Science.gov

Sample records for 130-260 ghz fusion-fem

  1. Construction, testing of the 1 MW, 130-260 GHz Fusion-FEM

    SciTech Connect

    Urbanus, W.H.; Bongers, G.; Dijk, C.A.J. van

    1995-12-31

    During the previous 9 months the major part of the Fusion-FEM has been constructed. The 2 MV Insulated Core Transformer, the electron gun, the accelerator, the focusing lenses and the undulator have been tested on-site. In the present - temporary - set-up, the electron beam line consists of a 12 A, 80 keV thermionic electron gun, a 2 MeV dc accelerator, beam transport optics, the undulator and a collector. The gun is mounted in the high voltage terminal, which is now at -2 MV, and the undulator and mm-wave system am at ground potential outside the SF{sub 6}-filled pressure tank. This so-called inverse set-up allows easy access to the larger part of the beam line, the undulator and the mm-wave system, which is important in the conditioning phase. The decelerator and depressed collector am not yet installed. The design of the electron beam line has been optimised using the GPS particle-tracking code and the TOSCA code. The TOSCA code is used for accurate field calculations of the magnetic lenses. The results are used in the GPS code. The combination of these two codes allows optimization of the tens designs with respect to aberations, such as to avoid emittance growth. The mm-wave beam line has been designed, including a Boron-Nitride, Brewster angle, high power, broadband window. The window is designed for transmitting 1 MW of mm-wave power in the frequency range 130 - 260 GHz. Loss power is of the order of a percent. The first major goal is the transport of the electron beam through the undulator with only a small loss current. We report the final design of the electron beam line, the design of the mm-wave beam line, and the status of construction and testing of the Fusion-FEM.

  2. Simulations of the performance of the Fusion-FEM, for an increased e-beam emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Tulupov, A.V.; Urbanus, W.H.; Caplan, M.

    1995-12-31

    The original design of the Fusion-FEM, which is under construction at the FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, was based on an electron beam emittance of 50 {pi} mm mrad. Recent measurements of the emittance of the beam emitted by the electron gun showed that the actual emittance is 80 {pi} mm mrad. This results in a 2.5 times lower beam current density inside the undulator. As a result it changes the linear gain, the start-up time, the saturation level and the frequency spectrum. The main goal of the FEM project is to demonstrate a stable microwave output power of at least 1 MW. The decrease of the electron beam current density has to be compensated by variations of the other FEM parameters, such as the reflection (feedback) coefficient of the microwave cavity and the length of the drift gap between the two sections of the step-tapered undulator. All basic dependencies of the linear and nonlinear gain, and of the output power on the main FEM parameters have been simulated numerically with the CRMFEL code. Regimes of stable operation of the FEM with the increased emittance have been found. These regimes could be found because of the original flexibility of the FEM design.

  3. Graphene based GHz detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Anthony K.; El Fatimy, Abdel; Barbara, Paola; Nath, Anindya; Campbell, Paul M.; Myers-Ward, Rachael; Daniels, Kevin; Gaskill, D. Kurt

    Graphene demonstrates great promise as a detector over a wide spectral range especially in the GHz range. This is because absorption is enhanced due to the Drude contribution. In the GHz range there are viable detection mechanisms for graphene devices. With this in mind, two types of GHz detectors are fabricated on epitaxial graphene using a lift off resist-based clean lithography process to produce low contact resistance. Both device types use asymmetry for detection, consistent with recent thoughts of the photothermoelectric effect (PTE) mechanism. The first is an antenna coupled device. It utilizes two dissimilar contact metals and the work function difference produces the asymmetry. The other device is a field effect transistor constructed with an asymmetric top gate that creates a PN junction and facilitates tuning the photovoltaic response. The response of both device types, tested from 100GHz to 170GHz, are reported. This work was sponsored by the U.S. Office of Naval Research (Award Number N000141310865).

  4. A 90-GHz Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.T.; Hogan, M.J.; Ferrario, M.; Serafini, L.; /Frascati /INFN, Milan

    2005-09-12

    Photocathode rf guns depend on mode locked laser systems to produce an electron beam at a given phase of the rf. In general, the laser pulse is less than {sigma}{sub z} = 10{sup o} of rf phase in length and the required stability is on the order of {Delta}{phi} = 1{sup o}. At 90 GHz (W-band), these requirements correspond to {sigma}{sub z} = 333 fsec and {Delta}{phi} = 33 fsec. Laser system with pulse lengths in the fsec regime are commercially available, the timing stability is a major concern. We propose a multi-cell W-band photoinjector that does not require a mode locked laser system. Thereby eliminating the stability requirements at W-band. The laser pulse is allowed to be many rf periods long. In principle, the photoinjector can now be considered as a thermionic rf gun. Instead of using an alpha magnet to compress the electron bunch, which would have a detrimental effect on the transverse phase space quality due to longitudinal phase space mixing, we propose to use long pulse laser system and a pair of undulators to produce a low emittance, high current, ultra-short electron bunch for beam dynamics experiments in the 90 GHz regime.

  5. An SIS Waveguide heterodyne Reciever for 600 GHz - 635 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salez, Morvan; Febvre, Pascal; McGrath, William R.; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry G.

    1994-01-01

    A waveguide SIS heterodyne receiver using a Nb/A10xNb junction has been built for astronomical observations of molecular tranitions in the frequency range 600GHz - 635GHZ, and has been successfully used at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO).

  6. 180-GHz Interferometric Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Lim, Boon H.; O'Dwyer, Ian J.; Soria, Mary M.; Owen, Heather R.; Gaier, Todd C.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn, H.; Tanner, Alan B.; Ruf, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A 180-GHz interferometric imager uses compact receiver modules, combined high- and low-gain antennas, and ASIC (application specific integrated circuit) correlator technology, enabling continuous, all-weather observations of water vapor with 25-km resolution and 0.3-K noise in 15 minutes of observation for numerical weather forecasting and tropical storm prediction. The GeoSTAR-II prototype instrument is broken down into four major subsystems: the compact, low-noise receivers; sub-array modules; IF signal distribution; and the digitizer/correlator. Instead of the single row of antennas adopted in GeoSTAR, this version has four rows of antennas on a coarser grid. This dramatically improves the sensitivity in the desired field of view. The GeoSTAR-II instrument is a 48-element, synthetic, thinned aperture radiometer operating at 165-183 GHz. The instrument has compact receivers integrated into tiles of 16 elements in a 4x4 arrangement. These tiles become the building block of larger arrays. The tiles contain signal distribution for bias controls, IF signal, and local oscillator signals. The IF signals are digitized and correlated using an ASIC correlator to minimize power consumption. Previous synthetic aperture imagers have used comparatively large multichip modules, whereas this approach uses chip-scale modules mounted on circuit boards, which are in turn mounted on the distribution manifolds. This minimizes the number of connectors and reduces system mass. The use of ASIC technology in the digitizers and correlators leads to a power reduction close to an order of magnitude.

  7. 30 GHz Commercial Satellite Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Ponchak, George E.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    NASA's research and development work in satellite communications for the past 10 years has included a major technology thrust aimed at opening the Ka frequency band to commercial exploitation. This has included the development and testing of advanced system network architectures, on-board switching and processing, multibeam and phased array antennas, and satellite and ground terminal RF and digital hardware. Development work in system hardware has focused on critical components including power amplifiers, satellite IF switch matrices, low noise receivers, baseband processors, and high data rate bandwidth efficient modems. This paper describes NASA's work in developing and testing 30 GHz low noise satellite receivers for commercial space communications uplink applications. Frequencies allotted for fixed service commercial satellite communications in the Ka band are 27.5 - 30.0 GHz for uplink transmission and 17.7 - 20.2 GHz for downlink transmission. The relatively large 2.5 GHz bandwidth lends itself to wideband, high data rate digital transmission applications.

  8. A 20-GHz IMPATT transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, J. L.; Sun, C.

    1983-01-01

    The engineering development of a solid state transmitter amplifier operating in the 20 GHz frequency band. The development effort involved a variety of disciplines including IMPATT device development, circulator design, simple and multiple diode circuits designs, and amplifier integration and test.

  9. 32-GHz Wideband Maser Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, J. S.; Neff, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    High-gain, wideband, microwave amplifier based on ruby cooled by liquid helium. Features include low input equivalent noise temperature and 400-MHz bandwidth. Design basically extension of previous reflected-wave masers built for frequency range of 18 to 26 GHz. Maser amplifier includes eight stages connected in reflected-wave configuration. Particularly useful for detection of weak microwave signals in radio astronomy and communications.

  10. 338-GHz Semiconductor Amplifier Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Gaier, Todd C.; Soria, Mary M.; Fung, King Man; Rasisic, Vesna; Deal, William; Leong, Kevin; Mei, Xiao Bing; Yoshida, Wayne; Liu, Po-Hsin; Uyeda, Jansen; Lai, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Research findings were reported from an investigation of new gallium nitride (GaN) monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers (PAs) targeting the highest output power and the highest efficiency for class-A operation in W-band (75-110 GHz). W-band PAs are a major component of many frequency multiplied submillimeter-wave LO signal sources. For spectrometer arrays, substantial W-band power is required due to the passive lossy frequency multipliers.

  11. 32-GHz Wideband Maser Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, J. S.; Neff, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    High-gain, wideband, microwave amplifier based on ruby cooled by liquid helium. Features include low input equivalent noise temperature and 400-MHz bandwidth. Design basically extension of previous reflected-wave masers built for frequency range of 18 to 26 GHz. Maser amplifier includes eight stages connected in reflected-wave configuration. Particularly useful for detection of weak microwave signals in radio astronomy and communications.

  12. Sixty GHz IMPATT diode development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Y. E.; Chen, J.; Benko, E.; Barger, M. J.; Nghiem, H.; Trinh, T. Q.; Kung, J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop 60 GHz GaAs IMPATT Diodes suitable for communications applications. The performance goal of the 60 GHz IMPATT is 1W CW output power with a conversion efficiency of 15 percent and 10 year life time. During the course of the program, double drift (DD) GaAs IMPATT Diodes have been developed resulting in the state of the art performance at V band frequencies. A CW output power of 1.12 W was demonstrated at 51.9 GHz with 9.7 percent efficiency. The best conversion efficiency achieved was 15.3 percent. V band DD GaAs IMPATTs were developed using both small signal and large signal analyses. GaAs wafers of DD flat, DD hybrid, and DD Read profiles using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) were developed with excellent doping profile control. Wafer evaluation was routinely made by the capacitance versus voltage (C-V) measurement. Ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis was also used for more detailed profile evaluation.

  13. Single-chip electron spin resonance detectors operating at 50 GHz, 92 GHz, and 146 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheoud, Alessandro V.; Gualco, Gabriele; Jeong, Minki; Zivkovic, Ivica; Brugger, Jürgen; Rønnow, Henrik M.; Anders, Jens; Boero, Giovanni

    2017-05-01

    We report on the design and characterization of single-chip electron spin resonance (ESR) detectors operating at 50 GHz, 92 GHz, and 146 GHz. The core of the single-chip ESR detectors is an integrated LC-oscillator, formed by a single turn aluminum planar coil, a metal-oxide-metal capacitor, and two metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors used as negative resistance network. On the same chip, a second, nominally identical, LC-oscillator together with a mixer and an output buffer are also integrated. Thanks to the slightly asymmetric capacitance of the mixer inputs, a signal at a few hundreds of MHz is obtained at the output of the mixer. The mixer is used for frequency down-conversion, with the aim to obtain an output signal at a frequency easily manageable off-chip. The coil diameters are 120 μm, 70 μm, and 45 μm for the U-band, W-band, and the D-band oscillators, respectively. The experimental frequency noises at 100 kHz offset from the carrier are 90 Hz/Hz1/2, 300 Hz/Hz1/2, and 700 Hz/Hz1/2 at 300 K, respectively. The ESR spectra are obtained by measuring the frequency variations of the single-chip oscillators as a function of the applied magnetic field. The experimental spin sensitivities, as measured with a sample of α,γ-bisdiphenylene-β-phenylallyl (BDPA)/benzene complex, are 1 × 108 spins/Hz1/2, 4 × 107 spins/Hz1/2, 2 × 107 spins/Hz1/2 at 300 K, respectively. We also show the possibility to perform experiments up to 360 GHz by means of the higher harmonics in the microwave field produced by the integrated single-chip LC-oscillators.

  14. 47 CFR 25.136 - Licensing provisions for user transceivers in the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile Satellite Services. 25.136 Section 25.136..., 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile Satellite Services. In addition to the technical requirements specified in § 25.213, earth stations operating in the 1.6/2.4 GHz and 1.5/1.6 GHz Mobile Satellite...

  15. 47 CFR 25.136 - Licensing provisions for user transceivers in the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile Satellite Services. 25.136 Section 25.136..., 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile Satellite Services. In addition to the technical requirements specified in § 25.213, earth stations operating in the 1.6/2.4 GHz and 1.5/1.6 GHz Mobile Satellite Services...

  16. 47 CFR 25.136 - Licensing provisions for user transceivers in the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile-Satellite Services. 25.136 Section 25.136..., 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile-Satellite Services. In addition to the technical requirements specified in § 25.213, earth stations operating in the 1.6/2.4 GHz and 1.5/1.6 GHz Mobile-Satellite Services...

  17. MMIC Amplifiers for 90 to 130 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Pukala, David; Peralta, Alejandro; Bryerton, Eric; Morgan, Matt; Boyd, T.; Hu, Ming; Schmitz, Adele

    2007-01-01

    This brief describes two monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) amplifier chips optimized to function in the frequency range of 90 to 130 GHz, covering nearly all of F-band (90 - 140 GHz). These amplifiers were designed specifically for local-oscillator units in astronomical radio telescopes such as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). They could also be readily adapted for use in electronic test equipment, automotive radar systems, and communications systems that operate between 90 and 130 GHz.

  18. Teleportation of a 3-dimensional GHZ State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hai-Jing; Wang, Huai-Sheng; Li, Peng-Fei; Song, He-Shan

    2012-05-01

    The process of teleportation of a completely unknown 3-dimensional GHZ state is considered. Three maximally entangled 3-dimensional Bell states function as quantum channel in the scheme. This teleportation scheme can be directly generalized to teleport an unknown d-dimensional GHZ state.

  19. The Future RFI Environment Above 30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, Andrew W.

    1995-12-01

    Encompassing 30 - 300 GHz, the millimeter wave (mmW) band offers relief from spectrum crowding at lower frequencies, large available bandwidth, favorable propagation characteristics for certain applications, and relatively high directivity with small antennas. The FCC has recently proposed regulatory changes to foster commercial development of the mmW band. Impending actions include: Designating the 46.7-46.9 GHz and 76-77 GHz bands for unlicensed vehicular radar systems. Potentially tens of millions of vehicles will be equipped with radars to provide ``intelligent cruise control" capability and driver blind-spot warnings. Unwanted emissions from vehicular radar systems may produce harmful interference to passive systems operating in protected bands. Opening the 59-64 GHz band, in which propagation is limited to short distances due to high atmospheric attenuation, to general unlicensed devices. A likely application for this band is wireless local area computer networks. The neighboring bands of 58.2 - 59 and 64 - 65 GHz are allocated to the passive services. Changes still under consideration include: Opening the 116 - 117 GHz band, co-located with an existing passive allocation, for licensed (116 - 116.5 GHz) and general unlicensed (116.5 - 117 GHz) devices. The opening (for licensed and unlicensed services) of nearly 5 GHz of additional spectrum space which neighbors passive allocations and poses a potential interference problem from out-of-band emissions. The status of the FCC's actions concerning the mmW band will be updated. An attempt will be made to predict the RFI environment in the mmW band assuming the likely applications for each of the reallocated bands. Particular emphasis will be placed on the impact of the FCC's actions on current and planned remote sensing and radio astronomy operations.

  20. Distilling perfect GHZ states from two copies of non-GHZ-diagonal mixed states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-Wen; Tang, Shi-Qing; Yuan, Ji-Bing; Zhang, Deng-Yu

    2017-06-01

    It has been shown that a nearly pure Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state could be distilled from a large (even infinite) number of GHZ-diagonal states that can be obtained by depolarizing general multipartite mixed states (non-GHZ-diagonal states) through sequences of (probabilistic) local operations and classical communications. We here demonstrate that perfect GHZ states can be extracted, with certain probabilities, from two copies of non-GHZ-diagonal mixed states when some conditions are satisfied. This result implies that it is not necessary to depolarize these entangled mixed states to the GHZ-diagonal type, and that they are better than GHZ-diagonal states for distillation of pure GHZ states. We find a wide class of multipartite entangled mixed states that fulfill the requirements. Moreover, we display that the obtained result can be applied to practical noisy environments, e.g., amplitude-damping channels. Our findings provide an important complementarity to conventional GHZ-state distillation protocols (designed for GHZ-diagonal states) in theory, as well as having practical applications.

  1. Cryogenic 160-GHz MMIC Heterodyne Receiver Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Soria, Mary M.; Owen, Heather R.; Dawson, Douglas E.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Gaier, Todd C.; Voll, Patricia; Lau, Judy; Sieth, Matt; Church, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    A cryogenic 160-GHz MMIC heterodyne receiver module has demonstrated a system noise temperature of 100 K or less at 166 GHz. This module builds upon work previously described in Development of a 150-GHz MMIC Module Prototype for Large-Scale CMB Radiation (NPO-47664), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 35, No. 8 (August 2011), p. 27. In the original module, the local oscillator signal was saturating the MMIC low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) with power. In order to suppress the local oscillator signal from reaching the MMIC LNAs, the W-band (75 110 GHz) signal had to be filtered out before reaching 140 170 GHz. A bandpass filter was developed to cover 120 170 GHz, using microstrip parallel-coupled lines to achieve the desired filter bandwidth, and ensure that the unwanted W-band local oscillator signal would be sufficiently suppressed. With the new bandpass filter, the entire receiver can work over the 140 180-GHz band, with a minimum system noise temperature of 460 K at 166 GHz. The module was tested cryogenically at 20 K ambient temperature, and it was found that the receiver had a noise temperature of 100 K over an 8-GHz bandwidth. The receiver module now includes a microstrip bandpass filter, which was designed to have a 3-dB bandwidth of approximately 120-170 GHz. The filter was fabricated on a 3-mil-thick alumina substrate. The filter design was based on a W-band filter design made at JPL and used in the QUIET (Q/U Imaging ExperimenT) radiometer modules. The W-band filter was scaled for a new center frequency of 150 GHz, and the microstrip segments were changed accordingly. Also, to decrease the bandwidth of the resulting scaled design, the center gaps between the microstrip lines were increased (by four micrometers in length) compared to the gaps near the edges. The use of the 150-GHz bandpass filter has enabled the receiver module to function well at room temperature. The system noise temperature was measured to be less than 600 K (at room temperature) from 154 to 168 GHz

  2. 47 CFR 15.251 - Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz. 15.251 Section 15.251 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  3. 47 CFR 15.251 - Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz. 15.251 Section 15.251 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  4. 47 CFR 15.251 - Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz. 15.251 Section 15.251 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  5. 47 CFR 15.251 - Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz. 15.251 Section 15.251 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  6. 47 CFR 15.251 - Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation within the bands 2.9-3.26 GHz, 3.267-3.332 GHz, 3.339-3.3458 GHz, and 3.358-3.6 GHz. 15.251 Section 15.251 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  7. Millimeter wave absorption in the nonhuman primate eye at 35 GHz and 94 GHz.

    PubMed

    Chalfin, Steven; D'Andrea, John A; Comeau, Paul D; Belt, Michael E; Hatcher, Donald J

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate anterior segment bioeffects of pulsed 35 GHz and 94 GHz microwave exposure in the nonhuman primate eye. Five juvenile rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) underwent baseline anterior segment ocular assessment consisting of slit lamp examination, corneal topography, specular microscopy, and pachymetry. These studies were repeated after exposure of one eye to pulsed 35 GHz or 94 GHz microwaves at varied fluences, with the other eye serving as a control. The mean fluence required to produce a threshold corneal lesion (faint epithelial edema and fluorescein staining) was 7.5 J cm(-2) at 35 GHz and 5 J cm(-2) at 94 GHz. Transient changes in corneal topography and pachymetry were noted at these fluences. Endothelial cell counts remained unchanged. Threshold corneal injury from 35 GHz and 94 GHz microwave exposure is produced at fluences below those previously reported for CO2 laser radiation. These data may help elucidate the mechanism of thermal injury to the cornea, and resolve discrepancies between IEEE C95.1 (1999), NCRP (1986), and ICNIRP (1998) safety standards for exposure to non-ionizing radiation at millimeter wavelengths.

  8. Contactless Investigations of Yeast Cell Cultivation in the 7 GHz and 240 GHz Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, J.; Schmalz, K.; Gastrock, G.; Cahill, B. P.; Meliani, C.

    2013-04-01

    Using a microfluidic system based on PTFE tubes, experimental results of contactless and label-free characterization techniques of yeast cell cultivation are presented. The PTFE tube has an inner diameter of 0.5 mm resulting in a sample volume of 2 μ1 for 1 cm sample length. Two approaches (at frequencies around 7 GHz and 240 GHz) are presented and compared in terms of sensitivity and applicability. These frequency bands are particularly interesting to gain information on the permittivity of yeast cells in Glucose solution. Measurements from 240 GHz to 300 GHz were conducted with a continuous wave spectrometer from Toptica. At 7 GHz band, measurements have been performed using a rat-race based characterizing system realized on a printed circuit board. The conducted experiments demonstrate that by selecting the phase as characterization parameter, the presented contactless and label-free techniques are suitable for cell cultivation monitoring in a PTFE pipe based microfluidic system.

  9. 140-GHz pulsed Fourier transform microwave spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbe, W. F.; Leskovar, B.

    1985-01-01

    A pulsed microwave spectrometer operating in the vicinity of 140 GHz for the detection of rotational transitions in gaseous molecules is described. The spectrometer incorporates a tunable Fabry-Perot cavity and a subharmonically pumped superheterodyne receiver for the detection of the molecular emission signals. A 70-GHz source supplying a high-efficiency frequency doubler which is pulse modulated at 30 MHz produces sidebands of sufficient power at 140 GHz to excite the molecules. The cavity is tuned to one of the modulation sidebands. The operation of the spectrometer is illustrated by the detection of emission signals from the 6(2, 4)-6(1, 5) transition of SO2 gas. The generation of the electric dipole analog of nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) ``spin-echo'' signals by a π/2-π pulse sequence is also described.

  10. A 30 GHz monolithic receive module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondal, J.; Contolatis, T.; Geddes, J.; Bauhahn, P.; Sokolov, V.

    1990-01-01

    The technical achievements and deliveries made during the duration of the program to develop a 30 GHz monolithic receive module for communication feed array applications and to deliver submodules and 30 GHz monolithic receive modules for experimental evaluation are discussed. Key requirements include an overall receive module noise figure of 5 dB, a 30 dB RF-to-RF gain with six levels of intermediate gain control, a five bit phase shifter, and a maximum power consumption of 250 mW. In addition, the monolithic receive module design addresses a cost goal of less than one thousand dollars (1980 dollars) per module in unit buys of 5,000 or more, and a mechanical configuration that is applicable to a spaceborne phase array system. An additional task for the development and delivery of 32 GHz phase shifter integrated circuit (IC) for deep space communication is also described.

  11. Low noise amplifiers above 18 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennan, W.; Chye, P.

    Noise reduction in ground stations operating above 18 GHz are explored in terms of current limitations in device, measurement and circuit technology and progress on a low noise amplifier. GaAs FETs have, as of 1982, reached a level of 1.55 dB noise and 12.3 dB gain. The devices include a 75 micron gate width and sub-quarter micron gate length. The noise figures are thus far determined in the 20-22 GHz range. A balanced microstrip circuit 0.65 x 0.51 cm in size featuring Lange couplers, input and output matching circuits, quarter wavelength bias chokes and TaN resistor bias networks has been developed for VSWR and cascading stages applications. The amplifier, in a two-stage configuration, has furnished a bandwidth of 12-22 GHz.

  12. A 12 GHz broadband latching circulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoh, Y.; Konishi, H.; Sakamoto, K.

    The two kinds of latching circulators, external return path and internal return path, are defined, noting the advantages (faster switching speed, lower switching energy, less complicated fabrication) offered by the internal configuration. It is noted, however, that this kind of circulator is difficult to make broadband because the return paths do not seem to act as part of the ferrite junction. The development of a 12-GHz broadband, internal return path circulator with impedance matching transformer and in-phase adjustment screws designed using eigenvalue measurement is described. In describing the operating characteristics, it is noted that more than 25 dB isolation over 11 GHz to 13.5 GHz and 0.25 dB insertion loss is obtained.

  13. Characterization of Power MESFETs at 21 GHz.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-15

    constructed for use between 12 and 24 GHz based on a microwave- diplexer filter. The bias-tee is constructed using air and teflon- loaded coaxial transmission...FREQUENCY 21 GHz GAIN (dB) VDe 6.5 V 8 I = 139 mnA AT RF MAX 7 28- D 6 z171 mnA no RF 5 4 -186 mnA AT 22.9 24 -dBmn OUTImI 2020 ~16- 14 12 12 88 4 4

  14. 17 GHz High Gradient Accelerator Research

    SciTech Connect

    Temkin, Richard J.; Shapiro, Michael A.

    2013-07-10

    This is a report on the MIT High Gradient Accelerator Research program which has included: Operation of the 17 GHz, 25 MeV MIT/Haimson Research Corp. electron accelerator at MIT, the highest frequency, stand-alone accelerator in the world; collaboration with members of the US High Gradient Collaboration, including the design and test of novel structures at SLAC at 11.4 GHz; the design, construction and testing of photonic bandgap structures, including metallic and dielectric structures; the investigation of the wakefields in novel structures; and the training of the next generation of graduate students and postdoctoral associates in accelerator physics.

  15. The 60 GHz solid state power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclymonds, J.

    1991-01-01

    A new amplifier architecture was developed during this contract that is superior to any other solid state approach. The amplifier produced 6 watts with 4 percent efficiency over a 2 GHz band at 61.5 GHz. The unit was 7 x 9 x 3 inches in size, 5.5 pounds in weight, and the conduction cooling through the baseplate is suitable for use in space. The amplifier used high efficiency GaAs IMPATT diodes which were mounted in 1-diode circuits, called modules. Eighteen modules were used in the design, and power combining was accomplished with a proprietary passive component called a combiner plate.

  16. 95 GHz gyrotron with ferroelectric cathode.

    PubMed

    Einat, M; Pilossof, M; Ben-Moshe, R; Hirshbein, H; Borodin, D

    2012-11-02

    Ferroelectric cathodes were reported as a feasible electron source for microwave tubes. However, due to the surface plasma emission characterizing this cathode, operation of millimeter wave tubes based on it remains questionable. Nevertheless, the interest in compact high power sources of millimeter waves and specifically 95 GHz is continually growing. In this experiment, a ferroelectric cathode is used as an electron source for a gyrotron with the output frequency extended up to 95 GHz. Power above a 5 kW peak and ~0.5 μs pulses are reported; a duty cycle of 10% is estimated to be achievable.

  17. 47 CFR 25.136 - Licensing provisions for user transceivers in the 1.6/2.4 GHz, 1.5/1.6 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Applications and Licenses Earth Stations § 25.136 Licensing provisions for user transceivers in the 1.6/2.4 GHz... specified in § 25.213, earth stations operating in the 1.6/2.4 GHz and 1.5/1.6 GHz Mobile Satellite Services... aircraft unless the earth station has a direct physical connection to the aircraft cabin or...

  18. A 20 GHz Active Receive Slot Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulintseff, A. N.; Lee, K.; Sukamto, L.; Chew, W.

    1994-01-01

    A 20 GHz active receive slot array has been developed for operation in the downlink frequency band of NASA's Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) for the ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) project. The AMT is to demonstrate voice and data communication between a mobile terminal in Los Angeles, California, and a fixed terminal in Cleveland, Ohio, via the ACTS satellite.

  19. Propagation handbook, frequencies above 10 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, Louis J.

    1988-01-01

    The progress and accomplishments in the developmet of the Fourth Edition of the NASA Propagation Effects Handbook for Satellite Systems Design, for frequencies 10 to 100 GHz, NASA Reference Publication 1082(04), dated May 1988, prepared by Westighouse Electric Corporation for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are discussed.

  20. A 20 GHz Active Receive Slot Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulintseff, A. N.; Lee, K.; Sukamto, L.; Chew, W.

    1994-01-01

    A 20 GHz active receive slot array has been developed for operation in the downlink frequency band of NASA's Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) for the ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) project. The AMT is to demonstrate voice and data communication between a mobile terminal in Los Angeles, California, and a fixed terminal in Cleveland, Ohio, via the ACTS satellite.

  1. 60 GHz Tapered Transmission Line Resonators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-15

    DARPA TEAM program (contract no. DAAB07-02-1- L428 ), Motorola, and the UC-Micro program. 60 GHz Tapered Transmission Line Resonators by...0403427, wafer fabrication donation by STMicroelectronics, DARPA TEAM program (con- tract no. DAAB07-02-1- L428 ), Motorola, and the UC-Micro program. 1

  2. 44/20 GHz Ground Terminal.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    contract was awarded to Andrew Antenna Co., Whitby , Ontario to design and construct the (44/20) GHz feed system. The design (Fig. 1) also included the...Receive 1.5 max. Power Rating (10 - 100) watts Axial ratios VSWR, and primary patterns (Appendix A) were measured at the Whitby Plant and supplied

  3. New high-performance complementary bipolar technology featuring 45-GHz NPN and 20-GHz PNP devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Martin C.; Osborne, Peter H.; Thomas, Simon; Cook, Trevor

    1999-09-01

    A new high performance silicon complementary bipolar technology is introduced. In addition a novel process 'enhancement' technique based on a local oxidation is described and demonstrated and NPN devices with cut-off frequencies up to 45GHz and PNP devices of 20GHz have been fabricate. We propose that the technique we have used will allow specific transistors within a circuit to be optimized, as required.

  4. A 10 GHz bandwidth, single transient, digitized oscilloscope with 20 GHz capability

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, C.L.; Kocimski, S.M.; Spector, J.; Thomas, J.B.; Woodstra, R.R.

    1993-12-31

    EG&G/EM has developed an oscilloscope with a {minus}3 dB bandwidth greater than 10 GHz. Its rolloff characteristics are such that single-transient data greater than 20 GHz may be captured. A demountable CCD camera records the oscilloscope trace and is provided with PC-compatible capture and data processing software. The capabilities of the oscilloscope, camera, and its processing software are described and examples of the system`s performance is shown.

  5. 164-GHz MMIC HEMT Frequency Doubler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Radisic, Vesna; Micovic, Miro; Hu, Ming; Janke, Paul; Ngo, Catherine; Nguyen, Loi; Morgan, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    A monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) that includes a high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) has been developed as a prototype of improved frequency doublers for generating signals at frequencies greater than 100 GHz. Signal sources that operate in this frequency range are needed for a variety of applications, notably including general radiometry and, more specifically, radiometric remote sensing of the atmosphere. Heretofore, it has been common practice to use passive (diode-based) frequency multipliers to obtain frequencies greater than 100 GHz. Unfortunately, diode-based frequency multipliers are plagued by high DC power consumption and low conversion efficiency. Moreover, multiplier diodes are not easily integrated with such other multiplier-circuit components as amplifiers and oscillators. The goals of developing the present MMIC HEMT frequency doubler were (1) to utilize the HEMT as an amplifier to increase conversion efficiency (more precisely, to reduce conversion loss), thereby increasing the output power for a given DC power consumption or, equivalently, reducing the DC power consumption for a given output power; and (2) to provide for the integration of amplifier and oscillator components on the same chip. The MMIC frequency doubler (see Figure 1) contains an AlInAs/GaInAs/InP HEMT biased at pinch-off to make it function as a class-B amplifier (meaning that it conducts in half-cycle pulses). Grounded coplanar waveguides (GCPWs) are used as impedance-matching transmission lines. Air bridges are placed at discontinuities to suppress undesired slot electromagnetic modes. Another combination of GCPWs also serves both as a low-pass filter to suppress undesired oscillations at frequencies below 60 GHz and as a DC blocker. Large decoupling capacitors and epitaxial resistors are added in the drain and gate lines to suppress bias oscillations. At the output terminal, the fundamental frequency is suppressed by a quarter-wave open stub, which presents

  6. Traveling-Wave Maser for 32 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, James; Clauss, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The figure depicts a traveling-wave ruby maser that has been designed (though not yet implemented in hardware) to serve as a low-noise amplifier for reception of weak radio signals in the frequency band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The design offers significant improvements over previous designs of 32-GHz traveling-wave masers. In addition, relative to prior designs of 32-GHz amplifiers based on high-electron-mobility transistors, this design affords higher immunity to radio-frequency interference and lower equivalent input noise temperature. In addition to the basic frequency-band and low-noise requirements, the initial design problem included a requirement for capability of operation in a closed-cycle helium refrigerator at a temperature .4 K and a requirement that the design be mechanically simplified, relative to prior designs, in order to minimize the cost of fabrication and assembly. Previous attempts to build 32- GHz traveling-wave masers involved the use of metallic slow-wave structures comprising coupled transverse electromagnetic (TEM)-mode resonators that were subject to very tight tolerances and, hence, were expensive to fabricate and assemble. Impedance matching for coupling signals into and out of these earlier masers was very difficult. A key feature of the design is a slow-wave structure, the metallic portions of which would be mechanically relatively simple in that, unlike in prior slow-wave structures, there would be no internal metal steps, irises, or posts. The metallic portions of the slow-wave structure would consist only of two rectangular metal waveguide arms. The arms would contain sections filled with the active material (ruby) alternating with evanescent-wave sections. This structure would be transparent in both the signal-frequency band (the aforementioned range of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz) and the pump-frequency band (65.75 to 66.75 GHz), and would impose large slowing factors in both frequency bands. Resonant ferrite isolators would be placed in the

  7. 47 CFR 101.525 - 24 GHz system operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 24 GHz system operations. 101.525 Section 101.525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.525 24 GHz...

  8. 47 CFR 101.525 - 24 GHz system operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 24 GHz system operations. 101.525 Section 101.525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.525 24 GHz...

  9. 47 CFR 101.525 - 24 GHz system operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false 24 GHz system operations. 101.525 Section 101.525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.525 24 GHz...

  10. 47 CFR 101.525 - 24 GHz system operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false 24 GHz system operations. 101.525 Section 101.525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.525 24 GHz...

  11. 47 CFR 101.525 - 24 GHz system operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 24 GHz system operations. 101.525 Section 101.525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.525 24 GHz...

  12. 802GHz integrated horn antennas imaging array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali-Ahmad, Walid Y.; Rebeiz, Gabriel M.; Dave, Hemant; Chin, Gordon

    1991-01-01

    Pattern measurements at 802GHz of a single element in 256-element integrated horn imaging array are presented. The integrated-horn antenna consists of a dipole-antenna suspended on a 1-micron dielectric membrane inside a pyramidal cavity etched in silicon. The theoretical far-field patterns, calculated using reciprocity and Floquet-modes representation of the free-space field, agree well with the measured far-field patterns at 802GHz. The associated directivity for a 1.40 lambda horn aperture, calculated from the measured E and H-plane patterns is 12.3dB + or - 0.2dB. This work demonstrates that high-efficiency integrated-horn antennas are easily scalable to terahertz frequencies and could be used for radio-astronomical and plasma-diagnostic applications.

  13. Integrated 222-GHz corner-reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gearhart, Steven S.; Ling, Curtis C.; Rebeiz, Gabriel M.

    1991-01-01

    A high-gain monolithic millimeter-wave antenna has been designed, fabricated, and tested at 222 GHz. The structure consists of a traveling-wave antenna integrated on a 1.2-micron dielectric membrane and suspended in a longitudinal cavity etched in a silicon wafer. A new traveling-wave antenna design yields a wideband input impedance and a low cross-polarization component in the E- and quasi-H-plane patterns. A directivity of 17.7 dB and a main-beam efficiency of 88.5 percent are calculated from the 222-GHz pattern measurements. The integrated corner-reflector antenna is well suited for millimeter- and submillimeter-wave imaging applications in large f-number systems.

  14. SEVENTH HARMONIC 20 GHz CO-GENERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L

    2014-04-08

    To satisfy the need for multi-MW rf sources in frequency ranges where commercial sources do not exist, a study was undertaken on a class of devices based on gyro-harmonic frequency multiplication. This mechanism relies upon adding energy in gyrating motion to a linear electron beam that traverses a rotating-mode TE111-mode drive cavity in a dc magnetic field. The beam then drifts along the magnetic field into a second cavity, operating in the TEn11-mode tuned to the nth harmonic of the drive cavity. Studies of this configuration have been carried out for 2 < n < 7. Results are given for multi-MW, efficient operation of a 7th harmonic device operating at 20 GHz, and a 2nd harmonic device operating at 22.4 GHz.

  15. Tree attenuation at 20 GHz: Foliage effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Wolfhard J.; Goldhirsh, Julius

    1993-08-01

    Static tree attenuation measurements at 20 GHz (K-Band) on a 30 deg slant path through a mature Pecan tree with and without leaves showed median fades exceeding approximately 23 dB and 7 dB, respectively. The corresponding 1% probability fades were 43 dB and 25 dB. Previous 1.6 GHz (L-Band) measurements for the bare tree case showed fades larger than those at K-Band by 3.4 dB for the median and smaller by approximately 7 dB at the 1% probability. While the presence of foliage had only a small effect on fading at L-Band (approximately 1 dB additional for the median to 1% probability range), the attenuation increase was significant at K-Band, where it increased by about 17 dB over the same probability range.

  16. Olympus 20/30 GHz communications payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartini, Lamberto; Sassorossi, Tiziano

    The 20/30 GHz communications payload, the first system of its type scheduled to operate in the Ka band, is designed to provide for communications systems test at 20/30 GHz over an area as large as Europe. To this end, two directive antennas with steerable beams, about one meter in diameter and connected to a transparent transponder, capable of supporting two narrow band channels (40 MHz) and one wideband channel (700 MHz), have been installed onboard the Olympus satellite. Experiments carried by the payload are described, including both point-to-point and multipoint teleconference services, a tele-education experiment, a transcommunications experiment with wideband signals, and a connection by digital transmission at 2048 Mbit/sec between small stations in Western Europe. Operating modes for the payload are outlined and the main results of the acceptance tests obtained on the first flight model are provided. A block diagram is included.

  17. Multiple teleportation via partially entangled GHZ state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Pei-Ying; Yu, Xu-Tao; Zhan, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Zai-Chen

    2016-08-01

    Quantum teleportation is important for quantum communication. We propose a protocol that uses a partially entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state for single hop teleportation. Quantum teleportation will succeed if the sender makes a Bell state measurement, and the receiver performs the Hadamard gate operation, applies appropriate Pauli operators, introduces an auxiliary particle, and applies the corresponding unitary matrix to recover the transmitted state.We also present a protocol to realize multiple teleportation of partially entangled GHZ state without an auxiliary particle. We show that the success probability of the teleportation is always 0 when the number of teleportations is odd. In order to improve the success probability of a multihop, we introduce the method used in our single hop teleportation, thus proposing a multiple teleportation protocol using auxiliary particles and a unitary matrix. The final success probability is shown to be improved significantly for the method without auxiliary particles for both an odd or even number of teleportations.

  18. Tree attenuation at 20 GHz: Foliage effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Wolfhard J.; Goldhirsh, Julius

    1993-01-01

    Static tree attenuation measurements at 20 GHz (K-Band) on a 30 deg slant path through a mature Pecan tree with and without leaves showed median fades exceeding approximately 23 dB and 7 dB, respectively. The corresponding 1% probability fades were 43 dB and 25 dB. Previous 1.6 GHz (L-Band) measurements for the bare tree case showed fades larger than those at K-Band by 3.4 dB for the median and smaller by approximately 7 dB at the 1% probability. While the presence of foliage had only a small effect on fading at L-Band (approximately 1 dB additional for the median to 1% probability range), the attenuation increase was significant at K-Band, where it increased by about 17 dB over the same probability range.

  19. VLBI survey at 2. 29 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.A.; Morabito, D.D.; Williams, J.G.; Faulkner, J.; Jauncey, D.L.

    1985-09-01

    VLBI observations at 2.29 GHz with fringe spacings of about 3 milliarcsec have been performed on 1398 radio sources spread over the entire sky. 917 sources were detected, including 93 percent of the identified BL Lacertae objects, 86 percent of the quasars, and 36 percent of the galaxies. The resulting catalog of compact radio sources is useful for various astrophysical studies and in the formation of VLBI celestial reference frames. 252 references.

  20. Australia 31-GHz brightness temperature exceedance statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, B. L.

    1988-01-01

    Water vapor radiometer measurements were made at DSS 43 during an 18 month period. Brightness temperatures at 31 GHz were subjected to a statistical analysis which included correction for the effects of occasional water on the radiometer radome. An exceedance plot was constructed, and the 1 percent exceedance statistics occurs at 120 K. The 5 percent exceedance statistics occurs at 70 K, compared with 75 K in Spain. These values are valid for all of the three month groupings that were studied.

  1. Novel 140 GHz gyro-TWT amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, W.; Kreischer, K.E.; Shapiro, M.; Temkin, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    The authors have designed and are currently building a novel gyro-TWT amplifier at powers up to 100 kW at a frequency of 140 GHz. The electron beam will be provided by an existing MIG electron gun which has been previously used in gyrotron oscillator research at the 100 kW power level at 140 GHz. The gun operates at 65 kV and up to 8A with {nu}{sub {perpendicular}}/{nu}{sub {parallel}} equal to 1.5. The novel wave circuit consists of two facing mirrors with confocal profiles in the transverse direction and flat profiles in the longitudinal direction. The mode is Gaussian-like in the transverse direction. This cavity design effectively reduces the mode competition problem in conventional amplifiers from two dimensions to one dimension. Another advantage of this circuit is the relatively large circuit size, which improves power capacity. Preliminary calculations indicate that the linear gain is about 2.7 dB/cm with an efficiency exceeding 20%. The driver of the Gyro-TWT amplifier is a 95 GHz Varian EIO generator with 100 W peak output power. The amplifier also employs a confocal mode converter which launches a gaussian beam along the axis. The slot size of the cavity is optimized to have minimal operating mode loss while maximizing losses of competing modes. A preliminary experiment using an oscillator configuration has also been designed. The device could easily be scaled to 95 GHz to meet D.O.D. needs at that frequency.

  2. The 30-GHz monolithic receive module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolov, V.; Geddes, J.; Bauhahn, P.

    1983-01-01

    Key requirements for a 30 GHz GaAs monolithic receive module for spaceborne communication antenna feed array applications include an overall receive module noise figure of 5 dB, a 30 dB RF to IF gain with six levels of intermediate gain control, a five-bit phase shifter, and a maximum power consumption of 250 mW. The RF designs for each of the four submodules (low noise amplifier, some gain control, phase shifter, and RF to IF sub-module) are presented. Except for the phase shifter, high frequency, low noise FETs with sub-half micron gate lengths are employed in the submodules. For the gain control, a two stage dual gate FET amplifier is used. The phase shifter is of the passive switched line type and consists of 5-bits. It uses relatively large gate width FETs (with zero drain to source bias) as the switching elements. A 20 GHz local oscillator buffer amplifier, a FET compatible balanced mixer, and a 5-8 GHz IF amplifier constitute the RF/IF sub-module. Phase shifter fabrication using ion implantation and a self-aligned gate technique is described. Preliminary RF results obtained on such phase shifters are included.

  3. The 60 GHz IMPATT diode development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dat, Rovindra; Ayyagari, Murthy; Hoag, David; Sloat, David; Anand, Yogi; Whitely, Stan

    1986-01-01

    The objective is to develop 60 GHz IMPATT diodes suitable for communications applications. The performance goals of the 60 GHz IMPATT is 1W CW output power with a conversion efficiency of 15 percent and 10-year lifetime. The final design of the 60 GHz IMPATT structure evolved from computer simulations performed at the University of Michigan. The initial doping profile, involving a hybrid double-drift (HDD) design, was derived from a drift-diffusion model that used the static velocity-field characteristics for GaAs. Unfortunately, the model did not consider the effects of velocity undershoot and delay of the avalanche process due to energy relaxation. Consequently, the initial devices were oscillating at a much lower frequency than anticipated. With a revised simulation program that included the two effects given above, a second HDD profile was generated and was used as a basis for fabrication efforts. In the area of device fabrication, significant progress was made in epitaxial growth and characterization, wafer processing, and die assembly. The organo-metallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) was used. Starting with a baseline X-Band IMPATT technology, appropriate processing steps were modified to satisfy the device requirements at V-Band. In terms of efficiency and reliability, the device requirements dictate a reduction in its series resistance and thermal resistance values. Qualitatively, researchers were able to reduce the diodes' series resistance by reducing the thickness of the N+ GaAs substrate used in its fabrication.

  4. Novel 140 GHz Gyro-TWT Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W.; Kreischer, K. E.; Shapiro, M.; Temkin, R. J.

    1996-11-01

    We have designed and are currently building a novel gyro-twt amplifier to operate at 100 kW and a frequency of 95 GHz. However, due to equipment availability in our laboratory, the amplifier will actually be operated a frequency of 140 GHz. The electron beam will be provided by an existing MIG electron gun which has been previously used in gyrotron oscillator research at the 100 kW power level at 140 GHz. The gun operates at 65 kV and up to 8A with equal to 1.5. The novel wave circuit consists of two facing mirrors with confocal profiles in the transverse direction and flat profiles in the longitudinal direction. The mode is Gaussian-like in the transverse direction. This design effectively reduces the mode competition problem in conventional amplifiers from two dimensional to one dimensional. Another advantage of this circuit is the relatively large cavity size, which improves power capacity. Preliminary calculations indicate that the linear gain is about 2.7dB/cm with an efficiency exceeding 20preliminary experiment using an oscillator configuration has also been designed.

  5. 16 channel GHz low noise SWIR photoreceivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiaogang; Yuan, Ping; McDonald, Paul; Boisvert, Joseph; Chang, James; Woo, Robyn; Labios, Eduaro; Sudharsanan, Rengarajan; Krainak, Michael; Yang, Guangning; Sun, Xiaoli; Lu, Wei; McIntosh, Dion; Zhou, Qiugui; Campbell, Joe

    2012-06-01

    Future NASA light detection and ranging (LIDAR) mapping systems require multi-channel receivers with high sensitivity and bandwidth operating at 1-1.5 μm wavelengths. One of the ways to improve the system performance is to improve the sensitivity of photoreceiver. InGaAs avalanche photodiode (APD) sensor technology is considered for this wavelength region because of high reliability. However, commercially available InGaAs APDs have low sensitivity due to the high excess-noise of InP material. Spectrolab has been developing low excess noise InGaAs avalanche photodiodes (APDs) with impact ionization engineering (I2E) structures and recently, APDs with excess noise factor of 0.15 have been demonstrated using an I2E design. Single channel photoreceivers built using low noise I2E APDs show a noise equivalent power (NEP) of 150 fW/rt(Hz) over a bandwidth of 1 GHz, a record for InGaAs based APDs. A 16 channel GHz SWIR photoreceiver was designed and built at Spectrolab. The photoreceiver was designed to work with a custom fiber bundle which couples the light from telescope to detectors. The photoreceiver shows a system level NEP less than 300 fW/rt(Hz) with 1 GHz bandwidth.

  6. Eruptive Solar Prominence at 37 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallunki, J.; Tornikoski, M.

    2017-07-01

    On 27 June 2012, an eruptive solar prominence was observed in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and radio wavebands. At the Aalto University Metsähovi Radio Observatory (MRO) it was observed at 37 GHz. It was the first time that the MRO followed a radio prominence with dense sampling in the millimetre wavelengths. This prompted us to study the connection of the 37 GHz event with other wavelength domains. At 37 GHz, the prominence was tracked to a height of around 1.6 R_{⊙}, at which the loop structure collapsed. The average velocity of the radio prominence was 55 ± 6 km s^{-1}. The brightness temperature of the prominence varied between 800 ± 100 K and 3200 ± 100 K. We compared our data with the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO)/ Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument's 304 Å EUV data, and found that the prominence behaves very similarly in both wavelengths. The EUV data also reveal flaring activity nearby the prominence. We present a scenario in which this flare works as a trigger that causes the prominence to move from a stable stage to an acceleration stage.

  7. A 75-116-Ghz LNA with 23-K Noise Temperature at 108 Ghz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varonen, Mikko; Reeves, Rodrigo; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Samoska, Lorene; Cleary, Kieran; Gawande, Rohit; Fung, Andy; Gaier, Todd; Weinreb, Sander; Readhead, Anthony C. S.; Sarkozy, Stephen; Lai, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the design and measurement results, both on-wafer and in package, of an ultra-low-noise and wideband monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifier in the frequency range of 75 to 116 GHz. The three-stage amplifier packaged in a WR10 waveguide housing and fabricated using a 35-nm InP HEMT technology achieves a record noise temperature of 23 K at 108 GHz when cryogenically cooled to 27 K. The measured gain is 22 to 27 dB for frequency range of 75 to 116 GHz. Furthermore, the amplifier utilizes four finger devices with total gate width of 60 um resulting for improved linearity.

  8. SAR measurements of mines and minefields at 35 GHz and 94 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimpf, Hartmuf; Puehl, M.; Biegel, Gregor

    1997-07-01

    Different types of anti-tank surface mines were measured on a turntable in a n anechoic chamber, and modelled with the German SIMPRASS model. In addition, several flights over a realistic minefield were performed with a 35 GHz and a 94 GHz radar operated in parallel in a SAR configuration. It is found that typical RCS values of AT mines at mmW frequencies are in the region between -18dBsm and -30dBsm. Therefore, they are detectable by airborne mmW radar only for a resolution cell size comparable to the physical size of the mine itself depending on the background clutter type.

  9. The 30-GHz monolithic receive module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauhahn, P.; Geddes, J.; Sokolov, V.; Contolatis, T.

    1988-01-01

    The fourth year progress is described on a program to develop a 27.5 to 30 GHz GaAs monolithic receive module for spaceborne-communication antenna feed array applications, and to deliver submodules for experimental evaluation. Program goals include an overall receive module noise figure of 5 dB, a 30 dB RF to IF gain with six levels of intermediate gain control, a five bit phase shifter, and a maximum power consumption of 250 mW. Submicron gate length single and dual gate FETs are described and applied in the development of monolithic gain control amplifiers and low noise amplifiers. A two-stage monolithic gain control amplifier based on ion implanted dual gate MESFETs was designed and fabricated. The gain control amplifier has a gain of 12 dB at 29 GHz with a gain control range of over 13 dB. A two-stage monolithic low noise amplifier based on ion implanted MESFETs which provides 7 dB gain with 6.2 dB noise figure at 29 GHz was also developed. An interconnected receive module containing LNA, gain control, and phase shifter submodules was built using the LNA and gain control ICs as well as a monolithic phase shifter developed previously under this program. The design, fabrication, and evaluation of this interconnected receiver is presented. Progress in the development of an RF/IF submodule containing a unique ion implanted diode mixer diode and a broadband balanced mixer monolithic IC with on-chip IF amplifier and the initial design of circuits for the RF portion of a two submodule receiver are also discussed.

  10. An LTCC 94 GHz Antenna Array

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, J; Pao, H; Lin, H; Garland, P; O'Neill, D; Horton, K

    2007-12-21

    An antenna array is designed in low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) Ferro A6M{trademark} for a mm-wave application. The antenna is designed to operate at 94 GHz with a few percent bandwidth. A key manufacturing technology is the use of 3 mil diameter vias on a 6 mil pitch to construct the laminated waveguides that form the beamforming network and radiating elements. Measurements for loss in the laminated waveguide are presented. The slot-fed cavity-radiating element is designed to account for extremely tight mutual coupling between elements. The array incorporates a slot-fed multi-layer beamforming network.

  11. The 53 GHz DMR sky map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The 53 GHz DMR sky map (top) prior to dipole subtraction, (middle) after dipole subtraction, and (bottom) after subtraction of a model of the Galactic emission, based on data gathered over the entire 4-year mission. The Galactic emission model is based on DIRBE far-infrared and Haslam et al. (1982) 408 MHz radio continuum observations (see Bennett et al. 1996, ApJ, 464, L1). Bennett et al. excluded an area around the Galactic plane referred to as the 'custom cut' region when they conducted their analysis. See slide 19 caption for information about map smoothing and projection.

  12. 600-GHz Electronically Tunable Vector Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dengler, Robert; Maiwald, Frank; Siegel, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A compact, high-dynamic-range, electronically tunable vector measurement system that operates in the frequency range from approximately 560 to approximately 635 GHz has been developed as a prototype of vector measurement systems that would be suitable for use in nearly-real-time active submillimeter-wave imaging. As used here, 'vector measurement system" signifies an instrumentation system that applies a radio-frequency (RF) excitation to an object of interest and measures the resulting amplitude and phase response, relative to either the applied excitatory signal or another reference signal related in a known way to applied excitatory signal.

  13. Astrometry at 24 and 43 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, Gabor E.; Boboltz, D.; Charlot, P.; Fey, A.; Fomalont, E.; Gordon, D.; Jacobs, C. S.; Ma, C. - C.; Naudet, C. J.; Sovers, O. J.; Zhang, L. D.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the goals and initial results of a collaboration formed to survey extragalactic objects at radio frequencies of 24 and 43 GHz This survey is for extending the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) that is the current coordinate system for astrometry and wh ich is the angular inertial frame of deep space navigation. In princ iple, the extension should lead to a more stable reference frame. We report upon our initial three 24-hour observing sessions involving about 100 radio sources at the VLBA.

  14. RF behaviour of 3GHz SCDTL structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Spataro, B.

    2002-10-01

    The 3 GHz linac section designed for the low energy (7 65MeV) part of TOP (Therapy Oncological Protons) linac consists of eight modules of the structure SCDTL (Side Coupled Drift Tube Linac). The non axisymmetric cavities required a full 3D modelling. Electromagnetic calculations carried out by using MAFIA code gave the full mode spectrum, power losses, the coupling coefficients distribution and some indications for the tuning procedure. This paper reports a comparison between the results of this study and some RF measurements on the first module (7 13.4MeV).

  15. Electron gun simulation for 95 GHz gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Udaybir; Kumar, Nitin; Sinha, A.K. E-mail: aksinha@ceeri.ernet.in; Purohit, L.P.

    2011-07-01

    A triode type Magnetron Injection Gun (MIG) for a 2 MW, 95 GHz Gyrotron has been designed by using commercially available code EGUN and another in-house developed code MIGANS. The operating mode of the gyrotron is TE{sub 24.8} and it is operated in the fundamental harmonic. The operating voltages of the modulating anode and the accelerating anode are 61 kV and 85 kV respectively. The parametric dependences of modulating anode voltage and cathode magnetic field on the beam quality have also been studied. (author)

  16. A wideband 12 GHz down converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, B. A.; Rosenbaum, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and evaluation of a single ended 12 GHz down-converter suitable for use in a low cost satellite ground terminal is described. The mixer uses waveguide, coaxial and MIC (microwave integrated circuit) transmission line components. Theoretical and experimental analyses of several microstrip circuit elements are presented including the traveling wave-directional filter, quarter wave-length proximity directional coupler, low pass filter and the quarterwave band stop filter. The optimum performance achieved for the mixer using a packaged diode was 9.4 db conversion loss and a bandwidth of 275 MHz.

  17. The 8-18 GHz radar spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, T. F.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1973-01-01

    The design, construction, testing, and accuracy of an 8-18 GHz radar spectrometer, an FM-CW system which employs a dual antenna system, is described. The antennas, transmitter, and a portion of the receiver are mounted at the top of a 26 meter hydraulic boom which is in turn mounted on a truck for system mobility. HH and VV polarized measurements are possible at incidence angles ranging from 0 deg. to 80 deg. Calibration is accomplished by referencing the measurements against a Luneberg lens of known radar cross section.

  18. dc-40 GHz and 20-40 GHz MMIC SPDT switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Manfred J.; Morris, Annamarie

    1987-12-01

    Direct current to 40 GHz and 20 to 40 GHz monolithic GaAs SPDT (single pole-double throw) switches have been demonstrated. Both the measured and the modeled small-signal performance are presented. Measured power handling performance and switching speed data are also presented. The 20-40 GHz switch uses a combination of shunt FETs and quarter-wave transformers. Better than 2 dB insertion loss and 25 dB isolation have been achieved. The dc-40 GHz switch uses a combination of series and shunt FETs. Better than 3 dB insertion loss and 23 dB isolation have been achieved. A simplified switching FET model is used to adequately model switch performance. It is demonstrated that parasitic 'off' state resistance is an important FET characteristic for broad-band switch design. The switches use MESFETs with the same characteristics as an existing millimeter-wave amplifier to allow for ease of future integration.

  19. A 17 GHz molecular rectifier

    PubMed Central

    Trasobares, J.; Vuillaume, D.; Théron, D.; Clément, N.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular electronics originally proposed that small molecules sandwiched between electrodes would accomplish electronic functions and enable ultimate scaling to be reached. However, so far, functional molecular devices have only been demonstrated at low frequency. Here, we demonstrate molecular diodes operating up to 17.8 GHz. Direct current and radio frequency (RF) properties were simultaneously measured on a large array of molecular junctions composed of gold nanocrystal electrodes, ferrocenyl undecanethiol molecules and the tip of an interferometric scanning microwave microscope. The present nanometre-scale molecular diodes offer a current density increase by several orders of magnitude compared with that of micrometre-scale molecular diodes, allowing RF operation. The measured S11 parameters show a diode rectification ratio of 12 dB which is linked to the rectification behaviour of the direct current conductance. From the RF measurements, we extrapolate a cut-off frequency of 520 GHz. A comparison with the silicon RF-Schottky diodes, architecture suggests that the RF-molecular diodes are extremely attractive for scaling and high-frequency operation. PMID:27694833

  20. Recent progress of RIKEN 18 GHz ECRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Takahide; Yoshitoshi, Miyazawa; Masatake, Hemmi; Masayuki, Kase; Tadashi, Kageyama; Osamu, Kamigaito; Toshiya, Chiba; Naohito, Inabe; Akira, Goto; Yasushige, Yano; Juha, Ärje

    1997-05-01

    We have constructed and tested a new ECRIS in RIKEN. This source has a higher magnetic field(1.4 T) and higher operational RF frequency(18 GHz). For gaseous elements, we obtained the 190 eμA of Ar^11+ and 5 eμA of Ar^16+. For the production of metallic ions, we use a special technique, the so called "MIVOC method". Using this method 140 eμA of Fe^10+ and 80 eμA of Fe^13+ were obtained. We also tested the pulsed mode operation. The beam intensity has strongly enhanced (e.g., 200 eμA of Fe^10+) compared to CW mode operation. We determined the ion confinement time in the ECRIS under the pulsed mode operation for various kinds of ions. In this contribution, we will present not only the results of production of ions (O, Ar, Kr, Cr, Fe, Ni, Ru, Mo, W, Ta etc) but also basic characteristics of the 18 GHz ECRIS including the ion confinement time.

  1. Decay of N-qubit GHZ states in Pauli channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Ting-Ting

    2015-08-01

    An N-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state has many applications in various quantum information tasks and can be realized in different experimental schemes. A GHZ diagonal state evolves to another GHZ diagonal state in independent parallel Pauli channels. We give the explicit expression of the resultant GHZ diagonal state in terms of the initial state and channel parameters. If the initial state is a pure N qubit GHZ state or a three-qubit GHZ diagonal state admits a condition, the full separability criterion of the Pauli noisy state is equivalent to positive partial transpose (PPT) criterion. Thus the fully separable condition follows. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11375152).

  2. Highly efficient Bell state purification and GHZ preparation and purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krastanov, Stefan; Jiang, Liang

    2016-05-01

    We investigate novel protocols for entanglement purification with Bell states. Employing genetic algorithms for the design of the purification circuit, we obtain shorter circuits giving higher success rates and better final fidelities than what is available in the literature. We generalize these circuits in order to prepare GHZ states from Bell pairs and to subsequently purify these GHZ states. We provide new threshold estimates for codes using these GHZ states for fault-tolerant stabilizer measurements.

  3. Radiometric Measurements of Powerline Cables at 94 GHz

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-02-01

    ARMY RESEARCH LABORATORY Radiometric Measurements of Powerline Cables at 94 GHz David A. Wikner and Thomas J. Pizzillo ARL-TR-837 February 2001...MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-837 February 2001 Radiometric Measurements of Powerline Cables at 94 GHz David A. Wikner and Thomas J. Pizzillo Sensors and...collision avoidance system," Proc. SPIE 3088 (April 1997), pp 57-63. 5. D. Wikner and T. Pizzillo, "Measurement of nadir and near-nadir 94-GHz

  4. Preliminary Bremstrahlung Measurements on VENUS at 18 and 28 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.M.; Leitner, D.

    2005-03-15

    The bremstrahlung produced by the VENUS ECR ion source at 18 GHz and 28 GHz in the axial direction has been measured with a germanium detector. The bremstrahlung spectrum goes out beyond 1 MeV at 28 GHz and this complicates analysis of the data and the design of the collimators and detection system. Preliminary spectra and the geometry of the detection system will be described.

  5. Development of a 233 GHz High Gain Traveling Wave Amplifier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-22

    USA 2Beam Wave Research, Inc., Bethesda, MD 20814 USA Abstract: We present development plans for a 233 GHz, serpentine waveguide vacuum electron...NRL G-band serpentine waveguide amplifier [2, 3] was the first demonstrated amplifier to use a UV-LIGA fabricated circuit. The small- signal gain...using the same techniques for 231.5 GHz to 235 GHz, an FCC Radiolocation band. Amplifier Design The compound, hybrid serpentine waveguide (SWG

  6. A 94/183 GHz multichannel radiometer for Convair flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliano, J. A.; Stratigos, J. A.; Forsythe, R. E.; Schuchardt, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    A multichannel 94/183 GHz radiometer was designed, built, and installed on the NASA Convair 990 research aircraft to take data for hurricane penetration flights, SEASAT-A underflights for measuring rain and water vapor, and Nimbus-G underflights for new sea ice signatures and sea surface temperature data (94 GHz only). The radiometer utilized IF frequencies of 1, 5, and 8.75 GHz about the peak of the atmospheric water vapor absorption line, centered at 183.3 GHz, to gather data needed to determine the shape of the water molecule line. Another portion of the radiometer operated at 94 GHz and obtained data on the sea brightness temperature, sea ice signatures, and on areas of rain near the ocean surface. The radiometer used a multiple lens antenna/temperature calibration technique using 3 lenses and corrugated feed horns at 94 GHz and 183 GHz. Alignment of the feed beams at 94 GHz and 183 GHz was accomplished using a 45 deg oriented reflecting surface which permitted simultaneous viewing of the feeds on alternate cycles of the chopping intervals.

  7. Synchrotron Spectral Curvature from 22 MHZ to 23 GHZ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    We combine surveys of the radio sky at frequencies 22 MHz to 1.4 GHz with data from the ARCADE-2 instrument at frequencies 3 GHz to 10 GHz to characterize the frequency spectrum of diffuse synchrotron emission in the Galaxy. The radio spectrum steepens with frequency from 22 MHz to 10 GHz. The projected spectral index at 23 GHz derived from the low-frequency data agrees well with independent measurements using only data at frequencies 23 GHz and above. Comparing the spectral index at 23 GHz to the value from previously published analyses allows extension of the model to higher frequencies. The combined data are consistent with a power-law index beta = -2.64 +/-= 0.03 at 0.31 GHz, steepening by an amount of Delta-beta = 0.07 every octave in frequency. Comparison of the radio data to models including the cosmic-ray energy spectrum suggests that any break in the synchrotron spectrum must occur at frequencies above 23 GHz.

  8. 30 GHz High Power Production for CLIC

    SciTech Connect

    Syratchev, I.

    2006-01-03

    The CLIC Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) is a passive microwave device in which bunches of the drive beam interact with the impedance of the periodically loaded waveguide and excite preferentially the synchronous TM01 mode at 30 GHz. The RF power produced (several hundred MW) is collected at the downstream end of the structure by means of the Power Extractor and conveyed to the main linac structure. The PETS geometry is a result of multiple compromises between beam stability along single decelerator (600 m) and active length of the structure given by main linac RF power needs and layout. Surface electric and magnetic fields, power extraction method, HOM damping, ON/OFF capability and fabrication technology were all evaluated to provide reliable design.

  9. The 94 GHz MMW imaging radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alon, Yair; Ulmer, Lon

    1993-01-01

    The 94 GHz MMW airborne radar system that provides a runway image in adverse weather conditions is now undergoing tests at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB). This system, which consists of a solid state FMCW transceiver, antenna, and digital signal processor, has an update rate of 10 times per second, 0.35x azimuth resolution and up to 3.5 meter range resolution. The radar B scope (range versus azimuth) image, once converted to C scope (elevation versus azimuth), is compatible with the standard TV presentation and can be displayed on the Head Up Display (HUD) or Head Down Display (HDD) to aid the pilot during landing and takeoff in limited visibility conditions.

  10. Advanced system characterizes antennas to 65 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Michael H.; Kremer, Douglas P.; Repjar, Andrew G.

    1990-03-01

    The antenna measurement service offered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology provides radiation-pattern, on-axis gain, and polarization measurements to 65 GHz using planar near-field and extrapolation techniques. It is pointed out that measurements of millimeter-wave antennas are both difficult and costly to make and that such measurements require low-noise, high-power signal sources and exceptionally stable and repeatable connections. The process of the three-antenna extrapolation technique and subsequent measurements of dual-port circularly polarized antennas and swept-frequency gain measurements are analyzed, and antenna standards are noted. Insertion-loss measurements and attenuator calibration are discussed, and measurement uncertainties and far-field patterns are analyzed.

  11. Operation of the SUPARAMP at 33GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, R. Y.; Parrish, P. T.

    1975-01-01

    A 9mm degenerate parametric amplifier was constructed using a linear, series array of unbiased Josephson junctions as the active, nonlinear element. A balanced diode mixer was used as a synchronous detector, with a single source serving both as the pump and as the mixer local oscillator. A stable, net gain of 15 dB in an instantaneous bandwith (FWHM) of 3.4 GHz was achieved. A system noise temperature of 220 K + or - 5 K (DSB) was measured with a SUPARAMP contribution of only 20 K x or - 10 K. Output saturation was observed and complicates the interpretation of the noise temperature measurements and may render them upper limits. A comparison was made with the results of an earlier 3 cm suparamp. The data is in substantial agreement with theoretical predictions.

  12. Contact gating at GHz frequency in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Wilmart, Q.; Inhofer, A.; Boukhicha, M.; Yang, W.; Rosticher, M.; Morfin, P.; Garroum, N.; Fève, G.; Berroir, J.-M.; Plaçais, B.

    2016-01-01

    The paradigm of graphene transistors is based on the gate modulation of the channel carrier density by means of a local channel gate. This standard architecture is subject to the scaling limit of the channel length and further restrictions due to access and contact resistances impeding the device performance. We propose a novel design, overcoming these issues by implementing additional local gates underneath the contact region which allow a full control of the Klein barrier taking place at the contact edge. In particular, our work demonstrates the GHz operation of transistors driven by independent contact gates. We benchmark the standard channel and novel contact gating and report for the later dynamical transconductance levels at the state of the art. Our finding may find applications in electronics and optoelectronics whenever there is need to control independently the Fermi level and the electrostatic potential of electronic sources or to get rid of cumbersome local channel gates. PMID:26879709

  13. Development of 20 GHz monolithic transmit modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The history of the development of a transmit module for the band 17.7 to 20.2 GHz is presented. The module was to monolithically combine, on one chip, five bits of phase shift, a buffer amplifier and a power amplifier to produce 200 mW to the antenna element. The approach taken was MESFET ion implanted device technology. A common pinch-off voltage was decided upon for each application. The beginning of the total integration phases revealed hitherto unencountered hazards of large microwave circuit integration which were successfully overcome. Yield and customer considerations finally led to two separate chips, one containing the power amplifiers and the other containing the complete five bit phase shifter.

  14. The HUT 93 GHz airborne imaging radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kemppinen, M.; Auer, T.; Pallonen, J.; Mononen, I.

    1996-10-01

    The 93 GHz conically scanning dual-channel Airborne Imaging Radiometer, AIR-93, was completed at the Helsinki University of Technology in April 1995. It was designed for Bell JetRanger platform, but modified to be compatible with the HUT remote sensing airplane in few weeks after the completion. Test and service flight experiences aboard both platforms brought up improvement ideas, whose realization was considered easier aboard the HUT airplane. The new features include (a) rebuilding the electronics unit,(b) the use of an attitude-dGPS instrument to produce gyro data for radiometer beam active stabilization, (c) an improved version of the airborne, liquid nitrogen cooled cold calibration target, and (d) the digital, computationally stabilized, position oriented optical comparison image system. 9 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Quantum limited quasiparticle mixers at 100 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, C.A; Hu, Qing; Richards, P.L. ); Worsham, A.H.; Prober, D.E. . Dept. of Applied Physics); Raeisaenen, A.V. . Radio Lab.)

    1990-09-01

    We have made accurate measurements of the noise and gain of superconducting-insulating-superconducting (SIS) mixers employing small area (1{mu}m{sup 2}) Ta/Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Pb{sub 0.9}Bi{sub 0.1} tunnel junctions. We have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 +/{minus} 0.31 quanta at 95.0 GHz, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit of 0.5 quanta. We have carried out a detailed comparison between theoretical predictions of the quantum theory of mixing and experimentally measured noise and gain. We used the shapes of I-V curves pumped at the upper and lower sideband frequencies to deduce values of the embedding admittances at these frequencies. Using these admittances, the mixer noise and gain predicted by quantum theory are in excellent agreement with experiment. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  16. The 5/15 GHz scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Robert K.

    1991-05-01

    Received signal level and multipath delay spread measurements were made at 5 and 16 GHz on a 161 km tropospheric scatter path over moderately rough terrain from Prospect Hill in Waltham, MA to Mt. Tug in Lebanon, NH. The measurement campaign spanned the summer months of May through Aug. 1989. The signal level data were processed to obtain hourly median values for the estimation of the cumulative distribution function (cdf) of received signal level for use in troposcatter communication system design. Multipath delay spread observations were made at the higher frequency. These data were also processed to obtain the sample cdf of the hourly median values of the two sigma multipath delay spread estimates.

  17. Contact gating at GHz frequency in graphene.

    PubMed

    Wilmart, Q; Inhofer, A; Boukhicha, M; Yang, W; Rosticher, M; Morfin, P; Garroum, N; Fève, G; Berroir, J-M; Plaçais, B

    2016-02-16

    The paradigm of graphene transistors is based on the gate modulation of the channel carrier density by means of a local channel gate. This standard architecture is subject to the scaling limit of the channel length and further restrictions due to access and contact resistances impeding the device performance. We propose a novel design, overcoming these issues by implementing additional local gates underneath the contact region which allow a full control of the Klein barrier taking place at the contact edge. In particular, our work demonstrates the GHz operation of transistors driven by independent contact gates. We benchmark the standard channel and novel contact gating and report for the later dynamical transconductance levels at the state of the art. Our finding may find applications in electronics and optoelectronics whenever there is need to control independently the Fermi level and the electrostatic potential of electronic sources or to get rid of cumbersome local channel gates.

  18. A Study of Dielectric Properties of Proteinuria between 0.2 GHz and 50 GHz

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Peck Shen; Ting, Hua Nong; Ong, Teng Aik; Wong, Chew Ming; Ng, Kwan Hong; Chong, Yip Boon

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the dielectric properties of urine in normal subjects and subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD) at microwave frequency of between 0.2 GHz and 50 GHz. The measurements were conducted using an open-ended coaxial probe at room temperature (25°C), at 30°C and at human body temperature (37°C). There were statistically significant differences in the dielectric properties of the CKD subjects compared to those of the normal subjects. Statistically significant differences in dielectric properties were observed across the temperatures for normal subjects and CKD subjects. Pearson correlation test showed the significant correlation between proteinuria and dielectric properties. The experimental data closely matched the single-pole Debye model. The relaxation dispersion and relaxation time increased with the proteinuria level, while decreasing with the temperature. As for static conductivity, it increased with proteinuria level and temperature. PMID:26066351

  19. A 250 GHz Gyrotron with a 3 GHz Tuning Bandwidth for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Nanni, Emilio A.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a novel tunable 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator with >10 W output power over most of a 3 GHz band and >35 W peak power. The tuning bandwidth and power are sufficient to generate a >1 MHz nutation frequency across the entire nitroxide EPR lineshape for cross effect DNP, as well as to excite solid effect transitions utilizing other radicals, without the need for sweeping the NMR magnetic field. Substantially improved tunability is achieved by implementing a long (23 mm) interaction cavity that can excite higher order axial modes by changing either the magnetic field of the gyrotron or the cathode potential. This interaction cavity excites the rotating TE5,2,q mode, and an internal mode converter outputs a high-quality microwave beam with >94% Gaussian content. The gyrotron was integrated into a DNP spectrometer, resulting in a measured DNP enhancement of 54 on the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. PMID:22743211

  20. A 250 GHz gyrotron with a 3 GHz tuning bandwidth for dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Alexander B; Nanni, Emilio A; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2012-08-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a novel tunable 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator with >10 W output power over most of a 3 GHz band and >35 W peak power. The tuning bandwidth and power are sufficient to generate a >1 MHz nutation frequency across the entire nitroxide EPR lineshape for cross effect DNP, as well as to excite solid effect transitions utilizing other radicals, without the need for sweeping the NMR magnetic field. Substantially improved tunability is achieved by implementing a long (23 mm) interaction cavity that can excite higher order axial modes by changing either the magnetic field of the gyrotron or the cathode potential. This interaction cavity excites the rotating TE(₅,₂,q) mode, and an internal mode converter outputs a high-quality microwave beam with >94% Gaussian content. The gyrotron was integrated into a DNP spectrometer, resulting in a measured DNP enhancement of 54 on the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin.

  1. A 250 GHz gyrotron with a 3 GHz tuning bandwidth for dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Nanni, Emilio A.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2012-08-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a novel tunable 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator with >10 W output power over most of a 3 GHz band and >35 W peak power. The tuning bandwidth and power are sufficient to generate a >1 MHz nutation frequency across the entire nitroxide EPR lineshape for cross effect DNP, as well as to excite solid effect transitions utilizing other radicals, without the need for sweeping the NMR magnetic field. Substantially improved tunability is achieved by implementing a long (23 mm) interaction cavity that can excite higher order axial modes by changing either the magnetic field of the gyrotron or the cathode potential. This interaction cavity excites the rotating TE5,2,q mode, and an internal mode converter outputs a high-quality microwave beam with >94% Gaussian content. The gyrotron was integrated into a DNP spectrometer, resulting in a measured DNP enhancement of 54 on the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin.

  2. Design of 132 GHz gyrotron with 3 GHz tunability for 200 MHz DNP/NMR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Singh, Udaybir; Sinha, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A complete design of 132 GHz gyrotron for 200 MHz DNP-NMR spectroscopy application is presented in this article. The design is performed considering a frequency tunability range of 3 GHz and output power around 100 W. A smooth frequency tunability is achieved via the excitation of TE03p modes (p = 1-6) through the variation of cavity magnetic field. The start oscillation current calculation is performed to estimate the required magnetic field for each TE03p mode. Cold cavity analysis and beam-wave interaction computation are carried out for the estimation of quality factor, resonant frequency corresponding to each TE03p mode, axial electric field profile and output power. Other important components of gyrotron such as magnetron injection gun, non-linear taper and RF window are also designed considering the smooth frequency tunability a main design parameter.

  3. Rectenna Technology Program: Ultra light 2.45 GHz rectenna 20 GHz rectenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, William C.

    1987-01-01

    The program had two general objectives. The first objective was to develop the two plane rectenna format for space application at 2.45 GHz. The resultant foreplane was a thin-film, etched-circuit format fabricated from a laminate composed of 2 mil Kapton F sandwiched between sheets of 1 oz copper. The thin-film foreplane contains half wave dipoles, filter circuits, rectifying Schottky diode, and dc bussing lead. It weighs 160 grams per square meter. Efficiency and dc power output density were measured at 85% and 1 kw/sq m, respectively. Special testing techniques to measure temperature of circuit and diode without perturbing microwave operation using the fluoroptic thermometer were developed. A second objective was to investigate rectenna technology for use at 20 GHz and higher frequencies. Several fabrication formats including the thin-film scaled from 2.45 GHz, ceramic substrate and silk-screening, and monolithic were investigated, with the conclusion that the monolithic approach was the best. A preliminary design of the monolithic rectenna structure and the integrated Schottky diode were made.

  4. VLBI observations of nineteen GHz-peaked-spectrum radio sources at 1.6 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Cui, L.; Luo, W.-F.; Shi, W.-Z.; Song, H.-G.

    2007-07-01

    Aims and Methods: We present the results of VLBI observations of nineteen GHz-peaked-spectrum (GPS) radio sources at 1.6 GHz. Of them, 15 sources are selected from the Parkes half-jansky (PHJ) sample (Snellen et al. 2002, MNRAS, 337, 981), and 4 others are from our previous observation list. We aimed at imaging the structure of GPS sources, searching for compact symmetric objects (CSOs) and studying the absorption for the convex radio spectra of GPS sources. Results: We obtained total-intensity 1.6 GHz VLBI images of 17 sources for the first time. Of them, 80% show a mini-double-lobe radio structure, indicating that they are CSOs or candidates, and their host AGNs could be edge-on to us. This result suggests that there is a high incidence of mini double-lobe sources (or CSOs) in the PHJ sample. The sources J0323+0534, J1135-0021, J1352+0232, J2058+0540, J2123-0112, and J2325-0344 are classified as CSOs with measured redshift, showing double-lobe structure with sizes of <1 kpc. Three sources J1057+0012, J1600-0037, and J1753+2750 are considered as core-jet sources according to their morphologies and flux variability.

  5. A low-noise 492 GHz SIS waveguide receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, C. K.; Kooi, J. W.; Chan, M.; Leduc, Henry G.; Schaffer, P. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Phillips, T. G.

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the design and performance of an SIS waveguide receiver which provides low noise performance from 375 to 510 GHz. At its design frequency of 492 GHz, the receiver has a double sideband noise temperature of approx. 172 K. By using embedded magnetic field concentrators, we are able to effectively suppress Josephson pair tunneling. Techniques for improving receiver performance are discussed.

  6. Spain 31-GHz observations of sky brightness temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, B. L.

    1988-01-01

    A water vapor radiometer was deployed at DSS 63 for 3 months of sky brightness temperature measurements at 31 GHz. An exceedance plot was derived from this data showing the fraction of time that 31 GHz 30 degree elevation angle brightness temperature exceeds specified values. The 5 percent exceedance statistics occurs at 75 K, compared with 70 K in Australia.

  7. Broadband Characterization of a 100 to 180 GHz Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Deal, W. R.; Mei, X. B.; Lai, R.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric science and weather forecasting require measurements of the temperature and humidity vs. altitude. These sounding measurements are obtained at frequencies close to the resonance frequencies of oxygen (118 GHz) and water (183 GHz) molecules. We have characterized a broadband amplifier that will increase the sensitivity of sounding and other instruments at these frequencies. This study demonstrated for the first t1me continuous low noise amplification from 100 to 180 GHz. The measured InP monolithic millimeter-wave Integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifier had more than 18 dB of gain from 100 to 180 GHz and 15 dB of gain up to 220 GHz. This is the widest bandwidth low noise amplifier result at these frequencies to date. The circuit was fabricated in Northrop Grumman Corporation 35 nm InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT).

  8. The 30 GHz communications satellite low noise receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffek, L. J.; Smith, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    A Ka-band low noise front end in proof of concept (POC) model form for ultimate spaceborne communications receiver deployment was developed. The low noise receiver consists of a 27.5 to 30.0 GHz image enhanced mixer integrated with a 3.7 to 6.2 GHz FET low noise IF amplifier and driven by a self contained 23.8 GHz phase locked local oscillator source. The measured level of receiver performance over the 27.3 to 30.0 GHz RF/3.7 to 6.2 GHz IF band includes 5.5 to 6.5 dB (typ) SSB noise figure, 20.5 + or - 1.5 dB conversion gain and +23 dBm minimum third order two tone intermodulation output intercept point.

  9. The 30 GHz communications satellite low noise receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffek, L. J.; Smith, D. W.

    1983-10-01

    A Ka-band low noise front end in proof of concept (POC) model form for ultimate spaceborne communications receiver deployment was developed. The low noise receiver consists of a 27.5 to 30.0 GHz image enhanced mixer integrated with a 3.7 to 6.2 GHz FET low noise IF amplifier and driven by a self contained 23.8 GHz phase locked local oscillator source. The measured level of receiver performance over the 27.3 to 30.0 GHz RF/3.7 to 6.2 GHz IF band includes 5.5 to 6.5 dB (typ) SSB noise figure, 20.5 + or - 1.5 dB conversion gain and +23 dBm minimum third order two tone intermodulation output intercept point.

  10. 177-207 GHz Radiometer Front End: Single Sideband Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galin, I.; Schnitzer, C. A.; Dengler, R. J.; Quintero, O.

    1999-01-01

    Twenty years of progress in 200 GHz receivers for spaceborne remote sensing has yielded a 180-220 GHz technology with maturing characteristics, as evident by increasing availability of relevant hardware, paralleled by further refinement in receiver performance requirements at this spectrum band. The 177-207 GHz superheterodyne receiver, for the Earth observing system (EOS) microwave limb sounder (MLS), effectively illustrates such technology developments. This MLS receiver simultaneously detects six different signals, located at sidebands below and above its 191.95 GHZ local-oscillator (LO). The paper describes the MLS 177-207 GHz receiver front-end (RFE), and provides measured data for its lower and upper sidebands. Sideband ratio data is provided as a function of IF frequency, at different LO power drive, and for variation in the ambient temperature.

  11. A New 95 GHz Methanol Maser Catalog. I. Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenjin; Xu, Ye; Chen, Xi; Ellingsen, Simon P.; Lu, Dengrong; Ju, Binggang; Li, Yingjie

    2017-08-01

    The Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m radio telescope has been used to search for 95 GHz (80–71A+) class I methanol masers toward 1020 Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) sources, leading to 213 detections. We have compared the line width of the methanol and HCO+ thermal emission in all of the methanol detections, and on that basis, we find that 205 of the 213 detections are very likely to be masers. This corresponds to an overall detection rate of 95 GHz methanol masers toward our BGPS sample of 20%. Of the 205 detected masers, 144 (70%) are new discoveries. Combining our results with those of previous 95 GHz methanol maser searches, a total of 481 95 GHz methanol masers are now known. We have compiled a catalog listing the locations and properties of all known 95 GHz methanol masers.

  12. System calibration of the 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz radiometers for soil moisture remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Shiue, J.; Gould, W.; Fuchs, J.; Hirschmann, E.; Glazar, W.

    1980-01-01

    Two microwave radiometers at the frequencies of 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz were mounted on a mobile tower and used for a remote sensing of soil moisture experiment at a Beltsville Agriculture Research Center test site. The experiment was performed in October 1979 over both bare field and fields covered with grass, soybean, and corn. The calibration procedure for the radiometer systems which forms the basis of obtaining the final radiometric data product is described. It is estimated from the calibration results that the accuracy of the 1.4 GHz radiometric measurements is about + or - 3 K. The measured 5 GHz brightness temperatures over bare fields with moisture content greater than 10 percent by dry weight are about 8 K lower than those taken simultaneously at 1.4 GHz. This could be due to either (1) a 5 GHz antenna side lobe seeing the cold brightness of the sky, or (2) the thermal microwave emission from a soil being less sensitive to surface roughness at 5 GHz than at 1.4 GHz.

  13. 30/20 GHz and 6/4 GHz band transponder development for communications satellite CS-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masayoshi; Nakamura, Makoto; Okamoto, Teruki; Kumazawa, Hiroyuki

    The next phase communications satellite CS-3 will be launched in 1988 as a successor to CS-2. The CS-3 is composed of two 6/4 GHz band and ten 30/20 GHz band transponders and its mission life is seven years. This paper describes the newly developed CS-3 transponder, especially a 4 GHz band 7 watt GaAs FET amplifier, Ka-band frequency single-conversion, a 30 GHz band low noise amplifier, and a 20 GHz band 10 watt TWTA. The introduction of these new technologies contributes significantly to reducing the CS-3 transponder weight and size, and to improving performance characteristics and insuring a long life.

  14. The 17 GHz active region number

    SciTech Connect

    Selhorst, C. L.; Pacini, A. A.; Costa, J. E. R.; Giménez de Castro, C. G.; Valio, A.; Shibasaki, K.

    2014-08-01

    We report the statistics of the number of active regions (NAR) observed at 17 GHz with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph between 1992, near the maximum of cycle 22, and 2013, which also includes the maximum of cycle 24, and we compare with other activity indexes. We find that NAR minima are shorter than those of the sunspot number (SSN) and radio flux at 10.7 cm (F10.7). This shorter NAR minima could reflect the presence of active regions generated by faint magnetic fields or spotless regions, which were a considerable fraction of the counted active regions. The ratio between the solar radio indexes F10.7/NAR shows a similar reduction during the two minima analyzed, which contrasts with the increase of the ratio of both radio indexes in relation to the SSN during the minimum of cycle 23-24. These results indicate that the radio indexes are more sensitive to weaker magnetic fields than those necessary to form sunspots, of the order of 1500 G. The analysis of the monthly averages of the active region brightness temperatures shows that its long-term variation mimics the solar cycle; however, due to the gyro-resonance emission, a great number of intense spikes are observed in the maximum temperature study. The decrease in the number of these spikes is also evident during the current cycle 24, a consequence of the sunspot magnetic field weakening in the last few years.

  15. 77 GHz radar for first responders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosowsky, L. H.; Aronoff, A. D.; Ferraro, R.; Alland, S.; Fleischman, E.

    2017-02-01

    First responders have the dangerous task of responding to emergency situations in firefighting scenarios involving homes and offices. The importance of this radar is its ability to see through walls and into adjacent areas to provide the first responder with information to assess the status of a building fire, its occupants, and to supplement his thermal camera which is obstructed by the wall. For the firefighter looking into an adjacent room containing unknown objects including humans, the challenge is to recognize what is in that room, the configuration of the room, and potential escape routes. We have just concluded a series of experiments to illustrate the performance of 77GHz radar in buildings. The experiments utilized the Delphi Automotive radar as the mm wave sensor and included display software developed by L. H. Kosowsky and Associates. The system has demonstrated the capability of seeing through walls consisting of sheetrock separated by two by four pieces of wood. It has demonstrated the ability to see into the adjacent room and to display the existence of persons and furniture Based on published data, the radar will perform well in a smoke, haze, and/or fog environment.

  16. 110 GHz, 1 MW Gyrotron Design Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauffman, Steve; Felch, Kevin; Borchard, Philipp; Cahalan, Pat; Chu, Sam; Dubrule, Craig

    1999-11-01

    Communications and Power Industries has incorporated a number of design changes into its most recent series of 110 GHz 1 MW gyrotrons, for use in ECH and ECCD experiments on the DIII-D tokamak. Two development gyrotrons previously installed at DIII-D used a modulating-anode electron gun design and output windows consisting of double-disk face-cooled sapphire on one system and an edge-cooled CVD diamond disk on the other. Three new systems presently in fabrication and test employ (a) a single-anode electron gun to avoid excitation of spurious modes during turn-on and turn-off and to simplify power supply requirements, (b) a modified TE_22,6 cavity to reduce competition from neighboring modes, (c) a two inch aperture edge-cooled CVD diamond window to allow transmission of a 1 MW Gaussian output beam, (d) a superconducting magnet system with a cryo-cooler to reduce liquid helium consumption, and (e) a number of internal and external plumbing simplifications to make cooling system connections more straightforward. Initial test results, if available, will be presented.

  17. 2-GHz frequency-domain fluorometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Laczko, Gabor; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    1986-10-01

    We developed a frequency-domain fluorometer which operates from 4 to 2000 MHz. The modulated excitation is provided by the harmonic content of a laser pulse train (3.76 MHz, 5 ps) from a synchronously pumped and cavity dumped dye laser. The phase angle and modulation of the emission are measured with a microchannel-plate photomultiplier (PMT). Cross-correlation detection is performed outside the PMT. The high-frequency signals for cross correlation were obtained by multiplication of the output from a 500-MHz frequency synthesizer. The performance was verified in several ways, including measurement of known time delays and examination of standard fluorophores. The detector displayed no detectable color effect, with the 300-600-nm difference being less than 5 ps. The precision of the measurements is adequate to detect differences of 20 ps for decay times of 500 ps. A correlation time of 53 ps was found for indole in water at 20 °C. The shortest correlation time we measured was 15 ps for indole in methanol/water (75/25) at 40 °C. Also, the 2-GHz data reveal the time-dependent ((t)1/2) terms found in the presence of collisional quenching. The degree of random error is about 0.3° of phase and 0.005 in modulation throughout the frequency range.

  18. Tunable All-Solid-State Local Oscillators to 1900 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, John; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Maestrini, Alain; Schlecht, Erich; Gill, John; Javadi, Hamid; Pukala, David; Maiwald, Frank; Mehdi, Imran

    2004-01-01

    We present a status report of an ongoing effort to develop robust tunable all-solid-state sources up to 1900 GHz for the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) on the Herschel Space Observatory. GaAs based multi-chip power amplifier modules at W-band are used to drive cascaded chains of multipliers. We have demonstrated performance from chains comprised of four doublers up to 1600 GHz as well as from a x2x3x3 chain to 1900 GHz. Measured peak output power of 23 (micro)W at 1782 GHz and 2.6 (micro)W at 1900 GHz has been achieved when the multipliers are cooled to 120K. The 1900 GHz tripler was pumped with a four anode tripler that produces a peak of 4 mW at 630 GHz when cooled to 120 K. We believe that these sources can now be used to pump hot electron bolometer (HEB) heterodyne mixers.ter (HEB) heterodyne mixers.

  19. EVIDENCE FOR ANOMALOUS DUST-CORRELATED EMISSION AT 8 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Michelle; Page, Lyman; Dunkley, Joanna

    2012-04-20

    In 1969 Edward Conklin measured the anisotropy in celestial emission at 8 GHz with a resolution of 16.{sup 0}2 and used the data to report a detection of the cosmic microwave background dipole. Given the paucity of 8 GHz observations over large angular scales and the clear evidence for non-power-law Galactic emission near 8 GHz, a new analysis of Conklin's data is informative. In this paper, we compare Conklin's data to that from Haslam et al. (0.4 GHz), Reich and Reich (1.4 GHz), and the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP; 23-94 GHz). We show that the spectral index between Conklin's data and the 23 GHz WMAP data is {beta} = -1.7 {+-} 0.1, where we model the emission temperature as T{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {beta}}. Free-free emission has {beta} Almost-Equal-To - 2.15 and synchrotron emission has {beta} Almost-Equal-To - 2.7 to -3. Thermal dust emission ({beta} Almost-Equal-To 1.7) is negligible at 8 GHz. We conclude that there must be another distinct non-power-law component of diffuse foreground emission that emits near 10 GHz, consistent with other observations in this frequency range. By comparing to the full complement of data sets, we show that a model with an anomalous emission component, assumed to be spinning dust, is preferred over a model without spinning dust at 5{sigma} ({Delta}{chi}{sup 2} = 31). However, the source of the new component cannot be determined uniquely.

  20. 670 GHz Schottky Diode Based Subharmonic Mixer with CPW Circuits and 70 GHz IF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Schlecht, Erich T. (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Lin, Robert H. (Inventor); Gill, John J. (Inventor); Sin, Seth (Inventor); Mehdi, Imran (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A coplanar waveguide (CPW) based subharmonic mixer working at 670 GHz using GaAs Schottky diodes. One example of the mixer has a LO input, an RF input and an IF output. Another possible mixer has a LO input, and IF input and an RF output. Each input or output is connected to a coplanar waveguide with a matching network. A pair of antiparallel diodes provides a signal at twice the LO frequency, which is then mixed with a second signal to provide signals having sum and difference frequencies. The output signal of interest is received after passing through a bandpass filter tuned to the frequency range of interest.

  1. Thermal modeling of millimeter wave damage to the primate cornea at 35 GHz and 94 GHz.

    PubMed

    Foster, Kenneth R; D'Andrea, John A; Chalfin, Steven; Hatcher, Donald J

    2003-06-01

    Recent data on damage to the primate cornea from exposure to millimeter wave radiation are interpreted in terms of a simple thermal model. The measured temperature increases during the exposures (duration 1-5 s, 35 or 94 GHz, 2-7 W cm(-2)) agree with the model within the variability of the data. The thresholds for damage to the cornea (staining of the corneal epithelium by fluorescein and corneal edema) correspond to temperature increases of about 20 degrees C at both irradiation frequencies. Within the limits of the one-dimensional model, thresholds for thermal damage to the cornea can be predicted for a range of exposure conditions.

  2. Asymptotic entanglement transformation between W and GHZ states

    SciTech Connect

    Vrana, Péter; Christandl, Matthias

    2015-02-15

    We investigate entanglement transformations with stochastic local operations and classical communication in an asymptotic setting using the concepts of degeneration and border rank of tensors from algebraic complexity theory. Results well-known in that field imply that GHZ states can be transformed into W states at rate 1 for any number of parties. As a generalization, we find that the asymptotic conversion rate from GHZ states to Dicke states is bounded as the number of subsystems increases and the number of excitations is fixed. By generalizing constructions of Coppersmith and Winograd and by using monotones introduced by Strassen, we also compute the conversion rate from W to GHZ states.

  3. Packaging of microwave integrated circuits operating beyond 100 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, L.; Daniel, E.; Sokolov, V.; Sommerfeldt, S.; Bublitz, J.; Olson, K.; Gilbert, B.; Chow, D.

    2002-01-01

    Several methods of packaging high speed (75-330 GHz) InP HEMT MMIC devices are discussed. Coplanar wirebonding is presented with measured insertion loss of less than 0.5dB and return loss better than -17 dB from DC to 110 GHz. A motherboard/daughterboard packaging scheme is presented which supports minimum loss chains of MMICs using this coplanar wirebonding method. Split waveguide block packaging approaches are presented in G-band (140-220 GHz) with two types of MMIC-waveguide transitions: E-plane probe andantipodal finline.

  4. High efficiency IMPATT diodes for 60 GHz intersatellite link applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haugland, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    Intersatellite links are expected to play an increasingly important role in future satellite systems. Improved components are required to properly utilize the wide bandwidth allocated for intersatellite link applications around 60 GHz. IMPATT diodes offer the highest potential performance as solid state power sources for a 60 GHz transmitter. Presently available devices do not have the desired power and efficiency. High efficiency, high power IMPATT diodes for intersatellite link applications are being developed by NASA and other government agencies. This paper describes the development of high efficiency 60 GHz IMPATT diodes by NASA. These programs are cofunded by the U.S. Air Force, Space Division.

  5. High efficiency IMPATT diodes for 60 GHz intersatellite link applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haugland, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    Intersatellite links are expected to play an increasingly important role in future satellite systems. Improved components are required to properly utilize the wide bandwidth allocated for intersatellite link applications around 60 GHz. IMPATT diodes offer the highest potential performance as solid state power sources for a 60 GHz transmitter. Presently available devices do not have the desired power and efficiency. High efficiency, high power IMPATT diodes for intersatellite link applications are being developed by NASA and other government agencies. The development of high efficiency 60 GHz IMPATT diodes by NASA is described.

  6. A search for methanol masers at 44 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenskij, S. V.; Bachiller, R.; Berulis, I. I.; Val'tts, I. E.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Rodriguez-Franco, A.; Slysh, V. I.

    1992-10-01

    Results of an extensive survey of young stellar objects in the methanol line 7(0) - 6(1)A(+) (44 GHz) are presented. Three new masers were detected towards cold IRAS sources in the dark clouds L 291 (GGD 27), L 379, and IC 1396 N. The new masers were also observed in 4(-1) - 3(0) E (36 GHz) and 1(0) - 0(0)A(+) (48 GHz) methanol transitions. A relationship between methanol masers and high-velocity flows with dense disks around central sources is proposed, and a possible correlation between maser emission and their intensity in the FIR is suggested.

  7. ATS-6 attenuation diversity measurements at 20 and 30 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, W. J.; Straiton, A. W.; Fannin, B. M.; Wagner, N. K.

    1975-01-01

    The results of data obtained at The University of Texas at Austin in conjunction with the ATS-6 millimeter wave experiment are presented. Attenuation measurements at 30 GHz and sky noise data at 20 GHz were obtained simultaneously at each of two sites separated by 11 km. Space diversity reduces outage time for a system in Austin, Texas with a 10 dB fade margin at 30 GHz from 15 hours to 16 minutes per year. The maximum cloud height shows a good correlation to the maximum attenuations measured.

  8. 14/12-GHz-band satellite communication services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kunihiro; Nagaki, Kiyoaki; Mori, Yasuo

    1990-01-01

    Three new systems for integrated TV-relay services have been developed: Satellite Video Comunication Service (SVCS) and Satellite Digital Communication Service (SDCS), with Japan's 14/12-GHz-band commercial communication satellites. These systems have been in commercial use since May 1989. Usually SVCS and SDCS have been provided using Ka-band (30/20 GHz-band) of CS-2 and Cs-3. This paper provides an overview of the design, the performance, and the systems of the new 14/12-GHz-band satellite communication services.

  9. The 30/20 GHz communications system functional requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siperko, C. M.; Frankfort, M.; Markham, R.; Wall, M.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of 30/20 GHz usage in satellite systems to be used in support of projected communication requirements of the 1990's are defined. A requirements analysis which develops projected market demand for satellite services by general and specialized carriers and an analysis of the impact of propagation and system constraints on 30/20 GHz operation are included. A set of technical performance characteristics for the 30/20 GHz systems which can serve the resulting market demand and the experimental program necessary to verify technical and operational aspects of the proposed systems is also discussed.

  10. Architecture for a 1-GHz Digital RADAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallik, Udayan

    2011-01-01

    An architecture for a Direct RF-digitization Type Digital Mode RADAR was developed at GSFC in 2008. Two variations of a basic architecture were developed for use on RADAR imaging missions using aircraft and spacecraft. Both systems can operate with a pulse repetition rate up to 10 MHz with 8 received RF samples per pulse repetition interval, or at up to 19 kHz with 4K received RF samples per pulse repetition interval. The first design describes a computer architecture for a Continuous Mode RADAR transceiver with a real-time signal processing and display architecture. The architecture can operate at a high pulse repetition rate without interruption for an infinite amount of time. The second design describes a smaller and less costly burst mode RADAR that can transceive high pulse repetition rate RF signals without interruption for up to 37 seconds. The burst-mode RADAR was designed to operate on an off-line signal processing paradigm. The temporal distribution of RF samples acquired and reported to the RADAR processor remains uniform and free of distortion in both proposed architectures. The majority of the RADAR's electronics is implemented in digital CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor), and analog circuits are restricted to signal amplification operations and analog to digital conversion. An implementation of the proposed systems will create a 1-GHz, Direct RF-digitization Type, L-Band Digital RADAR--the highest band achievable for Nyquist Rate, Direct RF-digitization Systems that do not implement an electronic IF downsample stage (after the receiver signal amplification stage), using commercially available off-the-shelf integrated circuits.

  11. MMIC HEMT Power Amplifier for 140 to 170 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Radisic, Vesna; Ngo, Catherine; Janke, Paul; Hu, Ming; Micovic, Miro

    2003-01-01

    A three-stage monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifier that features high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) as gain elements is reviewed. This amplifier is designed to operate in the frequency range of 140 to 170 GHz, which contains spectral lines of several atmospheric molecular species plus subharmonics of other such spectral lines. Hence, this amplifier could serve as a prototype of amplifiers to be incorporated into heterodyne radiometers used in atmospheric science. The original intended purpose served by this amplifier is to boost the signal generated by a previously developed 164-GHz MMIC HEMT doubler and drive a 164-to-328-GHz doubler to provide a few milliwatts of power at 328 GHz.

  12. Experimental evaluation of a ruby maser at 43 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, C. R.; Neff, D.

    1982-01-01

    Inversion ratio measurements were conducted at several frequencies between 27 and 43 GHz for a pink ruby material (0.05% Cr/3+/ in Al2O3) at the push-pull pump angle of 54.7 degrees in order to determine the upper frequency limit where pink ruby could be expected to operate as a practical maser amplifier. Based on these measurements, a single-stage maser was developed which yielded 8 + or - 1 dB net gain and a 3 dB bandwidth of 180 MHz at a center frequency of 42.5 GHz. It is concluded that a multistage reflected wave maser could achieve bandwidths exceeding 1 GHz with 30 dB net gain at center frequencies near 40 GHz.

  13. Photon polarization version of the GHz-Mermin Gedanken

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiess, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    We have defined a photon polarization analog of the Greenberger, Horne, and Zeilinger (GHZ) experiment that was initially proposed for spin-1/2 quanta. Analogs of the ket states and Pauli spin matrix operators are presented.

  14. Development of 30/20 GHz satellite antenna structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minomo, M.; Yasaka, T.

    1986-08-01

    An antenna structural design for a large capacity communication satellite using 13 beams in the 30/20GHz frequency bands is discussed. This design is to be utilized in developing a more cost effective domestic satellite communication system for Japan. This system requires 2 high precision deployable antennas with projected aperture diameters of 3.5m at 20GHz and 2.5m at 30GHz. The in-orbit demonstration will use the ETS-6 satellite. Based on experience in the development of spaceborne antennas for 30/20GHz bands (e.g., for the CS-2 and CS-3 satellites) activities in structural design of high precision deployable antennas show the truss reflector structure is promising for achieving required structural properties.

  15. Experimental evaluation of a ruby maser at 43 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. R.; Neff, D.

    1982-11-01

    Inversion ratio measurements were conducted at several frequencies between 27 and 43 GHz for a pink ruby material (0.05% Cr/3+/ in Al2O3) at the push-pull pump angle of 54.7 degrees in order to determine the upper frequency limit where pink ruby could be expected to operate as a practical maser amplifier. Based on these measurements, a single-stage maser was developed which yielded 8 + or - 1 dB net gain and a 3 dB bandwidth of 180 MHz at a center frequency of 42.5 GHz. It is concluded that a multistage reflected wave maser could achieve bandwidths exceeding 1 GHz with 30 dB net gain at center frequencies near 40 GHz.

  16. One GHz digitizer for space based laser altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staples, Edward J.

    1991-01-01

    This is the final report for the research and development of the one GHz digitizer for space based laser altimeter. A feasibility model was designed, built, and tested. Only partial testing of essential functions of the digitizer was completed. Hybrid technology was incorporated which allows analog storage (memory) of the digitally sampled data. The actual sampling rate is 62.5 MHz, but executed in 16 parallel channels, to provide an effective sampling rate of one GHz. The average power consumption of the one GHz digitizer is not more than 1.5 Watts. A one GHz oscillator is incorporated for timing purposes. This signal is also made available externally for system timing. A software package was also developed for internal use (controls, commands, etc.) and for data communication with the host computer. The digitizer is equipped with an onboard microprocessor for this purpose.

  17. Imaging, Doppler, and spectroscopic radars from 95 to 700 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Ken B.

    2016-05-01

    Imaging, Doppler, and spectroscopic radars from 95 to 700 GHz, all using the frequency-modulated continuous-wave technique, are in various stages of development for both defense and science applications at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. For standoff security screening, a 340 GHz imaging radar now achieves an 8.3 Hz frame, and it has been tested using power-efficient MMIC-based active multiplier sources into its front end. That system evolved from a 680 GHz security radar platform, which has also been modified to operate in a Doppler mode for probing the dynamics of blowing sand and sensing small-amplitude target vibrations. Meanwhile, 95 and 183 GHz radars based on similar RF architectures are currently being developed to probe cometary jets in space and, using a differential absorption technique, humidity inside upper-tropospheric clouds.

  18. Characterization of Long Baseline Calibrators at 2.3 GHz

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    determine their suitability as phase calibrators for long baseline radio interferometry at 2.3 GHz. For this purpose, we have used a set of complementary...baseline radio interferometry at 2.3 GHz. For this purpose, we have used a set of complementary metrics to classify these 31 southern sources into five...southern radio sources and determine their suitability as calibrators for southern VLBI experiments, especially those using MeerKAT and the SKA when

  19. 140 GHz microwave FEL experiments using ELF-II

    SciTech Connect

    Throop, A.L.; Jong, R.A.; Atkinson, D.P.; Clark, J.C.; Felker, B.; Ferguson, S.W.; Makowski, M.A.; Nexsen, W.E.; Stallard, B.W.; Stever, R.D.; Turner, W.C.

    1989-09-01

    We describe the modeling, the experimental facility, and the initial operating results for ELF-II, an induction-linac based free-electron laser designed to produce up to 2 GW of peak power at 140 GHz. ELF-II is the initial configuration of an FEL system which will eventually produce up to 2 MW of average power at a frequency of 250 GHz, for use in plasma heating experiments in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  20. 22 GHz VLBI Survey: Status Report and Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moellenbrock, G.; Fujisawa, K.; Preston, R.; Gurvits, L.; Dewey, R.; Hirabayashi, H.; Inoue, M.; Jauncey, D.; Migenes, V.; Roberts, D.; hide

    1994-01-01

    A ground-based VLBI survey to measure the visibilities and correlated flux densities in continuum at 22 GHz of more than 140 extragalactic radio sources has been conducted with baselines up to approximately 11 000 km. The project has been designed to help in preparation of target lists for VSOP and Radioastron Space VLBI missions as well as providing observational data for statistical study of structural properties at 22 GHz on sub-milliarcsecond scales for this large sample of extragalactic sources.

  1. Design of the Core 2-4 GHz Betatron Equalizer

    SciTech Connect

    Deibele, C.; /Fermilab

    2000-01-01

    The core betatron equalizer in the Accumulator in the Antiproton Source at Fermilab needed to be upgraded. The performance could be rated as only circa 650 MHz when the system was a 2 GHz system. The old equalizer did not correct for the strong phase mismatch for the relatively strong gain of the system slightly below 2 GHz. The design corrects this phase mismatch and is relatively well matched both in and out of band.

  2. Power-Amplifier Module for 145 to 165 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Peralta, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    A power-amplifier module that operates in the frequency range of 145 to 165 GHz has been designed and constructed as a combination of (1) a previously developed monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifier and (2) a waveguide module. The amplifier chip was needed for driving a high-electron-mobility-transistor (HEMT) frequency doubler. While it was feasible to connect the amplifier and frequency-doubler chips by use of wire bonds, it was found to be much more convenient to test the amplifier and doubler chips separately. To facilitate separate testing, it was decided to package the amplifier and doubler chips in separate waveguide modules. Figure 1 shows the resulting amplifier module. The amplifier chip was described in "MMIC HEMT Power Amplifier for 140 to 170 GHz" (NPO-30127), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 11, (November 2003), page 49. To recapitulate: This is a three-stage MMIC power amplifier that utilizes HEMTs as gain elements. The amplifier was originally designed to operate in the frequency range of 140 to 170 GHz. The waveguide module is based on a previously developed lower frequency module, redesigned to support operation in the frequency range of 140 to 220 GHz. Figure 2 presents results of one of several tests of the amplifier module - measurements of output power and gain as functions of input power at an output frequency of 150 GHz. Such an amplifier module has many applications to test equipment for power sources above 100 GHz.

  3. Studies of novel 140 GHz gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wen

    We have designed, built and tested the world's first mode-selective confocal cavity gyrotron oscillator operating at 140GHz with over 66kW of RF power and up to 23% efficiency. The tube operates at the HE06 mode of the confocal cavity. A Magnetotron Injection Gun (MIG) provides an annular electron beam with up to 70kV and 8A. The confocal gyrotron oscillator is designed to better characterize the confocal cavity's mode spectrum for future amplifier applications. The device utilizes the interaction between an electron beam in cyclotron motion and the cavity mode in an open two-mirror confocal cavity are suppressed, and only gaussian-like modes can propagate with small loss. As a result, the confocal geometry reduces mode indices from two dimensional TEn,m to one dimensional HE0,q in confocal waveguide. The greatly reduced mode density of this structure lowers the risk of spurious mode competition, which is a critical issue in gyrotron development. Several models were formulated for various configurations of gyrotrons. A nonlinear theory for the mirror based quasi-optical Gyrotron Traveling Wave Tube (Gyro-TWT) was developed for the first time. The Gyro-TWT consists of a series of parallel spherical mirrors. A free space Gaussian beam propagates through the structure by bouncing between the mirrors in a serpentine path. A co- propagating electron beam in gyromotion interacts with and the amplifies the wave. The model shows excellent agreement with the well benchmarked linear theory. The phase front distortion effect in the quasi-optical gyro- TWT is revealed by this model. A preliminary confocal waveguide based gyro-TWT amplifier is designed. Cold tests of the quasi-optical input circuit show good gaussian beam transport with low loss. The amplifier performance is theoretically predicted to have a 4dB/cm linear gain, 20% efficiency and 70kW RF power. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  4. Integration of 100 GHz and 50 GHz spectral bandwidth wavelength demultiplexer using 2D photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, V. R.; Murugan, M.; Robinson, S.

    2017-06-01

    The paper deals with the photonic crystal based demultiplexer that has been designed to separate the 100 GHz and 50 GHz channels in a single device. The proposed demultiplexer is designed to drop four unique wavelengths. The demultiplexer is consisted of bus waveguide, rectangular resonant cavity (RRC) and four dropping waveguide; the transmission of 100 GHz and 50 GHz channels are dropped separately. The operating wavelength range of the device lies between 1551nm to 1552nm for 0.4 nm channel spacing and 1554nm to 1559 for 0.8 nm channel spacing. This new methodology is expected to be applied in the future for the dual systems and the footprint and cost of the networking will also be significantly reduced.

  5. New JVLA observations at 3 GHz and 5.5 GHz of the "Kite" radio source in Abell 2626

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignesti, A.; Gitti, M.; Brunetti, G.; Feretti, L.; Giovannini, G.

    2017-07-01

    Context. We report on new Karl Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) observations performed at 3 GHz and 5.5 GHz of Abell 2626. The cluster has been the object of several studies in recent years due to its peculiar radio emission, which shows a complex system of symmetric radio arcs characterized by a steep spectrum. The origin of these radio sources is still unclear. Due to their mirror symmetry toward the center, it has been proposed that they may be created by pairs of precessing jets powered by the inner active galactic nuclei (AGN). Aims: The new JVLA observations were requested with the specific aim of detecting extended emission on frequencies higher than 1.4 GHz, in order to constrain the jet-precession model by analyzing the spectral index and radiative age patterns along the arcs. Methods: We performed a standard data reduction of the JVLA datasets with the software CASA. By combining the new 3 GHz data with the archival 1.4 GHz VLA dataset we produced a spectral index map of the extended emission, and then estimated the radiative age of the arcs by assuming that the plasma was accelerated in moving hot-spots tracing the arcs. Results: Thanks to the high sensitivity of the JVLA, we achieve the detection of the arcs at 3 GHz and extended emission at 5.5 GHz. We measure a mean spectral index <- 2.5 for the arcs up to 3 GHz. No clear trend in spectral index or radiative age is detected across the arcs, which may challenge the interpretation based on precession or put strong constraints on the jet-precession period. In particular, by analyzing the radiative age distribution along the arcs, we were able to provide for the first time a timescale <26 Myr of the jet-precession period.

  6. Integrated 1.55 µm photomixer local oscillator sources for heterodyne receivers from 70 GHz to beyond 250 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggard, Peter G.; Azcona, Luis; Laisné, Alexandre; Ellison, Brian N.; Shen, Pengbo; Gomes, Nathan J.; Davies, Phil A.

    2004-10-01

    Photomixing is a flexible and efficient method of providing both local oscillator signals for heterodyne receivers and high frequency phase reference signals. Ultrafast, 70 GHz bandwidth, λ = 1.55 µm, photodiodes from u2t Photonics AG have been incorporated into three designs of mm-wave waveguide mounts. The photomixers utilise a thin freestanding gold foil, or a gold on dielectric, probe to couple power into the waveguide and to deliver the photodiode bias. The frequency coverage of the designs is from 70 GHz to 300 GHz. A method of rapidly characterizing the frequency response of these photomixers using spontaneous-spontaneous beating of light from an EDFA is described. Recent work has been directed at increasing the degree of integration of the photodiode with the waveguide probe and choke filter to reduce the frequency dependence of the output power. A simplified photomixer block manufacturing process has also been introduced. A combined probe and filter structure, impedance matched to both the coplanar output line on the photodiode chip and to 0.4 height milled waveguide, is presented. This matching is achieved over the W-band with a fixed waveguide backshort. We present modelled and experimental results showing the increased efficiency and smoother tuning. The design and frequency response of such a probe is reported. We also present the performance of a simpler mount, operating in the frequency range from 160 GHz to 300 GHz, which generates powers of around 10 µW up to 250 GHz.

  7. 47 CFR 25.225 - Geographic Service Requirements for 17/24 GHz Broadcasting Satellite Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Requirements for 17/24 GHz Broadcasting Satellite Service. (a) Each operator of a 17/24 GHz BSS space station... GHz BSS space station subject to paragraph (a) of this section must design and configure its space... operator of a 17/24 GHz BSS space station that is used to provide video programming directly to...

  8. 47 CFR 25.225 - Geographic Service Requirements for 17/24 GHz Broadcasting Satellite Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Requirements for 17/24 GHz Broadcasting Satellite Service. (a) Each operator of a 17/24 GHz BSS space station... GHz BSS space station subject to paragraph (a) of this section must design and configure its space... operator of a 17/24 GHz BSS space station that is used to provide video programming directly to...

  9. 47 CFR 25.225 - Geographic Service Requirements for 17/24 GHz Broadcasting Satellite Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Requirements for 17/24 GHz Broadcasting Satellite Service. (a) Each operator of a 17/24 GHz BSS space station... GHz BSS space station subject to paragraph (a) of this section must design and configure its space... operator of a 17/24 GHz BSS space station that is used to provide video programming directly to...

  10. 47 CFR 25.225 - Geographic Service Requirements for 17/24 GHz Broadcasting Satellite Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Requirements for 17/24 GHz Broadcasting Satellite Service. (a) Each operator of a 17/24 GHz BSS space station... GHz BSS space station subject to paragraph (a) of this section must design and configure its space... operator of a 17/24 GHz BSS space station that is used to provide video programming directly to...

  11. 47 CFR 25.139 - NGSO FSS coordination and information sharing between MVDDS licensees in the 12.2 GHz to 12.7 GHz...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....2 GHz to 12.7 GHz band. (a) NGSO FSS licensees shall maintain a subscriber database in a format that... database to enable the MVDDS licensee to determine whether the proposed MVDDS transmitting site meets the...

  12. 47 CFR 25.139 - NGSO FSS coordination and information sharing between MVDDS licensees in the 12.2 GHz to 12.7 GHz...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....2 GHz to 12.7 GHz band. (a) NGSO FSS licensees shall maintain a subscriber database in a format that... database to enable the MVDDS licensee to determine whether the proposed MVDDS transmitting site meets the...

  13. 47 CFR 25.139 - NGSO FSS coordination and information sharing between MVDDS licensees in the 12.2 GHz to 12.7 GHz...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....2 GHz to 12.7 GHz band. (a) NGSO FSS licensees shall maintain a subscriber database in a format that... database to enable the MVDDS licensee to determine whether the proposed MVDDS transmitting site meets the...

  14. 47 CFR 25.139 - NGSO FSS coordination and information sharing between MVDDS licensees in the 12.2 GHz to 12.7 GHz...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....2 GHz to 12.7 GHz band. (a) NGSO FSS licensees shall maintain a subscriber database in a format that... database to enable the MVDDS licensee to determine whether the proposed MVDDS transmitting site meets the...

  15. Improved 20- to 32-GHz atmospheric absorption model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz Pol, Sandra L.; Ruf, Christopher S.; Keihm, Stephen J.

    1998-09-01

    An improved model for the absorption of the atmosphere near the 22-GHz water vapor line is presented. The Van Vleck-Weisskopf line shape is used with a simple parameterized version of the model from Liebe et al. [1993] for the water vapor absorption spectra and a scaling of the model from Rosenkranz [1993] for the 20- to 32-GHz oxygen absorption. Radiometric brightness temperature measurements from two sites of contrasting climatological properties, San Diego, California, and West Palm Beach, Florida, were used as ground truth for comparison with in situ radiosonde-derived brightness temperatures under clear-sky conditions. Estimation of the new model's four parameters, related to water vapor line strength, line width and continuum absorption, and far-wing oxygen absorption, was performed using the Newton-Raphson inversion method. Improvements to the water vapor line strength and line width parameters are found to be statistically significant. The accuracy of the new absorption model is estimated to be 3% between 20 and 24 GHz, degrading to 8% near 32 GHz. In addition, the Hill line shape asymmetry ratio was evaluated in several currently used models to show the agreement of the data with Van Vleck-Weisskopf based models and to rule out water vapor absorption models near 22 GHz given by Waters [1976] and Ulaby et al. [1981], which are based on the Gross line shape.

  16. Two-Stage, 90-GHz, Low-Noise Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Gaier, Todd C.; Xenos, Stephanie; Soria, Mary M.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Cleary, Kieran A.; Ferreira, Linda; Lai, Richard; Mei, Xiaobing

    2010-01-01

    A device has been developed for coherent detection of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). A two-stage amplifier has been designed that covers 75-110 GHz. The device uses the emerging 35-nm InP HEMT technology recently developed at Northrop Grumman Corporation primarily for use at higher frequencies. The amplifier has more than 18 dB gain and less than 35 K noise figure across the band. These devices have noise less than 30 K at 100 GHz. The development started with design activities at JPL, as well as characterization of multichip modules using existing InP. Following processing, a test campaign was carried out using single-chip modules at 100 GHz. Successful development of the chips will lead to development of multichip modules, with simultaneous Q and U Stokes parameter detection. This MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) amplifier takes advantage of performance improvements intended for higher frequencies, but in this innovation are applied at 90 GHz. The large amount of available gain ultimately leads to lower possible noise performance at 90 GHz.

  17. A 492 GHz cooled Schottky receiver for radio-astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernichel, J.; Schieder, R.; Stutzki, J.; Vowinkel, B.; Winnewisser, G.; Zimmermann, Peter

    1992-01-01

    We developed a 492 GHz cooled GaAs Schottky receiver driven by a solid state local oscillator with a DSB noise temperature of 550 K measured at the telescope. The receiver-bandwidth is approx. equal to 1.0 GHz. Quasi-optical mirrors focus the sky and local oscillator radiation into the mixer. Stability analysis via the Allan variance method shows that the total system including a 1 GHz bandwidth acousto-optical spectrometer built in Cologne allows integration times up to 100 sec per half switching cycle. We successfully used the receiver at the KOSMA 3 m telescope on Gornergrat (3150m) located in the central Swiss Alps near Zermatt during January-February 1992 for observations of the 492 GHz, (CI) (3)P1 to (3)P0 fine structure line in several galactic sources. These observations confirm that Gornergrat is an excellent winter submillimeter site in accordance with previous predictions based on the atmospheric opacity from KOSMA 345 GHz measurements.

  18. Solar Patrol Polarization Telescopes at 45 and 90 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valio, A.; Kaufmann, P.; Gimenez de Castro, C. G.; Raulin, J.-P.; Fernandes, L. O.; Marun, A.

    2012-12-01

    The spectra of solar flares provide important information about the physics involved in the flaring process. Presently, however, there is a large frequency gap at radio frequencies between 20 and 200 GHz. Unfortunately, this gap hinders the determination of important flare parameters such as: (i) the frequency of the peak of the spectra, or turnover frequency, which yields the magnetic field intensity in the flaring source and electron density; (ii) the optically thin frequency slope, that is related to the accelerated electrons with a power-law energy distribution, allowing information about the acceleration mechanism; (iii) and other physical parameters such as source size and inhomogeneities that may also be estimated from spectra with complete spectral coverage. Recently a new spectral component at high frequencies was discovered with fluxes increasing above 200 GHz, distinct from the traditional microwave component, with peak frequencies at about 10 GHz. To elucidate the nature of both components and fully characterize the spectra of solar flares, we analyze new observations at the intermediate frequencies obtained by two antennas with receivers at 45 and 90 GHz, capable of measuring circular polarization. The telescope, installed at CASLEO Observatory (Argentina), is described in detail. We also analyze the observations of the flares it has already detected, including their spectra especially when data at 212 and 405 GHz from the Solar Submillimeter Telescope (SST), located at the same site, is available.

  19. Arbitrary waveform modulated pulse EPR at 200 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminker, Ilia; Barnes, Ryan; Han, Songi

    2017-06-01

    We report here on the implementation of arbitrary waveform generation (AWG) capabilities at ∼200 GHz into an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) instrument platform operating at 7 T. This is achieved with the integration of a 1 GHz, 2 channel, digital to analog converter (DAC) board that enables the generation of coherent arbitrary waveforms at Ku-band frequencies with 1 ns resolution into an existing architecture of a solid state amplifier multiplier chain (AMC). This allows for the generation of arbitrary phase- and amplitude-modulated waveforms at 200 GHz with >150 mW power. We find that the non-linearity of the AMC poses significant difficulties in generating amplitude-modulated pulses at 200 GHz. We demonstrate that in the power-limited regime of ω1 < 1 MHz phase-modulated pulses were sufficient to achieve significant improvements in broadband (>10 MHz) spin manipulation in incoherent (inversion), as well as coherent (echo formation) experiments. Highlights include the improvement by one order of magnitude in inversion bandwidth compared to that of conventional rectangular pulses, as well as a factor of two in improvement in the refocused echo intensity at 200 GHz.

  20. STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF 12.2 GHz METHANOL MASERS ASSOCIATED WITH A COMPLETE SAMPLE OF 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, S. L.; Caswell, J. L.; Green, J. A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Fuller, G. A.; Quinn, L. J.; Avison, A.

    2011-06-01

    We present definitive detection statistics for 12.2 GHz methanol masers toward a complete sample of 6.7 GHz methanol masers detected in the Methanol Multibeam survey south of declination -20{sup 0}. In total, we detect 250 12.2 GHz methanol masers toward 580 6.7 GHz methanol masers. This equates to a detection rate of 43.1%, which is lower than that of previous significant searches of comparable sensitivity. Both the velocity ranges and the flux densities of the target 6.7 GHz sources surpass that of their 12.2 GHz companion in almost all cases. Eighty percent of the detected 12.2 GHz methanol maser peaks are coincident in velocity with the 6.7 GHz maser peak. Our data support an evolutionary scenario whereby the 12.2 GHz sources are associated with a somewhat later evolutionary stage than the 6.7 GHz sources devoid of this transition. Furthermore, we find that the 6.7 GHz and 12.2 GHz methanol sources increase in luminosity as they evolve. In addition to this, evidence for an increase in velocity range with evolution is presented. This implies that it is not only the luminosity but also the volume of gas conducive to the different maser transitions that increases as the sources evolve. Comparison with GLIMPSE mid-infrared sources has revealed a coincidence rate between the locations of the 6.7 GHz methanol masers and GLIMPSE point sources similar to that achieved in previous studies. Overall, the properties of the GLIMPSE sources with and without 12.2 GHz counterparts are similar. There is a higher 12.2 GHz detection rate toward those 6.7 GHz methanol masers that are coincident with extended green objects.

  1. 47 CFR 25.287 - Requirements pertaining to operation of mobile stations in the NVNG, 1.5/1.6 GHz, 1.6/2.4 GHz...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirements pertaining to operation of mobile stations in the NVNG, 1.5/1.6 GHz, 1.6/2.4 GHz, and 2 GHz Mobile-Satellite Service bands. 25.287 Section 25... COMMUNICATIONS Technical Operations § 25.287 Requirements pertaining to operation of mobile stations in the NVNG...

  2. The 20 GHz spacecraft FET solid state transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The engineering development of a solid state transmitter amplifier operating in the 20 GHz frequency band using GaAs field effect transistors (FETs) was detailed. The major efforts include GaAs FET device development, single-ended amplifier stage, balanced amplifier stage, cascaded stage and radial combiner designs, and amplifier integration and test. A multistage GaAs FET amplifier capable of 8.2 W CW output over the 17.9 to 19.1 GHz frequency band was developed. The GaAs FET devices developed represent state of the art FET power device technology. Further device improvements are necessary to increase the bandwidth to 2.5 GHz, improve dc-to-RF efficiency, and increase power capability at the device level. Higher power devices will simplify the amplifier combining scheme, reducing the size and weight of the overall amplifier.

  3. Ultrasonic attenuation in amorphous silicon at 50 and 100 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondongwa, D. B.; Daly, B. C.; Norris, T. B.; Yan, B.; Yang, J.; Guha, S.

    2011-03-01

    We have measured the attenuation of longitudinal acoustic waves in a series of amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon films using picosecond ultrasonics. The films were grown using a modified very high frequency glow discharge method on steel substrates. The deposition conditions were similar to that used in the fabrication of high-efficiency solar cells. The film thicknesses were varied so we could distinguish between interface losses and intrinsic losses within the silicon films. We determine the attenuation of amorphous Si to be 780 ± 160 cm-1 at 100 GHz and 340 ± 120 cm-1 at 50 GHz, values that are lower than those predicted by theories based on anharmonic interactions of the sound wave with localized phonons or extended resonant modes. We determine the attenuation of nanocrystalline Si at 50 GHz to be nearly an order of magnitude higher than amorphous Si (2600 ± 660 cm-1) and compare that value to a simple Rayleigh scattering prediction.

  4. Towards hard X-ray imaging at GHz frame rate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Morris, Christopher; Luo, Shengnian; Kwiatkowski, Kris K.; Kapustinsky, Jon S.

    2012-05-02

    Gigahertz (GHz) imaging using hard X-rays ({approx}> 10 keV) can be useful to high-temperature plasma experiments, as well as research using coherent photons from synchrotron radiation and X-ray free electron lasers. GHz framing rate can be achieved by using multiple cameras through multiplexing. The advantages and trade-offs of single-photon detection mode, when no more than one X-ray photon is detected per pixel, are given. Two possible paths towards X-ray imaging at GHz frame rates using a single camera are (a) Avalanche photodiode arrays of high-Z materials and (b) Microchannel plate photomultipliers in conjunction with materials with large indices of refraction.

  5. Towards hard x-ray imaging at GHz frame rate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhehui; Morris, C. L.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Luo, S.-N.

    2012-10-15

    Gigahertz (GHz) imaging using hard x-rays ( Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10 keV) can be useful to high-temperature plasma experiments, as well as research and applications using coherent photons from synchrotron radiation and x-ray free electron lasers. GHz framing rate can be achieved by using multiple cameras through multiplexing. The advantages and trade-offs of single-photon detection mode, when no more than one x-ray photon is detected per pixel, are given. Two possible paths towards x-ray imaging at GHz frame rates using a single camera are: (a) avalanche photodiode arrays of high-Z materials and (b) microchannel plate photomultipliers in conjunction with materials with large indices of refraction.

  6. A 200 GHz tripler using single barrier varactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, Debabani; Frerking, Margaret A.; Batelaan, Paul D.

    1992-01-01

    The GaAs Schottky varactor diode is the nonlinear device most commonly used for submillimeter wave harmonic generation. Output power adequate to serve as a local oscillator source for SIS tunnel junctions has been demonstrated with whisker-contacted GaAs Schottky varactor multipliers in waveguide mounts up to about 800 GHz. In this paper, we present results for a tripler to 200 GHz using a new multiplier device, the single barrier varactor (SBV). This new varactor has a potential advantages such as stronger nonlinearities or special symmetry, which make it attractive for submillimeter wave frequency multiplication. The performance of a tripler using a SBV over a output frequency range from 186 to 207 GHz has been measured in a crossed waveguide mount. The theoretical performance of the device has been calculated using large signal analysis. A comparison of theoretical and measured results and a discussion of various losses in the mount and the varactor have also been presented.

  7. Ka-band (32 GHz) allocations for deep space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroot, N. F.

    1987-01-01

    At the 1979 World Administrative Conference, two new bands were allocated for deep space telecommunications: 31.8 to 32.3 GHz, space-to-Earth, and 34.2 to 34.7 GHz, Earth-to-space. These bands provide opportunity for further development of the Deep Space Network and its support of deep space research. The history of the process by which JPL/NASA developed the rationale, technical background, and statement of requirement for the bands are discussed. Based on this work, United States proposals to the conference included the bands, and subsequent U.S. and NASA participation in the conference led to successful allocations for deep space telecommunications in the 30 GHz region of the spectrum. A detailed description of the allocations is included.

  8. IMPATT power building blocks for 20 GHz spaceborne transmit amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmus, J.; Cho, Y.; Degruyl, J.; Ng, E.; Giannakopoulos, A.; Okean, H. C.

    1982-01-01

    Single-stage circulator coupled IMPATT building block constituents of a 20-GHz solid state power amplifier (SSPA) currently under development for spaceborne downlink transmitter usage have been demonstrated as providing 1.5 to 2.0W RF power output at 4 to 5 dB operating gain over a 1 GHz bandwidth. Using either commercially available or recently developed in-house GaAs Schottky Read-profile IMPATT diodes, DC/RF power added efficiencies of 14 to 15% were achieved in these amplifier stages. A two stage IMPATT driver amplifier with similar RF output power capability exhibited 13 + or - 0.5 dB operating gain over a 1 GHz bandwidth.

  9. A 83 GHz InP DHBT static frequency divider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youtao, Zhang; Xiaopeng, Li; Min, Zhang; Wei, Cheng; Xinyu, Chen

    2014-04-01

    A static frequency divider is presented using 0.7 μm InP DHBTs with 280 GHz ft/fmax. The divider is based on ECL master-slave D-flip-flop topology with 30 HBTs and 20 resistors with a chip size 0.62 × 0.65 mm2. The circuits use peaking inductance as a part of the loads to maximize the highest clock rate. Momentum simulation is used to accurately characterize the effect of the clock feedback lines at the W band. Test results show that the divider can operate from 1 GHz up to 83 GHz. Its phase noise is 139 dBc/Hz with 100 kHz offset. The power dissipation of divider core is 350 mW.

  10. Microwave interferometer using 94-GHz solid-state sources

    SciTech Connect

    Coffield, F.E.; Thomas, S.R.; Lang, D.D.; Stever, R.D.

    1983-11-14

    A 94-GHz microwave interferometer has been designed for the Tandem Mirror Experiment Upgrade and the Mirror Fusion Test Facility to replace the 140-GHz system. The new system is smaller and has modular single-channel units designed for high reliability. It is magnetically shielded and can be mounted close to the machine, which allows the use of lower power solid-state sources. Test results of the 94-GHz prototype indicate that the phase resolution is better than 1/sup 0/, the Impatt FM noise is 5 MHz wide, and the Gunn FM noise is 6 kHz wide. This paper presents the antenna designs along with the test results and discusses the unique problems associated with diagnosing a high electron temperature plasma in the presence of electron cyclotron resonant heating.

  11. 324GHz CMOS VCO Using Linear Superimposition Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daquan, Huang; LaRocca, Tim R.; Samoska, Lorene A; Fung, Andy; Chang, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Terahertz (frequencies ranged from 300GHz to 3THz) imaging and spectroscopic systems have drawn increasing attention recently due to their unique capabilities in detecting and possibly analyzing concealed objects. The generation of terahertz signals is nonetheless nontrivial and traditionally accomplished by using either free-electron radiation, optical lasers, Gunn diodes or fundamental oscillation by using III-V based HBT/HEMT technology[1-3]... We have substantially extended the operation range of deep-scaled CMOS by using a linear superimposition method, in which we have realized a 324GHz VCO in 90nm digital CMOS with 4GHz tuning range under 1V supply voltage. This may also pave the way for ultra-high data rate wireless communications beyond that of IEEE 802.15.3c and reach data rates comparable to that of fiber optical communications, such as OC768 (40Gbps) and beyond.

  12. Measurement of the dielectric properties of the epidermis and dermis at frequencies from 0.5 GHz to 110 GHz.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, K; Wake, K; Watanabe, S

    2014-08-21

    Numerous studies have reported the measurements of the dielectric properties of the skin. Clarifying the manner in which the human body interacts with electromagnetic waves is essential for medical research and development, as well as for the safety assessment of electromagnetic wave exposure. The skin comprises several layers: the epidermis, the dermis, and the subcutaneous fat. Each of these skin layers has a different constitution; however, the previous measurements of their dielectric properties were typically conducted on tissue which included all three layers of the skin. This study presents novel dielectric property data for the epidermis and dermis with in vitro measurement at frequencies ranging from 0.5 GHz to 110 GHz. Measured data was compared with literature values; in particular, the findings were compared with Gabriel's widely used data on skin dielectric properties. The experimental results agreed with the data reported by Gabriel for the dermis of up to 20 GHz, which is the upper limit of the range of frequencies at which Gabriel reported measurements. For frequencies of 20-100 GHz, the experimental results indicated larger values than those extrapolated from Gabriel's data using parametric expansion. For frequencies over 20 GHz, the dielectric properties provided by the parametric model tend toward the experimental results for the epidermis with increasing frequency.

  13. Measurement of the dielectric properties of the epidermis and dermis at frequencies from 0.5 GHz to 110 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, K.; Wake, K.; Watanabe, S.

    2014-08-01

    Numerous studies have reported the measurements of the dielectric properties of the skin. Clarifying the manner in which the human body interacts with electromagnetic waves is essential for medical research and development, as well as for the safety assessment of electromagnetic wave exposure. The skin comprises several layers: the epidermis, the dermis, and the subcutaneous fat. Each of these skin layers has a different constitution; however, the previous measurements of their dielectric properties were typically conducted on tissue which included all three layers of the skin. This study presents novel dielectric property data for the epidermis and dermis with in vitro measurement at frequencies ranging from 0.5 GHz to 110 GHz. Measured data was compared with literature values; in particular, the findings were compared with Gabriel’s widely used data on skin dielectric properties. The experimental results agreed with the data reported by Gabriel for the dermis of up to 20 GHz, which is the upper limit of the range of frequencies at which Gabriel reported measurements. For frequencies of 20-100 GHz, the experimental results indicated larger values than those extrapolated from Gabriel’s data using parametric expansion. For frequencies over 20 GHz, the dielectric properties provided by the parametric model tend toward the experimental results for the epidermis with increasing frequency.

  14. An inductorless CMOS programmable-gain amplifier with a > 3 GHz bandwidth for 60 GHz wireless transceivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhu; Baoyong, Chi; Lixue, Kuang; Wen, Jia; Zhihua, Wang

    2014-10-01

    An inductorless wideband programmable-gain amplifier (PGA) for 60 GHz wireless transceivers is presented. To attain wideband characteristics, a modified Cherry—Hooper amplifier with a negative capacitive neutralization technique is employed as the gain cell while a novel circuit technique for gain adjustment is adopted; this technique can be universally applicable in wideband PGA design and greatly simplifying the design of wideband PGA. By cascading two gain cells and an output buffer stage, the PGA achieves the highest gain of 30 dB with the bandwidth much wider than 3 GHz. The PGA has been integrated into one whole 60 GHz wireless transceiver and implemented in the TSMC 65 nm CMOS process. The measurements on the receiver front-end show that the receiver front-end achieves an 18 dB variable gain range with a > 3 GHz bandwidth, which proves the proposed PGA achieves an 18 dB variable gain range with a bandwidth much wider than 3 GHz. The PGA consumes 10.7 mW of power from a 1.2-V supply voltage with a core area of only 0.025 mm2.

  15. 80-GHz MMIC HEMT Voltage-Controlled Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Radisic, Vesna; Micovic, Miro; Hu, Ming; Janke, Paul; Ngo, Catherine; Nguyen, Loi

    2003-01-01

    A voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) that operates in the frequency range from 77.5 to 83.5 GHz has been constructed in the form of a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) that includes high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs). This circuit is a prototype of electronically tunable signal sources in the 75-to-110-GHz range, needed for communication, imaging, and automotive radar applications, among others. This oscillator (see Figure 1) includes two AlInAs/GaInAs/InP HEMTs. One HEMT serves mainly as an oscillator gain element. The other HEMT serves mainly as a varactor for controlling the frequency: the frequency-control element is its gate-to-source capacitance, which is varied by changing its gate supply voltage. The gain HEMT is biased for class-A operation (meaning that current is conducted throughout the oscillation cycle). Grounded coplanar waveguides are used as impedance-matching transmission lines, the input and output matching being chosen to sustain oscillation and maximize output power. Air bridges are placed at discontinuities to suppress undesired slot electromagnetic modes. A high density of vias is necessary for suppressing a parallel-plate electromagnetic mode that is undesired because it can propagate energy into the MMIC substrate. Previous attempts at constructing HEMT-based oscillators yielded circuits with relatively low levels of output power and narrow tuning ranges. For example, one HEMT VCO reported in the literature had an output power of 7 dBm (.5 mW) and a tuning range 2-GHz wide centered approximately at a nominal frequency of 77 GHz. In contrast, as shown in Figure 2, the present MMIC HEMT VCO puts out a power of 12.5 dBm (.18 mW) or more over the 6-GHz-wide frequency range from 77.5 to 83.5 GHz

  16. A 150 GHz Receiver Module for Astronomical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voll, Patricia; Lau, J.; Sieth, M.; Church, S.; Samoska, L. A.; Kangaslahti, P. P.; Soria, M.; Gaier, T. C.; Van Winkle, D.; Tantawi, S.

    2011-01-01

    A compact, wide-band, heterodyne amplifier module has been designed to operate in the 150 GHz atmospheric window using High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) amplifier technology. This frequency range is important for many astrophysical science applications, including spectral line studies, separating the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation from foregrounds, and detecting the hot gas around galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. HEMT-based receiver arrays with excellent noise and scalability are already being manufactured around 100 GHz, but recent advances have made it possible to extend this technology to even higher frequencies. The prototype 150 GHz module housing utilizes Monolithic Millimeter-Wave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) InP Low Noise Amplifiers (LNAs). These amplifiers, along with a second harmonic mixer, bias circuitry, and connectors, are contained in a single, split-block housing approximately one inch cubed in size. Preliminary cryogenic tests have measured a system noise temperature of 150 K over a bandwidth of 25 GHz with a minimum noise temperature of less than 100 K at 168 GHz. The minimum noise temperature is less than 100 K at 168 GHz. Module improvements for the second phase are expected to reduce the noise temperature to the minimum allowed by the device limit. Development of a 4-element array to demonstrate the scalability of these receivers is currently underway, and will serve as a prototype for much larger, 100-element arrays for astrophysical applications. In the future, a space mission incorporating an array of these modules could be used to detect the curl modes (B-modes) of the CMB polarization, which is important for the search for the signature of inflation.

  17. Lightweight Reflectarray Antenna for 7.115 and 32 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zawadzki, Mark; Huang, John

    2007-01-01

    A lightweight reflectarray antenna that would enable simultaneous operation at frequencies near 7.115 GHz and frequencies near 32 GHz is undergoing development. More precisely, what is being developed is a combination of two reflectarray antennas -- one for each frequency band -- that share the same aperture. (A single reflectarray cannot work in both frequency bands.) The main advantage of the single dual-band reflectarray is that it would weigh less and occupy less space than do two single-band reflectarray antennas

  18. Low-noise 6-8 GHz receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandian, J. D.; Baker, L.; Cortes, G.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Deshpande, A. A.; Ganesan, R.; Hagen, J.; Locke, L.; Wadefalk, N.; Weinreb, S.

    2006-12-01

    The combination of the traveling wave OMT device and the ultra-low-noise MMIC amplifiers has allowed us to develop a broadband 6-8 GHz receiver with a noise temperature of around 10 K. The combination of receiver noise and the additional noise contributions by the telescope optics gives an overall receiver temperature of around 28 K and 34 K in the two polarizations. The large collecting area of the telescope gives rise to a system equivalent flux density of around 4.5 Jy at 7 GHz.

  19. Modeling of NASA's 30/20 GHz satellite communications system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwatra, S. C.; Maples, B. W.; Stevens, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    NASA is in the process of developing technology for a 30/20 GHz satellite communications link. Currently hardware is being assembled for a test transponder. A simulation package is being developed to study the link performance in the presence of interference and noise. This requires developing models for the components of the system. This paper describes techniques used to model the components for which data is available. Results of experiments performed using these models are described. A brief overview of NASA's 30/20 GHz communications satellite program is also included.

  20. A 32 GHz microstrip array antenna for microspacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.

    1994-01-01

    JPL/NASA is currently developing microspacecraft systems for future deep space applications. One of the frequency bands being investigated for microspacecraft is the Ka-band (32 GHz), which can be used with smaller equipment and provides a larger bandwidth. This article describes the successful development of a circularly polarized microstrip array with 28 dBic of gain at 32 GHz. This antenna, which is thin, flat, and small, can be surface-mounted onto the microspacecraft and, hence, takes very little volume and mass of the spacecraft. The challenges in developing this antenna are minimizing the microstrip antenna's insertion loss and maintaining a reasonable frequency bandwidth.

  1. The 20/30 GHz satellite systems technology needs assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, G.; Wright, D.

    1978-01-01

    Rain attenuation in the 20/30 GHz bands, and the resultant impact on system user costs were estimated for a variety of satellite communication system concepts. Results of previous and current NASA Lewis contractual and in-house studies on system design are reported as well as market studies conducted to evaluate the concepts and test their relevancy against forecasted market needs. The 20/30 GHz bands appear attractive economically and, with certain technology, appear to offer a virtually unlimited spectrum resource. This attractiveness is especially relevant to high density trunking where there is sufficient traffic to justify dual-station site diversity.

  2. Characterization of a 300-GHz Transmission System for Digital Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudlička, Martin; Salhi, Mohammed; Kleine-Ostmann, Thomas; Schrader, Thorsten

    2017-08-01

    The paper presents the characterization of a 300-GHz transmission system for modern digital communications. The quality of the modulated signal at the output of the system (error vector magnitude, EVM) is measured using a vector signal analyzer. A method using a digital real-time oscilloscope and consecutive mathematical processing in a computer is shown for analysis of signals with bandwidths exceeding that of state-of-the-art vector signal analyzers. The uncertainty of EVM measured using the real-time oscilloscope is open to analysis. Behaviour of the 300-GHz transmission system is studied with respect to various modulation schemes and different signal symbol rates.

  3. 90 GHz AND 150 GHz OBSERVATIONS OF THE ORION M42 REGION. A SUBMILLIMETER TO RADIO ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Dicker, S. R.; Korngut, P. M.; Devlin, M. J.; Mason, B. S.; Cotton, W. D.; Compiegne, M.; Martin, P. G.; Ade, P. A. R; Tucker, C.; Benford, D. J.; Staguhn, J. G.; Irwin, K. D.; Maddalena, R. J.; McMullin, J. P.; Shepherd, D.S.; Sievers, A.

    2009-11-01

    We have used the new 90 GHz MUSTANG camera on the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to map the bright Huygens region of the star-forming region M42 with a resolution of 9'' and a sensitivity of 2.8 mJy beam{sup -1}. Ninety GHz is an interesting transition frequency, as MUSTANG detects both the free-free emission characteristic of the H II region created by the Trapezium stars, normally seen at lower frequencies, and thermal dust emission from the background OMC1 molecular cloud, normally mapped at higher frequencies. We also present similar data from the 150 GHz GISMO camera taken on the IRAM 30 m telescope. This map has 15'' resolution. By combining the MUSTANG data with 1.4, 8, and 21 GHz radio data from the VLA and GBT, we derive a new estimate of the emission measure averaged electron temperature of T{sub e} = 11376 +- 1050 K by an original method relating free-free emission intensities at optically thin and optically thick frequencies. Combining Infrared Space Observatory-long wavelength spectrometer (ISO-LWS) data with our data, we derive a new estimate of the dust temperature and spectral emissivity index within the 80'' ISO-LWS beam toward Orion KL/BN, T{sub d} = 42 +- 3 K and beta {sub d} = 1.3 +- 0.1. We show that both T{sub d} and beta {sub d} decrease when going from the H II region and excited OMC1 interface to the denser UV shielded part of OMC1 (Orion KL/BN, Orion S). With a model consisting of only free-free and thermal dust emission, we are able to fit data taken at frequencies from 1.5 GHz to 854 GHz (350 mum).

  4. 90 GHz and 150 GHz Observations of the Orion M42 Region. A Submillimeter to Radio Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicker, S. R.; Mason, B. S.; Korngut, P. M.; Cotton, W. D.; Compiegne, M.; Devlin, M. J.; Martin, P. G.; Ade, P. A. R; Benford, D. J.; Irwin, K. D.; hide

    2009-01-01

    We have used the new 90GHz MUSTANG camera on the Robert C. Green Bank Telescope (GBT)to map the bright Huygens region of the star-forming region M42 with a resolution of 9" and a sensitivity of 2.8 mJy/beam. Ninety GHz is an interesting transition frequency, as MUSTANG detects both the free-free emission characteristic of the H II region created by the Trapezium stars, normally seen at lower frequencies, and thermal dust emission from the background OMCI molecular cloud, normally mapped at higher frequencies. We also present similar data from the 150 GHz GISMO camera taken on the IRAM 30 m telescope. This map has 15" resolution. By combining the MUSTANG data with 1.4, 8. and 31 GHz radio data from the VLA and GBT, we derive a new estimate of the emission measure averaged electron temperature of T(sub e) = 11376+/-1050 K by an original method relating free-free emission intensities at optically thin and optically thick frequencies. Combining Infrared Space Observatory-long wavelength spectrometer (ISO-LWS) data with our data, we derive a new estimate of the dust temperature and spectral emissivity index within the 80" ISO-LWS beam toward Orion KL/BN, T(sub d) = 42+/-3 K and Beta(sub d) = 1.3+/-0.1. We show that both T(sub d) and Beta(sub d) decrease when going from the H II region and excited OMCI interface to the denser UV shielded part OMCI (Orion KL/BN, Orion S). With a model consisting of only free-free and thermal dust emission, we are able to fit data taken at frequencies from 1.5 GHz to 854 GHz (350 micrometers).

  5. 90 GHz and 150 GHz Observations of the Orion M42 Region. A Submillimeter to Radio Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicker, S. R.; Mason, B. S.; Korngut, P. M.; Cotton, W. D.; Compiegne, M.; Devlin, M. J.; Martin, P. G.; Ade, P. A. R; Benford, D. J.; Irwin, K. D.; Maddalena, R. J.; McMullin, J. P.; Shepherd, D. S.; Sievers, A.; Staguhn, J. G.; Tucker, C.

    2009-01-01

    We have used the new 90GHz MUSTANG camera on the Robert C. Green Bank Telescope (GBT)to map the bright Huygens region of the star-forming region M42 with a resolution of 9" and a sensitivity of 2.8 mJy/beam. Ninety GHz is an interesting transition frequency, as MUSTANG detects both the free-free emission characteristic of the H II region created by the Trapezium stars, normally seen at lower frequencies, and thermal dust emission from the background OMCI molecular cloud, normally mapped at higher frequencies. We also present similar data from the 150 GHz GISMO camera taken on the IRAM 30 m telescope. This map has 15" resolution. By combining the MUSTANG data with 1.4, 8. and 31 GHz radio data from the VLA and GBT, we derive a new estimate of the emission measure averaged electron temperature of T(sub e) = 11376+/-1050 K by an original method relating free-free emission intensities at optically thin and optically thick frequencies. Combining Infrared Space Observatory-long wavelength spectrometer (ISO-LWS) data with our data, we derive a new estimate of the dust temperature and spectral emissivity index within the 80" ISO-LWS beam toward Orion KL/BN, T(sub d) = 42+/-3 K and Beta(sub d) = 1.3+/-0.1. We show that both T(sub d) and Beta(sub d) decrease when going from the H II region and excited OMCI interface to the denser UV shielded part OMCI (Orion KL/BN, Orion S). With a model consisting of only free-free and thermal dust emission, we are able to fit data taken at frequencies from 1.5 GHz to 854 GHz (350 micrometers).

  6. A 77-118 GHz RESONANCE-FREE SEPTUM POLARIZER

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yen-Lin; Chiueh, Tzihong; Teng, Hsiao-Feng

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of polarized radiation often reveal specific physical properties of emission sources, such as the strengths and orientations of magnetic fields offered by synchrotron radiation and Zeeman line emission, and the electron density distribution caused by free-free emission. Polarization-capable, millimeter/sub-millimeter telescopes are normally equipped with either septum polarizers or ortho-mode transducers (OMT) to detect polarized radiation. Though the septum polarizer is limited to a significantly narrower bandwidth than the OMT, it possesses advantageous features unparalleled by the OMT when it comes to determining astronomical polarization measurements. We design an extremely wide-band circular waveguide septum polarizer, covering 42% bandwidth, from 77 GHz to 118 GHz, without any undesired resonance, challenging the conventional bandwidth limit. Stokes parameters, constructed from the measured data between 77 GHz and 115 GHz, show that the leakage from I to Q and U is below ±2%, and the Q – U mutual leakage is below ±1%. Such a performance is comparable to other modern polarizers, but the bandwidth of this polarizer can be at least twice as wide. This extremely wide-band design removes the major weakness of the septum polarizer and opens up a new window for future astronomical polarization measurements.

  7. 35 GHz integrated circuit rectifying antenna with 33 percent efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoo, T.-W.; Chang, K.

    1991-01-01

    A 35 GHz integrated circuit rectifying antenna (rectenna) has been developed using a microstrip dipole antenna and beam-lead mixer diode. Greater than 33 percent conversion efficiency has been achieved. The circuit should have applications in microwave/millimeter-wave power transmission and detection.

  8. 77 FR 45503 - 4.9 GHz Band

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... No. 07-100; PS Docket No. 06-229; WT Docket No. 06-150; FCC 12-61] 4.9 GHz Band AGENCY: Federal...) 418-7233, or via email at Thomas.Eng@fcc.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This is a summary of the... copying during normal business hours in the FCC Reference Information Center, Portals II, 445 12th...

  9. Radially combined 30 W, 14-16 GHz amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Sechi, F.; Bujatti, M.; Knudson, R.; Bugos, R.

    1994-04-01

    The paper describes a highly integrated 30 W power amplifier for a Synthetic Aperture Radar, operating in the 14--16 GHz band. The use of a waveguide radial combiner, a microstrip power divider and direct microstrip to waveguide miniaturized ceramic technology, leads to an unusually compact and accessible structure, well suited for commercial production.

  10. A 77-118 GHz Resonance-free Septum Polarizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen-Lin; Chiueh, Tzihong; Teng, Hsiao-Feng

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of polarized radiation often reveal specific physical properties of emission sources, such as the strengths and orientations of magnetic fields offered by synchrotron radiation and Zeeman line emission, and the electron density distribution caused by free-free emission. Polarization-capable, millimeter/sub-millimeter telescopes are normally equipped with either septum polarizers or ortho-mode transducers (OMT) to detect polarized radiation. Though the septum polarizer is limited to a significantly narrower bandwidth than the OMT, it possesses advantageous features unparalleled by the OMT when it comes to determining astronomical polarization measurements. We design an extremely wide-band circular waveguide septum polarizer, covering 42% bandwidth, from 77 GHz to 118 GHz, without any undesired resonance, challenging the conventional bandwidth limit. Stokes parameters, constructed from the measured data between 77 GHz and 115 GHz, show that the leakage from I to Q and U is below ±2%, and the Q - U mutual leakage is below ±1%. Such a performance is comparable to other modern polarizers, but the bandwidth of this polarizer can be at least twice as wide. This extremely wide-band design removes the major weakness of the septum polarizer and opens up a new window for future astronomical polarization measurements.

  11. A 640 GHz Planar-Diode Fundamental Mixer/Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, P.; Mehdi, I.; Dengler, R.; Lee, T.; Humphrey, D.; Pease, A.

    1998-01-01

    The design and performance of a 640 GHz solid-state receiver using a fundamental planar-Schottky-diode mixer, InP Gunn diode oscillator, whisker-contacted Schottky-varactor-diode sextupler and folded-Fabry-Perot diplexer are reported.

  12. The 20 GHz power GaAs FET development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandell, M.

    1986-01-01

    The development of power Field Effect Transistors (FET) operating in the 20 GHz frequency band is described. The major efforts include GaAs FET device development (both 1 W and 2 W devices), and the development of an amplifier module using these devices.

  13. Laboratory Heterodyne Spectrometers Operating at 100 and 300 GHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maßen, Jakob; Wehres, Nadine; Hermanns, Marius; Lewen, Frank; Heyne, Bettina; Endres, Christian; Graf, Urs; Honingh, Netty; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2017-06-01

    Two new laboratory heterodyne emission spectrometers are presented that are currently used for high-resolution rotational spectroscopy of complex organic molecules. The room temperature heterodyne receiver operating between 80-110 GHz, as well as the SIS heterodyne receiver operating between 270-370 GHz allow access to two very important frequency regimes, coinciding with Bands 3 and 7 of the ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter Array) telescope. Taking advantage of recent progresses in the field of mm/submm technology, we build these two spectrometers using an XFFFTS (eXtended Fast Fourier Transform Spectrometer) for spectral acquisition. The instantaneous bandwidth is 2.5 GHz in a single sideband, spread over 32768 channels. Thus, the spectral resolution is about 76 kHz per channel and thus comparable to high resolution spectra from telescopes. Both receivers are operated in double sideband mode resulting in a total instantaneous bandwidth of 5 GHz. The system performances, in particular the noise temperatures and stabilities are presented. Proof-of-concept is demonstrated by showing spectra of methyl cyanide obtained with both spectrometers. While the transition frequencies for this molecule are very well known, intensities of those transitions can also be determined with high accuracy using our new instruments. This additional information shall be exploited in future measurements to improve spectral predictions for astronomical observations. Other future prospects concern the study of more complex organic species, such as ethyl cyanide. These aspects of the new instruments as well as limitations of the two distinct receivers will be discussed.

  14. Ka-band (32 GHz) benefits to planned missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, D. M.; Kliore, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    The benefits of using 32 GHz downlinks for a set of deep space missions, as well as the implications to radio science and the Deep Space Network (DSN) are documented. The basic comparison is between the use of the current X-band (8.4 GHz) and a 32 GHZ (Ka-band) downlink. There was shown to be approximately an 8 dB (about 600%) link advantage for 32 GHz. This 8 dB advantage would be able to either reduce mission cost or improve mission science return. Included here are studies on how the 8 dB advantage would be used for the Cassini and Mars Sample Return missions. While the work is preliminary, it shows that the 8 dB advantage can be exploited to provide large benefits to future deep space missions. There can be significant mass and/or power savings to the spacecraft, which can translate into cost savings. Alternatively, the increased downlink telecommunications performance can provide a greater science return.

  15. Remarkable flaring activity in Cygnus X-1 at 15 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooley, Guy

    2017-08-01

    The radio emission at 15 GHz from Cygnus X-1 is monitored regularly by the the AMI Large Array at MRAO, Cambridge. The radio flux density is typically near 20 mJy, but is subject to wide variations, including very rare events lasting for some minutes and which are usually termed 'flares'.

  16. Searching for inflationary B modes: can dust emission properties be extrapolated from 350 GHz to 150 GHz?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Pavlidou, Vasiliki

    2015-07-01

    Recent Planck results have shown that radiation from the cosmic microwave background passes through foregrounds in which aligned dust grains produce polarized dust emission, even in regions of the sky with the lowest level of dust emission. One of the most commonly used ways to remove the dust foreground is to extrapolate the polarized dust emission signal from frequencies where it dominates (e.g. ˜350 GHz) to frequencies commonly targeted by cosmic microwave background experiments (e.g. ˜150 GHz). In this Letter, we describe an interstellar medium effect that can lead to decorrelation of the dust emission polarization pattern between different frequencies due to multiple contributions along the line of sight. Using a simple 2-cloud model we show that there are two conditions under which this decorrelation can be large: (a) the ratio of polarized intensities between the two clouds changes between the two frequencies; (b) the magnetic fields between the two clouds contributing along a line of sight are significantly misaligned. In such cases, the 350 GHz polarized sky map is not predictive of that at 150 GHz. We propose a possible correction for this effect, using information from optopolarimetric surveys of dichroicly absorbed starlight.

  17. Design And Performance Of 20 And 45 GHZ MMIC Lange Couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Jack E.; Ellis, Grant A.

    1988-11-01

    Experimental results are presented for GaAs MMIC Lange coupler designs in both the 15 to 25 GHz and 33 to 50 GHz frequency ranges. Coupler insertion loss, return loss, isolation, and differential insertion phase are included.

  18. Developments Related to the Future Use of the 32-ghz Allocation for Deep Space Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroot, N. F.

    1983-01-01

    The advantage of 32-GHz links, the estimated link performance, and developments in the fields of antennas, low noise preamplifiers, radiometry, and propagation studies are discussed. A description of ways to demonstrate 32-GHz link capability concludes the discussion.

  19. MMIC DHBT Common-Base Amplifier for 172 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paidi, Vamsi; Griffith, Zack; Wei, Yun; Dahlstrom, Mttias; Urteaga, Miguel; Rodwell, Mark; Samoska, Lorene; Fung, King Man; Schlecht, Erich

    2006-01-01

    Figure 1 shows a single-stage monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifier in which the gain element is a double-heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT) connected in common-base configuration. This amplifier, which has been demonstrated to function well at a frequency of 172 GHz, is part of a continuing effort to develop compact, efficient amplifiers for scientific instrumentation, wide-band communication systems, and radar systems that will operate at frequencies up to and beyond 180 GHz. The transistor is fabricated from a layered structure formed by molecular beam epitaxy in the InP/InGaAs material system. A highly doped InGaAs base layer and a collector layer are fabricated from the layered structure in a triple mesa process. The transistor includes two separate emitter fingers, each having dimensions of 0.8 by 12 m. The common-base configuration was chosen for its high maximum stable gain in the frequency band of interest. The input-matching network is designed for high bandwidth. The output of the transistor is matched to a load line for maximum saturated output power under large-signal conditions, rather than being matched for maximum gain under small-signal conditions. In a test at a frequency of 172 GHz, the amplifier was found to generate an output power of 7.5 mW, with approximately 5 dB of large-signal gain (see Figure 2). Moreover, the amplifier exhibited a peak small-signal gain of 7 dB at a frequency of 176 GHz. This performance of this MMIC single-stage amplifier containing only a single transistor represents a significant advance in the state of the art, in that it rivals the 170-GHz performance of a prior MMIC three-stage, four-transistor amplifier. [The prior amplifier was reported in "MMIC HEMT Power Amplifier for 140 to 170 GHz" (NPO-30127), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 11 (November 2003), page 49.] This amplifier is the first heterojunction- bipolar-transistor (HBT) amplifier built for medium power operation in this

  20. Experimental study of a 1 MW, 170 GHz gyrotron oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Takuji

    A detailed experimental study is presented of a 1 MW, 170 GHz gyrotron oscillator whose design is consistent with the ECH requirements of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) for bulk heating and current drive. This work is the first to demonstrate that megawatt power level at 170 GHz can be achieved in a gyrotron with high efficiency for plasma heating applications. Maximum output power of 1.5 MW is obtained at 170.1 GHz in 85 kV, 50A operation for an efficiency of 35%. Although the experiment at MIT is conducted with short pulses (3 μs), the gyrotron is designed to be suitable for development by industry for continuous wave operation. The peak ohmic loss on the cavity wall for 1 MW of output power is calculated to be 2.3 kW/cm2, which can be handled using present cooling technology. Mode competition problems in a highly over-moded cavity are studied to maximize the efficiency. Various aspects of electron gun design are examined to obtain high quality electron beams with very low velocity spread. A triode magnetron injection gun is designed using the EGUN simulation code. A total perpendicular velocity spread of less than 8% is realized by designing a low- sensitivity, non-adiabatic gun. The RF power is generated in a short tapered cavity with an iris step. The operating mode is the TE28,8,1 mode. A mode converter is designed to convert the RF output to a Gaussian beam. Power and efficiency are measured in the design TE28,8,1 mode at 170.1 GHz as well as the TE27,8,1 mode at 166.6 GHz and TE29,8,1 mode at 173.5 GHz. Efficiencies between 34%-36% are consistently obtained over a wide range of operating parameters. These efficiencies agree with the highest values predicted by the multimode simulations. The startup scenario is investigated and observed to agree with the linear theory. The measured beam velocity ratio is consistent with EGUN simulation. Interception of reflected beam by the mod-anode is measured as a function of velocity ratio

  1. An integrated membrane sub-harmonic Schottky diode mixers at 340GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junlong; Yang, Dabao; Xing, Dong; Liang, Shixiong; Zhang, Lisen; Zhao, Xiangyang; Feng, Zhihong

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a sub-harmonic mixer operating over the spectral band 332-348 GHz. The mixers employ integrated GaAs membrane Schottky diode technology. The simulated results show that the conversion loss of the mixer is below dB in the band from 333 GHz to 347 GHz with a local oscillator power requirement of 5mW.The minimum is 8.2dB at 344GHz.

  2. Development of a 20/30 GHz Receiving Station for Propagation Experiments with L-SAT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-25

    EXPERIMENTS WITH L-SAT ~ Angel Cardama Universidad Politdcnica de Barcelona Escuela Tdcnica Superior • de Ingenieros de Telecomunicaci6n 08034 - Barcelona...reflexion and transmission modes. The operating options available in our laboratory, 2 - 20 GHz automa tic vector system, 36 GHz manual scalar for...to 20 GHz, manual scalar ceflection and transmission benches at 36 GHz and vector reflection system at the same frequency, will be com- pleted with a

  3. The Canadian approach to the development of communications by satellite in the 12-GHz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, R. R.

    1981-08-01

    WARC-79 made significant changes to how the 12-GHz band will be used in Region 2. In particular, it decided that the 12-GHz band in Region 2 will extend upwards the 12.7 GHz, and that the upper portion of the overall band (11.7 to 12.7 GHz), will be planned at the 1983 Regional Conference. The paper describes these allocation changes and how satellite systems are being developed in Canada under these new regulations.

  4. Complex permittivities of cyclomaltooligosaccharides (cyclodextrins) over microwave frequencies to 26 GHz.

    PubMed

    Atwater, J E

    2000-07-24

    Complex permittivities (epsilon*) for microwave radiation between 0.5 and 26 GHz have been determined for alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins in the solid state at room temperature. For the real component of epsilon*, maxima occur near 0.6 GHz, and the relation beta > alpha > gamma is evident across the full-frequency spectrum. Dielectric loss is significant only between 5 and 12 GHz for beta- and gamma-cyclodextrins with maxima near 7.5 GHz.

  5. Rain rate and modeled fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz derived from five years of network rain gauge measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Krichevsky, Vladimir; Gebo, Norman

    1992-01-01

    Five years of rain rate and modeled slant path attenuation distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz derived from a network of 10 tipping bucket rain gages was examined. The rain gage network is located within a grid 70 km north-south and 47 km east-west in the Mid-Atlantic coast of the United States in the vicinity of Wallops Island, Virginia. Distributions were derived from the variable integration time data and from one minute averages. It was demonstrated that for realistic fade margins, the variable integration time results are adequate to estimate slant path attenuations at frequencies above 20 GHz using models which require one minute averages. An accurate empirical formula was developed to convert the variable integration time rain rates to one minute averages. Fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz were derived employing Crane's Global model because it was demonstrated to exhibit excellent accuracy with measured COMSTAR fades at 28.56 GHz.

  6. 47 CFR 27.806 - 1.4 GHz service licenses subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 1.4 GHz service licenses subject to competitive bidding. 27.806 Section 27.806 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.806 1.4 GHz...

  7. 47 CFR 27.806 - 1.4 GHz service licenses subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false 1.4 GHz service licenses subject to competitive bidding. 27.806 Section 27.806 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.806 1.4 GHz...

  8. 47 CFR 27.806 - 1.4 GHz service licenses subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 1.4 GHz service licenses subject to competitive bidding. 27.806 Section 27.806 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.806 1.4 GHz...

  9. 47 CFR 27.806 - 1.4 GHz service licenses subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 1.4 GHz service licenses subject to competitive bidding. 27.806 Section 27.806 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.806 1.4 GHz...

  10. 47 CFR 27.806 - 1.4 GHz service licenses subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false 1.4 GHz service licenses subject to competitive bidding. 27.806 Section 27.806 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.806 1.4 GHz...

  11. The 18/30 GHz fixed communications system service demand assessment. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriszeski, T.; Reiner, P.; Rogers, J.; Terbo, W.

    1979-01-01

    The total demand for voice, video, and data communications services, and satellite transmission services at the 4/6 GHz, 12/14 GHz, and 18/30 GHz frequencies is discussed. Major study objectives, overall methodology, results, and general observations about a satellite systems market characteristics and trends are summarized.

  12. 90 GHz Observations of M87 and Hydra A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, W. D.; Mason, B. S.; Dicker, S. R.; Korngut, P. M.; Devlin, M. J.; Aquirre, J.; Benford, D. J.; Moseley, S. H.; Staguhn, J. G.; Irwin, K. D.; hide

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents new observations of the active galactic nuclei M87 and Hydra A at 90 GHz made with the MUSTANG array on the Green Bank Telescope at 8"5 resolution. A spectral analysis is performed combining this new data and archival VLA 7 data on these objects at longer wavelengths. This analysis can detect variations in spectral index and curvature expected from energy losses in the radiating particles. M87 shows only weak evidence for steepening of the spectrum along the jet suggesting either re-acceleration of the relativistic particles in the jet or insufficient losses to affect the spectrum at 90 GHz. The jets in Hydra A show strong steepening as they move from the nucleus suggesting unbalanced losses of the higher energy relativistic particles. The difference between these two sources may be accounted for by the lengths over which the jets are observable, 2 kpc for M87 and 45 kpc for Hydra A.

  13. The 30/20 GHz communications satellite trunking network study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, W.

    1981-01-01

    Alternative transmission media for a CONUS-wide trunking network in the years 1990 and 2000 are examined. The alternative technologies comprised fiber optic cable, conventional C- and Ku-band satellites, and 30/20 GHz satellites. Three levels of implementation were considered - a 10-city network, a 20-city network, and a 40-city network. The cities selected were the major metropolitan areas with the greatest communications demand. All intercity voice, data, and video traffic carried more than 40 miles was included in the analysis. In the optimized network, traffic transmitted less than 500 miles was found to be better served by fiber optic cable in 1990. By the year 2000, the crossover point would be down to 200 miles, assuming availability of 30/20 GHz satellites.

  14. Localized Heat Urticaria from 95-GHz Millimeter Waves.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, John A

    2017-06-01

    Local heat urticaria is a physical urticaria caused by the environmental stimulus of heat. Typically, the resultant lesion, a wheal, is pruritic (itches) and is sometimes accompanied by a burning sensation. It is a self-limited phenomenon that resolves after 1.5-2 h. The prevalence of local heat urticaria in the general population has been estimated as 1 in 200,000 persons. The subject, a 39-yr-old active duty man, participated in a test of a 95-GHz energy beam designed to heat the skin. He had delayed presentation of raised, erythematous, nonpruritic, nonpainful areas at five of the exposure sites where the skin temperature exceeded 54°C. All wheals resolved within 2 h of the exposures.Gibbons JA. Localized heat urticaria from 95-GHz millimeter waves. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(6):586-588.

  15. Development of 26 GHz Dielectric-Based Wakefield Power Extractor

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Gao, F.; Kazakov, S.; Kustov, A.

    2009-01-22

    High frequency, high power rf sources are needed for many applications in particle accelerators, communications, radar, etc. In this article we present a design of a 26 GHz high power rf source based on the extraction of wakefields from a relativistic electron beam. The extractor is designed to couple out rf power generated from a high charge electron bunch train traversing a dielectric loaded waveguide. Using a 20 nC bunch train (bunch length of 1.5 mm) at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility, we can obtain a steady 26 GHz output power of 148 MW. The extractor has been fabricated and bench tested, with the first high power beam experiments to be performed in the coming year.

  16. Development of ALMA Band 8 (385-500 GHz) Cartridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Y.; Iizuko, Y.; Satou, N.; Ito, T.; Kumagai, K.; Kamikura, M.; Naruse, M.; Shan, W. L.

    2008-04-01

    We have developed a cartridge-type receiver covering from 385 to 500 GHz for pre-production of ALMA Band 8. It receives two orthogonal polarizations and down-converts the sideband-separated signals to intermediate frequencies (IF) between 4 and 8 GHz. The cartridge-type receiver consists of a cold optics, a feed horn, an OMT, two sideband-separating SIS mixers, cryogenic multipliers of local oscillator (LO). These components were individually tested and then the cartridge was integrated and tested as a complete assembly. We have also developed equipment to test both components and the integrated receiver. The single sideband (SSB) noise temperature of this receiver is 130 K at the band center and 180 K at the band edges. The beam pattern and cross-polarization pattern are consistent with physical optical calculation. These results are promising for receiver production to the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).

  17. Development of a 385-500 GHz Orthomode Transducer (OMT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamikura, Mamoru; Naruse, Masato; Asayama, Shin'ichiro; Satou, Naohisa; Shan, Wenlei; Sekimoto, Yutaro

    2008-04-01

    We report on the development of an orthomode transducer (OMT) for ALMA Band 8 (385-500 GHz). The OMT is a scaled model of that of ALMA Band 4 (125-163 GHz), which has a Bφifot junction and a double ridge. The transmission loss of the OMT at 4 K was derived to be 0.4-0.5 dB from noise measurements with an SIS mixer. The polarization isolation was measured to be larger than 20 dB from quasioptical measurements. For electromagnetic design, effects of mechanical errors have been studied and then a robust design with allowable mechanical errors of 10 μm has been obtained.

  18. New 33 GHz measurements of the cosmic background radiation intensity

    SciTech Connect

    De Amici, G.; Smoot, G.; Friedman, S.D.; Witebsky, C.

    1985-11-15

    New measurements have been made of the intensity of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at 33 GHz (0.91 cm). The experiment was part of a larger effort to measure the spectrum of the CBR between 2.5 and 90 GHz (12 and 0.33 cm). Details are given of the experimental equipment and measurement procedures. The results of measurements made in 1982 and 1983 are presented and discussed in relation to preliminary results from the other radiometers. The measured value, T/sub CBR/ = (2.81 +- 0.12) K at 68% of confidence limits, is in very good agreement both with those previously published and those reported by our collaborators.

  19. Development of 26GHz dielectric-based wakefield power extractor.

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Gao, F.; Kazakov, S.; Kustov, A.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs; KEK; Dynamics Software

    2009-01-01

    High frequency, high power rf sources are needed for many applications in particle accelerators, communications, radar, etc. In this article we present a design of a 26 GHz high power rf source based on the extraction of wakefields from a relativistic electron beam. The extractor is designed to couple out rf power generated from a high charge electron bunch train traversing a dielectric loaded waveguide. Using a 20 nC bunch train (bunch length of 1.5 mm) at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility, we can obtain a steady 26 GHz output power of 148 MW. The extractor has been fabricated and bench tested, with the first high power beam experiments to be performed in the coming year.

  20. 100 GHz, 1 MW, CW gyrotron study program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, K.; Bier, R.; Caplan, M.; Jory, H.

    1983-09-01

    The results of a study program to investigate the feasibility of various approaches in designing a 100 GHz, 1 MW CW gyrotron are presented. A summary is given of the possible configurations for a high average power, high frequency gyrotron, including an historical survey of experimental results which are relevant to the various approaches. A set of basic scaling considerations which enable qualitative comparisons between particular gyrotron interaction circuits is presented. These calculations are important in understanding the role of various electron beam and circuit parameters in achieving a viable gyrotron design. Following these scaling exercises, a series of design calculations is presented for a possible approach in achieving 100 GHz, 1 MW CW. These calculations include analyses of the electron gun and interaction circuit parts of the gyrotron, and a general analysis of other aspects of a high average power, high frequency gyrotron. Scalability of important aspects of the design to other frequencies is also discussed, as well as key technology issues.

  1. Design of a 30 GHz Damped Detuned Accelerating Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehler, M.; Wilson, I.; Wuensch, W.; Jones, R. M.; Kroll, N. M.; Miller, R. H.

    1997-05-01

    Within the framework of the SLAC/CERN studies of 30 GHz linear colliders, an attempt has been made to scale the existing X-band NLC damped detuned accelerating structure to 30 GHz. A simple scaling was not chosen because of anticipated manufacturing difficulties. The new manifold-damped design has 101 cells and a minimum aperture of 3.4 mm. In order to obtain acceptably small values for both the single-bunch transverse wakefield and the long-range multibunch wakefield a relatively large non-linear variation of the iris thickness was introduced in addition to the iris diameter variation. The resulting short-range wakefield is 1270 V/pC/mm/m decreasing to less than 1after 1 ns.

  2. Submillimeter Spectroscopy with a 500-1000 GHz SIS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1997-01-01

    Sub-millimeter Spectroscopy with a 500-1000 GHz SIS Receiver, which extended over the period October 1, 1991 through January 31, 1997. The purpose of the grant was to fund the development and construction of a sensitive heterodyne receiver system for the submillimeter band (500-1000 GHz), using our newly-developed sensitive superconducting (SIS) detectors, and to carry out astronomical observations with this system aboard the NASA Kuiper Air- borne Observatory (a Lockheed C-141 aircraft carrying a 91 cm telescope). A secondary purpose of the grant was to stimulate the continued development of sensitive submillimeter detectors, in order to prepare for the next-generation airborne observatory, SOFIA, as well as future space missions (such as the ESA/NASA FIRST mission).

  3. 39 GHz Interferometer System for Measuring Detonation Velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Patrick W.; Tran, Vu; Waltman, Thomas B.; Tringe, Joe; May, Chadd; Cradick, Jerry; Hodgin, Ralph; Kane, Ron

    2015-05-13

    A new 39 GHz RF interferometer system is presented for use in velocity measurements of high explosives (HE) detonations. The frequency was chosen to compliment the currently available suite, and provide more spatial information. An RF signal is generated and coupled to a waveguide adapter serving as an antenna. The HE is initially transparent to the RF. When the HE detonates, the detonation front becomes reflective to the RF. This reflection is picked up by the waveguide adapter and mixed with an unperturbed RF signal to give a low frequency signal which can be digitized with an oscilloscope. By comparing the signal with a reference signal, velocity information can be obtained using Fourier Transforms and wavelet models. Bench test results using a “slapper” are shown. The 39 GHz microwave interferometer is used in Deflagration to Detonation shots. The signal is reflected off a moving surface, and the Doppler shift of the reflected signal is used to calculate the velocity.

  4. Snow backscatter in the 1-8 GHz region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.

    1976-01-01

    The 1-8 GHz microwave active spectrometer system was used to measure the backscatter response of snow covered ground. The scattering coefficient was measured for all linear polarization combinations at angles of incidence between nadir and 70 deg. Ground truth data consisted of soil moisture, soil temperature profile, snow depth, snow temperature profile, and snow water equivalent. The radar sensitivity to snow water equivalent increased in magnitude with increasing frequency and was almost angle independent for angles of incidence higher than 30 deg, particularly at the higher frequencies. In the 50 deg to 70 deg angular range and in the 6 to 8 GHz frequency range, the sensitivity was typically between -0.4 dB/.1 g/sq cm and -0.5 dB/,1 g/sq cm, and the associated linear correlation coefficient had a magnitude of about 0.8.

  5. Future mobile satellite communication concepts at 20/30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, S. K.; Norbury, J. R.

    The outline of a design of a system using ultra small earth stations (picoterminals) for data traffic at 20/30 GHz is discussed. The picoterminals would be battery powered, have an RF transmitter power of 0.5 W, use a 10 cm square patch antenna, and have a receiver G/T of about -8 dB/K. Spread spectrum modulation would be required (due to interference consideration) to allow a telex type data link (less than 200 bit/s data rate) from the picoterminal to the hub station of the network and about 40 kbit/s on the outbound patch. An Olympus type transponder at 20/30 GHz could maintain several thousand simultaneous picoterminal circuits. The possibility of demonstrating a picoterminal network with voice traffic using Olympus is discussed together with fully mobile systems based on this concept.

  6. Future mobile satellite communication concepts at 20/30 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, S. K.; Norbury, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    The outline of a design of a system using ultra small earth stations (picoterminals) for data traffic at 20/30 GHz is discussed. The picoterminals would be battery powered, have an RF transmitter power of 0.5 W, use a 10 cm square patch antenna, and have a receiver G/T of about -8 dB/K. Spread spectrum modulation would be required (due to interference consideration) to allow a telex type data link (less than 200 bit/s data rate) from the picoterminal to the hub station of the network and about 40 kbit/s on the outbound patch. An Olympus type transponder at 20/30 GHz could maintain several thousand simultaneous picoterminal circuits. The possibility of demonstrating a picoterminal network with voice traffic using Olympus is discussed together with fully mobile systems based on this concept.

  7. Calibration of a 35-GHz Airborne Cloud Radar: Lessons Learned and Intercomparison with a 94-GHz Airborne Cloud Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewald, Florian; Gross, Silke; Hagen, Martin; Hirsch, Lutz; Delanoë, Julien

    2017-04-01

    Clouds play an important role in the climate system since they have a profound influence on Earth's radiation budget and the water cycle. Uncertainties associated with their spatial characteristics as well as their microphysics still introduce large uncertainties in climate change predictions. In recent years, our understanding of the inner workings of clouds has been greatly advanced by the deployment of cloud profiling microwave radars from ground as well as from space like CloudSat or the upcoming EarthCARE satellite mission. In order to validate and assess the limitations of these spaceborne missions, a well-calibrated, airborne cloud radar with known sensitivity to clouds is indispensable. Within this context, the German research aircraft HALO was equipped with the high-power (30kW peak power) cloud radar operating at 35 GHz and a high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) system at 532 nm. During a number of flight experiments over Europe and over the tropical and extra-tropical North-Atlantic, several radar calibration efforts have been made using the ocean surface backscatter. Moreover, CloudSat underflights have been conducted to compare the radar reflectivity and measurement sensitivity between the air- and spaceborne instruments. Additionally, the influence of different radar wavelengths was explored with joint flights of HALO and the French Falcon 20 aircraft, which was equipped with the RASTA cloud radar at 94 GHz and a HSRL at 355 nm. In this presentation, we will give an overview of lessons learned from different calibration strategies using the ocean surface backscatter. Additional measurements of signal linearity and signal saturation will complement this characterization. Furthermore, we will focus on the coordinated airborne measurements regarding the different sensitivity for clouds at 35 GHz and 94 GHz. By using the highly sensitive lidar signals, we show if the high-power cloud radar at 35 GHz can be used to validate spaceborne and airborne

  8. The CTS 11.7 GHz angle of arrival experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, B. W.; Hodge, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of the experiment was to determine the statistical behavior of attenuation and angle of arrival on an Earth-space propagation path using the CTS 11.7 GHz beacon. Measurements performed from 1976 to 1978 form the data base for analysis. The statistics of the signal attenuation and phase variations due to atmospheric disturbances are presented. Rainfall rate distributions are also included to provide a link between the above effects on wave propagation and meteorological conditions.

  9. Solar Emissions From GHz to Sub-THz Frequencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-21

    installed at São Paulo. New discoveries arose from these observations, compared to data at other energy ranges, radio, visible, UV, soft and hard X...long before a very large flare. Similarities between solar flare particle accelerators to laboratory high energy accelerators have been proposed. A...observations, compared to data obtained at other energy ranges, radio, visible, UV, soft and hard X-rays. Detailed spectral properties were found in the GHz

  10. Startup and mode competition in a 420 GHz gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qixiang Zhao, A.; Sheng Yu, B.; Tianzhong Zhang, C.

    2017-09-01

    In the experiments of a 420 GHz second-harmonic gyrotron, it is found that the electron beam voltage and current ranges for single mode operation of TE17.4 are slightly narrower than those in the simulation. To explain this phenomenon, the startup scenario has been investigated with special emphasis on mode competition. The calculations indicate that the decreases of the operating ranges are caused by the voltage overshoot in the startup scenario.

  11. A VLBI survey at 2.29 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, R. A.; Morabito, D. D.; Williams, J. G.; Faulkner, J.; Jauncey, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    VLBI observations at 2.29 GHz with fringe spacings of about 3 milliarcsec have been performed on 1398 radio sources spread over the entire sky. 917 sources were detected, including 93 percent of the identified BL Lacertae objects, 86 percent of the quasars, and 36 percent of the galaxies. The resulting catalog of compact radio sources is useful for various astrophysical studies and in the formation of VLBI celestial reference frames.

  12. InP Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor Amplifiers to 255 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radisic, Vesna; Sawdai, Donald; Scott, Dennis; Deal, William; Dang, Linh; Li, Danny; Cavus, Abdullah; To, Richard; Lai, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Two single-stage InP heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) amplifiers operate at 184 and 255 GHz, using Northrop Grumman Corporation s InP HBT MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) technology. At the time of this reporting, these are reported to be the highest HBT amplifiers ever created. The purpose of the amplifier design is to evaluate the technology capability for high-frequency designs and verify the model for future development work.

  13. Beam Width Robustness of a 670 GHz Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, K. B.; Llombart, N.; Dengler, R. J.; Siegel, P. H.

    2009-01-01

    Detection of a replica bomb belt concealed on a mannequin at 4 m standoff range is achieved using a 670 GHz imaging radar. At a somewhat larger standoff range of 4.6 m, the radar's beam width increases substantially, but the through-shirt image quality remains good. This suggests that a relatively modest increase in aperture size over the current design will be sufficient to detect person-borne concealed weapons at ranges exceeding 25 meters.

  14. Infrared heterodyne receivers with IF responses approaching 5 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolczok, J. M.; Peyton, B. J.

    1980-01-01

    Specialized coherent 10.6 micrometer infrared receivers were developed with infrared frequency responses approaching 5 GHz. Carbon dioxide lasers were employed for these applications because of their availability, stability, and high average power levels. Heterodyne receivers which employ extrinsic photoconductive Ge:Cu(Sb) mixers were developed for measurements of carbon dioxide laser scattering to determine: (1) the drive lower hybrid wave density fluctuations; and (2) the plasma ion temperature of the dense Tokamak plasmas.

  15. Beam Width Robustness of a 670 GHz Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, K. B.; Llombart, N.; Dengler, R. J.; Siegel, P. H.

    2009-01-01

    Detection of a replica bomb belt concealed on a mannequin at 4 m standoff range is achieved using a 670 GHz imaging radar. At a somewhat larger standoff range of 4.6 m, the radar's beam width increases substantially, but the through-shirt image quality remains good. This suggests that a relatively modest increase in aperture size over the current design will be sufficient to detect person-borne concealed weapons at ranges exceeding 25 meters.

  16. Lightning and 85-GHz MCSs in the Global Tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toracinta, E. Richard; Zipser, E. J.

    1999-01-01

    Numerous observations of tropical convection show that tropical continental mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are much more prolific lightning producers than their oceanic counterparts. Satellite-based climatologies using 85-GHz passive microwave ice-scattering signatures from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) indicate that MCSs of various size and intensity are found throughout the global tropics. In contrast, global lightning distributions show a strong land bias with an order of magnitude difference between land and ocean lightning. This is somewhat puzzling, since 85-GHz ice-scattering and the charge separation processes that lead to lightning are both thought to depend upon the existence of large graupel particles. The fact that low 85-GHz brightness temperatures are observed in tropical oceanic MCSs containing virtually no lightning leads to the postulate that tropical oceanic and tropical continental MCSs have fundamentally different hydrometeor profiles through the mixed phase region of the cloud (0 C <= T <= 20 C). Until recently, validation of this postulate has not been practicable on a global scale. Recent deployment of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite presents a unique opportunity for MCS studies. The multi-sensor instrument ensemble aboard TRMM, including a multi-channel microwave radiometer, the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), and the first space-borne radar, facilitates high-resolution case studies of MCS structure throughout the global tropics. An important precursor, however, is to better understand the distribution of MCSs and lightning in the tropics. With that objective in mind, this research undertakes a systematic comparison of 85-GHz-defined MCSs and lightning over the global tropics for a full year, as an initial step toward quantifying differences between land and ocean convective systems.

  17. Lightning and 85-GHz MCSs in the Global Tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toracinta, E. Richard; Zipser, E. J.

    1999-01-01

    Numerous observations of tropical convection show that tropical continental mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are much more prolific lightning producers than their oceanic counterparts. Satellite-based climatologies using 85-GHz passive microwave ice-scattering signatures from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) indicate that MCSs of various size and intensity are found throughout the global tropics. In contrast, global lightning distributions show a strong land bias with an order of magnitude difference between land and ocean lightning. This is somewhat puzzling, since 85-GHz ice-scattering and the charge separation processes that lead to lightning are both thought to depend upon the existence of large graupel particles. The fact that low 85-GHz brightness temperatures are observed in tropical oceanic MCSs containing virtually no lightning leads to the postulate that tropical oceanic and tropical continental MCSs have fundamentally different hydrometeor profiles through the mixed phase region of the cloud (0 C <= T <= 20 C). Until recently, validation of this postulate has not been practicable on a global scale. Recent deployment of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite presents a unique opportunity for MCS studies. The multi-sensor instrument ensemble aboard TRMM, including a multi-channel microwave radiometer, the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), and the first space-borne radar, facilitates high-resolution case studies of MCS structure throughout the global tropics. An important precursor, however, is to better understand the distribution of MCSs and lightning in the tropics. With that objective in mind, this research undertakes a systematic comparison of 85-GHz-defined MCSs and lightning over the global tropics for a full year, as an initial step toward quantifying differences between land and ocean convective systems.

  18. A 32-GHz phased array transmit feed for spacecraft telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. A.; Rascoe, D. L.; Crist, R. A.; Huang, J.; Wamhof, P. D.; Lansing, F. S.

    1992-01-01

    A 21-element phased array transmit feed was demonstrated as part of an effort to develop and evaluate state-of-the-art transmitter and receiver components at 32 and 34 GHz for future deep-space missions. Antenna pattern measurements demonstrating electronic beam steering of the two-dimensional array are reported and compared with predictions based on measured performance of MMIC-based phase shifter and amplifier modules and Vivaldi slotline radiating elements.

  19. A Wideband 220 GHz, 50 W Serpentine Waveguide Amplifier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Abstract—Final assembly is underway for a 220 GHz, 50 W serpentine waveguide vacuum electron amplifier showcasing a novel embedded monofilament...4]. II. AMPLIFIER STATUS This serpentine waveguide (SWG) amplifier is designed to operate from a single, round 11.7 kV, 120 mA electron beam...III. CIRCUIT FABRICATION To create reliable, high vertical aspect ratio serpentine features as required, a UV-LIGA technique was employed in two

  20. High power 303 GHz gyrotron for CTS in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Kasa, J.; Saito, T.; Tatematsu, Y.; Kotera, M.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Tanaka, K.; Nishiura, M.

    2015-10-01

    A high-power pulsed gyrotron is under development for 300 GHz-band collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostics in the Large Helical Device (LHD). High-density plasmas in the LHD require a probe wave with power exceeding 100 kW in the sub-terahertz region to obtain sufficient signal intensity and large scattering angles. At the same time, the frequency bandwidth should be less than several tens of megahertz to protect the CTS receiver using a notch filter against stray radiations. Moreover, duty cycles of ~ 10% are desired for the time domain analysis of the CTS spectrum. At present, a 77 GHz gyrotron for electron cyclotron heating is used as a CTS wave source in the LHD. However, the use of such a low-frequency wave suffers from refraction, cutoff and absorption at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. Additionally, the signal detection is severely affected by background noise from electron cyclotron emission. To resolve those problems, high-power gyrotrons in the 300 GHz range have been developed. In this frequency range, avoiding mode competition is critical to realizing high-power and stable oscillation. A moderately over-moded cavity was investigated to isolate a desired mode from neighbouring modes. After successful tests with a prototype tube, the practical one was constructed with a cavity for TE22,2 operation mode, a triode electron gun forming intense laminar electron beams, and an internal mode convertor. We have experimentally confirmed single mode oscillation of the TE22,2 mode at the frequency of 303.3 GHz. The spectrum peak is sufficiently narrow. The output power of 290 kW has been obtained at the moment.

  1. Design of a 60 GHz beam waveguide antenna positioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emerick, Kenneth S.

    1989-01-01

    A development model antenna positioner mechanism with an integral 60 GHz radio frequency beam waveguide is discussed. The system features a 2-ft diameter carbon-fiber reinforced epoxy antenna reflector and support structure, and a 2-degree-of-freedom elevation over azimuth mechanism providing hemispherical field of view. Emphasis is placed on the constraints imposed on the mechanism by the radio frequency subsystems and how they impacted the mechanical configuration.

  2. A wideband 240 GHz receiver for the submillimeter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, C.-Y. Edward; Grimes, Paul K.; Leiker, Patrick S.; Zeng, Lingzhen; Lu, Wei-Chun; Chen, Tse-Jun; Han, Chih-Chiang; Wang, Ming-Jye

    2016-07-01

    We report on the design of a 240 GHz double-side-band receiver for the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The heart of this receiver is a 3-junction series connected SIS mixer, which allows it to provide intermediate frequency (IF) output up to more than 12 GHz. We have custom built a low noise Amplifier-Multiplier Chain for use as the receiver's Local Oscillator module, which is tunable from 210 to 270 GHz. The receiver has demonstrated low noise performance in laboratory. 7 out of the 8 SMA antennas are now equipped with this receiver. The receiver has already participated in Event Horizon Telescope observations in April 2016, working with the SMA-200 receiver to provide dual polarization coverage for the EHT Hawaii Station. This receiver has enabled the SMA to provide 32 Gbit per second data stream to the EHT observations. We are currently trying to improve the on-sky beam co-alignment of this receiver with respect to other SMA receivers.

  3. NASA 60 GHz intersatellite communication link definition study. Baseline document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The overall system and component concepts for a 60 GHz intersatellite communications link system (ICLS) are described. The ICLS was designed to augment the capabilities of the current Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), providing a data rate capacity large enough to accommodate the expected rates for user satellites (USAT's) in the post-1995 timeframe. The use of 60 GHz for the anticipated successor to TDRSS, the Tracking and Data Acquisition System (TDAS), was selected because of current technology development that will enable multigigibit data rates. Additionally, the attenuation of the earth's atmosphere at 60 GHz means that there is virtually no possibility of terrestrially generated interference (intentional or accidental) or terrestrially based intercept. The ICLS includes the following functional areas: (1) the ICLS payload package on the GEO TDAS satellite that communicates simultaneously with up to five LEO USAT's; (2) the payload package on the USAT that communicates with the TDAS satellite; and (3) the crosslink payload package on the TDAS satellite that communicates with another TDAS satellite. Two methods of data relay on-board the TDAS spacecraft were addressed. One is a complete baseband system (demod and remod) with a bi-directional 2 Gbps data stream; the other is a channelized system wherein some of the channels are baseband and others are merely frequency translated before re-transmission. Descriptions of the TDAS antenna, transmitter, receiver, and mechanical designs are presented.

  4. Subjects of discussion in radiated emission measurements above 1 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battermann, S.; Garbe, H.

    2008-05-01

    Some emission and susceptibility EMC standards already require measurements above 1 GHz or test site validations (IEC 2006, CISPR 2006). A simple assignment of the established measurement methods below 1 GHz to the frequency range above 1 GHz bears some risks. The ratio between the physical size of the equipment under test (EUT) and the wave-length rises with frequency. This increases the electrical size of the EUT. The directivity may become larger and the radiation pattern of the EUT is getting more complex which reduces the probability to detect the maximum emission with a simple planar cut scan. To analyse these effects in more detail this paper shows radiation characteristics of an exemplary EUT. The influence of a receiving antenna height scan and the angle increment of the turntable scan on the detection of the maximum of the electrical field strength will be discussed. As a result some ideas will be given to reduce the measurement time but keeping the reliability of the measurement results constant.

  5. MIMO based 3D imaging system at 360 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herschel, R.; Nowok, S.; Zimmermann, R.; Lang, S. A.; Pohl, N.

    2016-05-01

    A MIMO radar imaging system at 360 GHz is presented as a part of the comprehensive approach of the European FP7 project TeraSCREEN, using multiple frequency bands for active and passive imaging. The MIMO system consists of 16 transmitter and 16 receiver antennas within one single array. Using a bandwidth of 30 GHz, a range resolution up to 5 mm is obtained. With the 16×16 MIMO system 256 different azimuth bins can be distinguished. Mechanical beam steering is used to measure 130 different elevation angles where the angular resolution is obtained by a focusing elliptical mirror. With this system a high resolution 3D image can be generated with 4 frames per second, each containing 16 million points. The principle of the system is presented starting from the functional structure, covering the hardware design and including the digital image generation. This is supported by simulated data and discussed using experimental results from a preliminary 90 GHz system underlining the feasibility of the approach.

  6. 37 GHz observations of narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lähteenmäki, A.; Järvelä, E.; Hovatta, T.; Tornikoski, M.; Harrison, D. L.; López-Caniego, M.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Mingaliev, M.; Pearson, T. J.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reeves, R. A.; Richards, J. L.; Sotnikova, Y.; Tammi, J.

    2017-07-01

    Observations performed at Metsähovi Radio Observatory at 37 GHz are presented for a sample of 78 radio-loud and radio-quiet narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies, together with additional lower and higher frequency radio data from RATAN-600, Owens Valley Radio Observatory, and the Planck satellite. Most of the data have been gathered between February 2012 and April 2015 but for some sources even longer light curves exist. The detection rate at 37 GHz is around 19%, which is comparable to other populations of active galactic nuclei presumed to be faint at radio frequencies, such as BL Lac objects. Variability and spectral indices are determined for sources with enough detections. Based on the radio data, many NLS1 galaxies show a blazar-like radio spectra exhibiting significant variability. The spectra at a given time are often inverted or convex. The source of the high-frequency radio emission in NLS1 galaxies, detected at 37 GHz, is most probably a relativistic jet rather than star formation. Jets in NLS1 galaxies are therefore expected to be a much more common phenomenon than earlier assumed. Full Table 7 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/603/A100

  7. CARM and harmonic gyro-amplifier experiments at 17 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Menninger, W.L.; Danly, B.G.; Alberti, S.; Chen, C.; Rullier, J.L.; Temkin, R.J.; Giguet, E. |

    1993-11-01

    Cyclotron resonance maser amplifiers are possible sources for applications such as electron cyclotron resonance heating of fusion plasmas and driving high-gradient rf linear accelerators. For accelerator drivers, amplifiers or phase locked-oscillators are required. A 17 GHz cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) amplifier experiment and a 17 GHz third harmonic gyro-amplifier experiment are presently underway at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center. Using the SRL/MIT SNOMAD II introduction accelerator to provide a 380 kV, 180 A, 30 ns flat top electron beam, the gyro-amplifier experiment has produced 5 MW of rf power with over 50 dB of gain at 17 GHz. The gyro-amplifier operates in the TE{sub 31} mode using a third harmonic interaction. Because of its high power output, the gyro-amplifier will be used as the rf source for a photocathode rf electron gun experiment also taking place at MIT. Preliminary gyro-amplifier results are presented, including measurement of rf power, gain versus interaction length, and the far-field pattern. A CARM experiment designed to operate in the TE{sub 11} mode is also discussed.

  8. A 12 GHz RF Power Source for the CLIC Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schirm, Karl; Curt, Stephane; Dobert, Steffen; McMonagle, Gerard; Rossat, Ghislain; Syratchev, Igor; Timeo, Luca; Haase, Andrew Jensen, Aaron; Jongewaard, Erik; Nantista, Christopher; Sprehn, Daryl; Vlieks, Arnold; Hamdi, Abdallah; Peauger, Franck; Kuzikov, Sergey; Vikharev, Alexandr; /Nizhnii Novgorod, IAP

    2012-07-03

    The CLIC RF frequency has been changed in 2008 from the initial 30 GHz to the European X-band 11.9942 GHz permitting beam independent power production using klystrons for CLIC accelerating structure testing. A design and fabrication contract for five klystrons at that frequency has been signed by different parties with SLAC. France (IRFU, CEA Saclay) is contributing a solid state modulator purchased in industry and specific 12 GHz RF network components to the CLIC study. RF pulses over 120 MW peak at 230 ns length will be obtained by using a novel SLED-I type pulse compression scheme designed and fabricated by IAP, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. The X-band power test stand is being installed in the CLIC Test Facility CTF3 for independent structure and component testing in a bunker, but allowing, in a later stage, for powering RF components in the CTF3 beam lines. The design of the facility, results from commissioning of the RF power source and the expected performance of the Test Facility are reported.

  9. An 8-18 GHz broadband high power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifa, Wang; Ruixia, Yang; Jingfeng, Wu; Yanlei, Li

    2011-11-01

    An 8-18 GHz broadband high power amplifier (HPA) with a hybrid integrated circuit (HIC) is designed and fabricated. This HPA is achieved with the use of a 4-fingered micro-strip Lange coupler in a GaAs MMIC process. In order to decrease electromagnetic interference, a multilayer AlN material with good heat dissipation is adopted as the carrier of the power amplifier. When the input power is 25 dBm, the saturated power of the continuous wave (CW) outputted by the power amplifier is more than 39 dBm within the frequency range of 8-13 GHz, while it is more than 38.6 dBm within other frequency ranges. We obtain the peak power output, 39.4 dBm, at the frequency of 11.9 GHz. In the whole frequency band, the power-added efficiency is more than 18%. When the input power is 18 dBm, the small signal gain is 15.7 ± 0.7 dB. The dimensions of the HPA are 25 × 15 × 1.5 mm3.

  10. Low-Noise Amplifier for 100 to 180 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Pukala, David; Fung, King Man; Gaier, Todd; Mei, Xiaobing; Lai, Richard; Deal, William

    2009-01-01

    A three-stage monolithic millimeter-wave integrated-circuit (MMIC) amplifier designed to exhibit low noise in operation at frequencies from about 100 to somewhat above 180 GHz has been built and tested. This is a prototype of broadband amplifiers that have potential utility in diverse applications, including measurement of atmospheric temperature and humidity and millimeter-wave imaging for inspecting contents of opaque containers. Figure 1 depicts the amplifier as it appears before packaging. Figure 2 presents data from measurements of the performance of the amplifier as packaged in a WR-05 waveguide and tested in the frequency range from about 150 to about 190 GHz. The amplifier exhibited substantial gain throughout this frequency range. Especially notable is the fact that at 165 GHz, the noise figure was found to be 3.7 dB, and the noise temperature was found to be 370 K: This is less than half the noise temperature of the prior state of the art.

  11. NASA 60 GHz intersatellite communication link definition study. Baseline document

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-09-01

    The overall system and component concepts for a 60 GHz intersatellite communications link system (ICLS) are described. The ICLS was designed to augment the capabilities of the current Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), providing a data rate capacity large enough to accommodate the expected rates for user satellites (USAT's) in the post-1995 timeframe. The use of 60 GHz for the anticipated successor to TDRSS, the Tracking and Data Acquisition System (TDAS), was selected because of current technology development that will enable multigigibit data rates. Additionally, the attenuation of the earth's atmosphere at 60 GHz means that there is virtually no possibility of terrestrially generated interference (intentional or accidental) or terrestrially based intercept. The ICLS includes the following functional areas: (1) the ICLS payload package on the GEO TDAS satellite that communicates simultaneously with up to five LEO USAT's; (2) the payload package on the USAT that communicates with the TDAS satellite; and (3) the crosslink payload package on the TDAS satellite that communicates with another TDAS satellite. Two methods of data relay on-board the TDAS spacecraft were addressed. One is a complete baseband system (demod and remod) with a bi-directional 2 Gbps data stream; the other is a channelized system wherein some of the channels are baseband and others are merely frequency translated before re-transmission. Descriptions of the TDAS antenna, transmitter, receiver, and mechanical designs are presented.

  12. 650 GHz bistatic scattering measurements on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, Richard A.; Mujica-Schwahn, Natalie; Grossman, Erich N.

    2014-06-01

    Many groups are developing submillimeter cameras that will be used to screen human subjects for improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and other threat items hidden beneath their clothing. To interpret submillimeter camera images the scattering properties, specifically the bidirectional scattering distribution function (BSDF) must be known. This problem is not trivial because surfaces of man-made objects and human skin have topographic features comparable to the wavelength of submillimeter radiation—thus simple, theoretical scattering approximations do not apply. To address this problem we built a goniometer instrument to measure the BSDF from skin surfaces of live human subjects illuminated with a beam from a 650 GHz synthesized source. To obtain some multi-spectral information, the instrument was reconfigured with a 160 GHz source. Skin areas sampled are from the hand, interior of the forearm, abdomen, and back. The 650 GHz beam has an approximately Gaussian profile with a FWHM of approximately 1 cm. Instrument characteristics: angular resolution 2.9⍛; noise floor -45 dB/sr; dynamic range ˃ 70 dB; either s or p-polarization; 25⍛ bidirectional-scattering-angle ≤ 180⍛ ; The human scattering target skin area was placed exactly on the goniometer center of rotation with normal angle of incidence to the source beam. Scattering power increased at the higher frequency. This new work enables radiometrically correct models of humans.

  13. Initial Testing of a 140 GHz 1 MW Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauffman, Stephen; Felch, Kevin; Blank, Monica; Borchard, Philipp; Cahalan, Pat; Chu, Sam; Jory, Howard

    2001-10-01

    CPI has completed the fabrication of a 140 GHz 1 MW CW gyrotron to be used on the W7-X stellarator at IPP Greifswald. Testing of the initial build of this gyrotron had just begun when this abstract was prepared, and was expected to finish in September, at which time a planned rebuild of the device was scheduled to begin. This poster will summarize the gyrotron design, present results of initial testing, and outline any design changes planned as a consequence of these results. This gyrotron's design employs a number of advanced features, including a diode electron gun for simplified operation, a single-stage depressed collector to enhance overall efficiency, a CVD diamond output window, an internal mode converter that converts the excited TE28,7 cavity mode to a Gaussian output beam, and a high-voltage layout that locates all external high voltage below the superconducting magnet system without requiring an oil tank for insulation. Similar features are being used for an 84 GHz 500 kW system being built for the KSTAR tokamak program and for a 110 GHz 1.5 MW system being designed in collaboration with MIT, UMd, UW, GA, and Calabazas Creek Research with funding provided by DOE.

  14. GHz low noise short wavelength infrared (SWIR) photoreceivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiaogang; Yuan, Ping; McDonald, Paul; Boisvert, Joseph; Chang, James; Woo, Robyn; Labios, Eduardo; Sudharsanan, Rengarajan; Krainak, Michael; Yang, Guangning; Sun, Xiaoli; Lu, Wei; McIntosh, Dion; Zhou, Qiugui; Campbell, Joe

    2011-06-01

    Next generation LIDAR mapping systems require multiple channels of sensitive photoreceivers that operate in the wavelength region of 1.06 to 1.55 microns, with GHz bandwidth and sensitivity less than 300 fW/√Hz. Spectrolab has been developing high sensitivity photoreceivers using InAlAs impact ionization engineering (I2E) avalanche photodiodes (APDs) structures for this application. APD structures were grown using metal organic vapor epitaxy (MOVPE) and mesa devices were fabricated using these structures. We have achieved low excess noise at high gain in these APD devices; an impact ionization parameter, k, of about 0.15 has been achieved at gains >20 using InAlAs/InGaAlAs as a multiplier layer. Electrical characterization data of these devices show dark current less than 2 nA at a gain of 20 at room temperature; and capacitance of 0.4 pF for a typical 75 micron diameter APD. Photoreceivers were built by integrating I2E APDs with a low noise GHz transimpedance amplifier (TIA). The photoreceivers showed a bandwidth of 1 GHz and a noise equivalent power (NEP) of 150 fW/rt(Hz) at room temperature.

  15. The 20 GHz spacecraft IMPATT solid state transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Best, T.; Ngan, Y. C.

    1986-01-01

    The engineering development of a solid-state transmitter amplifier operating in the 20-GHz frequency range is described. This effort involved a multitude of disciplines including IMPATT device development, circulator design, multiple-diode circuit design, and amplifier integration and test. The objective was to develop a transmitter amplifier demonstrating the feasibility of providing an efficient, reliable, lightweight solid-state transmitter to be flown on a 30 to 20 GHz communication demonstration satellite. The work was done under contract from NASA/Lewis Research Center for a period of three years. The result was the development of a GaAs IMPACT diode amplifier capable of an 11-W CW output power and a 2-dB bandwidth of 300 MHz. GaAs IMPATT diodes incorporating diamond heatsink and double-Read doping profile capable of 5.3-W CW oscillator output power and 15.5% efficiency were developed. Up to 19% efficiency was also observed for an output power level of 4.4 W. High performance circulators with a 0.2 dB inserting loss and bandwidth of 5 GHz have also been developed. These represent a significant advance in both device and power combiner circuit technologies in K-band frequencies.

  16. A search for the rotational transitions of H2D+ at 1370 GHz and H3O+ at 985 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreiko, R. T.; Betz, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    A search was made for the 1370 GHz lowest rotational transition of the molecular ion H2D+ in NGC 2264, W3, and the IRc2 region of M42. No emission lines were seen, but an absorption feature was detected toward IRc2. The column density and fractional abundance were calculated using a tentative identification of the line as the transition of para H2D+. The LSR velocity and the measured line width are consistent with the dynamical parameters of the hot core source. Physical parameters deduced from the data differ from those derived from millimeter-wave observations of the hot core condensation. It is suggested that significant amounts of low-density gas are associated with this region and that the material is cold enough for enhanced deuterium fractionation to occur. A search was also made for the 985 GHz transition of ortho H3O+ in W3 and IRc2 with negative results.

  17. Experimental results of superimposing 9.9 GHz extraordinary mode microwaves on 2.45 GHz ECRIS plasma.

    PubMed

    Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Sato, Fuminobu; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Kato, Yushi

    2016-02-01

    Efficient production of multicharged ions has been investigated on the tandem-type ECRIS in Osaka University. According to the consideration of the accessibility conditions of microwaves to resonance and cutoff regions, it was suggested that the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) heating contributed to enhancement of ion beam intensity. In order to enhance multicharged ion beams efficiently, injecting higher frequency microwave with extraordinary (X-mode) toward UHR region has been tried. In this study, 2.45 GHz frequency microwaves are used for conventional ECR discharge, and 9.9 GHz frequency microwaves with X-mode are superimposed for UHR heating. The effects of additive microwave injection are investigated experimentally in terms of plasma parameters and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measured by Langmuir probe and ion beam current. As the results show, it is confirmed that the electrons in the high energy region are affected by 9.9 GHz X-mode microwave injection from the detailed analysis of EEDF.

  18. Experimental results of superimposing 9.9 GHz extraordinary mode microwaves on 2.45 GHz ECRIS plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Sato, Fuminobu; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Kato, Yushi

    2016-02-01

    Efficient production of multicharged ions has been investigated on the tandem-type ECRIS in Osaka University. According to the consideration of the accessibility conditions of microwaves to resonance and cutoff regions, it was suggested that the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) heating contributed to enhancement of ion beam intensity. In order to enhance multicharged ion beams efficiently, injecting higher frequency microwave with extraordinary (X-mode) toward UHR region has been tried. In this study, 2.45 GHz frequency microwaves are used for conventional ECR discharge, and 9.9 GHz frequency microwaves with X-mode are superimposed for UHR heating. The effects of additive microwave injection are investigated experimentally in terms of plasma parameters and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measured by Langmuir probe and ion beam current. As the results show, it is confirmed that the electrons in the high energy region are affected by 9.9 GHz X-mode microwave injection from the detailed analysis of EEDF.

  19. Experimental results of superimposing 9.9 GHz extraordinary mode microwaves on 2.45 GHz ECRIS plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiokada, Takuya Nagaya, Tomoki; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Kitagawa, Atsushi

    2016-02-15

    Efficient production of multicharged ions has been investigated on the tandem-type ECRIS in Osaka University. According to the consideration of the accessibility conditions of microwaves to resonance and cutoff regions, it was suggested that the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) heating contributed to enhancement of ion beam intensity. In order to enhance multicharged ion beams efficiently, injecting higher frequency microwave with extraordinary (X-mode) toward UHR region has been tried. In this study, 2.45 GHz frequency microwaves are used for conventional ECR discharge, and 9.9 GHz frequency microwaves with X-mode are superimposed for UHR heating. The effects of additive microwave injection are investigated experimentally in terms of plasma parameters and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measured by Langmuir probe and ion beam current. As the results show, it is confirmed that the electrons in the high energy region are affected by 9.9 GHz X-mode microwave injection from the detailed analysis of EEDF.

  20. A Deterministic and Random Propagation Study with the Design of an Open Path 320 GHz to 340 GHz Transmissometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scally, Lawrence J.

    This program was implemented by Lawrence J. Scally for a Ph.D. under the EECE department at the University of Colorado at Boulder with most funding provided by the U.S. Army. Professor Gasiewski is the advisor and guider for the entire program; he has a strong history decades ago in this type of program. This program is developing a more advanced than previous years transmissometer, called Terahertz Atmospheric and Ionospheric Propagation, Absorption and Scattering System (TAIPAS), on an open path between the University of Colorado EE building roof and the mesa on owned by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); NIST has invested money, location and support for the program. Besides designing and building the transmissometer, that has never be accomplished at this level, the system also analyzes the atmospheric propagation of frequencies by scanning between 320 GHz and 340 GHz, which includes the peak absorption frequency at 325.1529 GHz due to water absorption. The processing and characterization of the deterministic and random propagation characteristics of the atmosphere in the real world was significantly started; this will be executed with varies aerosols for decades on the permanently mounted system that is accessible 24/7 via a network over the CU Virtual Private Network (VPN).

  1. Studying Star Formation in the Central Molecular Zone using 22 GHz Water and 6.7 GHz Methanol Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickert, Matthew; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad; Ott, Juergen; Meier, David S.; SWAG

    2016-01-01

    The inner 400 pc of our Galaxy, or the so-called the central molecular zone (CMZ), has a unique environment with a large mass of dense, warm molecular gas. One of the premier questions is how star formation (SF) differs in this unique environment from elsewhere in the Galaxy. We intend to address this issue by identifying improved numbers and locations of early sites of SF. We have conducted high resolution surveys of the CMZ, looking for early SF indicators such as 22 GHz water and 6.7 GHz methanol masers. We present the initial water maser results from the SWAG survey and methanol results from the first full VLA survey of 6.7 GHz methanol masers in the CMZ. These surveys span beyond the inner 1.2ο x 0.5ο of the Galaxy, including Sgr B through Sgr C. The improved spatial and spectral resolutions (~26" and 2 km s-1) and sensitivity (RMS ~10 mJy beam-1) of our ATCA observations have allowed us to identify over 140 water maser candidates in the SWAG survey. This is a factor of 3 more than detected from prior surveys of the CMZ. The preliminary distribution of these candidates appears to be uniform along Galactic longitude. Should this distribution persist for water masers associated with star formation (as opposed to those produced by evolved stars), then this result would imply a more uniform distribution of recent SF activity in the CMZ. Prior works have shown that 2/3 of the molecular gas mass is located at positive Galactic longitudes, and young stellar objects (YSOs) identified by IR SEDs are located predominantly at negative Galactic longitudes. A combination of these results can provide insight on the evolution of SF within the CMZ. We are currently comparing the water maser positions to other catalogs (ex. OH/IR stars) in order to distinguish between the mechanisms producing these masers. We are also currently working on determining the distribution of 6.7 GHz methanol masers. These masers do not contain the same ambiguity as water masers as to their source

  2. 47 CFR 15.253 - Operation within the bands 46.7-46.9 GHz and 76.0-77.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation within the bands 46.7-46.9 GHz and 76.0-77.0 GHz. 15.253 Section 15.253 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.253...

  3. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  4. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  5. 47 CFR 15.253 - Operation within the bands 46.7-46.9 GHz and 76.0-77.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation within the bands 46.7-46.9 GHz and 76.0-77.0 GHz. 15.253 Section 15.253 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.253...

  6. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  7. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  8. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  9. 47 CFR 25.139 - NGSO FSS coordination and information sharing between MVDDS licensees in the 12.2 GHz to 12.7 GHz...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false NGSO FSS coordination and information sharing... Earth Stations § 25.139 NGSO FSS coordination and information sharing between MVDDS licensees in the 12.2 GHz to 12.7 GHz band. (a) NGSO FSS licensees shall maintain a subscriber database in a format that...

  10. 47 CFR 25.143 - Licensing provisions for the 1.6/2.4 GHz mobile-satellite service and 2 GHz mobile-satellite...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Space Stations § 25.143 Licensing provisions for the 1.6/2.4 GHz mobile-satellite service and 2 GHz... satellites, the blanket license will cover a specified number of space stations to operate in a specified... Requirements—(1) General Requirements. Each application for a space station system authorization in the 1.6/2.4...

  11. 47 CFR 25.143 - Licensing provisions for the 1.6/2.4 GHz mobile-satellite service and 2 GHz mobile-satellite...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Space Stations § 25.143 Licensing provisions for the 1.6/2.4 GHz mobile-satellite service and 2 GHz... satellites, the blanket license will cover a specified number of space stations to operate in a specified... Requirements—(1) General Requirements. Each application for a space station system authorization in the 1.6/2.4...

  12. Experimental results of the MIT 17 GHz RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. J.; Trotz, S.; Kreischer, K. E.; Pedrozzi, M.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    1999-07-01

    We report on experimental results of a 17 GHz RF photocathode electron gun. This is the first photocathode electron gun to operate at a frequency above 2.856 GHz. The 1.5 cell, π-mode, copper cavity was tested with 50 ns pulses from a 17.150 GHz klystron amplifier built by Haimson Research Corp. A Bragg filter was used at the RF gun to reduce the reflection of parasitic modes back into the klystron. Coupling hole theory in conjunction with cold test measurements was used to determine the field profile in the RF gun. The particle in cell code MAGIC was used to simulate the beam dynamics in the RF gun. With power levels of 4 MW, the on axis electric field at the cathode exceeds 300 MV/m, corresponding to an average accelerating gradient of 200 MV/m over the first half cell of the gun. Breakdown was observed at power levels above 5 MW. Electron bunches were produced by 20 μJ, 1 ps UV laser pulses impinging on the RF gun copper photocathode and were measured with a Faraday cup to have up to 0.1 nC of charge. This corresponds to a peak current of about 100 A, and a density at the cathode of 8.8 kA/cm2. Multiple output electron bunches were obtained for multiple laser pulses incident on the cathode. Phase scans of laser induced electron emission reveal an overall phase stability of better than ±20°, corresponding to ±3 ps synchronization of the laser pulses to the phase of the microwave field. A Browne-Buechner magnetic spectrometer indicated that the RF gun generated 1 MeV electrons with a single shot rms energy spread of less than 2.5%, in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  13. Experimental and theoretical investigations of a 17 GHz RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. J.; Trotz, S.; Kreischer, K. E.; Pedrozzi, M.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    1999-04-01

    We report on experimental and theoretical investigations of a 17 GHz RF photocathode electron gun. This is the first photocathode electron gun to operate at a frequency above 2.856 GHz. The 1.5 cell, π mode, copper cavity was tested with 50 ns pulses from a 17.150 GHz klystron amplifier built by Haimson Research Corp. A Bragg filter was used at the RF gun to reduce the reflection of parasitic modes back into the klystron. Coupling hole theory in conjunction with cold test measurements was used to determine the field profile in the RF gun. The particle in cell code MAGIC as well as coupled envelope equations were used to simulate the beam dynamics in the RF gun. With power levels of 4 MW, the on axis electric field at the cathode exceeds 300 MV/m, corresponding to an average accelerating gradient of 200 MV/m over the first half cell of the gun. Breakdown was observed at power levels above 5 MW. Electron bunches were produced by 20 μJ, 1 ps UV laser pulses impinging on the RF gun copper photocathode and were measured with a Faraday cup to have up to 0.1 nC of charge. This corresponds to a peak current of about 100 A, and a density at the cathode of 8.8 kA/cm 2. Multiple output electron bunches were obtained for multiple laser pulses incident on the cathode. Phase scans of laser-induced electron emission reveal an overall phase stability of better than ±20°, corresponding to ±3 ps synchronization of the laser pulses to the phase of the microwave field. A Browne-Buechner magnetic spectrometer indicated that the RF gun generated 1 MeV electrons with a single shot rms energy spread of less than 2.5%, in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  14. 94 GHz doppler wind radar satellite mission concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chung-Chi; Rommen, Björn; Buck, Christopher; Schüttemeyer, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    Extreme weather such as storms, hurricanes and typhoons, also called `high impact weather', is a high priority area of research for the atmospheric dynamics and meteorological science communities. 94 GHz Doppler wind radar satellite mission concepts have been elaborated, which use cloud and precipitation droplets/particles as tracers to measure 3-D wind fields. The so-called polarisation-diversity pulse-pair (PDPP) technique enables to derive line-of-sight wind speed with good accuracy (< 2-3 m/s) and large unambiguous dynamic range (e.g. 75 m/s). Two distinct system concepts have been elaborated: (1) a conically scanning radar concept with large coverage (> 800 km) and ˜50 km along-track sampling, and; (2) a stereo viewing concept with high sampling resolution (< 4 km) within an inclined cut through the atmosphere. The former concept is adequate for studying large-scale severe/extreme weather systems, whereas the latter would be more suitable for understanding of small-scale convective phenomena. For demonstrating the potential of the FDPP technique for deriving accurate Doppler observations, ground-based and airborne Doppler radar campaigns are in preparation. The Galileo 94 GHz radar, upgraded recently to include a FDPP capability, at Chilbolton in the UK, will be used for an extended ground-based campaign (6 months). For the airborne campaign, the dual-frequency (9.4 + 94 GHz) NAWX radar on board a Convair-580 aircraft of the National Science Council of Canada will be upgraded and flown. This paper describes the observation requirements, preliminary satellite mission concepts, associated wind retrieval aspects and the planned demonstration campaigns.

  15. Hot H2CO: Observations of Formaldehyde at 650GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootten, A.; Mangum, J.; Barsony, M.

    1996-12-01

    We determine the physical conditions in warm dense cores in molecular clouds via observations of the submillimeter wavelength transitions of formaldehyde (H_2CO). H_2CO is the ideal molecule for this purpose, since its numerous transitions in the submillimeter spectrum allow independent temperature and density determination of the emitting gas. The transitions in the 650 GHz atmospheric window arise from gas which is too warm for depletion onto grains to have hidden it from view. The lowest energy transitions lie at levels 160 K above ground, while the highest energy transitions in the window are the K=8 transitions arising from levels more than 1000 K above the ground state. Since formaldehyde is destroyed at temperatures by chemical reactions at moderate temperatures, little emission is expected from the most highly excited transitions. However, Schilke (private communication) reports the detection of the K=7 transitions at 654 GHz toward IRc2 in OMC1. These lines, which arise from levels 800 K above ground may occur in a transient chemistry, and provide information on conditions in shocked or ablated material quite close to the young star(s) buried in the dense core (Wootten, Loren and Bally 1984 Ap. J. 277, 189). We report observations of several highly excited lines of formaldehyde towards warm HII regions made with the Caltech Submillimeter Telescope (CSO). Our attempt to understand the conditions under which its emission is excited in star-forming molecular clouds confirms that denser, hotter regions give rise to more highly excited submillimeter transitions than heretofore found. In DR21(OH)MM1, for example, densities a factor of four higher than suggested by Mangum and Wootten (1993, Ap. J. Supp. 89, 123) are required to reproduce the strength of the 919 ->818 transition observed at 632 GHz. The CSO is operated by the California Institute of Technology under funding from the National Science Foundation, Contract No. AST-93-13929.

  16. Quasi-Optical Transmission Line for 94-GHz Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Raul M.; Veruttipong, Watt

    2008-01-01

    A quasi-optical transmission line (QOTL) has been developed as a low-loss transmission line for a spaceborne cloudobserving radar instrument that operates at a nominal frequency of 94 GHz. This QOTL could also readily be redesigned for use in terrestrial millimeter-wave radar systems and millimeter-wave imaging systems. In the absence of this or another lowloss transmission line, it would be necessary to use a waveguide transmission line in the original radar application. Unfortunately, transmission losses increase and power-handling capacities of waveguides generally decrease with frequency, such that at 94 GHz, the limitation on transmitting power and the combined transmission and reception losses (greater than 5 dB) in a waveguide transmission line previously considered for the original application would be unacceptable. The QOTL functions as a very-lowloss, three-port circulator. The QOTL includes a shaped input mirror that can be rotated to accept 94-GHz transmitter power from either of two high-power amplifiers. Inside the QOTL, the transmitter power takes the form of a linearly polarized beam radiated from a feed horn. This beam propagates through a system of mirrors, each of which refocuses the beam to minimize diffraction losses. A magnetically biased ferrite disc is placed at one of the foci to utilize the Faraday effect to rotate the polarization of the beam by 45 degrees. The beam is then transmitted via an antenna system. The radar return (scatter from clouds, and/or reflections from other objects) is collected by the same antenna and propagates through the Faraday rotator in the reverse of the direction of propagation of the transmitted beam. In the Faraday rotator, the polarization of the received signal is rotated a further 45 degrees, so that upon emerging from the Faraday rotator, the received beam is polarized at 90 with respect to the transmitted beam. The transmitted and received signals are then separated by a wire-grid polarizer.

  17. A 75 Watt, 59 to 64 Ghz Space TWT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limburg, Helen; Zamora, Diego; Davis, Jon; Tammaru, Ivo

    1995-01-01

    The design and performance of a high efficiency 70 Watt, 59 to 64 GHz traveling-wave tube (TWT) is described. This intersatellite communications TWT, designated the Hughes Aircraft Company Model 961HA, employs a coupled-cavity slow-wave structure with a two-step velocity taper and a four-stage isotropic graphite multistage depressed collector (MDC). This TWT achieved outstanding beam transmission, 96% with RF. This is the highest power and widest bandwidth device of this type. The tube has 45 dB of gain and 30% efficiency. This TWT is conduction cooled and weighs 13 lbs.

  18. Quantum secret sharing using the d-dimensional GHZ state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chen-Ming; Li, Zhi-Hui; Xu, Ting-Ting; Li, Yong-Ming

    2017-03-01

    We propose a quantum secret sharing scheme that uses an orthogonal pair of n-qudit GHZ states and local distinguishability. In the proposed protocol, the participants use an X-basis measurement and classical communication to distinguish between the two orthogonal states and reconstruct the original secret. We also present (2, n)-threshold and generalized restricted (2, n)-threshold schemes that enable any two cooperating players from two disjoint groups to always reconstruct the secret. Compared to the existing scheme by Rahaman and Parker (Phys Rev A 91:022330, 2015), the proposed scheme is more general and the access structure contains more authorized sets.

  19. A 220 GHz Communications Link Utilizing Frequency Multipliers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-17

    Laboratory, 2800 Powder Mill Rd., Adelphi, MD 20783 2Army Research Office, 4300 S Miami Blvd, Durham, NC 27703 Abstract: A solid - state 220-GHz...mixers) is limited, and one is left with passive components. As a result, the attainable solid - state output power available at this frequency range is...applications in 0.13μm SiGe BiCMOS,” 2014 IEEE International Solid - State Circuits Conference Digest of Technical Papers (ISSCC), pp. 256 – 257, San

  20. Feasibility studies for a wireless 60 GHz tracking detector readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmeier, S.; Schöning, A.; Soltveit, H. K.; Wiedner, D.

    2016-09-01

    The amount of data produced by highly granular silicon tracking detectors in high energy physics experiments poses a major challenge to readout systems. At high collision rates, e.g. at LHC experiments, only a small fraction of data can be read out with currently used technologies. To cope with the requirements of future or upgraded experiments new data transfer techniques are required which offer high data rates at low power and low material budget. Wireless technologies operating in the 60 GHz band or at higher frequencies offer high data rates and are thus a promising upcoming alternative to conventional data transmission via electrical cables or optical fibers. Using wireless technology, the amount of cables and connectors in detectors can be significantly reduced. Tracking detectors profit most from a reduced material budget as fewer secondary particle interactions (multiple Coulomb scattering, energy loss, etc.) improve the tracking performance in general. We present feasibility studies regarding the integration of the wireless technology at 60 GHz into a silicon tracking detector. We use spare silicon strip modules of the ATLAS experiment as test samples which are measured to be opaque in the 60 GHz range. The reduction of cross talk between links and the attenuation of reflections is studied. An estimate of the maximum achievable link density is given. It is shown that wireless links can be placed as close as 2 cm next to each other for a layer distance of 10 cm by exploiting one or several of the following measures: highly directive antennas, absorbers like graphite foam, linear polarization and frequency channeling. Combining these measures, a data rate area density of up to 11 Tb/(s·m2) seems feasible. In addition, two types of silicon sensors are tested under mm-wave irradiation in order to determine the influence of 60 GHz data transmission on the detector performance: an ATLAS silicon strip sensor module and an HV-MAPS prototype for the Mu3e

  1. 24-71 GHz PCB Array for 5G ISM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Markus H.; Volakis, John L.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2017-01-01

    Millimeter-wave 5G mobile architectures need to consolidate disparate frequency bands into a single, multifunctional array. Existing arrays are either narrow-band, prohibitively expensive or cannot be scaled to these frequencies. In this paper, we present the first ultra-wideband millimeter wave array to operate across six 5G and ISM bands spanning 24-71 GHz. Importantly, the array is realized using low-cost PCB. The paper presents the design and optimized layout, and discusses fabrication and measurements.

  2. Water vapor absorption in the atmospheric window at 239 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, A.; Godon, M.; Carlier, J.; Ma, Q.

    1995-01-01

    Absolute absorption rates of pure water vapor and mixtures of water vapor and nitrogen have been measured in the atmospheric window at 239 GHz. The dependence on pressure as well as temperature has been obtained. The experimental data are compared with several theoretical or empirical models, and satisfactory agreement is obtained with the models involving a continuum; in the case of pure water vapor, the continuum contribution based upon recent theoretical developments gives good results. The temperature dependence is stronger than that proposed in a commonly used atmospheric transmission model.

  3. Tunnel-Junction Mixers Perform Well At 205 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, Hamid H. S.; Mcgrath, William R.; Cypher, Scott R.; Bumble, Bruce; Leduc, Henry G.; Hunt, Brian D.

    1995-01-01

    Superconductor-Insulator Superconductor (SIS) tunnel junctions made of NbN/MgO/NbN and Nb/AlOx/Nb, with cross-sectional areas of about 0.30 and 0.25 micrometer(Sup2) respectively, fabricated and tested for use as mixers at frequencies near 205 GHz. Cross sections must be small to make capacitances of devices acceptably small for operation at this frequency. NbN and Nb good materials choices as superconductors because of high energy gap, and mechanically and electrically rugged and chemically stable.

  4. Maps based on 53 GHz (5.7 mm wavelength)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Maps based on 53 GHz (5.7 mm wavelength) observations made with the DMR over the entire 4-year mission (top) on a scale from 0 - 4 K, showing the near-uniformity of the CMB brightness, (middle) on a scale intended to enhance the contrast due to the dipole described in the slide 19 caption, and (bottom) following subtraction of the dipole component. Emission from the Milky Way Galaxy is evident in the bottom image. See slide 19 caption for information about map smoothing and projection.

  5. Satellites using the 30/20 GHz band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivo, J. N.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the future options open to satellite system planners focuses attention on the use of the 30/20 GHz band. Very broad bandwidths available, coupled with a primary allocation for fixed satellite service, make the band very attractive. NASA, in concert with the system and service supplier industries, is planning a research and development program aimed at flight demonstration of 30/20 satellite systems which it is hoped will lead to operational system use in the early 1990's. The communication system concepts and the spacecraft systems necessary to support these for operational use in 1990 and beyond are discussed.

  6. Amplifier Module for 260-GHz Band Using Quartz Waveguide Transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padmanabhan, Sharmila; Fung, King Man; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Peralta, Alejandro; Soria, Mary M.; Pukala, David M.; Sin, Seth; Samoska, Lorene A.; Sarkozy, Stephen; Lai, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Packaging of MMIC LNA (monolithic microwave integrated circuit low-noise amplifier) chips at frequencies over 200 GHz has always been problematic due to the high loss in the transition between the MMIC chip and the waveguide medium in which the chip will typically be used. In addition, above 200 GHz, wire-bond inductance between the LNA and the waveguide can severely limit the RF matching and bandwidth of the final waveguide amplifier module. This work resulted in the development of a low-loss quartz waveguide transition that includes a capacitive transmission line between the MMIC and the waveguide probe element. This capacitive transmission line tunes out the wirebond inductance (where the wire-bond is required to bond between the MMIC and the probe element). This inductance can severely limit the RF matching and bandwidth of the final waveguide amplifier module. The amplifier module consists of a quartz E-plane waveguide probe transition, a short capacitive tuning element, a short wire-bond to the MMIC, and the MMIC LNA. The output structure is similar, with a short wire-bond at the output of the MMIC, a quartz E-plane waveguide probe transition, and the output waveguide. The quartz probe element is made of 3-mil quartz, which is the thinnest commercially available material. The waveguide band used is WR4, from 170 to 260 GHz. This new transition and block design is an improvement over prior art because it provides for better RF matching, and will likely yield lower loss and better noise figure. The development of high-performance, low-noise amplifiers in the 180-to- 700-GHz range has applications for future earth science and planetary instruments with low power and volume, and astrophysics array instruments for molecular spectroscopy. This frequency band, while suitable for homeland security and commercial applications (such as millimeter-wave imaging, hidden weapons detection, crowd scanning, airport security, and communications), also has applications to

  7. Radar response to vegetation. II - 8-18 GHz band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Bush, T. F.; Batlivala, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    The results of experimental studies on the backscattering properties of corn, milo, soybeans, and alfalfa are presented. The measurements were made during the summer of 1973 over the 8-18 GHz frequency band. The data indicate that soil moisture estimation is best accomplished at incidence angles near nadir with lower frequencies while crop discrimination is best accomplished using two frequencies at incidence angles ranging from 30 deg to 65 deg. It is also shown that temporal plant morphology variations can cause extreme variations in the values of the scattering coefficients. These morphological changes can be caused by growth, heavy rain, and in the case of alfalfa, harvesting.

  8. Microwave Radiothermometry (9GHz) Applied To Breast Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautherie, M.; Mamouni, A.; Samsel, M.; Guerquin-Kern, J. L.; Leroy, Y.; Gros, Ch.

    1980-05-01

    Radiothermometric investigations have been carried out on breast cancer patients and on patients with tumors of various localizations and histologic types (liver,thyrold,...) (55 cases), by means of a high sensitivity hyperfrequency radiometer operating at 9GHz.The findings were analyzed as follow: (a) comparison between microwave thermal mapping and infrared thermography; (b) correlations with various morphologic and thermal parameters (depth and size oftumor thermal conductivity, vascularization and x-ray structures of tissues). Microwave radiometry seems to be able to provide significant information on meta-bolism and thermal conditions of subcutaneous tumor tissue, especially under those clinical situations where infrared thermography does not work.

  9. The VLBA Imaging And Polarimetry Survey at 5 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Helmboldt, J.F.; Taylor, G.B.; Tremblay, S.; Fassnacht, C.D.; Walker, R.C.; Myers, S.T.; Sjouwerman, L.O.; Pearson, T.J.; Readhead, A.C.S.; Weintraub, L.; Gehrels, N.; Romani, R.W.; Healey, S.; Michelson, P.F.; Blandford, R.D.; Cotter, G.; /New Mexico U. /UC, Davis /NRAO, Socorro /Caltech /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Oxford U.

    2006-11-20

    We present the first results of the VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey (VIPS), a 5 GHz VLBI survey of 1,127 sources with flat radio spectra. Through automated data reduction and imaging routines, we have produced publicly available I, Q, and U images and have detected polarized flux density from 37% of the sources. We have also developed an algorithm to use each source's I image to automatically classify it as a point-like source, a core-jet, a compact symmetric object (CSO) candidate, or a complex source. Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we have found no significant trend between optical flux and 5 GHz flux density for any of the source categories. Using the velocity width of the H{beta} emission line and the monochromatic luminosity at 5100 to estimate the central black hole mass, M{sub BH}, we have found a weak trend between M{sub BH} and 5 GHz luminosity density for objects with SDSS spectra. Ongoing optical follow-up for all VIPS sources will allow for more detailed explorations of these issues. The mean ratio of the polarized to total 5 GHz flux density for VIPS sources with detected polarized flux density ranges from 1% to 20% with a median value of about 5%. This ratio is a factor of {approx}3 larger if only the jet components of core-jet systems are considered and is noticeably higher for relatively large core-jet systems than for other source types, regardless of which components (i.e., core, jet, or both) are considered. We have also found significant evidence that the directions of the jets in core-jet systems tend to be perpendicular to the electric vector position angles (EVPAs). The data is consistent with a scenario in which {approx}24% of the polarized core-jets have EVPAs that are anti-aligned with the directions of their jet components and which have a substantial amount of Faraday rotation. Follow-up observations at multiple frequencies will address this issue in more detail. In addition to these initial results, plans for

  10. The 492 GHz emission of Sgr A* constrained by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Wright, Melvyn C. H.; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Requena-Torres, Miguel A.; Matsushita, Satoki; Martín, Sergio; Ott, Jürgen; Morris, Mark R.; Longmore, Steven N.; Brinkerink, Christiaan D.; Falcke, Heino

    2016-09-01

    Aims: Our aim is to characterize the polarized continuum emission properties including intensity, polarization position angle, and polarization percentage of Sgr A* at ~492 GHz. This frequency, well into the submillimeter bump where the emission is supposed to become optically thin, allows us to see down to the event horizon. Hence the reported observations contain potentially vital information on black hole properties. We have compared our measurements with previous, lower frequency observations, which provides information in the time domain. Methods: We report continuum emission properties of Sgr A* at ~492 GHz, based on Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations. We measured flux densities of Sgr A* from the central fields of our ALMA mosaic observations. We used calibration observations of the likely unpolarized continuum emission of Titan and the observations of Ci line emission, to gauge the degree of spurious polarization. Results: The flux density of 3.6 ± 0.72 Jy which we measured during our run is consistent with extrapolations from previous, lower frequency observations. We found that the continuum emission of Sgr A* at ~492 GHz shows large amplitude differences between the XX and the YY correlations. The observed intensity ratio between the XX and YY correlations as a function of parallactic angle can be explained by a constant polarization position angle of ~158°± 3°. The fitted polarization percentage of Sgr A* during our observational period is 14% ± 1.2%. The calibrator quasar J1744-3116 we observed on the same night can be fitted to Stokes I = 252 mJy, with 7.9% ± 0.9% polarization at position angle PA = 14°± 4.2°. Conclusions: The observed polarization percentage and polarization position angle in the present work appear consistent with those expected from longer wavelength observations in the period of 1999-2005. In particular, the polarization position angle at 492 GHz expected from the previously fitted 167°± 7° intrinsic

  11. A VLBI survey at 2.29 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morabito, D. D.; Preston, R. A.; Williams, J. G.; Faulkner, J.; Jauncey, D. L.; Nicolson, G. D.

    1985-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) is establishing a high-accuracy VLBI celestial reference frame. The results of a search for suitable radio sources to be used in constructing this frame are given. The VLBI observations using DSN baselines at 2.29 GHz with fringe spacings of about 3 milliarcseconds have been performed on 1398 radio sources spread over the entire sky. Of those, 917 sources were detected including 93% of the identifed BL Lacertae objects, 86% of Quasars and 36% of galaxies. The resulting catalog of compact radio sources is also useful for various astrophysical studies and in the formation of VLBI celestial reference frames.

  12. High power testing of a 17 GHz photocathode RF gun

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.C.; Danly, B.G.; Gonichon, J.

    1995-12-31

    The physics and technological issues involved in high gradient particle acceleration at high microwave (RF) frequencies are under study at MIT. The 17 GHz photocathode RF gun has a 1 1/2 cell ({pi} mode) room temperature cooper cavity. High power tests have been conducted at 5-10 MW levels with 100 ns pulses. A maximum surface electric field of 250 MV/m was achieved. This corresponds to an average on-axis gradient of 150 MeV/m. The gradient was also verified by a preliminary electron beam energy measurement. Even high gradients are expected in our next cavity design.

  13. Germanium photodetector with 60 GHz bandwidth using inductive gain peaking.

    PubMed

    Novack, Ari; Gould, Mike; Yang, Yisu; Xuan, Zhe; Streshinsky, Matthew; Liu, Yang; Capellini, Giovanni; Lim, Andy Eu-Jin; Lo, Guo-Qiang; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael

    2013-11-18

    Germanium-on-silicon photodetectors have been heavily investigated in recent years as a key component of CMOS-compatible integrated photonics platforms. It has previously been shown that detector bandwidths could theoretically be greatly increased with the incorporation of a carefully chosen inductor and capacitor in the photodetector circuit. Here, we show the experimental results of such a circuit that doubles the detector 3dB bandwidth to 60 GHz. These results suggest that gain peaking is a generally applicable tool for increasing detector bandwidth in practical photonics systems without requiring the difficult process of lowering detector capacitance.

  14. Extended depth of field imaging at 94 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mait, Joseph N.; Wikner, David A.; Mirotznik, Mark S.; van der Gracht, Joseph; Behrmann, Gregory P.; Good, Brandon L.; Mathews, Scott A.

    2008-04-01

    We describe a computational imaging technique to extend the depth-of field of a 94-GHz imaging system. The technique uses a cubic phase element in the pupil plane of the system to render system operation relatively insensitive to object distance. However, the cubic phase element also introduces aberrations but, since these are fixed and known, we remove them using post-detection signal processing. We present experimental results that validate system performance and indicate a greater than four-fold increase in depth-of-field from 17" to greater than 68".

  15. The MIT-Green Bank (MG) 5 GHz survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Lawrence, C. R.; Burke, B. F.; Hewitt, J. N.; Mahoney, J.

    1986-01-01

    The catalog yielded by the MIT-Green Bank 5-GHz survey contains 5974 sources with S/N ratio greater than 5; a supplemental catalog contains 3836 possible detections with S/N of less than 5. The reliability of the main list is measured to be about 96 percent, with a completeness of about 95 percent. Flux density errors are a function of flux density. A comparison is presently made of survey sources from the Douglas et al. (1980) 365-MHz Texas survey; spectral indices are computed for coincident sources, and the distribution of spectral indices is discussed.

  16. Copper coplanar waveguides in Si substrates for 10 GHz applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya, R. E.; Levenets, V.; Tarr, N. G.; Plett, C.

    2004-05-01

    This article presents an experimental study of copper coplanar waveguides fabricated on silicon substrates. The waveguides are separated from the substrate by thick layers of polyimide, and can be formed on commercial integrated circuit cores using a simple postprocessing sequence. Waveguide performance is compared to simulations and that of aluminum control devices underlayed with silicon dioxide. The lower resistance of the copper and improved substrate isolation obtained with the low-k polyimide dielectric provide a significant performance boost compared to the controls. Distributed model parameter are provided for frequencies up to 14 GHz to support circuit applications for theses devices. .

  17. A wide-band 760-GHz planar integrated Schottky receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gearhart, Steven S.; Hesler, Jeffrey; Bishop, William L.; Crowe, Thomas W.; Rebeiz, Gabriel M.

    1993-01-01

    A wideband planar integrated heterodyne receiver has been developed for use at submillimeter-wave to FIR frequencies. The receiver consists of a log-periodic antenna integrated with a planar 0.8-micron GaAs Schottky diode. The monolithic receiver is placed on a silicon lens and has a measured room temperature double side-band conversion loss and noise temperature of 14.9 +/- 1.0 dB and 8900 +/- 500 K, respectively, at 761 GHz. These results represent the best performance to date for room temperature integrated receivers at this frequency.

  18. Transmission Line for 258 GHz Gyrotron DNP Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdashov, Alexandr A.; Belousov, Vladimir I.; Chirkov, Alexey V.; Denisov, Gregory G.; Korchagin, Vyacheslav V.; Kornishin, Sergey Yu.; Tai, Evgeny M.

    2011-06-01

    We describe the design and test results of the transmission line for liquid-state (LS) and solid-state (SS) DNP spectrometers with the second-harmonic 258.6 GHz gyrotron at the Institute of the Biophysical Chemistry Center of Goethe University (Frankfurt). The 13-meter line includes a mode converter, HE11 waveguides, 4 mitre bends, a variable polarizer-attenuator, directional couplers, a water-flow calorimeter and a mechanical switch. A microwave power of about 15 W was obtained in the pure HE11 mode at the spectrometer inputs.

  19. COMSTAR satellite 19/29 GHz propagation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, S. C.; Davidson, D.; Tang, D. D.

    1981-08-01

    Results and analysis are presented for the 19/29-GHz satellite propagation experiments using beacons aboard the COMSTAR series. Emphasis is on diversity performance of the Tampa, Florida, Triad and single-site attenuation distributions in intense rain, and on single-site performance at Waltham, Massachusetts. The substantial data base evolved to show a flattish tail on distributions due to rapid rate-of-change at onset and recovery; this type of distribution found in Tampa rain environment was not found in Waltham.

  20. Operation Of A 140 GHz Tunable Backward Wave Gyrotron Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guss, W. C.; Kreischer, K. E.; Temkin, R. J.; Caplan, M.; Pirkle, D.

    1988-11-01

    A tunable backward-wave oscillator (BWO) gyrotron is currently being operated at MIT which is a prototype for a FEL driver at high frequency. Novel features of this design, are the overmoded TE12 cylindrical cavity, a wide band moth-eye window, and the use of a Pierce-wiggler gun. The design objectives are voltage tuning from 130-140 GHz with 10 kW output power. The interaction region is 10λο long where λο is the free space wave length. A linear 2° uptaper is used to maintain mode purity and a broadband motheye window is used for maximum transmission.

  1. A 20 GHz circularly polarized, fan beam slot array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weikle, D. C.

    1982-03-01

    An EHF waveguide slot array was developed for possible use as a receive-only paging antenna for ground mobile terminals. The design, fabrication, and measured performance of this antenna are presented. The antenna generates a circularly polarized fan beam that is narrow in azimuth and broad in elevation. When mechanically rotated in azimuth, it can receive a 20 GHz satellite transmission independent of mobile terminal direction. Azimuth plane sidelobe levels, which are typically <-40 dB from the main lobe, provide for discrimination against ground and airborne jammers.

  2. Few-hundred GHz carbon nanotube nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

    PubMed

    Island, J O; Tayari, V; McRae, A C; Champagne, A R

    2012-09-12

    We study 23-30 nm long suspended single-wall carbon nanotube quantum dots and observe both their stretching and bending vibrational modes. We use low-temperature DC electron transport to excite and measure the tubes' bending mode by making use of a positive feedback mechanism between their vibrations and the tunneling electrons. In these nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), we measure fundamental bending frequencies f(bend) ≈ 75-280 GHz and extract quality factors Q ∼ 10(6). The NEMS's frequencies can be tuned by a factor of 2 with tension induced by mechanical breakjunctions actuated by an electrostatic force or tension from bent suspended electrodes.

  3. 280  GHz dark soliton fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Song, Y F; Guo, J; Zhao, L M; Shen, D Y; Tang, D Y

    2014-06-15

    We report on an ultrahigh repetition rate dark soliton fiber laser. We show both numerically and experimentally that by taking advantage of the cavity self-induced modulation instability and the dark soliton formation in a net normal dispersion cavity fiber laser, stable ultrahigh repetition rate dark soliton trains can be formed in a dispersion-managed cavity fiber laser. Stable dark soliton trains with a repetition rate as high as ∼280  GHz have been generated in our experiment. Numerical simulations have shown that the effective gain bandwidth limitation plays an important role on the stabilization of the formed dark solitons in the laser.

  4. Feasiblity study for a 34 GHz (Ka band) gyroamplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, D. S.; Bier, R. E.; Caplan, M.; Huey, H. E.; Pirkle, D. R.; Robinson, J. D.; Thompson, L.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of using a gyroklystron power tube as the final amplifier in a 400 kW CW 34 GHz transmitter on the Goldstone Antenna is investigated. A conceptual design of the gyroklystron and the transmission line connecting it with the antenna feed horn is presented. The performance characteristics of the tube and transmission line are compared to the transmitter requirements for a deep space radar system. Areas of technical risk for a follow-on hardware development program for the gyroklystron amplifier and overmoded transmission line components are discussed.

  5. A proactive quantum secret sharing scheme based on GHZ state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Huawang; Zhu, Xiaohua; Dai, Yuewei

    2015-09-01

    A proactive quantum secret sharing scheme is proposed, in which the participants can update their shadows periodically. In an updating period, one participant randomly generates the GHZ states and sends the particles to the other participants, and the participants update their shadows according to the measurement performed on the particles. After an updating period, each participant can change his shadow but the secret is changeless. The old shadows will be useless even if they have been stolen by the attacker. The proactive property is very useful to resist the mobile attacker.

  6. Dynamic nuclear polarization at 700 MHz/460 GHz.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Alexander B; Markhasin, Evgeny; Daviso, Eugenio; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Nanni, Emilio A; Jawla, Sudheer K; Mena, Elijah L; DeRocher, Ronald; Thakkar, Ajay; Woskov, Paul P; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J; Griffin, Robert G

    2012-11-01

    We describe the design and implementation of the instrumentation required to perform DNP-NMR at higher field strengths than previously demonstrated, and report the first magic-angle spinning (MAS) DNP-NMR experiments performed at (1)H/e(-) frequencies of 700 MHz/460 GHz. The extension of DNP-NMR to 16.4 T has required the development of probe technology, cryogenics, gyrotrons, and microwave transmission lines. The probe contains a 460 GHz microwave channel, with corrugated waveguide, tapers, and miter-bends that couple microwave power to the sample. Experimental efficiency is increased by a cryogenic exchange system for 3.2 mm rotors within the 89 mm bore. Sample temperatures ≤85 K, resulting in improved DNP enhancements, are achieved by a novel heat exchanger design, stainless steel and brass vacuum jacketed transfer lines, and a bronze probe dewar. In addition, the heat exchanger is preceded with a nitrogen drying and generation system in series with a pre-cooling refrigerator. This reduces liquid nitrogen usage from >700 l per day to <200 l per day and allows for continuous (>7 days) cryogenic spinning without detrimental frost or ice formation. Initial enhancements, ε=-40, and a strong microwave power dependence suggests the possibility for considerable improvement. Finally, two-dimensional spectra of a model system demonstrate that the higher field provides excellent resolution, even in a glassy, cryoprotecting matrix.

  7. Observations of M87 and Hydra A at 90 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, W. D.; Mason, B. S.; Dicker, S.; Korngut, P.; Devlin, M. J.; Aquirre, J.; Benford, D.; Moseley, H.; Staguhn, J.; Irwin, K.; hide

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents new observations of the AGNs M87 and Hydra A at 90 GHz made with the MUSTANG bolometer array on the Green Bank Telescope at 8.5" resolution. A spectral analysis is performed combining this new data and archival VLA data or1 these objects at longer wavelengths. This analysis can detect variations in spectral index and curvature expected from energy losses in the radiating particles. L187 shows only weak evidence for steepening of the spectrum along the jet suggesting either re-acceleration of the relativistic particles in the jet or insufficient losesto affect the spectrum at 90 GHz The jets in Hydra A show strong steepening as they move from the nucleus suggesting unbalanced losses of the higher energy relativistic particles The difference between these two sources may be accounted for by the different lengths over which the jets are observable, 2 kpc for 5187 and 45 kpc for Hydra A. Subject headings: galaxies: jets, galaxies: active, radio continuum, galaxies: individual (M87. Hydra A),

  8. A 30/20 GHz FSS feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The near term feasibility of direct-to-subscriber services were determined using the 30/20 GHz Fixed Satellite Service (FSS) frequency bands. Those technologies which need to be further developed before such a system can be implemented, were identified. To determine this feasibility, dozens of potential applications were examined for their near-term viability, and the subscriber base of three promising applications were estimated. The system requirements, terminal design, and satellite architecture were all investigated to determine whether a 30/20 GHz FSS system is technically and economically feasible by mid-1990s. It was concluded that such a system is feasible, although maturation of some technologies is needed. This system would likely consist of one or two multibeam satellites serving hub/spoke networks of simple user terminals and more complex, mutli-channel terminals of the service providers. Rain compensation would be accomplished non-adaptively through the use of coding, nonuniform satellite TWT power that is a function of a beam's anticipated downlink fading, and signal regeneration of traffic to the wettest climate regions. It was estimated that a potential market of almost two million users could exist in in the mid-1990s time frame for home banking and financial services via Ka-band satellites.

  9. AC electromigration (10 MHz-1 GHz) in Al metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodbell, K. P.; Castellano, A. J.; Kaufman, R. I.

    1998-01-01

    In bipolar circuits elevated DC currents are adequate to evaluate the electromigration reliability of metal interconnects. However, in CMOS circuits the logic devices operate under constant current conditions while the signal lines are mainly AC. Therefore, reliability testing using realistic operating waveforms and frequencies becomes increasingly important. In this paper a high frequency bi-directional electromigration tester is described which allows for the simultaneous testing of 24 metal lines with a pure AC signal (up to 1 GHz), an offset AC signal, a variable duty cycle non-symmetric waveform or a high frequency (up to 1 GHz) pulsed unidirectional current. In this system sample power was monitored using a directional coupler which permitted both forward and reflected power to be measured with a single power meter. By using this approach, the matching network was greatly simplified. Lines of Ti/AlCu (200 μm long×0.6 μm thick×0.6 μm wide), containing W interlevel vias, were tested at 1.3 MA/cm2 and 200 °C with pure AC sinusoidal (sinc) waveforms (10-880 MHz) and with identical AC sine signals containing DC offsets. It was found that under all AC conditions investigated little or no damage occurred even after >4000 hours of testing. However, when small DC currents were added to pure AC sinc waveforms the electromigration lifetimes were inversely proportional to the square of the magnitude of the DC current applied.

  10. AN ACCURATE FLUX DENSITY SCALE FROM 1 TO 50 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, R. A.; Butler, B. J. E-mail: BButler@nrao.edu

    2013-02-15

    We develop an absolute flux density scale for centimeter-wavelength astronomy by combining accurate flux density ratios determined by the Very Large Array between the planet Mars and a set of potential calibrators with the Rudy thermophysical emission model of Mars, adjusted to the absolute scale established by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The radio sources 3C123, 3C196, 3C286, and 3C295 are found to be varying at a level of less than {approx}5% per century at all frequencies between 1 and 50 GHz, and hence are suitable as flux density standards. We present polynomial expressions for their spectral flux densities, valid from 1 to 50 GHz, with absolute accuracy estimated at 1%-3% depending on frequency. Of the four sources, 3C286 is the most compact and has the flattest spectral index, making it the most suitable object on which to establish the spectral flux density scale. The sources 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, NGC 7027, NGC 6542, and MWC 349 show significant variability on various timescales. Polynomial coefficients for the spectral flux density are developed for 3C48, 3C138, and 3C147 for each of the 17 observation dates, spanning 1983-2012. The planets Venus, Uranus, and Neptune are included in our observations, and we derive their brightness temperatures over the same frequency range.

  11. A 670 GHz gyrotron with record power and efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyavin, M. Yu.; Luchinin, A. G.; Nusinovich, G. S.; Rodgers, J.; Kashyn, D. G.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Pu, R.

    2012-10-01

    A 670 GHz gyrotron with record power and efficiency has been developed in joint experiments of the Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (Nizhny Novgord, Russia), and the University of Maryland (USA) teams. The magnetic field of 27-28 T required for operation at the 670 GHz at the fundamental cyclotron resonance is produced by a pulsed solenoid. The pulse duration of the magnetic field is several milliseconds. A gyrotron is driven by a 70 kV, 15 A electron beam, so the beam power is on the order of 1 MW in 10-20 ms pulses. The ratio of the orbital to axial electron velocity components is in the range of 1.2-1.3. The gyrotron is designed to operate in the TE31,8-mode. Operation in a so high-order mode results in relatively low ohmic losses (less than 10% of the radiated power). Achieved power of the outgoing radiation (210 kW) and corresponding efficiency (about 20%) represent record numbers for high-power sources of sub-THz radiation.

  12. A waveguide orthomode transducer for 385-500 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groppi, Christopher; Navarrini, Alessandro; Chattopadhyay, Goutam

    2010-07-01

    We describe the design, construction, and performance of a waveguide Orthomode Transducer (OMT) for the 385-500 GHz band. The OMT is based on a symmetric backward coupling structure with a square waveguide input (0.56x0.56 mm2) and two single-mode waveguide outputs: a standard WR2.2 waveguide (0.56x0.28 mm2) and an oval waveguide with full-radius corners. The OMT is rescaled from a lower frequency design that was developed for the 3 mm band; it was optimized using a commercial 3D electromagnetic simulator. The OMT consists of two mechanical blocks in split-block configuration, fabricated using a CNC micromilling machine. A first prototype copper alloy OMT employing standard UG387 flanges at all ports was fabricated and tested. From 385 to 500 GHz the measured input reflection coefficient was less than -10 dB, the isolation between the outputs was less than -25 dB, the cross polarization was less than -10 dB, and the transmission was ~-2 dB at room temperature for both polarization channels. The effects of misalignment errors in the OMT performance were studied using electromagnetic simulation. A second OMT version utilizing custom made mini-flanges and much shorter waveguides was designed and will be tested soon. This novel OMT is more tolerant to misalignment errors of the block halves and is expected to have much improved performance over the first prototype.

  13. ATLAS 10 GHz ECR ions source upgrade project.

    SciTech Connect

    Moehs, D. P.; Pardo, R. C.; Vondrasek, R.; Xie, D.

    1999-08-10

    A major upgrade of the first ATLAS 10 GHz ECR ion source, which began operations in 1987, is in the planning and procurement phase. The new design will convert the old two-stage source into a single-stage source with an electron donor disk and high gradient magnetic field that preserves radial access for solid material feeds and pumping of the plasma chamber. The new magnetic field profile allows for the possibility of a second ECR zone at a frequency of 14 GHz. An open hexapole configuration, using a high energy-product Nd-Fe-B magnet material, having an inner diameter of 8.8 cm and pole gaps of 2.4 cm has been adopted. Models indicate that the field strengths at the chamber wall, 4 cm in radius, will be 9.3 kG along the magnet poles and 5.6 kG along the pole gaps. The individual magnet bars will be housed in austenitic stainless steel allowing the magnet housing within the aluminum plasma chamber to be used as a water channel for direct cooling of the magnets. Eight solenoid coils from the existing ECR will be enclosed in an iron yoke to produce the axial mirror. Based on a current of 500 A, the final model predicts a minimum B field of 3 kG with injection and extraction mirror ratios of 4.4 and 2.9 respectively.

  14. Development of ALMA Band 4 (125-163 GHz) receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asayama, Shin'ichiro; Takahashi, Toshikazu; Kubo, Kouichi; Ito, Tetsuya; Inata, Motoko; Suzuki, Takakiyo; Wada, Toru; Soga, Tomio; Kamada, Chiyoshi; Karatsu, Miki; Fujii, Yumi; Obuchi, Yoshiyuki; Kawashima, Susumu; Iwashita, Hiroyuki; Uzawa, Yoshinori

    2014-06-01

    We have developed a dual-polarization receiver for Band 4 of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Band 4, which covers the 125 to 163 GHz spectral window, is one of the ten bands that form the ALMA Front End. The Band 4 receiver consists of three elements: a warm optics, a cold cartridge assembly, and a warm cartridge assembly. The cold cartridge includes a feed horn, an orthomode transducer, sideband-separating (2SB) superconductor-insulator-superconductor mixers, cold intermediate frequency (IF) amplifiers, IF isolators, bias-protection circuit boards, and component interconnections. The IF bandwidth is 4-8 GHz. The first eight receivers manufactured as preproduction models have demonstrated excellent performance within the stringent ALMA requirements. Stable astronomical fringes and closure phase have been successfully achieved during field performance tests of the Band 4 receivers installed in the ALMA antennas. Our well-established Band 4 receivers will contribute to various fields of astronomical research, such as the detection of high-redshift galaxies, characterization of cold molecular medium in normal field galaxies, and astrochemistry including observations of deuterated species.

  15. Dynamic nuclear polarization at 700 MHz/460 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Markhasin, Evgeny; Daviso, Eugenio; Michaelis, Vladimir K.; Nanni, Emilio A.; Jawla, Sudheer K.; Mena, Elijah L.; DeRocher, Ronald; Thakkar, Ajay; Woskov, Paul P.; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2012-11-01

    We describe the design and implementation of the instrumentation required to perform DNP-NMR at higher field strengths than previously demonstrated, and report the first magic-angle spinning (MAS) DNP-NMR experiments performed at 1H/e- frequencies of 700 MHz/460 GHz. The extension of DNP-NMR to 16.4 T has required the development of probe technology, cryogenics, gyrotrons, and microwave transmission lines. The probe contains a 460 GHz microwave channel, with corrugated waveguide, tapers, and miter-bends that couple microwave power to the sample. Experimental efficiency is increased by a cryogenic exchange system for 3.2 mm rotors within the 89 mm bore. Sample temperatures ⩽85 K, resulting in improved DNP enhancements, are achieved by a novel heat exchanger design, stainless steel and brass vacuum jacketed transfer lines, and a bronze probe dewar. In addition, the heat exchanger is preceded with a nitrogen drying and generation system in series with a pre-cooling refrigerator. This reduces liquid nitrogen usage from >700 l per day to <200 l per day and allows for continuous (>7 days) cryogenic spinning without detrimental frost or ice formation. Initial enhancements, ε = -40, and a strong microwave power dependence suggests the possibility for considerable improvement. Finally, two-dimensional spectra of a model system demonstrate that the higher field provides excellent resolution, even in a glassy, cryoprotecting matrix.

  16. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization at 700 MHz/460 GHz

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Markhasin, Evgeny; Daviso, Eugenio; Michaelis, Vladimir K.; Nanni, Emilio A.; Jawla, Sudheer; Mena, Elijah L.; DeRocher, Ronald; Thakkar, Ajay; Woskov, Paul; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the design and implementation of the instrumentation required to perform DNP-NMR at higher field strengths than previously demonstrated, and report the first magic-angle spinning (MAS) DNP-NMR experiments performed at H/e frequencies of 700 MHz/460 GHz. The extension of DNP-NMR to 16.4 T has required the development of probe technology, cryogenics, gyrotrons, and microwave transmission lines. The probe contains a 460 GHz microwave channel, with corrugated waveguide, tapers, and miter-bends that couple microwave power to the sample. Experimental efficiency is increased by a cryogenic exchange system for 3.2 mm rotors within the 89 mm bore. Sample temperatures ≤85 K, resulting in improved DNP enhancements, are achieved by a novel heat exchanger design, stainless steel and brass vacuum jacketed transfer lines, and a bronze probe dewar. In addition, the heat exchanger is preceded with a nitrogen drying and generation system in series with a pre-cooling refrigerator. This reduces liquid nitrogen usage from >400 liters per day to <100 liters per day and allows for continuous (>7 days) cryogenic spinning without detrimental frost or ice formation. Initial enhancements, ε=−40, and a strong microwave power dependence suggests the possibility for considerable improvement. Finally, two-dimensional spectra of a model system demonstrate that the higher field provides excellent resolution, even in a glassy, cryoprotecting matrix. PMID:23000974

  17. New candidate GHz peaked spectrum and compact steep spectrum sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, P. G.; Tingay, S. J.

    2004-09-01

    Data from a recent Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) program of multi-frequency, multi-epoch monitoring of 202 active galactic nuclei with declinations <+10o have been searched for GHz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) radio sources. Supplementary data at higher and lower frequencies, where available, have been used to further examine the spectral properties of previously reported and new candidate GPS and CSS sources. The ATCA monitoring program has allowed the variability and polarization properties of sources previously reported as GPS and CSS sources, and the majority of new GPS and CSS candidates, to be investigated, confirming that these are useful diagnostics in discriminating genuine GPS and CSS sources from variable sources that display similar spectra only temporarily. GPS sources are confirmed to be generally more compact, and less polarized, than CSS sources, although CSS sources show evidence for being somewhat less variable than GPS sources at 1.4 and 2.5 GHz. In addition, the widths of GPS spectra are examined, and a significant difference is found in the GPS sample of Snellen et al. (2000) between sources with compact double (CD) or compact symmetric object (CSO) morphologies and sources with other morphologies, in that CD and CSO sources have generally narrower spectra. Possible reasons for this difference are considered.

  18. Low-Noise MMIC Amplifiers for 120 to 180 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pukala, David; Samoska, Lorene; Peralta, Alejandro; Bayuk, Brian; Grundbacher, Ron; Oliver, Patricia; Cavus, Abdullah; Liu, Po-Hsin

    2009-01-01

    Three-stage monolithic millimeter-wave integrated-circuit (MMIC) amplifiers capable of providing useful amounts of gain over the frequency range from 120 to 180 GHz have been developed as prototype low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) to be incorporated into instruments for sensing cosmic microwave background radiation. There are also potential uses for such LNAs in electronic test equipment, passive millimeter- wave imaging systems, radar receivers, communication receivers, and systems for detecting hidden weapons. The main advantage afforded by these MMIC LNAs, relative to prior MMIC LNAs, is that their coverage of the 120-to-180-GHz frequency band makes them suitable for reuse in a wider variety of applications without need to redesign them. Each of these MMIC amplifiers includes InP transistors and coplanar waveguide circuitry on a 50- mthick chip (see Figure 1). Coplanar waveguide transmission lines are used for both applying DC bias and matching of input and output impedances of each transistor stage. Via holes are incorporated between top and bottom ground planes to suppress propagation of electromagnetic modes in the substrate. On the basis of computational simulations, each of these amplifiers was expected to operate with a small-signal gain of 14 dB and a noise figure of 4.3 dB. At the time of writing this article, measurements of noise figures had not been reported, but on-chip measurements had shown gains approaching their simulated values (see Figure 2).

  19. Radio Point Sources Toward Galaxy Clusters at 30 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coble, K.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Bonamente, M.; Dawson, K.; Holzapfel, W.; Joy, M.; LaRoque, S.; Reese, E. D.

    2006-01-01

    Extra-galactic point sources are a significant contaminant in cosmic microwave background and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect experiments. Deep interferometric observations with the BIMA and OVRO arrays are used to characterize the spatial, spectral, and flux distributions of radio point sources toward galaxy clusters at 28.5 GHz. We compute counts of mJy point source fluxes from 90 fields centered on known massive galaxy clusters and 8 non-cluster fields. Counts in the non-cluster fields are consistent with extrapolations from the results of other surveys. We also compute counts towards clusters as a function of luminosity in three redshift bins out to z = 1.0 and see no clear evidence for evolution with redshift. We compute spectral indices of mJy sources in cluster fields between 1.4 and 28.5 GHz. The distribution is skewed, with a median spectral index of 0.76 and 25th and 75th percentiles of 0.55 and 0.95, respectively. This is steeper than the spectral indices of brighter field point sources measured by other surveys.

  20. MALT 90: The Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, James M.; Foster, J.; Brooks, K.; Rathborne, J.; Longmore, S.

    2011-05-01

    We present the first season results of the Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz Survey (MALT90), which will image 3 mm molecular line emission from 3,000 dense star-forming cores. MALT90 exploits the capability of the ATNF Mopra 22 m telescope for fast mapping and simultaneous imaging of 16 molecular lines near 90 GHz. These molecular lines will probe the cores’ physical, chemical, and evolutionary state. The target cores are selected from the 870 micron ATLASGAL survey to host the early stages of high-mass star formation and to span the complete range of evolutionary states from pre-stellar cores, to protostellar cores, and on to H II regions. Each core will be mapped at excellent angular (40'') and spectral (0.1 km/s) resolution. We present preliminary results for four key science projects: (1) determining the kinematic distances and Galactic distribution of dense cores, (2) establishing the distribution and evolution of angular momentum in a large sample of high-mass cores, (3) investigating the chemical evolution of dense cores, and (4) comparing the extragalactic molecular line-infrared luminosity correlations with those in Galactic cores. MALT90 will provide the definitive source list of high-mass dense cores for ALMA.

  1. 90 GHz OBSERVATIONS OF M87 AND HYDRA A

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, W. D.; Mason, B. S.; Dicker, S. R.; Korngut, P. M.; Devlin, M. J.; Aquirre, J.; Benford, D. J.; Moseley, S. H.; Staguhn, J. G.; Irwin, K. D.; Ade, P.

    2009-08-20

    This paper presents new observations of the active galactic nuclei M87 and Hydra A at 90 GHz made with the MUSTANG array on the Green Bank Telescope at 8.''5 resolution. A spectral analysis is performed combining this new data and archival VLA{sup 7}The VLA is operated by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, which is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. data on these objects at longer wavelengths. This analysis can detect variations in spectral index and curvature expected from energy losses in the radiating particles. M87 shows only weak evidence for steepening of the spectrum along the jet suggesting either re-acceleration of the relativistic particles in the jet or insufficient losses to affect the spectrum at 90 GHz. The jets in Hydra A show strong steepening as they move from the nucleus suggesting unbalanced losses of the higher energy relativistic particles. The difference between these two sources may be accounted for by the lengths over which the jets are observable, 2 kpc for M87 and 45 kpc for Hydra A.

  2. Biasable Subharmonic Membrane Mixer for 520 to 600 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlecht, Erich; Siegel, Peter; Mehdi, Imran; Gill, John; Velebir, James; Peralta, Alejandro; Tsang, Raymond; Oswald, John; Dengler, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The figure shows a biasable subharmonic mixer designed to operate in the frequency range from 520 to 600 GHz. This mixer is a prototype of low-power mixers needed for development of wideband, high-resolution spectrometers for measuring spectra of molecules in the atmospheres of Earth, other planets, and comets in the frequency range of 400 to 700 GHz. Three considerations dictated the main features of the design: It is highly desirable to operate the spectrometers at or slightly below room temperature. This consideration is addressed by choosing Schottky diodes as the frequency-mixing circuit elements because of all mixer diodes, Schottky diodes are the best candidates for affording sufficient sensitivity at or slightly below room-temperature range. The short wavelengths in the intended operating-frequency range translate to stringent requirements for precision of fabrication and assembly of the circuits; these requirements are even more stringent for wide-bandwidth circuits. This consideration is addressed in two ways: (1) As much as possible of the mixer circuitry is fabricated in the form of a monolithic integrated circuit on a GaAs membrane, employing a modified version of a process used previously to fabricate a non-subharmonic mixer for a frequency of 2.5 THz and frequency multipliers for frequencies up to 2 THz. (2) The remainder of the circuitry is precision machined into a waveguide block that holds the GaAs integrated circuit.

  3. Plant response to microwaves at 2.45 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiles, J. W.

    2006-03-01

    The solar power satellites (SPS) concept envisions an array of satellites in Earth orbit where they will collect solar energy and beam it to Earth. One transmission method is to use microwaves at 2.45 GHz. It is uncertain what the long-term effects will be of continuous microwave energy illumination of the biosphere. An experiment was done that exposed alfalfa to continuous microwave energy at 2.45 GHz with intensities of 0.5-1.2 mW/cm 2. The hypothesis was that plants exposed to microwaves would be no different from those plants not exposed to microwaves. A tray of growing plants was illuminated with microwaves while control plants were grown behind a microwave-opaque shield. Test plants and the control plants were subjected to the same environment otherwise. The experiment was designed so that the only variable to which the test plants were subjected was microwave exposure. Precise, non-destructive measurements were taken weekly of leaf chlorophyll concentration. After 7 weeks the plants were harvested and fresh weight and dry weight were measured. Gross plant variables such as stem length and internodal distance were measured, and overall plant vigor was assessed. In all measured variables there was no difference between the control and the microwave treatment plants.

  4. TMRT Observations of 26 Pulsars at 8.6 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ru-Shuang; Wu, Xin-Ji; Yan, Zhen; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Manchester, R. N.; Qiao, Guo-Jun; Xu, Ren-Xin; Wu, Ya-Jun; Zhao, Rong-Bing; Li, Bin; Du, Yuan-Jie; Lee, Ke-Jia; Hao, Long-Fei; Liu, Qing-Hui; Lu, Ji-Guang; Shang, Lun-Hua; Wang, Jin-Qing; Wang, Min; Yuan, Jin; Zhi, Qi-Jun; Zhong, Wei-Ye

    2017-08-01

    Integrated pulse profiles at 8.6 GHz obtained with the Shanghai Tian Ma Radio Telescope (TMRT) are presented for a sample of 26 pulsars. Mean flux densities and pulse width parameters of these pulsars are estimated. For 11 pulsars these are the first high-frequency observations and for a further four, our observations have a better signal-to-noise ratio than previous observations. For one (PSR J0742-2822), the 8.6 GHz profile differs from previously observed profiles. A comparison of 19 profiles with those at other frequencies shows that in nine cases, the separation between the outmost leading and trailing components decreases with frequency, which is roughly in agreement with radius-to-frequency mapping, whereas in the other 10 the separation is nearly constant. Different spectral indices of profile components lead to the variation of integrated pulse profile shapes with frequency. In seven pulsars with multi-component profiles, the spectral indices of the central components are steeper than those of the outer components. For the 12 pulsars with multi-component profiles in the high-frequency sample, we estimate the core width using Gaussian fitting and discuss the width-period relationship.

  5. A 35 GHz vector system for non destructive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glay, D.; Lasri, T.; Mamouni, A.; Leroy, Y.

    2000-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that microwave techniques are well suited for nondestructive testing (NDT) of materials. The challenge now is to propose systems that can compete, in terms of reliability, precision and fabrication cost, with those already existing. Microwaves are expected to play a fundamental role if we are able to develop both methods and systems to fulfill the increasing demand of characterization in this dynamic field. We have developed devices operating at 2.45 and 10 GHz that have been used successfully for layer thickness and material parameters (permittivity, moisture,…) measurement. In order to tackle other problems met by the NDT community, that need to operate at higher frequencies we have conceived a sensor for the determination of the material under test reflection coefficient (magnitude and phase) at 35 GHz. This system conceived around a complex correlator (or IQ demodulator), made in microstrip technology, is used for the detection of flaws inside dielectric materials or on surface conductors. These investigations concern defects with various shapes, sizes, and dielectric properties.

  6. Modeling Results for Proposed NSTX 28 GHz and EBWH System

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G; Ellis, R A; Fredd, E; Greenough, N; Hosea, J C; Wilgen, J B; Harvey, R W; Smirnov, A P; Preinhaelter, J; Urban, J; Ram, A K

    2008-03-20

    A 28 GHz electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and electron Bernstein wave heating (EBWH) system has been proposed for installation on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). A 350 kW gyrotron connected to a fixed horn antenna is proposed for ECH-assisted solenoid-free plasma startup. Modeling predicts strong first pass on-axis EC absorption, even for low electron temperature, Te ~ 20 eV, Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) startup plasmas. ECH will heat the CHI plasma to Te ~ 300 eV, providing a suitable target plasma for 30 MHz high-harmonic fast wave heating. A second gyrotron and steered O-X-B mirror launcher is proposed for EBWH experiments. Radiometric measurements of thermal EBW emission detected via B-X-O coupling on NSTX support implementation of the proposed system. 80% B-X-O coupling efficiency was measured in L-mode plasmas and 60% B-X-O coupling efficiency was recently measured in H-mode plasmas conditioned with evaporated lithium. Modeling predicts local on-axis EBW heating and current drive using 28 GHz power in β ~ 20% NSTX plasmas should be possible, with current drive efficiencies ~ 40 kA/MW.

  7. Absolute measurement of the cosmic microwave background at 2 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersanelli, M.; Bensadoun, M.; de Amici, G.; Levin, S.; Limon, M.; Smoot, G. F.; Vinje, W.

    1994-04-01

    We measured the intensity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation at a frequency of 2.0 GHz (15 cm wavelength) with a ground-based total-power radio-frequency (RF) gain radiometer calibrated at the antenna aperture with a quasi-free space cold load. The observations were performed from a remote, high-altitude site near the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station to minimize systematic effects. The measured thermodynamic temperature of the CMB is TCMB = 2.55 +/- 0.14 K (68% confidence level), the limiting factors in the accuracy being the subtraction of the atmospheric and Galactic contributions. The atmospheric emission was evaluated both by direct measurements and by extrapolation from our higher frequency data. The Galactic emission was determined by scaling low-frequency maps and was checked with differential drift scans. Our result is approximately 1 sigma lower than the recent accurate value of TCMB obtained by Cosmic microwave Background Explorer (COBE)-FIRAS above 60 GHz. The temperature of the sky (i.e., CMB plus Galaxy and extragalactic sources) at the south celestial pole with approximately 22 deg resolution is TA, Sky = 2.83 +/- 0.10 K, and its accuracy is limited by the subtraction of atmospheric emission.

  8. Control system renewal for efficient operation in RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, A. Ozeki, K.; Higurashi, Y.; Kidera, M.; Komiyama, M.; Nakagawa, T.

    2016-02-15

    A RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (18 GHz ECRIS) is used as an external ion source at the Radioactive Ion Beam Factory (RIBF) accelerator complex to produce an intense beam of medium-mass heavy ions (e.g., Ca and Ar). In most components that comprise the RIBF, the control systems (CSs) are integrated by the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). On the other hand, a non-EPICS-based system has hardwired controllers, and it is used in the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as an independent system. In terms of efficient and effective operation, the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as well as the RIBF CS should be renewed using EPICS. Therefore, we constructed an 18 GHz ECRIS CS by using programmable logic controllers with embedded EPICS technology. In the renewed system, an operational log system was developed as a new feature, for supporting of the 18 GHz ECRIS operation.

  9. A 94/183 GHz aircraft radiometer system for Project Storm Fury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliano, J. A.; Stratigos, J. A.; Forsythe, R. E.; Schuchardt, J. M.; Welch, J. M.; Gallentine, D. O.

    1980-01-01

    A radiometer design suitable for use in NASA's WB-57F aircraft to collect data from severe storm regions was developed. The design recommended was a 94/183 GHz scanning radiometer with 3 IF channels on either side of the 183.3 GHz water vapor line and a single IF channel for a low loss atmospheric window channel at 94 GHz. The development and construction of the 94/183 GHz scanning radiometer known as the Advanced Microwave Moisture Sounder (AMMS) is presented. The radiometer scans the scene below the aircraft over an angle of + or - 45 degrees with the beamwidth of the scene viewed of approximately 2 degrees at 94 GHz and 1 degree at 183 GHz. The AMMS data collection system consists of a microcomputer used to store the radiometer data on the flight cartridge recorder, operate the stepper motor driven scanner, and collect housekeeping data such as thermistor temperature readings and aircraft time code.

  10. A 94/183 GHz aircraft radiometer system for Project Storm Fury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, J. A.; Stratigos, J. A.; Forsythe, R. E.; Schuchardt, J. M.; Welch, J. M.; Gallentine, D. O.

    1980-04-01

    A radiometer design suitable for use in NASA's WB-57F aircraft to collect data from severe storm regions was developed. The design recommended was a 94/183 GHz scanning radiometer with 3 IF channels on either side of the 183.3 GHz water vapor line and a single IF channel for a low loss atmospheric window channel at 94 GHz. The development and construction of the 94/183 GHz scanning radiometer known as the Advanced Microwave Moisture Sounder (AMMS) is presented. The radiometer scans the scene below the aircraft over an angle of + or - 45 degrees with the beamwidth of the scene viewed of approximately 2 degrees at 94 GHz and 1 degree at 183 GHz. The AMMS data collection system consists of a microcomputer used to store the radiometer data on the flight cartridge recorder, operate the stepper motor driven scanner, and collect housekeeping data such as thermistor temperature readings and aircraft time code.

  11. Extending the ICRF to Higher Radio Frequencies: 24 and 43 GHz Astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Charlot, Patrick; Fomalont, Ed B.; Gordon, David; Lanyi, Gabor E.; Ma, Chopo; Naudet, Charles J.; Sovers, Ojars J.; Zhang, Li-Wei D.

    2004-01-01

    We present imaging results and source structure analysis of extragalactic radio sources observed using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 24 GHz and 43 GHz as part of an ongoing NASA, USNO, NRAO and Bordeaux Observatory collaboration to extend the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to higher radio frequencies. The K/Q-band image database now includes images of 108 sources at 43 GHz (Q-band) and images of 230 sources at 24 GHz (K-band). Preliminary analysis of the observations taken to date shows that the sources are generally more compact as one goes from the ICRF frequency of 8.4 GHz to 24 GHz. This result is consistent with the standard theory of compact extragalactic radio sources and suggests that reference frames defined at these higher radio frequencies will be less susceptible to the effects of intrinsic source structure than those defined at lower frequencies.

  12. Control system renewal for efficient operation in RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, A.; Ozeki, K.; Higurashi, Y.; Kidera, M.; Komiyama, M.; Nakagawa, T.

    2016-02-01

    A RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (18 GHz ECRIS) is used as an external ion source at the Radioactive Ion Beam Factory (RIBF) accelerator complex to produce an intense beam of medium-mass heavy ions (e.g., Ca and Ar). In most components that comprise the RIBF, the control systems (CSs) are integrated by the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). On the other hand, a non-EPICS-based system has hardwired controllers, and it is used in the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as an independent system. In terms of efficient and effective operation, the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as well as the RIBF CS should be renewed using EPICS. Therefore, we constructed an 18 GHz ECRIS CS by using programmable logic controllers with embedded EPICS technology. In the renewed system, an operational log system was developed as a new feature, for supporting of the 18 GHz ECRIS operation.

  13. 110 GHz ECH on DIII-D: System overview and initial operation

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, W.P.; Allen, J.C.; Callis, R.W.; Doane, J.L.; Harris, T.E.; Moeller, C.P.; Nerem, A.; Prater, R.; Remsen, D.

    1991-11-01

    A new high power electron cyclotron heating (ECH) system has been introduced on D3-D. This system is designed to operate at 110 GHz with a total output power of 2 MW. The system consists of four Varian VGT-8011 gyrotrons, (output power of 500 kW), and their associated support equipment. All components have been designed for up to a 10 second pulse duration. The 110 GHz system is intended to further progress in rf current drive experiments on D3-D when used in conjunction with the existing 60 GHz ECH (1.6 MW), and the 30--60 MHz ICH (2 MW) systems. H-mode physics, plasma stabilization experiments and transport studies are also to be conducted at 110 GHz. The present system design philosophy was based on experience gained from the existing 60 GHz ECH system. The consequences of these design decisions will be addressed as will the actual performance of various 110 GHz components.

  14. Oscillations up to 712 GHz in InAs/AlSb resonant-tunneling diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. R.; Parker, C. D.; Mahoney, L. J.; Molvar, K. M.; Soderstrom, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Oscillations have been obtained at frequencies from 100 to 712 GHz in InAs/AlSb double-barrier resonant-tunneling diodes at room temperature. The measured power density at 360 GHz was 90 W/sq cm, which is 50 times that generated by GaAs/AlAs diodes at essentially the same frequency. The oscillation at 712 GHz represents the highest frequency reported to date from a solid-state electronic oscillator at room temperature.

  15. Demonstration of a High Power, Wideband 220 GHz Serpentine Waveguide Amplifier Fabricated by UV-LIGA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Abstract—We present the hot test results of a 220 GHz, serpentine waveguide vacuum electron amplifier showcasing a novel embedded monofilament...band (220 GHz), and 670 GHz to date. II. AMPLIFIER DESIGN The serpentine waveguide (SWG) amplifier is designed to operate from a single, round...circuit. III. CIRCUIT FABRICATION & TESTING To create reliable, high vertical aspect ratio serpentine features as required, a UV-LIGA technique was

  16. Electron-beam buncher to operate over the frequency range 1-4 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, D.A.; Arthur, A.A.; Flood, W.S.; Voelker, F.

    1983-03-01

    We present a description of an electron buncher to be installed in the terminal of a Van de Graaff, which is to produce a modulated beam over the frequency range 1-4 GHz. The modulator geometry has been optimized so that the modulation amplitude should be nearly constant over the frequency ranges 1-2 GHz and 2-4 GHz. Preliminary results indicate the device works as predicted.

  17. Pressure broadening of ClO by N2 and O2 near 204 and 649 GHz and new frequency measurements between 632 and 725 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, J. J.; Cohen, E. A.

    1994-01-01

    The N2 and O2 pressure broadening of the ClO transitions near 204 and 649 GHz have been measured between 200 and 300 K. Oxygen broadening has been measured for the transitions near 278 GHz. The accuracy of the derived air broadening is comparable to that for the air broadening of stable species and is estimated to be within approximately 3% over the entire temperature range. These transitions are currently being used for satellite, balloon, and ground based monitoring of atmospheric ClO, respectively. Some new frequency measurements are reported in the 632 - 725 GHz range. These are in good agreement with previous measurements and predictions.

  18. Compression of 200 GHz DWDM channelized TDM pulsed carrier from optically modelocking WRC-FPLD fiber ring at 10 GHz.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Chan; Peng, Guo-Hsuan; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2009-03-30

    The compression of 200GHz DWDM channelized optically mode-locking WRC-FPLD fiber ring pulse of at 10 GHz is performed for high-capacity TDM application. To prevent temporal and spectral cross-talk, the duty-cycle of the DWDM channelized WRC-FPLD FL pulse needs to be shortened without broadening its linewidth. With dual-cavity configuration induced DWDM channelization, a shortest single-channel WRC-FPLD FL pulsewidth of 19 ps is generated, which can be linearly compensated to 10 ps and fifth-order soliton compressed to 1.4 ps. Under a maximum pulsewidth compression ratio up to 14 and a +/-100 m tolerance on compressing fiber length, the single-channel pulsewidth remains <2 ps (duty-cycle <2%) with spectral linewidth only broadening from 0.29 nm to 0.8 nm. In comparison, a typical SOAFL without intra-cavity TBF in fiber ring broadens its spectral linewidth from 2.4 to 3.8 nm after compressing its mode-locked pulsewidth from 21 to 2.1 ps. The duty-cycle of the DWDM channelized WRC-FPLD FL pulsed carrier is approaching 1% to satisfy at least 256 optical TDM channels.

  19. New detections of 321 GHz water masers toward late-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljeström, Tarja; Winnberg, Anders; Booth, Roy

    The SEST telescope has been used for a submillimeter water maser survey toward late-type stars. Six new 321 GHz water masers were detected. These, as well as the earlier reported sources, VY CMa and o Cet, were also observed in the vibrationally excited water maser line at 96 GHz. However, only VY CMa and o Cet showed the 96 GHz emission. The line velocity of o Cet is blueshifted, suggesting that the hot water vapor at 96 GHz takes part in the pulsation-shock motion of the Mira variable.

  20. 146-GHz millimeter-wave radio-over-fiber photonic wireless transmission system.

    PubMed

    Fice, M J; Rouvalis, E; van Dijk, F; Accard, A; Lelarge, F; Renaud, C C; Carpintero, G; Seeds, A J

    2012-01-16

    We report the experimental implementation of a wireless transmission system with a 146-GHz carrier frequency which is generated by optical heterodyning the two modes from a monolithically integrated quantum dash dual-DFB source. The monolithic structure of the device and the inherent low noise characteristics of quantum dash gain material allow us to demonstrate the transmission of a 1 Gbps ON-OFF keyed data signal with the two wavelengths in a free-running state at 146-GHz carrier wave frequency. The tuning range of the device fully covers the W-band (75 - 110 GHz) and the F-band (90 - 140 GHz).

  1. Hysteresis effects in instantaneous frequency scaling of attenuation on 20 and 30 GHz satellite links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, D. G.; Pratt, T.; Bostian, C. W.

    1992-01-01

    It has been observed with 20/30 GHz satellite beacon measurements that the ratio of 30 GHz to 20 GHz attenuation changes during some fade events. This ratio displays a hysteresis effect. This effect can be explained by a change in the drop size distribution (DSD) during the event. However, it appears only above approximately 6-8 dB of attenuation at 20 GHz. Instantaneous frequency scaling of attenuation is being proposed as part of an algorithm for uplink power control (ULPC) and the dynamic range of such an algorithm must be appropriately limited to avoid the hysteresis.

  2. High Power Operation of a 170 GHz Gyrotron for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreischer, Kenneth E.

    1996-11-01

    Recent experiments at MIT (In collaboration with B.G. Danly, T. Kimura, and R.J. Temkin) on a megawatt gyrotron designed for ITER have achieved record powers at 170.1 GHz. Single mode emission with a peak output power of 1.5 MW and an efficiency of 35% has been measured. The MIT gyrotron operates for 3 μsec pulses at 2 Hz but has been designed to model long pulse or cw operation. The experiment is based on a resonant cylindrical cavity operating in the TE_28,8,1 mode that is situated in the bore of a 6.7 T magnet. It is necessary to operate in a very high order mode in order to reduce cavity ohmic losses to levels that can be adequately cooled (about 1 kW/cm^2). The microwaves are generated in the cavity by an 83 kV annular electron beam produced by a triode-type magnetron injection gun that is capable of currents up to 50 A. Megawatt power levels with efficiencies between 30-35% have been measured over a wide range of operating parameters for the TE_28,8,1 mode. Similar results were also achieved in the neighboring TE_27,8,1 mode at 166.6 GHz, and the TE_29,8,1 mode at 173.5 GHz. These results are in good agreement with nonlinear multimode simulations of the cavity. (S.Y. Cai, T.M. Antonsen, G. Saraph, and B. Levush, Int. J. Electronics, Vol. 72, 759-777 (1992).) The high output power is the result of a carefully designed electron gun that is less sensitive than previous guns to misalignment, and a novel cavity that is less prone to mode competition. The gun was built by C.P.I. (formerly Varian Associates), and has a low perpendicular velocity spread (6-10%). The cavity, which was designed in collaboration with the University of Maryland, uses an output iris to increase the diffraction Q while keeping the interaction length short. Future plans include the installation of an internal mode converter that will transform the TE_28,8,1 mode into a Gaussian beam, and the use of a depressed collector to increase the device efficiency above 50%. The successful

  3. Quasi-Optical 34-GHz Rf Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L

    2007-06-19

    Designs have been carried out on non-high-vacuum, low-power versions of three- and four-mirror quasi-optical passive and active Ka-band pulse compressors, and prototypes built and tested based on these designs. The active element is a quasi-optical grating employing gas discharge tubes in the gratings. Power gains of about 3:1 were observed experimentally for the passive designs, and about 7:1 with the active designs. High-power, high-vacuum versions of the three-and four-mirror quasi-optical pulse compressors were built and tested at low power. These now await installation and testing using multi-MW power from the 34-GHz magnicon.

  4. A 20 GHz, 75 watt helix TWT for space communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heney, J. F.; Tamashiro, R. N.

    A space-qualified, helix-type traveling wave tube is being developed for satellite communication systems in the frequency band of 17.7 to 21.2 GHz. The design approach stresses very high efficiency operation, but with very low distortion. The tube provides multi-mode operation, permitting CW saturated power output levels of 75 watts, 40 watt and 7.5 watts. Operation is also anticipated at 5 dB below these saturation levels to achieve the required low distortion levels. Advanced construction features include a 5 stage depressed collector, a diamond supported helix slow-wave circuit, and a type M dispenser cathode. High reliability and long life (10 years) are objectives of the tube design. The status of the development and recent experimental results are presented.

  5. An 8 GHz digital spectrometer for millimeter-wave astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Roberto G.; Gentaz, Olivier; Baldino, Maryse; Torres, Marc

    2012-09-01

    We have designed and tested a digital spectrometer suitable for analyzing 8 GHz baseband signals. It is based on a 16- Gsps, 5-bit ADC from e2v and a Stratix-IV FPGA employed for later filtering and signal processing. Digitized data is received and synchronized via twenty high-speed 4-Gbps transceivers integrated in the FPGA. A 64-channel polyphase filter bank separates the input signal into 250-MHz sub-bands, allowing subsequent high-resolution analysis. To obtain continuous spectral information over the input bandwidth, we have implemented a 50% overlapping architecture solution. Subsequently these sub-bands are processed using Fast Fourier Transform modules. This system meets present-day demands on high-resolution wideband digital back-ends for millimeter-wave telescopes. This technology will be part of the next generation wideband correlator for the future upgrade of the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer (NOEMA project).

  6. Attenuation of 7 GHz surface acoustic waves on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongyao; Cahill, David G.

    2016-09-01

    We measured the attenuation of GHz frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on the Si (001) surface using an optical pump-probe technique at temperatures between 300 and 600 K. SAWs are generated and detected by a 700 nm Al grating fabricated by nanoimprint lithography. The grating for SAW generation is separated from the grating for SAW detection by ≈150 μ m . The amplitude of SAWs is attenuated by coupling to bulk waves created by the Al grating, diffraction due to the finite size of the source, and the intrinsic relaxational Akhiezer damping of elastic waves in Si. Thermal phonon relaxation time and Grüneisen parameters are fitted using temperature-dependent measurement. The f Q product of a hypothetical micromechanical oscillator limited by Akhiezer damping at this frequency is ˜3 ×1013 Hz.

  7. Atomically referenced 1-GHz optical parametric oscillator frequency comb.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Richard A; Balskus, Karolis; Zhang, Zhaowei; Reid, Derryck T

    2015-06-15

    The visible to mid-infrared coverage of femtosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) frequency combs makes them attractive resources for high-resolution spectroscopy and astrophotonic spectrograph calibration. Such applications require absolute traceability and wide comb-tooth spacing, attributes which until now have remained unavailable from any single OPO frequency comb. Here, we report a 1-GHz Ti:sapphire pumped OPO comb whose repetition and offset frequencies are referenced to Rb-stabilised microwave and laser oscillators respectively. This technique simultaneously achieves fully stabilized combs from both the Ti:sapphire laser and the OPO with sub-MHz comb-tooth linewidths, multi-hour locking stability and without the need for super-continuum generation.

  8. The third MIT-Green Bank 5 GHz survey

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, M.; Heflin, M.; Conner, S.; Lehar, J.; Langston, G. National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA )

    1990-09-01

    The third MIT-Green Bank survey, which covers 1.11 sr in the right ascension range from 16.5 h to 5 h between +17 deg and +39.15 deg declination, is presented. The survey is unique in that a sample was observed twice in a short period of time and the spectral indices between 5 and 1.4 GHz are available for most of the sources brighter than 90 mJy. This survey can be used as the starting point for a search for gravitational lenses. The source list can also be examined for clustering and used to estimate the surface density of sources as a function of limiting flux density. 10 refs.

  9. The second MIT-Green Bank 5 GHz survey

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, G.I.; Heflin, M.B.; Conner, S.R.; Lehar, J.; Carrilli, C.L. E. O. Hulburt Center for Space Research, Washington, DC )

    1990-03-01

    The MHT-Green Bank II (MG II) 5-GHz survey covers 1.51 sr of sky in the right ascension range 4-21 h between +17 and +39.15 deg declination (J2000.0). The final MG II catalog contains 6182 sources detected with a signal-to-noise ratio greater than 5. The MG II flux density limit is 41 mJy. The catalog was produced from two separate north and south surveys with the NRAO 91-m transit telescope. Spectral indices are computed for sources identified in the NRAO 1400-MHz Survey (Condon and Broderick, 1985). A comparison of the spectral-index distributions for sources above and below 10 deg Galactic latitude is presented. 18 refs.

  10. Spacecraft multibeam antenna system for 30/20 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, T. E.; Scott, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    The major technical tasks that led to the definitions of operational and demonstration multiple beam antenna (MBA) flight systems and a proof of concept model (POC) are described. Features of the POC Model and its measured performance are presented in detail. Similar MBA's are proposed for transmitting and receiving with the POC Model representing the 20 GHz transmitting antenna. This POC MBA is a dual shaped-surface reflector system utilizing a movable free array to simulate complete CONUS coverage. The beam forming network utilizes ferrite components for switching from one beam to another. Measured results for components, subsystems and the complete MBA confirm the feasibility of the approach and also show excellent correlation with calculated values.

  11. Annular-beam, 17 GHz free-electron maser experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Earley, L.M.; Carlsten, B.E.; Fazio, M.V.

    1997-06-01

    Experiments have been conducted on a 15-17 GHz free electron maser (FEM) for producing a 500 MW output pulse with a phase stability appropriate for linear collider applications. The electron beam source was a 1 {mu}s, 800 kV, 5 kA, 6-cm-dia annular electron beam machine called BANSHEE. The beam interacted with the TM{sub 02} and TM{sub 03} mode Raman FEM amplifier in a corrugated cylindrical waveguide where the beam runs close to the interaction device walls to reduce the power density in the fields. This greatly reduced the kinetic energy loss caused by the beam potential depression associated with the space charge which was a significant advantage in comparison with conventional solid beam microwave tubes at the same beam current. The experiment was operated in a single shot mode with a large number of diagnostics to measure power, frequency and energy.

  12. NASA seeking high-power 60-GHz IMPATT diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haugland, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of high-power 60 GHz GaAs IMPATT diodes for communication links with high-data-rate satellites is discussed. One of the advantages of GaAs over Si as the material for the diodes are that GaAs is likely to have a higher output and efficiency than Si despite recent advances in Si technology. It is therefore in GaAs technology that research is currently concentrating. Some of the design strategies of the various companies working on the technology are described, including a pill process, MOCVD growth, and the use of diethy zinc as a dopant. Reliability testing of the diodes will be performed by NASA. Some of the alternatives to solid state amplifiers are discussed, including optical and traveling wave tube technology (TWT).

  13. The 90 GHz radiometric imaging. [for terrain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, H. E.; White, J. D.; Wilson, W. J.; Mori, T. T.; Hollinger, J. P.; Troy, B. E.; Kenney, J. E.; Mcgoogan, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    A 90-GHz (3 mm wavelength) radiometer with a noise output fluctuation of 0.22 K (RMS), with a scanning antenna beam mirror, and the data processing system are described. Real-time radiometric imaging of terrain and man-made objects are shown. Flying at an altitude of 1500 ft a radiometer antenna with a 2 degrees halfpower beamwidth can distinguish landforms, waterways, roads, runways, bridges, ships at sea and their wakes, aircraft on runways, and athletic fields. A flight taken at an altitude of 3000 ft with approximately 2000 ft of clouds below the radiometer demonstrates the ability to distinguish bridges, rivers, marshland and other landforms even though the clouds are optically opaque. The radiometric images of a few representative scenes along with photographs of the corresponding scenes are presented to demonstrate the resolution of the imager system.

  14. 92 GHz dual-polarized integrated horn antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali-Ahmad, Walid Y.; Rebeiz, Gabriel M.

    1991-01-01

    A dual-polarized two-dimensional imaging array was designed for millimeter-wave applications. The dual-polarized design consists of two dipoles perpendicular to each other and suspended on the same membrane inside a pyramidal cavity etched in silicon. The dual-polarized antenna is fully monolithic with room available for processing electronics. The IF or video signals are taken out through a novel bias and feeding structure. The measured polarization isolation is better than 20 dB at 92 GHz, and the orthogonal channels show identical far-field patterns. The antenna is well suited for millimeter-wave polarimetric synthetic-aperture radars (SARs) and high-efficiency balanced-mixer receivers.

  15. A 12 GHz solid state power amplifier, phase 1B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestwick, P. R.

    1986-05-01

    Attempts to develop a balanced amplifier developing 4 W power output at 12.6 GHz, with a gain of 3.5 dB are summarized. Calculation of the device large-signal conjugate match points, measurement of the points, design and tuning of single-ended amplifier, modules, and a bias insertion network are described. A Lange coupler and a termination for it are presented. The performance of the balanced amplifier, and that of a competing Fujitsu amplifier, are analyzed. The differences in device structure between the PRCL 4820 device and the Fujitsu device are assessed. The amplifier developed gives (at 1 dB gain compression) a gain of 2.4 dB and a power output of 3.2 dB. Difficulties stem from the use of the double-cell 4820 device, and of the Lange type quadrature couplers.

  16. A 14 GHz DCPSK direct demodulator for satellite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accatino, L.; Angelucci, A.

    1982-10-01

    A direct 14 GHz DCPSK demodulator for regenerative satellites is described. The circuit makes extensive use of microstrip quadrature hybrids implemented as Lange-type couplers. The delay element is composed of three five-pole 0.1 dB ripple Chebishev filters in cascade. The amplitude and group delay response of the delayed path is shown. Phase detectors are designed as singly balanced mixers and employ beam-lead low-barrier Schottky diodes. The circuit allows some degree of experimental adjustment. Output peak and offset voltages are shown for different operating temperatures. Results of BER measurements are exhibited, including DCPSK repeater BER versus C/N ratio for an RF input power level of approximately 6 dBm, and system performance degradation vs the RF input power level for a BER of 0.0001. The use of the low-loss delay element allows a reduction of the minimum input power necessary to achieve a correct demodulation.

  17. Polarimetric monopulse radar scattering measurements of targets at 95 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellman, R. J.; Nemarich, J.; Dropkin, H.; Hutchins, D. R.; Silvious, J. L.; Wikner, D. A.

    1991-09-01

    This paper describes a 95-GHz polarimetric monopulse instrumentation radar and selected scattering measurement results for an armored vehicle. The radar is all-solid-state, coherent, frequency steppable over a 640-MHz bandwidth, and completely polarimetric for linearly or circularly polarized radiation. Details of the methods used to perform the amplitude and phase calibrations and the effectiveness of polarization distortion matrix corrections are included in the paper. Measurements made with the radar of various vehicles on a turntable have allowed quasi-three-dimensional polarimetric ISAR images of the targets to be generated. Sample images for an infantry combat vehicle are presented together with high-resolution range profiles of the target for all monopulse channels.

  18. High Speed sub-GHz Spectrometer for Brillouin Scattering Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berghaus, Kim; Yun, Seok H.; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Brillouin spectroscopy allows non-contact, direct readout of viscoelastic properties of a material and has been a useful tool in material characterization1, structural monitoring2 and environmental sensing3,4. In the past, Brillouin spectroscopy has usually employed scanning Fabry-Perot etalons to perform spectral analysis which require high illumination power and long acquisition times, which prevents using this technique in biomedical applications. Our newly developed spectrometer overcomes this challenge by employing two virtually imaged phased arrays (VIPAs) in a cross-axis configuration, which enables us to do sub-GHz resolution spectral analysis with sub-seconds acquisition time and illumination power within the safety limits of biological tissue application5. This improvement allows for multiple applications of Brillouin spectroscopy, which are now being broadly explored in biological research and clinical application6. PMID:26779654

  19. Wideband fixed-tuned SIS receiver for 200-GHz operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blundell, Raymond; Tong, Cheuk-Yu E.; Papa, D. Cosmo; Leombruno, R. Louie; Zhang, Xiaolei; Paine, Scott; Stern, Jeffrey A.; Leduc, Henry G.; Bumble, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    We report on the design and development of a heterodyne receiver, designed to cover the frequency range 176-256 GHz. This receiver incorporates a niobium superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction mixer, which, chiefly for reasons of reliability and ease of operation, is a fixed-tuned waveguide design. On-chip tuning is provided to resonate out the junction's geometric capacitance and produce a good match to the waveguide circuit. Laboratory measurements on the first test receiver indicate that the required input bandwidth (about 40%) is achieved with an average receiver noise temperature of below 50 K. Mixer conversion gain is observed at some frequencies, and the lowest measured receiver noise is less than 30 K. Furthermore, the SIS mixer used in this receiver is of simple construction, is easy to assemble and is therefore a good candidate for duplication.

  20. A 30 GHz monolithic receive module technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geddes, J.; Sokolov, V.; Bauhahn, P.; Contolatis, T.

    1988-01-01

    This report is a technology assessment relevant to the 30 GHz Monolithic Receive Module development. It is based on results obtained on the present NASA Contract (NAS3-23356) as well as on information gathered from literature and other industry sources. To date the on-going Honeywell program has concentrated on demonstrating the so-called interconnected receive module which consists of four monolithic chips - the low noise front-end amplifier (LNA), the five bit phase shifter (PS), the gain control amplifier (GC), and the RF to IF downconverter (RF/IF). Results on all four individual chips have been obtained and interconnection of the first three functions has been accomplished. Future work on this contract is aimed at a higher level of integration, i.e., integration of the first three functions (LNA + PS + GC) on a single GaAs chip. The report presents the status of this technology and projections of its future directions.

  1. Wideband fixed-tuned SIS receiver for 200-GHz operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blundell, Raymond; Tong, Cheuk-Yu E.; Papa, D. Cosmo; Leombruno, R. Louie; Zhang, Xiaolei; Paine, Scott; Stern, Jeffrey A.; Leduc, Henry G.; Bumble, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    We report on the design and development of a heterodyne receiver, designed to cover the frequency range 176-256 GHz. This receiver incorporates a niobium superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction mixer, which, chiefly for reasons of reliability and ease of operation, is a fixed-tuned waveguide design. On-chip tuning is provided to resonate out the junction's geometric capacitance and produce a good match to the waveguide circuit. Laboratory measurements on the first test receiver indicate that the required input bandwidth (about 40%) is achieved with an average receiver noise temperature of below 50 K. Mixer conversion gain is observed at some frequencies, and the lowest measured receiver noise is less than 30 K. Furthermore, the SIS mixer used in this receiver is of simple construction, is easy to assemble and is therefore a good candidate for duplication.

  2. COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF PREBIOTIC PROPENAL UP TO 660 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, A. M.; Bermúdez, C.; Kolesniková, L.; Alonso, J. L.

    2015-06-22

    Since interstellar detection of propenal is only based on two rotational transitions in the centimeter wave region, its high resolution rotational spectrum has been measured up to 660 GHz and fully characterized by assignment of more than 12,000 transitions to provide direct laboratory data to the astronomical community. Spectral assignments and analysis include transitions from the ground state of the trans and cis isomers, three trans-{sup 13}C isotopologues, and ten excited vibrational states of the trans form. Combining new millimeter and submillimeter data with those from the far-infrared region has yielded the most precise set of spectroscopic constants of trans-propenal obtained to date. Newly determined rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, vibrational energies, and Coriolis and Fermi interaction constants are given with high accuracy and were used to predict transition frequencies and intensities over a wide frequency range. Results of this work should facilitate astronomers further observation of propenal in the interstellar medium.

  3. 5-100GHz free-space microwave characterization setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vasundara V.; Varadan, Vijay K.; Ghodgaonkar, Deepak K.

    1990-10-01

    We have set up a state of the art free space measurement system for characterizing the electromagnetic reflection and transmission properties of planar samples in the 5-100 GHz frequency range for both normal and oblique incidence. The key components of the measurement system consists of two spot-focusing antennas mounted on circular tracks on a horizontal table, mode transitions, coaxial cables and a HP851OB network analyzer. The system is fully automated and has been calibrated to yield reliable and accurate values of free space S-parameters of planar samples. The complex electromagnetic properties (e. g., complex permittivity, complex permeability, etc.) of the sample can be measured as a function of frequency. The experimental results for teflon, a microwave ceramic material and silicon rubber-carbonyl iron composites are presented. Measurements can be done in a non-destructive and non-contact mode, that also permits material characterization under high temperature conditions.

  4. 1.4 GHz continuum sources in the Cancer cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpeter, E. E.; Dickey, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Results of 1.4-GHz continuum observations are presented for 11 VLA fields, using the D-configuration, which contain the A group of the Cnc cluster (CC). Sixteen Zwicky spiral galaxies in the CC were detected, but no ellipticals, confirming the finding that spiral galaxies with close companions tend to have enhanced radio emission. Over 200 continuum sources beyond the CC are tabulated. The spectral index (relative to 610 MHz) is given for many of the sources, including some of the Zwicky galaxies. There is a suggestion for a nonuniform number surface-density distribution of the sources, not correlated with the CC. Possible predictions of such nonuniformities, from assumptions on 'super-superclusters', are discussed.

  5. Plant sensitivity to low intensity 105 GHz electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Tafforeau, Marc; Verdus, Marie-Claire; Norris, Vic; White, Glenn J; Cole, Mike; Demarty, Maurice; Thellier, Michel; Ripoll, Camille

    2004-09-01

    Exposing seedlings of the flax, Linum usitatissimum L., to a variety of weak environmental stresses followed by a 2 day calcium deprivation, triggers the common response of production of epidermal meristems (actively dividing groups of cells) in the hypocotyl, which is the part of the stem between the root and the cotyledons (the pre-existing leaves in the embryo). This production reaches a plateau of 10-20 meristems after a month in the case of mechanical stimulation and cold shock. Recently, we have shown that radiation from a global system for mobile communication (GSM) telephone also triggers production of meristems with a plateau of around six meristems. Here, we show that a single 2 h exposure to radiation emitted at 105 GHz at non-thermal levels by a Gunn oscillator induces meristem production with kinetics similar to that induced by weak environmental stimuli and radiation from GSM telephone.

  6. Atmospheric opacity at 2 - 48 GHz using radiosonde measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehto, H. J.

    Two sets of equations for calculating the atmospheric opacity in the frequency range 2 - 48 GHz are given. The first set of equations is based on ground observations of meteorological parameters and direct measurements of tropospheric conditions obtained from balloon soundings, which are made two to four times a day around the world. The total estimated error of this method is ±10% under good conditions. If strong weather fronts or high mountains occur between the observatory and the sounding station extra caution should be taken. The second, less accurate set of equations is used when no sounding data is available. In this case the atmosphere is assumed to have exponential distributions in pressure, absolute temperature and dew point. The estimated formal error of this method is ±20%. The author also gives instructions to decode the WMO RAOB-RAWIN radiosonde code, so that the opacity may be calculated in real time.

  7. High temperature heat treatment of 3GHz niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Diete, W. ); Rusnak, B.; Bennett, B.L.; Clark, W.L.; Maggs, R.G.; Shapiro, A.H.; Wright, P.V. )

    1992-01-01

    We applied high temperature heat treatment to 3GHz cavities to determine the preparation of niobium cavities using the titanium solid-state gettering process. Some preliminary results showed peak surface electric fields of up to 65MV/m at a Q-factor of 2{times}lO{sup 10}. We evaluated improvement in the purity of the niobium by measuring the residual resistance ratio (RRR) at 10K. The purest niobium we prepared reached a RRR of 670. To study the potential application to large-scale accelerator structures at lower frequencies, we are testing the possibility of heat treating the cavity half-cells before welding them. Therefore, we investigated the influence of electron beam welding on the RRR of high-purity niobium.

  8. A 10-GHz film-thickness-mode cavity optomechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Fong, King Y.; Tang, Hong X.

    2015-04-01

    We report on the advance of chip-scale cavity optomechanical resonators to beyond 10 GHz by exploiting the fundamental acoustic thickness mode of an aluminum nitride micro-disk. By engineering the mechanical anchor to minimize the acoustic loss, a quality factor of 1830 and hence a frequency-quality factor product of 1.9 × 1013 Hz are achieved in ambient air at room temperature. Actuated by strong piezo-electric force, the micro-disk resonator shows an excellent electro-optomechanical transduction efficiency. Our detailed analysis of the electro-optomechanical coupling allows identification and full quantification of various acoustic modes spanning from super-high to X-band microwave frequencies measured in the thin film resonator.

  9. 3 GHz, watt-level femtosecond Raman soliton source.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jinkang; Chen, Hung-Wen; Xu, Shanhui; Yang, Zhongmin; Chang, Guoqing; Kärtner, Franz X

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate a 3 GHz repetition rate, femtosecond Raman soliton source with its wavelength tunable from 1.15 to 1.35 μm. We investigate the dependence of Raman soliton formation on different photonic-crystal fibers (PCFs), input powers, and fiber lengths. To produce a Raman soliton peaking at the same wavelength, shorter PCFs demand higher input average powers and consequently generate stronger Raman soliton pulses. Using 30 cm PCF NL-3.2-945, the resulting Raman soliton pulse at 1.35 μm has 0.9 W average power. The integrated relative intensity noise of the Raman soliton pulse at 1.35 μm generated from the 54-cm PCF NL-3.2-945 is as low as 0.33% from 100 Hz to 10 MHz.

  10. Antennas for 20/30 GHz and beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. Harry; Wong, William C.; Hamada, S. Jim

    1989-01-01

    Antennas of 20/30 GHz and higher frequency, due to the small wavelength, offer capabilities for many space applications. With the government-sponsored space programs (such as ACTS) in recent years, the industry has gone through the learning curve of designing and developing high-performance, multi-function antennas in this frequency range. Design and analysis tools (such as the computer modelling used in feedhorn design and reflector surface and thermal distortion analysis) are available. The components/devices (such as BFN's, weight modules, feedhorns and etc.) are space-qualified. The manufacturing procedures (such as reflector surface control) are refined to meet the stringent tolerance accompanying high frequencies. The integration and testing facilities (such as Near-Field range) also advance to facilitate precision assembling and performance verification. These capabilities, essential to the successful design and development of high-frequency spaceborne antennas, shall find more space applications (such as ESGP) than just communications.

  11. Improved Speed and Functionality of a 580-GHz Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dengler, Robert; Cooper, Ken; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Siegel, Peter; Schlecht, Erich; Mehdi, Imran; Skalare, Anders; Gill, John

    2010-01-01

    With this high-resolution imaging radar system, coherent illumination in the 576-to-589-GHz range and phase-sensitive detection are implemented in an all-solid-state design based on Schottky diode sensors and sources. By employing the frequency-modulated, continuous-wave (FMCW) radar technique, centimeter-scale range resolution has been achieved while using fractional bandwidths of less than 3 percent. The high operating frequencies also permit centimeter-scale cross-range resolution at several-meter standoff distances without large apertures. Scanning of a single-pixel transceiver enables targets to be rapidly mapped in three dimensions, so that the technology can be applied to the detection of concealed objects on persons.

  12. 120-GHz HEMT Oscillator With Surface-Wave-Assisted Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Siegel, Peter; Leong, Kevin; Itoh, Tatsuo; Qian, Yongxi; Radisic, Vesna

    2003-01-01

    Two monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) have been designed and built to function together as a source of electromagnetic radiation at a frequency of 120 GHz. One of the MMICs is an oscillator and is the highest-power 120-GHz oscillator reported thus far in the literature. The other MMIC is an end-fire antenna that radiates the oscillator signal. Although these MMICs were constructed as separate units and electrically connected with wire bonds, future oscillator/ antenna combinations could readily be fabricated as monolithic integrated units. Such units could be used as relatively high-power solid-state microwave sources in diverse applications that include automotive radar, imaging, scientific instrumentation, communications, and radio astronomy. As such, these units would be attractive alternatives to vacuum-tube oscillators, which are still used to obtain acceptably high power in the frequency range of interest. The oscillator (see figure) includes a high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT), with gate-periphery dimensions of 4 by 37 m, in a common-source configuration. The series feedback element of the oscillator is a grounded coplanar waveguide (CPW) at the source. The HEMT is biased for class-A operation (meaning that current is conducted throughout the oscillation cycle) to maximize the output power of the oscillator. Input and output impedance-matching circuit elements are designed to maximize output power and to establish the conditions needed for oscillation. The design of the antenna takes advantage of surface waves, which, heretofore, have been regarded as highly disadvantageous because they can leak power and degrade the performances of antennas that have not been designed to exploit them. Measures taken to suppress surface waves have included complex machining of circuit substrates and addition of separate substrates. These measures are difficult to implement in standard MMIC fabrication processes. In contrast, because the design of the

  13. Component development for ALMA Band 1 (31-45 GHz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henke, Doug; Claude, Stéphane; Jiang, Frank; Dousset, David; Rossi, Fillipo

    2010-07-01

    ALMA Band 1, covering 31-45 GHz, is the lowest signal frequency band of the ALMA telescope and development of the technology to be used for the front-end cartridge is currently in a research phase. We have made progress on various key components designed for use in the ALMA Band 1 cartridge, including the orthomode transducer (OMT), low-noise amplifier (LNA), lens, and down-converting mixer. Since the layout of the ALMA cartridges within the antenna is not optimized for the lowest band, a dielectric lens is required to avoid blocking other bands. Using a lens necessitates careful characterization of the dielectric properties controlling focal length and dielectric loss. It is also important to match the index of refraction of the lens to minimize reflection while still providing equal performance for both linear polarizations and not introducing any cross-polarization effects. Different anti-reflection techniques will be shown; for example, a hole array, as an anti-reflection layer, has been used for a vacuum window and measured results are compared with simulation. A test cryostat has been constructed by adding an extension to a commercial liquid helium cryostat. Initial sensitivity measurements of a simplified prototype receiver will be given, incorporating an HDPE window, commercial conical feedhorn, 3-stage LNA, and warm amplification stage. An overview of the system losses, receiver noise budget, and system alignment tolerances will also be shown. Furthermore, there is interest in either extending or shifting the existing frequency towards 50 GHz, and the impact on each component will be considered.

  14. A 90 GHz Array for the Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicker, S. R.; Devlin, M. J.; Benford, D. J.; Irwin, K. D.; Mason, B. S.; Korngut, P. M.; Tucker, C.

    2005-12-01

    We report on the design and construction of the Penn Array Receiver, a 64 element array which will be a 90 GHz facility instrument for the 100 m Green Bank Telescope. Each array element is a transition edge sensor bolometer. Detector noise will be background limited by the random arrival of photons and in one hour we expect to be able to map a 5 arcminute square of sky to 80 μ Jy at a resolution of 8 arcseconds. No feed horns are used, instead cooled high-density polyethylene lenses and a cold (3 K) Lyot stop control the illumination of the telescope. Capacitive mesh filters act as IR blockers and define a bandpass of 86-94 GHz. The array elements are spaced by 0.5 f λ so that the sky is fully sampled in a single pointing of the GBT. This significantly simplifies the scanning patterns needed for sparser arrays. The detectors are cooled to 0.25 K using a pulse tube cooler and helium sorption refrigerators. The cryogenics along with all the electronics and the computer system have been successfully operated on the GBT. By February, detailed tests on the response of the detectors will allow us to further develop the data processing techniques needed to remove atmospheric noise from the data and beam measurements of the cryostat will confirm that the optical design is correct. We are also developing better control software to automatically bias the SQUID multiplexed readout. This work is funded by grants from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and NASA.

  15. Radio Sources Toward Galaxy Clusters at 30 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coble, K.; Bonamente, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Dawson, K.; Hasler, N.; Holzapfel, W.; Joy, M.; LaRoque, S.; Marrone, D. P.; Reese, E. D.

    2007-01-01

    Extra-galactic radio sources are a significant contaminant in cosmic microwave background and Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect experiments. Deep interferometric observations with the BIMA and OVRO arrays are used to characterize the spatial, spectral, and flux distributions of radio sources toward massive galaxy clusters at 28.5 GHz. We compute counts of mJy source fluxes from 89 fields centered on known massive galaxy clusters and 8 non-cluster fields. We find that source counts in the inner regions of the cluster fields (within 0.5 arcmin of the cluster center) are a factor of 8.9 (+4.2 to -3.8) times higher than counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields (radius greater than 0.5 arcmin). Counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields are in turn a factor of 3.3 (+4.1 -1.8) greater than those in the noncluster fields. Counts in the non-cluster fields are consistent with extrapolations from the results of other surveys. We compute spectral indices of mJy sources in cluster fields between 1.4 and 28.5 GHz and find a mean spectral index of al[ja = 0.66 with an rms dispersion of 0.36, where flux S varies as upsilon(sup -alpha). The distribution is skewed, with a median spectral index of 0.72 and 25th and 75th percentiles of 0.51 and 0.92, respectively. This is steeper than the spectral indices of stronger field sources measured by other surveys.

  16. HEMT Frequency Doubler with Output at 300 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Bruston, Jean

    2005-01-01

    An active frequency doubler in the form of an InP-based monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) containing a high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) has been demonstrated in operation at output frequencies in the vicinity of 300 GHz. This is the highestfrequency HEMT doubler reported to date, the next-highest-frequency active HEMT doubler having been previously reported to operate at 180 GHz. While the output power of this frequency doubler is less than that of a typical Schottky diode, this frequency doubler is considered an intermediate product of a continuing effort to realize the potential of active HEMT frequency doublers to operate with conversion efficiencies greater than those of passive diode frequency doublers. An additional incentive for developing active HEMT frequency doublers lies in the fact that they can be integrated with amplifiers, oscillators, and other circuitry on MMIC chips. The circuitry of the doubler MMIC (see Figure 1) features grounded coplanar waveguides. Air bridges and vias are used to make contact with the ground plane. The HEMT is biased for Class-A operation (in which current is conducted throughout each cycle of oscillation), which would ordinarily be better suited to linear amplification than to frequency doubling. Ordinarily, class-B operation (in which current is conducted during about half of each cycle of oscillation) would be more suitable for frequency doubling because of the essential nonlinearity of partial-cycle conduction. The reason for the unusual choice of class A was that computational simulations had shown that in this case, the efficiency in class B would be less than in class A. The input matching circuit of this doubler includes transmission lines that afford a good impedance match at the fundamental frequency, plus an open stub to prevent leakage of the second harmonic through the input terminals. The output circuit was designed to suppress the fundamental while providing a good match for the second

  17. Radio Sources toward Galaxy Clusters at 30 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coble, K.; Bonamente, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Dawson, K.; Hasler, N.; Holzapfel, W.; Joy, M.; LaRoque, S.; Marrone, D. P.; Reese, E. D.

    2007-01-01

    Extragalactic radio sources are a significant contaminant in cosmic microwave background and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect experiments. Deep interferometric observations with the BIMA and OVRO arrays are used to characterize the spatial, spectral, and flux distributions of radio sources toward massive galaxy clusters at 28.5 GHz. We compute counts of millijansky source fluxes from 89 fields centered on known massive galaxy clusters and 8 noncluster fields. We find that source counts in the inner regions of the cluster fields (within 0.5' of the cluster center) are a factor of 8.9 (sup +4.3)(sub -2.8) times higher than counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields (radius greater than 0.5'). Counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields are, in turn, a factor of 3.3 (sup +4.1) (sub -1.8) greater than those in the noncluster fields. Counts in the noncluster fields are consistent with extrapolations from the results of other surveys. We compute the spectral indices of millijansky sources in the cluster fields between 1.4 and 28.5 GHz and find a mean spectral index of alpha = 0.66 with an rms dispersion of 0.36, where flux S proportional to nu(sup -alpha). The distribution is skewed, with a median spectral index of 0.72 and 25th and 75th percentiles of 0.51 and 0.92, respectively. This is steeper than the spectral indices of stronger field sources measured by other surveys.

  18. A 4 GHz digital receiver using the Uniboard platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comoretto, Giovanni; Russo, Antonietta; Quertier, Benjamin; Cais, Philippe; Camino, Pascal

    2012-09-01

    The Uniboard is a general purpose board, developed as a part of the Radionet FP7 program, that hosts 8 Altera StratixIV FPGAs interconnected by high speed links. It can be used standalone or as a part of a more complex system. The Digital receiver application uses a single Uniboard to implement a flexible packetization of a wideband signal in the frequency domain. It accepts a 4 GHz (8 GS/s) input bandwidth and provides up to 64 output bands. The bandwidth and position of each output band can be independently adjusted. The input signal is first analyzed by a polyphase filterbank, that splits the input band into 32 sub-bands with a bandwidth of 190 MHz and a spacing of 128 MHz. The overlap among adjacent bands allows the positioning of the output bands without dead regions. This filterbank is followed by an array of digitally defined downconverters, each one composed of a mixer/LO and a variable decimation filter. The filter band can be adjusted in binary steps from 1 to 128 MHz. Using tap recirculation, the filter shape remains constant over this whole range, with about 60 dB of stopband rejection and 90% usable passband. The output bands are packetized according to the VDIF VLBI standard, over eight 10G Ethernet links. Further processing can be done either on board, or in a cluster of conventional PCs. In addition, high speed ADC are in-house developed (ASIC 65nm CMOS STmicroelectronics) to feed the Uniboard card with 8GS/s, 4GHz BW, 3bits samples.

  19. Radiometric measurements over bare and vegetated fields at 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequencies. [Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Maryland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Engman, E. T.; Jackson, T. J.; Schmugge, T. J.; Gould, W. I.; Glazar, W. S.; Fuchs, J. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Microwave emission from bare and vegetated fields was measured with dual polarized radiometers at 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequencies. The measured brightness temperatures over bare fields are shown to compare favorably with those calculated from radiative transfer theory with two constant parameters characterizing surface roughness effect. The presence of vegetation cover is found to reduce the sensitivity to soil moisture variation. This sensitivity reduction is generally pronounced the denser, the vegetation cover and the higher the frequency of observation. The effect of vegetation cover is also examined with respect to the measured polarization factor at both frequencies. With the exception of dry corn fields, the measured polarization factor over vegetated fields is found appreciably reduced compared to that over bare fields. A much larger reduction in this factor is found at 5GHz than at 1.4GHz frequency.

  20. 47 CFR 74.32 - Operation in the 17.7-17.8 GHz and 17.8-19.7 GHz bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....8-19.7 GHz bands. (a) To minimize or avoid harmful interference to Federal Government Satellite... location of such a station, must be coordinated with the Federal Government by the Commission before an...

  1. 47 CFR 25.143 - Licensing provisions for the 1.6/2.4 GHz Mobile-Satellite Service and 2 GHz Mobile-Satellite...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... a proposed system in the 1.6/2.4 GHz MSS frequency bands employs a non-geostationary constellation or constellations of satellites; (ii) That a system proposed to operate using non-geostationary...

  2. Microwave ablation at 10.0 GHz achieves comparable ablation zones to 1.9 GHz in ex vivo bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Luyen, Hung; Gao, Fuqiang; Hagness, Susan C; Behdad, Nader

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of using high-frequency microwaves for tissue ablation by comparing the performance of a 10 GHz microwave ablation system with that of a 1.9 GHz system. Two sets of floating sleeve dipole antennas operating at these frequencies were designed and fabricated for use in ex vivo experiments with bovine livers. Combined electromagnetic and transient thermal simulations were conducted to analyze the performance of these antennas. Subsequently, a total of 16 ablation experiments (eight at 1.9 GHz and eight at 10.0 GHz) were conducted at a power level of 42 W for either 5 or 10 min. In all cases, the 1.9 and 10 GHz experiments resulted in comparable ablation zone dimensions. Temperature monitoring probes revealed faster heating rates in the immediate vicinity of the 10.0 GHz antenna compared to the 1.9 GHz antenna, along with a slightly delayed onset of heating farther from the 10 GHz antenna, suggesting that heat conduction plays a greater role at higher microwave frequencies in achieving a comparably sized ablation zone. The results obtained from these experiments agree very well with the combined electromagnetic/thermal simulation results. These simulations and experiments show that using lower frequency microwaves does not offer any significant advantages, in terms of the achievable ablation zones, over using higher frequency microwaves. Indeed, it is demonstrated that high-frequency microwave antennas may be used to create reasonably large ablation zones. Higher frequencies offer the advantage of smaller antenna size, which is expected to lead to less invasive interstitial devices and may possibly lead to the development of more compact multielement arrays with heating properties not available from single-element antennas.

  3. Controlled Teleportation of a Qudit State by Partially Entangled GHZ States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin-wei; Shu, Lan; Mo, Zhi-wen; Zhang, Zhi-hua

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a controlled teleportation scheme which communicates an arbitrary ququart state via two sets of partially entangled GHZ state. The necessary measurements and operations are given detailedly. Furthmore the scheme is generalized to teleport a qudit state via s sets of partially entangled GHZ state.

  4. 78 FR 21320 - Unlicensed National Information Infrastructure (U-NII) Devices in the 5 GHz Band

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... it first made spectrum available in the 5 GHz band for U-NII in 1997. The Commission believes that... spectrum, combined with the ease of deployment and operational flexibility provided by its U-NII rules... made available spectrum in the 5 GHz band for U-NII in 1997, it has gained much experience with...

  5. 47 CFR 15.255 - Operation within the band 57-64 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation within the band 57-64 GHz. 15.255... Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.255 Operation within the band 57-64..., even if the sensor itself moves within the equipment. (b) Within the 57-64 GHz band, emission levels...

  6. 47 CFR 15.255 - Operation within the band 57-64 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation within the band 57-64 GHz. 15.255... Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.255 Operation within the band 57-64..., even if the sensor itself moves within the equipment. (b) Within the 57-64 GHz band, emission levels...

  7. The 60 GHz antenna system analyses for intersatellite links, phase B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study is first to investigate, classify, and compare applicable antenna systems capable of establishing and maintaining intersatellite links at 60 GHz and secondly to select the most applicable system for a detailed conceptual design. The results are to be applicable to the development of intersatellite links at 60 GHz for future programs. Design goals are listed.

  8. 47 CFR 101.537 - 24 GHz band subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 24 GHz band subject to competitive bidding. 101.537 Section 101.537 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service §...

  9. 76 FR 35176 - Operation of Radar Systems in the 76-77 GHz Band

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... enhanced vehicular radar technologies in the 76-77 GHz band to improve collision avoidance and driver... August 1, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Aamer Zain, Office of Engineering and Technology, (202... vehicular radar technologies in the 76-77 GHz band to improve collision avoidance and driver...

  10. Production of extremely high-lying states by 80-GHz microwave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakelyan, Alexandr; Gallagher, Thomas F.

    2015-05-01

    It was previously reported that ionization of Rydberg atoms of Na and Li by strong microwave (MW) fields of 17 and 38 GHz yields a substantial fraction of population left in the high-lying states with n > 250. This phenomenon was observed for any initial state at least fractionally ionized and was reported as a consequence of MW ionization of atoms. We present results of a similar experiment conducted with an 80-GHz MW field. The production of the high-lying states after the strong 80-GHz pulse is observed, but, in contrast to previous studies, not for any initial state. The high-lying states are only observed if atoms are excited to a zero-field state that is in a multiphoton resonance with the ionization limit (IL). We attribute the difference in the results of 80 and 17-GHz experiments to the fact that the ponderomotive shift is 4 and 90 GHz, respectively, at 100-V/cm. Consequently, we show that the high-lying states are produced if an initial state can be shifted in resonance with the IL. We also report MW ionization thresholds observed at 80 GHz to be much higher than those measured at 15 GHz: a transition to n + 1 state occurs only when big static field is present. Moreover, unlike results of 15-GHz experiment, ionization thresholds depend strongly on the width of the MW pulse. This work has been supported by the National Science Foundation.

  11. 47 CFR 25.225 - Geographic Service Requirements for 17/24 GHz Broadcasting Satellite Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Broadcasting Satellite Service. 25.225 Section 25.225 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.225 Geographic Service Requirements for 17/24 GHz Broadcasting Satellite Service. (a) Each operator of a 17/24 GHz BSS space...

  12. Investigations Into Accumulator 4-8 GHz Pickup Loop / Combiner Board Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Meuler, D.; /Fermilab

    2000-04-17

    A set of pickup measurements performed in August of 1999 (see Pbar note 618) indicated problems with the pickup sensitivity for frequencies above {approx}4.8 GHz. This note describes the effort made to determine if the problems with system performance were due to the design of the 4-8 GHz circuit board.

  13. Market capture by 30/20 GHz satellite systems. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, R. B.; Saporta, L.

    1981-01-01

    Demand for 30/20 GHz satellite systems over the next two decades is projected. Topics include a profile of the communications market, switched, dedicated, and packet transmission modes, deferred and real-time traffic, quality and reliability considerations, the capacity of competing transmission media, and scenarios for the growth and development of 30/20 GHz satellite communications.

  14. 37 GHz METHANOL MASERS : HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE FOR THE CLASS II METHANOL MASER PHASE?

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Sobolev, A. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Lo, N.

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  15. High sensitivity broadband 360GHz passive receiver for TeraSCREEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Oldfield, Matthew; Maestrojuán, Itziar; Platt, Duncan; Brewster, Nick; Viegas, Colin; Alderman, Byron; Ellison, Brian N.

    2016-05-01

    TeraSCREEN is an EU FP7 Security project aimed at developing a combined active, with frequency channel centered at 360 GHz, and passive, with frequency channels centered at 94, 220 and 360 GHz, imaging system for border controls in airport and commercial ferry ports. The system will include automatic threat detection and classification and has been designed with a strong focus on the ethical, legal and practical aspects of operating in these environments and with the potential threats in mind. Furthermore, both the passive and active systems are based on array receivers with the active system consisting of a 16 element MIMO FMCW radar centered at 360 GHz with a bandwidth of 30 GHz utilizing a custom made direct digital synthesizer. The 16 element passive receiver system at 360 GHz uses commercial Gunn diode oscillators at 90 GHz followed by custom made 90 to 180 GHz frequency doublers supplying the local oscillator for 360 GHz sub-harmonic mixers. This paper describes the development of the passive antenna module, local oscillator chain, frequency mixers and detectors used in the passive receiver array of this system. The complete passive receiver chain is characterized in this paper.

  16. New space research frequency band proposals in the 20- to 40.5-GHz range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, D. F.

    1991-01-01

    Future space research communications systems may require spectra above 20 GHz. Frequency bands above 20 GHz are identified that are suitable for space research. The selection of the proper bands depends on consideration of interference with other radio services, adequate bandwidths, link performance, and technical requirements for practical implementation.

  17. Quantum teleportation through noisy channels with multi-qubit GHZ states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espoukeh, Pakhshan; Pedram, Pouria

    2014-08-01

    We investigate two-party quantum teleportation through noisy channels for multi-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states and find which state loses less quantum information in the process. The dynamics of states is described by the master equation with the noisy channels that lead to the quantum channels to be mixed states. We analytically solve the Lindblad equation for -qubit GHZ states where Lindblad operators correspond to the Pauli matrices and describe the decoherence of states. Using the average fidelity, we show that 3GHZ state is more robust than GHZ state under most noisy channels. However, GHZ state preserves same quantum information with respect to Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen and 3GHZ states where the noise is in direction in which the fidelity remains unchanged. We explicitly show that Jung et al.'s conjecture (Phys Rev A 78:012312, 2008), namely "average fidelity with same-axis noisy channels is in general larger than average fidelity with different-axes noisy channels," is not valid for 3GHZ and 4GHZ states.

  18. No Radio Flaring Detected from Cygnus X-3 at 3 GHz by Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. K. G.; Bower, G. C.; Tomsick, J. A.; Bodaghee, A.; Corbet, R. H. D.

    2011-01-01

    Following the announcement of a 98 GHz flare from the microquasar Cygnus X-3 (ATel #3130), we observed it with the Allen Telescope Array (Welch et al., 2009 Proc. IEEE 97 1438 for 2.5 hours beginning at 2011 January 28.848 UT (MJD 55589.848), about 4.0 hours after the 98 GHz observations concluded.

  19. 47 CFR 101.527 - Construction requirements for 24 GHz operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Construction requirements for 24 GHz operations. 101.527 Section 101.527 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message...

  20. 47 CFR 101.537 - 24 GHz band subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 24 GHz band subject to competitive bidding. 101.537 Section 101.537 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service §...

  1. 47 CFR 101.527 - Construction requirements for 24 GHz operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Construction requirements for 24 GHz operations. 101.527 Section 101.527 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message...

  2. 47 CFR 101.529 - Renewal expectancy criteria for 24 GHz licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Renewal expectancy criteria for 24 GHz licenses. 101.529 Section 101.529 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message...

  3. 47 CFR 101.537 - 24 GHz band subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false 24 GHz band subject to competitive bidding. 101.537 Section 101.537 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service §...

  4. 47 CFR 101.537 - 24 GHz band subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false 24 GHz band subject to competitive bidding. 101.537 Section 101.537 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service §...

  5. 47 CFR 101.527 - Construction requirements for 24 GHz operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Construction requirements for 24 GHz operations. 101.527 Section 101.527 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message...

  6. 47 CFR 101.529 - Renewal expectancy criteria for 24 GHz licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Renewal expectancy criteria for 24 GHz licenses. 101.529 Section 101.529 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message...

  7. 47 CFR 101.529 - Renewal expectancy criteria for 24 GHz licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Renewal expectancy criteria for 24 GHz licenses. 101.529 Section 101.529 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message...

  8. 47 CFR 101.537 - 24 GHz band subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 24 GHz band subject to competitive bidding. 101.537 Section 101.537 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service §...

  9. 47 CFR 101.529 - Renewal expectancy criteria for 24 GHz licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Renewal expectancy criteria for 24 GHz licenses. 101.529 Section 101.529 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message...

  10. 47 CFR 101.527 - Construction requirements for 24 GHz operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Construction requirements for 24 GHz operations. 101.527 Section 101.527 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message...

  11. Sub-femtosecond absolute timing jitter with a 10 GHz hybrid photonic-microwave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortier, T. M.; Nelson, C. W.; Hati, A.; Quinlan, F.; Taylor, J.; Jiang, H.; Chou, C. W.; Rosenband, T.; Lemke, N.; Ludlow, A.; Howe, D.; Oates, C. W.; Diddams, S. A.

    2012-06-01

    We present an optical-electronic approach to generating microwave signals with high spectral purity. By circumventing shot noise and operating near fundamental thermal limits, we demonstrate 10 GHz signals with an absolute timing jitter for a single hybrid oscillator of 420 attoseconds (1 Hz-5 GHz).

  12. HIGH RESOLUTION 36 GHz IMAGING OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT OF SN 1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, T. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Zanardo, G.; Ng, C.-Y.; Gaensler, B. M.; Ball, Lewis; Kesteven, M. J.; Manchester, R. N.; Tzioumis, A. K.

    2009-11-01

    The aftermath of supernova (SN) 1987A continues to provide spectacular insights into the interaction between an SN blastwave and its circumstellar environment. We here present 36 GHz observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the radio remnant of SN 1987A. These new images, taken in 2008 April and 2008 October, substantially extend the frequency range of an ongoing monitoring and imaging program conducted between 1.4 and 20 GHz. Our 36.2 GHz images have a diffraction-limited angular resolution of 0.''3-0.''4, which covers the gap between high resolution, low dynamic range VLBI images of the remnant and low resolution, high dynamic range images at frequencies between 1 and 20 GHz. The radio morphology of the remnant at 36 GHz is an elliptical ring with enhanced emission on the eastern and western sides, similar to that seen previously at lower frequencies. Model fits to the data in the Fourier domain show that the emitting region is consistent with a thick inclined torus of mean radius 0.''85, and a 2008 October flux density of 27 +- 6 mJy at 36.2 GHz. The spectral index for the remnant at this epoch, determined between 1.4 GHz and 36.2 GHz, is alpha = -0.83. There is tentative evidence for an unresolved central source with flatter spectral index.

  13. THE CELESTIAL REFERENCE FRAME AT 24 AND 43 GHz. I. ASTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Lanyi, G. E.; Jacobs, C. S.; Naudet, C. J.; Sovers, O. J.; Zhang, L. D.; Boboltz, D. A.; Fey, A. L.; Charlot, P.; Fomalont, E. B.; Geldzahler, B. J.; Gordon, D.; Romney, J. D.

    2010-05-15

    We present astrometric results for compact extragalactic objects observed with the Very Long Baseline Array at radio frequencies of 24 and 43 GHz. Data were obtained from ten 24 hr observing sessions made over a five-year period. These observations were motivated by the need to extend the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to higher radio frequencies to enable improved deep space navigation after 2016 and to improve state-of-the-art astrometry. Source coordinates for 268 sources were estimated at 24 GHz and for 131 sources at 43 GHz. The median formal uncertainties of right ascension and declination at 24 GHz are 0.08 and 0.15 mas, respectively. Median formal uncertainties at 43 GHz are 0.20 and 0.35 mas, respectively. Weighted root-mean-square differences between the 24 and 43 GHz positions and astrometric positions based on simultaneous 2.3 and 8.4 GHz Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations, such as the ICRF, are less than about 0.3 mas in both coordinates. With observations over five years we have achieved a precision at 24 GHz approaching that of the ICRF but unaccounted systematic errors limit the overall accuracy of the catalogs.

  14. Characteristics of ocular temperature elevations after exposure to quasi- and millimeter waves (18-40 GHz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Masami; Suzuki, Yukihisa; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Sasaki, Kensuke; Wake, Kanako; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Kamimura, Yoshitsugu; Hirata, Akimasa; Sasaki, Kazuyuki; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate changes in ocular temperature in rabbit eyes exposed to different frequencies (18 to 40 GHz) of quasi-millimeter waves, and millimeter waves (MMW). Pigmented rabbits were anesthetized with both general and topical anesthesia, and thermometer probes (0.5 mm in diameter) were inserted into their cornea (stroma), lens (nucleus) and vitreous (center of vitreous). The eyes were exposed unilaterally to 200 mW/cm2 by horn antenna for 3 min at 18, 22 and 26.5 GHz using a K band exposure system or 26.5, 35 and 40 GHz using a Ka band exposure system. Changes in temperature of the cornea, lens and vitreous were measured with a fluoroptic thermometer. Since the ocular temperatures after exposure to 26.5 GHz generated by the K band and Ka band systems were similar, we assumed that experimental data from these 2 exposure systems were comparable. The highest ocular temperature was induced by 40 GHz MMW, followed by 35 GHz. The 26.5 and 22 GHz corneal temperatures were almost the same. The lowest temperature was recorded at 18 GHz. The elevation in ocular temperature in response to exposure to 200 mW/cm2 MMW is dependent on MMW frequency. MMW exposure induced heat is conveyed not only to the cornea but also the crystalline lens.

  15. Flare SOL2012-07-06: On the Origin of the Circular Polarization Reversal Between 17 GHz and 34 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altyntsev, A.; Meshalkina, N.; Myshyakov, I.; Pal`shin, V.; Fleishman, G.

    2017-09-01

    The new generation of multiwavelength radioheliographs with high spatial resolution will employ microwave imaging spectropolarimetry to recover flare topology and plasma parameters in the flare sources and along the wave propagation paths. The recorded polarization depends on the emission mechanism and emission regime (optically thick or thin), the emitting particle properties, and propagation effects. Here, we report an unusual flare, SOL2012-07-06T01:37, whose optically thin gyrosynchrotron emission of the main source displays an apparently ordinary mode sense of polarization in contrast to the classical theory that favors the extraordinary mode. This flare produced copious nonthermal emission in hard X-rays and in high-frequency microwaves up to 80 GHz. It is found that the main flare source corresponds to an interaction site of two loops with greatly different sizes. The flare occurred in the central part of the solar disk, which allows reconstructing the magnetic field in the flare region using vector magnetogram data. We have investigated the three possible known reasons of the circular polarization sense reversal - mode coupling, positron contribution, and the effect of beamed angular distribution. We excluded polarization reversal due to contribution of positrons because there was no relevant response in the X-ray emission. We find that a beam-like electron distribution can produce the observed polarization behavior, but the source thermal density must be much higher than the estimate from to the X-ray data. We conclude that the apparent ordinary wave emission in the optically thin mode is due to radio wave propagation across the quasi-transverse (QT) layer. The abnormally high transition frequency (above 35 GHz) can be achieved reasonably low in the corona where the magnetic field value is high and transverse to the line of sight. This places the microwave source below this QT layer, i.e. very low in the corona.

  16. A 20 GHz bright sample for δ > 72° - II. Multifrequency follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, R.; Righini, S.; Verma, R.; Prandoni, I.; Carretti, E.; Mack, K.-H.; Massardi, M.; Procopio, P.; Zanichelli, A.; Gregorini, L.; Mantovani, F.; Gawroński, M. P.; Peel, M. W.

    2013-11-01

    We present follow-up observations at 5, 8 and 30 GHz of the K-band Northern Wide Survey (KNoWS) 20 GHz Bright Sample, performed with the 32-m Medicina radio telescope and the 32-m Toruń radio telescope. The KNoWS sources were selected in the Northern Polar Cap (δ > 72°) and have a flux density limit S20 GHz = 115 mJy. We include NRAO-VLA Sky Survey 1.4 GHz measurements to derive the source radio spectra between 1.4 and 30 GHz. Based on optical identifications, 68 per cent of the sources are quasars and 27 per cent are radio galaxies. A redshift measurement is available for 58 per cent of the sources. The radio spectral properties of the different source populations are found to be in agreement with those of other high-frequency-selected samples.

  17. Cross-impact study of foreign satellite communications on NASA's 30/20 GHz program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive traffic demand forecast and a scenario for the transition process from current satellite systems to more advanced systems of the 1990's are presented. Systems configurations with and without the use of 30/20 GHz are described and these two alternatives are compared. It is concluded that: (1) the use of 30/20 GHz will result in increased satellite capacity, which will be needed to satisfy demand; (2) the use of 30/20 GHz will decrease the transmission cost, especially for broadband communications; (3) in some areas, particularly Europe and Japan but also the U.S., 30/20 GHz is the only available frequency band for customer premise Earth stations because of the dense terrestrial microwave networks; and (4) the development of 30/20 GHz technology will improve U.S. markets for equipment and satellites in many world regions.

  18. Cross-impact study of foreign satellite communications on NASA's 30/20 GHz program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-08-01

    A comprehensive traffic demand forecast and a scenario for the transition process from current satellite systems to more advanced systems of the 1990's are presented. Systems configurations with and without the use of 30/20 GHz are described and these two alternatives are compared. It is concluded that: (1) the use of 30/20 GHz will result in increased satellite capacity, which will be needed to satisfy demand; (2) the use of 30/20 GHz will decrease the transmission cost, especially for broadband communications; (3) in some areas, particularly Europe and Japan but also the U.S., 30/20 GHz is the only available frequency band for customer premise Earth stations because of the dense terrestrial microwave networks; and (4) the development of 30/20 GHz technology will improve U.S. markets for equipment and satellites in many world regions.

  19. 0.6 GHz mapping of extended radio galaxies. I - Edge-brightened double sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaegers, W. J.

    1987-02-01

    Radio observations made with the Westerbork telescope at 0.6 GHz are presented for 9 edge-brightened double sources: 3C 33.1, 3C 35, 3C 111, B 0844+316, 3C 223, 4C 26.35A, 4C 74.17.1, 3C 390.3 and 3C 452. Previously observed Westerbork data at 1.4 GHz are convolved for comparison with the 0.6 GHz observational data. Beside maps of the total intensity and linear polarization structure, the distributions of the spectral index, the depolarization and the rotation of the polarization position angle between 0.6 GHz and 1.4 GHz have been derived. Integrated values for the total intensity and the polarization are also given.

  20. A Compact 600 GHz Electronically Tunable Vector Measurement System for Submillimeter Wave Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dengler, Robert; Maiwald, Frank; Siegel, Peter H.

    2006-01-01

    The design of a complete vector measurement system being tested over 560-635 GHz is presented. The topics include: 1) Current State-of-the-Art in Vector Measurements; 2) Submillimeter Active Imaging Requirements; 3) 600 GHz Vector Measurement System; 4) 450 MHz IF Signal; 5) 450 MHz IF signal @ 1 kHz Res. BW; 6) 450 MHz IF Signal Mixed with Shifted 450 MHz Reference Signal; 7) Reference Signal Offset Generator; 8) Cavity Bandpass Filter; 9) Miniature Multistage Helical Filter; 10) X36 450 MHz Multiplier; 11) 600 GHz Test Setup; 12) 600 GHz Transmit Module; 13) 600 GHz Receive Module; 14) Performance Tests: Amplitude Stability & Dynamic Range; 15) Performance Tests: Phase Stability; 16) Stability at Imaging Bandwidths; 17) Phase Measurement Verification; and 18) The Next Step: Imaging.

  1. InP MMIC Chip Set for Power Sources Covering 80-170 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Catherine

    2001-01-01

    We will present a Monolithic Millimeter-wave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) chip set which provides high output-power sources for driving diode frequency multipliers into the terahertz range. The chip set was fabricated at HRL Laboratories using a 0.1-micrometer gate-length InAlAs/InGaAs/InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) process, and features transistors with an f(sub max) above 600 GHz. The HRL InP HEMT process has already demonstrated amplifiers in the 60-200 GHz range. In this paper, these high frequency HEMTs form the basis for power sources up to 170 GHz. A number of state-of-the-art InP HEMT MMICs will be presented. These include voltage-controlled and fixed-tuned oscillators, power amplifiers, and an active doubler. We will first discuss an 80 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator with 5 GHz of tunability and at least 17 mW of output power, as well as a 120 GHz oscillator providing 7 mW of output power. In addition, we will present results of a power amplifier which covers the full WRIO waveguide band (75-110 GHz), and provides 40-50 mW of output power. Furthermore, we will present an active doubler at 164 GHz providing 8% bandwidth, 3 mW of output power, and an unprecedented 2 dB of conversion loss for an InP HEMT MMIC at this frequency. Finally, we will demonstrate a power amplifier to cover 140-170 GHz with 15-25 mW of output power and 8 dB gain. These components can form a power source in the 155-165 GHz range by cascading the 80 GHz oscillator, W-band power amplifier, 164 GHz active doubler and final 140-170 GHz power amplifier for a stable, compact local oscillator subsystem, which could be used for atmospheric science or astrophysics radiometers.

  2. Dual frequency 230/690 GHz interferometry and phase transfer at the Submillimeter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, T. R.; Zhao, J. H.; Liu, S.-Y.; Su, Y.-N.

    2006-01-01

    The Submillimeter Array (SMA) is an eight-element radio interferometer located on Mauna Kea and designed to operate in the major atmospheric windows from 180 to 900 GHz with 2 GHz IF bandwidth in each sideband. With baseline lengths up to 500m, atmospheric instabilities can limit the phase coherence of the array, especially in the higher frequency bands. For this reason, the array was designed to support simultaneous operation of a low frequency receiver (< 350 GHz) with a high frequency receiver (> 330 GHz). The overlap region of 330-350 GHz was chosen to facilitate dual polarization measurements in the frequency range most likely to offer the highest sensitivity to dust continuum emission. At present, the array is equipped with SIS receivers covering the frequency ranges 176-250 GHz, 260-350 GHz, and 600-700 GHz. Single frequency operation has been routine in the lower two frequency bands for the past two years. In February 2005, with the completion of the IF hardware, dual receiver operation became possible. Since then we have made a number of Galactic and extragalactic astronomical observations in dual-band mode. Facing a severe lack of gain calibrators at high frequency, we have primarily used minor planets (Ceres, Io, Callisto) or 658 GHz water masers. However, the minor planets are resolved in our extended configurations, and new calibration techniques are needed. We have begun to explore the option of using the 230 GHz receiver as a phase reference to enable improved interferometry in the 650 GHz band. We will present the current antenna and receiver performance, and our initial attempts at phase transfer. New functions have been added to the Miriad and MIR/IDL data analysis software packages for fitting and applying antenna-based phase transfer coefficients. During some of the observing sessions, good phase correlations are seen, and the phase transfer method has been demonstrated to recover images of a point source, albeit at a somewhat reduced signal

  3. 47 CFR 25.250 - Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Earth Stations in the 19.3-19.7 GHz and 29.1-29.5 GHz Bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Earth....250 Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Earth Stations in the 19.3-19.7 GHz and 29.1-29.5 GHz Bands. (a) NGSO MSS applicants shall be licensed to operate in the 29.1-29.5 GHz band for...

  4. 47 CFR 25.250 - Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Earth Stations in the 19.3-19.7 GHz and 29.1-29.5 GHz Bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Earth....250 Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Earth Stations in the 19.3-19.7 GHz and 29.1-29.5 GHz Bands. (a) NGSO MSS applicants shall be licensed to operate in the 29.1-29.5 GHz band for...

  5. 47 CFR 25.250 - Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Earth Stations in the 19.3-19.7 GHz and 29.1-29.5 GHz Bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Earth....250 Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Earth Stations in the 19.3-19.7 GHz and 29.1-29.5 GHz Bands. (a) NGSO MSS applicants shall be licensed to operate in the 29.1-29.5 GHz band for...

  6. 47 CFR 25.250 - Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Earth Stations in the 19.3-19.7 GHz and 29.1-29.5 GHz Bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Earth....250 Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Earth Stations in the 19.3-19.7 GHz and 29.1-29.5 GHz Bands. (a) NGSO MSS applicants shall be licensed to operate in the 29.1-29.5 GHz band for...

  7. 47 CFR 25.250 - Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Earth Stations in the 19.3-19.7 GHz and 29.1-29.5 GHz Bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Earth....250 Sharing between NGSO MSS Feeder links Earth Stations in the 19.3-19.7 GHz and 29.1-29.5 GHz Bands. (a) NGSO MSS applicants shall be licensed to operate in the 29.1-29.5 GHz band for...

  8. Development of a 50 MW 30 GHz Gyroklystron Amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Read; Wesely Lawson, Lawrence Ives, Jeff Neilson

    2009-05-20

    DOE requires sources for testing of high gradient accelerator structures. A power of 50 MW is required at K and Ka band. The pulse length must be ~ 1 microsecond and the pulse repetition frequency at least 100 Hz. At least some applications may require phase stability not offered by a free running oscillator. CCR proposed to build a 50 MW 30 GHz gyrklystron amplifier. This approach would give the required phase stability. The frequency was at the second harmonic of the cycltron frequency and used the TE02 mode. This makes it possible to design a device without an inner conductor, and with a conventional (non-inverted) MIG. This minimizes cost and the risk due to mechanical alignment issues. A detailed design of the gyroklystron was produced. The design was based on simulations of the cavity(ies), electron gun, output coupler and output window. Two designs were produced. One was at the fundamental of the cyclotron frequency. Simulations predicted an output power of 72 MW with an efficiency of 48%. The other was at the second harmonic, producing 37 MW with an efficiency of 37%.

  9. Testing of a 3 MW, 140 GHz coaxial cavity gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Hogge, J.P.; Kreischer, K.; Read, M.E.; Nusinovich, G.; Dumbrajs, O.

    1995-12-31

    A gyrotron designed to produce 3 MW at 140 GHz has been realized and tested The cavity is coaxial, with a desired operating mode of TE{sub 21,13}. The coaxial cavity was designed to have peak ohmic heating of 2.9 kW/cm{sup 2} with less mode competition, and thus a higher electronic efficiency (45%) than the 37% predicted for a hollow cavity with the same mode number. The efficiency calculations were done by a time dependent, multimode simulation. The results of the code are shown. The electron gun is an inverted MIG, with the ``intermediate`` anode at ground potential. The beam voltage and current are 95 kV and 84 A, and the cathode and beam radii, 4.7 cm and 0.815 cm, respectively. The beam velocity ratio, {alpha}, and perpendicular velocity spread, as predicted by EGUN, are 1.44 and 3.7%, respectively. Measurements of the power and frequency spectrum will be presented.

  10. All-printed diode operating at 1.6 GHz

    PubMed Central

    Sani, Negar; Robertsson, Mats; Cooper, Philip; Wang, Xin; Svensson, Magnus; Andersson Ersman, Peter; Norberg, Petronella; Nilsson, Marie; Nilsson, David; Liu, Xianjie; Hesselbom, Hjalmar; Akesso, Laurent; Fahlman, Mats; Crispin, Xavier; Engquist, Isak; Berggren, Magnus; Gustafsson, Göran

    2014-01-01

    Printed electronics are considered for wireless electronic tags and sensors within the future Internet-of-things (IoT) concept. As a consequence of the low charge carrier mobility of present printable organic and inorganic semiconductors, the operational frequency of printed rectifiers is not high enough to enable direct communication and powering between mobile phones and printed e-tags. Here, we report an all-printed diode operating up to 1.6 GHz. The device, based on two stacked layers of Si and NbSi2 particles, is manufactured on a flexible substrate at low temperature and in ambient atmosphere. The high charge carrier mobility of the Si microparticles allows device operation to occur in the charge injection-limited regime. The asymmetry of the oxide layers in the resulting device stack leads to rectification of tunneling current. Printed diodes were combined with antennas and electrochromic displays to form an all-printed e-tag. The harvested signal from a Global System for Mobile Communications mobile phone was used to update the display. Our findings demonstrate a new communication pathway for printed electronics within IoT applications. PMID:25002504

  11. 6.7 GHz methanol maser variability in Cepheus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, M.; Wolak, P.; Bartkiewicz, A.

    2014-03-01

    6.7 GHz methanol maser emission from the well-studied star-forming region Cepheus A was monitored with the Torun 32 m radio telescope. We found synchronized and anticorrelated changes of the flux density of the two blueshifted and one redshifted maser features for ˜30 per cent of 1340 d of our observations. Two of those features exhibited high-amplitude flux density variations with periods of 84-87 d over the last 290 d interval of the monitoring. We also report on two flares of emission at two different redshifted velocities completely covered during the whole outburst. These flare events lasted 510-670 d and showed a very rapid linear rise and slow exponential decline, which may be caused by variability of the seed flux density. The flux density of the two strongest features dropped by a factor of 2-5 on a time-scale ˜22 yr, while other features have not changed significantly during this period, but showed strong variability on time-scales ≲ 5 yr.

  12. Molecular bremsstrahlung radiation at GHz frequencies in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Samarai, Imen; Bérat, Corinne; Deligny, Olivier; Letessier-Selvon, Antoine; Montanet, François; Settimo, Mariangela; Stassi, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    A detection technique for ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, complementary to the fluorescence technique, would be the use of the molecular bremsstrahlung radiation emitted by low-energy ionization electrons left after the passage of the showers in the atmosphere. In this article, a detailed estimate of the spectral intensity of photons at ground level originating from this radiation is presented. The spectral intensity expected from the passage of the high-energy electrons of the cascade is also estimated. The absorption of the photons in the plasma of electrons and neutral molecules is shown to be negligible. The obtained spectral intensity is shown to be 2 ×1 0-21 W cm-2 GHz-1 at 10 km from the shower core for a vertical shower induced by a proton of 1 017.5 eV . In addition, a recent measurement of bremsstrahlung radiation in air at gigahertz frequencies from a beam of electrons produced at 95 keV by an electron gun is also discussed and reasonably reproduced by the model.

  13. A 20 GHz, 75 watt, helix TWT for space communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heney, J. F.; Tamashiro, R. N.

    A space-qualified, helix-type traveling wave tube is being developed for satellite communication systems in the frequency band of 17.7 to 21.2 GHz. The design approach stresses very high efficiency operation, but with very low distortion. The tube provides multi-mode operation, permitting CW saturated power output levels of 75, 40, and 7.5 W. Operation is also anticipated at 5 dB below these saturation levels to achieve the required low distortion levels. Advanced construction features include a five-stage depressed collector, a diamond supported helix slow-wave circuit, and a type M dispenser cathode. High reliability and long life (10 yr) are objectives of the tube design. Preliminary test results on early developmental models of this tube are very encouraging. An output power of 75 to 90 W has been achieved over the full bandwidth with about 40 dB of saturated gain. More importantly, the basic electronic efficiency of the interaction process has been increased from about 7.5-11 percent by the use of the diamond helix support compared to earlier tubes using BeO support rods. This effort is supported by NASA Lewis Research Center and is aimed toward application in the NASA Advanced Communications Satellite Technology Program.

  14. 1-GHz harmonically pumped femtosecond optical parametric oscillator frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Balskus, K; Leitch, S M; Zhang, Z; McCracken, R A; Reid, D T

    2015-01-26

    We present the first example of a femtosecond optical parametric oscillator frequency comb harmonically-pumped by a 333-MHz Ti:sapphire laser to achieve a stabilized signal comb at 1-GHz mode spacing in the 1.1-1.6-µm wavelength band. Simultaneous locking of the comb carrier-envelope-offset and repetition frequencies is achieved with uncertainties over 1 s of 0.27 Hz and 5 mHz respectively, which are comparable with those of 0.27 Hz and 1.5 mHz achieved for 333-MHz fundamental pumping. The phase-noise power-spectral density of the CEO frequency integrated from 1 Hz-64 kHz was 2.8 rad for the harmonic comb, 1.0 rad greater than for fundamental pumping. The results show that harmonic operation does not substantially compromise the frequency-stability of the comb, which is shown to be limited only by the Rb atomic frequency reference used.

  15. 30/20 GHz communications satellite multibeam antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. G.; Luh, H. S.; Smoll, A. E.; Matthews, E. W.

    1982-01-01

    A 20 GHz downlink satellite antenna design is described. The aperture simultaneously radiates 18 fixed, 0.3 deg width pencil beams directed at 18 cities distributed over CONUS for Trunking Service. All beams use the same trunk frequency allocation for 18 reuses of the band. The same aperture also radiates six additional 0.3 deg spot beams for Customer Premises Service (CPS) for TDMA beam hopping operation to small terminals anywhere in CONUS. Each CPS beam scans one sector of CONUS and all six beams are frequency reused in a CPS band. Offset dual reflector optics are used with a feed array and multiport beam forming network (BFN). For so many frequency reuses, sidelobes per beam must be 30 to 40 dB down over CONUS. Novel dual reflector optics were devised with shaped surfaces providing low aberrations for all beam positions over CONUS (+ or - 12 BW by + or - 5 BW). Scan loss under 1 dB is calculated with nearly constant sidelobes. For each beam position, a 7-element cluster of feeds is activated in the feed array with coefficients adjusted by the BFN to maintain low sidelobes and thus high beam isolation for frequency reuse.

  16. A 90GHz Bolometer Camera Detector System for the Green

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Allen, Christine A.; Buchanan, Ernest; Chen, Tina C.; Chervenak, James A.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Forgione, Joshua B.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a close-packed, two-dimensional imaging detector system for operation at 90GHz (3.3 mm) for the 100m Green Bank Telescope (GBT). This system will provide high sensitivity (less than 1mJy in 1s) rapid imaging (15'x15' to 150 micron Jy in 1 hr) at the world's largest steerable aperture. The heart of this camera is an 8x8 close-packed, Nyquist-sampled array of superconducting transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers. We have designed and are producing a functional superconducting bolometer array system using a monolithic planar architecture and high-speed multiplexed readout electronics. With an NEP of approximately 2 x 10(exp -17) W/square root of Hz, the TES bolometers will provide fast, linear, sensitive response for high performance imaging. The detectors are read out by an 8x8 time domain SQUID multiplexer. A digital/analog electronics system has been designed to enable read out by SQUID multiplexers. First light for this instrument on the GBT is expected within a year.

  17. ALMA Images of the Orion Hot Core at 349 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, M. C. H.; Plambeck, R. L.

    2017-07-01

    We present ALMA images of the dust and molecular line emission in the Orion Hot Core at 349 GHz. At 0.″2 angular resolution the images reveal multiple clumps in an arc ˜1″ east of Orion Source I, the protostar at the center of the Kleinmann-Low Nebula, and another chain of peaks from IRc7 toward the southwest. The molecular line images show narrow filamentary structures at velocities >10 km s-1 away from the heavily resolved ambient cloud velocity ˜5 km s-1. Many of these filaments trace the SiO outflow from Source I, and lie along the edges of the dust emission. Molecular line emission at excitation temperatures 300-2000 K, and velocities >10 km s-1 from the ambient cloud, suggest that the Hot Core may be heated in shocks by the outflow from Source I or from the Becklin-Neugebauer (BN)/SrcI explosion. The spectral line observations also reveal a remarkable molecular ring, ˜2″ south of SrcI, with a diameter ˜600 au. The ring is seen in high-excitation transitions of HC3N, HCN v2 = 1, and SO2. An impact of ejecta from the BN/SrcI explosion with a dense dust clump could result in the observed ring of shocked material.

  18. The milliarcsecond structure of 3C 273 at 22 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Zensus, J.A.; Biretta, J.A.; Unwin, S.C.; Cohen, M.H. Owens Valley Radio Observatory, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-12-01

    The first VLBI images at 22 GHz of the jet in the quasar 3C 273 are presented. In addition to the compact core region, two emission regions can be identified with features seen at lower frequencies; they separate from the core with constant speeds of 0.65 + or - 0.09 and 0.92 + or - 0.11 mas/yr, corresponding to apparent superluminal motion of 4.3 + or - 0.3c and 6.1 + or - 0.3c (for Ho = 100 km/s Mpc, qo = 0.5). The core region brightened at about the estimated epoch of zero separation for the latest superluminal component, suggesting a causal relationship. The curved ridge line of the jet smoothly extends inward towards the core, although no pronounced bends in the range of core distance 0.5-2.5 mas are seen. No significant evidence is found against a common path of subsequent superluminal features. An apparent frequency dependence in the position of one superluminal feature tentatively suggests that opacity effects across the jet direction are present. The results are consistent with an interpretation of the superluminal features as shocks in an underlying relativistic flow, although alternative explanations cannot be ruled out. 43 refs.

  19. The 6-GHz multibeam maser survey - I. Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Fuller, G. A.; Avison, A.; Breen, S. L.; Brooks, K.; Burton, M. G.; Chrysostomou, A.; Cox, J.; Diamond, P. J.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Gray, M. D.; Hoare, M. G.; Masheder, M. R. W.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Pestalozzi, M.; Phillips, C.; Quinn, L.; Thompson, M. A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Walsh, A.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Wong-McSweeney, D.; Yates, J. A.; Cohen, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    A new seven-beam 6-7GHz receiver has been built to survey the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds for newly forming high-mass stars that are pinpointed by strong methanol maser emission at 6668MHz. The receiver was jointly constructed by Jodrell Bank Observatory (JBO) and the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) and allows simultaneous coverage at 6668 and 6035MHz. It was successfully commissioned at Parkes in 2006 January and is now being used to conduct the Parkes-Jodrell multibeam maser survey of the Milky Way. This will be the first systematic survey of the entire Galactic plane for masers of not only 6668-MHz methanol, but also 6035-MHz excited-state hydroxyl. The survey is two orders of magnitude faster than most previous systematic surveys and has an rms noise level of ~0.17Jy. This paper describes the observational strategy, techniques and reduction procedures of the Galactic and Magellanic Cloud surveys, together with deeper, pointed, follow-up observations and complementary observations with other instruments. It also includes an estimate of the survey detection efficiency. The 111d of observations with the Parkes telescope have so far yielded >800 methanol sources, of which ~350 are new discoveries. The whole project will provide the first comprehensive Galaxy-wide catalogue of 6668-MHz and 6035-MHz masers.

  20. A 220 GHz reflection-type phased array concept study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedden, Abigail S.; Dietlein, Charles R.; Wikner, David A.

    2011-05-01

    The goal of this project is to enable light-weight, durable, and portable systems capable of performing standoff detection of person-borne improvised explosive devices (PB-IEDs) through the development of millimeter-wave reflection-type phased arrays. Electronic beam steering eliminates the need for complex mechanical scanners that are commonly implemented with millimeter-wave imaging systems and would reduce overall system size and weight. We present a concept study of a 220 GHz reflection-type phased array for the purpose of performing beam scanning of a confocal reflector system. Requirements for effective imaging of the desired target region are established, including spatial resolution, total scan angle, and number of image pixels achievable. We examine the effects of array architecture on beam characteristics as it is scanned off broadside, including Gaussicity and encircled energy. Benchmark requirements are determined and compared with the capabilities of several potential phase shifter technologies, including MEMS-based variable capacitor phase shifters, switches, and varactor diode-based phase shifters.

  1. A 90GHz Bolometer Camera Detector System for the Green

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Allen, Christine A.; Buchanan, Ernest; Chen, Tina C.; Chervenak, James A.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Forgione, Joshua B.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a close-packed, two-dimensional imaging detector system for operation at 90GHz (3.3 mm) for the 100m Green Bank Telescope (GBT). This system will provide high sensitivity (less than 1mJy in 1s) rapid imaging (15'x15' to 150 micron Jy in 1 hr) at the world's largest steerable aperture. The heart of this camera is an 8x8 close-packed, Nyquist-sampled array of superconducting transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers. We have designed and are producing a functional superconducting bolometer array system using a monolithic planar architecture and high-speed multiplexed readout electronics. With an NEP of approximately 2 x 10(exp -17) W/square root of Hz, the TES bolometers will provide fast, linear, sensitive response for high performance imaging. The detectors are read out by an 8x8 time domain SQUID multiplexer. A digital/analog electronics system has been designed to enable read out by SQUID multiplexers. First light for this instrument on the GBT is expected within a year.

  2. Solar microwave millisecond spike at 2.84 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Qi-Jun; Jin, Sheng-Zhen; Zhao, Ren-Yang; Zheng, Le-Ping; Liu, Yu-Ying; Li, Xiao-Cong; Wang, Shu-Lan; Chen, Zhi-Jun; Hu, Chu-Min

    1986-01-01

    Using the high time resolution of 1 ms, the data of solar microwave millisecond spike (MMS) event was recorded more than two hundred times at the frequency of 2.84 GHz at Beijing (Peking) Observatory since May 1981. A preliminary analysis was made. It can be seen from the data that the MMS-events have a variety of the fast activities such as the dispersed and isolated spikes, the clusters of the crowded spikes, the weak spikes superimposed on the noise background, and the phenomena of absorption. The marked differences from that observed with lower time resolution are presented. Using the data, a valuable statistical analysis was made. There are close correlations between MMS-events and hard X-ray bursts, and fast drifting bursts. The MMS events are highly dependent on the type of active regions and the magnetic field configuration. It seems to be crucial to find out the accurate positions on the active region where the MMS-events happen and to make co-operative observations at different bands during the special period when specific active regions appear on the solar disk.

  3. A 200-GHz telescope unit for the QUIJOTE CMB Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanquirce, Rubén.; Etxeita, Borja; Murga, Gaizka; Fernandez, Esther; Sainz, Iñaki; Sánchez, Vicente; Viera-Curbelo, Teodora A.; Gómez, María. F.; Aguiar-Gonzalez, Marta; Hoyland, Roger J.; Pérez de Taoro, Ángeles R.; Vega, Afrodisio; Rebolo-López, Rafael; Rubiño, Jose Alberto

    2014-07-01

    Experiment QUIJOTE (Q-U-I JOint TEnerife) is a scientific collaboration, leaded by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), which can measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) in the range of frequency up to 200 GHz, at angular scales of 1°. The project is composed of 2 telescopes and 3 instruments, located in Teide Observatory (Tenerife, Spain). After the successful delivery of the first telescope (operative since 2012), Idom is currently involved on the turn key supply of the second telescope (phase II). The work started in June 2013 and it will be completed in a challenging period of 12 months (operative at the beginning of July 2014), including design, factory assembly and testing, transport and final commissioning on site. This second unit will improve the opto-mechanical performance and maintainability. The telescope will have an unlimited rotation capacity in azimuth axis and a range of movement between 25°-95° in elevation axis. An integrated rotary joint will transmit fluid, power and signal to the rotary elements. The pointing and tracking accuracy will be significantly below to specification: 1.76 arcmin and 44 arcsec, respectively. This project completes Idoḿs contribution during phase I, which also comprises the integration and functional tests for the 5 polarimeters of the first instrument in Bilbao headquarters, and the design and supervision of the building which protects both telescopes, including the installation and commissioning of the mechanism for shutters aperture.

  4. MALT90: The Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, J. M.; Rathborne, J. M.; Foster, J. B.; Whitaker, J. S.; Sanhueza, P.; Claysmith, C.; Mascoop, J. L.; Wienen, M.; Breen, S. L.; Herpin, F.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Csengeri, T.; Longmore, S. N.; Contreras, Y.; Indermuehle, B.; Barnes, P. J.; Walsh, A. J.; Cunningham, M. R.; Brooks, K. J.; Britton, T. R.; Voronkov, M. A.; Urquhart, J. S.; Alves, J.; Jordan, C. H.; Hill, T.; Hoq, S.; Finn, S. C.; Bains, I.; Bontemps, S.; Bronfman, L.; Caswell, J. L.; Deharveng, L.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Fuller, G. A.; Garay, G.; Green, J. A.; Hindson, L.; Jones, P. A.; Lenfestey, C.; Lo, N.; Lowe, V.; Mardones, D.; Menten, K. M.; Minier, V.; Morgan, L. K.; Motte, F.; Muller, E.; Peretto, N.; Purcell, C. R.; Schilke, P.; Bontemps, Schneider-N.; Schuller, F.; Titmarsh, A.; Wyrowski, F.; Zavagno, A.

    2013-11-01

    The Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz (MALT90) survey aims to characterise the physical and chemical evolution of high-mass star-forming clumps. Exploiting the unique broad frequency range and on-the-fly mapping capabilities of the Australia Telescope National Facility Mopra 22 m single-dish telescope 1 , MALT90 has obtained 3' × 3' maps towards ~2 000 dense molecular clumps identified in the ATLASGAL 870 μm Galactic plane survey. The clumps were selected to host the early stages of high-mass star formation and to span the complete range in their evolutionary states (from prestellar, to protostellar, and on to H II regions and photodissociation regions). Because MALT90 mapped 16 lines simultaneously with excellent spatial (38 arcsec) and spectral (0.11 km s-1) resolution, the data reveal a wealth of information about the clumps' morphologies, chemistry, and kinematics. In this paper we outline the survey strategy, observing mode, data reduction procedure, and highlight some early science results. All MALT90 raw and processed data products are available to the community. With its unprecedented large sample of clumps, MALT90 is the largest survey of its type ever conducted and an excellent resource for identifying interesting candidates for high-resolution studies with ALMA.

  5. 30/20 GHz communications satellite multibeam antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. G.; Luh, H. S.; Smoll, A. E.; Matthews, E. W.

    1982-01-01

    A 20 GHz downlink satellite antenna design is described. The aperture simultaneously radiates 18 fixed, 0.3 deg width pencil beams directed at 18 cities distributed over CONUS for Trunking Service. All beams use the same trunk frequency allocation for 18 reuses of the band. The same aperture also radiates six additional 0.3 deg spot beams for Customer Premises Service (CPS) for TDMA beam hopping operation to small terminals anywhere in CONUS. Each CPS beam scans one sector of CONUS and all six beams are frequency reused in a CPS band. Offset dual reflector optics are used with a feed array and multiport beam forming network (BFN). For so many frequency reuses, sidelobes per beam must be 30 to 40 dB down over CONUS. Novel dual reflector optics were devised with shaped surfaces providing low aberrations for all beam positions over CONUS (+ or - 12 BW by + or - 5 BW). Scan loss under 1 dB is calculated with nearly constant sidelobes. For each beam position, a 7-element cluster of feeds is activated in the feed array with coefficients adjusted by the BFN to maintain low sidelobes and thus high beam isolation for frequency reuse.

  6. TFTR 60 GHz alpha particle collective Thomson Scattering diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Machuzak, J.S.; Woskov, P.P.; Gilmore, J.; Bretz, N.L.; Park, H.K.; Aamodt, R.E.; Cheung, P.Y.; Russell, D.A.; Bindslev, H.

    1995-03-01

    A 60 GHz gyrotron collective Thomson Scattering alpha particle diagnostic has been implemented for the D-T period on TFM. Gyrotron power of 0.1-1 kW in pulses of up to 1 second can be launched in X-mode. Efficient corrugated waveguides are used with antennaes and vacuum windows of the TFTR Microwave Scattering system. A multichannel synchronous detector receiver system and spectrum analyzer acquire the scattered signals. A 200 Megasample/sec digitizer is used to resolve fine structure in the frequency spectrum. By scattering nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field, this experiment will take advantage of an enhancement of the scattered signal which results from the interaction of the alpha particles with plasma resonances in the lower hybrid frequency range. Significant enhancements are expected, which will make these measurements possible with gyrotron power less than 1 kW, while maintaining an acceptable signal to noise ratio. We hope to extract alpha particle density and velocity distribution functions from the data. The D and T fuel densities and temperatures may also be obtainable by measurement of the respective ion cyclotron harmonic frequencies.

  7. Multi-Megawatt Operation of a 95 GHz Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felch, Kevin; Blank, Monica; Borchard, Philipp; Cahalan, Pat; Cauffman, Steve

    2010-11-01

    A 95 GHz gyrotron capable of generating CW power levels in excess of 2 MW is under development at CPI. The gyrotron employs a single-anode electron gun that produces a 90-kV, 75-A electron beam for interaction with the TE22,6,1 cavity mode. Output power from the cavity is transformed into a Gaussian beam using an internal converter that consists of a waveguide launcher and three focusing and phase-correcting mirrors. The beam exits the tube through a chemical-vapor-deposition diamond window. The spent electron beam is dissipated in a 40.6-cm diameter collector fabricated from a strengthened copper alloy. The collector nominally operates at a voltage of 61 kV relative to the cathode potential to minimize the amount of power absorbed in the collector and to improve efficiency. In tests on the gyrotron the maximum power achieved thus far is 1.72 MW with 33% efficiency at the nominal beam current of 75 A. At a reduced beam current of 45 A, an output power of 1.4 MW is obtained with over 50% efficiency. We are planning tube modifications to increase the output power level where efficiencies of greater than 50% can still be obtained.

  8. A 190GHz active millimeter-wave imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, Michael L.; Timms, Greg P.; Bunton, John D.; Archer, John W.; Tello, Juan Y.; Rosolen, Grahame C.; Li, Yue; Hellicar, Andrew D.

    2007-04-01

    The design and testing of a 190 GHz imaging system is presented. The system features two beam-scanning antennas; the first transmits a horizontal fan beam and the second receives a vertical fan beam. By correlating the signals from the antennas, an estimate of the millimeter-wave reflectivity at the intersection of the fan beams is obtained. Each fan beam is scanned by rotating a small subreflector within the antenna; this simple rotation motion allows rapid scanning. The system is portable, currently approximately 0.6m × 0.6m × 2m high; the key size constraint is imposed by the 450 mm aperture length of the antennas. The imager has an angular resolution of 0.25° and a field of view of 14°×14°, resulting in a raw image of approximately 50 × 50 pixels. The raw image is processed using super-resolution techniques. Images will be presented which show the capability of the system to image metallic and ceramic objects beneath clothing. These images were obtained by illuminating the scene with signals from a frequency-doubled Gunn oscillator. While this paper focuses on active imaging, the system can also operate in passive mode with reduced sensitivity.

  9. The DIII-D 3 MW, 110 GHz ECH System

    SciTech Connect

    Callis, R.W.; Lohr, J.; Ponce, D.; O'Neill, R.C.; Prater, R.; Luce, T.C.

    1999-07-01

    Three 110 GHz gyrotrons with nominal output power of 1 MW each have been installed and are operational on the DIII-D tokamak. One gyrotron is built by Gycom and has a nominal rating of 1 MW and a 2 s pulse length, with the pulse length being determined by the maximum temperature allowed on the edge cooled Boron Nitride window. The second and third gyrotrons were built by Communications and Power Industries (CPI). The first CPI gyrotron uses a double disc FC-75 cooled sapphire window which has a pulse length rating of 0.8 s at 1 MW, 2s at 0.5 MW and 10s at 0.35 MW. The second CPI gyrotron, utilizes a single disc chemical-vapor-deposition diamond window, that employs water cooling around the edge of the disc. Calculation predict that the diamond window should be capable of full 1 MW cw operation. All gyrotrons are connected to the tokamak by a low-loss-windowless evacuated transmission line using circular corrugated waveguide for propagation in the HEl 1 mode. Each waveguide system incorporates a two mirror launcher which can steer the rf beam poloidally from the center to the outer edge of the plasma. Central current drive experiments with the two gyrotrons with 1.5 MW of injected power drove about 0.17 MA. Results from using the three gyrotron systems will be reported as well as the plans to upgrade the system to 6 MW.

  10. Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz Survey (MALT 90)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, James; Lo, Nadia; Rathborne, Jill; Jones, Paul; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Brooks, Kate; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Menten, Karl; Schilke, Peter; Garay, Guido; Mardones, Diego; Minier, Vincent; Longmore, Steven; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Herpin, Fabrice; Hill, Tracey; Bronfman, Leonardo; Deharveng, Lise; Finn, Susanna; Schuller, Frederic; Motte, Frédérique; Peretto, Nicolas; Bontemps, Sylvain; Wienen, Marion; Contreras, Yanett; Lenfestey, Clare; Foster, Jonathan; Sanhueza, Patricio; Claysmith, Christopher

    2011-04-01

    We request Mopra telescope time to complete MALT90, a new, international project to survey molecular line emission from 3,000 dense cores. MALT90 exploits Mopra's capability for fast mapping and simultaneous imaging of 16 molecular lines near 90 GHz. These molecular lines will probe the cores physical, chemical, and evolutionary state. The target cores are selected from the 870 um ATLASGAL survey to host the early stages of high-mass star formation and to span the complete range of evolutionary states from pre-stellar cores, to protostellar cores, and on to H II regions. Each core will be mapped at excellent angular (40'') and spectral (0.1 km/s) resolution. The survey data will be made available to the public via the internet. We require 875 hours per year for the next 4 winter seasons to complete the project, and request pre-graded (continuing) status. MALT90 will provide a key legacy database for the star-formation community and supply the definitive source list of high-mass dense cores for ALMA.

  11. Force detected electron spin resonance at 94 GHz.

    PubMed

    Cruickshank, Paul A S; Smith, Graham M

    2007-01-01

    Force detected electron spin resonance (FDESR) detects the presence of unpaired electrons in a sample by measuring the change in force on a mechanical resonator as the magnetization of the sample is modulated under magnetic resonance conditions. The magnetization is coupled to the resonator via a magnetic field gradient. It has been used to both detect and image distributions of electron spins, and it offers both extremely high absolute sensitivity and high spatial imaging resolution. However, compared to conventional induction mode ESR the technique also has a comparatively poor concentration sensitivity and it introduces complications in interpreting and combining both spectroscopy and imaging. One method to improve both sensitivity and spectral resolution is to operate in high magnetic fields in order to increase the sample magnetization and g-factor resolution. In this article we present FDESR measurements on the organic conductor (fluoranthene)(2)PF(6) at 3.2 T, with a corresponding millimeter-wave frequency of 93.5 GHz, which we believe are the highest field results for FDESR reported in the literature to date. A magnet-on-cantilever approach was used, with a high-anisotropy microwave ferrite as the gradient source and employing cyclic saturation to modulate the magnetization at the cantilever fundamental frequency.

  12. All-printed diode operating at 1.6 GHz.

    PubMed

    Sani, Negar; Robertsson, Mats; Cooper, Philip; Wang, Xin; Svensson, Magnus; Andersson Ersman, Peter; Norberg, Petronella; Nilsson, Marie; Nilsson, David; Liu, Xianjie; Hesselbom, Hjalmar; Akesso, Laurent; Fahlman, Mats; Crispin, Xavier; Engquist, Isak; Berggren, Magnus; Gustafsson, Göran

    2014-08-19

    Printed electronics are considered for wireless electronic tags and sensors within the future Internet-of-things (IoT) concept. As a consequence of the low charge carrier mobility of present printable organic and inorganic semiconductors, the operational frequency of printed rectifiers is not high enough to enable direct communication and powering between mobile phones and printed e-tags. Here, we report an all-printed diode operating up to 1.6 GHz. The device, based on two stacked layers of Si and NbSi2 particles, is manufactured on a flexible substrate at low temperature and in ambient atmosphere. The high charge carrier mobility of the Si microparticles allows device operation to occur in the charge injection-limited regime. The asymmetry of the oxide layers in the resulting device stack leads to rectification of tunneling current. Printed diodes were combined with antennas and electrochromic displays to form an all-printed e-tag. The harvested signal from a Global System for Mobile Communications mobile phone was used to update the display. Our findings demonstrate a new communication pathway for printed electronics within IoT applications.

  13. Multifunctional reconfigurable antennas and arrays operating at 60 GHz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalat, Abdurazag Mohamed

    To meet the ever increasing demand of high data rate, millimeter-wave (mm-wave) wireless communication has become an area of intense research due to the capability of offering very broad bandwidth. However, the propagation losses increase as a function of operation frequency. Therefore, there is need for antenna systems with high gain and beam-steering capability at elevated frequencies, which comes at the expense of high cost and increased complexity. This dissertation demonstrates the design, micro-fabrication, and characterization of two different antennas and two different antenna arrays. A broadband patch antenna operating within (57 - 66) GHz band, which works as a building block to create a multifunctional reconfigurable antenna (MRA) that is capable of beam steering in three directions pertaining to theta epsilon {-30 0, 00, 300}; φ = 900. These standalone antennas were then put in a linear formation to create a 2x8 planar array and a 4x1 multifunctional recon-figurable antenna array (MRAA) to increase the gain further and to offer wider bandwidth. The proposed novel MRA and MRAA possess variable element factors, which potentially can feature as the main building blocks of mm-wave reconfigurable wireless communication systems with reduced cost and complexity.

  14. Benzene at 1 GHz. Magnetic field-induced fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heist, L. M.; Poon, C.-D.; Samulski, E. T.; Photinos, D. J.; Jokisaari, J.; Vaara, J.; Emsley, J. W.; Mamone, S.; Lelli, M.

    2015-09-01

    The deuterium NMR spectrum of benzene-d6 in a high field spectrometer (1 GHz protons) exhibits a magnetic field-induced deuterium quadrupolar splitting Δν. The magnitude of Δν observed for the central resonance is smaller than that observed for the 13C satellite doublets Δν‧. This difference, Δ(Δν) = Δν‧ - Δν, is due to unresolved fine structure contributions to the respective resonances. We determine the origins of and simulate this difference, and report pulse sequences that exploit the connectivity of the peaks in the 13C and 2H spectra to determine the relative signs of the indirect coupling, JCD, and Δν. The positive sign found for Δν is consonant with the magnetic field biasing of an isolated benzene molecule-the magnetic energy of the aromatic ring is lowest for configurations where the C6 axis is normal to the field. In the neat liquid the magnitude of Δν is decreased by the pair correlations in this prototypical molecular liquid.

  15. Spectral Characteristics of a 140-GHz Long-Pulsed Gyrotron

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong-Tae; Griffin, Robert G.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Joye, Colin D.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Torrezan, Antonio C.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2008-01-01

    Gyrotrons operating in the millimeter and submillimeter wavelength ranges are the promising sources for applications that are requiring good spectral characteristics and a wide range of output power. We report the precise measurement results of gyrotron spectra. Experiments were conducted using a 140-GHz long-pulse gyrotron that is developed for the dynamic nuclear polarization/nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Transient downshift of the frequency by 12 MHz with a time constant of 3 s was observed. After reaching equilibrium, the frequency was maintained within 1 ppm for over 20 s. The coefficient of the frequency change with cavity temperature was −2.0 MHz/K, which shows that fine tuning of the gyrotron frequency is plausible by cavity-temperature control. Frequency pulling by the beam current was observed, but it was shown to be masked by the downward shift of the gyrotron frequency with temperature. The linewidth was measured to be much less than 1 MHz at 60 dB relative to the carrier power [in decibels relative to carrier (dBc)] and 4.3 MHz at 75 dBc, which is the largest dynamic range to date for the measurement of gyrotron linewidth to our knowledge. PMID:19081779

  16. Transport of DESY 1.3 GHZ Cryomodule at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Arkan, T.; Borissov, E.; Leibfritz, J.; Schappert, W.; Barbanotti, S.; /LASA, Segrate /INFN, Milan

    2009-05-01

    In an exchange of technology agreement, Deutsches Elektron-Synchrotron (DESY) Laboratory in Hamburg Germany has provided a 1.3 GHz cryomodule 'kit' to Fermilab. The cryomodule components (qualified dressed cavities, cold mass parts, vacuum vessel, etc.) sent from Germany in pieces were assembled at Fermilab's Cryomodule Assembly Facility (CAF). The cavity string was assembled at CAF-MP9 Class 10 cleanroom and then transported to CAF-ICB cold mass assembly area via a flatbed air ride truck. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) studies were implemented to define location of instrumentation for initial cold mass transport, providing modal frequencies and shapes. Subsequently, the fully assembled cryomodule was transported to the SRF Accelerator Test Facility at New Muon Lab (NML). Internal geophones (velocity sensors) were attached during the coldmass assembly for transport (warm) and operational (cold) measurements. A description of the isolation system that maintained alignment during transport and protected fragile components is provided. Shock and vibration measurement results of each transport and modal analysis are discussed.

  17. Progress toward a MEMS fabricated 100 GHz oscillator.

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Lemp, Thomas; Weyn, Mark L.; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Rowley, James E.

    2006-02-01

    This report summarizes an LDRD effort which looked at the feasibility of building a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) fabricated 100 GHz micro vacuum tube. PIC Simulations proved to be a very useful tool in investigating various device designs. Scaling parameters were identified. This in turn allowed predictions of oscillator growth based on beam parameters, cavity geometry, and cavity loading. The electron beam source was identified as a critical element of the design. FEA's (Field Emission Arrays) were purchased to be built into the micro device. Laboratory testing of the FEA's was also performed which pointed out care and handling issues along with maximum current capabilities. Progress was made toward MEMS fabrication of the device. Techniques were developed and successfully employed to build up several of the subassemblies of the device. However, the lower wall fabrication proved to be difficult and a successful build was not completed. Alternative approaches to building this structure have been identified. Although these alternatives look like good solutions for building the device, it was not possible to complete a redesign and build during the timeframe of this effort.

  18. Iron based carbon nanocomposites for electromagnetic wave absorber with wide bandwidth in GHz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. R.; Itoh, M.; Horikawa, T.; Taguchi, E.; Mori, H.; Machida, K.

    2006-02-01

    The electromagnetic wave absorption properties of resin compacts containing 40 vol. % composite powders of α-Fe/C(a), and Fe3C/C(a) were characterized in a frequency range of 0.05 26.5 GHz, according to a conventional reflection/transmission technique. The real part (ɛr ') and the imaginary part (ɛr '') of relative permittivity were constantly low in the 2 14 GHz (ɛr '= ˜12.4 and ɛr ''= ˜0.6) for α-Fe/C(a) resin composites, and in the 1 26.5 GHz (ɛr '= ˜9.6 and ɛr ''= ˜0.8) for Fe3C/C(a) ones. The imaginary part (μr '') of relative permeability exhibited wide peaks in the 1 9 GHz range for α-Fe/C(a), and in the 2 26.5 GHz range for Fe3C/C(a) owing to their different magnetocrystalline anisotropy field values. Consequently, the resin compacts with 40 vol. % α-Fe/C(a), and Fe3C/C(a) powders provided good electromagnetic wave absorption performances (reflection loss <-20 dB) in ranges of 4.3 8.2 GHz, and 9 26.5 GHz over absorber thicknesses of 1.8 3.3 mm, and 1.0 2.4 mm, respectively.

  19. RADIO SOURCES FROM A 31 GHz SKY SURVEY WITH THE SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Muchovej, Stephen; Hawkins, David; Lamb, James; Woody, David; Leitch, Erik; Carlstrom, John E.; Culverhouse, Thomas; Greer, Chris; Hennessy, Ryan; Loh, Michael; Marrone, Daniel P.; Pryke, Clem; Sharp, Matthew; Joy, Marshall; Miller, Amber; Mroczkowski, Tony

    2010-06-10

    We present the first sample of 31 GHz selected sources to flux levels of 1 mJy. From late 2005 to mid-2007, the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array observed 7.7 deg{sup 2} of the sky at 31 GHz to a median rms of 0.18 mJy beam{sup -1}. We identify 209 sources at greater than 5{sigma} significance in the 31 GHz maps, ranging in flux from 0.7 mJy to {approx}200 mJy. Archival NVSS data at 1.4 GHz and observations at 5 GHz with the Very Large Array are used to characterize the sources. We determine the maximum-likelihood integrated source count to be N(>S) = (27.2 {+-} 2.5)deg{sup -2} x (S {sub mJy}){sup -1.18{+-}0.12} over the flux range 0.7-15 mJy. This result is significantly higher than predictions based on 1.4 GHz selected samples, a discrepancy which can be explained by a small shift in the spectral index distribution for faint 1.4 GHz sources. From comparison with previous measurements of sources within the central arcminute of massive clusters, we derive an overdensity of 6.8 {+-} 4.4, relative to field sources.

  20. Class II 6.7 GHz Methanol Maser Association with Young Massive Cores Revealed by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibueze, James O.; Csengeri, Timea; Tatematsu, Ken’ichi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Iguchi, Satoru; Alhassan, Jibrin A.; Higuchi, Aya E.; Bontemps, Sylvain; Menten, Karl M.

    2017-02-01

    We explored the implication of the association (or lack of it) of 6.7 GHz class II methanol (CH3OH) masers with massive dense cores (MDCs) detected (within a sample of ATLASGAL selected infrared quiet massive clumps) at 0.9 mm with Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter array. We found 42 out of the 112 cores (37.5%) detected with the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) to be associated with 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers. The lowest mass core with CH3OH maser association is ∼ 12 {M}ȯ . The angular offsets of the ACA cores from the 6.7 GHz CH3OH maser peak positions range from 0.″17 to 4.″79, with a median value of 2.″19. We found a weak correlation between the 0.9 mm continuum (MDCs) peak fluxes and the peak fluxes of their associated methanol multibeam (MMB) 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers. About 90% of the cores associated with 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers have masses of >40 M ⊙. The CH3OH maser containing cores are candidates for embedded high-mass protostellar objects in their earliest evolutionary stages. With our ACA 0.9 continuum data compared with the MMB 6.7 GHz CH3OH maser survey, we have constrained the cores already housing massive protostars based on their association with the radiatively pumped 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers.

  1. 43 and 86 GHz VLBI Polarimetry of 3C454.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunacek, A.; Attridge, J. M.

    2004-12-01

    Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of the quasar 3C454.3 were made at epoch 2003.75, at 43 and 86 GHz in full polarization mode. Very Long Baseline Polarimetry (VLBP) is used to determine magnetic field structures in the jets of extragalactic radio sources at very high angular resolution - on the order of 0.3 milliarcseconds at 86 GHz. As Faraday rotation decreases with decreasing wavelength, high-frequency, high-resolution VLBP observations allow us to probe the polarization properties of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) close to the super-massive black holes thought to be the central engines of these objects. New total intensity and linear polarization images of 3C454.3 at both 43 and 86 GHz are presented here, along with historical images for comparison. The new images include the first 86 GHz linear polarization images ever made of the source 3C454.3, and these results bring the number of sources for which successful 86 GHz polarimetry has been accomplished to three. As 3C454.3 is fainter at 86 GHz than its counterparts 3C273 and 3C279, the new observations are quite promising for the success of 86 GHz VLBP on weaker sources. This research was carried out as part of MIT Haystack Observatory's Research Experiences for Undergraduates program funded by the National Science Foundation.

  2. Switchable Multi-Frequency MMIC Oscillator for the 60 GHz Millimeter Wave Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillefer, Eddy; Kitazawa, Shoichi; Ueba, Masazumi

    We propose a proof-of-concept of a switchable multi-frequency MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) oscillator device, operating in the 60GHz millimeter wave band, which is implemented in GaAs p-HEMT transistor technology. Oscillators that can switch between two frequencies have been designed, fabricated and evaluated. The oscillator uses a cross-coupled FET topology, combined with a bent asymmetric coplanar stripline for the resonator, and a switched-capacitor for the frequency switching components. The oscillator generates two oscillations at ƒ/2 and ƒ where ƒ is the target frequency of around 60GHz. The switchable oscillator has been demonstrated for the range of frequency from 44GHz to 68.9GHz. Moreover, the designed oscillator exhibits a wide-band negative resistance property that allows fabricating switchable oscillators covering the 50 to 75GHz V-band. An evaluated switchable oscillator delivers -17.09dBm and -13.72dBm output power at 62.45GHz and 64.78GHz, for a supplied power of 40.6mW and 39.1mW, respectively.

  3. First Results of the Superconducting ECR Ion Source Venus with 28 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C.M.; Abbott, S.R.; Dwinell, R.D.; Collins, D.; Leitner, M.

    2005-03-15

    VENUS (Versatile ECR ion source for NUclear Science) is a next generation superconducting ECR ion source, designed to produce high current, high charge state ions for the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. VENUS also serves as the prototype ion source for the RIA (Rare Isotope Accelerator) front end. The magnetic confinement configuration consists of three superconducting axial coils and six superconducting radial coils in a sextupole configuration. The nominal design fields of the axial magnets are 4T at injection and 3T at extraction; the nominal radial design field strength at the plasma chamber wall is 2T, making VENUS the world most powerful ECR plasma confinement structure. From the beginning, VENUS has been designed for optimum operation at 28 GHz with high power (10 kW).In 2003 the VENUS ECR ion source was commissioned at 18 GHz, while preparations for 28 GHz operation were being conducted. During this commissioning phase with 18 GHz, tests with various gases and metals have been performed with up to 2000 W RF power. At the initial commissioning tests at 18 GHz, 1100 e{mu}A of O6+, 160 e{mu}A of Xe20+, 160 e{mu}A of Bi25+ and 100 e{mu}A of Bi30+ and 11 e{mu}A of Bi41+ were produced.In May 2004 the 28 GHz microwave power has been coupled into the VENUS ECR ion source. At initial operation more than 320 e{mu}A of Xe20+ (twice the amount extracted at 18 GHz), 240 e{mu}A of Bi24+ and Bi25+, and 245 e{mu}A of Bi29+ were extracted. The paper briefly describes the design of the VENUS source, the 28 GHz microwave system and its beam analyzing system. First results at 28 GHz including emittance measurements are presented.

  4. The VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project: Continuum data and source catalog release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolčić, V.; Novak, M.; Bondi, M.; Ciliegi, P.; Mooley, K. P.; Schinnerer, E.; Zamorani, G.; Navarrete, F.; Bourke, S.; Karim, A.; Vardoulaki, E.; Leslie, S.; Delhaize, J.; Carilli, C. L.; Myers, S. T.; Baran, N.; Delvecchio, I.; Miettinen, O.; Banfield, J.; Baloković, M.; Bertoldi, F.; Capak, P.; Frail, D. A.; Hallinan, G.; Hao, H.; Herrera Ruiz, N.; Horesh, A.; Ilbert, O.; Intema, H.; Jelić, V.; Klöckner, H.-R.; Krpan, J.; Kulkarni, S. R.; McCracken, H.; Laigle, C.; Middleberg, E.; Murphy, E. J.; Sargent, M.; Scoville, N. Z.; Sheth, K.

    2017-06-01

    We present the VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project based on 384 h of observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 3 GHz (10 cm) toward the two square degree Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. The final mosaic reaches a median rms of 2.3 μJy beam-1 over the two square degrees at an angular resolution of 0.75″. To fully account for the spectral shape and resolution variations across the broad (2 GHz) band, we image all data with a multiscale, multifrequency synthesis algorithm. We present a catalog of 10 830 radio sources down to 5σ, out of which 67 are combined from multiple components.Comparing the positions of our 3 GHz sources with those from the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA)-COSMOS survey, we estimate that the astrometry is accurate to 0.01″ at the bright end (signal-to-noise ratio, S/N3 GHz > 20). Survival analysis on our data combined with the VLA-COSMOS 1.4 GHz Joint Project catalog yields an expected median radio spectral index of α = -0.7. We compute completeness corrections via Monte Carlo simulations to derive the corrected 3 GHz source counts. Our counts are in agreement with previously derived 3 GHz counts based on single-pointing (0.087 square degrees) VLA data. In summary, the VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project simultaneously provides the largest and deepest radio continuum survey at high (0.75″) angular resolution to date, bridging the gap between last-generation and next-generation surveys. The catalog is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/602/A1

  5. Development of over-MW gyrotrons for fusion at 14 GHz to sub-THz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariya, T.; Imai, T.; Minami, R.; Sakamoto, K.; Oda, Y.; Ikeda, R.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Idei, H.; Numakura, T.; Tsumura, K.; Ebashi, Y.; Okada, M.; Nakashima, Y.; Yoshimura, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Ito, S.; Hanada, K.; Nagasaki, K.; Ono, M.; Eguchi, T.; Mitsunaka, Y.

    2017-06-01

    Megawatt power gyrotrons are being developed for collaborative electron cyclotron heating (ECH) studies of advanced fusion devices and demonstration power plant (DEMO). (1) In the first experiment of a 300 GHz gyrotron, an output power above 0.5 MW in the TE32,18 single mode was achieved with a pulse width of 2 ms. This was the first observation of MW-scale oscillations in a DEMO-relevant gyrotron mode. It was also found that the reflection at the output window affected the determination of the oscillation mode. Furthermore, several single mode oscillations in the 226-254 GHz range were confirmed, which is important for the step-frequency tunable gyrotron in the sub-THz frequency range. (2) Based on the successful results of the 77 and 154 GHz large helical device (LHD) tubes, a new 154/116 GHz dual-frequency gyrotron with an output of over 1.5 MW is being designed. (3) A new record output of 1.38 MW was obtained using an existing 28 GHz gyrotron. A newly designed tube aimed at achieving a dual-frequency output power of 2 MW at 28 GHz (0.4 MW continuous wave) and 1 MW at 35 GHz was built. In the first experimental test, main mode oscillations were observed at the frequencies of 28.036 and 34.831 GHz with Gaussian-like output beams and output power of 1.27 and 0.48 MW, respectively. A total efficiency of 50% was achieved at 28 GHz operation.

  6. 47 CFR 25.138 - Blanket Licensing provisions of GSO FSS Earth Stations in the 18.3-18.8 GHz (space-to-Earth), 19...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Blanket Licensing provisions of GSO FSS Earth Stations in the 18.3-18.8 GHz (space-to-Earth), 19.7-20.2 GHz (space-to-Earth), 28.35-28.6 GHz (Earth-to... (space-to-Earth), 19.7-20.2 GHz (space-to-Earth), 28.35-28.6 GHz (Earth-to-space), and 29.25-30.0 GHz...

  7. 47 CFR 25.138 - Blanket Licensing provisions of GSO FSS Earth Stations in the 18.3-18.8 GHz (space-to-Earth), 19...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Blanket Licensing provisions of GSO FSS Earth Stations in the 18.3-18.8 GHz (space-to-Earth), 19.7-20.2 GHz (space-to-Earth), 28.35-28.6 GHz (Earth-to... (space-to-Earth), 19.7-20.2 GHz (space-to-Earth), 28.35-28.6 GHz (Earth-to-space), and 29.25-30.0 GHz...

  8. 47 CFR 25.138 - Licensing requirements for GSO FSS Earth Stations in the 18.3-18.8 GHz (space-to-Earth), 19.7-20...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Licensing requirements for GSO FSS Earth Stations in the 18.3-18.8 GHz (space-to-Earth), 19.7-20.2 GHz (space-to-Earth), 28.35-28.6 GHz (Earth-to...-Earth), 19.7-20.2 GHz (space-to-Earth), 28.35-28.6 GHz (Earth-to-space), and 29.25-30.0 GHz (Earth-to...

  9. Thermal and Behavioral Effects of Exposure to 30 kW, 95-GHz Millimeter Wave Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-04

    AFRL-RH-FS-TR-2017-0016 Thermal and Behavioral Effects of Exposure to 30-kW, 95-GHz Millimeter Wave Energy James E. Parker Eric...30-kW, 95-GHz Millimeter Wave Energy " LELAND JOHNSON, DR-III, DAF Contract Monitor Radio Frequency Bioeffects Branch STEPHANIE A. MILLER, DRIV, DAF...CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-13-D-6368-0007 Thermal and Behavioral Effects of Exposure to 30-kW, 95-GHz Millimeter Wave Energy 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A

  10. A 3 to 6 GHz microwave/photonic transceiver for phased-array interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, Edward; Wanuga, Stephen; Candela, Karen; Scotti, Ronald E.; MacDonald, V. W.; Gates, John V.

    1992-04-01

    The general design and operation of a microwave/photonic transceiver operating in the range 3-6 GHz are presented. The transceiver consists of drop-in submodules with optical fiber pigtails mounted on a brass carrier measuring less than 1 x 1 x 0.1 inch along with MMIC amplifiers and an alumina motherboard. Minimum 3 to 6 GHz return losses of 6 dB have been measured for both the microwave input and the microwave output of the module; the insertion loss is between 19 and 20 dB at most frequencies in the 3-6 GHz band.

  11. A quasioptical resonant-tunneling-diode oscillator operating above 200 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.R.; Parker, C.D.; Calawa, A.R.; Manfra, M.J.; Molvar, K.M. . Lincoln Lab.)

    1993-08-01

    A quasioptical resonant-tunneling-diode oscillator is demonstrated at frequencies above 200 GHz. The oscillator is stabilized by a semiconfocal open cavity. The maximum output power and the linewidth are approximately 50 [mu]W and 20 kHz, respectively, at a fundamental frequency of 210 GHz. By varying the cavity length, the oscillator frequency can be adjusted over a 0.4 GHz range in a repetitive manner. This behavior is explained by analogy with laser oscillators. The quasioptical RTD oscillator is well suited as a local oscillator for low-power radiometric mixers.

  12. Detection of 183 GHz H2O megamaser emission towards NGC 4945

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, E. M. L.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Galametz, M.; Olberg, M.; Conway, J. E.; Belitsky, V.; De Breuck, C.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to search Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 4945, a well-known 22 GHz water megamaser galaxy, for H2O (mega)maser emission at 183 GHz. Methods: We used APEX SEPIA Band 5 (an ALMA Band 5 receiver on the APEX telescope) to perform the observations. Results: We detected 183 GHz H2O maser emission towards NGC 4945 with a peak flux density of ~3 Jy near the galactic systemic velocity. The emission spans a velocity range of several hundred km s-1. We estimate an isotropic luminosity of >1000 L⊙, classifying the emission as a megamaser. A comparison of the 183 GHz spectrum with that observed at 22 GHz suggests that 183 GHz emission also arises from the active galactic nucleus (AGN) central engine. If the 183 GHz emission originates from the circumnuclear disk, then we estimate that a redshifted feature at 1084 km s-1 in the spectrum should arise from a distance of 0.022 pc from the supermassive black hole (1.6 × 105 Schwarzschild radii), i.e. closer than the water maser emission previously detected at 22 GHz. This is only the second time 183 GHz maser emission has been detected towards an AGN central engine (the other galaxy being NGC 3079). It is also the strongest extragalactic millimetre/submillimetre water maser detected to date. Conclusions: Strong millimetre 183 GHz H2O maser emission has now been shown to occur in an external galaxy. For NGC 4945, we believe that the maser emission arises, or is dominated by, emission from the AGN central engine. Emission at higher velocity, i.e. for a Keplerian disk closer to the black hole, has been detected at 183 GHz compared with that for the 22 GHz megamaser. This indicates that millimetre/submillimetre H2O masers can indeed be useful for tracing out more of AGN central engine structures and dynamics than previously probed. Future observations using ALMA Band 5 should unequivocally determine the origin of the emission in this and other galaxies.

  13. Continuously Tunable 250 GHz Gyrotron with a Double Disk Window for DNP-NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jawla, Sudheer; Ni, Qing Zhe; Barnes, Alexander; Guss, William; Daviso, Eugenio; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert; Temkin, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and experimental results from the rebuild of a 250 GHz gyrotron used for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy on a 380 MHz spectrometer. Tuning bandwidth of approximately 2 GHz is easily achieved at a fixed magnetic field of 9.24 T and a beam current of 95 mA producing an average output power of >10 W over the entire tuning band. This tube incorporates a double disk output sapphire window in order to maximize the transmission at 250.58 GHz. DNP Signal enhancement of >125 is achieved on a 13C-Urea sample using this gyrotron. PMID:23539422

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ACT high significance 148 and 218GHz sources (Marsden+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, D.; Gralla, M.; Marriage, T. A.; Switzer, E. R.; Partridge, B.; Massardi, M.; Morales, G.; Addison, G.; Bond, J. R.; Crichton, D.; Das, S.; Devlin, M.; Dunner, R.; Hajian, A.; Hilton, M.; Hincks, A.; Hughes, J. P.; Irwin, K.; Kosowsky, A.; Menanteau, F.; Moodley, K.; Niemack, M.; Page, L.; Reese, E. D.; Schmitt, B.; Sehgal, N.; Sievers, J.; Staggs, S.; Swetz, D.; Thornton, R.; Wollack, E.

    2014-11-01

    The ACT experiment (Swetz et al., 2011ApJS..194...41S) is situated on the slopes of Cerro Toco in the Atacama Desert of Chile at an elevation of 5190m. ACT's latitude gives access to both the northern and southern celestial hemispheres. Observations occurred simultaneously in three frequency bands, at 148GHz (2.0mm), 218GHz (1.4mm) and 277GHz (1.1mm) with angular resolutions of roughly 1.4 , 1.0 and 0.9-arcmin, respectively. (1 data file).

  15. Design of a 17.14 GHz quasi-optical pulse compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Petelin, M. I.; Kuzikov, S. V.; Danilov, Yu. Yu.; Granatstein, V. L.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    1999-07-12

    A quasi-optical version of the ring cavity pulse compressor is considered. This concept is based on the coupling of the input wave to a whispering gallery mode of a barrel-like cavity due to helical corrugations of the cavity wall. Low-power tests of the prototype were carried out at 11.4 GHz and demonstrated reasonable agree-ment between experimental data and theoretical predictions. The design of a similar pulse compressor at 17.14 GHz compatible with the 17.14 GHz, 100 MW gyroklystron currently under development at the University of Maryland is presented.

  16. Design and fabrication of 25-channel 200 GHz AWG based on Si nanowire waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai-li; Zhang, Jia-shun; An, Jun-ming; Li, Jian-guang; Wang, Liang-liang; Wang, Yue; Wu, Yuan-da; Yin, Xiao-jie; Hu, Xiong-wei

    2017-07-01

    A 25-channel 200 GHz arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) based on Si nanowire waveguides is designed, simulated and fabricated. Transfer function method is used in the simulation and error analysis of AWG with width fluctuations. The 25-channel 200 GHz AWG exhibits central channel insertion loss of 6.7 dB, crosstalk of -13 dB, and central wavelength of 1 560.55 nm. The error analysis can explain the experimental results of 25-channel 200 GHz AWG well. By using deep ultraviolet lithography (DUV) and inductively coupled plasma etching (ICP) technologies, the devices are fabricated on silicon- on-insulator (SOI) substrate.

  17. Continuously Tunable 250 GHz Gyrotron with a Double Disk Window for DNP-NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawla, Sudheer; Ni, Qing Zhe; Barnes, Alexander; Guss, William; Daviso, Eugenio; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert; Temkin, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and experimental results from the rebuild of a 250 GHz gyrotron used for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy on a 380 MHz spectrometer. Tuning bandwidth of approximately 2 GHz is easily achieved at a fixed magnetic field of 9.24 T and a beam current of 95 mA producing an average output power of >10 W over the entire tuning band. This tube incorporates a double disk output sapphire window in order to maximize the transmission at 250.58 GHz. DNP Signal enhancement of >125 is achieved on a 13C-Urea sample using this gyrotron.

  18. Continuously Tunable 250 GHz Gyrotron with a Double Disk Window for DNP-NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jawla, Sudheer; Ni, Qing Zhe; Barnes, Alexander; Guss, William; Daviso, Eugenio; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert; Temkin, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and experimental results from the rebuild of a 250 GHz gyrotron used for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy on a 380 MHz spectrometer. Tuning bandwidth of approximately 2 GHz is easily achieved at a fixed magnetic field of 9.24 T and a beam current of 95 mA producing an average output power of >10 W over the entire tuning band. This tube incorporates a double disk output sapphire window in order to maximize the transmission at 250.58 GHz. DNP Signal enhancement of >125 is achieved on a (13)C-Urea sample using this gyrotron.

  19. ASUR -- An airborne SIS receiver for atmospheric measurements of trace gases at 625--760 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Mees, J.; Stadt, H. van de; Panhuyzen, R.A.; Crewell, S.; Nett, H.; Lange, G. de; Kuipers, J.J.

    1995-11-01

    A heterodyne receiver making use of a SIS waveguide mixer with integrated horn and single backshort tuner has been built. It has been used for a series of airborne measurements of atmospheric trace gases, such as HCl and ClO, above northern Europe during the winter of 1993 and 1994. The receiver is suitable for measurements in the range of 625--760 GHz and shows stable operation in the airplane together with high sensitivity. Best achieved noise temperature are T{sub DSB} = 310 K at 708 GHz in the laboratory and T{sub SSB} = 1,500 K at 625 GHz for the complete system in the airplane.

  20. Efficient Three-Party Quantum Dialogue Protocol Based on the Continuous Variable GHZ States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhen-Bo; Gong, Li-Hua; Zhu, Qi-Biao; Cheng, Shan; Zhou, Nan-Run

    2016-07-01

    Based on the continuous variable GHZ entangled states, an efficient three-party quantum dialogue protocol is devised, where each legitimate communication party could simultaneously deduce the secret information of the other two parties with perfect efficiency. The security is guaranteed by the correlation of the continuous variable GHZ entangled states and the randomly selected decoy states. Furthermore, the three-party quantum dialogue protocol is directly generalized to an N-party quantum dialogue protocol by using the n-tuple continuous variable GHZ entangled states.

  1. A Ka-band (32 GHz) beacon link experiment (KABLE) with Mars Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, A. L.; Hansen, D. M.; Mileant, A.; Hartop, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    A proposal for a Ka-Band (32 GHz) Link Experiment (KABLE) with the Mars Observer mission was submitted to NASA. The experiment will rely on the fourth harmonic of the spacecraft X-band transmitter to generate a 33.6 GHz signal. The experiment will rely also on the Deep Space Network (DSN) receiving station equipped to simultaneously receive X- and Ka-band signals. The experiment will accurately measure the spacecraft-to-Earth telecommunication link performance at Ka-band and X-band (8.4 GHz).

  2. Beyond G-band : a 235 GHz InP MMIC amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Douglas; Samoska, Lorene; Fung, A. K.; Lee, Karen; Lai, Richard; Grundbacher, Ronald; Liu, Po-Hsin; Raja, Rohit

    2005-01-01

    We present results on an InP monolithic millimeter- wave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifier having 10-dB gain at 235 GHz. We designed this circuit and fabricated the chip in Northrop Grumman Space Technology's (NGST) 0.07- m InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) process. Using a WR3 (220-325 GHz) waveguide vector network analyzer system interfaced to waveguide wafer probes, we measured this chip on-wafer for -parameters. To our knowledge, this is the first time a WR3 waveguide on-wafer measurement system has been used to measure gain in a MMIC amplifier above 230 GHz.

  3. Beyond G-band : a 235 GHz InP MMIC amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Douglas; Samoska, Lorene; Fung, A. K.; Lee, Karen; Lai, Richard; Grundbacher, Ronald; Liu, Po-Hsin; Raja, Rohit

    2005-01-01

    We present results on an InP monolithic millimeter- wave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifier having 10-dB gain at 235 GHz. We designed this circuit and fabricated the chip in Northrop Grumman Space Technology's (NGST) 0.07- m InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) process. Using a WR3 (220-325 GHz) waveguide vector network analyzer system interfaced to waveguide wafer probes, we measured this chip on-wafer for -parameters. To our knowledge, this is the first time a WR3 waveguide on-wafer measurement system has been used to measure gain in a MMIC amplifier above 230 GHz.

  4. Wideband 220 GHz solid state power amplifier MMIC within minimal die size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheron, Jerome; Grossman, Erich N.

    2014-05-01

    A wideband and compact solid state power amplifier MMIC is simulated around 220 GHz. It utilizes 6 μm emitter length common base HBTs from a 250 nm InP HBT technology. Specific power cells and power combiners are simulated in order to minimize the width of the die, which must not exceed 300 μm to avoid multimode propagation in the substrate. Four stages are implemented over a total area of the (275x1840) μm2. Simulations of this power amplifier indicate a minimum output power of 14 dBm associated with 16 dB of power gain from 213 GHz to 240 GHz.

  5. Superconducting microstripline diplexer for CMB studies in the 200-300 GHz atmospheric window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Elizabeth; Timbie, Peter T.

    2017-01-01

    The B-mode polarization signals of the Cosmic Microwave Background are obscured by astrophysical foregrounds. Future ground-based measurement programs such as CMB-S4 will remove foregrounds by placing at least two observing bands in each of the atmospheric windows, from about 30 GHz to about 300 GHz. We designed a superconducting microstripline filter to split the highest frequency window, from about 200 - 300 GHz, into two bands. We chose the centers of the bands to optimize removal of foreground radiation from Galactic dust. We present electromagnetic simulations of the design and measurements of a scale model of the filter.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 86 and 43GHz observations of NRAO 150 (Agudo+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agudo, I.; Bach, U.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Marscher, A. P.; Gonidakis, I.; Diamond, P. J.; Perucho, M.; Alef, W.; Graham, D. A.; Witzel, A.; Zensus, J. A.; Bremer, M.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Barrena, R.

    2008-01-01

    The data set presented here consists of 5 VLBI images at 86GHz taken with the Global mm VLBI Array (GMVA, and its predecessor, the CMVA) covering the time range from October 2001 to April 2004, and 34 Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) images taken at 43GHz from June 1997 to February 2007. Among these 34 images, 20 obtained from June 1997 to May 2002 were taken as calibration measurements of the SiO maser monitoring program of TX Cam. A new 8.4GHz VLBA image obtained in June 2002 is also presented here. (3 data files).

  7. Wake Vortex Tracking Using a 35 GHz Pulsed Doppler Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neece, Robert T.; Britt, Charles L.; White, Joseph H.; Mudukutore, Ashok; Nguyen, Chi; Hooper, Bill

    2005-01-01

    A 35 GHz, pulsed-Doppler radar system has been designed and assembled for wake vortex detection and tracking in low visibility conditions. Aircraft wake vortices continue to be an important factor in determining safe following distances or spacings for aircraft in the terminal area. Currently, under instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), aircraft adhere to conservative, fixed following-distance guidelines based primarily on aircraft weight classifications. When ambient conditions are such that vortices will either drift or dissipate, leaving the flight corridor clear, the prescribed spacings are unnecessarily long and result in decreased airport throughput. There is a potential for significant airport efficiency improvement, if a system can be employed to aid regulators and pilots in setting safe and efficient following distances based on airport conditions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Federal Aviation Agency, and Volpe National Transportation Systems Center have promoted and worked to develop systems that would increase airport capacity and provide for safe reductions in aircraft separation. The NASA Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS), a wake vortex spacing system that can provide dynamic adjustment of spacings based on real-time airport weather conditions, has demonstrated that Lidar systems can be successfully used to detect and track vortices in clear air conditions. To fill the need for detection capability in low-visibility conditions, a 35 GHz, pulsed-Doppler radar system is being investigated for use as a complimentary, low-visibility sensor for wake vortices. The radar sensor provides spatial and temporal information similar to that provided by Lidar, but under weather conditions that a Lidar cannot penetrate. Currently, we are analyzing the radar design based upon the data and experience gained during the wake vortex Lidar deployment with AVOSS at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. As part of this study

  8. A 3 Ghz photoelectron gun for high beam intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, R.; Braun, H.; Dehler, M.

    1995-12-31

    The CLIC Test Facility (CTF) for new accelerator structures of the proposed Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is to be equipped with a new RF gun containing a laser driven photocathode. The new 3 GHz gun with photocathode shall produce a bunch train of 48 electron bunches of 25 nC charge each with a bunch length of 8 - 15 ps fwhm. The new RF gun consists of 2{1/2} cells and accelerates the beam to an energy of 7 MeV with a peak field gradient Ez = 100 MV/m. The strong space charge forces at low beam energy caused by the high charge density of the electron bunches must be contained by radial and longitudinal RF focusing in the RF gun. Radial RF focusing is applied by a conical backplane around the photocathode in the first cell where the electrons have a low energy. Longitudinal RF focusing is obtained by varying the length of each of the three cells of the gun. The total electric charge of the bunch train exceeds 1{mu}C and causes strong beam loading to the RF structures so that the stored energy is reduced to half of the unloaded RF energy. The RF gun under construction is being optimized by MAFIA beam simulations for an injector assembly comprising a second accelerating RF structure of 4 cells and an intermediate solenoid magnet correcting the beam divergence of the 2{1/2} cell gun. The scheme with two accelerating RF sections will provide a linear energy increase along the bunch suitable for further compression of the bunch length in a magnetic chicane.

  9. Kinetic inductance detectors for CMB polarimetry at 100 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowitz, Amy E.

    Kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) are a promising technology for astronomical observations over a wide range of wavelengths in the mm and submm regime. Simple fabrication, in as little as one lithographic layer, and passive frequency-domain multiplexing, with readout of up to ˜1000 pixels on a single line with a single cold amplifier, make KIDs an attractive solution for high pixel-count detector arrays. Described in this dissertation is the design, fabrication, and testing of a 20-pixel prototype array of kinetic inductance detectors intended for cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimetry in a band centered at 3 mm (100 GHz), which is an important band for CMB observations from the ground. We first show that the theoretical performance of idealized KIDs rivals that of their primary competitor detector technology, superconducting transition edge sensors (TESs). Next, we describe the design process, which employed both simulation and semianalytic calculations to optimize the resonant frequencies and optical coupling. Where a specific observing scenario was required to motivate design choices, we have used the QUBIC telescope, a bolometric interferometer designed to study the CMB polarization anisotropy initially from Alto Chorillos, Argentina and later from Dome C, Antarctica. Finally, we describe the fabrication and testing of three prototype arrays made with different materials and geometries. In two iterations of the device geometry, we demonstrate response to mm-wave illumination and improvements in control of pixel center frequencies and coupling quality factors. Additionally, we find that molybdenum is not well-suited to mm-wave KIDs because of excessive thermal dissipation resulting from double-gap behavior of superconducting molybdenum. Titanium nitride trilayers perform better, but exhibit complex and poorly-understood non-Mattis-Bardeen behavior. The superconducting properties of this material will need to be better understood before it can be used

  10. Two-Dimensional Pulsed TRIPLE at 95 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epel, B.; Goldfarb, D.

    2000-09-01

    The one-dimensional (1D) pulsed TRIPLE resonance experiment, introduced by Mehring et al. (M. Mehring, P. Höfer, and A. Grupp, Ber. Bunseges. Phys. Chem. 91, 1132-1137 (1987)) is a modification of the standard Davies ENDOR experiment where an additional RF π-pulse is applied during the mixing time. While the first RF pulse is set to one of the ENDOR transitions, the frequency of the second RF pulse is scanned to generate the TRIPLE spectrum. The difference between this spectrum and the ENDOR spectrum yields the difference TRIPLE spectrum, which exhibits only ENDOR lines that belong to the same MS manifold as the one selected by the first RF pulse. We have extended this experiment in two dimensions (2D) by sweeping the frequencies of both RF pulses. This experiment is particularly useful when the spectrum is congested and consists of signals originating from different paramagnetic centers. The connectivities between the peaks in the 2D spectrum enable a straightforward assignment of the signals to their respective centers and MS manifolds, thus providing the relative signs of hyperfine couplings. Carrying out the experiment at high fields has the additional advantage that nuclei with different nuclear gyromagnetic ratios are well separated. This is particularly true for protons which appear at significantly higher frequencies than other nuclei. The feasibility and effectiveness of the experiment is demonstrated at W-band (94.9 GHz) on a crystal of Cu2+-doped l-histidine. Homonuclear 1H-1H, 14N/35Cl-14N/35Cl and heteronuclear 1H-14N/35Cl 2D TRIPLE spectra were measured and from the various connectivities in the 2D map the 1H, 14N, and 35Cl signals that belong to two different Cu2+ centers were identified and grouped according to their MS manifolds.

  11. Passive 350 GHz Video Imaging Systems for Security Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, E.; May, T.; Born, D.; Zieger, G.; Anders, S.; Zakosarenko, V.; Meyer, H.-G.; Schäffel, C.

    2015-10-01

    Passive submillimeter-wave imaging is a concept that has been in the focus of interest as a promising technology for personal security screening for a number of years. In contradiction to established portal-based millimeter-wave scanning techniques, it allows for scanning people from a distance in real time with high throughput and without a distinct inspection procedure. This opens up new possibilities for scanning, which directly address an urgent security need of modern societies: protecting crowds and critical infrastructure from the growing threat of individual terror attacks. Considering the low radiometric contrast of indoor scenes in the submillimeter range, this objective calls for an extremely high detector sensitivity that can only be achieved using cooled detectors. Our approach to this task is a series of passive standoff video cameras for the 350 GHz band that represent an evolving concept and a continuous development since 2007. Arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TES), operated at temperatures below 1 K, are used as radiation detectors. By this means, background limited performance (BLIP) mode is achieved, providing the maximum possible signal to noise ratio. At video rates, this leads to a temperature resolution well below 1 K. The imaging system is completed by reflector optics based on free-form mirrors. For object distances of 5-25 m, a field of view up to 2 m height and a diffraction-limited spatial resolution in the order of 1-2 cm is provided. Opto-mechanical scanning systems are part of the optical setup and capable of frame rates of up to 25 frames per second.

  12. The 18/30 GHz fixed communications system service demand assessment. Volume 2: Main text

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriszeski, T.; Reiner, P.; Rogers, J.; Terbo, W.

    1979-01-01

    The total demand for communications services, and satellite transmission services at the 4/6 GHz, 12/14 GHz, and 18/30 GHz frequencies is assessed. The services are voice, video, and data services. Traffic demand, by service, is distributed by geographical regions, population density, and distance between serving points. Further distribution of traffic is made among four major end user groups: business, government, institutions and private individuals. A traffic demand analysis is performed on a typical metropolitan city to examine service distribution trends. The projected cost of C and Ku band satellite systems are compared on an individual service basis to projected terrestrial rates. Separation of traffic between transmission systems, including 18/30 GHz systems, is based on cost, user, and technical considerations.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 22GHz image of 3C 273 (Bruni+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruni, G.; Gomez, J. L.; Casadio, C.; Lobanov, A.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Sokolovsky, K. V.; Lisakov, M. M.; Bach, U.; Marscher, A.; Jorstad, S.; Anderson, J. M.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Savolainen, T.; Vega-Garcia, L.; Fuentes, A.; Zensus, J. A.; Alberdi, A.; Lee, S.-S.; Lu, R.-S.; Perez-Torres, M.; Ros, E.

    2017-07-01

    A global ground array of 22 antennas was used to perform observations, including VLBA (Sc, Hn, Nl, Fd, La, Kp, Pt, Ov, Br, Mk), EVN (Hh, Mc, Nt, Tr, Jb, Ef, Ys), Long Baseline Array (-LBA- At, Mp, Ho, Cd), and two Kvazar antennas (Sv, Zc), plus Kalyazin (managed by ASC, Russia), and Green Bank (NRAO, USA). The observations took place on January 18-19, 2014, for a total of 16.8 hours, and at three different frequencies: 15GHz, 22GHz, and 43GHz. RA was involved only for the 22GHz part, while for the other bands only the VLBA was used. Both the Green Bank and Pushchino tracking station took part in the experiment. A RA-compatible total bandwidth of 32MHz, split into two 16-MHz IFs, was used. RA was scheduled to observe three consecutive 9.5 minute scans every 1.25 hours, to allow for antenna cooling. (2 data files).

  14. Results of RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Nakagawa, T; Haba, H; Tamura, M; Aihara, T; Fujimaki, M; Komiyama, M; Uchiyama, A; Kamigaito, O

    2012-02-01

    We measured the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions and x-ray heat load for RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz microwaves under the various conditions. The beam intensity of Xe(20+) became maximum at B(min) ∼ 0.65 T, which was ∼65% of the magnetic field strength of electron cyclotron resonance (B(ECR)) for 28 GHz microwaves. We observed that the heat load of x-ray increased with decreasing gas pressure and field gradient at resonance zone. It seems that the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions with 28 GHz is higher than that with 18 GHz at same RF power.

  15. First results of the 2.45 GHz Oshima electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Asaji, T.; Nakamura, T.; Furuse, M.; Hitobo, T.; Uchida, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Kato, Y.

    2016-02-15

    A new electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been constructed at Oshima College with a 2.45 GHz magnetron microwave source and permanent magnets employed as the main components. In addition, a solid-state power amplifier with a frequency range of 2.5–6.0 GHz was installed to study two-frequency plasma heating. Three solenoid coils were set up for adjusting the axial magnetic fields. Argon plasma generation and ion beam production have been conducted during the first year of operation. Ion current densities in the ECR plasma were measured using a biased disk. For 2.45 and 4.65 GHz two-frequency plasma heating, the ion density was approximately 1.5 times higher than that of 2.45 GHz single-frequency heating.

  16. The 30/20 GHz fixed communications systems service demand assessment. Volume 3: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriszeski, T.; Reiner, P.; Rogers, J.; Terbo, W.

    1979-01-01

    The market analysis of voice, video, and data 18/30 GHz communications systems services and satellite transmission services is discussed. Detail calculations, computer displays of traffic, survey questionnaires, and detailed service forecasts are presented.

  17. The effects of rain on system performance for the NASA 30/20 GHz Experimental Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    A 30/20 GHz Experimental Communications Satellite System is presently under study by NASA to evaluate system technology and high data rate multi-beam communications techniques. In this paper the expected system performance for the 30/20 GHz Satellite is presented, for both trunking and customer premise service (CPS) modes, with particular emphasis on the effects of severe rain events on link reliability. A rain attenuation prediction model technique is described and path and two-way link availabilities are developed for the various modes of operation. The results indicate that acceptable link availabilities can be expected on the 30/20 GHz system for both the trunking and CPS modes, and the experimental satellite system can form the basis for verification of system performance for operational 30/20 GHz systems.

  18. Monitoring global vegetation using Nimbus-7 37 GHz data - Some empirical relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Tucker, C. J.

    1987-01-01

    The difference of the vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures observed by the 37 GHz channel of the SMMR on board the Nimbus-7 satellite are correlated temporally with three indicators of vegetation density, namely the temporal variation of the atmospheric CO2 concentration at Mauna Loa (Hawaii), rainfall over the Sahel and the normalized difference vegetation index derived from the AVHRR on board the NOAA-7 satellite. SMMR 37 GHz and AVHRR provide complementary data sets for monitoring global vegetation, the 37 GHz data being more suitable for arid and semiarid regions as these data are more sensitive to changes in sparse vegetation. The 37-GHz data might be useful for understanding desertification and indexing Co2 exchange between the biosphere and the atmosphere.

  19. Miniature Packaging Concept for LNAs in the 200-300 GHz Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Fung, Andy; Varonen, Mikko; Lin, Robert; Peralta, Alejandro; Soria, Mary; Lee, Choonsup; Padmanabhan, Sharmila; Sarkozy, Stephen; Lai, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we describe new miniaturized low noise amplifier modules which we developed for incorporation in small-scale satellites or Cubesats, and which exhibit similar or better performance compared to previously reported LNAs in the literature. We have targeted the WR4 (170-260 GHz) and WR3 (220-325 GHz) waveguide bands for the module development. The modules include two different methods of E-plane probes which have been developed for low loss, and stability at high frequencies. MMIC LNAs were also developed for these frequency ranges and fabricated in Northrop Grumman Corporation's 35 nm InP HEMT technology, and we have experimentally verified that noise performance is lower than reported in prior work. The best results include a miniature LNA module with 550K noise at 224 GHz, and a wideband LNA module with 15 dB gain from 230-280 GHz.

  20. A 60 GHz Planar Frequency Multiplier Feed on a Silicon Dielectric-Filled Parabola

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, M.; Fujiwra, B. H.; Humphrey, D. A.; Martin, S. C.; Smith, R. P.; Siegel, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A novel all-planar quasi-optical schottky varactor diode frequency doubler has been fabricated and has produced more than 1 mW of output power at 600 GHz with an approximately 2 percent conversion efficiency.