-01

    Studies of the dose response of the spermatogonial stem cells in the rhesus monkey were performed at intervals of 130 and 160 days after graded doses of X irradiation. The D0 of the spermatogonial stem cells was established using the total numbers of the type A spermatogonia that were present at 130 and 160 days after irradiation and was found to be 1.07 Gy; the 95% confidence interval was 0.90-1.34 Gy.

  14. Predicting the risk of pre-eclampsia between 11 and 13 weeks gestation by combining maternal characteristics and serum analytes, PAPP-A and free β-hCG

    PubMed Central

    GOETZINGER, Katherine R.; SINGLA, Ashima; GERKOWICZ, Sabrina; DICKE, Jeffrey M.; GRAY, Diana L.; ODIBO, Anthony O.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine if a simplified model for predicting pre-eclampsia can be developed by combining first trimester serum analytes, PAPP-A and free β-hCG, and maternal characteristics. Methods A retrospective cohort study of patients seen for first-trimester aneuploidy screening from 2003–2009. The 5th, 10th, 90th and 95th percentiles for the analyte-MoMs for our population were determined and evaluated for association with pre-eclampsia. Univariate and backward stepwise logistic regression analyses were performed and the area under the ROC curves (AUC) used to determine the best models for predicting pre-eclampsia. Results Among 4,020 women meeting the inclusion criteria, outcome data was available for 3,716 (93%). There were 293 cases of pre-eclampsia. The final model identified a history of pre-gestational diabetes (aOR 2.6, 95% CI 1.7–3.9), chronic hypertension (aOR 2.6, 95% CI 1.7–3.9), maternal BMI >25 (aOR 2.5, 95% CI 1.9–3.4), African American race (aOR 1.8, 95% CI 1.3–2.6), and PAPP-A MoM <10th percentile (aOR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.4) to be significant predictors of pre-eclampsia. (AUC= 0.70, 95% CI 0.65–0.72) Conclusion Low first-trimester PAPP-A levels are associated with the development of pre-eclampsia; however, the model was only modestly efficient in its predictive ability. PMID:20936638

  15. Benchmark Dose Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Finite doses are employed in experimental toxicology studies. Under the traditional methodology, the point of departure (POD) value for low dose extrapolation is identified as one of these doses. Dose spacing necessarily precludes a more accurate description of the POD value. ...

  16. Low Dose Studies with Focused X-rays in Cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Barry D. Michael; Kathryn Held; Kevin Prise

    2002-12-19

    The management of the risks of exposure of people to ionizing radiation is important in relation to its uses in industry and medicine, also to natural and man-made radiation in the environment. The vase majority of exposures are at a very low level of radiation dose. The risks are of inducing cancer in the exposed individuals and a smaller risk of inducing genetic damage that can be transmitted to children conceived after exposure. Studies of these risks in exposed population studies with any accuracy above the normal levels of cancer and genetic defects unless the dose levels are high. In practice, this means that our knowledge depends very largely on the information gained from the follow-up of the survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Japanese cities. The risks calculated from these high-dose short-duration exposures then have to be projected down to the low-dose long-term exposures that apply generally. Recent research using cells in culture has revealed that the relations hi between high- and low-dose biological damage may be much more complex than had previously been thought. The aims of this and other projects in the DOE's Low-Dose Program are to gain an understanding of the biological actions of low-dose radiation, ultimately to provide information that will lead to more accurate quantification of low-dose risk. Our project is based on the concept that the processes by which radiation induces cancer start where the individual tracks of radiation impact on cells and tissues. At the dose levels of most low-dose exposures, these events are rare and any individual cells only ''sees'' radiation tracks at intervals averaging from weeks to years apart. This contracts with the atomic bomb exposures where, on average, each cell was hit by hundreds of tracks instantaneously. We have therefore developed microbeam techniques that enable us to target cells in culture with any number of tracks, from one upwards. This approach enables us to study the biological basis

  17. Early initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy in the management of septic shock: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The use of low-dose steroid therapy in the management of septic shock has been extensively studied. However, the association between the timing of low-dose steroid therapy and the outcome has not been evaluated. Therefore, we evaluated whether early initiation of low-dose steroid therapy is associated with mortality in patients with septic shock. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 178 patients who received low-dose corticosteroid therapy for septic shock between January 2008 and December 2009. Time-dependent Cox regression models were used to adjust for potential confounding factors in the association between the time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy and in-hospital mortality. Results The study population consisted of 107 men and 71 women with a median age of 66 (interquartile range, 54 to 71) years. The 28-day mortality was 44% and low-dose corticosteroid therapy was initiated within a median of 8.5 (3.8 to 19.1) hours after onset of septic shock-related hypotension. Median time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy was significantly shorter in survivors than in non-survivors (6.5 hours versus 10.4 hours; P = 0.0135). The mortality rates increased significantly with increasing quintiles of time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy (P = 0.0107 for trend). Other factors associated with 28-day mortality were higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) 3 (P < 0.0001) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores (P = 0.0007), dose of vasopressor at the time of initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy (P < 0.0001), need for mechanical ventilation (P = 0.0001) and renal replacement therapy (P < 0.0001), while the impaired adrenal reserve did not affect 28-day mortality (81% versus 82%; P = 0.8679). After adjusting for potential confounding factors, the time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy was still significantly associated with 28-day mortality (adjusted odds

  18. Response to low-dose intrathecal clonidine in septuagenarians undergoing sub-umbilical surgeries: A study

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Jayashree; Sen, Bitan

    2015-01-01

    Clonidine, an alpha-2-adrenergic agonist, may have a clinically relevant analgesic action but also a hypotensive action, when administered spinally. Aim: To evaluate the analgesic and circulatory effects of low-dose intrathecal clonidine co-administered with hyperbaric bupivacaine in septuagenarian patients undergoing sub-umbilical surgeries. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 patients within the age group of 70-80 years of either sex, enrolled in this study, were randomly divided into groups of 10 each. Group I received clonidine 7.5 μg as an adjuvant to 15 mg of hyperbaric bupivacaine and Group II (control group) received 15 mg of bupivacaine with saline to make volume in the two solutions equal. Result: The level of subarachnoid block was comparable in the two groups. Duration of motor blockade was longer in the clonidine group (221.4 ± 35.92 min) compared with the control group (112.3 ± 12.45 min). Request for 1st dose of analgesic was earlier in the control group (135.5 ± 28.52 min) than the clonidine group (295 ± 18.85 min). Mean arterial pressure (clonidine 77.67 ± 6.47 vs. control 93.87 ± 3.03, P = 0.0002) and heart rate (clonidine 65.2 ± 5.20 vs. control 77.4 ± 6.06, P = 0.003) were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the clonidine group compared with the control group from 20 mins after the block to the end of 3 h. In the clonidine group, 3 patients had postoperative headache, 4 had intra-operative shivering. 2 patients in the clonidine group also developed hypotension and 1 bradycardia and 1 of them developed bradyapnea along with acute hypotension 5 min after shifting to the postoperative ward and later recovered on resuscitation. In the control group 2 patients had bradycardia, 6 had intra-operative shivering and 3 had postoperative headache. Conclusion: We conclude that addition of clonidine in the dose of 7.5 μg to bupivacaine significantly increases the duration of spinal analgesia with clinically insignificant influence on hemodynamic

  19. A tolerance study of single and multiple dosing of the selective dopamine uptake inhibitor GBR 12909 in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Søgaard, U; Michalow, J; Butler, B; Lund Laursen, A; Ingersen, S H; Skrumsager, B K; Rafaelsen, O J

    1990-10-01

    GBR 12909 selectively blocks dopamine uptake and its biochemical and pharmacological profiles suggest that it may possess antidepressant activity and be of value in treatment of Parkinson's disease. The tolerance, pharmacokinetics and influence on psychomotor performance of GBR 12909 were investigated in a randomized placebo-controlled double-blind study. Four healthy subjects were administered oral single doses of 100, 200 and 300 mg GBR 12909 and placebo, and four other healthy subjects received, 50, 100 and 150 mg GBR 12909 and placebo once daily for 7 days. The intermediate and highest doses resulted in mild to moderate side-effects such as difficulties in concentrating, asthenia, feeling of drug influence and palpitations. No changes were observed in haematological and clinico-chemical parameters. A dose-related effect on ECG was observed with a slight reduction of the T-wave amplitude. No signs of arrhythmia or decompensation during exercise until exhaustion were observed. Psychomotor performance indicated dose-related sedation in the single-dose study. Only minor deviations from first order kinetics were observed. Elimination half-life was estimated at 1-2 days. Steady-state serum concentrations of GBR 12909 appeared to be attained within 1 week. Based on the results of this study, the estimated therapeutic doses are expected to be well-tolerated in patients. PMID:2150527

  20. A Monte Carlo study on the effect of the orbital bone to the radiation dose delivered to the eye lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratis, Andreas; Zhang, Guozhi; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Bogaerts, Ria; Bosmans, Hilde

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of backscatter radiation from the orbital bone and the intraorbital fat on the eye lens dose in the dental CBCT energy range. To this end we conducted three different yet interrelated studies; A preliminary simulation study was conducted to examine the impact of a bony layer situated underneath a soft tissue layer on the amount of backscatter radiation. We compared the Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curves in soft tissue with and without the bone layer and we estimated the depth in tissue where the decrease in backscatter caused by the presence of the bone is noticeable. In a supplementary study, an eye voxel phantom was designed with the DOSxyznrc code. Simulations were performed exposing the phantom at different x-ray energies sequentially in air, in fat tissue and in realistic anatomy with the incident beam perpendicular to the phantom. Finally, a virtual head phantom was implemented into a validated hybrid Monte Carlo (MC) framework to simulate a large Field of View protocol of a real CBCT scanner and examine the influence of scattered dose to the eye lens during the whole rotation of the paired tube-detector system. The results indicated an increase in the dose to the lens due to the fatty tissue in the surrounding anatomy. There is a noticeable dose reduction close to the bone-tissue interface which weakens with increasing distance from the interface, such that the impact of the orbital bone in the eye lens dose becomes small.

  1. Toward IMRT 2D dose modeling using artificial neural networks: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantzis, Georgios; Vasquez-Quino, Luis A.; Zalman, Travis; Pratx, Guillem; Lei, Yu

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of artificial neural networks (ANN) to reconstruct dose maps for intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) fields compared with those of the treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: An artificial feed forward neural network and the back-propagation learning algorithm have been used to replicate dose calculations of IMRT fields obtained from PINNACLE{sup 3} v9.0. The ANN was trained with fluence and dose maps of IMRT fields for 6 MV x-rays, which were obtained from the amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging device of Novalis TX. Those fluence distributions were imported to the TPS and the dose maps were calculated on the horizontal midpoint plane of a water equivalent homogeneous cylindrical virtual phantom. Each exported 2D dose distribution from the TPS was classified into two clusters of high and low dose regions, respectively, based on the K-means algorithm and the Euclidian metric in the fluence-dose domain. The data of each cluster were divided into two sets for the training and validation phase of the ANN, respectively. After the completion of the ANN training phase, 2D dose maps were reconstructed by the ANN and isodose distributions were created. The dose maps reconstructed by ANN were evaluated and compared with the TPS, where the mean absolute deviation of the dose and the {gamma}-index were used. Results: A good agreement between the doses calculated from the TPS and the trained ANN was achieved. In particular, an average relative dosimetric difference of 4.6% and an average {gamma}-index passing rate of 93% were obtained for low dose regions, and a dosimetric difference of 2.3% and an average {gamma}-index passing rate of 97% for high dose region. Conclusions: An artificial neural network has been developed to convert fluence maps to corresponding dose maps. The feasibility and potential of an artificial neural network to replicate complex convolution kernels in the TPS for IMRT dose calculations

  2. Feasibility study of patient-specific quality assurance system for high-dose-rate brachytherapy in patients with cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Boram; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Hyeyoung; Han, Youngyih; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Jin Sung; Kim, Dong Wook; Sim, Jina; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted for the purpose of establishing a quality-assurance (QA) system for brachytherapy that can ensure patient-specific QA by enhancing dosimetric accuracy for the patient's therapy plan. To measure the point-absorbed dose and the 2D dose distribution for the patient's therapy plan, we fabricated a solid phantom that allowed for the insertion of an applicator for patient-specific QA and used an ion chamber and a film as measuring devices. The patient treatment plan was exported to the QA dose-calculation software, which calculated the time weight of dwell position stored in the plan DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) file to obtain an overall beam quality correction factor, and that correction was applied to the dose calculations. Experiments were conducted after importing the patient's treatment planning source data for the fabricated phantom and inserting the applicator, ion chamber, and film into the phantom. On completion of dose delivery, the doses to the ion chamber and film were checked against the corresponding treatment plan to evaluate the dosimetric accuracy. For experimental purposes, five treatment plans were randomly selected. The beam quality correction factors for ovoid and tandem brachytherapy applicators were found to be 1.15 and 1.10 - 1.12, respectively. The beam quality correction factor in tandem fluctuated by approximately 2%, depending on the changes in the dwell position. The doses measured by using the ion chamber showed differences ranging from -2.4% to 0.6%, compared to the planned doses. As for the film, the passing rate was 90% or higher when assessed using a gamma value of the local dose difference of 3% and a distance to agreement of 3 mm. The results show that the self-fabricated phantom was suitable for QA in clinical settings. The proposed patient-specific QA for the treatment planning is expected to contribute to reduce dosimetric errors in brachytherapy and, thus, to enhancing treatment

  3. A simplified surfactant dosing procedure in respiratory distress syndrome: the "side-hole" randomized study. Spanish Surfactant Collaborative Group.

    PubMed

    Valls-i-Soler, A; López-Heredia, J; Fernández-Ruanova, M B; Gastiasoro, E

    1997-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of acute adverse events and long-term outcome of two different surfactant dosing procedures in respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). The effects of two surfactant dosing procedures on the incidence of transient hypoxia and bradycardia, gas exchange, ventilatory requirements and 28 d outcome were compared. The patients, comprising 102 infants (birthweight 600-2000 g) with RDS on mechanical ventilation with FiO2 > or = 0.4, were randomized at 2-24 h to receive 200 mg kg(-1) of Curosurf; in 56 it was given by bolus delivery, and in 55 by a simplified technique (dose given in 1 min via a catheter introduced through a side-hole in the tracheal tube adaptor. The baby's position was not changed and ventilation was not interrupted). Two additional surfactant doses (100 mg kg(-1)) were also given, by the same method, if ventilation with FiO2 > or = 0.3 was needed 12 and 24 h after the initial dose. The number of episodes of hypoxia and/or bradycardia was similar in both groups. A slight and transient increase in PaCO2 was observed in the side-hole group. The efficacy of the surfactant, based on oxygenation improvement, ventilator requirements, number of doses required and incidence of air leaks, was similar. No differences were observed in the incidence of intraventricular haemorrhage, patent ductus arteriosus, bronchopulmonary dysplasia or survival. In conclusion, a simplified surfactant dosing procedure not requiring fractional doses, ventilator disconnection, changes in the baby's position or manual bagging was found to be as effective as bolus delivery. The number of dosing-related transient episodes of hypoxia and bradycardia was not decreased by the slow, 1 min, side-hole instillation procedure. PMID:9240884

  4. High-dose recombinant human erythropoietin for treatment of anemia in myelodysplastic syndromes and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Stebler, C; Tichelli, A; Dazzi, H; Gratwohl, A; Nissen, C; Speck, B

    1990-12-01

    In a dose escalation study we tested the feasibility and tolerance of high-dose recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEPO) therapy in four patients with ineffective erythropoiesis due to myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) or paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH). Recombinant human EPO was administered i.v. with an initial dose of 50 U/kg body weight (BW) three times per week. The dose was increased by steps of 25 or 50 U/kg bW with intervals of 1-4 weeks up to a maximum dose of 500 U/kg BW three times per week. All patients were treated as outpatients. Pre-study treatment with cyclosporin A and/or Danazol was continued in three patients. In one patient r-HuEPO was discontinued after 20 weeks because of relapse of severe aplastic anemia. No major side effects were observed even at the maximum dose. One patient with PNH showed an increase of hemoglobin from 89 to 139 g/liter that permitted monthly phlebotomies to reduce his iron overload. In one patient with MDS the reticulocyte count increased from 2.5 to 50 x 10(9)/liter, and the transfusion requirement decreased to 2 U every 3-4 weeks instead of every 2 weeks. Two patients did not complete the whole treatment period and showed no rise in reticulocyte count. We conclude that high dose r-HuEPO therapy is feasible in patients with anemia due to MDS or PNH. High-dose r-HuEPO appears to have some effect on anemia due to ineffective erythropoiesis in a subgroup of patients. Further studies are needed to identify potential responders and to define the optimal administration of r-HuEPO. PMID:2226680

  5. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in pediatric chest CT: a study in 30 patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P.

    2010-04-01

    Radiation-dose awareness and optimization in CT can greatly benefit from a dosereporting system that provides radiation dose and cancer risk estimates specific to each patient and each CT examination. Recently, we reported a method for estimating patientspecific dose from pediatric chest CT. The purpose of this study is to extend that effort to patient-specific risk estimation and to a population of pediatric CT patients. Our study included thirty pediatric CT patients (16 males and 14 females; 0-16 years old), for whom full-body computer models were recently created based on the patients' clinical CT data. Using a validated Monte Carlo program, organ dose received by the thirty patients from a chest scan protocol (LightSpeed VCT, 120 kVp, 1.375 pitch, 40-mm collimation, pediatric body scan field-of-view) was simulated and used to estimate patient-specific effective dose. Risks of cancer incidence were calculated for radiosensitive organs using gender-, age-, and tissue-specific risk coefficients and were used to derive patientspecific effective risk. The thirty patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-10.4 mSv/100 mAs and normalized effective risk of 0.5-5.8 cases/1000 exposed persons/100 mAs. Normalized lung dose and risk of lung cancer correlated strongly with average chest diameter (correlation coefficient: r = -0.98 to -0.99). Normalized effective risk also correlated strongly with average chest diameter (r = -0.97 to -0.98). These strong correlations can be used to estimate patient-specific dose and risk prior to or after an imaging study to potentially guide healthcare providers in justifying CT examinations and to guide individualized protocol design and optimization.

  6. Phase I dose-escalation and pharmacokinetic study of oral gefitinib and irinotecan in children with refractory solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, R. C.; Furman, W.; Mao, S.; Wu, J.; Turner, D. C.; Stewart, C. F.; Santana, V.; McGregor, L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This phase I study endeavored to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and describe the dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of oral irinotecan with gefitinib in children with refractory solid tumors. Methods Oral irinotecan was administered on days 1-5 and 8-12 with oral gefitinib (fixed dose, 150mg/m2/day) on days 1-12 of a 21-day course. The Escalation with Overdose Control (EWOC) method guided irinotecan dose escalation (7 dose levels, range 5mg/m2/day to 40mg/m2/day). Results Sixteen of 19 patients were evaluable, with serial pharmacokinetic studies in 10 patients. Diagnoses included osteosarcoma (N=5), neuroblastoma (N=3), sarcoma (N=3), and others (N=5). Patients received a median of two courses (range 1-20), with at least two patients treated on dose levels 2-7. Three patients had five DLTs; the most common being metabolic (hypokalemia, N=2 and hypophosphatemia, N=1) at dose levels two (10mg/m2) and four (20mg/m2). One patient experienced grade 3 diarrhea (40mg/m2). Irinotecan bioavailability was 2.5-fold higher when co-administered with gefitinib while the conversion rate of irinotecan to SN-38 lactone was unaffected. The study closed due to poor accrual before evaluation of the next recommended irinotecan dose level (35mg/m2). Of eleven patients receiving at least two courses of therapy, three had stable disease (SD) lasting two to four courses and one patient maintained a complete response through 18 courses. Conclusions The combination of oral gefitinib and irinotecan has acceptable toxicity and anti-tumor activity in pediatric patients with refractory solid tumors. Pharmacokinetic analysis confirms that co-administration of gefitinib increases irinotecan bioavailability leading to an increased SN-38 lactone systemic exposure. PMID:25257509

  7. The Asia-Pacific Flexible Dose Study of Dapoxetine and Patient Satisfaction in Premature Ejaculation Therapy: The PASSION Study

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Chris; Lee, Sung Won; Kim, Sae Woong; Moon, Du Geon; Kongkanand, Apichat; Tantiwongse, Kavirach

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dapoxetine is a short-acting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor for treatment of premature ejaculation (PE). Aim To evaluate the efficacy and safety of dapoxetine 30 and 60 mg as needed in Asia-Pacific men with PE. Methods The study was a prospective, 12-week, open-label study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of flexible-dose dapoxetine in men with PE diagnosed by a Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool score of at least 11, a self-estimated intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) no longer than 2 minutes, and an International Index of Erectile Function erectile function domain score of at least 21. Main Outcome Measures Percentage of subjects reporting their PE as at least “slightly better” using the Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGIC) question. Results Two hundred eighteen of 285 randomized subjects completed the study. The mean subject age was 45.9 years and 57.7% were Korean. Dosages 1 (30 mg), 2 (30 → 60 mg), and 3 (30 → 60 → 30 mg) were used in 141, 124, and 13 subjects, respectively. At study end, a PE CGIC rating of at least “slightly better” was reported by 77.3%, 92.8%, and 100% of subjects for dosages 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P = .49). At study end, a CGIC rating of “slightly better” was reported by 85.2% and 85.3% of subjects with lifelong PE and acquired PE, respectively (P = .50). At study end, a CGIC rating of “slightly better” was reported by 84.1% and 86.4% of subjects with an estimated baseline IELT no longer than and at least ≤1 minute, respectively (P = .16). The incidence of a CGIC rating of at least “slightly better” was lower in subjects reporting an adverse event of moderate or severe severity and in subjects who increased to and maintained a dapoxetine dose of 60 mg and higher in subjects older than 50 years and in subjects with a baseline estimated IELT of at least 1 minute. Conclusion In this study, flexible dosing of dapoxetine (30 and 60 mg) appeared effective in the

  8. A study of potential numerical pitfalls in GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnoux, Vincent; Ozell, Benoît; Bonenfant, Éric; Després, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of numerical errors caused by the floating point representation of real numbers in a GPU-based Monte Carlo code used for dose calculation in radiation oncology, and to identify situations where this type of error arises. The program used as a benchmark was bGPUMCD. Three tests were performed on the code, which was divided into three functional components: energy accumulation, particle tracking and physical interactions. First, the impact of single-precision calculations was assessed for each functional component. Second, a GPU-specific compilation option that reduces execution time as well as precision was examined. Third, a specific function used for tracking and potentially more sensitive to precision errors was tested by comparing it to a very high-precision implementation. Numerical errors were found in two components of the program. Because of the energy accumulation process, a few voxels surrounding a radiation source end up with a lower computed dose than they should. The tracking system contained a series of operations that abnormally amplify rounding errors in some situations. This resulted in some rare instances (less than 0.1%) of computed distances that are exceedingly far from what they should have been. Most errors detected had no significant effects on the result of a simulation due to its random nature, either because they cancel each other out or because they only affect a small fraction of particles. The results of this work can be extended to other types of GPU-based programs and be used as guidelines to avoid numerical errors on the GPU computing platform.

  9. Using Drosophila Larval Imaginal Discs to Study Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shian-Jang; Li, Willis X.

    2012-01-01

    Under genotoxic stress, activation of cell cycle checkpoint responses leads to cell cycle arrest, which allows cells to repair DNA damage before continuing to cycle. Drosophila larval epithelial sacs, called imaginal discs, are an excellent in vivo model system for studying radiation-induced cell cycle arrest. Larval imaginal discs go into cell cycle arrest after being subjected to low-dose irradiation, are subject to easy genetic manipulation, are not crucial for survival of the organism, and can be dissected easily for further molecular or cellular analysis. In this chapter, we describe methods for assessing low-dose irradiation-induced cell cycle arrest. Mitotic cells are identified by immunofluorescence staining for the mitotic marker phosphorylated histone H3 (phospho-histone H3 or pH3). When wandering third-instar control larvae, without transgene expression, are exposed to 500 rads of X-ray or γ-ray irradiation, the number of pH3-positive cells in wing imaginal discs is reduced from hundreds before irradiation to approximately 30 after irradiation, with an equal distribution between the anterior and posterior compartments (Yan et al., 2011, FASEB J). Using the GAL4/UAS system, RNAi, cDNA, or microRNA sponge transgenes can be expressed in the posterior compartment of the wing disc using drivers such as engrailed (en)-Gal4, while the anterior compartment serves as an internal control. This approach makes it possible to do genome-wide genetic screening for molecules involved in radiation-induced cell cycle arrest. PMID:21870287

  10. Using Drosophila larval imaginal discs to study low-dose radiation-induced cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shian-Jang; Li, Willis X

    2011-01-01

    Under genotoxic stress, activation of cell cycle checkpoint responses leads to cell cycle arrest, which allows cells to repair DNA damage before continuing to cycle. Drosophila larval epithelial sacs, called imaginal discs, are an excellent in vivo model system for studying radiation-induced cell cycle arrest. Larval imaginal discs go into cell cycle arrest after being subjected to low-dose irradiation, are subject to easy genetic manipulation, are not crucial for survival of the organism, and can be dissected easily for further molecular or cellular analysis. In this chapter, we describe methods for assessing low-dose irradiation-induced cell cycle arrest. Mitotic cells are identified by immunofluorescence staining for the mitotic marker phosphorylated histone H3 (phospho-histone H3 or pH3). When wandering third-instar control larvae, without transgene expression, are exposed to 500 rads of X-ray or γ-ray irradiation, the number of pH3-positive cells in wing imaginal discs is reduced from hundreds before irradiation to approximately 30 after irradiation, with an equal distribution between the anterior and posterior compartments (Yan et al., 2011, FASEB J). Using the GAL4/UAS system, RNAi, cDNA, or microRNA sponge transgenes can be expressed in the posterior compartment of the wing disc using drivers such as engrailed (en)-Gal4, while the anterior compartment serves as an internal control. This approach makes it possible to do genome-wide genetic screening for molecules involved in radiation-induced cell cycle arrest. PMID:21870287

  11. Interferon β-1a in ulcerative colitis: a placebo controlled, randomised, dose escalating study

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaus, S; Rutgeerts, P; Fedorak, R; Steinhart, A H; Wild, G E; Theuer, D; Möhrle, J; Schreiber, S

    2003-01-01

    Background and aims: Administration of interferon (IFN)-β may represent a rational approach to the treatment of ulcerative colitis through its immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. The present study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of IFN-β-1a. Methods: Patients (n=18) with moderately active ulcerative colitis were randomised to receive IFN-β-1a or placebo. IFN-β-1a was started at a dose of 22 μg three times a week subcutaneously, and the dose was increased at two week intervals to 44 μg and then to 88 μg if no response was observed. The maximum duration of treatment was eight weeks. End points were clinical treatment response, defined as a decrease of at least 3 points from baseline in the ulcerative colitis scoring system (UCSS) symptoms score and induction of endoscopically confirmed remission. Results: Baseline characteristics and disease severity were similar in both groups. Data from 17 patients are included in this report (10 patients in the IFN-β-1a group and seven patients in the placebo group). Clinical response was achieved in five patients (50%) in the IFN-β-1a group and in one (14%) in the placebo group (P=0.14). Remission was achieved in three patients in the IFN-β-1a group and in none in the placebo group (p=0.02). Most adverse reactions associated with IFN-β-1a were influenza-like symptoms or injection site reactions, and were mild or moderate in severity. Conclusions: IFN-β-1a may represent a promising novel treatment approach in ulcerative colitis. PMID:12912859

  12. Dose-response study of chloroform carcinogenesis in the mouse and rat: status report.

    PubMed Central

    Jorgenson, T A; Rushbrook, C J; Jones, D C

    1982-01-01

    Chloroform is being administered to male Osborne-Mendel rats and to female B6C3F1 mice at concentrations of 0 (negative control), 200, 400, 900 or 1800 ppm in the drinking water. Matched control groups of both species receive a volume of water identical to that consumed by the corresponding 1800 ppm groups. At this writing, the animals have completed 23 months on test. Negative control and CHCl3-treated rat groups have shown typical growth curves, with dose-related relative decrements in body weight evident throughout the study. Following decreases in CHCl3 groups during the first 8 weeks, rat water consumption values have continued to increase slowly, but persistent relative dose-related decrements are evident. No initial treatment-related decrements are evident. No initial treatment-related mortality was seen in the rats. Survival is 21, 41, 45, 76, 70 and 64% for the negative control, 200, 400, 900, 1800 ppm and matched control groups, respectively. Survival values for mice at three weeks were 99, 94, 74 and 76% for the 200, 400, 900 and 1800 ppm groups, respectively. Mortality was apparently related to markedly decreased fluid consumption among some of the treated mice. Subsequent mortality has been less than 15% for all mouse groups. Except for acclimation effects during the first 2-3 weeks, body weights for the treated mouse groups have been generally within 10% of negative control values. Tissue changes in decedents have been similar in treated and control groups, both in rats and mice. Terminal sacrifice and histologic evaluations will be initiated after completion of 24 months on test. PMID:7151755

  13. Comparative metabolism studies of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereomers in male rats following a single oral dose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed orally with 3 mg/kg of one of three hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereomers. Each diastereomer was well absorbed (73-83%), and distributed preferentially to lipophilic tissues. Feces were the major route of excretion; cumulatively 42% of dose for alpha-HBCD,...

  14. NIH study finds two doses of HPV vaccine may be as protective as full course

    Cancer.gov

    Two doses of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine Cervarix were as effective as the current standard three-dose regimen after four years of follow-up/NCI-sponsored Costa Rica Vaccine Trial was designed to assess the efficacy of Cervarix in a community-b

  15. POPULATION EXPOSURE AND DOSE MODEL FOR AIR TOXICS: A BENZENE CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is developing a human exposure and dose model called the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for Air Toxics (SHEDS-AirToxics) to characterize population exposure to air toxics in support of the National Air ...

  16. A unique dosing system for the production of OH under high vacuum for the study of environmental heterogeneous reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Matthew A.; Johanek, Viktor; Hemminger, John C.

    2008-02-15

    A unique dosing system for the production of hydroxyl radicals under high vacuum for the study of environmental heterogeneous reactions is described. Hydroxyl radicals are produced by the photodissociation of a hydrogen peroxide aqueous gas mixture with 254 nm radiation according to the reaction H{sub 2}O{sub 2}+h{nu} (254 nm){yields}OH+OH. Under the conditions of the current design, 0.6% conversion of hydrogen peroxide is expected yielding a hydroxyl number density on the order of 10{sup 10} molecules/cm{sup 3}. The flux distribution of the dosing system is calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation method and compared with the experimentally determined results. The performance of this unique hydroxyl dosing system is demonstrated for the heterogeneous reaction with a solid surface of potassium iodide. Coupling of the hydroxyl radical dosing system to a quantitative surface analysis system should help provide molecular level insight into detailed reaction mechanisms.

  17. Estimating individual thyroid doses for a case-control study of childhood thyroid cancer in Bryansk Oblast, Russia.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, V F; Voillequé, P G; Gavrilin, Yu I; Khrouch, V T; Shinkarev, S M; Orlov, M Yu; Kondrashov, A E; Petin, D V; Iaskova, E K; Tsyb, A F

    2004-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident, radioactive fission products, including (131)I and (137)Cs, were deposited in Bryansk Oblast in Russia. Intakes of radioiodines, mainly (131)I in milk, were the principal sources of radiation doses to thyroids of residents of the contaminated areas, but those radionuclides decayed before detailed contamination surveys could be performed. As a result, (137)Cs deposition density is the primary measure of the contamination due to the accident and there are relatively few measurements of the ratio of (131)I to (137)Cs in vegetation or soil samples from this area. Although many measurements of radiation emitted from the necks of residents were performed and used to estimate thyroidal (131)I activities and thyroid doses, such data are not available for all subjects. The semi-empirical model was selected to provide a dose calculation method to be applied uniformly to cases and controls in the study. The model was developed using dose estimates from direct measurements of (131)I in adult thyroids, and relates settlement average thyroid doses to (137)Cs contamination levels and ratios of (131)I to (137)Cs. This model is useful for areas where thyroid monitoring was not performed and can be used to estimate doses to exposed individuals. For application to children in this study, adjustment factors are used to address differences in age-dependent intake rates and thyroid dosimetry. Other individual dietary factors and sources (private/public) of milk consumed are reflected in the dose estimates. Countermeasures that reduced thyroid dose, such as cessation of milk consumption and intake of stable iodine, are also considered for each subject. The necessary personal information of subjects was obtained by interview, most frequently of their mothers, using a questionnaire developed for the study. Uncertainties in thyroid dose, estimated using Monte Carlo techniques, are presented for reference conditions. Thyroid dose estimates for individual

  18. The use of radiation surveys to estimate the radiation effective dose to visitors of hospitalized patients--a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Sherbini, Sami S; DeCicco, Joseph E

    2005-09-01

    Members of the public visiting hospitalized patients undergoing nuclear medicine procedures or brachytherapy are exposed to radiation emanating from the patient. The radiation protection staff at the hospital is responsible for ensuring that the doses to these visitors are kept as low as is reasonably achievable and are maintained below applicable regulatory limits. These limits are normally expressed in terms of the effective dose to the visitor. Direct measurement of the effective dose, however, is not feasible, and the use of a quantity that provides a reasonable estimate, referred to as a surrogate, is required. This study used Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations to examine the feasibility of using bedside survey results, in units of roentgens per hour, as a surrogate for estimating the effective dose to a person who may be present at the survey location. The Monte Carlo code used in this work was MCNP Version 5. In these calculations, both the patient and the visitor were modeled using modified Medical Internal Radiation Dose anthropomorphic phantoms. Radioactive material that emitted monoenergetic photons was located in several of the patient's organs in turn, and the bedside exposure rates and the effective doses at the same location were calculated. The calculations were repeated for several visitor locations, both at bedside along the length of the bed, and at increasing distances from the bed. The ratios of the exposure rates to the effective dose rates at each location gave an indication of the utility of the exposure rate measurements in providing a reasonable estimate of the effective dose. The results indicated that the survey data provided estimates of the effective dose within recommended accuracy for many exposure situations, but underestimated the effective dose to the visitor for other situations, especially locations close to bedside and for lower energy radiations. Use of appropriate correction factors based on this work could improve

  19. Patient- and cohort-specific dose and risk estimation for abdominopelvic CT: a study based on 100 patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this work was twofold: (a) to estimate patient- and cohort-specific radiation dose and cancer risk index for abdominopelvic computer tomography (CT) scans; (b) to evaluate the effects of patient anatomical characteristics (size, age, and gender) and CT scanner model on dose and risk conversion coefficients. The study included 100 patient models (42 pediatric models, 58 adult models) and multi-detector array CT scanners from two commercial manufacturers (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare). A previously-validated Monte Carlo program was used to simulate organ dose for each patient model and each scanner, from which DLP-normalized-effective dose (k factor) and DLP-normalized-risk index values (q factor) were derived. The k factor showed exponential decrease with increasing patient size. For a given gender, q factor showed exponential decrease with both increasing patient size and patient age. The discrepancies in k and q factors across scanners were on average 8% and 15%, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility of estimating patient-specific organ dose and cohort-specific effective dose and risk index in abdominopelvic CT requiring only the knowledge of patient size, gender, and age.

  20. A Dose-Ranging Study of Behavioral and Pharmacological Treatment for Children with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Pelham, William E.; Burrows-MacLean, Lisa; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Fabiano, Gregory A.; Coles, Erika K.; Wymbs, Brian T.; Chacko, Anil; Walker, Kathryn S.; Wymbs, Frances; Garefino, Allison; Hoffman, Martin T.; Waxmonsky, James G.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Placebo and 3 doses of methylphenidate (MPH) were crossed with 3 levels of behavioral modification (no behavioral modification, NBM; low-intensity behavioral modification, LBM; and high-intensity behavior modification, HBM) in the context of a summer treatment program (STP). Participants were 48 children with ADHD, aged 5–12. Behavior was examined in a variety of social settings (sports activities, art class, lunch) that are typical of elementary school, neighborhood, and after-school settings. Children received each behavioral condition for 3 weeks, order counterbalanced across groups. Children concurrently received in random order placebo, .15 mg/kg/dose, .3 mg/kg/dose, or .6 mg/kg/dose MPH, 3 times daily with dose manipulated on a daily basis in random order for each child. Both behavioral and medication treatments produced highly significant and positive effects on children's behavior. The treatment modalities also interacted significantly. Whereas there was a linear dose-response curve for medication in NBM, the dose-response curves flattened considerably in LBM and HBM. Behavior modification produced effects as large as moderate doses, and on some measures, high doses of medication. These results replicate and extend to social-recreational settings previously reported results in a classroom setting from the same sample (Fabiano et al., 2007). Results illustrate the importance of taking dosage/intensity into account when evaluating combined treatments; there were no benefits of combined treatments when the dosage of either treatment was high but combination of the low-dose treatments produced substantial incremental improvement over unimodal treatment. PMID:24429997

  1. Lower Loading Dose of Prasugrel Compared with Conventional Loading Doses of Clopidogrel and Prasugrel in Korean Patients Undergoing Elective Coronary Angiography: A Randomized Controlled Study Evaluating Pharmacodynamic Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hyun; Guo, Long Zhe; Park, Min Kyu; Yi, So Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Although prasugrel allows for rapid and potent platelet inhibition, the efficacy and safety of lower doses of prasugrel for patients of East Asian ethnicity has not yet been investigated. We compared the effect of a lower loading dose (LD) of prasugrel with conventional LDs of clopidogrel and prasugrel in Korean patients. Subjects and Methods Forty-three Korean patients undergoing coronary angiography were enrolled in the study. Participants were randomly administered LDs of clopidogrel 600 mg, prasugrel 30 mg or prasugrel 60 mg prior to coronary angiography. Platelet reactivity was assessed at baseline and at the time of peak platelet inhibition using light transmission aggregometry (LTA), the VerifyNow assay, and multiple electrode aggregometry. Results Although baseline platelet reactivity between the groups showed no significant differences, at the time of peak platelet inhibition, the prasugrel 30 mg (18.9±10.0%) and 60 mg groups (13.8±10.8%) showed significantly more potent platelet inhibition than the clopidogrel 600 mg group (52.9±15.8%; p<0.001) by LTA. However, there were no significant differences between the prasugrel 30 mg and 60 mg groups (p=0.549). Conclusion The loading effect of prasugrel 30 mg was more potent than clopidogrel 600 mg and was not significantly different from prasugrel 60 mg. PMID:25469140

  2. A study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios for CT scanning without table translation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob; Yang, Jie

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: For CT scanning in the stationary-table modes, AAPM Task Group 111 proposed to measure the midpoint dose on the central and peripheral axes of sufficiently long phantoms. Currently, a long cylindrical phantom is usually not available in many clinical facilities. The use of a long phantom is also challenging because of the heavy weight. In order to shed light on assessing the midpoint dose in CT scanning without table movement, the authors present a study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios, and perform a cross-comparison of CT dose ratios on different scanner models. Methods: The authors performed Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations with a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare), and modeled dosimetry measurements using a 0.6 cm{sup 3} Farmer type chamber and a 10-cm long pencil ion chamber. The short (15 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were computed for two PMMA diameters (16 and 32 cm), two phantom axes (the center and the periphery), and a range of beam apertures (3–25 cm). The results were compared with the published data of previous studies with other multiple detector CT (MDCT) scanners and cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners. Results: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios changed with beam apertures but were insensitive to beam qualities (80–140 kV, the head and body bowtie filters) and MDCT and CBCT scanner models. Conclusions: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios enable medical physicists to make dosimetry measurements using the standard CT dosimetry phantoms and a Farmer chamber or a 10 cm long pencil chamber, and to assess the midpoint dose in long phantoms. This method provides an effective approach for the dosimetry of CBCT scanning in the stationary-table modes, and is useful for perfusion and interventional CT.

  3. Dietary fat intake and endometrial cancer risk: dose-response meta-analysis of epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Luo; Hou, Rui; Gong, Ting-Ting; Wu, Qi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have provided controversial evidence of the association between dietary fat intake and endometrial cancer (EC) risk. To address this inconsistency, we conducted this dose-response meta-analysis by total dietary fat intake, based on epidemiological studies published up to the end of June 2015 identified from PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science. Two authors (RH and Q-JW) independently performed the eligibility evaluation and data extraction. All differences were resolved by discussion with the third investigator (LJ). Random-effects models were used to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Overall, the search yielded 16 studies (6 cohort and 10 case-control studies) that involved a total of 7556 EC cases and 563,781 non-cases. The summary RR for EC for each 30g/day increment intake was 0.98 (95%CI = 0.95–1.001; I2 = 0%; n = 11) for total dietary fat. Non-significant results were observed in plant-based fat (summary RR = 1.05, 95%CI = 0.94–1.18; I2 = 0%; n = 5) and animal-based fat (summary RR = 1.17, 95%CI = 0.92–1.36; I2 = 85.0%; n = 6). Additionally, the null associations were observed in almost all the subgroup and sensitivity analyses. In conclusion, findings of the present meta-analysis suggested a lack of association between total dietary fat intake and EC risk. Further studies, especially prospective designed studies are warranted to confirm our findings. PMID:26568366

  4. Brain asymmetry as a potential biomarker for developmental TCDD intoxication: a dose-response study.

    PubMed Central

    Henshel, D S; Martin, J W; DeWitt, J C

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that in ovo exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and related compounds is correlated with the development of grossly asymmetric brains. This asymmetry is manifested as a difference between the two halves of the forebrain and the tecta. Previously, only wildlife species (heron, cormorant, and eagle) had been shown to manifest this response. In the wildlife studies, the frequency and degree of left-right interhemispheric differences had been correlated with the levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) in eggs from the same nest (heron, cormorant). We studied the effect of in ovo exposure to TCDD on the brain throughout development in a sensitive laboratory model (chicken). Embryos from chicken eggs (Gallus gallus) injected with one of several doses of TCDD or vehicle control were sacrificed after 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, or 20 days of incubation, or incubated to hatch and then sacrificed either within 24 hr or at 3 weeks post-hatch. Measurements of both chicken embryo and hatchling brains indicated that 1) TCDD alone induced the brain asymmetry in developing chickens; 2) this brain asymmetry was similar to that observed in animals exposed in the wild to a mixture of TCDD-related contaminants; 3) there was a dose-related increase in both the frequency and severity of brain asymmetry observed at all ages measured; and 4) the asymmetry was measurable in embryonic brains at an age when the braincase was a thin, flexible layer (embryonic day 9), implying that the effect of TCDD was directly on the developing brain and not indirectly via an effect on the braincase. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 6. A Figure 6. B Figure 6. C Figure 6. D Figure 7. PMID:9294718

  5. A four-drug combination therapy consisting of low-dose tacrolimus, low-dose mycophenolate mofetil, corticosteroids, and mizoribine in living donor renal transplantation: A randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tian-zhong; Wu, Xiao-qiang; Rong, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We compared a three-drug combination therapy (control group) consisting of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and corticosteroids in living donor renal transplantation with a four-drug combination therapy (study group), in which the doses of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil were halved and the immunosuppressive drug mizoribine was added, in order to determine whether the incidence rates of acute rejection after transplantation between the study group and the control group are similar, whether the study group regimen prevents the occurrence of calcineurin inhibitor–induced renal damage, and whether the study group regimen prevents adverse effects such as diarrhea caused by mycophenolate mofetil. Methods: We investigated the incidence of acute rejection, serum creatinine levels, and estimated glomerular filtration rate and the incidence of adverse effects such as diarrhea. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in the incidence of acute rejection. Renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate and serum creatinine) was maintained in the control group whereas in the study group renal function gradually improved, with a statistical difference observed at 12 months. The incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms including diarrhea was significantly higher in the control group than in the study group. There was no significant difference in the incidence of cytomegalovirus infection and other adverse effects. Conclusion: These results suggest the study group therapy is an effective regimen in preventing acute rejection and the deterioration of renal function. These results also show this therapy can reduce the incidence of adverse effects such as gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:27231549

  6. Investigation of natural effective gamma dose rates case study: Ardebil Province in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Gamma rays pose enough energy to induce chemical changes that may be biologically important for the normal functioning of body cells. The external exposure of human beings to natural environmental gamma radiation normally exceeds that from all man-made sources combined. In this research natural background gamma dose rates and corresponding annual effective doses were determined for selected cities of Ardebil province. Outdoor gamma dose rates were measured using an Ion Chamber Survey Meter in 105 locations in selected districts. Average absorbed doses for Ardebil, Sar-Ein, Germy, Neer, Shourabil Recreational Lake, and Kosar were determined as 265, 219, 344, 233, 352, and 358 nSv/h, respectively. Although dose rates recorded for Germi and Kosar are comparable with some areas with high natural radiation background, however, the dose rates in other districts are well below the levels reported for such locations. Average annual effective dose due to indoor and outdoor gamma radiation for Ardebil province was estimated as 1.73 (1.35–2.39) mSv, which is on average 2 times higher than the world population weighted average. PMID:23369115

  7. Dosimetric study of the effective doses resulting during dental X-ray and panoramic radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shousha, Hany A.; Abd-El Hafez, A. I.; Ahmad, Fawzia

    2011-01-01

    The panoramic image is one of the most commonly used radiographic examinations in dentistry, owing to its low dose and large area for evaluation, including bone and teeth in the same image. Although digital images are usually reported to deliver a lower radiation dose to the patient, conventional images are still available, especially in countries where digital systems are not widely economically available. Dentists should weigh the benefits of dental radiographs against the consequences of increasing a patient's exposure to radiation, the effects of which accumulate from multiple sources over time. The "as low as reasonably achievable" principle should be followed to minimize the exposure to radiation. The purpose of this investigation is to measure the absorbed radiation doses at 12 anatomical sites of a Rando-phantom and calculate the effective doses result from a full-mouth survey and panoramic radiography. Organ-absorbed doses are measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD 100) and effective organ doses (μ Sv) are estimated according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection in 2007. The total effective dose results from the panoramic imaging system have so far been below those obtained using the full-mouth survey technique used in intra-oral radiographic examination.

  8. SU-E-I-98: Dose Comparison for Pulmonary Embolism CT Studies: Single Energy Vs. Dual Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the size specific dose estimate (SSDE), dose length product (DLP) and noise relationship for pulmonary embolism studies evaluated by single source dual energy computed tomography (DECT) against conventional CT (CCT) studies in a busy cancer center and to determine the dose savings provided by DECT. Methods: An IRB-approved retrospective study was performed to determine the CTDIvol and DLP from a subset of patients scanned with both DECT and CCT over the past five years. We were able to identify 30 breast cancer patients (6 male, 24 female, age range 24 to 81) who had both DECT and CCT studies performed. DECT scans were performed with a GE HD 750 scanner (140/80 kVp, 480 mAs and 40 mm) and CCT scans were performed with a GE Lightspeed 16 slice scanner (120 kVp, 352 mAs, 20 mm). Image noise was measured by placing an ROI and recording the standard deviation of the mean HU along the descending aorta. Results: The average DECT patient size specific dose estimate was to be 14.2 ± 1.7 mGy as compared to 22.4 ± 2.7 mGy from CCT PE studies, which is a 37% reduction in the SSDE. The average DECT DLP was 721.8 ± 84.6 mGy-cm as compared to 981.8 ± 106.1 mGy-cm for CCT, which is a 26% decrease. Compared to CCT the image noise was found to decrease by 19% when using DECT for PE studies. Conclusion: DECT SSDE and DLP measurements indicate dose savings and image noise reduction when compared to CCT. In an environment that heavily debates CT patient doses, this study confirms the effectiveness of DECT in PE imaging.

  9. Dose reduction and image quality optimizations in CT of pediatric and adult patients: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, P.-H.; Lee, C.-L.; Kim, D.-H.; Lee, Y.-J.; Jeon, S.-S.; Kim, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) can be used to easily and rapidly perform numerous acquisitions, possibly leading to a marked increase in the radiation dose to individual patients. Technical options dedicated to automatically adjusting the acquisition parameters according to the patient's size are of specific interest in pediatric radiology. A constant tube potential reduction can be achieved for adults and children, while maintaining a constant detector energy fluence. To evaluate radiation dose, the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw) was calculated based on the CT dose index (CTDI) measured using an ion chamber, and image noise and image contrast were measured from a scanned image to evaluate image quality. The dose-weighted contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRD) was calculated from the radiation dose, image noise, and image contrast measured from a scanned image. The noise derivative (ND) is a quality index for dose efficiency. X-ray spectra with tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kVp were used to compute the average photon energy. Image contrast and the corresponding contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were determined for lesions of soft tissue, muscle, bone, and iodine relative to a uniform water background, as the iodine contrast increases at lower energy (i.e., k-edge of iodine is 33 keV closer to the beam energy) using mixed water-iodine contrast normalization (water 0, iodine 25, 100, 200, and 1000 HU, respectively). The proposed values correspond to high quality images and can be reduced if only high-contrast organs are assessed. The potential benefit of lowering the tube voltage is an improved CNRD, resulting in a lower radiation dose and optimization of image quality. Adjusting the tube potential in abdominal CT would be useful in current pediatric radiography, where the choice of X-ray techniques generally takes into account the size of the patient as well as the need to balance the conflicting requirements of diagnostic image quality and radiation dose

  10. Low-level microwave irradiation and central cholinergic activity: a dose-response study

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W.

    1989-01-01

    Rats were irradiated with circularly polarized, 2,450-MHz pulsed microwaves (2-microseconds pulses, 500 pulses per second (pps)) for 45 min in the cylindrical waveguide system of Guy et al. Immediately after exposure, sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake, an indicator of cholinergic activity in neural tissue, was measured in the striatum, frontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. The power density was set to give average whole-body specific absorption rates (SAR) of 0.3, 0.45, 0.6, 0.75, 0.9, or 1.2 W/kg to study the dose-response relationship between the rate of microwave energy absorption and cholinergic activity in the different areas of the brain. Decrease in choline uptake was observed in the striatum at a SAR of 0.75 W/kg and above, whereas for the frontal cortex and hippocampus, decreases in choline uptake were observed at a SAR of 0.45 W/kg and above. No significant effect was observed in the hypothalamus at the irradiation power densities studied. The probit analysis was used to determine the SAR50 in each brain area, i.e., the SAR at which 50% of maximum response was elicited. SAR50 values for the striatum, frontal cortex, and hippocampus were 0.65, 0.38, and 0.44 W/kg, respectively.

  11. Pilot study about dose-effect relationship of ocular injury in argon laser photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Zhang, C. P.; Fu, X. B.; Zhang, T. M.; Wang, C. Z.; Qian, H. W.; San, Q.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this article was to study the injury effect of either convergent or parallel argon laser beam on rabbit retina, get the dose-effect relationship for the two types of laser beams, and calculate the damage threshold of argon laser for human retinas. An argon laser therapeutic instrument for ophthalmology was used in this study. A total of 80 rabbit eyes were irradiated for 600 lesions, half of which were treated by convergent laser and the other half were done with parallel laser beam. After irradiation, slit lamp microscope and fundus photography were used to observe the lesions, change and the incidence of injury was processed statistically to get the damage threshold of rabbit retina. Based on results from the experiments on animals and the data from clinical cases of laser treatment, the photocoagulation damage thresholds of human retinas for convergent and parallel argon laser were calculated to be 0.464 and 0.285 mJ respectively. These data provided biological reference for safely operation when employing laser photocoagulation in clinical practice and other fields.

  12. Energy and dose considerations for diffraction enhanced CT in small animal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Dean; Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Parham, Christopher; Kao, Teresa; Zhong, Zhong

    2007-03-01

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) uses monochromatic x-rays coupled to an analyzer crystal to extract information about the refraction of x-rays within the object. Studies of excised biological tissues show that DEI has significant contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) advantages for soft tissue when compared to standard radiography. DEI differs from conventional CT in that its refraction contrast depends on x-ray energy as 1/E, thus the energy and dose considerations for conventional CT will be inappropriate. The goal of this study was to assess the optimal energy for in vivo CT imaging of a mouse head to obtain the largest soft tissue refraction CNR. Through a theoretical model, optimum refraction CNR for mouse brain imaging was found to be about 20 keV. The findings were tested experimentally using the DEI system at the X15A beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source. Using the parameters for optimized refraction CNR (20 keV, silicon [333] reflection), large image artifacts were caused by DEI's scatter-rejection properties. By increasing the x-ray energy and using a lower order diffraction, silicon [111], soft tissue features within the brain, including the hippocampus, could be resolved.

  13. Protocol of the adaptive study of IL-2 dose frequency on regulatory T cells in type 1 diabetes (DILfrequency): a mechanistic, non-randomised, repeat dose, open-label, response-adaptive study

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Lucy A; Pekalski, Marcin L; Kareclas, Paula; Evangelou, Marina; Walker, Neil M; Howlett, James; Mander, Adrian P; Kennet, Jane; Wicker, Linda S; Bond, Simon; Todd, John A; Waldron-Lynch, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing β cells in the pancreatic islets, leading to insulinopenia and hyperglycaemia. Genetic analyses indicate that alterations of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) pathway mediating immune activation and tolerance predispose to T1D, specifically the polymorphic expression of the IL-2 receptor-α chain (CD25) on T lymphocytes. Replacement of physiological doses of IL-2 could restore self-tolerance and prevent further autoimmunity by enhancing the function of CD4+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) to limit the activation of auto reactive T effector cells (Teffs). In this experimental medicine study, we use an adaptive trial design to determine the optimal dosing regimen for IL-2 to improve Treg function while limiting activation of Teffs in participants with T1D. Methods and analysis The Adaptive study of IL-2 dose frequency on Tregs in type 1 diabetes(DILfrequency) is a mechanistic, non-randomised, repeat dose open-label, response-adaptive study of 36 participants with T1D. The objective is to establish the optimal dose and frequency of ultra-low dose IL-2: to increase Treg frequency within the physiological range, to increase CD25 expression on Tregs, without increasing CD4+ Teffs. DILfrequency has an initial learning phase where 12 participants are allocated to six different doses and frequencies followed by an interim statistical analysis. After analysis of the learning phase, the Dose and Frequency Committee will select the optimal targets for Treg frequency, Treg CD25 expression and Teff frequency. Three groups of eight participants will be treated consecutively in the confirming phase. Each dose and frequency selected will be based on statistical analysis of all data collected from the previous groups. Ethics Ethical approval for DILfrequency was granted on 12 August 2014. Results The results of this study will be reported, through peer-reviewed journals, conference presentations and

  14. A study to investigate dose escalation of doxorubicin in ABVD chemotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma incorporating biomarkers of response and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, A; Greystoke, A; Ranson, M; Linton, K; Neeson, S; Hampson, G; Illidge, T; Smith, E; Dive, C; Pettitt, A; Lister, A; Johnson, P; Radford, J

    2013-01-01

    Background: Myelotoxicity during initial cycles of chemotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma is associated with better outcome, supporting the concept of individualised dosing based on pharmacodynamic end points to optimise results. This study was performed to identify the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of doxorubicin within cycles 1–3 ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine). Circulating biomarkers of response (nucleosomal DNA, nDNA) and epithelial toxicity (Cytokeratin 18, CK18) were also measured. Methods: Dose escalation of doxorubicin in cycles 1–3 ABVD supported by pegfilgrastim was performed on a six-patient cohort basis (35, 45 and 55 mg m–2) with doxorubicin reduced to 25 mg m–2 or omitted in cycles 4–6 to maintain cumulative exposure of 103–130% standard ABVD. BVD was given at standard doses throughout. Six additional subjects were recruited at the MTD. Results: Twenty-four subjects were recruited. Dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of grade 3 neuropathy, pneumonitis, palmar-plantar erythema and neutropenic infection were observed at 55 mg m–2, so 45 mg m–2 was declared the MTD. In patients who subsequently experienced DLT at any time, large increases in CK18 were seen on day 3 of cycle 1 ABVD. Conclusion: Escalated ABVD incorporating doxorubicin at 45 mg m–2 in cycles 1–3 can be delivered safely with pegfilgrastim support. Circulating cell death biomarkers may assist in the development of future individualised dosing strategies. PMID:24136151

  15. Dose distribution from x-ray microbeam arrays applied to radiation therapy: an EGS4 Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    De Felici, M; Felici, R; Sanchez del Rio, M; Ferrero, C; Bacarian, T; Dilmanian, F A

    2005-08-01

    We present EGS4 Monte Carlo calculations of the spatial distribution of the dose deposited by a single x-ray pencil beam, a planar microbeam, and an array of parallel planar microbeams as used in radiation therapy research. The profiles of the absorbed dose distribution in a phantom, including the peak-to-valley ratio of the dose distribution from microbeam arrays, were calculated at micrometer resolution. We determined the dependence of the findings on the main parameters of photon and electron transport. The results illustrate the dependence of the electron range and the deposited in-beam dose on the cut-off energy, of the electron transport, as well as the effects on the dose profiles of the beam energy, the array size, and the beam spacing. The effect of beam polarization also was studied for a single pencil beam and for an array of parallel planar microbeams. The results show that although the polarization effect on the dose distribution from a 3 cm x 3 cm microbeam array inside a water phantom is large enough to be measured at the outer side of the array (16% difference of the deposited dose for x-ray beams of 200 keV), it is not detectable at the array's center, thus being irrelevant for the radiation therapy purposes. Finally we show that to properly compare the dose profiles determined with a metal oxide semiconductor field emission transistor detector with the computational method predictions, it is important to simulate adequately the size and the material of the device's Si active element. PMID:16193774

  16. Hepatic intra-arterial chemotherapy (HIAC) of high dose mitomycin and epirubicin combined with caval chemofiltration versus prolonged low doses in liver metastases from colorectal cancer: a prospective randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Fiorentini, G; Poddie, D B; Cantore, M; Rossi, S; Tumolo, S; Dentico, P; Bernardeschi, P; Guadagni, S; Rossi, G; Valori, V M; De Simone, M

    2004-11-01

    A multicenter randomized study comparing high dose of mitomycin and epirubicin given as hepatic intra-arterial chemotherapy (HIAC) combined with caval chemofiltration (CF) versus low doses of the same drugs in unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer showed a significant improvement in the survival rate of the 20 patients treated with high dose compared to the 22 patients treated with low doses with a 1 year survival of 69% vs 39%. The median survival was 17 vs 11 months and the responses were 65% vs 33%. Toxicity was colangitis in 50% of patients considered. The extrahepatic progression was similar in the two groups (7/20 vs 8/22). PMID:15675479

  17. Evaluating the dose effects of a longitudinal micro-CT study on pulmonary tissue in C57BL/6 mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detombe, Sarah A.; Dunmore-Buyze, Joy; Petrov, Ivailo E.; Drangova, Maria

    2012-03-01

    Background: Micro-computed tomography offers numerous advantages for small animal imaging, including the ability to monitor the same animals throughout a longitudinal study. However, concerns are often raised regarding the effects of x-ray dose accumulated over the course of the experiment. In this study, we scan C57BL/6 mice multiple times per week for six weeks, to determine the effect of the cumulative dose on pulmonary tissue at the end of the study. Methods/Results: C57BL/6 male mice were split into two groups (irradiated group=10, control group=10). The irradiated group was scanned (80kVp/50mA) each week for 6 weeks; the weekly scan session had three scans. This resulted in a weekly dose of 0.84 Gy, and a total study dose of 5.04 Gy. The control group was scanned on the final week. Scans from weeks 1 and 6 were reconstructed and analyzed: overall, there was no significant difference in lung volume or lung density between the control group and the irradiated group. Similarly, there were no significant differences between the week 1 and week 6 scans in the irradiated group. Histological samples taken from excised lung tissue also showed no evidence of inflammation or fibrosis in the irradiated group. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that a 5 Gy x-ray dose accumulated over six weeks during a longitudinal micro-CT study has no significant effects on the pulmonary tissue of C57BL/6 mice. As a result, the many advantages of micro- CT imaging, including rapid acquisition of high-resolution, isotropic images in free-breathing mice, can be taken advantage of in longitudinal studies without concern for negative dose-related effects.

  18. Mechanistic and quantitative studies of bystander response in 3D tissues for low-dose radiation risk estimations

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, Sally A.

    2013-06-12

    We have used the MatTek 3-dimensional human skin model to study the gene expression response of a 3D model to low and high dose low LET radiation, and to study the radiation bystander effect as a function of distance from the site of irradiation with either alpha particles or low LET protons. We have found response pathways that appear to be specific for low dose exposures, that could not have been predicted from high dose studies. We also report the time and distance dependent expression of a large number of genes in bystander tissue. the bystander response in 3D tissues showed many similarities to that described previously in 2D cultured cells, but also showed some differences.

  19. Prophylaxis in gynaecological and obstetric surgery: a comparative randomised multicentre study of single-dose cefotetan versus two doses of cefazolin.

    PubMed

    Periti, P; Mazzei, T; Periti, E

    1988-08-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis is recommended in all clean-contaminated surgery where the critical threshold of number and virulence of the contaminating organisms with respect to host resistance is reached. Obstetric and gynaecological surgery is clean-contaminated and risk of infection due to aerobic and anaerobic bacteria without prophylaxis can be quantified at 30-40% for vaginal hysterectomy, 10-35% for abdominal hysterectomy and 10-34% for caesarean section. To assess the role of two different cephalosporins as short term prophylaxis, we carried out a multicentre randomised study involving a single 2 g i.v. dose of cefotetan in comparison with two doses of cefazolin (2 g i.v. before surgery and after 8 hours). Criteria for exclusion were: exposure to antibiotics within 7 days, preoperative infection, hypersensitivity to beta-lactams. Four hundred and sixty patients entered the study, of which 229 received cefotetan and 231 cefazolin. No significant differences in mean age, obesity, preoperative weight loss, diabetes, type of disease, type of surgery (vaginal or abdominal hysterectomies and caesarean sections) and number of pregnancies and abortions existed between the two groups of patients. The total rate of infected patients undergoing hysterectomy was 8.6% (13/151) in the cefotetan group and 17.4% (29/167) in the cefazolin group (p less than 0.05). This difference was due to cases of symptomatic bacteriuria and antibiotic retreatment, while wound infections were not significantly different (2.6% and 1.8% respectively). Among patients undergoing caesarean section, 9 of 78 (11.5%) and 7 of 64 (10.9%) were infected following cefotetan and cefazolin, respectively (not significant). Cefotetan mean tissue concentrations in gynaecological organs were higher than those of cefazolin (25.5-44.8 vs. 7.4-9.5 mg/kg).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3052893

  20. Acute Effects of Classroom Exercise Breaks on Executive Function and Math Performance: A Dose-Response Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howie, Erin K.; Schatz, Jeffrey; Pate, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the acute dose-response relationship of classroom exercise breaks with executive function and math performance in 9- to 12-year-old children by comparing 5-min, 10-min, or 20-min classroom exercise breaks to 10 min of sedentary classroom activity. Method: This study used a within-subjects…

  1. Intrathecal Baclofen in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Dose-Finding Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoving, Marjanke A.; van Raak, Elisabeth P. M.; Spincemaille, Geert H. J. J.; Palmans, Liesbeth J.; Sleypen, Frans A. M.; Vles, Johan S. H.

    2007-01-01

    Intrathecal baclofen (ITB) therapy can be very effective in the treatment of intractable spasticity, but its effectiveness and safety have not yet been thoroughly studied in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The aims of this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-finding study were to select children eligible for continuous ITB…

  2. APPLICATION OF BENCHMARK DOSE METHODOLOGY TO DATA FROM PRENATAL DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The benchmark dose (BMD) concept was applied to 246 conventional developmental toxicity datasets from government, industry and commercial laboratories. Five modeling approaches were used, two generic and three specific to developmental toxicity (DT models). BMDs for both quantal ...

  3. RECONSTRUCTING POPULATION EXPOSURES FROM DOSE BIOMARKERS: INHALATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) AS A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling is a well-established toxicological tool designed to relate exposure to a target tissue dose. The emergence of federal and state programs for environmental health tracking and the availability of exposure monitoring through bi...

  4. Effects of therapeutic and supratherapeutic doses of oral tedizolid phosphate on cardiac repolarisation in healthy volunteers: a randomised controlled study.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Shawn; Litwin, Jeffrey; Fang, Edward; Prokocimer, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Drug-induced prolongation of the QT interval on the electrocardiogram (ECG) infrequently results in Torsades de pointes, a potentially fatal arrhythmia. Therefore, thorough QT analysis of new drugs is a regulatory requirement. The objective of this phase 1 study was to assess the effects of oral tedizolid phosphate on the QT interval corrected with Fridericia's formula (QTcF) in healthy adult subjects. A single therapeutic dose (200 mg) and a supratherapeutic dose (1200 mg) of tedizolid phosphate were administered to characterise QTc changes following typical systemic exposure and with markedly higher exposures, respectively. This was a four-way crossover study with 48 subjects randomly assigned to receive therapeutic and supratherapeutic doses of tedizolid phosphate, moxifloxacin (positive control for QT interval prolongation) and placebo (negative control). A continuous 12-lead ECG was recorded from 1 h before drug administration to 23 h after administration. Adverse events, which were generally mild, occurred most frequently with moxifloxacin or with a supratherapeutic dose of tedizolid phosphate; however, all treatments were well tolerated. This study demonstrated that therapeutic or supratherapeutic doses of the antibacterial tedizolid had no clinically significant effect on QT interval in healthy adults [ClinicalTrials.gov registration no.: NCT01461460]. PMID:27342387

  5. A Phase I Dose Finding Study of 5-Azacytidine in Combination with Sodium Phenylbutyrate in Patients with Refractory Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jianqing; Gilbert, Jill; Rudek, Michelle A.; Zwiebel, James A.; Gore, Steve; Jiemjit, Anchalee; Zhao, Ming; Baker, Sharyn D.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Herman, James G.; Donehower, Ross C.; Carducci, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This was a phase I trial to determine the minimal effective dose and optimal dose schedule of 5-AC in combination with sodium phenylbutyrate in patients with refractory solid tumors. The pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and antineoplastic effects were also studied. Experimental design Three dosing regimens were studied in 27 patients with advanced solid tumors and toxicity was recorded. The pharmacokinetics of the combination of drugs was evaluated. Repeat tumor biopsies and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were analyzed to evaluate epigenetic changes in response to therapy. Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) titers were evaluated as a surrogate measure for gene re-expression of epigenetic modulation in PBMC. Results The three dose regimens of 5-AC and PB were generally well tolerated and safe. A total of 48 cycles was administrated to 27 patients. The most common toxicities were bone marrow suppression related neutropenia and anemia, which were minor. The clinical response rate was disappointing for the combination of agents. One patient demonstrated stable disease for 5 months while 26 patients demonstrated progressive disease as best tumor response. The administration of PB and 5-AC did not appear to alter the pharmacokinetics of either drug. Although there were individual cases of targeted DNMT activity and histone H3/4 acetylation changes from paired biopsy or PBMC, no conclusive statement can be made based on these limited correlative studies. Conclusion The combination of 5-AC and PB across three dose schedules was generally well tolerated and safe, yet lacked any real evidence for clinical benefit. PMID:19789320

  6. A Phase I Dose-Finding Study of Silybin Phosphatidylcholine (Milk Thistle) in Patients With Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Abby B.; Narayan, Rupa; Rodriguez, Rosa; Goyal, Abhishek; Jacobson, Judith S.; Kelly, Kara; Ladas, Elena; Lunghofer, Paul J.; Hansen, Ryan J.; Gustafson, Daniel L.; Flaig, Thomas W.; Tsai, Wei Yann; Wu, David P. H.; Lee, Valerie; Greenlee, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the maximum tolerated dose per day of silybin phosphatidylcholine (Siliphos) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and hepatic dysfunction. Experimental Design Patients with advanced HCC not eligible for other therapies based on poor hepatic function were enrolled in a phase I study of silybin phosphatidylcholine. A standard phase I design was used with 4 planned cohorts, dose escalating from 2, 4, 8, to 12 g per day in divided doses for 12 weeks. Results Three participants enrolled in this single institution trial. All enrolled subjects consumed 2 g per day of study agent in divided doses. Serum concentrations of silibinin and silibinin glucuronide increased within 1 to 3 weeks. In all 3 patients, liver function abnormalities and tumor marker α-fetoprotein progressed, but after day 56 the third patient showed some improvement in liver function abnormalities and inflammatory biomarkers. All 3 participants died within 23 to 69 days of enrolling into the trial, likely from hepatic failure, but it could not be ruled out that deaths were possibly due to the study drug. Conclusion Short-term administration of silybin phosphatidylcholine in patients with advanced HCC resulted in detectable increases in silibinin and its metabolite, silibinin glucuronide. The maximum tolerated dose could not be established. Since patients died soon after enrollment, this patient population may have been too ill to benefit from an intervention designed to improve liver function tests. PMID:23757319

  7. A macroscopic and microscopic study of radon exposure using Geant4 and MCNPX to estimate dose rates and DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Akker, Mary Evelyn

    Radon is considered the second-leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. Epidemiological studies have been conducted in miner cohorts as well as general populations to estimate the risks associated with high and low dose exposures. There are problems with extrapolating risk estimates to low dose exposures, mainly that the dose-response curve at low doses is not well understood. Calculated dosimetric quantities give average energy depositions in an organ or a whole body, but morphological features of an individual can affect these values. As opposed to human phantom models, Computed Tomography (CT) scans provide unique, patient-specific geometries that are valuable in modeling the radiological effects of the short-lived radon progeny sources. Monte Carlo particle transport code Geant4 was used with the CT scan data to model radon inhalation in the main bronchial bifurcation. The equivalent dose rates are near the lower bounds of estimates found in the literature, depending on source volume. To complement the macroscopic study, simulations were run in a small tissue volume in Geant4-DNA toolkit. As an expansion of Geant4 meant to simulate direct physical interactions at the cellular level, the particle track structure of the radon progeny alphas can be analyzed to estimate the damage that can occur in sensitive cellular structures like the DNA molecule. These estimates of DNA double strand breaks are lower than those found in Geant4-DNA studies. Further refinements of the microscopic model are at the cutting edge of nanodosimetry research.

  8. Analysis of renal impairment in MM-003, a phase III study of pomalidomide + low - dose dexamethasone versus high - dose dexamethasone in refractory or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Katja C; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Moreau, Philippe; Lacy, Martha Q; Song, Kevin W; Delforge, Michel; Karlin, Lionel; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Banos, Anne; Oriol, Albert; Alegre, Adrian; Chen, Christine; Cavo, Michele; Garderet, Laurent; Ivanova, Valentina; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Knop, Stefan; Yu, Xin; Hong, Kevin; Sternas, Lars; Jacques, Christian; Zaki, Mohamed H; San Miguel, Jesus

    2016-07-01

    Pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone is effective and well tolerated for refractory or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma after bortezomib and lenalidomide failure. The phase III trial MM-003 compared pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone with high-dose dexamethasone. This subanalysis grouped patients by baseline creatinine clearance ≥ 30 - < 60 mL/min (n=93, pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone; n=56, high-dose dexamethasone) or ≥ 60 mL/min (n=205, pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone; n=93, high-dose dexamethasone). Median progression-free survival was similar for both subgroups and favored pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone versus high-dose dexamethasone: 4.0 versus 1.9 months in the group with baseline creatinine clearance ≥ 30 - < 60 mL/min (P<0.001) and 4.0 versus 2.0 months in the group with baseline creatinine clearance ≥ 60 mL/min (P<0.001). Median overall survival for pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone versus high-dose dexamethasone was 10.4 versus 4.9 months (P=0.030) and 15.5 versus 9.2 months (P=0.133), respectively. Improved renal function, defined as an increase in creatinine clearance from < 60 to ≥ 60 mL/min, was similar in pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone and high-dose dexamethasone patients (42% and 47%, respectively). Improvement in progression-free and overall survival in these patients was comparable with that in patients without renal impairment. There was no increase in discontinuations of therapy, dose modifications, and adverse events in patients with moderate renal impairment. Pomalidomide at a starting dose of 4 mg + low-dose dexamethasone is well tolerated in patients with refractory or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma, and of comparable efficacy if moderate renal impairment is present. This trial was registered with clinicaltrials.gov identifier 01311687 and EudraCT identifier 2010-019820-30. PMID:27081177

  9. Analysis of renal impairment in MM-003, a phase III study of pomalidomide + low - dose dexamethasone versus high - dose dexamethasone in refractory or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Weisel, Katja C.; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Moreau, Philippe; Lacy, Martha Q.; Song, Kevin W.; Delforge, Michel; Karlin, Lionel; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Banos, Anne; Oriol, Albert; Alegre, Adrian; Chen, Christine; Cavo, Michele; Garderet, Laurent; Ivanova, Valentina; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Knop, Stefan; Yu, Xin; Hong, Kevin; Sternas, Lars; Jacques, Christian; Zaki, Mohamed H.; Miguel, Jesus San

    2016-01-01

    Pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone is effective and well tolerated for refractory or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma after bortezomib and lenalidomide failure. The phase III trial MM-003 compared pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone with high-dose dexamethasone. This subanalysis grouped patients by baseline creatinine clearance ≥ 30 − < 60 mL/min (n=93, pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone; n=56, high-dose dexamethasone) or ≥ 60 mL/min (n=205, pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone; n=93, high-dose dexamethasone). Median progression-free survival was similar for both subgroups and favored pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone versus high-dose dexamethasone: 4.0 versus 1.9 months in the group with baseline creatinine clearance ≥ 30 − < 60 mL/min (P<0.001) and 4.0 versus 2.0 months in the group with baseline creatinine clearance ≥ 60 mL/min (P<0.001). Median overall survival for pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone versus high-dose dexamethasone was 10.4 versus 4.9 months (P=0.030) and 15.5 versus 9.2 months (P=0.133), respectively. Improved renal function, defined as an increase in creatinine clearance from < 60 to ≥ 60 mL/min, was similar in pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone and high-dose dexamethasone patients (42% and 47%, respectively). Improvement in progression-free and overall survival in these patients was comparable with that in patients without renal impairment. There was no increase in discontinuations of therapy, dose modifications, and adverse events in patients with moderate renal impairment. Pomalidomide at a starting dose of 4 mg + low-dose dexamethasone is well tolerated in patients with refractory or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma, and of comparable efficacy if moderate renal impairment is present. This trial was registered with clinicaltrials.gov identifier 01311687 and EudraCT identifier 2010-019820-30. PMID:27081177

  10. A Multi-Compartment, Single and Multiple Dose Pharmacokinetic Study of the Vaginal Candidate Microbicide 1% Tenofovir Gel

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jill L.; Rountree, Wes; Kashuba, Angela D. M.; Brache, Vivian; Creinin, Mitchell D.; Poindexter, Alfred; Kearney, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Tenofovir (TFV) gel is being evaluated as a microbicide with pericoital and daily regimens. To inhibit viral replication locally, an adequate concentration in the genital tract is critical. Methods and Findings Forty-nine participants entered a two-phase study: single-dose (SD) and multi-dose (MD), were randomized to collection of genital tract samples (endocervical cells [ECC], cervicovaginal aspirate and vaginal biopsies) at one of seven time points [0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 24 hr(s)] post-dose following SD exposure of 4 mL 1% TFV gel and received a single dose. Forty-seven were randomized to once (QD) or twice daily (BID) dosing for 2 weeks and to collection of genital tract samples at 4, 8 or 24 hrs after the final dose, but two discontinued prior to gel application. Blood was collected during both phases at the seven times post-dose. TFV exposure was low in blood plasma for SD and MD; median Cmax was 4.0 and 3.4 ng/mL, respectively (C≤29 ng/mL). TFV concentrations were high in aspirates and tissue after SD and MD, ranging from 1.2×104 to 9.9×106 ng/mL and 2.1×102 to 1.4×106 ng/mL, respectively, and did not noticeably differ between proximal and distal tissue. TFV diphosphate (TFV-DP), the intracellular active metabolite, was high in ECC, ranging from 7.1×103 to 8.8×106 ng/mL. TFV-DP was detectable in approximately 40% of the tissue samples, ranging from 1.8×102 to 3.5×104 ng/mL. AUC for tissue TFV-DP was two logs higher after MD compared to SD, with no noticeable differences when comparing QD and BID. Conclusions Single-dose and multiple-dose TFV gel exposure resulted in high genital tract concentrations for at least 24 hours post-dose with minimal systemic absorption. These results support further study of TFV gel for HIV prevention. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00561496 PMID:22039430

  11. A study of the angular dependence problem in effective dose equivalent assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.G.; Reece, W.D.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1995-02-01

    The newly revised American National Standard N13.11 (1993) includes measurements of angular response as part of personnel dosimeter performance testing. However, data on effective dose equivalent (H{sub E}), the principle limiting quantity defined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 26 and later adopted by U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), for radiation incident on the body from off-normal angles are little seen in the literature. The absence of scientific data has led to unnecessarily conservative approaches in radiation protection practices. This paper presents a new set of fluence-to-H{sub E} conversion factors as a function of radiation angles and sex for monoenergetic photon beams of 0.08, 0.3, and 1.0 MeV. A Monte Carlo transport code (MCNP) and sex-specific anthropomorphic phantoms were used in this study. Results indicate that Anterior-posterior (AP) exposure produces the highest H{sub E} per unit photon fluence in all cases. Posterior-anterior (PA) exposure produces the highest H{sub E} among beams incident from the rear half-plane of the body. H{sub E} decreases dramatically as one departs from the AP and PA orientations. Results also indicate that overestimations caused by using isotropic dosimeters in assessing effective dose equivalent from near-overhead and near-underfoot exposures are 550%, 390%, and 254% for 0.08, 0.3, and 1.0 MeV, respectively. Comparisons of the angular dependence of H{sub E} with those based on the secondary quantities defined in International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) Reports 39, 43, and 47 show significant differences. This paper discusses why more accurate assessments of H{sub E} are necessary and possible. An empirical equation is proposed which can be used as the optimum dosimeter angular response function for radiation angles ranging from 0{degrees} to 90{degrees} for dosimeter calibration, performance testing, and design. 27 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Experimental study on photon-beam peripheral doses, their components and some possibilities for their reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Rühmann, Antje; Willborn, Kay C.; Wiezorek, Tilo; Poppe, Björn

    2010-07-01

    The component analysis of the peripheral doses produced at typical accelerators such as the Siemens Primus 6/15 is regarded as an approach enabling technical strategies towards the reduction of second malignancies associated with photon beam radiotherapy. Suitable phantom and detector arrangements have been applied to show that the unavoidable peripheral dose contribution due to photon scattering from the directly irradiated part of the body or phantom does not constitute the entirety of the peripheral doses. Rather, there are peripheral dose contributions due to beam head leakage and to extrafocal radiation which can be regarded as partly avoidable. Simple methods of reducing beam head leakage from the Siemens Primus 6/15 linac are, for the crossplane direction, to install a pair of adjustable shielding blocks in the accessory holder and, for the inplane direction, to close all out-of-field leaf pairs of the multileaf collimator via the treatment planning system software. The relative efficiency of these shielding measures is largest in the case of small unavoidable dose