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Sample records for 1324-n surface impoundment

  1. Post-Closure Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 1324-N Surface Impoundment and 1324-NA Percolation Pond

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2004-04-02

    The 1324-N Surface Impoundment and the 1324-NA Percolation Pond, located in the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site, are regulated under the Resource Consevation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Surface and underground features of the facilities have been removed and laboratory analyses showed that soil met the closure performance standards. These sites have been backfilled and revegetated.

  2. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 1301-N, 1324-N/NA, and 1325-N RCRA Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2002-06-08

    The 1301-N and 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities, the 1324-N Surface Impoundment, and the 1324-NA Percolation Pond, located in the 100 N Area of the Hanford Site, are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). The closure plans for these facilities stipulate that groundwater is monitored according to the 100-N Pilot Project: Proposed Consolidated Groundwater Monitoring Program (BHI-00725). This document supplements the consolidated plan by providing information on sampling and analysis protocols, quality assurance, data management, and a conceptual model for the RCRA sites. Monitoring well networks, constituents, and sampling frequency remain the same as in the consolidated plan or the previous groundwater monitoring plan (Hartman 1996).

  3. 40 CFR 268.14 - Surface impoundment exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface impoundment exemptions. 268.14... Standards § 268.14 Surface impoundment exemptions. (a) This section defines additional circumstances under which an otherwise prohibited waste may continue to be placed in a surface impoundment. (b) Wastes...

  4. 40 CFR 268.4 - Treatment surface impoundment exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... required: I certify under penalty of law that the requirements of 40 CFR 268.4(a)(3) have been met for all... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Treatment surface impoundment... WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS General § 268.4 Treatment surface impoundment exemption....

  5. 40 CFR 264.1085 - Standards: Surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Air Emission Standards for Tanks, Surface Impoundments, and Containers § 264.1085 Standards: Surface impoundments. (a) The provisions of this section apply to the control of air pollutant...

  6. 40 CFR 264.1085 - Standards: Surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Air Emission Standards for Tanks, Surface Impoundments, and Containers § 264.1085 Standards: Surface impoundments. (a) The provisions of this section apply to the control of air pollutant...

  7. 40 CFR 264.1085 - Standards: Surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Air Emission Standards for Tanks, Surface Impoundments, and Containers § 264.1085 Standards: Surface impoundments. (a) The provisions of this section apply to the control of air pollutant...

  8. 40 CFR 264.1085 - Standards: Surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Air Emission Standards for Tanks, Surface Impoundments, and Containers § 264.1085 Standards: Surface impoundments. (a) The provisions of this section apply to the control of air pollutant...

  9. 40 CFR 264.1085 - Standards: Surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Air Emission Standards for Tanks, Surface Impoundments, and Containers § 264.1085 Standards: Surface impoundments. (a) The provisions of this section apply to the control of air pollutant...

  10. 40 CFR 265.1086 - Standards: Surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WASTES (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Air Emission Standards for Tanks, Surface Impoundments, and Containers... air pollutant emissions from surface impoundments for which § 265.1083(b) of this subpart...

  11. 40 CFR 268.4 - Treatment surface impoundment exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... required: I certify under penalty of law that the requirements of 40 CFR 268.4(a)(3) have been met for all... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Treatment surface impoundment... WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS General § 268.4 Treatment surface impoundment exemption....

  12. 40 CFR 268.4 - Treatment surface impoundment exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... required: I certify under penalty of law that the requirements of 40 CFR 268.4(a)(3) have been met for all... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Treatment surface impoundment... WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS General § 268.4 Treatment surface impoundment exemption....

  13. 40 CFR 61.344 - Standards: Surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of the surface impoundment is maintained at a pressure less than atmospheric pressure, then paragraph... methods specified in § 61.355(h) of this subpart; and (3) The pressure is monitored continuously to ensure that the pressure in the enclosure of the surface impoundment remains below atmospheric pressure....

  14. 40 CFR 61.344 - Standards: Surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of the surface impoundment is maintained at a pressure less than atmospheric pressure, then paragraph... methods specified in § 61.355(h) of this subpart; and (3) The pressure is monitored continuously to ensure that the pressure in the enclosure of the surface impoundment remains below atmospheric pressure....

  15. FINAL CLOSURE PLAN SURFACE IMPOUNDMENTS CLOSURE, SITE 300

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, J E; Scott, J E; Mathews, S E

    2004-09-29

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory of the University of California (LLNL) operates two Class II surface impoundments that store wastewater that is discharged from a number of buildings located on the Site 300 Facility (Site 300). The wastewater is the by-product of explosives processing. Reduction in the volume of water discharged from these buildings over the past several years has significantly reduced the wastewater storage needs. In addition, the impoundments were constructed in 1984, and the high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane liners are nearing the end of their service life. The purpose of this project is to clean close the surface impoundments and provide new wastewater storage using portable, above ground storage tanks at six locations. The tanks will be installed prior to closure of the impoundments and will include heaters for allowing evaporation during relatively cool weather. Golder Associates (Golder) has prepared this Final Closure Plan (Closure Plan) on behalf of LLNL to address construction associated with the clean closure of the impoundments. This Closure Plan complies with State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Section 21400 of the California Code of Regulations Title 27 (27 CCR {section}21400). As required by these regulations and guidance, this Plan provides the following information: (1) A site characterization, including the site location, history, current operations, and geology and hydrogeology; (2) The regulatory requirements relevant to clean closure of the impoundments; (3) The closure procedures; and, (4) The procedures for validation and documentation of clean closure.

  16. 40 CFR 265.1086 - Standards: Surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 265.1086 Standards: Surface impoundments. (a) The provisions of this section apply to the control of... the use of this section for such air emission control. (b) The owner or operator shall control air...) A cover that is vented through a closed-vent system to a control device in accordance with...

  17. 40 CFR 265.1086 - Standards: Surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... § 265.1086 Standards: Surface impoundments. (a) The provisions of this section apply to the control of... the use of this section for such air emission control. (b) The owner or operator shall control air...) A cover that is vented through a closed-vent system to a control device in accordance with...

  18. 40 CFR 265.1086 - Standards: Surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... § 265.1086 Standards: Surface impoundments. (a) The provisions of this section apply to the control of... the use of this section for such air emission control. (b) The owner or operator shall control air...) A cover that is vented through a closed-vent system to a control device in accordance with...

  19. 40 CFR 268.4 - Treatment surface impoundment exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... required: I certify under penalty of law that the requirements of 40 CFR 268.4(a)(3) have been met for all... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Treatment surface impoundment exemption. 268.4 Section 268.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  20. 40 CFR 61.344 - Standards: Surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... removal of treatment residuals in accordance with 40 CFR 268.4 or closure of the surface impoundment in accordance with 40 CFR 264.228. (Note: the treatment residuals generated by these activities may be subject... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for...

  1. 40 CFR 61.344 - Standards: Surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... removal of treatment residuals in accordance with 40 CFR 268.4 or closure of the surface impoundment in accordance with 40 CFR 264.228. (Note: the treatment residuals generated by these activities may be subject... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for...

  2. 40 CFR 61.344 - Standards: Surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... removal of treatment residuals in accordance with 40 CFR 268.4 or closure of the surface impoundment in accordance with 40 CFR 264.228. (Note: the treatment residuals generated by these activities may be subject... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for...

  3. 40 CFR 63.687 - Standards: Surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in accordance with the applicable provisions specified in 40 CFR 63 subpart QQ—National Emission... device in accordance with all applicable provisions specified in 40 CFR 63 subpart QQ—National Emission... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Surface impoundments....

  4. An Exercise in Evaluating the Contamination Potential of Surface Impoundments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinker, John R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Outlines a laboratory procedure which enables students to evaluate the contamination potential of surface impoundments and apply basic principles of hydrogeology to the land disposal of waste material. Includes a list of materials needed and directions for the instructor. (Author/DC)

  5. 40 CFR 63.942 - Standards-Surface impoundment floating membrane cover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operations, and form a continuous barrier over the entire surface area of the liquid. (2) The cover shall be... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards-Surface impoundment floating... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Surface Impoundments § 63.942...

  6. 40 CFR 63.134 - Process wastewater provisions-surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Manufacturing Industry for Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater § 63.134 Process wastewater provisions—surface impoundments. (a) For each surface impoundment that receives, manages, or... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Process wastewater...

  7. 40 CFR 63.134 - Process wastewater provisions-surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Manufacturing Industry for Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater § 63.134 Process wastewater provisions—surface impoundments. (a) For each surface impoundment that receives, manages, or... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Process wastewater...

  8. 40 CFR 63.7907 - What are my inspection and monitoring requirements for surface impoundments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are my inspection and monitoring requirements for surface impoundments? 63.7907 Section 63.7907 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Remediation Surface Impoundments § 63.7907 What are my inspection and monitoring requirements for...

  9. 40 CFR 63.7907 - What are my inspection and monitoring requirements for surface impoundments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true What are my inspection and monitoring requirements for surface impoundments? 63.7907 Section 63.7907 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Remediation Surface Impoundments § 63.7907 What are my inspection and monitoring requirements for...

  10. 40 CFR 63.7907 - What are my inspection and monitoring requirements for surface impoundments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are my inspection and monitoring requirements for surface impoundments? 63.7907 Section 63.7907 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Remediation Surface Impoundments § 63.7907 What are my inspection and monitoring requirements for...

  11. 40 CFR 63.7907 - What are my inspection and monitoring requirements for surface impoundments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are my inspection and monitoring requirements for surface impoundments? 63.7907 Section 63.7907 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Remediation Surface Impoundments § 63.7907 What are my inspection and monitoring requirements for...

  12. 40 CFR 63.7907 - What are my inspection and monitoring requirements for surface impoundments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are my inspection and monitoring requirements for surface impoundments? 63.7907 Section 63.7907 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Remediation Surface Impoundments § 63.7907 What are my inspection and monitoring requirements for...

  13. 40 CFR 270.17 - Specific part B information requirements for surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Specific part B information requirements for surface impoundments. 270.17 Section 270.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... an engineering report describing how the surface impoundment is designed and is or will...

  14. 40 CFR 270.17 - Specific part B information requirements for surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Specific part B information requirements for surface impoundments. 270.17 Section 270.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... an engineering report describing how the surface impoundment is designed and is or will...

  15. 40 CFR 270.17 - Specific part B information requirements for surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... overtopping; and (7) Structural integrity of dikes; (c) A description of how each surface impoundment... certification by a qualified engineer which attests to the structural integrity of each dike, as required...

  16. Transport and dispersion of pollutants in surface impoundments: a finite difference model

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.

    1980-07-01

    A surface impoundment model by finite-difference (SIMFD) has been developed. SIMFD computes the flow rate, velocity field, and the concentration distribution of pollutants in surface impoundments with any number of islands located within the region of interest. Theoretical derivations and numerical algorithm are described in detail. Instructions for the application of SIMFD and listings of the FORTRAN IV source program are provided. Two sample problems are given to illustrate the application and validity of the model.

  17. Final Clean Closure Report Site 300 Surface Impoundments Closure Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California

    SciTech Connect

    Haskell, K

    2006-02-14

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory operated two Class II surface impoundments that stored wastewater that was discharged from a number of buildings located on the Site 300 Facility (Site 300). The wastewater was the by-product of explosives processing. Reduction in the volume of water discharged from these buildings over the past several years significantly reduced the wastewater storage needs. In addition, the impoundments were constructed in 1984, and the high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane liners were nearing the end of their service life. The purpose of this project was to clean close the surface impoundments and provide new wastewater storage using above ground storage tanks at six locations. The tanks were installed and put into service prior to closure of the impoundments. This Clean Closure Report (Closure Report) complies with State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Section 21400 of the California Code of Regulations Title 27 (27 CCR section 21400). As required by these regulations and guidance, this Closure Report provides the following information: (1) a brief site description; (2) the regulatory requirements relevant to clean closure of the impoundments; (3) the closure procedures; and (4) the findings and documentation of clean closure.

  18. 40 CFR 63.134 - Process wastewater provisions-surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... treatment residuals in accordance with 40 CFR 268.4 or closure of the surface impoundment in accordance with 40 CFR 264.228. (2) Floating flexible membrane covers shall meet the requirements specified in... to float on the liquid surface during normal operations, and to form a continuous barrier over...

  19. 40 CFR 63.134 - Process wastewater provisions-surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... treatment residuals in accordance with 40 CFR 268.4 or closure of the surface impoundment in accordance with 40 CFR 264.228. (2) Floating flexible membrane covers shall meet the requirements specified in... to float on the liquid surface during normal operations, and to form a continuous barrier over...

  20. 40 CFR 270.17 - Specific part B information requirements for surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... an engineering report describing how the surface impoundment is designed and is or will be...(b), submit detailed plans and engineering and hydrogeologic reports, as appropriate, describing... detection system is located in a saturated zone, submit detailed plans and an engineering report...

  1. 40 CFR 63.134 - Process wastewater provisions-surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... that is either: (A) High density polyethylene (HDPE) with a thickness no less than 2.5 millimeters (100... treatment residuals in accordance with 40 CFR 268.4 or closure of the surface impoundment in accordance with 40 CFR 264.228. (2) Floating flexible membrane covers shall meet the requirements specified...

  2. 75 FR 64974 - Notice of Data Availability on Coal Combustion Residual Surface Impoundments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... data posted in the docket for EPA's proposed rulemaking (75 FR 51434, August 20, 2010) on the Disposal of Coal Combustion Residuals from Electric Utilities. The Agency is seeking public comment on how, if... Coal Combustion Residual Surface Impoundments AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)....

  3. 40 CFR 270.17 - Specific part B information requirements for surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... under § 270.14(b)(7); (f) A description of how hazardous waste residues and contaminated materials will... AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT... of hazardous waste in surface impoundments must provide the following additional information: (a)...

  4. 40 CFR 63.942 - Standards-Surface impoundment floating membrane cover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... material integrity for the intended service life of the material. (3) The cover shall be installed in a..., and will maintain the integrity of the equipment throughout its intended service life. Factors to be... from the bottom of surface impoundment. (2) Opening of a spring-loaded pressure-vacuum relief...

  5. An experimental approach to determining subsurface leakage from a surface impoundment using a radioisotope tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Story, J.D.; Larsen, I.L.; Schultz, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    Bromine-82, a 35.3-h half-life radionuclide, was used as a tracer to determine the paths and rates of leakage from an unlined, 1,000,000-gal (3,785,000 L), surface impoundment at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Since the impoundment is underlain and surrounded by storm sewer and sanitary sewer lines (most of them predating the impoundment), known and suspected leak sites in storm drain catch basins and sanitary sewer manholes were sampled periodically and analyzed for /sup 82/Br. A series of four ground water monitoring wells - three downgradient and one upgradient from the impoundment - were also sampled for /sup 82/Br. Although the catch basin and manhole samples picked up /sup 82/Br in leakage from the impoundment less than 5 h after application of the tracer, the monitoring well samples did not contain detectable levels of the radionuclide. It was concluded that the monitoring wells were sampling groundwater moving through the formation, whereas the storm drains and manholes were sampling water leading rapidly through secondary porosity and along preferred pathways. The decline in tracer concentration as a function of time was used to determine the residence time of water in the pond and hence the flow rate through the pond. This flow rate, when compared with the known outflow rate, indicated that the leakage flow was small. Hence, the main value of the test was to identify rapid leakage pathways. The experiment demonstrates the need for sampling subsurface drain systems as part of an integrated monitoring system for leak detection. The effectiveness of /sup 82/Br as a tracer for rapid leaks was also shown.

  6. Experimental approach to determining subsurface leakage from a surface impoundment using a radioisotope tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Story, J.D.; Larsen, I.L.; Schultz, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    Bromine-82, a 35.3-h half-life radionuclide, was used as a tracer to determine the paths and rates of leakage from an unlined, 1,000,000-gal (3,785,000 L), surface impoundment at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Since the impoundment is underlain and surrounded by storm sewer and sanitary sewer lines (most of them predating the impoundment), known and suspected leak sites in storm drain catch basins and sanitary sewer manholes were sampled periodically and analyzed for /sup 82/Br. A series of four ground water monitoring wells - three downgradient and one upgradient from the impoundment - were also sampled for /sup 82/Br. Although the catch basin and manhole samples picked up /sup 82/Br in leakage from the impoundment less than 5 h after application of the tracer, the monitoring well samples did not contain detectable levels of the radionuclide. It was concluded that the monitoring wells were sampling groundwater moving through the formation, whereas the storm drains and manholes were sampling water leaking rapidly through secondary porosity and along preferred pathways. The decline in tracer concentration as a function of time was used to determine the residence time of water in the pond and hence the flow rate through the pond. This flow rate, when compared with the known outflow rate, indicated that the leakage flow was small. Hence, the main value of the test was to identify rapid leakage pathways. The experiment demonstrates the need for sampling subsurface drain systems as part of an integrated monitoring system for leak detection. The effectiveness of /sup 82/Br as a tracer for rapid leaks was also shown.

  7. Technical work plan for Surface Impoundments Operable Unit engineering support studies

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This document provides a comprehensive work plan which, when utilized as a data collection guide for field activities, will provide the necessary information required to complete a report on geotechnical properties of the sediments contained in the Surface Impoundments Operable Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Detailed guidance is provided for the following activities: collection of samples from the impoundments; compressive strength testing of the raw sediments; compressive strength testing of the structurally modified (lime and cement additives) sediments; testing for sediment physical properties and settling rates; testing for sediment dewatering characteristics; testing for radiation activity during the field work; testing for polymer additions that may enhance settling. The work plan additionally provides guidance and examples for the preparation of documents necessary to establish readiness for safe and satisfactory performance of the field activities. An outline for the format requested for a report of these data is also provided.

  8. Use and abandonment of surface impoundments for the disposal of oil-field produced waters

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Surface impoundments, or sumps, are utilized for the disposal of oil-field produced water through percolation and evaporation in California's San Joaquin basin. Environmental concerns have resulted in increased regulation of sumps. Surface disposal of produced waters into unlined sumps is permitted where the quality of the produced water meets the stated criteria in the applicable basin plan as regulated by the local regional water quality control board. In the San Joaquin Basin, surface disposal is initially governed by the Tulare Lake basin plan (5D). A basin plan permits disposal into sumps of produced waters which do not exceed a maximum electrical conductivity, chlorides content, or boron content in areas which overlie useable groundwater. If the produced water exceeds any one of the maximum constituent levels, regulation of surface disposal passes to Title 23, California code of Regulations, sections 2,510-2,601 (subchapter 15). Subchapter 15 regulates the use and abandonment of lined surface impoundments designed to dispose of produced water through evaporation. Subchapter 15 requires the operator to conduct a site hydrogeologic characterization, install a groundwater monitoring system, and construct and enclose the surface impoundment in accordance with specified criteria. Sumps can be utilized in areas which do not meet the criteria of the appropriate basin plan, or subchapter 15, where the operator demonstrates that surface percolation of the produced waters will not degrade underlying useable groundwater. Abandonment of unlined sumps includes removal and disposal of all free liquids, analysis of sludges and soils beneath the sumps, removal of contaminated sludges and soils, analysis of soils after removal of contaminated sludges and soils, backfilling of the sump, and revegetation of the site.

  9. Transport and dispersion of pollutants in surface impoundments: a finite element model

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.

    1980-07-01

    A surface impoundment model in finite element (SIMFE) is presented to enable the simulation of flow circulations and pollutant transport and dispersion in natural or artificial lakes, reservoirs or ponds with any number of islands. This surface impoundment model consists of two sub-models: hydrodynamic and pollutant transport models. Both submodels are simulated by the finite element method. While the hydrodynamic model is solved by the standard Galerkin finite element scheme, the pollutant transport model can be solved by any of the twelve optional finite element schemes built in the program. Theoretical approximations and the numerical algorithm of SIMFE are described. Detail instruction of the application are given and listing of FORTRAN IV source program are provided. Two sample problems are given. One is for an idealized system with a known solution to show the accuracy and partial validation of the models. The other is applied to Prairie Island for a set of hypothetical input data, typifying a class of problems to which SIMFE may be applied.

  10. LCDRS FLOW FROM DOUBLE-LINED LANDFILLS AND SURFACE IMPOUNDMENTS. Project Summary (EPA/600/SR-93/070)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study, sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), on measured flows from leakage detection, collection, and removal systems (LDCRSs) of 28 double-lined landfills and 8 double-lined surface impoundments indicated — all landfills with geomembrane top liners l...

  11. Phenolic contamination in the sand-and-gravel aquifer from a surface impoundment of wood treatment wastes, Pensacola, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, D.E.; Godsy, E.M.; Goerlitz, D.F.; Ehrlich, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    Creosote and pentachlorophenol wastewaters discharged to unlined surface impoundments have resulted in groundwater contamination in the vicinity of an industrial site near Pensacola, Florida. Total phenol concentrations of 36,000 microgm/liter have been detected 40 ft below land surface in a test hole 100 ft south of an overflow impoundment but less than 10 microgm/liter 90 ft below land surface. Samples collected in test holes 1,350 ft downgradient from the surface impoundments and 100 ft north of Pensacola Bay, above and immediately below a clay lens, indicate that phenol contaminated groundwater may not be discharging directly into Pensacola Bay. Phenol concentrations exceeding 20 microgm/liter were detected in samples from a drainage ditch discharging directly into Bayou Chico. Microbiological data collected near the test site suggest that an anaerobic methanogenic ecosystem contributes to a reduction in phenol concentrations in groundwater. A laboratory study using bacteria isolated from the study site indicates that phenol, 2-methylphenol, and 3-methylphenol are significantly degraded and that methanogenesis reduces total phenol concentrations in laboratory digestors by 45%. Pentachlorophenol may inhibit methanogenesis at concentrations exceeding 0.45 milligm/liter. (USGS)

  12. Coal combustion waste management at landfills and surface impoundments 1994-2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.; Ranek, N. L.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-09-08

    On May 22, 2000, as required by Congress in its 1980 Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Regulatory Determination on Wastes from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels. On the basis of information contained in its 1999 Report to Congress: Wastes from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels, the EPA concluded that coal combustion wastes (CCWs), also known as coal combustion by-products (CCBs), did not warrant regulation under Subtitle C of RCRA, and it retained the existing hazardous waste exemption for these materials under RCRA Section 3001(b)(3)(C). However, the EPA also determined that national regulations under Subtitle D of RCRA were warranted for CCWs that are disposed of in landfills or surface impoundments. The EPA made this determination in part on the basis of its findings that 'present disposal practices are such that, in 1995, these wastes were being managed in 40 percent to 70 percent of landfills and surface impoundments without reasonable controls in place, particularly in the area of groundwater monitoring; and while there have been substantive improvements in state regulatory programs, we have also identified gaps in State oversight' (EPA 2000). The 1999 Report to Congress (RTC), however, may not have reflected the changes in CCW disposal practices that occurred since the cutoff date (1995) of its database and subsequent developments. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the EPA discussed this issue and decided to conduct a joint DOE/EPA study to collect new information on the recent CCW management practices by the power industry. It was agreed that such information would provide a perspective on the chronological adoption of control measures in CCW units based on State regulations. A team of experts from the EPA, industry, and DOE (with support from Argonne National Laboratory) was established to develop a mutually acceptable approach for collecting and analyzing data on CCW

  13. 30 CFR 77.216-5 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., sediment, or slurry impoundment and impounding structure which meets the requirements of 30 CFR 77.216(a... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-5 Water, sediment...

  14. 30 CFR 77.216-5 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., sediment, or slurry impoundment and impounding structure which meets the requirements of 30 CFR 77.216(a... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-5 Water, sediment...

  15. 30 CFR 77.216-5 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., sediment, or slurry impoundment and impounding structure which meets the requirements of 30 CFR 77.216(a... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-5 Water, sediment...

  16. 30 CFR 77.216-5 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., sediment, or slurry impoundment and impounding structure which meets the requirements of 30 CFR 77.216(a... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-5 Water, sediment...

  17. 30 CFR 77.216-5 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., sediment, or slurry impoundment and impounding structure which meets the requirements of 30 CFR 77.216(a... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-5 Water, sediment...

  18. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements; correction of hazards; program requirements. (a) All water, sediment,...

  19. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements; correction of hazards; program requirements. (a) All water, sediment,...

  20. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements; correction of hazards; program requirements. (a) All water, sediment,...

  1. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements; correction of hazards; program requirements. (a) All water, sediment,...

  2. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements; correction of hazards; program requirements. (a) All water, sediment,...

  3. Probabilistic risk assessment for the Sandia National Laboratories Technical Area V Liquid Waste Disposal System surface impoundments

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, L.A.; Eidson, A.F.

    1996-03-01

    A probabilistic risk assessment was completed for a former radioactive waste disposal site. The site, two unlined surface impoundment, was designed as part of the Liquid Waste Disposal System (LWDS) to receive radioactive effluent from nuclear reactors in Technical Area-V (TA-V) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). First, a statistical comparison of site sampling results to natural background, using EPA methods, and a spatial distribution analysis were performed. Risk assessment was conducted with SNL/NM`s Probabilistic Risk Evaluation and Characterization Investigation System model. The risk assessment indicated that contamination from several constituents might have been high enough to require remediation. However, further analysis based on expected site closure activities and recent EPA guidance indicated that No Further Action was acceptable.

  4. Results of the measurement survey of elevation and environmental media in surface impoundments 3513 (B) and 3524 (A) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, M.E.; Rose, D.A.; Brown, K.S.; Coe, R.H.C. III; Lawrence, J.D.; Winton, W.

    1998-07-01

    A measurement survey of the elevation and environmental media in impoundments 3513 (B) and 3524 (A) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted during April 1998. The investigation was performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Life Sciences Division of ORNL at the request of Bechtel Jacobs Company. Measurement activities were conducted at selected locations in order to determine the depth and appearance of the sediment and describe the clay underlying the impoundments prior to remediation. The survey was a follow-up to a previous elevation survey. The survey included the following: collection of sediment/clay cores from selected locations in each impoundment; measurement and documentation of the elevation at the water surface, at the top of sediment, at the top of clay, and at the bottom of each core; visual inspection of each core by a soil scientist to confirm the presence of clay and not material such as fly ash and soda lime compacted over the last 50 years; measurement and documentation of the background beta-gamma radiation level at the time and location of collection of each core, the highest beta-gamma level along the sediment portion of each core, and the highest beta-gamma level along the clay portion of each core; measurement and documentation of the length of the clay and of the sediment portion of each core; photographic documentation of each core; and replacement of each core in the impoundment.

  5. Results of the radiological and chemical characterization of surface impoundments 3539 and 3540 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, M.E.; Rose, D.A.; Brown, K.S.; Winton, W.; Dean, R.A.; Coe, R.H. III

    1998-03-01

    A radiological and chemical characterization survey of impoundments 3539 and 3540 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted during December 1997. Impoundments 3539 and 3540 are located in the Surface Impoundments Operable Unit (SIOU) of Waste Area Group 1. The investigation was performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Life Sciences Division of ORNL at the request of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration. Sampling was conducted in order to quantify the presence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents, and other contaminants of interest in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation for the SIOU> The survey included collection of sediment/clay samples, quality control blank water samples and equipment rinsate samples for chemical and radiological analysis. Results show the samples contain traces of various organic, inorganic, and radioactive materials. Of particular interest are PCB values which demonstrate the impoundments are not regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act.

  6. 40 CFR 63.942 - Standards-Surface impoundment floating membrane cover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... specifications: (1) The floating membrane cover shall be designed to float on the liquid surface during normal operations, and form a continuous barrier over the entire surface area of the liquid. (2) The cover shall be... determined to have both organic permeability properties that are equivalent to those of the material...

  7. 40 CFR 63.942 - Standards-Surface impoundment floating membrane cover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... specifications: (1) The floating membrane cover shall be designed to float on the liquid surface during normal operations, and form a continuous barrier over the entire surface area of the liquid. (2) The cover shall be... determined to have both organic permeability properties that are equivalent to those of the material...

  8. 40 CFR 63.942 - Standards-Surface impoundment floating membrane cover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... specifications: (1) The floating membrane cover shall be designed to float on the liquid surface during normal operations, and form a continuous barrier over the entire surface area of the liquid. (2) The cover shall be... determined to have both organic permeability properties that are equivalent to those of the material...

  9. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  10. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  11. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  12. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  13. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  14. Small agricultural impoundments affect pollutant transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-03-01

    Reservoirs created by dams intercept runoff from upslope areas and thus are often sinks for fertilizers and other pollutants that would otherwise flow downstream. Most studies of solute transport through impoundments have focused on large, long-lived systems. However, small impoundments, such as those created for irrigation or livestock watering, are common in agricultural regions, and their total global surface area is comparable to that of large reservoirs. As these small systems mature, the impoundments fill with sediment, creating ecosystems with wetland-like characteristics. Because dams that create these small impoundments are more likely to be degraded, poorly maintained, or removed by their owners, it is important to understand how changes in such systems may affect pollutant transport.

  15. Intrinsic remediation of an industrial waste impoundment

    SciTech Connect

    Swindoll, C.M.; Lee, M.D.; Wood, K.N.; Hartten, A.S.; Bishop, A.L.; Connor, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    Intrinsic remediation, also known as natural restoration, was evaluated as a potential corrective action alternative for an industrial surface impoundment previously used for the disposal of waste treatment biosolids, organic wastes, and fly ash. Organic waste constituents included chlorobenzene, aniline, xylenes, benzene, toluene, acetone, p-cresol, 2-butanone, fluorene, and ethylbenzene. The evaluation demonstrated that the impoundment contains an active microbial community including aerobic, denitrifying, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic microbes, and that environmental conditions were favorable for their growth. Laboratory studies confirmed that these microbes could biodegrade the organic waste constituents under varying redox conditions. The sorptive properties of the residual biosolids and fly ash contribute to the immobilization of chemical constituents and may enhance biodegradation by sequestering chemicals onto surfaces where microbes grow. Based on this field and laboratory evaluation, it was concluded that intrinsic remediation offers significant environmental benefits over other corrective action alternatives that would not allow these natural restoration processes to continue in the surface impoundment.

  16. Survey of intersex largemouth bass from impoundments in Georgia USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellock, Kristen A.; Trushel, Brittany E.; Ely, Patrick C.; Jennings, Cecil A.; Bringolf, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Intersex fish are increasingly being reported worldwide, primarily in rivers that receive treated wastewater, but few studies have investigated intersex in waters that do not receive wastewater. In a recent reconnaissance survey of intersex fish in North America, a high rate of intersex was reported for Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides in some southeastern U.S. rivers; however, the occurrence of intersex in impoundments has not been well described, especially on a statewide scale. Therefore, our objective for this project was to survey the occurrence of intersex Largemouth Bass in a variety of impoundment habitats across Georgia. Largemouth Bass were collected from 11 impoundments without direct municipal or agricultural wastewater inputs. Gonads from all male Largemouth Bass were evaluated for the incidence and severity of the intersex condition based on presence and arrangement of testicular oocytes. Overall 48% of male Largemouth Bass collected from impoundments were intersex, which was found in 9 of the 11 impoundments. Among impoundments, incidence of intersex ranged from 0 to 82% of the males sampled and surface area of the impoundment was a significant predictor of intersex incidence. Intersex fish were smaller than normal males, but population-level effects of intersex and causative factors of endocrine disruption in the impoundments remain unknown. The high incidence of intersex males in small impoundments demonstrates that the condition is not confined to rivers and suggests that factors other than those previously associated with intersex (i.e., municipal wastewater) may be involved.

  17. 30 CFR 77.216-1 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-1 Water, sediment or..., operating, or controlling the structure, shall be located on or immediately adjacent to each water,...

  18. 30 CFR 77.216-1 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-1 Water, sediment or..., operating, or controlling the structure, shall be located on or immediately adjacent to each water,...

  19. 30 CFR 77.216-1 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-1 Water, sediment or..., operating, or controlling the structure, shall be located on or immediately adjacent to each water,...

  20. 30 CFR 77.216-1 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-1 Water, sediment or..., operating, or controlling the structure, shall be located on or immediately adjacent to each water,...

  1. 30 CFR 77.216-1 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-1 Water, sediment or..., operating, or controlling the structure, shall be located on or immediately adjacent to each water,...

  2. Impoundment liner repair by electrophoresis of clay

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, A.T.; Corapcioglu, M.Y.; Stallard, W.M.; Chung, M.

    1997-10-01

    Electrophoresis of clay particles from dilute suspensions is an innovative technology to seal leaks in operating surface impoundments that does not require removal of impoundment contents, exposure of workers to contaminants, or prior knowledge of the leak locations. A suspension of clay particles is added to the impoundment liquid. A cathode (negative electrode) is placed inside and an anode (positive electrode) is placed outside the leaking impoundment. A direct current (DC) electric field is imposed externally across the geomembrane liner through the leaks. The clay particles migrate to the leaks under the influence of the imposed electric field to form a clay cake seal. The results of laboratory experiments to evaluate the use of a DC electric field to direct migration of clay particles into a leak and the hydraulic integrity of the resulting seal are presented in this paper. The effects of clay type, clay particle concentration in suspension, size of leak, and electric field strength on the migration of clay particles and process of cake formation are evaluated. The sealing effectiveness and internal structure of the resulting clay cakes are examined by hydraulic conductivity measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Electrophoretic mobilities of bentonite particles in different chemical environments were also measured to evaluate the feasibility of the technology in practical situations.

  3. Biological productivity in small impoundments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most ponds and small impoundments are built or used with a principal use in mind. That use may be recreational fishing, commercial aquaculture, waterfowl hunting, potable water storage, irrigation water supply, livestock watering, stormwater retention, landscaping, swimming, or others. In practice, ...

  4. Microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing for recovery of shale gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Hammack, Richard W; Vidic, Radisav D; Gregory, Kelvin B

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction from shale produces waste brine known as flowback that is impounded at the surface prior to reuse and/or disposal. During impoundment, microbial activity can alter the fate of metals including radionuclides, give rise to odorous compounds, and result in biocorrosion that complicates water and waste management and increases production costs. Here, we describe the microbial ecology at multiple depths of three flowback impoundments from the Marcellus shale that were managed differently. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that bacterial communities in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments were depth dependent, diverse, and most similar to species within the taxa [gamma]-proteobacteria, [alpha]-proteobacteria, δ-proteobacteria, Clostridia, Synergistetes, Thermotogae, Spirochetes, and Bacteroidetes. The bacterial community in the pretreated and aerated impoundment was uniform with depth, less diverse, and most similar to known iodide-oxidizing bacteria in the [alpha]-proteobacteria. Archaea were identified only in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments and were affiliated to the Methanomicrobia class. This is the first study of microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing. The findings expand our knowledge of microbial diversity of an emergent and unexplored environment and may guide the management of flowback impoundments.

  5. Microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing for recovery of shale gas.

    PubMed

    Murali Mohan, Arvind; Hartsock, Angela; Hammack, Richard W; Vidic, Radisav D; Gregory, Kelvin B

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction from shale produces waste brine known as flowback that is impounded at the surface prior to reuse and/or disposal. During impoundment, microbial activity can alter the fate of metals including radionuclides, give rise to odorous compounds, and result in biocorrosion that complicates water and waste management and increases production costs. Here, we describe the microbial ecology at multiple depths of three flowback impoundments from the Marcellus shale that were managed differently. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that bacterial communities in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments were depth dependent, diverse, and most similar to species within the taxa γ-proteobacteria, α-proteobacteria, δ-proteobacteria, Clostridia, Synergistetes, Thermotogae, Spirochetes, and Bacteroidetes. The bacterial community in the pretreated and aerated impoundment was uniform with depth, less diverse, and most similar to known iodide-oxidizing bacteria in the α-proteobacteria. Archaea were identified only in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments and were affiliated to the Methanomicrobia class. This is the first study of microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing. The findings expand our knowledge of microbial diversity of an emergent and unexplored environment and may guide the management of flowback impoundments.

  6. Wind erosion of waste impoundments in arid climates and mitigation of dust pollution.

    PubMed

    Blight, G E

    2008-12-01

    Wind can erode and disperse fine-grained material from an impoundment of mining, industrial or municipal waste that stands above the level of its surroundings. Such dust dispersion can be a serious nuisance as well as a health hazard to inhabitants and animals in nearby settlements. It can also degrade crops, making them less marketable, and pollute soil, surface water and ground water. Wind can seasonally erode waste impoundments in all types of climate, but the erosion intensifies and persists for more of each year as regional aridity increases. As clouds of dust are often observed billowing across the top surfaces of waste impoundments in dry windy weather, there is a common misconception that dust arises from erosion of the top surface of an impoundment, resulting in much effort and money being misspent on top treatments when in fact the sloped sides of the impoundments are the true source of blown dust. This paper offers a brief review of general waste impoundment wind erosion issues and then focuses in more detail on the mechanics of how wind erodes surfaces of waste impoundments. Recommendations are offered for mitigating the effects of wind-eroded dust.

  7. DOCUMENTING THE U.S. LANDFILL/IMPOUNDMENT PERMIT: A GUIDE TO TECHNICAL RESOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since 1976, beginning with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the United States government has legislated standards for landfills and surface impoundments to make certain that when disposing of hazardous wstes, human health and the environment will be protected. ...

  8. An assessment of streamflow, water quality, and the effects of constructing an impoundment on Bridge Creek at Augusta, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    House, Leo B.

    1981-01-01

    Nutrient concentrations in Bridge Creek and comparisons with a similar impoundment at nearby Fall Creek indicate that the proposed impoundment would have nuisance weed growth. The impoundment would have a computed transit time of about 3 days, with a surface-level outlet, or 1 day with a bottom-draw outlet, assuming a normal pool elevation and a summer base flow of 7.5 cubic feet per second. Total storage in the proposed impoundment is estimated to be 48 acre-feet.

  9. 30 CFR 77.216-4 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and....216-4 Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements... of the initial plan approval, the person owning, operating, or controlling a water, sediment,...

  10. 30 CFR 77.216-4 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and....216-4 Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements... of the initial plan approval, the person owning, operating, or controlling a water, sediment,...

  11. 30 CFR 77.216-4 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and....216-4 Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements... of the initial plan approval, the person owning, operating, or controlling a water, sediment,...

  12. 30 CFR 77.216-4 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and....216-4 Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements... of the initial plan approval, the person owning, operating, or controlling a water, sediment,...

  13. 30 CFR 77.216-4 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and....216-4 Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements... of the initial plan approval, the person owning, operating, or controlling a water, sediment,...

  14. 30 CFR 816.49 - Impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reference was approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR... conditions, and a seismic safety factor of at least 1.2. (ii) Impoundments not included in paragraph (a)(4)(i... by waves and by sudden increases in storage volume. Impoundments meeting the Class B or C...

  15. 30 CFR 816.49 - Impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reference was approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR... conditions, and a seismic safety factor of at least 1.2. (ii) Impoundments not included in paragraph (a)(4)(i... by waves and by sudden increases in storage volume. Impoundments meeting the Class B or C...

  16. 30 CFR 816.49 - Impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reference was approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR... conditions, and a seismic safety factor of at least 1.2. (ii) Impoundments not included in paragraph (a)(4)(i... by waves and by sudden increases in storage volume. Impoundments meeting the Class B or C...

  17. 30 CFR 816.49 - Impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reference was approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR... conditions, and a seismic safety factor of at least 1.2. (ii) Impoundments not included in paragraph (a)(4)(i... by waves and by sudden increases in storage volume. Impoundments meeting the Class B or C...

  18. 30 CFR 816.49 - Impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reference was approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR... conditions, and a seismic safety factor of at least 1.2. (ii) Impoundments not included in paragraph (a)(4)(i... by waves and by sudden increases in storage volume. Impoundments meeting the Class B or C...

  19. Stability Analysis of the Impoundment of Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slávik, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    An impoundment is an engineering construction used for the safe deposition of unexploitable waste from industrial and mining facilities. In terms of the legislative requirements of the Slovak Republic, a "Measurements Project" must be developed for each impoundment. In this document the prerequisites for the safe operation of an impoundment, the limit and critical values of the monitored phenomena and the facts influencing the safety of the impoundment and the area endangered by such a site are also defined. The safety and stability of an impoundment are verified according to a "Measurements Project" by considering stability at regular time intervals. This contribution presents, in the form of a parametric study, a stability analysis of an ash impoundment. The stability analysis provides an example of the utilization of an information database of the results of the regular monitoring of the geotechnical properties of the materials forming the impoundment's body and the surrounding rock mass. The stability of the impoundment is expressed for a recent state - without a continuous water level in its body and, at the same time, for a hypothetical limit and critical water level according to the valid "Handling Regulations".

  20. 39 CFR 952.6 - Interim impounding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interim impounding. 952.6 Section 952.6 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO FALSE REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS § 952.6 Interim impounding. In preparation for or during the pendency of...

  1. Retention and transport of nutrients in a mature agricultural impoundment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, S. M.; Julian, J. P.; Doyle, M. W.; Stanley, E. H.

    2013-03-01

    Small impoundments intended for irrigation, livestock watering, and hydropower are numerous in agricultural regions of the world. Many of these artificial water bodies are well positioned to intercept fertilizer runoff and pollutants but could be vulnerable to long-term sedimentation, management intervention, or failure. We examined solute retention in a mature, sediment-filled, run-of-river impoundment created by a small, >100 year old dam in agricultural Wisconsin, United States. To do so, we measured instantaneous net fluxes of inorganic and organic solutes through the system, which contained wetlands. The impoundment was a persistent net sink for sulfate and, during the warm season only, a net sink for nitrate, ammonium, and soluble reactive phosphorus. There was also a negative relationship between nitrate and sulfate retention, suggestive of nitrate-stimulated sulfate production. Impoundment hydraulics were then altered by a management manipulation (dam removal) that caused mean water travel time to decrease by approximately 40%. Following manipulation, autoregressive modeling of solute time series indicated a decrease in mean net retention of nitrate, sulfate, ammonium, and soluble reactive phosphorus. There was also a decrease in the variability (coefficient of variation) of instantaneous net exports of dissolved organic nitrogen and dissolved organic phosphorus. These biogeochemical changes were consistent with predictions based on hydraulics (reduced water travel time), with the exception of ammonium release immediately following reservoir dewatering. Our results emphasize the biogeochemical importance of reservoir-wetland ecosystems, which are expanding with impoundment sedimentation but are threatened by infrastructure aging. We suggest that reservoir wetlands be considered in the management of dams and surface water pollution.

  2. Distribution of aquifers, liquid-waste impoundments, and municipal water-supply sources, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, David F.; Maevsky, Anthony

    1980-01-01

    Impoundments of liquid waste are potential sources of ground-water contamination in Massachusetts. The map report, at a scale of 1 inch equals 4 miles, shows the idstribution of aquifers and the locations of municipal water-supply sources and known liquid-waste impoundments. Ground water, an important source of municipal water supply, is produced from shallow sand and gravel aquifers that are generally unconfined, less than 200 feet thick, and yield less than 2,000 gallons per minute to individual wells. These aquifers commonly occupy lowlands and stream valleys and are most extensive in eastern Massachusetts. Surface impoundments of liquid waste are commonly located over these aquifers. These impoundments may leak and allow waste to infiltrate underlying aquifers and alter their water quality. (USGS)

  3. 50 CFR 28.42 - Impounding of domestic animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Impounding of domestic animals. 28.42... VIOLATIONS OF PARTS 25, 26, AND 27 Impoundment Procedures § 28.42 Impounding of domestic animals. (a) Any animal trespassing on the lands of any national wildlife refuge may be impounded and disposed of...

  4. 50 CFR 28.42 - Impounding of domestic animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Impounding of domestic animals. 28.42... VIOLATIONS OF PARTS 25, 26, AND 27 Impoundment Procedures § 28.42 Impounding of domestic animals. (a) Any animal trespassing on the lands of any national wildlife refuge may be impounded and disposed of...

  5. 50 CFR 28.42 - Impounding of domestic animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Impounding of domestic animals. 28.42... VIOLATIONS OF PARTS 25, 26, AND 27 Impoundment Procedures § 28.42 Impounding of domestic animals. (a) Any animal trespassing on the lands of any national wildlife refuge may be impounded and disposed of...

  6. 50 CFR 28.42 - Impounding of domestic animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Impounding of domestic animals. 28.42... VIOLATIONS OF PARTS 25, 26, AND 27 Impoundment Procedures § 28.42 Impounding of domestic animals. (a) Any animal trespassing on the lands of any national wildlife refuge may be impounded and disposed of...

  7. 50 CFR 28.42 - Impounding of domestic animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Impounding of domestic animals. 28.42... VIOLATIONS OF PARTS 25, 26, AND 27 Impoundment Procedures § 28.42 Impounding of domestic animals. (a) Any animal trespassing on the lands of any national wildlife refuge may be impounded and disposed of...

  8. 49 CFR 193.2181 - Impoundment capacity: LNG storage tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Impoundment capacity: LNG storage tanks. 193.2181... Impoundment capacity: LNG storage tanks. Each impounding system serving an LNG storage tank must have a minimum volumetric liquid impoundment capacity of: (a) 110 percent of the LNG tank's maximum...

  9. 49 CFR 193.2181 - Impoundment capacity: LNG storage tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Impoundment capacity: LNG storage tanks. 193.2181... Impoundment capacity: LNG storage tanks. Each impounding system serving an LNG storage tank must have a minimum volumetric liquid impoundment capacity of: (a) 110 percent of the LNG tank's maximum...

  10. 49 CFR 193.2181 - Impoundment capacity: LNG storage tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Impoundment capacity: LNG storage tanks. 193.2181... Impoundment capacity: LNG storage tanks. Each impounding system serving an LNG storage tank must have a minimum volumetric liquid impoundment capacity of: (a) 110 percent of the LNG tank's maximum...

  11. 49 CFR 193.2181 - Impoundment capacity: LNG storage tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Impoundment capacity: LNG storage tanks. 193.2181... Impoundment capacity: LNG storage tanks. Each impounding system serving an LNG storage tank must have a minimum volumetric liquid impoundment capacity of: (a) 110 percent of the LNG tank's maximum...

  12. 30 CFR 816.84 - Coal mine waste: Impounding structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. 816.84... ACTIVITIES § 816.84 Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. New and existing impounding structures constructed of coal mine waste or intended to impound coal mine waste shall meet the requirements of §...

  13. 30 CFR 817.84 - Coal mine waste: Impounding structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. 817.84... ACTIVITIES § 817.84 Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. New and existing impounding structures constructed of coal mine waste or intended to impound coal mine waste shall meet the requirements of §...

  14. 30 CFR 816.84 - Coal mine waste: Impounding structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. 816.84... ACTIVITIES § 816.84 Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. New and existing impounding structures constructed of coal mine waste or intended to impound coal mine waste shall meet the requirements of §...

  15. 30 CFR 817.84 - Coal mine waste: Impounding structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. 817.84... ACTIVITIES § 817.84 Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. New and existing impounding structures constructed of coal mine waste or intended to impound coal mine waste shall meet the requirements of §...

  16. 30 CFR 816.84 - Coal mine waste: Impounding structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. 816.84... ACTIVITIES § 816.84 Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. New and existing impounding structures constructed of coal mine waste or intended to impound coal mine waste shall meet the requirements of §...

  17. 30 CFR 817.84 - Coal mine waste: Impounding structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. 817.84... ACTIVITIES § 817.84 Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. New and existing impounding structures constructed of coal mine waste or intended to impound coal mine waste shall meet the requirements of §...

  18. 30 CFR 817.84 - Coal mine waste: Impounding structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. 817.84... ACTIVITIES § 817.84 Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. New and existing impounding structures constructed of coal mine waste or intended to impound coal mine waste shall meet the requirements of §...

  19. 30 CFR 816.84 - Coal mine waste: Impounding structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. 816.84... ACTIVITIES § 816.84 Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. New and existing impounding structures constructed of coal mine waste or intended to impound coal mine waste shall meet the requirements of §...

  20. 30 CFR 816.84 - Coal mine waste: Impounding structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. 816.84... ACTIVITIES § 816.84 Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. New and existing impounding structures constructed of coal mine waste or intended to impound coal mine waste shall meet the requirements of §...

  1. 30 CFR 817.84 - Coal mine waste: Impounding structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. 817.84... ACTIVITIES § 817.84 Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. New and existing impounding structures constructed of coal mine waste or intended to impound coal mine waste shall meet the requirements of §...

  2. Sediment characteristics and configuration within three dam impoundments on the Kalamazoo River, Michigan, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rheaume, S.J.; Rachol, C.M.; Hubbell, D.L.; Simard, Andreanne

    2002-01-01

    The removal of the remnants of three hydroelectric dams on the Kalamazoo River near Plainwell, Otsego, and Allegan, Michigan, has been proposed. The benefits of this removal include returning the Kalamazoo River to its pre-dam flow, increasing recreational use and safety on the river, and improving aquatic habitat. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has designated this reach of the Kalamazoo River as a Federal Superfund site because of the historical discharge of papermill waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls. Much of this waste material remains concentrated in organic sediment and kaolinite clay deposited upstream from the three dam foundations. Sediment containing up to 150 milligrams per kilogram polychlorinated biphenyls could move if dam foundations are removed; therefore, it is necessary to estimate the characteristic and configuration of the sediment before work begins. Data collected from augered sections and sediment cores show that impoundment sediments were deposited in two distinctly different sedimentary environments. Interbedded lacustrine sediments that overlie the pre-dam channel surface consist of organic-rich silt and clay, fine to medium sand, and some gravel. These materials were deposited in a repetitive, cyclic fashion related to former stream velocities when the impoundment water levels were 5-10 feet higher. Lowering of these water levels and demolition of the superstructures of these dams resulted in erosion of much of these instream lacustrine sediments and subsequent deposition of coarse-grained alluvium in the impounded channel behind the remaining dam foundations. The composite thicknesses of the lacustrine deposits and overlying alluvium was determined from sediment cores collected from each impoundment. The volume of instream sediment contained in each impoundment is estimated to be about 77,600 cubic yards at the Plainwell impoundment; 268,900 cubic yards at the Otsego impoundment; and 1,192,600 cubic yards at the

  3. Effects of seasonal drawdowns on fish assemblages in sections of an impounded river-canal system in upstate New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, Scott D.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Wells, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    The Mohawk River and New York State Barge Canal run together as a series of permanent and temporary impoundments for most of the distance between Rome and Albany, New York. The downstream or lower section is composed of two permanent impoundments, the middle section of a series of temporary (seasonal) impoundments, and the upper section of a series of permanent impoundments. In the middle section, movable dams are lifted from the water during winter and the wetted surface area decreases by 36–56%. We used boat electrofishing during spring 2014 and 2015 to compare the relative abundance of fish populations and the composition of fish assemblages between the permanently and seasonally impounded sections of the Barge Canal and to infer the effects of the two flow management practices. A total of 3,264 individuals from 38 species were captured, and total catch per unit effort (CPUE) ranged from 46.0 to 134.7 fish/h at sites in the seasonally impounded section, compared with 140.0–342.0 fish/h in the permanent lower section and 89.0–282.0 fish/h in the permanent upper section. The amount of drawdown explained 55% of the variation in total CPUE and was a highly significant predictor variable. Mean total CPUE in the seasonally impounded section was significantly lower (by about 50%) than that in either permanently impounded section, and the assemblage composition differed significantly between sections. The relative abundance of many lentic species was markedly lower in the seasonally impounded section, while the relative abundance of several native cyprinids and the percentage of individuals belonging to species that are native to the watershed was greater in this section. Overall, these findings suggest that winter dam removal in impounded rivers may reduce the abundance of fish but may also create more natural riverine conditions that favor some native species.

  4. The global abundance and size distribution of lakes, ponds, and impoundments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Downing, J.A.; Prairie, Y.T.; Cole, J.J.; Duarte, C.M.; Tranvik, L.J.; Striegl, R.G.; McDowell, W.H.; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Caraco, N.F.; Melack, J.M.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    One of the major impediments to the integration of lentic ecosystems into global environmental analyses has been fragmentary data on the extent and size distribution of lakes, ponds, and impoundments. We use new data sources, enhanced spatial resolution, and new analytical approaches to provide new estimates of the global abundance of surface-water bodies. A global model based on the Pareto distribution shows that the global extent of natural lakes is twice as large as previously known (304 million lakes; 4.2 million km 2 in area) and is dominated in area by millions of water bodies smaller than 1 km2. Similar analyses of impoundments based on inventories of large, engineered dams show that impounded waters cover approximately 0.26 million km2. However, construction of low-tech farm impoundments is estimated to be between 0.1 % and 6% of farm area worldwide, dependent upon precipitation, and represents >77,000 km 2 globally, at present. Overall, about 4.6 million km2 of the earth's continental "land" surface (>3%) is covered by water. These analyses underscore the importance of explicitly considering lakes, ponds, and impoundments, especially small ones, in global analyses of rates and processes. ?? 2006, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  5. Effects of rock riprap design parameters on flood protection costs for uranium tailings impoundments

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, R.M.

    1984-07-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is studying the problem of long-term protection of earthen covers on decommissioned uranium tailings impoundments. The major erosive forces acting on these covers will be river flooding and overland flow from rainfall-runoff. For impoundments adjacent to rivers, overbank flooding presents the greater potential for significant erosion. To protect the earthen covers against flood erosion, rock riprap armoring will be placed over the cover surface. Because of the large size rock usually required for riprap, the quarrying, transport, and placement of the rock could be a significant part of the decommissioning cost. This report examines the sensitivity of riprap protection costs to certain design parameters at tailings impoundments. The parameters include flood discharge, riprap materials, impoundment side slopes, and an added safety factor. Two decommissioned tailings impoundments are used as case studies for the evaluation. These are the Grand Junction, Colorado, impoundment located adjacent to the Colorado River and the Slickrock, Colorado, impoundment located adjacent to the Dolores River. The evaluation considers only the cost of riprap protection against flood erosion. The study results show that embankment side slope and rock specific gravity can have optimum values or ranges at a specific site. For both case study sites the optimum side slope is about 5H:1V. Of the rock sources considered at Grand Junction, the optimum specific gravity would be about 2.50; however, an optimum rock specific gravity for the Slickrock site could not be determined. Other results indicate that the arbitrary safety factor usually added in riprap design can lead to large increases in protection costs. 22 references, 19 figures, 15 tables.

  6. 36 CFR 262.12 - Impounding of personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Impounding of personal... AGRICULTURE LAW ENFORCEMENT SUPPORT ACTIVITIES Impoundments and Removals § 262.12 Impounding of personal... personal property on National Forest System lands without the authorization of a Forest officer which...

  7. 36 CFR 262.11 - Impounding of dogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Impounding of dogs. 262.11... ENFORCEMENT SUPPORT ACTIVITIES Impoundments and Removals § 262.11 Impounding of dogs. Any dog found running at large in a part of the National Forest System, which has been closed to dogs running at large, may...

  8. 32 CFR 634.49 - Standards for impoundment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to other roadway users or the general public. An example would be a vehicle parked within 15 feet of... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Impounding Privately Owned Vehicles § 634.49 Standards for impoundment. (a) POVs should not be impounded unless the vehicles clearly interfere...

  9. 32 CFR 634.49 - Standards for impoundment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to other roadway users or the general public. An example would be a vehicle parked within 15 feet of... CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Impounding Privately Owned Vehicles § 634.49 Standards for impoundment. (a) POVs should not be impounded unless the vehicles clearly interfere...

  10. 36 CFR 262.11 - Impounding of dogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Impounding of dogs. 262.11... ENFORCEMENT SUPPORT ACTIVITIES Impoundments and Removals § 262.11 Impounding of dogs. Any dog found running at large in a part of the National Forest System, which has been closed to dogs running at large, may...

  11. 36 CFR 262.11 - Impounding of dogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Impounding of dogs. 262.11... ENFORCEMENT SUPPORT ACTIVITIES Impoundments and Removals § 262.11 Impounding of dogs. Any dog found running at large in a part of the National Forest System, which has been closed to dogs running at large, may...

  12. 36 CFR 262.11 - Impounding of dogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Impounding of dogs. 262.11... ENFORCEMENT SUPPORT ACTIVITIES Impoundments and Removals § 262.11 Impounding of dogs. Any dog found running at large in a part of the National Forest System, which has been closed to dogs running at large, may...

  13. 36 CFR 262.11 - Impounding of dogs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Impounding of dogs. 262.11... ENFORCEMENT SUPPORT ACTIVITIES Impoundments and Removals § 262.11 Impounding of dogs. Any dog found running at large in a part of the National Forest System, which has been closed to dogs running at large, may...

  14. Methylmercury in flood-control impoundments and natural waters of northwestern Minnesota, 1997-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brigham, M.E.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Olson, M.L.; DeWild, J.F.

    2002-01-01

    We studied methylmercury (MeHg) and total mercury (HgT) in impounded and natural surface waters in northwestern Minnesota, in settings ranging from agricultural to undeveloped. In a recently constructed (1995) permanent-pool impoundment, MeHg levels typically increased from inflow to outflow during 1997; this trend broke down from late 1998 to early 1999. MeHg levels in the outflow reached seasonal maxima in mid-summer (maximum of 1.0 ng L−1 in July 1997) and late-winter (maximum of 6.6 ng L−1 in February 1999), and are comparable to high levels observed in new hydroelectric reservoirs in Canada. Spring and autumn MeHg levels were typically about 0.1–0.2 ng L−1. Overall, MeHg levels in both the inflow (a ditch that drains peatlands) and outflow were significantly higher than in three nearby reference natural lakes. Eleven older permanent-pool impoundments and six natural lakes in northwestern Minnesota were sampled five times. The impoundments typically had higher MeHg levels (0.071–8.36 ng L−1) than natural lakes. Five of six lakes MeHg levels typical of uncontaminated lakes (0.014–1.04 ng L−1) with highest levels in late winter, whereas a hypereutrophic lake had high levels (0.37–3.67 ng L−1) with highest levels in mid-summer. Seven temporary-pool impoundments were sampled during summer high-flow events. Temporary-pool impoundments that retained water for about 10–15 days after innundation yielded pronounced increases in MeHg from inflow to outflow, in one case reaching 4.6 ng L−1, which was about 2 ng L−1 greater than the mean inflow concentration during the runoff event.

  15. RCRA closure of mixed waste impoundments

    SciTech Connect

    Blaha, F.J.; Greengard, T.C.; Arndt, M.B.

    1989-11-01

    A case study of a RCRA closure action at the Rocky Flats Plant is presented. Closure of the solar evaporation ponds involves removal and immobilization of a mixed hazardous/radioactive sludge, treatment of impounded water, groundwater monitoring, plume delineation, and collection and treatment of contaminated groundwater. The site closure is described within the context of regulatory negotiations, project schedules, risk assessment, clean versus dirty closure, cleanup levels, and approval of closure plans and reports. Lessons learned at Rocky Flats are summarized.

  16. Patterns of fish use and piscivore abundance within a reconnected saltmarsh impoundment in the northern Indian River Lagoon, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Philip W.; Montague, C.L.; Sulak, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    Nearly all saltmarshes in east-central, Florida were impounded for mosquito control during the 1960s. The majority of these marshes have since been reconnected to the estuary by culverts, providing an opportunity to effectively measure exchange of aquatic organisms. A multi-gear approach was used monthly to simultaneously estimate fish standing stock (cast net), fish exchange with the estuary (culvert traps), and piscivore abundance (gill nets and bird counts) to document patterns of fish use in a reconnected saltmarsh impoundment. Changes in saltmarsh fish abundance, and exchange of fish with the estuary reflected the seasonal pattern of marsh flooding in the northern Indian River Lagoon system. During a 6-month period of marsh flooding, resident fish had continuous access to the marsh surface. Large piscivorous fish regularly entered the impoundment via creeks and ditches to prey upon small resident fish, and piscivorous birds aggregated following major fish movements to the marsh surface or to deep habitats. As water levels receded in winter, saltmarsh fish concentrated into deep habitats and emigration to the estuary ensued (200% greater biomass left the impoundment than entered). Fish abundance and community structure along the estuary shoreline (although fringed with marsh vegetation) were not analogous to marsh creeks and ditches. Perimeter ditches provided deep-water habitat for large estuarine predators, and shallow creeks served as an alternative habitat for resident fish when the marsh surface was dry. Use of the impoundment as nursery by transients was limited to Mugil cephalus Linnaeus, but large juvenile and adult piscivorous fish used the impoundment for feeding. In conclusion, the saltmarsh impoundment was a feeding site for piscivorous fish and birds, and functioned as a net exporter of forage fish to adjacent estuarine waters. ?? Springer 2006.

  17. 30 CFR 817.56 - Postmining rehabilitation of sedimentation ponds, diversions, impoundments, and treatment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ponds, diversions, impoundments, and treatment facilities. 817.56 Section 817.56 Mineral Resources... Postmining rehabilitation of sedimentation ponds, diversions, impoundments, and treatment facilities. Before... removed and reclaimed, and that all permanent sedimentation ponds, diversions, impoundments, and...

  18. 30 CFR 816.56 - Postmining rehabilitation of sedimentation ponds, diversions, impoundments, and treatment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ponds, diversions, impoundments, and treatment facilities. 816.56 Section 816.56 Mineral Resources... rehabilitation of sedimentation ponds, diversions, impoundments, and treatment facilities. Before abandoning a... and reclaimed, and that all permanent sedimentation ponds, diversions, impoundments, and...

  19. Groundwater chemistry near an impoundment for produced water, Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.; Bartos, T.T.; Rice, C.A.; McKinley, M.P.; Smith, B.D.

    2011-01-01

    The Powder River Basin is one of the largest producers of coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) in the United States. An important environmental concern in the Basin is the fate of the large amounts of groundwater extracted during CBNG production. Most of this produced water is disposed of in unlined surface impoundments. A 6-year study of groundwater flow and water chemistry at one impoundment, Skewed Reservoir, has produced the most detailed data set for any impoundment in the Basin. Data were collected from a network of 21 observation wells and three suction lysimeters. A groundwater mound formed atop bedrock within initially unsaturated, unconsolidated deposits underlying the reservoir. Heterogeneity in physical and chemical properties of sediments resulted in complex groundwater flow paths and highly variable groundwater chemistry. Sulfate, bicarbonate, sodium, and magnesium were the dominant ions in all areas, but substantial variability existed in relative concentrations; pH varied from less than 3 to more than 9, and total dissolved solids concentrations ranged from less than 5000 to greater than 100,000. mg/L. Selenium was a useful tracer of reservoir water; selenium concentrations exceeded 300 ??g/L in samples obtained from 18 of the 24 sampling points. Groundwater travel time from the reservoir to a nearby alluvial aquifer (a linear distance of 177. m) was calculated at 474. days on the basis of selenium concentrations. The produced water is not the primary source of solutes in the groundwater. Naturally occurring salts and minerals within the unsaturated zone, dissolved and mobilized by infiltrating impoundment water, account for most of the solute mass in groundwater. Gypsum dissolution, cation-exchange, and pyrite oxidation appear to be important reactions. The complex geochemistry and groundwater flow paths at the study site underscore the difficulty in assessing effects of surface impoundments on water resources within the Powder River Basin. ?? 2011.

  20. Infiltration from an impoundment for coal-bed natural gas, Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Evolution of water and sediment chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.; Rice, C.A.; Bartos, T.T.; McKinley, M.P.

    2008-01-01

    Development of coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, has increased substantially in recent years. Among environmental concerns associated with this development is the fate of groundwater removed with the gas. A preferred water-management option is storage in surface impoundments. As of January 2007, permits for more than 4000 impoundments had been issued within Wyoming. A study was conducted on changes in water and sediment chemistry as water from an impoundment infiltrated the subsurface. Sediment cores were collected prior to operation of the impoundment and after its closure and reclamation. Suction lysimeters were used to collect water samples from beneath the impoundment. Large amounts of chloride (12,300 kg) and nitrate (13,500 kg as N), most of which accumulated naturally in the sediments over thousands of years, were released into groundwater by infiltrating water. Nitrate was more readily flushed from the sediments than chloride. If sediments at other impoundment locations contain similar amounts of chloride and nitrate, impoundments already permitted could release over 48 x 106 kg of chloride and 52 x 106 kg of nitrate into groundwater in the basin. A solute plume with total dissolved solid (TDS) concentrations at times exceeding 100,000 mg/L was created in the subsurface. TDS concentrations in the plume were substantially greater than those in the CBNG water (about 2300 mg/L) and in the ambient shallow groundwater (about 8000 mg/L). Sulfate, sodium, and magnesium are the dominant ions in the plume. The elevated concentrations are attributed to cation-exchange-enhanced gypsum dissolution. As gypsum dissolves, calcium goes into solution and is exchanged for sodium and magnesium on clays. Removal of calcium from solution allows further gypsum dissolution.

  1. 32 CFR 634.51 - Procedures for impoundment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Procedures for impoundment. 634.51 Section 634.51 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW... § 634.51 Procedures for impoundment. (a) Unattended POVs. (1) DD Form 2504 (Abandoned Vehicle...

  2. Sediment quality in freshwater impoundments at Savannah National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    Freshwater impoundments at Savannah National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), South Carolina, provide an important habitat for wildlife species, but degraded sediment quality in the Savannah River downstream of the discharge from two impoundments have caused concern about potential contaminant problems within the impoundments. The quality of sediments from five impoundments (impoundments no. 1, 2, 6, 7, and 17) on the NWR was evaluated using physical and chemical characterization, contaminant concentrations (metals, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and toxicity testing. Survival of Hyalella azteca (freshwater amphipod) exposed for 28 days to solid-phase sediments was not significantly different from controls, but growth was significantly decreased at several sites. Survival in 96-hour exposures to sediment pore water was significantly decreased at most sites. Factors contributing to the toxic responses were low pH (3.7 to 4.1), ammonia (20 mg/L), and increased concentrations of cations in the pore water. The excess of simultaneously extracted metals over the acid volatile sulfides in the sediments was also typical of sites displaying decreased sediment quality. Elemental concentrations in pore water were negatively correlated with pH, and the highest concentrations were observed in impoundment no. 7. The acidic nature of the sediment in this impoundment was exacerbated by recent draining, burning, and disking, which allowed oxidation of the previously anoxic wetland sediment. Sediment disturbance and mixing of vegetation into the sediments by disking may also have contributed to the formation of ammonia caused by microbial decomposition of the fragmented organic matter. Contaminants were not detected in sediments from the impoundments, but releases of acidic water with increased levels of sediment cations from the impoundments may have contributed to the degraded sediment conditions previously observed in the river

  3. Fish assemblage structure following Impoundment of a Great Plains river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quist, M.C.; Hubert, W.A.; Rahel, F.J.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the upstream and downstream effect of impoundments on stream fish assemblages is important in managing fish populations and predicting the effects of future human activities on stream ecosystems. We used information collected over a 41-year period (1960-2001) to assess changes in fish assemblage structure resulting from impoundment of the Laramie River by Grayrocks Reservoir. Prior to impoundment (i.e., 1960-1979), fish assemblages were dominated by native catostomids and cyprinids. After impoundment several exotic species (e.g., smallmouth bass [Micropterus dolomieu], walleye [Sander vitreus; formerly Stizostedion vitreum], yellow perch [Perca flavescens], brown trout [Salmo trutta]) were sampled from reaches upstream and downstream of the reservoir. Suckermouth minnows (Phenacobius mirabilis) were apparently extirpated, and hornyhead chubs (Nocomis biguttatus) and common shiners (Luxilus cornutus) became rare upstream of Grayrocks Reservoir. The lower Laramie River downstream from Grayrocks Reservoir near its mouth retains habitat characteristics similar to those prior to impoundment (e.g., shallow, braided channel morphology) and is the only downstream area where several sensitive species persist, including sucker-mouth minnows, hornyhead chubs, and bigmouth shiners (Notropis dorsalis). Grayrocks Reservoir serves as a source of exotic piscivores to both upstream and downstream reaches and has altered downstream habitat characteristics. These impacts have had a substantial influence on native fish assemblages. Our results suggest that upstream and downstream effects of impoundment on fish assemblage structure are similar and that downstream reaches which retain habitat characteristics similar to pre-impoundment conditions may serve as areas of refuge for native species.

  4. Preliminary Toxicological Analysis of the Effect of Coal Slurry Impoundment Water on Human Liver Cells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunnell, Joseph E.

    2008-01-01

    Coal is usually 'washed' with water and a variety of chemicals to reduce its content of sulfur and mineral matter. The 'washings' or 'coal slurry' derived from this process is a viscous black liquid containing fine particles of coal, mineral matter, and other dissolved and particulate substances. Coal slurry may be stored in impoundments or in abandoned underground mines. Human health and environmental effects potentially resulting from leakage of chemical substances from coal slurry into drinking water supplies or aquatic ecosystems have not been systematically examined. Impoundments are semipermeable, presenting the possibility that inorganic and organic substances, some of which may be toxic, may contaminate ground or surface water. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has concluded that well water in Mingo County, West Virginia, constitutes a public health hazard.

  5. Riverbed-Sediment Mapping in the Edwards Dam Impoundment on the Kennebec River, Maine By Use of Geophysical Techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dudley, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In July 1997, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued a Final Environmental Impact Statement recommending that the 162-year-old Edwards Dam on the Kennebec River in Augusta, Maine, be removed. The impoundment formed by Edwards Dam extends about 15 mi to the city of Waterville, near the confluence of the Sebasticook River with the Kennebec River. The impoundment has a surface area of 1,143 acres, a gross storage of approximately 740 million ft3, and a usable storage of about 184 million ft3 (Stone and Webster, 1995a). According to FERC, removal of the 917-ft-long, 24-ft-high timber crib and concrete structure would restore 15 mi of riverine habitat, improve passage of ocean-migrating fish species native to the Kennebec River, and result in substantial recreational enhancements (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 1997). Because the removal of Edwards Dam would change the hydraulic characteristics of the river in the present-day impoundment, the potential transport of erodible, fine-grained sediment currently in the impoundment is a concern. Of particular concern is the erosion and transport of this sediment to areas downstream from the dam, a process that could introduce possible bacterial and chemical contamination and could impede river navigation as a result of sediment deposition. In an effort to build upon available information on the composition of the riverbed, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Maine State Planning Office, classified riverbed sediment types and mapped their areal extents in the lower (southern) half of the Edwards Dam impoundment. This report describes the methods used to collect and analyze the data used to create a map of sediment types in the Edwards Dam impoundment. The map is included with this report. Data used to map riverbed sediment types were also used to estimate the volume of observed mud and mud-containing sediment in the study area.

  6. 30 CFR 77.216-2 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; minimum plan requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... District Manager; and the identification number of the mine or preparation plant as assigned by MSHA. (2... watershed affecting the impoundment. (5) A description of the physical and engineering properties of...

  7. 30 CFR 77.216-2 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; minimum plan requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... District Manager; and the identification number of the mine or preparation plant as assigned by MSHA. (2... watershed affecting the impoundment. (5) A description of the physical and engineering properties of...

  8. 30 CFR 77.216-2 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; minimum plan requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... District Manager; and the identification number of the mine or preparation plant as assigned by MSHA. (2... watershed affecting the impoundment. (5) A description of the physical and engineering properties of...

  9. 30 CFR 77.216-2 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; minimum plan requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... District Manager; and the identification number of the mine or preparation plant as assigned by MSHA. (2... watershed affecting the impoundment. (5) A description of the physical and engineering properties of...

  10. 30 CFR 77.216-2 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; minimum plan requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... District Manager; and the identification number of the mine or preparation plant as assigned by MSHA. (2... watershed affecting the impoundment. (5) A description of the physical and engineering properties of...

  11. Towards Sustainable Water Quality In Estuarine Impoundments: The Current State.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J.; Worrall, F.

    Several estuarine impoundment schemes have been built or are proposed in the UK and worldwide. The impounding of estuaries is currently a popular approach to urban regeneration in the UK. By creation of an aesthetically pleasing amenity impound- ment, including the drowning of "unsightly" tidal mud flats, it is hoped that prestige development will be encouraged in the estuarine area. Impounding fundamentally alters the dynamics of estuaries, with consequences in terms of sedimentation patterns and rates, and water quality. The SIMBA Project at- tempts to understand the controls on water quality in impoundments, with a view to- wards long term and sustainable high water quality through good barrage design and management practice. Detailed water quality surveys have been carried out on a total of 79 dates on the Tees, Tawe, Wansbeck and Blyth estuaries. Water quality parameters which have been determined are pH, Eh, dissolved oxygen (DO), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), conductivity, transparency, suspended solids, alkalinity, temperature, nutri- ents (nitrate+nitrite, ammonium and orthophosphate), and a large range of dissolved metals. Statistical analyses are used to demonstrate the major controls on water qual- ity in impoundments. A distinction is made between total tidal exclusion (freshwater) systems, in which water quality is primarily influenced by external/catchment factors, and partial tidal exclusion systems, in which water quality is processed internally. This internal processing is due to density stratification creating compartments of saline wa- ter in contact with oxygen demanding sediments and isolated from the atmosphere, which leads to conditions of low DO and changes in redox conditions which may lead to release of metals and phosphate from the sediment.

  12. An inventory of wetland impoundments in the coastal zone of Louisiana, USA: Historical trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Richard H.; Holz, Robert K.; Day, John W.

    1990-03-01

    We inventoried wetland impoundments in the Louisiana, USA, coastal zone from the late 1900s to 1985. Historically, impoundment of wetlands for reclamation resulted in direct wetland loss after levees (dikes) failed and the impounded area was permanently flooded, reverting not to wetland, but to open-water habitat. A current management approach is to surround wetlands by levees and water control structures, a practice termed semi-impoundment marsh management. The purpose of this semi-impoundment is to retard saltwater intrusion and reduce water level fluctuations in an attempt to reduce wetland loss, which is a serious problem in coastal Louisiana. In order to quantify the total impounded area, we used historic data and high-altitude infrared photography to map coastal impoundments. Our goal was to produce a documented inventory of wetlands intentionally impounded by levees in the coastal zone of Louisiana in order to provide a benchmark for further research. We inventoried 370,658 ha within the coastal zone that had been intentionally impounded before 1985. This area is equal to about 30% of the total wetland area in the coastal zone. Of that total area, approximately 12% (43,000 ha) is no longer impounded (i.e., failed impoundments; levees no longer exist or only remnants remain). Of the 328,000 ha still impounded, about 65% (214,000 ha) is developed (agriculture, aquaculture, urban and industrial development, and contained spoil). The remaining 35% (114,000 ha) of impoundments are in an undeveloped state (wetland or openwater habitat). In December 1985, approximately 50% (78,000 ha) of the undeveloped and failed impoundments were open-water habitat. This inventory will allow researchers to monitor future change in land-water ratios that occur within impounded wetlands and thus to assess the utility of coastal wetland management using impoundments.

  13. 32 CFR 634.52 - Search incident to impoundment based on criminal activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Search incident to impoundment based on criminal... Privately Owned Vehicles § 634.52 Search incident to impoundment based on criminal activity. Search of a POV... and crime-related impoundments and abandoned vehicle seizures. A property search related to...

  14. 32 CFR 634.52 - Search incident to impoundment based on criminal activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Search incident to impoundment based on criminal... Privately Owned Vehicles § 634.52 Search incident to impoundment based on criminal activity. Search of a POV... and crime-related impoundments and abandoned vehicle seizures. A property search related to...

  15. 32 CFR 634.52 - Search incident to impoundment based on criminal activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Search incident to impoundment based on criminal... Privately Owned Vehicles § 634.52 Search incident to impoundment based on criminal activity. Search of a POV... and crime-related impoundments and abandoned vehicle seizures. A property search related to...

  16. 32 CFR 634.52 - Search incident to impoundment based on criminal activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Search incident to impoundment based on criminal... Privately Owned Vehicles § 634.52 Search incident to impoundment based on criminal activity. Search of a POV... and crime-related impoundments and abandoned vehicle seizures. A property search related to...

  17. 32 CFR 634.52 - Search incident to impoundment based on criminal activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Search incident to impoundment based on criminal... Privately Owned Vehicles § 634.52 Search incident to impoundment based on criminal activity. Search of a POV... and crime-related impoundments and abandoned vehicle seizures. A property search related to...

  18. 25 CFR 161.709 - What happens after unauthorized livestock or other property are impounded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... property are impounded? 161.709 Section 161.709 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 161.709 What happens after unauthorized livestock or other property are impounded? Following the impoundment of...

  19. 25 CFR 166.809 - What happens after my unauthorized livestock or other property are impounded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... property are impounded? 166.809 Section 166.809 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 166.809 What happens after my unauthorized livestock or other property are impounded? Following the impoundment of unauthorized livestock or...

  20. 25 CFR 161.709 - What happens after unauthorized livestock or other property are impounded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... property are impounded? 161.709 Section 161.709 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 161.709 What happens after unauthorized livestock or other property are impounded? Following the impoundment of...

  1. 25 CFR 166.809 - What happens after my unauthorized livestock or other property are impounded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... property are impounded? 166.809 Section 166.809 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 166.809 What happens after my unauthorized livestock or other property are impounded? Following the impoundment of unauthorized livestock or...

  2. Simulated effects of impoundment of lake seminole on ground-water flow in the upper Floridan Aquifer in southwestern Georgia and adjacent parts of Alabama and Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, L. Elliott; Torak, Lynn J.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrologic implications of the impoundment of Lake Seminole in southwest Georgia and its effect on components of the surface- and ground-water flow systems of the lower Apalachicola?Chattahoochee?Flint (ACF) River Basin were investigated using a ground-water model. Comparison of simulation results of postimpoundment drought conditions (October 1986) with results of hypothetical preimpoundment conditions (a similar drought prior to 1955) provides a qualitative measure of the changes in hydraulic head and ground-water flow to and from streams and Lake Seminole, and across State lines caused by the impoundment. Based on the simulation results, the impoundment of Lake Seminole changed ground-water flow directions within about 20?30 miles of the lake, reducing the amount of ground water flowing from Florida to Georgia southeast of the lake. Ground-water storage was increased by the impoundment, as indicated by a simulated increase of as much as 26 feet in the water level in the Upper Floridan aquifer. The impoundment of Lake Seminole caused changes to simulated components of the ground-water budget, including reduced discharge from the Upper Floridan aquifer to streams (315 million gallons per day); reduced recharge from or increased discharge to regional ground-water flow at external model boundaries (totaling 183 million gallons per day); and reduced recharge from or increased discharge to the undifferentiated overburden (totaling 129 million gallons per day).

  3. 32 CFR 636.38 - Impounding privately owned vehicles (POVs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the following conditions exist: (i) The privately owned vehicle is illegally parked— (A) On a street... or the general public. An example would be a vehicle parked within 15 feet of a fire hydrant or... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Impounding privately owned vehicles (POVs)....

  4. 32 CFR 634.23 - Specified consent to impoundment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Motor Vehicle Registration § 634.23... installation traffic code provide for the removal and temporary impoundment of privately owned motor vehicles that are either parked illegally, or for unreasonable periods, interfering with military...

  5. 32 CFR 634.23 - Specified consent to impoundment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Motor Vehicle Registration § 634.23... installation traffic code provide for the removal and temporary impoundment of privately owned motor vehicles that are either parked illegally, or for unreasonable periods, interfering with military...

  6. 1. BUNKER HILL LEAD SMELTER. VIEW IS FROM CENTRAL IMPOUNDMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. BUNKER HILL LEAD SMELTER. VIEW IS FROM CENTRAL IMPOUNDMENT AREA LOOKING SOUTH. PLANT DRY IS IN CENTER FOREGROUND, SLAG FUMING PLANT IS IN RIGHT FOREGROUND, AND BAG HOUSE IS IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. VARIOUS PLANT STACKS ARE ALSO VISIBLE. - Bunker Hill Lead Smelter, Bradley Rail Siding, Kellogg, Shoshone County, ID

  7. 40 CFR 265.1086 - Standards: Surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... membrane material that is either: (A) High density polyethylene (HDPE) with a thickness no less than 2.5... individual drain system is considered to be a closed system when it meets the requirements of 40 CFR part...

  8. Predicting and controlling downwind concentrations of PCB from surface impoundments

    SciTech Connect

    Angiola, A.J.; Soden, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Over 227,000 kv of PCB were discharged into the Hudson River from two capacitor manufacturing plants at Fort Edward and Hudson Falls, New York. Much of the discharged PCB was absorbed by the bottom sediments of the river and accumulated behind the Fort Edward Dam. A large amount of the contaminated sediments migrated dowstream when the dam was removed. An effort has been made to dredge PCB-contaminated sediments from the Upper Hudson River and to deposit those sediments in a secure containment site. Part of this project was an air quality impact analysis which addressed the effect of PCB volatilization from the proposed containment site on ambient 24-hour concentrations of PCB downwind of the site. An estimate of the volatilization rate was made and a dispersion modeling analysis was performed in order to calculate the potential impact on residences. 4 references, 1 table.

  9. 40 CFR 63.687 - Standards: Surface impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... in accordance with the applicable provisions specified in 40 CFR 63 subpart QQ—National Emission... device in accordance with all applicable provisions specified in 40 CFR 63 subpart QQ—National...

  10. 40 CFR 268.4 - Treatment surface impoundment exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... required: I certify under penalty of law that the requirements of 40 CFR 268.4(a)(3) have been met for all... information, including the possibility of fine and imprisonment. (b) Evaporation of hazardous constituents...

  11. Infiltration from an impoundment for coal-bed natural gas, Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Evolution of water and sediment chemistry - article no. W06424

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, R.W.; Rice, C.A.; Bartos, T.T.; McKinley, M.P.

    2008-06-15

    Development of coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, has increased substantially in recent years. Among environmental concerns associated with this development is the fate of groundwater removed with the gas. A preferred water-management option is storage in surface impoundments. A study was conducted on changes in water and sediment chemistry as water from an impoundment infiltrated the subsurface. Sediment cores were collected prior to operation of the impoundment and after its closure and reclamation. Suction lysimeters were used to collect water samples from beneath the impoundment. Large amounts of chloride (12,300 kg) and nitrate (13,500 kg as N), most of which accumulated naturally in the sediments over thousands of years, were released into groundwater by infiltrating water. Nitrate was more readily flushed from the sediments than chloride. If sediments at other impoundment locations contain similar amounts of chloride and nitrate, impoundments already permitted could release over 48 x 10{sup 6} kg of chloride and 52 x 10{sup 6} kg of nitrate into groundwater in the basin. A solute plume with total dissolved solid (TDS) concentrations at times exceeding 100,000 mg/L was created in the subsurface. TDS concentrations in the plume were substantially greater than those in the CBNG water (about 2300 mg/L) and in the ambient shallow groundwater (about 8000 mg/L). Sulfate, sodium, and magnesium are the dominant ions in the plume. The elevated concentrations are attributed to cation-exchange-enhanced gypsum dissolution. As gypsum dissolves, calcium goes into solution and is exchanged for sodium and magnesium on clays. Removal of calcium from solution allows further gypsum dissolution.

  12. Measures of Water Quality in Merrit Island National Wildlife Refuge Impoundments and Adjacent Indian River Lagoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, Linda K.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this project was to conduct preliminary investigations to determine appropriate sampling strategies to measure the flux of dissolved nutrients (specifically, NH4+, NO3-, NO2-, and PO4(3-)) and suspended particulate matter (TSS) between impoundments and the IRL in preparation for an intensive three-year monitoring program. In addition to nutrients and TSS, a variety of common water quality indicators were also measured during these preliminary studies. Six impoundments and a single restored marsh were selected for study. Over a month long period, water samples were collected weekly at selected impoundment culverts. Water was collected in duplicate as independent grab samples from both the lagoon side and within the perimeter ditch directly adjacent to the culverts. Water quality indicators inside and outside the marsh impoundments were different. Ammonium, salinity, bacteria, and chlorophyll-a were higher inside the impoundments as expected possibly as a result of the great affect of evaporation on impoundment water. Water quality indicators responded rapidly both inside and outside the impoundments as exemplified by the increase in NH4(+)-N concentrations during a horseshoe crab die-off. Water quality indicators were high variable during the month in which water samples were collected. Because the impoundments are widely spaced it is logistically unrealistic to sample each of the impoundments and associated seagrass beds on a single day, sampling must be stratified to allow patterns of material movement and the annual flux of materials to and from the impoundments to be determined.

  13. Assessment of sediments in the riverine impoundments of national wildlife refuges in the Souris River Basin, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tangen, Brian A.; Laubhan, Murray K.; Gleason, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Accelerated sedimentation of reservoirs and riverine impoundments is a major concern throughout the United States. Sediments not only fill impoundments and reduce their effective life span, but they can reduce water quality by increasing turbidity and introducing harmful chemical constituents such as heavy metals, toxic elements, and nutrients. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service national wildlife refuges in the north-central part of the United States have documented high amounts of sediment accretion in some wetlands that could negatively affect important aquatic habitats for migratory birds and other wetland-dependent wildlife. Therefore, information pertaining to sediment accumulation in refuge impoundments potentially is important to guide conservation planning, including future management actions of individual impoundments. Lands comprising Des Lacs, Upper Souris, and J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuges, collectively known as the Souris River Basin refuges, encompass reaches of the Des Lacs and Souris Rivers of northwestern North Dakota. The riverine impoundments of the Souris River Basin refuges are vulnerable to sedimentation because of the construction of in-stream dams that interrupt and slow river flows and because of post-European settlement land-use changes that have increased the potential for soil erosion and transport to rivers. Information regarding sediments does not exist for these refuges, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service personnel have expressed interest in assessing refuge impoundments to support refuge management decisions. Sediment cores and surface sediment samples were collected from impoundments within Des Lacs, Upper Souris, and J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuges during 2004–05. Cores were used to estimate sediment accretion rates using radioisotope (cesium-137 [137Cs], lead-210 [210Pb]) dating techniques. Sediment cores and surface samples were analyzed for a suite of elements and agrichemicals, respectively. Examination of

  14. Recent accretion in two managed marsh impoundments in coastal Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahoon, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    Recent accretion was measured by the feldspar marker horizon method in two gravity-drained, managed, marsh impoundments and unmanaged reference marshes located on the rapidly subsiding coast of Louisiana. Water level management was designed to limit hydrologic exchange to the managed marsh by regulating the direction and rate of water flows. During a drawdown-flooding water management cycle, the unmanaged reference marshes had significantly higher vertical accretion rates, higher soil bulk density and soil mineral matter content, lower soil organic matter content, and higher rates of organic matter accumulation than the managed marsh. The rate of mineral matter accumulation was higher in both reference marshes, but was significantly higher in only one. Spatial variability in accumulation rates was low when analyzed in one managed marsh site, suggesting a primarily autochthonous source of matter. In contrast, the associated reference marsh apparently received allochthonous material that settled out in a distinct spatial pattern as water velocity decreased. The impoundment marshes experienced an accretion deficit of one full order of magnitude (0.1 vs. 1.0 m/yr) based on comparison of accretion and sea level rise data, while the unmanaged reference marshes experienced a five-fold smaller deficit or no deficit. These data suggest that the gravity-drained impoundments likely have a shorter life expectancy than the reference marshes in the rapidly subsiding Louisiana coast.

  15. Computational modelling of final covers for uranium mill tailings impoundments.

    PubMed

    Leoni, Guilherme Luís Menegassi; Almeida, Márcio de Souza Soares; Fernandes, Horst Monken

    2004-07-01

    To properly design a final cover for uranium mill tailings impoundments the designer must attempt to find an effective geotechnical solution which addresses the radiological and non-radiological potential impact and prevents geochemical processes from occurring within the tailings. This paper presents a computer-based method for evaluating the performance of engineered final covers for the remediation of uranium mill tailings impoundments. Three hypothetical final covers were taken from scientific literature to investigate the proposed method: (i) a compacted clay liner (CCL); (ii) a composite liner (CL) and (iii) a capillary barrier (CB). The processes investigated: (i) the saturated hydraulic flux; (ii) the unsaturated hydraulic flux (exclusively for the capillary barrier) and (iii) the radon exhalation to the atmosphere. The computer programs utilised for the analyses are: (i) Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP); (ii) SEEP/W and (iii) RADON. The site considered for the development of the research presented herein was the uranium mill tailings impoundment located at the Brazilian city of Poços de Caldas, in the Minas Gerais State. PMID:15177735

  16. A risk assessment of water salinization during the initial impounding period of a proposed reservoir in Tianjin, China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liqin; Jiang, Cuiling; Wang, Youheng; Peng, Yanmei; Zhang, Peng

    2013-09-01

    Water salinization of coastal reservoirs seriously threatens the safety of their water supply. To elucidate the mechanism of salinization and to quantitatively analyze the risk in the initial period of the impoundment of a proposed reservoir in Tianjin Binhai New Area, laboratory and field simulation experiments were implemented and integrated with the actual operation of Beitang Reservoir, which is located in the same region and has been operational for many years. The results suggested that water salinization of the proposed reservoir was mainly governed by soil saline release, evaporation and leakage. Saline release was the prevailing factor in the earlier stage of the impoundment, then the evaporation and leakage effects gradually became notable over time. By referring to the actual case of Beitang Reservoir, it was predicted that the chloride ion (Cl(-)) concentration of the water during the initial impounding period of the proposed reservoir would exceed the standard for quality of drinking water from surface water sources (250 mg L(-1)), and that the proposed reservoir had a high risk of water salinization.

  17. A risk assessment of water salinization during the initial impounding period of a proposed reservoir in Tianjin, China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liqin; Jiang, Cuiling; Wang, Youheng; Peng, Yanmei; Zhang, Peng

    2013-09-01

    Water salinization of coastal reservoirs seriously threatens the safety of their water supply. To elucidate the mechanism of salinization and to quantitatively analyze the risk in the initial period of the impoundment of a proposed reservoir in Tianjin Binhai New Area, laboratory and field simulation experiments were implemented and integrated with the actual operation of Beitang Reservoir, which is located in the same region and has been operational for many years. The results suggested that water salinization of the proposed reservoir was mainly governed by soil saline release, evaporation and leakage. Saline release was the prevailing factor in the earlier stage of the impoundment, then the evaporation and leakage effects gradually became notable over time. By referring to the actual case of Beitang Reservoir, it was predicted that the chloride ion (Cl(-)) concentration of the water during the initial impounding period of the proposed reservoir would exceed the standard for quality of drinking water from surface water sources (250 mg L(-1)), and that the proposed reservoir had a high risk of water salinization. PMID:23887689

  18. Modeling bed material transport through colonial-age mill dam impoundments, northern Delaware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, A.; Pizzuto, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Two hundred -year old colonial mill dam impoundments of the White Clay and Red Clay Creeks in northern Delaware are barely 20% 'filled' with sediment. Field evidence suggests that gravel-sized bed material supplied from upstream is able to pass through these impoundments, implying that the impoundment morphology has reached an equilibrium morphology controlled by the prevailing hydraulic regime. We assess this hypothesis using backwater modeling to compute local boundary shear stresses and the Wilcock-Crowe sediment transport equation to determine bed material transport rates in a representative impoundment with a ~ 2 m high dam and a 1.5 km-long impoundment. While previous conceptual models suggest that cobbles could only be transported through impoundments during catastrophic storm events or after impoundments had completely filled, our analysis demonstrates that transport rates of cobbles during the 2 year flow are significant. Even smaller discharges can be effective: the 0.5 year discharge moves coarse-grained bed material (11.2 - 32 mm) at moderate rates outside the impoundment and at low rates within the impoundment, suggesting net accumulation. Larger flows (5-25 year) transport material at similar rates both outside and within the impoundment. Averaged over time, this regime would keep the bed of the stream in quasi-equilibrium, with lower flows filling the impoundment and higher flows removing the accumulated sediment. This behavior is reminiscent of the response and recovery cycle described for quasi-equilibrium stream channels, suggesting that these impounded channels behave as graded streams with a reduced slope rather than as stagnant quasi-lacustrine systems incapable of transporting the sediment supplied from upstream. The current morphology (only 20% filled by sand and gravel) may not have existed in the past. Cores from floodplains adjacent to the impoundments reveal deposits of laminated mud suggesting a former fine-grained impoundment fill that

  19. Tectonic state: its significance and characterization in the assessment of seismic effects associated with reservoir impounding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castle, R.O.; Clark, M.M.; Grantz, A.; Savage, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    Any analysis of seismicity associated with the filling of large reservoirs requires an evaluation of the natural tectonic state in order to determine whether impoundment is the basic source, a mechanically unrelated companion feature, or a triggering stimulus of the observed seismicity. Several arguments indicate that the associated seismicity is usually a triggered effect. Among the elements of tectonic state considered here (existing fractures, accumulated elastic strain, and deformational style), deformational style is especially critical in forecasting the occurrence of impoundment-induced seismicity. The observational evidence indicates that seismicity associated with impounding generally occurs in areas that combine steeply dipping faults, relatively high strain rates, and either extensional or horizontal-shear strain. Simple physical arguments suggest: (1) that increased fluid pressures resulting from increased reservoir head should enhance the likelihood of seismic activity, whatever the tectonic environment; (2) that stress changes resulting from surface loading may increase the likelihood of crustal failure in areas of normal and transcurrent faulting, whereas they generally inhibit failure in areas of thrust faulting. Comparisons with other earthquake-producing artificial and natural processes (underground explosions, fluid injection, underground mining, fluid extraction, volcanic emissions) indicate that reservoir loading may similarly modify the natural tectonic state. Subsurface loading resulting from fluid extraction may be a particularly close analogue of reservoir loading; "seismotectonic" events associated with fluid extraction have been recognized in both seismically active and otherwise aseismic regions. Because the historic record of seismicity and surface faulting commonly is short in comparison with recurrence intervals of earthquake and fault-slip events, tectonic state is most reliably appraised through combined studies of historic

  20. Characterization plan for the waste holding basin (3513 impoundment)

    SciTech Connect

    Stansfield, R.G.; Francis, C.W.

    1986-09-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are required to comply fully with all federal and state regulations. In response to this requirement, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established the remedial action program, to provide comprehensive management of areas where past research, development, and waste management activities have been conducted and have resulted in residual contamination of facilities or the environment. One of the objectives of this program is to define the extent of contamination at these sites. The intent is to document the known environmental characteristics of the sites and identify the additional actions, such as sampling, analytical measurements, and modeling, necessary to confirm contamination and the possible migration of contaminants from the sites. One of these sites is the waste holding basin (3513 impoundment). The 3513 impoundment is an unlined waste settling basin constructed in 1944 for collection of ORNL wastewater before its discharge into White Oak Creek. Operation of the facility ceased in 1976 when a new process waste treatment plant came into operation. Considerable site-specific environmental information has been developed over the years relative to the type and quantities of radionuclides and hazardous substances contained in the pond water and sediment. The concentrations and patterns of distribution for many of the radionuclides in the aquatic biota as well as for the terrestrial plants growing on the berm of the impoundment have been determined by DOE ecological studies. Recently, some data were collected that evaluate the extent of contaminant movement to the groundwater. Results from these studies are summarized in this report. Also included in this report is an outline of additional tasks needed to obtain the necessary information to model the transport and dose pathways of hazardous substances from the site.

  1. Vegetation effects on fish distribution in impounded salt marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stolen, Eric D.; Collazo, Jaime; Percival, H. Franklin

    2009-01-01

    We compared the density and biomass of resident fish in vegetated and unvegetated flooded habitats of impounded salt marshes in the northern Indian River Lagoon (IRL) Estuary of east-central Florida. A 1-m2 throw trap was used to sample fish in randomly located, paired sample plots (n = 198 pairs) over 5 seasons in 7 impoundments. We collected a total of 15 fish taxa, and 88% of the fishes we identified from the samples belonged to three species: Cyprinodon variegatus (Sheepshead Minnow), Gambusia holbrooki (Eastern Mosquitofish), and Poecilia latipinna (Sailfin Molly). Vegetated habitat usually had higher density and biomass of fish. Mean fish density (and 95% confidence interval) for vegetated and unvegetated sites were 8.2 (6.7–9.9) and 2.0 (1.6–2.4) individuals m-2, respectively; mean biomass (and 95%) confidence interval) for vegetated and unvegetated sites were 3.0 (2.5–3.7) and 1.1 (0.9–1.4) g m-2, respectively. We confirmed previous findings that impounded salt marshes of the northern IRL Estuary produce a high standing stock of resident fishes. Seasonal patterns of abundance were consistent with fish moving between vegetated and unvegetated habitat as water levels changed in the estuary. Differences in density, mean size, and species composition of resident fishes between vegetated and unvegetated habitats have important implications for movement of biomass and nutrients out of salt marsh by piscivores (e.g., wading birds and fishes) via a trophic relay.

  2. 36 CFR 327.15 - Abandonment and impoundment of personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Abandonment and impoundment of personal property. 327.15 Section 327.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT... ADMINISTERED BY THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.15 Abandonment and impoundment of personal property. (a)...

  3. 36 CFR 327.15 - Abandonment and impoundment of personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Abandonment and impoundment of personal property. 327.15 Section 327.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS... ADMINISTERED BY THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.15 Abandonment and impoundment of personal property. (a)...

  4. 43 CFR 423.23 - Abandonment and impoundment of personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... accordance with the procedures contained in title 41 CFR and applicable Reclamation and Department of the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Abandonment and impoundment of personal... WATERBODIES Rules of Conduct § 423.23 Abandonment and impoundment of personal property. (a) You must...

  5. 43 CFR 423.23 - Abandonment and impoundment of personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... accordance with the procedures contained in title 41 CFR and applicable Reclamation and Department of the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Abandonment and impoundment of personal... WATERBODIES Rules of Conduct § 423.23 Abandonment and impoundment of personal property. (a) You must...

  6. 43 CFR 423.23 - Abandonment and impoundment of personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... accordance with the procedures contained in title 41 CFR and applicable Reclamation and Department of the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Abandonment and impoundment of personal... WATERBODIES Rules of Conduct § 423.23 Abandonment and impoundment of personal property. (a) You must...

  7. 36 CFR 327.15 - Abandonment and impoundment of personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Abandonment and impoundment of personal property. 327.15 Section 327.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS... ADMINISTERED BY THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.15 Abandonment and impoundment of personal property. (a)...

  8. 36 CFR 327.15 - Abandonment and impoundment of personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Abandonment and impoundment of personal property. 327.15 Section 327.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS... ADMINISTERED BY THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.15 Abandonment and impoundment of personal property. (a)...

  9. 43 CFR 423.23 - Abandonment and impoundment of personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... accordance with the procedures contained in title 41 CFR and applicable Reclamation and Department of the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Abandonment and impoundment of personal... WATERBODIES Rules of Conduct § 423.23 Abandonment and impoundment of personal property. (a) You must...

  10. 43 CFR 423.23 - Abandonment and impoundment of personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... accordance with the procedures contained in title 41 CFR and applicable Reclamation and Department of the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Abandonment and impoundment of personal... WATERBODIES Rules of Conduct § 423.23 Abandonment and impoundment of personal property. (a) You must...

  11. 25 CFR 161.710 - How can impounded livestock or other property be redeemed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How can impounded livestock or other property be redeemed? 161.710 Section 161.710 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER... property be redeemed? Impounded livestock or other property may be redeemed by submitting proof...

  12. 25 CFR 166.810 - How do I redeem my impounded livestock or other property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How do I redeem my impounded livestock or other property? 166.810 Section 166.810 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 166.810 How do I redeem my impounded livestock or other property?...

  13. 25 CFR 161.711 - How will BIA sell impounded livestock or other property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How will BIA sell impounded livestock or other property? 161.711 Section 161.711 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER... or other property? (a) Unless the owner or known lien holder of the impounded livestock or...

  14. 25 CFR 161.711 - How will BIA sell impounded livestock or other property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How will BIA sell impounded livestock or other property? 161.711 Section 161.711 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER... or other property? (a) Unless the owner or known lien holder of the impounded livestock or...

  15. 25 CFR 166.810 - How do I redeem my impounded livestock or other property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How do I redeem my impounded livestock or other property? 166.810 Section 166.810 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 166.810 How do I redeem my impounded livestock or other property?...

  16. 25 CFR 161.710 - How can impounded livestock or other property be redeemed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How can impounded livestock or other property be redeemed? 161.710 Section 161.710 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER... property be redeemed? Impounded livestock or other property may be redeemed by submitting proof...

  17. 30 CFR 817.56 - Postmining rehabilitation of sedimentation ponds, diversions, impoundments, and treatment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Postmining rehabilitation of sedimentation ponds, diversions, impoundments, and treatment facilities. 817.56 Section 817.56 Mineral Resources... Postmining rehabilitation of sedimentation ponds, diversions, impoundments, and treatment facilities....

  18. 30 CFR 816.56 - Postmining rehabilitation of sedimentation ponds, diversions, impoundments, and treatment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Postmining rehabilitation of sedimentation ponds, diversions, impoundments, and treatment facilities. 816.56 Section 816.56 Mineral Resources... rehabilitation of sedimentation ponds, diversions, impoundments, and treatment facilities. Before abandoning...

  19. 25 CFR 161.711 - How will BIA sell impounded livestock or other property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How will BIA sell impounded livestock or other property? 161.711 Section 161.711 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 161.711 How will BIA sell impounded...

  20. 25 CFR 161.710 - How can impounded livestock or other property be redeemed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How can impounded livestock or other property be redeemed? 161.710 Section 161.710 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 161.710 How can impounded livestock or...

  1. 30 CFR 780.25 - Reclamation plan: Siltation structures, impoundments, and refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may review and download the incorporated document from the Natural... specific design parameters and construction methods. (d) Coal mine waste impoundments and refuse piles. If you, the permit applicant, propose to place coal mine waste in a refuse pile or impoundment, or if...

  2. Sediment organic carbon distribution in 4 small northern Missouri impoundments: implications for sampling and carbon sequestration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent research suggests that the rate of sediment carbon storage of small agricultural impoundments may be of similar magnitude on a per unit area as that of the world’s oceans. However, the role of small impoundments in the carbon budget has not received adequate attention; indeed availability of ...

  3. Mercury methylation trends pre and post refilling in a Northern Appalachian impoundment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eklof, K. J.; Drohan, P. J.; Boyer, E. W.; Iavorivska, L.; Harper, J.; Brown, M.; Fink, C.; Gogno, J.

    2014-12-01

    High rates of atmospheric deposition of mercury (Hg) in the northern Appalachian Mountain region of the eastern United States have led to an accumulation of anthropogenic Hg in soils and the aquatic food chain. Much concern is focused on methyl mercury (MeHg) in surface waters as it is the most bioavailable species. The bacterial transformation of organic Hg to MeHg has been suggested to increase when oxidized soils or sediments become reduced, such as during flooding. The refilling of a Northern Appalachian impoundment has been tracked in this study in order to examine a potential increase in methylation rate. The sediments in this 0.29 km2 constructed impoundment lay dry for 6 years before dam reconstruction allowed refilling. Since being drained, redox concentration and depletion colors have appeared in the formerly gley sediments suggesting intense oxidation/reduction events. Dry sediment (soil order Entisols) Hg concentrations were typically highest in the upper horizon of the sediments and coincided with the highest concentrations of organic carbon. The ratio of MeHg to total Hg (THg) in the soils/sediments was used as an indicator of methylation rate. The highest ratio of MeHg/THg before the refilling were found in the deepest part of the former lake, were the sediments still periodically held rainwater. The sediments will be sampled again in late summer 2014 to evaluate the change in methylation rate with lake refilling. A potential change in stream water MeHg concentration in the outflow versus inflow determines if the restored lake may act as a source of MeHg to downstream environments. Results from this sampling of post-refilling water and sediments will be evaluated during the fall.

  4. Electrophoretic repair of impoundment leaks: Analysis and verification with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Corapcioglu, M.Y.; Kambham, K.K.R.; Tuncay, K.

    1998-12-01

    Sealing leaks which have developed in liquid surface impoundments with geomembrane liners may be difficult due to aged liner material. A technique utilizing electrophoresis which causes clay particles to be attracted toward leaks when an electric field is applied provides a cost-effective method for repair. This study presents an experimentally verified methodology to predict electrophoretic sealing of in-service geomembrane liners. The methodology includes a procedure to simulate axis-symmetric electrophoretic cake formation and a numerical technique to solve the electric field for voltage gradients. Path lines of solid particles are generated by superposing electrophoretic and Stokes` settling velocities. A numerical method to obtain a steady-state cake profile by conserving solids mass and an approach which uses path lines to simulate transient cake formation are described. For an initially uniform suspension, final and transient cake profiles are obtained under varying conditions. The effects of voltage difference, surface electrode size, and initial bentonite concentration on cake formation are discussed. In general, a higher voltage difference or a wider surface electrode accelerates the cake formation process. For efficient cake formation, the surface electrode should be located close to the water surface over the leak. A comparison of theoretical predictions with previously obtained experimental data shows a reasonable agreement. The analysis presented in the study provides a relatively inexpensive and useful tool in the implementation of an in situ field operation.

  5. Sediment organic carbon burial in agriculturally eutrophic impoundments over the last century

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Downing, J.A.; Cole, J.J.; Middelburg, J.J.; Striegl, R.G.; Duarte, C.M.; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Prairie, Y.T.; Laube, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    We estimated organic carbon (OC) burial over the past century in 40 impoundments in one of the most intensively agricultural regions of the world. The volume of sediment deposited per unit time varied as a function of lake and watershed size, but smaller impoundments had greater deposition and accumulation rates per unit area. Annual water storage losses varied from 0.1-20% and were negatively correlated with impoundment size. Estimated sediment OC content was greatest in lakes with low ratios of watershed to impoundment area. Sediment OC burial rates were higher than those assumed for fertile impoundments by previous studies and were much higher than those measured in natural lakes. OC burial ranged from a high of 17,000 g C m-2 a-1 to a low of 148 g C m-2 a-1 and was significantly greater in small impoundments than large ones. The OC buried in these lakes originates in both autochthonous and allochthonous production. These analyses suggest that OC sequestration in moderate to large impoundments may be double the rate assumed in previous analyses. Extrapolation suggests that they may bury 4 times as much carbon (C) as the world's oceans. The world's farm ponds alone may bury more OC than the oceans and 33% as much as the world's rivers deliver to the sea. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Creating and managing wetland impoundments to provide habitat for aquatic birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, M.C.; Kangas, P.; Obrecht, H.H.; Comin, Francisco A.; Herrera-Silveira, Jorge A.; Ramirez-Ramirez, Javier

    2000-01-01

    Patuxent Research Refuge, located in Central Maryland (USA), has approximately 140 ha of impoundments that were constructed for recreational and wildlife conservation purposes. Impoundments are of three major designs: dammed ravines, excavated basins, and diked ponds. Over 50 species of wetland plants were transplanted to impoundments of Patuxent from many parts of the United States between 1945 and 1963 to determine the species best suited for establishment in tannin-stained infertile waters. The wood duck was the only waterfowl species commonly observed on the Refuge when the area was established, but Canada geese, mallards, and black ducks, were introduced and numerous techniques developed to improve nesting and brood habitat. Twenty-six waterfowl species and 80 species of other water birds have used the impoundments for resting, feeding, or nesting. Management is now conducted to optimize avian biodiversity. Management techniques include drawdowns of water every 3-5 years in most impoundments to provide maximum plant and invertebrate food resources for wildlife. Research on the impounded wetlands at Patuxent has included evaluation of vegetation in regard to water level management, improving nest box design to reduce use of boxes by starlings, imprinting of waterfowl to elevated nesting structures to reduce predation on nests, and drawdown techniques to increase macroinvertebrates. Data on waterfowl abundance are evaluated relative to management activities and a preliminary computer model for management of the impoundments has been developed. Past, present, and future management and research projects are reviewed in this paper.

  7. Predicting change in fish mercury concentrations following reservoir impoundment.

    PubMed

    Therriault, T W; Schneider, D C

    1998-01-01

    Fish mercury concentrations frequently increase after impoundment of a reservoir. Soil flooding releases organic matter and nutrients, providing food to bacterial communities that methylate inorganic mercury. Methylation and bioaccumulation are the primary pathways for mercury accumulation in fish. We investigated if changes in fish mercury concentrations could be predicted from the change in reservoir size. Data for three fish species, northern pike (Esox lucius), walleye (Stizostedion vitreum), and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) from reservoirs in northern Manitoba and northern Quebec were used to evaluate four simple models of change in mercury with change in flooded area. For three additional fish species, all primary carnivores, the preferred model consisted of a single exponential enrichment term. This model successfully predicted two cases not used in model development-one with a large change in area and one with a small change in area. Models with good predictive skill can be developed when the underlying dynamics are known. PMID:15093096

  8. The role of cassiterite controlling arsenic mobility in an abandoned stanniferous tailings impoundment at Llallagua, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Romero, Francisco Martín; Canet, Carles; Alfonso, Pura; Zambrana, Rubén N; Soto, Nayelli

    2014-05-15

    The surface water contamination by potentially toxic elements (PTE) leached from mine tailings is a major environmental concern. However, the formation of insoluble solid phases can control the mobility of PTE, with subsequent decrease of the risk that tailings suppose to the environment. We characterized the tailings from a tin inactive mine in Llallagua, Bolivia in order to assess the risk for surface water quality. These tailings contain high concentrations of PTE, with up to 94,344 mg/kg Fe, 9,135 mg/kg Sn, 4,606 mg/kg As, 1,362 mg/kg Cu, 1,220 mg/kg Zn, 955 mg/kg Pb and 151 mg/kg Cd. Oxidation of sulfide minerals in these tailings generates acid leachates (pH=2.5-3.5), rich in SO4(2-) and dissolved PTE, thereby releasing contaminants to the surface waters. Nevertheless, the concentrations of dissolved Sn, As and Pb in acid leachates are low (Sn<0.01 mg/L; As=0.25-2.55 mg/L; Pb<0.05 mg/L). This indicates that, for the most part, Sn, As and Pb are being retained by the solid phases in the impoundment, so that these elements are not reaching the surface waters. Fe-bearing cassiterite-an insoluble and weathering-resistant oxide mineral-is abundant in the studied tailing deposits; it should be the main solid phase controlling Sn and As mobility in the impoundment. Additionally, jarosite and plumbojarosite, identified among the secondary minerals, could also play an important role controlling the mobility of As and Pb. Taking into account (a) the low solubility constants of cassiterite (Ksp=10(-64.2)), jarosite (Ksp=10(-11)) and plumbojarosite (Ksp=10(-28.66)), and (b) the stability of these minerals under acidic conditions, we can conclude that they control the long-term fate of Sn, As and Pb in the studied tailings.

  9. Sedimentation in Lake Onalaska, Navigation Pool 7, upper Mississippi River, since impoundment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Korschgen, C.E.; Jackson, G.A.; Muessig, L.F.; Southworth, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    Sediment accumulation was evaluated in Lake Onalaska, a 2800-ha backwater impoundment on the Upper Mississippi River. Computer programs were used to process fathometric charts and generate an extensive data set on water depth for the lake. Comparison of 1983 survey data with pre-impoundment (before 1937) data showed that Lake Onalaska had lost less than 10 percent of its original mean depth in the 46 years since impoundment. Previous estimates of sedimentation rates based on Cesium-137 sediment core analysis appear to have been too high. (DBO)

  10. Sedimentation in Lake Onalaska, Navigation Pool 7, Upper Mississippi River, since impoundment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Korschgen, C.E.; Jackson, G.A.; Muessig, L.F.; Southworth, D.

    1987-01-01

    Sediment accumulation was evaluated in Lake Onalaska a 2800-ha backwater impoundment on the Upper Mississippi River. Computer programs were used to process fathometric charts and generate an extensive data set on water depth for the lake. Comparison of 1983 survey data with pre-impoundment (before 1937) data showed that Lake Onalaska had lost less than 10 percent of its original mean depth in the 46 years since impoundment. Previous estimates of sedimentation rates based on Cesium-137 sediment core analysis appear to have been too high.

  11. Hydrologic and geochemical data collected near Skewed Reservoir, an impoundment for coal-bed natural gas produced water, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, Richard W.; Rice, Cynthia A.; Bartos, Timothy T.

    2012-01-01

    The Powder River Structural Basin is one of the largest producers of coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) in the United States. An important environmental concern in the Basin is the fate of groundwater that is extracted during CBNG production. Most of this produced water is disposed of in unlined surface impoundments. A 6-year study of groundwater flow and subsurface water and soil chemistry was conducted at one such impoundment, Skewed Reservoir. Hydrologic and geochemical data collected as part of that study are contained herein. Data include chemistry of groundwater obtained from a network of 21 monitoring wells and three suction lysimeters and chemical and physical properties of soil cores including chemistry of water/soil extracts, particle-size analyses, mineralogy, cation-exchange capacity, soil-water content, and total carbon and nitrogen content of soils.

  12. Upstream effects of a reservoir on fish assemblages 45 years following impoundment.

    PubMed

    Franssen, N R; Tobler, M

    2013-05-01

    Fish assemblage structure, rarefied species richness, species diversity and evenness of assemblages upstream of a reservoir in Oklahoma, U.S.A., were compared pre and post-impoundment as well as in contemporary collections from streams above and below the reservoir. There were significant shifts in assemblage structure between historical and contemporary collections above the reservoir but not between contemporary assemblages above and below the impoundment. Indicator species analysis revealed that the sand shiner Notropis stramineus and fathead minnow Pimephales promelas have declined, whereas largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and western mosquitofish Gambusia affinis have increased in relative abundance in assemblages upstream of the impoundment. Species richness was lower in contemporary assemblages compared with historical assemblages. Furthermore, contemporary assemblages below the dam had lower species richness, diversity and evenness compared with contemporary collections above the dam. These results highlight the spatial and temporal extent of reservoirs altering fish assemblages upstream of impoundments. PMID:23639160

  13. Efficiency of baited hoop nets for sampling catfish in southeastern U.S. small impoundments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Benjamin C.; Weaver, Daniel M.; Kwak, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Many U.S. natural resource agencies stock catfish (Ictaluridae) into small impoundments to provide recreational fishing opportunities. However, effective standardized methods for sampling catfish in small impoundments have not been developed for wide application, particularly in the southeastern United States. We evaluated the efficiency of three bait treatments (i.e., soybean cake, sunflower cake, and no bait) of tandem hoop nets in two North Carolina small impoundments during the fall of 2008 and spring of 2009 in a factorial experimental design. The impoundments were stocked with catchable-size channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus at contrastingly low (5.5 fi sh/ha) and high (90.0 fi sh/ha) rates prior to our sampling. Nets baited with soybean cake consistently sampled more channel catfish than any other treatment. Channel catfish catch ranged as high as 3,251 fi sh per net series during the fall in nets baited with soybean cake in the intensively stocked impoundment and was up to 8.5 and 15.3 times higher during the fall than in the spring in each impoundment. Nets baited with soybean cake sampled significantly (12 and 24 times) more channel catfish than those with no bait in the two impoundments. These trends did not occur among other catfish species. Nonictalurid fish and turtle catch was higher during spring compared to that of fall, corresponding with low channel catfish catches. Our results indicate that tandem hoop nets baited with soybean cake during the fall is a more efficient method for sampling channel catfish compared to nets baited with sunflower cake or no bait in spring or fall. Our findings validate this technique for application in southeastern U.S. small impoundments to assess catfish abundance to guide management and evaluate the success of catfish stocking programs.

  14. Sediment quantity and quality in three impoundments in Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, Marc James; Breault, Robert F.

    2003-01-01

    As part of a study with an overriding goal of providing information that would assist State and Federal agencies in developing screening protocols for managing sediments impounded behind dams that are potential candidates for removal, the U.S Geological Survey determined sediment quantity and quality at three locations: one on the French River and two on Yokum Brook, a tributary to the west branch of the Westfield River. Data collected with a global positioning system, a geographic information system, and sediment-thickness data aided in the creation of sediment maps and the calculation of sediment volumes at Perryville Pond on the French River in Webster, Massachusetts, and at the Silk Mill and Ballou Dams on Yokum Brook in Becket, Massachusetts. From these data the following sediment volumes were determined: Perryville Pond, 71,000 cubic yards, Silk Mill, 1,600 cubic yards, and Ballou, 800 cubic yards. Sediment characteristics were assessed in terms of grain size and concentrations of potentially hazardous organic compounds and metals. Assessment of the approaches and methods used at study sites indicated that ground-penetrating radar produced data that were extremely difficult and time-consuming to interpret for the three study sites. Because of these difficulties, a steel probe was ultimately used to determine sediment depth and extent for inclusion in the sediment maps. Use of these methods showed that, where sampling sites were accessible, a machine-driven coring device would be preferable to the physically exhausting, manual sediment-coring methods used in this investigation. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were an effective tool for screening large numbers of samples for a range of organic contaminant compounds. An example calculation of the number of samples needed to characterize mean concentrations of contaminants indicated that the number of samples collected for most analytes was adequate; however, additional analyses for lead, copper, silver

  15. Vehicle impoundments improve drinking and driving licence suspension outcomes: Large-scale evidence from Ontario.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Patrick A; Ma, Tracey; Elzohairy, Yoassry

    2016-10-01

    Although vehicle impoundment has become a common sanction for various driving offences, large-scale evaluations of its effectiveness in preventing drinking and driving recidivism are almost non-existent in the peer-reviewed literature. One reason is that impoundment programs have typically been introduced simultaneously with other countermeasures, rendering it difficult to disentangle any observed effects. Previous studies of impoundment effectiveness conducted when such programs were implemented in isolation have typically been restricted to small jurisdictions, making high-quality evaluation difficult. In contrast, Ontario's "long-term" and "seven-day" impoundment programs were implemented in relative isolation, but with tight relationships to already existing drinking and driving suspensions. In this work, we used offence data produced by Ontario's population of over 9 million licensed drivers to perform interrupted time series analysis on drinking and driving recidivism and on rates of driving while suspended for drinking and driving. Our results demonstrate two key findings: (1) impoundment, or its threat, improves compliance with drinking and driving licence suspensions; and (2) addition of impoundment to suspension reduces drinking and driving recidivism, possibly through enhanced suspension compliance.

  16. Estimated sediment thickness, quality, and toxicity to benthic organisms in selected impoundments in Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breault, Robert F.; Sorenson, Jason R.; Weiskel, Peter K.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Massachusetts Department of Fish and Game, Division of Ecological Restoration, collaborated to collect baseline information on the quantity and quality of sediment impounded behind selected dams in Massachusetts, including sediment thickness and the occurrence of contaminants potentially toxic to benthic organisms. The thicknesses of impounded sediments were measured, and cores of sediment were collected from 32 impoundments in 2004 and 2005. Cores were chemically analyzed, and concentrations of 32 inorganic elements and 108 organic compounds were quantified. Sediment thicknesses varied considerably among the 32 impoundments, with an average thickness of 3.7 feet. Estimated volumes also varied greatly, ranging from 100,000 cubic feet to 81 million cubic feet. Concentrations of toxic contaminants as well as the number of contaminants detected above analytical quantification levels (also known as laboratory reporting levels) varied greatly among sampling locations. Based on measured contaminant concentrations and comparison to published screening thresholds, bottom sediments were predicted to be toxic to bottom-dwelling (benthic) organisms in slightly under 30 percent of the impoundments sampled. Statistically significant relations were found between several of the contaminants and individual indicators of urban land use and industrial activity in the upstream drainage areas of the impoundments. However, models developed to estimate contaminant concentrations at unsampled sites from upstream landscape characteristics had low predictive power, consistent with the long and complex land-use history that is typical of many drainage areas in Massachusetts.

  17. Clean closure of former hazardous waste impoundments using statistical analysis of constituent concentrations in associated media

    SciTech Connect

    McGaughey, L.; Tuck, J.; Zimmermann, M.

    1994-12-31

    In 1988--89, six former hazardous waste impoundments at a chemical manufacturing plant in California were remediated by stabilization and excavation of waste. Affected soil and wastes were consolidated beneath a RCRA cap constructed over four of the impoundments. Verification samples for clean closure were collected beneath the two remaining excavated impoundments for clean closure and results were submitted to the California EPA`s Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC). DTSC noted high concentrations of arsenic and chromium in the verification samples and requested the installation of a RCRA cap over the two remaining excavated impoundments, concluding that the levels of arsenic and chromium were above acceptable levels from their health based risk assessment. In late 1993, AWD Technologies (AWM) prepared a submittal to DTSC which re-evaluated the verification data for clean closure of the two remaining excavated impoundments. A standard statistical technique was used to determine the upper and lower confidence limits for arsenic and chromium, the constituents of concern. Evaluation of groundwater data from wells in the vicinity also indicated that groundwater had not been affected by either arsenic or chromium. AWD`s evaluation concluded that no reduction in risk would be expected if a cap were constructed over the impoundments.

  18. Presentations from the 1992 Coal Mining Impoundment Informational Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    On May 20 and 21, 1992, the MSHA Coal Mining Impoundment Informational Meeting was held at the National Mine Health and Safety Academy in Beckley, West Virginia. Fifteen presentations were given on key issues involved in the design and construction of dams associated with coal mining. The attendees were told that to improve the consistency among the plan reviewers, engineers from the Denver and Pittsburgh Technical Support Centers meet twice annually to discuss specific technical issues. It was soon discovered that the topics being discussed needed to be shared with anyone involved with coal waste dam design, construction, or inspection. The only way to accomplish that goal was through the issuance of Procedure Instruction Letters. The Letters present a consensus of engineering philosophy that could change over time. They do not present policy or carry the force of law. Currently, thirteen position papers have been disseminated and more will follow as the need arises. The individual paper were not even entered into the database.

  19. Primary production in an impounded baldcypress swamp (Taxodium distichum) at the northern limit of the range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, B.A.; McKee, K.L.

    2005-01-01

    The ability of baldcypress (Taxodium distichum)swamps to maintain themselves near the northern limit of their range depends on their levels of production, which is not only are response to climate but also to local environmental factors(e.g., impoundment). We asked if primary production was reduced under impounded conditions and if species' responses to impoundment were individualistic or more generalized. To examine long-term production trends in a permanently impounded baldcypress swamp, a 6-year study of leaf litterfall was conducted in Buttonland Swamp, Illinois, which had been impounded for 10 years before the beginning of the study. Buttonland Swamp is at the northern boundary of the baldcypress swamp region along the Cache River, Illinois, in the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley of the United States. When the litter production of impounded sites was compared to those with natural hydrology in the same region, impounded sites had about half of the total litterfall of natural sites. Overall, leaf litterfall rates declined during the study(201 vs. 113 gm-2 yr-1), but the pattern was negatively correlated with water depth, which explained 97% of the variation in the data. Along the transect with the lowest mean minimum water depth(<0.5 cm), leaf litterfall decreased linearly over 6 years from 377 to 154gm-2 yr-1. Total leaf litterfall rates were lower at the other three depths(5, 43, and 49 cm mean minimum water depths)and remained below 200 gm-2 yr -1 throughout the study. Acer saccharinum, Nyssa aquatica, and Salix nigra were most responsible for the decline in total leaf litterfall. Amounts of leaf litterfall of T. distichum and Liquidambar styraciflua also generally decreased, while that of Cephalanthus occidentalis increased overtime. Because species' responses to environmental factors such as impoundment are individualistic, models should be based on the responses of individual species, rather than on communities. Our study further suggests that the

  20. The fish community of a small impoundment in upstate New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, C. Mead; Madenjian, Charles P.; Adams, Jean V.; Harman, Willard N.

    2001-01-01

    Moe Pond is a dimictic impoundment with surface area of 15.6 ha, a mean depth of 1.8 m, and an unexploited fish community of only two species: brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) and golden shiner (Notemigonus crysoleucas). The age-1 and older brown bullhead population was estimated to be 4,057 individuals, based on the Schnabel capture-recapture method of population estimation. Density and biomass were respectively estimated at 260 individuals/ha and 13 kg/ha. Annual survival rate of age-2 through age-5 brown bullheads was estimated at 48%. The golden shiner length-frequency distribution was unimodal with modal length of 80 mm and maximum total length of 115 m. The golden shiner population estimate was 7,154 individuals, based on seven beach seine haul replicate samples; the density and biomass were 686 shiners/ha and 5 kg/ha, respectively. This study provides an information baseline that may be useful in understanding food web interactions and whole-pond nutrient flux.

  1. Bed disturbance patterns in two mediterranean impounded rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobera, Gemma; López-Tarazón, José A.; Vericat, Damià; Batalla, Ramon J.; Andrés-Doménech, Ignacio; Millán-Romero, Pedro; Vallés, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    Physical processes in rivers are the result of the interaction between flow regime and hydraulics, morphology, sedimentology and sediment transport. The frequency and magnitude of physical disturbance (i.e. bed stability) control habitat integrity and, consequently, ecological diversity of a particular fluvial system. Mediterranean basins are characterized by marked hydroclimatic fluctuations, from low discharges during long dry seasons to flashy events during wetter periods. Dams alter the river's flow regime (e.g. changes on annual runoff, seasonal patterns, flood magnitude and frequency) and the morphosedimentary dynamics in downstream reaches (e.g. channel incision, bed armouring, vegetation encroachment). Impacts caused by reservoirs in rivers of dryland regions (i.e. Mediterranean) are even more pronounced because their channel form and river ecology are adapted to such highly variable flow regimes. Within this context, this paper analyses intra and inter bed disturbance patterns in two Mediterranean impounded rivers with contrasted characteristics (i.e. high and low Mediterranean character). This research was developed in four river reaches, upstream and downstream of a dam in the Esera and Siurana rivers (Ebro catchment, NE Iberian Peninsula) during two hydrological years. The River Esera is considered a Mediterranean River with a continental character, while the River Siurana has a strong Mediterranean character. As bed disturbance can be assessed in different ways, we have designed a methodological approach that integrates four main components in order to examine the effects of regulation in bed disturbance at different spatial and temporal scales: 1) description of channel morphology (together with changes before and after floods) by means of detailed topographical data and close-range aerial photography; 2) flow discharge and hydraulics by determination of flow parameters from 2D hydraulic modelling that is based on detailed topographical data; 3

  2. Fate of Radium in Marcellus Shale Flowback Water Impoundments and Assessment of Associated Health Risks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tieyuan; Hammack, Richard W; Vidic, Radisav D

    2015-08-01

    Natural gas extraction from Marcellus Shale generates large quantities of flowback water that contain high levels of salinity, heavy metals, and naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This water is typically stored in centralized storage impoundments or tanks prior to reuse, treatment or disposal. The fate of Ra-226, which is the dominant NORM component in flowback water, in three centralized storage impoundments in southwestern Pennsylvania was investigated during a 2.5-year period. Field sampling revealed that Ra-226 concentration in these storage facilities depends on the management strategy but is generally increasing during the reuse of flowback water for hydraulic fracturing. In addition, Ra-226 is enriched in the bottom solids (e.g., impoundment sludge), where it increased from less than 10 pCi/g for fresh sludge to several hundred pCi/g for aged sludge. A combination of sequential extraction procedure (SEP) and chemical composition analysis of impoundment sludge revealed that Barite is the main carrier of Ra-226 in the sludge. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) (EPA Method 1311) was used to assess the leaching behavior of Ra-226 in the impoundment sludge and its implications for waste management strategies for this low-level radioactive solid waste. Radiation exposure for on-site workers calculated using the RESRAD model showed that the radiation dose equivalent for the baseline conditions was well below the NRC limit for the general public.

  3. Fate of Radium in Marcellus Shale Flowback Water Impoundments and Assessment of Associated Health Risks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tieyuan; Hammack, Richard W; Vidic, Radisav D

    2015-08-01

    Natural gas extraction from Marcellus Shale generates large quantities of flowback water that contain high levels of salinity, heavy metals, and naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This water is typically stored in centralized storage impoundments or tanks prior to reuse, treatment or disposal. The fate of Ra-226, which is the dominant NORM component in flowback water, in three centralized storage impoundments in southwestern Pennsylvania was investigated during a 2.5-year period. Field sampling revealed that Ra-226 concentration in these storage facilities depends on the management strategy but is generally increasing during the reuse of flowback water for hydraulic fracturing. In addition, Ra-226 is enriched in the bottom solids (e.g., impoundment sludge), where it increased from less than 10 pCi/g for fresh sludge to several hundred pCi/g for aged sludge. A combination of sequential extraction procedure (SEP) and chemical composition analysis of impoundment sludge revealed that Barite is the main carrier of Ra-226 in the sludge. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) (EPA Method 1311) was used to assess the leaching behavior of Ra-226 in the impoundment sludge and its implications for waste management strategies for this low-level radioactive solid waste. Radiation exposure for on-site workers calculated using the RESRAD model showed that the radiation dose equivalent for the baseline conditions was well below the NRC limit for the general public. PMID:26154523

  4. Effects of increased summer flooding on nitrogen dynamics in impounded mangroves.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, Jos T A; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J; Rains, Mark C; Whigham, Dennis F

    2014-06-15

    Mangroves are important for coastal protection, carbon sequestration and habitat provision for plants and animals in the tropics and subtropics. Mangroves are threatened by habitat destruction and sea level rise, but management activities such as impounding for mosquito control can also have negative effects. We studied the effects of Rotational Impoundment Management (RIM) on nitrogen dynamics in impoundments dominated by three types of Black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) stands along the Indian River Lagoon (Florida). RIM, designed for noxious insect control, involves pumping estuarine water into impoundments in this area during spring and summer to raise water levels by 30 cm. We compared aspects of the nitrogen cycle before and after the start of the RIM and measured the same variables in an impoundment without RIM management. RIM led to the accumulation of ammonium in the substrate which coincided with a lowering of nitrification rates and decreased denitrification rates. Salt pan habitats dominated by dwarf mangroves became less saline following RIM initiation. Shoot growth of mangroves increased in response to higher nitrogen availability and lower pore water salinity. Mangrove responses were greatest in areas with dwarf and sparse mangrove cover. Overall, RIM resulted in lower nitrification and denitrification leading to lower nitrogen losses and increased Black mangrove growth, all benefits of RIM beyond those associated with noxious insect control. PMID:24751377

  5. Assessment of stormwater impoundments as contaminant hazards to red-winged blackbirds

    SciTech Connect

    Eisemann, J.D.; Spading, D.

    1995-12-31

    Stormwater impoundments, a recent engineering solution to the treatment of stormwater, slow runoff and allow the settling of sediments and associated contaminants. They also provide valuable habitat in urban settings. In this study, the authors used red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) to indicate potential contaminant hazards to avian species reared in stormwater impoundments. The authors studied four types of impoundments, grouped by the development in the supplying drainage; residential, commercial and highway development and a reference site with no development. They examined physiological biomarkers of 56, 8-day old nestlings, nesting parameters and foraging location of parent birds, food items delivered to nestlings, water chemistry, and sediments. Biomarker analysis included whole blood analysis for ALAD, blood serum chemistry (i.e., ALT, AST, CK, LDH, glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, uric acid) and oxidative stress enzymes in liver tissue. Hepatic EROD and brain acetylcholinesterase levels were analyzed to assess exposure to contaminants other than metals. All samples were assayed for heavy metals by atomic absorption. A total of 198 nests were located. Overall nest success was significantly higher at the impoundment with no development in the supplying drainage. Focal parent feeding observations indicated females foraged less often in impoundments in highway locations. Preliminary analyses indicate sediments are not accumulating high metal levels. Serum and hepatic biomarker analyses indicate no statistically significant effects among drainage types.

  6. Using Helicopter Electromagnetic Surveys to Identify Potential Hazards at Mine Waste Impoundments

    SciTech Connect

    Hammack, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    In July 2003, helicopter electromagnetic surveys were conducted at 14 coal waste impoundments in southern West Virginia. The purpose of the surveys was to detect conditions that could lead to impoundment failure either by structural failure of the embankment or by the flooding of adjacent or underlying mine works. Specifically, the surveys attempted to: 1) identify saturated zones within the mine waste, 2) delineate filtrate flow paths through the embankment or into adjacent strata and receiving streams, and 3) identify flooded mine workings underlying or adjacent to the waste impoundment. Data from the helicopter surveys were processed to generate conductivity/depth images. Conductivity/depth images were then spatially linked to georeferenced air photos or topographic maps for interpretation. Conductivity/depth images were found to provide a snapshot of the hydrologic conditions that exist within the impoundment. This information can be used to predict potential areas of failure within the embankment because of its ability to image the phreatic zone. Also, the electromagnetic survey can identify areas of unconsolidated slurry in the decant basin and beneath the embankment. Although shallow, flooded mineworks beneath the impoundment were identified by this survey, it cannot be assumed that electromagnetic surveys can detect all underlying mines. A preliminary evaluation of the data implies that helicopter electromagnetic surveys can provide a better understanding of the phreatic zone than the piezometer arrays that are typically used.

  7. Tidal management sffects sub-adult fish assemblages in impounded South Carolina Marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carswell, Ben L.; Peterson, James T.; Jennings, Cecil A.

    2015-01-01

    In coastal South Carolina, most impounded marshes are managed for waterfowl; fewer are managed for fishes. Tidal control is central to each strategy but raises concerns that nursery function could be impaired. This research examined the assemblage composition of fishes during early-life stages. We sampled two impoundments of each management type monthly in 2008 and 2009. We used light traps to collect 61,527 sub-adult fish representing 21 species and 16 families and push nets to collect 12,670 sub-adult fish representing 13 species and 11 families. The effective number of species detected at larval stage in “fish” impoundments (summer mean = 2.52 ± 0.20, winter mean = 2.02 ± 0.66) was greater than in “waterfowl” impoundments (summer mean = 1.27 ± 0.14, winter mean = 1.06 ± 0.09); CI = 90 %. Species richness did not differ between management types, but hierarchical linear models predicted differences in assemblage composition. These findings underscore the importance of frequent water exchange for maintaining diverse assemblages of early-life-stage fishes in marsh impoundments.

  8. Effects of increased summer flooding on nitrogen dynamics in impounded mangroves.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, Jos T A; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J; Rains, Mark C; Whigham, Dennis F

    2014-06-15

    Mangroves are important for coastal protection, carbon sequestration and habitat provision for plants and animals in the tropics and subtropics. Mangroves are threatened by habitat destruction and sea level rise, but management activities such as impounding for mosquito control can also have negative effects. We studied the effects of Rotational Impoundment Management (RIM) on nitrogen dynamics in impoundments dominated by three types of Black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) stands along the Indian River Lagoon (Florida). RIM, designed for noxious insect control, involves pumping estuarine water into impoundments in this area during spring and summer to raise water levels by 30 cm. We compared aspects of the nitrogen cycle before and after the start of the RIM and measured the same variables in an impoundment without RIM management. RIM led to the accumulation of ammonium in the substrate which coincided with a lowering of nitrification rates and decreased denitrification rates. Salt pan habitats dominated by dwarf mangroves became less saline following RIM initiation. Shoot growth of mangroves increased in response to higher nitrogen availability and lower pore water salinity. Mangrove responses were greatest in areas with dwarf and sparse mangrove cover. Overall, RIM resulted in lower nitrification and denitrification leading to lower nitrogen losses and increased Black mangrove growth, all benefits of RIM beyond those associated with noxious insect control.

  9. Waterbird use of coastal impoundments and management implications in east-central Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, David R.; Smith, Rebecca B.

    1990-01-01

    Monthly surveys were conducted on Kennedy Space Center for one year to determine densities of waterbirds within impounded salt marshes that were predominantly open water with little emergent vegetation. The objective was to assess the importance of these impoundments to waterbirds, particularly wading birds, which are species of special conservation concern. Water-level management for mosquito control and waterfowl provided habitat for an abundance of ducks, shorebirds, coots, and wading birds. Average densities throughout the year for these groups were 5.26, 412, 2.80, and 2.20 birds/ha, respectively. The majority of waterfowl were present during the winter. Shorebirds were most common during spring migration. Wading bird densities increased with declining water level. Due to the extensive alteration and development of coastal wetlands in central Florida, properly managed impoundments may provide important feeding areas for maintaining certain waterbird populations.

  10. 25 CFR 166.808 - How are trespassers notified if their unauthorized livestock or other property are to be impounded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... livestock or other property are to be impounded? 166.808 Section 166.808 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 166.808 How are trespassers notified if their unauthorized livestock or other property are to be impounded? (a) If the trespass is...

  11. 25 CFR 166.811 - How will the sale of impounded livestock or other property be conducted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... property be conducted? 166.811 Section 166.811 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 166.811 How will the sale of impounded livestock or other property be conducted? (a) Unless the owner or known lien holder of the impounded livestock...

  12. 25 CFR 166.811 - How will the sale of impounded livestock or other property be conducted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... property be conducted? 166.811 Section 166.811 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 166.811 How will the sale of impounded livestock or other property be conducted? (a) Unless the owner or known lien holder of the impounded livestock...

  13. 25 CFR 166.808 - How are trespassers notified if their unauthorized livestock or other property are to be impounded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... livestock or other property are to be impounded? 166.808 Section 166.808 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 166.808 How are trespassers notified if their unauthorized livestock or other property are to be impounded? (a) If the trespass is...

  14. Observation and analysis of time-variable gravity signal in China's Three Gorges Reservoir during the experimental water impoundment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Chen, C.; Liang, Q.; Du, J.

    2012-12-01

    The reasons of gravity field changes in the Three Gorges Reservoir of China are mainly due to the loads of huge water variations, which give rise to the crustal load deformation, the fluctuation of underground water and the secondary geological hazards. These consequences are becoming inevitable problems. On October 26, 2010, the dam front water level reached 175 m which was the highest water level of engineering design. Since then, the Three Gorges Reservoir had carried out experimental impoundment for three consecutive years. To obtain the response information of Three Gorges Reservoir and geological environment of surrounding area during fluctuation period, we conducted a series of continuous gravity observation, expecting to study the time-variable gravity field during the fluctuation and high water level period, and then to discuss the evolution of geological environment. This paper is based on the continuous gravity observation data (gPhone#101) during five months (from July 2011 to December 2011) before and after Three Gorges Project experimental impoundment on the observation points off shore of Yangtze River. The results show that it can be effectively detected the impact of impoundment on regional gravity field by using gravity observing methods. After removing the various corrections of theory tides, atmospheric pressure, polar motion, etc., analysis show that the linear changes of gravity in the stable water level period was caused by instrument zero drift. According to the linear drift rate fitting from the period, the changes in composition of the entire observation period can be obtained using segmented drift fitting. Residuals of gravity anomalies after piecewise subsection fitting drift were in high consistency with the water level. In the prophase of impoundment, direct gravitational effects caused by lower water level fluctuations were very obvious and the gravity response changed before dam front water level because of the indirect factors such

  15. The influence of the impoundment of Three Gorges Reservoir on the M5.1 Badong earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Huihong; Zhang, Huai; Shi, Yaolin

    2014-05-01

    while the water level variations. The magnitude of pore pressure can reach 16kPa when the diffusion coefficient was selected as 0.2m2/s, which was according to the distribution of small foreshocks. The maximum surface deformation beneath the of Three Gorges Reservoir is up to 3.6cm when the water level 135m and the surface deformation near the Badong area is 1.35cm, which well accordance with the GPS measurement. Although the total elastic strain energy accumulation caused by the impound water load is around 7.3×1011J, the energy density is still insignificant compared to the vast reservoir inundation area, as it is only less than 3.5 percent of the total seismic wave energy released by the M5.1 earthquake, which confirms that the tectonic stresses is the major source for the earthquake and weak fault zone and impoundment of the reservoir triggered earthquakes. We expect that the pore pressure diffusion in the future may increase deeper fault instability, therefore reservoir earthquake may still occur instead of disappear, although the maximam magnitude of triggered earthquakes by the Three Gorges Reservoir may not exceed M5.5 as suggested by previous researchers.

  16. Improving Water Management: Applying ModelBuilder to site water impoundments using AEM survey data

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, J.I.; Lipinski, B.A.; Harbert, W.P.; Ackman, T.E.

    2007-01-01

    ArcGIS ModelBuilder was used to create a GIS-based decision support model that incorporated digital elevation data and electromagnetic geophysical results gathered by helicopter to screen potential sites for water disposal impoundments produced from coal bed natural gas.

  17. 33 CFR 220.1 - Low level discharge facilities for drawdown of impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Low level discharge facilities for drawdown of impoundments. 220.1 Section 220.1 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DESIGN CRITERIA FOR DAM AND LAKE PROJECTS § 220.1 Low...

  18. 33 CFR 220.1 - Low level discharge facilities for drawdown of impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Low level discharge facilities for drawdown of impoundments. 220.1 Section 220.1 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DESIGN CRITERIA FOR DAM AND LAKE PROJECTS § 220.1 Low...

  19. Spawning activity of the Australian lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri in an impoundment.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D T; Mallett, S; Krück, N C; Loh, W; Tibbetts, I

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the spawning activity of the threatened Australian lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri by measuring egg densities within the artificial habitat of a large impoundment (Lake Wivenhoe, Australia). Eggs were sampled (August to November 2009) from multiple locations across the impoundment, but occurred at highest densities in water shallower than 40 cm along shorelines with a dense cover of submerged terrestrial vegetation. The numbers of eggs declined over the study period and all samples were dominated by early developmental stages and high proportions of unviable eggs. The quality of the littoral spawning habitats declined over the study as flooded terrestrial grasses decomposed and filamentous algae coverage increased. Water temperatures at the spawning site exhibited extreme variations, ranging over 20·4° C in water shallower than 5 cm. Dissolved oxygen concentrations regularly declined to <1 mg l⁻¹ at 40 and 80 cm water depth. Spawning habitats utilised by N. forsteri within impoundments expose embryos to increased risk of desiccation or excessive submergence through water-level variations, and extremes in temperature and dissolved oxygen concentration that present numerous challenges for successful spawning and recruitment of N. forsteri in large impoundment environments.

  20. Effects of reservoir impoundment on fish assemblages in the Wujiang River of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, D.; Yang, Z.

    2016-08-01

    Fishery catches were investigated during the spring and autumn in the period 2006-2010. The fish assemblages’ composition and dynamics were analysed and compared under the pressure of the Pengshui Reservoir impoundment. A total of 101 species were sampled in the lower Wujiang River. 78 species and 83 species were found in the upper and the lower reaches, respectively. After impoundment there were five species in the Yanhe branch and nine species in the Pengshui branch. The abundance of species was higher in the Pengshui than in the Yanhe. Fish abundance did not change in the first year of impoundment (2008) in the Lujiao- Gongtan reach, but it dramatically declined by 45.95% in 2009. The fish were subdivided into three groups and two ecotypes according to their time-series appearance in fish catches and their habitat preference. Species composition changed significantly with decreases in numbers of lotic species. Fish assemblages responded more rapidly and dramatically to impoundment in the reservoir section than the section below the Pengshui Dam.

  1. 25 CFR 166.807 - When will we impound unauthorized livestock or other property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... WATER GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 166.807 When will we impound unauthorized livestock or other...) Where there is imminent danger of severe injury to growing or harvestable crop or destruction of the... other property refuses to accept delivery of a written notice of trespass and the unauthorized...

  2. 25 CFR 166.807 - When will we impound unauthorized livestock or other property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... WATER GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 166.807 When will we impound unauthorized livestock or other...) Where there is imminent danger of severe injury to growing or harvestable crop or destruction of the... other property refuses to accept delivery of a written notice of trespass and the unauthorized...

  3. 25 CFR 166.807 - When will we impound unauthorized livestock or other property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... WATER GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 166.807 When will we impound unauthorized livestock or other...) Where there is imminent danger of severe injury to growing or harvestable crop or destruction of the... other property refuses to accept delivery of a written notice of trespass and the unauthorized...

  4. 25 CFR 161.707 - When will BIA impound unauthorized livestock or other property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 161.707 When will BIA impound... following conditions: (a) Where there is imminent danger of severe injury to growing or harvestable crop or... livestock or other property refuses to accept delivery of a written notice of trespass and the...

  5. 25 CFR 161.707 - When will BIA impound unauthorized livestock or other property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 161.707 When will BIA impound... following conditions: (a) Where there is imminent danger of severe injury to growing or harvestable crop or... livestock or other property refuses to accept delivery of a written notice of trespass and the...

  6. 25 CFR 161.707 - When will BIA impound unauthorized livestock or other property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 161.707 When will BIA impound... following conditions: (a) Where there is imminent danger of severe injury to growing or harvestable crop or... livestock or other property refuses to accept delivery of a written notice of trespass and the...

  7. 25 CFR 166.807 - When will we impound unauthorized livestock or other property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... WATER GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 166.807 When will we impound unauthorized livestock or other...) Where there is imminent danger of severe injury to growing or harvestable crop or destruction of the... other property refuses to accept delivery of a written notice of trespass and the unauthorized...

  8. 25 CFR 161.707 - When will BIA impound unauthorized livestock or other property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 161.707 When will BIA impound... following conditions: (a) Where there is imminent danger of severe injury to growing or harvestable crop or... livestock or other property refuses to accept delivery of a written notice of trespass and the...

  9. 25 CFR 161.707 - When will BIA impound unauthorized livestock or other property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 161.707 When will BIA impound... following conditions: (a) Where there is imminent danger of severe injury to growing or harvestable crop or... livestock or other property refuses to accept delivery of a written notice of trespass and the...

  10. 25 CFR 166.807 - When will we impound unauthorized livestock or other property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... WATER GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 166.807 When will we impound unauthorized livestock or other...) Where there is imminent danger of severe injury to growing or harvestable crop or destruction of the... other property refuses to accept delivery of a written notice of trespass and the unauthorized...

  11. 25 CFR 161.708 - How are trespassers notified of impoundments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How are trespassers notified of impoundments? 161.708 Section 161.708 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER NAVAJO... published in the local newspaper nearest to the Indian agricultural lands where the trespass is...

  12. 25 CFR 161.709 - What happens after unauthorized livestock or other property are impounded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What happens after unauthorized livestock or other property are impounded? 161.709 Section 161.709 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Actions § 161.709 What...

  13. 30 CFR 784.16 - Reclamation plan: Siltation structures, impoundments, and refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may review and download the incorporated document from the Natural... analysis of alternatives for the proposed impoundment or refuse pile under 40 CFR 230.10 to meet Clean... related fields such as geology, land surveying, and landscape architecture; (B) Include any...

  14. 30 CFR 784.16 - Reclamation plan: Siltation structures, impoundments, and refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may review and download the incorporated document from the Natural... analysis of alternatives for the proposed impoundment or refuse pile under 40 CFR 230.10 to meet Clean... related fields such as geology, land surveying, and landscape architecture; (B) Include any...

  15. 30 CFR 780.25 - Reclamation plan: Siltation structures, impoundments, and refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may review and download the incorporated document from the Natural... proposed impoundment or refuse pile under 40 CFR 230.10 to meet Clean Water Act requirements, you may... related fields such as geology, land surveying, and landscape architecture; (B) Include any...

  16. 30 CFR 780.25 - Reclamation plan: Siltation structures, impoundments, and refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may review and download the incorporated document from the Natural... proposed impoundment or refuse pile under 40 CFR 230.10 to meet Clean Water Act requirements, you may... related fields such as geology, land surveying, and landscape architecture; (B) Include any...

  17. 30 CFR 780.25 - Reclamation plan: Siltation structures, impoundments, and refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may review and download the incorporated document from the Natural... proposed impoundment or refuse pile under 40 CFR 230.10 to meet Clean Water Act requirements, you may... related fields such as geology, land surveying, and landscape architecture; (B) Include any...

  18. 30 CFR 784.16 - Reclamation plan: Siltation structures, impoundments, and refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may review and download the incorporated document from the Natural... analysis of alternatives for the proposed impoundment or refuse pile under 40 CFR 230.10 to meet Clean... related fields such as geology, land surveying, and landscape architecture; (B) Include any...

  19. 30 CFR 784.16 - Reclamation plan: Siltation structures, impoundments, and refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may review and download the incorporated document from the Natural... analysis of alternatives for the proposed impoundment or refuse pile under 40 CFR 230.10 to meet Clean... related fields such as geology, land surveying, and landscape architecture; (B) Include any...

  20. 30 CFR 780.25 - Reclamation plan: Siltation structures, impoundments, and refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may review and download the incorporated document from the Natural... proposed impoundment or refuse pile under 40 CFR 230.10 to meet Clean Water Act requirements, you may... related fields such as geology, land surveying, and landscape architecture; (B) Include any...

  1. Seasonal variations in phytoplankton diversity in the Bui dam area of the Black Volta in Ghana during the pre- and post-impoundment periods.

    PubMed

    Alhassan, Elliot Haruna

    2015-03-01

    Phytoplankton constitutes the primary producers of aquatic ecosystems and represents the food chain base that supports the commercial fisheries of most water bodies. Nowadays, there is lack of information on phytoplankton assemblages of most reservoirs in Africa. To contribute with this knowledge, this study was carried out to determine the density and diversity of seasonal variations of phytoplankton species in the Bui dam area of the Black Volta, during the pre- (2011) and post-impoundment (2012) periods. For this, a three-level stratified random sampling approach was adopted for 22 months. Phytoplankton samples were obtained by towing a 0.5m diameter phytoplankton net (35 microm mesh size and 0.25m2 mouth surface area) from a non-motorized canoe through a distance of about 100 m against the current from downstream to upstream of the river. In 2011, 35 species of phytoplankton belonging to four classes, Bacillariophyceae (7.6%), Chlorophyceae (43%), Cyanophyceae (48.6%) and Euglenophyceae (0.8%) were identified. In the 2012 sampling, 18 species belonging to three classes, Bacillariophyceae (2.2%), Chlorophyceae (26.1%) and Cyanophyceae (71.7%) were observed. A total of 17 species of phytoplankton, including Gyrosigma sp., Surirella sp., Carteria sp., Chlosterium sp., Chlorogonium sp., Coelastrum sp., Cosmarium sp., Volvox sp., Chroococcus sp., Coelosphaerium sp., Rivularia sp. and Spirulina sp., were absent during the late post-impoundment period. Mean monthly total phytoplankton abundance decreased from June (7 384 cells/M3) to August (106 cells/m3) in 2011. In 2012 however, mean total phytoplankton decreased from February (1237 cels/m3) to August (4 cells/m3). The results also showed that variations occurred between seasons among some phytoplankton groups. The dry and pre-wet seasons had significantly (p<0.05) higher mean phytoplankton abundance than the wet season during the 22 months of sampling period. The biotic indices of Shannon-Wiener (HI) were

  2. Seasonal variations in phytoplankton diversity in the Bui dam area of the Black Volta in Ghana during the pre- and post-impoundment periods.

    PubMed

    Alhassan, Elliot Haruna

    2015-03-01

    Phytoplankton constitutes the primary producers of aquatic ecosystems and represents the food chain base that supports the commercial fisheries of most water bodies. Nowadays, there is lack of information on phytoplankton assemblages of most reservoirs in Africa. To contribute with this knowledge, this study was carried out to determine the density and diversity of seasonal variations of phytoplankton species in the Bui dam area of the Black Volta, during the pre- (2011) and post-impoundment (2012) periods. For this, a three-level stratified random sampling approach was adopted for 22 months. Phytoplankton samples were obtained by towing a 0.5m diameter phytoplankton net (35 microm mesh size and 0.25m2 mouth surface area) from a non-motorized canoe through a distance of about 100 m against the current from downstream to upstream of the river. In 2011, 35 species of phytoplankton belonging to four classes, Bacillariophyceae (7.6%), Chlorophyceae (43%), Cyanophyceae (48.6%) and Euglenophyceae (0.8%) were identified. In the 2012 sampling, 18 species belonging to three classes, Bacillariophyceae (2.2%), Chlorophyceae (26.1%) and Cyanophyceae (71.7%) were observed. A total of 17 species of phytoplankton, including Gyrosigma sp., Surirella sp., Carteria sp., Chlosterium sp., Chlorogonium sp., Coelastrum sp., Cosmarium sp., Volvox sp., Chroococcus sp., Coelosphaerium sp., Rivularia sp. and Spirulina sp., were absent during the late post-impoundment period. Mean monthly total phytoplankton abundance decreased from June (7 384 cells/M3) to August (106 cells/m3) in 2011. In 2012 however, mean total phytoplankton decreased from February (1237 cels/m3) to August (4 cells/m3). The results also showed that variations occurred between seasons among some phytoplankton groups. The dry and pre-wet seasons had significantly (p<0.05) higher mean phytoplankton abundance than the wet season during the 22 months of sampling period. The biotic indices of Shannon-Wiener (HI) were

  3. Rock riprap design methods and their applicability to long-term protection of uranium mill tailings impoundments

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.H.

    1982-08-01

    This report reviews the more accepted or recommended riprap design methods currently used to design rock riprap protection against soil erosion by flowing water. The basic theories used to develop the various methods are presented. The Riprap Design with Safety Factors Method is identified as the logical choice for uranium mill tailings impoundments. This method is compared to the other methods and its applicability to the protection requirements of tailings impoundments is discussed. Other design problems are identified and investigative studies recommended.

  4. An evaluation of the specific deterrent effects of vehicle impoundment on suspended, revoked, and unlicensed drivers in California.

    PubMed

    Deyoung, D J

    1999-01-01

    There have been a number of studies conducted during the past two decades that convincingly demonstrate that license suspension and revocation are some of the most effective countermeasures currently available for attenuating the traffic safety risk of problem drivers. At the same time, it is also known that most suspended/revoked (S/R) drivers violate their illegal driving status and continue to drive, accruing traffic convictions and becoming involved in crashes. In an attempt to strengthen license actions and to better control S/R and unlicensed drivers, California enacted two laws effective January 1995 which provide for the impoundment and forfeiture of vehicles driven by S/R and unlicensed drivers. The study described in this paper evaluates the impact of vehicle impoundment on the 1-year subsequent driving behavior of S/R and unlicensed drivers who experience this sanction. The results show that drivers with no prior convictions for driving while S/R or unlicensed whose vehicles were impounded have, relative to similar drivers whose vehicles were not impounded: 23.8% fewer driving while suspended/revoked or unlicensed convictions; 18.1% fewer traffic convictions; and 24.7% fewer crashes. The differences between the impound and no-impound groups are even larger when the driving records of repeat offenders (i.e. drivers with prior driving-while-S/R or unlicensed convictions) are examined. Repeat offenders whose vehicles are impounded have 34.2% fewer driving-while-S/R or unlicensed convictions, 22.3% fewer traffic convictions and 37.6% fewer crashes. These findings provide strong support for impounding vehicles driven by S/R and unlicensed drivers.

  5. Aquatic impacts of an environmental disaster in a relatively pristine watershed: the breach of the Mount Polley Mine tailings impoundment, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Philip; Petticrew, Ellen; Albers, Sam

    2015-04-01

    On 4th August 2014, the tailings impoundment of the Mount Polley copper and gold mine in British Columbia failed. Material from the impoundment (surface area = 2.7 km2) flowed into nearby Polley Lake and Hazeltine Creek, before discharging into Quesnel Lake, a large (ca. 100 km long, >500 m deep), relatively pristine lake. Estimates suggest that approximately 25 Mm3 of tailings (water and solids), in addition to eroded soils and surficial materials from Hazeltine Creek, were delivered to Quesnel Lake, raising the lake by 7.7 cm. Much of this material was deposited at the bottom of Quesnel Lake but a large plume of fine-grained sediment (d50 of ca. 1 µm) moved both up-lake towards important salmon spawning areas and down-lake into Quesnel River, which in turn flows into the Fraser River. This movement of the sediment plume is controlled by the physical limnology of the lake, especially seiche events. Samples of lake water and sediment samples taken from the impacted area show elevated levels of metals and other elements, which may have important implications for the ecosystem in this watershed (>11,000 km2). This presentation describes the failure and presents preliminary findings of the aquatic impacts of this environmental disaster.

  6. Geochemistry of a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. [Quarterly] technical report, September 1, 1993--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.; Heidari, M.

    1993-12-31

    The highly alkaline residue from the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) of coal may be an environmentally acceptable material for use in neutralizing acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in coal slurry solids (CSS). Previous research indicated that FBC residues in mixtures with pyrite-rich CSS neutralized the acid produced by or attenuated the oxidation of pyrite in CSS. In the present research we intend to collect cores of unconsolidated material and sample pore gases from a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. The data gathered will provide background information necessary for the development of a predictive computer model of the generation and migration of acid in a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. A conceptual model for the oxidation of pyrite at near-neutral conditions is being developed. This report includes our first approximation of the model. The model is subject to change.

  7. Geochemistry of a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.; Heidari, M.

    1994-06-01

    The highly alkaline residue from the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) of coal may be an environmentally acceptable material for use in neutralizing acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in coal slurry solids (CSS). Previous research indicated that FBC residues in mixtures with pyrite-rich CSS neutralized the acid produced by or attenuated the oxidation of pyrite in CSS. In the present research we intend to collect cores of unconsolidation material and sample pore gases from a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. The data gathered will provide background information necessary for the development of a predictive computer model of the generation and migration of acid in a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. The conceptual model for the oxidation of pyrite at near-neutral conditions has been revised. The model is being built around the method of Morel and Hering (1993) and Westall (1986).

  8. Effects of river impoundment on ecosystem services of large tropical rivers: embodied energy and market value of artisanal fisheries.

    PubMed

    Hoeinghaus, David J; Agostinho, Angelo A; Gomes, Luiz C; Pelicice, Fernando M; Okada, Edson K; Latini, João D; Kashiwaqui, Elaine A L; Winemiller, Kirk O

    2009-10-01

    Applying the ecosystem services concept to conservation initiatives or in managing ecosystem services requires understanding how environmental impacts affect the ecology of key species or functional groups providing the services. We examined effects of river impoundments, one of the leading threats to freshwater biodiversity, on an important ecosystem service provided by large tropical rivers (i.e., artisanal fisheries). The societal and economic importance of this ecosystem service in developing countries may provide leverage to advance conservation agendas where future impoundments are being considered. We assessed impoundment effects on the energetic costs of fisheries production (embodied energy) and commercial market value of the artisanal fishery of the Paraná River, Brazil, before and after formation of Itaipu Reservoir. High-value migratory species that dominated the fishery before the impoundment was built constituted a minor component of the contemporary fishery that is based heavily on reservoir-adapted introduced species. Cascading effects of river impoundment resulted in a mismatch between embodied energy and market value: energetic costs of fisheries production increased, whereas market value decreased. This was partially attributable to changes in species functional composition but also strongly linked to species identities that affected market value as a result of consumer preferences even when species were functionally similar. Similar trends are expected in other large tropical rivers following impoundment. In addition to identifying consequences of a common anthropogenic impact on an important ecosystem service, our assessment provides insight into the sustainability of fisheries production in tropical rivers and priorities for regional biodiversity conservation. PMID:19459891

  9. Cumuilative Effects of Impoundments on the Hydrology of Riparian Wetlands along the Marmaton River, west-central Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heimann, David C.; Krempa, Heather M.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of proposed impoundments and resulting streamflow regulation on riparian wetlands in the Marmaton River Basin, Missouri, USA were determined using measurements and numerical simulations of wetland water budgets. Calibrated and validated Soil-Plant-Air-Water (SPAW) models were used to simulate daily water depths of four riparian wetlands for Current (model scenario of existing impoundments) and Proposed (model scenario of existing and proposed impoundments) impoundment conditions. The simulated frequency of flooding decreased 19–65% at the wetlands following the additions of proposed impoundments. The reduced flooding resulted in decreases in wetland water depths at all sites during the 10 simulated growing seasons under Proposed conditions with an average duration of continuous water-depth declines of 289 days at the upstream (most regulated) site. Downstream wetlands within the zone of least regulation had an average duration of water level decreases of about 20 days. Decreased water levels under Proposed conditions resulted in a range of 65–365 additional dry days at the study wetlands during the simulated 10-year period of Proposed conditions. The areas of the four wetlands meeting the hydrologic criteria of a formal jurisdictional wetland definition decreased ranging from zero to 31% under Proposed impoundment conditions.

  10. Profiling of Sediment Microbial Community in Dongting Lake before and after Impoundment of the Three Gorges Dam

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Jiang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    The sediment microbial community in downstream-linked lakes can be affected by the operation of large-scale water conservancy projects. The present study determined Illumina reads (16S rRNA gene amplicons) to analyze and compare the bacterial communities from sediments in Dongting Lake (China) before and after impoundment of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD), the largest hydroelectric project in the world. Bacterial communities in sediment samples in Dongting Lake before impoundment of the TGD (the high water period) had a higher diversity than after impoundment of the TGD (the low water period). The most abundant phylum in the sediment samples was Proteobacteria (36.4%–51.5%), and this result was due to the significant abundance of Betaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria in the sediment samples before impoundment of the TGD and the abundance of Gammaproteobacteria in the sediment samples after impoundment of the TGD. In addition, bacterial sequences of the sediment samples are also affiliated with Acidobacteria (11.0% on average), Chloroflexi (10.9% on average), Bacteroidetes (6.7% on average), and Nitrospirae (5.1% on average). Variations in the composition of the bacterial community within some sediment samples from the river estuary into Dongting Lake were related to the pH values. The bacterial community in the samples from the three lake districts of Dongting Lake before and after impoundment of the TGD was linked to the nutrient concentration. PMID:27338434

  11. Profiling of Sediment Microbial Community in Dongting Lake before and after Impoundment of the Three Gorges Dam.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Jiang, Xia

    2016-06-21

    The sediment microbial community in downstream-linked lakes can be affected by the operation of large-scale water conservancy projects. The present study determined Illumina reads (16S rRNA gene amplicons) to analyze and compare the bacterial communities from sediments in Dongting Lake (China) before and after impoundment of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD), the largest hydroelectric project in the world. Bacterial communities in sediment samples in Dongting Lake before impoundment of the TGD (the high water period) had a higher diversity than after impoundment of the TGD (the low water period). The most abundant phylum in the sediment samples was Proteobacteria (36.4%-51.5%), and this result was due to the significant abundance of Betaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria in the sediment samples before impoundment of the TGD and the abundance of Gammaproteobacteria in the sediment samples after impoundment of the TGD. In addition, bacterial sequences of the sediment samples are also affiliated with Acidobacteria (11.0% on average), Chloroflexi (10.9% on average), Bacteroidetes (6.7% on average), and Nitrospirae (5.1% on average). Variations in the composition of the bacterial community within some sediment samples from the river estuary into Dongting Lake were related to the pH values. The bacterial community in the samples from the three lake districts of Dongting Lake before and after impoundment of the TGD was linked to the nutrient concentration.

  12. Effects of river impoundment on ecosystem services of large tropical rivers: embodied energy and market value of artisanal fisheries.

    PubMed

    Hoeinghaus, David J; Agostinho, Angelo A; Gomes, Luiz C; Pelicice, Fernando M; Okada, Edson K; Latini, João D; Kashiwaqui, Elaine A L; Winemiller, Kirk O

    2009-10-01

    Applying the ecosystem services concept to conservation initiatives or in managing ecosystem services requires understanding how environmental impacts affect the ecology of key species or functional groups providing the services. We examined effects of river impoundments, one of the leading threats to freshwater biodiversity, on an important ecosystem service provided by large tropical rivers (i.e., artisanal fisheries). The societal and economic importance of this ecosystem service in developing countries may provide leverage to advance conservation agendas where future impoundments are being considered. We assessed impoundment effects on the energetic costs of fisheries production (embodied energy) and commercial market value of the artisanal fishery of the Paraná River, Brazil, before and after formation of Itaipu Reservoir. High-value migratory species that dominated the fishery before the impoundment was built constituted a minor component of the contemporary fishery that is based heavily on reservoir-adapted introduced species. Cascading effects of river impoundment resulted in a mismatch between embodied energy and market value: energetic costs of fisheries production increased, whereas market value decreased. This was partially attributable to changes in species functional composition but also strongly linked to species identities that affected market value as a result of consumer preferences even when species were functionally similar. Similar trends are expected in other large tropical rivers following impoundment. In addition to identifying consequences of a common anthropogenic impact on an important ecosystem service, our assessment provides insight into the sustainability of fisheries production in tropical rivers and priorities for regional biodiversity conservation.

  13. Impact of seasonality and anthropogenic impoundments on dissolved organic matter dynamics in the Klamath River (Oregon/California, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Allison A.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; Deas, Michael L.; Dahlgren, Randy A.

    2016-07-01

    Rivers play a major role in the transport and processing of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Disturbances that impact DOM dynamics, such as river impoundments and flow regulation, have consequences for biogeochemical cycling and aquatic ecosystems. In this study we examined how river impoundments and hydrologic regulation impact DOM quantity and quality by tracking spatial and seasonal patterns of DOM in a large, regulated river (Klamath River, USA). Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations decreased downstream and longitudinal patterns in DOC load varied by season. Export of DOM (as DOC) was largely driven by river flow, while DOM composition was strongly influenced by impoundments. Seasonal algal blooms in upstream lentic reaches provided a steady source of algal DOM that was processed in downstream reaches. DOM at upstream sites had an average spectral slope ratio (SR) > 1, indicating algal-derived material, but decreased downstream to an average SR < 1, more indicative of terrestrial-derived material. The increasingly terrestrial nature of DOM exported from reservoirs likely reflects degraded algal material that becomes increasingly more recalcitrant with distance from upstream source and additional processing. As a result, DOM delivered to free-flowing river reaches below impoundments was less variable in composition. Downstream of impoundments, tributary influences resulted in increasing contributions of terrestrial DOM from the surrounding watershed. Removal of the four lower dams on the Klamath River is scheduled to proceed in the next decade. These results suggest that management should consider the role of impoundments on altering DOM dynamics, particularly in the context of dam removal.

  14. Profiling of Sediment Microbial Community in Dongting Lake before and after Impoundment of the Three Gorges Dam.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Jiang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    The sediment microbial community in downstream-linked lakes can be affected by the operation of large-scale water conservancy projects. The present study determined Illumina reads (16S rRNA gene amplicons) to analyze and compare the bacterial communities from sediments in Dongting Lake (China) before and after impoundment of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD), the largest hydroelectric project in the world. Bacterial communities in sediment samples in Dongting Lake before impoundment of the TGD (the high water period) had a higher diversity than after impoundment of the TGD (the low water period). The most abundant phylum in the sediment samples was Proteobacteria (36.4%-51.5%), and this result was due to the significant abundance of Betaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria in the sediment samples before impoundment of the TGD and the abundance of Gammaproteobacteria in the sediment samples after impoundment of the TGD. In addition, bacterial sequences of the sediment samples are also affiliated with Acidobacteria (11.0% on average), Chloroflexi (10.9% on average), Bacteroidetes (6.7% on average), and Nitrospirae (5.1% on average). Variations in the composition of the bacterial community within some sediment samples from the river estuary into Dongting Lake were related to the pH values. The bacterial community in the samples from the three lake districts of Dongting Lake before and after impoundment of the TGD was linked to the nutrient concentration. PMID:27338434

  15. Predicting coliform concentrations in upland impoundments: design and calibration of a multivariate model.

    PubMed Central

    Kay, D; McDonald, A

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports on the calibration and use of a multiple regression model designed to predict concentrations of Escherichia coli and total coliforms in two upland British impoundments. The multivariate approach has improved predictive capability over previous univariate linear models because it includes predictor variables for the timing and magnitude of hydrological input to the reservoirs and physiochemical parameters of water quality. The significance of these results for catchment management research is considered. PMID:6639016

  16. Restoration of Tidal Flow to Impounded Salt Marsh Exerts Mixed Effect on Leaf Litter Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, B. A.; Schade, J. D.; Foreman, K.

    2015-12-01

    Salt marsh impoundments (e.g. roads, levees) disconnect marshes from ocean tides, which impairs ecosystem services and often promotes invasive species. Numerous restoration projects now focus on removing impoundments. Leaf litter decomposition is a central process in salt marsh carbon and nutrient cycles, and this study investigated the extent to which marsh restoration alters litter decomposition rates. We considered three environmental factors that can potentially change during restoration: salinity, tidal regime, and dominant plant species. A one-month field experiment (Cape Cod, MA) measured decay of litter bags in impounded, restored, and natural marshes under ambient conditions. A two-week lab experiment measured litter decay in controlled incubations under experimental treatments for salinity (1ppt and 30 ppt), tidal regime (inundated and 12 hr wet-dry cycles), and plant species (native Spartina alterniflora and invasive Phragmites australis). S. alterniflora decomposed faster in situ than P. australis (14±1.0% mass loss versus 0.74±0.69%). Corroborating this difference in decomposition, S. alterniflora supported greater microbial respiration during lab incubation, measured as CO2 flux from leaf litter and biological oxygen demand of water containing leached organic matter (OM). However, nutrient analysis of plant tissue and leached OM show P. australis released more nitrogen than S. alterniflora. Low salinity treatments in both lab and field experiments decayed more rapidly than high salinity treatments, suggesting that salinity inhibited microbial activity. Manipulation of inundation regime did not affect decomposition. These findings suggest the reintroduction of tidal flow to an impounded salt marsh can have mixed effects; recolonization by the native cordgrass could supply labile OM to sediment and slow carbon sequestration, while an increase in salinity might inhibit decomposition and accelerate sequestration.

  17. Changes in Benthic Invertebrate Communities During the Introduction of Zebra Mussels Into an Impounded Michigan River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luttenton, M.; Godby, N.; Rutherford, E.; Vankampen, S.

    2005-05-01

    Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha, ZM) were introduced into the Croton impoundment on the Muskegon River, MI, sometime during the late 1990s, and subsequently colonized downstream. We evaluated changes in invertebrate communities in the Muskegon River during ZM colonization. ZM were not found in benthic samples collected during 1998-1999 but densities reached 12,000 m-2 and 26,000 m-2 in 2000 and 2001 respectively, immediately below the Croton impoundment. ZM densities remained relatively low (<70 m-2) at sites 1.75 km and 8.75 km downstream. Total arthropod densities increased from 1998-99 to 2001. Trichoptera densities declined at all sites in 2000 but recovered in 2001. The relative abundance of Hyropsychidae varied between 1998-99 and 2001 at each sample site. Cheumatopsyche sp. increased significantly below Croton dam occupying spaces within and below ZM clumps, but declined at downstream sites following introduction of ZM. Chironomidae were uncommon in 1998-99 samples but were numerically dominant in 2000 and 2001 averaging 16525 m-2 over both years. Data from 2003 indicated that ZM remove 32% of suspended Chl. a in the first 500 m below Croton Dam. Thus, ZM may affect benthic invertebrate communities in impounded river systems by redistributing particulate organic matter within the system.

  18. Effect of ship locking on sediment oxygen uptake in impounded rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorke, A.; McGinnis, D. F.; Maeck, A.; Fischer, H.

    2012-12-01

    In the majority of large river systems, flow is regulated and/or otherwise affected by operational and management activities, such as ship locking. The effect of lock operation on sediment-water oxygen fluxes was studied within a 12.9 km long impoundment at the Saar River (Germany) using eddy-correlation flux measurements. The continuous observations cover a time period of nearly 5 days and 39 individual locking events. Ship locking is associated with the generation of surges propagating back and forth through the impoundment which causes strong variations of near-bed current velocity and turbulence. These wave-induced flow variations cause variations in sediment-water oxygen fluxes. While the mean flux during time periods without lock operation was 0.5 ± 0.1 g m-2 d-1, it increased by about a factor of 2 to 1.0 ± 0.5 g m-2 d-1within time periods with ship locking. Following the daily schedule of lock operations, fluxes are predominantly enhanced during daytime and follow a pronounced diurnal rhythm. The driving force for the increased flux is the enhancement of diffusive transport across the sediment-water interface by bottom-boundary layer turbulence and perhaps resuspension. Additional means by which the oxygen budget of the impoundment is affected by lock-induced flow variations are discussed.

  19. Surficial geology and distribution of post-impoundment sediment in Las Vegas Bay, Lake Mead

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twichell, David C.; Cross, VeeAnn A.; Rudin, Mark J.; Parolski, Kenneth F.; Rendigs, Richard R.

    2001-01-01

    Sidescan sonar imagery and seismic-reflection profiles were collected in the northwestern part of Las Vegas Bay to map the distribution and volume of sediment that has accumulated in this part of Lake Mead since impoundment. The mapping suggests that three ephemeral streams are the primary source of this sediment, and of these, Las Vegas Wash is the largest. Two deltas off the mouth of Las Vegas Wash formed at different lake elevations and account for 41% of the total volume of post-impoundment sediment within the study area. Deltas off the other two washes (Gypsum and Government) account for only 6% of the total volume. The sediment beyond the front of the deltas is primarily mud, and it only occurs in valley floors, where it forms a flat-lying blanket that is mostly less than 1.5 m thick. Although a thin layer, the fine-grained sediment accounts for approximately 53% of the total post-impoundment sediment volume of 5.7 x 106 m3 that has accumulated in the study area. This sediment appears to have been transported several kilometers from the river sources by density flows.

  20. Pre- and post-impoundment nitrogen in the lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blevins, Dale W.; Wilkison, Donald H.; Niesen, Shelley L.

    2013-01-01

    Large water-sample sets collected from 1899 through 1902, 1907, and in the early 1950s allow comparisons of pre-impoundment and post-impoundment (1969 through 2008) nitrogen concentrations in the lower Missouri River. Although urban wastes were not large enough to detectably increase annual loads of total nitrogen at the beginning of the 20th century, carcass waste, stock-yard manure, and untreated human wastes measurably increased ammonia and organic-nitrogen concentrations during low flows. Average total-nitrogen concentrations in both periods were about 2.5 mg/l, but much of the particulate-organic nitrogen, which was the dominant form of nitrogen around 1900, has been replaced by nitrate. This change in speciation was caused by the nearly 80% decrease in suspended-sediment concentrations that occurred after impoundment, modern agriculture, drainage of riparian wetlands, and sewage treatment. Nevertheless, bioavailable nitrogen has not been low enough to limit primary production in the Missouri River since the beginning of the 20th century. Nitrate concentrations have increased more rapidly from 2000 through 2008 (5 to 12% per year), thus increasing bioavailable nitrogen delivered to the Mississippi River and affecting Gulf Coast hypoxia. The increase in nitrate concentrations with distance downstream is much greater during the post-impoundment period. If strategies to decrease total-nitrogen loads focus on particulate N, substantial decreases will be difficult because particulate nitrogen is now only 23% of total nitrogen in the Missouri River. A strategy aimed at decreasing particulates also could further exacerbate land loss along the Gulf of Mexico, which has been sediment starved since Missouri River impoundment. In contrast, strategies or benchmarks aimed at decreasing nitrate loads could substantially decrease nitrogen loadings because nitrates now constitute over half of the Missouri's nitrogen input to the Mississippi. Ongoing restoration and creation

  1. Sediment transport to and from small impoundments in northeast Kansas, March 2009 through September 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Guy M.; Lee, Casey J.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kansas Water Office, investigated sediment transport to and from three small impoundments (average surface area of 0.1 to 0.8 square miles) in northeast Kansas during March 2009 through September 2011. Streamgages and continuous turbidity sensors were operated upstream and downstream from Atchison County, Banner Creek, and Centralia Lakes to study the effect of varied watershed characteristics and agricultural practices on sediment transport in small watersheds in northeast Kansas. Atchison County Lake is located in a predominantly agricultural basin of row crops, with wide riparian buffers along streams, a substantial amount of tile drainage, and numerous small impoundments (less than 0.05 square miles; hereafter referred to as “ponds”). Banner Creek Lake is a predominantly grassland basin with numerous small ponds located in the watershed, and wide riparian buffers along streams. Centralia Lake is a predominantly agricultural basin of row crops with few ponds, few riparian buffers along streams, and minimal tile drainage. Upstream from Atchison County, Banner Creek, and Centralia Lakes 24, 38, and 32 percent, respectively, of the total load was transported during less than 0.1 percent (approximately 0.9 days) of the time. Despite less streamflow in 2011, larger sediment loads during that year indicate that not all storm events transport the same amount of sediment; larger, extreme storms during the spring may transport much larger sediment loads in small Kansas watersheds. Annual sediment yields were 360, 400, and 970 tons per square mile per year at Atchison County, Banner, and Centralia Lake watersheds, respectively, which were less than estimated yields for this area of Kansas (between 2,000 and 5,000 tons per square mile per year). Although Centralia and Atchison County Lakes had similar percentages of agricultural land use, mean annual sediment yields upstream from Centralia Lake were about 2.7 times

  2. Elemental and mineral inventory of tailing impoundments near Pezinok, Slovakia and possible courses of action for their remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majzlan, Juraj; Brecht, Björn; Lalinská, Bronislava; Chovan, Martin; Moravanský, Daniel; Uhlík, Peter

    2010-01-01

    An effective remediation strategy for a polluted site should take the absolute amount of the pollutant(s) into account. Here, we present an elemental budget for As, Sb and Fe in two tailing impoundments of the former Sb-Au deposit near Pezinok, Slovakia. The two impoundments contain 5,740×103 kg As, 6,360×103 kg Sb and 50,105×103 kg Fe. An estimated total Au content in the impoundments is 132 kg. The most abundant minerals in the tailings are quartz, illite, and chlorite. The content of carbonates in the tailings is 3.5-10.5 wt% calcite equivalent and we estimate that the carbonates are sufficiently abundant to buffer the pH at circumneutral values, up to the point when all pyrite decomposes. The possible courses of action are i) do nothing, ii) build an active barrier to capture the released As and Sb, iii) isolate the impoundments from rain and ground water and iv) use the impoundments as a source of Sb and redeposit the waste in a safer form. The simplest approach is to do nothing, which seems to be the most likely course of events, given the current economic, political and societal state of the Slovak Republic. Although this action costs nothing in the short term, it may cause significant damage to the environment, especially to the alluvial sediments and associated water resources in the long term.

  3. Development of a dust deposition forecast model for a mine tailings impoundment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovern, Michael

    Wind erosion, transport and deposition of particulate matter can have significant impacts on the environment. It is observed that about 40% of the global land area and 30% of the earth's population lives in semiarid environments which are especially susceptible to wind erosion and airborne transport of contaminants. With the increased desertification caused by land use changes, anthropogenic activities and projected climate change impacts windblown dust will likely become more significant. An important anthropogenic source of windblown dust in this region is associated with mining operations including tailings impoundments. Tailings are especially susceptible to erosion due to their fine grain composition, lack of vegetative coverage and high height compared to the surrounding topography. This study is focused on emissions, dispersion and deposition of windblown dust from the Iron King mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site. The tailings impoundment is heavily contaminated with lead and arsenic and is located directly adjacent to the town of Dewey-Humboldt. The study includes in situ field measurements, computational fluid dynamic modeling and the development of a windblown dust deposition forecasting model that predicts deposition patterns of dust originating from the tailings impoundment. Two instrumented eddy flux towers were setup on the tailings impoundment to monitor the aeolian and meteorological conditions. The in situ observations were used in conjunction with a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to simulate the transport of windblown dust from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The CFD model simulations include gaseous plume dispersion to simulate the transport of the fine aerosols, while individual particle transport was used to track the trajectories of larger particles and to monitor their deposition locations. The CFD simulations were used to estimate deposition of tailings dust and identify topographic mechanisms

  4. Methane-Derived Carbon in the Benthic Food Web in Stream Impoundments

    PubMed Central

    Mbaka, John Gichimu; Somlai, Celia; Köpfer, Denis; Maeck, Andreas; Lorke, Andreas; Schäfer, Ralf B.

    2014-01-01

    Methane gas (CH4) has been identified as an important alternative source of carbon and energy in some freshwater food webs. CH4 is oxidized by methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB), and subsequently utilized by chironomid larvae, which may exhibit low δ13C values. This has been shown for chironomid larvae collected from lakes, streams and backwater pools. However, the relationship between CH4 concentrations and δ13C values of chironomid larvae for in-stream impoundments is unknown. CH4 concentrations were measured in eleven in-stream impoundments located in the Queich River catchment area, South-western Germany. Furthermore, the δ13C values of two subfamilies of chironomid larvae (i.e. Chironomini and Tanypodinae) were determined and correlated with CH4 concentrations. Chironomini larvae had lower mean δ13C values (−29.2 to −25.5 ‰), than Tanypodinae larvae (−26.9 to −25.3 ‰). No significant relationships were established between CH4 concentrations and δ13C values of chironomids (p>0.05). Mean δ13C values of chironomid larvae (mean: −26.8‰, range: −29.2‰ to −25.3‰) were similar to those of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) (mean: −28.4‰, range: −29.3‰ to −27.1‰) and tree leaf litter (mean: −29.8 ‰, range: −30.5‰ to −29.1‰). We suggest that CH4 concentration has limited influence on the benthic food web in stream impoundments. PMID:25360609

  5. Geochemistry of a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. Technical report, 1 March--31 May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.; Heidari, M.

    1994-09-01

    The highly alkaline residue from the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) of coal may be an environmentally acceptable material for use in neutralizing acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in coal slurry solids (CSS). Previous research indicated that FBC residues in mixtures with pyrite-rich CSS neutralized the acid produced by or attenuated the oxidation of pyrite in CSS. The intent in this research was to collect cores of unconsolidated material and sample pore gases from a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. The gas composition data would provide background data for the development of a predictive computer model of the generation and migration of acid in a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. Cores of coal slurry were collected on May 16--18, 1994 from four holes in a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. There was no unsaturated zone in the coal, so no gas samples can be collected from that zone. The authors installed three samplers in one hole. Two of the samplers are in the saturated zone (in the coal) and the third one might be in the unsaturated zone, but in the soil cover above the coal particles. They plan to collect samples in about mid-June. The water and solids from the cores are being separated for chemical analysis. The computer model for the oxidation of pyrite at near-neutral conditions is being developed. The first portion of code, the calculation of thermodynamic equilibrium without consideration of ionic strength, has been written. The methods of Morel and Hering (1993) and Westall (1986) are the basis for the model, however, the model does not follow the matrix solution used by them. Rather, an algebraic solution is used. A matrix similar to the one reported last quarter was used to formulate mass balance and material balance equations.

  6. Cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins are present in drinking water impoundments and groundwater wells in desert environments.

    PubMed

    Chatziefthimiou, Aspassia D; Metcalf, James S; Glover, W Broc; Banack, Sandra A; Dargham, Soha R; Richer, Renee A

    2016-05-01

    Desert environments and drylands experience a drastic scarcity of water resources. To alleviate dependence on freshwater for drinking water needs, countries have invested in infrastructure development of desalination plants. Collectively, the countries of the Arabian Gulf produce 45% of the world's desalinated water, which is stored in dams, mega-reservoirs and secondary house water tanks to secure drinking water beyond daily needs. Improper storage practices of drinking water in impoundments concomitant with increased temperatures and light penetration may promote the growth of cyanobacteria and accumulation of cyanotoxins. To shed light on this previously unexplored research area in desert environments, we examined drinking and irrigation water of urban and rural environments to determine whether cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins are present, and what are the storage and transportation practices as well as the environmental parameters that best predict their presence. Cyanobacteria were present in 80% of the urban and 33% of the rural water impoundments. Neurotoxins BMAA, DAB and anatoxin-a(S) were not detected in any of the water samples, although they have been found to accumulate in the desert soils, which suggests a bioaccumulation potential if they are leached into the aquifer. A toxic BMAA isomer, AEG, was found in 91.7% of rural but none of the urban water samples and correlated with water-truck transportation, light exposure and chloride ions. The hepatotoxic cyanotoxin microcystin-LR was present in the majority of all sampled impoundments, surpassing the WHO provisional guideline of 1 μg/l in 30% of the urban water tanks. Finally, we discuss possible management strategies to improve storage and transportation practices in order to minimize exposure to cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins, and actions to promote sustainable use of limited water resources. PMID:26921462

  7. Cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins are present in drinking water impoundments and groundwater wells in desert environments.

    PubMed

    Chatziefthimiou, Aspassia D; Metcalf, James S; Glover, W Broc; Banack, Sandra A; Dargham, Soha R; Richer, Renee A

    2016-05-01

    Desert environments and drylands experience a drastic scarcity of water resources. To alleviate dependence on freshwater for drinking water needs, countries have invested in infrastructure development of desalination plants. Collectively, the countries of the Arabian Gulf produce 45% of the world's desalinated water, which is stored in dams, mega-reservoirs and secondary house water tanks to secure drinking water beyond daily needs. Improper storage practices of drinking water in impoundments concomitant with increased temperatures and light penetration may promote the growth of cyanobacteria and accumulation of cyanotoxins. To shed light on this previously unexplored research area in desert environments, we examined drinking and irrigation water of urban and rural environments to determine whether cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins are present, and what are the storage and transportation practices as well as the environmental parameters that best predict their presence. Cyanobacteria were present in 80% of the urban and 33% of the rural water impoundments. Neurotoxins BMAA, DAB and anatoxin-a(S) were not detected in any of the water samples, although they have been found to accumulate in the desert soils, which suggests a bioaccumulation potential if they are leached into the aquifer. A toxic BMAA isomer, AEG, was found in 91.7% of rural but none of the urban water samples and correlated with water-truck transportation, light exposure and chloride ions. The hepatotoxic cyanotoxin microcystin-LR was present in the majority of all sampled impoundments, surpassing the WHO provisional guideline of 1 μg/l in 30% of the urban water tanks. Finally, we discuss possible management strategies to improve storage and transportation practices in order to minimize exposure to cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins, and actions to promote sustainable use of limited water resources.

  8. [Phytoplankton Community Structure and Water Quality Assessment in Jialing River After the Impoundment of Caojie Reservoir].

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Zhang, Sheng; Liu, Shuo-ru

    2015-07-01

    The variation of phytoplankton community and the water quality in Jialing River after the impoundment of Caojie Reservoir was studied in this paper. There were 145 species of phytoplankton under the membership of 8 divisions and 74 genera. Bacillariophyta was the first dominant division, with a total of 57 species of 23 genera, accounted for 39. 3% of total phytoplankton species, followed by Chlorophyta, with 53 species of 28 genera and accounted for 36. 6%. Only 35 species of 23 genera belonged to Euglenphyta, Cryptophyta, Pyrrophyta, Chrysophyta, and Cyanophyta. The average phytoplankton abundance was 1. 82 x 10(5)cell . L-1, and the top three taxon of most abundant were Bacillariophyta, Cryptophyta and Pyrrophyta, accounted for 39. 2%, 29. 9%, and 24. 5% of total abundance, respectively. The cell abundance in spring was significantly higher than those in other seasons. The dominant species included Aulacoseria granulata, Melosira varians, Peridiniopsis niei, Komma caudata, Cryptomonas erosa etc., indicated by the dominant index. Excluded by cluster analysis, the influence on phytoplankton had initially emerged after the impoundment of Caojie Reservoir. The reservoir area could be divided into different ecological regions longitudinally after Caojie Reservoir impoundment, which had an important impact on the phytoplankton. Meanwhile, the phytoplankton and flow velocity between upstream and downstream of the dam significantly varied. Shannon-Wiener species diversity index, Margalef species richness index and Pielous evenness index ranged 2. 06 - 3. 55, 0. 76 - 1. 90 and 0. 50 - 0. 78, respectively. The evaluation results of phytoplankton community structure showed that the eutrophic state was at medium eutrophication level, while diversity analysis results indicated light to moderate pollution. PMID:26489315

  9. 40 CFR 63.943 - Standards-Surface impoundment vented to control device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the cover not vented to the control device shall be equipped with a closure device. If the pressure in the vapor headspace underneath the cover is less than atmospheric pressure when the control device is... headspace underneath the cover is equal to or greater than atmospheric pressure when the control device...

  10. A prototype computer interactive ground water monitoring methodology for surface water impoundments

    SciTech Connect

    Evertt, L.G.; Rasmussen, W.O.

    1982-08-01

    An approach to developing a ground water monitoring program for coal strip mine operations has been developed by Tempo. The Tempo methodology for ground water monitoring has evolved over the last few years. Described herein is a computer program which automates components of that methodology. This interactive computer program is designed to be operated by persons with little, if any previous exposure to computers. The Tempo methodology is comprised of several steps. Associated with each step are several objectives that are to be met. Finally, there are numerous alternative monitoring methods available for meeting each of these objectives. For a given step and objective, the user is presented with a description of the principle involved with each of the alternative methods, the advantages and disadvantages of each method, along with the associated cost. The user is then queried, by the program, as to which method he is now using and which methods he wishes to use in the future for his specific mine sites. The alternative methods he chooses to depict his ongoing monitoring and that which he wishes to use in the future are entered into a monitoring design file which is being held specifically for his mine site. The totality of those alternative methods is the tailor made overall ground water monitoring design he has assembled for his mine site.

  11. A prototype computer interactive ground water monitoring methodology for surface water impoundments

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, L.G.; Rasmussen, W.O.

    1982-01-01

    An account is given for the Tempo computerised monitoring method (developed by a US consulting firm under an EPA contract) which covers identification, quantification and ranking for monitoring ground water degradation sources within coal strip-mining areas. The program is described in detail.

  12. 40 CFR 63.943 - Standards-Surface impoundment vented to control device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... in 40 CFR part 63, subpart DD—National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Standards from... shall inspect and monitor the air emission control equipment in accordance with the procedures specified... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR...

  13. 40 CFR 63.943 - Standards-Surface impoundment vented to control device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the cover not vented to the control device shall be equipped with a closure device. If the pressure in the vapor headspace underneath the cover is less than atmospheric pressure when the control device is... headspace underneath the cover is equal to or greater than atmospheric pressure when the control device...

  14. 40 CFR 63.943 - Standards-Surface impoundment vented to control device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the cover not vented to the control device shall be equipped with a closure device. If the pressure in the vapor headspace underneath the cover is less than atmospheric pressure when the control device is... headspace underneath the cover is equal to or greater than atmospheric pressure when the control device...

  15. 40 CFR 63.943 - Standards-Surface impoundment vented to control device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the cover not vented to the control device shall be equipped with a closure device. If the pressure in the vapor headspace underneath the cover is less than atmospheric pressure when the control device is... headspace underneath the cover is equal to or greater than atmospheric pressure when the control device...

  16. Geochemical and mineralogical characterization of a neutral, low-sulfide/high-carbonate tailings impoundment, Markušovce, eastern Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Edgar; Petrák, Marián; Tóth, Roman; Lalinská-Voleková, Bronislava; Jurkovič, L'ubomír; Kučerová, Gabriela; Radková, Anežka; Sottník, Peter; Vozár, Jaroslav

    2013-11-01

    mineral assemblage and their occurrence follows the order: chalcopyrite > pyrite > tetrahedrite>arsenopyrite. The mineralogical composition of the tailings corresponds well to the primary mineralization mined. The neutralization capacity of the tailings is high, as confirmed by the values of neutralization potential to acid generation potential ratio, ranging from 6.7 to 63.9, and neutral to slightly alkaline pH of the tailings (paste pH 7.16-8.12) and the waters (pH 7.00-8.52). This is explained by abundant occurrence of carbonate minerals in the tailings, which readily neutralize the acidity generated by sulfide oxidation. The total solid-phase concentrations of metal(loid)s decrease as Cu>Sb>Hg>As and reflect the proportions of sulfides present in the tailings. Sulfide oxidation generally extends to a depth of 2 m. μ-XRD and EMPA were used to study secondary products developed on the surface of sulfide minerals and within the tailings. The main secondary minerals identified are goethite and X-ray amorphous Fe oxyhydroxides and their occurrence decreases with increasing tailings depth. Secondary Fe phases are found as mineral coatings or individual grains and retain relatively high amounts of metal(loid)s (up to 57.6 wt% Cu, 1.60 wt% Hg, 23.8 wt% As, and 2.37 wt% Sb). Based on batch leaching tests and lysimeter results, the mobility of potentially toxic elements in the tailings is low. The limited mobility of metals and metalloids is due to their retention by Fe oxyhydroxides and low solubilities of metal(loid)-bearing sulfides. The observations are consistent with PHREEQC calculations, which predict the precipitation of Fe oxyhydroxides as the main solubility-controlling mineral phases for As, Cu, Hg, and Sb. Waters discharging from tailings impoundment are characterized by a neutral to slightly alkaline pH (7.52-7.96) and low concentrations of dissolved metal(loid)s (<5-7.0 μg/L Cu, <0.1-0.3 μg/L Hg, 5.0-16 μg/L As, and 5.0-43 μg/L Sb). Primary factors

  17. Impoundment of the Zipingpu reservoir and triggering of the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake, China

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Wei; Masterlark, Timothy; Ronchin, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Impoundment of the Zipingpu reservoir (ZR), China, began in September 2005 and was followed 2.7 years later by the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake (WE) rupturing the Longmen Shan Fault (LSF), with its epicenter ~12 km away from the ZR. Based on the poroelastic theory, we employ three‐dimensional finite element models to simulate the evolution of stress and pore pressure due to reservoir impoundment, and its effect on the Coulomb failure stress on the LSF. The results indicate that the reservoir impoundment formed a pore pressure front that slowly propagated through the crust with fluid diffusion. The reservoir loading induced either moderate or no increase of the Coulomb failure stress at the hypocenter prior to the WE. The Coulomb failure stress, however, grew ~9.3–69.1 kPa in the depth range of 1–8 km on the LSF, which may have advanced tectonic loading of the fault system by ~60–450 years. Due to uncertainties of fault geometry and hypocenter location of the WE, it is inconclusive whether impoundment of the ZR directly triggered the WE. However, a small event at the hypocenter could have triggered large rupture elsewhere on fault, where the asperities were weakened by the ZR. The microseismicity around the ZR also showed an expanding pattern from the ZR since its impoundment, likely associated with diffusion of a positive pore pressure pulse. These results suggest a poroelastic triggering effect (even if indirectly) of the WE due to the impoundment of the ZR. PMID:27812436

  18. Interreservoir interactions: Effects of a new reservoir on organic matter production and processing in a multiple-impoundment series

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, B.L.; Soballe, D.M.; Adams, S.M.; Palumbo, A.V.; Ford, C.J.; Bevelhimer, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    Impoundment of the R.B. Russell Reservoir (RBR) between two existing reservoirs (Hartwell Reservoir (HT) upstream and Clark Hill Reservoir (CH) downstream) on the Savannah River (Georgia-South Carolina, USA) provided an opportunity to investigate the limnological influence of interreservoir transfers of nutrients and organic matter down a multiple-impoundment series. The objective was to document within- and among-reservoir patterns in organic matter production and processing in the HT-RBR-CH reservoir series as organic matter dynamics were influenced by the inundation and subsequent stabilization of the RBR basin.

  19. Microcrustaceans (Branchipoda and Copepoda) of Wetland Impoundments on the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    DeBiase, Adrienne E; Taylor, Barbara E

    2005-09-21

    The United States Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, contains an abundance of freshwater wetlands and impoundments. Four large impoundments, as well as several small, abandoned farm and mill ponds, and about 400 Carolina bays and other small, isolated depression wetland ponds are located within the 893 km2 area of the SRS. Crustaceans of the orders Branchiopoda and Copepoda are nearly ubiquitous in these water bodies. Although small in size, these organisms are often very abundant. They consequently play an important trophic role in freshwater food webs supporting fish, larval salamanders, larval insects, and numerous other animals, aquatic and terrestrial. This report provides an introduction to the free-living microcrustaceans of lentic water bodies on the SRS and a comprehensive list of species known to occur there. Occurrence patterns are summarized from three extensive survey studies, supplemented with other published and unpublished records. In lieu of a key, we provide a guide to taxonomic resources and notes on undescribed species. Taxa covered include the orders Cladocera, Anostraca, Laevicaudata, and Spinicaudata of the Subclass Branchiopoda and the Superorders Calanoida and Cyclopoida of Subclass Copepoda. Microcrustaceans of the Superorder Harpacticoida of the Subclass Copepoda and Subclass Ostracoda are also often present in lentic water bodies. They are excluded from this report because they have not received much study at the species level on the SRS.

  20. Geochemistry of a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. Final technical report, September 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.; Heidari, M.

    1994-12-31

    The highly alkaline residue from the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) of coal may be an environmentally acceptable material for use in neutralizing acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in coal. slurry solids (CSS). Previous research indicated that FBC residues in mixtures with pyrite-rich CSS neutralized the acid produced by or attenuated the oxidation of pyrite in CSS. In the present research project we retrieved five drill cores from a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment, and installed three samplers in one of the core holes. The solids were chemically and mineralogically analyzed. Display of the mineralogical data on a cross section showed that pyrite was randomly distributed through much of the length of the coal slurry impoundment. Trace concentrations of heavy metals were correlated with pyrite in the core solids. Water samples were collected and analyzed. The water analyses showed that nutrients are insufficient to support plant growth without supplemental fertilization. The analytical data will provide background information necessary for the development of a predictive computer model of the kinetics of pyrite oxidation at near-neutral pH conditions. Programming of a computerized model to simulate pyrite oxidation under near-neutral pH conditions was begun. The program includes ideas from Morel and Hering (1993) and species are calculated in terms of 7 components of known concentrations. The ionic strength of the solution, the species activity coefficients, and the activities are calculated iteratively.

  1. Treatability of TCE-contaminated clay soils at the Rinsewater Impoundment, Michoud Assembly Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lucero, A.J.; Gilbert, V.P.; Hewitt, J.D.; Koran, L.J. Jr.; Jennings, H.L.; Donaldson, T.L.; West, O.R.; Cline, S.R.; Marshall, D.S.

    1995-02-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has conducted treatability studies on clay soils taken from the Rinsewater Impoundment at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Michoud Assembly Facility. The soils are contaminated with up to 3000 mg/kg of trichloroethylene and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, less than 10 mg/kg of trans-1,2-DCE, and less than 10 mg/kg of vinyl chloride. The goal of the study described in this report was to identify and test in situ technologies and/or develop a modified treatment regime to remove or destroy volatile organic compounds from the contaminated clay soils. Much of the work was based upon previous experience with mixed-region vapor stepping and mixed-region peroxidation. Laboratory treatments were performed on intact soil cores that were taken from contaminated areas at the Rinsewater Impoundment at MAF. Treatability studies were conducted on soil that was close to in situ conditions in terms of soil structure and contaminant concentrations.

  2. Horse impoundments under Control of Horses legislation in the Munster region of Ireland: factors affecting euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Cullinane, M; O'Sullivan, E; Collins, D M; Byrne, A W; More, S J

    2015-01-24

    Recently, considerable international attention has been paid to the problem of unwanted horses. In Ireland, stray horses, particularly in urban areas, are a further problem. The Control of Horses Act 1996 was enacted in response to an ongoing problem of uncontrolled horses in public places. As yet, no research work has been conducted focusing on stray horses in Ireland. This paper describes horses impounded under the Act in the Munster region of Ireland during 2005-2012 and the factors influencing decisions regarding their disposal. A logistic regression model was developed to investigate factors influencing the probability that a horse was euthanised during impoundment. In total, 3625 seizure events were recorded, most towards the end of the study period. Predictors for euthanasia during 2010-2012 included seizure location, sex, age, colour, body condition score and year. This study highlights the problem of stray horses in Ireland, particularly in urban areas. There is a need for rigorous enforcement of newly enacted horse identification legislation, allowing a fully integrated traceability system. More is required to manage the long-established societal problems of stray horses in urban settings, with a uniform approach by all Local Authorities being long overdue.

  3. Geometrical and hydrogeological impact on the behaviour of deep-seated rock slides during reservoir impoundment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Heidrun; Zangerl, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Given that there are still uncertainties regarding the deformation and failure mechanisms of deep-seated rock slides this study concentrates on key factors that influence the behaviour of rock slides in the surrounding of reservoirs. The focus is placed on the slope geometry, hydrogeology and kinematics. Based on numerous generic rock slide models the impacts of the (i) rock slide geometry, (ii) reservoir impoundment and level fluctuations, (iii) seepage and buoyancy forces and (iv) hydraulic conductivity of the rock slide mass and the basal shear zone are examined using limit equilibrium approaches. The geometry of many deep-seated rock slides in metamorphic rocks is often influenced by geological structures, e.g. fault zones, joints, foliation, bedding planes and others. With downslope displacement the rock slide undergoes a change in shape. Several observed rock slides in an advanced stage show a convex, bulge-like topography at the foot of the slope and a concave topography in the middle to upper part. Especially, the situation of the slope toe plays an important role for stability. A potentially critical situation can result from a partially submerged flat slope toe because the uplift due to water pressure destabilizes the rock slide. Furthermore, it is essential if the basal shear zone daylights at the foot of the slope or encounters alluvial or glacial deposits at the bottom of the valley, the latter having a buttressing effect. In this study generic rock slide models with a shear zone outcropping at the slope toe are established and systematically analysed using limit equilibrium calculations. Two different kinematic types are modelled: (i) a translational or planar and (ii) a rotational movement behaviour. Questions concerning the impact of buoyancy and pore pressure forces that develop during first time impoundment are of key interest. Given that an adverse effect on the rock slide stability is expected due to reservoir impoundment the extent of

  4. The net GHG (CO2, CH4 and N2O) footprint of a newly impounded subtropical hydroelectric reservoir: Nam Theun 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Chandrashekhar; Guérin, Frédéric; Delon, Claire; Pighini, Sylvie; Vongkhamsao, Axay; Descloux, Stéphane; Chanudet, Vincent; Tardif, Raphael; Godon, Arnaud; Guédant, Pierre; Galy-Lacaux, Corinne; Zouiten, Cyril; Oliva, Priscia; Audry, Stéphane; Serça, Dominique

    2013-04-01

    There is a rising concern over the contribution of hydroelectric reservoirs to global anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions. We present here the first comprehensive assessment of GHGs footprint associated with the creation of the Nam Theun 2 (NT2) hydroelectric reservoir in subtropical region of the Lao People's Democratic Republic. This assessment is the results of a monthly monitoring that have been conducted over 4 year (2008-to date). The carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) sources and sinks were quantified before and after impoundment, which began in May 2008. Before impoundment, the landscape to be flooded was a sink of carbon dioxide (-73 ± 225 Gg CO2eq yr-1),roughly neutral in terms of methane (7 ± 11 Gg CO2eq yr-1), and a source of nitrous oxide (345 ± 158 Gg CO2eq yr-1). After impoundment, total CO2 and CH4 emissions increased and N2O emissions decreased. For the year 2010, CO2 (791 ± 54 Gg CO2eq yr-1) and CH4 (644 ± 124 Gg CO2eq yr-1) contributed equally to the total gross GHG emissions from NT2 (54 and 43% for CO2 and CH4, respectively) whereas N2O contributed only 3% (47 ± 29 Gg CO2eq yr-1). The GHG emissions remained constant in 2011. Our results indicate that most of the GHG (around 90%) were emitted from reservoir water surface and the drawdown area, and only 10% were emitted by degassing at the turbines and from diffusive emissions downstream of the turbines and the dam, a percentage lower than reported for other hydroelectric reservoirs. With a total emissions of 1482 ± 207 and 1298 ± 200 Gg CO2eq yr-1 for year 2010 and 2011, gross NT2 emissions are about an order of magnitude higher than pre-impoundment emissions (276 ± 393 Gg CO2eq yr-1). With a net GHG emissions of 1203 ± 601 (2010) and 1022 ± 594 (2011) Gg CO2eq yr-1, and an annual power generation of about 6 TWh, GHG emission factor equal to 0.20 (2010) and 0.17 (2011) Mg CO2eq MWh-1 for NT2 which is up to five times lower than the emission factor

  5. The use of artificial impoundments by two amphibian species in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julian, J.T.; Snyder, C.D.; Young, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    We compared breeding activity of Ambystoma maculatum (Spotted Salamander) and Rana sylvatica (Wood Frog) in artificial impoundments to patterns in natural wetlands over a three-year period in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. Rana sylvatica were 5.6 times more likely to use natural bodies of water for breeding than artificial impoundments, while A. maculatum were 2.7 times more likely to use natural bodies of water. Both species were approximately 9 times more likely to breed in fishless bodies of water than in waters with predatory fish. Ambystoma maculatum were 6 times more likely to breed in wetlands with more stable seasonal hydroperiods, while R. sylvatica were only 2 times more likely to do so. We conclude that the high likelihood of fish presence in impoundments was the primary explanation for why both species were less likely to use impoundments than natural wetlands, while the tendency of A. maculatum to avoid natural wetlands with shorter hydroperiods explained why differences in use between pond types was more pronounced for R. sylvatica.

  6. Limnology of Taylor Creek impoundment : with reference to other bodies in Upper St Johns River Basin, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goolsby, D.A.; McPherson, Benjamin F.

    1978-01-01

    Taylor Creek Impoundment, on the western part of the upper St. Johns basin, Fla., provides flood control and flow regulation. The 4,000-acre impoundment was first filled in 1969. The water was of relatively poor quality during the first three years of its existence, 1970-72. The impoundment is deep enough for thermal stratification, and a thermocline usually develops at 8 to 10 feet. During 1970-72 the hypolimnion remained anaerobic for more than six months. The poor water quality is attributed to the decomposition of flooded vegetation, of soil organic matter, and to heavy growths of phytoplankton and duckweed stimulated by an abundant supply of nutrients. Since 1972, the quality of the water has improved because of flushing of the impoundment and depletion of leachable nutrients and soil organic matter. The water is now similar in quality to that of nearby Wolf and Jane Green Creeks. Large releases of water may produce velocities great enough to resuspend bottom sediments several miles downstream where Taylor Creek flows into Lake Poinsett. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Effects of impoundments on water quality of streams in the Coteau des Prairies-upper Minnesota River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, C.J.; Payne, G.A.; Tornes, L.H.

    1990-01-01

    Periods of summer stratification and accumulation of late winter snow on pool ice were frequently accompanied by near total depletion of dissolved oxygen. During summer stratification the concentration of ammonia increased with time in the lower part of the water column in some impoundments.

  8. Interrelationships between Fish Tissue Mercury Concentrations and Water Quality for South Dakota Natural Lakes and Impoundments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chipps, Steven R.; Stetler, Larry; Stone, James J.; McCutcheon, Cindy M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether water quality parameters commonly associated with primary productivity may be used to predict the susceptibility of a specific water body to exceed proposed fish consumption advisory limitation of 0.3 mg kg−1. South Dakota currently has nine lakes and impoundments that exceed fish tissue mercury advisory limits of 1.0 mg kg−1 total mercury, far exceeding US Environmental Protection Agency and Food and Drug Administration 0.3 mg kg−1 consumption criteria. Previous studies suggest that increased aquatic productivity may mitigate the effects of biological production and subsequent uptake of methyl mercury through bio-dilution; however, it is uncertain whether these trends may exist within highly alkaline and highly productive aquatic conditions common to South Dakota lakes and impoundments. Water quality parameters and fish tissue mercury data for northern pike and walleye were collected and assessed using existing South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources and Game Fish and Parks data. The data was initially screened using both parametric linear regression and non-parametric Mann–Whitney rank sum comparisons and further assessed using binary logistic regression and stepwise logistic regression methodology. Three separate phosphorus measurements (total, total dissolved, and Trophic State Index) and pH were determined to significantly correlate with increased mercury concentrations for the northern pike-in-impoundments model. However, phosphorus surprisingly was not a strong predictor for the remaining scenarios modeled. For the northern pike-in-natural lakes models, alkalinity was the most significant water quality parameter predicting increased mercury concentrations. Mercury concentrations for the walleye-in-natural lakes models were further influenced by pH and alkalinity. The water quality and fish tissue mercury interrelationships determined within this study suggest aquatic

  9. A model for evaluating effects of climate, water availability, and water management on wetland impoundments--a case study on Bowdoin, Long Lake, and Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tangen, Brian A.; Gleason, Robert A.; Stamm, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Many wetland impoundments managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Wildlife Refuge System throughout the northern Great Plains rely on rivers as a primary water source. A large number of these impoundments currently are being stressed from changes in water supplies and quality, and these problems are forecast to worsen because of projected changes to climate and land use. For example, many managed wetlands in arid regions have become degraded owing to the long-term accumulation of salts and increased salinity associated with evapotranspiration. A primary goal of the USFWS is to provide aquatic habitats for a diversity of waterbirds; thus, wetland managers would benefit from a tool that facilitates evaluation of wetland habitat quality in response to current and anticipated impacts of altered hydrology and salt balances caused by factors such as climate change, water availability, and management actions. A spreadsheet model that simulates the overall water and salinity balance (WSB model) of managed wetland impoundments is presented. The WSB model depicts various habitat metrics, such as water depth, salinity, and surface areas (inundated, dry), which can be used to evaluate alternative management actions under various water-availability and climate scenarios. The WSB model uses widely available spreadsheet software, is relatively simple to use, relies on widely available inputs, and is readily adaptable to specific locations. The WSB model was validated using data from three National Wildlife Refuges with direct and indirect connections to water resources associated with rivers, and common data limitations are highlighted. The WSB model also was used to conduct simulations based on hypothetical climate and management scenarios to demonstrate the utility of the model for evaluating alternative management strategies and climate futures. The WSB model worked well across a range of National Wildlife Refuges and could be a valuable tool for USFWS

  10. Spatiotemporal patterns of fish assemblage structure in a river impounded by low-head dams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillette, David P.; Tiemann, Jeremy S.; Edds, David R.; Wildhaber, Mark L.

    2005-01-01

    We studied spatiotemporal patterns of fish assemblage structure in the Neosho River, Kansas, a system impounded by low-head dams. Spatial variation in the fish assemblage was related to the location of dams that created alternating lotic and lentic stream reaches with differing fish assemblages. At upstream sites close to dams, assemblages were characterized by species associated with deeper, slower-flowing habitat. Assemblages at sites immediately downstream from dams had higher abundance of species common to shallow, swift-flowing habitat. Temporal variation in assemblage structure was stronger than spatial variation, and was associated with fish life history events such as spawning and recruitment, as well as seasonal changes in environmental conditions. Our results suggest that low-head dams can influence spatial patterns of fish assemblage structure in systems such as the Neosho River and that such assemblages also vary seasonally.

  11. Characterization of grain sizes in the reservoir impoundment behind Marmot Dam post-dam removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Leonardo, D. R.; Podolak, C.; Wilcock, P.

    2009-12-01

    Marmot Dam was built in 1913 and stood until 2007 to divert water from the Sandy River to the Bull Run Hydroelectric Plant. During that time Marmot Dam impounded a reservoir deposit of approximately 750,000 cubic meters of sediment. Prior to dam removal Squier Associates completed a series of sediment cores and bulk samples to estimate the composition of the deposit (Stillwater 2000). Since 2007 the Sandy River has carved a path through the reservoir leaving vertical sections of the deposit exposed. This study aims to use these remains of the deposit to make another estimate of its composition using pebble counts and a bulk sample. It serves as a back of the envelope double check of the Squier Associates study and an experiment with a new sampling method. Our results suggest that the deposit may be coarser than previously thought

  12. Effects of flooding on abundance of native and nonnative fishes downstream from a small impoundment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, A.A.; Maughan, O.E.; Bonar, Scott A.; Matter, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    Flooding can benefit native fishes in southwestern streams by disproportionately displacing nonnative fishes. We examined how the presence of an upstream impoundment affected this relationship in lower Sonoita Creek, Arizona. Nonnative species not found in the reservoir decreased in abundance in lower Sonoita Creek after flooding. The catch and relative abundance of some nonnative species found in both the reservoir and the creek increased in lower Sonoita Creek after flooding. Movement of nonnative fishes out of the reservoir via the spillway during periods of high water probably contributes to the persistence and abundance of these species downstream. Both preventing nonnative fishes from escaping reservoirs and the release of flushing flows would aid conservation of native southwestern fishes downstream.

  13. Density-production characteristics of box-nesting wood ducks in a northern greentree impoundment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haramis, G.M.; Thompson, D.Q.

    1985-01-01

    Nesting wood ducks (A. sponsa) were studied for 7 yr (1973-1979) following placement of nest boxes within a 250 ha experimental greentree impoundment located at the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge in central New York [USA]. Wood ducks filled available nesting space in the 3rd yr of the study. As nesting space became saturated, density strife was reflected in dump nesting, nest desertion and reduced hatchability. By the 5th yr of study, nesting interference had reduced nesting efficiency to 22%. Discontinued flooding of the impoundment during the last 2 yr of the study reduced the density of breeding pairs and restored nesting efficiency to 50 and 60%, respectively. Egg pecking by northern flickers (Colaptes auratus) increased as the study progressed and contributed to nest desertion. Dump nesting contributed efficiently to production under low density breeding conditions and permitted greater use of nest sites with a moderate but progressive decline in nesting efficiency as the population expanded. Total nest starts correlated negatively with nesting efficiency (r = - 0.75, P < 0.05) and positively with the number of dump nests (r = +0.96, P < 0.01), number of deserted dump nests (r = +0.77, P < 0.05), and number of ducklings left in nest boxes (r = +0.77, P < 0.05). Mark-recapture estimates of day-old duckling production showed a sharp increase in production from tree cavities from 1973 to 1974, a probable result of a rapidly expanding nesting population and removal of raccoons (Procyon lotor) from the study area.

  14. Fishers' knowledge identifies environmental changes and fish abundance trends in impounded tropical rivers.

    PubMed

    Hallwass, Gustavo; Lopes, Priscila F; Juras, Anastácio A; Silvano, Renato A M

    2013-03-01

    The long-term impacts of large hydroelectric dams on small-scale fisheries in tropical rivers are poorly known. A promising way to investigate such impacts is to compare and integrate the local ecological knowledge (LEK) of resource users with biological data for the same region. We analyzed the accuracy of fishers' LEK to investigate fisheries dynamics and environmental changes in the Lower Tocantins River (Brazilian Amazon) downstream from a large dam. We estimated fishers' LEK through interviews with 300 fishers in nine villages and collected data on 601 fish landings in five of these villages, 22 years after the dam's establishment (2006-2008). We compared these two databases with each other and with data on fish landings from before the dam's establishment (1981) gathered from the literature. The data obtained based on the fishers' LEK (interviews) and from fisheries agreed regarding the primary fish species caught, the most commonly used type of fishing gear (gill nets) and even the most often used gill net mesh sizes but disagreed regarding seasonal fish abundance. According to the interviewed fishers, the primary environmental changes that occurred after the impoundment were an overall decrease in fish abundance, an increase in the abundance of some fish species and, possibly, the local extinction of a commercial fish species (Semaprochilodus brama). These changes were corroborated by comparing fish landings sampled before and 22 years after the impoundment, which indicated changes in the composition of fish landings and a decrease in the total annual fish production. Our results reinforce the hypothesis that large dams may adversely affect small-scale fisheries downstream and establish a feasible approach for applying fishers' LEK to fisheries management, especially in regions with a low research capacity.

  15. Dissolved carbon dynamics in large boreal rivers from eastern Canada following their impoundment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helie, J.; Rosa, E.; Lalonde, A.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.

    2009-12-01

    The carbon cycling in Canadian boreal environments is the focus of a growing number of investigations mainly because of the importance of hydropower and its potential in the area. Here, we document the behaviour of dissolved inorganic and organic carbon as well as particulate organic carbon (DIC-DOC-POC henceforth) in 5 impounded and 2 pristine river systems (respectively: La Grande 3400 m 3s-1, Eastmain 990 m3s-1, St. Lawrence 12 100 m3s-1, Ottawa 1950 m3s-1, Nelson 2370 m3s-1; Great Whales 680 m3s-1 and Koksoak 1895 m3s-1) river systems. These major rivers were sampled monthly at their outlet for one year except at the St. Lawrence River that has been sampled since June of 1997 on a bi-weekly basis. Complementary synoptic surveys were undertaken in August 2008 on the La Grande and Great Whales Rivers. When sampling, water temperature, pH, alkalinity and specific conductivity were measured. Samples were collected for the analysis of i) major ions concentrations; ii) δ13C and concentration of DIC, DOC and POC); iii) δ18O and δ2H of the water molecule; and iv) U series and Sr isotopes. In all the sampled river systems, POC concentrations were at least an order of magnitude smaller than the dissolved forms. Rivers draining carbonates bedrocks (St.Lawrence and Nelson Rivers) present higher concentrations and δ13C-DIC values linked to carbonate dissolution in soils. Conversely, rivers draining silicate-rich watersheds present lower δ13C- DIC values linked to the production of an isotopically light CO2 through oxidation of organic matter in soils and that of soil-derived DOC along river courses. However, isotopic composition of DIC in impounded rivers draining silicate catchments indicate significant CO2 degassing and some isotopic exchange with atmospheric CO2 in reservoirs. A relatively strong relationship is observed between pCO2 and δ13C-DIC across the studied river systems suggesting a continuum between the production of CO2 through DOM oxidation and CO2

  16. Conversion of a tailing impoundment to a freshwater reservoir, the Eagle Park Reservoir project, Climax Mine, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Romig, B.R.; Cupp, J.L.; Ford, R.C.

    1999-07-01

    The Climax Molybdenum Mine, located near Leadville, Colorado, is the site of a lengthy mining history spanning more than 80 years. In the 1960's, extraction of molybdenum from oxide ore located adjacent to the massive molybdenite sulfide deposit resulted in the construction of an earthen core dam to impound fine-grained oxide tailing in the Eagle River Valley. Through recognized value of water storage and reclamation opportunities, a tailing removal project was initiated in 1993 to convert the impoundment facilities to a post-mining beneficial land use of developed water resources. An evaluation of the effect residual materials and lake dynamics would have on in-stream water quality was performed. Eagle Park Reservoir stands as a model for future reclamation efforts that involve water delivery to highly sensitive receiving waters. This paper provides a case study on project development, the evolution of water quality assessment, and the regulatory framework that contributed to this project's success.

  17. [Influence of 175-m-impoundment in Three Gorges Reservoir area on the food web energy sources of main commercial fishes in backwater area of xiaojiang River].

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Wang, Zhi-Jian; Yue, Xing-Jian; Wang, Yong-Ming; Jin, Li; Zhang, Yao-Guang

    2013-06-01

    The impoundment in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area (TGRA) was first reached 175 m in 2010. To approach the influence of this impoundment on the food web energy sources of fishes in the tributaries of TRGA, an analysis was made on the food web energy sources of seven economically important fishes (Carassius auratus, Cyprinus carpio, Silurus asotus, Culter mongolicus mongolicus, Mystus macropterus, Pelteobagrus vachelli, and Pelteobagrus nitidus) in the backwater area of Xiaojiang River by using stable isotope method in combining with IsoSource Model. The results showed that before this impoundment (July 2010), microalgae were the main energy sources for the seven species. After this impoundment (December 2010), the contribution ratio of the microalgae decreased somewhat, while the relative contribution of terrestrial C4 plants had an obvious increase. Especially for crucian carp (C. auratus) and catfish (S. asotus), the contribution rate of the C4 plants reached 38-54% and 32-50%, respectively. After the impoundment, at least 30% of the energy resources of these two fishes were come from terrestrial C4 plants, suggesting that the impoundment in TGRA increased the contribution rate of exogenous terrestrial C4 plants as the energy sources of fishes.

  18. Hypersalinity reduces the risk of cyanide toxicosis to insectivorous bats interacting with wastewater impoundments at gold mines.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Stephen R; Donato, David B; Lumsden, Linda F; Coulson, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Wildlife and livestock that ingest bioavailable cyanide compounds in gold mining tailings dams are known to experience cyanide toxicosis. Elevated levels of salinity in open impoundments have been shown to prevent wildlife cyanide toxicosis by reducing drinking and foraging. This finding appears to be consistent for diurnal wildlife interacting with open impoundments, however the risks to nocturnal wildlife of cyanide exposure are unknown. We investigated the activity of insectivorous bats in the airspace above both fresh (potable to wildlife) and saline water bodies at two gold mines in the goldfields of Western Australian. During this study, cyanide-bearing solutions stored in open impoundments at both mine sites were hypersaline (range=57,000-295,000 mg/L total dissolved solids (TDS)), well above known physiological tolerance of any terrestrial vertebrate. Bats used the airspace above each water body monitored, but were more active at fresh than saline water bodies. In addition, considerably more terminal echolocation buzz calls were recorded in the airspace above fresh than saline water bodies at both mine sites. However, it was not possible to determine whether these buzz calls corresponded to foraging or drinking bouts. No drinking bouts were observed in 33 h of thermal video footage recorded at one hypersaline tailings dam, suggesting that this water is not used for drinking. There is no information on salinity tolerances of bats, but it could be assumed that bats would not tolerate salinity in drinking water at concentrations greater than those documented as toxic for saline-adapted terrestrial wildlife. Therefore, when managing wastewater impoundments at gold mines to avoid wildlife mortalities, adopting a precautionary principle, bats are unlikely to drink solutions at salinity levels ≥50,000 mg/L TDS.

  19. Hypersalinity reduces the risk of cyanide toxicosis to insectivorous bats interacting with wastewater impoundments at gold mines.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Stephen R; Donato, David B; Lumsden, Linda F; Coulson, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Wildlife and livestock that ingest bioavailable cyanide compounds in gold mining tailings dams are known to experience cyanide toxicosis. Elevated levels of salinity in open impoundments have been shown to prevent wildlife cyanide toxicosis by reducing drinking and foraging. This finding appears to be consistent for diurnal wildlife interacting with open impoundments, however the risks to nocturnal wildlife of cyanide exposure are unknown. We investigated the activity of insectivorous bats in the airspace above both fresh (potable to wildlife) and saline water bodies at two gold mines in the goldfields of Western Australian. During this study, cyanide-bearing solutions stored in open impoundments at both mine sites were hypersaline (range=57,000-295,000 mg/L total dissolved solids (TDS)), well above known physiological tolerance of any terrestrial vertebrate. Bats used the airspace above each water body monitored, but were more active at fresh than saline water bodies. In addition, considerably more terminal echolocation buzz calls were recorded in the airspace above fresh than saline water bodies at both mine sites. However, it was not possible to determine whether these buzz calls corresponded to foraging or drinking bouts. No drinking bouts were observed in 33 h of thermal video footage recorded at one hypersaline tailings dam, suggesting that this water is not used for drinking. There is no information on salinity tolerances of bats, but it could be assumed that bats would not tolerate salinity in drinking water at concentrations greater than those documented as toxic for saline-adapted terrestrial wildlife. Therefore, when managing wastewater impoundments at gold mines to avoid wildlife mortalities, adopting a precautionary principle, bats are unlikely to drink solutions at salinity levels ≥50,000 mg/L TDS. PMID:24176292

  20. Spatial and seasonal distribution of phosphorus in the mainstem within the Three Gorges Reservoir before and after impoundment.

    PubMed

    Lou, Baofeng; Yin, Shiyong

    2016-01-01

    The Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) began to store water in 2003. The water level reached 135 m in 2003, 156 m in 2006, 172 m in 2008 and 175 m (target level) in every year from 2010 through 2013. Impacts of dams on the environment are a concern all over the world. A major concern for reservoirs is phosphorus and possible eutrophication. Therefore, total phosphorus (TP) in the TGR mainstem was determined at five stations (S1-S5) from 1998 through 2013 to investigate variations of phosphorus with water level elevations. Results revealed that a new spatial and seasonal TP distribution has occurred after the impoundment. TP levels in the reach between S3 (nearly 300 km from the dam) and S5 (near the dam) have decreased sharply compared with those before the impoundment. The reduction degree of TP in wet season was greater than in dry season. Additionally, TP spatially decreased from upstream to the dam after the impoundment. The reduction of TP levels was mainly attributed to the settling of suspended solids and adsorbed phosphorus. These findings will inform research about transport and fate of phosphorus in TGR and Yangtze River. The challenge remains to implement measures to limit the release of phosphorus from sediments.

  1. Temporal variation and spatial distribution of PAH in water of Three Gorges Reservoir during the complete impoundment period.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingxian; Henkelmann, Bernhard; Bi, Yonghong; Zhu, Kongxian; Pfister, Gerd; Hu, Wei; Temoka, Cedrique; Westrich, Bernhard; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2013-10-01

    Bioavailable concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated in water of Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) using semipermeable membrane devices during the period of completely impounding water. ∑PAH concentrations in water of TGR in the period of completely impounding water were 15-381 ng L(-1). ∑PAH concentrations increased from town or counties to big industrialized cities in TGR, indicating urbanization effects on PAH pollution in the water. Tributaries in TGR have a certain contribution of PAH pollution to the mainstream of Yangtze River and their pollution could not be neglected. An obvious decrease of PAH concentration was observed after 175-m water impounding in 2011 in TGR. Several factors may account for this decrease, including execution of comprehensive treatment and management measures in TGR, less rainfall in 2011, and sedimentation effect caused by the dam. Passive sampling method has been successfully applied in the investigation of trace PAH in water of TGR and proved to be a useful and efficient tool for the management and sustainable development of the big reservoir. The results of the study provide valuable information about PAH pollution in the whole reservoir including some tributaries, and the pollution status is dynamically related with human activities. Therefore, PAH could be used as a marker compound or indicator in the network monitoring system to surveil and trace the pollution status in TGR.

  2. Water velocity, turbulence, and migration rate of subyearling fall Chinook salmon in the free-flowing and impounded Snake River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2009-01-01

    We studied the migratory behavior of subyearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in free-flowing and impounded reaches of the Snake River to evaluate the hypothesis that velocity and turbulence are the primary causal mechanisms of downstream migration. The hypothesis states that impoundment reduces velocity and turbulence and alters the migratory behavior of juvenile Chinook salmon as a result of their reduced perception of these cues. At a constant flow (m3 /s), both velocity (km/d) and turbulence (the SD of velocity) decreased from riverine to impounded habitat as cross-sectional areas increased. We found evidence for the hypothesis that subyearling Chinook salmon perceive velocity and turbulence cues and respond to these cues by varying their behavior. The percentage of the subyearlings that moved faster than the average current speed decreased as fish made the transition from riverine reaches with high velocities and turbulence to upper reservoir reaches with low velocities and turbulence but increased to riverine levels again as the fish moved further down in the reservoir, where velocity and turbulence remained low. The migration rate (km/d) decreased in accordance with longitudinal reductions in velocity and turbulence, as predicted by the hypothesis. The variation in migration rate was better explained by a repeatedmeasures regression model containing velocity (Akaike’s information criterion ¼ 1,769.0) than a model containing flow (2,232.6). We conclude that subyearling fall Chinook salmon respond to changes in water velocity and turbulence, which work together to affect the migration rate.

  3. Temporal variation and spatial distribution of PAH in water of Three Gorges Reservoir during the complete impoundment period.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingxian; Henkelmann, Bernhard; Bi, Yonghong; Zhu, Kongxian; Pfister, Gerd; Hu, Wei; Temoka, Cedrique; Westrich, Bernhard; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2013-10-01

    Bioavailable concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated in water of Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) using semipermeable membrane devices during the period of completely impounding water. ∑PAH concentrations in water of TGR in the period of completely impounding water were 15-381 ng L(-1). ∑PAH concentrations increased from town or counties to big industrialized cities in TGR, indicating urbanization effects on PAH pollution in the water. Tributaries in TGR have a certain contribution of PAH pollution to the mainstream of Yangtze River and their pollution could not be neglected. An obvious decrease of PAH concentration was observed after 175-m water impounding in 2011 in TGR. Several factors may account for this decrease, including execution of comprehensive treatment and management measures in TGR, less rainfall in 2011, and sedimentation effect caused by the dam. Passive sampling method has been successfully applied in the investigation of trace PAH in water of TGR and proved to be a useful and efficient tool for the management and sustainable development of the big reservoir. The results of the study provide valuable information about PAH pollution in the whole reservoir including some tributaries, and the pollution status is dynamically related with human activities. Therefore, PAH could be used as a marker compound or indicator in the network monitoring system to surveil and trace the pollution status in TGR. PMID:23274807

  4. Spatial and seasonal distribution of phosphorus in the mainstem within the Three Gorges Reservoir before and after impoundment.

    PubMed

    Lou, Baofeng; Yin, Shiyong

    2016-01-01

    The Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) began to store water in 2003. The water level reached 135 m in 2003, 156 m in 2006, 172 m in 2008 and 175 m (target level) in every year from 2010 through 2013. Impacts of dams on the environment are a concern all over the world. A major concern for reservoirs is phosphorus and possible eutrophication. Therefore, total phosphorus (TP) in the TGR mainstem was determined at five stations (S1-S5) from 1998 through 2013 to investigate variations of phosphorus with water level elevations. Results revealed that a new spatial and seasonal TP distribution has occurred after the impoundment. TP levels in the reach between S3 (nearly 300 km from the dam) and S5 (near the dam) have decreased sharply compared with those before the impoundment. The reduction degree of TP in wet season was greater than in dry season. Additionally, TP spatially decreased from upstream to the dam after the impoundment. The reduction of TP levels was mainly attributed to the settling of suspended solids and adsorbed phosphorus. These findings will inform research about transport and fate of phosphorus in TGR and Yangtze River. The challenge remains to implement measures to limit the release of phosphorus from sediments. PMID:26877047

  5. 10 CFR 960.5-2-8 - Surface characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A...-water systems and the terrain, the requirements specified in § 960.5-1(a)(3) can be met during... flood plains, the failure of existing or planned man-made surface-water impoundments, or the failure...

  6. 10 CFR 960.5-2-8 - Surface characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A...-water systems and the terrain, the requirements specified in § 960.5-1(a)(3) can be met during... flood plains, the failure of existing or planned man-made surface-water impoundments, or the failure...

  7. 10 CFR 960.5-2-8 - Surface characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A...-water systems and the terrain, the requirements specified in § 960.5-1(a)(3) can be met during... flood plains, the failure of existing or planned man-made surface-water impoundments, or the failure...

  8. 10 CFR 960.5-2-8 - Surface characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A...-water systems and the terrain, the requirements specified in § 960.5-1(a)(3) can be met during... flood plains, the failure of existing or planned man-made surface-water impoundments, or the failure...

  9. Regrowth of enterococci indicator in an open recycled-water impoundment.

    PubMed

    Derry, Chris; Attwater, Roger

    2014-01-15

    The purpose of the research was to assess the potential for enterococci faecal-indicator to regrow in recycled water while under environmentally-open storage. Regrowth would result in false-positive indicator results with possible downgrading, rejection or over-chlorination of recycled water. The research setting was the main 93-megalitre storage impoundment of the Hawkesbury Water Recycling Scheme in Sydney's North West, receiving tertiary treated (chlorinated) effluent from the Richmond sewage treatment plant. The water is used to irrigate horticultural food crops, pasture for dairy cattle, sheep, deer and horses, and for the maintenance of lawns and sports fields. Highly significant positive relationships were noted in multivariate analysis between indicator counts and the growth factors atmospheric temperature and UV254 unfiltered as proxy for total organic carbon (p=0.001 and 0.003 respectively). Nitrate and phosphate did not show significant relationships suggesting that these nutrients may not be growth-limiting at levels found in recycled water. Rainfall and wild duck presence did not appear to have an impact on enterococcal growth in the study. The overall predictive power of the regression model was shown to be highly significant (p=0.001). These findings will assist in recycled water monitoring and the revision of guidelines, with potential for the reduction of the chlorination by-product burden on the environment. A formula derived for the relationship between the indicator and atmospheric temperature could be used in food-production and climate-change modelling. PMID:24008073

  10. Survivability of ancient man-made earthen mounds: implications for uranium mill tailings impoundments

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, C.G.; Mishima, J.; King, S.E.; Walters, W.H.

    1983-06-01

    As part of a study for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating long-term stabilization techniques for uranium mill impoundments. Part of this investigation involves the design of a rock armoring blanket (riprap) to mitigate wind and water erosion of the underlying soil cover, which in turn prevents exposure of the tailings to the environment. However, the need for the armoring blanket, as well as the blanket's effectiveness, depends on the stability of the underlying soil cap (radon suppression cover) and on the tailings themselves. Compelling evidence in archaeological records suggests that large man-made earthen structures can remain sound and intact for time periods comparable to those required for the stabilization of the tailings piles if properly constructed. We present archaeological evidence on the existence and survivability of man-made earthen and rock structures through specific examples of such structures from around the world. We also review factors contributing to their survival or destruction and address the influence of climate, building materials, and construction techniques on survivability.

  11. Regrowth of enterococci indicator in an open recycled-water impoundment.

    PubMed

    Derry, Chris; Attwater, Roger

    2014-01-15

    The purpose of the research was to assess the potential for enterococci faecal-indicator to regrow in recycled water while under environmentally-open storage. Regrowth would result in false-positive indicator results with possible downgrading, rejection or over-chlorination of recycled water. The research setting was the main 93-megalitre storage impoundment of the Hawkesbury Water Recycling Scheme in Sydney's North West, receiving tertiary treated (chlorinated) effluent from the Richmond sewage treatment plant. The water is used to irrigate horticultural food crops, pasture for dairy cattle, sheep, deer and horses, and for the maintenance of lawns and sports fields. Highly significant positive relationships were noted in multivariate analysis between indicator counts and the growth factors atmospheric temperature and UV254 unfiltered as proxy for total organic carbon (p=0.001 and 0.003 respectively). Nitrate and phosphate did not show significant relationships suggesting that these nutrients may not be growth-limiting at levels found in recycled water. Rainfall and wild duck presence did not appear to have an impact on enterococcal growth in the study. The overall predictive power of the regression model was shown to be highly significant (p=0.001). These findings will assist in recycled water monitoring and the revision of guidelines, with potential for the reduction of the chlorination by-product burden on the environment. A formula derived for the relationship between the indicator and atmospheric temperature could be used in food-production and climate-change modelling.

  12. Significance of bacteria and viruses in the carbon flow of tropical freshwater impoundments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peduzzi, P.; Schiemer, F.

    2003-04-01

    In two types of tropical freshwater impoundments, free and particle-attached bacterial abundance and production as well as virus abundance, frequency of viral infection and virus production were investigated together with a set of environmental factors during two characteristic seasons. Organic nitrogen, phosphorus species, dissolved organic carbon and suspended solids were elevated in the wind-mixed water body of a shallow reservoir during the dry season, whereas a deeper reservoir type exhibited no obvious seasonality in these parameters. In SYBR GREEN-stained samples, bacterial abundance showed no seasonal pattern in either reservoir type. A large proportion of the overall bacterial production was associated with particulate material. Highest densities of virus particles and elevated frequency of bacteria containing mature phages were observed in the shallow reservoir during the dry season. The specific bacterial production was related to the abundance of particulate organic matter, phosphorus species and organic nitrogen. Most virus parameters were positively linked to bacterial density, production and to organic nitrogen. We calculated that between 13.2 and 46.1% of the bacterial standing stocks would be subjected to virus-mediated mortality. Carbon budgets for the microbial and organic matter compartments of these tropical freshwater reservoirs indicate prevailing autotrophy and a substantial pathway through the viral shunt. During the dry season the shallow, wind-mixed reservoir provided favorable conditions for bacterial growth and virus propagation.

  13. The Effect of Zebra Mussels on Algal Community Structure in an Impounded River System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumble, A. F.; Luttenton, M.

    2005-05-01

    The zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, invaded the Great Lakes Region in the mid 1980's, and subsequently colonized inland lakes and coastal river systems through secondary invasions. The Muskegon River below Croton Dam was colonized by zebra mussels in 2000 following their introduction into Croton impoundment in the late 1990's. No zebra mussels were found below Croton Dam in 1999 but had increased to 25,000 m-2 by 2001. We examined the affect of zebra mussels on epilithic periphyton communities by comparing plots that were and were not colonized by zebra mussels. Chlorophyll a increased in both treatments over time but was significantly higher in control plots than in zebra mussel plots. The concentration of chlorophyll a in the control plots increased from 14 µgcm-2 to 26 µgcm-2 and the concentration in the zebra mussel plots started at 12 µgcm-2, peaked at 19 µgcm-2, and then decreased to 15 µgcm-2 over a 6 week period. In a related experiment using artificial streams, chlorophyll a increased with increasing zebra mussel density, but differences were not significant. The different trends observed between the two experiments may be explained in part by arthropod invertebrates associated with zebra mussel populations.

  14. Influences of water quality on distribution of striped bass in a Tennessee River impoundment

    SciTech Connect

    Cheek, T.E.; van den Avyle, M.J.; Coutant, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    Telemetry techniques were used to evaluate relationships between water quality and distribution of adult striped bass Morone saxatilis during an 18-month period in Watts Bar Reservoir, Tennessee. Distribution and movements of fish were influenced by water temperature and dissolved oxygen concentration. During winter and early spring, temperature was vertically and horizontally uniform, and striped bass were relatively mobile and occurred in both tributary arms as well as in the main body of the reservoir. As the reservoir warmed in summer, fish were less mobile and progressively limited to areas in the tributary arms where temperature was less than 24 C and dissolved oxygen exceeded 4 mg/liter. Parts of the tributary arms of Watts Bar Reservoir provided such areas due to hypolimnetic discharges from upstream impoundments and groundwater inflows. Striped bass were restricted to these areas until late fall, when the entire reservoir cooled and again was nearly isothermal. Knowledge of relationships between striped bass habitat use and water quality is useful for fishery management and resource protection for reservoirs; an example is provided for Watts Bar Reservoir. 35 references, 3 figures.

  15. Quantifying downstream impacts of impoundment on flow regime and channel planform, lower Trinity River, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellmeyer, Jessica L.; Slattery, Michael C.; Phillips, Jonathan D.

    2005-07-01

    As human population worldwide has grown, so has interest in harnessing and manipulating the flow of water for the benefit of humans. The Trinity River of eastern Texas is one such watershed greatly impacted by engineering and urbanization. Draining the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, just under 30 reservoirs are in operation in the basin, regulating flow while containing public supplies, supporting recreation, and providing flood control. Lake Livingston is the lowest, as well as largest, reservoir in the basin, a mere 95 km above the Trinity's outlet near Galveston Bay. This study seeks to describe and quantify channel activity and flow regime, identifying effects of the 1968 closure of Livingston dam. Using historic daily and peak discharge data from USGS gauging stations, flow duration curves are constructed, identifying pre- and post-dam flow conditions. A digital historic photo archive was also constructed using six sets of aerial photographs spanning from 1938 to 1995, and three measures of channel activity applied using a GIS. Results show no changes in high flow conditions following impoundment, while low flows are elevated. However, the entire post-dam period is characterized by significantly higher rainfall, which may be obscuring the full impact of flow regulation. Channel activity rates do not indicate a more stabilized planform following dam closure; rather they suggest that the Trinity River is adjusting itself to the stress of Livingston dam in a slow, gradual process that may not be apparent in a modern time scale.

  16. Methane oxidation and molecular characterization of methanotrophs from a former mercury mine impoundment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baesman, Shaun; Miller, Laurence G.; Wei, Jeremy H.; Cho, Yirang; Matys, Emily D.; Summons, Roger E.; Welander, Paula V.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    The Herman Pit, once a mercury mine, is an impoundment located in an active geothermal area. Its acidic waters are permeated by hundreds of gas seeps. One seep was sampled and found to be composed of mostly CO2 with some CH4 present. The δ13CH4 value suggested a complex origin for the methane: i.e., a thermogenic component plus a biological methanogenic portion. The relatively 12C-enriched CO2 suggested a reworking of the ebullitive methane by methanotrophic bacteria. Therefore, we tested bottom sediments for their ability to consume methane by conducting aerobic incubations of slurried materials. Methane was removed from the headspace of live slurries, and subsequent additions of methane resulted in faster removal rates. This activity could be transferred to an artificial, acidic medium, indicating the presence of acidophilic or acid-tolerant methanotrophs, the latter reinforced by the observation of maximum activity at pH = 4.5 with incubated slurries. A successful extraction of sterol and hopanoid lipids characteristic of methanotrophs was achieved, and their abundances greatly increased with increased sediment methane consumption. DNA extracted from methane-oxidizing enrichment cultures was amplified and sequenced for pmoA genes that aligned with methanotrophic members of the Gammaproteobacteria. An enrichment culture was established that grew in an acidic (pH 4.5) medium via methane oxidation.

  17. Methane Oxidation and Molecular Characterization of Methanotrophs from a Former Mercury Mine Impoundment

    PubMed Central

    Baesman, Shaun M.; Miller, Laurence G.; Wei, Jeremy H.; Cho, Yirang; Matys, Emily D.; Summons, Roger E.; Welander, Paula V.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    The Herman Pit, once a mercury mine, is an impoundment located in an active geothermal area. Its acidic waters are permeated by hundreds of gas seeps. One seep was sampled and found to be composed of mostly CO2 with some CH4 present. The δ13CH4 value suggested a complex origin for the methane: i.e., a thermogenic component plus a biological methanogenic portion. The relatively 12C-enriched CO2 suggested a reworking of the ebullitive methane by methanotrophic bacteria. Therefore, we tested bottom sediments for their ability to consume methane by conducting aerobic incubations of slurried materials. Methane was removed from the headspace of live slurries, and subsequent additions of methane resulted in faster removal rates. This activity could be transferred to an artificial, acidic medium, indicating the presence of acidophilic or acid-tolerant methanotrophs, the latter reinforced by the observation of maximum activity at pH = 4.5 with incubated slurries. A successful extraction of sterol and hopanoid lipids characteristic of methanotrophs was achieved, and their abundances greatly increased with increased sediment methane consumption. DNA extracted from methane-oxidizing enrichment cultures was amplified and sequenced for pmoA genes that aligned with methanotrophic members of the Gammaproteobacteria. An enrichment culture was established that grew in an acidic (pH 4.5) medium via methane oxidation.

  18. Evidence for serial discontinuity in the fish community of a heavily impounded river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Dembkowski, D.J.

    2016-01-01

    In the Tennessee River, USA, we examined lengthwise patterns in fish community structure and species richness within and among nine reservoirs organized in sequence and connected through navigational locks. Within reservoirs, the riverine, transition and lacustrine zones supported distinct, although overlapping, nearshore fish assemblages; differences were also reflected in measures of species richness. Spatial patterns were most apparent for rheophilic species, which increased in species richness and representation upstream within each reservoir and downstream across the chain of reservoirs. This pattern resembled a sawtooth wave, with the amplitude of the wave peaking in the riverine zone below each dam, and progressively higher wave amplitude developing downstream in the reservoir chain. The observed sawtooth pattern supports the serial discontinuity concept in that the continuity of the riverine fish community is interrupted by the lacustrine conditions created behind each dam. Upstream within each reservoir, and downstream in the chain of reservoirs, habitat characteristics become more riverine. To promote sustainability of rheophilic fishes and maintain biodiversity in impounded rivers, conservation plans could emphasize maintenance and preservation of riverine environments of the reservoir's upper reaches, while remaining cognizant of the broader basin trends that provide opportunities for a lengthwise array of conservation and management policy. 

  19. Methane Oxidation and Molecular Characterization of Methanotrophs from a Former Mercury Mine Impoundment

    PubMed Central

    Baesman, Shaun M.; Miller, Laurence G.; Wei, Jeremy H.; Cho, Yirang; Matys, Emily D.; Summons, Roger E.; Welander, Paula V.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    The Herman Pit, once a mercury mine, is an impoundment located in an active geothermal area. Its acidic waters are permeated by hundreds of gas seeps. One seep was sampled and found to be composed of mostly CO2 with some CH4 present. The δ13CH4 value suggested a complex origin for the methane: i.e., a thermogenic component plus a biological methanogenic portion. The relatively 12C-enriched CO2 suggested a reworking of the ebullitive methane by methanotrophic bacteria. Therefore, we tested bottom sediments for their ability to consume methane by conducting aerobic incubations of slurried materials. Methane was removed from the headspace of live slurries, and subsequent additions of methane resulted in faster removal rates. This activity could be transferred to an artificial, acidic medium, indicating the presence of acidophilic or acid-tolerant methanotrophs, the latter reinforced by the observation of maximum activity at pH = 4.5 with incubated slurries. A successful extraction of sterol and hopanoid lipids characteristic of methanotrophs was achieved, and their abundances greatly increased with increased sediment methane consumption. DNA extracted from methane-oxidizing enrichment cultures was amplified and sequenced for pmoA genes that aligned with methanotrophic members of the Gammaproteobacteria. An enrichment culture was established that grew in an acidic (pH 4.5) medium via methane oxidation. PMID:27682090

  20. The niche of an invasive marine microbe in a subtropical freshwater impoundment

    PubMed Central

    David Hambright, K; Beyer, Jessica E; Easton, James D; Zamor, Richard M; Easton, Anne C; Hallidayschult, Thayer C

    2015-01-01

    Growing attention in aquatic ecology is focusing on biogeographic patterns in microorganisms and whether these potential patterns can be explained within the framework of general ecology. The long-standing microbiologist's credo ‘Everything is everywhere, but, the environment selects' suggests that dispersal is not limiting for microbes, but that the environment is the primary determining factor in microbial community composition. Advances in molecular techniques have provided new evidence that biogeographic patterns exist in microbes and that dispersal limitation may actually have an important role, yet more recent study using extremely deep sequencing predicts that indeed everything is everywhere. Using a long-term field study of the ‘invasive' marine haptophyte Prymnesium parvum, we characterize the environmental niche of P. parvum in a subtropical impoundment in the southern United States. Our analysis contributes to a growing body of evidence that indicates a primary role for environmental conditions, but not dispersal, in the lake-wide abundances and seasonal bloom patterns in this globally important microbe. PMID:24950108

  1. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress Report for the Period April 1 to June 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-09-01

    This report describes the progress of 13 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period April 1 to June 30, 1989. These projects are for the 300 area process trenches (300 area), 183-H solar evaporation basins (100-H area), 200 areas low-level burial grounds, nonradioactive dangerous waste landfill (southeast of the 200 areas), 1301-N liquid waste disposal facility (100-N area), 1324-N surface impoundment and 1324-NA percolation pond (100-N area), 1325-N liquid waste disposal facility (100-N area), 216-A-10 crib (200-east area), 216-A-29 ditch (200-east area), 216-A-36B crib (200-east area), 216-B-36B crib (200-east area), 216-B-3 pond (east of the 200-east area), 2101-M pond (200-east area), grout treatment facility (200-east area).

  2. Automated detection of submerged navigational obstructions in freshwater impoundments with hull mounted sidescan sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Phillip A.

    The prevalence of low-cost side scanning sonar systems mounted on small recreational vessels has created improved opportunities to identify and map submerged navigational hazards in freshwater impoundments. However, these economical sensors also present unique challenges for automated techniques. This research explores related literature in automated sonar imagery processing and mapping technology, proposes and implements a framework derived from these sources, and evaluates the approach with video collected from a recreational grade sonar system. Image analysis techniques including optical character recognition and an unsupervised computer automated detection (CAD) algorithm are employed to extract the transducer GPS coordinates and slant range distance of objects protruding from the lake bottom. The retrieved information is formatted for inclusion into a spatial mapping model. Specific attributes of the sonar sensors are modeled such that probability profiles may be projected onto a three dimensional gridded map. These profiles are computed from multiple points of view as sonar traces crisscross or come near each other. As lake levels fluctuate over time so do the elevation points of view. With each sonar record, the probability of a hazard existing at certain elevations at the respective grid points is updated with Bayesian mechanics. As reinforcing data is collected, the confidence of the map improves. Given a lake's current elevation and a vessel draft, a final generated map can identify areas of the lake that have a high probability of containing hazards that threaten navigation. The approach is implemented in C/C++ utilizing OpenCV, Tesseract OCR, and QGIS open source software and evaluated in a designated test area at Lake Lavon, Collin County, Texas.

  3. Destratification of an impounding reservoir using compressed air??case of Mudi reservoir, Blantyre, Malawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipofya, V. H.; Matapa, E. J.

    This paper reviews the operational and cost effectiveness of a compressed air destratification system that was installed in the Mudi reservoir for destratifying the reservoir. Mudi reservoir is a raw water source for the Blantyre Water Board. It has a capacity of 1,400,000 cubic metres. The reservoir is 15.3 m deep at top water level. In the absence of any artificial circulation of air, the reservoir stratifies into two layers. There is a warm epilimnion in the top 3 m of the reservoir, with temperatures ranging from 23 to 26 °C. There is prolific algal growth in this layer. The bottom layer has much lower temperatures, and is oxygen deficient. Under such anaerobic conditions, ammonia, sulphides, iron and manganese are released from the sediments of the reservoir. As a result of nutrient inflow from the catchments, coupled with tropical ambient temperatures, the reservoir is most times infested with blue-green algae. This results into water treatment problems in respect of taste and odour and iron and manganese soluble salts. To abate such problems, air is artificially circulated in the reservoir, near the intake tower, through a perforated pipe that is connected to an electrically driven compressor. This causes artificial circulation of water in the hypolimnion region of the reservoir. As a result of this circulation, a hostile environment that inhibits the propagation of algae is created. Dissolved oxygen and temperature profiles are practically uniform from top to bottom of reservoir. Concentrations of iron and manganese soluble salts are much reduced at any of the draw-off points available for the water treatment process. The paper concludes by highlighting the significant cost savings in water treatment that are accrued from the use of compressed air destratification in impounding water storage reservoirs for the control of algae and other chemical pollutants.

  4. The R3/R5 impoundment study: a large-scale management experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyons, J.E.; Laskowski, H.P.; Runge, M.C.; Lor, S.; Kendall, W.L.; Talbott, S.

    2005-01-01

    Managed wetlands provide a broad spectrum of resources to migratory waterbirds (shorebirds, wading birds, and waterfowl) throughout the annual cycle. Successful conservation and management of waterbirds depends on integrated approaches that (1) incorporate larger spatial and temporal scales than traditional approaches to wetland management, and (2) use experimental designs to reduce uncertainty about the response of the systems to management. In a previous experiment on USFWS National Wildlife Refuges in the Northeast, we explored the effects of water-level management on migratory shorebirds in spring. We documented regional patterns of shorebird use of Refuge wetlands and showed that across the region, a slow drawdown was superior to 2 alternatives. USGS and USFWS have now cooperatively undertaken an expanded study focusing on 3 waterbird guilds in the context of the complete annual cycle and over a larger spatial extent. For this 3-yr study, now in its first year, 2 impoundments were selected at each of 23 NWRs across the Northeast and Upper Midwest Regions. Two experimental treatments (annual water regimes focused on early-season or late-season drawdowns) are being applied each year in a cross-over design. This experimental design will increase our understanding of cross-seasonal interactions which result from specific hydrologic regimes aimed at a particular waterbird guild. Monitoring will allow waterbird responses to be linked with direct effects of water management on plant and invertebrate populations. Results of this large-scale experiment will be used to motivate formal adaptive management of wetlands and waterbirds at refuges following completion of this experiment.

  5. A microbial arsenic cycle in sediments of an acidic mine impoundment: Herman Pit, Clear Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blum, Jodi S.; McCann, Shelley; Bennett, S.; Miller, Laurence G.; Stolz, J. R.; Stoneburner, B.; Saltikov, C.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of prokaryotes in the redox reactions of arsenic occurring between its +5 [arsenate; As(V)] and +3 [arsenite; As(III)] oxidation states has been well established. Most research to date has focused upon circum-neutral pH environments (e.g., freshwater or estuarine sediments) or arsenic-rich “extreme” environments like hot springs and soda lakes. In contrast, relatively little work has been conducted in acidic environments. With this in mind we conducted experiments with sediments taken from the Herman Pit, an acid mine drainage impoundment of a former mercury (cinnabar) mine. Due to the large adsorptive capacity of the abundant Fe(III)-rich minerals, we were unable to initially detect in solution either As(V) or As(III) added to the aqueous phase of live sediment slurries or autoclaved controls, although the former consumed added electron donors (i.e., lactate, acetate, hydrogen), while the latter did not. This prompted us to conduct further experiments with diluted slurries using the live materials from the first incubation as inoculum. In these experiments we observed reduction of As(V) to As(III) under anoxic conditions and reduction rates were enhanced by addition of electron donors. We also observed oxidation of As(III) to As(V) in oxic slurries as well as in anoxic slurries amended with nitrate. We noted an acid-tolerant trend for sediment slurries in the cases of As(III) oxidation (aerobic and anaerobic) as well as for anaerobic As(V) reduction. These observations indicate the presence of a viable microbial arsenic redox cycle in the sediments of this extreme environment, a result reinforced by the successful amplification of arsenic functional genes (aioA, and arrA) from these materials.

  6. Suspended sediment, carbon and nitrogen transport in two impounded mountainous rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres Lopez-Tarazon, Jose; López, Pilar; Lobera, Gemma; Batalla, Ramon J.

    2016-04-01

    Impoundment alters rivers' characteristics, transforming parts of them into lakes, and affecting their hydrological, physical, chemical, and biological characteristics and dynamics. Reservoirs are very effective retaining particulate materials, thereby avoiding the downstream transport of suspended sediment and the chemical substances associated with it (e.g. Carbon, C, or Nitrogen, N) so they have proven to be the most important sinks for organic carbon among inland waters and have a potential significance as nitrogen sinks. Therefore, the study of C and N transport by rivers is of great interest since river load represents a major link to the global C and N cycles. Present work investigates the effects of the Barasona reservoir on the runoff, suspended sediment, C and N derived from the highly active mountainous Ésera and Isábena rivers. Main results indicate that the reservoir reduces the Ésera-Isábena river fluxes dramatically as almost all the inputs are retained within the reservoir. 300,000 t of suspended sediment were deposited into the Barasona Reservoir, from which more than 16,000 were C (i.e. 2,200 t as organic C) and 222 t were N, despite that the study year (2011-2012) can be considered as very dry. These values may not be seen as remarkable in a wider global context but figures would increase up to ca. 2.6 × 106 t of C (i.e. 360,000 t of organic C) and 35,000 t of N if it is assumes that around 30 hm3 of sediment are currently stored in the reservoir. Nevertheless, these values are indicative and should be treated with caution as there is incomplete understanding of all the processes which affect C and N, hence further investigation to establish a more complete picture of C and N yields and budgets by monitoring the different processes involved is essential.

  7. [Trophic states and nutrient output of tributaries bay in Three Gorges Reservoir after impoundment].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Li, Chong-Ming; Fu, Yong-Chuan; Zhang, Yong; Zheng, Jian

    2008-01-01

    After the Three Gorges Reservoir storaged water in June 2003, total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), chlorophyll a (Chl-a), potassium permanganate index and Secchi depth (SD) were determined in 12 tributaries bay in Three Gorges Reservoir. Trophic states were assessed and output fluxes of TN, TP and potassium permanganate index were calculated. The results showed that value of TN,TP, potassium permanganate index, SD and Chl-a were different in each tributary bay. SD, TN, TP, potassium permanganate index and Chl-a value were 0.10-3.5m, 0.535-7.47 mg x L(-1), 0.016-0.835 mg x L(-1), 1.55-5.88 mg x L(-1) and 1.38-23.7 mg x m(-3) respectively. The water body of tributaries is polluted at various levels. The concentration of TN is abundant. The rate of TN and TP showed that a part of tributaries eutrophication were limited by TP. The correlation of nutrient and Chl-a were researched. It indicated there was a significant positive correlation (r = 0.6242) between chlorophyll a and potassium permanganate index. Utilizing the method of integrated nutrition state index, it assessed the trophic states degree of tributaries bay. The integrated nutrition state index ranged from 33.3 to 66.1. Among all of the studied tributaries, 5 tributaries are eutrophic in May and 8 tributaries are eutrophic in June. The rest of tributaries are mesotrophic. The degree of eutrophication is more serious than before the Three Gorges Reservoir impoundment. The nutrient fluxes load was calculated by discharge and concentration of each tributary. The nutrient fluxes load of TN, TP, potassium permanganate index and NH4(+)-N are 668, 26.7, 890 and 99.2 g x s(-1) respectively. After the Three Gorges Dam was completed in 2009, eutrophication trend of tributaries estuaries will be more serious with the more slow flow velocity.

  8. ULTRASONICALLY-ENHANCED DENSE-MEDIUM CYCLONING FOR FINE COAL AND COAL REFUSE IMPOUNDMENT MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Mark S. Klima; Dr. Barbara J. Arnold

    2001-08-01

    The Pennsylvania State University, its project team (Typlex, Inc., DAGER, Inc., and PrepTech, Inc.), and advisory committee members have demonstrated the application of ultrasonic energy during dense-medium cyclining and subsequent recovery of fine coal and coal refuse impoundment materials. The results will help to extend the range of conventional dense-medium cyclining to sizes now typically cleaned in relatively inefficient water-only cyclone and spiral concentrators circuits. This technology also provides a potential approach to produce ultra-clean material as would be used for feedstocks for premium carbon products. This report describes Phase I of the project, which involved laboratory testing of dense-medium cyclining and subsequent medium recovery, with and without ultrasonic treatment, along with fundamental dispersion testing. Dense-medium cycloning was conducted with a 76.2-mm (3-in.) diameter cyclone under various conditions including magnetite grade, medium relative density, inlet pressure, cyclone geometry, and feed coal. Dense-medium recovery testing was carried out with a 305-mm (12-in.) diameter x 152-mm (6-in.) wide wet-drum magnetic separator using the cyclone clean coal and refuse products as the feed material. Fundamental testing of dispersion/reagglomeration phenomena was conducted with coal/clay mixtures. In almost all cases, the dense-medium cyclone was capable of achieving separations down to approximately 0.037 mm. Ultrasonic treatment had a slight effect on reducing the ash content of the clean coal. It was also found that ultrasonic treatment improved the purity of the magnetic fraction during wet-drum magnetic separation. The treatment was particularly beneficial for the cyclone overflow material. The fundamental testing indicated that agitation after ultrasonic treatment is necessary to disperse fine particles and to prevent agglomeration.

  9. Influences of local habitat, tributary position, and dam characteristics on fish assemblages within impoundments of low-head dams in the tributaries of the Qingyi River, China

    PubMed Central

    LI, Xian; LI, Yu-Ru; CHU, Ling; ZHU, Ren; WANG, Li-Zhu; YAN, Yun-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Low-head dam impoundments modify local habitat and alter fish assemblages; however, to our knowledge, the pattern of how fish assemblages in the impoundments relate to local habitat, tributary position, and dam characteristics is still unclear. We used data collected in 62 impoundments created by low-head dams in headwater streams of the Qingyi River, China, to examine relationships between fish assemblages and local habitat, tributary position, and dam characteristics. We also assessed the relative importance of the three groups of factors in determining fish species richness and composition. Linear regression models showed that fish species richness was related to substrate heterogeneity, confluence link, and dam number upstream. Redundancy analysis showed that fish species compositions were influenced by substrate heterogeneity, confluence link, dam height, dam numbers upstream and downstream. Overall, dam characteristics were more important in affecting fish species richness but less important in determining fish species composition than local habitat (i.e., substrate heterogeneity) and tributary position. Our results suggest that low-head dam may affect fish species richness in impoundments by modifying local habitat and constraining fish movement, and the relative abundances of those fish species may depend more on species habitat presences and stream size than on impoundment size and number. PMID:27029863

  10. Influences of local habitat, tributary position, and dam characteristics on fish assemblages within impoundments of low-head dams in the tributaries of the Qingyi River, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian; Li, Yu-Ru; Chu, Ling; Zhu, Ren; Wang, Li-Zhu; Yan, Yun-Zhi

    2016-03-18

    Low-head dam impoundments modify local habitat and alter fish assemblages; however, to our knowledge, the pattern of how fish assemblages in the impoundments relate to local habitat, tributary position, and dam characteristics is still unclear. We used data collected in 62 impoundments created by low-head dams in headwater streams of the Qingyi River, China, to examine relationships between fish assemblages and local habitat, tributary position, and dam characteristics. We also assessed the relative importance of the three groups of factors in determining fish species richness and composition. Linear regression models showed that fish species richness was related to substrate heterogeneity, confluence link, and dam number upstream. Redundancy analysis showed that fish species compositions were influenced by substrate heterogeneity, confluence link, dam height, dam numbers upstream and downstream. Overall, dam characteristics were more important in affecting fish species richness but less important in determining fish species composition than local habitat (i.e., substrate heterogeneity) and tributary position. Our results suggest that low-head dam may affect fish species richness in impoundments by modifying local habitat and constraining fish movement, and the relative abundances of those fish species may depend more on species habitat presences and stream size than on impoundment size and number. PMID:27029863

  11. Analysis of Wading Bird use of Impounded Wetland Habitat on the Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, 1987-1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolen, Eric D.; Breininger, David R.; Smith, Rebecca B.; Quincy, Charlie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes results of the first eleven years of monthly aerial surveys of wading bird use of foraging habitats within impoundments on the Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Some impoundments were used much more heavily by wading birds than were others. Analysis suggests that an increase in interspersion of open water and vegetated habitats is preferred foraging habitat. Many wading bird species increased their use of vegetated habitat in Fall and Winter when impoundments were flooded. The mean number of wading birds per survey was greatest during the Pre-nesting and Nesting seasons, declined during Post-nesting season, and was lowest during Winter when water levels within impoundments were high. During these times, shallow habitat along the IRL shoreline provided alternative habitats for wading birds. Various measures of monthly precipitation and impoundment water level were well correlated with the numbers of wading birds observed. Numbers of nesting attempts was steady during the study period, with the exception of an unusually high number of attempts in 1990. White Ibis accounted for over half of all wading bird nests counted. The mean number of nests per colony decreased during the study period, and the number of individual colonies increased.

  12. Influences of local habitat, tributary position, and dam characteristics on fish assemblages within impoundments of low-head dams in the tributaries of the Qingyi River, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian; Li, Yu-Ru; Chu, Ling; Zhu, Ren; Wang, Li-Zhu; Yan, Yun-Zhi

    2016-03-18

    Low-head dam impoundments modify local habitat and alter fish assemblages; however, to our knowledge, the pattern of how fish assemblages in the impoundments relate to local habitat, tributary position, and dam characteristics is still unclear. We used data collected in 62 impoundments created by low-head dams in headwater streams of the Qingyi River, China, to examine relationships between fish assemblages and local habitat, tributary position, and dam characteristics. We also assessed the relative importance of the three groups of factors in determining fish species richness and composition. Linear regression models showed that fish species richness was related to substrate heterogeneity, confluence link, and dam number upstream. Redundancy analysis showed that fish species compositions were influenced by substrate heterogeneity, confluence link, dam height, dam numbers upstream and downstream. Overall, dam characteristics were more important in affecting fish species richness but less important in determining fish species composition than local habitat (i.e., substrate heterogeneity) and tributary position. Our results suggest that low-head dam may affect fish species richness in impoundments by modifying local habitat and constraining fish movement, and the relative abundances of those fish species may depend more on species habitat presences and stream size than on impoundment size and number.

  13. Contrasting fish assemblages in free-flowing and impounded tributaries to the Upper Delaware River: Implications for conserving biodiversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldigo, Barry P.; Delucia, Mari-Beth; Keller, Walter D.; Schuler, George E.; Apse, Colin D.; Moberg, Tara

    2015-01-01

    The Neversink River and the Beaver Kill in southeastern New York are major tributaries to the Delaware River, the longest undammed river east of the Mississippi. While the Beaver Kill is free flowing for its entire length, the Neversink River is subdivided by the Neversink Reservoir, which likely affects the diversity of local fish assemblages and health of aquatic ecosystems. The reservoir is an important part of the New York City waster-supply system that provides drinking water to more than 9 million people. Fish population and community data from recent quantitative surveys at comparable sites in both basins were assessed to characterize the differences between free-flowing and impounded rivers and the extent of reservoir effects to improve our capacity to define ecosystems responses that two modified flow-release programs (implemented in 2007 and 2011) should produce in the Neversink River. In general, the continuum of changes in fish assemblages which normally occur between headwaters and mouth was relatively uninterrupted in the Beaver Kill, but disrupted by the mid-basin impoundment in the Neversink River. Fish assemblages were also adversely affected at several acidified sites in the upper Neversink River, but not at most sites assessed herein. The reservoir clearly excluded diadromous species from the upper sub-basin, but it also substantially reduced community richness, diversity, and biomass at several mid-basin sites immediately downstream from the impoundment. There results will aid future attempts to determine if fish assemblages respond to more natural, yet highly regulated, flow regimes in the Neversink River. More important, knowledge gained from this study can help optimize use of valuable water resources while promoting species of special concern, such as American eel (Anguilla rostrata) and conserving biodiversity in Catskill Mountain streams.

  14. Sediment Characteristics and Configuration within the Otsego City Dam Impoundment on the Kalamazoo River, Michigan, 2001-02

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rheaume, S.J.; Hubbell, D.L.; Rachol, C.M.; Simard, A.; Fuller, L.M.

    2004-01-01

    The removal of the Otsego City Dam on the Kalamazoo River at Otsego, Mich., is under consideration by the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality and the city of Otsego. The historical discharge of papermill waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls from sources upstream from the dam has led the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to designate the Kalamazoo River from Morrow Dam near Comstock to its mouth near Saugatuck as a Federal Superfund site. The papermill waste is concentrated in organic sediment and kaolinite clay, with the sediment containing as much as 94 milligrams per kilogram polychlorinated biphenyls. This contaminated sediment could move if the dam is removed; therefore, it is necessary to estimate the characteristics and configuration of the sediment before removal plans begin. Data from augered sections and sediment cores show that the current Otsego City impoundment sediments were deposited in two distinctly different sedimentary environments: (1) lacustrine sediments consisting of organic-rich silt and clay, fine to medium sand, and some gravel deposited in a repetitive, cyclic fashion related to former stream velocities when the Otsego City impoundment water levels were 2-4 feet higher (1880s-1960s), and from downstream movement of lacustrine sediments during the removal of the upstream Plainwell Dam superstructure in the 1980s; and (2) more recent (1980s-2002) coarse-grained alluvium deposited on top of the lacustrine sediments. The volume of instream sediment contained within the Otsego City impoundment is estimated to be about 457,270 cubic yards. This estimate is based on the composite thicknesses of the lacustrine deposits and overlying alluvium, which were determined to contain PCBs, and does not include bank or flood-plain deposits.

  15. Dynamic biogeochemical controls on river pCO2 under increasing impoundment: an example of the Yangtze River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaoda; Lu, Xi Xi

    2016-04-01

    We highlight two aspects of the dynamic biogeochemical controls of riverine pCO2 in an increasingly impounded large subtropical river (the Yangtze River): the terrestrial dominance through internal respiration of terrestrially derived organic carbon and the influence of increased autotrophic activity in impounded areas on river pCO2. River pCO2 and total organic carbon (TOC) increase downstream on the mainstem (pCO2: 528-1703 μatm; TOC: 137-263 μmol/L) and vary significantly among tributaries (464-3300 μatm; TOC: 109-340 μmol/L). pCO2 displays larger spatial variability than temporal variability and is spatially correlated with river organic carbon across the river (p < 0.05-0.0001) (seasonal independent). pCO2 is also negatively correlated with dissolved oxygen (r2 = 0.46, p < 0.0001). Heterotrophic respiration of river organic carbon is concluded as an essential source of CO2 supersaturation and river heterotrophy. However, preliminary budgeting indicates that water column respiration alone cannot explain the magnitude of CO2 emission from the river, and significant benthic respiration and/or direct soil CO2 transport (e.g., via groundwater) (~ 80%) must exist to account for the discrepancy. The temporal and spatial distribution of POC compositional characteristics and chlorophyll a indicate the dominant control of terrestrial processes (e.g., organic matter transport and soil erosion) on the river pCO2 biogeochemistry, especially in warm seasons. Increased autotrophy and significant pCO2 decrease (> 60%) do occur in impounded areas (especially in nutrient-rich rivers), but the decrease is mostly temporal and regional (~ 8% of the data points are significant influenced, all from the upper reach and/or major tributaries). The paper concludes that terrestrial influence still dominate the pCO2 biogeochemistry in this increasingly intercepted and regulated river system. However, the effect of continuing river impounding and increased nutrients input is to be

  16. Downstream Influences of Beaver Impoundments on the Biogeochemical Characteristics of a New England Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, L. A.; Bubier, J.; Kyker-Snowman, T.

    2001-05-01

    A study was conducted from June to August 2000 in a tributary stream of the Quabbin Reservoir, water supply to metropolitan Boston, to investigate the effects of beaver (Castor canadensis) populations on stream water quality. Spatial and temporal trends of parameters including NH4+, NO3-, PO43-, DOC, dissolved oxygen, pH and specific conductivity in the water column were examined in three branches of the same stream. Two of the branches had varying levels of impoundment by beaver and the third had no recent history of beaver alteration. Historically almost every stream system in New England was altered by beaver, but populations reached almost extinction levels with hunting by early settlers. After reintroduction and elimination of natural predators, the populations are again growing, and their effects on ecosystems are coming under question. Studies have shown that beavers alter their local environment by facilitating a shift of nutrient storage from upland forest to the sediments of a pond by altering the entire ecosystems hydrologic regime. In some cases there are no differences between nutrient levels entering and exiting a pond system, but many studies have shown that beaver ponds facilitate nutrient transformations, sequester NO3- and PO43- and increase exports of NH4+ and DOC to downstream systems. Although wetland systems are generally thought to be beneficial to downstream ecosystems, it is not known to what extent beaver activities alter downstream nutrient levels. Preliminary analysis of temporal trends in nutrient concentrations show an overall increase in NO3- from the beginning of June to the end of August in Underhill Brook. There were no significant changes in DOC, little change in PO43- levels, and either no change or a decrease in specific conductivity. Between-branch comparisons showed that the least change took place in the branch unaltered by beaver, and the greatest in the branch with the most area altered by beaver. Nutrient gradients

  17. Integration of field measurements and reactive transport modelling to evaluate contaminant transport at a sulfide mine tailings impoundment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookfield, A. E.; Blowes, D. W.; Mayer, K. U.

    2006-11-01

    Over a decade of field observations including geochemical, mineralogical and hydrological information are available on the generation of acid mine drainage from the Pistol Dam region of the P-area of Inco's tailings impoundment in Copper Cliff, Ontario. This work focuses on the integration and quantitative assessment of this data set using reactive transport modeling. The results of the reactive transport simulations are in general agreement with the field observations; however, exact agreement between the field and simulated results was not the objective of this study, and was not attained. Many factors contribute to the discrepancies between the field observations and simulation results including geochemical and hydrogeological complexities and necessary model simplifications. For example, fluctuating water levels observed at the site were averaged and described using a steady state flow system. In addition, the lack of representative thermodynamic and rate expression data contributed to the discrepancies between observations and simulation results, thus further research into the applicability of laboratory-derived thermodynamic and rate expression data to field conditions could minimize these discrepancies. Despite the discrepancies between the field observations and simulated results, integrating field observations with numerical modelling of the P-area tailings impoundment allowed for a more complete understanding of what affects the complex geochemical reactions.

  18. Microcrustaceans (Branchiopoda and Copepoda) of Wetland Ponds and Impoundments on the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Adrienne E. DeBiase; Barbara E. Taylor

    2005-09-21

    The United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, contains an abundance of freshwater wetlands and impoundments. Four large impoundments, as well as several small, abandoned farm and mill ponds, and about 400 Carolina bays and other small, isolated depression wetland ponds are located within the 893 km2 area of the SRS. Crustaceans of the orders Branchiopoda and Copepoda are nearly ubiquitous in these water bodies. Although small in size, these organisms are often very abundant. They consequently play an important trophic role in freshwater food webs supporting fish, larval salamanders, larval insects, and numerous other animals, aquatic and terrestrial. This report provides an introduction to the free-living microcrustaceans of lentic water bodies on the SRS and a comprehensive list of species known to occur there. Occurrence patterns are summarized from three extensive survey studies, supplemented with other published and unpublished records. In lieu of a key, we provide a guide to taxonomic resources and notes on undescribed species. Taxa covered include the orders Cladocera, Anostraca, Laevicaudata, and Spinicaudata of the Subclass Branchiopoda and the Superorders Calanoida and Cyclopoida of Subclass Copepoda. Microcrustaceans of the Superorder Harpacticoida of the Subclass Copepoda and Subclass Ostracoda are also often present in lentic water bodies. They are excluded from this report because they have not received much study at the species level on the SRS.

  19. A Risk Assessment Approach to Manage Inundation of Elseya albagula Nests in Impounded Waters: A Win-Win Situation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDougall, A. J.; Espinoza, T.; Hollier, C.; Limpus, D. J.; Limpus, C. J.

    2015-03-01

    A risk assessment process was used to trial the impact of potential new operating rules on the frequency of nest inundation for the White-throated snapping turtle, Elseya albagula, in the impounded waters of the Burnett River, Queensland, Australia. The proposed operating rules would increase the barrage storage level during the turtle nesting season (May-July) and then would be allowed to reduce to a lower level for incubation for the rest of the year. These proposed operating rules reduce rates of nest inundation by altering water levels in the Ben Anderson Barrage impoundment of the Burnett River. The rules operate throughout the turtle reproductive period and concomitantly improve stability of littoral habitat and fishway operation. Additionally, the proposed rules are expected to have positive socio-economic benefits within the region. While regulated water resources will inherently have a number of negative environmental implications, these potential new operating rules have the capacity to benefit the environment while managing resources in a more sustainable manner. The operating rules have now been enacted in subordinate legislation and require the operator to maintain water levels to minimize turtle nest inundation.

  20. Integration of field measurements and reactive transport modelling to evaluate contaminant transport at a sulfide mine tailings impoundment.

    PubMed

    Brookfield, A E; Blowes, D W; Mayer, K U

    2006-11-20

    Over a decade of field observations including geochemical, mineralogical and hydrological information are available on the generation of acid mine drainage from the Pistol Dam region of the P-area of Inco's tailings impoundment in Copper Cliff, Ontario. This work focuses on the integration and quantitative assessment of this data set using reactive transport modeling. The results of the reactive transport simulations are in general agreement with the field observations; however, exact agreement between the field and simulated results was not the objective of this study, and was not attained. Many factors contribute to the discrepancies between the field observations and simulation results including geochemical and hydrogeological complexities and necessary model simplifications. For example, fluctuating water levels observed at the site were averaged and described using a steady state flow system. In addition, the lack of representative thermodynamic and rate expression data contributed to the discrepancies between observations and simulation results, thus further research into the applicability of laboratory-derived thermodynamic and rate expression data to field conditions could minimize these discrepancies. Despite the discrepancies between the field observations and simulated results, integrating field observations with numerical modelling of the P-area tailings impoundment allowed for a more complete understanding of what affects the complex geochemical reactions. PMID:16844261

  1. Hydrologic Change during the Colonial Era of the United States: Beavers and the Energy Cost of Impoundments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. B.; Bain, D. J.; Arrigo, J. S.; Duncan, J. M.; Kumar, S.; Parolari, A.; Salant, N.; Vorosmarty, C. J.; Aloysius, N. R.; Bray, E. N.; Ruffing, C. M.; Witherell, B. B.

    2009-12-01

    Europeans colonized North America in the early 17th century with intentions ranging between long-term inhabitation and quick extraction of resources for economic gain in Europe. Whatever the intentions, the colonists relied on the landscape for resources resulting in dramatic change to the forest and fur-bearing mammal population. We demonstrate that initial exploitation of North American forest and furs caused a substantial decrease in mean water residence time (τ) between 1600 and 1800 A.D. That loss, which regionally changed from 51 to 41 days, contrasts with conventional wisdom that humans tend to diminish variability in water resources by increasing storage capacity and thus increasing τ. The loss of τ resulted from over-hunted beaver for the hat market in Europe. Analysis suggests that colonial era demographics and economics did not allow human resource allocation to impoundment construction on a level matching the historic beaver effort. However, the τ appears to have regionally increased during the 19th century, suggesting that humans eventually began replacing the water storage lost with the beaver. The analysis highlights the energy cost of impounding water, which is likely to continue to be an important factor given the increasing need for stable water resources and finite energy resources.

  2. A risk assessment approach to manage inundation of Elseya albagula nests in impounded waters: a win-win situation?

    PubMed

    McDougall, A J; Espinoza, T; Hollier, C; Limpus, D J; Limpus, C J

    2015-03-01

    A risk assessment process was used to trial the impact of potential new operating rules on the frequency of nest inundation for the White-throated snapping turtle, Elseya albagula, in the impounded waters of the Burnett River, Queensland, Australia. The proposed operating rules would increase the barrage storage level during the turtle nesting season (May-July) and then would be allowed to reduce to a lower level for incubation for the rest of the year. These proposed operating rules reduce rates of nest inundation by altering water levels in the Ben Anderson Barrage impoundment of the Burnett River. The rules operate throughout the turtle reproductive period and concomitantly improve stability of littoral habitat and fishway operation. Additionally, the proposed rules are expected to have positive socio-economic benefits within the region. While regulated water resources will inherently have a number of negative environmental implications, these potential new operating rules have the capacity to benefit the environment while managing resources in a more sustainable manner. The operating rules have now been enacted in subordinate legislation and require the operator to maintain water levels to minimize turtle nest inundation. PMID:25432451

  3. A long-term comparison of carbon sequestration rates in impounded and naturally tidal freshwater marshes along the lower Waccamaw River, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drexler, Judith Z.; Krauss, Ken W.; Sasser, M. Craig; Fuller, Christopher C.; Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Powell, Amber; Swanson, Kathleen M.; Orlando, James

    2013-01-01

    Carbon storage was compared between impounded and naturally tidal freshwater marshes along the Lower Waccamaw River in South Carolina, USA. Soil cores were collected in (1) naturally tidal, (2) moist soil (impounded, seasonally drained since ~1970), and (3) deeply flooded “treatments” (impounded, flooded to ~90 cm since ~2002). Cores were analyzed for % organic carbon, % total carbon, bulk density, and 210Pb and 137Cs for dating purposes. Carbon sequestration rates ranged from 25 to 200 g C m−2 yr−1 (moist soil), 80–435 g C m−2 yr−1 (naturally tidal), and 100–250 g C m−2 yr−1 (deeply flooded). The moist soil and naturally tidal treatments were compared over a period of 40 years. The naturally tidal treatment had significantly higher carbon storage (mean = 219 g C m−2 yr−1 vs. mean = 91 g C m−2 yr−1) and four times the vertical accretion rate (mean = 0.84 cm yr−1 vs. mean = 0.21 cm yr−1) of the moist soil treatment. The results strongly suggest that the long drainage period in moist soil management limits carbon storage over time. Managers across the National Wildlife Refuge system have an opportunity to increase carbon storage by minimizing drainage in impoundments as much as practicable.

  4. Water-quality study of Tulpehocken Creek, Berks County, Pennsylvania, prior to impoundment of Blue Marsh Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, James L.

    1977-01-01

    Blue Marsh Lake is planned as a multipurpose impoundment to be constructed on Tulpehocken Creek near Bernville, Berks County, Pennsylvania. Prior to construction, samples of water, bed material, and soil were collected throughout the impoundment site to determine concentrations of nutrients, insecticides, trace metals, suspended sediment, and bacteria. Analyses of water suggest the Tulpehocken Creek basin to be a highly fertile environment. Nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations near the proposed dam site had median values of 4.5 and 0.13 mg/L, respectively. Suspended sediment discharges average between 100 and 200 tons (90.7 to 181.4 metric tons) per day during normal flows but may exceed 10,000 tons (9,070 metric tons) per day during storm runoff. Highest yields were measured during winter and early spring. Concentrations range from 3 mg/L to more than 500 mg/L. Bed material samples contain trace quantities of aldrin, DDT, DDD, DDE, dieldrin, and chlordane. Polychlorinated biphyenyls (PCB's) ranged from 10 to 100 μg/kg. Soils at the impoundment site are of average fertility. However, the silt loam texture is ideal for attachment and growth of aquatic plants. Bacteria populations indicative of recent fecal contamination are prevalent in the major inflows to the proposed lake. Fecal Coliform exceeded the standards recommended by the Federal Water Pollution Administration Committee on Water Quality Criteria for public water supply in 29 percent of the monthly samples, and exceeded the recommended public bathing waters standard in 83 percent of the samples collected from June to September. Arsenic from an industrial waste was found in the water, suspended sediment, and bed material of Tulpehocken Creek in concentrations of 0 to 30 μg/l, 2 to 879 μg/l, and 1 to 79 μg/g, respectively. It represents a potential environmental hazard; however, the measured concentrations are less than that known to be harmful to man, fish, or wildlife, according to published water

  5. Effects of a drawdown on plant communities in a freshwater impoundment at Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, Rebecca J.; Allain, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Disturbance is an important natural process in the creation and maintenance of wetlands. Water depth manipulation and prescribed fire are two types of disturbance commonly used by humans to influence vegetation succession and composition in wetlands with the intention of improving wildlife habitat value. A 6,475-hectare (ha) impoundment was constructed in 1943 on Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge in southwest Louisiana to create freshwater wetlands as wintering waterfowl habitat. Ten years after construction of the impoundment, called Lacassine pool, was completed, refuge staff began expressing concerns about increasing emergent vegetation cover, organic matter accumulation, and decreasing area of open water within the pool. Because the presence of permanent standing water impedes actions that can address these concerns, a small impoundment within the pool where it was possible to manipulate water depth was created. The 283-ha subimpoundment called Unit D was constructed in 1989. Water was pumped from Unit D in 1990, and the unit was permanently reflooded about 3 years later. Four prescribed fires were applied during the drawdown. A study was initiated in 1990 to investigate the effect of the experimental drawdown on vegetation and soils in Unit D. Four plant community types were described, and cores were collected to measure the depth of the soil organic layer. A second study of Unit D was conducted in 1997, 4 years after the unit was reflooded, by using the same plots and similar sampling methods. This report presents an analysis and synthesis of the data from the two studies and provides an evaluation of the impact of the management techniques applied. We found that plant community characteristics often differed among the four communities and varied with time. Species richness increased in two of the communities, and total aboveground biomass increased in all four during the drawdown. These changes, however, did not persist when Unit D was reflooded; by 1997

  6. Effects of Impoundments and Land-Cover Changes on Streamflows and Selected Fish Habitat in the Upper Osage River Basin, Missouri and Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heimann, David C.; Licher, Susan S.; Schalk, Gregg K.

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Conservation to estimate the effects of existing and proposed impoundments, land-cover changes, and reported water uses on streamflows in the 5,410-square mile upper Osage River Basin. The hydrologic model Hydrologic Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) was calibrated and validated to current (1995?2004 water years) regulation and water-use conditions, and scenarios were developed to evaluate differences for the same 10-years of record under pre-settlement, and proposed impoundment conditions. Analyses included quantification of changes in the magnitude, frequency, timing, and duration of streamflows under each simulation scenario. Streamflows from the simulations were used in conjunction with known streamflow-fish habitat relations to quantify effects of altered flows on fish-habitat area at selected Marais des Cygnes and Marmaton River locations. The cumulative effects of impoundments and land-cover changes were determined to substantially alter streamflows in the upper Osage River Basin model simulations spanning pre-settlement to proposed future conditions. The degree of streamflow alteration varied between major subbasins. Streamflows in the Marais des Cygnes River Basin were altered between pre-settlement and current conditions, primarily by major impoundments, with smaller changes expected with proposed regulation. Streamflows in the Little Osage River Basin were relatively unchanged between pre-settlement and current conditions with land-cover changes (primarily the conversion of native prairies to cultivated land) affecting flows more than the few current impoundments in this basin. The current peak flows in the Marmaton River Basin generally were higher than pre-settlement or proposed scenario peak flows. Of the three major subbasins, the Marmaton River Basin is likely to be the most affected by proposed impoundments. Declines in monthly minimum streamflows

  7. The use of an aeration system to prevent thermal stratification of a freshwater impoundment and its effect on downstream fish assemblages.

    PubMed

    Miles, N G; West, R J

    2011-03-01

    Warm-water riverine fish assemblages were investigated downstream of an impoundment before and after thermal stratification and the associated cold-water pollution was prevented using an aeration system. Temperatures below the dam significantly increased after installation of the aeration system and this correlated with an increased abundance and greater number of species downstream. Overall, aeration appeared to be beneficial for both the lake (upstream) and the downstream riverine environments.

  8. Test of salt marsh as a site of production and export of fish biomass with implications for impoundment management and restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Philip W.

    2002-01-01

    Salt marshes are among the most productive ecosystems in the world, and although they are thought to enhance the productivity of open estuarine waters, the mechanism by which energy transfer occurs has been debated for decades. One possible mechanism is the transfer of saltmarsh production to estuarine waters by vagile fishes and invertebrates. Saltmarsh impoundments in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida, that have been reconnected to the estuary by culverts provide unique opportunities for studying marsh systems with respect to aquatic communities. The boundaries between salt marshes and the estuary are clearly defined by a system of dikes that confine fishes into a known area, and the exchange of aquatic organisms are restricted to culverts where they may be easily sampled. A multi-gear approach was used monthly to estimate fish standing stock, fish ingress/egress, and predation. Changes in saltmarsh fish abundance, and exchange with the estuary reflected the seasonal pattern of marsh flooding in the xv northern Indian River Lagoon system. During a six month period of marsh flooding, saltmarsh fishes had continuous access to marsh food resources. Piscivorous fishes regularly entered the marsh via creeks and ditches to prey upon marsh fishes, and piscivorous birds aggregated following major fish migrations to the marsh surface or to deep habitats. As water levels receded in winter, saltmarsh fishes concentrated into deep habitats and migration to the estuary ensued. The monthly estimates of fish standing stock, net fish ingress, and predation were used to develop a biomass budget to estimate annual production of fishes and the relative yield to predatory fish, birds, and direct migration to the estuary. Annual production of saltmarsh fishes was estimated to be 17.7 g·m-2 salt marsh, which falls within the range of previously reported values for estuarine fish communities. The relative yields were at least 21% to piscivorous fishes, 14% to piscivorous birds, and 32

  9. Geochemical characterisation of seepage and drainage water quality from two sulphide mine tailings impoundments: Acid mine drainage versus neutral mine drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heikkinen, P.M.; Raisanen, M.L.; Johnson, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    Seepage water and drainage water geochemistry (pH, EC, O2, redox, alkalinity, dissolved cations and trace metals, major anions, total element concentrations) were studied at two active sulphide mine tailings impoundments in Finland (the Hitura Ni mine and Luikonlahti Cu mine/talc processing plant). The data were used to assess the factors influencing tailings seepage quality and to identify constraints for water treatment. Changes in seepage water quality after equilibration with atmospheric conditions were evaluated based on geochemical modelling. At Luikonlahti, annual and seasonal changes were also studied. Seepage quality was largely influenced by the tailings mineralogy, and the serpentine-rich, low sulphide Hitura tailings produced neutral mine drainage with high Ni. In contrast, drainage from the high sulphide, multi-metal tailings of Luikonlahti represented typical acid mine drainage with elevated contents of Zn, Ni, Cu, and Co. Other factors affecting the seepage quality included weathering of the tailings along the seepage flow path, process water input, local hydrological settings, and structural changes in the tailings impoundment. Geochemical modelling showed that pH increased and some heavy metals were adsorbed to Fe precipitates after net alkaline waters equilibrated with the atmosphere. In the net acidic waters, pH decreased and no adsorption occurred. A combination of aerobic and anaerobic treatments is proposed for Hitura seepages to decrease the sulphate and metal loading. For Luikonlahti, prolonged monitoring of the seepage quality is suggested instead of treatment, since the water quality is still adjusting to recent modifications to the tailings impoundment.

  10. Surficial Geology of the Floor of Lake Mead (Arizona and Nevada) as Defined by Sidescan-Sonar Imagery, Lake-Floor Topography, and Post-Impoundment Sediment Thickness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twichell, D.C.; Cross, V.A.

    2009-01-01

    Sidescan-sonar imagery collected in Lake Mead during 1999-2001, a period of high lake level, has been used to map the surficial geology of the floor of this large reservoir that formed upon completion of the Hoover Dam in 1935. Four surficial geologic units were identified and mapped: rock exposures and alluvial deposits that existed prior to the formation of the lake and thin post-impoundment sediments ( 1 m) deposited since the lake formed. Exposures of rock are most extensive in the narrow, steep-sided sections of the lake, while alluvial deposits are most extensive on the gentle flanks of the broader basin sections of the lake. Post-impoundment sediment is restricted to the floors of the original river valleys that now lie below lake level. These sediments are thickest in the deltas that form at the mouths of the Colorado River and its tributaries, but cover the entire length of the valley floors of the lake. This sediment distribution is consistent with deposition from turbidity currents. Lake level has dropped more than 30 m between collection of the sidescan imagery and publication of this report. During this time, thick delta deposits have been eroded and redistributed to deeper parts of the lake by turbidity currents. While present-day post-impoundment sediment distribution should be similar to what it was in 2001, the thickness may be greater in some of the deeper parts of the lake now.

  11. Overland erosion of uranium-mill-tailings impoundments: physical processes and computational methods

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, M.H.

    1983-03-01

    The surface runoff and erosional processes of watersheds caused by rainfall-runoff are reviewed. Soil properties, topography, and rainstorm distribution are discussed with respect to their effects on soil erosion. The effects of climate and vegetation are briefly presented. Regression models and physical process simulation models are reviewed.

  12. Sulfide mineral oxidation and subsequent reactive transport of oxidation products in mine tailings impoundments: A numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderly, M. D.; Blowes, D. W.; Frind, E. O.; Ptacek, C. J.

    1996-10-01

    A versatile numerical model that couples oxygen diffusion and sulfide-mineral oxidation (PYROX) has been developed to simulate the oxidation of pyrite in the vadose zone of mine tailings. A shrinking-core oxidation model and a finite element numerical scheme are used to simulate the transport of oxygen and oxidation of pyrite grains. The rate of pyrite oxidation is assumed to be limited by the transport of oxygen to the reaction site. The model determines the spatially variable bulk diffusion coefficient for oxygen on the basis of moisture content, porosity, and temperature, all of which are variable input parameters. The model PYROX has been coupled to an existing reactive transport model (MINTRAN), which uses a finite element scheme for transport of contaminants and MINTEQA2 to solve for the equilibrium geochemistry. The reactions described by MINTRAN are subject to the local equilibrium assumption. The resulting model, MINTOX, is capable of simulating tailings impoundments where the oxidation of pyrite or pyrrhotite is causing acidic drainage and where acid neutralization and attenuation of dissolved metals can be attributed to equilibrium reactions. Because MINTOX uses realistic boundary conditions and hydrogeological properties, the potential benefits of various remediation schemes, such as moisture-retaining covers, can be quantitatively evaluated.

  13. Artificial destratification effects on nitrogen and phosphorus dynamics in a eutrophic impoundment in the northern Great Plains.

    PubMed

    Balangoda, Anusha

    2016-08-01

    To determine the influence of artificial destratification on nutrient variations in a small eutrophic impoundment, field monitoring and laboratory analyses were conducted in three consecutive summers (2010, 2011, and 2012). The impact of aeration among sampling locations and across the water column of nutrient concentrations, including total and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) and water temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO) was evaluated under aerated and non-aerated conditions. Aeration eliminated thermal stratification and DO concentrations of bottom waters increased. Nutrients including soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), total phosphorus (TP), and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations across the water column did not change significantly during aeration. Nevertheless, under aerated conditions, dissolved inorganic nutrients, TN, TP, and temperature were homogenously distributed throughout the water column as an effect of aeration. Results indicated that artificial destratification resuspended nutrients throughout the water column; however, it did not have a significant effect on nutrient concentrations in the water column, but SRP, TN, and TP concentrations did not reach to the recommended limit as needed by the North Dakota Department of Health requirements. Therefore, alternative aeration methods, for instance, hypolimnetic oxygenation or hypolimnetic aeration are recommended to control nutrient redistribution and/or further releases by existing aeration system. PMID:27418076

  14. Artificial destratification effects on nitrogen and phosphorus dynamics in a eutrophic impoundment in the northern Great Plains.

    PubMed

    Balangoda, Anusha

    2016-08-01

    To determine the influence of artificial destratification on nutrient variations in a small eutrophic impoundment, field monitoring and laboratory analyses were conducted in three consecutive summers (2010, 2011, and 2012). The impact of aeration among sampling locations and across the water column of nutrient concentrations, including total and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) and water temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO) was evaluated under aerated and non-aerated conditions. Aeration eliminated thermal stratification and DO concentrations of bottom waters increased. Nutrients including soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), total phosphorus (TP), and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations across the water column did not change significantly during aeration. Nevertheless, under aerated conditions, dissolved inorganic nutrients, TN, TP, and temperature were homogenously distributed throughout the water column as an effect of aeration. Results indicated that artificial destratification resuspended nutrients throughout the water column; however, it did not have a significant effect on nutrient concentrations in the water column, but SRP, TN, and TP concentrations did not reach to the recommended limit as needed by the North Dakota Department of Health requirements. Therefore, alternative aeration methods, for instance, hypolimnetic oxygenation or hypolimnetic aeration are recommended to control nutrient redistribution and/or further releases by existing aeration system.

  15. Variation in prey selection of a piscivorous fish after the impoundment of a neotropical reservoir: prey size and type.

    PubMed

    Cantanhêde, G; Fugi, R; Hahn, N S

    2009-07-01

    The relative abundance and size of prey fish in the stomachs of the predator Acestrorhynchus pantaneiro were compared with those recorded in the field to estimate prey selection. Fish samples were taken monthly in the Manso Reservoir (State of Mato Grosso, Brazil) immediately after the impoundment, from March 2000 to February 2001 (period I) and from March 2003 to February 2004 (period II). In period I, the small relative dominance of the prey in the environment seemed to have lead to random foraging. In period II, however, when the forage fish Moenkhausia dichroura was dominant in the environment, the predator shifted its diet, foraging mainly on this prey. Species with short relative body depth were positively selected. The prey size classes between 30 and 49 mm, and 50 and 69 mm standard length (L(S)) were the most abundant in the environment. Small prey were predominantly selected by A. pantaneiro. Even when a given prey or prey size was predominant in the environment, A. pantaneiro was a selective predator and maintained its preferences associated to prey type and L(S), although it consumed the most abundant resource. PMID:20738483

  16. Differences in the dynamics and potential production of impounded and unimpounded white sturgeon populations in the lower Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Beamesderfer, R.C.P.; Rien, T.A.; Nigro, A.A.

    1995-11-01

    White sturgeons Acipenser transmontanus were sampled in three lower Columbia River reservoirs from 1987 to 1991 to describe population dynamics, the ability of these stocks to sustain harvest, and differences among reservoir and unimpounded populations. Significant differences were observed among reservoirs in white sturgeon abundance, biomass, size composition, sex ratio, size of females at maturity, growth rate, condition factor, and rate of exploitation. No differences among reservoirs were detected in fecundity, natural mortality rate, or longevity, in part because of sampling difficulties. Recruitment rates and densities in reservoirs were inversely correlated with growth rate, condition factor, and size of females at maturity. Differences in population dynamics resulted in substantial differences in sustainable yields. Maximum yields per recruit were predicted at annual exploitation rates between 5 and 15%. Most characteristics of reservoir populations were less than or equal to optima reported for the unimpounded lower river; as a result, yield per recruit, reproductive potential per recruit, and the number of recruits were less in reservoirs than in the unimpounded river. Comparisons with pristine standing stocks suggest that the unimpounded river may approximate preimpoundment conditions for white sturgeon. We conclude that potential yield from impounded populations has been reduced by dam construction, which restricts populations to river segments that may not include conditions optimal for all life stages. Alternatives for enchancement of reservoir populations might include improved passage at dams, increased spring flow to improve spawning success, transplants from productive populations, hatchery supplementation, and more intensive harvest management. 54 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Changes in the fish community of the Kpong Headpond, lower Volta River, Ghana after 25 years of impoundment.

    PubMed

    Quarcoopome, Theodore; Amevenku, Francis; Ofori-Danson, Patrick

    2011-12-01

    The Kpong Headpond was the second created on the Volta River after Akosombo Dam, primarily as a source of hydroelectric power generation and potable water supply, and additionally, it has supported some fish production in Ghana since impoundment. The changes in fish community of the Kpong Headpond were studied to provide baseline information for strategies formulation to support the socio-economic development of the reservoir. The study identified changes in the fish community of the reservoir by comparing occurrence, composition, relative abundance and relative importance estimates of fish species, families and trophic groups, from available previous studies in the reservoir. From the collated information all fishes identified in the reservoir were categorised based on occurrence and importance as disappeared, appeared, permanent, declined or important, to show current status. The results indicated that the fish community has experienced a shift in the composition and relative abundance of important species, families and trophic groups in terms of number and weight, while remaining ecologically balanced. Representatives of the families Osteoglossidae, Centropomidae and Characidae have declined while representatives of the families Claroteidae, Cyprinidae and Cichlidae have increased. The aufwuch-detritus and herbivores declined while semi-pelagic omnivores increased resulting in a shift in dominance to benthic and semi pelagic omnivores. The appearance of five species and the disappearance of 25 others indicated a dynamic restructuring of the fish community in the reservoir, as expected. Enforcement of fishing regulations including the use of appropriate gear and fishing methods, fishery access control, promotion of culture-based fisheries and improvement in fisher education are recommended topics for sustainable fisheries in the reservoir. PMID:22208085

  18. Changes in the fish community of the Kpong Headpond, lower Volta River, Ghana after 25 years of impoundment.

    PubMed

    Quarcoopome, Theodore; Amevenku, Francis; Ofori-Danson, Patrick

    2011-12-01

    The Kpong Headpond was the second created on the Volta River after Akosombo Dam, primarily as a source of hydroelectric power generation and potable water supply, and additionally, it has supported some fish production in Ghana since impoundment. The changes in fish community of the Kpong Headpond were studied to provide baseline information for strategies formulation to support the socio-economic development of the reservoir. The study identified changes in the fish community of the reservoir by comparing occurrence, composition, relative abundance and relative importance estimates of fish species, families and trophic groups, from available previous studies in the reservoir. From the collated information all fishes identified in the reservoir were categorised based on occurrence and importance as disappeared, appeared, permanent, declined or important, to show current status. The results indicated that the fish community has experienced a shift in the composition and relative abundance of important species, families and trophic groups in terms of number and weight, while remaining ecologically balanced. Representatives of the families Osteoglossidae, Centropomidae and Characidae have declined while representatives of the families Claroteidae, Cyprinidae and Cichlidae have increased. The aufwuch-detritus and herbivores declined while semi-pelagic omnivores increased resulting in a shift in dominance to benthic and semi pelagic omnivores. The appearance of five species and the disappearance of 25 others indicated a dynamic restructuring of the fish community in the reservoir, as expected. Enforcement of fishing regulations including the use of appropriate gear and fishing methods, fishery access control, promotion of culture-based fisheries and improvement in fisher education are recommended topics for sustainable fisheries in the reservoir.

  19. Sulfide oxidation and acid mine drainage formation within two active tailings impoundments in the Golden Quadrangle of the Apuseni Mountains, Romania.

    PubMed

    Sima, Mihaela; Dold, Bernhard; Frei, Linda; Senila, Marin; Balteanu, Dan; Zobrist, Jurg

    2011-05-30

    Sulfidic mine tailings have to be classified as one of the major source of hazardous materials leading to water contamination. This study highlights the processes leading to sulfide oxidation and acid mine drainage (AMD) formation in the active stage of two tailings impoundments located in the southern part of the Apuseni Mountains, in Romania, a well-known region for its long-term gold-silver and metal mining activity. Sampling was undertaken when both impoundments were still in operation in order to assess their actual stage of oxidation and long-term behavior in terms of the potential for acid mine drainage generation. Both tailings have high potential for AMD formation (2.5 and 3.7 wt.% of pyrite equivalent, respectively) with lesser amount of carbonates (5.6 and 3.6 wt.% of calcite equivalent) as neutralization potential (ABA=-55.6 and -85.1 tCaCO(3)/1000 t ) and showed clear signs of sulfide oxidation yet during operation. Sequential extraction results indicate a stronger enrichment and mobility of elements in the oxidized tailings: Fe as Fe(III) oxy-hydroxides and oxides (transformation from sulfide minerals, leaching in oxidation zone), Ca mainly in water soluble and exchangeable form where gypsum and calcite are dissolved and higher mobility of Cu for Ribita and Pb for Mialu. Two processes leading to the formation of mine drainage at this stage could be highlighted (1) a neutral Fe(II) plume forming in the impoundment with ferrihydrite precipitation at its outcrop and (2) acid mine drainage seeping in the unsaturated zone of the active dam, leading to the formation of schwertmannite at its outcrop. PMID:21316846

  20. Dynamic biogeochemical controls on river pCO2 and recent changes under aggravating river impoundment: An example of the subtropical Yangtze River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaoda; Lu, Xi Xi; Xia, Xinghui; Zhang, Shurong; Ran, Lishan; Yang, Xiankun; Liu, Ting

    2016-06-01

    This paper highlights two aspects of the dynamic biogeochemical controls of riverine pCO2 in an increasingly impounded large subtropical river (the Yangtze): the terrestrial dominance through internal respiration of land-derived organic carbon and the influence of increased autotrophic activity in impounded areas on river pCO2. River pCO2 and total organic carbon (TOC) increase downstream on the main stem (pCO2: 528-1703 µatm; TOC: 137-263 µmol/L) and vary significantly among tributaries (464-3300 µatm; TOC: 109-340 µmol/L). pCO2 displays larger spatial variability than temporal variability and is spatially correlated with river organic carbon across the river (p < 0.05-0.0001, seasonally independent). pCO2 is also negatively correlated with dissolved oxygen (r2 = 0.46, p < 0.0001). Respiration of allochthonous organic carbon in water column is concluded as an essential source of CO2 supersaturation and river heterotrophy. However, significant benthic respiration and/or direct soil CO2 transport (e.g., via groundwater, ~80%) exist at the same time. The temporal and spatial distribution of POC compositional characteristics and chlorophyll a indicate the dominant control of terrestrial processes (e.g., organic matter transport and soil erosion) on the river pCO2 biogeochemistry, especially in warm seasons. Increased autotrophy and significant pCO2 decrease (>60%) do occur in impounded areas (especially in nutrient-rich rivers), but the decrease is mostly temporal and regional (~8% of the data points are significantly influenced, all from the upper reach and/or major tributaries). The paper concludes that terrestrial influence still dominates the pCO2 biogeochemistry in this increasingly intercepted and regulated river system.

  1. Hydrologic and water-quality data for streams and impoundments in the Coteau des Prairies-Upper Minnesota River basin, 1979-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, C.J.; Payne, G.A.; Tornes, L.H.

    1990-01-01

    All data collected during the study are given in tables 4-13 of this report. The tables list mean-daily stream discharge, mean-daily suspendedsediment concentration, daily suspended-sediment discharge, results of waterquality analyses, and bed-material particle-size analyses at stream sites. The tables also list information on pool stage, water temperature, and transparency, on dissolved-oxygen, chlorophyll a, phytoplankton, and nutrient concentrations, and on chemical and partical-size analyses of bed material at impoundment sites.

  2. Age, growth, and maturity of thirteen species of fish from Lake Oahe during the early years of impoundment, 1963-68

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, William R.

    1974-01-01

    The body-scale relation, calculated length, length-weight relation, age at maturity, and sex ratio of 13 major species collected in Lake Oahe from 1963 to 1968 with trap nets and bottom trawls are described. Eight species grew at a faster rate than has been recorded in other Missouri River reservoirs: goldeye (Hiodon alosoides), bigmouth buffalo (Ictiobus cyprinellus), smallmouth buffalo (Ictiobus bubalus), white bass (Morone chrysops), black crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus), white crappie (Pomoxis annularis), walleye (Stizostedion vitreum vitreum), and freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens). Four species grew at rates similar to those recorded from other Missouri River reservoirs: carp (Cyprinus carpio), yellow perch (Perca flavescens), northern pike (Esox lucius), and sauger (Stizostedion canadense). One species -- river carpsucker (Carpiodes carpio) -- grew slower than in other waters. Growth generally was excellent for all major species in the early years of impoundment (1959-62) but then declined. Species showing the greatest decline in growth from 1962 to 1967 were goldeye, bigmouth buffalo, sauger, walleye, northern pike, and freshwater drum. As growth rate decreased, age at sexual maturity increased for northern pike, carp, river carpsucker, bigmouth buffalo, and freshwater drum. Although inundation of new lands was associated with rapid growth of fishes in the early years of impoundment, water level fluctuations during the growing season had no discernible effect on growth rate. Increased average reservoir depth, which decreased the amount of littoral area, was associated with decreased fish growth.

  3. Hydrologic considerations for estimation of storage-capacity requirements of impounding and side-channel reservoirs for water supply in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koltun, G.F.

    2001-01-01

    This report provides data and methods to aid in the hydrologic design or evaluation of impounding reservoirs and side-channel reservoirs used for water supply in Ohio. Data from 117 streamflow-gaging stations throughout Ohio were analyzed by means of nonsequential-mass-curve-analysis techniques to develop relations between storage requirements, water demand, duration, and frequency. Information also is provided on minimum runoff for selected durations and frequencies. Systematic record lengths for the streamflow-gaging stations ranged from about 10 to 75 years; however, in many cases, additional streamflow record was synthesized. For impounding reservoirs, families of curves are provided to facilitate the estimation of storage requirements as a function of demand and the ratio of the 7-day, 2-year low flow to the mean annual flow. Information is provided with which to evaluate separately the effects of evaporation on storage requirements. Comparisons of storage requirements for impounding reservoirs determined by nonsequential-mass-curve-analysis techniques with storage requirements determined by annual-mass-curve techniques that employ probability routing to account for carryover-storage requirements indicate that large differences in computed required storages can result from the two methods, particularly for conditions where demand cannot be met from within-year storage. For side-channel reservoirs, tables of demand-storage-frequency information are provided for a primary pump relation consisting of one variable-speed pump with a pumping capacity that ranges from 0.1 to 20 times demand. Tables of adjustment ratios are provided to facilitate determination of storage requirements for 19 other pump sets consisting of assorted combinations of fixed-speed pumps or variable-speed pumps with aggregate pumping capacities smaller than or equal to the primary pump relation. The effects of evaporation on side-channel reservoir storage requirements are incorporated into the

  4. Effects of dams in river networks on fish assemblages in non-impoundment sections of rivers in Michigan and Wisconsin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, Jana S.; Lizhu Wang,; Infante, Dana M.; Lyons, John D.; Arthur Cooper,

    2011-01-01

    Regional assessment of cumulative impacts of dams on riverine fish assemblages provides resource managers essential information for dam operation, potential dam removal, river health assessment and overall ecosystem management. Such an assessment is challenging because characteristics of fish assemblages are not only affected by dams, but also influenced by natural variation and human-induced modification (in addition to dams) in thermal and flow regimes, physicochemical habitats and biological assemblages. This study evaluated the impacts of dams on river fish assemblages in the non-impoundment sections of rivers in the states of Michigan and Wisconsin using multiple fish assemblage indicators and multiple approaches to distinguish the influences of dams from those of other natural and human-induced factors. We found that environmental factors that influence fish assemblages in addition to dams should be incorporated when evaluating regional effects of dams on fish assemblages. Without considering such co-influential factors, the evaluation is inadequate and potentially misleading. The role of dams alone in determining fish assemblages at a regional spatial scale is relatively small (explained less than 20% of variance) compared with the other environmental factors, such as river size, flow and thermal regimes and land uses jointly. However, our results do demonstrate that downstream and upstream dams can substantially modify fish assemblages in the non-impoundment sections of rivers. After excluding river size and land-use influences, our results clearly demonstrate that dams have significant impacts on fish biotic-integrity and habitat-and-social-preference indicators. The influences of the upstream dams, downstream dams, distance to dams, and dam density differ among the fish indicators, which have different implications for maintaining river biotic integrity, protecting biodiversity and managing fisheries.

  5. The role of run-of-river impoundments in CO2 and CH4 emissions from floodplains of the Delaware Piedmont, Christina River Basin Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, A.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Vargas, R.

    2014-12-01

    There is strong interest in understanding how run-of-river impoundments affect streams and their floodplains. Most recent work has focused on the fate of sediment within these dammed systems both past and current, the geomorphic impacts associated with sediment, and issues associated with removing run-of-the-river dams. Here, we assess how run-of-river impoundments alter the floodplain effluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4). We sampled two pairs of floodplains on the Red Clay Creek (140 km2) located in the Christina River Basin Critical Zone Observatory. The floodplain pairs were centered on a current and a former location of a run-of-river dam (one floodplain upstream, one downstream of dam location). Each floodplain was subjected to a suite of measurements that included bi-weekly gas flux (CO2, CH4, and H2O), bi-weekly soil moisture and temperature, monthly biomass sampling, C/N ratio sampling from O and A horizons, and cores that constrain the total organic carbon and nitrogen at depth as well as provide a description of the stratigraphy. Preliminary findings show that all floodplains are sources of CH4 (0.18 - 1.12 nmol m-2s-1) and CO2 (0.42 - 3.12 µmol m-2s-1). Despite temporal variability, the upstream floodplains produce more CH4 and CO2 than downstream floodplains. Our results may suggest that run-of-the-river dams enhance release of carbon from floodplains into the atmosphere.

  6. Effects of dams in river networks on fish assemblages in non-impoundment sections of rivers in Michigan and Wisconsin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, L.; Infante, D.; Lyons, J.; Stewart, J.; Cooper, A.

    2011-01-01

    Regional assessment of cumulative impacts of dams on riverine fish assemblages provides resource managers essential information for dam operation, potential dam removal, river health assessment and overall ecosystem management. Such an assessment is challenging because characteristics of fish assemblages are not only affected by dams, but also influenced by natural variation and human-induced modification (in addition to dams) in thermal and flow regimes, physicochemical habitats and biological assemblages. This study evaluated the impacts of dams on river fish assemblages in the non-impoundment sections of rivers in the states of Michigan and Wisconsin using multiple fish assemblage indicators and multiple approaches to distinguish the influences of dams from those of other natural and human-induced factors. We found that environmental factors that influence fish assemblages in addition to dams should be incorporated when evaluating regional effects of dams on fish assemblages. Without considering such co-influential factors, the evaluation is inadequate and potentially misleading. The role of dams alone in determining fish assemblages at a regional spatial scale is relatively small (explained less than 20% of variance) compared with the other environmental factors, such as river size, flow and thermal regimes and land uses jointly. However, our results do demonstrate that downstream and upstream dams can substantially modify fish assemblages in the non-impoundment sections of rivers. After excluding river size and land-use influences, our results clearly demonstrate that dams have significant impacts on fish biotic-integrity and habitat-and-social-preference indicators. The influences of the upstream dams, downstream dams, distance to dams, and dam density differ among the fish indicators, which have different implications for maintaining river biotic integrity, protecting biodiversity and managing fisheries. ?? 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Holocene Record of Major and Trace Components in the Sediments of an Urban Impoundment on the Mississippi River: Lake Pepin, Minnesota and Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, Walter E.

    2009-01-01

    Lake Pepin is a natural impoundment formed by damming of the Mississippi River about 9,180 radiocarbon years ago (19,600 calendar years) by an alluvial fan deposited by the Chippewa River, a tributary of the Mississippi in Wisconsin. Unique among 26 Mississippi River impoundments, Lake Pepin has stratigraphically preserved Holocene materials, including pollutants, that have been transported down the Mississippi. This natural Holocene record can then be compared to changes that have occurred since European settlement (ca. AD 1830), and since enactment of clean air and water legislation. The most immediate response to settlement in the sediments of Lake Pepin was an increase in bulk-sediment accumulation rate. This was accompanied by gradual increases in concentrations of phosphorus (P), and organic carbon (OC), followed by dramatic increases in these elements beginning about 1940. The increase in P was far greater than any of the minor fluctuations in P that occurred throughout the Holocene, but the increase in OC was comparable to an increase in OC that occurred in the mid-Holocene. The concentrations of several metals (for example, cadmium [Cd], and lead [Pb]) also are elevated in recent sediments. Increased Cd concentrations lasted only about two decades during the industrial era between World War II and the enactment of clean water standards in the 1970s. Increased Pb emissions, on the other hand, occurred over more than 100 years, first from burning of coal and smelting of lead ores, and then, beginning in the 1930s, burning of leaded gasoline. Concentrations of Pb in the sediments of Lake Pepin decreased to about two times preindustrial levels within a decade of enactment of unleaded gasoline restrictions.

  8. Nutrient characteristics in the Yangtze River Estuary and the adjacent East China Sea before and after impoundment of the Three Gorges Dam.

    PubMed

    Chai, Chao; Yu, Zhiming; Shen, Zhiliang; Song, Xiuxian; Cao, Xihua; Yao, Yun

    2009-08-01

    From November 2002 to 2006, five cruises were undertaken in the Yangtze River Estuary and the adjacent East China Sea to compare the nutrient concentrations, ratios and potential nutrient limitation of phytoplankton growth before and after impoundment (June 2003) of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD). Concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and total nitrogen (TN) exhibited an increasing trend from 2002 to 2006. In contrast, total phosphorus (TP) concentration exhibited a decreasing trend. The mean concentrations of DIN, SRP, and TN in the total study area increased from 21.4 microM, 0.9 microM, and 41.8 microM in 2002 to 37.5 microM, 1.3 microM, and 82.2 microM in 2006, respectively, while TP decreased from 2.1 microM to 1.7 microM. The concentration of dissolved reactive silica (DRSi) had no major fluctuations and the differences were not significant. The mean concentration of DRSi in the total study area ranged from 52.5 to 92.3 microM. The Si:N ratio decreased significantly from 2.7 in 2002 to 1.3 in 2006, while TN:TP ratio increased from 22.1 to 80.3. The area of potential P limitation of phytoplankton growth expanded after 2003 and potential Si limitation appeared in 2005 and 2006. Potential P limitation mainly occurred in an area of salinity less than 30 after 2003, while potential Si limitation occurred where the salinity was greater than 30. By comparison with historical data, the concentrations of nitrate and SRP in this upper estuary during November 1980-2006 increased obviously after impoundment of TGD but DRSi decreased. Meanwhile, the ratios of N:P, Si:N and Si:P decreased obviously.

  9. Simulated effects of existing and proposed surface-water impoundments and gas-well pads on streamflow and suspended sediment in the Cypress Creek watershed, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Rheannon M.

    2014-01-01

    The Arkansas Natural Resources Commission and the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality list suspended sediment from “poor pastures” as a primary source of nonpoint-source pollution in north-central Arkansas, but unpaved (gravel) roads are another important source of suspended sediment. Because of the high sediment-loading rates associated with gravel roads and the large amount of pasture within the watershed, the factors most responsible for suspended sediment within the Cypress Creek watershed are likely associated more with the pastureland and gravel roads, than factors associated with gas-well pads/pipelines.

  10. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1--March 31, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the progress of eight Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988. The facilities represented by the eight projects are the 300 Area Process trenches, 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds, Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill, 216-A-36B Crib, 1301-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility, 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility, and 1324-N/NA Surface Impoundment and Percolation Ponds. The latter four projects are included in this series of quarterly reports for the first time. This report is the seventh in a series of periodic status reports; the first six cover the period from May 1, 1986, through December 31, 1987 (PNL 1986; 1987a, b, c, d; 1988a). This report satisfies the requirements of Section 17B(3) of the Consent Agreement and Compliance Order issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (1986a) to the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office. 13 refs., 19 figs., 24 tabs.

  11. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    SciTech Connect

    Fruland, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-02-01

    This report describes the progress of 12 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988. During this quarter, field activities at the 300 Area process trenches, the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, the 1324-N/NA Surface Impoundment and Percolation Ponds, the 1301-N and 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities, and the 216-A-36B Crib consisted of ground-water sampling and analyses, and water-level monitoring. The 200 Area Low-Level Burial Grounds section includes well development data, sediment analysis, and water-level measurements. Ground-water sampling was begun at this site, and results will be included in next quarter's report. Twelve new wells were installed during the quarter, two at the 216-A-29 Ditch, size at the 216-A-10 Crib, and four at the 216-B-3 Pond. Preliminary characterization data for these new wells are included in this report. Driller's logs and other drilling and site characterization data will be provided in the next quarterly report. At the 2101-M Pond, construction was completed on four wells, and initial ground-water samples were taken. The drilling logs, geophysical logging data, and as-built diagrams are included in this report in Volume 2. 19 refs., 24 figs., 39 tabs.

  12. Methane and carbon dioxide concentrations in sediments and diffusive fluxes at the sediment-water interface from three tropical systems in Brazil during the pre-impoundment phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, D. S.; Sidagis-Galli, C.; Grimberg, D. E.; Blanco, F. D.; Rodrigues-Filho, J. L.; Tundisi, J. G.; Matsumura-Tundisi, T.; Tundisi, J. E.; Cimbleris, A. C.; Damázio, J. M.; Project Balcar

    2013-05-01

    The concentrations of methane and carbon dioxide in the sediments pore water were quantified by gas chromatography in three hydroelectric reservoirs under construction during the pre-impoundment phase. Sediment sampling was performed in ten to twelve stations in each river by a Kajak-Brinkhurst corer coupled to a 3 m long aluminum rod in four seasons. The theoretical diffusive fluxes of these gases at the sediment-water interface were also calculated using the Fick's first law of diffusion. The mean annual concentration and diffusive flux of methane were highest in the sediments of the Xingu River (12.71 ± 3.03 mmol CH4 m-2 and 3.84 ± 0.91 mmol CH4 m-2 d-1), located in the Amazon, influenced by the presence of organic matter originating from the surrounding forest. The mean annual concentration of carbon dioxide was highest in the São Marcos River (71.36 ± 10.36 mmol CO2 m-2), located in an area of cerrado savanna, while the highest diffusive flux of carbon dioxide was observed in the Madeira River (30.23 ± 2.41 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1), which rises in the Andes Cordillera and has a very high water flow. The mean concentration and diffusive flux of carbon dioxide in the three studied systems were much higher (64-98%) in comparison with the methane, influenced by the oxic condition in these lotic systems. Nevertheless, the present study shows that the sediments of these systems, especially in the Xingu River, have significant amount of methane dissolved in the pore water which is being diffused to the overlying water. The information obtained in this study during the pre-filling phase will be important for the calculation of net flows of greenhouse gases after the impoundment of these future reservoirs. This study is part of the Strategic Project "Monitoring Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in Hydroelectric Reservoirs" - Call 099/2008 of the Brazilian Agency of Electric Energy (ANEEL) and sponsored by ELETRONORTE, FURNAS and CHESF.

  13. Effects of water temperature and discharge on natural reproduction time of the Chinese sturgeon, Acipenser sinensis, in the Yangtze River, China and impacts of the impoundment of the Three Gorges Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Lin, Pengcheng; Li, Mingzheng; Duan, Zhonghua; Liu, Huanzhang

    2014-05-01

    Chinese sturgeon, Acipenser sinensis, is a critically endangered anadromous fish species spawning in the Yangtze River of China during October and November. In this study, we analyzed the effects of hydrological factors, such as water temperature and discharge, on the natural reproduction time of the Chinese sturgeon and evaluated the impact of the impoundment of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) based on our survey data from 1998 to 2011. The results showed that the first spawning dates were significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with the date of water temperature reaching 20°C (20°C WT dates), October mean discharge (Oct. discharge), and the discharge change from October to November (Oct-Nov Δdischarge). Regression analysis suggested that one day delay of 20°C WT dates could postpone the first spawning date by 0.673 days. A discharge increase of 1000 m(3)s(-1) in October could bring forward the first spawning date by two days. Our results also indicated that the impoundment of the TGR had delayed the first spawning time due to water temperature lag and flow regulation. We suggest the following ecological regulations in order to facilitate conservation of the Chinese sturgeon: to eliminate water temperature lag by regulating water temperature downstream of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD), to enhance water discharge downstream in October, and to complete impoundment before October.

  14. Effects of water temperature and discharge on natural reproduction time of the Chinese sturgeon, Acipenser sinensis, in the Yangtze River, China and impacts of the impoundment of the Three Gorges Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Lin, Pengcheng; Li, Mingzheng; Duan, Zhonghua; Liu, Huanzhang

    2014-05-01

    Chinese sturgeon, Acipenser sinensis, is a critically endangered anadromous fish species spawning in the Yangtze River of China during October and November. In this study, we analyzed the effects of hydrological factors, such as water temperature and discharge, on the natural reproduction time of the Chinese sturgeon and evaluated the impact of the impoundment of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) based on our survey data from 1998 to 2011. The results showed that the first spawning dates were significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with the date of water temperature reaching 20°C (20°C WT dates), October mean discharge (Oct. discharge), and the discharge change from October to November (Oct-Nov Δdischarge). Regression analysis suggested that one day delay of 20°C WT dates could postpone the first spawning date by 0.673 days. A discharge increase of 1000 m(3)s(-1) in October could bring forward the first spawning date by two days. Our results also indicated that the impoundment of the TGR had delayed the first spawning time due to water temperature lag and flow regulation. We suggest the following ecological regulations in order to facilitate conservation of the Chinese sturgeon: to eliminate water temperature lag by regulating water temperature downstream of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD), to enhance water discharge downstream in October, and to complete impoundment before October. PMID:24832899

  15. The impact of a catastrophic mine tailings impoundment spill into one of North America's largest fjord lakes: Quesnel Lake, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petticrew, Ellen L.; Albers, Sam J.; Baldwin, Susan A.; Carmack, Eddy C.; Déry, Stephen J.; Gantner, Nikolaus; Graves, Kelly E.; Laval, Bernard; Morrison, John; Owens, Philip N.; Selbie, Daniel T.; Vagle, Svein

    2015-05-01

    On 4 August 2014, a catastrophic breach of the Mount Polley mine tailings impoundment released ~25 M m3 of tailings and water and scoured an unknown quantity of overburden into the West Basin of Quesnel Lake. We document Quesnel Lake and Quesnel River observations for 2 months postspill. Breach inflows raised Quesnel Lake by 7.7 cm, equivalent to ~21 M m3. The West Basin hypolimnion was modified immediately, exhibiting increased temperature (~5°C to 6-7.5°C), conductivity (110 to 160 μS/cm), and turbidity (<1 to 200-1000 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU)). Cooscillating seiches moved West Basin hypolimnetic water both westward and eastward contaminating the Main Basin. Postspill, high-turbidity water propagated eastward (~1 cm/s), introducing a persistent ~20 m thick layer below the thermocline and an ~30 m thick layer at the bottom. The contaminant introduction, mobilization, and bioaccumulation may pose risks to resident and anadromous fish stocks, which support recreational, commercial, and First Nations fisheries.

  16. Sulfide variation in the pore and surface waters of artificial salt-marsh ditches and a natural tidal creek

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, J.R.; Shaffer, J.; Kain, T.; Stahl, R.; Crossman, R. )

    1992-09-01

    Pore and surface water sulfide variation near artificial ditches and a natural creek are examined in salt marshes bordering the Indian River Lagoon in east-central Florida. Pore water sulfide concentrations ranged from 0 [mu]g-at l[sup [minus]1] to 1,640 [mu]g-at l[sup [minus]1]. On average, the natural creek had the lowest sulfide concentrations (mean < 1.0 [mu]g-at l[sup [minus]1]) and the perimeter ditch of a managed salt marsh impoundment the highest (436.5 [mu]g-at l[sup [minus]1]). There was a trend of increasing sulfide concentration in the summer, and sharp peaks in late fall-early winter which correspond with peak litter input into the sediments. Significant differences in sulfide concentration between sites are attributed to differences in water flow and in organic matter content. Delaying the seasonal opening of culverts (which connect impounded marshes with the lagoon) until lagoon water levels rise in fall may prevent massive fish kills that have been associated with high sulfide levels in the impoundment perimeter ditches. 35 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Temporal changes in spatial patterns of submersed macrophytes in two impounded reaches of the Upper Mississippi River, USA, 1998-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Jager, Nathan R.; Yin, Yao

    2011-01-01

    We examined temporal changes in spatial patterns of submersed aquatic macrophytes during a recent three-fold increase in macrophyte abundance and in response to the cumulative effects of management actions (island construction and water level management) and changes in regional environmental conditions (turbidity) in two navigation pools of the Upper Mississippi River, Pool 8 (managed) and Pool 13 (unmanaged). We used cross-correlograms to quantify changes in the degree and range of spatial correlation between submersed macrophytes and depth across the impounded portions of the two pools from 1998-2009. Along with increases in abundance, we observed gradual expansion of submersed macrophytes into deeper water in both pools. However, we detected no temporal change in spatial patterns in Pool 13, where the range of spatial correlation was ~ 1500-2500 m in length in the downriver direction and ~ 500-1000 m in length in the crossriver direction. We initially detected similar ranges of spatial correlation in Pool 8, but over time the range of correlation in the cross river direction increased from ~ 500 m in 1998 to ~ 2000 m by 2009. Thus, the expansion of submersed macrophytes into deeper water areas in Pool 8 appears to have occurred in the cross-river direction and led to increases in patch size and a more symmetrical patch configuration. Hence, very similar temporal changes in submersed macrophyte abundance corresponded with different diffusion dynamics and spatial patterns in the two pools. We hypothesize that management actions altered spatial patterns of depth, water flow and/or wind fetch and led to the differences in spatial patterns reported here.

  18. Tracking the monthly changes of dissolved organic matter composition in a newly constructed reservoir and its tributaries during the initial impounding period.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meilian; He, Wei; Choi, Ilhwan; Hur, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the roles of inland reservoirs becomes increasingly important with respect to global carbon cycling as well as water resource management due to the unprecedented demand for construction in recent decades. In this study, the dissolved organic matter (DOM) quantity and quality in a newly constructed dam reservoir and its tributaries were monitored monthly during the initial impounding period (July to November 2014) using a size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with online organic carbon detector (OCD). The highest values were observed in the month of August with the highest precipitation for the bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific UV absorbance (SUVA), and most of the assigned size fractions (except for biopolymers) in the tributaries, indicating that allochthonous sources of DOM were dominant in the feeding stream waters of the reservoir. The bulk DOC and high molecular weight humic substance fraction (∼1 kDa) were generally co-varied with the monthly precipitation in the tributaries, while building blocks (350-500 Da), and low molecular weight (LMW) acids and neutrals showed different trends. In a dam site, the smaller molecular fractions became more abundant during the dry season (September to November), presumably due to the in-reservoir processes such as photo- and bio-degradation. Our results also revealed that storms mobilized a large amount of highly aromatic soil-derived DOM to the reservoir. A depth profile at the dam site showed the water is well mixed up to a depth of ∼20 m. The SEC-OCD data coupled with non-metric multidimensional scaling provided a clear visualization of the spatiotemporal variations in DOM composition, which shed new light on the DOM composition formed in a newly constructed dam reservoir and also on the strategies for future water treatment options.

  19. Records of pan (floodplain wetland) sedimentation as an approach for post-hoc investigation of the hydrological impacts of dam impoundment: The Pongolo river, KwaZulu-Natal.

    PubMed

    Heath, S K; Plater, A J

    2010-07-01

    River impoundment by dams has far-reaching consequences for downstream floodplains in terms of hydrology, water quality, geomorphology, ecology and ecosystem services. With the imperative of economic development, there is the danger that potential environmental impacts are not assessed adequately or monitored appropriately. Here, an investigation of sediment composition of two pans (floodplain wetlands) in the Pongolo River floodplain, KwaZulu-Natal, downstream of the Pongolapoort dam constructed in 1974, is considered as a method for post-hoc assessment of the impacts on river hydrology, sediment supply and water quality. Bumbe and Sokhunti pans have contrasting hydrological regimes in terms of their connection to the main Pongolo channel - Bumbe is a shallow ephemeral pan and Sokhunti is a deep, perennial water body. The results of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) geochemical analysis of their sediment records over a depth of >1 m show that whilst the two pans exhibit similar sediment composition and variability in their lower part, Bumbe pan exhibits a shift toward increased fine-grained mineral supply and associated nutrient influx at a depth of c. 45 cm whilst Sokhunti pan is characterised by increased biogenic productivity at a depth of c. 26 cm due to enhanced nutrient status. The underlying cause is interpreted as a shift in hydrology to a 'post-dam' flow regime of reduced flood frequencies with more regular baseline flows which reduce the average flow velocity. In addition, Sokhunti shows a greater sensitivity to soil influx during flood events due to the nature of its 'background' of autochthonous biogenic sedimentation. The timing of the overall shift in sediment composition and the dates of the mineral inwash events are not well defined, but the potential for these wetlands as sensitive recorders of dam-induced changes in floodplain hydrology, especially those with a similar setting to Sokhunti pan, is clearly demonstrated.

  20. 40 CFR 421.11 - Specialized definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... outside slopes of the impoundment dam and the surface area between the outside edge of the impoundment dam... 30 percent of the water surface area within the impoundment dam at maximum capacity. (e) The...

  1. Geotechnical considerations in surface mine reclamation

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, A.K.

    1999-07-01

    Most attention in surface mine reclamation is given to agronomic soils and revegetation, but reclamation success depends on the geotechnical characteristics of the underlying earth. If the soil and rock that underline the surface are not stable, surface treatments lack the dependable foundation needed for them to succeed. Reclamation practioners need to understand those geotechnical considerations--material properties, structure, and processes--that affect stability. properties of rock and soil are altered by mining, and those altered materials together with water and processing waste form often-complex mixtures of materials that must be stabilized in reclamation. Surface mining alters existing landforms and creates new ones such as pit walls, spoil and waste rock piles, tailings impoundments, and earthfills. those structures need to be constructed or stabilized so that they can endure and support successful reclamation. processes that affect material properties and landforms include mechanical breakage, accelerated weathering, erosion, and mass movements. Mechanical breakage and the resulting accelerated weathering combine to change material properties, usually expressed as degraded strength, that can lead to instability of landforms. Erosion, especially that related to extreme storm events, and mass movements in the form of slop failures are the most problematic processes that must be taken into account in reclaiming mined lands. These geotechnical considerations are essential in successful reclamation, and practioners who overlook them may find their work literally sliding down a slippery slope.

  2. Investigations on the "Extreme" Microbial Methane Cycle within the Sediments of an Acidic Impoundment of the Inactive Sulfur Bank Mercury Mine: Herman Pit, Clear Lake, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.; Wei, J. H. C.; Welander, P. V.

    2014-12-01

    The inactive Sulfur Bank Mercury Mine is located in a volcanic region having geothermal flow and gas inputs into the Herman Pit impoundment. The acidic (pH 2 - 4) waters of the Herman Pit are permeated by hundreds of continuous flow gas seeps that contain CO2, H2S and CH4. We sampled one seep and found it to be composed of 95 % CO2 and 5 % CH4, in agreement with earlier measurements. Only a trace of ethane (10 - 20 ppm) was found and propane was below detection, resulting in a high CH4/C2H6 + C3H8 ratio of > 5,000, while the δ13CH4 and the δ13CO2 were respectively - 24 and - 11 per mil. Collectively, these results suggested a complex origin for the methane, being made up of a thermogenic component resulting from pyrolysis of buried organics, along with an active methanogenic portion. The relatively 12C-enriched value for the CO2 suggested a reworking of the ebullitive methane by methanotrophic bacteria. We found that dissolved methane in the collected water from 2-4 m depth was high (~ 400 µM), which would support methanotrophy in the lake's aerobic biomes. We therefore tested the ability of bottom sediments to consume methane by conducting aerobic incubations of slurried bottom sediments. Methane was removed from the headspace of live slurries, and subsequent additions of methane to the headspace over the course of 2-3 months resulted in faster removal rates suggesting a buildup of the population of methanotrophs. This activity could be transferred to an artificial medium originally devised for the cultivation of acidophilic iron oxidizing bacteria (Silverman and Lundgren, 1959; J. Bacteriol. 77: 642 - 647), suggesting the possibility of future cultivation of acidophilic methanotrophs. A successful extraction of some hopanoid compounds from the sediments was achieved, although the results were too preliminary at the time of this writing to identify any hopanoids specifically linked to methanotrophic bacteria. Further efforts to amplify functional genes for

  3. Effects of urbanization, construction activity, management practices, and impoundments on suspended-sediment transport in Johnson County, northeast Kansas, February 2006 through November 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Casey J.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Johnson County, Kansas, Stormwater Management Program, investigated the effects of urbanization, construction activity, management practices, and impoundments on suspended-sediment transport in Johnson County from February 2006 through November 2008. Streamgages and continuous turbidity sensors were operated at 15 sites within the urbanizing 57-square-mile Mill Creek Basin, and 4 sites downstream from the other largest basins (49 to 66 square miles) in Johnson County. The largest sediment yields in Johnson County were observed downstream from basins with increased construction activity. Sediment yields attributed to the largest (68 acre) active construction site in the study area were 9,300 tons per square mile in 2007 and 12,200 tons per square mile in 2008; 5 to 55 times larger than yields observed at other sampling sites. However, given erodible soils and steep slopes at this site, sediment yields were relatively small compared to the range in historic values from construction sites without erosion and sediment controls in the United States (2,300 to 140,000 tons per square mile). Downstream from this construction site, a sediment forebay and wetland were constructed in series upstream from Shawnee Mission Lake, a 120-acre reservoir within Shawnee Mission Park. Although the original intent of the sediment forebay and constructed wetland were unrelated to upstream construction, they were nonetheless evaluated in 2008 to characterize sediment removal before stream entry into the lake. The sediment forebay was estimated to reduce 33 percent of sediment transported to the lake, whereas the wetland did not appear to decrease downstream sediment transport. Comparisons of time-series data and relations between turbidity and sediment concentration indicate that larger silt-sized particles were deposited within the sediment forebay, whereas smaller silt and clay-sized sediments were transported through the wetland and

  4. Relationships of surface water, pore water, and sediment chemistry in wetlands adjacent to Great Salt Lake, Utah, and potential impacts on plant community health.

    PubMed

    Carling, Gregory T; Richards, David C; Hoven, Heidi; Miller, Theron; Fernandez, Diego P; Rudd, Abigail; Pazmino, Eddy; Johnson, William P

    2013-01-15

    We collected surface water, pore water, and sediment samples at five impounded wetlands adjacent to Great Salt Lake, Utah, during 2010 and 2011 in order to characterize pond chemistry and to compare chemistry with plant community health metrics. We also collected pore water and sediment samples along multiple transects at two sheet flow wetlands during 2011 to investigate a potential link between wetland chemistry and encroachment of invasive emergent plant species. Samples were analyzed for a suite of trace and major elements, nutrients, and relevant field parameters. The extensive sampling campaign provides a broad assessment of Great Salt Lake wetlands, including a range of conditions from reference to highly degraded. We used nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMS) to characterize the wetland sites based on the multiple parameters measured in surface water, pore water, and sediment. NMS results showed that the impounded wetlands fall along a gradient of high salinity/low trace element concentrations to low salinity/high trace element concentrations, whereas the sheet flow wetlands have both elevated salinity and high trace element concentrations, reflecting either different sources of element loading or different biogeochemical/hydrological processes operating within the wetlands. Other geochemical distinctions were found among the wetlands, including Fe-reducing conditions at two sites and sulfate-reducing conditions at the remaining sites. Plant community health metrics in the impounded wetlands showed negative correlations with specific metal concentrations in sediment (THg, Cu, Zn, Cd, Sb, Pb, Ag, Tl), and negative correlations with nutrient concentrations in surface water (nitrite, phosphate, nitrate). In the sheet flow wetlands, invasive plant species were inversely correlated with pore water salinity. These results indicate that sediment and pore water chemistry play an important role in wetland plant community health, and that monitoring and

  5. Design, construction and management of tailings storage facilities for surface disposal in China: case studies of failures.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zuoan; Yin, Guangzhi; Wang, J G; Wan, Ling; Li, Guangzhi

    2013-01-01

    Rapid development of China's economy demands for more mineral resources. At the same time, a vast quantity of mine tailings, as the waste byproduct of mining and mineral processing, is being produced in huge proportions. Tailings impoundments play an important role in the practical surface disposal of these large quantities of mining waste. Historically, tailings were relatively small in quantity and had no commercial value, thus little attention was paid to their disposal. The tailings were preferably discharged near the mines and few tailings storage facilities were constructed in mainland China. This situation has significantly changed since 2000, because the Chinese economy is growing rapidly and Chinese regulations and legislation require that tailings disposal systems must be ready before the mining operation begins. Consequently, data up to 2008 shows that more than 12 000 tailings storage facilities have been built in China. This paper reviews the history of tailings disposal in China, discusses three cases of tailings dam failures and explores failure mechanisms, and the procedures commonly used in China for planning, design, construction and management of tailings impoundments. This paper also discusses the current situation, shortcomings and key weaknesses, as well as future development trends for tailings storage facilities in China.

  6. Superamphiphobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chu, Zonglin; Seeger, Stefan

    2014-04-21

    Superamphiphobicity is an effect where surface roughness and surface chemistry combine to generate surfaces which are both superhydrophobic and superoleophobic, i.e., contact angles (θCA) greater than 150° along with low contact angle hysteresis (CAH) not only towards probing water but also for low-surface-tension 'oils'. In this review, we summarize the research on superamphiphobic surfaces, including the characterization of superamphiphobicity, different techniques towards the fabrication of surface roughness and surface modification with low-surface-energy materials as well as their functional applications.

  7. Surface gravity and deformation effects of water storage changes in China's Three Gorges Reservoir constrained by modeled results and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linsong; Chen, Chao; Zou, Rong; Du, Jinsong

    2014-09-01

    The water impoundment of China's Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), with the largest dam in the world, makes a large mass concentrated and thus influences the surface gravity field and crustal deformation field. In the TGR area, water impoundment began in 2003, and the Earth is responding to the ongoing changes of water storage. These responses can be investigated using the gravimeter and the GPS. In this paper, using a water load model derived from Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data and elastic loading Green's function, we modeled the surface gravity and displacement changes in the front area of TGR caused by water storage variations. Predictive results are compared with the measurements derived from absolute gravity by A10, continuous gravity by gPhone and GPS time series at the sites of front area in TGR. The observations agree well with the prediction spatially and temporally. The quantitative comparison and analysis indicate that the ground gravity and the vertical displacement are more sensitive to water storage changes than the horizontal displacement. The predictions from the water load model are consistent with the in situ measurements reported in this work and therefore can be utilized for water effect corrections for exacting the further signals related to lithospheric dynamics and geological hazards, such as abnormal deformation of active faults and landslides.

  8. Surface and subsurface soils at the Pond B dam: July 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, N.V.

    1999-12-03

    Pond B, 685-13G, is an inactive reactor cooling impoundment built in 1961 on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Between 1961 and 1964, Pond B received R-Reactor cooling water discharges that were contaminated with {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and plutonium. Though the pond has not been used since 1964, radionuclides from the contaminated cooling water remain in the water and in the surface sediments of the pond. The current proposal to fix and repair the Pond B dam structure includes installing a new drain system and monitoring equipment. The dam will be reinforced with additional previous material on the downstream face of the dam. The objectives of this report are to describe the sampling methodology used during the July 1998 sampling event at the downstream face of the Pond B dam and in Pond B, present the results of the sampling event, and compare, where possible, these results to related risk-based standards.

  9. Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theissen, David B.; Man, Kin F.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of surface tension is observed inmany everyday situations. For example, a slowly leaking faucet drips because the force surface tension allows the water to cling to it until a sufficient mass of water is accumulated to break free.

  10. Surface finishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinzler, J. A.; Hefferman, J. T.; Fehrenkamp, L. G.; Lee, W. S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A surface of an article adapted for relative motion with a fluid environment is finished by coating the surface with a fluid adhesive, covering the adhesive with a sheet of flexible film material under tension on the film material whereby the tensioned film material is bonded to the surface by the adhesive.

  11. Water-quality conditions of inflow, outflow, and impounded water at Rathbun Reservoir, Iowa, Clinton and Pomona Lakes, Kansas, and Harlan County Reservoir, Nebraska, May through August 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ziegler, A.C.; Rasmussen, P.P.; Carlson, M.D.; Hargadine, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    During May through August 1993, water-quality samples were collected twice from selected sites in Rathbun Reservoir, Iowa, Clinton and Pomona Lakes, Kansas, and Harlan County Reservoir, Nebraska. Samples were analyzed for selected physical and chemical properties, bacteria, major ions, nutrients, selected metals, total organic carbon, selected herbicides, and chlorophyll-a and -b. During May through August 1993, precipitation at all four reservoirs exceeded mean precipitation at nearby long-term precipitation gages; precipitation ranged from 7.76 inches above the long-term mean at Pomona Lake to 12.62 inches above the long-term mean at Rathbun Reservoir. Reservoir water-surface elevations exceeded flood-pool elevation by 4 feet in Clinton Lake, by 19 feet in Pomona Lake, and by 2 feet in Harlan County Reservoir in July. Thermal stratification of water occurred at one site in Rathbun Reservoir in August, at two sites in Clinton Lake in May, at one site in Pomona Lake in June, and at one site in Harlan County Reservoir in June. Total triazine herbicide concentrations in water samples from all four reservoirs ranged from 0.2 to 19 micrograms per liter and were largest water samples from Rathbun Reservoir in June. Concen- trations of atrazine exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Maximum Contaminant Level of 3.0 micrograms per liter for drinking water in at least one sample each from Rathbun Reservoir, Clinton Lake, and Pomona Lake. Concentrations of cyanazine exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Maximum Contaminant Level of 1.0 microgram per liter in water samples from Rathbun Reservoir.

  12. Investigations on the "Extreme" Microbial Arsenic Cycle within the Sediments of an Acidic Impoundment of the Former Sulfur Bank Mercury Mine: Herman Pit, Clear Lake, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J. S.; Hoeft McCann, S. E.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Stoneburner, B.; Saltikov, C.; Oremland, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    The involvement of prokaryotes in the redox reactions of arsenic occurring between this element's +5 [arsenate; As(V)] and + 3 [arsenite; As(III)] oxidation states has been well established. Most research has focused upon circum-neutral pH environments, such as freshwater lake and aquifer sediments, and extreme environments like hot springs and hypersaline soda lakes have also been well investigated. In contrast, little work has been conducted on acidic environments. The azure-hued, clear waters of the Herman Pit are acidic (pH 2-4), and overlie oxidized sediments that have a distinctive red/orange coloration indicative of the presence of ferrihydrites and other Fe(III) minerals. There is extensive ebullitive release of geothermal gases from the lake bottom in the form of numerous continuous-flow seeps which are composed primarily of mixtures of CO2, CH4, and H2S. We collected near-shore surface sediments with an Eckman grab, and stored the "soupy" material in filled mason jars kept at 4˚C. Initial experiments were conducted using 3:1 mixtures of lake water: sediment so as to generate dilute slurries which were amended with mM levels of electron acceptors (arsenate, nitrate, oxygen), electron donors (arsenite, acetate, lactate, hydrogen), and incubated under N2, air, or H2. Owing to the large adsorptive capacity of the Fe(III)-rich slurries, we were unable to detect As(V) or As(III) in the aqueous phase of either live or autoclaved controls, although the former consumed lactate, acetate, nitrate, or hydrogen, while the latter did not. This prompted us to conduct a series of further diluted slurry experiments using the live materials from the first as a 10 % addition to lakewater. In these experiments we observed reduction of As(V) to As(III) in anoxic slurries and that rates were enhanced by addition of electron donors (H2, acetate, or lactate). We also observed oxidation of As(III) to As(V) in oxic slurries and in anoxic slurries amended with nitrate. These

  13. Superhydrophobic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Evelyn N; McCarthy, Matthew; Enright, Ryan; Culver, James N; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-03-24

    Surfaces having a hierarchical structure--having features of both microscale and nanoscale dimensions--can exhibit superhydrophobic properties and advantageous condensation and heat transfer properties. The hierarchical surfaces can be fabricated using biological nanostructures, such as viruses as a self-assembled nanoscale template.

  14. Surface Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A simple surface treatment process is provided which offers a high performance surface for a variety of applications at low cost. This novel surface treatment, which is particularly useful for Ti-6Al-4V alloys, is achieved by forming oxides on the surface with a two-step chemical process and without mechanical abrasion. First, after solvent degreasing, sulfuric acid is used to generate a fresh titanium surface. Next, an alkaline perborate solution is used to form an oxide on the surface. This acid-followed-by-base treatment is cost effective and relatively safe to use in commercial applications. In addition, it is chromium-free, and has been successfully used with a sol-gel coating to afford a strong adhesive bond that exhibits excellent durability after the bonded specimens have been subjected to a harsh 72 hour water boil immersion. Phenylethynyl containing adhesives were used to evaluate this surface treatment with a novel coupling agent containing both trialkoxysilane and phenylethynyl groups. 8 Claims, 16 Drawing Sheets

  15. 30 CFR 817.49 - Impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the National Technical Information... steady state seepage saturation conditions, and a seismic safety factor of at least 1.2. (ii... adequate freeboard to resist overtopping by waves and by sudden increases in storage volume....

  16. 30 CFR 817.49 - Impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the National Technical Information... steady state seepage saturation conditions, and a seismic safety factor of at least 1.2. (ii... adequate freeboard to resist overtopping by waves and by sudden increases in storage volume....

  17. 30 CFR 817.49 - Impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the National Technical Information... steady state seepage saturation conditions, and a seismic safety factor of at least 1.2. (ii... adequate freeboard to resist overtopping by waves and by sudden increases in storage volume....

  18. 30 CFR 817.49 - Impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the National Technical Information... steady state seepage saturation conditions, and a seismic safety factor of at least 1.2. (ii... adequate freeboard to resist overtopping by waves and by sudden increases in storage volume....

  19. 30 CFR 817.49 - Impoundments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR Part 51. Copies may be obtained from the National Technical Information... steady state seepage saturation conditions, and a seismic safety factor of at least 1.2. (ii... adequate freeboard to resist overtopping by waves and by sudden increases in storage volume....

  20. Reconnaissance of the chemical quality of surface waters of the Neches River basin, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, Leon S.; Leifeste, Donald K.

    1967-01-01

    with less than 30 ppm hardness. The chloride concentrations are less than 20 ppm in surface water in the southern half of the basin and usually range from 20 to 100 ppm in the northern half of the basin. Concentrations greater than 100 ppm are found only where pollution is occurring. The Neches River basin has an abundance of surface water, but uneven distribution of runoff makes storage projects necessary to provide dependable water supplies. The principal existing reservoirs, with the exception of Striker Creek Reservoir, contain water of excellent quality. Chemical-quality data for the Striker Creek drainage area indicate that its streams are affected by .the disposal of brines associated with oil production. Sam Rayburn Reservoir began impounding water in 1965. The water impounded should prove of acceptable quality for most uses, but municipal and industrial wastes released into the Angelina River near Lufkin may have a degrading effect on the quality of the water, especially during extended periods of low flows. Water available for storage at the many potential reservoir sites will be of good quality; but, if the proposed salt-water barrier is to impound acceptable water, the disposal of oilfield brine into Pine Island Bayou should be discontinued.

  1. Aqueous geochemistry and analysis of pyrite surfaces in sulfide-rich mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al, T. A.; Blowes, D. W.; Martin, C. J.; Cabri, L. J.; Jambor, J. L.

    1997-06-01

    Aqueous geochemical techniques and analysis of pyrite surfaces have been used to study element partitioning between the aqueous and solid phase and to infer mechanisms that limit the concentrations of elements in porewater in a sulfide-rich mine tailings impoundment. Porewater samples and pyrite grains for surface analysis were collected from oxidized and unoxidized zones within the tailings. Surface analyses were conducted using a Time-of-Flight Laser-Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TOFLIMS). The porewater pH at the different sample locations varies from 3.85 to 6.98. High relative abundances of Na, K, Ca, Mg, Al, and Ni occur at the surfaces of the pyrite grains from all of the sample locations. The porewater concentrations of these elements in the low-pH zone may be controlled by precipitation or coprecipitation in secondary mineral coatings on the pyrite surface. Surface abundances of the metals Cu, Ag, Pb, Zn, and Cd are lowest, and porewater concentrations are highest, in the low-pH oxidized tailings. Surface abundances of As are greatest, and porewater concentrations are lowest, in the low-pH sulfide-oxidation zone. These trends vs. pH are consistent with an adsorption model for attenuation of Cu, Ag, Pb, Zn, Cd, and As from the porewater. The porewater Cu and Ag concentrations may be limited by replacement reactions that form secondary Cu and Ag sulfides at the pyrite surface. The highest abundance of C on the surface of the pyrite grains is in the shallow sulfide-oxidation zone; this interval coincides with large abundances of chemolithotrophic bacteria and may reflect populations of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria such as Thiobacilli.

  2. Surface Tension

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Surface tension in the kitchen sink. At Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry, scientists study surface tension to understand how molecules "self-assemble." The coin trick in the video uses the re-arrangement of water molecules to seemingly create order out of disorder. The same principle can be used to create order in otherwise hard-to-handle nano materials. Scientists can then transfer these ordered materials onto surfaces by dipping them through the air-water interface, or (as we've recently shown) squeeze them so that they collapse into the water as two-molecule-thick nano sheets. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/10/17/shaken-not-stirred/

  3. Monopolar surfaces.

    PubMed

    van Oss, C J; Chaudhury, M K; Good, R J

    1987-11-01

    Following the development of a methodology for determining the apolar components as well as the electron donor and the electron acceptor parameters of the surface tension of polar surfaces, surfaces of a number of quite common materials were found to manifest virtually only electron donor properties and no, or hardly, any electron acceptor properties. Such materials may be called monopolar; they can strongly interact with bipolar materials (e.g., with polar liquids such as water); but one single polar parameter of a monopolar material cannot contribute to its energy of cohesion. Monopolar materials manifesting only electron acceptor properties also may exist, but they do not appear to occur in as great an abundance. Among the electron donor monopolar materials are: polymethylmethacrylate, polyvinylalcohol, polyethyleneglycol, proteins, many polysaccharides, phospholipids, nonionic surfactants, cellulose esters, etc. Strongly monopolar materials of the same sign repel each other when immersed or dissolved in water or other polar liquids. The interfacial tension between strongly monopolar surfaces and water has a negative value. This leads to a tendency for water to penetrate between facing surfaces of a monopolar substance and hence, to repulsion between the molecules or particles of such a monopolar material, when immersed in water, and thus to pronounced solubility or dispersibility. Monopolar repulsion energies can far outweigh Lifshitz-van der Waals attractions as well as electrostatic and "steric" repulsions. In aqueous systems the commonly observed stabilization effects, which usually are ascribed to "steric" stabilization, may in many instances be attributed to monopolar repulsion between nonionic stabilizing molecules. The repulsion between monopolar molecules of the same sign can also lead to phase separation in aqueous solutions (or suspensions), where not only two, but multiple phases are possible. Negative interfacial tensions between monopolar

  4. 40 CFR 63.7908 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emissions limitations and work practice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... compliance with the emissions limitations and work practice standards for surface impoundments? 63.7908...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Site Remediation Surface Impoundments § 63.7908... for surface impoundments? (a) You must demonstrate continuous compliance with the...

  5. 40 CFR 63.7908 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emissions limitations and work practice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... compliance with the emissions limitations and work practice standards for surface impoundments? 63.7908...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Site Remediation Surface Impoundments § 63.7908... for surface impoundments? (a) You must demonstrate continuous compliance with the...

  6. 40 CFR 63.7908 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emissions limitations and work practice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... compliance with the emissions limitations and work practice standards for surface impoundments? 63.7908...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Site Remediation Surface Impoundments § 63.7908... for surface impoundments? (a) You must demonstrate continuous compliance with the...

  7. 40 CFR 63.7908 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emissions limitations and work practice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... compliance with the emissions limitations and work practice standards for surface impoundments? 63.7908...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Site Remediation Surface Impoundments § 63.7908... for surface impoundments? (a) You must demonstrate continuous compliance with the...

  8. 40 CFR 63.7908 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emissions limitations and work practice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... compliance with the emissions limitations and work practice standards for surface impoundments? 63.7908...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Site Remediation Surface Impoundments § 63.7908... for surface impoundments? (a) You must demonstrate continuous compliance with the...

  9. Surface Variety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02175 Surface Variety This image of part of Aram Chaos shows two different surface textures with distinctly different brightnesses. The lighter layer appears to be on top (therefore younger) than the darker surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 2.1N, Longitude 338.7E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Eroded Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 19 August 2003

    The knobby terrain and eroded impact crater observed in this THEMIS image of the Eumenides Dorsum region are evidence to a surface that has been heavily modified and stripped over time. Variable layering of material within the impact crater suggest a succession of events which eroded the surface and exposed possibly different units. Slope streaks and dust avalanches are also observed within the impact crater and point to recent and continued modification of the surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 4.9, Longitude 203.6 East (156.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. Surface mining

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    This paper reports on a GAO study of attorney and expert witness fees awarded as a result of litigation brought under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. As of March 24, 1989, a total of about $1.4 million had been awarded in attorney fees and expenses - about $1.3 subject to the provisions of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, a comparison of its features with provisions of ERISA showed that the plan differed from ERISA provisions in areas such as eligibility, funding, and contribution limits.

  12. 40 CFR 264.227 - Emergency repairs; contingency plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... into or out of the impoundment; or (2) The dike leaks. (b) When a surface impoundment must be removed... service as the result of actual or imminent dike failure, the dike's structural integrity must...

  13. Fractured Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03084 Fractured Surface

    These fractures and graben are part of Gordii Fossae, a large region that has undergone stresses which have cracked the surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16.6S, Longitude 234.3E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. 40 CFR 264.227 - Emergency repairs; contingency plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emergency repairs; contingency plans... FACILITIES Surface Impoundments § 264.227 Emergency repairs; contingency plans. (a) A surface impoundment... liquids in the impoundment suddenly drops and the drop is not known to be caused by changes in the...

  15. Oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Willmott, Phil

    2008-07-01

    Although the history of metal oxides and their surfaces goes back several decades to landmark studies, such as Mott and Peierls' explanation of electrical insulation in materials that are predicted in band theory to be conducting, or the observation by Morin of the superfast metal-to-insulator transition in vanadium dioxide, it is only in the last two decades that the world of condensed matter physics has become increasingly dominated by research into complex metal oxides. This has been driven most notably by an attempt to better understand and describe the fundamental physical processes behind their seemingly endless spectrum of properties, which in turn has also led to the discovery of novel phenomena, most prominently demonstrated by the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in 1986, colossal magnetoresistance in 1994, and most recently, the formation of a two-dimensional conducting layer at the interface between two band insulators in 2004. One important reason why metal oxides, particularly in the form of thin films, have become such a popular subject for basic condensed matter research is that they offer a uniquely versatile materials base for the development of novel technologies. They owe this versatility both to the many different elemental combinations that lead to structurally similar forms, and also to the fact that in many cases, the strong interaction between the valence electrons means that there is a subtle interplay between structure and magnetic and electronic properties. This aspect has led in recent years to the birth or renaissance of research fields such as spintronics, orbital ordering, and multiferroics. Surfaces and interfaces are especially interesting in these strongly-correlated electron systems, where the rearrangement of electrical charge resulting from a minimization of surface or interfacial energy can have unexpected and often exciting consequences. Indeed, as the drive to miniaturize devices well below the micron size

  16. Surface waters of Illinois River basin in Arkansas and Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laine, L.L.

    1959-01-01

    flow during the 19-year base period, an impoundment at that site would have required a usable storage of 185,000 acre-ft to satisfy this demand during the drought years 1954-1956. The surface waters of the Illinois River basin are excellent quality being suitable for municipal, agriculture and most industrial uses. The average concentration of the dissolved mineral content is about 105 ppm (parts per million) and the hardness about 85 ppm. The water is slightly alkaline, having a range of pH values from 7.2 to 8.0. This report gives the estimated average discharge at gaging stations and approximations of average discharge at the State line for 3 sub-basins during the 19-year period October 1937 to September 1956, used as a base period in this report. Duration-of-flow data for various percentages of the time are shown for the period of observed record at the gaging stations; similar data are estimated for the selected base period. Storage requirements to sustain flow during the recent drought years are given for 3 stations. The streamflow records in the basin are presented on a monthly and annual basis through September 1957; provisional records for 3 stations are included through July 1958 for correlation purposes. Results of discharge measurements are given for miscellaneous sites where low-flow observations have been made. (available as photostat copy only)

  17. Toroidal surfaces compared with spherocylindrical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malacara-Doblado, Daniel; Malacara-Hernandez, Daniel; Garcia-Marquez, Jorge L.

    1995-08-01

    Toroidal and sphero-cylindrical optical surfaces are two different kinds of surfaces (Menchaca and Malacara, 1986), but they are almost identical in the vicinity of the optical axis. The separation between these two surfaces increases when the distance to the optical axis increases. In this work the separation between these two surfaces outside of the central region is analytically studied.

  18. Groundwater Surface Trends at Van Norden Meadow, California, from Ground Penetrating Radar Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadrick, N. I.; Blacic, T. M.; Yarnell, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Van Norden meadow in the Donner Summit area west of Lake Tahoe is one of the largest sub-alpine meadows in the Sierra Nevada mountain range. As natural water retention basins, meadows attenuate floods, improve water quality and support vegetation that stabilizes stream banks and promotes high biodiversity. Like most meadows in the Sierras however, over-grazing, road-building, and development has resulted in localized stream incision, degradation, and partial conversion from wet to dry conditions in Van Norden. Additionally, a small dam at the base of the meadow has partially flooded the lower meadow creating reservoir conditions. Privately owned since the late 1800s, Van Norden was recently purchased by a local land trust to prevent further development and return the area to public ownership. Restoration of the natural meadow conditions will involve notching the dam in 2016 to reduce currently impounded water volumes from 250 to less than 50 acre-feet. To monitor the effects of notching the dam on the upstream meadow conditions, better understanding of the surface and groundwater hydrology both pre- and post-restoration is required. We surveyed the meadow in summer 2014 with ground penetrating radar (GPR) to map the groundwater surface prior to restoration activities using a 270MHz antenna to obtain a suite of longitudinal and transverse transects. Groundwater level within the meadow was assessed using both piezometer readings and sweeps of the GPR antenna. Seventeen piezometers were added this year to the 13 already in place to monitor temporal changes in the groundwater surface, while the GPR profiles provided information about lateral variations. Our results provide an estimate of the groundwater depth variations across the upper portion of the meadow before notching. We plan to return in 2015 to collect GPR profiles during wetter conditions, which will provide a more complete assessment of the pre-notching groundwater hydrology.

  19. Overview on surface representations for freeform surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, H.; Brömel, A.; Beier, M.; Steinkopf, R.; Hartung, J.; Zhong, Y.; Oleszko, M.; Ochse, D.

    2015-09-01

    Freeform surfaces are a new and exciting opportunity in lens design. The technological boundary conditions for manufacturing surfaces with reduced symmetry are complicated. Recently the progress in understanding and controlling this kind of components is ready for use in commercial products. Nearly all procedures of classical design development are changing, if freeform surfaces are used. The mathematical description of the surfaces, the optimization algorithms in lens design and their convergence, the initial design approaches, the evaluation of performance over the field of view, the data transfer in the mechanical design software and in the manufacturing machines, the metrology for characterization of real surfaces and the return of the real surfaces into the simulation are affected. In this contribution, in particular an overview on possible mathematical formulations of the surfaces is given. One of the requirements on the descriptions is a good performance to correct optical aberrations. After fabrication of real surfaces, there are typical deviations seen in the shape. First more localized deformations are observed, which are only poorly described by mode expansions. Therefore a need in describing the surface with localized finite support exists. Secondly the classical diamond turning grinding process typically shows a regular ripple structure. These midfrequency errors are best described by special approaches. For all these cases it would be the best to have simple, robust solutions, that allow for fast calculation in fitting measured surfaces and in raytrace.

  20. Fast Disinfecting Antimicrobial Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Ahmad E.; Dabkowski, Jeffery M.; Nüsslein, Klaus; Tew, Gregory N.

    2013-01-01

    Silicon wafers and glass surfaces were functionalized with facially amphiphilic antimicrobial copolymers using the “grafting from” technique. Surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was used to grow poly(butylmethacrylate)-co-poly(Boc-aminoethyl methacrylate) from the surfaces. Upon Boc-deprotection, these surfaces became highly antimicrobial and killed S. aureus and E. coli 100% in less than 5 min. The molecular weight and grafting density of the polymer were controlled by varying the polymerization time and initiator surface density. Antimicrobial studies showed that the killing efficiency of these surfaces was independent of polymer layer thickness or grafting density within the range of surfaces studied. PMID:19177651

  1. Computer aided surface representation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, R.E.

    1990-02-19

    The central research problem of this project is the effective representation, computation, and display of surfaces interpolating to information in three or more dimensions. If the given information is located on another surface, then the problem is to construct a surface defined on a surface''. Sometimes properties of an already defined surface are desired, which is geometry processing''. Visualization of multivariate surfaces is possible by means of contouring higher dimensional surfaces. These problems and more are discussed below. The broad sweep from constructive mathematics through computational algorithms to computer graphics illustrations is utilized in this research. The breadth and depth of this research activity makes this research project unique.

  2. Ground-water and surface-water flow and estimated water budget for Lake Seminole, southwestern Georgia and northwestern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalton, Melinda S.; Aulenbach, Brent T.; Torak, Lynn J.

    2004-01-01

    Lake Seminole is a 37,600-acre impoundment formed at the confluence of the Flint and Chattahoochee Rivers along the Georgia?Florida State line. Outflow from Lake Seminole through Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam provides headwater to the Apalachicola River, which is a major supply of freshwater, nutrients, and detritus to ecosystems downstream. These rivers,together with their tributaries, are hydraulically connected to karst limestone units that constitute most of the Upper Floridan aquifer and to a chemically weathered residuum of undifferentiated overburden. The ground-water flow system near Lake Seminole consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer and undifferentiated overburden. The aquifer is confined below by low-permeability sediments of the Lisbon Formation and, generally, is semiconfined above by undifferentiated overburden. Ground-water flow within the Upper Floridan aquifer is unconfined or semiconfined and discharges at discrete points by springflow or diffuse leakage into streams and other surface-water bodies. The high degree of connectivity between the Upper Floridan aquifer and surface-water bodies is limited to the upper Eocene Ocala Limestone and younger units that are in contact with streams in the Lake Seminole area. The impoundment of Lake Seminole inundated natural stream channels and other low-lying areas near streams and raised the water-level altitude of the Upper Floridan aquifer near the lake to nearly that of the lake, about 77 feet. Surface-water inflow from the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers and Spring Creek and outflow to the Apalachicola River through Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam dominate the water budget for Lake Seminole. About 81 percent of the total water-budget inflow consists of surface water; about 18 percent is ground water, and the remaining 1 percent is lake precipitation. Similarly, lake outflow consists of about 89 percent surface water, as flow to the Apalachicola River through Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam, about 4 percent ground water

  3. Computer aided surface representation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, R E

    1987-11-01

    The aims of this research are the creation of new surface forms and the determination of geometric and physical properties of surfaces. The full sweep from constructive mathematics through the implementation of algorithms and the interactive computer graphics display of surfaces is utilized. Both three-dimensional and multi- dimensional surfaces are considered. Particular emphasis is given to the scientific computing solution of Department of Energy problems. The methods that we have developed and that we are proposing to develop allow applications such as: Producing smooth contour maps from measured data, such as weather maps. Modeling the heat distribution inside a furnace from sample measurements. Terrain modeling based on satellite pictures. The investigation of new surface forms includes the topics of triangular interpolants, multivariate interpolation, surfaces defined on surfaces and monotone and/or convex surfaces. The geometric and physical properties considered include contours, the intersection of surfaces, curvatures as a interrogation tool, and numerical integration.

  4. Designing Superoleophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuteja, Anish; Choi, Wonjae; Ma, Minglin; Mabry, Joseph M.; Mazzella, Sarah A.; Rutledge, Gregory C.; McKinley, Gareth H.; Cohen, Robert E.

    2007-12-01

    Understanding the complementary roles of surface energy and roughness on natural nonwetting surfaces has led to the development of a number of biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces, which exhibit apparent contact angles with water greater than 150 degrees and low contact angle hysteresis. However, superoleophobic surfaces—those that display contact angles greater than 150 degrees with organic liquids having appreciably lower surface tensions than that of water—are extremely rare. Calculations suggest that creating such a surface would require a surface energy lower than that of any known material. We show how a third factor, re-entrant surface curvature, in conjunction with chemical composition and roughened texture, can be used to design surfaces that display extreme resistance to wetting from a number of liquids with low surface tension, including alkanes such as decane and octane.

  5. Surface characteristics of thermally treated titanium surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yang-Jin; Cui, De-Zhe; Jeon, Ha-Ra; Chung, Hyun-Ju; Park, Yeong-Joon; Kim, Ok-Su

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The characteristics of oxidized titanium (Ti) surfaces varied according to treatment conditions such as duration time and temperature. Thermal oxidation can change Ti surface characteristics, which affect many cellular responses such as cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Thus, this study was conducted to evaluate the surface characteristics and cell response of thermally treated Ti surfaces. Methods The samples were divided into 4 groups. Control: machined smooth titanium (Ti-S) was untreated. Group I: Ti-S was treated in a furnace at 300℃ for 30 minutes. Group II: Ti-S was treated at 500℃ for 30 minutes. Group III: Ti-S was treated at 750℃ for 30 minutes. A scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, and X-ray diffraction were used to assess surface characteristics and chemical composition. The water contact angle and surface energy were measured to assess physical properties. Results The titanium dioxide (TiO2) thickness increased as the treatment temperature increased. Additional peaks belonging to rutile TiO2 were only found in group III. The contact angle in group III was significantly lower than any of the other groups. The surface energy significantly increased as the treatment temperature increased, especially in group III. In the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, after 24 hours of incubation, the assessment of cell viability showed that the optical density of the control had a higher tendency than any other group, but there was no significant difference. However, the alkaline phosphatase activity increased as the temperature increased, especially in group III. Conclusions Consequently, the surface characteristics and biocompatibility increased as the temperature increased. This indicates that surface modification by thermal treatment could be another useful method for medical and dental implants. PMID:22803009

  6. Fluorinated silica microchannel surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Kirby, Brian J.; Shepodd, Timothy Jon

    2005-03-15

    A method for surface modification of microchannels and capillaries. The method produces a chemically inert surface having a lowered surface free energy and improved frictional properties by attaching a fluorinated alkane group to the surface. The coating is produced by hydrolysis of a silane agent that is functionalized with either alkoxy or chloro ligands and an uncharged C.sub.3 -C.sub.10 fluorinated alkane chain. It has been found that the extent of surface coverage can be controlled by controlling the contact time from a minimum of about 2 minutes to a maximum of 120 minutes for complete surface coverage.

  7. Extremal surface barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Netta; Wall, Aron C.

    2014-03-01

    We present a generic condition for Lorentzian manifolds to have a barrier that limits the reach of boundary-anchored extremal surfaces of arbitrary dimension. We show that any surface with nonpositive extrinsic curvature is a barrier, in the sense that extremal surfaces cannot be continuously deformed past it. Furthermore, the outermost barrier surface has nonnegative extrinsic curvature. Under certain conditions, we show that the existence of trapped surfaces implies a barrier, and conversely. In the context of AdS/CFT, these barriers imply that it is impossible to reconstruct the entire bulk using extremal surfaces. We comment on the implications for the firewall controversy.

  8. Laser Surface Profiler

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.A.; Chu, A.

    1998-11-24

    By accurately measuring the angle of reflection of a laser beam incident on a reflective surface with a position sensitive detector, changes in the surface normal direction (slope of the surface) can be determined directly. An instrument has been built that makes repeated measurements over the surface, and uses this data to produce a grayscale image of the slope. The resolution of this system to changes in the surface normal direction is found to be better than 0.01 degrees. By focusing the Iaser beam to achieve a lateral resolution of 5 pm, the resolvable surface height change due to a variation in slope is estimated to be <1 nm.

  9. PREFACE: Vibrations at surfaces Vibrations at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Talat S.

    2011-12-01

    This special issue is dedicated to the phenomenon of vibrations at surfaces—a topic that was indispensible a couple of decades ago, since it was one of the few phenomena capable of revealing the nature of binding at solid surfaces. For clean surfaces, the frequencies of modes with characteristic displacement patterns revealed how surface geometry, as well as the nature of binding between atoms in the surface layers, could be different from that in the bulk solid. Dispersion of the surface phonons provided further measures of interatomic interactions. For chemisorbed molecules on surfaces, frequencies and dispersion of the vibrational modes were also critical for determining adsorption sites. In other words, vibrations at surfaces served as a reliable means of extracting information about surface structure, chemisorption and overlayer formation. Experimental techniques, such as electron energy loss spectroscopy and helium-atom-surface scattering, coupled with infra-red spectroscopy, were continually refined and their resolutions enhanced to capture subtleties in the dynamics of atoms and molecules at surfaces. Theoretical methods, whether based on empirical and semi-empirical interatomic potential or on ab initio electronic structure calculations, helped decipher experimental observations and provide deeper insights into the nature of the bond between atoms and molecules in regions of reduced symmetry, as encountered on solid surfaces. Vibrations at surfaces were thus an integral part of the set of phenomena that characterized surface science. Dedicated workshops and conferences were held to explore the variety of interesting and puzzling features revealed in experimental and theoretical investigations of surface vibrational modes and their dispersion. One such conference, Vibrations at Surfaces, first organized by Harald Ibach in Juelich in 1980, continues to this day. The 13th International Conference on Vibrations at Surfaces was held at the University of

  10. Durable low surface-energy surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Paul B. (Inventor); McElroy, Paul M. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory H. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A formulation for forming a low surface-energy surface on a substrate having (i) a fluoroalkyl silane having a low surface energy part, (ii) a liquid crystal silane operable for enhancing the orientation of the molecules of the fluoroalkyl silane and for crosslinking with the fluoroalkyl silane, and, (iii) a transport medium for applying the fluoroalkyl silane and the liquid crystal silane to the surface of a substrate. In one embodiment the formulation can includes a crosslinking agent for crosslinking the fluoroalkyl silane. In another embodiment the formulation has a condensation catalyst for enhancing chemical bonding of the fluoroalkyl silane to the substrate. The transport medium can be an alcohol such as methanol or ethanol.

  11. Laser textured surface gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Van Duong; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Li, Ji; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Esenturk, Emre; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2016-05-01

    This work demonstrates a novel technique for fabricating surfaces with roughness and wettability gradients and their subsequent applications for chemical sensors. Surface roughness gradients on brass sheets are obtained directly by nanosecond laser texturing. When these structured surfaces are exposed to air, their wettability decreases with time (up to 20 days) achieving both spatial and temporal wettability gradients. The surfaces are responsive to organic solvents. Contact angles of a series of dilute isopropanol solutions decay exponentially with concentration. In particular, a fall of 132° in contact angle is observed on a surface gradient, one order of magnitude higher than the 14° observed for the unprocessed surface, when the isopropanol concentration increased from 0 to 15.6 wt%. As the wettability changes gradually over the surface, contact angle also changes correspondingly. This effect offers multi-sensitivity at different zones on the surface and is useful for accurate measurement of chemical concentration.

  12. Durable superoleophobic polypropylene surfaces.

    PubMed

    Brown, Philip S; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-08-01

    Polypropylene (PP) is a popular plastic material used in consumer packaging. It would be desirable if such plastic containers were liquid repellent and not so easily fouled by their contents. Existing examples of superoleophobic surfaces typically rely on poorly adhered coatings or delicate surface structures, resulting in poor mechanical durability. Here, we report a facile method for creating superoleophobic PP surfaces via incorporation of nanoparticles (NPs) into the polymer surface. A solvent-NP-PP mixture was spin coated at high temperature to achieve the necessary roughness. Such surfaces were further functionalized with fluorosilane to result in a durable, super-repellent surface. They were also found to exhibit some repellency towards shampoos. This method of incorporating NPs into polymer surfaces could also prove useful in improving the anti-bacterial, mechanical and liquid-repellent properties of plastic devices.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'. PMID:27354730

  13. EPA Permeable Surface Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  14. On neutron surface waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatovich, V. K.

    2009-01-15

    It is shown that neutron surface waves do not exist. The difference between the neutron wave mechanics and the wave physics of electromagnetic and acoustic processes, which allows the existence of surface waves, is analyzed.

  15. Silica reusable surface insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, H. E.; Smith, M.; Leiser, D. B. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A reusable silica surface insulation material is provided by bonding amorphous silica fibers with colloidal silica at an elevated temperature. The surface insulation is ordinarily manufactured in the form of blocks (i.e., tiles).

  16. Demonstration of Surface Tension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Surface tension is a fundamental obstacle in the spontaneous formation of bubbles, droplets, and crystal nuclei in liquids. Describes a simple overhead projector demonstration that illustrates the power of surface tension that can prevent so many industrial processes. (ASK)

  17. Application of near surface geophysical methods to image water table response in an Alpine Meadow, Northern California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayers, M.; Blacic, T. M.; Craig, M. S.; Yarnell, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Meadows are recognized for their value to the ecological, hydrologic, and aesthetic functions of a watershed. As natural water retention sinks, meadows attenuate floods, improve water quality and support herbaceous vegetation that stabilize streambanks and promote high biodiversity. Alpine meadows are especially vital, serving as freshwater sources and distributing to lower lying provinces through ground and surface water interaction. These complexes are highly vulnerable to drought conditions, altered seasonal precipitation patterns, and mismanaged land use. One such location, Van Norden meadow located in the Donner Summit area west of Lake Tahoe, is one of the largest sub-alpine meadows in the Sierra Nevada mountain range of Northern California. Van Norden meadow offers a natural hydrologic laboratory. Ownership transfer of the area from a local land trust to the Forestry Service requires restoration toward natural meadow conditions, and involves notching the dam in 2016 to reduce currently impounded water volumes from 250 to less than 50 acre-feet. To monitor the effects of notching the dam on the upstream meadow conditions, better understanding of the surface and groundwater hydrology both pre-and post-base level alteration is required. Comprehensive understanding of groundwater flux that supports meadow reaches relies on knowledge of their often complex stratigraphic and structural subsurface framework. In recent years hydrogeophysics has emphasized the combination of near surface geophysical techniques, collaborated with well and borehole measures, to qualitatively define these parameters. Building on a preliminary GPR investigation conducted in 2014, in which 44 270 MHz transect lines were collected, we returned to Van Norden meadow in late summer 2015 to collect lower frequency GPR (50 and 100 MHz) and electrical resistivity profiles to better define the groundwater table, sedimentary, and structural features of the meadow.

  18. Surface drip irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For many years, surface drip irrigation has been used to irrigation high value vegetable crops. In recent years, surface drip of row crops has been increasing throughout the United States. Surface drip irrigation can precisely deliver water and nutrients to the crop root zone. This article provides ...

  19. Surface Conductive Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, John; Suib, Steven L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the properties of surface-conducting glass and the chemical nature of surface-conducting stannic (tin) oxide. Also provides the procedures necessary for the preparation of surface-conducting stannic oxide films on glass substrates. The experiment is suitable for the advanced inorganic chemistry laboratory. (JN)

  20. PSC: protein surface classification.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yan Yuan; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2012-07-01

    We recently proposed to classify proteins by their functional surfaces. Using the structural attributes of functional surfaces, we inferred the pairwise relationships of proteins and constructed an expandable database of protein surface classification (PSC). As the functional surface(s) of a protein is the local region where the protein performs its function, our classification may reflect the functional relationships among proteins. Currently, PSC contains a library of 1974 surface types that include 25,857 functional surfaces identified from 24,170 bound structures. The search tool in PSC empowers users to explore related surfaces that share similar local structures and core functions. Each functional surface is characterized by structural attributes, which are geometric, physicochemical or evolutionary features. The attributes have been normalized as descriptors and integrated to produce a profile for each functional surface in PSC. In addition, binding ligands are recorded for comparisons among homologs. PSC allows users to exploit related binding surfaces to reveal the changes in functionally important residues on homologs that have led to functional divergence during evolution. The substitutions at the key residues of a spatial pattern may determine the functional evolution of a protein. In PSC (http://pocket.uchicago.edu/psc/), a pool of changes in residues on similar functional surfaces is provided.

  1. Reclamation Strategies and Geomorphic Outcomes in Coal Surface Mines of Eastern Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, M.; Jaeger, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Coal surface mining is a significant landscape disturbance in the United States. Since 1977, the reclamation of mined lands has been regulated by the Surface Mine Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA). Prior to the act, many coalfields were left un-reclaimed or partially reclaimed, with highly irregular topology and drainage networks. Under the act, the reverse is often true; adherence to SMCRA often leads to the homogenization of surfaces and channel networks. While both pre and post-SMCRA landscapes are highly altered, they exhibit strongly dissimilar characteristics. We examine pre-SMCRA, post-SMCRA and unmined watersheds at 3 spatial scales in order to compare the geomorphic differences between reclamation strategies. In particular, we attempt to separate anthropogenic factors from pre-existing, natural factors via comparisons to unmined watersheds. Our study design incorporates a 3 scale top-down analysis of 21 independent watersheds (7 of each treatment type). Each watershed has an area of approximately 1km2. All watersheds share similar geography, climate and geology. At the landscape scale, characteristics are derived from 0.762m (2.5ft) resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). At the channel network scale, DEMs, as well as remote sensing data (including the National Wetlands Inventory database) are used. Finally, the reach scale incorporates longitudinal and cross-section surveys (using a total station) as well as a particle size distribution. At each scale, attributes are parameterized for statistical comparison. Post-SMCRA sites are characterized by a general reduction of watershed surface slopes (11.9% median) compared to pre-SMCRA (19.3%) and unmined (19.8%) sites. Both pre and post-SMCRA channel networks are characterized by significant surface impoundments (in the form of remnant headwall trenches on pre-SMCRA sites and engineered retention basins on post-SMCRA sites). Pre-SMCRA outlet reaches have significantly steeper bed slopes (2.79% mean) than

  2. The neutral surface layer above rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedman, Ann-Sofi; Sahlee, Erik

    2014-05-01

    It is generally accepted that turbulent fluxes (momentum and scalar fluxes) are approx. constant with height above horizontal surfaces with low roughness. But what will happen when the roughness sub-layer is large as found over cities, forests and rough seas? In a study of the kinematic structure of the near neutral atmospheric surface layer, Högström, Hunt and Smedman, 2002, it was demonstrated that a model with detached eddies from above the surface layer impinging on to the surface (Hunt and Morison, 2000) could explain some of the observed features in the neutral atmospheric boundary layer. Thus the detached eddy model proved successful in explaining the dynamic structure of the near neutral atmospheric surface layer, especially the shape of the spectra of the wind components and scalars and corresponding fluxes. Here we make the hypothesis that the detached-eddy model can also be used to explain the experimental results related to the 3-dimensional turbulence structure above rough surfaces. Measurements are taken both over land (grass and forest) and over sea (Baltic Sea and hurricane Fabian in the Atlantic) above the roughness sub-layer. Analysis of the turbulence structure shows a striking similarity between the different sites. Hunt, J.C.R and Morrison, J.F., 2000: Eddy structure in turbulent boundary layers, Euro. J. Mech. B-Fluids, 19, 673-694. Högström, U., Hunt, J.C.R., and Smedman, A., 2002: Theory and measurements for turbulence spectra and variances in the atmospheric neutral surface layer, Bound.-Layer Meteorol., 103,101-124.

  3. Surface cleanliness measurement procedure

    DOEpatents

    Schroder, Mark Stewart; Woodmansee, Donald Ernest; Beadie, Douglas Frank

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  4. Surface freezing of water.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, J L; Álvarez-Valenzuela, M A; Rodríguez-Celis, F

    2016-01-01

    Freezing, melting, evaporation and condensation of water are essential ingredients for climate and eventually life on Earth. In the present work, we show how surface freezing of supercooled water in an open container is conditioned and triggered-exclusively-by humidity in air. Additionally, a change of phase is demonstrated to be triggered on the water surface forming surface ice crystals prior to freezing of bulk. The symmetry of the surface crystal, as well as the freezing point, depend on humidity, presenting at least three different types of surface crystals. Humidity triggers surface freezing as soon as it overpasses a defined value for a given temperature, generating a plurality of nucleation nodes. An evidence of simultaneous nucleation of surface ice crystals is also provided. PMID:27330895

  5. Surface freezing of water.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, J L; Álvarez-Valenzuela, M A; Rodríguez-Celis, F

    2016-01-01

    Freezing, melting, evaporation and condensation of water are essential ingredients for climate and eventually life on Earth. In the present work, we show how surface freezing of supercooled water in an open container is conditioned and triggered-exclusively-by humidity in air. Additionally, a change of phase is demonstrated to be triggered on the water surface forming surface ice crystals prior to freezing of bulk. The symmetry of the surface crystal, as well as the freezing point, depend on humidity, presenting at least three different types of surface crystals. Humidity triggers surface freezing as soon as it overpasses a defined value for a given temperature, generating a plurality of nucleation nodes. An evidence of simultaneous nucleation of surface ice crystals is also provided.

  6. Long-Term Recovery of PCB-Contaminated Surface Sediments at the Sangamo-Weston / Twelvemile Creek / Lake Hartwell Superfund Site

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, Richard C.; Magar, Victor S.; Ickes, Jennifer A.; Foote, Eric A.; Abbott, James E.; Bingler, Linda S.; Crecelius, Eric A.

    2004-03-10

    Natural recovery of contaminated sediments relies on burial of contaminated sediments with increasingly clean sediments over time (i.e., natural capping). Natural capping reduces the risk of resuspension of contaminated surface sediments, and it reduces the potential for contaminant transport into the food chain by limiting bioturbation of contaminated surface or near-surface sediments. This study evaluated the natural recovery of surface sediments contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at the Sangamo-Weston/Twelvemile Creek/Lake Hartwell Superfund Site (Lake Hartwell), Pickens County, SC. The primary focus was on sediment recovery resulting from natural capping processes. Total PCB (t-PCB), lead-210 (210Pb), and cesium-137 (137Cs) sediment core profiles were used to establish vertical t-PCB concentration profiles, age date sediments, and determine surface sedimentation and surface sediment recovery rates in 18 cores collected along 10 transects. Four upgradient transects in the headwaters of Lake Hartwell were impacted by historical sediment releases from three upgradient sediment impoundments. These transects were characterized by silt/ clay and sand layering. The highest PCB concentrations were associated with silt/clay layers (1.8-3.5% total organic carbon (TOC)), while sand layers (0.05-0.32% TOC) contained much lower PCB concentrations. The historical sediment releases resulted in substantial burial of PCBcontaminated sediment in the vicinity of these four cores; each core contained less than 1 mg/kg t-PCBs in the surface sand layers. Cores collected from six downgradient Lake Hartwell transects consisted primarily of silt and clay (0.91-5.1% TOC) and were less noticeably impacted by the release of sand from the impoundments. Vertical t-PCB concentration profiles in these cores began with relatively low PCB concentrations at the sediment-water interface and increased in concentration with depth until maximum PCB concentrations were measured at _30

  7. Continuous measurements of water surface height and width along a 6.5km river reach for discharge algorithm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuozzolo, S.; Durand, M. T.; Pavelsky, T.; Pentecost, J.

    2015-12-01

    The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite will provide measurements of river width and water surface elevation and slope along continuous swaths of world rivers. Understanding water surface slope and width dynamics in river reaches is important for both developing and validating discharge algorithms to be used on future SWOT data. We collected water surface elevation and river width data along a 6.5km stretch of the Olentangy River in Columbus, Ohio from October to December 2014. Continuous measurements of water surface height were supplemented with periodical river width measurements at twenty sites along the study reach. The water surface slope of the entire reach ranged from during 41.58 cm/km at baseflow to 45.31 cm/km after a storm event. The study reach was also broken into sub-reaches roughly 1km in length to study smaller scale slope dynamics. The furthest upstream sub-reaches are characterized by free-flowing riffle-pool sequences, while the furthest downstream sub-reaches were directly affected by two low-head dams. In the sub-reaches immediately upstream of each dam, baseflow slope is as low as 2 cm/km, while the furthest upstream free-flowing sub-reach has a baseflow slope of 100 cm/km. During high flow events the backwater effect of the dams was observed to propagate upstream: sub-reaches impounded by the dams had increased water surface slopes, while free flowing sub-reaches had decreased water surface slopes. During the largest observed flow event, a stage change of 0.40 m affected sub-reach slopes by as much as 30 cm/km. Further analysis will examine height-width relationships within the study reach and relate cross-sectional flow area to river stage. These relationships can be used in conjunction with slope data to estimate discharge using a modified Manning's equation, and are a core component of discharge algorithms being developed for the SWOT mission.

  8. DNA ELECTROPHORESIS AT SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    RAFAILOVICH, MIRIAM; SOKOLOV, JONATHAN; GERSAPPE, DILIP

    2003-09-01

    During this year we performed two major projects: I. We developed a detailed theoretical model which complements our experiments on surface DNA electrophoresis. We found that it was possible to enhance the separation of DNA chains by imposing a chemical nanoscale pattern on the surface. This approach utilized the surface interaction effect of the DNA chains with the substrate and is a refinement to our previous method in which DNA chains were separated on homogeneous flat surfaces. By introducing the nano-patterns on the surface, the conformational changes of DNA chains of different lengths can be amplified, which results in the different friction strengths with the substrate surface. Our results also show that, when compared to the DNA electrophoresis performed on homogeneous flat surfaces, nanopatterned surfaces offer a larger window in choosing different surface interactions to achieve separation. II. In collaboration with a large international manufacturer of skin care products we also embarked on a project involving photo toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, which are a key ingredient in sunscreen and cosmetic lotions. The results clearly implicated the nanoparticles in catalyzing damage to chromosomal DNA. We then used this knowledge to develop a polymer/anti-oxidant coating which prevented the photocatalytic reaction on DNA while still retaining the UV absorptive properties of the nanoparticles. The standard gel electrophoresis was not sufficient in determining the extent of the DNA damage. The conclusions of this study were based predominantly on analysis obtained with the surface electrophoresis method.

  9. Periodic minimal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Alan L.

    1985-04-01

    A minimal surface is one for which, like a soap film with the same pressure on each side, the mean curvature is zero and, thus, is one where the two principal curvatures are equal and opposite at every point. For every closed circuit in the surface, the area is a minimum. Schwarz1 and Neovius2 showed that elements of such surfaces could be put together to give surfaces periodic in three dimensions. These periodic minimal surfaces are geometrical invariants, as are the regular polyhedra, but the former are curved. Minimal surfaces are appropriate for the description of various structures where internal surfaces are prominent and seek to adopt a minimum area or a zero mean curvature subject to their topology; thus they merit more complete numerical characterization. There seem to be at least 18 such surfaces3, with various symmetries and topologies, related to the crystallographic space groups. Recently, glyceryl mono-oleate (GMO) was shown by Longley and McIntosh4 to take the shape of the F-surface. The structure postulated is shown here to be in good agreement with an analysis of the fundamental geometry of periodic minimal surfaces.

  10. Interactions of silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, G.; Xu, Z.; Steinberg, S.; Israelachvili, J. . Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering and Materials Dept.)

    1994-07-01

    Adhesion, friction, and colloidal forces in air and aqueous salt solutions have been measured between various silica surfaces prepared by depositing amorphous but highly smooth silica films on mica. The results show four interesting and interrelated phenomena: (i) the adhesion of silica surfaces in air increases slowly with contact time, especially in humid air where the contacting surfaces become separated by an [approximately]20-[angstrom]-thick layer of hydrated silica or silica gel; (ii) the friction of two silica surfaces exhibits large sticking or stiction spikes, whose magnitude increases in the presence of water and when the surfaces are kept in contact longer before sliding; (iii) the non-DLVO repulsion commonly seen at short range (<40 A) between silica surfaces immersed in aqueous solutions is monotonically repulsive, with no oscillatory component, and is quite unlike theoretical expectations and previous measurements of forces due to solvent structure; (iv) dynamic contact angle measurements reveal time-dependent effects which cannot be due to a fixed surface chemical heterogeneity or roughness. The results indicate that silica surfaces undergo slow structural and chemical changes during interactions with water and with each other. More specifically, the authors propose that the unusual interfacial and colloidal properties of silica are due, not to hydration effects, but to the presence of an [approximately]10-[angstrom]-thick gel-like layer of protruding silanol and silicilic acid groups that grow on the surfaces in the presence of water. These protruding groups react chemically (sinter) with similar groups located on an opposing surface and give rise to the unusual time-dependent adhesion, friction, and non-DLVO forces observed. The proposed mechanism in terms of a surface layer of silica gel is consistent with the known surface chemistry of silica and accounts for the results reported and for other unusual surface and colloidal properties of silica.

  11. 75 FR 70732 - BPUS Generation Development, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... consist of the following: (1) A proposed upper impoundment having a surface area of about 52 acres and a normal water surface elevation of 1,640 feet mean sea level; (2) a proposed lower impoundment having a surface area of about 40 acres and a normal surface area of 940 feet mean sea level; (3) a...

  12. On orbit surfacing of thermal control surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Substrates to be contaminated and contamination source were prepared. Additional information on paint spray method apparatus was obtained. Silver teflon second surface mirror samples and S 13 GLO paint samples were mounted, photographed under the microscope and measured to establish baseline data. Atomic oxygen cleaning and spray painting are being considered. Electrostatic powder and plasma spray coating systems appear to have serious drawbacks.

  13. Collapse of Surface Nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Longquan; Chan, Chon U.; Arora, Manish; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2014-11-01

    Surface nanobubbles are nanoscopic gaseous domains that entrap on immersed solid surfaces in water. They are surprisingly stable and are difficult to be distinguished from polymeric/hydrophobic drops and solid particles (contamination). Here, we report a comparative study of contact line motion across surface nanobubbles, polymeric drops and solid particles. We show that surface nanobubbles spontaneously collapse once contact line touches them while a fast jump process and a pinning process are observed on polymeric drops and on solid particles, respectively. These distinct contact line dynamics provide a new approach to identify surface nanobubbles. The collapse of surface nanobubbles demonstrates their gaseous property and also indicates that they are metastable. The collapse process last few milliseconds with a characteristic speed of 0.1 mm/s, which is much longer and slower than that of hydrodynamic phenomena. We further show that the collapse phenomenon can be explained with a microscopic contact line dynamics.

  14. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, J.R.; Ruzic, D.N.; Moore, R.L.; Cohen, S.A.; Manos, D.M.

    1982-06-16

    A method is described for treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1..mu.. to 5..mu.. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  15. Impact of surface chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

    2011-01-01

    The applications of molecular surface chemistry in heterogeneous catalyst technology, semiconductor-based technology, medical technology, anticorrosion and lubricant technology, and nanotechnology are highlighted in this perspective. The evolution of surface chemistry at the molecular level is reviewed, and the key roles of surface instrumentation developments for in situ studies of the gas–solid, liquid–solid, and solid–solid interfaces under reaction conditions are emphasized. PMID:20880833

  16. Landsat surface reflectance data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2015-01-01

    Landsat satellite data have been produced, archived, and distributed by the U.S. Geological Survey since 1972. Users rely on these data for historical study of land surface change and require consistent radiometric data processed to the highest science standards. In support of the guidelines established through the Global Climate Observing System, the U.S. Geological Survey has embarked on production of higher-level Landsat data products to support land surface change studies. One such product is Landsat surface reflectance.

  17. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, John R.; Ruzic, David N.; Moore, Richard L.; Cohen, Samuel A.; Manos, Dennis M.

    1983-01-01

    A method of treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1.mu. to 5.mu. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  18. Tribological properties of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    The real area of contact between two solid surfaces is only a small portion of the apparent area. Deformation of these areas can result in solid state contact through surface films. For clean solid to solid contact strong adhesive bonding occurs across the interface. Under these conditions many properties of the solid such as the metallurgical and chemical nature of metals can influence adhesion, friction, and wear behavior. The presence of gases, liquids, and solid films on the surface of solids alter markedly tribological characteristics. These surface films can also considerably change the mechanical effects of solid state contact on bulk material behavior.

  19. Martian surface simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskell, R. W.

    1992-01-01

    Current scenarios for a Mars landing involve the extensive analysis of the surface near the landing site. Pinpoint landing, for example, requires a detailed mapping of the area from orbit for landmark identification and landing site selection, and the use by the lander of its own imaging data to recognize these landmarks and to guide itself safely to the surface. Hazard avoidance requires sufficient orbital imaging to ensure that safe landing sites exist, with the lander using its sensory data to find one of them. Once on the surface, a rover must be able to avoid or surmount obstacles, travel across surfaces with varying compositions and slopes, and navigate to a desired destination. Computer simulated Martian surfaces are being constructed to aid in the development of these exploration technologies. These surface simulations attempt to mimic the specific geologic episodes that built the surface, such as cratering, lava flows, and aeolian activity. Each episode takes a preexisting surface as a starting point, alters it in some way, and stores the new surface for further processing. This modular construction makes it possible for new processes to be included without altering existing software.

  20. Chemistry of ferroelectric surfaces.

    PubMed

    Garrity, K; Kolpak, A M; Ismail-Beigi, S; Altman, E I

    2010-07-20

    It has been recognized since the 1950s that the polar and switchable nature of ferroelectric surfaces can potentially lead to polarization direction-dependent surface chemistry. Recent theoretical studies and advances in growing high quality epitaxial ferroelectric thin films have motivated a flurry of experimental studies aimed at creating surfaces with switchable adsorption and catalytic properties, as well as films whose polarization direction switches depending on the gas phase environment. This research news article briefly reviews the key findings of these studies. These include observations that the adsorption strengths, and in certain cases the activation energies for reactions, of polar molecules on the surfaces of ferroelectric materials are sensitive to the polarization direction. For bare ferroelectric surfaces, the magnitudes of these differences are not large, but are still comparable to the energy barrier required to switch the polarization of approximately 10 nm thick films. Highlights of a recent study where chemical switching of a thin film ferroelectric was demonstrated are presented. Attempts to use the ferroelectric polarization to influence the behavior of supported catalytic metals will also be described. It will be shown that the tendency of the metals to cluster into particles makes it difficult to alter the chemical properties of the metal surface, since it is separated from the ferroelectric by several layers of metal atoms. An alternate approach to increasing the reactivity of ferroelectric surfaces is suggested that involves modifying the surface with atoms that bind strongly to the surface and thus remain atomically dispersed.

  1. Mars surface transportation options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitner, Jeffrey M.; Alred, John W.

    1986-01-01

    As the number of scientific experiments for the surface of Mars grows, the need for effective surface transportation becomes critical. Because of the diversity of the experiments proposed, as well as the desire to explore Mars from the equator to the poles, the optimum surface vehicle configuration is not obvious. Five candidate vehicles are described, with an estimate of their size and performance. In order to maximize the success of a manned Mars mission, it appears that two vehicles should be designed for surface transportation: an advanced long-range rover, and a remotely-piloted airplane.

  2. Martian surface simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, R. W.

    1993-06-01

    Computer generated surfaces have been created to aid in imaging, landing and rover studies for Mars and the moon. They are also being applied to the study of cratering histories. The surfaces are generated in steps which attempt to mimic geologic episodes. Surface roughness is realized fractally, while craters and other specific features have shapes and distributions dictated by observation. Surface materials are assigned appropriate albedos, making the images more realistic. With the inclusion of correlations between crater and rock distributions, the simulations are beginning to acquire a predictive capability.

  3. Incompressible Flows Free Surfaces

    1992-02-01

    NASA-VOF3D is a three-dimensional, transient, free surface, incompressible fluid dynamics program. It is specifically designed to calculate confined flows in a low gravity environment in which surface physics must be accurately treated. It allows multiple free surfaces with surface tension and wall adhesion and includes a partial cell treatment that allows curved boundaries and internal obstacles. Variable mesh spacing is permitted in all three coordinate directions. Boundary conditions available are rigid free-slip wall, rigid no-slipmore » wall, continuative, periodic, and specified pressure outflow boundary.« less

  4. Surface nanobubbles and nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, Detlef; Zhang, Xuehua

    2015-07-01

    Surface nanobubbles are nanoscopic gaseous domains on immersed substrates which can survive for days. They were first speculated to exist about 20 years ago, based on stepwise features in force curves between two hydrophobic surfaces, eventually leading to the first atomic force microscopy (AFM) image in 2000. While in the early years it was suspected that they may be an artifact caused by AFM, meanwhile their existence has been confirmed with various other methods, including through direct optical observation. Their existence seems to be paradoxical, as a simple classical estimate suggests that they should dissolve in microseconds, due to the large Laplace pressure inside these nanoscopic spherical-cap-shaped objects. Moreover, their contact angle (on the gas side) is much smaller than one would expect from macroscopic counterparts. This review will not only give an overview on surface nanobubbles, but also on surface nanodroplets, which are nanoscopic droplets (e.g., of oil) on (hydrophobic) substrates immersed in water, as they show similar properties and can easily be confused with surface nanobubbles and as they are produced in a similar way, namely, by a solvent exchange process, leading to local oversaturation of the water with gas or oil, respectively, and thus to nucleation. The review starts with how surface nanobubbles and nanodroplets can be made, how they can be observed (both individually and collectively), and what their properties are. Molecular dynamic simulations and theories to account for the long lifetime of the surface nanobubbles are then reported on. The crucial element contributing to the long lifetime of surface nanobubbles and nanodroplets is pinning of the three-phase contact line at chemical or geometric surface heterogeneities. The dynamical evolution of the surface nanobubbles then follows from the diffusion equation, Laplace's equation, and Henry's law. In particular, one obtains stable surface nanobubbles when the gas influx from

  5. Robust omniphobic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tuteja, Anish; Choi, Wonjae; Mabry, Joseph M.; McKinley, Gareth H.; Cohen, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces display water contact angles greater than 150° in conjunction with low contact angle hysteresis. Microscopic pockets of air trapped beneath the water droplets placed on these surfaces lead to a composite solid-liquid-air interface in thermodynamic equilibrium. Previous experimental and theoretical studies suggest that it may not be possible to form similar fully-equilibrated, composite interfaces with drops of liquids, such as alkanes or alcohols, that possess significantly lower surface tension than water (γlv = 72.1 mN/m). In this work we develop surfaces possessing re-entrant texture that can support strongly metastable composite solid-liquid-air interfaces, even with very low surface tension liquids such as pentane (γlv = 15.7 mN/m). Furthermore, we propose four design parameters that predict the measured contact angles for a liquid droplet on a textured surface, as well as the robustness of the composite interface, based on the properties of the solid surface and the contacting liquid. These design parameters allow us to produce two different families of re-entrant surfaces— randomly-deposited electrospun fiber mats and precisely fabricated microhoodoo surfaces—that can each support a robust composite interface with essentially any liquid. These omniphobic surfaces display contact angles greater than 150° and low contact angle hysteresis with both polar and nonpolar liquids possessing a wide range of surface tensions. PMID:19001270

  6. Vacuolar myelinopathy in waterfowl from a North Carolina impoundment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Augspurger, T.; Fischer, John R.; Thomas, Nancy; Sileo, L.; Brannian, Roger E.; Miller, Kimberli J.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2003-01-01

    Vacuolar myelinopathy was confirmed by light and electron microscopic examination of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), ring-necked ducks (Aythya collaris), and buffleheads (Bucephala albeola) collected during an epizootic at Lake Surf in central North Carolina (USA) between November 1998 and February 1999. Clinical signs of affected birds were consistent with central nervous system impairment of motor function (incoordination, abnormal movement and posture, weakness, paralysis). This is the first report of this disease in wild waterfowl (Anseriformes).Aug

  7. Suspended sediment transport in two mediterranean impounded rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobera, Gemma; Batalla, Ramon J.; Vericat, Damià; López, Jose A.; Tena, Alvaro

    2016-04-01

    Mediterranean basins are characterized by marked hydroclimatic fluctuations, from low discharges during long dry seasons to flashy events during wetter periods. Moreover, Mediterranean regions are often rugged, marked by a notable altitudinal gradient between the headwaters and the outlet; hence large climatic heterogeneity can be found along relatively short horizontal distances, with mean annual precipitation usually ranging from 275 to >900 mm. As a result, and in order to ensure water availability and reduce its spatial and temporal variability, a high number of large dams were built during the 20th century, with more than 3500 located in Mediterranean rivers. Dams alter the river's flow regime and interrupt the continuity of sediment transfer along the river network, thereby changing its functioning as an ecosystem. Within this context, this paper assesses the suspended sediment loads and dynamics of two climatically contrasting Mediterranean regulated rivers (i.e. the Ésera and Siurana) during a 2-yr period. Key findings indicate that floods were responsible for 92% of the total suspended sediment load in the River Siurana, while this percentage falls to 70% for the Ésera, indicating the importance of baseflows on sediment transport in the Ésera. This fact is related to the high sediment availability, with the Ésera acting as a non-supply-limited catchment due to the high productivity of the sources (i.e. badlands). In contrast, the Siurana can be considered a supply-limited system due to its low geomorphic activity and reduced sediment availability, with suspended sediment concentration remaining low even for high magnitude flood events. Reservoirs in both rivers reduce sediment load up to 90%, although total runoff is only reduced in the case of the River Ésera. A remarkable fact is the change of the hydrological character of both rivers downstream for the dams; the Ésera shifts from a humid mountainous river regime to a quasi-invariable pattern, whereas the Siurana experiences the opposite effect, changing from a flashy Mediterranean river to a more constant flow regime below the dam.

  8. 32 CFR 636.38 - Impounding privately owned vehicles (POVs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or bridge, or is double parking and interferes with the orderly flow of traffic. (B) On a sidewalk... emergency exit door of any public place (installation theater, club, dining facility, hospital, or other...) Emergency operations during a natural disaster or fire or must be removed from the disaster area...

  9. 32 CFR 636.38 - Impounding privately owned vehicles (POVs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... or bridge, or is double parking and interferes with the orderly flow of traffic. (B) On a sidewalk... emergency exit door of any public place (installation theater, club, dining facility, hospital, or other...) Emergency operations during a natural disaster or fire or must be removed from the disaster area...

  10. 32 CFR 636.38 - Impounding privately owned vehicles (POVs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... or bridge, or is double parking and interferes with the orderly flow of traffic. (B) On a sidewalk... emergency exit door of any public place (installation theater, club, dining facility, hospital, or other...) Emergency operations during a natural disaster or fire or must be removed from the disaster area...

  11. 32 CFR 636.38 - Impounding privately owned vehicles (POVs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... empowered to control the vehicle will be informed that the Military Police are not responsible for... place of safety for storage or safekeeping. (vii) Military Police reasonably believe the vehicle is... security of towed vehicles. One set of keys to the enclosed area will be maintained by the Military...

  12. Lunar Surface-to-Surface Power Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.

    2007-01-01

    A human lunar outpost, under NASA study for construction in the 2020's, has potential requirements to transfer electric power up to 50-kW across the lunar surface from 0.1 to 10-km distances. This power would be used to operate surface payloads located remotely from the outpost and/or outpost primary power grid. This paper describes concept designs for state-of-the-art technology power transfer subsystems including AC or DC power via cables, beamed radio frequency power and beamed laser power. Power transfer subsystem mass and performance are calculated and compared for each option. A simplified qualitative assessment of option operations, hazards, costs and technology needs is also described. Based on these concept designs and performance analyses, a DC power cabling subsystem is recommended to minimize subsystem mass and to minimize mission and programmatic costs and risks. Avenues for additional power transfer subsystem studies are recommended.

  13. Bacteria-surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tuson, Hannah H.; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of bacteria with surfaces has important implications in a range of areas, including bioenergy, biofouling, biofilm formation, and the infection of plants and animals. Many of the interactions of bacteria with surfaces produce changes in the expression of genes that influence cell morphology and behavior, including genes essential for motility and surface attachment. Despite the attention that these phenotypes have garnered, the bacterial systems used for sensing and responding to surfaces are still not well understood. An understanding of these mechanisms will guide the development of new classes of materials that inhibit and promote cell growth, and complement studies of the physiology of bacteria in contact with surfaces. Recent studies from a range of fields in science and engineering are poised to guide future investigations in this area. This review summarizes recent studies on bacteria-surface interactions, discusses mechanisms of surface sensing and consequences of cell attachment, provides an overview of surfaces that have been used in bacterial studies, and highlights unanswered questions in this field. PMID:23930134

  14. Protective Surfacing for Playgrounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Joe L.

    Noting that 90 percent of serious playground injuries result from falls to hard surfaces, this paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of various playground surfacing materials in terms of cost, climate, durability, aesthetics, and play value. Findings are based on the personal experience of the author, government documents, laboratory…

  15. Mechanically durable superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Verho, Tuukka; Bower, Chris; Andrew, Piers; Franssila, Sami; Ikkala, Olli; Ras, Robin H A

    2011-02-01

    Development of durable non-wetting surfaces is hindered by the fragility of the microscopic roughness features that are necessary for superhydrophobicity. Mechanical wear on superhydrophobic surfaces usually shows as increased sticking of water, leading to loss of non-wettability. Increased wear resistance has been demonstrated by exploiting hierarchical roughness where nanoscale roughness is protected to some degree by large scale features, and avoiding the use of hydrophilic bulk materials is shown to help prevent the formation of hydrophilic defects as a result of wear. Additionally, self-healing hydrophobic layers and roughness patterns have been suggested and demonstrated. Nevertheless, mechanical contact not only causes damage to roughness patterns but also surface contamination, which shortens the lifetime of superhydrophobic surfaces in spite of the self-cleaning effect. The use of photocatalytic effect and reduced electric resistance have been suggested to prevent the accumulation of surface contaminants. Resistance to organic contaminants is more challenging, however, oleophobic surface patterns which are non-wetting to organic liquids have been demonstrated. While the fragility of superhydrophobic surfaces currently limits their applicability, development of mechanically durable surfaces will enable a wide range of new applications in the future. PMID:21274919

  16. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Henderson and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-04-14

    Chemical reactions at surfaces underlie some of the most important processes of today, including catalysis, energy conversion, microelectronics, human health and the environment. Understanding surface chemical reactions at a fundamental level is at the core of the field of surface science. The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is one of the premiere meetings in the field. The program this year will cover a broad range of topics, including heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry, surfaces in environmental chemistry and energy conversion, reactions at the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interface, electronic materials growth and surface modification, biological interfaces, and electrons and photons at surfaces. An exciting program is planned, with contributions from outstanding speakers and discussion leaders from the international scientific community. The conference provides a dynamic environment with ample time for discussion and interaction. Attendees are encouraged to present posters; the poster sessions are historically well attended and stimulate additional discussions. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for junior researchers (e.g. graduate students or postdocs) to present their work and interact with established leaders in the field.

  17. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  18. Environmental surface asepsis.

    PubMed

    Palenik, Charles John

    2005-09-01

    Environmental surface disinfection is easily accomplished with precleaning and disinfection techniques, and prepared surfaces or difficult-to-clean items can be covered with impermeable barriers. When carried out effectively, both practitioners and patients are protected from exposure to microorganisms that transmit disease and cause illness.

  19. Touching the Surface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Beverly

    1992-01-01

    Author describes five self-developed activities that utilize readily available materials to help students understand surface tension in liquids. The hands-on activities allow students to see that strong bonds hold molecules together in a liquid and the molecules seem to stretch producing a "skin" at the surface of liquids. (PR)

  20. Mechanically durable superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Verho, Tuukka; Bower, Chris; Andrew, Piers; Franssila, Sami; Ikkala, Olli; Ras, Robin H A

    2011-02-01

    Development of durable non-wetting surfaces is hindered by the fragility of the microscopic roughness features that are necessary for superhydrophobicity. Mechanical wear on superhydrophobic surfaces usually shows as increased sticking of water, leading to loss of non-wettability. Increased wear resistance has been demonstrated by exploiting hierarchical roughness where nanoscale roughness is protected to some degree by large scale features, and avoiding the use of hydrophilic bulk materials is shown to help prevent the formation of hydrophilic defects as a result of wear. Additionally, self-healing hydrophobic layers and roughness patterns have been suggested and demonstrated. Nevertheless, mechanical contact not only causes damage to roughness patterns but also surface contamination, which shortens the lifetime of superhydrophobic surfaces in spite of the self-cleaning effect. The use of photocatalytic effect and reduced electric resistance have been suggested to prevent the accumulation of surface contaminants. Resistance to organic contaminants is more challenging, however, oleophobic surface patterns which are non-wetting to organic liquids have been demonstrated. While the fragility of superhydrophobic surfaces currently limits their applicability, development of mechanically durable surfaces will enable a wide range of new applications in the future.