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Sample records for 135-kilodalton membrane-associated proteins

  1. beta. -Amyloid precursor protein of Alzheimer disease occurs as 110- to 135-kilodalton membrane-associated proteins in neural and nonneural tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Selkoe, D.J.; Podlisny, M.B.; Joachim, C.L.; Vickers, E.A.; Lee, G.; Fritz, L.C.; Oltersdorf, T. )

    1988-10-01

    Progressive cerebral deposition of extracellular filaments composed of the {beta}-amyloid protein ({beta}AP) is a constant feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). Since the gene on chromosome 21 encoding the {beta}AP precursor ({beta}APP) is not known to be altered in AD, transcriptional or posttranslational changes may underlie accelerated {beta}AP deposition. Using two antibodies to the predicted carboxyl terminus of {beta}APP, the authors have identified the native {beta}APP in brain and nonneural human tissues as a 110- to 135-kDa protein complex that is insoluble in buffer and found in various membrane-rich subcellular fractions. These proteins are relatively uniformly distributed in adult brain, abundant in fetal brain, and detected in nonneural tissues that contain {beta}APP mRNA. Similarly sized proteins occur in rat, cow, and monkey brain and in cultured human HL-60 and HeLa cells; the precise patterns in the 110- to 135-kDa range are heterogeneous among various tissues and cell lines. They conclude that the highly conserved {beta}APP molecule occurs in mammalian tissues as a heterogeneous group of membrane-associated proteins of {approx} 120 kDa. Detection of the nonamyloidogenic carboxyl terminus within plaques suggests that proteolytic processing of the {beta}APP into insoluble filaments occurs locally in cortical regions that develop {beta}-amyloid deposits with age.

  2. Membrane-associated proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Lensink, Marc F

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the practical aspects of setting up molecular dynamics simulations of membrane-associated proteins and peptides, and the analysis thereof. Topology files for selected lipids are provided and selected analysis tools presented. These include tools for the creation of lipid bilayers of mixed lipid content (DOPE) and easy extraction of lipid coordinates (g_zcoor, g_xycoor), the calculation of helical axes (g_helixaxis) and aromatic order parameters (g_arom), the determination of peptide- or protein-interacting lipids (g_under), and the investigation of lipid-specific interactions through the calculation of lipid-bridged residue-residue contacts (g_prolip). PMID:25330961

  3. Membrane association of presynaptic cytomatrix protein bassoon.

    PubMed

    Sanmartí-Vila, L; tom Dieck, S; Richter, K; Altrock, W; Zhang, L; Volknandt, W; Zimmermann, H; Garner, C C; Gundelfinger, E D; Dresbach, T

    2000-08-18

    Components of the specialized cytomatrix at active zones of presynaptic nerve terminals are thought to be involved in organizing synaptic events such as immobilisation or translocation of synaptic vesicles and assemblingactive zone components. The 420-kDa non-transmembraneprotein Bassoon is a specific componentof the presynaptic cytomatrix that shares features with both cytoskeleton-associated and peripheral-membrane proteins. Using immunogold electron microscopy we show here that synapse associated Bassoon is distributed in a subregion of active zones. Using a biochemical assay we show that a fraction of Bassoon is membrane associated. Electron microscopy performed on the same biochemical fraction further revealed that Bassoon is associated with vesicular structures. Together these data suggest that at least a fraction of Bassoon is associated with a membraneous compartment in neurons.

  4. Lipid nanotechnologies for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Grushin, Kirill; Dalm, Daniela; Miller, Jaimy

    2014-11-01

    We present a methodology of lipid nanotubes (LNT) and nanodisks technologies optimized in our laboratory for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins at close to physiological conditions. The application of these lipid nanotechnologies for structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is fundamental for understanding and modulating their function. The LNTs in our studies are single bilayer galactosylceramide based nanotubes of ∼20 nm inner diameter and a few microns in length, that self-assemble in aqueous solutions. The lipid nanodisks (NDs) are self-assembled discoid lipid bilayers of ∼10 nm diameter, which are stabilized in aqueous solutions by a belt of amphipathic helical scaffold proteins. By combining LNT and ND technologies, we can examine structurally how the membrane curvature and lipid composition modulates the function of the membrane-associated proteins. As proof of principle, we have engineered these lipid nanotechnologies to mimic the activated platelet's phosphtaidylserine rich membrane and have successfully assembled functional membrane-bound coagulation factor VIII in vitro for structure determination by cryo-EM. The macromolecular organization of the proteins bound to ND and LNT are further defined by fitting the known atomic structures within the calculated three-dimensional maps. The combination of LNT and ND technologies offers a means to control the design and assembly of a wide range of functional membrane-associated proteins and complexes for structural studies by cryo-EM. The presented results confirm the suitability of the developed methodology for studying the functional structure of membrane-associated proteins, such as the coagulation factors, at a close to physiological environment.

  5. Chicken Egg Shell Membrane Associated Proteins and Peptides.

    PubMed

    Makkar, Sarbjeet; Liyanage, Rohana; Kannan, Lakshmi; Packialakshmi, Balamurugan; Lay, Jack O; Rath, Narayan C

    2015-11-11

    Egg shells are poultry industry byproducts with potential for use in various biological and agricultural applications. We have been interested in the membranes underlying the calcareous shell as a feed supplement, which showed potential to improve immunity and performance of post hatch poultry. Therefore, to determine their protein and peptide profiles, we extracted the egg shell membranes (ESM) from fresh unfertilized eggs with methanol and guanidine hydrochloride (GdHCl) to obtain soluble proteins for analysis by mass spectrometry. The methanol extract was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), electrospray ionization (ESI), high-performance reverse phase liquid chromatographic separation (HPLC), and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to determine its peptide and protein profiles. The GdHCl extract was subjected to ESI-HPLC-MS/MS following trypsin digestion of reduced/alkylated proteins. Nine proteins from the methanol extract and >275 proteins from the GdHCl extract were tentatively identified. The results suggested the presence of several abundant proteins from egg whites, such as ovoalbumin, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme as well as many others associated with antimicrobial, biomechanical, cytoskeletal organizational, cell signaling, and enzyme activities. Collagens, keratin, agrin, and laminin were some of the structural proteins present in the ESM. The methanol-soluble fraction contained several clusterin peptides and defensins, particularly, two isoforms of gallin. The ratios of the two isoforms of gallin differed between the membranes obtained from brown and white eggs. The high abundance of several antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, and other bioactive proteins in the ESM along with its potential to entrap various microbes and antigens may make it a suitable vehicle for oral immunization of post hatch poultry and improve their disease resistance.

  6. Systematically Ranking the Tightness of Membrane Association for Peripheral Membrane Proteins (PMPs)*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Liyan; Ge, Haitao; Huang, Xiahe; Liu, Kehui; Zhang, Yuanya; Xu, Wu; Wang, Yingchun

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale quantitative evaluation of the tightness of membrane association for nontransmembrane proteins is important for identifying true peripheral membrane proteins with functional significance. Herein, we simultaneously ranked more than 1000 proteins of the photosynthetic model organism Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for their relative tightness of membrane association using a proteomic approach. Using multiple precisely ranked and experimentally verified peripheral subunits of photosynthetic protein complexes as the landmarks, we found that proteins involved in two-component signal transduction systems and transporters are overall tightly associated with the membranes, whereas the associations of ribosomal proteins are much weaker. Moreover, we found that hypothetical proteins containing the same domains generally have similar tightness. This work provided a global view of the structural organization of the membrane proteome with respect to divergent functions, and built the foundation for future investigation of the dynamic membrane proteome reorganization in response to different environmental or internal stimuli. PMID:25505158

  7. Membrane association of sucrose synthase: changes during the graviresponse and possible control by protein phosphorylation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, J. L.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Sucrose synthase (SuSy) plays an important role in sucrose degradation and occurs both as a soluble and as a membrane-associated enzyme in higher plants. We show that membrane association can vary in vivo in response to gravistimulation, apparently involving SuSy dephosphorylation, and is a reversible process in vitro. Phosphorylation of SuSy has little effect on its activity but decreases its surface hydrophobicity as reported with the fluorescent probe bis-ANS. We postulate that phosphorylation of SuSy (and perhaps other membrane proteins) is involved in the release of the membrane-bound enzyme in part as a result of decreased surface hydrophobicity.

  8. Immunogenic membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sudhir; Kosalai, K; Arora, Shalini; Namane, Abdelkader; Sharma, Pawan; Gaikwad, Anil N; Brodin, Priscille; Cole, Stewart T

    2005-07-01

    Membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis offer a challenge, as well as an opportunity, in the quest for better therapeutic and prophylactic interventions against tuberculosis. The authors have previously reported that extraction with the detergent Triton X-114 (TX-114) is a useful step in proteomic analysis of mycobacterial cell membranes, and detergent-soluble membrane proteins of mycobacteria are potent stimulators of human T cells. In this study 1-D and 2-D gel electrophoresis-based protocols were used for the analysis of proteins in the TX-114 extract of M. tuberculosis membranes. Peptide mass mapping (using MALDI-TOF-MS, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry) of 116 samples led to the identification of 105 proteins, 9 of which were new to the M. tuberculosis proteome. Functional orthologues of 73 of these proteins were also present in Mycobacterium leprae, suggesting their relative importance. Bioinformatics predicted that as many as 73% of the proteins had a hydrophobic disposition. 1-D gel electrophoresis revealed more hydrophobic/transmembrane and basic proteins than 2-D gel electrophoresis. Identified proteins fell into the following major categories: protein synthesis, cell wall biogenesis/architecture and conserved hypotheticals/unknowns. To identify immunodominant proteins of the detergent phase (DP), 14 low-molecular-mass fractions prepared by continuous-elution gel electrophoresis were subjected to T cell activation assays using blood samples from BCG-vaccinated healthy donors from a tuberculosis endemic area. Analysis of the responses (cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production) showed that the immunodominance of certain DP fractions was most probably due to ribosomal proteins, which is consistent with both their specificity for mycobacteria and their abundance. Other membrane-associated proteins, including transmembrane proteins/lipoproteins and ESAT-6, did not appear to contribute

  9. Fusions involving protein kinase C and membrane-associated proteins in benign fibrous histiocytoma.

    PubMed

    Płaszczyca, Anna; Nilsson, Jenny; Magnusson, Linda; Brosjö, Otte; Larsson, Olle; Vult von Steyern, Fredrik; Domanski, Henryk A; Lilljebjörn, Henrik; Fioretos, Thoas; Tayebwa, Johnbosco; Mandahl, Nils; Nord, Karolin H; Mertens, Fredrik

    2014-08-01

    Benign fibrous histiocytoma (BFH) is a mesenchymal tumor that most often occurs in the skin (so-called dermatofibroma), but may also appear in soft tissues (so-called deep BFH) and in the skeleton (so-called non-ossifying fibroma). The origin of BFH is unknown, and it has been questioned whether it is a true neoplasm. Chromosome banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, RNA sequencing, RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR were used to search for recurrent somatic mutations in a series of BFH. BFHs were found to harbor recurrent fusions of genes encoding membrane-associated proteins (podoplanin, CD63 and LAMTOR1) with genes encoding protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms PRKCB and PRKCD. PKCs are serine-threonine kinases that through their many phosphorylation targets are implicated in a variety of cellular processes, as well as tumor development. When inactive, the amino-terminal, regulatory domain of PKCs suppresses the activity of their catalytic domain. Upon activation, which requires several steps, they typically translocate to cell membranes, where they interact with different signaling pathways. The detected PDPN-PRKCB, CD63-PRKCD and LAMTOR1-PRKCD gene fusions are all predicted to result in chimeric proteins consisting of the membrane-binding part of PDPN, CD63 or LAMTOR1 and the entire catalytic domain of the PKC. This novel pathogenetic mechanism should result in constitutive kinase activity at an ectopic location. The results show that BFH indeed is a true neoplasm, and that distorted PKC activity is essential for tumorigenesis. The findings also provide means to differentiate BFH from other skin and soft tissue tumors. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Rare cancers.

  10. Differential Expression in Phanerochaete chrysosporium of Membrane-Associated Proteins Relevant to Lignin Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Shary, Semarjit; Kapich, Alexander N.; Panisko, Ellen A.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Cullen, Dan; Hammel, Ken

    2008-10-02

    Fungal lignin-degrading systems must include membrane-associated proteins that participate in diverse processes such as uptake and oxidation of lignin fragments, secretion of ligninolytic secondary metabolites, and defense of the mycelium against ligninolytic oxidants. Despite their importance, little is known about the nature or regulation of these membrane-associated components. We grew the white rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium on cellulose or glucose as the carbon source and monitored the mineralization of a 14C-labeled synthetic lignin by these cultures to assess their ligninolytic competence. The results showed that the cellulose-grown cultures were ligninolytic, whereas the glucose-grown ones were not. We isolated microsomal membrane fractions from both types of culture and analyzed tryptic digests of them by shotgun liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Comparison of the results against the predicted P. chrysosporium proteome showed that a catalase (Joint Genome Institute P. chrysosporium protein I.D. 124398), an alcohol oxidase (126879), two transporters (137220 and 132234), and two cytochrome P450s (5011 and 8912) were up-regulated under ligninolytic conditions. Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays showed that RNA transcripts encoding all of these proteins were also up-regulated in ligninolytic cultures. Catalase 124398, alcohol oxidase 126879, and transporter 137220 were found in a proteomic analysis of partially purified plasma membranes from ligninolytic P. chrysosporium, and are therefore most likely associated with the outer envelope of the fungus.

  11. A proteomic study reveals the diversified distribution of plasma membrane-associated proteins in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuanwen; Cao, Jia; Jin, Qihui; Xie, Chunliang; He, Quanyuan; Cao, Rui; Xiong, Jixian; Chen, Ping; Wang, Xianchun; Liang, Songping

    2008-06-01

    To investigate the heterogeneous protein composition of highly polarized hepatocyte plasma membrane (PM), three PM-associated subfractions were obtained from freshly isolated rat hepatocytes using density gradient centrifugation. The origins of the three subfractions were determined by morphological analysis and western blotting. The proteins were subjected to either one-dimensional (1-D) SDS-PAGE or two-dimensional (2-D) benzyldimethyl-n-hexadecylammonium chloride (BAC)/SDS-PAGE before nano-Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization--tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-ESI-MS/MS). A total of 613 non-redundant proteins were identified, among which 371 (60.5%) proteins were classified as PM or membrane-associated proteins according to GO annotations and the literatures and 32.4% had transmembrane domains. PM proteins from microsomal portion possessed the highest percentage of transmembrane domain, about 46.5% of them containing at least one transmembrane domain. In addition to proteins known to be located at polarized liver PM regions, such as asialoglycoprotein receptor 2, desmoplakin and bile salt export pump, several proteins which had the potential to become novel subfraction-specific proteins were also identified, such as annexin a6, pannexin and radixin. Our analysis also evaluated the application of 1-D SDS-PAGE and 2-D 16-BAC/SDS-PAGE on the separation of integral membrane proteins.

  12. The Drosophila centrosomal protein Nuf is required for recruiting Dah, a membrane associated protein, to furrows in the early embryo.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, W F; Zhang, C X; Zelano, C; Hsieh, T S; Sullivan, W

    1999-09-01

    During mitosis of the Drosophila cortical syncytial divisions, actin-based membrane furrows separate adjacent spindles. Our genetic analysis indicates that the centrosomal protein Nuf is specifically required for recruitment of components to the furrows and the membrane-associated protein Dah is primarily required for the inward invagination of the furrow membrane. Recruitment of actin, anillin and peanut to the furrows occurs normally in dah-derived embryos. However, subsequent invagination of the furrows fails in dah-derived embryos and the septins become dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. This indicates that stable septin localization requires Dah-mediated furrow invagination. Close examination of actin and Dah localization in wild-type embryos reveals that they associate in adjacent particles during interphase and co-localize in the invaginating furrows during prophase and metaphase. We show that the Nuf centrosomal protein is required for recruiting the membrane-associated protein Dah to the furrows. In nuf-mutant embryos, much of the Dah does not reach the furrows and remains in a punctate distribution. This suggests that Dah is recruited to the furrows in vesicles and that the recruiting step is disrupted in nuf mutants. These studies lead to a model in which the centrosomes play an important role in the transport of membrane-associated proteins and other components to the developing furrows.

  13. Localization of Drosophila retinal degeneration B, a membrane- associated phosphatidylinositol transfer protein

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The Drosophila retinal degeneration B (rdgB) mutation causes abnormal photoreceptor response and light-enhanced retinal degeneration. Immunoblots using polyclonal anti-rdgB serum showed that rdgB is a 160- kD membrane protein. The antiserum localized the rdgB protein in photoreceptors, antennae, and regions of the Drosophila brain, indicating that the rdgB protein functions in many sensory and neuronal cells. In photoreceptors, the protein localized adjacent to the rhabdomeres, in the vicinity of the subrhabdomeric cisternae. The rdgB protein's amino-terminal 281 residues are > 40% identical to the rat brain phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PI-TP). A truncated rdgB protein, which contains only this amino-terminal domain, possesses a phosphatidylinositol transfer activity in vitro. The remaining 773 carboxyl terminal amino acids have additional functional domains. Nitrocellulose overlay experiments reveal that an acidic amino acid domain, adjacent to the PI transfer domain, binds 45Ca+2. Six hydrophobic segments are found in the middle of the putative translation product and likely function as membrane spanning domains. These results suggest that the rdgB protein, unlike the small soluble PI-TPs, is a membrane-associated PI-TP, which may be directly regulated by light-induced changes in intracellular calcium. PMID:8354691

  14. FAM65B is a membrane-associated protein of hair cell stereocilia required for hearing.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Horta, Oscar; Subasioglu-Uzak, Asli; Grati, M'hamed; DeSmidt, Alexandra; Foster, Joseph; Cao, Lei; Bademci, Guney; Tokgoz-Yilmaz, Suna; Duman, Duygu; Cengiz, F Basak; Abad, Clemer; Mittal, Rahul; Blanton, Susan; Liu, Xue Z; Farooq, Amjad; Walz, Katherina; Lu, Zhongmin; Tekin, Mustafa

    2014-07-01

    In a large consanguineous Turkish kindred with recessive nonsyndromic, prelingual, profound hearing loss, we identified in the gene FAM65B (MIM611410) a splice site mutation (c.102-1G>A) that perfectly cosegregates with the phenotype in the family. The mutation leads to exon skipping and deletion of 52-amino acid residues of a PX membrane localization domain. FAM65B is known to be involved in myotube formation and in regulation of cell adhesion, polarization, and migration. We show that wild-type Fam65b is expressed during embryonic and postnatal development stages in murine cochlea, and that the protein localizes to the plasma membranes of the stereocilia of inner and outer hair cells of the inner ear. The wild-type protein targets the plasma membrane, whereas the mutant protein accumulates in cytoplasmic inclusion bodies and does not reach the membrane. In zebrafish, knockdown of fam65b leads to significant reduction of numbers of saccular hair cells and neuromasts and to hearing loss. We conclude that FAM65B is a plasma membrane-associated protein of hair cell stereocilia that is essential for hearing.

  15. Conserved Determinants for Membrane Association of Nonstructural Protein 5A from Hepatitis C Virus and Related Viruses▿

    PubMed Central

    Brass, Volker; Pal, Zsuzsanna; Sapay, Nicolas; Deléage, Gilbert; Blum, Hubert E.; Penin, François; Moradpour, Darius

    2007-01-01

    Nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) is a membrane-associated essential component of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication complex. An N-terminal amphipathic alpha helix mediates in-plane membrane association of HCV NS5A and at the same time is likely involved in specific protein-protein interactions required for the assembly of a functional replication complex. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants for membrane association of NS5A from the related GB viruses and pestiviruses. Although primary amino acid sequences differed considerably, putative membrane anchor domains with amphipathic features were predicted in the N-terminal domains of NS5A proteins from these viruses. Confocal laser scanning microscopy, as well as membrane flotation analyses, demonstrated that NS5As from GB virus B (GBV-B), GBV-C, and bovine viral diarrhea virus, the prototype pestivirus, display membrane association characteristics very similar to those of HCV NS5A. The N-terminal 27 to 33 amino acid residues of these NS5A proteins were sufficient for membrane association. Circular dichroism analyses confirmed the capacity of these segments to fold into alpha helices upon association with lipid-like molecules. Despite structural conservation, only very limited exchanges with sequences from related viruses were tolerated in the context of functional HCV RNA replication, suggesting virus-specific interactions of these segments. In conclusion, membrane association of NS5A by an N-terminal amphipathic alpha helix is a feature shared by HCV and related members of the family Flaviviridae. This observation points to conserved roles of the N-terminal amphipathic alpha helices of NS5A in replication complex formation. PMID:17192310

  16. Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP) Regulates Melanosomal pH and Influences Tyrosinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Yang, Seung Ha; Shin, Misun; Nam, Yeon-Ju; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Ai-Young; Hwang, Daehee; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Lee, Tae Ryong

    2015-01-01

    The SLC45A2 gene encodes a Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP). Mutations of this gene cause oculocutaneous albinism type 4 (OCA4). However, the molecular mechanism of its action in melanogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we discuss the role of MATP in melanin production. The SLC45A2 gene is highly enriched in human melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, and its protein, MATP, is located in melanosomes. The knockdown of MATP using siRNAs reduced melanin content and tyrosinase activity without any morphological change in melanosomes or the expression of melanogenesis-related proteins. Interestingly, the knockdown of MATP significantly lowered the melanosomal pH, as verified through DAMP analysis, suggesting that MATP regulates melanosomal pH and therefore affects tyrosinase activity. Finally, we found that the reduction of tyrosinase activity associated with the knockdown of MATP was readily recovered by copper treatment in the in vitro L-DOPA oxidase activity assay of tyrosinase. Considering that copper is an important element for tyrosinase activity and that its binding to tyrosinase depends on melanosomal pH, MATP may play an important role in regulating tyrosinase activity via controlling melanosomal pH. PMID:26057890

  17. Plasma membrane associated membranes (PAM) from Jurkat cells contain STIM1 protein is PAM involved in the capacitative calcium entry?

    PubMed

    Kozieł, Katarzyna; Lebiedzinska, Magdalena; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Onopiuk, Marta; Brutkowski, Wojciech; Wierzbicka, Katarzyna; Wilczyński, Grzegorz; Pinton, Paolo; Duszyński, Jerzy; Zabłocki, Krzysztof; Wieckowski, Mariusz R

    2009-12-01

    A proper cooperation between the plasma membrane, the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria seems to be essential for numerous cellular processes involved in Ca(2+) signalling and maintenance of Ca(2+) homeostasis. A presence of microsomal and mitochondrial proteins together with those characteristic for the plasma membrane in the fraction of the plasma membrane associated membranes (PAM) indicates a formation of stabile interactions between these three structures. We isolated the plasma membrane associated membranes from Jurkat cells and found its significant enrichment in the plasma membrane markers including plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and CD3 as well as sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase as a marker of the endoplasmic reticulum membranes. In addition, two proteins involved in the store-operated Ca(2+) entry, Orai1 located in the plasma membrane and an endoplasmic reticulum protein STIM1 were found in this fraction. Furthermore, we observed a rearrangement of STIM1-containing protein complexes isolated from Jurkat cells undergoing stimulation by thapsigargin. We suggest that the inter-membrane compartment composed of the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum, and isolated as a stabile plasma membrane associated membranes fraction, might be involved in the store-operated Ca(2+) entry, and their formation and rebuilding have an important regulatory role in cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis.

  18. Membrane association of Wuhan nodavirus protein A is required for its ability to accumulate genomic RNA1 template.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yang; Wang, Zhaowei; Liu, Yongxiang; Qi, Nan; Miao, Meng; Si, Jie; Xiang, Xue; Cai, Dawei; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2013-05-10

    One common feature of positive-strand RNA viruses is the association of viral RNA and viral RNA replicase proteins with specific intracellular membranes to form RNA replication complexes. Wuhan nodavirus (WhNV) encodes protein A, which is the sole viral RNA replicase. Here, we showed that WhNV protein A closely associates with mitochondrial outer membranes and colocalizes with viral RNA replication sites. We further identified the transmembrane domains (N-terminal aa 33-64 and aa 212-254) of protein A for membrane association and mitochondrial localization. Moreover, we found that protein A accumulates genomic RNA by stabilizing the RNA. And our further investigation revealed that the ability of WhNV protein A to associate with membranes is closely linked with its ability for membrane recruitment and stabilization of viral genomic RNA templates. This study represents an advance toward understanding the mechanism of the RNA replication of WhNV and probably other nodaviruses. PMID:23490047

  19. Potassium-dependent changes in the expression of membrane-associated proteins in barley roots

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, M.; Kulpa, J.; Siddiqi, M.Y.; Glass, A.D.M. )

    1990-04-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Halcyon) seedlings which has been grown in full strength complete inorganic nutrient media (containing 6 millimolar K{sup +}) had high internal K{sup +} concentrations and low values of K{sup +} ({sup 86}Rb{sup +}) influx when influx was measured from solutions containing 100 micromolar K{sup +}. Transfer of these plants to solutions lacking K{sup +} resulted in significant reductions of root and shoot K{sup +} concentrations and values of K{sup +} ({sup 86}Rb{sup +}) influx increased by greater than 10-fold within 3 days. When plants treated in this way were returned to complete solutions, containing K{sup +}, the changes induced by K{sup +} deprivation were reversed. Parallel studies of microsomal membranes by means of SDS-PAGE demonstrated that the expression of a group of polypeptides increased or decreased in parallel with changes of K{sup +} ({sup 86}Rb{sup +}) influx. Most prominent of these were 45 and 34 kilodalton polypeptides which specifically responded to K{sup +} status of the barley plants; their expression was not enhanced by N or P deprivation. The 45 kilodalton polypeptide was susceptible to degradation by a membrane associated protease when microsomes were washing in buffer containing 0.2 millimolar PMSF. This loss was prevented by increasing PMSF concentration to 2 millimolar.

  20. Lymphocyte cytosolic protein 1 is a chronic lymphocytic leukemia membrane-associated antigen critical to niche homing

    PubMed Central

    Dubovsky, Jason A.; Chappell, Danielle L.; Harrington, Bonnie K.; Agrawal, Kitty; Andritsos, Leslie A.; Flynn, Joseph M.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Paulaitis, Michael E.; Bolon, Brad; Johnson, Amy J.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane antigens are critical to the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) as they facilitate microenvironment homing, proliferation, and survival. Targeting the CLL membrane and associated signaling patterns is a current focus of therapeutic development. Many tumor membrane targets are simultaneously targeted by humoral immunity, thus forming recognizable immunoglobulin responses. We sought to use this immune response to identify novel membrane-associated targets for CLL. Using a novel strategy, we interrogated CLL membrane-specific autologous immunoglobulin G reactivity. Our analysis unveiled lymphocyte cytosolic protein 1 (LCP1), a lymphocyte-specific target that is highly expressed in CLL. LCP1 plays a critical role in B-cell biology by crosslinking F-actin filaments, thereby solidifying cytoskeletal structures and providing a scaffold for critical signaling pathways. Small interfering RNA knockdown of LCP1 blocked migration toward CXCL12 in transwell assays and to bone marrow in an in vivo xenotransplant model, confirming a role for LCP1 in leukemia migration. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib or the PI3K inhibitor idelalisib block B-cell receptor induced activation of LCP1. Our data demonstrate a novel strategy to identify cancer membrane target antigens using humoral anti-tumor immunity. In addition, we identify LCP1 as a membrane-associated target in CLL with confirmed pathogenic significance. This clinical trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov; study ID number: OSU-0025 OSU-0156. PMID:24009233

  1. Liposome-based assays to study membrane-associated protein networks.

    PubMed

    Niehage, Christian; Stange, Christoph; Anitei, Mihaela; Hoflack, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Transport carriers regulate the bidirectional flow of membrane between the compartments of the secretory and endocytic pathways. Their biogenesis relies on the recruitment of a number of cytosolic proteins and protein complexes on specific membrane microdomains with defined protein and lipid compositions. The timely assembly of these cellular machines onto membranes involves multiple protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions and is necessary to select membrane proteins and lipids into nascent carriers, to bend the flat membrane of the donor compartment, to change the shape of this nascent carrier into a tubular-vesicular structure, and to operate its scission from the donor compartment. A challenge in this field of membrane cell biology has been to identify these machineries and to understand their precise function, in particular by studying their spatial and temporal dynamics during carrier biogenesis. During the past years, liposome-based synthetic biology fully recapitulating the fidelity of carrier biogenesis as seen in vivo has proved to be instrumental to identify these key cytosolic components using mass spectrometry and their dynamics using fluorescence microscopy. We describe here the methods to isolate on synthetic membranes the protein networks needed for carrier biogenesis, to identify them using label-free quantitative proteomics, and to visualize their dynamics on giant unilamellar vesicles. PMID:24359957

  2. Z-scan Fluorescence Profile Deconvolution of Cytosolic and Membrane-associated Protein Populations

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elizabeth M.; Hennen, Jared; Chen, Yan; Mueller, Joachim D.

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a technique that characterizes the spatial distribution of peripheral membrane proteins that associate reversibly with the plasma membrane. An axial scan through the cell generates a z-scan intensity profile of a fluorescently labeled peripheral membrane protein. This profile is analytically separated into membrane and cytoplasmic components by accounting for both the cell geometry and the point spread function. We experimentally validated the technique and characterized both the resolvability and stability of z-scan measurements. Further, using the cellular brightness of green fluorescent protein, we were able to convert the fluorescence intensities into concentrations at the membrane and in the cytoplasm. We applied the technique to study the translocation of the pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C-delta1 labeled with green fluorescent protein upon ionomycin treatment. Analysis of the z-scan fluorescence profiles revealed protein-specific cell height changes and allowed for comparison between the observed fluorescence changes and predictions based on the cellular surface area to volume ratio. The quantitative capability of z-scan fluorescence profile deconvolution offers opportunities for investigating peripheral membrane proteins in the living cell that were previously not accessible. PMID:25862080

  3. G-protein. alpha. -subunit expression, myristoylation, and membrane association in COS cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mumby, S.M.; Gilman, A.G. ); Heukeroth, R.O.; Gordon, J.I. )

    1990-01-01

    Myristolyation of seven different {alpha} subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) was examined by expressing these proteins in monkey kidney COS cells. Metabolic labeling studies of cells transfected with cytomegalovirus-based expression vectors indicated that ({sup 3}H)myristate was incorporated into {alpha}{sub i1}, {alpha}{sub i2}, {alpha}{sub i3}, {alpha}{sub 0}, and {alpha}{sub 1}, and {alpha}{sub z} but not {alpha}{sub s} subunits. The role of myristoylation in the association of {alpha} subunits with membranes was analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis and by substitution of myristate with a less hydrophobic analog, 10-(propoxy)decanoate (11-oxamyristate). Myristoylation of {alpha}{sub 0} was blocked when an alanine residue was substituted for its amino-terminal glycine, as was association of the protein with membranes. Substitution of the myristoyl group with 11-oxamyristate affected the cellular distribution of a subset of acylated {alpha} subunits. The results are consistent with a model wherein the hydrophobic interaction of myristate with the bilayer permits continued association of the protein with the plasma membrane when G-protein {alpha} subunits dissociated from {beta}{gamma}.

  4. The Membrane Associated RING-CH Proteins: A Family of E3 Ligases with Diverse Roles through the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Means, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery that conjugation of ubiquitin to proteins can drive proteolytic degradation, ubiquitination has been shown to perform a diverse range of functions in the cell. It plays an important role in endocytosis, signal transduction, trafficking of vesicles inside the cell, and even DNA repair. The process of ubiquitination-mediated control has turned out to be remarkably complex, involving a diverse array of proteins and many levels of control. This review focuses on a family of structurally related E3 ligases termed the membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) ubiquitin ligases, which were originally discovered as structural homologs to the virals E3s, K3, and K5 from Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). These proteins contain a catalytic RING-CH finger and are typically membrane-bound, with some having up to 14 putative transmembrane domains. Despite several lines of evidence showing that the MARCH proteins play a complex and essential role in several cellular processes, this family remains understudied. PMID:27419207

  5. PutA protein, a membrane-associated flavin dehydrogenase, acts as a redox-dependent transcriptional regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Ostrovsky de Spicer, P; Maloy, S

    1993-01-01

    The proline utilization (put) operon of Salmonella typhimurium is transcriptionally repressed by PutA protein in the absence of proline. PutA protein also carries out the enzymatic steps in proline catabolism. These two roles require different cellular localizations of PutA. Catabolism of proline requires PutA to associate with the membrane because reoxidation of the FAD cofactor in PutA needs the presence of an electron acceptor. Repression of the put operon requires PutA to bind to the put control-region DNA in the cytoplasm. The presence of proline, the inducer, is necessary but not sufficient for PutA to discriminate between its roles as an enzyme or as a repressor. Two conditions that prevent PutA protein binding to the put control region are (i) when proline and an electron acceptor or the cytoplasmic membrane are present or (ii) when PutA is reduced by dithionite. These two conditions increase the relative hydrophobicity of PutA protein, favoring membrane association and therefore enzymatic activity. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8483946

  6. Acyl-Protein Thioesterase 2 Catalizes the Deacylation of Peripheral Membrane-Associated GAP-43

    PubMed Central

    Tomatis, Vanesa M.; Trenchi, Alejandra; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Daniotti, Jose L.

    2010-01-01

    An acylation/deacylation cycle is necessary to maintain the steady-state subcellular distribution and biological activity of S-acylated peripheral proteins. Despite the progress that has been made in identifying and characterizing palmitoyltransferases (PATs), much less is known about the thioesterases involved in protein deacylation. In this work, we investigated the deacylation of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), a dually acylated protein at cysteine residues 3 and 4. Using fluorescent fusion constructs, we measured in vivo the rate of deacylation of GAP-43 and its single acylated mutants in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 and human HeLa cells. Biochemical and live cell imaging experiments demonstrated that single acylated mutants were completely deacylated with similar kinetic in both cell types. By RT-PCR we observed that acyl-protein thioesterase 1 (APT-1), the only bona fide thioesterase shown to mediate deacylation in vivo, is expressed in HeLa cells, but not in CHO-K1 cells. However, APT-1 overexpression neither increased the deacylation rate of single acylated GAP-43 nor affected the steady-state subcellular distribution of dually acylated GAP-43 both in CHO-K1 and HeLa cells, indicating that GAP-43 deacylation is not mediated by APT-1. Accordingly, we performed a bioinformatic search to identify putative candidates with acyl-protein thioesterase activity. Among several candidates, we found that APT-2 is expressed both in CHO-K1 and HeLa cells and its overexpression increased the deacylation rate of single acylated GAP-43 and affected the steady-state localization of diacylated GAP-43 and H-Ras. Thus, the results demonstrate that APT-2 is the protein thioesterase involved in the acylation/deacylation cycle operating in GAP-43 subcellular distribution. PMID:21152083

  7. ADAM22, a Kv1 channel-interacting protein, recruits membrane-associated guanylate kinases to juxtaparanodes of myelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Oses-Prieto, Juan; Kim, Moon Young; Horresh, Ido; Peles, Elior; Burlingame, Alma L; Trimmer, James S; Meijer, Dies; Rasband, Matthew N

    2010-01-20

    Clustered Kv1 K(+) channels regulate neuronal excitability at juxtaparanodes of myelinated axons, axon initial segments, and cerebellar basket cell terminals (BCTs). These channels are part of a larger protein complex that includes cell adhesion molecules and scaffolding proteins. To identify proteins that regulate assembly, clustering, and/or maintenance of axonal Kv1 channel protein complexes, we immunoprecipitated Kv1.2 alpha subunits, and then used mass spectrometry to identify interacting proteins. We found that a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 22 (ADAM22) is a component of the Kv1 channel complex and that ADAM22 coimmunoprecipitates Kv1.2 and the membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) PSD-93 and PSD-95. When coexpressed with MAGUKs in heterologous cells, ADAM22 and Kv1 channels are recruited into membrane surface clusters. However, coexpression of Kv1.2 with ADAM22 and MAGUKs does not alter channel properties. Among all the known Kv1 channel-interacting proteins, only ADAM22 is found at every site where Kv1 channels are clustered. Analysis of Caspr-null mice showed that, like other previously described juxtaparanodal proteins, disruption of the paranodal junction resulted in redistribution of ADAM22 into paranodal zones. Analysis of Caspr2-, PSD-93-, PSD-95-, and double PSD-93/PSD-95-null mice showed ADAM22 clustering at BCTs requires PSD-95, but ADAM22 clustering at juxtaparanodes requires neither PSD-93 nor PSD-95. In direct contrast, analysis of ADAM22-null mice demonstrated juxtaparanodal clustering of PSD-93 and PSD-95 requires ADAM22, whereas Kv1.2 and Caspr2 clustering is normal in ADAM22-null mice. Thus, ADAM22 is an axonal component of the Kv1 K(+) channel complex that recruits MAGUKs to juxtaparanodes. PMID:20089912

  8. Protein phosphorylation and membrane association of sucrose synthase in developing tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Anguenot, Raphaël; Nguyen-Quoc, Binh; Yelle, Serge; Michaud, Dominique

    2006-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) activities were detected both in the soluble and the membrane fraction of various tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) organs, using a synthetic peptide mimicking the serine 11 phosphorylation site of a tomato sucrose synthase (SS, EC 2.4.1.13) isoform as substrate. The levels of membrane and soluble Ser-CDPK activities were differentially regulated during fruit development. The membrane Ser-CDPK activity was maximal in young fruit but decreased as the fruit developed, suggesting a specific role during fruit growth. Using an in gel assay with purified tomato SS as substrate, we showed that partially purified soluble and membrane Ser-CDPK preparations both contained a SS-kinase polypeptide of 55 kDa. The membrane and soluble Ser-CDPK activities were largely inactivated in the absence of calcium or when MgCl(2) was replaced by MnCl(2). Both soluble and membrane Ser-CDPK activities were very sensitive to staurosporine. Using Fe(III)-immobilized metal chromatography to determine the apparent phosphorylation status of the enzyme in vivo, we showed that soluble SS was largely dephosphorylated in fruits fed EGTA or staurosporine, compared to fruits fed water or sucrose. Moreover, the level of SS increased by about two-fold in the membrane fraction of fruits fed the Ser-CDPK inhibitors, compared to the control. The level of SS protein in the membrane and soluble fractions of tomato fruit was developmentally regulated, the membrane form being specifically detected in actively growing fruits. Together, our results suggest that a mechanism involving protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation and/or calcium would in part control the association of SS isoforms with membranes in developing tomato fruit.

  9. In Silico Study of Plant Polyphenols' Interactions with VP24-Ebola Virus Membrane-associated Protein.

    PubMed

    Pleško, Sebastian; Volk, Helena; Lukšič, Miha; Podlipnik, Črtomir

    2015-01-01

    The Zaire Ebola viral protein VP24 selectively inhibits nuclear import of STAT1 and as such blocks interferon-induced antiviral responses vital for cell's emergency. Inhibition of VP24 with small molecule inhibitor may neutralize the threatening action of Ebola virus. We performed molecular docking of compounds from a selected small library of plant polyphenols on to VP24. Our research shows that 1,2,3,6-tetragalloyl glucose, epigallocatechin gallate, chlorogenic acic, oleuropein and miquelianin represent promising leads for further studies. PMID:26454589

  10. 1,25(OH)2D3 increases membrane associated protein kinase C in MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Simboli-Campbell, M; Franks, D J; Welsh, J

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol [1,25(OH)2D3] affects protein kinase C (PKC) activity in kidney, as has been demonstrated in HL-60 cells we measured 1,25(OH)2D3 binding, PKC activity and PKC immunoreactivity in Madin Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells, a normal renal epithelial cell line derived from bovine kidney. Our data demonstrate that MDBK cells exhibit specific high affinity binding for 1,25(OH)2D3, indicating the presence of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Treatment of MDBK cells with 1,25(OH)2D3 for 24 h increased membrane PKC activity and immunoreactivity. The effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 was dose-dependent, with a peak effect observed at 10(-7)M 1,25(OH)2D3. The 1,25(OH)2D3 induced increase in membrane PKC was paralleled by a comparable decrease in cytosolic PKC activity and amount. Although time course studies were consistent with a VDR mediated effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on PKC protein synthesis, total PKC activity was not increased by 1,25(OH)2D3, suggesting an effect on PKC translocation or localization. These results suggest that 1,25(OH)2D3 modulates PKC mediated events in kidney, a classic target for this steroid hormone.

  11. Multiple roles for membrane-associated protein trafficking and signaling in gravitropism

    PubMed Central

    Strohm, Allison K.; Baldwin, Katherine L.; Masson, Patrick H.

    2012-01-01

    Gravitropism is a process that allows plant organs to guide their growth relative to the gravity vector. It requires them to sense changes in their orientation and generate a biochemical signal that they transmit to the tissues that drive organ curvature. Trafficking between the plasma membrane and endosomal compartments is important for all of these phases of the gravitropic response. The sedimentation of starch-filled organelles called amyloplasts plays a key role in sensing reorientation, and vacuolar integrity is required for amyloplast sedimentation in shoots. Other proteins associated with the vesicle trafficking pathway contribute to early gravity signal transduction independently of amyloplast sedimentation in both roots and hypocotyls. Phosphatidylinositol signaling, which starts at the plasma membrane and later affects the localization of auxin efflux facilitators, is a likely second messenger in the signal transduction phase of gravitropism. Finally, membrane-localized auxin influx and efflux facilitators contribute to a differential auxin gradient across the gravistimulated organs, which directs root curvature. PMID:23248632

  12. Membrane associated protein flotillin-2 in Litopenaeus vannamei plays a role in WSSV infection.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hong; Guo, Guangran; Liu, Rongdiao; Wang, Chuanqi; Xu, Xun; Ruan, Lingwei

    2016-07-01

    Flotillin-2, an important protein of vesicular endocytosis, plays an essential role in a large number of cellular processes, including viruses and pathogen infection. In the present study, a flotillin-2 homolog in Litopenaeus vannamei, designed as Lvflotillin-2, was cloned and characterized. To analyze the putative role of Lvflotillin-2 during white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection, real-time quantitative PCR was performed. The result showed that the transcriptional level of Lvflotillin-2 was up-regulated significantly after virus challenge. Furthermore, upon WSSV stimulation, Lvflotillin-2 in shrimp cells could translocate from the plasma membrane to intracellular compartments, and unexpectedly, also into nucleus. Additionally, depletion of Lvflotillin-2 inhibited WSSV gene ie1 transcription. It suggested that Lvflotillin-2 could be hijacked by WSSV. These observations indicated that Lvflotillin-2 was involved in WSSV infection, and presented here should be useful for gaining insight into shrimp immunity and WSSV pathogenesis.

  13. Investigating polymorphisms in membrane-associated transporter protein SLC45A2, using sucrose transporters as a model.

    PubMed

    Reinders, Anke; Ward, John M

    2015-07-01

    Solute carrier family 45 member 2 encodes the melanosomal membrane protein, membrane-associated transporter protein (MATP), of unknown function, that is required for normal melanin synthesis. The present study analyzed the effects of two human MATP mutations, D93N, which causes oculocutaneous albinism 4 (OCA4), and L374F, which is correlated with light pigmentation in European populations. Corresponding mutations were produced in the related and well-characterized sucrose transporter from rice, OsSUT1, and transport activity was measured by heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes, in addition to 14C-sucrose uptake in yeast. The mutation corresponding to D93N resulted in a complete loss of transport activity. The mutation corresponding to L374F resulted in a 90% decrease in transport activity, although the substrate affinity was unaffected. The results indicated that the D93N mutation causes OCA4 as a result of loss of MATP transport activity, and that the F374 allele confers significantly lower transport activity than L374. PMID:25760657

  14. Induction of a cytoplasmic activator of DNA synthesis in lymphocytes is mediated through a membrane-associated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Autieri, M V; Fresa, K L; Coffman, F D; Katz, M E; Cohen, S

    1990-01-01

    We have shown previously that cytoplasmic extracts from actively dividing lymphoid cells are capable of inducing DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei. One of the factors involved in this activity, ADR, appears to be a greater than 90 kDa heat-labile protease. Cytoplasmic extracts prepared from nonproliferating lymphocytes express little to no ADR activity. However, ADR activity can be generated in these extracts by brief exposure to a membrane-enriched fraction of spontaneously proliferating, leukemic human T lymphoblastoid (MOLT-4) cells. This suggests that ADR activity is present in the resting cytoplasm in an inactive or precursor form. This in vitro generation of ADR activity can be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the isoquinolinesulfonamide derivative, H-7 (1-(5-isoquinoline-sulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine dihydrochloride), an inhibitor of both cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinases and protein kinase C (PKC). However, more specific inhibitors of cAMP-dependent protein kinases, including N-[( 2-methylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide dihydrochloride (H8) and N-(2-gua-nidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA-1004), had little to no effect on the in vitro generation of ADR activity. Furthermore, membranes from MOLT-4 cells depleted of PKC by long-term exposure (24 h) to phorbol esters and calcium ionophores were unable to induce ADR activity in resting peripheral blood lymphocytes extracts. The results of these studies suggest 1) ADR activity is present in resting cell cytoplasm in an inactive or precursor form; and 2) ADR activity can be induced in this resting cytoplasm through a mechanism involving a membrane-associated protein kinase, possibly PKC. The ability of alkaline phosphatase to deplete the activity of preformed ADR suggests the possibility that ADR itself is phosphoprotein. PMID:1725128

  15. Induction of a cytoplasmic activator of DNA synthesis in lymphocytes is mediated through a membrane-associated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Autieri, M V; Fresa, K L; Coffman, F D; Katz, M E; Cohen, S

    1990-12-01

    We have shown previously that cytoplasmic extracts from actively dividing lymphoid cells are capable of inducing DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei. One of the factors involved in this activity, ADR, appears to be a greater than 90 kDa heat-labile protease. Cytoplasmic extracts prepared from nonproliferating lymphocytes express little to no ADR activity. However, ADR activity can be generated in these extracts by brief exposure to a membrane-enriched fraction of spontaneously proliferating, leukemic human T lymphoblastoid (MOLT-4) cells. This suggests that ADR activity is present in the resting cytoplasm in an inactive or precursor form. This in vitro generation of ADR activity can be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the isoquinolinesulfonamide derivative, H-7 (1-(5-isoquinoline-sulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine dihydrochloride), an inhibitor of both cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinases and protein kinase C (PKC). However, more specific inhibitors of cAMP-dependent protein kinases, including N-[( 2-methylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide dihydrochloride (H8) and N-(2-gua-nidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA-1004), had little to no effect on the in vitro generation of ADR activity. Furthermore, membranes from MOLT-4 cells depleted of PKC by long-term exposure (24 h) to phorbol esters and calcium ionophores were unable to induce ADR activity in resting peripheral blood lymphocytes extracts. The results of these studies suggest 1) ADR activity is present in resting cell cytoplasm in an inactive or precursor form; and 2) ADR activity can be induced in this resting cytoplasm through a mechanism involving a membrane-associated protein kinase, possibly PKC. The ability of alkaline phosphatase to deplete the activity of preformed ADR suggests the possibility that ADR itself is phosphoprotein. PMID:1725128

  16. Structural Analysis of the Roles of Influenza A Virus Membrane-Associated Proteins in Assembly and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Chlanda, Petr; Schraidt, Oliver; Kummer, Susann; Riches, James; Oberwinkler, Heike; Prinz, Simone; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg

    2015-01-01

    viral proteins in mediating virus assembly and determining virus shape. To do this, we used a range of electron microscopy techniques to obtain and compare two- and three-dimensional images of virus particles and virus-like particles during and after assembly. The virus-like particles were produced using different combinations of viral proteins. Among our results, we found that coexpression of one or both of the viral surface proteins (hemagglutinin and neuraminidase) with the viral membrane-associated proteins encoded by the M segment results in assembly and release of filamentous virus-like particles in a manner very similar to that of the budding and release of influenza virions. These data provide novel insights into the roles played by individual viral proteins in influenza A virus assembly. PMID:26085153

  17. Molecular cloning of a membrane-associated human FK506- and rapamycin-binding protein, FKBP-13.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Y J; Albers, M W; Lane, W S; Bierer, B E; Schreiber, S L; Burakoff, S J

    1991-01-01

    The 12-kDa FK506-binding protein (FKBP-12) is a cytosolic receptor for the immunosuppressants FK506 and rapamycin. Here we report the molecular cloning and subcellular localization of a 13-kDa FKBP (FKBP-13), which has a 21-amino acid signal peptide and appears to be membrane-associated. Although no internal hydrophobic region, and thus no transmembrane domain, is apparent within the 120 amino acids of mature FKBP-13, a potential endoplasmic reticulum retention sequence (Arg-Thr-Glu-Leu) is found at its C terminus. FKBP-13 has 51% nucleotide sequence identity and 43% amino acid sequence identity to FKBP-12; the N-terminal sequences are divergent, but the 92-amino acid C-terminal sequence of FKBP-13 has 46 identical and 20 related residues when compared with FKBP-12. The conserved residues that comprise the drug binding site and rotamase active site of FKBP-12 are completely conserved in FKBP-13. Therefore, the three-dimensional structures of FKBP-12 and the FKBP-12/FK506 complex are likely to be excellent models of the corresponding FKBP-13 structure. Images PMID:1713687

  18. Structures formed by a cell membrane-associated arabinogalactan-protein on graphite or mica alone and with Yariv phenylglycosides

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li Hong; Weizbauer, Renate A.; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Xu, Feng; Genin, Guy M.; Pickard, Barbara G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Certain membrane-associated arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) with lysine-rich sub-domains participate in plant growth, development and resistance to stress. To complement fluorescence imaging of such molecules when tagged and introduced transgenically to the cell periphery and to extend the groundwork for assessing molecular structure, some behaviours of surface-spread AGPs were visualized at the nanometre scale in a simplified electrostatic environment. Methods Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-labelled LeAGP1 was isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves using antibody-coated magnetic beads, deposited on graphite or mica, and examined with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Key Results When deposited at low concentration on graphite, LeAGP can form independent clusters and rings a few nanometres in diameter, often defining deep pits; the aperture of the rings depends on plating parameters. On mica, intermediate and high concentrations, respectively, yielded lacy meshes and solid sheets that could dynamically evolve arcs, rings, ‘pores’ and ‘co-pores’, and pits. Glucosyl Yariv reagent combined with the AGP to make very large and distinctive rings. Conclusions Diverse cell-specific nano-patterns of native lysine-rich AGPs are expected at the wall–membrane interface and, while there will not be an identical patterning in different environmental settings, AFM imaging suggests protein tendencies for surficial organization and thus opens new avenues for experimentation. Nanopore formation with Yariv reagents suggests how the reagent might bind with AGP to admit Ca2+ to cells and hints at ways in which AGP might be structured at some cell surfaces. PMID:25164699

  19. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fei; He, Jinyan; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Xu, Jian; Li, Xia; Li, Peng; Wu, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70), IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT) of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep.

  20. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fei; He, Jinyan; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Xu, Jian; Li, Xia; Li, Peng; Wu, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70), IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT) of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep. PMID:27537186

  1. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fei; He, Jinyan; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Xu, Jian; Li, Xia; Li, Peng; Wu, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70), IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT) of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep. PMID:27537186

  2. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a plasma membrane-associated, uronide binding phosphoprotein with physical properties similar to viral movement proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Reymond, P; Kunz, B; Paul-Pletzer, K; Grimm, R; Eckerskorn, C; Farmer, E E

    1996-01-01

    Oligogalacturonides are structural and regulatory homopolymers from the extracellular pectic matrix of plants. In vitro micromolar concentrations of oligogalacturonates and polygalacturonates were shown previously to stimulate the phosphorylation of a small plasma membrane-associated protein in potato. Immunologically cross-reactive proteins were detected in plasma membrane-enriched fractions from all angiosperm subclasses in the Cronquist system. Polygalacturonate-enhanced phosphorylation of the protein was observed in four of the six dicotyledon subclasses but not in any of the five monocotyledon subclasses. A cDNA for the protein was cloned from potato. The deduced protein is extremely hydrophilic and has a proline-rich N terminus. The C-terminal half of the protein was predicted to be a coiled coil, suggesting that the protein interacts with other macromolecules. The recombinant protein was found to bind both simple and complex galacturonides. The behavior of the protein suggests several parallels with viral proteins involved in intercellular communication. PMID:8989883

  3. Identification of cDNA clones encoding valosin-containing protein and other plant plasma membrane-associated proteins by a general immunoscreening strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, J; Dixon, R A; Gonzales, R A; Kjellbom, P; Bhattacharyya, M K

    1995-01-01

    An approach was developed for the isolation and characterization of soybean plasma membrane-associated proteins by immunoscreening of a cDNA expression library. An antiserum was raised against purified plasma membrane vesicles. In a differential screening of approximately 500,000 plaque-forming units with the anti-(plasma membrane) serum and DNA probes derived from highly abundant clones isolated in a preliminary screening, 261 clones were selected from approximately 1,200 antiserum-positive plaques. These clones were classified into 40 groups by hybridization analysis and 5'- and 3'-terminal sequencing. By searching nucleic acid and protein sequence data bases, 11 groups of cDNAs were identified, among which valosin-containing protein (VCP), clathrin heavy chain, phospholipase C, and S-adenosylmethionine:delta 24-sterol-C-methyltransferase have not to date been cloned from plants. The remaining 29 groups did not match any current data base entries and may, therefore, represent additional or yet uncharacterized genes. A full-length cDNA encoding the soybean VCP was sequenced. The high level of amino acid identity with vertebrate VCP and yeast CDC48 protein indicates that the soybean protein is a plant homolog of vertebrate VCP and yeast CDC48 protein. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7753826

  4. Ameliorative effect of membrane-associated estrogen receptor G protein coupled receptor 30 activation on object recognition memory in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takashi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kirino, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Membrane-associated estrogen receptor "G protein-coupled receptor 30" (GPR30) has been implicated in spatial recognition memory and protection against neuronal death. The present study investigated the role of GPR30 in object recognition memory in an Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model (5XFAD) by using novel object recognition (NOR) test. Impairment of long-term (24 h) recognition memory was observed in both male and female 5XFAD mice. Selective GPR30 agonist, G-1, ameliorated this impairment in female 5XFAD mice, but not in male mice. Our study demonstrated the ameliorative role of GPR30 in NOR memory impaired by AD pathology in female mice. PMID:27423484

  5. Basis for the Specificity and Activation of the Serpin Protein Z-dependent Proteinase Inhibitor (ZPI) as an Inhibitor of Membrane-associated Factor Xa

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Dementiev, Alexey; Olson, Steven T.; Gettins, Peter G.W.

    2012-12-13

    The serpin ZPI is a protein Z (PZ)-dependent specific inhibitor of membrane-associated factor Xa (fXa) despite having an unfavorable P1 Tyr. PZ accelerates the inhibition reaction {approx}2000-fold in the presence of phospholipid and Ca{sup 2+}. To elucidate the role of PZ, we determined the x-ray structure of Gla-domainless PZ (PZ{sub {Delta}GD}) complexed with protein Z-dependent proteinase inhibitor (ZPI). The PZ pseudocatalytic domain bound ZPI at a novel site through ionic and polar interactions. Mutation of four ZPI contact residues eliminated PZ binding and membrane-dependent PZ acceleration of fXa inhibition. Modeling of the ternary Michaelis complex implicated ZPI residues Glu-313 and Glu-383 in fXa binding. Mutagenesis established that only Glu-313 is important, contributing {approx}5-10-fold to rate acceleration of fXa and fXIa inhibition. Limited conformational change in ZPI resulted from PZ binding, which contributed only {approx}2-fold to rate enhancement. Instead, template bridging from membrane association, together with previously demonstrated interaction of the fXa and ZPI Gla domains, resulted in an additional {approx}1000-fold rate enhancement. To understand why ZPI has P1 tyrosine, we examined a P1 Arg variant. This reacted at a diffusion-limited rate with fXa, even without PZ, and predominantly as substrate, reflecting both rapid acylation and deacylation. P1 tyrosine thus ensures that reaction with fXa or most other arginine-specific proteinases is insignificant unless PZ binds and localizes ZPI and fXa on the membrane, where the combined effects of Gla-Gla interaction, template bridging, and interaction of fXa with Glu-313 overcome the unfavorability of P1 Tyr and ensure a high rate of reaction as an inhibitor.

  6. Membrane-associated proteomics of chickpea identifies Sad1/UNC-84 protein (CaSUN1), a novel component of dehydration signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Mishra, Poonam; Subba, Pratigya; Rathi, Divya; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2014-02-01

    Dehydration affects almost all the physiological processes including those that result in the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which in turn elicits a highly conserved signaling, the unfolded protein response (UPR). We investigated the dehydration-responsive membrane-associated proteome of a legume, chickpea, by 2-DE coupled with mass spectrometry. A total of 184 protein spots were significantly altered over a dehydration treatment of 120 h. Among the differentially expressed proteins, a non-canonical SUN domain protein, designated CaSUN1 (Cicer arietinum Sad1/UNC-84), was identified. CaSUN1 localized to the nuclear membrane and ER, besides small vacuolar vesicles. The transcripts were downregulated by both abiotic and biotic stresses, but not by abscisic acid treatment. Overexpression of CaSUN1 conferred stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis. Furthermore, functional complementation of the yeast mutant, slp1, could rescue its growth defects. We propose that the function of CaSUN1 in stress response might be regulated via UPR signaling.

  7. Mutational Analysis on Membrane Associated Transporter Protein (MATP) and Their Structural Consequences in Oculocutaeous Albinism Type 4 (OCA4)-A Molecular Dynamics Approach.

    PubMed

    Kamaraj, Balu; Purohit, Rituraj

    2016-11-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism type IV (OCA4) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder which is characterized by reduced biosynthesis of melanin pigmentation in skin, hair, and eyes and caused by the genetic mutations in the membrane-associated transporter protein (MATP) encoded by SLC45A2 gene. The MATP protein consists of 530 amino acids which contains 12 putative transmembrane domains and plays an important role in pigmentation and probably functions as a membrane transporter in melanosomes. We scrutinized the most OCA4 disease-associated mutation and their structural consequences on SLC45A2 gene. To understand the atomic arrangement in 3D space, the native and mutant structures were modeled. Further the structural behavior of native and mutant MATP protein was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) approach in explicit lipid and water background. We found Y317C as the most deleterious and disease-associated SNP on SLC45A2 gene. In MDS, mutations in MATP protein showed loss of stability and became more flexible, which alter its structural conformation and function. This phenomenon has indicated a significant role in inducing OCA4. Our study explored the understanding of molecular mechanism of MATP protein upon mutation at atomic level and further helps in the field of pharmacogenomics to develop a personalized medicine for OCA4 disorder. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2608-2619, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27019209

  8. Membrane-associated proteomics of chickpea identifies Sad1/UNC-84 protein (CaSUN1), a novel component of dehydration signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Mishra, Poonam; Subba, Pratigya; Rathi, Divya; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2014-01-01

    Dehydration affects almost all the physiological processes including those that result in the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which in turn elicits a highly conserved signaling, the unfolded protein response (UPR). We investigated the dehydration-responsive membrane-associated proteome of a legume, chickpea, by 2-DE coupled with mass spectrometry. A total of 184 protein spots were significantly altered over a dehydration treatment of 120 h. Among the differentially expressed proteins, a non-canonical SUN domain protein, designated CaSUN1 (Cicer arietinum Sad1/UNC-84), was identified. CaSUN1 localized to the nuclear membrane and ER, besides small vacuolar vesicles. The transcripts were downregulated by both abiotic and biotic stresses, but not by abscisic acid treatment. Overexpression of CaSUN1 conferred stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis. Furthermore, functional complementation of the yeast mutant, slp1, could rescue its growth defects. We propose that the function of CaSUN1 in stress response might be regulated via UPR signaling. PMID:24577507

  9. Lipid membrane association of myelin proteins and peptide segments studied by oriented and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Muruganandam, Gopinath; Bürck, Jochen; Ulrich, Anne S; Kursula, Inari; Kursula, Petri

    2013-12-01

    Myelin-specific proteins are either integral or peripheral membrane proteins that, in complex with lipids, constitute a multilayered proteolipid membrane system, the myelin sheath. The myelin sheath surrounds the axons of nerves and enables rapid conduction of axonal impulses. Myelin proteins interact intimately with the lipid bilayer and play crucial roles in the assembly, function, and stability of the myelin sheath. Although myelin proteins have been investigated for decades, their structural properties upon membrane surface binding are still largely unknown. In this study, we have used simplified model systems consisting of synthetic peptides and membrane mimics, such as detergent micelles and/or lipid vesicles, to probe the conformation of peptides using synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy (SRCD). Additionally, oriented circular dichroism spectroscopy (OCD) was employed to examine the orientation of myelin peptides in macroscopically aligned lipid bilayers. Various representative peptides from the myelin basic protein (MBP), P0, myelin/oligodencrocyte glycoprotein, and connexin32 (cx32) were studied. A helical peptide from the central immunodominant epitope of MBP showed a highly tilted orientation with respect to the membrane surface, whereas the N-terminal cytoplasmic segment of cx32 folded into a helical structure that was only slightly tilted. The folding of full-length myelin basic protein was, furthermore, studied in a bicelle environment. Our results provide information on the conformation and membrane alignment of important membrane-binding peptides in a membrane-mimicking environment, giving novel insights into the mechanisms of membrane binding and stacking by myelin proteins.

  10. Crystal structures of the trimeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 matrix protein: implications for membrane association and assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, C P; Worthylake, D; Bancroft, D P; Christensen, A M; Sundquist, W I

    1996-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) matrix protein forms a structural shell associated with the inner viral membrane and performs other essential functions throughout the viral life cycle. The crystal structure of the HIV-1 matrix protein, determined at 2.3 angstrom resolution, reveals that individual matrix molecules are composed of five major helices capped by a three-stranded mixed beta-sheet. Unexpectedly, the protein assembles into a trimer in three different crystal lattices, burying 1880 angstrom2 of accessible surface area at the trimer interfaces. Trimerization appears to create a large, bipartite membrane binding surface in which exposed basic residues could cooperate with the N-terminal myristoyl groups to anchor the protein on the acidic inner membrane of the virus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8610175

  11. A Visual Screen of Protein Localization during Sporulation Identifies New Components of Prospore Membrane-Associated Complexes in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Chien; Santore, Ethan; Lavoie, Elizabeth; Needleman, Leor; Fiacco, Nicholas; Kim, Carey

    2014-01-01

    During ascospore formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the secretory pathway is reorganized to create new intracellular compartments, termed prospore membranes. Prospore membranes engulf the nuclei produced by the meiotic divisions, giving rise to individual spores. The shape and growth of prospore membranes are constrained by cytoskeletal structures, such as septin proteins, that associate with the membranes. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions to various proteins that associate with septins at the bud neck during vegetative growth as well as to proteins encoded by genes that are transcriptionally induced during sporulation were examined for their cellular localization during prospore membrane growth. We report localizations for over 100 different GFP fusions, including over 30 proteins localized to the prospore membrane compartment. In particular, the screen identified IRC10 as a new component of the leading-edge protein complex (LEP), a ring structure localized to the lip of the prospore membrane. Localization of Irc10 to the leading edge is dependent on SSP1, but not ADY3. Loss of IRC10 caused no obvious phenotype, but an ady3 irc10 mutant was completely defective in sporulation and displayed prospore membrane morphologies similar to those of an ssp1 strain. These results reveal the architecture of the LEP and provide insight into the evolution of this membrane-organizing complex. PMID:24390141

  12. Annexin A5 is the Most Abundant Membrane-Associated Protein in Stereocilia but is Dispensable for Hair-Bundle Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Krey, Jocelyn F.; Drummond, Meghan; Foster, Sarah; Porsov, Edward; Vijayakumar, Sarath; Choi, Dongseok; Friderici, Karen; Jones, Sherri M.; Nuttall, Alfred L.; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    The phospholipid- and Ca2+-binding protein annexin A5 (ANXA5) is the most abundant membrane-associated protein of ~P23 mouse vestibular hair bundles, the inner ear’s sensory organelle. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we estimated that ANXA5 accounts for ~15,000 copies per stereocilium, or ~2% of the total protein there. Although seven other annexin genes are expressed in mouse utricles, mass spectrometry showed that none were present at levels near ANXA5 in bundles and none were upregulated in stereocilia of Anxa5−/− mice. Annexins have been proposed to mediate Ca2+-dependent repair of membrane lesions, which could be part of the repair mechanism in hair cells after noise damage. Nevertheless, mature Anxa5−/− mice not only have normal hearing and balance function, but following noise exposure, they are identical to wild-type mice in their temporary or permanent changes in hearing sensitivity. We suggest that despite the unusually high levels of ANXA5 in bundles, it does not play a role in the bundle’s key function, mechanotransduction, at least until after two months of age in the cochlea and six months of age in the vestibular system. These results reinforce the lack of correlation between abundance of a protein in a specific compartment or cellular structure and its functional significance. PMID:27251877

  13. Annexin A5 is the Most Abundant Membrane-Associated Protein in Stereocilia but is Dispensable for Hair-Bundle Development and Function.

    PubMed

    Krey, Jocelyn F; Drummond, Meghan; Foster, Sarah; Porsov, Edward; Vijayakumar, Sarath; Choi, Dongseok; Friderici, Karen; Jones, Sherri M; Nuttall, Alfred L; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    The phospholipid- and Ca(2+)-binding protein annexin A5 (ANXA5) is the most abundant membrane-associated protein of ~P23 mouse vestibular hair bundles, the inner ear's sensory organelle. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we estimated that ANXA5 accounts for ~15,000 copies per stereocilium, or ~2% of the total protein there. Although seven other annexin genes are expressed in mouse utricles, mass spectrometry showed that none were present at levels near ANXA5 in bundles and none were upregulated in stereocilia of Anxa5(-/-) mice. Annexins have been proposed to mediate Ca(2+)-dependent repair of membrane lesions, which could be part of the repair mechanism in hair cells after noise damage. Nevertheless, mature Anxa5(-/-) mice not only have normal hearing and balance function, but following noise exposure, they are identical to wild-type mice in their temporary or permanent changes in hearing sensitivity. We suggest that despite the unusually high levels of ANXA5 in bundles, it does not play a role in the bundle's key function, mechanotransduction, at least until after two months of age in the cochlea and six months of age in the vestibular system. These results reinforce the lack of correlation between abundance of a protein in a specific compartment or cellular structure and its functional significance.

  14. The Membrane-associated Protein, Supervillin, Accelerates F-actin-dependent Rapid Integrin Recycling and Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhiyou; Takizawa, Norio; Wilson, Korey A.; Smith, Tara C.; Delprato, Anna; Davidson, Michael W.; Lambright, David G.; Luna, Elizabeth J.

    2010-01-01

    In migrating cells, the cytoskeleton coordinates signal transduction and re-distributions of transmembrane proteins, including integrins and growth factor receptors. Supervillin is an F-actin- and myosin II-binding protein that tightly associates with signaling proteins in cholesterol-rich, “lipid raft” membrane microdomains. We show here that supervillin also can localize with markers for early and sorting endosomes (EE/SE) and with overexpressed components of the Arf6 recycling pathway in the cell periphery. Supervillin tagged with the photoswitchable fluorescent protein, tdEos, moves both into and away from dynamic structures resembling podosomes at the basal cell surface. Rapid integrin recycling from EE/SE is inhibited in supervillin-knockdown cells, but the rates of integrin endocytosis and recycling from the perinuclear recycling center (PNRC) are unchanged. A lack of synergy between supervillin knockdown and the actin filament barbed-end inhibitor, cytochalasin D, suggests that both treatments affect actin-dependent rapid recycling. Supervillin also enhances signaling from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK) and increases the velocity of cell translocation. These results suggest that supervillin, F-actin, and associated proteins may coordinate a rapid, basolateral membrane recycling pathway that contributes to ERK signaling and actin-based cell motility. PMID:20331534

  15. Modulation of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptors and membrane-associated IGF-binding proteins in endometrial cancer cells by estradiol.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, D; Karas, M; Roberts, C T; LeRoith, D; Phillip, M; Segev, Y; Levy, J; Sharoni, Y

    1995-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptors and membrane-associated IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) were examined in Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells. Our findings suggest that about 95% of [125I]IGF-I is bound to membrane-associated IGFBPs rather than to IGF-I receptors. Specifically, [125I]IGF-I binding to cell membranes could be completely displaced by cold IGF-I or IGF-II, but not by insulin, suggesting that binding was primarily due to IGFBPs. This was confirmed by using [125I]des-(1-3)IGF-I as the ligand. Des-(1-3) IGF-I binds with high affinity to IGF-I receptors, but with markedly lower affinity to IGFBPs. [125I]Des-(1-3)IGF-I bound to Ishikawa cells was displaced by IGF-I, IGF-II, and insulin. These results suggest that measuring IGF-I receptor levels using labeled IGF-I may be misleading. Accordingly, we evaluated the differential binding of [125I]IGF-I and [125I]des-(1-3)IGF-I to study the involvement of the IGF system in the stimulation of Ishikawa cell growth by estradiol. IGF-I stimulates Ishikawa cell proliferation, but at low concentrations, and this stimulation is largely dependent on the presence of estradiol. Estradiol caused a 2.5-fold increase in IGF-I receptor levels. Moreover, estradiol reduced soluble IGFBP levels, presumably increasing the availability of IGFs for their receptors. This elevation in IGF-I receptor levels and the decrease in IGFBP levels were accompanied by a 3.5-fold increase in IGF-I receptor messenger RNA and a 2.5-fold decrease in IGFBP messenger RNAs. These experiments suggest that estradiol sensitizes endometrial cancer cells to the effects of IGFs by simultaneously elevating receptor levels and decreasing (potentially inhibitory) IGFBP levels.

  16. Three-dimensional structure and mimetic-membrane association of consensus 11-amino-acid motif from soybean LEA3 protein.

    PubMed

    Xue, Rong; Liu, Yun; Zheng, Yizhi; Wu, Yijie; Li, Xiaojing; Pei, Fengkui; Ni, Jiazuan

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of a highly conserved 11-mer repeating motif in the primary sequence is a major characteristic of group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA3) proteins, which are strongly associated with abiotic stress tolerance of the plants. In this study, the three-dimensional structure, mimetic membrane association, and salt effect for consensus 11-mer motif from soybean PM2 protein (LEA3) were investigated in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles by NMR techniques. It was shown that the 11-mer motif was disordered in aqueous solution, but adopted an α-helix in SDS micelles. NMR diffusion measurements demonstrated that the 11-mer motif was associated with SDS micelles. Paramagnetic quenching NMR experiments further revealed the orientation of the 11-mer motif with respect to the mimetic membrane: the ordered N-terminal segment was inserted into the mimetic membrane, and the disordered C-terminal segment was exposed to water. In addition, salt addition could not change the secondary structure of the 11-mer motif, but might slightly alter the relative spatial position of some N-terminal residue atoms. These results implied that the 11-mer motif would take an important role in structural plasticity and membrane stabilization for LEA3 proteins. PMID:23325560

  17. Cleavage of human fibronectin and other basement membrane-associated proteins by a Cryptococcus neoformans serine proteinase.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marcio L; dos Reis, Flavia C G; Puccia, Rosana; Travassos, Luiz R; Alviano, Celuta S

    2003-02-01

    The interaction between the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans and human fibronectin (HFN) was examined in this study. Polypeptides from cryptococcal whole homogenates and cell wall with molecular masses of 25 and 35 kDa, respectively reacted with HFN. The relevance of the occurrence of these proteins in intact cells was uncertain, since yeast cells from different strains and serotypes of C. neoformans did not significantly adhere to soluble or solid-phased HFN. In contrast, an exocellular proteolytic activity that cleaves HFN was suggested. Degradation of HFN by culture supernatant fluids was demonstrated by Western blotting using a monoclonal anti-HFN antibody. Several fragments of lower molecular weights were observed which reacted with the antibody. Proteolysis was mediated by a serine protease activity, since HFN cleavage was completely inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), aprotinin, and N-tosyl-L-phenylalanyl chloromethylketone (TPCK), but not by inhibitors of metalo, cysteine, or aspartyl proteases. Similar results were obtained when the fluorogenic peptide carbobenzoxy-phenylalanyl-arginyl-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin (CBZ-Phe-Arg-NHmet-C) was used as substrate. The cryptococcal supernatant also cleaved laminin and type IV collagen, as demonstrated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with co-polymerized proteins. The hydrolysis of these proteins was mediated by a single cryptococcal protease with a molecular mass of 75 kDa. The cleavage of key host components of the basement membrane and extracellular matrix by C. neoformans may be a relevant factor in the process of fungal invasion.

  18. REDOR solid-state NMR as a probe of the membrane locations of membrane-associated peptides and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Lihui; Liang, Shuang; Sackett, Kelly; Xie, Li; Ghosh, Ujjayini; Weliky, David P.

    2015-04-01

    Rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) solid-state NMR is applied to probe the membrane locations of specific residues of membrane proteins. Couplings are measured between protein 13CO nuclei and membrane lipid or cholesterol 2H and 31P nuclei. Specific 13CO labeling is used to enable unambiguous assignment and 2H labeling covers a small region of the lipid or cholesterol molecule. The 13CO-31P and 13CO-2H REDOR respectively probe proximity to the membrane headgroup region and proximity to specific insertion depths within the membrane hydrocarbon core. One strength of the REDOR approach is use of chemically-native proteins and membrane components. The conventional REDOR pulse sequence with 100 kHz 2H π pulses is robust with respect to the 2H quadrupolar anisotropy. The 2H T1's are comparable to the longer dephasing times (τ's) and this leads to exponential rather than sigmoidal REDOR buildups. The 13CO-2H buildups are well-fitted to A × (1 - e-γτ) where A and γ are fitting parameters that are correlated as the fraction of molecules (A) with effective 13CO-2H coupling d = 3γ/2. The REDOR approach is applied to probe the membrane locations of the "fusion peptide" regions of the HIV gp41 and influenza virus hemagglutinin proteins which both catalyze joining of the viral and host cell membranes during initial infection of the cell. The HIV fusion peptide forms an intermolecular antiparallel β sheet and the REDOR data support major deeply-inserted and minor shallowly-inserted molecular populations. A significant fraction of the influenza fusion peptide molecules form a tight hairpin with antiparallel N- and C-α helices and the REDOR data support a single peptide population with a deeply-inserted N-helix. The shared feature of deep insertion of the β and α fusion peptide structures may be relevant for fusion catalysis via the resultant local perturbation of the membrane bilayer. Future applications of the REDOR approach may include samples that contain cell

  19. Immunogold localization of acyl carrier protein in plants and Escherichia coli: Evidence for membrane association in plants.

    PubMed

    Slabas, A R; Smith, C G

    1988-08-01

    Immunogold labelling was used to study the distribution of acyl carrier protein (ACP) in Escherichia coli and a variety of plant tissues. In E. coli, ACP is distributed throughout the cytoplasm, confirming the observation of S. Jackowski et al. (1985, J. Bacteriol., 162, 5-8_. In the mesocarp of Avocado (Persea americana) and maturing seeds of oil-seed rape (Brassica napus cv. Jet Neuf), over 95% of the ACP is localised to plastids. The protein is almost exclusively located in the chloroplasts of leaf material from oil-seed rape. Approximately 80% of the gold particles associated with the ACP were further localized to the thylakoid membrane of the chloroplast. Since acetyl-CoA carboxylase has been reported to be localized to the thylakoid membrane (C.G. Kannangara and C.J. Jensen, 1975, Eur. J. Biochem., 54, 25-30), these results are consistent with the view that the two sequential enzymes in fatty-acid synthesis are in close spacial proximity.

  20. Role of Dlg5/lp-dlg, a Membrane-Associated Guanylate Kinase Family Protein, in Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in LLc-PK1 Renal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sogabe, Takayuki; Kakuda, Kumiyo; Tomiyama, Lucia; Matsuno, Yohsuke; Ichikawa, Takafumi; Matsuo, Michinori; Ueda, Kazumitsu; Kioka, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    Discs large homolog 5 (Dlg5) is a member of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase adaptor family of proteins, some of which are involved in the regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Dlg5 has been described as a susceptibility gene for Crohn's disease; however, the physiological function of Dlg5 is unknown. We show here that transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-induced EMT suppresses Dlg5 expression in LLc-PK1 cells. Depletion of Dlg5 expression by knockdown promoted the expression of the mesenchymal marker proteins, fibronectin and α-smooth muscle actin, and suppressed the expression of E-cadherin. In addition, activation of JNK and p38, which are stimulated by TGF-β, was enhanced by Dlg5 depletion. Furthermore, inhibition of the TGF-β receptor suppressed the effects of Dlg5 depletion. These observations suggest that Dlg5 is involved in the regulation of TGF-βreceptor-dependent signals and EMT. PMID:22539977

  1. Arabidopsis membrane-associated acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP1 is involved in stem cuticle formation

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yan; Xiao, Shi; Kim, Juyoung; Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Chen, Liang; Tanner, Julian A.; Suh, Mi Chung; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-anchored Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN1 (AtACBP1) plays important roles in embryogenesis and abiotic stress responses, and interacts with long-chain (LC) acyl-CoA esters. Here, AtACBP1 function in stem cuticle formation was investigated. Transgenic Arabidopsis transformed with an AtACBP1pro::GUS construct revealed β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression on the stem (but not leaf) surface, suggesting a specific role in stem cuticle formation. Isothermal titration calorimetry results revealed that (His)6-tagged recombinant AtACBP1 interacts with LC acyl-CoA esters (18:1-, 18:2-, and 18:3-CoAs) and very-long-chain (VLC) acyl-CoA esters (24:0-, 25:0-, and 26:0-CoAs). VLC fatty acids have been previously demonstrated to act as precursors in wax biosynthesis. Gas chromatography (GC)–flame ionization detector (FID) and GC–mass spectrometry (MS) analyses revealed that an acbp1 mutant showed a reduction in stem and leaf cuticular wax and stem cutin monomer composition in comparison with the wild type (Col-0). Consequently, the acbp1 mutant showed fewer wax crystals on the stem surface in scanning electron microscopy and an irregular stem cuticle layer in transmission electron microscopy in comparison with the wild type. Also, the mutant stems consistently showed a decline in expression of cuticular wax and cutin biosynthetic genes in comparison with the wild type, and the mutant leaves were more susceptible to infection by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, these findings suggest that AtACBP1 participates in Arabidopsis stem cuticle formation by trafficking VLC acyl-CoAs. PMID:25053648

  2. High-resolution Structures of Protein-Membrane Complexes by Neutron Reflection and MD Simulation: Membrane Association of the PTEN Tumor Suppressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lösche, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    The lipid matrix of biomembranes is an in-plane fluid, thermally and compositionally disordered leaflet of 5 nm thickness and notoriously difficult to characterize in structural terms. Yet, biomembranes are ubiquitous in the cell, and membrane-bound proteins are implicated in a variety of signaling pathways and intra-cellular transport. We developed methodology to study proteins associated with model membranes using neutron reflection measurements and showed recently that this approach can resolve the penetration depth and orientation of membrane proteins with ångstrom resolution if their crystal or NMR structure is known. Here we apply this technology to determine the membrane bindung and unravel functional details of the PTEN phosphatase, a key player in the PI3K apoptosis pathway. PTEN is an important regulatory protein and tumor suppressor that performs its phosphatase activity as an interfacial enzyme at the plasma membrane-cytoplasm boundary. Acting as an antagonist to phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) in cell signaling, it is deleted in many human cancers. Despite its importance in regulating the levels of the phosphoinositoltriphosphate PI(3,4,5)P3, there is little understanding of how PTEN binds to membranes, is activated and then acts as a phosphatase. We investigated the structure and function of PTEN by studying its membrane affinity and localization on in-plane fluid, thermally disordered synthetic membrane models. The membrane association of the protein depends strongly on membrane composition, where phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol diphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) act synergetically in attracting the enzyme to the membrane surface. Membrane affinities depend strongly on membrane fluidity, which suggests multiple binding sites on the protein for PI(4,5)P2. Neutron reflection measurements show that the PTEN phosphatase ``scoots'' along the membrane surface (penetration < 5 å) but binds the membrane tightly with its two major domains, the C2 and

  3. Membrane and membrane-associated proteins in Triton X-114 extracts of Mycobacterium bovis BCG identified using a combination of gel-based and gel-free fractionation strategies.

    PubMed

    Målen, Hiwa; Berven, Frode S; Søfteland, Tina; Arntzen, Magnus Øverlie; D'Santos, Clive S; De Souza, Gustavo Antonio; Wiker, Harald G

    2008-05-01

    Tuberculosis is an ancient disease that remains a significant global health problem. Because many membrane and membrane-associated proteins of this pathogen represent potential targets for drugs, diagnostic probes or vaccine components, we have analysed Mycobacterium bovis, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) substrain Moreau, using Triton X-114 for extraction of lipophilic proteins, followed by identification with LC coupled MS/MS. We identified 351 different proteins in total, and 103 (29%) were predicted as integral membrane proteins with at least one predicted transmembrane region and another 84 (23.9%) proteins had a positive grand average of hydropathicity (GRAVY) value, indicating increased probability for membrane association. Altogether 43 predicted lipoproteins (Lpps) were identified which is close to 50% of the total number of Lpps in the genome. Fifty-four proteins, including twenty-four predicted integral membrane proteins and seven predicted Lpps are described for the first time. The proportion of hydrophobic membrane and membrane-associated proteins shows that Triton X-114 is a highly efficient method for extraction of membrane proteins from bacteria, without the need for preisolation of membranes. ATP synthase, NAD(P) transhydrogenase, ubiquinone oxidoreductase and ubiquinol-cytochrome C reductase appear to represent major enzyme complexes in the membrane of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms.

  4. Membrane Association of the PTEN Tumor Suppressor: Molecular Details of the Protein-Membrane Complex from SPR Binding Studies and Neutron Reflection

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Siddharth; Shekhar, Prabhanshu; Heinrich, Frank; Daou, Marie-Claire; Gericke, Arne; Ross, Alonzo H.; Lösche, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    The structure and function of the PTEN phosphatase is investigated by studying its membrane affinity and localization on in-plane fluid, thermally disordered synthetic membrane models. The membrane association of the protein depends strongly on membrane composition, where phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol diphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) act pronouncedly synergistic in pulling the enzyme to the membrane surface. The equilibrium dissociation constants for the binding of wild type (wt) PTEN to PS and PI(4,5)P2 were determined to be Kd∼12 µM and 0.4 µM, respectively, and Kd∼50 nM if both lipids are present. Membrane affinities depend critically on membrane fluidity, which suggests multiple binding sites on the protein for PI(4,5)P2. The PTEN mutations C124S and H93R show binding affinities that deviate strongly from those measured for the wt protein. Both mutants bind PS more strongly than wt PTEN. While C124S PTEN has at least the same affinity to PI(4,5)P2 and an increased apparent affinity to PI(3,4,5)P3, due to its lack of catalytic activity, H93R PTEN shows a decreased affinity to PI(4,5)P2 and no synergy in its binding with PS and PI(4,5)P2. Neutron reflection measurements show that the PTEN phosphatase “scoots" along the membrane surface (penetration <5 Å) but binds the membrane tightly with its two major domains, the C2 and phosphatase domains, as suggested by the crystal structure. The regulatory C-terminal tail is most likely displaced from the membrane and organized on the far side of the protein, ∼60 Å away from the bilayer surface, in a rather compact structure. The combination of binding studies and neutron reflection allows us to distinguish between PTEN mutant proteins and ultimately may identify the structural features required for membrane binding and activation of PTEN. PMID:22505997

  5. Modulation of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-membrane associated, rapid response steroid binding protein expression in mouse odontoblasts by 1alpha,25-(OH)2D3.

    PubMed

    Teillaud, Christophe; Nemere, Ilka; Boukhobza, Florine; Mathiot, Claire; Conan, Nicole; Oboeuf, Martine; Hotton, Dominique; Macdougall, Mary; Berdal, Ariane

    2005-01-01

    The rapid, nongenomic effects of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1alpha,25-(OH)2D3 have been related to a 1,25D3-membrane associated, rapid response steroid binding protein or 1,25D3-[MARRS]bp, with a molecular weight of 65 kDa, in several tissues and species. Currently, no information is available concerning the nongenomic responses to 1alpha,25-(OH)2D3 in dental tissues. In order to investigate the expression of 1,25D3-[MARRS]bp in dental cells, in the presence or absence of 1alpha,25-(OH)2D3, we have used rabbit polyclonal antibodies directed against the N-terminus of the 1,25D3-[MARRS]bp (Ab099) that recognizes the 1alpha,25-(OH)2D3 binding protein in chick intestinal basolateral membranes and a mouse odontoblast-like cell line (MO6-G3). Western blotting and flow cytometric analyses with Ab099 specifically detected 1,25D3-[MARRS]bp in MO6-G3 cells. Moreover, 1,25D3-[MARRS]bp was up-regulated, in vivo, in differentiated dental cells. Electron microscopic analysis confirmed the plasma membrane localization of this binding protein and also showed its intracellular presence. Incubation of MO6-G3 cells with different doses of 1alpha,25-(OH)2D3 for 36 h resulted in an inhibition of 1,25D3-[MARRS]bp expression with a maximal effect at 50 nM steroid. In addition, the culture media of MO6-G3 cells contains immunoreactive 1,25D3-[MARRS]bp. Immunogold positive membrane vesicle-like structures are present in the extracellular matrix of MO6-G3 cells. Altogether, these results indicate that the 1,25D3-[MARRS]bp expression in MO6-G3 cells is modulated by 1alpha,25-(OH)2D3. In conclusion, this 1alpha,25-(OH)2D3 binding protein could play an important role in the rapid, nongenomic responses to 1alpha,25-(OH)2D3 in dental cells.

  6. Expression of a 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 membrane-associated rapid-response steroid binding protein during human tooth and bone development and biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Mesbah, Mohand; Nemere, Ilka; Papagerakis, Petros; Nefussi, Jean-Raphael; Orestes-Cardoso, Silvana; Nessmann, Catherine; Berdal, Ariane

    2002-09-01

    The calciotropic hormone 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] has been established to control skeletal tissue formation and biomineralization via the regulation of gene expression. This action involves the well-characterized nuclear 1,25(OH)2D3 receptor. However, it has been recognized that several cellular responses to 1,25(OH)2D3 may not to be related to the exclusive nuclear receptor. Indeed, this secosteroid is able to generate rapid responses that have been proposed to be mediated by interactions of the ligand, which is a putative cell membrane-associated rapid-response steroid (MARRS) binding protein for 1,25(OH)2D3 [1,25D3-MARRS]. The nongenomic pathway of 1,25(OH)2D3 was studied here in detail by immunolocalization of the 1,25D3-MARRS during the specific context of human prenatal development. Western blotting with proteins extracted from 4 week- to 27-week-old embryos was performed, evidencing a 65-kDa molecular species recognized by antibody Ab 099 generated against synthetic peptides corresponding to the N terminus of the 1,25D3-MARRS from chick intestinal basolateral membranes. Based on this biochemical conservation of protein in the human species, the temporospatial expression patterns were established in the craniofacial skeleton at the same ages. Comparative analysis was performed in teeth and bones from early morphogenesis to terminal cell differentiation and extracellular biomineralization. The data show the potential implication of 1,25D3-MARRS in the heterogeneous cell population including ameloblasts, odontoblasts, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts. The epithelial-mesenchymal cascade related to odontogenesis was coincident with a sequence of up- and down-regulation of immunoreactive 1,25D3-MARRS. Biomineralization was associated with a striking up-regulation in the adjoining secretory cells in all tissues. Finally, osteoclasts appeared also to express the 1,25D3-MARRS during these early phases of bone modeling. Previously obtained data of the

  7. The Helicobacter pylori cag Pathogenicity Island Protein CagN Is a Bacterial Membrane-Associated Protein That Is Processed at Its C Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Bourzac, Kevin M.; Satkamp, Laura A.; Guillemin, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects nearly half the world's population and is associated with a spectrum of gastric maladies. Infections with cytotoxin-associated gene pathogenicity island (cag PAI)-containing strains are associated with an increased risk for gastric cancer. The cag PAI contains genes encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS) and a delivered effector, CagA, that becomes tyrosine phosphorylated upon delivery into host cells and initiates changes in cell signaling. Although some cag PAI genes have been shown to be required for CagA delivery, a subset of which are homologues of T4SS genes from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, the majority have no known function or homologues. We have performed a detailed investigation of one such cag PAI protein, CagN, which is encoded by the gene HP0538. Our results show that CagN is not delivered into host cells and instead is associated with the bacterial membrane. We demonstrate that CagN is cleaved at its C terminus by a mechanism that is independent of other cag PAI proteins. Finally, we show that a ΔcagN mutant is not impaired in its ability to deliver CagA to gastric epithelial cells and initiate cell elongation. PMID:16622188

  8. The Helicobacter pylori cag pathogenicity island protein CagN is a bacterial membrane-associated protein that is processed at its C terminus.

    PubMed

    Bourzac, Kevin M; Satkamp, Laura A; Guillemin, Karen

    2006-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects nearly half the world's population and is associated with a spectrum of gastric maladies. Infections with cytotoxin-associated gene pathogenicity island (cag PAI)-containing strains are associated with an increased risk for gastric cancer. The cag PAI contains genes encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS) and a delivered effector, CagA, that becomes tyrosine phosphorylated upon delivery into host cells and initiates changes in cell signaling. Although some cag PAI genes have been shown to be required for CagA delivery, a subset of which are homologues of T4SS genes from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, the majority have no known function or homologues. We have performed a detailed investigation of one such cag PAI protein, CagN, which is encoded by the gene HP0538. Our results show that CagN is not delivered into host cells and instead is associated with the bacterial membrane. We demonstrate that CagN is cleaved at its C terminus by a mechanism that is independent of other cag PAI proteins. Finally, we show that a delta cagN mutant is not impaired in its ability to deliver CagA to gastric epithelial cells and initiate cell elongation. PMID:16622188

  9. Altered membrane association of p60v-src and a murine 63-kDa N-myristoyl protein after incorporation of an oxygen-substituted analog of myristic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Heuckeroth, R.O.; Gordon, J.I. )

    1989-07-01

    A number of viral and cellular proteins contain covalently bound lipids. In a subset of these acyl proteins, the 14-carbon saturated fatty acid myristic acid is attached through an amide linkage to an NH2-terminal glycine residue. Myristoyl-CoA:protein N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) transfers the myristoyl moiety from myristoyl-CoA to these nascent proteins and is highly selective for fatty acid chain length. We have found that 10-(propoxy)decanoyl-CoA (11-oxymyristoyl-CoA), an analog of myristic acid with reduced hydrophobicity, acts as a substrate for NMT both in vitro and in vivo. Comparison of the in vitro kinetic properties of a number of synthetic octapeptide substrates of NMT using myristoyl-CoA or 11-oxymyristoyl-CoA indicated that there is an interaction between the acyl-CoA and peptide binding sites of this acyltransferase. Peptide catalytic efficiency with 11-oxymyristoyl-CoA was reduced relative to that with myristoyl-CoA, but the extent of the reduction varied widely among the octapeptides tested. These in vitro data accurately predicted that only a subset of myristoyl proteins synthesized in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a murine myocyte-like cell line (BC3H1) would incorporate 11-oxy(3H)myristate. Substitution of the myristoyl moiety by the 11-oxymyristoyl moiety does not significantly affect the membrane association of most N-myristoyl proteins. However, for the tyrosine kinase p60v-src and a 63-kDa N-myristoyl protein in BC3H1 cells, analog incorporation results in marked redistribution from the membrane to the cytosolic fraction. These studies demonstrate the utility of heteroatom-containing analogs for analysis of the role of myristate in acyl protein targeting. The sequence-specific nature of analog incorporation and the protein-specific effects on membrane association suggests that these compounds may represent a useful class of antiviral and antitumor agents.

  10. Plasma membrane-associated platforms: dynamic scaffolds that organize membrane-associated events.

    PubMed

    Astro, Veronica; de Curtis, Ivan

    2015-03-10

    Specialized regions of the plasma membrane dedicated to diverse cellular processes, such as vesicle exocytosis, extracellular matrix remodeling, and cell migration, share a few cytosolic scaffold proteins that associate to form large plasma membrane-associated platforms (PMAPs). PMAPs organize signaling events and trafficking of membranes and molecules at specific membrane domains. On the basis of the intrinsic disorder of the proteins constituting the core of these PMAPs and of the dynamics of these structures at the periphery of motile cells, we propose a working model for the assembly and turnover of these platforms.

  11. Regulation mechanism of ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) protein/plasma membrane association: possible involvement of phosphatidylinositol turnover and Rho-dependent signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The ERM proteins, ezrin, radixin, and moesin, are involved in the actin filament/plasma membrane interaction as cross-linkers. CD44 has been identified as one of the major membrane binding partners for ERM proteins. To examine the CD44/ERM protein interaction in vitro, we produced mouse ezrin, radixin, moesin, and the glutathione-S- transferase (GST)/CD44 cytoplasmic domain fusion protein (GST-CD44cyt) by means of recombinant baculovirus infection, and constructed an in vitro assay for the binding between ERM proteins and the cytoplasmic domain of CD44. In this system, ERM proteins bound to GST-CD44cyt with high affinity (Kd of moesin was 9.3 +/- 1.6nM) at a low ionic strength, but with low affinity at a physiological ionic strength. However, in the presence of phosphoinositides (phosphatidylinositol [PI], phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate [4-PIP], and phosphatidylinositol 4.5-bisphosphate [4,5-PIP2]), ERM proteins bound with a relatively high affinity to GST-CD44cyt even at a physiological ionic strength: 4,5- PIP2 showed a marked effect (Kd of moesin in the presence of 4,5-PIP2 was 9.3 +/- 4.8 nM). Next, to examine the regulation mechanism of CD44/ERM interaction in vivo, we reexamined the immunoprecipitated CD44/ERM complex from BHK cells and found that it contains Rho-GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI), a regulator of Rho GTPase. We then evaluated the involvement of Rho in the regulation of the CD44/ERM complex formation. When recombinant ERM proteins were added and incubated with lysates of cultured BHK cells followed by centrifugation, a portion of the recombinant ERM proteins was recovered in the insoluble fraction. This binding was enhanced by GTP gamma S and markedly suppressed by C3 toxin, a specific inhibitor of Rho, indicating that the GTP form of Rho in the lysate is required for this binding. A mAb specific for the cytoplasmic domain of CD44 also markedly suppressed this binding, identifying most of the binding partners for exogenous ERM proteins in

  12. Open and closed conformations of two SpoIIAA-like proteins (YP_749275.1 and YP_001095227.1) provide insights into membrane association and ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhinav; Lomize, Andrei; Jin, Kevin K; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L; Chiu, Hsiu Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Klock, Heath E; Knuth, Mark W; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S Sri; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J; Trame, Christine B; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc André; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A

    2010-10-01

    The crystal structures of the proteins encoded by the YP_749275.1 and YP_001095227.1 genes from Shewanella frigidimarina and S. loihica, respectively, have been determined at 1.8 and 2.25 Å resolution, respectively. These proteins are members of a novel family of bacterial proteins that adopt the α/β SpoIIAA-like fold found in STAS and CRAL-TRIO domains. Despite sharing 54% sequence identity, these two proteins adopt distinct conformations arising from different dispositions of their α2 and α3 helices. In the `open' conformation (YP_001095227.1), these helices are 15 Å apart, leading to the creation of a deep nonpolar cavity. In the `closed' structure (YP_749275.1), the helices partially unfold and rearrange, occluding the cavity and decreasing the solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface. These two complementary structures are reminiscent of the conformational switch in CRAL-TRIO carriers of hydrophobic compounds. It is suggested that both proteins may associate with the lipid bilayer in their `open' monomeric state by inserting their amphiphilic helices, α2 and α3, into the lipid bilayer. These bacterial proteins may function as carriers of nonpolar substances or as interfacially activated enzymes.

  13. A membrane-associated movement protein of Pelargonium flower break virus shows RNA-binding activity and contains a biologically relevant leucine zipper-like motif.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Turiño, Sandra; Hernández, Carmen

    2011-05-10

    Two small viral proteins (DGBp1 and DGBp2) have been proposed to act in a concerted manner to aid intra- and intercellular trafficking of carmoviruses though the distribution of functions and mode of action of each protein partner are not yet clear. Here we have confirmed the requirement of the DGBps of Pelargonium flower break virus (PFBV), p7 and p12, for pathogen movement. Studies focused on p12 have shown that it associates to cellular membranes, which is in accordance to its hydrophobic profile and to that reported for several homologs. However, peculiarities that distinguish p12 from other DGBps2 have been found. Firstly, it contains a leucine zipper-like motif which is essential for virus infectivity in plants. Secondly, it has an unusually long and basic N-terminal region that confers RNA binding activity. The results suggest that PFBV p12 may differ mechanistically from related proteins and possible roles of PFBV DGBps are discussed.

  14. The membrane-associated progesterone-binding protein 25-Dx: expression, cellular localization and up-regulation after brain and spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Guennoun, R; Meffre, D; Labombarda, F; Gonzalez, S L; Gonzalez Deniselle, M C; Stein, D G; De Nicola, A F; Schumacher, M

    2008-03-01

    Progesterone has neuroprotective effects in the injured and diseased spinal cord and after traumatic brain injury (TBI). In addition to intracellular progesterone receptors (PR), membrane-binding sites of progesterone may be involved in neuroprotection. A first putative membrane receptor of progesterone, distinct from the classical intracellular PR isoforms, with a single membrane-spanning domain, has been cloned from porcine liver. Homologous proteins were cloned in rats (25-Dx), mice (PGRMC1) and humans (Hpr.6). We will refer to this progesterone-binding protein as 25-Dx. The distribution and regulation of 25-Dx in the nervous system may provide some clues to its functions. In spinal cord, 25-Dx is localized in cell membranes of dorsal horn neurons and ependymal cells lining the central canal. A role of 25-Dx in mediating the protective effects of progesterone in the spinal cord is supported by the observation that its mRNA and protein are up-regulated by progesterone in dorsal horn of the injured spinal cord. In contrast, the classical intracellular PRs were down-regulated under these conditions. In brain, 25-Dx is particularly abundant in the hypothalamic area, circumventricular organs, ependymal cells of the ventricular walls, and the meninges. Interestingly, it is co-expressed with vasopressin in neurons of the paraventricular, supraoptic and retrochiasmatic nuclei. In response to TBI, 25-Dx expression is up-regulated in neurons and induced in astrocytes. The expression of 25-Dx in structures involved in cerebrospinal fluid production and osmoregulation, and its up-regulation after brain damage, point to a potentially important role of this progesterone-binding protein in the maintenance of water homeostasis after TBI. Our observations suggest that progesterone's actions may involve different signaling mechanisms depending on the pathophysiological context, and that 25-Dx may be involved in the neuroprotective effect of progesterone in the injured brain and

  15. Contribution of topology determinants of a viral movement protein to its membrane association, intracellular traffic, and viral cell-to-cell movement.

    PubMed

    Genovés, A; Pallás, V; Navarro, J A

    2011-08-01

    The p7B movement protein (MP) of Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) is a single-pass membrane protein associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the Golgi apparatus (GA), and plasmodesmata (Pd). Experimental data presented here revealed that the p7B transmembrane domain (TMD) was sufficient to target the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to ER membranes. In addition, the short extramembrane regions of p7B were essential for subsequent ER export and transport to the GA and Pd. Microsomal partitioning and bimolecular fluorescence assays supported a type II topology of p7B in planta. Mutations affecting conventional determinants of p7B membrane topology, such as the TMD secondary structure, the overall hydrophobicity profile, the so-called "aromatic belt," and the net charge distribution on either side of the TMD, were engineered into infectious RNAs to investigate the relationship between the MP structure and MNSV cell-to-cell movement. The results revealed that (i) the overall hydrophobic profile and the α-helix integrity of the TMD were relevant for virus movement, (ii) modification of the net charge balance of the regions flanking both TMD sides drastically reduced cell-to-cell movement, (iii) localization of p7B to the GA was necessary but not sufficient for virus movement, and (iv) membrane insertion was essential for p7B function in virus movement. Our results therefore indicate that MNSV cell-to-cell movement requires sequential transport of p7B from the ER via the GA to Pd, which is modulated by a combination of several signals with different strengths in the extramembrane regions and TMD of the MP.

  16. Herpes simplex virus 1 glycoprotein M and the membrane-associated protein UL11 are required for virus-induced cell fusion and efficient virus entry.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Joong; Chouljenko, Vladimir N; Walker, Jason D; Kousoulas, Konstantin G

    2013-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) facilitates virus entry into cells and cell-to-cell spread by mediating fusion of the viral envelope with cellular membranes and fusion of adjacent cellular membranes. Although virus strains isolated from herpetic lesions cause limited cell fusion in cell culture, clinical herpetic lesions typically contain large syncytia, underscoring the importance of cell-to-cell fusion in virus spread in infected tissues. Certain mutations in glycoprotein B (gB), gK, UL20, and other viral genes drastically enhance virus-induced cell fusion in vitro and in vivo. Recent work has suggested that gB is the sole fusogenic glycoprotein, regulated by interactions with the viral glycoproteins gD, gH/gL, and gK, membrane protein UL20, and cellular receptors. Recombinant viruses were constructed to abolish either gM or UL11 expression in the presence of strong syncytial mutations in either gB or gK. Virus-induced cell fusion caused by deletion of the carboxyl-terminal 28 amino acids of gB or the dominant syncytial mutation in gK (Ala to Val at amino acid 40) was drastically reduced in the absence of gM. Similarly, syncytial mutations in either gB or gK did not cause cell fusion in the absence of UL11. Neither the gM nor UL11 gene deletion substantially affected gB, gC, gD, gE, and gH glycoprotein synthesis and expression on infected cell surfaces. Two-way immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that the membrane protein UL20, which is found as a protein complex with gK, interacted with gM while gM did not interact with other viral glycoproteins. Viruses produced in the absence of gM or UL11 entered into cells more slowly than their parental wild-type virus strain. Collectively, these results indicate that gM and UL11 are required for efficient membrane fusion events during virus entry and virus spread.

  17. Phorbol ester stimulates membrane association of protein kinase C and inhibits spontaneous Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca/sup 2 +/ release in rat cardiac cells

    SciTech Connect

    Capogrossi, M.C.; Kaku, T.; Filburn, C.H.; Pelto, D.J.; Hansford, R.G.; Lakatta, E.G.

    1986-03-01

    Spontaneous oscillatory Ca/sup 2 +/ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) occurs in rat cardiac myocytes at hyperpolarized membrane potentials and is manifested as contractile waves (W). W frequency varies with SR functional status and cell Ca/sup 2 +/ loading. In myocyte suspensions (Hepes buffer, 37/sup 0/C (Ca/sup 2 +/) = 1.0mM) phorbol myristate acetate, PMA, (10/sup -7/ M) increased protein kinase C activity in membranes as a fraction of total (PKCAM) fivefold with a t 1/2 of < 30 sec (n = 3) and decreased W frequency in individual myocytes (n = 8). This effect varied directly and linearly with baseline W frequency, r = .94, p < .001). Dioctanoyl glycerol (10 ..mu.. M) had a similar effect on W. The PMA effect to decrease W frequency could be a direct one on SR or result from a reduction in cell Ca/sup 2 +/. The time course of PKCAM change is sufficiently rapid for it to mediate the effect on W. Thus, enhanced PKCAM may exert negative feedback control on Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization during ..cap alpha..-adrenergic stimulation.

  18. Malaria Parasite CLAG3, a Protein Linked to Nutrient Channels, Participates in High Molecular Weight Membrane-Associated Complexes in the Infected Erythrocyte

    PubMed Central

    Zainabadi, Kayvan

    2016-01-01

    Malaria infected erythrocytes show increased permeability to a number of solutes important for parasite growth as mediated by the Plasmodial Surface Anion Channel (PSAC). The P. falciparum clag3 genes have recently been identified as key determinants of PSAC, though exactly how they contribute to channel function and whether additional host/parasite proteins are required remain unknown. To begin to answer these questions, I have taken a biochemical approach. Here I have used an epitope-tagged CLAG3 parasite to perform co-immunoprecipitation experiments using membrane fractions of infected erythrocytes. Native PAGE and mass spectrometry studies reveal that CLAG3 participate in at least three different high molecular weight complexes: a ~720kDa complex consisting of CLAG3, RHOPH2 and RHOPH3; a ~620kDa complex consisting of CLAG3 and RHOPH2; and a ~480kDa complex composed solely of CLAG3. Importantly, these complexes can be found throughout the parasite lifecycle but are absent in untransfected controls. Extracellular biotin labeling and protease susceptibility studies localize the 480kDa complex to the erythrocyte membrane. This complex, likely composed of a homo-oligomer of 160kDa CLAG3, may represent a functional subunit, possibly the pore, of PSAC. PMID:27299521

  19. The Odyssey of Hsp60 from Tumor Cells to Other Destinations Includes Plasma Membrane-Associated Stages and Golgi and Exosomal Protein-Trafficking Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Merendino, Anna M.; Fucarino, Alberto; Burgio, Giosalba; Corona, Davide F. V.; Barbieri, Giovanna; David, Sabrina; Farina, Felicia; Zummo, Giovanni; de Macario, Everly Conway; Macario, Alberto J. L.; Cappello, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background In a previous work we showed for the first time that human tumor cells secrete Hsp60 via exosomes, which are considered immunologically active microvesicles involved in tumor progression. This finding raised questions concerning the route followed by Hsp60 to reach the exosomes, its location in them, and whether Hsp60 can be secreted also via other mechanisms, e.g., by the Golgi. We addressed these issues in the work presented here. Principal Findings We found that Hsp60 localizes in the tumor cell plasma membrane, is associated with lipid rafts, and ends up in the exosomal membrane. We also found evidence that Hsp60 localizes in the Golgi apparatus and its secretion is prevented by an inhibitor of this organelle. Conclusions/Significance We propose a multistage process for the translocation of Hsp60 from the inside to the outside of the cell that includes a combination of protein traffic pathways and, ultimately, presence of the chaperonin in the circulating blood. The new information presented should help in designing future strategies for research and for developing diagnostic-monitoring means useful in clinical oncology. PMID:22848686

  20. Expansion and apparent fluidity decrease of nuclear membranes induced by low Ca/Mg. Modulation of nuclear membrane lipid fluidity by the membrane-associated nuclear matrix proteins?

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Macronuclei isolated from Tetrahymena are contracted in form (average diameter: 10.2 micron) at a final Ca/Mg (3:2)concentration of 5 mM. Lowering the ion concentration to 1 mM induces an expansion of the average nuclear diameter to 12.2 micron. Both contracted and expanded nuclei are surrounded by a largely intact nuclear envelope as revealed by thin-sectioning electron microscopy. Nuclear swelling is accompanied by an expansion of the nuclear envelope as indicated by the decrease in the frequency of nuclear pore complexes from 52.6 to 42.1 pores/micron2 determined by freeze-etch electron microscopy. Contracted nuclear membranes reveal particle-devoid areas (average size: 0.21 micron2) on 59% of their fracture faces at the optimal growth temperature of 28 degrees C. About three-fifths of the number of these smooth areas disappear upon nuclear membrane expansion. Electron spin resonance using 5-doxylstearic acid as a spin label indicates a higher lipid fluidity in contracted than in expa,ded nuclear membranes. Moreover, a thermotropic lipid clustering occurs at approximately 17 degrees C only in expanded nuclear membranes. In contrast to the nuclear membrane- bound lipids, free lipids extracted from the nuclei rigidify with increasing Ca/Mg concentrations. Our findings are compatible with the view that the peripheral layer of the fundamental nuclear protein- framework, the so-called nuclear matrix, can modulate, inter alia, the lipid distribution and fluidity, respectively, in nuclear membranes. We suggest that a contraction of the nuclear matrix's peripheral layer induces a contraction of the nuclear membranes which, in turn, leads to an isothermic lateral lipid segregation within nuclear membranes. PMID:102650

  1. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of human immunodeficiency virus gp41 protein that includes the fusion peptide: NMR detection of recombinant Fgp41 in inclusion bodies in whole bacterial cells and structural characterization of purified and membrane-associated Fgp41.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Erica P; Curtis-Fisk, Jaime; Young, Kaitlin M; Weliky, David P

    2011-11-22

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of a host cell begins with fusion of the HIV and host cell membranes and is mediated by the gp41 protein, a single-pass integral membrane protein of HIV. The 175 N-terminal residues make up the ectodomain that lies outside the virus. This work describes the production and characterization of an ectodomain construct containing the 154 N-terminal gp41 residues, including the fusion peptide (FP) that binds to target cell membranes. The Fgp41 sequence was derived from one of the African clade A strains of HIV-1 that have been less studied than European/North American clade B strains. Fgp41 expression at a level of ~100 mg/L of culture was evidenced by an approach that included amino acid type (13)CO and (15)N labeling of recombinant protein and solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy of lyophilized whole cells. The approach did not require any protein solubilization or purification and may be a general approach for detection of recombinant protein. The purified Fgp41 yield was ~5 mg/L of culture. SSNMR spectra of membrane-associated Fgp41 showed high helicity for the residues C-terminal of the FP. This was consistent with a "six-helix bundle" (SHB) structure that is the final gp41 state during membrane fusion. This observation and negligible Fgp41-induced vesicle fusion supported a function for SHB gp41 of membrane stabilization and fusion arrest. SSNMR spectra of residues in the membrane-associated FP provided evidence of a mixture of molecular populations with either helical or β-sheet FP conformation. These and earlier SSNMR data strongly support the existence of these populations in the SHB state of membrane-associated gp41.

  2. Efficient Exploration of Membrane-Associated Phenomena at Atomic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Vermaas, Josh V; Baylon, Javier L; Arcario, Mark J; Muller, Melanie P; Wu, Zhe; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-06-01

    Biological membranes constitute a critical component in all living cells. In addition to providing a conducive environment to a wide range of cellular processes, including transport and signaling, mounting evidence has established active participation of specific lipids in modulating membrane protein function through various mechanisms. Understanding lipid-protein interactions underlying these mechanisms at a sufficiently high resolution has proven extremely challenging, partly due to the semi-fluid nature of the membrane. In order to address this challenge computationally, multiple methods have been developed, including an alternative membrane representation termed highly mobile membrane mimetic (HMMM) in which lateral lipid diffusion has been significantly enhanced without compromising atomic details. The model allows for efficient sampling of lipid-protein interactions at atomic resolution, thereby significantly enhancing the effectiveness of molecular dynamics simulations in capturing membrane-associated phenomena. In this review, after providing an overview of HMMM model development, we will describe briefly successful application of the model to study a variety of membrane processes, including lipid-dependent binding and insertion of peripheral proteins, the mechanism of phospholipid insertion into lipid bilayers, and characterization of optimal tilt angle of transmembrane helices. We conclude with practical recommendations for proper usage of the model in simulation studies of membrane processes. PMID:25998378

  3. Efficient Exploration of Membrane-Associated Phenomena at Atomic Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Vermaas, Josh V.; Baylon, Javier L.; Arcario, Mark J.; Muller, Melanie P.; Wu, Zhe; Pogorelov, Taras V.; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes constitute a critical component in all living cells. In addition to providing a conducive environment to a wide range of cellular processes, including transport and signaling, mounting evidence has established active participation of specific lipids in modulating membrane protein function through various mechanisms. Understanding lipid-protein interactions underlying these mechanisms at a sufficiently high resolution has proven extremely challenging, partly due to the semi-fluid nature of the membrane. In order to address this challenge computationally, multiple methods have been developed, including an alternative membrane representation termed HMMM (highly mobile membrane mimetic) in which lateral lipid diffusion has been significantly enhanced without compromising atomic details. The model allows for efficient sampling of lipid-protein interactions at atomic resolution, thereby significantly enhancing the effectiveness of molecular dynamics simulations in capturing membrane-associated phenomena. In this review, after providing an overview of HMMM model development, we will describe briefly successful application of the model to study a variety of membrane processes, including lipid-dependent binding and insertion of peripheral proteins, the mechanism of phospholipid insertion into lipid bilayers, and characterization of optimal tilt angle of transmembrane helices. We conclude with practical recommendations for proper usage of the model in simulation studies of membrane processes. PMID:25998378

  4. Membrane Contact Sites: Complex Zones for Membrane Association and Lipid Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Quon, Evan; Beh, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid transport between membranes within cells involves vesicle and protein carriers, but as agents of nonvesicular lipid transfer, the role of membrane contact sites has received increasing attention. As zones for lipid metabolism and exchange, various membrane contact sites mediate direct associations between different organelles. In particular, membrane contact sites linking the plasma membrane (PM) and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) represent important regulators of lipid and ion transfer. In yeast, cortical ER is stapled to the PM through membrane-tethering proteins, which establish a direct connection between the membranes. In this review, we consider passive and facilitated models for lipid transfer at PM–ER contact sites. Besides the tethering proteins, we examine the roles of an additional repertoire of lipid and protein regulators that prime and propagate PM–ER membrane association. We conclude that instead of being simple mediators of membrane association, regulatory components of membrane contact sites have complex and multilayered functions. PMID:26949334

  5. Nuclear translocation of the 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS (membrane associated rapid response to steroids) receptor protein and NF{kappa}B in differentiating NB4 leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenqing; Beilhartz, Greg; Roy, Yvette; Richard, Cynthia L.; Curtin, Maureen; Brown, Lauren; Cadieux, Danielle; Coppolino, Marc; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Nemere, Ilka; Meckling, Kelly A.

    2010-04-15

    1,25 Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D{sub 3}) primes NB4 promyelocytic leukemia cells to differentiate along the monocyte/macrophage lineage through a non-genomic mechanism. Here we show that NB4 cells express high levels of the recently identified membrane receptor for 1,25D{sub 3}, which is a distinct gene product from the classical nuclear vitamin D receptor. This 57 kDa protein, named 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS (Membrane Activated Rapid Response to Steroids)/ERp57/PIA3 appears to associate in a complex with the transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B). In unstimulated cells, 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS can be co-immunoprecipitated with antibodies directed at NF{kappa}B, and NF{kappa}B is co-precipitated when antibodies against 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS or ERp57 are used. Confocal microscopy and subcellular fractionation studies demonstrate that both 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS and NF{kappa}B begin translocating to the nucleus within minutes of co-stimulation with 1,25D{sub 3} and phorbol ester. The predominant nuclear localization of both proteins precedes the expression of the monocyte/macrophage phenotype and suggests that this event may be critical to the differentiation pathway. This suggests a role for 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS in the nucleus as a regulator of gene expression. Here it may also regulate the activity of NF{kappa}B and other factors with which it may be interacting.

  6. Extended surface for membrane association in Zika virus NS1 structure.

    PubMed

    Brown, W Clay; Akey, David L; Konwerski, Jamie R; Tarrasch, Jeffrey T; Skiniotis, Georgios; Kuhn, Richard J; Smith, Janet L

    2016-09-01

    The Zika virus, which has been implicated in an increase in neonatal microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome, has spread rapidly through tropical regions of the world. The virulence protein NS1 functions in genome replication and host immune-system modulation. Here, we report the crystal structure of full-length Zika virus NS1, revealing an elongated hydrophobic surface for membrane association and a polar surface that varies substantially among flaviviruses. PMID:27455458

  7. Extended surface for membrane association in Zika virus NS1 structure.

    PubMed

    Brown, W Clay; Akey, David L; Konwerski, Jamie R; Tarrasch, Jeffrey T; Skiniotis, Georgios; Kuhn, Richard J; Smith, Janet L

    2016-09-01

    The Zika virus, which has been implicated in an increase in neonatal microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome, has spread rapidly through tropical regions of the world. The virulence protein NS1 functions in genome replication and host immune-system modulation. Here, we report the crystal structure of full-length Zika virus NS1, revealing an elongated hydrophobic surface for membrane association and a polar surface that varies substantially among flaviviruses.

  8. Membrane associated phospholipase C from bovine brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Ryu, S.H.; Suh, P.; Choi, W.C.; Rhee, S.G.

    1987-05-01

    Cytosolic fractions of bovine brain contain 2 immunologically distinct phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase (PLC), PLC-I and PLC-II, whose MW are 150,000 and 145,000 respectively, under a denaturing condition. Monoclonal antibodies were derived against each form and specific radioimmunoassays were developed. Distribution of PLC-I and PLC-II in cytosolic and particulate fractions was measured using the radioimmunoassay. More than 90% of PLC-II was found in the cytosolic fraction, while the anti-PLC-I antibody cross-reacting protein was distributed nearly equally between the soluble fraction and the 2 M KCl extract of particulate fraction. The PLC enzyme in the particulate fraction was purified to homogeneity, yielding 2 proteins of 140 KDa and 150 KDa when analyzed on SDS-PAGE. Neither of the 2 enzymes cross-reacted with anti-PLC-II antibodies, but both could be immunoblotted by all 4 different anti-PLC-I antibodies. This suggests that the 140 KDa PLC was derived from the 150 KDa form. The 150 Kda form from particulate fraction was indistinguishable from the cytosolic PLC-I when their mixture was analyzed on SDS-PAGE. In addition, the elution profile of tryptic peptides derived from the 150 KDa particulate form was identical to that of cytosolic PLC-I. This result indicates that PLC-I is reversibly associated to membranes.

  9. Decrease in membrane-associated actin of fibroblasts after transformation by Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed

    Wickus, G; Gruenstein, E; Robbins, P W; Rich, A

    1975-02-01

    The actin content of membranes prepared from cultured chick embryo fibroblasts has been measured on polyacrylamide gels. The actin was identified by tryptic peptide mapping. After transformation of the cells by Rous sarcoma virus, the amount of actin associated with the membranes is decreased by 30-50%. This result is not due to infection per se, since infection by a temperature-sensitive strain of the virus decreases membrane-associated actin only at the permissive temperature. A shift from the nonpermissive (41 degrees) to the permissive (36 degrees) temperature results in an increase in the percentage of total cellular protein synthesis devoted to actin production, so that the decrease in membrane-associated actin appears to be a selective displacement from the membrane rather than a general decrease in total cellular actin.

  10. Targeting RAS Membrane Association: Back to the Future for Anti-RAS Drug Discovery?

    PubMed

    Cox, Adrienne D; Der, Channing J; Philips, Mark R

    2015-04-15

    RAS proteins require membrane association for their biologic activity, making this association a logical target for anti-RAS therapeutics. Lipid modification of RAS proteins by a farnesyl isoprenoid is an obligate step in that association, and is an enzymatic process. Accordingly, farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI) were developed as potential anti-RAS drugs. The lack of efficacy of FTIs as anticancer drugs was widely seen as indicating that blocking RAS membrane association was a flawed approach to cancer treatment. However, a deeper understanding of RAS modification and trafficking has revealed that this was an erroneous conclusion. In the presence of FTIs, KRAS and NRAS, which are the RAS isoforms most frequently mutated in cancer, become substrates for alternative modification, can still associate with membranes, and can still function. Thus, FTIs failed not because blocking RAS membrane association is an ineffective approach, but because FTIs failed to accomplish that task. Recent findings regarding RAS isoform trafficking and the regulation of RAS subcellular localization have rekindled interest in efforts to target these processes. In particular, improved understanding of the palmitoylation/depalmitoylation cycle that regulates RAS interaction with the plasma membrane, endomembranes, and cytosol, and of the potential importance of RAS chaperones, have led to new approaches. Efforts to validate and target other enzymatically regulated posttranslational modifications are also ongoing. In this review, we revisit lessons learned, describe the current state of the art, and highlight challenging but promising directions to achieve the goal of disrupting RAS membrane association and subcellular localization for anti-RAS drug development. Clin Cancer Res; 21(8); 1819-27. ©2015 AACR. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Targeting RAS-Driven Cancers." PMID:25878363

  11. Targeting RAS Membrane Association: Back to the Future for Anti-RAS Drug Discovery?

    PubMed

    Cox, Adrienne D; Der, Channing J; Philips, Mark R

    2015-04-15

    RAS proteins require membrane association for their biologic activity, making this association a logical target for anti-RAS therapeutics. Lipid modification of RAS proteins by a farnesyl isoprenoid is an obligate step in that association, and is an enzymatic process. Accordingly, farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI) were developed as potential anti-RAS drugs. The lack of efficacy of FTIs as anticancer drugs was widely seen as indicating that blocking RAS membrane association was a flawed approach to cancer treatment. However, a deeper understanding of RAS modification and trafficking has revealed that this was an erroneous conclusion. In the presence of FTIs, KRAS and NRAS, which are the RAS isoforms most frequently mutated in cancer, become substrates for alternative modification, can still associate with membranes, and can still function. Thus, FTIs failed not because blocking RAS membrane association is an ineffective approach, but because FTIs failed to accomplish that task. Recent findings regarding RAS isoform trafficking and the regulation of RAS subcellular localization have rekindled interest in efforts to target these processes. In particular, improved understanding of the palmitoylation/depalmitoylation cycle that regulates RAS interaction with the plasma membrane, endomembranes, and cytosol, and of the potential importance of RAS chaperones, have led to new approaches. Efforts to validate and target other enzymatically regulated posttranslational modifications are also ongoing. In this review, we revisit lessons learned, describe the current state of the art, and highlight challenging but promising directions to achieve the goal of disrupting RAS membrane association and subcellular localization for anti-RAS drug development. Clin Cancer Res; 21(8); 1819-27. ©2015 AACR. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Targeting RAS-Driven Cancers."

  12. Targeting RAS Membrane Association: Back to the Future for Anti-RAS Drug Discovery?

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Adrienne D.; Der, Channing J.; Philips, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    RAS proteins require membrane association for their biological activity, making this association a logical target for anti-RAS therapeutics. Lipid modification of RAS proteins by a farnesyl isoprenoid is an obligate step in that association, and is an enzymatic process. Accordingly, farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) were developed as potential anti-RAS drugs. The lack of efficacy of FTIs as anti-cancer drugs was widely seen as indicating that blocking RAS membrane association was a flawed approach to cancer treatment. However, a deeper understanding of RAS modification and trafficking has revealed that this was an erroneous conclusion. In the presence of FTIs, KRAS and NRAS, which are the RAS isoforms most frequently mutated in cancer, become substrates for alternative modification, can still associate with membranes, and can still function. Thus, FTIs failed not because blocking RAS membrane association is an ineffective approach, but because FTIs failed to accomplish that task. Recent findings regarding RAS isoform trafficking and the regulation of RAS subcellular localization have rekindled interest in efforts to target these processes. In particular, improved understanding of the palmitoylation/depalmitoylation cycle that regulates RAS interaction with the plasma membrane, endomembranes and cytosol, and of the potential importance of RAS chaperones, have led to new approaches. Efforts to validate and target other enzymatically regulated post-translational modifications are also ongoing. In this review, we revisit lessons learned, describe the current state of the art, and highlight challenging but promising directions to achieve the goal of disrupting RAS membrane association and subcellular localization for anti-RAS drug development. PMID:25878363

  13. Chicken egg shell membrane associated proteins and peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Egg shells are poultry industry byproducts with potential for use in various biological and agricultural applications. We have been interested in the membranes underlying the calcareous shell, as a feed supplement which showed potential to t improve immunity and performance of post hatch poultry. ...

  14. Membrane-associated transcription factor peptidase, site-2 protease, antagonizes ABA signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shun-Fan; Sun, Le; Valdés, Ana Elisa; Engström, Peter; Song, Ze-Ting; Lu, Sun-Jie; Liu, Jian-Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Abscisic acid plays important roles in maintaining seed dormancy while gibberellins (GA) and other phytohormones antagonize ABA to promote germination. However, how ABA signaling is desensitized during the transition from dormancy to germination is still poorly understood. We functionally characterized the role of membrane-associated transcription factor peptidase, site-2 protease (S2P), in ABA signaling during seed germination in Arabidopsis. Genetic analysis showed that loss-of-function of S2P conferred high ABA sensitivity during seed germination, and expression of the activated form of membrane-associated transcription factor bZIP17, in which the transmembrane domain and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen-facing C-terminus were deleted, in the S2P mutant rescued its ABA-sensitive phenotype. MYC and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged bZIP17 were processed and translocated from the ER to the nucleus in response to ABA treatment. Furthermore, genes encoding negative regulators of ABA signaling, such as the transcription factor ATHB7 and its target genes HAB1, HAB2, HAI1 and AHG3, were up-regulated in seeds of the wild-type upon ABA treatment; this up-regulation was impaired in seeds of S2P mutants. Our results suggest that S2P desensitizes ABA signaling during seed germination through regulating the activation of the membrane-associated transcription factor bZIP17 and therefore controlling the expression level of genes encoding negative regulators of ABA signaling. PMID:25919792

  15. Structure–function relationships of membrane-associated GT-B glycosyltransferases†

    PubMed Central

    Albesa-Jové, David; Giganti, David; Jackson, Mary; Alzari, Pedro M; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-associated GT-B glycosyltransferases (GTs) comprise a large family of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a sugar moiety from nucleotide-sugar donors to a wide range of membrane-associated acceptor substrates, mostly in the form of lipids and proteins. As a consequence, they generate a significant and diverse amount of glycoconjugates in biological membranes, which are particularly important in cell–cell, cell–matrix and host–pathogen recognition events. Membrane-associated GT-B enzymes display two “Rossmann-fold” domains separated by a deep cleft that includes the catalytic center. They associate permanently or temporarily to the phospholipid bilayer by a combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. They have the remarkable property to access both hydrophobic and hydrophilic substrates that reside within chemically distinct environments catalyzing their enzymatic transformations in an efficient manner. Here, we discuss the considerable progress that has been made in recent years in understanding the molecular mechanism that governs substrate and membrane recognition, and the impact of the conformational transitions undergone by these GTs during the catalytic cycle. PMID:24253765

  16. Membrane-association of mRNA decapping factors is independent of stress in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Huch, Susanne; Gommlich, Jessie; Muppavarapu, Mridula; Beckham, Carla; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that the degradation of mRNA occurs on translating ribosomes or alternatively within RNA granules called P bodies, which are aggregates whose core constituents are mRNA decay proteins and RNA. In this study, we examined the mRNA decapping proteins, Dcp1, Dcp2, and Dhh1, using subcellular fractionation. We found that decapping factors co-sediment in the polysome fraction of a sucrose gradient and do not alter their behaviour with stress, inhibition of translation or inhibition of the P body formation. Importantly, their localisation to the polysome fraction is independent of the RNA, suggesting that these factors may be constitutively localised to the polysome. Conversely, polysomal and post-polysomal sedimentation of the decapping proteins was abolished with the addition of a detergent, which shifts the factors to the non-translating RNP fraction and is consistent with membrane association. Using a membrane flotation assay, we observed the mRNA decapping factors in the lower density fractions at the buoyant density of membrane-associated proteins. These observations provide further evidence that mRNA decapping factors interact with subcellular membranes, and we suggest a model in which the mRNA decapping factors interact with membranes to facilitate regulation of mRNA degradation. PMID:27146487

  17. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study of the secondary structure of the gastric H+,K+-ATPase and of its membrane-associated proteolytic peptides.

    PubMed

    Raussens, V; Ruysschaert, J M; Goormaghtigh, E

    1997-01-01

    Membrane topology of the H+,K+-ATPase has been studied after proteolytic degradation of the protein by proteinase K. Proteinase K had access to either the cytoplasmic part of the protein or to both sides of the membrane. Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy indicated that membrane-associated domain of the protein represented about 55% of the native protein, meanwhile the cytoplasmic part represented only 27% of the protein. The secondary structure of the ATPase and of its membrane-associated domains was investigated by infrared spectroscopy. The secondary structure of the membrane-associated structures and of the entire protein was quite similar (alpha-helices, 35%; beta-sheets, 35%; turns, 20%; random, 15%). These data were in agreement with 10 alpha-helical transmembrane segments but suggested a participation of beta-sheet structures in the membrane-associated part of the protein. Polarized infrared spectroscopy indicated that the alpha-helices were oriented nearly perpendicular to the membrane plane. No preferential orientation could be attributed to the beta-sheets. Monitoring the amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics demonstrated that the membrane associated part of the ATPase molecule is characterized by a relatively high accessibility to the solvent, quite different from that observed for bacteriorhodopsin membrane segments.

  18. Function of Membrane-Associated Proteoglycans in the Regulation of Satellite Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Muscle growth can be divided into embryonic and postnatal periods. During the embryonic period, mesenchymal stem cells proliferate and differentiate to form muscle fibers. Postnatal muscle growth (hypertrophy) is characterized by the enlargement of existing muscle fiber size. Satellite cells (also known as adult myoblasts) are responsible for hypertrophy. The activity of satellite cells can be regulated by their extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM is composed of collagens, proteoglycans, non-collagenous glycoproteins, cytokines and growth factors. Proteoglycans contain a central core protein with covalently attached glycosaminoglycans (GAGs: chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate) and N- or O-linked glycosylation chains. Membrane-associated proteoglycans attach to the cell membrane either through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor or transmembrane domain. The GAGs can bind proteins including cytokines and growth factors. Both cytokines and growth factors play important roles in regulating satellite cell growth and development. Cytokines are generally associated with immune cells. However, cytokines can also affect muscle cell development. For instance, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and leukemia inhibitory factor have been reported to affect the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells and myoblasts. Growth factors are potent stimulators or inhibitors of satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. The proper function of some cytokines and growth factors requires an interaction with the cell membrane-associated proteoglycans to enhance the affinity to bind to their primary receptors to initiate downstream signal transduction. This chapter is focused on the interaction of membrane-associated proteoglycans with cytokines and growth factors, and their role in satellite cell growth and development.

  19. Plasma membrane-associated superstructure: Have we overlooked a new type of organelle in eukaryotic cells?

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Fernández, José Luis; de Lacoba, Mario García

    2015-09-01

    A variety of intriguing plasma membrane-associated regions, including focal adhesions, adherens junctions, tight junctions, immunological synapses, neuromuscular junctions and the primary cilia, among many others, have been described in eukaryotic cells. Emphasizing their importance, alteration in their molecular structures induces or correlates with different pathologies. These regions display surface proteins connected to intracellular molecules, including cytoskeletal component, which maintain their cytoarchitecture, and signalling proteins, which regulate their organization and functions. Based on the molecular similarities and other common features observed, we suggest that, despite differences in external appearances, all these regions are just the same superstructure that appears in different locations and cells. We hypothesize that this superstructure represents an overlooked new type of organelle that we call plasma membrane-associated superstructure (PMAS). Therefore, we suggest that eukaryotic cells include classical organelles (e.g. mitochondria, Golgi and others) and also PMAS. We speculate that this new type of organelle might be an innovation associated to the emergence of eukaryotes. Finally we discuss the implications of the hypothesis proposed.

  20. Membrane-associated proteolytic activity in Escherichia coli that is stimulated by ATP

    SciTech Connect

    Klemes, Y.; Voellmy, R.W.; Goldberg, A.L.

    1986-05-01

    The degradation of proteins in bacteria requires metabolism energy. One important enzyme in this process is protease La, a soluble ATP-dependent protease encoded by the lon gene. However, lon mutants that lack a functional protease La still show some ATP-dependent protein breakdown. The authors have reported an ATP-stimulated endoproteolytic activity associated with the inner membrane of E. coli. This ATP-stimulated activity is found in normal levels in membranes derived from lon mutants, including strains carrying insertions in the lon gene. The membrane-bound activity hydrolyzes /sup 14/C-methylglobin at a linear rate for up to 3 hours. These fractions also contain appreciable proteolytic activity that is not affected by ATP. The stimulation by ATP requires the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/. Nonhydrolyzable ATP analogs (e.g. AMPPNP or ATP-..gamma..-S) and ADP do not enhance proteolysis. Unlike protease La, the membrane-associated enzyme does not degrade the fluorometric substrate, Glt-Ala-Ala-Phe-MNA, in an ATP-stimulated fashion, and its level is not influenced by high temperature of by the gene which regulates the heat-shock response. The enzyme is inhibited by dichloroisocoumarin and certain peptide chloromethyl ketones. They conclude that E. coli contain at least two ATP-dependent proteases with distinct specificities: one is soluble and the other is membrane-associated.

  1. Membrane Association and Destabilization by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Leukotoxin Requires Changes in Secondary Structures

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Michael J.; Brown, Angela C.; Edrington, Thomas C.; Baranwal, Somesh; Du, Yurong; Lally, Edward T.; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a common inhabitant of the upper aerodigestive tract of humans and non-human primates and is associated with disseminated infections, including lung and brain abscesses, pediatric infective endocarditis in children, and localized aggressive periodontitis. A. actinomycetemcomitans secretes a repeats-in-toxin protein, leukotoxin, which exclusively kills lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1-bearing cells. The toxin's pathological mechanism is not fully understood; however, experimental evidence indicates that it involves the association with and subsequent destabilization of the target cell's plasma membrane. We have long hypothesized that leukotoxin secondary structure is strongly correlated with membrane association and/or destabilization. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by analyzing lipid-induced changes in leukotoxin conformation. Upon incubation of leukotoxin with lipids that favor leukotoxin-membrane association, we observed an increase in leukotoxin α-helical content that was not observed with lipids that favor membrane destabilization. The change in leukotoxin conformation after incubation with these lipids suggests that membrane binding and membrane destabilization have distinct secondary structural requirements, suggesting that they are independent events. These studies thus provide insight into the mechanism of cell damage that leads to disease progression by A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:23678967

  2. Membrane-associated Sulfur Oxidation by the Autotroph Thiobacillus thiooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Adair, Frank W.

    1966-01-01

    Adair, Frank W. (Rutgers, The State University, New Brunswick, N. J.). Membrane-associated sulfur oxidation by the autotroph Thiobacillus thiooxidans. J. Bacteriol. 92:899–904. 1966.—Washed cell wall-membrane fragments derived from sulfur-grown cells of the strictly autotrophic bacterium, Thiobacillus thiooxidans, oxidized elemental sulfur to sulfate without the addition of cofactors. The oxidation was optimal at pH 7.0 and was increased by the presence of wetting agents. Oxygen uptake was inhibited by cyanide, azide, and thiol-binding agents. Sulfite was also oxidized, and both the sulfur- and sulfite-oxidizing systems were heat-labile. Neither thiosulfate nor tetrathionate was oxidized by soluble or membrane preparations. The fragments fixed C14O2 in the presence of ribose-5-phosphate, Mg++, and adenosine triphosphate. Sulfur oxidation did not provide energy for C14O2 fixation in this system. PMID:5926757

  3. Turnip mosaic virus moves systemically through both phloem and xylem as membrane-associated complexes.

    PubMed

    Wan, Juan; Cabanillas, Daniel Garcia; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2015-04-01

    Plant viruses move systemically in plants through the phloem. They move as virions or as ribonucleic protein complexes, although it is not clear what these complexes are made of. The approximately 10-kb RNA genome of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) encodes a membrane protein, known as 6K2, that induces endomembrane rearrangements for the formation of viral replication factories. These factories take the form of vesicles that contain viral RNA (vRNA) and viral replication proteins. In this study, we report the presence of 6K2-tagged vesicles containing vRNA and the vRNA-dependent RNA polymerase in phloem sieve elements and in xylem vessels. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed the presence in the xylem vessels of vRNA-containing vesicles that were associated with viral particles. Stem-girdling experiments, which leave xylem vessels intact but destroy the surrounding tissues, confirmed that TuMV could establish a systemic infection of the plant by going through xylem vessels. Phloem sieve elements and xylem vessels from Potato virus X-infected plants also contained lipid-associated nonencapsidated vRNA, indicating that the presence of membrane-associated ribonucleic protein complexes in the phloem and xylem may not be limited to TuMV. Collectively, these studies indicate that viral replication factories could end up in the phloem and the xylem.

  4. Turnip mosaic virus Moves Systemically through Both Phloem and Xylem as Membrane-Associated Complexes1

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Huanquan

    2015-01-01

    Plant viruses move systemically in plants through the phloem. They move as virions or as ribonucleic protein complexes, although it is not clear what these complexes are made of. The approximately 10-kb RNA genome of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) encodes a membrane protein, known as 6K2, that induces endomembrane rearrangements for the formation of viral replication factories. These factories take the form of vesicles that contain viral RNA (vRNA) and viral replication proteins. In this study, we report the presence of 6K2-tagged vesicles containing vRNA and the vRNA-dependent RNA polymerase in phloem sieve elements and in xylem vessels. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed the presence in the xylem vessels of vRNA-containing vesicles that were associated with viral particles. Stem-girdling experiments, which leave xylem vessels intact but destroy the surrounding tissues, confirmed that TuMV could establish a systemic infection of the plant by going through xylem vessels. Phloem sieve elements and xylem vessels from Potato virus X-infected plants also contained lipid-associated nonencapsidated vRNA, indicating that the presence of membrane-associated ribonucleic protein complexes in the phloem and xylem may not be limited to TuMV. Collectively, these studies indicate that viral replication factories could end up in the phloem and the xylem. PMID:25717035

  5. Turnip mosaic virus moves systemically through both phloem and xylem as membrane-associated complexes.

    PubMed

    Wan, Juan; Cabanillas, Daniel Garcia; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2015-04-01

    Plant viruses move systemically in plants through the phloem. They move as virions or as ribonucleic protein complexes, although it is not clear what these complexes are made of. The approximately 10-kb RNA genome of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) encodes a membrane protein, known as 6K2, that induces endomembrane rearrangements for the formation of viral replication factories. These factories take the form of vesicles that contain viral RNA (vRNA) and viral replication proteins. In this study, we report the presence of 6K2-tagged vesicles containing vRNA and the vRNA-dependent RNA polymerase in phloem sieve elements and in xylem vessels. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed the presence in the xylem vessels of vRNA-containing vesicles that were associated with viral particles. Stem-girdling experiments, which leave xylem vessels intact but destroy the surrounding tissues, confirmed that TuMV could establish a systemic infection of the plant by going through xylem vessels. Phloem sieve elements and xylem vessels from Potato virus X-infected plants also contained lipid-associated nonencapsidated vRNA, indicating that the presence of membrane-associated ribonucleic protein complexes in the phloem and xylem may not be limited to TuMV. Collectively, these studies indicate that viral replication factories could end up in the phloem and the xylem. PMID:25717035

  6. Actin filaments elongate from their membrane-associated ends

    PubMed Central

    Tilney, LG; Bonder, EM; DeRosier, DJ

    1981-01-01

    In limulus sperm an actin filament bundle 55 mum in length extends from the acrosomal vacuole membrane through a canal in the nucleus and then coils in a regular fashion around the base of the nucleus. The bundle expands systematically from 15 filaments near the acrosomal vacuole to 85 filaments at the basal end. Thin sections of sperm fixed during stages in spermatid maturation reveal that the filament bundle begins to assemble on dense material attached to the acrosomal vacuole membrane. In micrographs fo these early stages in maturation, short bundles are seen extending posteriorly from the dense material. The significance is that these short, developing bundles have about 85 filaments, suggesting that the 85-filament end of the bundle is assembled first. By using filament bundles isolated and incubated in vitro with G actin from muscle, we can determine the end “preferred” for addition of actin monomers during polymerization. The end that would be associated with the acrosomal vacuole membrane, a membrane destined to be continuous with the plasma membrane, is preferred about 10 times over the other, thicker end. Decoration of the newly polymerized portions of the filament bundle with subfragment 1 of myosin reveals that the arrowheads point away from the acrosomal vacuole membrane, as is true of other actin filament bundles attached to membranes. From these observations we conclude that the bundle is nucleated from the dense material associated with the acrosomal vacuole and that monomers are added to the membrane-associated end. As monomers are added at the dense material, the thick first-made end of the filament bundle is pushed down through the nucleus where, upon reaching the base of the nucleus, it coils up. Tapering is brought about by the capping of the peripheral filaments in the bundle. PMID:7197276

  7. Neobiosynthesis of Glycosphingolipids by Plasma Membrane-associated Glycosyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Pilar M.; Demichelis, Vanina Torres; Daniotti, José L.

    2010-01-01

    Gangliosides, complex glycosphingolipids containing sialic acids, are synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum and in the Golgi complex. These neobiosynthesized gangliosides move via vesicular transport to the plasma membrane, becoming components of the external leaflet. Gangliosides can undergo endocytosis followed by recycling to the cell surface or sorting to the Golgi complex or lysosomes for remodeling and catabolism. Recently, glycosphingolipid catabolic enzymes (glycohydrolases) have been found to be associated with the plasma membrane, where they display activity on the membrane components. In this work, we demonstrated that ecto-ganglioside glycosyltransferases may catalyze ganglioside synthesis outside the Golgi compartment, particularly at the cell surface. Specifically, we report the first direct evidence of expression and activity of CMP-NeuAc:GM3 sialyltransferase (Sial-T2) at the cell surface of epithelial and melanoma cells, with membrane-integrated ecto-Sial-T2 being able to sialylate endogenously synthesized GM3 ganglioside as well as exogenously incorporated substrate. Interestingly, we also showed that ecto-Sial-T2 was able to synthesize GD3 ganglioside at the cell surface using the endogenously synthesized cytidine monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-NeuAc) available at the extracellular milieu. In addition, the expression of UDP-GalNAc:LacCer/GM3/GD3 N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GalNAc-T) was also detected at the cell surface of epithelial cells, whose catalytic activity was only observed after feeding the cells with exogenous GM3 substrate. Thus, the relative interplay between the plasma membrane-associated glycosyltransferase and glycohydrolase activities, even when acting on a common substrate, emerges as a potential level of regulation of the local glycosphingolipid composition in response to different external and internal stimuli. PMID:20639193

  8. Membrane Association and Catabolite Repression of the Sulfolobus solfataricus α-Amylase

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Edith; Rudrappa, Deepak; Blum, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Sulfolobus solfataricus is a thermoacidophilic member of the archaea whose envelope consists of an ether-linked lipid monolayer surrounded by a protein S-layer. Protein translocation across this envelope must accommodate a steep proton gradient that is subject to temperature extremes. To better understand this process in vivo, studies were conducted on the S. solfataricus glycosyl hydrolyase family 57 α-Amylase (AmyA). Cell lines harboring site specific modifications of the amyA promoter and AmyA structural domains were created by gene replacement using markerless exchange and characterized by Western blot, enzyme assay and culture-based analysis. Fusion of amyA to the malAp promoter overcame amyAp-mediated regulatory responses to media composition including glucose and amino acid repression implicating action act at the level of transcription. Deletion of the AmyA Class II N-terminal signal peptide blocked protein secretion and intracellular protein accumulation. Deletion analysis of a conserved bipartite C-terminal motif consisting of a hydrophobic region followed by several charged residues indicated the charged residues played an essential role in membrane-association but not protein secretion. Mutants lacking the C-terminal bipartite motif exhibited reduced growth rates on starch as the sole carbon and energy source; therefore, association of AmyA with the membrane improves carbohydrate utilization. Widespread occurrence of this motif in other secreted proteins of S. solfataricus and of related Crenarchaeota suggests protein association with membranes is a general trait used by these organisms to influence external processes.

  9. Purification of a native membrane-associated adenovirus tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Persson, H; Katze, M G; Philipson, L

    1982-01-01

    A 15,000-dalton protein was purified from HeLa cells infected with adenovirus type 2. Proteins solubilized from a membrane fraction of lytically infected cells was used as the starting material for purification. Subsequent purification steps involved lentil-lectin, phosphocellulose, hydroxyapatite, DEAE-cellulose, and aminohexyl-Sepharose chromatographies. A monospecific antiserum, raised against the purified protein, immunoprecipitated a 15,000-dalton protein encoded in early-region E1B (E1B/15K protein) of the adenovirus type 2 DNA. Tryptic finger print analysis revealed that the purified protein was identical to the E1B/15K protein encoded in the transforming part of the viral genome. The antiserum immunoprecipitated the E1B/15K protein from a variety of viral transformed cell lines isolated from humans, rats, or hamsters. The E1B/15K protein was associated with the membrane fraction of both lytically and virus-transformed cell lines and could only be released by detergent treatment. Furthermore, a 11,000- to 12,000-dalton protein that could be precipitated with the anti-E1B/15K serum was recovered from membranes treated with trypsin or proteinase K, suggesting that a major part of the E1B/15K protein is protected in membrane vesicles. Translation of early viral mRNA in a cell-free system, supplemented with rough microsomes, showed that this protein was associated with the membrane fraction also in vitro. Images PMID:7097863

  10. Glutamic Acid Residues in HIV-1 p6 Regulate Virus Budding and Membrane Association of Gag

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Melanie; Setz, Christian; Hahn, Friedrich; Matthaei, Alina; Fraedrich, Kirsten; Rauch, Pia; Henklein, Petra; Traxdorf, Maximilian; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1 Gag p6 protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of its two late (l-) domains, which recruit Tsg101 and ALIX, components of the ESCRT system. Even though p6 consists of only 52 amino acids, it is encoded by one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and undergoes various posttranslational modifications including sumoylation, ubiquitination, and phosphorylation. In addition, it mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into budding virions. Despite its small size, p6 exhibits an unusually high charge density. In this study, we show that mutation of the conserved glutamic acids within p6 increases the membrane association of Pr55 Gag followed by enhanced polyubiquitination and MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag-derived epitopes, possibly due to prolonged exposure to membrane bound E3 ligases. The replication capacity of the total glutamic acid mutant E0A was almost completely impaired, which was accompanied by defective virus release that could not be rescued by ALIX overexpression. Altogether, our data indicate that the glutamic acids within p6 contribute to the late steps of viral replication and may contribute to the interaction of Gag with the plasma membrane. PMID:27120610

  11. RNA interference targeting tNOX attenuates cell migration via a mechanism that involves membrane association of Rac

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.-C.; Yang, J.-J.; Shao, K.-N.; Chueh, P.J.

    2008-01-25

    tNOX, a tumor-associated NADH oxidase, is a growth-related protein present in transformed cells. In this study, we employed RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated down-regulation of tNOX protein expression to explore the role of tNOX in regulating cell growth in human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells. In this first reported use of RNAi to decrease tNOX expression, we found that HeLa cell growth was significantly inhibited by shRNA-knockdown of tNOX. Furthermore, cell migration and membrane association of Rac were decreased concomitantly with the reduction in tNOX protein expression. These results indicate that shRNA targeting of tNOX inhibits the growth of cervical cancer cells, and reduces cell migration via a decrease in the membrane association of Rac. We propose that tNOX is a potential upstream mediator of Rho activation that plays a role in regulating cell proliferation, migration, and invasion.

  12. Structural features of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin that activates membrane-associated guanylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Shimonishi, Y

    2004-03-01

    Heat-stable enterotoxin (ST), a small peptide of 18 or 19 amino acid residues produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, is the cause of acute diarrhea in infants and travelers in developing countries. ST triggers a biological response by binding to a membrane-associated guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C) which is located on intestinal epithelial cell membranes. This binding causes an increase in the concentration of cGMP as a second messenger in cells and activates protein kinase A and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. Here we describe the crystal structure of an ST at 0.89 A resolution. The molecule has a ring-shaped molecular architecture consisting of six peptide molecules with external and internal diameters of approximately 35 and 7 A, respectively and a thickness of approximately 11 A. The conserved residues at the central portion of ST are distributed on the outer surface of the ring-shaped peptide hexamer, suggesting that the hexamer may be implicated in the association with GC-C through these invariant residues. PMID:15049831

  13. Pressure Modulation of the Enzymatic Activity of Phospholipase A2, A Putative Membrane-Associated Pressure Sensor.

    PubMed

    Suladze, Saba; Cinar, Suleyman; Sperlich, Benjamin; Winter, Roland

    2015-10-01

    Phospholipases A2 (PLA2) catalyze the hydrolysis reaction of sn-2 fatty acids of membrane phospholipids and are also involved in receptor signaling and transcriptional pathways. Here, we used pressure modulation of the PLA2 activity and of the membrane's physical-chemical properties to reveal new mechanistic information about the membrane association and subsequent enzymatic reaction of PLA2. Although the effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on aqueous soluble and integral membrane proteins has been investigated to some extent, its effect on enzymatic reactions operating at the water/lipid interface has not been explored, yet. This study focuses on the effect of HHP on the structure, membrane binding and enzymatic activity of membrane-associated bee venom PLA2, covering a pressure range up to 2 kbar. To this end, high-pressure Fourier-transform infrared and high-pressure stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopies were applied. The results show that PLA2 binding to model biomembranes is not significantly affected by pressure and occurs in at least two kinetically distinct steps. Followed by fast initial membrane association, structural reorganization of α-helical segments of PLA2 takes place at the lipid water interface. FRET-based activity measurements reveal that pressure has a marked inhibitory effect on the lipid hydrolysis rate, which decreases by 75% upon compression up to 2 kbar. Lipid hydrolysis under extreme environmental conditions, such as those encountered in the deep sea where pressures up to the kbar-level are encountered, is hence markedly affected by HHP, rendering PLA2, next to being a primary osmosensor, a good candidate for a sensitive pressure sensor in vivo.

  14. The second C2-domain of copine-2, copine-6 and copine-7 is responsible for their calcium-dependent membrane association.

    PubMed

    Perestenko, Pavel; Watanabe, Masanori; Beusnard-Bee, Tobias; Guna, Prakash; McIlhinney, Jeffrey

    2015-10-01

    The copine family of proteins contains nine members with a similar domain structure, namely two N-terminal C2-domains (C2A and C2B) and a C-terminal A-domain. The former are thought to be responsible for binding to the inner face of the plasma membrane following increases in intracellular calcium levels, whereas the A-domain has been suggested to be a protein-binding structure. In this study, we examined the effects of mutagenesis of selected residues in the linker area between the C2-domains and the A-domain, and mutagenesis of the aspartates of the C2-domains, which are predicted to bind calcium and promote membrane association of the copines. We found that Lys282-Lys284 of the linker area are important for the folding of the intact protein. We showed that substitution with asparagine, single or multiple, of the aspartates in the C2A-domain had no effect on the calcium-mediated membrane association of copine-2, copine-6, or copine-7. Similar mutagenesis of a single residue in the C2B-domain of copine-6 (but not copine-2 and copine-7) was sufficient to eliminate its calcium-mediated membrane binding, and simultaneous substitution of all four of the asparagines in the C2B-domain resulted in constitutive membrane association of copine-2, copine-6 and copine-7 with the plasma membrane. These data show that the C2B-domains of copine-2, copine-6 and copine-7 are the domains responsible for the protein calcium-dependent membrane association.

  15. Oligomerization, Membrane Association, and in Vivo Phosphorylation of Sugarcane UDP-glucose Pyrophosphorylase*

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Jose Sergio M.; Gentile, Agustina; Scorsato, Valeria; Lima, Aline da C.; Kiyota, Eduardo; dos Santos, Marcelo Leite; Piattoni, Claudia V.; Huber, Steven C.; Aparicio, Ricardo; Menossi, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane is a monocot plant that accumulates sucrose to levels of up to 50% of dry weight in the stalk. The mechanisms that are involved in sucrose accumulation in sugarcane are not well understood, and little is known with regard to factors that control the extent of sucrose storage in the stalks. UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase; EC 2.7.7.9) is an enzyme that produces UDP-glucose, a key precursor for sucrose metabolism and cell wall biosynthesis. The objective of this work was to gain insights into the ScUGPase-1 expression pattern and regulatory mechanisms that control protein activity. ScUGPase-1 expression was negatively correlated with the sucrose content in the internodes during development, and only slight differences in the expression patterns were observed between two cultivars that differ in sucrose content. The intracellular localization of ScUGPase-1 indicated partial membrane association of this soluble protein in both the leaves and internodes. Using a phospho-specific antibody, we observed that ScUGPase-1 was phosphorylated in vivo at the Ser-419 site in the soluble and membrane fractions from the leaves but not from the internodes. The purified recombinant enzyme was kinetically characterized in the direction of UDP-glucose formation, and the enzyme activity was affected by redox modification. Preincubation with H2O2 strongly inhibited this activity, which could be reversed by DTT. Small angle x-ray scattering analysis indicated that the dimer interface is located at the C terminus and provided the first structural model of the dimer of sugarcane UGPase in solution. PMID:25320091

  16. Conformational plasticity of the essential membrane-associated mannosyltransferase PimA from mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Giganti, David; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Urresti, Saioa; Albesa-Jové, David; Rodrigo-Unzueta, Ane; Comino, Natalia; Kachala, Michael; López-Fernández, Sonia; Svergun, Dmitri I; Fernández, Julio M; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2013-10-11

    Phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosyltransferase A (PimA) is an essential glycosyltransferase (GT) that initiates the biosynthetic pathway of phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides, lipomannan, and lipoarabinomannan, which are key glycolipids/lipoglycans of the mycobacterial cell envelope. PimA belongs to a large family of peripheral membrane-associated GTs for which the understanding of the molecular mechanism and conformational changes that govern substrate/membrane recognition and catalysis remains a major challenge. Here we used single molecule force spectroscopy techniques to study the mechanical and conformational properties of PimA. In our studies, we engineered a polyprotein containing PimA flanked by four copies of the well characterized I27 protein, which provides an unambiguous mechanical fingerprint. We found that PimA exhibits weak mechanical stability albeit displaying β-sheet topology expected to unfold at much higher forces. Notably, PimA unfolds following heterogeneous multiple step mechanical unfolding pathways at low force akin to molten globule states. Interestingly, the ab initio low resolution envelopes obtained from small angle x-ray scattering of the unliganded PimA and the PimA·GDP complexed forms clearly demonstrate that not only the "open" and "closed" conformations of the GT-B enzyme are largely present in solution, but in addition, PimA experiences remarkable flexibility that undoubtedly corresponds to the N-terminal "Rossmann fold" domain, which has been proved to participate in protein-membrane interactions. Based on these results and on our previous experimental data, we propose a model wherein the conformational transitions are important for the mannosyltransferase to interact with the donor and acceptor substrates/membrane. PMID:23963451

  17. Complete genomic organization of the human erythroid p55 gene (MPP1), a membrane-associated guanylate kinase homologue

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, A.C.; Metzenberg, A.B.; Sahr, K.E.

    1996-01-15

    Human p55 is an abundantly palmitoylated phosphoprotein of the erythroid membrane. It is the prototype of a newly discovered family of membrane-associated proteins termed MAGUKs (membrane-associated guanylate kinase homologues). The MAGUKs interact with the cytoskeleton and regulate cell proliferation, signaling pathways, and intercellular junctions. Here, we report the complete intron-exon map of the human erythroid p55 gene (HGMW-approved symbol MPP1). The structure of the p55 gene was determined from cosmid clones isolated from a cosmid library specific for the human X chromosome. There is a single copy of the p55 gene, composed of 12 exons and spanning approximately 28 kb in the q28 region of the human X chromosome. The exon sizes range from 69 (exon 5) to 203 bp (intron 2) to {approximately}14 kb (intron 1). The intron-exon boundaries conform to the donor/acceptor consensus sequence, GT-AG, for splice junctions. Several of the exon boundaries correspond to the boundaries of functional domains in the p55 protein. These domains include a SH3 motif and a region that binds to cytoskeletal protein 4.1. In addition, a comparison of the genomic and the primary structures of p55 reveals a highly conserved phosphotyrosine domain located between the protein 4.1 binding domain and the guanylate kinase domain. Finally, promoter activity measurements of the region immediately upstream of the p55 gene, which contains several cis-elements commonly found in housekeeping genes, suggest that a CpG island may be associated with the p55 gene expression in vivo. 42 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Membrane-associated signaling in human B-lymphoma lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tauzin, Sebastien; Ding, Heidrun; Burdevet, Dimitri; Borisch, Bettina; Hoessli, Daniel C.

    2011-01-15

    In B-non-Hodgkin lymphomas, Lyn and Cbp/PAG constitute the core of an oncogenic signalosome that captures the Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, the Spleen tyrosine kinase and the Signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 to generate pro-survival and proliferative signals. Lymphoma lines corresponding to follicular, mantle-cell and Burkitt-derived lymphomas display type-specific signalosome organizations that differentially activate PI3K, Syk and STAT3. In the follicular lymphoma line, PI3K, Syk and STAT3 were optimally activated upon association with the Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome, while in the Burkitt lymphoma-derived line, the association with Cbp/PAG and activation of PI3K were interfered with by the latent membrane proteins encoded by the Epstein-Barr virus. In the Jeko-1 mantle-cell line, a weak association of Syk with the Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome resulted in poor activation of Syk, but in those cells, as in the follicular and Burkitt-derived lines, efficient apoptosis induction by the Syk inhibitor R406 indicated that Syk is nonetheless an important prosurvival element and therefore a valuable therapeutic target. In all configurations described herein is the Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome independent of external signals and provides efficient means of activation for its associated lipid and protein kinases. In follicular and Burkitt-derived lines, Syk appears to be activated following binding to Cbp/PAG and no longer requires B-cell receptor-associated activation motifs for activation. Assessment of the different modalities of Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome organization could help in selecting the appropriate combination of kinase inhibitors to eliminate a particular type of lymphoma cells.

  19. [PROPERTIES OF CHICKEN LIVER MEMBRANE-ASSOCIATED THIAMINE TRIPHOSPHATASE].

    PubMed

    Kolas, I K; Makarchikov, A F

    2015-01-01

    The enzymes involved in thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) metabolism in birds are not characterized so far. The aim of the present work was to study some properties of ThTPase in chicken liver. In liver homogenate, ThTPase activity has been found to display a bell-like pH-profile with a maximum of 5.5-6.0. Low activity was observed without divalent metal ions, while the addition of Mg2+ or Ca2+, each at 5 mM concentration, enhanced the rate of ThTP hydrolysis by a factor of 17-20. In the presence of 5 mM Mg2+ an apparent K(m) of the enzyme for ThTP was estimated by the method of non-linear regression as well as from the Hanes plot to be 1.7-2.2 mM. Monovalent anions such as I-, SCN-, NO3-, Br-, Cl- (at 150 mM concentration) showed inhibitory effect decreasing the rate of ThTPase reaction by 20-60%. After the homogenate was centrifuged, more than 85% of ThTPase activity was revealed in the fraction of insoluble particles indicating a membrane localization of the enzyme. The precipitate treatment with 1% sodium deoxycholate caused about 53% solubilization of the activity. During Toyopeal HW-55 chromatography, ThTPase activity was eluted simultaneously with ATPase and ITPase peaks in the void volume of the column. Thus, a non-specific high molecular mass protein complex seems to be involved in ThTP hydrolysis in the chicken liver. The chicken liver phosphatase is clearly distinguishable from all membrane-bound ThTPases reported previously. PMID:26502698

  20. [PROPERTIES OF CHICKEN LIVER MEMBRANE-ASSOCIATED THIAMINE TRIPHOSPHATASE].

    PubMed

    Kolas, I K; Makarchikov, A F

    2015-01-01

    The enzymes involved in thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) metabolism in birds are not characterized so far. The aim of the present work was to study some properties of ThTPase in chicken liver. In liver homogenate, ThTPase activity has been found to display a bell-like pH-profile with a maximum of 5.5-6.0. Low activity was observed without divalent metal ions, while the addition of Mg2+ or Ca2+, each at 5 mM concentration, enhanced the rate of ThTP hydrolysis by a factor of 17-20. In the presence of 5 mM Mg2+ an apparent K(m) of the enzyme for ThTP was estimated by the method of non-linear regression as well as from the Hanes plot to be 1.7-2.2 mM. Monovalent anions such as I-, SCN-, NO3-, Br-, Cl- (at 150 mM concentration) showed inhibitory effect decreasing the rate of ThTPase reaction by 20-60%. After the homogenate was centrifuged, more than 85% of ThTPase activity was revealed in the fraction of insoluble particles indicating a membrane localization of the enzyme. The precipitate treatment with 1% sodium deoxycholate caused about 53% solubilization of the activity. During Toyopeal HW-55 chromatography, ThTPase activity was eluted simultaneously with ATPase and ITPase peaks in the void volume of the column. Thus, a non-specific high molecular mass protein complex seems to be involved in ThTP hydrolysis in the chicken liver. The chicken liver phosphatase is clearly distinguishable from all membrane-bound ThTPases reported previously.

  1. Up-regulation of stomatin expression by hypoxia and glucocorticoid stabilizes membrane-associated actin in alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji-Cheng; Cai, Hao-Yu; Wang, Yan; Ma, Yuan-Yuan; Song, Liang-Nian; Yin, Li-Juan; Cao, Dong-Mei; Diao, Fei; Li, Yi-Dong; Lu, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Stomatin is an important lipid raft-associated protein which interacts with membrane proteins and plays a role in the membrane organization. However, it is unknown whether it is involved in the response to hypoxia and glucocorticoid (GC) in alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). In this study we found that hypoxia and dexamethasone (dex), a synthetic GC not only up-regulated the expression of stomatin alone, but also imposed additive effect on the expression of stomatin in A549 cells, primary AEC and lung of rats. Then we investigated whether hypoxia and dex transcriptionally up-regulated the expression of stomatin by reporter gene assay, and found that dex, but not hypoxia could increase the activity of a stomatin promoter-driven reporter gene. Further deletion and mutational studies demonstrated that a GC response element (GRE) within the promoter region mainly contributed to the induction of stomatin by dex. Moreover, we found that hypoxia exposure did not affect membrane-associated actin, but decreased actin in cytoplasm in A549 cells. Inhibiting stomatin expression by stomatin siRNA significantly decreased dense of peripheral actin ring in hypoxia or dex treated A549 cells. Taken all together, these data indicated that dex and/or hypoxia significantly up-regulated the expression of stomatin in vivo and in vitro, which could stabilize membrane-associated actin in AEC. We suppose that the up-regulation of stomatin by hypoxia and dex may enhance the barrier function of alveolar epithelia and mediate the adaptive role of GC to hypoxia. PMID:23672602

  2. Involvement of the β3-α3 loop of the Proline Dehydrogenase Domain in Allosteric Regulation of Membrane Association of Proline Utilization A†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weidong; Haile, Ashley M.; Singh, Ranjan K.; Larson, John D.; Smithen, Danielle; Chan, Jie Y.; Tanner, John J.; Becker, Donald F.

    2013-01-01

    Proline utilization A (PutA) from Escherichia coli is a membrane-associated trifunctional flavoenzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of proline to glutamate and moonlights as a transcriptional regulator. As a regulatory protein, PutA represses transcription of the put regulon, which contains the genes encoding PutA and the proline transporter PutP. The binding of proline to the proline dehydrogenase active site and the subsequent reduction of the flavin induces high affinity membrane association of PutA and relieves repression of the put regulon, thereby causing PutA to switch from its regulatory to its enzymatic role. Here, we present evidence suggesting that residues of the β3-α3 loop of the proline dehydrogenase domain (βα)8 barrel are involved in proline-mediated allosteric regulation of PutA-membrane binding. Mutation of the conserved residues Asp370 and Glu372 in the β3-α3 loop abrogates the ability of proline to induce functional membrane association. Both in vitro lipid/membrane binding assays and in vivo cell-based assays demonstrate that mutagenesis of Asp370 (D370N/A) or Glu372 (E372A) dramatically impedes PutA functional switching. The crystal structures of the proline dehydrogenase domain mutants PutA86-630D370N and PutA86-630D370A complexed with the proline analog L-tetrahydro-2-furoic acid show that the mutations cause only minor perturbations to the active site but no major structural changes, suggesting that the lack of proline response is not due to a failure of the mutated active sites to correctly bind the substrate. Rather, these results suggest that the β3-α3 loop may be involved in transmitting the status of the proline dehydrogenase active site and flavin redox state to the distal membrane association domain. PMID:23713611

  3. Solution NMR and X-ray Crystal Structures of Membrane-associated Lipoprotein-17 Domain Reveal a Novel Fold

    SciTech Connect

    R Mani; S Vorobiev; G Swapna; H Neely; H Janjua; C Ciccosanti; D Xiao; J Hunt; G Montelione; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The conserved Lipoprotein-17 domain of membrane-associated protein Q9PRA0{_}UREPA from Ureaplasma parvum was selected for structure determination by the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, as part of the Protein Structure Initiative's program on structure-function analysis of protein domains from large domain sequence families lacking structural representatives. The 100-residue Lipoprotein-17 domain is a 'domain of unknown function' (DUF) that is a member of Pfam protein family PF04200, a large domain family for which no members have characterized biochemical functions. The three-dimensional structure of the Lipoprotein-17 domain of protein Q9PRA0{_}UREPA was determined by both solution NMR and by X-ray crystallography at 2.5 {angstrom}. The two structures are in good agreement with each other. The domain structure features three {alpha}-helices, {alpha}1 through {alpha}3, and five {beta}-strands. Strands {beta}1/{beta}2, {beta}3/{beta}4, {beta}4/{beta}5 are anti-parallel to each other. Strands {beta}1 and {beta}2 are orthogonal to strands {beta}3, {beta}4, {beta}5, while helix {alpha}3 is formed between the strands {beta}3 and {beta}4. One-turn helix {alpha}2 is formed between the strands {beta}1 and {beta}2, while helix {alpha}1 occurs in the N-terminal polypeptide segment. Searches of the Protein Data Bank do not identify any other protein with significant structural similarity to Lipoprotein-17 domain of Q9PRA0{_}UREPA, indicating that it is a novel protein fold.

  4. Effects of a human plasma membrane-associated sialidase siRNA on prostate cancer invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaojie; Zhang, Ling; Shao, Yueting; Liang, Zuowen; Shao, Chen; Wang, Bo; Guo, Baofeng; Li, Na; Zhao, Xuejian; Li, Yang; Xu, Deqi

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neu3 is as one of the sialidases and regulates cell surface functions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A Neu3-specific siRNA inhibited prostrate cancer cell invasion and migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Neu3-specific siRNA inhibited prostate cancer metastasis in mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting Neu3 may have utility for gene-based therapy of human cancer metastasis. -- Abstract: Human plasma membrane-associated sialidase (Neu3) is one of several sialidases that hydrolyze sialic acids in the terminal position of the carbohydrate groups of glycolipids and glycoproteins. Neu3 is mainly localized in plasma membranes and plays crucial roles in the regulation of cell surface functions. In this study, we investigated the effects and molecular mechanisms of Neu3 on cell invasion and migration in vivo and in vitro. Initially, we found that the levels of Neu3 expression were higher in prostate cancer tissues and cell lines than in normal prostate tissues based on RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses. We then applied a Neu3 siRNA approach to block Neu3 signaling using PC-3M cells as model cells. Transwell invasion assays and wound assays showed significantly decreased invasion and migration potential in the Neu3 siRNA-transfected cells. RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses revealed that Neu3 knockdown decreased the expressions of the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9. In vivo, mice injected with PC-3M cell tumors were evaluated by SPECT/CT to determine the presence of bone metastases. Mice treated with attenuated Salmonella carrying the Neu3 siRNA developed fewer bone metastases than mice treated with attenuated Salmonella carrying a control Scramble siRNA, attenuated Salmonella alone or PBS. The results for bone metastasis detection by pathology were consistent with the data obtained by SPECT/CT. Tumor blocks were evaluated by histochemical, RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses. The results revealed

  5. Regulation of Smoothened Phosphorylation and High-Level Hedgehog Signaling Activity by a Plasma Membrane Associated Kinase.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuangxi; Li, Shuang; Han, Yuhong; Tong, Chao; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling controls embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-family protein Smoothened (Smo). Upon stimulation, Smo accumulates on the cell surface in Drosophila or primary cilia in vertebrates, which is thought to be essential for its activation and function, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that Hh stimulates the binding of Smo to a plasma membrane-associated kinase Gilgamesh (Gish)/CK1γ and that Gish fine-tunes Hh pathway activity by phosphorylating a Ser/Thr cluster (CL-II) in the juxtamembrane region of Smo carboxyl-terminal intracellular tail (C-tail). We find that CL-II phosphorylation is promoted by protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of Smo C-tail and depends on cell surface localization of both Gish and Smo. Consistent with CL-II being critical for high-threshold Hh target gene expression, its phosphorylation appears to require higher levels of Hh or longer exposure to the same level of Hh than PKA-site phosphorylation on Smo. Furthermore, we find that vertebrate CK1γ is localized at the primary cilium to promote Smo phosphorylation and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway activation. Our study reveals a conserved mechanism whereby Hh induces a change in Smo subcellular localization to promote its association with and activation by a plasma membrane localized kinase, and provides new insight into how Hh morphogen progressively activates Smo. PMID:27280464

  6. Regulation of Smoothened Phosphorylation and High-Level Hedgehog Signaling Activity by a Plasma Membrane Associated Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Chao; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling controls embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-family protein Smoothened (Smo). Upon stimulation, Smo accumulates on the cell surface in Drosophila or primary cilia in vertebrates, which is thought to be essential for its activation and function, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that Hh stimulates the binding of Smo to a plasma membrane-associated kinase Gilgamesh (Gish)/CK1γ and that Gish fine-tunes Hh pathway activity by phosphorylating a Ser/Thr cluster (CL-II) in the juxtamembrane region of Smo carboxyl-terminal intracellular tail (C-tail). We find that CL-II phosphorylation is promoted by protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of Smo C-tail and depends on cell surface localization of both Gish and Smo. Consistent with CL-II being critical for high-threshold Hh target gene expression, its phosphorylation appears to require higher levels of Hh or longer exposure to the same level of Hh than PKA-site phosphorylation on Smo. Furthermore, we find that vertebrate CK1γ is localized at the primary cilium to promote Smo phosphorylation and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway activation. Our study reveals a conserved mechanism whereby Hh induces a change in Smo subcellular localization to promote its association with and activation by a plasma membrane localized kinase, and provides new insight into how Hh morphogen progressively activates Smo. PMID:27280464

  7. Microtubule-membrane interactions in cilia. II. Photochemical cross-linking of bridge structures and the identification of a membrane-associated dynein-like ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Dentler, W.L.; Pratt, M.M.; Stephens, R.E.

    1980-02-01

    Photochemical cross-linking of both tetrahymena and aequipecten ciliary membrane proteins with the lipophilic reagent 4,4'-dithiobisphenylazide links together a high molecular weight dynein-like ATPase, membrane tubulin, and at least two other proteins. Electron microscopy of detergent-extracted cilia reveals that the cross-linked complex remains attached to the outer-doublet microtubules by a microtubule-membrane bridge. Cleavage of the reagent's disulfide bond releases the bridge-membrane complex and the dynein-like membrane-associated ATPase. Photochemical cross-linking of ciliary membrane proteins in vivo results initially in the modification of ciliary beat and, eventually, in the cessation of ciliary movement. These results suggest that a dynein-like ATPase comprises the bridge which links the ciliary membrane to the outer-doublet microtubules and that this bridge is involved in the modulation of normal ciliary movement.

  8. Membrane-Associated Molecules Regulate the Formation of Layer-Specific Cortical Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Valerie; Bolz, Jurgen

    1997-06-01

    The columnar organization of the mammalian neocortex is based on radially oriented axon collaterals which precisely link cells from distinct cortical layers. During development, these interlaminar connections are specific from their initial outgrowth: collaterals form only in the target layers and there are no transient axonal collaterals in the nontarget layers. To examine whether positional cues within individual cortical layers regulate the laminar specificity of collateral formation, explants of cells destined for different cortical layers were cultured on membranes prepared from target and nontarget layers. Axonal growth and branching were examined on homogeneous membrane substrates and on alternating stripes of membranes from different layers. Results show that axons branch preferentially on membrane substrates from those layers that they would target in vivo. In addition, when cortical axons were given a choice to grow on membranes from either their target or their nontarget layer, they exhibited a clear preference for the target layers. This indicates that membrane-associated cues confined to individual layers regulate the formation of collaterals of cortical axons and restrict their growth to their target layers. Heat inactivation of membranes from target layers resulted in reduced axonal branching. The same manipulation of membranes from nontarget layers increased axonal branching for one population of cortical neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that membrane-associated molecules confined to individual layers induce and prevent the formation of axon collaterals in distinct populations of cortical neurons. Thus, the expression of layer-specific cues provides important constraints for the remodeling of local circuits during cortical development.

  9. Novel secreted isoform of adhesion molecule ICAM-4: Potential regulator of membrane-associated ICAM-4 interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gloria; Spring, Frances A.; Parons, Stephen F.; Mankelow, Tosti J.; Peters, Luanne L.; Koury, Mark J.; Mohandas, Narla; Anstee, David J.; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2003-02-18

    ICAM-4, a newly characterized adhesion molecule, is expressed early in human erythropoiesis and functions as a ligand for binding a4b1 and aV integrin-expressing cells. Within the bone marrow, erythroblasts surround central macrophages forming erythroblastic islands. Evidence suggests that these islands are highly specialized subcompartments where cell adhesion events, in concert with cytokines, play critical roles in regulating erythropoiesis and apoptosis. Since erythroblasts express a4b1 and ICAM-4 and macrophages exhibit aV, ICAM-4 is an attractive candidate for mediating cellular interactions within erythroblastic islands. To determine whether ICAM-4 binding properties are conserved across species, we first cloned and sequenced the murine homologue. The translated amino acid sequence showed 68 percent overall identity with human ICAM-4. Using recombinant murine ICAM-4 extracellular domains, we discovered that hematopoietic a4b1-expressing HEL cells and non-hematopoietic aV-expressing FLY cells adhered to mouse ICAM-4. Cell adhesion studies showed that FLY and HEL cells bound to mouse and human proteins with similar avidity. These data strongly suggest conservation of integrin-binding properties across species. Importantly, we characterized a novel second splice cDNA that would be predicted to encode an ICAM-4 isoform, lacking the membrane-spanning domain. Erythroblasts express both isoforms of ICAM-4. COS-7 cells transfected with GFP constructs of prototypic or novel ICAM-4 cDNA showed different cellular localization patterns. Moreover, analysis of tissue culture medium revealed that the novel ICAM-4 cDNA encodes a secreted protein. We postulate that secretion of this newly described isoform, ICAM-4S, may modulate binding of membrane-associated ICAM-4 and could thus play a critical regulatory role in erythroblast molecular attachments.

  10. Membrane-Associated Conformation of HIV-1 Nef Investigated with Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry at a Langmuir Monolayer.

    PubMed

    Pirrone, Gregory F; Emert-Sedlak, Lori A; Wales, Thomas E; Smithgall, Thomas E; Kent, Michael S; Engen, John R

    2015-07-21

    In the companion paper to this work, we described development of a new type of hydrogen exchange (HX) mass spectrometry (MS) measurement that integrates Langmuir monolayers. With Langmuir monolayers, the lipid packing density can be reproducibly controlled and changed as desired. Analysis of HX in proteins that may undergo conformational changes as a function of lipid packing (for example, conformational rearrangements after insertion into a lipid layer) are then possible. We previously used neutron reflection to characterize just such a conformational change in the myristoylated HIV-1 Nef protein (myrNef): at high lipid packing density, myrNef could not insert into the lipids and maintained a compact conformation adjacent to the monolayer, whereas at lower lipid packing density, myrNef was able to insert N-terminal arm residues, causing displacement of the core domain away from the monolayer. In order to locate where conformation may have been altered by lipid association, we applied the HX MS Langmuir monolayer method to myrNef associated with monolayers of packing densities identical to those used for the prior neutron reflection measurements. The results show that the N-terminal region and the C-terminal unstructured loop undergo conformational changes when associated with a low density lipid monolayer. The results are not consistent with the hypothesis of myrNef dimerization upon membrane association in the absence of other myrNef binding partners. The HX MS Langmuir monolayer method provides new and meaningful information for myrNef that helps explain necessary conformational changes required for function at the membrane.

  11. Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirB9, an outer-membrane-associated component of a type IV secretion system, regulates substrate selection and T-pilus biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Simon J; Cascales, Eric; Krishnamoorthy, Vidhya; Christie, Peter J

    2005-05-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens translocates DNA and protein substrates between cells via a type IV secretion system (T4SS) whose channel subunits include the VirD4 coupling protein, VirB11 ATPase, VirB6, VirB8, VirB2, and VirB9. In this study, we used linker insertion mutagenesis to characterize the contribution of the outer-membrane-associated VirB9 to assembly and function of the VirB/D4 T4SS. Twenty-five dipeptide insertion mutations were classified as permissive for intercellular substrate transfer (Tra+), completely transfer defective (Tra-), or substrate discriminating, e.g., selectively permissive for transfer only of the oncogenic transfer DNA and the VirE2 protein substrates or of a mobilizable IncQ plasmid substrate. Mutations inhibiting transfer of DNA substrates did not affect formation of close contacts of the substrate with inner membrane channel subunits but blocked formation of contacts with the VirB2 and VirB9 channel subunits, which is indicative of a defect in assembly or function of the distal portion of the secretion channel. Several mutations in the N- and C-terminal regions disrupted VirB9 complex formation with the outer-membrane-associated lipoprotein VirB7 or the inner membrane energy sensor VirB10. Several VirB9.i2-producing Tra+ strains failed to elaborate T pilus at detectable levels (Pil-), and three such Tra+ Pil- mutant strains were rendered Tra- upon deletion of virB2, indicating that the cellular form of pilin protein is essential for substrate translocation. Our findings, together with computer-based analyses, support a model in which distinct domains of VirB9 contribute to substrate selection and translocation, establishment of channel subunit contacts, and T-pilus biogenesis. PMID:15866936

  12. Estrogen action and cytoplasmic signaling cascades. Part I: membrane-associated signaling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Segars, James H.; Driggers, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Remarkable progress in recent years has suggested that estrogen action in vivo is complex and often involves activation of cytoplasmic signaling cascades in addition to genomic actions mediated directly through estrogen receptors α and β. Rather than a linear response mediated solely through estrogen-responsive DNA elements, in vivo estrogen might simultaneously activate distinct signaling cascades that function as networks to coordinate tissue responses to estrogen. This complex signaling system provides for exquisite control and plasticity of response to estrogen at the tissue level, and undoubtedly contributes to the remarkable tissue-specific responses to estrogens. In part I of this series, we summarize cytoplasmic signaling modules involving estrogen or estrogen receptors, with particular focus on recently described membrane-associated signaling complexes. PMID:12217492

  13. Membrane-associated polypeptides induced in Chlamydomonas by limiting CO sub 2 concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, M.H.; Jeffrey, M. )

    1989-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and other unicellular green algae have a high apparent affinity for CO{sub 2}, little O{sub 2} inhibition of photosynthesis, and reduced photorespiration. These characteristics result from operation of a CO{sub 2}-concentrating system. The CO{sub 2}-concentrating system involves active inorganic carbon transport and is under environmental control. Cells grown at limiting CO{sub 2} concentrations have inorganic carbon transport activity, but cells grown at 5% CO{sub 2} do not. Four membrane-associated polypeptides (M{sub r}, 19, 21, 35, and 36 kilodaltons) have been identified which either appear or increase in abundance during adaptation to limiting CO{sub 2} concentrations. The appearance of two of the polypeptides occurs over roughly the same time course as the appearance of the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system activity in response to CO{sub 2} limitation.

  14. Characterization of a membrane-associated cytidine diphosphate-diacylglycerol-dependent phosphatidylserine synthase in bacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Dutt, A; Dowhan, W

    1981-01-01

    The synthesis of phosphatidylserine in two gram-positive aerobic bacteria has been partially characterized. We have located a cytidine 5'-diphospho-diacylglycerol:L-serine O-phosphatidyltransferase (phosphatidylserine synthase) activity in the membrane fraction of Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus subtilis. The activity was demonstrated to be membrane associated by differential centrifugation, sucrose gradient centrifugation, and detergent solubilization. The direct involvement of cytidine 5'-diphospho-diacylglycerol in the reaction was demonstrated by the conversion of the liponucleotide phosphatidyl moiety to phosphatidylserine. This activity is dependent on divalent metal ion (manganese being optimal) and is stimulated by nonionic detergent and its product phosphatidylserine. Based on studies with various combinations of products and substrates, the reaction appears to follow a sequential BiBi kinetic mechanism. PMID:6267011

  15. Plasma membrane associated, virus-specific polypeptides required for the formation of target antigen complexes recognized by virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Domber, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    These studies were undertaken to define some of the poxvirus-specific target antigens which are synthesized in infected cells and recognized by vaccinia virus-specific CTLs (VV-CTLs). Since vaccinia virus infected, unmanipulated target cells express numerous virus-specific antigens on the plasma membrane, attempts were made to manipulate expression of the poxvirus genome after infection so that one or a few defined virus-specified antigens were expressed on the surface of infected cells. In vitro (/sup 51/Cr)-release assays determined that viral DNA synthesis and expression of late viral proteins were not necessary to form a target cell which was fully competent for lysis by VV-CTLs. Under the conditions employed in these experiments, 90-120 minutes of viral protein synthesis were necessary to produce a competent cell for lysis by VV-CTLs. In order to further inhibit the expression of early viral proteins in infected cells, partially UV-inactivated vaccinia virus was employed to infect target cells. It was determined that L-cells infected with virus preparations which had been UV-irradiated for 90 seconds were fully competent for lysis by VV-CTLs. Cells infected with 90 second UV-irr virus expressed 3 predominant, plasma membrane associated antigens of 36-37K, 27-28K, and 19-17K. These 3 viral antigens represent the predominant membrane-associated viral antigens available for interaction with class I, major histocompatibility antigens and hence are potential target antigens for VV-CTLs.

  16. Microtubule-based endoplasmic reticulum motility in Xenopus laevis: activation of membrane-associated kinesin during development.

    PubMed

    Lane, J D; Allan, V J

    1999-06-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in animal cells uses microtubule motor proteins to adopt and maintain its extended, reticular organization. Although the orientation of microtubules in many somatic cell types predicts that the ER should move toward microtubule plus ends, motor-dependent ER motility reconstituted in extracts of Xenopus laevis eggs is exclusively a minus end-directed, cytoplasmic dynein-driven process. We have used Xenopus egg, embryo, and somatic Xenopus tissue culture cell (XTC) extracts to study ER motility during embryonic development in Xenopus by video-enhanced differential interference contrast microscopy. Our results demonstrate that cytoplasmic dynein is the sole motor for microtubule-based ER motility throughout the early stages of development (up to at least the fifth embryonic interphase). When egg-derived ER membranes were incubated in somatic XTC cytosol, however, ER tubules moved in both directions along microtubules. Data from directionality assays suggest that plus end-directed ER tubule extensions contribute approximately 19% of the total microtubule-based ER motility under these conditions. In XTC extracts, the rate of ER tubule extensions toward microtubule plus ends is lower ( approximately 0.4 microm/s) than minus end-directed motility ( approximately 1.3 microm/s), and plus end-directed motility is eliminated by a function-blocking anti-conventional kinesin heavy chain antibody (SUK4). In addition, we provide evidence that the initiation of plus end-directed ER motility in somatic cytosol is likely to occur via activation of membrane-associated kinesin.

  17. Application of comparative genomics in the identification and analysis of novel families of membrane-associated receptors in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Anantharaman, Vivek; Aravind, L

    2003-01-01

    Background A great diversity of multi-pass membrane receptors, typically with 7 transmembrane (TM) helices, is observed in the eukaryote crown group. So far, they are relatively rare in the prokaryotes, and are restricted to the well-characterized sensory rhodopsins of various phototropic prokaryotes. Results Utilizing the currently available wealth of prokaryotic genomic sequences, we set up a computational screen to identify putative 7 (TM) and other multi-pass membrane receptors in prokaryotes. As a result of this procedure we were able to recover two widespread families of 7 TM receptors in bacteria that are distantly related to the eukaryotic 7 TM receptors and prokaryotic rhodopsins. Using sequence profile analysis, we were able to establish that the first members of these receptor families contain one of two distinct N-terminal extracellular globular domains, which are predicted to bind ligands such as carbohydrates. In their intracellular portions they contain fusions to a variety of signaling domains, which suggest that they are likely to transduce signals via cyclic AMP, cyclic diguanylate, histidine phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, and through direct interactions with DNA. The second family of bacterial 7 TM receptors possesses an α-helical extracellular domain, and is predicted to transduce a signal via an intracellular HD hydrolase domain. Based on comparative analysis of gene neighborhoods, this receptor is predicted to function as a regulator of the diacylglycerol-kinase-dependent glycerolipid pathway. Additionally, our procedure also recovered other types of putative prokaryotic multi-pass membrane associated receptor domains. Of these, we characterized two widespread, evolutionarily mobile multi-TM domains that are fused to a variety of C-terminal intracellular signaling domains. One of these typified by the Gram-positive LytS protein is predicted to be a potential sensor of murein derivatives, whereas the other one typified by the Escherichia

  18. Ultrastructural localization of plasma membrane-associated urokinase- type plasminogen activator at focal contacts

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have recently shown that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 are both found extracellularly beneath cultured human skin fibroblasts and HT-1080 sarcoma cells, but in distinct localizations. Here, the ultrastructural distribution of u-PA was studied using immunoferritin electron microscopy. In HT-1080 cells, u-PA on the extracellular aspect of the plasma membrane was detected at sites of direct contact of the cell with the growth substratum beneath all parts of the ventral cell surface. The ferritin-labeled adhesion plaques, which were enriched in submembraneous microfilaments, were frequently seen at the leading lamellae of the cells as well as in lamellipodia and microspikes. Besides the cell-substratum adhesion plaques, ferritin label was detected at cell-cell contact sites. Double-label immunofluorescence showed a striking colocalization of u-PA and vinculin in both HT-1080 cells and WI-38 lung fibroblasts, which is consistent with u-PA being a focal contact component. The u-PA-containing focal contacts of WI-38 cells had no direct codistribution with fibronectin fibrils. In WI-38 cells made stationary by cultivation in a medium containing 0.5% FCS, vinculin plaques became highly elongated and more centrally located, whereas u-PA immunolabel disappeared from such focal adhesions. These findings show that plasma membrane-associated u-PA is an intrinsic component of focal contacts, where, we propose, it enables directional proteolysis for cell migration and invasion. PMID:3123496

  19. Structural basis for the membrane association of ankyrinG via palmitoylation

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Kondo, Hiroko X.; Shirota, Matsuyuki; Kobayashi, Megumi; Takeshita, Kohei; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Okamura, Yasushi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    By clustering various ion channels and transporters, ankyrin-G (AnkG) configures the membrane-excitation platforms in neurons and cardiomyocytes. AnkG itself localizes to specific areas on the plasma membrane via s-palmitoylation of Cys. However, the structural mechanism by which AnkG anchors to the membrane is not understood. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of the reduced and oxidized forms of the AnkG s-palmitoylation domain and used multiple long-term coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to analyze their membrane association. Here we report that the membrane anchoring of AnkG was facilitated by s-palmitoylation, defining a stable binding interface on the lipid membrane, and that AnkG without s-palmitoylation also preferred to stay near the membrane but did not have a unique binding interface. This suggests that AnkG in the juxtamembrane region is primed to accept lipid modification at Cys, and once that happens AnkG constitutes a rigid structural base upon which a membrane-excitation platform can be assembled. PMID:27046665

  20. Structural basis for the membrane association of ankyrinG via palmitoylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Kondo, Hiroko X.; Shirota, Matsuyuki; Kobayashi, Megumi; Takeshita, Kohei; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Okamura, Yasushi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-04-01

    By clustering various ion channels and transporters, ankyrin-G (AnkG) configures the membrane-excitation platforms in neurons and cardiomyocytes. AnkG itself localizes to specific areas on the plasma membrane via s-palmitoylation of Cys. However, the structural mechanism by which AnkG anchors to the membrane is not understood. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of the reduced and oxidized forms of the AnkG s-palmitoylation domain and used multiple long-term coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to analyze their membrane association. Here we report that the membrane anchoring of AnkG was facilitated by s-palmitoylation, defining a stable binding interface on the lipid membrane, and that AnkG without s-palmitoylation also preferred to stay near the membrane but did not have a unique binding interface. This suggests that AnkG in the juxtamembrane region is primed to accept lipid modification at Cys, and once that happens AnkG constitutes a rigid structural base upon which a membrane-excitation platform can be assembled.

  1. Nephritogenic Lupus Antibodies Recognize Glomerular Basement Membrane-Associated Chromatin Fragments Released from Apoptotic Intraglomerular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalaaji, Manar; Mortensen, Elin; Jørgensen, Leif; Olsen, Randi; Rekvig, Ole Petter

    2006-01-01

    Antibodies to dsDNA represent a classification criterion for systemic lupus erythematosus. Subpopulations of these antibodies are involved in lupus nephritis. No known marker separates nephritogenic from non-nephritogenic anti-dsDNA antibodies. It is not clear whether specificity for glomerular target antigens or intrinsic antibody-affinity for dsDNA or nucleosomes is a critical parameter. Furthermore, it is still controversial whether glomerular target antigen(s) is constituted by nucleosomes or by non-nucleosomal glomerular structures. Previously, we have demonstrated that antibodies eluted from murine nephritic kidneys recognize nucleosomes, but not other glomerular antigens. In this study, we determined the structures that bind nephritogenic autoantibodies in vivo by transmission electron microscopy, immune electron microscopy, and colocalization immune electron microscopy using experimental antibodies to dsDNA, to histones and transcription factors, or to laminin. The data obtained are consistent and point at glomerular basement membrane-associated nucleosomes as target structures for the nephritogenic autoantibodies. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling or caspase-3 assays demonstrate that lupus nephritis is linked to intraglomerular cell apoptosis. The data suggest that nucleosomes are released by apoptosis and associate with glomerulus basement membranes, which may then be targeted by pathogenic anti-nucleosome antibodies. Thus, apoptotic nucleosomes may represent both inducer and target structures for nephritogenic autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:16723695

  2. The plasma membrane-associated NADH oxidase of spinach leaves responds to blue light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James; Penel, Claude; Greppin, Hubert; Morre, Dorothy M.

    2002-01-01

    The plasma membrane-associated NADH oxidase (NOX) of spinach leaf disks is characterized by oscillations in activity with a regular period length of ca. 24 min. Within a single population of plants exposed to light at the same time, NOX activities of all plants function synchronously. Exposure of plants transferred from darkness to blue light (495 nm, 2 min, 50 micromoles m-2 s-1) resulted in a complex response pattern but with a new maximum in the rate of NOX activity 36 (24+12) min after illumination and then with maxima in the rate of NOX activity every 24 min thereafter. Transient maxima in NOX activity were observed as well after 9.3 + /- 1.4 and 20.7 +/- 2.1 min. The blue light response differed from the response to red (650 nm, 10 min, 50 micromoles m-2 s-1) or white light where activity maxima were initiated 12 min after the light exposure followed by maxima every 24 min thereafter. Green or yellow light was ineffective. The light response was independent of the time in the 24-min NOX cycle when the light was given. The net effects of blue and red light were ultimately the same with a new maximum in the rate of NOX activity at 12+24=36 min (and every 24 min thereafter), but the mechanisms appear to be distinct.

  3. Nephritogenic lupus antibodies recognize glomerular basement membrane-associated chromatin fragments released from apoptotic intraglomerular cells.

    PubMed

    Kalaaji, Manar; Mortensen, Elin; Jørgensen, Leif; Olsen, Randi; Rekvig, Ole Petter

    2006-06-01

    Antibodies to dsDNA represent a classification criterion for systemic lupus erythematosus. Subpopulations of these antibodies are involved in lupus nephritis. No known marker separates nephritogenic from non-nephritogenic anti-dsDNA antibodies. It is not clear whether specificity for glomerular target antigens or intrinsic antibody-affinity for dsDNA or nucleosomes is a critical parameter. Furthermore, it is still controversial whether glomerular target antigen(s) is constituted by nucleosomes or by non-nucleosomal glomerular structures. Previously, we have demonstrated that antibodies eluted from murine nephritic kidneys recognize nucleosomes, but not other glomerular antigens. In this study, we determined the structures that bind nephritogenic autoantibodies in vivo by transmission electron microscopy, immune electron microscopy, and colocalization immune electron microscopy using experimental antibodies to dsDNA, to histones and transcription factors, or to laminin. The data obtained are consistent and point at glomerular basement membrane-associated nucleosomes as target structures for the nephritogenic autoantibodies. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling or caspase-3 assays demonstrate that lupus nephritis is linked to intraglomerular cell apoptosis. The data suggest that nucleosomes are released by apoptosis and associate with glomerulus basement membranes, which may then be targeted by pathogenic anti-nucleosome antibodies. Thus, apoptotic nucleosomes may represent both inducer and target structures for nephritogenic autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  4. Activation of membrane-associated estrogen receptors decreases food and water intake in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Santollo, Jessica; Marshall, Anikó; Daniels, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Estradiol (E2) decreases food and water intake in a variety of species, including rats. Available evidence suggests that this is mediated by genomic mechanisms that are most often attributed to nuclear estrogen receptors. More recent studies indicate that membrane-associated estrogen receptors (mERs) also can influence gene expression through the activation of transcription factors, yet it is unclear whether mERs are involved in mediating the hypophagic and antidipsetic effects of E2. In the present experiments, we injected E2 or a membrane-impermeable form of E2 (E2-BSA) into the lateral cerebral ventricle of ovariectomized female rats and evaluated the effect on 23 h food and water intake. First, we found that higher doses of E2 were necessary to reduce water intake than were sufficient to reduce food intake. Analysis of drinking microstructure revealed that the decrease in water intake after E2 treatment was mediated by both a decrease in burst number and burst size. Next, the activation of mERs with E2-BSA decreased both overnight food and water intake and analysis of drinking microstructure indicated that the decreased water intake resulted from a decrease in burst number. Finally, E2-BSA did not condition a taste aversion, suggesting that the inhibitory effects on food and water intake were not secondary to malaise. Together these findings suggest that activation of mERs is sufficient to decrease food and water intake in female rats.

  5. Membrane-associated actin in the rhabdomeral microvilli of crayfish photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Infiltration of compound eyes of crayfish, Cherax destructor, with the thiol protease inhibitor Ep-475 or with trifluoperazine prior to fixation for electron microscopy was found to stabilize an axial filament of 6-12 nm diam within each rhabdomeral microvillus of the photoreceptors. Rhabdoms isolated from retinal homogenates by sucrose gradient centrifugation under conditions that stabilize cytoskeletal material contained large amounts of a 42-kd polypeptide that co- migrated with insect flight muscle actin in one- and two-dimensional PAGE, inhibited pancreatic DNase l, and bound to vertebrate myosin. Vertebrate skeletal muscle actin added to retinal homogenates did not co-purify with rhabdoms, implying that actin was not a contaminant from nonmembranous structures. DNase l inhibition assays of detergent-lysed rhabdoms indicated the presence of large amounts of filamentous actin provided ATP was present. Monomeric actin in such preparations was completely polymerizable only after 90 min incubation with equimolar phalloidin. More than half of the actin present could be liberated from the membrane by sonication, indicating a loose association with the membrane. However, a large proportion of the actin was tightly bound to the rhabdomeral membrane, and washing sonicated membrane fractions with solutions of a range of ionic strengths and nonionic detergents failed to remove it. Antibodies to scallop actin only bound to frozen sections of rhabdoms after gentle permeabilization and very long incubation periods, probably because of steric hindrance and the hydrophobicity of the structure. The F-actin probe nitrobenzoxadiazol phallacidin bound to rhabdoms and labeled F-actin aggregates in other retinal components, but rhabdom fluorescence was not abolished by preincubation with phalloidin. The biochemical data indicate the existence of two distinct actin-based cytoskeletal systems, one being closely membrane associated. The other may possibly constitute the axial filament

  6. Acidic mist reduces foliar membrane-associated calcium and impairs stomatal responsiveness in red spruce.

    PubMed

    Borer, Catherine H; Schaberg, Paul G; DeHayes, Donald H

    2005-06-01

    Acidic deposition can leach essential pools of calcium (Ca) directly from plant foliage. Because of the central role of Ca in environmental signal transduction, disruptions of labile foliar Ca pools could impair physiological responses to a variety of environmental stimuli and stressors. We investigated the possibility that acidic mist-induced depletion of membrane-associated Ca (mCa), which is one form of labile Ca, may alter stomatal responsiveness to water stress, a process known to include Ca in signal transduction cascades. Red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) seedlings were exposed to either pH 3.0 or pH 5.0 mist treatments for one growing season. Foliar nutrition was assessed following treatments, and declines in stomatal conductance and net photosynthesis were measured on current-year shoots following stem excision. Seedlings exposed to pH 3.0 acidic mist treatments had reduced mCa relative to the pH 5.0 treated seedlings. Seedlings subjected to the pH 3.0 acidic mist treatment exhibited impaired stomatal functions, including a smaller maximum aperture, slower closure and an increased lag time between stomatal closure and photosynthetic decline following experimental water stress. Delayed stomatal closure could undermine desiccation avoidance mechanisms. Previous work has demonstrated that acidic mist treatments deplete mCa in red spruce and impair cold tolerance, with similar effects in other species. The results we present provide further evidence that acidic mist-induced mCa depletion may cause disruption of a broad range of plant stress responses.

  7. Functional significance of membrane associated proteolysis in the toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxin against Colorado potato beetle.

    PubMed

    García-Robles, Inmaculada; Ochoa-Campuzano, Camila; Sánchez, Jorge; Contreras, Estefanía; Real, M Dolores; Rausell, Carolina

    2012-11-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins are widely used as biocontrol agents in bioinsecticides and transgenic plants. In the three domain-Cry toxins, domain II has been identified as an important determinant of their highly specific activity against insects. In this work, we assessed the role in membrane associated proteolysis and toxicity in Colorado potato beetle (CPB) of a previously reported ADAM recognition motif present in Cry3Aa toxin domain II. We used site-directed mutagenesis to modify the Bacillus thuringiensis cry3A gene in amino acid residues 344, 346, 347, 351 and 353 of the ADAM recognition motif in Cry3Aa toxin. Cry3Aa toxin mutants displayed decreased toxicity when compared to the wild type toxin and impaired ability to compete CPB brush border membrane associated cleavage of an ADAM fluorogenic substrate. Although the proteolytic profile of Cry3Aa toxin mutants generated by brush border membrane associated proteases was similar to that of Cry3Aa toxin, the metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline was less efficient on the proteolysis of mutants than on that of the wild type toxin. The relevance of the Cry3Aa-ADAM interaction through the predicted recognition sequence was further confirmed by analyzing the effect of membrane integrity disturbance on Cry3Aa toxin membrane associated proteolysis and CPB larvae toxicity. Data support that Cry3Aa proteolysis, as a result of the interaction with ADAM through the Cry3Aa recognition motif, is essential for Cry3Aa toxic action in CPB. Detailed knowledge of Cry3Aa interaction with CPB midgut membrane should facilitate the development of more effective Bt based products against this devastating pest and other Coleoptera. PMID:22884605

  8. Functional significance of membrane associated proteolysis in the toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxin against Colorado potato beetle.

    PubMed

    García-Robles, Inmaculada; Ochoa-Campuzano, Camila; Sánchez, Jorge; Contreras, Estefanía; Real, M Dolores; Rausell, Carolina

    2012-11-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins are widely used as biocontrol agents in bioinsecticides and transgenic plants. In the three domain-Cry toxins, domain II has been identified as an important determinant of their highly specific activity against insects. In this work, we assessed the role in membrane associated proteolysis and toxicity in Colorado potato beetle (CPB) of a previously reported ADAM recognition motif present in Cry3Aa toxin domain II. We used site-directed mutagenesis to modify the Bacillus thuringiensis cry3A gene in amino acid residues 344, 346, 347, 351 and 353 of the ADAM recognition motif in Cry3Aa toxin. Cry3Aa toxin mutants displayed decreased toxicity when compared to the wild type toxin and impaired ability to compete CPB brush border membrane associated cleavage of an ADAM fluorogenic substrate. Although the proteolytic profile of Cry3Aa toxin mutants generated by brush border membrane associated proteases was similar to that of Cry3Aa toxin, the metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline was less efficient on the proteolysis of mutants than on that of the wild type toxin. The relevance of the Cry3Aa-ADAM interaction through the predicted recognition sequence was further confirmed by analyzing the effect of membrane integrity disturbance on Cry3Aa toxin membrane associated proteolysis and CPB larvae toxicity. Data support that Cry3Aa proteolysis, as a result of the interaction with ADAM through the Cry3Aa recognition motif, is essential for Cry3Aa toxic action in CPB. Detailed knowledge of Cry3Aa interaction with CPB midgut membrane should facilitate the development of more effective Bt based products against this devastating pest and other Coleoptera.

  9. Membrane-associated GRP78 helps subgroup J avian leucosis virus enter cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Mei, Mei; Qin, Aijian; Ye, Jianqiang; Qian, Kun; Shao, Hongxia

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified chicken Annexin A2 (chANXA2) as a novel receptor for retrovirus avian leucosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J), using a DF1 cell line expressing the viral envelope (env) protein. To further probe whether other proteins participate in virus infection, we investigated several host proteins from co-immunoprecipitation with the DF1 cell line expressing viral env. Mass spectrometry analysis indicates that the chicken glucose-regulation protein 78 (chGRP78) of the DF1 membrane interacted with the ALV-J env protein. The results revealed that antibodies or siRNA to chGRP78 significantly inhibited ALV-J infection and replication, and over-expression of chGRP78 enabled the entry of ALV-J into non-susceptible cells. Taken together, these results are the first to report that chGRP78 functions to help ALV-J enter cells. PMID:27599847

  10. Membrane-associated GRP78 helps subgroup J avian leucosis virus enter cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Mei, Mei; Qin, Aijian; Ye, Jianqiang; Qian, Kun; Shao, Hongxia

    2016-09-06

    We previously identified chicken Annexin A2 (chANXA2) as a novel receptor for retrovirus avian leucosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J), using a DF1 cell line expressing the viral envelope (env) protein. To further probe whether other proteins participate in virus infection, we investigated several host proteins from co-immunoprecipitation with the DF1 cell line expressing viral env. Mass spectrometry analysis indicates that the chicken glucose-regulation protein 78 (chGRP78) of the DF1 membrane interacted with the ALV-J env protein. The results revealed that antibodies or siRNA to chGRP78 significantly inhibited ALV-J infection and replication, and over-expression of chGRP78 enabled the entry of ALV-J into non-susceptible cells. Taken together, these results are the first to report that chGRP78 functions to help ALV-J enter cells.

  11. Suppression of Toll-like Receptor-Mediated Innate Immune Responses at the Ocular Surface by the Membrane-associated Mucins MUC1 and MUC16

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Balaraj B.; Kaiser-Marko, Christina; Spurr-Michaud, Sandra; Tisdale, Ann S.; Gipson, Ilene K.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-associated mucins (MAMs) expressed on the ocular surface epithelium form a dense glycocalyx, which is hypothesized to protect the cornea and conjunctiva from external insult. In this study, the hypothesis that the MAMs MUC1 and MUC16, expressed on the apical surface of the corneal epithelium, suppress Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated innate immune responses was tested. Using an in vitro model of corneal epithelial cells that are cultured to express MAMs, we show that reduced expression of either MUC1 or MUC16 correlates with increased message and secreted protein levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α following exposure of cells to the TLR2 and TLR5 agonists, heat killed Listeria monocytogenes and flagellin, respectively. Since mice express MUC1 (but not MUC16) in the corneal epithelium, a Muc1-/- mouse model was used to extend in vitro findings. Indeed, IL-6 and TNF-α message levels were increased in the corneal epithelium of Muc1-/- mice, in comparison to wild type mice, following exposure of enucleated eyes to the TLR2 and TLR5 agonists. Our results suggest that the MAMs MUC1 and MUC16 contribute to the maintenance of immune homeostasis at the ocular surface by limiting TLR-mediated innate immune responses. PMID:25563498

  12. Turkey erythrocytes possess a membrane-associated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase that is activated by Ca2+ in the presence of calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, A J; Downes, C P; Harden, T K; Michell, R H

    1987-01-01

    Turkey erythrocytes contain soluble and particulate kinase activities which catalyse the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3]. The particle-bound activity accounts for approximately one-quarter of the total cellular Ins(1,4,5)P3 kinase, when assayed at a [Ca2+] of 10 nM. The particle-bound Ins(1,4,5)P3 kinase is not washed from the membrane by 0.6 M-KCl, yet may be solubilized by a variety of detergents. This suggests that it is an intrinsic membrane protein. The product of the membrane-bound Ins(1,4,5)P3 kinase is inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate [Ins(1,3,4,5)P4], identifying the enzyme as an Ins(1,4,5)P3 3-kinase. In the presence of calmodulin, the membrane-associated Ins(1,4,5)P3 3-kinase is activated as [Ca2+] is increased over the range 0.2-1.0 microM. Under these conditions, the rates of dephosphorylation of Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 and Ins(1,4,5)P3 by phosphatases in the membrane fraction are unchanged. PMID:2829830

  13. Atox1 Contains Positive Residues That Mediate Membrane Association and Aid Subsequent Copper Loading

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Adrian G.; Unger, Vinzenz M.

    2013-01-01

    Copper chaperones bind intracellular copper and ensure proper trafficking to downstream targets via protein-protein interactions. In contrast to the mechanisms of copper binding and transfer to downstream targets, the mechanisms of initial copper loading of the chaperones are largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that antioxidant protein 1 (Atox1 in human cells), the principal cellular copper chaperone responsible for delivery of copper to the secretory pathway, possesses the ability to interact with negatively charged lipid headgroups via distinct surface lysine residues. Moreover, loss of these residues lowers the efficiency of copper loading of Atox1 in vivo, suggesting that the membrane may play a scaffolding role in copper distribution to Atox1. These findings complement the recent discovery that the membrane also facilitates copper loading of the copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase 1 and provide further support for the emerging paradigm that the membrane bilayer plays a central role in cellular copper acquisition and distribution. PMID:24036897

  14. Phytoene Desaturase from Oryza sativa: Oligomeric Assembly, Membrane Association and Preliminary 3D-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Koschmieder, Julian; Brausemann, Anton; Drepper, Friedel; Rodriguez-Franco, Marta; Ghisla, Sandro; Warscheid, Bettina; Einsle, Oliver; Beyer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant phytoene desaturase (PDS-His6) from rice was purified to near-homogeneity and shown to be enzymatically active in a biphasic, liposome-based assay system. The protein contains FAD as the sole protein-bound redox-cofactor. Benzoquinones, not replaceable by molecular oxygen, serve as a final electron acceptor defining PDS as a 15-cis-phytoene (donor):plastoquinone oxidoreductase. The herbicidal PDS-inhibitor norflurazon is capable of arresting the reaction by stabilizing the intermediary FADred, while an excess of the quinone acceptor relieves this blockage, indicating competition. The enzyme requires its homo-oligomeric association for activity. The sum of data collected through gel permeation chromatography, non-denaturing polyacrylamide electrophoresis, chemical cross-linking, mass spectrometry and electron microscopy techniques indicate that the high-order oligomers formed in solution are the basis for an active preparation. Of these, a tetramer consisting of dimers represents the active unit. This is corroborated by our preliminary X-ray structural analysis that also revealed similarities of the protein fold with the sequence-inhomologous bacterial phytoene desaturase CRTI and other oxidoreductases of the GR2-family of flavoproteins. This points to an evolutionary relatedness of CRTI and PDS yielding different carotene desaturation sequences based on homologous protein folds. PMID:26147209

  15. Sequence and expression of the chicken membrane-associated phospholipases A1 alpha (LIPH) and beta (LIPI).

    PubMed

    Hesse, Manuela; Willscher, Edith; Schmiedel, Benjamin J; Posch, Stefan; Golbik, Ralph P; Staege, Martin S

    2012-01-01

    Cancer/testis antigens (CTA) are a heterogeneous group of antigens that are expressed preferentially in tumor cells and testis. Based on this definition the human membrane-associated phospholipase A1 beta (lipase family member I, LIPI) has been identified as CTA. The high homology of LIPI and the membrane-associated phospholipase A1 alpha (lipase family member H, LIPH) suggests that both genes are derived from a common ancestor by gene duplication. In contrast to human LIPI, human LIPH is expressed in several tissues. LIPI sequences have only been identified in mammals. Here, we describe the identification of LIPI in non-mammalian vertebrates. Based on the conserved genomic organization of LIPI and LIPH we identified sequences for both lipases in birds and fishes. In all vertebrates the LIPI locus is neighbored by a member of the RNA binding motif (RBM) family, RBM11. By sequencing of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction products we determined the sequences of LIPI and LIPH messenger RNA from broilers. We found that the sequence homology between LIPI and LIPH is much higher in non-mammalian species than in mammals. In addition, we found broad expression of LIPI in broilers, resembling the expression profile of LIPH. Our data suggest that LIPI is a CTA only in mammalian species and that the unique sequence features of the mammalian LIPI/RBM11 locus have evolved together with the CTA-like expression pattern of LIPI.

  16. Mistic's membrane association and its assistance in overexpression of a human GPCR are independent processes

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Jacopo; Bordag, Natalie; Keller, Sandro; Zerbe, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of the Bacillus subtilis protein Mistic with the bacterial membrane and its role in promoting the overexpression of other membrane proteins are still matters of debate. In this study, we aimed to determine whether individual helical fragments of Mistic are sufficient for its interaction with membranes in vivo and in vitro. To this end, fragments encompassing each of Mistic's helical segments and combinations of them were produced as GFP-fusions, and their cellular localization was studied in Escherichia coli. Furthermore, peptides corresponding to the four helical fragments were synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis, and their ability to acquire secondary structure in a variety of lipids and detergents was studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Both types of experiments demonstrate that the third helical fragment of Mistic interacts only with LDAO micelles but does not partition into lipid bilayers. Interestingly, the other three helices interact with membranes in vivo and in vitro. Nevertheless, all of these short sequences can replace full-length Mistic as N-terminal fusions to achieve overexpression of a human G-protein-coupled receptor in E. coli, although with different effects on quantity and quality of the protein produced. A bioinformatic analysis of the Mistic family expanded the number of homologs from 4 to 20, including proteins outside the genus Bacillus. This information allowed us to discover a highly conserved Shine-Dalgarno sequence in the operon mstX-yugO that is important for downstream translation of the potassium ion channel yugO. PMID:25297828

  17. Medically Relevant Acinetobacter Species Require a Type II Secretion System and Specific Membrane-Associated Chaperones for the Export of Multiple Substrates and Full Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Christian M.; Kinsella, Rachel L.; Palmer, Lauren D.; Skaar, Eric P.; Feldman, Mario F.

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, A. nosocomialis, and A. pittii have recently emerged as opportunistic human pathogens capable of causing severe human disease; however, the molecular mechanisms employed by Acinetobacter to cause disease remain poorly understood. Many pathogenic members of the genus Acinetobacter contain genes predicted to encode proteins required for the biogenesis of a type II secretion system (T2SS), which have been shown to mediate virulence in many Gram-negative organisms. Here we demonstrate that Acinetobacter nosocomialis strain M2 produces a functional T2SS, which is required for full virulence in both the Galleria mellonella and murine pulmonary infection models. Importantly, this is the first bona fide secretion system shown to be required for virulence in Acinetobacter. Using bioinformatics, proteomics, and mutational analyses, we show that Acinetobacter employs its T2SS to export multiple substrates, including the lipases LipA and LipH as well as the protease CpaA. Furthermore, the Acinetobacter T2SS, which is found scattered amongst five distinct loci, does not contain a dedicated pseudopilin peptidase, but instead relies on the type IV prepilin peptidase, reinforcing the common ancestry of these two systems. Lastly, two of the three secreted proteins characterized in this study require specific chaperones for secretion. These chaperones contain an N-terminal transmembrane domain, are encoded adjacently to their cognate effector, and their disruption abolishes type II secretion of their cognate effector. Bioinformatic analysis identified putative chaperones located adjacent to multiple previously known type II effectors from several Gram-negative bacteria, which suggests that T2SS chaperones constitute a separate class of membrane-associated chaperones mediating type II secretion. PMID:26764912

  18. Modification of trout sperm membranes associated with activation and cryopreservation. Implications for fertilizing potential.

    PubMed

    Purdy, P H; Barbosa, E A; Praamsma, C J; Schisler, G J

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effects of two trout sperm activation solutions on sperm physiology and membrane organization prior to and following cryopreservation using flow cytometry and investigated their impact on in vitro fertility. Overall, frozen-thawed samples had greater phospholipid disorder when compared with fresh samples (high plasma membrane fluidity; P < 0.0001) and sperm activated with water also had high plasma membrane fluidity when compared to sperm activated with Lahnsteiner solution (LAS; P < 0.0001). Following cryopreservation water activated samples had membranes with greater membrane protein disorganization compared with LAS but the membrane protein organization of LAS samples was similar to samples prior to freezing (P < 0.0001). Post-thaw water activation resulted in significant increases in intracellular calcium compared to LAS (P < 0.002). In vitro fertility trials with frozen-thawed milt and LAS activation resulted in greater fertility (45%) compared to water activated samples (10%; P < 0.0001). Higher fertility rates correlated with lower intracellular calcium with water (R(2) = -0.9; P = 0.01) and LAS (R(2) = -0.85; P = 0.03) activation. Greater plasma membrane phospholipid (R(2) = -0.89; P = 0.02) and protein (R(2) = -0.84; P = 0.04) disorder correlated with lower water activation fertility rates. These membrane organization characteristics only approached significance with LAS activation in vitro fertility (P = 0.09, P = 0.06, respectively). Potentially the understanding of sperm membrane reorganizations and the physiology associated with activation following cryopreservation may enable users in a repository or hatchery setting to estimate the fertilizing potential of a sample and determine its value.

  19. Glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane association of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus GP4 glycoprotein and its co-localization with CD163 in lipid rafts

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yijun; Pattnaik, Asit K.; Song, Cheng; Yoo, Dongwan; Li, Gang

    2012-03-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) glycoprotein 4 (GP4) resembles a typical type I membrane protein in its structure but lacks a hydrophilic tail at the C-terminus, suggesting that GP4 may be a lipid-anchored membrane protein. Using the human decay-accelerating factor (DAF; CD55), a known glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) lipid-anchored protein, chimeric constructs were made to substitute the GPI-anchor domain of DAF with the putative lipid-anchor domain of GP4, and their membrane association and lipase cleavage were determined in cells. The DAF-GP4 fusion protein was transported to the plasma membrane and was cleaved by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), indicating that the C-terminal domain of GP4 functions as a GPI anchor. Mutational studies for residues adjacent to the GPI modification site and characterization of respective mutant viruses generated from infectious cDNA clones show that the ability of GP4 for membrane association corresponded to virus viability and growth characteristics. The residues T158 ({omega} - 2, where {omega} is the GPI moiety at E160), P159 ({omega} - 1), and M162 ({omega} + 2) of GP4 were determined to be important for virus replication, with M162 being of particular importance for virus infectivity. The complete removal of the peptide-anchor domain in GP4 resulted in a complete loss of virus infectivity. The depletion of cholesterol from the plasma membrane of cells reduced the virus production, suggesting a role of lipid rafts in PRRSV infection. Remarkably, GP4 was found to co-localize with CD163 in the lipid rafts on the plasma membrane. Since CD163 has been reported as a cellular receptor for PRRSV and GP4 has been shown to interact with this receptor, our data implicates an important role of lipid rafts during entry of the virus.

  20. Entamoeba histolytica: soluble and membrane-associated neutral sphingomyelinase-C and other unidentified esterase activity.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Palacios-Corona, Rebeca; Hernández-Luna, Carlos; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito David; Torres de la Cruz, Victor M; Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I; González-Salazar, Francisco; Garza-González, Jesús Norberto; Escobedo-Guajardo, Brenda Leticia; Said-Fernández, Salvador

    2010-08-01

    Sphingomyelinase (SMase) activity was measured in Entamoeba histolytica particulate and soluble subcellular fractions. The effects on SMase of incubation time, total protein concentration, pH, and several divalent cations were determined. SMase-C and other unidentified esterase activity were detected in soluble and particulate fractions. SMase-C was 94.5-96.0% higher than the unidentified esterase activity. Soluble and insoluble SMase-C specific activities increased with protein dose and incubation time. Soluble and insoluble SMase-C activities were maximum at pH 7.5 and were dependent on Mg(2+), Mn(2+), or Co(2+), and inhibited by Zn(2+), Hg(2+), Ca(2+), and EDTA. SMase-C was active in the pH range of 3-10 and its maximum activity was at pH 7.5. The soluble and insoluble SMases have remarkably similar physicochemical properties, strongly suggesting that E. histolytica has just one isoform of neutral SMase-C that had not been described before and might be essential for E. histolytica metabolism or virulence. PMID:20350542

  1. Plant gamma-tubulin interacts with alphabeta-tubulin dimers and forms membrane-associated complexes.

    PubMed

    Dryková, Denisa; Cenklová, Vēra; Sulimenko, Vadym; Volc, Jindrich; Dráber, Pavel; Binarová, Pavla

    2003-02-01

    gamma-Tubulin is assumed to participate in microtubule nucleation in acentrosomal plant cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still unknown. Here, we show that gamma-tubulin is present in protein complexes of various sizes and different subcellular locations in Arabidopsis and fava bean. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed an association of gamma-tubulin with alphabeta-tubulin dimers. gamma-Tubulin cosedimented with microtubules polymerized in vitro and localized along their whole length. Large gamma-tubulin complexes resistant to salt treatment were found to be associated with a high-speed microsomal fraction. Blue native electrophoresis of detergent-solubilized microsomes showed that the molecular mass of the complexes was >1 MD. Large gamma-tubulin complexes were active in microtubule nucleation, but nucleation activity was not observed for the smaller complexes. Punctate gamma-tubulin staining was associated with microtubule arrays, accumulated with short kinetochore microtubules interacting in polar regions with membranes, and localized in the vicinity of nuclei and in the area of cell plate formation. Our results indicate that the association of gamma-tubulin complexes with dynamic membranes might ensure the flexibility of noncentrosomal microtubule nucleation. Moreover, the presence of other molecular forms of gamma-tubulin suggests additional roles for this protein species in microtubule organization. PMID:12566585

  2. Membrane-associated zinc peptidase families: comparing ACE and ACE2.

    PubMed

    Guy, J L; Lambert, D W; Warner, F J; Hooper, N M; Turner, A J

    2005-08-01

    In contrast to the relatively ubiquitous angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), expression of the mammalian ACE homologue, ACE2, was initially described in the heart, kidney and testis. ACE2 is a type I integral membrane protein with its active site domain exposed to the extracellular surface of endothelial cells and the renal tubular epithelium. Here ACE2 is poised to metabolise circulating peptides which may include angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor and the product of angiotensin I cleavage by ACE. To this end, ACE2 may counterbalance the effects of ACE within the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Indeed, ACE2 has been implicated in the regulation of heart and renal function where it is proposed to control the levels of angiotensin II relative to its hypotensive metabolite, angiotensin-(1-7). The recent solution of the structure of ACE2, and ACE, has provided new insight into the substrate and inhibitor profiles of these two key regulators of the RAS. As the complexity of this crucial pathway is unravelled, there is a growing interest in the therapeutic potential of agents that modulate the activity of ACE2.

  3. AMACO is a novel component of the basement membrane associated Fraser complex

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Rebecca J.; Gebauer, Jan M.; Zhang, Jin-Li; Kobbe, Birgit; Keene, Douglas R.; Karlsen, Kristina Røkenes; Richetti, Stefânia; Wohl, Alexander P.; Sengle, Gerhard; Neiss, Wolfram F.; Paulsson, Mats; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Wagener, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Fraser syndrome (FS) is a phenotypically variable, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmus, cutaneous syndactyly and other malformations resulting from mutations in FRAS1, FREM2 and GRIP1. Transient embryonic epidermal blistering causes the characteristic defects of the disorder. Fras1, Frem1 and Frem2 form the extracellular Fraser complex, which is believed to stabilize the basement membrane (BM). However, several cases of FS could not be attributed to mutations in FRAS1, FREM2 or GRIP1, while Fraser syndrome displays high clinical variability, suggesting there is an additional genetic, possibly modifying contribution to this disorder. AMACO, encoded by the VWA2 gene, has a very similar tissue distribution to the Fraser complex proteins in both mouse and zebrafish. Here, we show that AMACO deposition is lost in Fras1 deficient zebrafish and mice and that Fras1 and AMACO interact directly via their CSPG and P2 domains. Knockdown of vwa2, which alone causes no phenotype, enhances the phenotype of hypomorphic Fras1 mutant zebrafish. Together, our data suggest that AMACO represents a novel member of the Fraser complex. PMID:24232570

  4. Membrane-associated virus replication complexes locate to plant conducting tubes

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Juan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that in order to establish a systemic infection in a plant, viruses move from the initially infected cell to the vascular tissues by cell-to-cell movement through plasmodesmata (PD), and load into the vascular conducting tubes (i.e. phloem sieve elements and xylem vessel elements) for long-distance movement. The viral unit in these movements can be a virion or a yet-to-be-defined ribonucleic protein (RNP) complex. Using live-cell imaging, our laboratory has previously demonstrated that membrane-bound replication complexes move cell-to-cell during turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) infection. Our recent study shows that these membrane-bound replication complexes end up in the vascular conducting tubes, which is likely the case for potato virus X (PVX) also. The presence of TuMV-induced membrane complexes in xylem vessels suggests that viral components could also be found in other apoplastic regions of the plant, such as the intercellular space. This possibility may have implications regarding how we approach the study of plant innate immune responses against viruses. PMID:25955489

  5. Beta-amyloid fibrils of Alzheimer's disease: pathologically altered, basement membrane-associated microfibrils?

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Kisilevsky, R

    2001-01-01

    Beta amyloid fibrils were examined in situ in the cerebral cortex of brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease using high resolution ultrastructural and immunohistochemical techniques. The main body of the fibril was identical with that of microfibrils and was made up of a core containing amyloid P component (AP), and a surface layer. Beta amyloid protein (Abeta) in the form of 1 nm wide flexible filaments was associated with the external surface of the microfibril. In cerebrovascular amyloid angiopathy the fibrils were formed at the outer surface of the vascular basement membrane. Overproduction of microfibrils has been reported at the basement membrane of "leaky" capillaries including the glomerular capillary in disease or leaky alveolar-capillary walls of normal lungs. Similarly, in Alzheimer's disease overproduction of microfibril-like beta amyloid fibrils in amyloid angiopathy coincided with breakdown of the blood-brain barrier of the cerebromicrovasculature. Thus, in the above three locations, the presence of abundant microfibrils, or microfibril-like structures, may be related to plasma which leaks out of the circulation into the adjoining vascular basement membrane. AP is an essential constituent of microfibrils and since the only site where AP is available in the cerebral cortex is in leaky microvasculature, a chronic, steady supply of AP into perivascular areas may be the cause of overproduction of microfibrils. Brain "microfibrils" may further be altered pathologically into beta amyloid fibrils by the addition of Abeta. The origin of the fibrils in senile plaques may also be the microvasculature since in the area of the plaques no source of AP is apparent.

  6. Beta-amyloid fibrils of Alzheimer's disease: pathologically altered, basement membrane-associated microfibrils?

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Kisilevsky, R

    2001-01-01

    Beta amyloid fibrils were examined in situ in the cerebral cortex of brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease using high resolution ultrastructural and immunohistochemical techniques. The main body of the fibril was identical with that of microfibrils and was made up of a core containing amyloid P component (AP), and a surface layer. Beta amyloid protein (Abeta) in the form of 1 nm wide flexible filaments was associated with the external surface of the microfibril. In cerebrovascular amyloid angiopathy the fibrils were formed at the outer surface of the vascular basement membrane. Overproduction of microfibrils has been reported at the basement membrane of "leaky" capillaries including the glomerular capillary in disease or leaky alveolar-capillary walls of normal lungs. Similarly, in Alzheimer's disease overproduction of microfibril-like beta amyloid fibrils in amyloid angiopathy coincided with breakdown of the blood-brain barrier of the cerebromicrovasculature. Thus, in the above three locations, the presence of abundant microfibrils, or microfibril-like structures, may be related to plasma which leaks out of the circulation into the adjoining vascular basement membrane. AP is an essential constituent of microfibrils and since the only site where AP is available in the cerebral cortex is in leaky microvasculature, a chronic, steady supply of AP into perivascular areas may be the cause of overproduction of microfibrils. Brain "microfibrils" may further be altered pathologically into beta amyloid fibrils by the addition of Abeta. The origin of the fibrils in senile plaques may also be the microvasculature since in the area of the plaques no source of AP is apparent. PMID:11730002

  7. Identification of three competitive inhibitors for membrane-associated, Mg2+-dependent and neutral 60 kDa sphingomyelinase activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok Kyun; Jung, Sang Mi; Ahn, Kyong Hoon; Jeon, Hyung Jun; Lee, Dong Hun; Jung, Kwang Mook; Jung, Sung Yun; Kim, Dae Kyong

    2005-08-01

    Methanol extracts of domestic plants of Korea were evaluated as a potential inhibitor of neutral pH optimum and membrane-associated 60 kDa sphingomyelinase (N-SMase) activity. In this study, we partially purified N-SMase from bovine brain membranes using ammonium sulfate. It was purified approximately 163-fold by the sequential use of DE52, Butyl-Toyopearl, DEAE-Cellulose, and Phenyl-5PW column chromatographies. The purified N-SMase activity was assayed in the presence of the plant extracts of three hundreds species. Based on the in vitro assay, three plant extracts significantly inhibited the N-SMase activity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. To further examine the inhibitory pattern, a Dixon plot was constructed for each of the plant extracts. The extracts of Abies nephrolepis, Acer tegmentosum, and Ginkgo biloba revealed a competitive inhibition with the inhibition constant (Ki) of 11.9 microg/ mL, 9.4 microg/mL, and 12.9 microg/mL, respectively. These extracts also inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the production of ceramide induced by serum deprivation in human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y.

  8. Structural basis for selective recognition of acyl chains by the membrane-associated acyltransferase PatA

    PubMed Central

    Albesa-Jové, David; Svetlíková, Zuzana; Tersa, Montse; Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Carreras-González, Ana; Bonnet, Pascal; Arrasate, Pedro; Eguskiza, Ander; Angala, Shiva K.; Cifuente, Javier O.; Korduláková, Jana; Jackson, Mary; Mikušová, Katarína; Guerin, Marcelo E.

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of phospholipids and glycolipids are critical pathways for virtually all cell membranes. PatA is an essential membrane associated acyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of mycobacterial phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs). The enzyme transfers a palmitoyl moiety from palmitoyl–CoA to the 6-position of the mannose ring linked to 2-position of inositol in PIM1/PIM2. We report here the crystal structures of PatA from Mycobacterium smegmatis in the presence of its naturally occurring acyl donor palmitate and a nonhydrolyzable palmitoyl–CoA analog. The structures reveal an α/β architecture, with the acyl chain deeply buried into a hydrophobic pocket that runs perpendicular to a long groove where the active site is located. Enzyme catalysis is mediated by an unprecedented charge relay system, which markedly diverges from the canonical HX4D motif. Our studies establish the mechanistic basis of substrate/membrane recognition and catalysis for an important family of acyltransferases, providing exciting possibilities for inhibitor design. PMID:26965057

  9. Structural basis for selective recognition of acyl chains by the membrane-associated acyltransferase PatA.

    PubMed

    Albesa-Jové, David; Svetlíková, Zuzana; Tersa, Montse; Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Carreras-González, Ana; Bonnet, Pascal; Arrasate, Pedro; Eguskiza, Ander; Angala, Shiva K; Cifuente, Javier O; Korduláková, Jana; Jackson, Mary; Mikušová, Katarína; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of phospholipids and glycolipids are critical pathways for virtually all cell membranes. PatA is an essential membrane associated acyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of mycobacterial phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs). The enzyme transfers a palmitoyl moiety from palmitoyl-CoA to the 6-position of the mannose ring linked to 2-position of inositol in PIM1/PIM2. We report here the crystal structures of PatA from Mycobacterium smegmatis in the presence of its naturally occurring acyl donor palmitate and a nonhydrolyzable palmitoyl-CoA analog. The structures reveal an α/β architecture, with the acyl chain deeply buried into a hydrophobic pocket that runs perpendicular to a long groove where the active site is located. Enzyme catalysis is mediated by an unprecedented charge relay system, which markedly diverges from the canonical HX4D motif. Our studies establish the mechanistic basis of substrate/membrane recognition and catalysis for an important family of acyltransferases, providing exciting possibilities for inhibitor design. PMID:26965057

  10. Integrating solid-state NMR and computational modeling to investigate the structure and dynamics of membrane-associated ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Vortmeier, Gerrit; DeLuca, Stephanie H; Els-Heindl, Sylvia; Chollet, Constance; Scheidt, Holger A; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Meiler, Jens; Huster, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin activates the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a, also known as the ghrelin receptor. This 28-residue peptide is acylated at Ser3 and is the only peptide hormone in the human body that is lipid-modified by an octanoyl group. Little is known about the structure and dynamics of membrane-associated ghrelin. We carried out solid-state NMR studies of ghrelin in lipid vesicles, followed by computational modeling of the peptide using Rosetta. Isotropic chemical shift data of isotopically labeled ghrelin provide information about the peptide's secondary structure. Spin diffusion experiments indicate that ghrelin binds to membranes via its lipidated Ser3. Further, Phe4, as well as electrostatics involving the peptide's positively charged residues and lipid polar headgroups, contribute to the binding energy. Other than the lipid anchor, ghrelin is highly flexible and mobile at the membrane surface. This observation is supported by our predicted model ensemble, which is in good agreement with experimentally determined chemical shifts. In the final ensemble of models, residues 8-17 form an α-helix, while residues 21-23 and 26-27 often adopt a polyproline II helical conformation. These helices appear to assist the peptide in forming an amphipathic conformation so that it can bind to the membrane. PMID:25803439

  11. Membrane-associated glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family enzymes PhcC and PhcD are essential for enantioselective catabolism of dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hirose, Yusaku; Kamimura, Naofumi; Hishiyama, Shojiro; Hara, Hirofumi; Araki, Takuma; Kasai, Daisuke; Kajita, Shinya; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao; Masai, Eiji

    2015-12-01

    Sphingobium sp. strain SYK-6 is able to degrade various lignin-derived biaryls, including a phenylcoumaran-type compound, dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DCA). In SYK-6 cells, the alcohol group of the B-ring side chain of DCA is initially oxidized to the carboxyl group to generate 3-(2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-7-methoxy-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-5-yl) acrylic acid (DCA-C). Next, the alcohol group of the A-ring side chain of DCA-C is oxidized to the carboxyl group, and then the resulting metabolite is catabolized through vanillin and 5-formylferulate. In this study, the genes involved in the conversion of DCA-C were identified and characterized. The DCA-C oxidation activities in SYK-6 were enhanced in the presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide and an artificial electron acceptor and were induced ca. 1.6-fold when the cells were grown with DCA. Based on these observations, SLG_09480 (phcC) and SLG_09500 (phcD), encoding glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family proteins, were presumed to encode DCA-C oxidases. Analyses of phcC and phcD mutants indicated that PhcC and PhcD are essential for the conversion of (+)-DCA-C and (-)-DCA-C, respectively. When phcC and phcD were expressed in SYK-6 and Escherichia coli, the gene products were mainly observed in their membrane fractions. The membrane fractions of E. coli that expressed phcC and phcD catalyzed the specific conversion of DCA-C into the corresponding carboxyl derivatives. In the oxidation of DCA-C, PhcC and PhcD effectively utilized ubiquinone derivatives as electron acceptors. Furthermore, the transcription of a putative cytochrome c gene was significantly induced in SYK-6 grown with DCA. The DCA-C oxidation catalyzed by membrane-associated PhcC and PhcD appears to be coupled to the respiratory chain. PMID:26362985

  12. Membrane-Associated Glucose-Methanol-Choline Oxidoreductase Family Enzymes PhcC and PhcD Are Essential for Enantioselective Catabolism of Dehydrodiconiferyl Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hirose, Yusaku; Kamimura, Naofumi; Hishiyama, Shojiro; Hara, Hirofumi; Araki, Takuma; Kasai, Daisuke; Kajita, Shinya; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Sphingobium sp. strain SYK-6 is able to degrade various lignin-derived biaryls, including a phenylcoumaran-type compound, dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DCA). In SYK-6 cells, the alcohol group of the B-ring side chain of DCA is initially oxidized to the carboxyl group to generate 3-(2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-7-methoxy-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-5-yl) acrylic acid (DCA-C). Next, the alcohol group of the A-ring side chain of DCA-C is oxidized to the carboxyl group, and then the resulting metabolite is catabolized through vanillin and 5-formylferulate. In this study, the genes involved in the conversion of DCA-C were identified and characterized. The DCA-C oxidation activities in SYK-6 were enhanced in the presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide and an artificial electron acceptor and were induced ca. 1.6-fold when the cells were grown with DCA. Based on these observations, SLG_09480 (phcC) and SLG_09500 (phcD), encoding glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family proteins, were presumed to encode DCA-C oxidases. Analyses of phcC and phcD mutants indicated that PhcC and PhcD are essential for the conversion of (+)-DCA-C and (−)-DCA-C, respectively. When phcC and phcD were expressed in SYK-6 and Escherichia coli, the gene products were mainly observed in their membrane fractions. The membrane fractions of E. coli that expressed phcC and phcD catalyzed the specific conversion of DCA-C into the corresponding carboxyl derivatives. In the oxidation of DCA-C, PhcC and PhcD effectively utilized ubiquinone derivatives as electron acceptors. Furthermore, the transcription of a putative cytochrome c gene was significantly induced in SYK-6 grown with DCA. The DCA-C oxidation catalyzed by membrane-associated PhcC and PhcD appears to be coupled to the respiratory chain. PMID:26362985

  13. Immunocytochemical localization and biochemical characterization of a novel plasma membrane-associated, neutral pH optimum alpha-L-fucosidase from rat testis and epididymal spermatozoa.

    PubMed Central

    Avilés, M; Abascal, I; Martínez-Menárguez, J A; Castells, M T; Skalaban, S R; Ballesta, J; Alhadeff, J A

    1996-01-01

    1. Immunocytochemical and biochemical techniques have been used to localize and characterize a novel plasma membrane-associated, neutral-pH-optimum alpha-L-fucosidase from rat spermatozoa. Light and electron microscopy specifically localized the fucosidase on the plasma membrane of the convex region of the principal segment of testicular and cauda epididymal sperm heads. Immunoreactivity for alpha-L-fucosidase was also detected in the Golgi apparatus of spermatocytes and spermatids but no immunoreactivity was observed in the acrosome. 2. Fractionation of epididymal sperm homogenates indicated that over 90% of the alpha-L-fucosidase activity was associated with the 48,000 g pellet. This pellet-associated activity could be solubilized with 0.5 M NaCl but not with 0.5% Triton X-100, suggesting that fucosidase is peripherally associated with membranes. Sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation of sperm homogenates indicated that fucosidase was enriched in the plasma membrane-enriched fraction. Analysis of alpha-L-fucosidase on intact epididymal sperm indicated that the enzyme was active, displayed linear kinetics and had a pH-activity curve (with an optimum near 7) which was comparable to that of fucosidase from epididymal sperm extracts. These results further suggest that fucosidase is associated with plasma membranes, and that its active site is accessible to fucoconjugates. Evidence that most of the fucosidase is associated with the exterior of the plasma membrane came from studies in which intact sperm had fucosidase activity comparable to that of sperm sonicates, and from studies in which approx. 90% of the fucosidase activity on intact sperm could be released from the sperm by gentle shaking with 0.5 M NaCl. Isoelectric focusing indicated that the NaCl-solubilized epididymal sperm fucosidase appears to have one major and one minor isoform with pIs near 7.2 and 5.2, respectively. SDS/PAGE and Western blotting indicated that the NaCl-solubilized extract of epididymal

  14. Alteration of the isoform composition of plasma-membrane-associated rat sperm alpha-L-fucosidase during late epididymal maturation: comparative characterization of the acidic and neutral isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    Abascal, I; Skalaban, S R; Grimm, K M; Avilés, M; Martianez-Menarguez, J A; Castells, M T; Ballesta, J; Alhadeff, J A

    1998-01-01

    In a previous study, evidence was provided for the presence of a novel plasma-membrane-associated neutral-pH-optimum alpha-L-fucosidase in rat sperm. In the present study, rat sperm alpha-L-fucosidase was characterized during epididymal maturation. The pH 7 activity optimum of alpha-L-fucosidase and its subunit composition (one or two closely spaced immunoreactive protein bands of about 53+/-2 kDa) did not appear to change during transit through the epididymis. Isoelectric focusing of alpha-L-fucosidase indicated the presence of a major isoform (B) with a pI near 7 in sperm from testis, caput, corpus and the proximal half of the cauda. alpha-L-Fucosidase from sperm from the distal half of the cauda, which contained a significant enrichment of sperm and alpha-L-fucosidase activity, contained isoform B and an additional minor isoform (A) with a pI near 5.2. Isoform B and small amounts of isoform A were present in sperm from the vas deferens. The two fucosidase isoforms present in sperm from the distal cauda were separated by isoelectric focusing and comparatively characterized. They had similar pH-activity curves (with optima near pH 7) and comparable apparent KM values (0.4+/-0.04 mM) for 4-methylumbelliferyl alpha-l-fucopyranoside. Preincubation of the isoforms at different temperatures indicated that isoform A is considerably more thermostable than isoform B. Immunoprecipitation studies using polyclonal antibodies against human liver alpha-L-fucosidase indicated that approx. 90% of the enzymic activity for both isoforms was immunoprecipitable under conditions that immunoprecipitated essentially all the human liver enzyme. Neuraminidase treatment of sperm alpha-L-fucosidase from distal cauda (when compared with the appropriate heat-treated control) led to disappearance of isoform A and a concomitant increase in isoform B. The overall results suggest that isoform A is derived by sialylation of isoform B near the end of epididymal maturation. PMID:9639580

  15. 17 beta-estradiol-BSA conjugates and 17 beta-estradiol regulate growth plate chondrocytes by common membrane associated mechanisms involving PKC dependent and independent signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Sylvia, V L; Walton, J; Lopez, D; Dean, D D; Boyan, B D; Schwartz, Z

    2001-01-01

    ]-thymidine incorporation, and the effect was dose-dependent. E(2)-BSA caused time-dependent increases in PKC in RC and GC cells; effects were observed within three minutes in RC cells and within one minute in GC cells. Response to E(2) was more robust in RC cells, whereas in GC cells, E(2) and E(2)-BSA caused a comparable increase in PKC. GDP beta S inhibited the activation of PKC in E(2)-BSA-stimulated RC and GC cells. GTP gamma S increased PKC in E(2)-BSA-stimulated GC cells, but had no effect in E(2)-BSA-stimulated RC cells. The phosphatidylinositol-specific PLC inhibitor U73122 blocked E(2)-BSA-stimulated PKC activity in both RC and GC cells, whereas the phosphatidylcholine-specific PLC inhibitor D609 had no effect. Neither the PLD inhibitor wortmannin nor the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294022 had any effect on E(2)-BSA-stimulated PKC activity in either RC or GC cells. The classical estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780 was unable to block the stimulatory effect of E(2)-BSA on PKC. Moreover, the classical receptor agonist diethylstilbestrol (DES) had no effect on PKC, nor did it alter the stimulatory effect of E(2)-BSA. The specificity of the membrane response to E(2) was also demonstrated by showing that the membrane receptor for 1 alpha,25-(OH)(2)D(3) was not involved. These data indicate that the rapid nongenomic effect of E(2)-BSA on PKC activity in RC and GC cells is dependent on G-protein-coupled PLC and support the hypothesis that many of the effects of E(2) involve membrane-associated mechanisms independent of classical estrogen receptors. (c) 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Analysis of NAD(P)+/NAD(P)H cofactors by imprinted polymer membranes associated with ion-sensitive field-effect transistor devices and Au-quartz crystals.

    PubMed

    Pogorelova, Svetlana P; Zayats, Maya; Bourenko, Tatyana; Kharitonov, Andrei B; Lioubashevski, Oleg; Katz, Eugenii; Willner, Itamar

    2003-02-01

    Specific recognition sites for the NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H cofactors are imprinted in a cross-linked acrylamide-acrylamidophenylboronic acid copolymer membrane. The imprinted membranes, associated with pH-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs) or Au-quartz piezoelectric crystals, enable the potentiometric or microgravimetric analysis of the oxidized NAD(P)+ cofactors and the reduced NAD(P)H cofactors, respectively. The NAD+- and NADP+-imprinted membranes associated with the ISFET allow the analysis of NAD+ and NADP+ with sensitivities that correspond to 15.0 and 18.0 mVdecade(-1) and detection limits of 4 x 10(-7) and 2 x 10(-7) M, respectively. The NADH- and NADPH-imprinted membranes associated with the ISFET device enable the analysis of NADH and NADPH with sensitivities that correspond to 24.2 and 21.8 mV x decade(-1) and lower detection limits that are 1 x 10(-7) and 2 x 10(-7) M, respectively. The ISFET devices functionalized with the NADH and NADPH membranes are employed in the analysis of the biocatalyzed oxidation of lactic acid and ethanol in the presence of lactate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively. PMID:12585477

  17. A soil actinobacterium scavenges atmospheric H2 using two membrane-associated, oxygen-dependent [NiFe] hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Greening, Chris; Berney, Michael; Hards, Kiel; Cook, Gregory M; Conrad, Ralf

    2014-03-18

    In the Earth's lower atmosphere, H2 is maintained at trace concentrations (0.53 ppmv/0.40 nM) and rapidly turned over (lifetime ≤ 2.1 y(-1)). It is thought that soil microbes, likely actinomycetes, serve as the main global sink for tropospheric H2. However, no study has ever unambiguously proven that a hydrogenase can oxidize this trace gas. In this work, we demonstrate, by using genetic dissection and sensitive GC measurements, that the soil actinomycete Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155 constitutively oxidizes subtropospheric concentrations of H2. We show that two membrane-associated, oxygen-dependent [NiFe] hydrogenases mediate this process. Hydrogenase-1 (Hyd1) (MSMEG_2262-2263) is well-adapted to rapidly oxidize H2 at a range of concentrations [Vmax(app) = 12 nmol⋅g⋅dw(-1)⋅min(-1); Km(app) = 180 nM; threshold = 130 pM in the Δhyd23 (Hyd1 only) strain], whereas Hyd2 (MSMEG_2719-2720) catalyzes a slower-acting, higher-affinity process [Vmax(app) = 2.5 nmol⋅g⋅dw(-1)⋅min(-1); Km(app) = 50 nM; threshold = 50 pM in the Δhyd13 (Hyd2 only) strain]. These observations strongly support previous studies that have linked group 5 [NiFe] hydrogenases (e.g., Hyd2) to the oxidation of tropospheric H2 in soil ecosystems. We further reveal that group 2a [NiFe] hydrogenases (e.g., Hyd1) can contribute to this process. Hydrogenase expression and activity increases in carbon-limited cells, suggesting that scavenging of trace H2 helps to sustain dormancy. Distinct physiological roles for Hyd1 and Hyd2 during the adaptation to this condition are proposed. Soil organisms harboring high-affinity hydrogenases may be especially competitive, given that they harness a highly dependable fuel source in otherwise unstable environments.

  18. A soil actinobacterium scavenges atmospheric H2 using two membrane-associated, oxygen-dependent [NiFe] hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Greening, Chris; Berney, Michael; Hards, Kiel; Cook, Gregory M.; Conrad, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    In the Earth’s lower atmosphere, H2 is maintained at trace concentrations (0.53 ppmv/0.40 nM) and rapidly turned over (lifetime ≤ 2.1 y−1). It is thought that soil microbes, likely actinomycetes, serve as the main global sink for tropospheric H2. However, no study has ever unambiguously proven that a hydrogenase can oxidize this trace gas. In this work, we demonstrate, by using genetic dissection and sensitive GC measurements, that the soil actinomycete Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155 constitutively oxidizes subtropospheric concentrations of H2. We show that two membrane-associated, oxygen-dependent [NiFe] hydrogenases mediate this process. Hydrogenase-1 (Hyd1) (MSMEG_2262-2263) is well-adapted to rapidly oxidize H2 at a range of concentrations [Vmax(app) = 12 nmol⋅g⋅dw−1⋅min−1; Km(app) = 180 nM; threshold = 130 pM in the Δhyd23 (Hyd1 only) strain], whereas Hyd2 (MSMEG_2719-2720) catalyzes a slower-acting, higher-affinity process [Vmax(app) = 2.5 nmol⋅g⋅dw−1⋅min−1; Km(app) = 50 nM; threshold = 50 pM in the Δhyd13 (Hyd2 only) strain]. These observations strongly support previous studies that have linked group 5 [NiFe] hydrogenases (e.g., Hyd2) to the oxidation of tropospheric H2 in soil ecosystems. We further reveal that group 2a [NiFe] hydrogenases (e.g., Hyd1) can contribute to this process. Hydrogenase expression and activity increases in carbon-limited cells, suggesting that scavenging of trace H2 helps to sustain dormancy. Distinct physiological roles for Hyd1 and Hyd2 during the adaptation to this condition are proposed. Soil organisms harboring high-affinity hydrogenases may be especially competitive, given that they harness a highly dependable fuel source in otherwise unstable environments. PMID:24591586

  19. Cell-free system for synthesizing membrane proteins cell free method for synthesizing membrane proteins

    DOEpatents

    Laible, Philip D; Hanson, Deborah K

    2013-06-04

    The invention provides an in vitro method for producing proteins, membrane proteins, membrane-associated proteins, and soluble proteins that interact with membrane-associated proteins for assembly into an oligomeric complex or that require association with a membrane for proper folding. The method comprises, supplying intracytoplasmic membranes from organisms; modifying protein composition of intracytoplasmic membranes from organism by modifying DNA to delete genes encoding functions of the organism not associated with the formation of the intracytoplasmic membranes; generating appropriate DNA or RNA templates that encode the target protein; and mixing the intracytoplasmic membranes with the template and a transcription/translation-competent cellular extract to cause simultaneous production of the membrane proteins and encapsulation of the membrane proteins within the intracytoplasmic membranes.

  20. Revealing mechanisms of selective, concentration-dependent potentials of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal to induce apoptosis in cancer cells through inactivation of membrane-associated catalase.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Georg; Zarkovic, Neven

    2015-04-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against superoxide anion-mediated intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling by the expression of membrane-associated catalase. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), a versatile second messenger generated during lipid peroxidation, has been shown to induce apoptosis selectively in malignant cells. The findings described in this paper reveal the strong, concentration-dependent potential of 4-HNE to specifically inactivate extracellular catalase of tumor cells both indirectly and directly and to consequently trigger apoptosis in malignant cells through superoxide anion-mediated intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Namely, 4-HNE caused apoptosis selectively in NOX1-expressing tumor cells through inactivation of their membrane-associated catalase, thus reactivating subsequent intercellular signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite and HOCl pathways, followed by the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Concentrations of 4-HNE of 1.2 µM and higher directly inactivated membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells, whereas at lower concentrations, 4-HNE triggered a complex amplificatory pathway based on initial singlet oxygen formation through H2O2 and peroxynitrite interaction. Singlet-oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8 increased superoxide anion generation by NOX1 and amplification of singlet oxygen generation, which allowed singlet-oxygen-dependent inactivation of catalase. 4-HNE and singlet oxygen cooperate in complex autoamplificatory loops during this process. The finding of these novel anticancer pathways may be useful for understanding the role of 4-HNE in the control of malignant cells and for the optimization of ROS-dependent therapeutic approaches including antioxidant treatments.

  1. A Cell Surface Biotinylation Assay to Reveal Membrane-associated Neuronal Cues: Negr1 Regulates Dendritic Arborization*

    PubMed Central

    Pischedda, Francesca; Szczurkowska, Joanna; Cirnaru, Maria Daniela; Giesert, Florian; Vezzoli, Elena; Ueffing, Marius; Sala, Carlo; Francolini, Maura; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Cancedda, Laura; Piccoli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    A complex and still not comprehensively resolved panel of transmembrane proteins regulates the outgrowth and the subsequent morphological and functional development of neuronal processes. In order to gain a more detailed description of these events at the molecular level, we have developed a cell surface biotinylation assay to isolate, detect, and quantify neuronal membrane proteins. When we applied our assay to investigate neuron maturation in vitro, we identified 439 differentially expressed proteins, including 20 members of the immunoglobulin superfamily. Among these candidates, we focused on Negr1, a poorly described cell adhesion molecule. We demonstrated that Negr1 controls the development of neurite arborization in vitro and in vivo. Given the tight correlation existing among synaptic cell adhesion molecules, neuron maturation, and a number of neurological disorders, our assay results are a useful tool that can be used to support the understanding of the molecular bases of physiological and pathological brain function. PMID:24382801

  2. A cell surface biotinylation assay to reveal membrane-associated neuronal cues: Negr1 regulates dendritic arborization.

    PubMed

    Pischedda, Francesca; Szczurkowska, Joanna; Cirnaru, Maria Daniela; Giesert, Florian; Vezzoli, Elena; Ueffing, Marius; Sala, Carlo; Francolini, Maura; Hauck, Stefanie M; Cancedda, Laura; Piccoli, Giovanni

    2014-03-01

    A complex and still not comprehensively resolved panel of transmembrane proteins regulates the outgrowth and the subsequent morphological and functional development of neuronal processes. In order to gain a more detailed description of these events at the molecular level, we have developed a cell surface biotinylation assay to isolate, detect, and quantify neuronal membrane proteins. When we applied our assay to investigate neuron maturation in vitro, we identified 439 differentially expressed proteins, including 20 members of the immunoglobulin superfamily. Among these candidates, we focused on Negr1, a poorly described cell adhesion molecule. We demonstrated that Negr1 controls the development of neurite arborization in vitro and in vivo. Given the tight correlation existing among synaptic cell adhesion molecules, neuron maturation, and a number of neurological disorders, our assay results are a useful tool that can be used to support the understanding of the molecular bases of physiological and pathological brain function.

  3. Two conformational states of the membrane-associated Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Ba {delta}-endotoxin complex revealed by electron crystallography: Implications for toxin-pore formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ounjai, Puey; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Sigworth, Fred J.; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2007-10-05

    The insecticidal nature of Cry {delta}-endotoxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis is generally believed to be caused by their ability to form lytic pores in the midgut cell membrane of susceptible insect larvae. Here we have analyzed membrane-associated structures of the 65-kDa dipteran-active Cry4Ba toxin by electron crystallography. The membrane-associated toxin complex was crystallized in the presence of DMPC via detergent dialysis. Depending upon the charge of the adsorbed surface, 2D crystals of the oligomeric toxin complex have been captured in two distinct conformations. The projection maps of those crystals have been generated at 17 A resolution. Both complexes appeared to be trimeric; as in one crystal form, its projection structure revealed a symmetrical pinwheel-like shape with virtually no depression in the middle of the complex. The other form revealed a propeller-like conformation displaying an obvious hole in the center region, presumably representing the toxin-induced pore. These crystallographic data thus demonstrate for the first time that the 65-kDa activated Cry4Ba toxin in association with lipid membranes could exist in at least two different trimeric conformations, conceivably implying the closed and open states of the pore.

  4. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  5. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  6. The plasma membrane-associated NADH oxidase (ECTO-NOX) of mouse skin responds to blue light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James; Morre, Dorothy M.

    2003-01-01

    NADH oxidases of the external plasma membrane surface (ECTO-NOX proteins) are characterized by oscillations in activity with a regular period length of 24 min. Explants of mouse skin exhibit the oscillatory activity as estimated from the decrease in A(340) suggesting that individual ECTO-NOX molecules must somehow be induced to function synchronously. Transfer of explants of mouse skin from darkness to blue light (495 nm, 2 min, 50 micromol m(-1) s(-1)) resulted in initiation of a new activity maximum (entrainment) with a midpoint 36 min after light exposure followed by maxima every 24 min thereafter. Addition of melatonin resulted in a new maximum 24 min after melatonin addition. The findings suggest that the ECTO-NOX proteins play a central role in the entrainment of the biological clock both by light and by melatonin.

  7. Discovery of Novel Disease-specific and Membrane-associated Candidate Markers in a Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis*

    PubMed Central

    Dagley, Laura F.; Croft, Nathan P.; Isserlin, Ruth; Olsen, Jonathan B.; Fong, Vincent; Emili, Andrew; Purcell, Anthony W.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic demyelinating disorder characterized by the infiltration of auto-reactive immune cells from the periphery into the central nervous system resulting in axonal injury and neuronal cell death. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis represents the best characterized animal model as common clinical, histological, and immunological features are recapitulated. A label-free mass spectrometric proteomics approach was used to detect differences in protein abundance within specific fractions of disease-affected tissues including the soluble lysate derived from the spinal cord and membrane protein-enriched peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Tissues were harvested from actively induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice and sham-induced (“vehicle” control) counterparts at the disease peak followed by subsequent analysis by nanoflow liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Relative protein quantitation was performed using both intensity- and fragmentation-based approaches. After statistical evaluation of the data, over 500 and 250 differentially abundant proteins were identified in the spinal cord and peripheral blood mononuclear cell data sets, respectively. More than half of these observations have not previously been linked to the disease. The biological significance of all candidate disease markers has been elucidated through rigorous literature searches, pathway analysis, and validation studies. Results from comprehensive targeted mass spectrometry analyses have confirmed the differential abundance of ∼200 candidate markers (≥twofold dysregulated expression) at a 70% success rate. This study is, to our knowledge, the first to examine the cell-surface proteome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data provide a unique mechanistic insight into the dynamics of peripheral immune cell infiltration into CNS-privileged sites at a molecular level and has identified

  8. Plasma membrane-associated antigens on tumor cells derived from transitional-cell carcinoma of the human urinary bladder. II. Identification at the molecular level of plasma membrane-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M U; Paulie, S; Troye, M; Perlmann, P

    1980-08-01

    The surface proteins of seven human cell lines (three bladder carcinomas (TCC), two normal urothelial lines, one colon carcinoma, and one malignant melanoma) were labelled with 125I by the glucose oxidase-lactoperoxidase technique. Plasma membranes of the cells were isolated and analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). When analysed under reducing conditions by staining with protein stain, approximately 45 distinct membrane polypeptides were detected in all membrane preparations. Although the banding patterns for all cell lines were very similar, a 23 K and a 110 K band were only seen in the five unrothelial lines. When the same gels were analysed by autoradiography, between 13 and 17 bands were detected for each of the cell lines. However, in this case, analysis revealed individual and stable banding profiles for each. One 180 K band and one 100 K band were only seen in the autoradiographs of the two normal lines but not in those of the tumor membranes. Analysis under non-reducing conditions gave similar results. The antigenicity of these surface components was analysed by incubating detergent extracts of surface-iodinated cells with IgG from a rabbit anti-TCC serum, absorbed with fetal bovine serum and bound to protein A (from Staphylococcus aureus) on a matrix of Sepharose 4B. Analysis of the eluates by autoradiography after SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions showed that many of the labelled polypeptides were antigenic and shared by all seven cell lines. Analysis of eluates from IgG preparations, exhaustively absorbed with human spleen, revealed the presence of at least one antigenic 110 K polypeptide confined to the membrane of the urothelial cells. Preparation of a rabbit antiserum to this 110 K component, isolated from one of the TCC-lines and tested by ADCC, indicated that this polypeptide constitutes an important surface antigen, present on urothelial cells of both TCC- and normal origin but absent from the colon carcinoma and

  9. Improved Solubilization of Surface Proteins from Listeria monocytogenes for Two-dimensional Gel Electrophoresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solubilization of bacterial surface (cell wall and membrane-associated) proteins for 2-DE is challenging, particularly in the case of Gram-positive bacteria. This is primarily due to strong protein association with the cell wall peptidoglycan and protein hydrophobicity. We solubilized surface protei...

  10. Membrane associated cancer-oocyte neoantigen SAS1B/ovastacin is a candidate immunotherapeutic target for uterine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pires, Eusebio S; D'Souza, Ryan S; Needham, Marisa A; Herr, Austin K; Jazaeri, Amir A; Li, Hui; Stoler, Mark H; Anderson-Knapp, Kiley L; Thomas, Theodore; Mandal, Arabinda; Gougeon, Alain; Flickinger, Charles J; Bruns, David E; Pollok, Brian A; Herr, John C

    2015-10-01

    The metalloproteinase SAS1B [ovastacin, ASTL, astacin-like] was immunolocalized on the oolemma of ovulated human oocytes and in normal ovaries within the pool of growing oocytes where SAS1B protein was restricted to follicular stages spanning the primary-secondary follicle transition through ovulation. Gene-specific PCR and immunohistochemical studies revealed ASTL messages and SAS1B protein in both endometrioid [74%] and malignant mixed Mullerian tumors (MMMT) [87%] of the uterus. A MMMT-derived cell line, SNU539, expressed cell surface SAS1B that, after binding polyclonal antibodies, internalized into EEA1/LAMP1-positive early and late endosomes. Treatment of SNU539 cells with anti-SAS1B polyclonal antibodies caused growth arrest in the presence of active complement. A saporin-immunotoxin directed to SAS1B induced growth arrest and cell death. The oocyte restricted expression pattern of SAS1B among adult organs, cell-surface accessibility, internalization into the endocytic pathway, and tumor cell growth arrest induced by antibody-toxin conjugates suggest therapeutic approaches that would selectively target tumors while limiting adverse drug effects in healthy cells. The SAS1B metalloproteinase is proposed as a prototype cancer-oocyte tumor surface neoantigen for development of targeted immunotherapeutics with limited on-target/off tumor effects predicted to be restricted to the population of growing oocytes.

  11. Membrane associated cancer-oocyte neoantigen SAS1B/ovastacin is a candidate immunotherapeutic target for uterine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Eusebio S.; D'Souza, Ryan S.; Needham, Marisa A.; Herr, Austin K.; Jazaeri, Amir A.; Li, Hui; Stoler, Mark H.; Anderson-Knapp, Kiley L.; Thomas, Theodore; Mandal, Arabinda; Gougeon, Alain; Flickinger, Charles J.; Bruns, David E.; Pollok, Brian A.; Herr, John C.

    2015-01-01

    The metalloproteinase SAS1B [ovastacin, ASTL, astacin-like] was immunolocalized on the oolemma of ovulated human oocytes and in normal ovaries within the pool of growing oocytes where SAS1B protein was restricted to follicular stages spanning the primary-secondary follicle transition through ovulation. Gene-specific PCR and immunohistochemical studies revealed ASTL messages and SAS1B protein in both endometrioid [74%] and malignant mixed Mullerian tumors (MMMT) [87%] of the uterus. A MMMT-derived cell line, SNU539, expressed cell surface SAS1B that, after binding polyclonal antibodies, internalized into EEA1/LAMP1-positive early and late endosomes. Treatment of SNU539 cells with anti-SAS1B polyclonal antibodies caused growth arrest in the presence of active complement. A saporin-immunotoxin directed to SAS1B induced growth arrest and cell death. The oocyte restricted expression pattern of SAS1B among adult organs, cell-surface accessibility, internalization into the endocytic pathway, and tumor cell growth arrest induced by antibody-toxin conjugates suggest therapeutic approaches that would selectively target tumors while limiting adverse drug effects in healthy cells. The SAS1B metalloproteinase is proposed as a prototype cancer-oocyte tumor surface neoantigen for development of targeted immunotherapeutics with limited on-target/off tumor effects predicted to be restricted to the population of growing oocytes. PMID:26327203

  12. Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, Fred E.; Gooding, Karen M.

    Because of the complexity of cellular material and body fluids, it is seldom possible to analyze a natural product directly. Qualitative and quantitative analyses must often be preceded by some purification step that separates the molecular species being examined from interfering materials. In the case of proteins, column liquid chromatography has been used extensively for these fractionations. With the advent of gel permeation, cation exchange, anion exchange, hydrophobic, and affinity chromatography, it became possible to resolve proteins through their fundamental properties of size, charge, hydrophobicity, and biological affinity. The chromatographic separations used in the early isolation and characterization of many proteins later became analytical tools in their routine analysis. Unfortunately, these inherently simple and versatile column chromatographic techniques introduced in the 50s and 60s have a severe limitation in routine analysis-separation time. It is common to encounter 1-24 h separation times with the classical gel-type supports.

  13. Role of membrane-associated thiol groups in the functional regulation of gastric microsomal (H+ + K+)-transporting ATPase system.

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, J; Meng-Ai, Z; Ray, T K

    1983-01-01

    The distribution of free thiol groups associated with the membrane proteins of the purified pig gastric microsomal vesicles was quantified, and the relation of thiol groups to the function of the gastric (H+ + K+)-transporting ATPase system was investigated. Two different thiol-specific agents, carboxypyridine disulphide (CPDS) and N-(1-naphthyl)maleimide (NNM) were used for the study. The structure-function relationship of the membrane thiol groups was studied after modification by the probes under various conditions, relating the inhibition of the (H+ + K+)-transporting ATPase to the ATP-dependent H+ accumulation by the gastric microsomal vesicles. On the basis of the extent of stimulation of the microsomal (H+ + K+)-transporting ATPase in the presence and absence of valinomycin (val) about 85% of the vesicles were found to be intact. CPDS at 1 mM completely inhibits the valinomycin-stimulated ATPase and the associated p-nitrophenyl phosphatase with a concomitant inhibition of vesicular H+ uptake. Both the enzyme and dye-uptake activities were fully protected against CPDS inhibition when the treatment with CPDS was carried out in the presence of ATP. ATP also offered protection (about 65%) against NNM inhibition of the (H+ + K+)-transporting ATPase system and vesicular H+ uptake. Under similar conditions ATP also protected about 10 and 6 nmol of thiol groups/mg of protein respectively from CPDS and NNM reaction. Our data suggest that the thiol groups on the outer surface of the vesicles are primarily involved in gastric (H+ + K+)-transporting ATPase function. Furthermore, at least about 15% of the total microsomal thiol groups appear to be associated with the ATPase system. The data have been discussed in terms of the structure-function relationship of gastric microsomes. PMID:6311168

  14. Membrane-Associated Proteins of a Lipopolysaccharide-Deficient Mutant of Neisseria meningitidis Activate the Inflammatory Response through Toll-Like Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Ingalls, Robin R.; Lien, Egil; Golenbock, Douglas T.

    2001-01-01

    The recent isolation of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-deficient mutant of Neisseria meningitidis has allowed us to explore the roles of other gram-negative cell wall components in the host response to infection. The experiments in this study were designed to examine the ability of this mutant strain to activate cells. Although it was clearly less potent than the parental strain, we found the LPS-deficient mutant to be a capable inducer of the inflammatory response in monocytic cells, inducing a response similar to that seen with Staphylococcus aureus. Cellular activation by the LPS mutant was related to expression of CD14, a high-affinity receptor for LPS and other microbial products, as well as Toll-like receptor 2, a member of the Toll family of receptors recently implicated in host responses to gram-positive bacteria. In contrast to the parental strain, the synthetic LPS antagonist E5564 did not inhibit the LPS-deficient mutant. We conclude that even in the absence of LPS, the gram-negative cell wall remains a potent inflammatory stimulant, utilizing signaling pathways independent of those involved in LPS signaling. PMID:11254578

  15. Accessory proteins for heterotrimeric G-proteins in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Park, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins play a fundamentally important role in regulating signal transduction pathways in the kidney. Accessory proteins are being identified as direct binding partners for heterotrimeric G-protein α or βγ subunits to promote more diverse mechanisms by which G-protein signaling is controlled. In some instances, accessory proteins can modulate the signaling magnitude, localization, and duration following the activation of cell membrane-associated receptors. Alternatively, accessory proteins complexed with their G-protein α or βγ subunits can promote non-canonical models of signaling activity within the cell. In this review, we will highlight the expression profile, localization and functional importance of these newly identified accessory proteins to control the function of select G-protein subunits under normal and various disease conditions observed in the kidney. PMID:26300785

  16. Role of the chymotrypsin-like membrane-associated proteinase from Treponema denticola ATCC 35405 in inactivation of bioactive peptides.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, P L; Mäkinen, K K; Syed, S A

    1995-09-01

    The ability of washed whole cells of Treponema denticola ATCC 35405 to hydrolyze (inactivate) substance P, bradykinin, and angiotensin I was studied. Substance P was attacked primarily at the Phe-8-Gly-9 bond by a chymotrypsin-like proteinase (CTLP), at Pro-4-Gln-5 by an endo-acting prolyl oligopeptidase (POPase), and at Gln-5-Gln-6 by an endopeptidase (FALGPA-peptidase). Bradykinin was cleaved at Phe-5-Ser-6 by the FALGPA-peptidase and at Pro-7-Phe-8 by the POPase. Angiotensin I was rapidly converted to angiotensin II by the CTLP, and both angiotensin I and angiotensin II were further hydrolyzed at Pro-7-Phe-8 by the POPase. All these enzymes were assumed to be cell associated and were easily extracted with a mild (0.05 to 0.1%) Triton X-100 treatment. Because it was conceivable that the hydrolysis of substance P at the Phe-8-Gly-9 bond was catalyzed by a CTLP described earlier (V.-J. Uitto, D. Grenier, E. C. S. Chan, and B. C. McBride, Infect. Immun. 56:2717-2722, 1988), the enzyme was purified to homogeneity by means of conventional fast protein liquid chromatography procedures. For kinetic studies, Phe-8(4-nitro)-substance P (NSP) (absorption maximum at 309.2 nm, epsilon = 545 M-1 cm-1) was synthesized to replace substance P as a substrate in kinetic studies. In reversed-phase chromatography, both NSP and substance P gave identical results with both whole cells and the purified enzyme. The CTLP has a mass of 95 kDa, and its activity is suggested to be based on an active seryl residue, on an active imidazole group, and on an active carboxyl group but not on metal cations. The enzyme hydrolyzes N-succinyl-L-Ala-L-Ala-L-Pro-L-Phe-p-nitroaniline (SAAPFNA, a typical chymotrypsin substrate) at a high rate and several proteins, such as calf thymus histone, human plasma fibrinogen, milk caseins, and gelatin. Among the substrates tested, substance P showed the highest affinity (Km = 0.22 mM) for the purified enzyme. Depending on conditions, clinically applicable

  17. Outer membrane-associated serine protease involved in adhesion of Shewanella oneidensis to Fe(III) oxides.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justin L; Ginn, Brian R; Bates, David J; Dublin, Steven N; Taylor, Jeanette V; Apkarian, Robert P; Amaro-Garcia, Samary; Neal, Andrew L; Dichristina, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    The facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a variety of anaerobic electron acceptors, including insoluble Fe(III) oxides. S. oneidensis employs a number of novel strategies for respiration of insoluble Fe(III) oxides, including localization of respiratory proteins to the cell outer membrane (OM). The molecular mechanism by which S. oneidensis adheres to and respires Fe(III) oxides, however, remains poorly understood. In the present study, whole cell fractionation and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS techniques were combined to identify a serine protease (SO3800) associated with the S. oneidensis OM. SO3800 contained predicted structural motifs similar to cell surface-associated serine proteases that function as bacterial adhesins in other gram-negative bacteria. The gene encoding SO3800 was deleted from the S. oneidensis genome, and the resulting mutant strain (DeltaSO3800) was tested for its ability to adhere to and respire Fe(III) oxides. DeltaSO3800 was severely impaired in its ability to adhere to Fe(III) oxides, yet retained wild-type Fe(III) respiratory capability. Laser Doppler velocimetry and cryoetch high-resolution SEM experiments indicated that DeltaSO3800 displayed a lower cell surface charge and higher amount of surface-associated exopolysaccharides. Results of this study indicate that S. oneidensis may respire insoluble Fe(III) oxides at a distance, negating the requirement for attachment prior to electron transfer.

  18. The Membrane-Associated Sec1/Munc18 KEULE is Required for Phragmoplast Microtubule Reorganization During Cytokinesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Alexander; Müller, Lin; Rybak, Katarzyna; Vodermaier, Vera; Facher, Eva; Thellmann, Martha; Ravikumar, Raksha; Wanner, Gerhard; Hauser, Marie-Theres; Assaad, Farhah F

    2016-04-01

    Cytokinesis, the partitioning of the cytoplasm following nuclear division, requires extensive coordination between membrane trafficking and cytoskeletal dynamics. In plants, the onset of cytokinesis is characterized by the assembly of a bipolar microtubule array, the phragmoplast, and of a transient membrane compartment, the cell plate. Little is known about the coordination between membrane deposition at the cell plate and the dynamics of phragmoplast microtubules. In this study, we monitor the localization dynamics of microtubule and membrane markers throughout cytokinesis. Our spatiotemporal resolution is consistent with the general view that microtubule dynamics drive membrane movements. Nonetheless, we provide evidence for active sorting at the cell plate and show that this is, at least in part, mediated by the TRAPPII tethering complex. We also characterize phragmoplast microtubule organization and cell plate formation in a suite of cytokinesis-defective mutants. Of four mutant lines with defects in phragmoplast microtubule organization, only mor1 microtubule-associated mutants exhibited aberrant cell plates. Conversely, the mutants with the strongest impairment in phragmoplast microtubule reorganization are keule alleles, which have a primary defect in membrane fusion. Our findings identify the SEC1/Munc18 protein KEULE as a central regulatory node in the coordination of membrane and microtubule dynamics during plant cytokinesis. PMID:26700031

  19. Solo/Trio8, a membrane-associated short isoform of Trio, modulates endosome dynamics and neurite elongation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying-Jie; Nishikawa, Kaori; Yuda, Hideki; Wang, Yu-Lai; Osaka, Hitoshi; Fukazawa, Nobuna; Naito, Akira; Kudo, Yoshihisa; Wada, Keiji; Aoki, Shunsuke

    2006-09-01

    With DNA microarrays, we identified a gene, termed Solo, that is downregulated in the cerebellum of Purkinje cell degeneration mutant mice. Solo is a mouse homologue of rat Trio8-one of multiple Trio isoforms recently identified in rat brain. Solo/Trio8 contains N-terminal sec14-like and spectrin-like repeat domains followed by a single guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (GEF1) domain, but it lacks the C-terminal GEF2, immunoglobulin-like, and kinase domains that are typical of Trio. Solo/Trio8 is predominantly expressed in Purkinje neurons of the mouse brain, and expression begins following birth and increases during Purkinje neuron maturation. We identified a novel C-terminal membrane-anchoring domain in Solo/Trio8 that is required for enhanced green fluorescent protein-Solo/Trio8 localization to early endosomes (positive for both early-endosome antigen 1 [EEA1] and Rab5) in COS-7 cells and primary cultured neurons. Solo/Trio8 overexpression in COS-7 cells augmented the EEA1-positive early-endosome pool, and this effect was abolished via mutation and inactivation of the GEF domain or deletion of the C-terminal membrane-anchoring domain. Moreover, primary cultured neurons transfected with Solo/Trio8 showed increased neurite elongation that was dependent on these domains. These results suggest that Solo/Trio8 acts as an early-endosome-specific upstream activator of Rho family GTPases for neurite elongation of developing Purkinje neurons.

  20. Plasma Membrane-Associated pY397FAK Is a Marker of Cytotrophoblast Invasion in Vivo and in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ilić, Duško; Genbačev, Olga; Jin, Fang; Caceres, Eduardo; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.; Bellingard-Dubouchaud, Valérie; Schaefer, Erik M.; Damsky, Caroline H.; Fisher, Susan J.

    2001-01-01

    During human pregnancy specialized placental cells of fetal origin, termed cytotrophoblasts, invade the uterus and its blood vessels. This tumor-like process anchors the conceptus to the mother and diverts the flow of uterine blood to the placenta. Previously, we showed that the expression of molecules with important functional roles, including a number of extracellular matrix integrin receptors, is precisely modulated during cytotrophoblast invasion in situ. Here we exploited this observation to study the role of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), which transduces signals from the extracellular matrix and recruits additional signaling proteins to focal adhesions. Immunolocalization studies on tissue sections showed that FAK is expressed by cytotrophoblasts in all stages of differentiation. Because extracellular matrix-induced integrin clustering results in FAK (auto)phosphorylation on tyrosine 397 (Y397FAK), we also localized this form of the molecule. Immunolocalization experiments detected Y397FAK in a subset of cytotrophoblasts near the surface of the uterine wall. To assess the functional relevance of this observation, we used an adenovirus strategy to inhibit cytotrophoblast expression of FAK as the cells differentiated along the invasive pathway in vitro. Compared to control cells transduced with a wild-type virus, cytotrophoblasts that expressed antisense FAK exhibited a striking reduction in their ability to invade an extracellular matrix substrate. When cytotrophoblast differentiation was compromised (hypoxia in vitro, preeclampsia in vivo), Y397FAK levels associated with the plasma membrane were strikingly lower, although total FAK levels did not change. Together our results suggest that (auto)phosphorylation of Y397 on FAK is a critical component of the signaling pathway that mediates cytotrophoblast migration/invasion. PMID:11438458

  1. Unraveling lipid/protein interaction in model lipid bilayers by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Alessandrini, Andrea; Facci, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The current view of the biological membrane is that in which lipids and proteins mutually interact to accomplish membrane functions. The lateral heterogeneity of the lipid bilayer can induce partitioning of membrane-associated proteins, favoring protein-protein interaction and influence signaling and trafficking. The Atomic Force Microscope allows to study the localization of membrane-associated proteins with respect to the lipid organization at the single molecule level and without the need for fluorescence staining. These features make AFM a technique of choice to study lipid/protein interactions in model systems or native membranes. Here we will review the technical aspects inherent to and the main results obtained by AFM in the study of protein partitioning in lipid domains concentrating in particular on GPI-anchored proteins, lipidated proteins, and transmembrane proteins. Whenever possible, we will also discuss the functional consequences of what has been imaged by Atomic Force Microscopy.

  2. Chromosomal mapping of the gene (INPP5A) encoding the 43-kDa membrane-associated inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase to 10q26.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, C.A.; Speed, C.J.; Nicholl, J.; Sutherland, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses the localization of a membrane-associated inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase gene to human chromosome 10q26.3 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This 43-kDa 5-phosphatase does not map to the same location as any other 5-phosphatase enzymes. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Inhibition of nitrate transport by anti-nitrate reductase IgG fragments and the identification of plasma membrane associated nitrate reductase in roots of barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, M. R.; Tischner, R.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    Membrane associated nitrate reductase (NR) was detected in plasma membrane (PM) fractions isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning from barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var CM 72) roots. The PM associated NR was not removed by washing vesicles with 500 millimolar NaCl and 1 millimolar EDTA and represented up to 4% of the total root NR activity. PM associated NR was stimulated up to 20-fold by Triton X-100 whereas soluble NR was only increased 1.7-fold. The latency was a function of the solubilization of NR from the membrane. NR, solubilized from the PM fraction by Triton X-100 was inactivated by antiserum to Chlorella sorokiniana NR. Anti-NR immunoglobulin G fragments purified from the anti-NR serum inhibited NO3- uptake by more than 90% but had no effect on NO2- uptake. The inhibitory effect was only partially reversible; uptake recovered to 50% of the control after thorough rinsing of roots. Preimmune serum immunoglobulin G fragments inhibited NO3- uptake 36% but the effect was completely reversible by rinsing. Intact NR antiserum had no effect on NO3- uptake. The results present the possibility that NO3- uptake and NO3- reduction in the PM of barley roots may be related.

  4. 13C-13C and 15N-13C correlation spectroscopy of membrane-associated and uniformly labeled human immunodeficiency virus and influenza fusion peptides: Amino acid-type assignments and evidence for multiple conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodner, Michele L.; Gabrys, Charles M.; Struppe, Jochem O.; Weliky, David P.

    2008-02-01

    Many viruses which cause disease including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and influenza are "enveloped" by a membrane and infection of a host cell begins with joining or "fusion" of the viral and target cell membranes. Fusion is catalyzed by viral proteins in the viral membrane. For HIV and for the influenza virus, these fusion proteins contain an ˜20-residue apolar "fusion peptide" that binds to target cell membranes and plays a critical role in fusion. For this study, the HIV fusion peptide (HFP) and influenza virus fusion peptide (IFP) were chemically synthesized with uniform C13, N15 labeling over large contiguous regions of amino acids. Two-dimensional C13-C13 and N15-C13 spectra were obtained for the membrane-bound fusion peptides and an amino acid-type C13 assignment was obtained for the labeled residues in HFP and IFP. The membrane used for the HFP sample had a lipid headgroup and cholesterol composition comparable to that of host cells of the virus, and the C13 chemical shifts were more consistent with β strand conformation than with helical conformation. The membrane used for the IFP sample did not contain cholesterol, and the chemical shifts of the dominant peaks were more consistent with helical conformation than with β strand conformation. There were additional peaks in the IFP spectrum whose shifts were not consistent with helical conformation. An unambiguous C13 and N15 assignment was obtained in an HFP sample with more selective labeling, and two shifts were identified for the Leu-9 CO, Gly-10 N, and Gly-10 Cα nuclei. These sets of two shifts may indicate two β strand registries such as parallel and antiparallel. Although most spectra were obtained on a 9.4T instrument, one C13-C13 correlation spectrum was obtained on a 16.4T instrument and was better resolved than the comparable 9.4T spectrum. More selective labeling and higher field may, therefore, be approaches to obtaining unambiguous assignments for membrane-associated fusion peptides.

  5. Involvement of 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS (membrane associated, rapid response steroid-binding), a novel vitamin D receptor, in growth inhibition of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, Cynthia L.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Rohe, Ben; Nemere, Ilka; Meckling, Kelly A.

    2010-03-10

    In addition to classical roles in calcium homeostasis and bone development, 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} [1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}] inhibits the growth of several cancer types, including breast cancer. Although cellular effects of 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} traditionally have been attributed to activation of a nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR), a novel receptor for 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} called 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS (membrane-associated, rapid response steroid-binding) protein was identified recently. The purpose of this study was to determine if the level of 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS expression modulates 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} activity in breast cancer cells. Relative levels of 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS protein in MCF-7, MDA MB 231, and MCF-10A cells were estimated by real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting. To determine if 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS receptor was involved in the growth inhibitory effects of 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} in MCF-7 cells, a ribozyme construct designed to knock down 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS mRNA was stably transfected into MCF-7 cells. MCF-7 clones in which 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS receptor expression was reduced showed increased sensitivity to 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} ( IC{sub 50} 56 {+-} 24 nM) compared to controls (319 {+-} 181 nM; P < 0.05). Reduction in 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS receptor lengthened the doubling time in transfectants treated with 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}. Knockdown of 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS receptor also increased the sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to the vitamin D analogs KH1060 and MC903, but not to unrelated agents (all-trans retinoic acid, paclitaxel, serum/glucose starvation, or the isoflavone, pomiferin). These results suggest that 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS receptor expression interferes with the growth inhibitory activity of 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} in breast cancer cells, possibly through the nuclear VDR. Further research should examine the potential for pharmacological or natural agents that modify 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS expression or activity as anticancer agents.

  6. PDZ Protein Regulation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Trafficking and Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Henry A; Ferguson, Stephen S G

    2015-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) contribute to the regulation of every aspect of human physiology and are therapeutic targets for the treatment of numerous diseases. As a consequence, understanding the myriad of mechanisms controlling GPCR signaling and trafficking is essential for the development of new pharmacological strategies for the treatment of human pathologies. Of the many GPCR-interacting proteins, postsynaptic density protein of 95 kilodaltons, disc large, zona occludens-1 (PDZ) domain-containing proteins appear most abundant and have similarly been implicated in disease mechanisms. PDZ proteins play an important role in regulating receptor and channel protein localization within synapses and tight junctions and function to scaffold intracellular signaling protein complexes. In the current study, we review the known functional interactions between PDZ domain-containing proteins and GPCRs and provide insight into the potential mechanisms of action. These PDZ domain-containing proteins include the membrane-associated guanylate-like kinases [postsynaptic density protein of 95 kilodaltons; synapse-associated protein of 97 kilodaltons; postsynaptic density protein of 93 kilodaltons; synapse-associated protein of 102 kilodaltons; discs, large homolog 5; caspase activation and recruitment domain and membrane-associated guanylate-like kinase domain-containing protein 3; membrane protein, palmitoylated 3; calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase; membrane-associated guanylate kinase protein (MAGI)-1, MAGI-2, and MAGI-3], Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor proteins (NHERFs) (NHERF1, NHERF2, PDZ domain-containing kidney protein 1, and PDZ domain-containing kidney protein 2), Golgi-associated PDZ proteins (Gα-binding protein interacting protein, C-terminus and CFTR-associated ligand), PDZ domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) 1 and 2, regulator of G protein signaling (RGS)-homology-RhoGEFs (PDZ domain-containing RhoGEF and

  7. Discoveries and controversies in BCL-2 protein-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Janet H; Viacava Follis, Ariele; Kriwacki, Richard W; Moldoveanu, Tudor

    2016-07-01

    B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) family proteins mediate mitochondrial apoptosis by regulating mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), which leads to the activation of the downstream caspase cascade to execute apoptosis. The pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic BCL-2 proteins function through protein-protein interactions in soluble and membrane-associated states. How soluble BCL-2 proteins interact is well understood. Anti-apoptotic proteins, such as BCL-2 and BCL-xL, and the pro-apoptotic effectors of MOMP, including BAK and BAX, interact with pro-apoptotic BCL-2 homology 3 (BH3)-only proteins similarly. Whereas anti-apoptotic BCL-2 proteins tightly bind all the BH3-only proteins to block apoptosis initiation, the effector BCL-2 proteins are potently triggered by specific BH3-only proteins to undergo conformational changes, membrane association and insertion, oligomerization, and pore formation. The anti-apoptotic BCL-2 proteins also inhibit the activated effectors. p53 is a direct BAX activator inhibited by BCL-xL, defining a prototype non-canonical modulator of BCL-2 proteins-mediated MOMP. How BCL-2 proteins cooperate in the presence of membranes remains poorly understood, impeding our understanding of MOMP and apoptosis. Here, we highlight the latest structural views of MOMP by BCL-2 proteins.

  8. Fe(III) and Fe(II) ions different effects on Enterococcus hirae cell growth and membrane-associated ATPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Vardanyan, Zaruhi; Trchounian, Armen

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe{sup 3+} stimulates but Fe{sup 2+} suppresses Enterococcus hirae wild-type and atpD mutant growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe ions change oxidation-reduction potential drop during cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+} have opposite effects on a membrane-associated ATPase activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These effects are either in the presence of F{sub 0}F{sub 1} inhibitor or non-functional F{sub 0}F{sub 1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe ions decrease protons and coupled potassium ions fluxes across the membrane. -- Abstract: Enterococcus hirae is able to grow under anaerobic conditions during glucose fermentation (pH 8.0) which is accompanied by acidification of the medium and drop in its oxidation-reduction potential (E{sub h}) from positive values to negative ones (down to {approx}-200 mV). In this study, iron (III) ions (Fe{sup 3+}) have been shown to affect bacterial growth in a concentration-dependent manner (within the range of 0.05-2 mM) by decreasing lag phase duration and increasing specific growth rate. While iron(II) ions (Fe{sup 2+}) had opposite effects which were reflected by suppressing bacterial growth. These ions also affected the changes in E{sub h} values during bacterial growth. It was revealed that ATPase activity with and without N,N Prime -dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), an inhibitor of the F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-ATPase, increased in the presence of even low Fe{sup 3+} concentration (0.05 mM) but decreased in the presence of Fe{sup 2+}. It was established that Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+} both significantly inhibited the proton-potassium exchange of bacteria, but stronger effects were in the case of Fe{sup 2+} with DCCD. Such results were observed with both wild-type ATCC9790 and atpD mutant (with defective F{sub 0}F{sub 1}) MS116 strains but they were different with Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+}. It is suggested that the effects of Fe{sup 3+} might be due to

  9. Palmitoylated proteins in Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    PubMed Central

    Thirkell, D; Myles, A D; Russell, W C

    1991-01-01

    After incubation of Ureaplasma urealyticum serotype 8 in the presence of 3H-labeled palmitic acid, about 25 acylated proteins were detected by electrophoresis and fluorography. Of these, at least six were shown to be antigenic by immunoprecipitation of solubilized palmitate-labeled cells with a homologous polyclonal serum. These six included the serotype 8-specific surface-expressed 96-kDa antigen. After phase partition of palmitate-labeled cells with Triton X-114, all but six acylated proteins partitioned entirely into the detergent phase. The others, including the 96-kDa antigen, partitioned preferentially into the detergent phase and were apparently amphipathic. These results are consistent with the acylated proteins being mainly membrane associated. Images PMID:1997429

  10. Mass Spectrometry of Membrane Proteins: A Focus on Aquaporins

    PubMed Central

    Schey, Kevin L.; Grey, Angus C.; Nicklay, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are abundant, critically important biomolecules that conduct essential functions in all cells and are the targets of a significant number of therapeutic drugs. However, the analysis of their expression, modification, protein–protein interactions, and structure by mass spectrometry has lagged behind similar studies of soluble proteins. Here we review the limitations to analysis of integral membrane and membrane-associated proteins and highlight advances in sample preparation and mass spectrometry methods that have led to the successful analysis of this protein class. Advances in the analysis of membrane protein posttranslational modification, protein–protein interaction, protein structure, and tissue distributions by imaging mass spectrometry are discussed. Furthermore, we focus our discussion on the application of mass spectrometry for the analysis of aquaporins as a prototypical integral membrane protein and how advances in analytical methods have revealed new biological insights into the structure and function of this family of proteins. PMID:23394619

  11. Against the mainstream: the membrane-associated type I toxin BsrG from Bacillus subtilis interferes with cell envelope biosynthesis without increasing membrane permeability.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Natalie; Brantl, Sabine; Strahl, Henrik

    2015-11-01

    Toxin-antitoxin loci, which encode a toxic protein alongside with either RNA or a protein able to counteract the toxicity, are widespread among archaea and bacteria. These loci are implicated in persistence, and as addiction modules to ensure stable inheritance of plasmids and phages. In type I toxin-antitoxin systems, a small RNA acts as an antitoxin, which prevents the synthesis of the toxin. Most type I toxins are small hydrophobic membrane proteins generally assumed to induce pores, or otherwise permeabilise the cytoplasmic membrane and, as a result, induce cell death by energy starvation. Here we show that this mode of action is not a conserved property of type I toxins. The analysis of the cellular toxicity caused by Bacillus subtilis prophage SPβ-encoded toxin BsrG revealed that, surprisingly, it neither dissipates membrane potential nor affects cellular ATP-levels. In contrast, BsrG strongly interferes with the cell envelope biosynthesis, causes membrane invaginations together with delocalisation of the cell wall synthesis machinery and triggers autolysis. Furthermore, efficient inhibition of protein biosynthesis is observed. These findings question the simplistic assumption that small membrane targeting toxins generally act by permeabilising the membrane. PMID:26234942

  12. Multiple Posttranslational Modifications of Leptospira biflexa Proteins as Revealed by Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, James A.; Olano, L. Rennee; Sturdevant, Daniel E.; Rosa, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    The saprophyte Leptospira biflexa is an excellent model for studying the physiology of the medically important Leptospira genus, the pathogenic members of which are more recalcitrant to genetic manipulation and have significantly slower in vitro growth. However, relatively little is known regarding the proteome of L. biflexa, limiting its utility as a model for some studies. Therefore, we have generated a proteomic map of both soluble and membrane-associated proteins of L. biflexa during exponential growth and in stationary phase. Using these data, we identified abundantly produced proteins in each cellular fraction and quantified the transcript levels from a subset of these genes using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). These proteins should prove useful as cellular markers and as controls for gene expression studies. We also observed a significant number of L. biflexa membrane-associated proteins with multiple isoforms, each having unique isoelectric focusing points. L. biflexa cell lysates were examined for several posttranslational modifications suggested by the protein patterns. Methylation and acetylation of lysine residues were predominately observed in the proteins of the membrane-associated fraction, while phosphorylation was detected mainly among soluble proteins. These three posttranslational modification systems appear to be conserved between the free-living species L. biflexa and the pathogenic species Leptospira interrogans, suggesting an important physiological advantage despite the varied life cycles of the different species. PMID:26655756

  13. Natural Products at Work: Structural Insights into Inhibition of the Bacterial Membrane Protein MraY.

    PubMed

    Koppermann, Stefan; Ducho, Christian

    2016-09-19

    Natural(ly) fit: The X-ray crystal structure of the bacterial membrane protein MraY in complex with its natural product inhibitor muraymycin D2 is discussed. MraY catalyzes one of the membrane-associated steps in peptidoglycan biosynthesis and, therefore, represents a promising target for novel antibiotics. Structural insights derived from the protein-inhibitor complex might now pave the way for the development of new antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27511599

  14. Inhibition of the Plasma-Membrane-Associated Serine Protease Cathepsin G by Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3364c Suppresses Caspase-1 and Pyroptosis in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Danelishvili, Lia; Everman, Jamie L.; McNamara, Michael J.; Bermudez, Luiz E.

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease associated with the infection of a great part of the world’s population and is responsible for the death of two to three million people annually. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infects macrophages and subverts its mechanisms of killing. The pathogen suppresses macrophage apoptosis by many different mechanisms. We describe that, upon uptake by macrophages, M. tuberculosis overexpresses an operon Rv3361c-Rv3365c and secretes Rv3364c. The Rv3365c knockout strain is deficient in apoptosis inhibition. The Rv3364c protein binds to the serine protease cathepsin G on the membrane, inhibiting its enzymatic activity and the downstream activation of caspase-1-dependent apoptosis. In summary, M. tuberculosis prevents macrophage pyroptosis by a novel mechanism involving cytoplasmic surveillance proteins. PMID:22275911

  15. Interaction between Parasitophorous Vacuolar Membrane-associated GRA3 and Calcium Modulating Ligand of Host Cell Endoplasmic Reticulum in the Parasitism of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Ahn, Hye-Jin; Ryu, Kyung Ju

    2008-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody against Toxoplasma gondii of Tg556 clone (Tg556) blotted a 29 kDa protein, which was localized in the dense granules of tachyzoites and secreted into the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane (PVM) after infection to host cells. A cDNA fragment encoding the protein was obtained by screening a T. gondii cDNA expression library with Tg556, and the full-length was completed by 5'-RACE of 2,086 bp containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 669 bp. The ORF encoded a polypeptide of 222 amino acids homologous to the revised GRA3 but not to the first reported one. The polypeptide has 3 hydrophobic moieties of an N-terminal stop transfer sequence and 2 transmembrane domains (TMD) in posterior half of the sequence, a cytoplasmic localization motif after the second TMD and an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retrival motif in the C-terminal end, which suggests GRA3 as a type III transmembrane protein. With the ORF of GRA3, yeast two-hybrid assay was performed in HeLa cDNA expression library, which resulted in the interaction of GRA3 with calcium modulating ligand (CAMLG), a type II transmembrane protein of ER. The specific binding of GRA3 and CAMLG was confirmed by glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays. The localities of fluorescence transfectionally expressed from GRA3 and CAMLG plasmids were overlapped completely in HeLa cell cytoplasm. In immunofluorescence assay, GRA3 and CAMLG were shown to be co-localized in the PVM of host cells. Structural binding of PVM-inserted GRA3 to CAMLG of ER suggested the receptor-ligand of ER recruitment to PVM during the parasitism of T. gondii. PMID:19127325

  16. Escherichia coli mrsC Is an Allele of hflB, Encoding a Membrane-Associated ATPase and Protease That Is Required for mRNA Decay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong-fu; O’Hara, Eileen B.; Aldea, Marti; Bargmann, Cornelia I.; Gromley, Heather; Kushner, Sidney R.

    1998-01-01

    The mrsC gene of Escherichia coli is required for mRNA turnover and cell growth, and strains containing the temperature-sensitive mrsC505 allele have longer half-lives than wild-type controls for total pulse-labeled and individual mRNAs (L. L. Granger et al., J. Bacteriol. 180:1920–1928, 1998). The cloned mrsC gene contains a long open reading frame beginning at an initiator UUG codon, confirmed by N-terminal amino acid sequencing, encoding a 70,996-Da protein with a consensus ATP-binding domain. mrsC is identical to the independently identified ftsH gene except for three additional amino acids at the N terminus (T. Tomoyasu et al., J. Bacteriol. 175:1344–1351, 1993). The purified protein had a Km of 28 μM for ATP and a Vmax of 21.2 nmol/μg/min. An amino-terminal glutathione S-transferase–MrsC fusion protein retained ATPase activity but was not biologically active. A glutamic acid replacement of the highly conserved lysine within the ATP-binding motif (mrsC201) abolished the complementation of the mrsC505 mutation, confirming that the ATPase activity is required for MrsC function in vivo. In addition, the mrsC505 allele conferred a temperature-sensitive HflB phenotype, while the hflB29 mutation promoted mRNA stability at both 30 and 44°C, suggesting that the inviability associated with the mrsC505 allele is not related to the defect in mRNA decay. The data presented provide the first direct evidence for the involvement of a membrane-bound protein in mRNA decay in E. coli. PMID:9537394

  17. Protein purification using PDZ affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains function in nature as protein-binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise approximately 90 residues and undergo specific, high-affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, other PDZ domains, and/or phospholipids. We have previously shown that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. This unit provides protocols for the PDZ affinity chromatography procedure that are applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domains or PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We detail the preparation of affinity resins composed of PDZ domains or PDZ domain peptide ligands coupled to solid supports. These resins can be used to purify proteins containing endogenous or genetically introduced PDZ domains or ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. PMID:25829303

  18. Inhibition of lethal inflammatory responses through the targeting of membrane-associated Toll-like receptor 4 signaling complexes with a Smad6-derived peptide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youn Sook; Park, Jin Seok; Jung, Su Myung; Kim, Sang-Doo; Kim, Jun Hwan; Lee, Jae Young; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Mamura, Mizuko; Lee, Sangho; Kim, Seong-Jin; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Park, Seok Hee

    2015-05-01

    We have previously reported that Smad6, one of the inhibitory Smads of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, inhibits Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 signaling by disrupting the Pellino-1-mediated TLR4 signaling complex. Here, we developed Smaducin-6, a novel membrane-tethered palmitic acid-conjugated Smad6-derived peptide composed of amino acids 422-441 of Smad6. Smaducin-6 interacted with Pellino-1, located in the inner membrane, thereby disrupting the formation of IRAK1-, RIP1-, IKKε-mediated TLR4 signaling complexes. Systemic administration of Smaducin-6 showed a significant therapeutic effect on mouse TLR4-mediated inflammatory disease models, cecal-ligation-puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis, and lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia, by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine production and apoptosis while enhancing neutrophil migration and bacterial clearance. Our findings provide clues to develop new peptide-based drugs to target Pellino-1 protein in TLR4 signaling pathway for the treatment of sepsis.

  19. The nuclear membrane-associated honeycomb structure of the unicellular organism Amoeba proteus: on the search for homologies with the nuclear lamina of metazoa.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Grossmann, U; Krohne, G

    1995-07-01

    In the protozoon Amoeba proteus, a complex and highly organized structure with the morphology of a honeycomb is associated with the nucleoplasmic surface of the nuclear membrane. We have tested whether this structure exhibits similarity to the nuclear lamina of metazoic organisms. First, we have shown that the honeycomb layer is composed of 3 to 5 nm thick protein fibrils resistant to treatment with detergent, high salt, and digestion with nucleases, thus possessing properties typical for karyoskeletal elements. However, in contrast to the meshwork of lamin filaments in somatic cells of metazoic organisms, the honeycomb layer is not tightly anchored to the nucleoplasmic side of pore complexes, or to the inner nuclear membrane. Second, in microinjection experiments we investigated whether fluorescently labeled lamins of Xenopus laevis (lamins A and LI) and Drosophila melanogaster (lamin Dmo) were able to associate in vivo with the Amoeba proteus honeycomb structure. In microinjected amoeba these three lamins were efficiently transported into the nucleus, but did not associate with the nuclear envelope. Our results suggest that the Amoeba proteus nuclear envelope, including the honeycomb layer, does not contain proteins exhibiting high homologies to lamins of metazoan species thus preventing the localized assembly of microinjected lamins along the nuclear periphery.

  20. SusG: A Unique Cell-Membrane-Associated [alpha]-Amylase from a Prominent Human Gut Symbiont Targets Complex Starch Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2010-09-21

    SusG is an {alpha}-amylase and part of a large protein complex on the outer surface of the bacterial cell and plays a major role in carbohydrate acquisition by the animal gut microbiota. Presented here, the atomic structure of SusG has an unusual extended, bilobed structure composed of amylase at one end and an unprecedented internal carbohydrate-binding motif at the other. Structural studies further demonstrate that the carbohydrate-binding motif binds maltooligosaccharide distal to, and on the opposite side of, the amylase catalytic site. SusG has an additional starch-binding site on the amylase domain immediately adjacent to the active cleft. Mutagenesis analysis demonstrates that these two additional starch-binding sites appear to play a role in catabolism of insoluble starch. However, elimination of these sites has only a limited effect, suggesting that they may have a more important role in product exchange with other Sus components.

  1. The Presence of Sterols Favors Sticholysin I-Membrane Association and Pore Formation Regardless of Their Ability to Form Laterally Segregated Domains.

    PubMed

    Pedrera, Lohans; Gomide, Andreza B; Sánchez, Rafael E; Ros, Uris; Wilke, Natalia; Pazos, Fabiola; Lanio, María E; Itri, Rosangela; Fanani, María Laura; Alvarez, Carlos

    2015-09-15

    Sticholysin I (St I) is a pore-forming toxin (PFT) produced by the Caribbean Sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus belonging to the actinoporin protein family, a unique class of eukaryotic PFT. As for actinoporins, it has been proposed that the presence of cholesterol (Chol) and the coexistence of lipid phases increase binding to the target membrane and pore-forming ability. However, little is known about the role of membrane structure and dynamics (phase state, fluidity, and the presence of lipid domains) on the activity of actinoporins or which regions of the membrane are the most favorable for protein insertion, oligomerization, and eventually pore formation. To gain insight into the role of membrane properties on the functional activity of St I, we studied its binding to monolayers and vesicles of phosphatidylcholine (PC), sphingomyelin (SM), and sterols inducing (ergosterol -Erg and cholesterol -Chol) or not (cholestenone - Cln) membrane phase segregation in liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains. This study revealed that St I binds and permeabilizes with higher efficiency sterol-containing membranes independently of their ability to form domains. We discuss the results in terms of the relevance of different membrane properties for the actinoporins mechanism of action, namely, molecular heterogeneity, specially potentiated in membranes with sterols inducers of phase separation (Chol or Erg) or Cln, a sterol noninducer of phase separation but with a high propensity to induce nonlamellar phase. The role of the Ld phase is pointed out as the most suitable platform for pore formation. In this regard, such regions in Chol-containing membranes seem to be the most favored due to its increased fluidity; this property promotes toxin insertion, diffusion, and oligomerization leading to pore formation. PMID:26273899

  2. Definition of novel cell envelope associated proteins in Triton X-114 extracts of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Membrane- and membrane-associated proteins are important for the pathogenicity of bacteria. We have analysed the content of these proteins in virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv using Triton X-114 detergent-phase separation for extraction of lipophilic proteins, followed by their identification with high resolution mass spectrometry. Results In total, 1417 different proteins were identified. In silico analysis of the identified proteins revealed that 248 proteins had at least one predicted trans-membrane region. Also, 64 of the identified proteins were predicted lipoproteins, and 54 proteins were predicted as outer membrane proteins. Three-hundred-and-ninety-five of the observed proteins, including 91 integral membrane proteins were described for the first time. Comparison of abundance levels of the identified proteins was performed using the exponentially modified protein abundance index (emPAI) which takes into account the number of the observable peptides to the number of experimentally observed peptide ions for a given protein. The outcome showed that among the membrane-and membrane-associated proteins several proteins are present with high relative abundance. Further, a close examination of the lipoprotein LpqG (Rv3623) which is only detected in the membrane fractions of M. tuberculosis but not in M. bovis, revealed that the homologous gene in M. bovis lack the signal peptide and lipobox motif, suggesting impaired export to the membrane. Conclusions Altogether, we have identified a substantial proportion of membrane- and membrane-associated proteins of M. tuberculosis H37Rv, compared the relative abundance of the identified proteins and also revealed subtle differences between the different members of the M. tuberculosis complex. PMID:20429878

  3. Calreticulin: one protein, one gene, many functions.

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, M; Corbett, E F; Mesaeli, N; Nakamura, K; Opas, M

    1999-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a critical role in the synthesis and chaperoning of membrane-associated and secreted proteins. The membrane is also an important site of Ca(2+) storage and release. Calreticulin is a unique ER luminal resident protein. The protein affects many cellular functions, both in the ER lumen and outside of the ER environment. In the ER lumen, calreticulin performs two major functions: chaperoning and regulation of Ca(2+) homoeostasis. Calreticulin is a highly versatile lectin-like chaperone, and it participates during the synthesis of a variety of molecules, including ion channels, surface receptors, integrins and transporters. The protein also affects intracellular Ca(2+) homoeostasis by modulation of ER Ca(2+) storage and transport. Studies on the cell biology of calreticulin revealed that the ER membrane is a very dynamic intracellular compartment affecting many aspects of cell physiology. PMID:10567207

  4. Trichomonas vaginalis: identification of soluble and membrane-associated phospholipase A1 and A2 activities with direct and indirect hemolytic effects.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito David; Palacios-Corona, Rebeca; González-Salazar, Francisco; Cortes-Gutierrez, Elva I; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia G; Said-Fernández, Salvador

    2005-02-01

    A direct hemolytic activity, dependent on phospholipase A (PLA) activity, was located in the particulate subcellular fraction (P30) of Trichomonas vaginalis. We identified soluble direct and indirect hemolytic activities in the spent medium and soluble fraction (S30) of T. vaginalis strain GT-13. Spent medium showed the highest specific indirect hemolytic activity (SIHA) at pH 6.0 (91 indirect hemolytic units [HU]/mg/hr). Spent medium and P30, but not S30, showed direct hemolytic activity. PLA activity was protein dose dependent and time dependent. The highest PLA activity was observed at pH 6.0. All trichomonad preparations showed phospholipase A1 (PLA A1) and phospholipase A2 (PLA A2) activities. Indirect and direct hemolytic activity and PLA A1 and PLA A2 diminished at pH 6.0 and 8.0 with increasing concentrations of Rosenthal's inhibitor. The greatest effect was observed with 80 microM at pH 6.0 on the SIHA of S30 (83% reduction) and the lowest at pH 8.0, also on the SIHA of S30 (26% reduction). In conclusion, T. vaginalis contains particulate and soluble acidic, and alkaline direct and indirect hemolytic activities, which are partially dependent on alkaline or acidic PLA A1 and PLA A2 enzymes. These could be responsible for the contact-dependent and -independent hemolytic and cytolytic activities of T. vaginalis. PMID:15856864

  5. An Analysis of Lipoproteins, Bile Acids, and Red Cell Membranes Associated with Target Cells and Spur Cells in Patients with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Richard A.; Diloy-Puray, Milagros; Lando, Patricia; Greenberg, Mortimer S.

    1972-01-01

    Most patients with stable cirrhosis of the alcoholic have “target” red cells; however, a minority have “spur” cells and severe hemolytic anemia. These two syndromes were studied in 27 patients with target cells and 17 patients with spur cells, all of whom had advanced cirrhosis. The cholesterol and phospholipid content of red cell membranes effectively distinguished target cells from spur cells. Target cells alone were rich in lecithin, and both the cholesterol/phospholipid and cholesterol/lecithin mole ratios were greater in spur cells. The cholesterol/phospholipid mole ratio of both types of red cells correlated closely with the free cholesterol saturation of serum lipoproteins, as defined by the amount of free cholesterol relative to phospholipid and protein in these lipoproteins. Lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity was decreased in most patients with target cells and spur cells; however, the relationship between this activity and the lipid abnormalities observed was weak. Serum bile acid levels also correlated poorly with serum and cell lipids. However, in patients with target cells the amount of cholic and deoxycholic acids in serum was approximately equal to the amount of chenodeoxycholic acid, whereas in patients with spur cells chenodeoxycholic acid (the precursor of lithocholic acid) predominated. PMID:4640953

  6. Thermodynamic and Biophysical Analysis of the Membrane-Association of a Histidine-Rich Peptide with Efficient Antimicrobial and Transfection Activities.

    PubMed

    Voievoda, Nataliia; Schulthess, Therese; Bechinger, Burkhard; Seelig, Joachim

    2015-07-30

    LAH4-L1 is a synthetic amphipathic peptide with antimicrobial activity. The sequence of the 23 amino acid peptide was inspired by naturally occurring frog peptides such as PGLa and magainin. LAH4-L1 also facilitates the transport of nucleic acids through the cell membrane. We have investigated the membrane binding properties and energetics of LAH4-L1 at pH 5.5 with physical-chemical methods. CD spectroscopy was employed to quantitate the membrane-induced random coil-to-helix transition of LAH4-L1. Binding isotherms were obtained with CD spectroscopy as a function of the lipid-to-protein ratio for neutral and negatively charged membranes and were analyzed with both the Langmuir multisite adsorption model and the surface partition/Gouy-Chapman model. According to the Langmuir adsorption model each molecule LAH4-L1 binds 4 POPS molecules, independent of the POPS concentration in the membrane. This is supported by the surface partition/Gouy-Chapman model which predicts an electric charge of LAH4-L1 of z = 4. Binding affinity is dominated by electrostatic attraction. The thermodynamics of the binding process was elucidated with isothermal titration calorimetry. The ITC data revealed that the binding process is composed of at least three different reactions, that is, a coil-to-helix transition with an exothermic enthalpy of about -11 kcal/mol and two endothermic processes with enthalpies of ∼4 and ∼8 kcal/mol, respectively, which partly compensate the exothermic enthalpy of the conformational change. The major endothermic reaction is interpreted as a deprotonation reaction following the insertion of a highly charged cationic peptide into a nonpolar environment. PMID:26134591

  7. Intracellular membrane association of the N-terminal domain of classical swine fever virus NS4B determines viral genome replication and virulence.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Tomokazu; Ruggli, Nicolas; Nagashima, Naofumi; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Igarashi, Manabu; Mine, Junki; Hofmann, Martin A; Liniger, Matthias; Summerfield, Artur; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2015-09-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes a highly contagious disease in pigs that can range from a severe haemorrhagic fever to a nearly unapparent disease, depending on the virulence of the virus strain. Little is known about the viral molecular determinants of CSFV virulence. The nonstructural protein NS4B is essential for viral replication. However, the roles of CSFV NS4B in viral genome replication and pathogenesis have not yet been elucidated. NS4B of the GPE-  vaccine strain and of the highly virulent Eystrup strain differ by a total of seven amino acid residues, two of which are located in the predicted trans-membrane domains of NS4B and were described previously to relate to virulence, and five residues clustering in the N-terminal part. In the present study, we examined the potential role of these five amino acids in modulating genome replication and determining pathogenicity in pigs. A chimeric low virulent GPE- -derived virus carrying the complete Eystrup NS4B showed enhanced pathogenicity in pigs. The in vitro replication efficiency of the NS4B chimeric GPE-  replicon was significantly higher than that of the replicon carrying only the two Eystrup-specific amino acids in NS4B. In silico and in vitro data suggest that the N-terminal part of NS4B forms an amphipathic α-helix structure. The N-terminal NS4B with these five amino acid residues is associated with the intracellular membranes. Taken together, this is the first gain-of-function study showing that the N-terminal domain of NS4B can determine CSFV genome replication in cell culture and viral pathogenicity in pigs. PMID:26018962

  8. Two Membrane-Associated NiFeS-Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenases from the Anaerobic Carbon-Monoxide-Utilizing Eubacterium Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans

    PubMed Central

    Svetlitchnyi, Vitali; Peschel, Christine; Acker, Georg; Meyer, Ortwin

    2001-01-01

    Two monofunctional NiFeS carbon monoxide (CO) dehydrogenases, designated CODH I and CODH II, were purified to homogeneity from the anaerobic CO-utilizing eubacterium Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans. Both enzymes differ in their subunit molecular masses, N-terminal sequences, peptide maps, and immunological reactivities. Immunogold labeling of ultrathin sections revealed both CODHs in association with the inner aspect of the cytoplasmic membrane. Both enzymes catalyze the reaction CO + H2O → CO2 + 2 e− + 2 H+. Oxidized viologen dyes are effective electron acceptors. The specific enzyme activities were 15,756 (CODH I) and 13,828 (CODH II) μmol of CO oxidized min−1 mg−1 of protein (methyl viologen, pH 8.0, 70°C). The two enzymes oxidize CO very efficiently, as indicated by kcat/Km values at 70°C of 1.3 · 109 M−1 CO s−1 (CODH I) and 1.7 · 109 M−1 CO s−1 (CODH II). The apparent Km values at pH 8.0 and 70°C are 30 and 18 μM CO for CODH I and CODH II, respectively. Acetyl coenzyme A synthase activity is not associated with the enzymes. CODH I (125 kDa, 62.5-kDa subunit) and CODH II (129 kDa, 64.5-kDa subunit) are homodimers containing 1.3 to 1.4 and 1.7 atoms of Ni, 20 to 22 and 20 to 24 atoms of Fe, and 22 and 19 atoms of acid-labile sulfur, respectively. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy revealed signals indicative of [4Fe-4S] clusters. Ni was EPR silent under any conditions tested. It is proposed that CODH I is involved in energy generation and that CODH II serves in anabolic functions. PMID:11489867

  9. Global Membrane Protein Interactome Analysis using In vivo Crosslinking and Mass Spectrometry-based Protein Correlation Profiling*

    PubMed Central

    Larance, Mark; Kirkwood, Kathryn J.; Tinti, Michele; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Ferguson, Michael A. J.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2016-01-01

    We present a methodology using in vivo crosslinking combined with HPLC-MS for the global analysis of endogenous protein complexes by protein correlation profiling. Formaldehyde crosslinked protein complexes were extracted with high yield using denaturing buffers that maintained complex solubility during chromatographic separation. We show this efficiently detects both integral membrane and membrane-associated protein complexes,in addition to soluble complexes, allowing identification and analysis of complexes not accessible in native extracts. We compare the protein complexes detected by HPLC-MS protein correlation profiling in both native and formaldehyde crosslinked U2OS cell extracts. These proteome-wide data sets of both in vivo crosslinked and native protein complexes from U2OS cells are freely available via a searchable online database (www.peptracker.com/epd). Raw data are also available via ProteomeXchange (identifier PXD003754). PMID:27114452

  10. Global Membrane Protein Interactome Analysis using In vivo Crosslinking and Mass Spectrometry-based Protein Correlation Profiling.

    PubMed

    Larance, Mark; Kirkwood, Kathryn J; Tinti, Michele; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Ferguson, Michael A J; Lamond, Angus I

    2016-07-01

    We present a methodology using in vivo crosslinking combined with HPLC-MS for the global analysis of endogenous protein complexes by protein correlation profiling. Formaldehyde crosslinked protein complexes were extracted with high yield using denaturing buffers that maintained complex solubility during chromatographic separation. We show this efficiently detects both integral membrane and membrane-associated protein complexes,in addition to soluble complexes, allowing identification and analysis of complexes not accessible in native extracts. We compare the protein complexes detected by HPLC-MS protein correlation profiling in both native and formaldehyde crosslinked U2OS cell extracts. These proteome-wide data sets of both in vivo crosslinked and native protein complexes from U2OS cells are freely available via a searchable online database (www.peptracker.com/epd). Raw data are also available via ProteomeXchange (identifier PXD003754).

  11. A low molecular weight peptide from snow mold with epitopic homology to the winter flounder antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Newsted, W J; Polvi, S; Papish, B; Kendall, E; Saleem, M; Koch, M; Hussain, A; Cutler, A J; Georges, F

    1994-01-01

    Evidence for a small size protein (ca. 3500 kDa) exhibiting epitopic homology to the Atlantic winter flounder antifreeze protein (AFP) is found in the snow molds Coprinus psychromorbidus, Myriosclerotinia borealis, and Typhula incarnata. The protein shows strong cross-reactivity with antisera specific for the flounder AFP. Preliminary studies suggest that the protein is synthesized in response to lowering the culture temperature, and that it is membrane associated and, therefore, may function in an analogous capacity to the fish AFP. Also, the protein is shown to have antifreeze properties as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging experiments.

  12. Protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Salaski, Edward J

    2002-05-01

    Specific mutations in the ras gene impair the guanosine triphophatase (GTPase) activity of Ras proteins, which play a fundamental role in the signaling cascade, leading to uninterrupted growth signals and to the transformation of normal cells into malignant phenotypes. It has been shown that normal cells transfected with mutant ras gene become cancerous and that unfarnesylated, cytosolic mutant Ras protein does not anchor onto cell membranes and cannot induce this transformation. Posttranslational modification and plasma membrane association of mutant Ras is necessary for this transforming activity. Since its identification, the enzyme protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) that catalyzes the first and essential step of the three Ras-processing steps has emerged as the most promising target for therapeutic intervention. FTase has been implicated as a potential target in inhibiting the prenylation of a variety of proteins, thus in controlling varied disease states (e.g. cancer, neurofibromatosis, restenosis, viral hepatitis, bone resorption, parasitic infections, corneal inflammations, and diabetes) associated with prenyl modifications of Ras and other proteins. Furthermore, it has been suggested that FTase inhibitors indirectly help in inhibiting tumors via suppression of angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis. Major milestones have been achieved with small-molecule FTase inhibitors that show efficacy without toxicity in vitro, as well as in mouse models bearing ras-dependent tumors. With the determination of the crystal structure of mammalian FTase, existent leads have been fine-tuned and new potent molecules of diverse structural classes have been designed. A few of these molecules are currently in the clinic, with at least three drug candidates in Phase II studies and one in Phase III. This article will review the progress that has been reported with FTase inhibitors in drug discovery and in the clinic. PMID:12733981

  13. Nanolipoprotein particles and related methods and systems for protein capture, solubilization, and/or purification

    DOEpatents

    Chromy, Brett A.; Henderson, Paul; Hoeprich, Jr, Paul D.

    2016-10-04

    Provided herein are methods and systems for assembling, solubilizing and/or purifying a membrane associated protein in a nanolipoprotein particle, which comprise a temperature transition cycle performed in presence of a detergent, wherein during the temperature transition cycle the nanolipoprotein components are brought to a temperature above and below the gel to liquid crystalling transition temperature of the membrane forming lipid of the nanolipoprotein particle.

  14. Nanolipoprotein particles and related methods and systems for protein capture, solubilization, and/or purification

    SciTech Connect

    Chromy, Brett A; Henderson, Paul; Hoeprich, Jr., Paul D

    2014-12-09

    Provided herein are methods and systems for assembling, solubilizing and/or purifying a membrane associated protein in a nanolipoprotein particle, which comprise a temperature transition cycle performed in presence of a detergent, wherein during the temperature transition cycle the nanolipoprotein components are brought to a temperature above and below the gel to liquid crystalling transition temperature of the membrane forming lipid of the nanolipoprotein particle.

  15. Global Analysis of Palmitoylated Proteins in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Foe, Ian T; Child, Matthew A; Majmudar, Jaimeen D; Krishnamurthy, Shruthi; van der Linden, Wouter A; Ward, Gary E; Martin, Brent R; Bogyo, Matthew

    2015-10-14

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as palmitoylation are critical for the lytic cycle of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. While palmitoylation is involved in invasion, motility, and cell morphology, the proteins that utilize this PTM remain largely unknown. Using a chemical proteomic approach, we report a comprehensive analysis of palmitoylated proteins in T. gondii, identifying a total of 282 proteins, including cytosolic, membrane-associated, and transmembrane proteins. From this large set of palmitoylated targets, we validate palmitoylation of proteins involved in motility (myosin light chain 1, myosin A), cell morphology (PhIL1), and host cell invasion (apical membrane antigen 1, AMA1). Further studies reveal that blocking AMA1 palmitoylation enhances the release of AMA1 and other invasion-related proteins from apical secretory organelles, suggesting a previously unrecognized role for AMA1. These findings suggest that palmitoylation is ubiquitous throughout the T. gondii proteome and reveal insights into the biology of this important human pathogen.

  16. Possible relationship of brain cytoplasmic tetrodotoxin-sensitive protein to voltage-gated sodium channel shown by monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, G V; Malysheva, M K; Pinchuk, L N; Gerasymenko, O V; Zhukareva, V A

    1990-02-01

    Biochemical events leading to the formation of mature membrane-associated sodium channel proteins are not completely understood. We have recently purified a protein from the cytoplasm of brain cells, which is able to become incorporated into liposomes and induce neurotoxin-dependent sodium permeability. Here we report data on a monoclonal antibody derived against this protein. This antibody crossreacts with cell membrane preparations. The antibody binding to viable neuroblastoma cells is inhibited by veratrine, indicating that membrane molecules antigenically related to the cytoplasmic protein may also be related to the voltage-gated sodium channel.

  17. B-cell epitopes recognized by Chinese water buffaloes (Bos buffelus) on the 22 kDa tegumental membrane-associated antigen (Sj-22) of the Asiatic bloodfluke, Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Waine, G J; Zeng, Q; Zeng, X; Yi, X; McManus, D P

    1999-01-01

    The 22.6 kDa tegumental membrane-associated antigen of schistosomes is of recognized importance in immunity to schistosomiasis. In China, bovines are known to play an important role in the transmission of Schistosoma japonicum. Ten buffaloes (Bos buffelus) were vaccinated with a recombinant form (reSj-22) of the S. japonicum 22.6 kDa tegumental antigen (Sj-22) and the sera were used to identify and map possible linear B-cell epitopes on this molecule using a series of 18 overlapping synthetic peptides (P1-P18). Sera from all of the ten vaccinated buffaloes reacted strongly with Sj-22 in western blots and in ELISA, while sera from a further ten adjuvant (Quil A) control buffaloes did not. Four peptides (P3, P8, P9 and P10) were predominantly recognized by at least 90% of the buffalo sera. This pattern of recognition is similar to that obtained in a previous study we undertook in mice immunized with the same antigen whereby peptides 3, 8, 9 and 10 were recognized by over 80% of CBA strain mice. The peptide most frequently recognized by mice (peptide 6), and mapping to an EF-hand calcium binding domain, was recognized by six of the ten vaccinated buffaloes. The major difference between buffaloes and mice occurred with peptide 1 which was recognized very frequently by all three strains of mice tested but was only weakly recognized by three of the ten buffaloes. This study provides a valuable reference for further study on the immunity stimulated by the 22.6 kDa tegumental antigen in the murine model and a natural bovine host of Schistosomiasis japonica.

  18. Impact of membrane-associated hydrogenases on the F₀F₁-ATPase in Escherichia coli during glycerol and mixed carbon fermentation: ATPase activity and its inhibition by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide in the mutants lacking hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Blbulyan, Syuzanna; Trchounian, Armen

    2015-08-01

    Escherichia coli is able to ferment glycerol and to produce molecular hydrogen (H2) by four membrane-associated hydrogenases (Hyd) changing activity in response to different conditions. In this study, overall ATPase activity of glycerol alone and mixed carbon sources (glucose and glycerol) fermented E. coli wild type and different Hyd mutants and its inhibition by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) were first investigated. ATPase activity was higher in glycerol fermented wild type cells at pH 7.5 compared to pH 6.5 and pH 5.5; DCCD inhibited markedly ATPase activity at pH 7.5. The ATPase activity at pH 7.5, compared with wild type, was lower in selC and less in hypF single mutants, suppressed in hyaB hybC selC triple mutant. Moreover, total ATPase activity of mixed carbon fermented wild type cells was maximal at pH 7.5 and lowered at pH 5.5. The ATPase activities of hypF and hyaB hybC selC mutants were higher at pH 5.5, compared with wild type; DCCD inhibited markedly ATPase activity of hypF mutant. These results demonstrate that in E. coli during glycerol fermentation the membrane proton-translocating FOF1-ATPase has major input in overall ATPase activity and alkaline pH is more optimal for the FOF1-ATPase operation. Hyd-1 and Hyd-2 are required for the FOF1-ATPase activity upon anaerobic fermentation of glycerol. The impact of Hyd-1 and Hyd-2 on the FOF1-ATPase is more obvious during mixed carbon fermentation at slightly acidic pH.

  19. Subcellular targeting of nine calcium-dependent protein kinase isoforms from Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dammann, Christian; Ichida, Audrey; Hong, Bimei; Romanowsky, Shawn M.; Hrabak, Estelle M.; Harmon, Alice C.; Pickard, Barbara G.; Harper, Jeffrey F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are specific to plants and some protists. Their activation by calcium makes them important switches for the transduction of intracellular calcium signals. Here, we identify the subcellular targeting potentials for nine CDPK isoforms from Arabidopsis, as determined by expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in transgenic plants. Subcellular locations were determined by fluorescence microscopy in cells near the root tip. Isoforms AtCPK3-GFP and AtCPK4-GFP showed a nuclear and cytosolic distribution similar to that of free GFP. Membrane fractionation experiments confirmed that these isoforms were primarily soluble. A membrane association was observed for AtCPKs 1, 7, 8, 9, 16, 21, and 28, based on imaging and membrane fractionation experiments. This correlates with the presence of potential N-terminal acylation sites, consistent with acylation as an important factor in membrane association. All but one of the membrane-associated isoforms targeted exclusively to the plasma membrane. The exception was AtCPK1-GFP, which targeted to peroxisomes, as determined by covisualization with a peroxisome marker. Peroxisome targeting of AtCPK1-GFP was disrupted by a deletion of two potential N-terminal acylation sites. The observation of a peroxisome-located CDPK suggests a mechanism for calcium regulation of peroxisomal functions involved in oxidative stress and lipid metabolism.

  20. Differential Regulation of Clathrin and Its Adaptor Proteins during Membrane Recruitment for Endocytosis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Hu, Tianwei; Yan, Xu; Meng, Tingting; Wang, Yutong; Wang, Qingmei; Zhang, Xiaoyue; Gu, Ying; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Gadeyne, Astrid; Lin, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    In plants, clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is dependent on the function of clathrin and its accessory heterooligomeric adaptor protein complexes, ADAPTOR PROTEIN2 (AP-2) and the TPLATE complex (TPC), and is negatively regulated by the hormones auxin and salicylic acid (SA). The details for how clathrin and its adaptor complexes are recruited to the plasma membrane (PM) to regulate CME, however, are poorly understood. We found that SA and the pharmacological CME inhibitor tyrphostin A23 reduce the membrane association of clathrin and AP-2, but not that of the TPC, whereas auxin solely affected clathrin membrane association, in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Genetic and pharmacological experiments revealed that loss of AP2μ or AP2σ partially affected the membrane association of other AP-2 subunits and that the AP-2 subunit AP2σ, but not AP2μ, was required for SA- and tyrphostin A23-dependent inhibition of CME. Furthermore, we show that although AP-2 and the TPC are both required for the PM recruitment of clathrin in wild-type cells, the TPC is necessary for clathrin PM association in AP-2-deficient cells. These results indicate that developmental signals may differentially modulate the membrane recruitment of clathrin and its core accessory complexes to regulate the process of CME in plant cells. PMID:26945051

  1. Subcellular targeting of nine calcium-dependent protein kinase isoforms from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dammann, Christian; Ichida, Audrey; Hong, Bimei; Romanowsky, Shawn M; Hrabak, Estelle M; Harmon, Alice C; Pickard, Barbara G; Harper, Jeffrey F

    2003-08-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are specific to plants and some protists. Their activation by calcium makes them important switches for the transduction of intracellular calcium signals. Here, we identify the subcellular targeting potentials for nine CDPK isoforms from Arabidopsis, as determined by expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in transgenic plants. Subcellular locations were determined by fluorescence microscopy in cells near the root tip. Isoforms AtCPK3-GFP and AtCPK4-GFP showed a nuclear and cytosolic distribution similar to that of free GFP. Membrane fractionation experiments confirmed that these isoforms were primarily soluble. A membrane association was observed for AtCPKs 1, 7, 8, 9, 16, 21, and 28, based on imaging and membrane fractionation experiments. This correlates with the presence of potential N-terminal acylation sites, consistent with acylation as an important factor in membrane association. All but one of the membrane-associated isoforms targeted exclusively to the plasma membrane. The exception was AtCPK1-GFP, which targeted to peroxisomes, as determined by covisualization with a peroxisome marker. Peroxisome targeting of AtCPK1-GFP was disrupted by a deletion of two potential N-terminal acylation sites. The observation of a peroxisome-located CDPK suggests a mechanism for calcium regulation of peroxisomal functions involved in oxidative stress and lipid metabolism.

  2. Ethanol and diolein stimulate PKC (protein kinase C) translocation in astroglial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Skwish, S. ); Shain, W. New York State Department of Health, Albany )

    1990-01-01

    Ethanol exposure stimulates taurine release from astroglial cells. To determine if ethanol mediates this release using protein kinase C (PKC), PKC activity was measured using LRM55 astroglial cells. When ethanol or diolein was applied to cells for 30 seconds, PKC activity was observed to decrease in the cytosol and increase in the membrane fraction of the cell while the whole cell activity remained unchanged. The membrane-associated activity increased by almost 100%. When ethanol and diolein were applied simultaneously, membrane-associated activity increased to become 3-5 times greater than when either PKC activator was applied alone. These changes in PKC activity parallel changes in taurine release observed when cells are exposed to ethanol and the PKC activator diolein. Ethanol-stimulated release may be associated with the translocation of PKC activity from the cytosol to the membrane.

  3. The conundrum of a unique protein encoded by citrus tristeza virus that is dispensable for infection of most hosts yet shows characteristics of a viral movement protein.

    PubMed

    Bak, Aurélie; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2015-11-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), one of the most economically important viruses, produces a unique protein, p33, which is encoded only in the genomes of isolates of CTV. Recently, we demonstrated that membrane association of the p33 protein confers virus ability to extend its host range. In this work we show that p33 shares characteristics of viral movement proteins. Upon expression in a host cell, the protein localizes to plasmodesmata and displays the ability to form extracellular tubules. Furthermore, p33 appears to traffic via the cellular secretory pathway and the actin network to plasmodesmata locations and is likely being recycled through the endocytic pathway. Finally, our study reveals that p33 colocalizes with a putative movement protein of CTV, the p6 protein. These results suggest a potential role of p33 as a noncanonical viral movement protein, which mediates virus translocation in the specific hosts.

  4. The conundrum of a unique protein encoded by citrus tristeza virus that is dispensable for infection of most hosts yet shows characteristics of a viral movement protein.

    PubMed

    Bak, Aurélie; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2015-11-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), one of the most economically important viruses, produces a unique protein, p33, which is encoded only in the genomes of isolates of CTV. Recently, we demonstrated that membrane association of the p33 protein confers virus ability to extend its host range. In this work we show that p33 shares characteristics of viral movement proteins. Upon expression in a host cell, the protein localizes to plasmodesmata and displays the ability to form extracellular tubules. Furthermore, p33 appears to traffic via the cellular secretory pathway and the actin network to plasmodesmata locations and is likely being recycled through the endocytic pathway. Finally, our study reveals that p33 colocalizes with a putative movement protein of CTV, the p6 protein. These results suggest a potential role of p33 as a noncanonical viral movement protein, which mediates virus translocation in the specific hosts. PMID:26210077

  5. Identification of Giardia lamblia DHHC Proteins and the Role of Protein S-palmitoylation in the Encystation Process

    PubMed Central

    Merino, María C.; Zamponi, Nahuel; Vranych, Cecilia V.; Touz, María C.; Rópolo, Andrea S.

    2014-01-01

    Protein S-palmitoylation, a hydrophobic post-translational modification, is performed by protein acyltransferases that have a common DHHC Cys-rich domain (DHHC proteins), and provides a regulatory switch for protein membrane association. In this work, we analyzed the presence of DHHC proteins in the protozoa parasite Giardia lamblia and the function of the reversible S-palmitoylation of proteins during parasite differentiation into cyst. Two specific events were observed: encysting cells displayed a larger amount of palmitoylated proteins, and parasites treated with palmitoylation inhibitors produced a reduced number of mature cysts. With bioinformatics tools, we found nine DHHC proteins, potential protein acyltransferases, in the Giardia proteome. These proteins displayed a conserved structure when compared to different organisms and are distributed in different monophyletic clades. Although all Giardia DHHC proteins were found to be present in trophozoites and encysting cells, these proteins showed a different intracellular localization in trophozoites and seemed to be differently involved in the encystation process when they were overexpressed. dhhc transgenic parasites showed a different pattern of cyst wall protein expression and yielded different amounts of mature cysts when they were induced to encyst. Our findings disclosed some important issues regarding the role of DHHC proteins and palmitoylation during Giardia encystation. PMID:25058047

  6. Rescuing Those Left Behind: Recovering and Characterizing Underdigested Membrane and Hydrophobic Proteins To Enhance Proteome Measurement Depth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Giannone, Richard J.; Wurch, Louie L.; Podar, Mircea; Hettich, Robert L.

    2015-06-25

    The marine archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. It is thought that this interaction is membrane-associated, involving a myriad of membrane-anchored proteins; proteomic efforts to better characterize this difficult to analyze interface are paramount to uncovering the mechanism of their association. By extending multienzyme digestion strategies that use sample filtration to recover underdigested proteins for reprocessing/consecutive proteolytic digestion, we applied chymotrypsin to redigest the proteinaceous material left over after initial proteolysis with trypsin of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extracted I. hospitalis-N. equitansproteins. We show that proteins with increased hydrophobic character, includingmore » membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane helices, are enriched and recovered in the underdigested fraction. Chymotryptic reprocessing provided significant sequence coverage gains in both soluble and hydrophobic proteins alike, with the latter benefiting more so in terms of membrane protein representation. Moreover, these gains were despite a large proportion of high-quality peptide spectra remaining unassigned in the underdigested fraction suggesting high levels of protein modification on these often surface-exposed proteins. Importantly, these gains were achieved without applying extensive fractionation strategies usually required for thorough characterization of membrane-associated proteins and were facilitated by the generation of a distinct, complementary set of peptides that aid in both the identification and quantitation of this important, under-represented class of proteins.« less

  7. Rescuing Those Left Behind: Recovering and Characterizing Underdigested Membrane and Hydrophobic Proteins To Enhance Proteome Measurement Depth

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J.; Wurch, Louie L.; Podar, Mircea; Hettich, Robert L.

    2015-06-25

    The marine archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. It is thought that this interaction is membrane-associated, involving a myriad of membrane-anchored proteins; proteomic efforts to better characterize this difficult to analyze interface are paramount to uncovering the mechanism of their association. By extending multienzyme digestion strategies that use sample filtration to recover underdigested proteins for reprocessing/consecutive proteolytic digestion, we applied chymotrypsin to redigest the proteinaceous material left over after initial proteolysis with trypsin of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extracted I. hospitalis-N. equitansproteins. We show that proteins with increased hydrophobic character, including membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane helices, are enriched and recovered in the underdigested fraction. Chymotryptic reprocessing provided significant sequence coverage gains in both soluble and hydrophobic proteins alike, with the latter benefiting more so in terms of membrane protein representation. Moreover, these gains were despite a large proportion of high-quality peptide spectra remaining unassigned in the underdigested fraction suggesting high levels of protein modification on these often surface-exposed proteins. Importantly, these gains were achieved without applying extensive fractionation strategies usually required for thorough characterization of membrane-associated proteins and were facilitated by the generation of a distinct, complementary set of peptides that aid in both the identification and quantitation of this important, under-represented class of proteins.

  8. Statistical prediction of protein structural, localization and functional properties by the analysis of its fragment mass distributions after proteolytic cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Kayumov, Airat R.; Markelov, Oleg A.; Bunde, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Structural, localization and functional properties of unknown proteins are often being predicted from their primary polypeptide chains using sequence alignment with already characterized proteins and consequent molecular modeling. Here we suggest an approach to predict various structural and structure-associated properties of proteins directly from the mass distributions of their proteolytic cleavage fragments. For amino-acid-specific cleavages, the distributions of fragment masses are determined by the distributions of inter-amino-acid intervals in the protein, that in turn apparently reflect its structural and structure-related features. Large-scale computer simulations revealed that for transmembrane proteins, either α-helical or β -barrel secondary structure could be predicted with about 90% accuracy after thermolysin cleavage. Moreover, 3/4 intrinsically disordered proteins could be correctly distinguished from proteins with fixed three-dimensional structure belonging to all four SCOP structural classes by combining 3–4 different cleavages. Additionally, in some cases the protein cellular localization (cytosolic or membrane-associated) and its host organism (Firmicute or Proteobacteria) could be predicted with around 80% accuracy. In contrast to cytosolic proteins, for membrane-associated proteins exhibiting specific structural conformations, their monotopic or transmembrane localization and functional group (ATP-binding, transporters, sensors and so on) could be also predicted with high accuracy and particular robustness against missing cleavages. PMID:26924271

  9. Statistical prediction of protein structural, localization and functional properties by the analysis of its fragment mass distributions after proteolytic cleavage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Kayumov, Airat R.; Markelov, Oleg A.; Bunde, Armin

    2016-02-01

    Structural, localization and functional properties of unknown proteins are often being predicted from their primary polypeptide chains using sequence alignment with already characterized proteins and consequent molecular modeling. Here we suggest an approach to predict various structural and structure-associated properties of proteins directly from the mass distributions of their proteolytic cleavage fragments. For amino-acid-specific cleavages, the distributions of fragment masses are determined by the distributions of inter-amino-acid intervals in the protein, that in turn apparently reflect its structural and structure-related features. Large-scale computer simulations revealed that for transmembrane proteins, either α-helical or β -barrel secondary structure could be predicted with about 90% accuracy after thermolysin cleavage. Moreover, 3/4 intrinsically disordered proteins could be correctly distinguished from proteins with fixed three-dimensional structure belonging to all four SCOP structural classes by combining 3–4 different cleavages. Additionally, in some cases the protein cellular localization (cytosolic or membrane-associated) and its host organism (Firmicute or Proteobacteria) could be predicted with around 80% accuracy. In contrast to cytosolic proteins, for membrane-associated proteins exhibiting specific structural conformations, their monotopic or transmembrane localization and functional group (ATP-binding, transporters, sensors and so on) could be also predicted with high accuracy and particular robustness against missing cleavages.

  10. Multiple cellular proteins modulate the dynamics of K-ras association with the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Bhagatji, Pinkesh; Leventis, Rania; Rich, Rebecca; Lin, Chen-ju; Silvius, John R

    2010-11-17

    Although specific proteins have been identified that regulate the membrane association and facilitate intracellular transport of prenylated Rho- and Rab-family proteins, it is not known whether cellular proteins fulfill similar roles for other prenylated species, such as Ras-family proteins. We used a previously described method to evaluate how several cellular proteins, previously identified as potential binding partners (but not effectors) of K-ras4B, influence the dynamics of K-ras association with the plasma membrane. Overexpression of either PDEδ or PRA1 enhances, whereas knockdown of either protein reduces, the rate of dissociation of K-ras from the plasma membrane. Inhibition of calmodulin likewise reduces the rate of K-ras dissociation from the plasma membrane, in this case in a manner specific for the activated form of K-ras. By contrast, galectin-3 specifically reduces the rate of plasma membrane dissociation of activated K-ras, an effect that is blocked by the K-ras antagonist farnesylthiosalicylic acid (salirasib). Multiple cellular proteins thus control the dynamics of membrane association and intercompartmental movement of K-ras to an important degree even under basal cellular conditions.

  11. Ubiquitin modification of serum and glucocorticoid-induced protein kinase-1 (SGK-1).

    PubMed

    Brickley, Deanna R; Mikosz, Christina A; Hagan, Christy R; Conzen, Suzanne D

    2002-11-01

    The serum and glucocorticoid-induced protein kinase gene (sgk-1) encodes a multifunctional kinase that can be phosphorylated and activated through a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent signaling pathway. In many cell types, endogenous SGK-1 steady-state protein levels are very low but can be acutely up-regulated after glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcriptional activation; in breast epithelial and cancer cell lines, this up-regulation is associated with promotion of cell survival. We and others have noted that ectopically introduced full-length SGK-1 is poorly expressed, although SGK-1 lacking the first 60 amino acids (delta60SGK-1) is expressed at much higher-fold protein levels than wild-type SGK-1 in both human embryonic kidney 293T and MCF10A mammary epithelial cells. In this report, we demonstrate for the first time that the low steady-state expression level of SGK-1 is due to polyubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. Deletion of the amino-terminal 60 amino acids of SGK-1 results in a mutant SGK-1 protein that is neither efficiently polyubiquitinated nor degraded by the 26S proteasome, accounting for the higher steady-state levels of the truncated protein. We also demonstrate that a subset of SGK-1 localizes to the plasma membrane and that the polyubiquitin-modified SGK-1 localizes to a membrane-associated fraction of the cell. Taken together, these data suggest that a significant fraction of SGK-1 is membrane-associated and ubiquitinated. These findings are consistent with the recently described role of SGK-1 in phosphorylating the membrane-associated protein Nedd4-2 and the integral membrane Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) and suggest a novel mechanism of regulation of SGK-1.

  12. Formation of functional cell membrane domains: the interplay of lipid- and protein-mediated interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Numerous cell membrane associated processes, including signal transduction, membrane sorting, protein processing and virus trafficking take place in membrane subdomains. Protein-protein interactions provide the frameworks necessary to generate biologically functional membrane domains. For example, coat proteins define membrane areas destined for sorting processes, viral proteins self-assemble to generate a budding virus, and adapter molecules organize multimolecular signalling assemblies, which catalyse downstream reactions. The concept of raft lipid-based membrane domains provides a different principle for compartmentalization and segregation of membrane constituents. Accordingly, rafts are defined by the physical properties of the lipid bilayer and function by selective partitioning of membrane lipids and proteins into membrane domains of specific phase behaviour and lipid packing. Here, I will discuss the interplay of these independent principles of protein scaffolds and raft lipid microdomains leading to the generation of biologically functional membrane domains. PMID:12803918

  13. Outer Hair Cell Lateral Wall Structure Constrains the Mobility of Plasma Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Tetsuji; Hakizimana, Pierre; Wu, Siva; Hassan, Ahmed; Jacob, Stefan; Temirov, Jamshid; Fang, Jie; Mellado-Lagarde, Marcia; Gursky, Richard; Horner, Linda; Leibiger, Barbara; Leijon, Sara; Centonze, Victoria E; Berggren, Per-Olof; Frase, Sharon; Auer, Manfred; Brownell, William E; Fridberger, Anders; Zuo, Jian

    2015-09-01

    Nature's fastest motors are the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs). These sensory cells use a membrane protein, Slc26a5 (prestin), to generate mechanical force at high frequencies, which is essential for explaining the exquisite hearing sensitivity of mammalian ears. Previous studies suggest that Slc26a5 continuously diffuses within the membrane, but how can a freely moving motor protein effectively convey forces critical for hearing? To provide direct evidence in OHCs for freely moving Slc26a5 molecules, we created a knockin mouse where Slc26a5 is fused with YFP. These mice and four other strains expressing fluorescently labeled membrane proteins were used to examine their lateral diffusion in the OHC lateral wall. All five proteins showed minimal diffusion, but did move after pharmacological disruption of membrane-associated structures with a cholesterol-depleting agent and salicylate. Thus, our results demonstrate that OHC lateral wall structure constrains the mobility of plasma membrane proteins and that the integrity of such membrane-associated structures are critical for Slc26a5's active and structural roles. The structural constraint of membrane proteins may exemplify convergent evolution of cellular motors across species. Our findings also suggest a possible mechanism for disorders of cholesterol metabolism with hearing loss such as Niemann-Pick Type C diseases. PMID:26352669

  14. Outer Hair Cell Lateral Wall Structure Constrains the Mobility of Plasma Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Tetsuji; Hakizimana, Pierre; Wu, Siva; Hassan, Ahmed; Jacob, Stefan; Temirov, Jamshid; Fang, Jie; Mellado-Lagarde, Marcia; Gursky, Richard; Horner, Linda; Leibiger, Barbara; Leijon, Sara; Centonze, Victoria E.; Berggren, Per-Olof; Frase, Sharon; Auer, Manfred; Brownell, William E.; Fridberger, Anders; Zuo, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Nature’s fastest motors are the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs). These sensory cells use a membrane protein, Slc26a5 (prestin), to generate mechanical force at high frequencies, which is essential for explaining the exquisite hearing sensitivity of mammalian ears. Previous studies suggest that Slc26a5 continuously diffuses within the membrane, but how can a freely moving motor protein effectively convey forces critical for hearing? To provide direct evidence in OHCs for freely moving Slc26a5 molecules, we created a knockin mouse where Slc26a5 is fused with YFP. These mice and four other strains expressing fluorescently labeled membrane proteins were used to examine their lateral diffusion in the OHC lateral wall. All five proteins showed minimal diffusion, but did move after pharmacological disruption of membrane-associated structures with a cholesterol-depleting agent and salicylate. Thus, our results demonstrate that OHC lateral wall structure constrains the mobility of plasma membrane proteins and that the integrity of such membrane-associated structures are critical for Slc26a5’s active and structural roles. The structural constraint of membrane proteins may exemplify convergent evolution of cellular motors across species. Our findings also suggest a possible mechanism for disorders of cholesterol metabolism with hearing loss such as Niemann-Pick Type C diseases. PMID:26352669

  15. Role of PDZ Proteins in Regulating Trafficking, Signaling, and Function of GPCRs: Means, Motif, and Opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Guillermo; von Zastrow, Mark; Friedman, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    PDZ proteins, named for the common structural domain shared by the postsynaptic density protein (PSD95), Drosophila disc large tumor suppressor (DlgA), and zonula occludens-1 protein (ZO-1), constitute a family of 200–300 recognized members. These cytoplasmic adapter proteins are capable of assembling a variety of membrane-associated proteins and signaling molecules in short-lived functional units. Here, we review PDZ proteins that participate in the regulation of signaling, trafficking, and function of G protein-coupled receptors. Salient structural features of PDZ proteins that allow them to recognize targeted GPCRs are considered. Scaffolding proteins harboring PDZ domains may contain single or multiple PDZ modules and may also include other protein–protein interaction modules. PDZ proteins may impact receptor signaling by diverse mechanisms that include retaining the receptor at the cell membrane, thereby increasing the duration of ligand binding, as well as importantly influencing GPCR internalization, trafficking, recycling, and intracellular sorting. PDZ proteins are also capable of modifying the assembled complex of accessory proteins such as β-arrestins that themselves regulate GPCR signaling. Additionally, PDZ proteins may modulate GPCR signaling by altering the G protein to which the receptor binds, or affect other regulatory proteins that impact GTPase activity, protein kinase A, phospholipase C, or modify downstream signaling events. Small molecules targeting the PDZ protein-GPCR interaction are being developed and may become important and selective drug candidates. PMID:21907913

  16. Replication of murine coronavirus requires multiple cysteines in the endodomain of spike protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jinhua; Lv, Jun; Wang, Yuyan; Gao, Shuang; Yao, Qianqian; Qu, Di; Ye, Rong

    2012-06-05

    A conserved cysteine-rich motif located between the transmembrane domain and the endodomain is essential for membrane fusion and assembly of coronavirus spike (S) protein. Here, we proved that three cysteines within the motif, but not dependent on position, are minimally required for the survival of the recombinant mouse hepatitis virus. When the carboxy termini with these mutated motifs of S proteins were respectively introduced into a heterogeneous protein, both incorporation into lipid rafts and S-palmitoylation of these recombinant proteins showed a similar quantity requirement to cysteine residues. Meanwhile, the redistribution of these proteins on cellular surface indicated that the absence of the positively charged rather than cysteine residues in the motif might lead the dramatic reduction in syncytial formation of some mutants with the deleted motifs. These results suggest that multiple cysteine as well as charged residues concurrently improves the membrane-associated functions of S protein in viral replication and cytopathogenesis.

  17. Recent advances in protein prenyltransferases: substrate identification, regulation, and disease interventions.

    PubMed

    Zverina, Elaina A; Lamphear, Corissa L; Wright, Elia N; Fierke, Carol A

    2012-12-01

    Protein post-translational modifications increase the functional diversity of the proteome by covalently adding chemical moieties onto proteins thereby changing their activation state, cellular localization, interacting partners, and life cycle. Lipidation is one such modification that enables membrane association of naturally cytosolic proteins. Protein prenyltransferases irreversibly install isoprenoid units of varying length via a thioether linkage onto proteins that exert their cellular activity at membranes. Substrates of prenyltransferases are involved in countless signaling pathways and processes within the cell. Identification of new prenylation substrates, prenylation pathway regulators, and dynamic trafficking of prenylated proteins are all avenues of intense, ongoing research that are challenging, exciting, and have the potential to significantly advance the field in the near future.

  18. Monitoring Protein Fouling on Polymeric Membranes Using Ultrasonic Frequency-Domain Reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    Kujundzic, Elmira; Greenberg, Alan R.; Fong, Robin; Hernandez, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Novel signal-processing protocols were used to extend the in situ sensitivity of ultrasonic frequency-domain reflectometry (UFDR) for real-time monitoring of microfiltration (MF) membrane fouling during protein purification. Different commercial membrane materials, with a nominal pore size of 0.2 μm, were challenged using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and amylase as model proteins. Fouling induced by these proteins was observed in flat-sheet membrane filtration cells operating in a laminar cross-flow regime. The detection of membrane-associated proteins using UFDR was determined by applying rigorous statistical methodology to reflection spectra of ultrasonic signals obtained during membrane fouling. Data suggest that the total power reflected from membrane surfaces changes in response to protein fouling at concentrations as low as 14 μg/cm2, and results indicate that ultrasonic spectra can be leveraged to detect and monitor protein fouling on commercial MF membranes. PMID:24957732

  19. Rapid Oligo-Galacturonide Induced Changes in Protein Phosphorylation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kohorn, Bruce D; Hoon, Divya; Minkoff, Benjamin B; Sussman, Michael R; Kohorn, Susan L

    2016-04-01

    The wall-associated kinases (WAKs)(1)are receptor protein kinases that bind to long polymers of cross-linked pectin in the cell wall. These plasma-membrane-associated protein kinases also bind soluble pectin fragments called oligo-galacturonides (OGs) released from the wall after pathogen attack and damage. WAKs are required for cell expansion during development but bind water soluble OGs generated from walls with a higher affinity than the wall-associated polysaccharides. OGs activate a WAK-dependent, distinct stress-like response pathway to help plants resist pathogen attack. In this report, a quantitative mass-spectrometric-based phosphoproteomic analysis was used to identify Arabidopsis cellular events rapidly induced by OGsin planta Using N(14/)N(15)isotopicin vivometabolic labeling, we screened 1,000 phosphoproteins for rapid OG-induced changes and found 50 proteins with increased phosphorylation, while there were none that decreased significantly. Seven of the phosphosites within these proteins overlap with those altered by another signaling molecule plants use to indicate the presence of pathogens (the bacterial "elicitor" peptide Flg22), indicating distinct but overlapping pathways activated by these two types of chemicals. Genetic analysis of genes encoding 10 OG-specific and two Flg22/OG-induced phosphoproteins reveals that null mutations in eight proteins compromise the OG response. These phosphorylated proteins with genetic evidence supporting their role in the OG response include two cytoplasmic kinases, two membrane-associated scaffold proteins, a phospholipase C, a CDPK, an unknown cadmium response protein, and a motor protein. Null mutants in two proteins, the putative scaffold protein REM1.3, and a cytoplasmic receptor like kinase ROG2, enhance and suppress, respectively, a dominantWAKallele. Altogether, the results of these chemical and genetic experiments reveal the identity of several phosphorylated proteins involved in the kinase

  20. Identification of a virB10 protein aggregate in the inner membrane of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, J E; Dale, E M; Nester, E W; Binns, A N

    1990-01-01

    Products of the virB operon are proposed components of a membrane-associated T-DNA transport apparatus in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Here we identified the virB10 gene product and raised specific antiserum to the protein. While the virB10 reading frame contains two potential ATG translation start sites located 32 codons apart, we found that only the downstream ATG was required for efficient VirB10 synthesis. Cellular localization studies and analysis of translational fusions with the Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase gene (phoA) indicated that VirB10 was anchored in the inner membrane and contained a periplasmic domain. This work also demonstrated the utility of alkaline phosphatase as a reporter for secreted proteins in A. tumefaciens. Several high-molecular-weight forms of VirB10 were observed after treatment of A. tumefaciens whole cells or inner membranes with protein cross-linking agents, suggesting that VirB10 exists as a native oligomer or forms an aggregate with other membrane proteins. These results provide the first biochemical evidence that a VirB protein complex is membrane associated in A. tumefaciens. Images PMID:2394684

  1. Static retention of the lumenal monotopic membrane protein torsinA in the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Vander Heyden, Abigail B; Naismith, Teresa V; Snapp, Erik L; Hanson, Phyllis I

    2011-01-01

    TorsinA is a membrane-associated enzyme in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen that is mutated in DYT1 dystonia. How it remains in the ER has been unclear. We report that a hydrophobic N-terminal domain (NTD) directs static retention of torsinA within the ER by excluding it from ER exit sites, as has been previously reported for short transmembrane domains (TMDs). We show that despite the NTD's physicochemical similarity to TMDs, it does not traverse the membrane, defining torsinA as a lumenal monotopic membrane protein and requiring a new paradigm to explain retention. ER retention and membrane association are perturbed by a subset of nonconservative mutations to the NTD, suggesting that a helical structure with defined orientation in the membrane is required. TorsinA preferentially enriches in ER sheets, as might be expected for a lumenal monotopic membrane protein. We propose that the principle of membrane-based protein sorting extends to monotopic membrane proteins, and identify other proteins including the monotopic lumenal enzyme cyclooxygenase 1 (prostaglandin H synthase 1) that share this mechanism of retention with torsinA. PMID:21785409

  2. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  3. Malate synthase a membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, K.D.; Turley, R.B.; Hermerath, C.A.; Carrapico, F.; Trelease, R.N.

    1987-04-01

    Malate synthase (MS) is generally regarded as a peripheral membrane protein, and believed by some to be ontogenetically associated with ER. However, immuno- and cyto-chemical in situ localizations show MS throughout the matrix of cotton (and cucumber) glyoxysomes, not specifically near their boundary membranes, nor in ER. Only a maximum of 50% MS can be solubilized from cotton glyoxysomes with 1% Triton X-100, 2mM Zwittergen 14, or 10mM DOC +/- salts. Cotton MS does not incorporate /sup 3/H-glucosamine in vivo, nor does it react with Con A on columns or blots. Cotton MS banded with ER in sucrose gradients (20-40%) in Tricine after 3h, but not after 22h in Tricine or Hepes, or after 3h in Hepes or K-phosphate. Collectively the authors data are inconsistent with physiologically meaningful MS-membrane associations in ER or glyoxysomes. It appears that experimentally-induced aggregates of MS migrate in ER gradients and occur in isolated glyoxysomes. These data indicate that ER is not involved in synthesis or modification of cottonseed MS prior to its import into the glyoxysomal matrix.

  4. NMR of Membrane Proteins: Beyond Crystals.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Bonev, Boyan B

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential for the flow of signals, nutrients and energy between cells and between compartments of the cell. Their mechanisms can only be fully understood once the precise structures, dynamics and interactions involved are defined at atomic resolution. Through advances in solution and solid state NMR spectroscopy, this information is now available, as demonstrated by recent studies of stable peripheral and transmembrane proteins. Here we highlight recent cases of G-protein coupled receptors, outer membrane proteins, such as VDAC, phosphoinositide sensors, such as the FAPP-1 pleckstrin homology domain, and enzymes including the metalloproteinase MMP-12. The studies highlighted have resulted in the determination of the 3D structures, dynamical properties and interaction surfaces for membrane-associated proteins using advanced isotope labelling strategies, solubilisation systems and NMR experiments designed for very high field magnets. Solid state NMR offers further insights into the structure and multimeric assembly of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, as well as into interactions with ligands and targets. Remaining challenges for wider application of NMR to membrane structural biology include the need for overexpression and purification systems for the production of isotope-labelled proteins with fragile folds, and the availability of only a few expensive perdeuterated detergents.Step changes that may transform the field include polymers, such as styrene maleic acid, which obviate the need for detergent altogether, and allow direct high yield purification from cells or membranes. Broader demand for NMR may be facilitated by MODA software, which instantly predicts membrane interactive residues that can subsequently be validated by NMR. In addition, recent developments in dynamic nuclear polarization NMR instrumentation offer a remarkable sensitivity enhancement from low molarity samples and cell surfaces. These advances illustrate the current

  5. NMR of Membrane Proteins: Beyond Crystals.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Bonev, Boyan B

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential for the flow of signals, nutrients and energy between cells and between compartments of the cell. Their mechanisms can only be fully understood once the precise structures, dynamics and interactions involved are defined at atomic resolution. Through advances in solution and solid state NMR spectroscopy, this information is now available, as demonstrated by recent studies of stable peripheral and transmembrane proteins. Here we highlight recent cases of G-protein coupled receptors, outer membrane proteins, such as VDAC, phosphoinositide sensors, such as the FAPP-1 pleckstrin homology domain, and enzymes including the metalloproteinase MMP-12. The studies highlighted have resulted in the determination of the 3D structures, dynamical properties and interaction surfaces for membrane-associated proteins using advanced isotope labelling strategies, solubilisation systems and NMR experiments designed for very high field magnets. Solid state NMR offers further insights into the structure and multimeric assembly of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, as well as into interactions with ligands and targets. Remaining challenges for wider application of NMR to membrane structural biology include the need for overexpression and purification systems for the production of isotope-labelled proteins with fragile folds, and the availability of only a few expensive perdeuterated detergents.Step changes that may transform the field include polymers, such as styrene maleic acid, which obviate the need for detergent altogether, and allow direct high yield purification from cells or membranes. Broader demand for NMR may be facilitated by MODA software, which instantly predicts membrane interactive residues that can subsequently be validated by NMR. In addition, recent developments in dynamic nuclear polarization NMR instrumentation offer a remarkable sensitivity enhancement from low molarity samples and cell surfaces. These advances illustrate the current

  6. Baculovirus display for discovery of low-affinity extracellular receptor-ligand interactions using protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Tom, Irene; Estevez, Alberto; Bowman, Krista; Gonzalez, Lino C

    2015-06-15

    When used in conjunction with multivalent protein probes, protein microarrays offer a robust technology for discovery of low-affinity extracellular protein-protein interactions. Probes for receptor-matching screens generally consist of purified extracellular domains fused to affinity tags. Given that approximately two-thirds of extracellular proteins are transmembrane domain-containing proteins, it would be desirable to develop a system to express and display probe receptors in a native-like membrane environment. Toward this end, we evaluated baculovirus display as a platform for generating multivalent probes for protein microarray screens. Virion particles were generated displaying single-transmembrane domain receptors BTLA, CD200, and EFNB2, representing a range of affinities for their interacting partners. Virions directly labeled with Cy5 fluorophore were screened against a microarray containing more than 600 extracellular proteins, and the results were compared with data derived from soluble Fc protein or probe-coated protein A microbeads. An optimized protocol employing a blocking step with a nonrelated probe-expressing control baculovirus allowed identification of the expected interactions with a signal-to-noise ratio similar to or higher than those obtained with the other formats. Our results demonstrate that baculovirus display is suitable for detection of high- and low-affinity extracellular protein-protein interactions on protein microarrays. This platform eliminates the need for protein purification and provides a native-like lipid environment for membrane-associated receptors. PMID:25797350

  7. Peptide linkage mapping of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens vir-encoded type IV secretion system reveals protein subassemblies.

    PubMed

    Ward, Doyle V; Draper, Olga; Zupan, John R; Zambryski, Patricia C

    2002-08-20

    Numerous bacterial pathogens use type IV secretion systems (T4SS) to deliver virulence factors directly to the cytoplasm of plant, animal, and human host cells. Here, evidence for interactions among components of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens vir-encoded T4SS is presented. The results derive from a high-resolution yeast two-hybrid assay, in which a library of small peptide domains of T4SS components was screened for interactions. The use of small peptides overcomes problems associated with assaying for interactions involving membrane-associated proteins. We established interactions between VirB11 (an inner membrane pore-forming protein), VirB9 (a periplasmic protein), and VirB7 (an outer membrane-associated lipoprotein and putative pilus component). We provide evidence for an interaction pathway, among conserved members of a T4SS, spanning the A. tumefaciens envelope and including a potential pore protein. In addition, we have determined interactions between VirB1 (a lytic transglycosylase likely involved in the local remodeling of the peptidoglycan) and primarily VirB8, but also VirB4, VirB10, and VirB11 (proteins likely to assemble the core structure of the T4SS). VirB4 interacts with VirB8, VirB10, and VirB11, also establishing a connection to the core components. The identification of these interactions suggests a model for assembly of the T4SS. PMID:12177441

  8. Type IV pilus retraction in pathogenic Neisseria is regulated by the PilC proteins

    PubMed Central

    Morand, Philippe C; Bille, Emmanuelle; Morelle, Sandrine; Eugène, Emmanuel; Beretti, Jean-Luc; Wolfgang, Matthew; Meyer, Thomas F; Koomey, Michael; Nassif, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    Pathogenic Neisseria express type IV pili (tfp), which have been shown to play a central role in the interactions of bacteria with their environment. The regulation of piliation thus constitutes a central element in bacterial life cycle. The PilC proteins are outer membrane-associated proteins that have a key role in tfp biogenesis since PilC-null mutants appear defective for fibre expression. Moreover, tfp are also subjected to retraction, which is under the control of the PilT nucleotide-binding protein. In this work, we bring evidence that fibre retraction involves the translocation of pilin subunits to the cytoplasmic membrane. Furthermore, by engineering meningococcal strains that harbour inducible pilC genes, and with the use of meningococcus–cell interaction as a model for the sequential observation of fibre expression and retraction, we show that the PilC proteins regulate PilT-mediated fibre retraction. PMID:15103324

  9. Processing and intracellular localization of rice stripe virus Pc2 protein in insect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Shuling; Zhang, Gaozhan; Dai, Xuejuan; Hou, Yanling; Li, Min; Liang, Jiansheng; Liang, Changyong

    2012-08-01

    Rice stripe virus (RSV) belongs to the genus Tenuivirus and its genome consists of four single-stranded RNAs encoding seven proteins. Here, we have analyzed the processing and membrane association of Pc2 encoded by vcRNA2 in insect cells. The enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) was fused to the Pc2 and used for the detection of Pc2 fusion proteins. The results showed that Pc2 was cleaved to produce two proteins named Pc2-N and Pc2-C. When expressed alone, either Pc2-N or Pc2-C could transport to the Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes independently. Further mutagenesis studies revealed that Pc2 contained three ER-targeting domains. The results led us to propose a model for the topology of the Pc2 in which an internal signal peptide immediately followed a cleavage site, and two transmembrane regions are contained.

  10. Biochemical Characterization of Rous Sarcoma Virus MA Protein Interaction with Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Amanda K.; Murray, Paul S.; Murray, Diana; Vogt, Volker M.

    2005-01-01

    The MA domain of retroviral Gag proteins mediates association with the host cell membrane during assembly. The biochemical nature of this interaction is not well understood. We have used an in vitro flotation assay to directly measure Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) MA-membrane interaction in the absence of host cell factors. The association of purified MA and MA-containing proteins with liposomes of defined composition was electrostatic in nature and depended upon the presence of a biologically relevant concentration of negatively charged lipids. A mutant MA protein known to be unable to promote Gag membrane association and budding in vivo failed to bind to liposomes. These results were supported by computational modeling. The intrinsic affinity of RSV MA for negatively charged membranes appears insufficient to promote efficient plasma membrane binding during assembly. However, an artificially dimerized form of MA bound to liposomes by at least an order of magnitude more tightly than monomeric MA. This result suggests that the clustering of MA domains, via Gag-Gag interactions during virus assembly, drives membrane association in vivo. PMID:15858007

  11. The Leptospiral Antigen Lp49 is a Two-Domain Protein with Putative Protein Binding Function

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira Giuseppe,P.; Oliveira Neves, F.; Nascimento, A.; Gomes Guimaraes, B.

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a life-threatening disease that affects populations worldwide. Currently available vaccines have limited effectiveness and therapeutic interventions are complicated by the difficulty in making an early diagnosis of leptospirosis. The genome of Leptospira interrogans was recently sequenced and comparative genomic analysis contributed to the identification of surface antigens, potential candidates for development of new vaccines and serodiagnosis. Lp49 is a membrane-associated protein recognized by antibodies present in sera from early and convalescent phases of leptospirosis patients. Its crystal structure was determined by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction using selenomethionine-labelled crystals and refined at 2.0 Angstroms resolution. Lp49 is composed of two domains and belongs to the all-beta-proteins class. The N-terminal domain folds in an immunoglobulin-like beta-sandwich structure, whereas the C-terminal domain presents a seven-bladed beta-propeller fold. Structural analysis of Lp49 indicates putative protein-protein binding sites, suggesting a role in Leptospira-host interaction. This is the first crystal structure of a leptospiral antigen described to date.

  12. Proteomic Analysis of a Fraction with Intact Eyespots of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Assignment of Protein Methylation.

    PubMed

    Eitzinger, Nicole; Wagner, Volker; Weisheit, Wolfram; Geimer, Stefan; Boness, David; Kreimer, Georg; Mittag, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Flagellate green algae possess a visual system, the eyespot. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii it is situated at the edge of the chloroplast and consists of two carotenoid rich lipid globule layers subtended by thylakoid membranes (TM) that are attached to both chloroplast envelope membranes and a specialized area of the plasma membrane (PM). A former analysis of an eyespot fraction identified 203 proteins. To increase the understanding of eyespot related processes, knowledge of the protein composition of the membranes in its close vicinity is desirable. Here, we present a purification procedure that allows isolation of intact eyespots. This gain in intactness goes, however, hand in hand with an increase of contaminants from other organelles. Proteomic analysis identified 742 proteins. Novel candidates include proteins for eyespot development, retina-related proteins, ion pumps, and membrane-associated proteins, calcium sensing proteins as well as kinases, phosphatases and 14-3-3 proteins. Methylation of proteins at Arg or Lys is known as an important posttranslational modification involved in, e.g., signal transduction. Here, we identify several proteins from eyespot fractions that are methylated at Arg and/or Lys. Among them is the eyespot specific SOUL3 protein that influences the size and position of the eyespot and EYE2, a protein important for its development. PMID:26697039

  13. Proteomic Analysis of a Fraction with Intact Eyespots of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Assignment of Protein Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Eitzinger, Nicole; Wagner, Volker; Weisheit, Wolfram; Geimer, Stefan; Boness, David; Kreimer, Georg; Mittag, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Flagellate green algae possess a visual system, the eyespot. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii it is situated at the edge of the chloroplast and consists of two carotenoid rich lipid globule layers subtended by thylakoid membranes (TM) that are attached to both chloroplast envelope membranes and a specialized area of the plasma membrane (PM). A former analysis of an eyespot fraction identified 203 proteins. To increase the understanding of eyespot related processes, knowledge of the protein composition of the membranes in its close vicinity is desirable. Here, we present a purification procedure that allows isolation of intact eyespots. This gain in intactness goes, however, hand in hand with an increase of contaminants from other organelles. Proteomic analysis identified 742 proteins. Novel candidates include proteins for eyespot development, retina-related proteins, ion pumps, and membrane-associated proteins, calcium sensing proteins as well as kinases, phosphatases and 14-3-3 proteins. Methylation of proteins at Arg or Lys is known as an important posttranslational modification involved in, e.g., signal transduction. Here, we identify several proteins from eyespot fractions that are methylated at Arg and/or Lys. Among them is the eyespot specific SOUL3 protein that influences the size and position of the eyespot and EYE2, a protein important for its development. PMID:26697039

  14. Global Topology Analysis of Pancreatic Zymogen Granule Membrane Proteins *S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuequn; Ulintz, Peter J.; Simon, Eric S.; Williams, John A.; Andrews, Philip C.

    2008-01-01

    The zymogen granule is the specialized organelle in pancreatic acinar cells for digestive enzyme storage and regulated secretion and is a classic model for studying secretory granule function. Our long term goal is to develop a comprehensive architectural model for zymogen granule membrane (ZGM) proteins that would direct new hypotheses for subsequent functional studies. Our initial proteomics analysis focused on identification of proteins from purified ZGM (Chen, X., Walker, A. K., Strahler, J. R., Simon, E. S., Tomanicek-Volk, S. L., Nelson, B. B., Hurley, M. C., Ernst, S. A., Williams, J. A., and Andrews, P. C. (2006) Organellar proteomics: analysis of pancreatic zymogen granule membranes. Mol. Cell. Proteomics 5, 306–312). In the current study, a new global topology analysis of ZGM proteins is described that applies isotope enrichment methods to a protease protection protocol. Our results showed that tryptic peptides of ZGM proteins were separated into two distinct clusters according to their isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) ratios for proteinase K-treated versus control zymogen granules. The low iTRAQ ratio cluster included cytoplasm-orientated membrane and membrane-associated proteins including myosin V, vesicle-associated membrane proteins, syntaxins, and all the Rab proteins. The second cluster having unchanged ratios included predominantly luminal proteins. Because quantification is at the peptide level, this technique is also capable of mapping both cytoplasm- and lumen-orientated domains from the same transmembrane protein. To more accurately assign the topology, we developed a statistical mixture model to provide probabilities for identified peptides to be cytoplasmic or luminal based on their iTRAQ ratios. By implementing this approach to global topology analysis of ZGM proteins, we report here an experimentally constrained, comprehensive topology model of identified zymogen granule membrane proteins. This model

  15. Phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins: sequence motifs in structural and evolutionary analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Solidar, Ada; Yoden, Marilyn D.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITP) are a family of monomeric proteins that bind and transfer phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine between membrane compartments. They are required for production of inositol and diacylglycerol second messengers, and are found in most metazoan organisms. While PITPs are known to carry out crucial cell-signaling roles in many organisms, the structure, function and evolution of the majority of family members remains unexplored; primarily because the ubiquity and diversity of the family thwarts traditional methods of global alignment. To surmount this obstacle, we instead took a novel approach, using MEME and a parsimony-based analysis to create a cladogram of conserved sequence motifs in 56 PITP family proteins from 26 species. In keeping with previous functional annotations, three clades were supported within our evolutionary analysis; two classes of soluble proteins and a class of membrane-associated proteins. By, focusing on conserved regions, the analysis allowed for in depth queries regarding possible functional roles of PITP proteins in both intra- and extra- cellular signaling. PMID:27429707

  16. Super-resolution Microscopy Reveals Compartmentalization of Peroxisomal Membrane Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Galiani, Silvia; Waithe, Dominic; Reglinski, Katharina; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Garcia, Esther; Clausen, Mathias P.; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-associated events during peroxisomal protein import processes play an essential role in peroxisome functionality. Many details of these processes are not known due to missing spatial resolution of technologies capable of investigating peroxisomes directly in the cell. Here, we present the use of super-resolution optical stimulated emission depletion microscopy to investigate with sub-60-nm resolution the heterogeneous spatial organization of the peroxisomal proteins PEX5, PEX14, and PEX11 around actively importing peroxisomes, showing distinct differences between these peroxins. Moreover, imported protein sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) occupies only a subregion of larger peroxisomes, highlighting the heterogeneous distribution of proteins even within the peroxisome. Finally, our data reveal subpopulations of peroxisomes showing only weak colocalization between PEX14 and PEX5 or PEX11 but at the same time a clear compartmentalized organization. This compartmentalization, which was less evident in cases of strong colocalization, indicates dynamic protein reorganization linked to changes occurring in the peroxisomes. Through the use of multicolor stimulated emission depletion microscopy, we have been able to characterize peroxisomes and their constituents to a yet unseen level of detail while maintaining a highly statistical approach, paving the way for equally complex biological studies in the future. PMID:27311714

  17. Purified membrane and soluble folate binding proteins from cultured KB cells have similar amino acid compositions and molecular weights but differ in fatty acid acylation.

    PubMed Central

    Luhrs, C A; Pitiranggon, P; da Costa, M; Rothenberg, S P; Slomiany, B L; Brink, L; Tous, G I; Stein, S

    1987-01-01

    A membrane-associated folate binding protein (FBP) and a soluble FBP, which is released into the culture medium, have been purified from human KB cells using affinity chromatography. By NaDodSO4/PAGE, both proteins have an apparent Mr of approximately 42,000. However, in the presence of Triton X-100, the soluble FBP eluted from a Sephadex G-150 column with an apparent Mr of approximately 40,000 (similar to NaDodSO4/PAGE) but the membrane-associated FBP eluted with an apparent Mr of approximately 160,000, indicating that this species contains a hydrophobic domain that interacts with the detergent micelles. The amino acid compositions of both forms of FBP were similar, especially with respect to the apolar amino acids. In addition, the 18 amino acids at the amino termini of both proteins were identical. The membrane FBP, following delipidation with chloroform/methanol, contained 7.1 mol of fatty acid per mol of protein, of which 4.7 mol was amide-linked and 2.4 mol was ester-linked. The soluble FBP contained only 0.05 mol of fatty acid per mol of protein. These studies indicate that the membrane FBP of KB cells contains covalently bound fatty acids that may serve to anchor the protein in the cell membrane. Images PMID:3476960

  18. Purified membrane and soluble folate binding proteins from cultured KB cells have similar amino acid compositions and molecular weights but differ in fatty acid acylation

    SciTech Connect

    Luhrs, C.A.; Pitiranggon, P.; Costa, M.D.; Rothenberg, S.P.; Slomiany, B.L.; Brink, L.; Tous, G.I.; Stein, S.

    1987-09-01

    A membrane-associated folate binding protein (FBP) and a soluble FBP, which is released into the culture medium, have been purified from human KB cells using affinity chromatography. By NaDodSO/sub 4/PAGE, both proteins have an apparent M/sub r/ of approx. 42,000. However, in the presence of Triton X-100, the soluble FBP eluted from a Sephadex G-150 column with an apparent M/sub r/ of approx. 40,000 (similar to NaDodSO/sub 4/PAGE) but the membrane-associated FBP eluted with an apparent M/sub r/ of approx. = 160,000, indicating that this species contains a hydrophobic domain that interacts with the detergent micelles. The amino acid compositions of both forms of FBP were similar, especially with respect to the apolar amino acids. In addition, the 18 amino acids at the amino termini of both proteins were identical. The membrane FBP, following delipidation with chloroformmethanol, contained 7.1 mol of fatty acid per mol of protein, of which 4.7 mol was amide-linked and 2.4 mol was ester-linked. The soluble FBP contained only 0.05 mol of fatty acid per mol of protein. These studies indicate that the membrane FBP of KB cells contains covalently bound fatty acids that may serve to anchor the protein in the cell membrane.

  19. Identification of shed proteins from Chinese hamster ovary cells: Application of statistical confidence using human and mouse protein databases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahram, Mamoun; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Hunter, Joel C.; Miller, John H.; Springer, David L.

    2005-05-01

    The shedding process releases ligands, receptors, and other proteins from the surface of the cell and is a mechanism whereby cells communicate. Even though altered regulation of this process has been implicated in several diseases, global approaches to evaluate shed proteins have not been developed. A goal of this study was to identify global changes in shed proteins in media taken from cells exposed to low-doses of radiation in an effort to develop a fundamental understanding of the bystander response. CHO cells were chosen for this study because they have been widely used for radiation studies and since they have been reported to respond to radiation by releasing factors into the media that cause genomic instability and cytotoxicity in unexposed cells, i.e., a bystander effect. Media samples taken for irradiated cells were evaluated using a combination of tandem- and FTICR-mass spectrometry analysis. Since the hamster genome has not been sequenced, mass spectrometry data was searched against the mouse and human proteins databases. Nearly 150 proteins that were identified by tandem mass spectrometry were confirmed by FTICR. When both types of mass spectrometry data were evaluated with a new confidence scoring tool, which is based on discriminant analyses, about 500 protein were identified. Approximately 20% of these identifications were either integral membrane proteins or membrane associated proteins, suggesting that they were derived from the cell surface, hence were likely shed. However, estimates of quantitative changes, based on two independent mass spectrometry approaches, did not identify any protein abundance changes attributable to the bystander effect. Results from this study demonstrate the feasibility of global evaluation of shed proteins using mass spectrometry in conjunction with cross-species protein databases and that significant improvement in peptide/protein identifications is provided by the confidence scoring tool.

  20. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2007-09-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  1. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2014-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  2. Membrane Binding of HIV-1 Matrix Protein: Dependence on Bilayer Composition and Protein Lipidation

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marilia; Nanda, Hirsh

    2016-01-01

    -bounded protein lattice that recruits genomic RNA into the virus and forms the shell of a budding immature viral capsid. In binding studies of HIV-1 Gag MA to model membranes with well-controlled lipid composition, we dissect the multiple interactions of the MA domain with its target membrane. This results in a detailed understanding of the thermodynamic aspects that determine membrane association, preferential lipid recruitment to the viral shell, and those aspects of Gag assembly into the membrane-bound protein lattice that are determined by MA. PMID:26912608

  3. Proteomic analysis of Lawsonia intracellularis reveals expression of outer membrane proteins during infection.

    PubMed

    Watson, Eleanor; Alberdi, M Pilar; Inglis, Neil F; Lainson, Alex; Porter, Megan E; Manson, Erin; Imrie, Lisa; Mclean, Kevin; Smith, David G E

    2014-12-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the aetiological agent of the commercially significant porcine disease, proliferative enteropathy. Current understanding of host-pathogen interaction is limited due to the fastidious microaerophilic obligate intracellular nature of the bacterium. In the present study, expression of bacterial proteins during infection was investigated using a mass spectrometry approach. LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of two isolates of L. intracellularis from heavily-infected epithelial cell cultures and database mining using fully annotated L. intracellularis genome sequences identified 19 proteins. According to the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) functional classification, proteins were identified with roles in cell metabolism, protein synthesis and oxidative stress protection; seven proteins with putative or unknown function were also identified. Detailed bioinformatic analyses of five uncharacterised proteins, which were expressed by both isolates, identified domains and motifs common to other outer membrane-associated proteins with important roles in pathogenesis including adherence and invasion. Analysis of recombinant proteins on Western blots using immune sera from L. intracellularis-infected pigs identified two proteins, LI0841 and LI0902 as antigenic. The detection of five outer membrane proteins expressed during infection, including two antigenic proteins, demonstrates the potential of this approach to interrogate L. intracellularis host-pathogen interactions and identify novel targets which may be exploited in disease control.

  4. [Identification of the immunogenic outer membrane proteins of relapsing fever Borrelia].

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Norihiko; Murakami, Noritaka; Fukunaga, Masahito

    2013-01-01

    Borrelia duttonii, a causative agent of relapsing fever, is transmitted between the distinct microenvironments of the vector tick, Ornithodoros moubata, and a mammalian host. We identified the total and membrane fraction proteins of B. duttonii strain Ly isolated from a patient in Tanzania by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The analyses of the total and membrane fractions from bacterial cultures incubated at 37°C identified 68 and 15 proteins, respectively. Since spirochaete clearance in mice is associated with an immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3)-mediated response, immunoblot analyses were used to identify the proteins reactive with IgM and IgG3 of gerbil serum against B. duttonii strain Ly. The outcome showed that six proteins (antigen p83/100, membrane-associated protein P66 (P66), flagellar filament outer layer protein, hypothetical protein BDU_412, vlp protein gamma subfamily (γ-Vlp) and flagellin (FlaB)) were identified against IgM, and four (antigen p83/100, P66, γ-Vlp and FlaB) of the six proteins also reacted with IgG3. It is believed that these proteins are immunodominant antigens for the host immune response. Some of these immunogenic proteins might be used as molecular diagnostic tools in the study of relapsing fever in Tanzania.

  5. Proteomic analysis of mouse liver plasma membrane: use of differential extraction to enrich hydrophobic membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijun; Xie, Jinyun; Wang, Xi'e; Liu, Xiaohui; Tang, Xinke; Cao, Rui; Hu, Weijun; Nie, Song; Fan, Chunming; Liang, Songping

    2005-11-01

    To comprehensively identify proteins of liver plasma membrane (PM), we isolated PMs from mouse liver by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. An optimized extraction method for whole PM proteins and several methods of differential extraction expected to enrich hydrophobic membrane proteins were tested. The extracted PM proteins were separated by 2-DE, and were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS, and ESI-quadrupole-TOF MS. As the complementary method, 1-DE-MS/MS was also used to identify PM proteins. The optimized lysis buffer containing urea, thiourea, CHAPS and NP-40 was able to extract more PM proteins, and treatment of PM samples with chloroform/methanol and sodium carbonate led to enrichment of more hydrophobic PM proteins. From the mouse liver PM fraction, 175 non-redundant gene products were identified, of which 88 (about 50%) were integral membrane proteins with one to seven transmembrane domains. The remaining products were probably membrane-associated and cytosolic proteins. The function distribution of all the identified liver PM proteins was analyzed; 40% represented enzymes, 12% receptors and 9% proteins with unknown function.

  6. In situ structural analysis of Golgi intracisternal protein arrays

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Benjamin D.; Schaffer, Miroslava; Albert, Sahradha; Asano, Shoh; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    We acquired molecular-resolution structures of the Golgi within its native cellular environment. Vitreous Chlamydomonas cells were thinned by cryo-focused ion beam milling and then visualized by cryo-electron tomography. These tomograms revealed structures within the Golgi cisternae that have not been seen before. Narrow trans-Golgi lumina were spanned by asymmetric membrane-associated protein arrays that had ∼6-nm lateral periodicity. Subtomogram averaging showed that the arrays may determine the narrow central spacing of the trans-Golgi cisternae through zipper-like interactions, thereby forcing cargo to the trans-Golgi periphery. Additionally, we observed dense granular aggregates within cisternae and intracisternal filament bundles associated with trans-Golgi buds. These native in situ structures provide new molecular insights into Golgi architecture and function. PMID:26311849

  7. Synaptic scaffolding molecule (S-SCAM) membrane-associated guanylate kinase with inverted organization (MAGI)-2 is associated with cell adhesion molecules at inhibitory synapses in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Sumita, Kazutaka; Sato, Yuji; Iida, Junko; Kawata, Akira; Hamano, Mamiko; Hirabayashi, Susumu; Ohno, Kikuo; Peles, Elior; Hata, Yutaka

    2007-01-01

    Synaptic scaffolding molecule (S-SCAM) is a synaptic protein, which harbors five or six PSD-95/Discs large/ZO-1 (PDZ), a guanylate kinase and two WW domains. It interacts with NMDA receptor subunits, neuroligin and beta-catenin, and is involved in the accumulation of neuroligin at excitatory synapses. In this study, we have demonstrated S-SCAM is localized at inhibitory synapses in rat primary cultured hippocampal neurons. We have identified beta-dystroglycan (beta-DG) as a binding partner for S-SCAM at inhibitory synapses. WW domains of S-SCAM bind to three sequences of beta-DG. We have also revealed that S-SCAM can interact with neuroligin 2, which is known to be exclusively localized at inhibitory synapses. The WW domains and the second PDZ domain of S-SCAM are involved in the interaction with neuroligin 2. Beta-DG, neuroligin 2 and S-SCAM form a tripartite complex in vitro. Neuroligin 2 is detected in the immunoprecipitates by anti-beta-DG antibody from rat brain. S-SCAM, beta-DG and neuroligin 2 are partially co-localized in rat hippocampal neurons. These data suggest that S-SCAM is associated with beta-DG and neuroligin 2 at inhibitory synapses, and functions as a linker between the dystrophin glycoprotein complex and the neurexin-neuroligin complex.

  8. Exploitation of complement regulatory proteins by Borrelia and Francisella.

    PubMed

    Madar, Marian; Bencurova, Elena; Mlynarcik, Patrik; Almeida, André M; Soares, Renata; Bhide, Katarina; Pulzova, Lucia; Kovac, Andrej; Coelho, Ana V; Bhide, Mangesh

    2015-06-01

    Pathogens have developed sophisticated mechanisms of complement evasion such as binding to the host complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) on their surface or expression of CRP mimicking molecules. The ability of pathogens to evade the complement system has been correlated with pathogenesis and host selectivity. Hitherto, little work has been undertaken to determine whether Borrelia and Francisella exploit various CRPs to block complement attack. Seventeen Borrelia (twelve species) and six Francisella (three subspecies) strains were used to assess their ability to bind human, sheep and cattle CRPs or mimic membrane associated complement regulators. A series of experiments including affinity ligand binding experiments, pull-down assays and mass spectrometry based protein identification, revealed an array of CRP binding proteins of Borrelia and Francisella. Unlike Francisella, Borrelia strains were able to bind multiple human CRPs. Three strains of Borrelia (SKT-4, SKT-2 and HO14) showed the presence of a human CD46-homologous motif, indicating their ability to possess putative human CD46 mimicking molecules. Similarly, five strains of Borrelia and two strains of Francisella may have surface proteins with human CD59-homologous motifs. Among ovine and bovine CRPs, the only CRP bound by Francisella (LVS, Tul4 strain) was vitronectin, while ovine C4BP, ovine factor H and bovine factor H were bound to Borrelia strains SKT-2, DN127 and Co53. This study presents an array of proteins of Borrelia and Francisella that bind CRPs or may mimic membrane-CRPs, thus enabling multiphasic complement evasion strategies of these pathogens.

  9. Calcium-independent binding to interfacial phorbol esters causes protein kinase C to associate with membranes in the absence of acidic lipids.

    PubMed

    Mosior, M; Newton, A C

    1996-02-01

    The mechanism of interaction of phorbol esters with conventional protein kinase Cs was addressed by examining the direct binding of this class of activators to protein kinase C beta II. Binding measurements reveal that the major role of phorbol esters is to increase the affinity of protein kinase C for membranes by several orders of magnitude. The relative increase depends linearly on the mole fraction of phorbol esters in membranes, with the potency illustrated by the finding that 1 mol% phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) increases protein kinase C's membrane association by approximately 4 orders of magnitude. For comparison, diacylglycerol (DG), which also activates protein kinase C by increasing the enzyme's membrane affinity, is 2 orders of magnitude less effective than PMA in altering protein kinase C's membrane affinity. The remarkably high-affinity interaction with phorbol esters allowed us to measure the direct binding of protein kinase C to PMA in neutral membranes and, thus, to evaluate the effect of Ca2+ on the phorbol ester interaction in the absence of Ca2+ effects on the enzyme's interaction with acidic lipids. Changing the Ca2+ concentration over 5 orders of magnitude had no effect on the direct interaction of protein kinase C with PMA immobilized in phosphatidylcholine membranes. Thus, the Ca(2+)-binding site for membrane association and the phorbol ester-binding site do not interact allosterically. Lastly, a method that does not have the limitations of the Scatchard plot for analysis of amphitropic proteins was used to determine the dissociation constant of protein kinase C from phorbol esters: expressed relative to membrane lipids, the dissociation constant is 1.5 x 10(-5) mol %. In summary, our data reveal that (1) the direct binding of protein kinase C to phorbol esters, in the absence of interactions with acidic lipids, provides a major contribution to the free energy change involved in the association of protein kinase C with membranes and

  10. Merosin, a protein specific for basement membranes of Schwann cells, striated muscle, and trophoblast, is expressed late in nerve and muscle development.

    PubMed Central

    Leivo, I; Engvall, E

    1988-01-01

    We have identified a tissue-specific basement membrane-associated protein by using monoclonal antibodies prepared against a protein fraction of human placenta. In immunofluorescence, the monoclonal antibodies stained basement membranes of Schwann cells, striated muscle, and trophoblast, whereas no reaction was seen with any other basement membrane or tissue structure. In antibody-affinity chromatography of proteolytic digests of human placenta, a 65-kDa polypeptide was bound by these monoclonal antibodies. Rabbit antisera and monoclonal antibodies raised against the isolated 65-kDa polypeptide stained human and monkey tissues identically to the original monoclonal antibodies and reacted with an 80-kDa polypeptide in tissue extracts prepared without proteolysis. The 65-kDa and 80-kDa polypeptides were shown to be immunologically distinct from laminin, type IV collagen, fibronectin, and major serum proteins. They presumably represent a novel basement membrane-associated protein, which we have named merosin. No merosin immunoreactivity could be detected in cultures of any of 28 established cell lines. In developing mouse tissues, merosin staining first appeared at the newborn stage. The restricted tissue distribution and late developmental appearance of merosin suggest that the protein has a tissue-specific function associated with a high level of differentiation. Images PMID:3278318

  11. Vangl1 protein acts as a downstream effector of intestinal trefoil factor (ITF)/TFF3 signaling and regulates wound healing of intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kalabis, Jiri; Rosenberg, Ian; Podolsky, Daniel K

    2006-03-10

    The intestinal trefoil factor (ITF/TFF3) protects intestinal epithelia from a range of insults and contributes to mucosal repair. However, the signaling events that mediate healing responses are only partially understood. To identify ITF signaling pathways, proteins that were Ser/Thr phosphorylated in response to ITF stimulation were immunoprecipitated from human colon carcinoma cell lines and identified by mass spectrometry. We demonstrated that Van Gogh-like protein 1 (also designated Vang-like 1 or Vangl1), a protein with four transmembrane domains, was Ser/Thr phosphorylated in response to ITF stimulation. Vangl1 was present in normal human colon and all intestinal epithelial cell lines (IEC) tested. In transfected IEC, FLAG-Vangl1 was mostly present in the Nonidet P-40 soluble fraction as detected by Western blotting, corresponding to the localization of endogenous protein in cytoplasmic vesicular structures by confocal microscopy with rabbit polyclonal anti-human Vangl1 antibody (alpha-Vangl1). Vangl1 cell membrane association increased with differentiation, as demonstrated by co-localization with E-cadherin in differentiated IEC. Increased Vangl1 phosphorylation after stimulation with ITF corresponded to decreased cell membrane association with E-cadherin. Functionally, Vangl1 overexpression enhanced ITF unstimulated and stimulated wound closure of IEC, whereas siRNA directed against Vangl1 inhibited the migratory response to ITF. Vangl1 protein may serve as an effector mediating the ITF healing response of the intestinal mucosa.

  12. Recombinantly expressed isoenzymic aminopeptidases from Helicoverpa armigera (American cotton bollworm) midgut display differential interaction with closely related Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, R; Agrawal, Neema; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Sivakumar, S; Ahmad, Suhail; Bhatnagar, Raj K

    2003-01-01

    Several investigators have independently identified membrane-associated aminopeptidases in the midgut of insect larvae as the initial interacting ligand to the insecticidal crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis. Though several isoenzymes of aminopeptidases have been identified from the midgut of an insect and their corresponding cDNA cloned, only one of the isoform has been expressed heterologously and studied for its binding to Cry toxins. Here we report the cloning and expression of two aminopeptidases N from Helicoverpa armigera (American cotton bollworm) (HaAPNs). The full-length cDNA of H. armigera APN1 (haapn1) is 3205 bp in size and encodes a 1000-amino-acid protein, while H. armigera APN2 (haapn2) is 3116 bp in size and corresponds to a 1012-amino-acid protein. Structurally these proteins show sequence similarity to other insect aminopeptidases and possess characteristic aminopeptidase motifs. Both the genes have been expressed in Trichoplusia ni (cabbage looper) cells using a baculovirus expression vector. The expressed aminopeptidases are membrane-associated, catalytically active and glycosylated. Ligand-blot analysis of both these aminopeptidases with bioactive Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac proteins displayed differential interaction. All the three toxins bound to HaAPN1, whereas only Cry1Ac interacted with HaAPN2. This is the first report demonstrating differential Cry-toxin-binding abilities of two different aminopeptidases from a susceptible insect. PMID:12441000

  13. Subcellular Golgi localization of stathmin family proteins is promoted by a specific set of DHHC palmitoyl transferases.

    PubMed

    Levy, Aurore D; Devignot, Véronique; Fukata, Yuko; Fukata, Masaki; Sobel, André; Chauvin, Stéphanie

    2011-06-01

    Protein palmitoylation is a reversible lipid modification that plays critical roles in protein sorting and targeting to specific cellular compartments. The neuronal microtubule-regulatory phosphoproteins of the stathmin family (SCG10/stathmin 2, SCLIP/stathmin 3, and RB3/stathmin 4) are peripheral proteins that fulfill specific and complementary roles in the formation and maturation of the nervous system. All neuronal stathmins are localized at the Golgi complex and at vesicles along axons and dendrites. Their membrane anchoring results from palmitoylation of two close cysteine residues present within their homologous N-terminal targeting domains. By preventing palmitoylation with 2-bromopalmitate or disrupting the integrity of the Golgi with brefeldin A, we were able to show that palmitoylation of stathmins 2 and 3 likely occurs at the Golgi and is crucial for their specific subcellular localization and trafficking. In addition, this membrane binding is promoted by a specific set of palmitoyl transferases that localize with stathmins 2 and 3 at the Golgi, directly interact with them, and enhance their membrane association. The subcellular membrane-associated microtubule-regulatory activity of stathmins might then be fine-tuned by extracellular stimuli controlling their reversible palmitoylation, which can be viewed as a crucial regulatory process for specific and local functions of stathmins in neurons.

  14. Phosphoproteomic analysis of protein kinase C signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals Slt2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent phosphorylation of eisosome core components.

    PubMed

    Mascaraque, Victoria; Hernáez, María Luisa; Jiménez-Sánchez, María; Hansen, Rasmus; Gil, Concha; Martín, Humberto; Cid, Víctor J; Molina, María

    2013-03-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been thoroughly studied as a paradigm of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. It consists of a classic MAPK module comprising the Bck1 MAPK kinase kinase, two redundant MAPK kinases (Mkk1 and Mkk2), and the Slt2 MAPK. This module is activated under a variety of stimuli related to cell wall homeostasis by Pkc1, the only member of the protein kinase C family in budding yeast. Quantitative phosphoproteomics based on stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture is a powerful tool for globally studying protein phosphorylation. Here we report an analysis of the yeast phosphoproteome upon overexpression of a PKC1 hyperactive allele that specifically activates CWI MAPK signaling in the absence of external stimuli. We found 82 phosphopeptides originating from 43 proteins that showed enhanced phosphorylation in these conditions. The MAPK S/T-P target motif was significantly overrepresented in these phosphopeptides. Hyperphosphorylated proteins provide putative novel targets of the Pkc1-cell wall integrity pathway involved in diverse functions such as the control of gene expression, protein synthesis, cytoskeleton maintenance, DNA repair, and metabolism. Remarkably, five components of the plasma-membrane-associated protein complex known as eisosomes were found among the up-regulated proteins. We show here that Pkc1-induced phosphorylation of the eisosome core components Pil1 and Lsp1 was not exerted directly by Pkc1, but involved signaling through the Slt2 MAPK module.

  15. Human carcinomas variably express the complement inhibitory proteins CD46 (membrane cofactor protein), CD55 (decay-accelerating factor), and CD59 (protectin).

    PubMed

    Niehans, G A; Cherwitz, D L; Staley, N A; Knapp, D J; Dalmasso, A P

    1996-07-01

    Normal human tissues express membrane-associated complement inhibitory proteins that protect these tissues from damage by autologous complement. To determine whether neoplasms also express these proteins, we examined the distribution of the complement inhibitors decay-accelerating factor (DAF), CD59 (protectin), and membrane cofactor protein in frozen samples of human breast, colon, kidney, and lung carcinomas and in adjacent non-neoplastic tissues, using immunohistochemistry. All samples were also studied for deposition of C3 fragments and activated C5b-9. Differences between normal tissues and the corresponding neoplasms were often observed, with loss or gain of expression of one or more inhibitors. Ductal carcinomas of the breast showed the most variation in phenotype; some tumors expressed only one inhibitor while others expressed different combinations of two or three inhibitors. Colon carcinomas, by contrast, stained intensely for all inhibitors. Renal cell carcinomas had weak to moderate expression of one to three inhibitors, generally DAF and CD59, whereas non-small cell carcinomas of the lung usually expressed CD59 and membrane cofactor protein with variable DAF immunoreactivity. The two small cell carcinomas of the lung showed little or no staining for any inhibitor. Activated C5b-9 deposition was seen adjacent to tumor nests in a minority of carcinomas and showed no correlation with complement inhibitor expression. C3 fragment deposition was minimal. Our results demonstrate that most carcinomas, with the exception of small cell carcinomas of the lung, do express one or more complement inhibitors at a level likely to inhibit complement-mediated cellular damage. Unexpectedly, large quantities of DAF and CD59 were often observed in tumor stroma, with only limited deposition in normal connective tissue. This suggests that carcinomas may supplement the activity of membrane-associated complement inhibitors by release of soluble forms of DAF and CD59 into the

  16. Fractionation profiling: a fast and versatile approach for mapping vesicle proteomes and protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Borner, Georg H. H.; Hein, Marco Y.; Hirst, Jennifer; Edgar, James R.; Mann, Matthias; Robinson, Margaret S.

    2014-01-01

    We developed “fractionation profiling,” a method for rapid proteomic analysis of membrane vesicles and protein particles. The approach combines quantitative proteomics with subcellular fractionation to generate signature protein abundance distribution profiles. Functionally associated groups of proteins are revealed through cluster analysis. To validate the method, we first profiled >3500 proteins from HeLa cells and identified known clathrin-coated vesicle proteins with >90% accuracy. We then profiled >2400 proteins from Drosophila S2 cells, and we report the first comprehensive insect clathrin-coated vesicle proteome. Of importance, the cluster analysis extends to all profiled proteins and thus identifies a diverse range of known and novel cytosolic and membrane-associated protein complexes. We show that it also allows the detailed compositional characterization of complexes, including the delineation of subcomplexes and subunit stoichiometry. Our predictions are presented in an interactive database. Fractionation profiling is a universal method for defining the clathrin-coated vesicle proteome and may be adapted for the analysis of other types of vesicles and particles. In addition, it provides a versatile tool for the rapid generation of large-scale protein interaction maps. PMID:25165137

  17. FERM family proteins and their importance in cellular movements and wound healing (review).

    PubMed

    Bosanquet, David C; Ye, Lin; Harding, Keith G; Jiang, Wen G

    2014-07-01

    Motility is a requirement for a number of biological processes, including embryonic development, neuronal development, immune responses, cancer progression and wound healing. Specific to wound healing is the migration of endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other key cellular players into the wound space. Aberrations in wound healing can result in either chronic wounds or abnormally healed wounds. The protein 4.1R, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM) superfamily consists of over 40 proteins all containing a three lobed N-terminal FERM domain which binds a variety of cell-membrane associated proteins and lipids. The C-terminal ends of these proteins typically contain an actin-binding domain (ABD). These proteins therefore mediate the linkage between the cell membrane and the actin cytoskeleton, and are involved in cellular movements and migration. Certain FERM proteins have been shown to promote cancer metastasis via this very mechanism. Herein we review the effects of a number of FERM proteins on wound healing and cancer. We show how these proteins typically aid wound healing through their effects on increasing cellular migration and movements, but also typically promote metastasis in cancer. We conclude that FERM proteins play important roles in cellular migration, with markedly different outcomes in the context of cancer and wound healing.

  18. Isolation and analysis of a cDNA clone encoding an S. guttatum alternataive oxidase protein

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, D.M.; McIntosh, L. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing )

    1990-05-01

    Antibodies that recognize the 35, 36, and 37 kilodalton (kDa) alternative oxidase proteins were used to isolate a cDNA proteins were used to isolate a cDNA clone of a nuclearly encoded protein of Sauromatum guttatum. The amino acid sequence deduced from clone pAOSG81 revealed a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 44 kDa, while a 42 kDa protein is immunoprecipitated from in vitro translation products made using S. guttatum poly A+ RNA. The protein contains a 60-65 amino acid transit peptide which is predicted to form amphiphilic helices. We have also identified regions of the mature 42 kDa protein which are likely to be membrane associated. Clone pAOSG81 is being used to screen a genomic library. The genomic clone encoding the 42 kDa protein will be used to investigate the salicylic-acid-controlled transcriptional regulation of the S. guttatum alternative oxidase proteins.

  19. Ethylene perception by the ERS1 protein in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hall, A E; Findell, J L; Schaller, G E; Sisler, E C; Bleecker, A B

    2000-08-01

    Ethylene perception in Arabidopsis is controlled by a family of five genes, including ETR1, ERS1 (ethylene response sensor 1), ERS2, ETR2, and EIN4. ERS1, the most highly conserved gene with ETR1, encodes a protein with 67% identity to ETR1. To clarify the role of ERS1 in ethylene sensing, we biochemically characterized the ERS1 protein by heterologous expression in yeast. ERS1, like ETR1, forms a membrane-associated, disulfide-linked dimer. In addition, yeast expressing the ERS1 protein contains ethylene-binding sites, indicating ERS1 is also an ethylene-binding protein. This finding supports previous genetic evidence that isoforms of ETR1 also function in plants as ethylene receptors. Further, we used the ethylene antagonist 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) to characterize the ethylene-binding sites of ERS1 and ETR1. We found 1-MCP to be both a potent inhibitor of the ethylene-induced seedling triple response, as well as ethylene binding by yeast expressing ETR1 and ERS1. Yeast expressing ETR1 and ERS1 showed nearly identical sensitivity to 1-MCP, suggesting that the ethylene-binding sites of ETR1 and ERS1 have similar affinities for ethylene.

  20. Multiple regulatory domains on the Byr2 protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Tu, H; Barr, M; Dong, D L; Wigler, M

    1997-01-01

    Byr2 protein kinase, a homolog of mammalian mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEKK) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae STE11, is required for pheromone-induced sexual differentiation in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Byr2 functions downstream of Ste4, Ras1, and the membrane-associated receptor-coupled heterotrimeric G-protein alpha subunit, Gpa1. Byr2 has a distinctive N-terminal kinase regulatory domain and a characteristic C-terminal kinase catalytic domain. Ste4 and Ras1 interact with the regulatory domain of Byr2 directly. Here, we define the domains of Byr2 that bind Ste4 and Ras1 and show that the Byr2 regulatory domain binds to the catalytic domain in the two-hybrid system. Using Byr2 mutants, we demonstrate that these direct physical interactions are all required for proper signaling. In particular, the physical association between Byr2 regulatory and catalytic domains appears to result in autoinhibition, the loss of which results in kinase activation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Shk1, the S. pombe homolog of the STE20 protein kinase, can directly antagonize the Byr2 intramolecular interaction, possibly by phosphorylating Byr2. PMID:9315645

  1. Decrease in membrane phospholipid unsaturation induces unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Ariyama, Hiroyuki; Kono, Nozomu; Matsuda, Shinji; Inoue, Takao; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2010-07-16

    Various kinds of fatty acids are distributed in membrane phospholipids in mammalian cells and tissues. The degree of fatty acid unsaturation in membrane phospholipids affects many membrane-associated functions and can be influenced by diet and by altered activities of lipid-metabolizing enzymes such as fatty acid desaturases. However, little is known about how mammalian cells respond to changes in phospholipid fatty acid composition. In this study we showed that stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) knockdown increased the amount of saturated fatty acids and decreased that of monounsaturated fatty acids in phospholipids without affecting the amount or the composition of free fatty acid and induced unfolded protein response (UPR), evidenced by increased expression of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) mRNAs and splicing of Xbox-binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA. SCD1 knockdown-induced UPR was rescued by various unsaturated fatty acids and was enhanced by saturated fatty acid. Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (LPCAT3), which incorporates preferentially polyunsaturated fatty acids into phosphatidylcholine, was up-regulated in SCD1 knockdown cells. Knockdown of LPCAT3 synergistically enhanced UPR with SCD1 knockdown. Finally we showed that palmitic acid-induced UPR was significantly enhanced by LPCAT3 knockdown as well as SCD1 knockdown. These results suggest that a decrease in membrane phospholipid unsaturation induces UPR.

  2. Protein Network of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Denitrification Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Borrero-de Acuña, José Manuel; Rohde, Manfred; Wissing, Josef; Jänsch, Lothar; Schobert, Max; Molinari, Gabriella; Timmis, Kenneth N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oxidative phosphorylation using multiple-component, membrane-associated protein complexes is the most effective way for a cell to generate energy. Here, we systematically investigated the multiple protein-protein interactions of the denitrification apparatus of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. During denitrification, nitrate (Nar), nitrite (Nir), nitric oxide (Nor), and nitrous oxide (Nos) reductases catalyze the reaction cascade of NO3− → NO2− → NO → N2O → N2. Genetic experiments suggested that the nitric oxide reductase NorBC and the regulatory protein NosR are the nucleus of the denitrification protein network. We utilized membrane interactomics in combination with electron microscopy colocalization studies to elucidate the corresponding protein-protein interactions. The integral membrane proteins NorC, NorB, and NosR form the core assembly platform that binds the nitrate reductase NarGHI and the periplasmic nitrite reductase NirS via its maturation factor NirF. The periplasmic nitrous oxide reductase NosZ is linked via NosR. The nitrate transporter NarK2, the nitrate regulatory system NarXL, various nitrite reductase maturation proteins, NirEJMNQ, and the Nos assembly lipoproteins NosFL were also found to be attached. A number of proteins associated with energy generation, including electron-donating dehydrogenases, the complete ATP synthase, almost all enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and the Sec system of protein transport, among many other proteins, were found to interact with the denitrification proteins. This deduced nitrate respirasome is presumably only one part of an extensive cytoplasmic membrane-anchored protein network connecting cytoplasmic, inner membrane, and periplasmic proteins to mediate key activities occurring at the barrier/interface between the cytoplasm and the external environment. IMPORTANCE The processes of cellular energy generation are catalyzed by large multiprotein enzyme complexes

  3. Cell Membrane Proteins Modulate the Carbon Nanotube Optical Bandgap via Surface Charge Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Roxbury, Daniel; Jena, Prakrit V; Shamay, Yosi; Horoszko, Christopher P; Heller, Daniel A

    2016-01-26

    Cell adhesion is a protein-mediated process intrinsic to most living organisms. Dysfunction in cell adhesion processes is implicated in various diseases, including thrombosis and metastatic cancers. Using an approach to resolve spectral features from cell membrane-associated photoluminescent single-walled carbon nanotubes, we found that nanotube optical bandgaps respond to the electrostatic potential of the cell surface, which corresponds to cell adhesion properties. We studied the carbon nanotube emission energy response to solution ionic potentials, which suggests sensitivity to local charge accumulation. We conclude that nanotubes respond to cell surface electrostatic potentials that are mediated by membrane proteins, which vary significantly across cell types. These findings portend the optical measurement of surface electrostatic potentials for biophysical measurements and biomedical applications. PMID:26654246

  4. In vitro binding and phosphorylation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef protein by serine/threonine protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Bodéus, M; Marie-Cardine, A; Bougeret, C; Ramos-Morales, F; Benarous, R

    1995-06-01

    Although the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nef gene still has no precisely defined function, in vivo studies have demonstrated that Nef is an important pathogenic determinant of HIV. In order to identify cellular proteins capable of binding to Nef, the HIV-1LAI nef gene product was expressed in the bacterial vector pGEX-2T as a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-Nef fusion protein. Deletion mutants corresponding to 86 and 35 N-terminal residues of the Nef protein were prepared. The GST-Nef constructs were used to identify cellular kinases capable of interacting with Nef. After incubation with a Jurkat cell lysate, the GST-Nef constructs immobilized on glutathione-agarose beads bound to cellular kinase(s) and were phosphorylated at three sites in vitro: one on threonine at position 15, one on serine between residues 1 and 35, and one on threonine between residues 36 and 86. The Nef-phosphorylating activity was inhibited by protein kinase C (PKC)-selective inhibitors. Cell fractionation showed that this Nef-binding kinase was mainly in the membrane-associated fraction. These results suggest that kinase(s) of the PKC family are specifically bound to and phosphorylate Nef in vitro. The interaction of Nef with cellular kinases and its phosphorylation may be important in mediating the effects of Nef in HIV-1 pathogenesis.

  5. The Synaptojanin-like Protein Inp53/Sjl3 Functions with Clathrin in a Yeast TGN-to-Endosome Pathway Distinct from the GGA Protein-dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Seon-Ah; Torabinejad, Javad; DeWald, Daryll B.; Wenk, Markus R.; Lucast, Louise; De Camilli, Pietro; Newitt, Richard A.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Nothwehr, Steven F.

    2003-01-01

    Yeast TGN resident proteins that frequently cycle between the TGN and endosomes are much more slowly transported to the prevacuolar/late endosomal compartment (PVC) than other proteins. However, TGN protein transport to the PVC is accelerated in mutants lacking function of Inp53p. Inp53p contains a SacI polyphosphoinositide phosphatase domain, a 5-phosphatase domain, and a proline-rich domain. Here we show that all three domains are required to mediate “slow delivery” of TGN proteins into the PVC. Although deletion of the proline-rich domain did not affect general membrane association, it caused localization to become less specific. The proline-rich domain was shown to bind to two proteins, including clathrin heavy chain, Chc1p. Unlike chc1 mutants, inp53 mutants do not mislocalize TGN proteins to the cell surface, consistent with the idea that Chc1p and Inp53p act at a common vesicular trafficking step but that Chc1p is used at other steps also. Like mutations in the AP-1 adaptor complex, mutations in INP53 exhibit synthetic growth and transport defects when combined with mutations in the GGA proteins. Taken together with other recent studies, our results suggest that Inp53p and AP-1/clathrin act together in a TGN-to-early endosome pathway distinct from the direct TGN-to-PVC pathway mediated by GGA/clathrin. PMID:12686590

  6. Total protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  7. Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard-Blum, S.

    Proteins are key actors in the life of the cell, involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Since variations in the expression of messenger RNA are not systematically correlated with variations in the protein levels, the latter better reflect the way a cell functions. Protein microarrays thus supply complementary information to DNA chips. They are used in particular to analyse protein expression profiles, to detect proteins within complex biological media, and to study protein-protein interactions, which give information about the functions of those proteins [3-9]. They have the same advantages as DNA microarrays for high-throughput analysis, miniaturisation, and the possibility of automation. Section 18.1 gives a brief overview of proteins. Following this, Sect. 18.2 describes how protein microarrays can be made on flat supports, explaining how proteins can be produced and immobilised on a solid support, and discussing the different kinds of substrate and detection method. Section 18.3 discusses the particular format of protein microarrays in suspension. The diversity of protein microarrays and their applications are then reported in Sect. 18.4, with applications to therapeutics (protein-drug interactions) and diagnostics. The prospects for future developments of protein microarrays are then outlined in the conclusion. The bibliography provides an extensive list of reviews and detailed references for those readers who wish to go further in this area. Indeed, the aim of the present chapter is not to give an exhaustive or detailed analysis of the state of the art, but rather to provide the reader with the basic elements needed to understand how proteins are designed and used.

  8. A gene encoding a vicilin-like protein is specifically expressed in fern spores. Evolutionary pathway of seed storage globulins.

    PubMed

    Shutov, A D; Braun, H; Chesnokov, Y V; Bäumlein, H

    1998-02-15

    The isolation and characterisation of a cDNA coding for a vicilin-like protein of the fern Matteuccia struthiopteris is described. The corresponding gene is specifically expressed during late stages of spore development. Extensive sequence comparisons suggest that the fern protein can be considered as a molecular missing link between single-domain germin/spherulin-like proteins and two-domain seed storage globulins of gymnosperms and angiosperms. Further, evidence is provided for the existence of a superfamily of structurally related, functionally different proteins which includes storage globulins of the vicilin and legumin families, a membrane-associated sucrose-binding protein of soybean, a Forssman antigen-binding lectin of velvet bean, the precursor of the vacuolar membrane bound proteins MP27/MP32 of pumpkin, the embryogenesis-specific protein Gea8 of carrot, the fern-spore-specific protein described here as well as the functionally diverse family of germins/germin-like proteins and the spherulins of myxomycetes. We propose that seed storage globulins of spermatophytes evolved from desiccation-related single-domain proteins of prokaryotes via a duplicated two-domain ancestor that is best represented by the extant fern spore-specific vicilin-like protein.

  9. Dietary Proteins

    MedlinePlus

    ... meat, dairy products, nuts, and certain grains and beans. Proteins from meat and other animal products are complete proteins. This means they supply all of the amino acids the body can't make on its own. Most plant proteins are incomplete. You should eat different types ...

  10. Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  11. Evaluation of Salmonella enterica type III secretion system effector proteins as carriers for heterologous vaccine antigens.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, Wael Abdel Halim; Xu, Xin; Metelitsa, Leonid; Hensel, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Live attenuated strains of Salmonella enterica have a high potential as carriers of recombinant vaccines. The type III secretion system (T3SS)-dependent translocation of S. enterica can be deployed for delivery of heterologous antigens to antigen-presenting cells. Here we investigated the efficacy of various effector proteins of the Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI2)-encoded T3SS for the translocation of model antigens and elicitation of immune responses. The SPI2 T3SS effector proteins SifA, SteC, SseL, SseJ, and SseF share an endosomal membrane-associated subcellular localization after translocation. We observed that all effector proteins could be used to translocate fusion proteins with the model antigens ovalbumin and listeriolysin into the cytosol of host cells. Under in vitro conditions, fusion proteins with SseJ and SteC stimulated T-cell responses that were superior to those triggered by fusion proteins with SseF. However, in mice vaccinated with Salmonella carrier strains, only fusion proteins based on SseJ or SifA elicited potent T-cell responses. These data demonstrate that the selection of an optimal SPI2 effector protein for T3SS-mediated translocation is a critical parameter for the rational design of effective Salmonella-based recombinant vaccines.

  12. Proteomic analysis of membrane proteins from a radioresistant and moderate thermophilic bacterium Deinococcus geothermalis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bing; Wang, Hu; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Hu, Yaping; Sun, Zongtao; Shen, Shaochuan; Wang, Fei; Hua, Yuejin

    2010-10-01

    Deinococcus geothermalis is a radioresistant and moderate thermophilic bacterium. Little was known about the membrane or membrane associated proteins of this bacterium. This study established the membrane subproteome profile of D. geothermalis, using 1-D PAGE and LC-MS/MS analysis following Triton X-114 detergent extraction. A total of 552 proteins from the membrane preparations were identified from two independent trials. In the total identified proteins, 117 were membrane subproteomic proteins, and 89 of them were described for the first time in D. geothermalis including fimbrial pilin (Dgeo_2038), cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase (Dgeo_2705) and multi-sensor (Dgeo_2096). The major membrane subproteomic proteins were distributed into 18 functional groups including nutrient transport and metabolism, energy production and conversion, cell wall/membrane biogenesis and a poorly characterized subclass. The identifications of Deinococcus-specific proteins, such as cell surface receptor IPT/TIG (Dgeo_1119) and four hypothetical proteins, demonstrated the special protein composition and functions in the cell membrane of Deinococcus. The results provide a basis for quantitative proteomic analysis, which will facilitate the understanding of the adaptation of this organism to different environmental stresses and the development of strategies for bioremediation of environmental waste.

  13. The PCA and LDA analysis on the differential expression of proteins in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Seng; Singh, Manjit; Dharmaraj, Saravanan; Gam, Lay-Harn

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of mortality in women. In Malaysia, it is the most common cancer to affect women. The most common form of breast cancer is infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC). A proteomic approach was undertaken to identify protein profile changes between cancerous and normal breast tissues from 18 patients. Two protein extracts; aqueous soluble and membrane associated protein extracts were studied. Thirty four differentially expressed proteins were identified. The intensities of the proteins were used as variables in PCA and reduced data of six principal components (PC) were subjected to LDA in order to evaluate the potential of these proteins as collective biomarkers for breast cancer. The protein intensities of SEC13-like 1 (isoform b) and calreticulin contributed the most to the first PC while the protein intensities of fibrinogen beta chain precursor and ATP synthase D chain contributed the most to the second PC. Transthyretin precursor and apolipoprotein A-1 precursor contributed the most to the third PC. The results of LDA indicated good classification of samples into normal and cancerous types when the first 6 PCs were used as the variables. The percentage of correct classification was 91.7% for the originally grouped tissue samples and 88.9% for cross-validated samples.

  14. The PCA and LDA Analysis on the Differential Expression of Proteins in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Seng; Singh, Manjit; Dharmaraj, Saravanan; Gam, Lay-Harn

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of mortality in women. In Malaysia, it is the most common cancer to affect women. The most common form of breast cancer is infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC). A proteomic approach was undertaken to identify protein profile changes between cancerous and normal breast tissues from 18 patients. Two protein extracts; aqueous soluble and membrane associated protein extracts were studied. Thirty four differentially expressed proteins were identified. The intensities of the proteins were used as variables in PCA and reduced data of six principal components (PC) were subjected to LDA in order to evaluate the potential of these proteins as collective biomarkers for breast cancer. The protein intensities of SEC13-like 1 (isoform b) and calreticulin contributed the most to the first PC while the protein intensities of fibrinogen beta chain precursor and ATP synthase D chain contributed the most to the second PC. Transthyretin precursor and apolipoprotein A-1 precursor contributed the most to the third PC. The results of LDA indicated good classification of samples into normal and cancerous types when the first 6 PCs were used as the variables. The percentage of correct classification was 91.7% for the originally grouped tissue samples and 88.9% for cross-validated samples. PMID:21206008

  15. Frictional drag and electrical manipulation of recombinant proteins in polymer-supported membranes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Motomu; Hermann, Joachim; Haase, Ilka; Fischer, Markus; Boxer, Steven G

    2007-05-01

    We establish a lipid monolayer supported by a polymer interface that offers advantages over conventional solid-supported membranes for determining the frictional drag at the membrane-protein interface as well as for electric field manipulation of membrane-anchored proteins. Polymer-supported monolayers with functional lipid anchors allow for the specific docking of His-tagged green fluorescent protein variants (His-EGFP and His-DsRed tetramer) onto the membrane surface at a defined surface density. In the first part, we measure the lateral diffusion coefficients of lipids and proteins and calculate the frictional drag at the protein-membrane interface. The second part deals with the electric field-induced accumulation of recombinant proteins on a patterned surface. The mean drift velocity of proteins, which can be obtained analytically from the shape of the steady-state concentration gradient, can be controlled by tuning the interplay of electrophoresis and electroosmosis. The results demonstrate the potential of such molecular constructs for the local functionalization of solid substrates with membrane-associated proteins.

  16. The myristoylated amino-terminus of an Arabidopsis calcium-dependent protein kinase mediates plasma membrane localization.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sheen X; Hrabak, Estelle M

    2013-06-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPK) are a major group of calcium-stimulated kinases found in plants and some protists. Many CDPKs are membrane-associated, presumably because of lipid modifications at their amino termini. We investigated the subcellular location and myristoylation of AtCPK5, a member of the Arabidopsis CDPK family. Most AtCPK5 was associated with the plasma membrane as demonstrated by two-phase fractionation of plant microsomes and by in vivo detection of AtCPK5-GFP fusion proteins. AtCPK5 was a substrate for plant N-myristoyltransferase and myristoylation was prevented by converting the glycine at the proposed site of myristate attachment to alanine (G2A). In transgenic plants, a G2A mutation completely abolished AtCPK5 membrane association, indicating that myristoylation was essential for membrane binding. The first sixteen amino acids of AtCPK5 were sufficient to direct plasma membrane localization. In addition, differentially phosphorylated forms of AtCPK5 were detected both in planta and after expression of AtCPK5 in a cell-free plant extract. Our results demonstrate that AtCPK5 is myristoylated at its amino terminus and that myristoylation is required for membrane binding.

  17. Dispersible amyloid β-protein oligomers, protofibrils, and fibrils represent diffusible but not soluble aggregates: their role in neurodegeneration in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Rijal Upadhaya, Ajeet; Capetillo-Zarate, Estibaliz; Kosterin, Irina; Abramowski, Dorothee; Kumar, Sathish; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Walter, Jochen; Fändrich, Marcus; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf

    2012-11-01

    Soluble amyloid β-protein (Aβ) aggregates have been identified in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. Dispersed Aβ aggregates in the brain parenchyma are different from soluble, membrane-associated and plaque-associated solid aggregates. They are in mixture with the extra- or intracellular fluid but can be separated from soluble proteins by ultracentrifugation. To clarify the role of dispersible Aβ aggregates for neurodegeneration we analyzed 2 different amyloid precursor protein (APP)-transgenic mouse models. APP23 mice overexpress human mutant APP with the Swedish mutation. APP51/16 mice express high levels of human wild type APP. Both mice develop Aβ-plaques. Dendritic degeneration, neuron loss, and loss of asymmetric synapses were seen in APP23 but not in APP51/16 mice. The soluble and dispersible fractions not separated from one another were received as supernatant after centrifugation of native forebrain homogenates at 14,000 × g. Subsequent ultracentrifugation separated the soluble, i.e., the supernatant, from the dispersible fraction, i.e., the resuspended pellet. The major biochemical difference between APP23 and APP51/16 mice was that APP23 mice exhibited higher levels of dispersible Aβ oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils precipitated with oligomer (A11) and protofibril/fibril (B10AP) specific antibodies than APP51/16 mice. These differences, rather than soluble Aβ and Aβ plaque pathology were associated with dendritic degeneration, neuron, and synapse loss in APP23 mice in comparison with APP51/16 mice. Immunoprecipitation of dispersible Aβ oligomers, protofibrils, and fibrils revealed that they were associated with APP C-terminal fragments (APP-CTFs). These results indicate that dispersible Aβ oligomers, protofibrils, and fibrils represent an important pool of Aβ aggregates in the brain that critically interact with membrane-associated APP C-terminal fragments. The concentration of dispersible Aβ aggregates, thereby, presumably determines

  18. Highly potent intracellular membrane-associated Aβ seeds

    PubMed Central

    Marzesco, Anne-Marie; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Bühler, Anika; Obermüller, Ulrike; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Jucker, Mathias; Baumann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    An early event in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis is the formation of extracellular aggregates of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), thought to be initiated by a prion-like seeding mechanism. However, the molecular nature and location of the Aβ seeds remain rather elusive. Active Aβ seeds are found in crude homogenates of amyloid-laden brains and in the soluble fraction thereof. To analyze the seeding activity of the pellet fraction, we have either separated or directly immunoisolated membranes from such homogenates. Here, we found considerable Aβ seeding activity associated with membranes in the absence of detectable amyloid fibrils. We also found that Aβ seeds on mitochondrial or associated membranes efficiently induced Aβ aggregation in vitro and seed β-amyloidosis in vivo. Aβ seeds at intracellular membranes may contribute to the spreading of Aβ aggregation along neuronal pathways and to the induction of intracellular pathologies downstream of Aβ. PMID:27311744

  19. Force Generation by Membrane-Associated Myosin-I

    PubMed Central

    Pyrpassopoulos, Serapion; Arpağ, Göker; Feeser, Elizabeth A.; Shuman, Henry; Tüzel, Erkan; Ostap, E. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate myosin-IC (Myo1c) is a type-1 myosin that links cell membranes to the cytoskeleton via its actin-binding motor domain and its phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2)-binding tail domain. While it is known that Myo1c bound to PtdIns(4,5)P2 in fluid-lipid bilayers can propel actin filaments in an unloaded motility assay, its ability to develop forces against external load on actin while bound to fluid bilayers has not been explored. Using optical tweezers, we measured the diffusion coefficient of single membrane-bound Myo1c molecules by force-relaxation experiments, and the ability of ensembles of membrane-bound Myo1c molecules to develop and sustain forces. To interpret our results, we developed a computational model that recapitulates the basic features of our experimental ensemble data and suggests that Myo1c ensembles can generate forces parallel to lipid bilayers, with larger forces achieved when the myosin works away from the plane of the membrane or when anchored to slowly diffusing regions. PMID:27156719

  20. Expression of Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 (PGRMC1), Progestin and AdipoQ Receptor 7 (PAQPR7), and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 RNA-Binding Protein (PAIRBP1) in Glioma Spheroids In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hlavaty, Juraj; Ertl, Reinhard; Miller, Ingrid; Gabriel, Cordula

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Some effects of progesterone on glioma cells can be explained through the slow, genomic mediated response via nuclear receptors; the other effects suggest potential role of a fast, nongenomic action mediated by membrane-associated progesterone receptors. Methods. The effects of progesterone treatment on the expression levels of progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 RNA-binding protein (PAIRBP1), and progestin and adipoQ receptor 7 (PAQR7) on both mRNA and protein levels were investigated in spheroids derived from human glioma cell lines U-87 MG and LN-229. Results. The only significant alteration at the transcript level was the decrease in PGRMC1 mRNA observed in LN-229 spheroids treated with 30 ng/mL of progesterone. No visible alterations at the protein levels were observed using immunohistochemical analysis. Stimulation of U-87 MG spheroids resulted in an increase of PGRMC1 but a decrease of PAIRBP1 protein. Double immunofluorescent detection of PGRMC1 and PAIRBP1 identified the two proteins to be partially colocalized in the cells. Western blot analysis revealed the expected bands for PGRMC1 and PAIRBP1, whereas two bands were detected for PAQR7. Conclusion. The progesterone action is supposed to be mediated via membrane-associated progesterone receptors as the nuclear progesterone receptor was absent in tested spheroids. PMID:27340667

  1. Rhamnose Links Moonlighting Proteins to Membrane Phospholipid in Mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Daubenspeck, James M; Liu, Runhua; Dybvig, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins that have a primary function as a cytoplasmic protein are known to have the ability to moonlight on the surface of nearly all organisms. An example is the glycolytic enzyme enolase, which can be found on the surface of many types of cells from bacteria to human. Surface enolase is not enzymatic because it is monomeric and oligomerization is required for glycolytic activity. It can bind various molecules and activate plasminogen. Enolase lacks a signal peptide and the mechanism by which it attaches to the surface is unknown. We found that treatment of whole cells of the murine pathogen Mycoplasma pulmonis with phospholipase D released enolase and other common moonlighting proteins. Glycostaining suggested that the released proteins were glycosylated. Cytoplasmic and membrane-bound enolase was isolated by immunoprecipitation. No post-translational modification was detected on cytoplasmic enolase, but membrane enolase was associated with lipid, phosphate and rhamnose. Treatment with phospholipase released the lipid and phosphate from enolase but not the rhamnose. The site of rhamnosylation was identified as a glutamine residue near the C-terminus of the protein. Rhamnose has been found in all species of mycoplasma examined but its function was previously unknown. Mycoplasmas are small bacteria with have no peptidoglycan, and rhamnose in these organisms is also not associated with polysaccharide. We suggest that rhamnose has a central role in anchoring proteins to the membrane by linkage to phospholipid, which may be a general mechanism for the membrane association of moonlighting proteins in mycoplasmas and perhaps other bacteria. PMID:27603308

  2. Rhamnose Links Moonlighting Proteins to Membrane Phospholipid in Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Daubenspeck, James M.; Liu, Runhua; Dybvig, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins that have a primary function as a cytoplasmic protein are known to have the ability to moonlight on the surface of nearly all organisms. An example is the glycolytic enzyme enolase, which can be found on the surface of many types of cells from bacteria to human. Surface enolase is not enzymatic because it is monomeric and oligomerization is required for glycolytic activity. It can bind various molecules and activate plasminogen. Enolase lacks a signal peptide and the mechanism by which it attaches to the surface is unknown. We found that treatment of whole cells of the murine pathogen Mycoplasma pulmonis with phospholipase D released enolase and other common moonlighting proteins. Glycostaining suggested that the released proteins were glycosylated. Cytoplasmic and membrane-bound enolase was isolated by immunoprecipitation. No post-translational modification was detected on cytoplasmic enolase, but membrane enolase was associated with lipid, phosphate and rhamnose. Treatment with phospholipase released the lipid and phosphate from enolase but not the rhamnose. The site of rhamnosylation was identified as a glutamine residue near the C-terminus of the protein. Rhamnose has been found in all species of mycoplasma examined but its function was previously unknown. Mycoplasmas are small bacteria with have no peptidoglycan, and rhamnose in these organisms is also not associated with polysaccharide. We suggest that rhamnose has a central role in anchoring proteins to the membrane by linkage to phospholipid, which may be a general mechanism for the membrane association of moonlighting proteins in mycoplasmas and perhaps other bacteria. PMID:27603308

  3. Synthesis of protein in intestinal cells exposed to cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.W.; Berg, W.D. Jr.; Coppenhaver, D.H.

    1987-11-01

    The mechanism by which cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), formed by intestinal epithelial cells in response to cholera toxin, ultimately results in alterations in water and electrolyte transport is poorly understood. Several studies have indicated that inhibitors of transcription or translation block much of the transport of ions and water in the intestine and edema formation in tissue elicited by cholera toxin. Data presented in this study confirmed the inhibitory effects of cycloheximide on cholera toxin-induced fluid accumulation in the rabbit intestinal loop model. Neither cycloheximide nor actinomycin D altered the amount of cyclic AMP that accumulated in intestinal cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed to cholera toxin. An increase in (/sup 3/H) leucine incorporation was readily demonstrable in intestinal epithelial cells from rabbits challenged with Vibrio cholerae. Similarly, intestinal epithelial cells incubated with cholera toxin for 4 hr synthesized substantially more protein than controls as determined by relative incorporation of (/sup 35/S) methionine. Most of the new protein synthesized in response to cholera toxin was membrane associated and of high molecular weight. The possible significance of the toxin-induced protein relative to cholera pathogenesis was discussed.

  4. Structure and biochemical analysis of a secretin pilot protein

    PubMed Central

    Lario, Paula I; Pfuetzner, Richard A; Frey, Elizabeth A; Creagh, Louise; Haynes, Charles; Maurelli, Anthony T; Strynadka, Natalie C J

    2005-01-01

    The ability to translocate virulence proteins into host cells through a type III secretion apparatus (TTSS) is a hallmark of several Gram-negative pathogens including Shigella, Salmonella, Yersinia, Pseudomonas, and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. In common with other types of bacterial secretion apparatus, the assembly of the TTSS complex requires the preceding formation of its integral outer membrane secretin ring component. We have determined at 1.5 Å the structure of MxiM28–142, the Shigella pilot protein that is essential for the assembly and membrane association of the Shigella secretin, MxiD. This represents the first atomic structure of a secretin pilot protein from the several bacterial secretion systems containing an orthologous secretin component. A deep hydrophobic cavity is observed in the novel ‘cracked barrel' structure of MxiM, providing a specific binding domain for the acyl chains of bacterial lipids, a proposal that is supported by our various lipid/MxiM complex structures. Isothermal titration analysis shows that the C-terminal domain of the secretin, MxiD525–570, hinders lipid binding to MxiM. PMID:15775974

  5. Negative regulation of lymphocyte activation by the adaptor protein LAX.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Minghua; Granillo, Olivia; Wen, Renren; Yang, Kaiyong; Dai, Xuezhi; Wang, Demin; Zhang, Weiguo

    2005-05-01

    The membrane-associated adaptor protein LAX is a linker for activation of T cells (LAT)-like molecule that is expressed in lymphoid tissues. Upon stimulation of T or B cells, it is phosphorylated and interacts with Grb2 and the p85 subunit of PI3K. LAX, however, is not capable of replacing LAT in the TCR signaling pathway. In this study we report that upon T or B cell activation, the LAX protein was up-regulated dramatically. Although disruption of the LAX gene by homologous recombination had no major impact on lymphocyte development, it caused a significant reduction in CD23 expression on mature B cells. Interestingly, naive LAX(-/-) mice had spontaneous germinal center formation. Compared with normal T and B cells, LAX(-/-) T and B cells were hyperresponsive and had enhanced calcium flux, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, MAPK and Akt activation, and cell survival upon engagement of the T or B AgRs. Our data demonstrate that LAX functions as a negative regulator in lymphocyte signaling.

  6. Differential expression profile of membrane proteins in L-02 cells exposed to trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wen-Xu; Huang, Aibo; Lin, Sheng; Yang, Xifei; Yang, Linqing; Zhou, Li; Huang, Haiyan; Wu, Desheng; Huang, Xinfeng; Xu, Hua; Liu, Jianjun

    2016-10-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a halogenated organic solvent widely used in industries, is known to cause severe hepatotoxicity. However, the mechanisms underlying TCE hepatotoxicity are still not well understood. It is predicted that membrane proteins are responsible for key biological functions, and recent studies have revealed that TCE exposure can induce abnormal levels of membrane proteins in body fluids and cultured cells. The aim of this study is to investigate the TCE-induced alterations of membrane proteins profiles in human hepatic L-02 liver cells. A comparative membrane proteomics analysis was performed in combination with two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 15 proteins were identified as differentially expressed (4 upregulated and 11 downregulated) between TCE-treated cells and normal controls. Among this, 14 of them are suggested as membrane-associated proteins by their transmembrane domain and/or subcellular location. Furthermore, the differential expression of β subunit of adenosine triphosphate synthase (ATP5B) and prolyl 4-hydroxylase, β polypeptide (P4HB) were verified by Western blot analysis in TCE-treated L-02 cells. Our work not only reveals the association between TCE exposure and altered expression of membrane proteins but also provides a novel strategy to discover membrane biomarkers and elucidate the potential mechanisms involving with membrane proteins response to chemical-induced toxic effect.

  7. Proteins induced during adaptation of Acetobacter aceti to high acetate concentrations.

    PubMed

    Steiner, P; Sauer, U

    2001-12-01

    As a typical product of microbial metabolism, the weak acid acetate is well known for its cytotoxic effects. In contrast to most other microbes, the so-called acetic acid bacteria can acquire significant resistance to high acetate concentrations when properly adapted to such hostile conditions. To characterize the molecular events that are associated with this adaptation, we analyzed global protein expression levels during adaptation of Acetobacter aceti by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Adaptation was achieved by using serial batch and continuous cultivations with increasing acetate supplementation. Computer-aided analysis revealed a complex proteome response with at least 50 proteins that are specifically induced by adaptation to acetate but not by other stress conditions, such as heat or oxidative or osmotic stress. Of these proteins, 19 were significantly induced in serial batch and continuous cultures and were thus noted as acetate adaptation proteins (Aaps). Here we present first microsequence information on such Aaps from A. aceti. Membrane-associated processes appear to be of major importance for adaptation, because some of the Aap bear N-terminal sequence homology to membrane proteins and 11 of about 40 resolved proteins from membrane protein-enriched fractions are significantly induced.

  8. Structure of the Na,K-ATPase regulatory protein FXYD1 in micelles†

    PubMed Central

    Teriete, Peter; Franzin, Carla M.; Choi, Jungyuen; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2008-01-01

    FXYD1 is a major regulatory subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, and the principal substrate of hormone-regulated phosphorylation by c-AMP dependent protein kinases A and C in heart and skeletal muscle sarcolemma. It is a member of an evolutionarily conserved family of membrane proteins that regulate the function of the enzyme complex in a tissue-specific and physiological-state-specific manner. Here we present the three-dimensional structure of FXYD1 determined in micelles by NMR spectroscopy. Structure determination was made possible by measuring residual dipolar couplings in weakly oriented micelle samples of the protein. This allowed us to obtain the relative orientations of the helical segments of the protein, and also provided information about the protein dynamics. The structural analysis was further facilitated by the inclusion of distance restraints, obtained from paramagnetic spin label relaxation enhancements, and by refinement with a micelle depth restraint, derived from paramagnetic Mn line broadening effects. The structure of FXYD1 provides the foundation for understanding its intra-membrane association with the Na,K-ATPase α subunit, and suggests a mechanism whereby the phosphorylation of conserved Ser residues, by protein kinases A and C, could induce a conformational change in the cytoplasmic domain of the protein, to modulate its interaction with the α subunit. PMID:17511473

  9. Proteins Induced during Adaptation of Acetobacter aceti to High Acetate Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Peter; Sauer, Uwe

    2001-01-01

    As a typical product of microbial metabolism, the weak acid acetate is well known for its cytotoxic effects. In contrast to most other microbes, the so-called acetic acid bacteria can acquire significant resistance to high acetate concentrations when properly adapted to such hostile conditions. To characterize the molecular events that are associated with this adaptation, we analyzed global protein expression levels during adaptation of Acetobacter aceti by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Adaptation was achieved by using serial batch and continuous cultivations with increasing acetate supplementation. Computer-aided analysis revealed a complex proteome response with at least 50 proteins that are specifically induced by adaptation to acetate but not by other stress conditions, such as heat or oxidative or osmotic stress. Of these proteins, 19 were significantly induced in serial batch and continuous cultures and were thus noted as acetate adaptation proteins (Aaps). Here we present first microsequence information on such Aaps from A. aceti. Membrane-associated processes appear to be of major importance for adaptation, because some of the Aap bear N-terminal sequence homology to membrane proteins and 11 of about 40 resolved proteins from membrane protein-enriched fractions are significantly induced. PMID:11722895

  10. An Amphipathic α-Helix Controls Multiple Roles of Brome Mosaic Virus Protein 1a in RNA Replication Complex Assembly and Function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ling; Westler, William M.; den Boon, Johan A.; Wang, Xiaofeng; Diaz, Arturo; Steinberg, H. Adam; Ahlquist, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) protein 1a has multiple key roles in viral RNA replication. 1a localizes to perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes as a peripheral membrane protein, induces ER membrane invaginations in which RNA replication complexes form, and recruits and stabilizes BMV 2a polymerase (2aPol) and RNA replication templates at these sites to establish active replication complexes. During replication, 1a provides RNA capping, NTPase and possibly RNA helicase functions. Here we identify in BMV 1a an amphipathic α-helix, helix A, and use NMR analysis to define its structure and propensity to insert in hydrophobic membrane-mimicking micelles. We show that helix A is essential for efficient 1a–ER membrane association and normal perinuclear ER localization, and that deletion or mutation of helix A abolishes RNA replication. Strikingly, mutations in helix A give rise to two dramatically opposite 1a function phenotypes, implying that helix A acts as a molecular switch regulating the intricate balance between separable 1a functions. One class of helix A deletions and amino acid substitutions markedly inhibits 1a–membrane association and abolishes ER membrane invagination, viral RNA template recruitment, and replication, but doubles the 1a-mediated increase in 2aPol accumulation. The second class of helix A mutations not only maintains efficient 1a–membrane association but also amplifies the number of 1a-induced membrane invaginations 5- to 8-fold and enhances viral RNA template recruitment, while failing to stimulate 2aPol accumulation. The results provide new insights into the pathways of RNA replication complex assembly and show that helix A is critical for assembly and function of the viral RNA replication complex, including its central role in targeting replication components and controlling modes of 1a action. PMID:19325881

  11. Transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Jack D

    2013-04-16

    This Teaching Resource provides and describes two animated lessons that illustrate general properties of transport proteins. The lesson called "transport protein classes" depicts major classes and subclasses of transport proteins. The "transporters, mechanism of action" lesson explains how transporters and P class ATPase (adenosine triphosphatase) pumps function. These animations serve as valuable resources for any collegiate-level course that describes these important factors. Courses that might use them include introductory biology, biochemistry, cell biology, physiology, and biophysics.

  12. Proteins wriggle.

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Michael; Cahill, Sean; Cahill, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    We propose an algorithmic strategy for improving the efficiency of Monte Carlo searches for the low-energy states of proteins. Our strategy is motivated by a model of how proteins alter their shapes. In our model, when proteins fold under physiological conditions, their backbone dihedral angles change synchronously in groups of four or more to avoid steric clashes and respect the kinematic conservation laws. They wriggle; they do not thrash. We describe a simple algorithm that can be used to incorporate wriggling in Monte Carlo simulations of protein folding. We have tested this wriggling algorithm against a code in which the dihedral angles are varied independently (thrashing). Our standard of success is the average root-mean-square distance (rmsd) between the alpha-carbons of the folding protein and those of its native structure. After 100,000 Monte Carlo sweeps, the relative decrease in the mean rmsd, as one switches from thrashing to wriggling, rises from 11% for the protein 3LZM with 164 amino acids (aa) to 40% for the protein 1A1S with 313 aa and 47% for the protein 16PK with 415 aa. These results suggest that wriggling is useful and that its utility increases with the size of the protein. One may implement wriggling on a parallel computer or a computer farm. PMID:11964253

  13. Sensory neuron proteins interact with the intracellular domains of sodium channel NaV1.8.

    PubMed

    Malik-Hall, Misbah; Poon, W-Y Louisa; Baker, Mark D; Wood, John N; Okuse, Kenji

    2003-02-20

    Voltage-gated sodium channels initiate and propagate action potentials in excitable cells. The tetrodotoxin-resistant Na(+) channel (Na(V)1.8/SNS) is expressed in damage-sensing neurons (nociceptors) and plays an important role in pain pathways. Expression of high levels of functional Na(V)1.8 in heterologous cells has proved problematic, even in the presence of known sodium channel accessory beta-subunits. This suggests that other regulatory proteins are required for normal levels of Na(V)1.8 expression. Here we report the use of a yeast two-hybrid system and a rat dorsal root ganglion cDNA library to identify 28 different clones encoding proteins which interact with intracellular domains of Na(V)1.8. Many clones are expressed at high levels in small diameter DRG neurons as judged by in situ hybridization. Interacting proteins include cytoplasmic elements and linker proteins (e.g. beta-actin and moesin), enzymes (e.g. inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase and TAO2 thousand and one protein kinase), channels and membrane-associated proteins (voltage-dependent anion channel VDAC3V and tetraspanin), as well as motor proteins (dynein intermediate and light chain) and transcripts encoding previously undescribed proteins. Immunoprecipitation (pull-down) assays confirm that some of the proteins interact with, and may hence regulate, Na(V)1.8 in vivo. PMID:12591166

  14. Identification of membrane proteins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus using proteomics and prediction programs.

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, J. F.; Poole, F. L.; Tollaksen, S. L.; Giometti, C. S.; Lim, H.; Yates, J. R.; Adams, M. W. W.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Georgia; The Scnpps Research Inst.

    2001-01-01

    Cell-free extracts from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus were separated into membrane and cytoplasmic fractions and each was analyzed by 2D-gel electrophoresis. A total of 66 proteins were identified, 32 in the membrane fraction and 34 in the cytoplasmic fraction. Six prediction programs were used to predict the subcellular locations of these proteins. Three were based on signal-peptides (SignalP, TargetP, and SOSUISignal) and three on transmembrane-spanning a-helices (TSEG, SOSUI, and PRED-TMR2). A consensus of the six programs predicted that 23 of the 32 proteins (72%) from the membrane fraction should be in the membrane and that all of the proteins from the cytoplasmic fraction should be in the cytoplasm. Two membrane-associated proteins predicted to be cytoplasmic by the programs are also predicted to consist primarily of transmembrane-spanning {beta}-sheets using porin protein models, suggesting that they are, in fact, membrane components. An ATPase subunit homolog found in the membrane fraction, although predicted to be cytoplasmic, is most likely complexed with other ATPase subunits in the membrane fraction. An additional three proteins predicted to be cytoplasmic but found in the membrane fraction, may be cytoplasmic contaminants. These include a chaperone homolog that may have attached to denatured membrane proteins during cell fractionation. Omitting these three proteins would boost the membrane-protein predictability of the models to near 80%. A consensus prediction using all six programs for all 2242 ORFs in the P. furiosus genome estimates that 24% of the ORF products are found in the membrane. However, this is likely to be a minimum value due to the programs' inability to recognize certain membrane-related proteins, such as subunits associated with membrane complexes and porin-type proteins.

  15. Identification of Membrane Proteins in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus Furiosus Using Proteomics and Prediction Programs

    PubMed Central

    Holden, James F.; Poole II, Farris L.; Tollaksen, Sandra L.; Giometti, Carol S.; Lim, Hanjo; Yates III, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Cell-free extracts from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus were separated into membrane and cytoplasmic fractions and each was analyzed by 2D-gel electrophoresis. A total of 66 proteins were identified, 32 in the membrane fraction and 34 in the cytoplasmic fraction. Six prediction programs were used to predict the subcellular locations of these proteins. Three were based on signal-peptides (SignalP, TargetP, and SOSUISignal) and three on transmembrane-spanning α-helices (TSEG, SOSUI, and PRED-TMR2). A consensus of the six programs predicted that 23 of the 32 proteins (72%) from the membrane fraction should be in the membrane and that all of the proteins from the cytoplasmic fraction should be in the cytoplasm. Two membrane-associated proteins predicted to be cytoplasmic by the programs are also predicted to consist primarily of transmembrane-spanning β-sheets using porin protein models, suggesting that they are, in fact, membrane components. An ATPase subunit homolog found in the membrane fraction, although predicted to be cytoplasmic, is most likely complexed with other ATPase subunits in the membrane fraction. An additional three proteins predicted to be cytoplasmic but found in the membrane fraction, may be cytoplasmic contaminants. These include a chaperone homolog that may have attached to denatured membrane proteins during cell fractionation. Omitting these three proteins would boost the membrane-protein predictability of the models to near 80%. A consensus prediction using all six programs for all 2242 ORFs in the P. furiosus genome estimates that 24% of the ORF products are found in the membrane. However, this is likely to be a minimum value due to the programs’ inability to recognize certain membrane-related proteins, such as subunits associated with membrane complexes and porin-type proteins. PMID:18629240

  16. Immunohistochemical study of the membrane skeletal protein, membrane protein palmitoylated 6 (MPP6), in the mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kamijo, Akio; Saitoh, Yurika; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Ohno, Shinichi; Terada, Nobuo

    2016-01-01

    The membrane protein palmitoylated (MPP) family belongs to the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family. MPP1 interacts with the protein 4.1 family member, 4.1R, as a membrane skeletal protein complex in erythrocytes. We previously described the interaction of another MPP family, MPP6, with 4.1G in the mouse peripheral nervous system. In the present study, the immunolocalization of MPP6 in the mouse small intestine was examined and compared with that of E-cadherin, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, and 4.1B, which we previously investigated in intestinal epithelial cells. The immunolocalization of MPP6 was also assessed in the small intestines of 4.1B-deficient (-/-) mice. In the small intestine, Western blotting revealed that the molecular weight of MPP6 was approximately 55-kDa, and MPP6 was immunostained under the cell membranes in the basolateral portions of almost all epithelial cells from the crypts to the villi. The immunostaining pattern of MPP6 in epithelial cells was similar to that of E-cadherin, but differed from that of ZO-1. In intestinal epithelial cells, the immunostained area of MPP6 was slightly different from that of 4.1B, which was restricted to the intestinal villi. The immunolocalization of MPP6 in small intestinal epithelial cells was similar between 4.1B(-/-) mice and 4.1B(+/+) mice. In the immunoprecipitation study, another MAGUK family protein, calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK), was shown to molecularly interact with MPP6. Thus, we herein showed the immunolocalization and interaction proteins of MPP6 in the mouse small intestine, and also that 4.1B in epithelial cells was not essential for the sorting of MPP6.

  17. Identification of a palmitoyl acyltransferase required for protein sorting to the flagellar membrane.

    PubMed

    Emmer, Brian T; Souther, Christina; Toriello, Krista M; Olson, Cheryl L; Epting, Conrad L; Engman, David M

    2009-03-15

    Protein palmitoylation has diverse effects in regulating protein membrane affinity, localization, binding partner interactions, turnover and function. Here, we show that palmitoylation also contributes to the sorting of proteins to the eukaryotic flagellum. African trypanosomes are protozoan pathogens that express a family of unique Ca(2+)-binding proteins, the calflagins, which undergo N-terminal myristoylation and palmitoylation. The localization of calflagins depends on their acylation status. Myristoylation alone is sufficient for membrane association, but, in the absence of palmitoylation, the calflagins localize to the pellicular (cell body) membrane. Palmitoylation, which is mediated by a specific palmitoyl acyltransferase, is then required for subsequent trafficking of calflagin to the flagellar membrane. Coincident with the redistribution of calflagin from the pellicular to the flagellar membrane is their association with lipid rafts, which are highly enriched in the flagellar membrane. Screening of candidate palmitoyl acyltranferases identified a single enzyme, TbPAT7, that is necessary for calflagin palmitoylation and flagellar membrane targeting. Our results implicate protein palmitoylation in flagellar trafficking, and demonstrate the conservation and specificity of palmitoyl acyltransferase activity by DHHC-CRD proteins across kingdoms. PMID:19240115

  18. Mechanistic insights into the first Lygus-active β-pore forming protein.

    PubMed

    Jerga, Agoston; Chen, Danqi; Zhang, Chunfen; Fu, Jinping; Kouadio, Jean-Louis K; Wang, Yanfei; Duff, Stephen M G; Howard, Jennifer E; Rydel, Timothy J; Evdokimov, Artem G; Ramaseshadri, Parthasarathy; Evans, Adam; Bolognesi, Renata; Park, Yoonseong; Haas, Jeffrey A

    2016-06-15

    The cotton pests Lygus hesperus and Lygus lineolaris can be controlled by expressing Cry51Aa2.834_16 in cotton. Insecticidal activity of pore-forming proteins is generally associated with damage to the midgut epithelium due to pores, and their biological specificity results from a set of key determinants including proteolytic activation and receptor binding. We conducted mechanistic studies to gain insight into how the first Lygus-active β-pore forming protein variant functions. Biophysical characterization revealed that the full-length Cry51Aa2.834_16 was a stable dimer in solution, and when exposed to Lygus saliva or to trypsin, the protein underwent proteolytic cleavage at the C-terminus of each of the subunits, resulting in dissociation of the dimer to two separate monomers. The monomer showed tight binding to a specific protein in Lygus brush border membranes, and also formed a membrane-associated oligomeric complex both in vitro and in vivo. Chemically cross-linking the β-hairpin to the Cry51Aa2.834_16 body rendered the protein inactive, but still competent to compete for binding sites with the native protein in vivo. Our study suggests that disassociation of the Cry51Aa2.834_16 dimer into monomeric units with unoccupied head-region and sterically unhindered β-hairpin is required for brush border membrane binding, oligomerization, and the subsequent steps leading to insect mortality. PMID:27001423

  19. Interactions Between Fatty Acid Transport Proteins, Genes That Encode for Them, and Exercise: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Jayewardene, Avindra F; Mavros, Yorgi; Reeves, Anneliese; Hancock, Dale P; Gwinn, Tom; Rooney, Kieron B

    2016-08-01

    Long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) movement into skeletal muscle involves a highly mediated process in which lipid rafts are utilized in the cellular membrane, involving numerous putative plasma membrane-associated LCFA transport proteins. The process of LCFA uptake and oxidation is of particular metabolic significance both at rest and during light to moderate exercise. A comprehensive systematic search of electronic databases was conducted to investigate whether exercise alters protein and/or gene expression of putative LCFA transport proteins. There were 31 studies meeting all eligibility criteria, of these 13 utilized an acute exercise protocol and 18 examined chronic exercise adaptations. Seventeen involved a study design incorporating an exercise stimulus, while the remaining 14 incorporated a combined exercise and diet stimulus. Divergent data relating to acute exercise, as well as prolonged exercise training (≥3 weeks), on protein content (PC) response was identified for proteins CD36, FABPpm and CAV1. Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) data did not always correspond to functional PC, supporting previous suggestions of a disconnect due to potentially limiting factors post gene expression. The large array of study designs, cohorts, and primary dependent variables within the studies included in the present review elucidate the complexity of the interaction between exercise and LCFA transport proteins. Summary of the results in the present review validate the need for further targeted investigation within this topic, and provide an important information base for such research. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1671-1687, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Conserved interdomain linker promotes phase separation of the multivalent adaptor protein Nck

    PubMed Central

    Banjade, Sudeep; Wu, Qiong; Mittal, Anuradha; Peeples, William B.; Pappu, Rohit V.; Rosen, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    The organization of membranes, the cytosol, and the nucleus of eukaryotic cells can be controlled through phase separation of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Collective interactions of multivalent molecules mediated by modular binding domains can induce gelation and phase separation in several cytosolic and membrane-associated systems. The adaptor protein Nck has three SRC-homology 3 (SH3) domains that bind multiple proline-rich segments in the actin regulatory protein neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) and an SH2 domain that binds to multiple phosphotyrosine sites in the adhesion protein nephrin, leading to phase separation. Here, we show that the 50-residue linker between the first two SH3 domains of Nck enhances phase separation of Nck/N-WASP/nephrin assemblies. Two linear motifs within this element, as well as its overall positively charged character, are important for this effect. The linker increases the driving force for self-assembly of Nck, likely through weak interactions with the second SH3 domain, and this effect appears to promote phase separation. The linker sequence is highly conserved, suggesting that the sequence determinants of the driving forces for phase separation may be generally important to Nck functions. Our studies demonstrate that linker regions between modular domains can contribute to the driving forces for self-assembly and phase separation of multivalent proteins. PMID:26553976

  1. Structure determination of a sugar-binding protein from the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas citri

    PubMed Central

    Medrano, Francisco Javier; de Souza, Cristiane Santos; Romero, Antonio; Balan, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The uptake of maltose and related sugars in Gram-negative bacteria is mediated by an ABC transporter encompassing a periplasmic component (the maltose-binding protein or MalE), a pore-forming membrane protein (MalF and MalG) and a membrane-associated ATPase (MalK). In the present study, the structure determination of the apo form of the putative maltose/trehalose-binding protein (Xac-MalE) from the citrus pathogen Xanthomonas citri in space group P6522 is described. The crystals contained two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit and diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. Xac-MalE conserves the structural and functional features of sugar-binding proteins and a ligand-binding pocket with similar characteristics to eight different orthologues, including the residues for maltose and trehalose interaction. This is the first structure of a sugar-binding protein from a phytopathogenic bacterium, which is highly conserved in all species from the Xanthomonas genus. PMID:24817711

  2. Helical crystallization on nickel-lipid nanotubes: perfringolysin O as a model protein.

    PubMed

    Dang, Thanh X; Milligan, Ronald A; Tweten, Rodney K; Wilson-Kubalek, Elizabeth M

    2005-11-01

    To facilitate purification and subsequent structural studies of recombinant proteins the most widely used genetically encoded tag is the histidine tag (His-tag) which specifically binds to N-nitrilotriacetic-acid-chelated nickel ions. Lipids derivatized with a nickel-chelating head group can be mixed with galactosylceramide glycolipids to prepare lipid nanotubes that bind His-tagged proteins. In this study, we use His-tagged perfringolysin O (PFO), a soluble toxin secreted by the bacterial pathogen Clostridium perfringens, as a model protein to test the utility of nickel-lipid nanotubes as a tool for structural studies of His-tagged proteins. PFO is a member of the cholesterol dependent cytolysin family (CDC) of oligomerizing, pore-forming toxins found in a variety of Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. CDC pores have been difficult to study by X-ray crystallography because they are membrane associated and vary in size. We demonstrate that both a wild-type and a mutant form of PFO form helical arrays on nickel-lipid containing nanotubes. Cryo-electron microscopy and image analysis of the helical arrays were used to reconstruct a 3D density map of wild-type PFO. This study suggests that the use of nickel-lipid nanotubes may offer a general approach for structural studies of recombinant proteins and may provide insights into the molecular interactions of proteins that have a natural affinity for a membrane surface.

  3. Levels of germination proteins in Bacillus subtilis dormant, superdormant, and germinating spores.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Ray, W Keith; Helm, Richard F; Melville, Stephen B; Popham, David L

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial endospores exhibit extreme resistance to most conditions that rapidly kill other life forms, remaining viable in this dormant state for centuries or longer. While the majority of Bacillus subtilis dormant spores germinate rapidly in response to nutrient germinants, a small subpopulation termed superdormant spores are resistant to germination, potentially evading antibiotic and/or decontamination strategies. In an effort to better understand the underlying mechanisms of superdormancy, membrane-associated proteins were isolated from populations of B. subtilis dormant, superdormant, and germinated spores, and the relative abundance of 11 germination-related proteins was determined using multiple-reaction-monitoring liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry assays. GerAC, GerKC, and GerD were significantly less abundant in the membrane fractions obtained from superdormant spores than those derived from dormant spores. The amounts of YpeB, GerD, PrkC, GerAC, and GerKC recovered in membrane fractions decreased significantly during germination. Lipoproteins, as a protein class, decreased during spore germination, while YpeB appeared to be specifically degraded. Some protein abundance differences between membrane fractions of dormant and superdormant spores resemble protein changes that take place during germination, suggesting that the superdormant spore isolation procedure may have resulted in early, non-committal germination-associated changes. In addition to low levels of germinant receptor proteins, a deficiency in the GerD lipoprotein may contribute to heterogeneity of spore germination rates. Understanding the reasons for superdormancy may allow for better spore decontamination procedures.

  4. Human lysosomal acid phosphatase is transported as a transmembrane protein to lysosomes in transfected baby hamster kidney cells.

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, A; Gottschalk, S; Hille, A; Krentler, C; Pohlmann, R; Braulke, T; Hauser, H; Geuze, H; von Figura, K

    1988-01-01

    BHK cells transfected with human lysosomal acid phosphatase (LAP) cDNA (CT29) expressed 70-fold higher enzyme activities of acid phosphatase than non-transfected BHK cells. The CT29-LAP was synthesized in BHK cells as a heterogeneously glycosylated precursor that was tightly membrane associated. Transfer to the trans-Golgi was associated with a small increase in size (approximately 7 kd) and partial processing of the oligosaccharides to complex type structures. CT29-LAP was transferred into lysosomes as shown by subcellular fractionation, immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. Lack of mannose-6-phosphate residues suggested that transport does not involve mannose-6-phosphate receptors. Part of the membrane-associated CT29-LAP was processed to a soluble form. The mechanism that converts CT29-LAP into a soluble form was sensitive to NH4Cl, and reduced the size of the polypeptide by 7 kd. In vitro translation of CT29-derived cRNA in the presence of microsomal membranes yielded a CT29-LAP precursor that is protected from proteinase K except for a small peptide of approximately 2 kd. In combination with the sequence data available for LAP, these observations suggest that CT29-LAP is synthesized and transported to lysosomes as a transmembrane protein. In the lysosomes, CT29-LAP is released from the membrane by proteolytic cleavage, which removes a C-terminal peptide including the transmembrane domain and the cytosolic tail of 18 amino acids. Images PMID:3056714

  5. High-throughput Isolation and Characterization of Untagged Membrane Protein Complexes: Outer Membrane Complexes of Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cell membranes represent the “front line” of cellular defense and the interface between a cell and its environment. To determine the range of proteins and protein complexes that are present in the cell membranes of a target organism, we have utilized a “tagless” process for the system-wide isolation and identification of native membrane protein complexes. As an initial subject for study, we have chosen the Gram-negative sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris. With this tagless methodology, we have identified about two-thirds of the outer membrane- associated proteins anticipated. Approximately three-fourths of these appear to form homomeric complexes. Statistical and machine-learning methods used to analyze data compiled over multiple experiments revealed networks of additional protein–protein interactions providing insight into heteromeric contacts made between proteins across this region of the cell. Taken together, these results establish a D. vulgaris outer membrane protein data set that will be essential for the detection and characterization of environment-driven changes in the outer membrane proteome and in the modeling of stress response pathways. The workflow utilized here should be effective for the global characterization of membrane protein complexes in a wide range of organisms. PMID:23098413

  6. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA encoding a membrane bound acyl-CoA binding protein from Agave americana L. epidermis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Consuelo; Martín-Rufián, M; Reina, José J; Heredia, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A cDNA encoding an acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) homologue has been cloned from a cDNA library made from mRNA isolated from epidermis of young leaves of Agave americana L. The derived amino acid sequence reveals a protein corresponding to the membrane-associated form of ACBPs only previously described in Arabidopsis and rice. Northern blot analysis showed that the A. americana ACBP gene is mainly expressed in the epidermis of mature zone of the leaves. The epidermis of A. americana leaves have a well developed cuticle with the highest amounts of the cuticular components waxes, cutin and cutan suggesting a potential role of the protein in cuticle formation.

  7. Novel strategy for the selection of human recombinant Fab fragments to membrane proteins from a phage-display library.

    PubMed

    Labrijn, Aran F; Koppelman, Marco H G M; Verhagen, Janneke; Brouwer, Mieke C; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Hack, C Erik; Huisman, Han G

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, the selection of phage-display libraries is performed on purified antigens (Ags), immobilized to a solid substrate. However, this approach may not be applicable for some Ags, such as membrane proteins, which for structural integrity strongly rely on their native environment. Here we describe an approach for the selection of phage-libraries against membrane proteins. The envelope glycoproteins (Env) of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) were used as a model for a type-1 integral membrane protein. HIV-1IHI Env, expressed on the surface of Rabbit Kidney cells (RK13) with a recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV), was solubilized using the non-ionic detergent n-Octyl beta-D-glucopyranoside (OG). Membrane associated Env was reconstituted into vesicles by the simultaneous removal of detergent and free monomeric Env subunits by gel-filtration. The resulting antigen preparation, termed OG-P1IHI, was captured on microtiter plates coated with Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) and used for rounds of selection (panning) of a well-characterized phage-display library derived from an HIV-1 seropositive donor. Simultaneously, an identical experiment was performed with OG-P1IHI vesicles disrupted by Nonidet P-40 (NP-P1IHI). Both membrane-associated and soluble Ags were selected for vaccinia-specific clones (OG-P1IHI: 59/75 and NP-P1IHI: 1/75) and HIV-1-specific clones (OG-P1IHI: 11/75 and NP-P1IHI: 65/75) using our approach. Hence, the novel panning strategy described here may be applicable for selection of phage-libraries against membrane proteins.

  8. Characterization of Plasma Membrane Proteins from Ovarian Cancer Cells Using Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, David L.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Ahram, Mamoun; Adkins, Joshua N.; Feldhaus, Jane M.; Wahl, Jon H.; Wunsch, David M.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2003-01-01

    To determine how the repertoire of plasma membrane proteins change with disease state, specifically related to cancer, several methods for preparation of plasma membrane proteins were evaluated. Cultured cells derived from stage IV ovarian tumors were grown to 90% confluence and harvested in buffer containing CHAPS detergent. This preparation was centrifuged at low speed to remove insoluble cellular debris resulting in a crude homogenate. Glycosylated proteins in the crude homogenate were selectively enriched using lectin affinity chromatography. The crude homogenate and the lectin purified sample were prepared for mass spectrometric evaluation. The general procedure for protein identification began with trypsin digestion of protein fractions followed by separation by reversed phase liquid chromatography that was coupled directly to a conventional tandem mass spectrometer (i.e. LCQ ion trap). Mass and fragmentation data for the peptides were searched against a human proteome data base using the informatics program SEQUEST. Using this procedure 398 proteins were identified with high confidence, including receptors, membrane-associated ligands, proteases, phosphatases, as well as structural and adhesion proteins. Results indicate that lectin chromatography provides a select subset of proteins and that the number and quality of the identifications improve as does the confidence of the protein identifications for this subset. These results represent the first step in development of methods to separate and successfully identify plasma membrane proteins from advanced ovarian cancer cells. Further characterization of plasma membrane proteins will contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying progression of this deadly disease and may lead to new targeted interventions as well as new biomarkers for diagnosis.

  9. Characterization of Plasma Membrane Proteins from Ovarian Cancer Cells Using Mass Spectrometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Springer, David L.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Ahram, Mamoun; Adkins, Joshua N.; Feldhaus, Jane M.; Wahl, Jon H.; Wunschel, David S.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2004-01-01

    To determine how the repertoire of plasma membrane proteins change with disease state, specifically related to cancer, several methods for preparation of plasma membrane proteins were evaluated. Cultured cells derived from stage IV ovarian tumors were grown to 90% confluence and harvested in buffer containing CHAPS detergent. This preparation was centrifuged at low speed to remove insoluble cellular debris resulting in a crude homogenate. Glycosylated proteins in the crude homogenate were selectively enriched using lectin affinity chromatography. The crude homogenate and the lectin purified sample were prepared for mass spectrometric evaluation. The general procedure for protein identification began with trypsinmore » digestion of protein fractions followed by separation by reversed phase liquid chromatography that was coupled directly to a conventional tandem mass spectrometer (i.e. LCQ ion trap). Mass and fragmentation data for the peptides were searched against a human proteome data base using the informatics program SEQUEST. Using this procedure 398 proteins were identified with high confidence, including receptors, membrane-associated ligands, proteases, phosphatases, as well as structural and adhesion proteins. Results indicate that lectin chromatography provides a select subset of proteins and that the number and quality of the identifications improve as does the confidence of the protein identifications for this subset. These results represent the first step in development of methods to separate and successfully identify plasma membrane proteins from advanced ovarian cancer cells. Further characterization of plasma membrane proteins will contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying progression of this deadly disease and may lead to new targeted interventions as well as new biomarkers for diagnosis.« less

  10. Membrane palmitoylated protein 2 is a synaptic scaffold protein required for synaptic SK2-containing channel function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gukhan; Luján, Rafael; Schwenk, Jochen; Kelley, Melissa H; Aguado, Carolina; Watanabe, Masahiko; Fakler, Bernd; Maylie, James; Adelman, John P

    2016-01-01

    Mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons express apamin-sensitive SK2-containing channels in the post-synaptic membrane, positioned close to NMDA-type (N-methyl-D-aspartate) glutamate receptors. Activated by synaptically evoked NMDAR-dependent Ca2+ influx, the synaptic SK2-containing channels modulate excitatory post-synaptic responses and the induction of synaptic plasticity. In addition, their activity- and protein kinase A-dependent trafficking contributes to expression of long-term potentiation (LTP). We have identified a novel synaptic scaffold, MPP2 (membrane palmitoylated protein 2; p55), a member of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family that interacts with SK2-containing channels. MPP2 and SK2 co-immunopurified from mouse brain, and co-immunoprecipitated when they were co-expressed in HEK293 cells. MPP2 is highly expressed in the post-synaptic density of dendritic spines on CA1 pyramidal neurons. Knocking down MPP2 expression selectively abolished the SK2-containing channel contribution to synaptic responses and decreased LTP. Thus, MPP2 is a novel synaptic scaffold that is required for proper synaptic localization and function of SK2-containing channels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12637.001 PMID:26880549

  11. The Roles of Phosphorylation and SHAGGY-Like Protein Kinases in Geminivirus C4 Protein Induced Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Mills-Lujan, Katherine; Andrews, David L.; Chou, Chau-wen; Deom, C. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Even though plant cells are highly plastic, plants only develop hyperplasia under very specific abiotic and biotic stresses, such as when exposed to pathogens like Beet curly top virus (BCTV). The C4 protein of BCTV is sufficient to induce hyperplasia and alter Arabidopsis development. It was previously shown that C4 interacts with two Arabidopsis Shaggy-like protein kinases, AtSK21 and 23, which are negative regulators of brassinosteroid (BR) hormone signaling. Here we show that the C4 protein interacts with five additional AtSK family members. Bikinin, a competitive inhibitor of the seven AtSK family members that interact with C4, induced hyperplasia similar to that induced by the C4 protein. The Ser49 residue of C4 was found to be critical for C4 function, since: 1) mutagenesis of Ser49 to Ala abolished the C4-induced phenotype, abolished C4/AtSK interactions, and resulted in a mutant protein that failed to induce changes in the BR signaling pathway; 2) Ser49 is phosphorylated in planta; and 3) plant-encoded AtSKs must be catalytically active to interact with C4. A C4 N-myristoylation site mutant that does not localize to the plasma membrane and does not induce a phenotype, retained the ability to bind AtSKs. Taken together, these results suggest that plasma membrane associated C4 interacts with and co-opts multiple AtSKs to promote its own phosphorylation and activation to subsequently compromise cell cycle control. PMID:25815729

  12. The roles of phosphorylation and SHAGGY-like protein kinases in geminivirus C4 protein induced hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Mills-Lujan, Katherine; Andrews, David L; Chou, Chau-Wen; Deom, C Michael

    2015-01-01

    Even though plant cells are highly plastic, plants only develop hyperplasia under very specific abiotic and biotic stresses, such as when exposed to pathogens like Beet curly top virus (BCTV). The C4 protein of BCTV is sufficient to induce hyperplasia and alter Arabidopsis development. It was previously shown that C4 interacts with two Arabidopsis Shaggy-like protein kinases, AtSK21 and 23, which are negative regulators of brassinosteroid (BR) hormone signaling. Here we show that the C4 protein interacts with five additional AtSK family members. Bikinin, a competitive inhibitor of the seven AtSK family members that interact with C4, induced hyperplasia similar to that induced by the C4 protein. The Ser49 residue of C4 was found to be critical for C4 function, since: 1) mutagenesis of Ser49 to Ala abolished the C4-induced phenotype, abolished C4/AtSK interactions, and resulted in a mutant protein that failed to induce changes in the BR signaling pathway; 2) Ser49 is phosphorylated in planta; and 3) plant-encoded AtSKs must be catalytically active to interact with C4. A C4 N-myristoylation site mutant that does not localize to the plasma membrane and does not induce a phenotype, retained the ability to bind AtSKs. Taken together, these results suggest that plasma membrane associated C4 interacts with and co-opts multiple AtSKs to promote its own phosphorylation and activation to subsequently compromise cell cycle control.

  13. F-actin asymmetry and the endoplasmic reticulum-associated TCC-1 protein contribute to stereotypic spindle movements in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    PubMed

    Berends, Christian W H; Muñoz, Javier; Portegijs, Vincent; Schmidt, Ruben; Grigoriev, Ilya; Boxem, Mike; Akhmanova, Anna; Heck, Albert J R; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2013-07-01

    The microtubule spindle apparatus dictates the plane of cell cleavage in animal cells. During development, dividing cells control the position of the spindle to determine the size, location, and fate of daughter cells. Spindle positioning depends on pulling forces that act between the cell periphery and astral microtubules. This involves dynein recruitment to the cell cortex by a heterotrimeric G-protein α subunit in complex with a TPR-GoLoco motif protein (GPR-1/2, Pins, LGN) and coiled-coil protein (LIN-5, Mud, NuMA). In this study, we searched for additional factors that contribute to spindle positioning in the one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. We show that cortical actin is not needed for Gα-GPR-LIN-5 localization and pulling force generation. Instead, actin accumulation in the anterior actually reduces pulling forces, possibly by increasing cortical rigidity. Examining membrane-associated proteins that copurified with GOA-1 Gα, we found that the transmembrane and coiled-coil domain protein 1 (TCC-1) contributes to proper spindle movements. TCC-1 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and interacts with UNC-116 kinesin-1 heavy chain in yeast two-hybrid assays. RNA interference of tcc-1 and unc-116 causes similar defects in meiotic spindle positioning, supporting the concept of TCC-1 acting with kinesin-1 in vivo. These results emphasize the contribution of membrane-associated and cortical proteins other than Gα-GPR-LIN-5 in balancing the pulling forces that position the spindle during asymmetric cell division.

  14. Two distinct domains of protein 4.1 critical for assembly of functional nuclei in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Heald, Rebecca; Lee, Gloria; Nunomura, Wataru; Gimm, J Aura; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2002-11-15

    Protein 4.1R, a multifunctional structural protein, acts as an adaptor in mature red cell membrane skeletons linking spectrin-actin complexes to plasma membrane-associated proteins. In nucleated cells protein 4.1 is not associated exclusively with plasma membrane but is also detected at several important subcellular locations crucial for cell division. To identify 4.1 domains having critical functions in nuclear assembly, 4.1 domain peptides were added to Xenopus egg extract nuclear reconstitution reactions. Morphologically disorganized, replication deficient nuclei assembled when spectrin-actin-binding domain or NuMA-binding C-terminal domain peptides were present. However, control variant spectrin-actin-binding domain peptides incapable of binding actin or mutant C-terminal domain peptides with reduced NuMA binding had no deleterious effects on nuclear reconstitution. To test whether 4.1 is required for proper nuclear assembly, 4.1 isoforms were depleted with spectrin-actin binding or C-terminal domain-specific antibodies. Nuclei assembled in the depleted extracts were deranged. However, nuclear assembly could be rescued by the addition of recombinant 4.1R. Our data establish that protein 4.1 is essential for nuclear assembly and identify two distinct 4.1 domains, initially characterized in cytoskeletal interactions, that have crucial and versatile functions in nuclear assembly.

  15. The Binding of the PDZ Tandem of Syntenin to Target Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Grembecka,J.; Cierpicki, T.; Drvedjiev, Y.; Derewenda, U.; Kang, B.; Bushweller, J.; Derewenda, Z.

    2006-01-01

    PDZ domains are among the most abundant protein modules in the known genomes. Their main function is to provide scaffolds for membrane-associated protein complexes by binding to the cytosolic, C-terminal fragments of receptors, channels, and other integral membrane proteins. Here, using both heteronuclear NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction, we show how peptides with different sequences, including those corresponding to the C-termini of syndecan, neurexin, and ephrin B, can simultaneously bind to both PDZ domains of the scaffolding protein syntenin. The PDZ2 domain binds these peptides in the canonical fashion, and an induced fit mechanism allows for the accommodation of a range of side chains in the P{sub 0} and P{sub -2} positions. However, binding to the PDZ1 domain requires that the target peptide assume a noncanonical conformation. These data help explain how syntenin, and perhaps other PDZ-containing proteins, may preferentially bind to dimeric and clustered targets, and provide a mechanistic explanation for the previously reported cooperative ligand binding by syntenin's two PDZ domains.

  16. Expression of two novel proteins in Chlamydia trachomatis during natural infection.

    PubMed

    Myers, G S; Grinvalds, R; Booth, S; Hutton, S I; Binks, M; Kemp, D J; Sriprakash, K S

    2000-08-01

    Genes for a putative membrane associated protein (mvi -homologue) and a 48 kDa protein (ctr48) in Chlamydia trachomatis were characterized. The mvi -homologue has 12 transmembrane domains and shows considerable homology to the members of this gene family in various organisms. The ctr48 has a leader sequence and the C-proximal half is tryptophan-rich. The latter region shares 65% identity with the N-proxima third of C. pneumoniae 76 kDa protein over an overlap of 231 amino acid residues. The genes for the mvi -homologue and the ctr48 are present in the B, Ba, D, E, J and L2 serotypes of C. trachomatis. Immediately downstream from the ctr48 gene are multiple stop codons which are followed by a functional rho-independent terminator. The mvi -homologue and ctr48 genes are independently transcribed, albeit poorly in serotype B. However, protein products corresponding to these genes could not be detected by western blotting in HEp2 cells infected with C. trachomatis. Nevertheless, antibodies to peptides corresponding to these proteins were detected in sera with high micro-immunofluorescence titre against C. trachoImatic, collected from a Chlamydia -endemic population. These results suggest that the mvi -homologue and ctr48 are expressed by C. trachomatis during natural infection. PMID:10906261

  17. Evolutionarily conserved intercalated disc protein Tmem65 regulates cardiac conduction and connexin 43 function.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Parveen; Abbasi, Cynthia; Lazic, Savo; Teng, Allen C T; Wang, Dingyan; Dubois, Nicole; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Wong, Victoria; Liu, Jun; Araki, Toshiyuki; Tiburcy, Malte; Ackerley, Cameron; Zimmermann, Wolfram H; Hamilton, Robert; Sun, Yu; Liu, Peter P; Keller, Gordon; Stagljar, Igor; Scott, Ian C; Kislinger, Thomas; Gramolini, Anthony O

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are crucial to heart function and development. Here we combine cationic silica-bead coating with shotgun proteomics to enrich for and identify plasma membrane-associated proteins from primary mouse neonatal and human fetal ventricular cardiomyocytes. We identify Tmem65 as a cardiac-enriched, intercalated disc protein that increases during development in both mouse and human hearts. Functional analysis of Tmem65 both in vitro using lentiviral shRNA-mediated knockdown in mouse cardiomyocytes and in vivo using morpholino-based knockdown in zebrafish show marked alterations in gap junction function and cardiac morphology. Molecular analyses suggest that Tmem65 interaction with connexin 43 (Cx43) is required for correct localization of Cx43 to the intercalated disc, since Tmem65 deletion results in marked internalization of Cx43, a shorter half-life through increased degradation, and loss of Cx43 function. Our data demonstrate that the membrane protein Tmem65 is an intercalated disc protein that interacts with and functionally regulates ventricular Cx43.

  18. Src family protein tyrosine kinases induce autoactivation of Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, S; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Kut, S A; Saouaf, S J; Bolen, J B

    1995-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is tyrosine phosphorylated and enzymatically activated following ligation of the B-cell antigen receptor. These events are temporally regulated, and Btk activation follows that of various members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, thus raising the possibility that Src kinases participate in the Btk activation process. We have evaluated the mechanism underlying Btk enzyme activation and have explored the potential regulatory relationship between Btk and Src protein kinases. We demonstrate in COS transient-expression assays that Btk can be activated through intramolecular autophosphorylation at tyrosine 551 and that Btk autophosphorylation is required for Btk catalytic functions. Coexpression of Btk with members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, but not Syk, led to Btk tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Using a series of point mutations in Blk (a representative Src protein kinase) and Btk, we show that Src kinases activate Btk through an indirect mechanism that requires membrane association of the Src enzymes as well as functional Btk SH3 and SH2 domains. Our results are compatible with the idea that Src protein tyrosine kinases contribute to Btk activation by indirectly stimulating Btk intramolecular autophosphorylation. PMID:7565679

  19. Src family protein tyrosine kinases induce autoactivation of Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, S; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Kut, S A; Saouaf, S J; Bolen, J B

    1995-10-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is tyrosine phosphorylated and enzymatically activated following ligation of the B-cell antigen receptor. These events are temporally regulated, and Btk activation follows that of various members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, thus raising the possibility that Src kinases participate in the Btk activation process. We have evaluated the mechanism underlying Btk enzyme activation and have explored the potential regulatory relationship between Btk and Src protein kinases. We demonstrate in COS transient-expression assays that Btk can be activated through intramolecular autophosphorylation at tyrosine 551 and that Btk autophosphorylation is required for Btk catalytic functions. Coexpression of Btk with members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, but not Syk, led to Btk tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Using a series of point mutations in Blk (a representative Src protein kinase) and Btk, we show that Src kinases activate Btk through an indirect mechanism that requires membrane association of the Src enzymes as well as functional Btk SH3 and SH2 domains. Our results are compatible with the idea that Src protein tyrosine kinases contribute to Btk activation by indirectly stimulating Btk intramolecular autophosphorylation. PMID:7565679

  20. Cell-specific abnormal prenylation of Rab proteins in platelets and melanocytes of the gunmetal mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Zhen, Lijie; Li, Wei; Novak, Edward K; Collinson, Lucy M; Jang, Elliott K; Haslam, Richard J; Elliott, Rosemary W; Swank, Richard T

    2002-05-01

    The mutant gunmetal mouse exhibits reduced rates of platelet synthesis, abnormalities of platelet alpha and dense granules and hypopigmentation. Several of these features resemble those of human alpha/delta platelet storage pool disease, grey platelet syndrome and Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. Gunmetal mice have reduced levels of Rab geranylgeranyltransferase (RabGGTase), which adds lipophilic prenyl groups to the carboxyl terminus of Rab proteins. The degree of prenylation and the subcellular distribution of several Rab proteins were evaluated in mutant platelets, melanocytes and other tissues. Significant deficits in prenylation and membrane binding of most Rabs were observed in platelets and melanocytes. In contrast, minimal alterations in Rab prenylation were apparent in several other gunmetal tissues despite the fact that RabGGTase activity was equally diminished in these tissues. The mutant tissue-specific effects are probably due to increased concentrations of Rab proteins in platelets and melanocytes. These experiments show that Rab proteins are differentially sensitive to levels of RabGGTase activity and that normal platelet synthesis, platelet organelle function and normal pigmentation are highly sensitive to the degree of prenylation and membrane association of Rab proteins. Further, the tissue-specific effects of the gunmetal mutation suggest that RabGGTase is a potential target for therapy of thrombocytosis.

  1. Association of the GTP-binding protein Rab3A with bovine adrenal chromaffin granules

    SciTech Connect

    Darchen, F.; Hammel, F.; Monteils, M.P.; Scherman, D. ); Zahraoui, A.; Tavitian, A. )

    1990-08-01

    The Rab3A protein belongs to a large family of small GTP-binding proteins that are present in eukaryotic cells and that share amino acid identities with the Ras proteins (products of the ras protooncogenes). Rab3A, which is specifically located in nervous and endocrine tissues, is suspected to play a key role in secretion. Its localization was investigated in bovine adrenal gland by using a polyclonal antibody. Rab3A was detected in adrenal medulla but not in adrenal cortex. In cultured adrenal medulla cells, Rab3A was specifically expressed in the catecholamine-secreting chromaffin cells. Subcellular fractionation suggested that Rab3A is about 30% cytosolic and that particulate Rab3A is associated with the membrane of chromaffin granules (the catecholamine storage organelles) and with a second compartment likely to be the plasma membrane. The Rab3A localization on chromaffin granule membranes was confirmed by immunoadsorption with an antibody against dopamine {beta}-hydroxylase. Rab3A was not extracted from this membrane by NaCl or KBr but was partially extracted by urea and totally solubilized by Triton X-100, suggesting either an interaction with an intrinsic protein or a membrane association through fatty acid acylation. This study suggests that Rab3A, which may also be located on other secretory vesicles containing noncharacterized small GTP-binding proteins, is involved in their biogenesis or in the regulated secretion process.

  2. KNQ1, a Kluyveromyces lactis gene encoding a transmembrane protein, may be involved in iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Emmanuela; Lodi, Tiziana; Donnini, Claudia

    2007-08-01

    The original purpose of the experiments described in this article was to identify, in the biotechnologically important yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, gene(s) that are potentially involved in oxidative protein folding within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which often represents a bottleneck for heterologous protein production. Because treatment with the membrane-permeable reducing agent dithiothreitol inhibits disulfide bond formation and mimics the reducing effect that the normal transit of folding proteins has in the ER environment, the strategy was to search for genes that conferred higher levels of resistance to dithiothreitol when present in multiple copies. We identified a gene (KNQ1) encoding a drug efflux permease for several toxic compounds that in multiple copies conferred increased dithiothreitol resistance. However, the KNQ1 product is not involved in the excretion of dithiothreitol or in recombinant protein secretion. We generated a knq1 null mutant, and showed that both overexpression and deletion of the KNQ1 gene resulted in increased resistance to dithiothreitol. KNQ1 amplification and deletion resulted in enhanced transcription of iron transport genes, suggesting, for the membrane-associated protein Knq1p, a new, unexpected role in iron homeostasis on which dithiothreitol tolerance may depend.

  3. Three-dimensional structure of the water-insoluble protein crambin in dodecylphosphocholine micelles and its minimal solvent-exposed surface.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hee-Chul; Juranić, Nenad; Macura, Slobodan; Markley, John L

    2006-04-01

    We chose crambin, a hydrophobic and water-insoluble protein originally isolated from the seeds of the plant Crambe abyssinica, as a model for NMR investigations of membrane-associated proteins. We produced isotopically labeled crambin(P22,L25) (variant of crambin containing Pro22 and Leu25) as a cleavable fusion with staphylococcal nuclease and refolded the protein by an approach that has proved successful for the production of proteins with multiple disulfide bonds. We used NMR spectroscopy to determine the three-dimensional structure of the protein in two membrane-mimetic environments: in a mixed aqueous-organic solvent (75%/25%, acetone/water) and in DPC micelles. With the sample in the mixed solvent, it was possible to determine (>NH...OC<) hydrogen bonds directly by the detection of (h3)J(NC)' couplings. H-bonds determined in this manner were utilized in the refinement of the NMR-derived protein structures. With the protein in DPC (dodecylphosphocholine) micelles, we used manganous ion as an aqueous paramagnetic probe to determine the surface of crambin that is shielded by the detergent. With the exception of the aqueous solvent exposed loop containing residues 20 and 21, the protein surface was protected by DPC. This suggests that the protein may be similarly embedded in physiological membranes. The strategy described here for the expression and structure determination of crambin should be applicable to structural and functional studies of membrane active toxins and small membrane proteins.

  4. Multifunctional roles for the protein translocation machinery in RNA anchoring to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, Sujatha; Hsu, Jack C-C; Reid, David W; Chen, Qiang; Thompson, Will J; Moseley, Arthur M; Nicchitta, Christopher V

    2014-09-12

    Signal sequence-encoding mRNAs undergo translation-dependent localization to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and at the ER are anchored via translation on Sec61-bound ribosomes. Recent investigations into the composition and membrane association characteristics of ER-associated mRNAs have, however, revealed both ribosome-dependent (indirect) and ribosome-independent (direct) modes of mRNA association with the ER. These findings raise important questions regarding our understanding of how mRNAs are selected, localized, and anchored to the ER. Using semi-intact tissue culture cells, we performed a polysome solubilization screen and identified conditions that distinguish polysomes engaged in the translation of distinct cohorts of mRNAs. To gain insight into the molecular basis of direct mRNA anchoring to the ER, we performed RNA-protein UV photocross-linking studies in rough microsomes and demonstrate that numerous ER integral membrane proteins display RNA binding activity. Quantitative proteomic analyses of HeLa cytosolic and ER-bound polysome fractions identified translocon components as selective polysome-interacting proteins. Notably, the Sec61 complex was highly enriched in polysomes engaged in the translation of endomembrane organelle proteins, whereas translocon accessory proteins, such as ribophorin I, were present in all subpopulations of ER-associated polysomes. Analyses of the protein composition of oligo(dT)-selected UV photocross-linked ER protein-RNA adducts identified Sec61α,β and ribophorin I as ER-poly(A) mRNA-binding proteins, suggesting unexpected roles for the protein translocation and modification machinery in mRNA anchoring to the ER. In summary, we propose that multiple mechanisms of mRNA and ribosome association with ER operate to enable an mRNA transcriptome-wide function for the ER in protein synthesis.

  5. Casein kinase I-like protein kinases encoded by YCK1 and YCK2 are required for yeast morphogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, L C; Menold, M M; Garrett, S; Culbertson, M R

    1993-01-01

    Casein kinase I is an acidotropic protein kinase class that is widely distributed among eukaryotic cell types. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the casein kinase I isoform encoded by the gene pair YCK1 and YCK2 is a 60- to 62-kDa membrane-associated form. The Yck proteins perform functions essential for growth and division; either alone supports growth, but loss of function of both is lethal. We report here that casein kinase I-like activity is associated with a soluble Yck2-beta-galactosidase fusion protein in vitro and that thermolabile protein kinase activity is exhibited by a protein encoded by fusion of a temperature-sensitive yck2 allele with lacZ. Cells carrying the yck2-2ts allele arrest at restrictive temperature with multiple, elongated buds containing multiple nuclei. This phenotype suggests that the essential functions of the Yck proteins include roles in bud morphogenesis, possibly in control of cell growth polarity, and in cytokinesis or cell separation. Further, a genetic relationship between the yck2ts allele and deletion of CDC55 indicates that the function of Yck phosphorylation may be related to that of protein phosphatase 2A activity. Images PMID:8474447

  6. Prediction of surface exposed proteins in Streptococcus pyogenes, with a potential application to other Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Barinov, Aleksandr; Loux, Valentin; Hammani, Amal; Nicolas, Pierre; Langella, Philippe; Ehrlich, Dusko; Maguin, Emmanuelle; van de Guchte, Maarten

    2009-01-01

    The in silico prediction of bacterial surface exposed proteins is of growing interest for the rational development of vaccines and in the study of bacteria-host relationships, whether pathogenic or host beneficial. This interest is driven by the increase in the use of DNA sequencing as a major tool in the early characterization of pathogenic bacteria and, more recently, even of complex ecosystems at the host-environment interface in metagenomics approaches. Current protein localization protocols are not suited to this prediction task as they ignore the potential surface exposition of many membrane-associated proteins. Therefore, we developed a new flow scheme, SurfG+, for the processing of protein sequence data with the particular aim of identification of potentially surface exposed (PSE) proteins from Gram-positive bacteria, which was validated for Streptococcus pyogenes. The results of an exploratory case study on closely related lactobacilli of the acidophilus group suggest that the yogurt bacterium Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) dedicates a relatively important fraction of its coding capacity to secreted proteins, while the probiotic gastrointestinal (GI) tract bacteria L. johnsonii and L. gasseri appear to encode a larger variety of PSE proteins, that may play a role in the interaction with the host.

  7. Isotopically Labeled Expression in E. coli, Purification, and Refolding of the Full Ectodomain of the Influenza Virus Membrane Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Curtis-Fisk, Jaime; Spencer, Ryan M.; Weliky, David P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes methods to produce an isotopically labeled 23 kDa viral membrane protein with purified yield of 20 mg/L of E. coli shake flask culture. This yield is sufficient for NMR structural studies and the protein production methods are simple, straightforward, and rapid and likely applicable to other recombinant membrane proteins expressed in E. coli. The target FHA2 protein is the full ectodomain construct of the influenza virus hemagglutinin protein which catalyzes fusion between the viral and the cellular endosomal membranes during infection. The high yield of FHA2 was achieved by: (1) initial growth in rich medium to A600 ~ 8 followed by a switch to minimal medium and induction of protein expression; and (2) obtaining protein both from purification of the detergent-soluble lysate and from solubilization, purification, and refolding of inclusion bodies. The high cell density was achieved after optimization of pH, oxygenation, and carbon source and concentration, and the refolding protocol was optimized using circular dichroism spectroscopy. For a single residue of membrane-associated FHA2 that was obtained from purification and refolding of inclusion bodies, native conformation was verified by the 13CO chemical shift measured using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. PMID:18640277

  8. Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  9. Association of Streptococcus pneumoniae common protein antigen (CPA) antibodies and pneumococcal nasopharyngeal colonization in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected African children.

    PubMed

    Ditse, Z; Adrian, P V; Kuwanda, L; Madhi, S A

    2013-09-13

    Due to the high cost and limited serotype coverage of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV), pneumococcal common protein antigens (CPAs) are being investigated as potential vaccine candidates. CPAs are likely to be immunogenic in infants and could confer serotype-independent protection. There are limited data on natural antibody kinetics against CPAs in African populations. We aimed to determine the prevalence of naturally acquired antibody titres to 15 CPAs and explore their association to concurrent pneumococcal nasopharyngeal colonization in children aged 4-7 years with and without underlying HIV-infection and/or previous PCV-vaccination. A 15-plex Luminex assay was established to measure serum IgG titres against "cell-wall associated or surface-exposed" proteins (PspA, PspC, LytB, IgA1-proteinase, SP0082, PdB and PcsB), "membrane-associated" proteins (PsaA, SP0609, SP0749, PpmA, SlrA, StkP and SP2194) as well as the hypothetical protein, SP2027. Archived serum samples from HIV-uninfected (n=212) and HIV-infected (n=74) children were analyzed. Concurrent pneumococcal nasopharyngeal colonization was determined with standard microbiological methods. HIV-uninfected children had significantly higher antibody titres against PspA, PspC, PdB, SP0082, LytB, IgA1 proteinase and PcsB compared to HIV-infected children. In contrast, antibody titres against membrane associated proteins (PsaA, SP2027, PpmA and SlrA) were significantly lower in HIV-uninfected compared to HIV-infected children. Higher antibody titres against PdB, and PcsB were associated with the absence of pneumococcal colonization. There was no association between anti-CPA titres and PCV vaccination. In conclusion PdB and PcsB antigens are potential vaccine-candidates which may protect against pneumococcal colonization and consequently pneumococcal disease. PMID:23845819

  10. Bacteriophage protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Häuser, Roman; Blasche, Sonja; Dokland, Terje; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; von Brunn, Albrecht; Salas, Margarita; Casjens, Sherwood; Molineux, Ian; Uetz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages T7, λ, P22, and P2/P4 (from Escherichia coli), as well as ϕ29 (from Bacillus subtilis), are among the best-studied bacterial viruses. This chapter summarizes published protein interaction data of intraviral protein interactions, as well as known phage-host protein interactions of these phages retrieved from the literature. We also review the published results of comprehensive protein interaction analyses of Pneumococcus phages Dp-1 and Cp-1, as well as coliphages λ and T7. For example, the ≈55 proteins encoded by the T7 genome are connected by ≈43 interactions with another ≈15 between the phage and its host. The chapter compiles published interactions for the well-studied phages λ (33 intra-phage/22 phage-host), P22 (38/9), P2/P4 (14/3), and ϕ29 (20/2). We discuss whether different interaction patterns reflect different phage lifestyles or whether they may be artifacts of sampling. Phages that infect the same host can interact with different host target proteins, as exemplified by E. coli phage λ and T7. Despite decades of intensive investigation, only a fraction of these phage interactomes are known. Technical limitations and a lack of depth in many studies explain the gaps in our knowledge. Strategies to complete current interactome maps are described. Although limited space precludes detailed overviews of phage molecular biology, this compilation will allow future studies to put interaction data into the context of phage biology. PMID:22748812

  11. Protein Co-Expression Analysis as a Strategy to Complement a Standard Quantitative Proteomics Approach: Case of a Glioblastoma Multiforme Study

    PubMed Central

    Deighton, Ruth F.

    2016-01-01

    Although correlation network studies from co-expression analysis are increasingly popular, they are rarely applied to proteomics datasets. Protein co-expression analysis provides a complementary view of underlying trends, which can be overlooked by conventional data analysis. The core of the present study is based on Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis applied to a glioblastoma multiforme proteomic dataset. Using this method, we have identified three main modules which are associated with three different membrane associated groups; mitochondrial, endoplasmic reticulum, and a vesicle fraction. The three networks based on protein co-expression were assessed against a publicly available database (STRING) and show a statistically significant overlap. Each of the three main modules were de-clustered into smaller networks using different strategies based on the identification of highly connected networks, hierarchical clustering and enrichment of Gene Ontology functional terms. Most of the highly connected proteins found in the endoplasmic reticulum module were associated with redox activity while a core of the unfolded protein response was identified in addition to proteins involved in oxidative stress pathways. The proteins composing the electron transfer chain were found differently affected with proteins from mitochondrial Complex I being more down-regulated than proteins from Complex III. Finally, the two pyruvate kinases isoforms show major differences in their co-expressed protein networks suggesting roles in different cellular locations. PMID:27571357

  12. Protein Co-Expression Analysis as a Strategy to Complement a Standard Quantitative Proteomics Approach: Case of a Glioblastoma Multiforme Study.

    PubMed

    Kanonidis, Evangelos I; Roy, Marcia M; Deighton, Ruth F; Le Bihan, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Although correlation network studies from co-expression analysis are increasingly popular, they are rarely applied to proteomics datasets. Protein co-expression analysis provides a complementary view of underlying trends, which can be overlooked by conventional data analysis. The core of the present study is based on Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis applied to a glioblastoma multiforme proteomic dataset. Using this method, we have identified three main modules which are associated with three different membrane associated groups; mitochondrial, endoplasmic reticulum, and a vesicle fraction. The three networks based on protein co-expression were assessed against a publicly available database (STRING) and show a statistically significant overlap. Each of the three main modules were de-clustered into smaller networks using different strategies based on the identification of highly connected networks, hierarchical clustering and enrichment of Gene Ontology functional terms. Most of the highly connected proteins found in the endoplasmic reticulum module were associated with redox activity while a core of the unfolded protein response was identified in addition to proteins involved in oxidative stress pathways. The proteins composing the electron transfer chain were found differently affected with proteins from mitochondrial Complex I being more down-regulated than proteins from Complex III. Finally, the two pyruvate kinases isoforms show major differences in their co-expressed protein networks suggesting roles in different cellular locations. PMID:27571357

  13. TIMAP-protein phosphatase 1-complex controls endothelin-1 production via ECE-1 dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Boratkó, Anita; Veréb, Zoltán; Petrovski, Goran; Csortos, Csilla

    2016-04-01

    Endothelin induced signaling pathways can affect blood pressure and vascular tone, but the influence of endothelins on tumor cells is also significant. We have detected elevated endothelin-1 secretion from TIMAP (TGF-β inhibited membrane associated protein) depleted vascular endothelial cells. The autocrine signaling activated by the elevated endothelin-1 level through the ETB receptors evoked an angiogenic-like phenotype, the cells assumed an elongated morphology, and enhanced tube formation and wound healing abilities. The depleted protein, TIMAP, is a highly specific and abundant protein in the endothelial cells, and it is a regulatory/targeting subunit for the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c). Protein-protein interaction between the TIMAP-PP1c complex and the endothelin converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) was detected, the latter of which is a transmembrane protein that produces the biologically active 21-amino acid form of endothelin-1 from proendothelin. The results indicate that silencing of TIMAP induces a reduction in TIMAP-PP1c activity connected to ECE-1. This leads to an increase in the amount of ECE-1 protein in the plasma membrane and a consequent increase in endothelin-1 secretion. Similarly, activation of PKC, the kinase responsible for ECE-1 phosphorylation increased ECE-1 protein level in the membrane fraction of the endothelial cells. The elevated ECE-1 level was mitigated in time in normal cells, but was clearly preserved in TIMAP-depleted cells. Overall, our results indicate that PKC-phosphorylated ECE-1 is a TIMAP-PP1c substrate and this phosphatase complex has an important role in endothelin-1 production of EC through the regulation of ECE-1 activity.

  14. TIMAP-protein phosphatase 1-complex controls endothelin-1 production via ECE-1 dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Boratkó, Anita; Veréb, Zoltán; Petrovski, Goran; Csortos, Csilla

    2016-04-01

    Endothelin induced signaling pathways can affect blood pressure and vascular tone, but the influence of endothelins on tumor cells is also significant. We have detected elevated endothelin-1 secretion from TIMAP (TGF-β inhibited membrane associated protein) depleted vascular endothelial cells. The autocrine signaling activated by the elevated endothelin-1 level through the ETB receptors evoked an angiogenic-like phenotype, the cells assumed an elongated morphology, and enhanced tube formation and wound healing abilities. The depleted protein, TIMAP, is a highly specific and abundant protein in the endothelial cells, and it is a regulatory/targeting subunit for the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c). Protein-protein interaction between the TIMAP-PP1c complex and the endothelin converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) was detected, the latter of which is a transmembrane protein that produces the biologically active 21-amino acid form of endothelin-1 from proendothelin. The results indicate that silencing of TIMAP induces a reduction in TIMAP-PP1c activity connected to ECE-1. This leads to an increase in the amount of ECE-1 protein in the plasma membrane and a consequent increase in endothelin-1 secretion. Similarly, activation of PKC, the kinase responsible for ECE-1 phosphorylation increased ECE-1 protein level in the membrane fraction of the endothelial cells. The elevated ECE-1 level was mitigated in time in normal cells, but was clearly preserved in TIMAP-depleted cells. Overall, our results indicate that PKC-phosphorylated ECE-1 is a TIMAP-PP1c substrate and this phosphatase complex has an important role in endothelin-1 production of EC through the regulation of ECE-1 activity. PMID:26806547

  15. Syntrophin proteins as Santa Claus: role(s) in cell signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Hina F; Adams, Marvin E; Khanday, Firdous A

    2013-07-01

    Syntrophins are a family of cytoplasmic membrane-associated adaptor proteins, characterized by the presence of a unique domain organization comprised of a C-terminal syntrophin unique (SU) domain and an N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain that is split by insertion of a PDZ domain. Syntrophins have been recognized as an important component of many signaling events, and they seem to function more like the cell's own personal 'Santa Claus' that serves to 'gift' various signaling complexes with precise proteins that they 'wish for', and at the same time care enough for the spatial, temporal control of these signaling events, maintaining overall smooth functioning and general happiness of the cell. Syntrophins not only associate various ion channels and signaling proteins to the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC), via a direct interaction with dystrophin protein but also serve as a link between the extracellular matrix and the intracellular downstream targets and cell cytoskeleton by interacting with F-actin. They play an important role in regulating the postsynaptic signal transduction, sarcolemmal localization of nNOS, EphA4 signaling at the neuromuscular junction, and G-protein mediated signaling. In our previous work, we reported a differential expression pattern of alpha-1-syntrophin (SNTA1) protein in esophageal and breast carcinomas. Implicated in several other pathologies, like cardiac dys-functioning, muscular dystrophies, diabetes, etc., these proteins provide a lot of scope for further studies. The present review focuses on the role of syntrophins in membrane targeting and regulation of cellular proteins, while highlighting their relevance in possible development and/or progression of pathologies including cancer which we have recently demonstrated. PMID:23263165

  16. Type III Protein Secretion Systems in Bacterial Pathogens of Animals and Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hueck, Christoph J.

    1998-01-01

    Various gram-negative animal and plant pathogens use a novel, sec-independent protein secretion system as a basic virulence mechanism. It is becoming increasingly clear that these so-called type III secretion systems inject (translocate) proteins into the cytosol of eukaryotic cells, where the translocated proteins facilitate bacterial pathogenesis by specifically interfering with host cell signal transduction and other cellular processes. Accordingly, some type III secretion systems are activated by bacterial contact with host cell surfaces. Individual type III secretion systems direct the secretion and translocation of a variety of unrelated proteins, which account for species-specific pathogenesis phenotypes. In contrast to the secreted virulence factors, most of the 15 to 20 membrane-associated proteins which constitute the type III secretion apparatus are conserved among different pathogens. Most of the inner membrane components of the type III secretion apparatus show additional homologies to flagellar biosynthetic proteins, while a conserved outer membrane factor is similar to secretins from type II and other secretion pathways. Structurally conserved chaperones which specifically bind to individual secreted proteins play an important role in type III protein secretion, apparently by preventing premature interactions of the secreted factors with other proteins. The genes encoding type III secretion systems are clustered, and various pieces of evidence suggest that these systems have been acquired by horizontal genetic transfer during evolution. Expression of type III secretion systems is coordinately regulated in response to host environmental stimuli by networks of transcription factors. This review comprises a comparison of the structure, function, regulation, and impact on host cells of the type III secretion systems in the animal pathogens Yersinia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

  17. Recombinant protein production technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  18. Split-Doa10: A Naturally Split Polytopic Eukaryotic Membrane Protein Generated by Fission of a Nuclear Gene

    PubMed Central

    Stuerner, Elisabeth; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Hochstrasser, Mark; Kreft, Stefan G.

    2012-01-01

    Large polytopic membrane proteins often derive from duplication and fusion of genes for smaller proteins. The reverse process, splitting of a membrane protein by gene fission, is rare and has been studied mainly with artificially split proteins. Fragments of a split membrane protein may associate and reconstitute the function of the larger protein. Most examples of naturally split membrane proteins are from bacteria or eukaryotic organelles, and their exact history is usually poorly understood. Here, we describe a nuclear-encoded split membrane protein, split-Doa10, in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. In most species, Doa10 is encoded as a single polypeptide with 12–16 transmembrane helices (TMs), but split-KlDoa10 is encoded as two fragments, with the split occurring between TM2 and TM3. The two fragments assemble into an active ubiquitin-protein ligase. The K. lactis DOA10 locus has two ORFs separated by a 508-bp intervening sequence (IVS). A promoter within the IVS drives expression of the C-terminal KlDoa10 fragment. At least four additional Kluyveromyces species contain an IVS in the DOA10 locus, in contrast to even closely related genera, allowing dating of the fission event to the base of the genus. The upstream Kluyveromyces Doa10 fragment with its N-terminal RING-CH and two TMs resembles many metazoan MARCH (Membrane-Associated RING-CH) and related viral RING-CH proteins, suggesting that gene splitting may have contributed to MARCH enzyme diversification. Split-Doa10 is the first unequivocal case of a split membrane protein where fission occurred in a nuclear-encoded gene. Such a split may allow divergent functions for the individual protein segments. PMID:23071509

  19. Soluble NSF attachment protein receptor molecular mimicry by a Legionella pneumophila Dot/Icm effector.

    PubMed

    King, Nathan P; Newton, Patrice; Schuelein, Ralf; Brown, Darren L; Petru, Marketa; Zarsky, Vojtech; Dolezal, Pavel; Luo, Lin; Bugarcic, Andrea; Stanley, Amanda C; Murray, Rachael Z; Collins, Brett M; Teasdale, Rohan D; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Stow, Jennifer L

    2015-06-01

    Upon infection, Legionella pneumophila uses the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system to translocate effector proteins from the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) into the host cell cytoplasm. The effectors target a wide array of host cellular processes that aid LCV biogenesis, including the manipulation of membrane trafficking. In this study, we used a hidden Markov model screen to identify two novel, non-eukaryotic soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) homologs: the bacterial Legionella SNARE effector A (LseA) and viral SNARE homolog A proteins. We characterized LseA as a Dot/Icm effector of L. pneumophila, which has close homology to the Qc-SNARE subfamily. The lseA gene was present in multiple sequenced L. pneumophila strains including Corby and was well distributed among L. pneumophila clinical and environmental isolates. Employing a variety of biochemical, cell biological and microbiological techniques, we found that farnesylated LseA localized to membranes associated with the Golgi complex in mammalian cells and LseA interacted with a subset of Qa-, Qb- and R-SNAREs in host cells. Our results suggested that LseA acts as a SNARE protein and has the potential to regulate or mediate membrane fusion events in Golgi-associated pathways.

  20. Discrete nascent chain lengths are required for the insertion of presecretory proteins into microsomal membranes

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Ribosomes synthesizing nascent secretory proteins are targeted to the membrane by the signal recognition particle (SRP), a small ribonucleoprotein that binds to the signal peptide as it emerges from the ribosome. SRP arrests further elongation, causing ribosomes to stack behind the arrested ribosome. Upon interaction of SRP with its receptor on the ER membrane, the translation arrest is released and the ribosome becomes bound to the ER membrane. We have examined the distribution of unattached and membrane-bound ribosomes during the translation of mRNAs encoding two secretory proteins, bovine preprolactin and rat preproinsulin I. We find that the enhancement of ribosome stacking that occurs when SRP arrests translation of these proteins is relaxed in the presence of microsomal membranes. We also demonstrate that two previously described populations of membrane- associated ribosomes, distinguished by their sensitivity to high salt or EDTA extraction, correspond to ribosomes that have synthesized differing lengths of the nascent polypeptide. This analysis has revealed that nascent chain insertion into the membrane begins at distinct points for different presecretory proteins. PMID:8389768

  1. A Commensal Strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis Overexpresses Membrane Proteins Associated with Pathogenesis When Grown in Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Águila-Arcos, S; Ding, S; Aloria, K; Arizmendi, J M; Fearnley, I M; Walker, J E; Goñi, F M; Alkorta, I

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis has emerged as one of the major nosocomial pathogens associated with infections of implanted medical devices. The most important factor in the pathogenesis of these infections is the formation of bacterial biofilms. Bacteria grown in biofilms are more resistant to antibiotics and to the immune defence system than planktonic bacteria. In these infections, the antimicrobial therapy usually fails and the removal of the biofilm-coated implanted device is the only effective solution. In this study, three proteomic approaches were performed to investigate membrane proteins associated to biofilm formation: (i) sample fractionation by gel electrophoresis, followed by isotopic labelling and LC-MS/MS analysis, (ii) in-solution sample preparation, followed by isotopic labelling and LC-MS/MS analysis and (iii) in-solution sample preparation and label-free LC-MS/MS analysis. We found that the commensal strain S. epidermidis CECT 231 grown in biofilms expressed higher levels of five membrane and membrane-associated proteins involved in pathogenesis: accumulation-associated protein, staphylococcal secretory antigen, signal transduction protein TRAP, ribonuclease Y and phenol soluble modulin beta 1 when compared with bacteria grown under planktonic conditions. These results indicate that a commensal strain can acquire a pathogenic phenotype depending on the mode of growth.

  2. Governing effect of regulatory proteins for Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchanger 2 activity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yon Soo; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2016-01-01

    Anion exchanger 2 (AE2) has a critical role in epithelial cells and is involved in the ionic homeostasis such as Cl(-) uptake and HCO3(-) secretion. However, little is known about the regulatory mechanism of AE2. The main goal of the present study was to investigate potential regulators, such as spinophilin (SPL), inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate [IP3] receptors binding protein released with IP3 (IRBIT), STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) kinase, and carbonic anhydrase XII (CA XII). We found that SPL binds to AE2 and markedly increased the Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange activity of AE2. Especially SPL 1-480 domain is required for enhancing AE2 activity. For other regulatory components that affect the fidelity of fluid and HCO3(-) secretion, IRBIT and SPAK had no effect on the activity of AE2 and no protein-protein interaction with AE2. It has been proposed that CA activity is closely associated with AE activity. In this study, we provide evidence that the basolateral membrane-associated CA isoform CA XII significantly increased the activity of AE2 and co-localized with AE2 to the plasma membrane. Collectively, SPL and CA XII enhanced the Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange activity of AE2. The modulating action of these regulatory proteins could serve as potential therapeutic targets for secretory diseases mediated by AE2.

  3. Proton detection for signal enhancement in solid-state NMR experiments on mobile species in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Ward, Meaghan E; Ritz, Emily; Ahmed, Mumdooh A M; Bamm, Vladimir V; Harauz, George; Brown, Leonid S; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-12-01

    Direct proton detection is becoming an increasingly popular method for enhancing sensitivity in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Generally, these experiments require extensive deuteration of the protein, fast magic angle spinning (MAS), or a combination of both. Here, we implement direct proton detection to selectively observe the mobile entities in fully-protonated membrane proteins at moderate MAS frequencies. We demonstrate this method on two proteins that exhibit different motional regimes. Myelin basic protein is an intrinsically-disordered, peripherally membrane-associated protein that is highly flexible, whereas Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is composed of seven rigid transmembrane α-helices connected by mobile loop regions. In both cases, we observe narrow proton linewidths and, on average, a 10× increase in sensitivity in 2D insensitive nuclear enhancement of polarization transfer-based HSQC experiments when proton detection is compared to carbon detection. We further show that our proton-detected experiments can be easily extended to three dimensions and used to build complete amino acid systems, including sidechain protons, and obtain inter-residue correlations. Additionally, we detect signals which do not correspond to amino acids, but rather to lipids and/or carbohydrates which interact strongly with membrane proteins.

  4. Characterization of Tetratricopeptide Repeat-Like Proteins in Francisella tularensis and Identification of a Novel Locus Required for Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Dankova, Vera; Balonova, Lucie; Straskova, Adela; Spidlova, Petra; Putzova, Daniela; Kijek, Todd; Bozue, Joel; Cote, Christopher; Mou, Sherry; Worsham, Patricia; Szotakova, Barbora; Stulik, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterium that causes the potentially lethal disease tularemia. This extremely virulent bacterium is able to replicate in the cytosolic compartments of infected macrophages. To invade macrophages and to cope with their intracellular environment, Francisella requires multiple virulence factors, which are still being identified. Proteins containing tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-like domains seem to be promising targets to investigate, since these proteins have been reported to be directly involved in virulence-associated functions of bacterial pathogens. Here, we studied the role of the FTS_0201, FTS_0778, and FTS_1680 genes, which encode putative TPR-like proteins in Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica FSC200. Mutants defective in protein expression were prepared by TargeTron insertion mutagenesis. We found that the locus FTS_1680 and its ortholog FTT_0166c in the highly virulent Francisella tularensis type A strain SchuS4 are required for proper intracellular replication, full virulence in mice, and heat stress tolerance. Additionally, the FTS_1680-encoded protein was identified as a membrane-associated protein required for full cytopathogenicity in macrophages. Our study thus identifies FTS_1680/FTT_0166c as a new virulence factor in Francisella tularensis. PMID:25245806

  5. Characterization of RAB-like4, the first identified RAB-like protein from Trypanosoma cruzi with GTPase activity.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Fabiane Pereira; Araripe, Júlia Rolão; Urményi, Turán Péter; Silva, Rosane; Cunha e Silva, Narcisa Leal; Leite Fontes, Carlos Frederico; da Silveira, José Franco; Rondinelli, Edson

    2005-08-01

    RAB proteins, which belong to the RAS superfamily, regulate exocytic and endocytic pathways of eukaryotic cells, controlling vesicle docking and fusion. Few RAB proteins have been identified in parasites. Molecular markers for cellular compartments are important to studies concerning about the protein traffic in Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas disease. In this work, we describe the characterization of TcRABL4, the first RAB-like gene identified in T. cruzi (GenBank Accession No.: ), present as a single-copy gene. TcRABL4 contains all five consensus RAB motifs but lacks cysteine residues at the C terminus, which are essential to isoprenylation, an absolute prerequisite for membrane association of these proteins. TcRABL4 is a functional GTPase that is able to bind and hydrolyze GTP, and its gene is transcribed as a single 1.2 kb mRNA in epimastigotes. TcRABL4 appears to be differentially regulated in the three cell forms of the parasite, and the protein is not associated to membranes, unlike other RAB proteins. It is possible that TcRABL4 may be a member of a novel family of small GTPases.

  6. Microgravity induces changes in microsome-associated proteins of Arabidopsis seedlings grown on board the international space station.

    PubMed

    Mazars, Christian; Brière, Christian; Grat, Sabine; Pichereaux, Carole; Rossignol, Michel; Pereda-Loth, Veronica; Eche, Brigitte; Boucheron-Dubuisson, Elodie; Le Disquet, Isabel; Medina, Francisco Javier; Graziana, Annick; Carnero-Diaz, Eugénie

    2014-01-01

    The "GENARA A" experiment was designed to monitor global changes in the proteome of membranes of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings subjected to microgravity on board the International Space Station (ISS). For this purpose, 12-day-old seedlings were grown either in space, in the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) under microgravity or on a 1 g centrifuge, or on the ground. Proteins associated to membranes were selectively extracted from microsomes and identified and quantified through LC-MS-MS using a label-free method. Among the 1484 proteins identified and quantified in the 3 conditions mentioned above, 80 membrane-associated proteins were significantly more abundant in seedlings grown under microgravity in space than under 1 g (space and ground) and 69 were less abundant. Clustering of these proteins according to their predicted function indicates that proteins associated to auxin metabolism and trafficking were depleted in the microsomal fraction in µg space conditions, whereas proteins associated to stress responses, defence and metabolism were more abundant in µg than in 1 g indicating that microgravity is perceived by plants as a stressful environment. These results clearly indicate that a global membrane proteomics approach gives a snapshot of the cell status and its signaling activity in response to microgravity and highlight the major processes affected.

  7. The first α-helical domain of the vesicle-inducing protein in plastids 1 promotes oligomerization and lipid binding.

    PubMed

    Otters, Stephanie; Braun, Paula; Hubner, Johanna; Wanner, Gerhardt; Vothknecht, Ute C; Chigri, Fatima

    2013-02-01

    The vesicle-inducing protein in plastids 1 (Vipp1) is an essential component for thylakoid biogenesis in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts. Vipp1 proteins share significant structural similarity with their evolutionary ancestor PspA (bacterial phage shock protein A), namely a predominantly α-helical structure, the formation of oligomeric high molecular weight complexes (HMW-Cs) and a tight association with membranes. Here, we elucidated domains of Vipp1 from Arabidopsis thaliana involved in homo-oligomerization as well as association with chloroplast inner envelope membranes. We could show that the 21 N-terminal amino acids of Vipp1, which form the first α-helix of the protein, are essential for assembly of the 2 MDa HMW-C but are not needed for formation of smaller subcomplexes. Interestingly, removal of this domain also interferes with association of the Vipp1 protein to the inner envelope. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of recombinant Vipp1 further indicates that Escherichia coli lipids bind tightly enough that they can be co-purified with the protein. This feature also depends on the presence of the first helix, which strongly supports an interaction of lipids with the Vipp1 HMW-C but not with smaller subcomplexes. Therefore, Vipp1 oligomerization appears to be a prerequisite for its membrane association. Our results further highlight structural differences between Vipp1 and PspA, which might be important in regard to their different function in thylakoid biogenesis and bacterial stress response, respectively.

  8. Microgravity Induces Changes in Microsome-Associated Proteins of Arabidopsis Seedlings Grown on Board the International Space Station

    PubMed Central

    Grat, Sabine; Pichereaux, Carole; Rossignol, Michel; Pereda-Loth, Veronica; Eche, Brigitte; Boucheron-Dubuisson, Elodie; Le Disquet, Isabel; Medina, Francisco Javier; Graziana, Annick; Carnero-Diaz, Eugénie

    2014-01-01

    The “GENARA A” experiment was designed to monitor global changes in the proteome of membranes of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings subjected to microgravity on board the International Space Station (ISS). For this purpose, 12-day-old seedlings were grown either in space, in the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) under microgravity or on a 1 g centrifuge, or on the ground. Proteins associated to membranes were selectively extracted from microsomes and identified and quantified through LC-MS-MS using a label-free method. Among the 1484 proteins identified and quantified in the 3 conditions mentioned above, 80 membrane-associated proteins were significantly more abundant in seedlings grown under microgravity in space than under 1 g (space and ground) and 69 were less abundant. Clustering of these proteins according to their predicted function indicates that proteins associated to auxin metabolism and trafficking were depleted in the microsomal fraction in µg space conditions, whereas proteins associated to stress responses, defence and metabolism were more abundant in µg than in 1 g indicating that microgravity is perceived by plants as a stressful environment. These results clearly indicate that a global membrane proteomics approach gives a snapshot of the cell status and its signaling activity in response to microgravity and highlight the major processes affected. PMID:24618597

  9. Vaccinia virus virion membrane biogenesis protein A11 associates with viral membranes in a manner that requires the expression of another membrane biogenesis protein, A6.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiang; Meng, Xiangzhi; Yan, Bo; Rose, Lloyd; Deng, Junpeng; Xiang, Yan

    2012-10-01

    A group of vaccinia virus (VACV) proteins, including A11, L2, and A6, are required for biogenesis of the primary envelope of VACV, specifically, for the acquisition of viral membrane precursors. However, the interconnection among these proteins is unknown and, with the exception of L2, the connection of these proteins with membranes is also unknown. In this study, prompted by the findings that A6 coprecipitated A11 and that the cellular distribution of A11 was dramatically altered by repression of A6 expression, we studied the localization of A11 in cells by using immunofluorescence and cell fractionation analysis. A11 was found to associate with membranes and colocalize with virion membrane proteins in viral replication factories during normal VACV replication. A11 partitioned almost equally between the detergent and aqueous phases upon Triton X-114 phase separation, demonstrating an intrinsic affinity with lipids. However, in the absence of infection or VACV late protein synthesis, A11 did not associate with cellular membranes. Furthermore, when A6 expression was repressed, A11 did not colocalize with any viral membrane proteins or associate with membranes. In contrast, when virion envelope formation was blocked at a later step by repression of A14 expression or by rifampin treatment, A11 colocalized with virion membrane proteins in the factories. Altogether, our data showed that A11 associates with viral membranes during VACV replication, and this association requires A6 expression. This study provides a physical connection between A11 and viral membranes and suggests that A6 regulates A11 membrane association.

  10. An extended spectrum of target proteins and modification sites in the general O-linked protein glycosylation system in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Anonsen, Jan Haug; Vik, Åshild; Egge-Jacobsen, Wolfgang; Koomey, Michael

    2012-12-01

    The bacterial human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae expresses a general O-linked protein glycosylation (Pgl) system known to target at least 12 membrane-associated proteins. To facilitate a better understanding of the mechanisms, significance and function of this glycosylation system, we sought to further delineate the target proteome of the Pgl system. To this end, we employed immunoaffinity enrichment of glycoproteins using a monoclonal antibody against the glycan moiety. Enzymatically generated peptides were subsequently analyzed by MS to identify glycopeptides and glycosylation sites. In this way, we increase the total number of known glycoproteins in N. gonorrhoeae to 19. These new glycoproteins are involved in a wide variety of extracytoplasmic functions. By employing collision fragmentation, we mapped nine new glycosylation sites, all of which were serine. No target sequon was readily apparent, although attachment sites were most often localized with regions of low sequence complexity. Moreover, we found that 5 of the proteins were modified with more than one glycan. This work thus confirms and extends earlier observations on the structural features of Neisseria glycoproteins.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of the human folate-binding protein cDNA from placenta and malignant tissue culture (KB) cells.

    PubMed

    Elwood, P C

    1989-09-01

    Human folate-binding proteins (FBPs) are single chain glycoproteins that contain a high affinity binding site for folates and methotrexate and occur in a soluble or membrane-associated form. The membrane-associated FBP is involved in the uptake of physiologic folates and methotrexate. In this study, human FBP cDNA clones were isolated from human malignant nasopharyngeal carcinoma (KB) cell and placental cDNA libraries by means of oligonucleotide probes derived from determined internal amino acid sequences. The longest cDNA nucleotide sequence is 1126 base pairs and encodes a polypeptide that contains 257 amino acid residues (calculated molecular mass = 29,817). The deduced amino acid sequence is 80% homologous to a bovine soluble FBP, is greater than 99% homologous to the reported partial amino acid sequence of the human soluble FBP, contains three potential N-linked glycosylation sites, and has hydrophobic amino- and carboxylterminal regions which are consistent with a signal peptide and a potential membrane-anchoring domain, respectively. On Northern blot analysis, radiolabeled cDNA probes hybridize to a single 1100-base pair mRNA species that is expressed to a variable degree in human KB cells, placenta, brain, and epithelial mRNA but is not detectable in human liver mRNA. In vitro translation of RNA transcripts from the FBP cDNA inserts yields a 30-kDa and a 42-kDa polypeptide in the absence and presence of microsomal membranes, respectively. PMID:2768245

  12. Structural and Temporal Requirements of Wnt/PCP Protein Vangl2 Function for Convergence and Extension Movements and Facial Branchiomotor Neuron Migration in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiufang; Sittaramane, Vinoth; Gurung, Suman; Chandrasekhar, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Van gogh-like 2 (Vangl2), a core component of the Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) signaling pathway, is a four-pass transmembrane protein with N-terminal and C-terminal domains located in the cytosol, and is structurally conserved from flies to mammals. In vertebrates, Vangl2 plays an essential role in convergence and extension (CE) movements during gastrulation and in facial branchiomotor (FBM) neuron migration in the hindbrain. However, the roles of specific Vangl2 domains, of membrane association, and of specific extracellular and intracellular motifs have not been examined, especially in the context of FBM neuron migration. Through heat shock-inducible expression of various Vangl2 transgenes, we found that membrane associated functions of the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of Vangl2 are involved in regulating FBM neuron migration. Importantly, through temperature shift experiments, we found that the critical period for Vangl2 function coincides with the initial stages of FBM neuron migration out of rhombomere 4. Intriguingly, we have also uncovered a putative nuclear localization motif in the C-terminal domain that may play a role in regulating CE movements. PMID:24333599

  13. Conserved evolutionary units in the heme-copper oxidase superfamily revealed by novel homologous protein families

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Li, Wenlin; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2014-01-01

    The heme-copper oxidase (HCO) superfamily includes HCOs in aerobic respiratory chains and nitric oxide reductases (NORs) in the denitrification pathway. The HCO/NOR catalytic subunit has a core structure consisting of 12 transmembrane helices (TMHs) arranged in three-fold rotational pseudosymmetry, with six conserved histidines for heme and metal binding. Using sensitive sequence similarity searches, we detected a number of novel HCO/NOR homologs and named them HCO Homology (HCOH) proteins. Several HCOH families possess only four TMHs that exhibit the most pronounced similarity to the last four TMHs (TMHs 9–12) of HCOs/NORs. Encoded by independent genes, four-TMH HCOH proteins represent a single evolutionary unit (EU) that relates to each of the three homologous EUs of HCOs/NORs comprising TMHs 1–4, TMHs 5–8, and TMHs 9–12. Single-EU HCOH proteins could form homotrimers or heterotrimers to maintain the general structure and ligand-binding sites defined by the HCO/NOR catalytic subunit fold. The remaining HCOH families, including NnrS, have 12-TMHs and three EUs. Most three-EU HCOH proteins possess two conserved histidines and could bind a single heme. Limited experimental studies and genomic context analysis suggest that many HCOH proteins could function in the denitrification pathway and in detoxification of reactive molecules such as nitric oxide. HCO/NOR catalytic subunits exhibit remarkable structural similarity to the homotrimers of MAPEG (membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism) proteins. Gene duplication, fusion, and fission likely play important roles in the evolution of HCOs/NORs and HCOH proteins. PMID:24931479

  14. A new multigene family encoding calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding membrane proteins of Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Chan, C W; Saimi, Y; Kung, C

    1999-04-29

    Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) regulates various physiological processes in a wide variety of organisms, metazoa and protists alike. To better understand Ca2+/CaM-dependent processes, particularly those with membrane-associated components, we studied Ca2+/CaM-binding membrane proteins in Paramecium tetraurelia, a unicellular model system. A CaM-binding protein, PCM1 (Paramecium CaM-binding membrane-bound protein), from a detergent-solubilized ciliary membrane fraction was identified and purified through Ca2+-dependent CaM-affinity chromatography. PCM1 has an apparent molecular mass of approx. 65kDa. It binds radiolabeled CaM in blot overlay assays and binds to CaM-affinity columns, both only in the presence of 10 microM or higher Ca2+. Three peptide sequences from PCM1 were obtained, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern hybridization experiments were designed accordingly, leading to a partial cDNA clone for PCM1 and the discovery of three homologs: PCM2, PCM3 and PCM4. Amino acid sequences predicted by the full-length coding sequence for PCM3 and partial genes for PCM1, PCM2 and PCM4 are very similar (approx. 85% amino-acid identities). Their sequences indicate that they are hitherto novel proteins with beta/gamma-crystallin domains, cysteine-rich regions and potential CaM-binding domains. These protein motifs are suggested to mediate protein-protein interaction important for Ca2+/CaM signal transduction event(s) through the PCM family of proteins.

  15. A novel RING finger in the C-terminal domain of the coatomer protein α-COP.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2015-01-01

    The C-terminal domain of α-COP, an essential subunit of the COPI coatomer complex, is composed of an all α-helical region and a small β-sheet domain. We show that this β-sheet domain is a Really Interesting New Gene (RING)-like treble clef zinc finger. The zinc-binding residues are substituted by other aminoacids in many homologs including the structurally-characterized proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Bos taurus. This RING-like domain is possibly related to those of other vesicle membrane-associated complexes, such as CORVET, HOPS and SEA, and likely mediates interactions with Dsl1p and assist in coat oligomerization. PMID:26666296

  16. The Phosphocarrier Protein HPr Contributes to Meningococcal Survival during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Ana; Derkaoui, Meriem; Terrade, Aude; Denizon, Mélanie; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Deutscher, Josef; Delany, Isabel; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is an exclusively human pathogen frequently carried asymptomatically in the nasopharynx but it can also provoke invasive infections such as meningitis and septicemia. N. meningitidis uses a limited range of carbon sources during infection, such as glucose, that is usually transported into bacteria via the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS), in which the phosphocarrier protein HPr (encoded by the ptsH gene) plays a central role. Although N. meningitidis possesses an incomplete PTS, HPr was found to be required for its virulence. We explored the role of HPr using bioluminescent wild-type and ΔptsH strains in experimental infection in transgenic mice expressing the human transferrin. The wild-type MC58 strain was recovered at higher levels from the peritoneal cavity and particularly from blood compared to the ΔptsH strain. The ΔptsH strain provoked lower levels of septicemia in mice and was more susceptible to complement-mediated killing than the wild-type strain. We tested whether meningococcal structures impacted complement resistance and observed that only the capsule level was decreased in the ΔptsH mutant. We therefore compared the transcriptomic profiles of wild-type and ΔptsH strains and identified 49 differentially expressed genes. The HPr regulon contains mainly hypothetical proteins (43%) and several membrane-associated proteins that could play a role during host interaction. Some other genes of the HPr regulon are involved in stress response. Indeed, the ΔptsH strain showed increased susceptibility to environmental stress conditions. Our data suggest that HPr plays a pleiotropic role in host-bacteria interactions most likely through the innate immune response that may be responsible for the enhanced clearance of the ΔptsH strain from blood. PMID:27655040

  17. Human and pneumococcal cell surface glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) proteins are both ligands of human C1q protein.

    PubMed

    Terrasse, Rémi; Tacnet-Delorme, Pascale; Moriscot, Christine; Pérard, Julien; Schoehn, Guy; Vernet, Thierry; Thielens, Nicole M; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Frachet, Philippe

    2012-12-14

    C1q, a key component of the classical complement pathway, is a major player in the response to microbial infection and has been shown to detect noxious altered-self substances such as apoptotic cells. In this work, using complementary experimental approaches, we identified the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a C1q partner when exposed at the surface of human pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and human apoptotic cells. The membrane-associated GAPDH on HeLa cells bound the globular regions of C1q as demonstrated by pulldown and cell surface co-localization experiments. Pneumococcal strains deficient in surface-exposed GAPDH harbored a decreased level of C1q recognition when compared with the wild-type strains. Both recombinant human and pneumococcal GAPDHs interacted avidly with C1q as measured by surface plasmon resonance experiments (K(D) = 0.34-2.17 nm). In addition, GAPDH-C1q complexes were observed by transmission electron microscopy after cross-linking. The purified pneumococcal GAPDH protein activated C1 in an in vitro assay unlike the human form. Deposition of C1q, C3b, and C4b from human serum at the surface of pneumococcal cells was dependent on the presence of surface-exposed GAPDH. This ability of C1q to sense both human and bacterial GAPDHs sheds new insights on the role of this important defense collagen molecule in modulating the immune response. PMID:23086952

  18. Pmp-like proteins Pls1 and Pls2 are secreted into the lumen of the Chlamydia trachomatis inclusion.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Ine; Valdivia, Raphael H

    2008-09-01

    The obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis secretes effector proteins across the membrane of the pathogen-containing vacuole (inclusion) to modulate host cellular functions. In an immunological screen for secreted chlamydial proteins, we identified CT049 and CT050 as potential inclusion membrane-associated proteins. These acidic, nonglobular proteins are paralogously related to the passenger domain of the polymorphic membrane protein PmpC and, like other Pmp proteins, are highly polymorphic among C. trachomatis ocular and urogenital strains. We generated antibodies to these Pmp-like secreted (Pls) proteins and determined by immunofluorescence microscopy that Pls1 (CT049) and Pls2 (CT050) localized to globular structures within the inclusion lumen and at the inclusion membrane. Fractionation of membranes and cytoplasmic components from infected cells by differential and density gradient centrifugation further indicated that Pls1 and Pls2 associated with membranes distinct from the bulk of bacterial and inclusion membranes. The accumulation of Pls1 and, to a lesser extent, Pls2 in the inclusion lumen was insensitive to the type III secretion inhibitor C1, suggesting that this translocation system is not essential for Pls protein secretion. In contrast, Pls secretion and stability were sensitive to low levels of beta-lactam antibiotics, suggesting that a functional cell wall is required for Pls secretion from the bacterial cell. Finally, we tested the requirement for these proteins in Chlamydia infection by microinjecting anti-Pls1 and anti-Pls2 antibodies into infected cells. Coinjection of anti-Pls1 and -Pls2 antibodies partially inhibited expansion of the inclusion. Because Pls proteins lack classical sec-dependent secretion signals, we propose that Pls proteins are secreted into the inclusion lumen by a novel mechanism to regulate events important for chlamydial replication and inclusion expansion.

  19. Systematic analysis of protein-detergent complexes applying dynamic light scattering to optimize solutions for crystallization trials.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Arne; Dierks, Karsten; Hussein, Rana; Brillet, Karl; Brognaro, Hevila; Betzel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Detergents are widely used for the isolation and solubilization of membrane proteins to support crystallization and structure determination. Detergents are amphiphilic molecules that form micelles once the characteristic critical micelle concentration (CMC) is achieved and can solubilize membrane proteins by the formation of micelles around them. The results are presented of a study of micelle formation observed by in situ dynamic light-scattering (DLS) analyses performed on selected detergent solutions using a newly designed advanced hardware device. DLS was initially applied in situ to detergent samples with a total volume of approximately 2 µl. When measured with DLS, pure detergents show a monodisperse radial distribution in water at concentrations exceeding the CMC. A series of all-trans n-alkyl-β-D-maltopyranosides, from n-hexyl to n-tetradecyl, were used in the investigations. The results obtained verify that the application of DLS in situ is capable of distinguishing differences in the hydrodynamic radii of micelles formed by detergents differing in length by only a single CH2 group in their aliphatic tails. Subsequently, DLS was applied to investigate the distribution of hydrodynamic radii of membrane proteins and selected water-insoluble proteins in presence of detergent micelles. The results confirm that stable protein-detergent complexes were prepared for (i) bacteriorhodopsin and (ii) FetA in complex with a ligand as examples of transmembrane proteins. A fusion of maltose-binding protein and the Duck hepatitis B virus X protein was added to this investigation as an example of a non-membrane-associated protein with low water solubility. The increased solubility of this protein in the presence of detergent could be monitored, as well as the progress of proteolytic cleavage to separate the fusion partners. This study demonstrates the potential of in situ DLS to optimize solutions of protein-detergent complexes for crystallization applications.

  20. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    MedlinePlus

    ... of protein and fat, called lipoproteins (such as LDL cholesterol). ... globulin proteins may indicate: Abnormally low level of LDL cholesterol Malnutrition Increased gamma globulin proteins may indicate: Bone ...

  1. Synechocystis HSP17 is an amphitropic protein that stabilizes heat-stressed membranes and binds denatured proteins for subsequent chaperone-mediated refolding

    PubMed Central

    Török, Zsolt; Goloubinoff, Pierre; Horváth, Ibolya; Tsvetkova, Nelly M.; Glatz, Attila; Balogh, Gábor; Varvasovszki, Viktória; Los, Dmitry A.; Vierling, Elizabeth; Crowe, John H.; Vígh, László

    2001-01-01

    The small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are ubiquitous stress proteins proposed to act as molecular chaperones to prevent irreversible protein denaturation. We characterized the chaperone activity of Synechocystis HSP17 and found that it has not only protein-protective activity, but also a previously unrecognized ability to stabilize lipid membranes. Like other sHSPs, recombinant Synechocystis HSP17 formed stable complexes with denatured malate dehydrogenase and served as a reservoir for the unfolded substrate, transferring it to the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE and GroEL/ES chaperone network for subsequent refolding. Large unilamellar vesicles made of synthetic and cyanobacterial lipids were found to modulate this refolding process. Investigation of HSP17-lipid interactions revealed a preference for the liquid crystalline phase and resulted in an elevated physical order in model lipid membranes. Direct evidence for the participation of HSP17 in the control of thylakoid membrane physical state in vivo was gained by examining an hsp17− deletion mutant compared with the isogenic wild-type hsp17+ revertant Synechocystis cells. We suggest that, together with GroEL, HSP17 behaves as an amphitropic protein and plays a dual role. Depending on its membrane or cytosolic location, it may function as a “membrane stabilizing factor” as well as a member of a multichaperone protein-folding network. Membrane association of sHSPs could antagonize the heat-induced hyperfluidization of specific membrane domains and thereby serve to preserve structural and functional integrity of biomembranes. PMID:11248038

  2. Early events of human T lymphocyte activation are associated with type I protein kinase A activity.

    PubMed Central

    Laxminarayana, D; Berrada, A; Kammer, G M

    1993-01-01

    Human T lymphocytes possess both the type I and II isozymes of protein kinase A (PKA). The type I (PKA-I) isozyme is predominantly associated with the plasma membrane, whereas the type II (PKA-II) isozyme is primarily localized to the cytosol. Because the functions of both PKA-I and PKA-II isozymes in the biochemical events of T lymphocyte activation have not been clearly elucidated, we tested the hypothesis that very early events of normal human T lymphocyte activation are mediated by the PKA-I and/or PKA-II isozyme(s). Fresh normal human T cells and a normal human CD4+ T cell line (GK606) activated with anti-CD3-epsilon and recombinant interleukin 1 alpha (rIL-1 alpha) exhibited a peak six- to sevenfold increase of PKA phosphotransferase activity at 5 min that returned to baseline by 60 min. Similarly, both fresh T cells and the T cell line activated by phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin demonstrated a peak eightfold increase of PKA activity by 15 min that returned toward baseline by 60 min. Chromatographic separation of the PKA isozymes and quantification of phosphotransferase activities after T cell activation by either agonist pair showed preferential activation of the PKA-I isozyme, resulting in a significant reduction in the ratio of PKA-I to PKA-II isozyme activity from 3.1:1-6.2:1 to 1.1:1-3.2:1. PKA-I isozyme activation resulted in the release of free catalytic (C) subunit, an increase in C subunit phosphotransferase activity, and the phosphorylation of T cell plasma membrane-associated proteins, p14, p17, p20, p21, p38, and p48. However, activation of the PKA-I isozyme did not appear to be required for the transcription of IL-2 mRNA, an event necessary for mitosis. These data indicate that ligand-induced T cell activation is associated with rapid activation of the PKA-I, but not PKA-II, isozyme that results in phosphorylation of plasma membrane-associated proteins. The involvement of the PKA-I isozyme during the very early events of T cell

  3. The contribution of genetic and environmental factors to quantitative variability of erythrocyte membrane proteins in primary hypotension.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V P; Polonikov, A V; Solodilova, M A

    2005-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that, compared with healthy individuals, patients with primary arterial hypotension (PAH) have significant quantitative changes in erythrocyte membrane proteins. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the contribution made by genetic and environmental factors to quantitative variation of erythrocyte membrane proteins in PAH. We studied 109 hypotensive patients, 124 normotensive subjects, 222 of their first-degree relatives and 24 twin pairs by sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The decomposition of total phenotypic variance of erythrocyte membrane proteins to genetic and environmental components was performed on the basis of correlations among first-degree relatives by the least squares method. The genetic dominance and shared environmental factors were found to influence the variability of cytoskeletal membrane proteins whose contents were changed in PAH. Furthermore, variations in alpha-spectrin, actin and anion exchanger in hypotensives were substantially influenced by major gene and maternal effects. Ankyrin 2.1 and actin content was under the control of common underlying genes. Variations in membrane-associated glutathione-S-transferase and tropomyosin were predominantly affected by polygenes. These findings suggest that the putative major genes with pleiotropic effects appear to be involved in the control of quantitative disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins in primary hypotension. PMID:15638825

  4. The tight junction protein ZO-2 associates with Jun, Fos and C/EBP transcription factors in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Betanzos, Abigail; Huerta, Miriam; Lopez-Bayghen, Esther; Azuara, Elisa; Amerena, José; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2004-01-01

    ZO-2 is a membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) protein present at the tight junction (TJ) of epithelial cells. While confluent monolayers have ZO-2 at their cellular borders, sparse cultures conspicuously show ZO-2 at the nuclei. To study the role of nuclear ZO-2, we tested by pull-down assays and gel shift analysis the interaction between ZO-2 GST fusion proteins and different transcription factors. We identified the existence of a specific interaction of ZO-2 with Fos, Jun and C/EBP (CCAAT/enhancer binding protein). To analyze if this association is present "in vivo", we performed immunoprecipitation and immunolocalization experiments, which revealed an interaction of ZO-2 with Jun, Fos and C/EBP not only at the nucleus but also at the TJ region. To test if the association of ZO-2 with AP-1 (activator protein-1) modulates gene transcription, we performed reporter gene assays employing chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) constructs with promoters under the control of AP-1 sites. We observed that the co-transfected ZO-2 down-regulates CAT expression in a dose-dependent manner. Since ZO-2 is a multidomain protein, we proceeded to determine which region of the molecule is responsible for the modulation of gene expression, and observed that both the amino and the carboxyl domains are capable of inhibiting gene transcription.

  5. The Helicobacter pylori Cag Pathogenicity Island Protein Cag1 is Associated with the Function of T4SS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaochun; Ling, Feng; Wang, Hua; Yu, Min; Zhu, Hong; Chen, Cheng; Qian, Jingyi; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Shao, Shihe

    2016-07-01

    The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori is involved in gastric diseases ranging from gastritis to gastric cancer. Virulent strains harboring the cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI) which encode a Type IV Secretion System (T4SS) can induce pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-8 and deliver their major effector proteins CagA into the gastric cells. While a subset of cag PAI genes have been identified to be the homologues of T4SS genes from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, a majority have unknown functions. We have identified one of such proteins, Cag1, which was predicted to be a non-classically secreted and virulent protein. Our results showed that Cag1 is a membrane-associated protein essential for the induction of multiple cytokine secretions, and cag1-deficient mutant has partial influence on CagA translocation; while the protein itself was not injected into host cells. Our data indicated that Cag1 is located in the bacterial membrane and is associated with the function of T4SS. PMID:26971262

  6. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction of LGN in complex with the actin-binding protein afadin.

    PubMed

    Carminati, Manuel; Cecatiello, Valentina; Mapelli, Marina

    2016-02-01

    Asymmetric stem-cell divisions are fundamental for morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis. They rely on the coordination between cortical polarity and the orientation of the mitotic spindle, which is orchestrated by microtubule pulling motors recruited at the cortex by NuMA-LGN-Gαi complexes. LGN has emerged as a central component of the spindle-orientation pathway that is conserved throughout species. Its domain structure consists of an N-terminal TPR domain associating with NuMA, followed by four GoLoco motifs binding to Gαi subunits. The LGN(TPR) region is also involved in interactions with other membrane-associated proteins ensuring the correct cortical localization of microtubule motors, among which is the junctional protein afadin. To investigate the architecture of LGN(TPR) in complex with afadin, a chimeric fusion protein with a native linker derived from the region of afadin upstream of the LGN-binding domain was generated. The fusion protein behaves as a globular monomer in solution and readily crystallizes in the presence of sulfate-containing reservoirs. The crystals diffracted to 3.0 Å resolution and belonged to the cubic space group P213, with unit-cell parameter a = 170.3 Å. The structure of the engineered protein revealed that the crystal packing is promoted by the coordination of sulfate ions by residues of the afadin linker region and LGN(TPR).

  7. GEM, a member of the GRAM domain family of proteins, is part of the ABA signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, Nuria; Fernández-Marcos, María; Costas, Celina; Desvoyes, Bénédicte; Pichel, Antonio; Caro, Elena; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is fundamental for plant development. Multiple factors have been identified that participate in the ABA signaling network, although a role of many proteins still await to be demonstrated. Here we have investigated the role of GEM (GL2 EXPRESSION MODULATOR), originally annotated as an ABA-responsive protein. GEM contains a GRAM domain, a feature shared with other eight Arabidopsis proteins for which we propose the name of GRE (GEM-RELATED) proteins. We found that (i) GEM expression responds to ABA, (ii) its promoter contains ABRE sites required for ABA response, and (iii) GEM expression depends on members of the ABA signaling pathway. This is consistent with the expression pattern of GEM during development in plant locations were ABA is known to play a direct role. We also found that GEM binds various phospholipids, e.g. mono and diphosphates and phosphatidic acid, suggesting a potential link of GEM with membrane-associated processes. Consistent with this, we found that the phosphoinositol-4-phosphate kinase PIP5K9 binds GEM in vivo. Finally, we demonstrated a role of GEM in seed dormancy. Together, our data led us to propose that GEM is an ABA-responsive protein that may function downstream of ABI5 as part of the ABA signaling pathway. PMID:26939893

  8. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein-1/CAP1 as a biological target substrate of gelatinase B/MMP-9

    SciTech Connect

    Cauwe, Benedicte; Martens, Erik; Van den Steen, Philippe E.; Proost, Paul; Van Aelst, Ilse; Blockmans, Daniel; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2008-09-10

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are classically associated with the turnover of secreted structural and functional proteins. Although MMPs have been shown to process also a kaleidoscope of membrane-associated substrates, little is known about the processing of intracellular proteins by MMPs. Physiological and pathological cell apoptosis, necrosis and tumor lysis by chemotherapy, radiotherapy or immunological cytotoxicity, are examples of conditions in which an overload of intracellular proteins becomes accessible to the action of MMPs. We used a model system of dying human myelomonocytic cells to study the processing of intracellular protein substrates by gelatinase B/MMP-9 in vitro. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein-1 or CAP1 was identified as a novel and most efficient substrate of gelatinase B/MMP-9. The presence of CAP1 in the extracellular milieu in vivo was documented by analysis of urine of patients with systemic autoimmune diseases. Whereas no active MMP-9 could be detected in urines of healthy controls, all urine samples of patients with clinical parameters of renal failure contained activated MMP-9 and/or MMP-2. In addition, in some of these patients indications of CAP1 cleavage are observed, implying CAP1 degradation in vivo. The high turnover rate of CAP1 by MMP-9, comparable to that of gelatin as the natural extracellular substrate of this enzyme, may be critical to prevent pathological conditions associated with considerable cytolysis.

  9. Human papillomavirus E5 oncoproteins bind the A4 endoplasmic reticulum protein to regulate proliferative ability upon differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kotnik Halavaty, Katarina; Regan, Jennifer; Mehta, Kavi; Laimins, Laimonis

    2014-03-15

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infect stratified epithelia and link their life cycles to epithelial differentiation. The HPV E5 protein plays a role in the productive phase of the HPV life cycle but its mechanism of action is still unclear. We identify a new binding partner of E5, A4, using a membrane-associated yeast-two hybrid system. The A4 protein co-localizes with HPV 31 E5 in perinuclear regions and forms complexes with E5 and Bap31. In normal keratinocytes, A4 is found primarily in basal cells while in HPV positive cells high levels of A4 are seen in both undifferentiated and differentiated cells. Reduction of A4 expression by shRNAs, enhanced HPV genome amplification and increased cell proliferation ability following differentiation but this was not seen in cells lacking E5. Our studies suggest that the A4 protein is an important E5 binding partner that plays a role in regulating cell proliferation ability upon differentiation. - Highlights: • A4 associates with HPV 31 E5 proteins. • A4 is localized to endoplasmic reticulum. • HPV proteins induce A4 expression in suprabasal layers of stratified epithelium. • E5 is important for proliferation ability of differentiating HPV positive cells.

  10. Cellular Solid-State NMR Investigation of a Membrane Protein Using Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Caporini, Marc A.; Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    While an increasing number of structural biology studies successfully demonstrate the power of high-resolution structures and dynamics of membrane proteins in fully understanding their function, there is considerable interest in developing NMR approaches to obtain such information in a cellular setting. As long as the proteins inside the living cell tumble rapidly in the NMR timescale, recently developed in-cell solution NMR approaches can be applied towards the determination of 3D structural information. However, there are numerous challenges that need to be overcome to study membrane proteins inside a cell. Research in our laboratory is focused on developing a combination of solid-state NMR and biological approaches to overcome these challenges with a specific emphasis on obtaining high-resolution structural insights into electron transfer biological processes mediated by membrane-bound proteins like mammalian cytochrome b5, cytochrome P450 and cytochrome P450 reductase. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of using the signal-enhancement rendered by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy for in-cell studies on a membrane-anchored protein. Our experimental results obtained from 13C-labeled membrane-anchored cytochrome b5 in native Escherichia coli cells show a ~16-fold DNP signal enhancement (ε). Further, results obtained from a 2D 13C/13C chemical shift correlation MAS experiment demonstrates that it is highly possible to suppress the background signals from other cellular contents for high-resolution structural studies on membrane proteins. We believe that this study would pave new avenues for high-resolution 3D structural studies on a variety of membrane-associated proteins and their complexes in the cellular context to fully understand their functional roles in physiological processes. PMID:25017802

  11. The number of α-synuclein proteins per vesicle gives insights into its physiological function

    PubMed Central

    Fakhree, Mohammad A. A.; Zijlstra, Niels; Raiss, Christian C.; Siero, Carolus J.; Grabmayr, Heinrich; Bausch, Andreas R.; Blum, Christian; Claessens, Mireille M. A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well established that the protein α-synuclein (αS) plays an important role in Parkinson’s disease, its physiological function remains largely unknown. It has been reported to bind membranes and to play a role in membrane remodeling processes. The mechanism by which αS remodels membranes is still debated; it may either affect its physical properties or act as a chaperone for other membrane associated proteins. To obtain insight into the role of αS in membrane remodeling we investigated the number of αS proteins associated with single small vesicles in a neuronal cell model. Using single-molecule microscopy and photo-bleaching approaches, we most frequently found 70 αS-GFPs per vesicle. Although this number is high enough to modulate physical membrane properties, it is also strikingly similar to the number of synaptobrevins, a putative interaction partner of αS, per vesicle. We therefore hypothesize a dual, synergistic role for αS in membrane remodeling. PMID:27477055

  12. Multidrug resistance protein 1 localization in lipid raft domains and prostasomes in prostate cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Gomà, Alba; Mir, Roser; Martínez-Soler, Fina; Tortosa, Avelina; Vidal, August; Condom, Enric; Pérez–Tomás, Ricardo; Giménez-Bonafé, Pepita

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the problems in prostate cancer (CaP) treatment is the appearance of the multidrug resistance phenotype, in which ATP-binding cassette transporters such as multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) play a role. Different localizations of the transporter have been reported, some of them related to the chemoresistant phenotype. Aim This study aimed to compare the localization of MRP1 in three prostate cell lines (normal, androgen-sensitive, and androgen-independent) in order to understand its possible role in CaP chemoresistance. Methods MRP1 and caveolae protein markers were detected using confocal microscopy, performing colocalization techniques. Lipid raft isolation made it possible to detect these proteins by Western blot analysis. Caveolae and prostasomes were identified by electron microscopy. Results We show that MRP1 is found in lipid raft fractions of tumor cells and that the number of caveolae increases with malignancy acquisition. MRP1 is found not only in the plasma membrane associated with lipid rafts but also in cytoplasmic accumulations colocalizing with the prostasome markers Caveolin-1 and CD59, suggesting that in CaP cells, MRP1 is localized in prostasomes. Conclusion We hypothesize that the presence of MRP1 in prostasomes could serve as a reservoir of MRP1; thus, taking advantage of the release of their content, MRP1 could be translocated to the plasma membrane contributing to the chemoresistant phenotype. The presence of MRP1 in prostasomes could serve as a predictor of malignancy in CaP. PMID:25525371

  13. Structural basis of lantibiotic recognition by the nisin resistance protein from Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Khosa, Sakshi; Frieg, Benedikt; Mulnaes, Daniel; Kleinschrodt, Diana; Hoeppner, Astrid; Gohlke, Holger; Smits, Sander H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Lantibiotics are potent antimicrobial peptides. Nisin is the most prominent member and contains five crucial lanthionine rings. Some clinically relevant bacteria express membrane-associated resistance proteins that proteolytically inactivate nisin. However, substrate recognition and specificity of these proteins is unknown. Here, we report the first three-dimensional structure of a nisin resistance protein from Streptococcus agalactiae (SaNSR) at 2.2 Å resolution. It contains an N-terminal helical bundle, and protease cap and core domains. The latter harbors the highly conserved TASSAEM region, which lies in a hydrophobic tunnel formed by all domains. By integrative modeling, mutagenesis studies, and genetic engineering of nisin variants, a model of the SaNSR/nisin complex is generated, revealing that SaNSR recognizes the last C-terminally located lanthionine ring of nisin. This determines the substrate specificity of SaNSR and ensures the exact coordination of the nisin cleavage site at the TASSAEM region. PMID:26727488

  14. The number of α-synuclein proteins per vesicle gives insights into its physiological function.

    PubMed

    Fakhree, Mohammad A A; Zijlstra, Niels; Raiss, Christian C; Siero, Carolus J; Grabmayr, Heinrich; Bausch, Andreas R; Blum, Christian; Claessens, Mireille M A E

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well established that the protein α-synuclein (αS) plays an important role in Parkinson's disease, its physiological function remains largely unknown. It has been reported to bind membranes and to play a role in membrane remodeling processes. The mechanism by which αS remodels membranes is still debated; it may either affect its physical properties or act as a chaperone for other membrane associated proteins. To obtain insight into the role of αS in membrane remodeling we investigated the number of αS proteins associated with single small vesicles in a neuronal cell model. Using single-molecule microscopy and photo-bleaching approaches, we most frequently found 70 αS-GFPs per vesicle. Although this number is high enough to modulate physical membrane properties, it is also strikingly similar to the number of synaptobrevins, a putative interaction partner of αS, per vesicle. We therefore hypothesize a dual, synergistic role for αS in membrane remodeling. PMID:27477055

  15. The Troyer syndrome (SPG20) protein spartin interacts with Eps15

    SciTech Connect

    Bakowska, Joanna C.; Jenkins, Russell; Pendleton, James; Blackstone, Craig . E-mail: blackstc@ninds.nih.gov

    2005-09-09

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias comprise a group of inherited neurological disorders in which the primary manifestation is spastic weakness of the lower extremities. Troyer syndrome is an autosomal recessive form of spastic paraplegia caused by a frameshift mutation in the spartin (SPG20) gene. Currently, neither the localization nor the functions of the spartin protein are known. In this study, we generated anti-spartin antibodies and found that spartin is both cytosolic and membrane-associated. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach, we screened an adult human brain library for binding partners of spartin. We identified Eps15, a protein known to be involved in endocytosis and the control of cell proliferation. This interaction was confirmed by fusion protein 'pull-down' experiments as well as a cellular redistribution assay. Our results suggest that spartin might be involved in endocytosis, vesicle trafficking, or mitogenic activity, and that impairment in one of these processes may underlie the long axonopathy in patients with Troyer syndrome.

  16. Targeting Toxoplasma Tubules: Tubulin, Microtubules, and Associated Proteins in a Human Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that causes serious opportunistic infections, birth defects, and blindness in humans. Microtubules are critically important components of diverse structures that are used throughout the Toxoplasma life cycle. As in other eukaryotes, spindle microtubules are required for chromosome segregation during replication. Additionally, a set of membrane-associated microtubules is essential for the elongated shape of invasive “zoites,” and motility follows a spiral trajectory that reflects the path of these microtubules. Toxoplasma zoites also construct an intricate, tubulin-based apical structure, termed the conoid, which is important for host cell invasion and associates with proteins typically found in the flagellar apparatus. Last, microgametes specifically construct a microtubule-containing flagellar axoneme in order to fertilize macrogametes, permitting genetic recombination. The specialized roles of these microtubule populations are mediated by distinct sets of associated proteins. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of tubulin, microtubule populations, and associated proteins in Toxoplasma; these components are used for both novel and broadly conserved processes that are essential for parasite survival. PMID:25380753

  17. Distribution of the scaffolding proteins PSD-95, PSD-93, and SAP97 in isolated PSDs.

    PubMed

    DeGiorgis, Joseph A; Galbraith, James A; Dosemeci, Ayse; Chen, Xiaobing; Reese, Thomas S

    2006-12-01

    We compared the distribution of three scaffolding proteins, all belonging to a family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases, thought to have key roles in the organization of the postsynaptic density (PSD). Isolated PSDs readily adhered to treated glass coverslips where they were labeled with immunogold and rotary shadowed for analysis by EM. The distribution of proteins within individual PSDs were measured by counting and mapping individual immunogold particles. PSD-95, as previously described, is distributed evenly throughout the PSD. We find here that PSD-93 has a nearly identical distribution suggesting that PSD-95 and PSD-93 could perform similar roles. SAP97, in contrast, is concentrated near edges of cleft sides of the PSDs, and in small clumps on their cytoplasmic sides. The homogenous distribution of PSD-95 and PSD-93 throughout the PSD is consistent with their being part of a backbone that stabilizes their various binding partners within the PSD. The distribution of SAP97 confirms that this protein is actually an integral component of the PSD, and suggests that it may have a role in inserting or stabilizing its main binding partner, Glu-R1, at the edge of the PSD. PMID:18392731

  18. HETEROLOGOUS PRODUCTION, PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ENZYMATICALLY ACTIVE SINDBIS VIRUS NONSTRUCTURAL PROTEIN NSP1

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, Shailly; Narwal, Manju; Harms, Etti; Smith, Janet L.; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Alphavirus nonstructural protein nsP1 possesses distinct methyltransferase (MTase) and guanylyltransferase (GTase) activities involved in the capping of viral RNAs. In alphaviruses, the methylation of GTP occurs before RNA transguanylation and nsP1 forms a covalent complex with m7GMP unlike the host mRNA guanylyltransferase which forms GMP-enzyme complex. In this study, full length SINV nsP1 was expressed in a soluble form with an N-terminal histidine tag in Escherichia coli and purified to homegeneity. The purified protein is enzymatically active and contains both MTase and GTase activity indicating that SINV nsP1 does not require membrane association for its enzymatic function. Biochemical analysis shows that detergents abolish nsP1 GTase activity, whereas nonionic detergents do not affect MTase activity. Furthermore, SINV nsP1 contains the metal-ion dependent GTase whereas MTase does not require a metal ion. Circular dichroism spectroscopic analyses of purified protein indicate that nsP1 has a mixed α/β structure and is in the folded native conformation. PMID:21693190

  19. Heterologous production, purification and characterization of enzymatically active Sindbis virus nonstructural protein nsP1.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Shailly; Narwal, Manju; Harms, Etti; Smith, Janet L; Kuhn, Richard J

    2011-10-01

    Alphavirus nonstructural protein nsP1 possesses distinct methyltransferase (MTase) and guanylyltransferase (GTase) activities involved in the capping of viral RNAs. In alphaviruses, the methylation of GTP occurs before RNA transguanylation and nsP1 forms a covalent complex with m(7)GMP unlike the host mRNA guanylyltransferase which forms GMP-enzyme complex. In this study, full length SINV nsP1 was expressed in a soluble form with an N-terminal histidine tag in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein is enzymatically active and contains both MTase and GTase activity indicating that SINV nsP1 does not require membrane association for its enzymatic function. Biochemical analysis shows that detergents abolish nsP1 GTase activity, whereas nonionic detergents do not affect MTase activity. Furthermore, SINV nsP1 contains the metal-ion dependent GTase, whereas MTase does not require a metal ion. Circular dichroism spectroscopic analysis of purified protein indicate that nsP1 has a mixed α/β structure and is in the folded native conformation. PMID:21693190

  20. Identification of domains mediating transcriptional activation and cytoplasmic export in the caudal homeobox protein Cdx-3.

    PubMed

    Trinh, K Y; Jin, T; Drucker, D J

    1999-02-26

    The caudal genes have important functions in embryonic development and cell differentiation. The caudal-related protein Cdx-2/3 (the protein designated Cdx-2 in the mouse and Cdx-3 in the hamster) is expressed in the gastrointestinal epithelium and in islet and enteroendocrine cells, where it activates proglucagon gene transcription. We show here that Cdx-3 sequences amino-terminal to the homeodomain (amino acids 1-180) function as a heterologous transcriptional activation domain when fused to the LexA DNA binding domain. A Cdx-3-Pit-1 fusion protein containing only the first 83 amino acids of Cdx-3 linked to the POU domain of Pit-1 markedly stimulated the transcriptional activity of a Pit-1-responsive promoter. Analysis of the transcriptional properties of Cdx-3 mutants in fibroblasts and islet cells revealed distinct amino-terminal subdomains that function in a cell-specific manner. Point mutations within the amino-terminal A domain were associated with reduced transcriptional activity. Furthermore, internal deletions and selected point mutations within domain A, but not the B or C domains, resulted in accumulation of mutant Cdx-3 in the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, mutation of an Asp-Lys-Asp motif within domain A identified a putative cytoplasmic membrane-associated export signal that mediates Cdx-3 compartmentalization. These experiments delineate unique activities for specific amino-terminal sequences that are functionally important for Cdx-3 biological activity.

  1. Protein sulfhydration.

    PubMed

    Paul, Bindu D; Snyder, Solomon H

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is one of the gasotransmitters that modulates various biological processes and participates in multiple signaling pathways. H2S signals by a process termed sulfhydration. Sulfhydration has recently been recognized as a posttranslational modification similar to nitrosylation. Sulfhydration occurs at reactive cysteine residues in proteins and results in the conversion of an -SH group of cysteine to an -SSH or a persulfide group. Sulfhydration is highly prevalent in vivo, and aberrant sulfhydration patterns have been observed under several pathological conditions ranging from heart disease to neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease. The biotin switch assay, originally developed to detect nitrosylation, has been modified to detect sulfhydration. In this chapter, we discuss the physiological roles of sulfhydration and the methodologies used to detect this modification.

  2. A Novel Pex14 Protein-interacting Site of Human Pex5 Is Critical for Matrix Protein Import into Peroxisomes*♦

    PubMed Central

    Neuhaus, Alexander; Kooshapur, Hamed; Wolf, Janina; Meyer, N. Helge; Madl, Tobias; Saidowsky, Jürgen; Hambruch, Eva; Lazam, Anissa; Jung, Martin; Sattler, Michael; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Protein import into peroxisomes relies on the import receptor Pex5, which recognizes proteins with a peroxisomal targeting signal 1 (PTS1) in the cytosol and directs them to a docking complex at the peroxisomal membrane. Receptor-cargo docking occurs at the membrane-associated protein Pex14. In human cells, this interaction is mediated by seven conserved diaromatic penta-peptide motifs (WXXX(F/Y) motifs) in the N-terminal half of Pex5 and the N-terminal domain of Pex14. A systematic screening of a Pex5 peptide library by ligand blot analysis revealed a novel Pex5-Pex14 interaction site of Pex5. The novel motif composes the sequence LVAEF with the evolutionarily conserved consensus sequence LVXEF. Replacement of the amino acid LVAEF sequence by alanines strongly affects matrix protein import into peroxisomes in vivo. The NMR structure of a complex of Pex5-(57–71) with the Pex14-N-terminal domain showed that the novel motif binds in a similar α-helical orientation as the WXXX(F/Y) motif but that the tryptophan pocket is now occupied by a leucine residue. Surface plasmon resonance analyses revealed 33 times faster dissociation rates for the LVXEF ligand when compared with a WXXX(F/Y) motif. Surprisingly, substitution of the novel motif with the higher affinity WXXX(F/Y) motif impairs protein import into peroxisomes. These data indicate that the distinct kinetic properties of the novel Pex14-binding site in Pex5 are important for processing of the peroxisomal targeting signal 1 receptor at the peroxisomal membrane. The novel Pex14-binding site may represent the initial tethering site of Pex5 from which the cargo-loaded receptor is further processed in a sequential manner. PMID:24235149

  3. Identification of a novel protein encoded by the BamHI A region of the Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed Central

    Fries, K L; Sculley, T B; Webster-Cyriaque, J; Rajadurai, P; Sadler, R H; Raab-Traub, N

    1997-01-01

    An unusual set of 3' coterminal, spliced mRNAs transcribed through the BamHI A fragment have been previously identified in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) tissues. These RNAs have also been detected at low levels in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cell lines and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphocytes. Sequence analyses of clones from a cDNA library derived from the C15 NPC tumor indicated that the primary transcripts are differentially spliced, giving rise to a family of related transcripts, all of which encompass the BARF0 open reading frame (ORF) at the 3' end of the transcripts. One cDNA was identified that extended the BARF0 ORF at the 5' end, forming the RK-BARF0 ORF. In this study, a rabbit antiserum to a synthetic peptide representing an amino acid sequence encoded by the BARF0 ORF was prepared. This antiserum detected a glutathione S-transferase-BARF0 fusion protein and both BARF0 and RK-BARF0 proteins expressed from transfected constructs in H1299 cells. The serum also immunoprecipitated the 20-kDa BARF0 and 30-kDa RK-BARF0 in vitro-translated proteins. Immunoblot analyses identified a protein doublet of 30 and 35 kDa in all of the EBV-infected cell lines tested. Cellular fractionation studies revealed that the proteins were membrane associated. The sizes of the proteins detected in cell lines and their association with membranes suggests that they are likely encoded by the RK-BARF0 transcript, which is predicted to contain a membrane localization signal. The proteins were also detected in protein extracts prepared from NPC biopsies and a BL biopsy but not from hairy leukoplakia, a permissive EBV infection. These results reveal that the rightward RNA transcripts from the BamHI A region of EBV encode one or more proteins that are expressed in latently infected cells and in tumor tissue. PMID:9060630

  4. PDZ Affinity Chromatography: A general method for affinity purification of proteins based on PDZ domains and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G.; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2014-01-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, DiscsLarge, ZO1) domains function in nature as protein binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise ~ 90 residues and make specific, high affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, with other PDZ domains, and with phospholipids. We hypothesized that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands would make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. Here we describe a novel affinity chromatography method applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We created a series of affinity resins comprised of PDZ domains from the scaffold protein PSD-95, or from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), coupled to solid supports. We used them to purify heterologously expressed neuronal proteins or protein domains containing endogenous PDZ domain ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. We show that Proteins of Interest (POIs) lacking endogenous PDZ domain ligands can be engineered as fusion products containing C-terminal PDZ domain ligand peptides or internal, N- or C-terminal PDZ domains and then can be purified by the same method. Using this method, we recovered recombinant GFP fused to a PDZ-domain ligand in active form as verified by fluorescence yield. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and β-Galactosidase (LacZ) fused to a C-terminal PDZ domain ligand or an N-terminal PDZ domain were purified in active form as assessed by enzymatic assay. In general, PDZ domains and ligands derived from PSD-95 were superior to those from nNOS for this method. PDZ Domain Affinity Chromatography promises to be a versatile and effective method for purification of a wide variety of natural and recombinant proteins. PMID:24607360

  5. Comparative Proteome Analysis Reveals Four Novel Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) Granule-Associated Proteins in Ralstonia eutropha H16

    PubMed Central

    Sznajder, Anna; Pfeiffer, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Identification of proteins that were present in a polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granule fraction isolated from Ralstonia eutropha but absent in the soluble, membrane, and membrane-associated fractions revealed the presence of only 12 polypeptides with PHB-specific locations plus 4 previously known PHB-associated proteins with multiple locations. None of the previously postulated PHB depolymerase isoenzymes (PhaZa2 to PhaZa5, PhaZd1, and PhaZd2) and none of the two known 3-hydroxybutyrate oligomer hydrolases (PhaZb and PhaZc) were significantly present in isolated PHB granules. Four polypeptides were found that had not yet been identified in PHB granules. Three of the novel proteins are putative α/β-hydrolases, and two of those (A0671 and B1632) have a PHB synthase/depolymerase signature. The third novel protein (A0225) is a patatin-like phospholipase, a type of enzyme that has not been described for PHB granules of any PHB-accumulating species. No function has been ascribed to the fourth protein (A2001), but its encoding gene forms an operon with phaB2 (acetoacetyl-coenzyme A [CoA] reductase) and phaC2 (PHB synthase), and this is in line with a putative function in PHB metabolism. The localization of the four new proteins at the PHB granule surface was confirmed in vivo by fluorescence microscopy of constructed fusion proteins with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP). Deletion of A0671 and B1632 had a minor but detectable effect on the PHB mobilization ability in the stationary growth phase of nutrient broth (NB)-gluconate cells, confirming the functional involvement of both proteins in PHB metabolism. PMID:25548058

  6. Extensive Association of Functionally and Cytotopically Related mRNAs with Puf Family RNA-Binding Proteins in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Genes encoding RNA-binding proteins are diverse and abundant in eukaryotic genomes. Although some have been shown to have roles in post-transcriptional regulation of the expression of specific genes, few of these proteins have been studied systematically. We have used an affinity tag to isolate each of the five members of the Puf family of RNA-binding proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and DNA microarrays to comprehensively identify the associated mRNAs. Distinct groups of 40–220 different mRNAs with striking common themes in the functions and subcellular localization of the proteins they encode are associated with each of the five Puf proteins: Puf3p binds nearly exclusively to cytoplasmic mRNAs that encode mitochondrial proteins; Puf1p and Puf2p interact preferentially with mRNAs encoding membrane-associated proteins; Puf4p preferentially binds mRNAs encoding nucleolar ribosomal RNA-processing factors; and Puf5p is associated with mRNAs encoding chromatin modifiers and components of the spindle pole body. We identified distinct sequence motifs in the 3′-untranslated regions of the mRNAs bound by Puf3p, Puf4p, and Puf5p. Three-hybrid assays confirmed the role of these motifs in specific RNA–protein interactions in vivo. The results suggest that combinatorial tagging of transcripts by specific RNA-binding proteins may be a general mechanism for coordinated control of the localization, translation, and decay of mRNAs and thus an integral part of the global gene expression program. PMID:15024427

  7. Triton X-114 phase fractionation of membrane proteins of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans R2.

    PubMed

    Bricker, T M; Sherman, L A

    1984-11-15

    The thylakoid polypeptides of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans R2 were analyzed by Triton X-114 phase fractionation [C. Bordier (1981) J. Biol. Chem. 256, 1604-1607, as adapted for photosynthetic membranes by T.M. Bricker and L.A. Sherman (1982) FEBS Lett. 149, 197-202]. In this procedure, polypeptides with extensive hydrophobic regions (i.e., intrinsic proteins) form mixed micelles with Triton X-114, and are separated from extrinsic proteins by temperature-mediated precipitation of the mixed Triton X-114-intrinsic protein micelles. The polypeptide pattern after phase fractionation was highly complementary, with 62 of the observed 110 polypeptide components partitioning into the Triton X-114-enriched fraction. Identified polypeptides fractionating into the Triton X-114 phase included the apoproteins for Photosystems I and II, cytochromes f and b6, and the herbicide-binding protein. Identified polypeptides fractioning into the Triton X-114-depleted (aqueous) phase included the large and small subunits of RuBp carboxylase, cytochromes c550 and c554, and ferredoxin. Enzymatic radioiodination of the photosynthetic membranes followed by Triton X-114 phase fractionation allowed direct identification of intrinsic polypeptide components which possess surface-exposed regions susceptible to radioiodination. The most prominent of these polypeptides was a 34-kDa component which was associated with photosystem II. This phase partitioning procedure has been particularly helpful in the clarification of the identity of the membrane-associated cytochromes, and of photosystem II components. When coupled with surface-probing techniques, this procedure is very useful in identifying intrinsic proteins which possess surface-exposed domains. Phase fractionation, in conjunction with the isolation of specific membrane components and complexes, has allowed the identification of many of the important intrinsic thylakoid membrane proteins of A. nidulans R2.

  8. Association of the Astrovirus Structural Protein VP90 with Membranes Plays a Role in Virus Morphogenesis▿

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Ernesto; Aguirre-Crespo, Gabriela; Zavala, Guadalupe; Arias, Carlos F.

    2007-01-01

    VP90, the capsid polyprotein precursor of human astrovirus Yuc8, is assembled into viral particles, and its processing at the carboxy terminus by cellular caspases, to yield VP70, has been correlated with the cell release of the virus. Here, we characterized the effect of the VP90-VP70 processing on the properties of these proteins, as well as on their intracellular distribution. VP90 was found in membrane-enriched fractions (mVP90), as well as in fractions enriched in cytosolic proteins (cVP90), while VP70 was found exclusively in the latter fractions. Upon trypsin activation, infectivity was detected in all VP90-containing fractions, confirming that both mVP90 and cVP90 are able to assemble into particles; however, the two forms of VP90 showed differential sensitivities to trypsin, especially at their carboxy termini, which in the case of mVP90 was shown to remain membrane associated after protease digestion. Structural protein oligomers were detected in purified VP70-containing viruses, as well as in membrane-enriched fractions, but they were less evident in cytosolic fractions. Ultrastructural studies of infected cells revealed different types of viral particles, some of which appeared to be associated with membranes. By immunoelectron microscopy, structural proteins were shown to form virus particles in clusters and to associate with the edges of vesicles induced during infection, which also appear to contain subviral particles inside. Nonstructural proteins and viral RNA colocalized with mVP90, but not with cVP90, suggesting that mVP90 might represent the form of the protein that is initially assembled into particles, at the sites where the virus genome is being replicated. PMID:17652389

  9. Hydrodynamic and Membrane Binding Properties of Purified Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Hirsh; Fang, Xianyang; Wen, Yi; Barros, Marilia; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan; Vogt, Volker M.

    2015-01-01

    and can adopt a folded-over conformation on a lipid bilayer, implicating both the N and C termini in membrane binding. In addition, binding of Gag to membranes is diminished when either terminal domain is truncated. RSV Gag membrane association is significantly less sensitive than HIV Gag membrane association to lipid acyl chain saturation. These findings shed light on Gag assembly and membrane binding, critical steps in the viral life cycle and an untapped target for antiretroviral drugs. PMID:26246573

  10. Fusion-protein-assisted protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Kobe, Bostjan; Ve, Thomas; Williams, Simon J

    2015-07-01

    Fusion proteins can be used directly in protein crystallization to assist crystallization in at least two different ways. In one approach, the `heterologous fusion-protein approach', the fusion partner can provide additional surface area to promote crystal contact formation. In another approach, the `fusion of interacting proteins approach', protein assemblies can be stabilized by covalently linking the interacting partners. The linker connecting the proteins plays different roles in the two applications: in the first approach a rigid linker is required to reduce conformational heterogeneity; in the second, conversely, a flexible linker is required that allows the native interaction between the fused proteins. The two approaches can also be combined. The recent applications of fusion-protein technology in protein crystallization from the work of our own and other laboratories are briefly reviewed.

  11. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  12. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  13. IL-1beta-induced nitric oxide release from insulin-secreting beta-cells: further evidence for the involvement of GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Tannous, M; Veluthakal, R; Amin, R; Kowluru, A

    2002-12-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated regulatory roles for G-proteins (e.g., H-Ras) in IL-1beta induced NO release from HIT-T15 cells. Herein, we report a similar regulatory mechanism for IL-1beta induced NO release from RIN5F and INS-1 cells. Our data indicate that functional inactivation of Ras, either by Clostridial toxins or by specific inhibitors of Ras function, results in a significant inhibition in IL-1beta induced NO release, suggesting that activation of specific G-proteins is essential for IL-1beta induced NO release. In the present study, we report possible loci where IL-1beta treatment might result in functional activation of these G-proteins. For example, IL-1beta treatment resulted in significant reduction in (high-and low-affinity) GTPase activities in lysates derived from normal rat islets; such a scenario might lead to retention of candidate G-proteins in GTP-bound, active conformation. Further, IL-1beta treatment increased the G-protein carboxyl methyl transferase activity as well as carboxyl methylation of endogenous beta-cell proteins; such a modification has been shown to increase the membrane association and interaction of these G-proteins with their respective effector proteins. Also, we report immunologic localization of H-Ras regulatory proteins including its nucleotide exchange factor (GRF-1) and its effector protein (eg., Raf-1) in isolated beta-cells. Together, our data indicate localization, and regulation by IL-1beta, of specific enzymes that are critical to activation of G-proteins. Based on these preliminary findings, we propose a model for the involvement of G-proteins in IL-1beta induced NO release and subsequent demise of the pancreatic beta-cell. PMID:12688637

  14. Development of Solid State NMR Methods for the Structural Characterization of Membrane Proteins: Applications to Understand Multiple Sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cosman, M; Tran, A T; Ulloa, J; Maxwell, R S

    2003-03-04

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a relapsing-remitting disorder of the central nervous system that results in the loss of the myelin sheaths insulating nerve fibers (axons). Strong evidence suggests that MS is an autoimmune disease mediated by T-cell and antibody responses against myelin antigens. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a 26 kD to 28 kD an integral membrane protein of the central nervous system implicated as a target for autoaggressive antibodies in MS. To date, the conformation of MOG in association with the myelin membrane is unknown and the exact nature of the interactions between this protein and disease-inducing immune responses have not been determined. Since membrane associated proteins are typically characterized by decreased correlation times, solution state NMR methodologies are often impracticable. Membrane proteins are also often difficult to crystallize for X-ray diffraction studies, Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop new structure characterization tools for this important class of biomolecules. The research described here overviews the initial stages of our effort to develop an integrated, NMR based approach to structural studies of MOG over the many structural domains it is postulated to posses. The structural knowledge gained about this important MS antigen in its native environment will contribute significantly to our understanding of its function in vivo. This project will also aid in the development of therapeutics to inhibit the antigedantibody interaction and thus prevent demyelination in MS patients.

  15. Discovery of sialyl Lewis A and Lewis X modified protein cancer biomarkers using high density antibody arrays

    PubMed Central

    Rho, Jung-hyun; Mead, Judson R.; Wright, W. Shea; Brenner, Dean E.; James, W. Stave; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.; Lampe, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a high-dimensional method to globally profile glycoproteins that are modified with sialyl Lewis A or Lewis X glycans. Specifically, glycoproteins in serum or plasma are fractionated on a high-density antibody microarray (i.e., each are localized to their specific antibody spot) and are specifically detected via fluorescently labeled anti-sialyl Lewis A or anti- Lewis X antibodies with quantification in a microarray scanner. Non-glycosylated proteins or glycoproteins with other glycan motifs do not interfere with this assay. The whole process is very rapid and applicable for high-throughput screening without the need for purification of glycoproteins from the samples. Using these methods, sialyl Lewis A or Lewis X moieties were found to be expressed on many previously unreported secreted or membrane associated proteins. Furthermore, the combination of sialyl Lewis A or Lewis X content with protein level increased the ability of certain glycoproteins to distinguish 30 patients with stage III and IV colon cancer from 60 control samples. Thus, this highly sensitive method is capable of discovering novel specific glycan modifications on proteins, many of which will likely be useful for disease detection and monitoring. PMID:24185138

  16. A sequence-specific protease cleaves a maternal, cortical protein during early embryogenesis in Sciara coprophila (Diptera).

    PubMed

    Ruder, F J; Fischer, R; Büsen, W

    1990-08-01

    One of the first events of egg activation in Sciara coprophila (Diptera) is the disappearance of an abundant maternal 38-kDa protein (p38) and the simultaneous emergence of an abundant 35-kDa protein (p35). Western blotting experiments using monoclonal antibodies directed against p38 reveal that p38 and p35 are serologically related and indicate that maternal p38 is transformed into p35 during early development. This transition is possibly accompanied by a conformational change in the part of the protein that is common to both protein species. The processing of p38 to p35 can be mimicked by trypsin treatment in vitro, suggesting that a trypsin-like protease is responsible for this conversion in vivo. Immunostaining indicates that the p38 class of antigens is evenly distributed in the periplasm of early cleavage embryos. After the arrival of nuclei in the periplasm, the antigens become associated with the infolding cellular membranes. A similar membrane association of actin can be observed with anti-actin antibodies. Nevertheless, p38 and actin are clearly distinct from each other. We presume that p38 is a product of a maternal effect gene necessary for early dipteran development.

  17. Cloning and characterization of CSP37, a novel gene encoding a putative membrane protein of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Sentandreu, M; Nieto, A; Iborra, A; Elorza, M V; Ponton, J; Fonzi, W A; Sentandreu, R

    1997-01-01

    In the course of an analysis of the functions and assembly of the cell wall of Candida albicans, we have cloned and characterized a gene, which we designated CSP37 (cell surface protein), encoding a 37-kDa polypeptide which is a membrane-associated protein. The gene was isolated by immunological screening of a DNA library constructed from mycelial cells with a polyclonal serum raised against cell walls of this morphology. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of a corresponding genomic DNA fragment revealed a single open reading frame which encodes a predicted protein of 321 amino acids with no significant homology to others in the databases. Disruption of the CSP37 gene by the method described by Fonzi and Irwin (Genetics 134:717-728, 1993) eliminated expression of the Csp37 protein. The mutant strains showed no apparent defect in cell viability, growth, or cell wall assembly but displayed attenuated virulence in systemic infections induced in mice and reduced the ability to adhere to polystyrene. PMID:9244249

  18. Interaction of syncollin with GP-2, the major membrane protein of pancreatic zymogen granules, and association with lipid microdomains.

    PubMed Central

    Kalus, Ina; Hodel, Alois; Koch, Annett; Kleene, Ralf; Edwardson, J Michael; Schrader, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Syncollin, a novel pancreatic zymogen granule protein, is present on the luminal side of the granule membrane. To address the function of syncollin, we searched for putative binding partners. Cross-linking experiments with purified syncollin, and granule content and membrane proteins revealed a direct interaction between syncollin and GP-2, a major glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane glycoprotein. An interaction was also observed when cross-linking was performed with recombinant GP-2. In addition, syncollin could be cross-linked to itself, supporting the suggestion that it exists as a homo-oligomer. Cleavage of the GPI anchor of GP-2 by treatment of granule membranes with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C had no effect on the membrane attachment of syncollin, indicating that it is not mediated exclusively via an interaction with GP-2. Syncollin was found to be associated with detergent-insoluble cholesterol/glycolipid-enriched complexes. These complexes floated to the lighter fractions of sucrose-density gradients and also contained GP-2, the lectin ZG16p, sulphated matrix proteoglycans and the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) syntaxin 3 and synaptobrevin 2. Our results indicate that membrane-associated syncollin is a component of lipid rafts, where it interacts both with GP-2 and membrane lipids. We suggest that the syncollin-GP-2 complex might play a role in signal transduction across the granule membrane. PMID:11853552

  19. Interaction of the Full-length Bax Protein with Biomimetic Mitochondrial Liposomes: A Small-Angle Neutron Scattering and Fluorescence Study

    SciTech Connect

    Satsoura, D; Kucerka, Norbert; Shivakumar, S; Pencer, J; Griffiths, C; Leber, B; Andrews, D.W; Katsaras, John; Fradin, C

    2012-01-01

    In response to apoptotic stimuli, the pro-apoptotic protein Bax inserts in the outer mitochondrial membrane, resulting in the formation of pores and the release of several mitochondrial components, and sealing the cell's fate. To study the binding of Bax to membranes, we used an in vitro system consisting of 50 nm diameter liposomes prepared with a lipid composition mimicking that of mitochondrial membranes in which recombinant purified full-length Bax was inserted via activation with purified tBid. We detected the association of the protein with the membrane using fluorescence fluctuation methods, and found that it could well be described by an equilibrium between soluble and membrane-bound Bax and that at a high protein-toliposome ratio the binding seemed to saturate at about 15 Bax proteins per 50 nm diameter liposome. We then obtained structural data for samples in this saturated binding regime using small-angle neutron scattering under different contrast matching conditions. Utilizing a simple model to fit the neutron data, we observed that a significant amount of the protein mass protrudes above the membrane, in contrast to the conjecture that all of the membrane-associated Bax states are umbrella-like. Upon protein binding, we also observed a thinning of the lipid bilayer accompanied by an increase in liposome radius, an effect reminiscent of the action of antimicrobial peptides on membranes.

  20. Identification of Ca2+-dependent binding partners for the neuronal calcium sensor protein neurocalcin delta: interaction with actin, clathrin and tubulin.

    PubMed Central

    Ivings, Lenka; Pennington, Stephen R; Jenkins, Roz; Weiss, Jamie L; Burgoyne, Robert D

    2002-01-01

    The neuronal calcium sensors are a family of EF-hand-containing Ca(2+)-binding proteins expressed predominantly in retinal photoreceptors and neurons. One of the family members is neurocalcin delta, the function of which is unknown. As an approach to elucidating the protein interactions made by neurocalcin delta, we have identified brain cytosolic proteins that bind to neurocalcin delta in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. We used immobilized recombinant myristoylated neurocalcin delta combined with protein identification using MS. We demonstrate a specific interaction with clathrin heavy chain, alpha- and beta-tubulin, and actin. These interactions were dependent upon myristoylation of neurocalcin delta indicating that the N-terminal myristoyl group may be important for protein-protein interactions in addition to membrane association. Direct binding of neurocalcin delta to clathrin, tubulin and actin was confirmed using an overlay assay. These interactions were also demonstrated for endogenous neurocalcin delta by co-immunoprecipitation from rat brain cytosol. When expressed in HeLa cells, neurocalcin delta was cytosolic at resting Ca(2+) levels but translocated to membranes, including a perinuclear compartment (trans-Golgi network) where it co-localized with clathrin, following Ca(2+) elevation. These data suggest the possibility that neurocalcin delta functions in the control of clathrin-coated vesicle traffic. PMID:11964161

  1. Ca2(+)-dependent interaction of N-copine, a member of the two C2 domain protein family, with OS-9, the product of a gene frequently amplified in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, T; Yaoi, T; Kuwajima, G; Yoshie, O; Sakata, T

    1999-06-18

    N-copine is a novel two C2 domain protein that shows Ca2(+)-dependent phospholipid binding and membrane association. By using yeast two-hybrid assays, we identified OS-9 as a protein capable of interacting with N-copine. We further revealed that the second C2 domain of N-copine bound with the carboxy-terminal region of OS-9. Their interaction in vivo was also confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation from 293E cells co-expressing transfected N-copine and OS-9. In vitro binding assays showed that this interaction was Ca2(+)-dependent. By Northern blot analysis, N-copine and OS-9 were co-expressed in the same regions of human brain. These results reveal that OS-9 is a potential target of N-copine. PMID:10403379

  2. Mutations of C19orf12, coding for a transmembrane glycine zipper containing mitochondrial protein, cause mis-localization of the protein, inability to respond to oxidative stress and increased mitochondrial Ca²⁺.

    PubMed

    Venco, Paola; Bonora, Massimo; Giorgi, Carlotta; Papaleo, Elena; Iuso, Arcangela; Prokisch, Holger; Pinton, Paolo; Tiranti, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in C19orf12 have been identified in patients affected by Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA), a clinical entity characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. By using western blot analysis with specific antibody and confocal studies, we showed that wild-type C19orf12 protein was not exclusively present in mitochondria, but also in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and MAM (Mitochondria Associated Membrane), while mutant C19orf12 variants presented a different localization. Moreover, after induction of oxidative stress, a GFP-tagged C19orf12 wild-type protein was able to relocate to the cytosol. On the contrary, mutant isoforms were not able to respond to oxidative stress. High mitochondrial calcium concentration and increased H2O2 induced apoptosis were found in fibroblasts derived from one patient as compared to controls. C19orf12 protein is a 17 kDa mitochondrial membrane-associated protein whose function is still unknown. Our in silico investigation suggests that, the glycine zipper motifs of C19orf12 form helical regions spanning the membrane. The N- and C-terminal regions with respect to the transmembrane portion, on the contrary, are predicted to rearrange in a structural domain, which is homologs to the N-terminal regulatory domain of the magnesium transporter MgtE, suggesting that C19orf12 may act as a regulatory protein for human MgtE transporters. The mutations here described affect respectively one glycine residue of the glycine zipper motifs, which are involved in dimerization of transmembrane helices and predicted to impair the correct localization of the protein into the membranes, and one residue present in the regulatory domain, which is important for protein-protein interaction.

  3. Mutations of C19orf12, coding for a transmembrane glycine zipper containing mitochondrial protein, cause mis-localization of the protein, inability to respond to oxidative stress and increased mitochondrial Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Venco, Paola; Bonora, Massimo; Giorgi, Carlotta; Papaleo, Elena; Iuso, Arcangela; Prokisch, Holger; Pinton, Paolo; Tiranti, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in C19orf12 have been identified in patients affected by Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA), a clinical entity characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. By using western blot analysis with specific antibody and confocal studies, we showed that wild-type C19orf12 protein was not exclusively present in mitochondria, but also in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and MAM (Mitochondria Associated Membrane), while mutant C19orf12 variants presented a different localization. Moreover, after induction of oxidative stress, a GFP-tagged C19orf12 wild-type protein was able to relocate to the cytosol. On the contrary, mutant isoforms were not able to respond to oxidative stress. High mitochondrial calcium concentration and increased H2O2 induced apoptosis were found in fibroblasts derived from one patient as compared to controls. C19orf12 protein is a 17 kDa mitochondrial membrane-associated protein whose function is still unknown. Our in silico investigation suggests that, the glycine zipper motifs of C19orf12 form helical regions spanning the membrane. The N- and C-terminal regions with respect to the transmembrane portion, on the contrary, are predicted to rearrange in a structural domain, which is homologs to the N-terminal regulatory domain of the magnesium transporter MgtE, suggesting that C19orf12 may act as a regulatory protein for human MgtE transporters. The mutations here described affect respectively one glycine residue of the glycine zipper motifs, which are involved in dimerization of transmembrane helices and predicted to impair the correct localization of the protein into the membranes, and one residue present in the regulatory domain, which is important for protein-protein interaction. PMID:26136767

  4. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  5. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  6. Protein immobilization strategies for protein biochips.

    PubMed

    Rusmini, Federica; Zhong, Zhiyuan; Feijen, Jan

    2007-06-01

    In the past few years, protein biochips have emerged as promising proteomic and diagnostic tools for obtaining information about protein functions and interactions. Important technological innovations have been made. However, considerable development is still required, especially regarding protein immobilization, in order to fully realize the potential of protein biochips. In fact, protein immobilization is the key to the success of microarray technology. Proteins need to be immobilized onto surfaces with high density in order to allow the usage of small amount of sample solution. Nonspecific protein adsorption needs to be avoided or at least minimized in order to improve detection performances. Moreover, full retention of protein conformation and activity is a challenging task to be accomplished. Although a large number of review papers on protein biochips have been published in recent years, few have focused on protein immobilization technology. In this review, current protein immobilization strategies, including physical, covalent, and bioaffinity immobilization for the fabrication of protein biochips, are described. Particular consideration has been given to oriented immobilization, also referred to as site-specific immobilization, which is believed will improve homogeneous surface covering and accessibility of the active site.

  7. Evidence for a role of the polysaccharide capsule transport proteins in pertussis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hoo, Regina; Lam, Jian Hang; Huot, Ludovic; Pant, Aakanksha; Li, Rui; Hot, David; Alonso, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Polysaccharide (PS) capsules are important virulence determinants for many bacterial pathogens. Bordetella pertussis, the agent of whooping cough, produces a surface associated microcapsule but its role in pertussis pathogenesis remained unknown. Here we showed that the B. pertussis capsule locus is expressed in vivo in murine lungs and that absence of the membrane-associated protein KpsT, involved in the transport of the PS polymers across the envelope, but not the surface-exposed PS capsule itself, affects drastically B. pertussis colonization efficacy in mice. Microarray analysis revealed that absence of KpsT in B. pertussis resulted in global down-regulation of gene expression including key virulence genes regulated by BvgA/S, the master two-component system. Using a BvgS phase-locked mutant, we demonstrated a functional link between KpsT and BvgA/S-mediated signal transduction. Whereas pull-down assays do not support physical interaction between BvgS sensor and any of the capsule locus encoded proteins, absence of KpsT impaired BvgS oligomerization, necessary for BvgS function. Furthermore, complementation studies indicated that instead of KpsT alone, the entire PS capsule transport machinery spanning the cell envelope likely plays a role in BvgS-mediated signal transduction. Our work thus provides the first experimental evidence of a role for a virulence-repressed gene in pertussis pathogenesis.

  8. Hypobaric hypoxia-reoxygenation diminishes band 3 protein functions in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    González, Gustavo; Celedón, Gloria; Sandoval, Mario; González, Gabriela E; Ferrer, Verónica; Astete, Rodrigo; Behn, Claus

    2002-12-01

    We have previously shown that subjects exposed to acute hypobaric hypoxia display an erythrocyte membrane protein band 3 with an increased susceptibility to proteolytic degradation. We suggested it was due to an oxidative damage of band 3. We now report that exposure to hypobaric hypoxia followed by reoxygenation affects protein band 3 functions such as anion transport and binding of glyceraldehyde-3P-dehydrogenase. Transport capacity was assessed with the fluorescent probe 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino] ethanesulfonate (NBD-taurine). Binding capacity was evaluated from the activity of the membrane-associated enzyme. Healthy young men were exposed for 20 min to hypobaric hypoxia, simulating an altitude of 4,500 m above sea level and after recompression band 3 function was assessed. An inhibition of band 3 anion transport function and a decrease in the binding of glyceraldehyde-3P-dehydrogenase to band 3 were observed. Evidence is given supporting the hypothesis that functional alteration of band 3 is due to its oxidative modification originated as a consequence of the exposure to hypobaric hypoxia and further reoxygenation. PMID:12466935

  9. Hypobaric hypoxia-reoxygenation diminishes band 3 protein functions in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    González, Gustavo; Celedón, Gloria; Sandoval, Mario; González, Gabriela E; Ferrer, Verónica; Astete, Rodrigo; Behn, Claus

    2002-12-01

    We have previously shown that subjects exposed to acute hypobaric hypoxia display an erythrocyte membrane protein band 3 with an increased susceptibility to proteolytic degradation. We suggested it was due to an oxidative damage of band 3. We now report that exposure to hypobaric hypoxia followed by reoxygenation affects protein band 3 functions such as anion transport and binding of glyceraldehyde-3P-dehydrogenase. Transport capacity was assessed with the fluorescent probe 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino] ethanesulfonate (NBD-taurine). Binding capacity was evaluated from the activity of the membrane-associated enzyme. Healthy young men were exposed for 20 min to hypobaric hypoxia, simulating an altitude of 4,500 m above sea level and after recompression band 3 function was assessed. An inhibition of band 3 anion transport function and a decrease in the binding of glyceraldehyde-3P-dehydrogenase to band 3 were observed. Evidence is given supporting the hypothesis that functional alteration of band 3 is due to its oxidative modification originated as a consequence of the exposure to hypobaric hypoxia and further reoxygenation.

  10. Evidence for a Role of the Polysaccharide Capsule Transport Proteins in Pertussis Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hoo, Regina; Lam, Jian Hang; Huot, Ludovic; Pant, Aakanksha; Li, Rui; Hot, David; Alonso, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Polysaccharide (PS) capsules are important virulence determinants for many bacterial pathogens. Bordetella pertussis, the agent of whooping cough, produces a surface associated microcapsule but its role in pertussis pathogenesis remained unknown. Here we showed that the B. pertussis capsule locus is expressed in vivo in murine lungs and that absence of the membrane-associated protein KpsT, involved in the transport of the PS polymers across the envelope, but not the surface-exposed PS capsule itself, affects drastically B. pertussis colonization efficacy in mice. Microarray analysis revealed that absence of KpsT in B. pertussis resulted in global down-regulation of gene expression including key virulence genes regulated by BvgA/S, the master two-component system. Using a BvgS phase-locked mutant, we demonstrated a functional link between KpsT and BvgA/S-mediated signal transduction. Whereas pull-down assays do not support physical interaction between BvgS sensor and any of the capsule locus encoded proteins, absence of KpsT impaired BvgS oligomerization, necessary for BvgS function. Furthermore, complementation studies indicated that instead of KpsT alone, the entire PS capsule transport machinery spanning the cell envelope likely plays a role in BvgS-mediated signal transduction. Our work thus provides the first experimental evidence of a role for a virulence-repressed gene in pertussis pathogenesis. PMID:25501560

  11. A dynamin-like protein involved in bacterial cell membrane surveillance under environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Prachi; Eissenberger, Kristina; Karier, Laurence; Mascher, Thorsten; Bramkamp, Marc

    2016-09-01

    In ever-changing natural environments, bacteria are continuously challenged with numerous biotic and abiotic stresses. Accordingly, they have evolved both specific and more general mechanisms to counteract stress-induced damage and ensure survival. In the soil habitat of Bacillus subtilis, peptide antibiotics and bacteriophages are among the primary stressors that affect the integrity of the cytoplasmic membrane. Dynamin-like proteins (DLPs) play a major role in eukaryotic membrane re-modelling processes, including antiviral activities, but the function of the corresponding bacterial homologues was so far poorly understood. Here, we report on the protective function of a bacterial DLP, DynA from B. subtilis. We provide evidence that DynA plays an important role in a membrane surveillance system that counteracts membrane pore formation provoked by antibiotics and phages. In unstressed cells, DynA is a highly dynamic membrane-associated protein. Upon membrane damage, DynA localizes into large and static assemblies, where DynA acts locally to counteract stress-induced pores, presumably by inducing lipid bilayer fusion and sealing membrane gaps. Thus, lack of DynA increases the sensitivity to antibiotic exposure and phage infection. Taken together, our work suggests that DynA, and potentially other bacterial DLPs, contribute to the innate immunity of bacteria against membrane stress.

  12. The early endosome: a busy sorting station for proteins at the crossroads

    PubMed Central

    Jovic, Marko; Sharma, Mahak; Rahajeng, Juliati; Caplan, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Summary Endocytosis marks the entry of internalized receptors into the complex network of endocytic trafficking pathways. Endocytic vesicles are rapidly targeted to a distinct membrane-bound endocytic organelle referred to as the early endosome. Despite the existence of numerous internalization routes, early endosomes (EE) serve as a focal point of the endocytic pathway. Sorting events initiated at this compartment determine the subsequent fate of internalized proteins and lipids, destining them either for recycling to the plasma membrane, degradation in lysosomes or delivery to the trans-Golgi network. Sorting of endocytic cargo to the latter compartments is accomplished through the formation of distinct microdomains within early endosomes, through the coordinate recruitment and assembly of the sorting machinery. An elaborate network of interactions between endocytic regulatory proteins ensures synchronized sorting of cargo to microdomains followed by morphological changes at the early endosomal membranes. Consequently, the cargo targeted either for recycling back to the plasma membrane, or for retrograde transport to the trans-Golgi network, localizes to newly-formed tubular membranes. With a high ratio of membrane surface to lumenal volume, these tubules effectively concentrate the recycling cargo, ensuring efficient transport out of the EE. Conversely, receptors sorted for degradation cluster at the flat clathrin lattices involved in invaginations of the limiting membrane, associating with newly formed intralumenal vesicles. In this review we will discuss the characteristics of early endosomes, their role in the regulation of endocytic transport, and their aberrant function in a variety of diseases. PMID:19924646

  13. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol is involved in the membrane attachment of proteins in granules of chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fouchier, F; Bastiani, P; Baltz, T; Aunis, D; Rougon, G

    1988-01-01

    Incubation at 37 degrees C or treatment of granule membranes of chromaffin cells with Staphylococcus aureus phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C converted from an amphiphilic to a hydrophilic form two proteins with molecular masses of 82 and 68 kDa respectively. Their release is time- and enzyme-concentration-dependent. We showed that they were immunoreactive with an anti-(cross-reacting determinant) antibody known to be revealed only after removal of a diacylglycerol anchor. Furthermore, the action of HNO2 suggests the presence of a non-acetylated glucosamine residue in the determinant. This is one of the first reports suggesting that a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor might exist in membranes other than the plasma membrane. We showed that the 68 kDa protein is probably not the subunit of dopamine (3,4-dihydroxyphenethylamine) beta-hydroxylase, an enzyme present in granules in both soluble and membrane-associated forms. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:2851974

  14. The nitrogenase proteins of Rhizobium meliloti: purification and properties of the MoFe and Fe components.

    PubMed

    Miller, R W; Yu, Z; Zarkadas, C G

    1993-04-21

    The alfalfa-Rhizobium meliloti symbiosis contributes a major portion of biologically fixed nitrogen to temperate zone forage crop production. Highly-purified molybdenum-iron (MoFe) and iron (Fe) nitrogenase components were obtained for the first time from extracts of R. meliloti bacteroids. Intact bacteroid cells were isolated anaerobically from 100 g quantities of alfalfa nodules following storage in liquid nitrogen. Centrifuged bacteroid extracts showed a marked reduction in specific activity when assayed at protein concentrations less than 1 mg/ml. Both nitrogenase proteins were resolved and purified to homogeneity as determined spectroscopically and by SDS-PAGE. The purified MoFe protein differed in several respects from previously characterized nitrogenase proteins. Saturation of the acetylene-reducing and proton-reducing activities of the R. meliloti MoFe protein required higher relative concentrations of Fe protein than nitrogenase proteins purified from free living diazotrophs. Electron allocation to dinitrogen reduction was sustained at component ratios similar to those present in bacteroid extracts, suggesting that while the observed saturation effects were not detrimental to physiological function in the symbiotic system, overall activity could be enhanced by higher levels of iron protein. Analyses of the MoFe protein gave 22 Fe, 22 labile sulfide and 1.7 Mo atoms per molecular unit of 215 kDa. Dithionite-reduced MoFe protein contained a spin 3/2 iron centre but had a lower visible absorbance at 360 nm than the equivalent Azotobacter chroococcum component. Amino-acid composition indicated a notably lesser tryptophan content, and cysteine content greater than that of the equivalent tetrameric protein of free living diazotrophs. Ratios of acidic and basic residues were similar to other MoFe proteins. Calculation of hydrophobicity and discriminant parameters gave values midway between those expected for soluble cytoplasmic proteins and peripheral membrane

  15. Protein-losing enteropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  16. Protein in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... basic structure of protein is a chain of amino acids. You need protein in your diet to help ... Protein foods are broken down into parts called amino acids during digestion. The human body needs a number ...

  17. A molecular map of G protein alpha chains in microdissected rat nephron segments.

    PubMed Central

    Senkfor, S I; Johnson, G L; Berl, T

    1993-01-01

    Membrane-associated guanine nucleotide binding proteins regulate many receptor-mediated signals. Heterogeneity of biochemical and functional properties in nephron segments could be due to differences in G protein expression. To ascertain whether such heterogeneity of G proteins is present in various nephron segments, this study examines the distribution and relative abundance of G protein alpha chains in microdissected medullary thick ascending limb, cortical collecting tubules, outer medullary collecting tubules, proximal inner medullary tubules, and distal inner medullary tubules. Reverse transcription and polymerase chain reactions were employed using oligonucleotides encoding highly conserved regions of all known alpha chains. The cDNA was sequenced for alpha chain identification. The alpha i2 versus alpha s distribution was different in the outer medullary collecting tubules, when compared with the medullary thick ascending limb (P < 0.001) or the cortical collecting tubule, the proximal inner medullary tubules, and the distal inner medullary tubules (P < 0.05). These latter four segments did not significantly differ from each other. A similar analysis was applied to the frequently used line of kidney cells, LLC-PK1, whose exact cellular origin remains unclear. Interestingly, we detected both alpha i2 and alpha i3, while only alpha i2 was detected in the rat distal nephron. No alpha o or alpha z reverse transcription PCR products were detected. In contrast alpha 11 and alpha 14 members of the more recently described alpha q family were detected in the outer medullary collecting tubules and the proximal inner medullary tubules, respectively. We conclude that the majority of nephron segments have a relatively constant distribution of G protein alpha chains. Images PMID:8349818

  18. Expression and localization of an ice nucleating protein from a soil bacterium, Pseudomonas borealis.

    PubMed

    Vanderveer, Tara L; Choi, Julie; Miao, Denian; Walker, Virginia K

    2014-08-01

    An ice nucleating protein (INP) coding region with 66% sequence identity to the INP of Pseudomonas syringae was previously cloned from P. borealis, a plant beneficial soil bacterium. Ice nucleating activity (INA) in the P. borealis DL7 strain was highest after transfer of cultures to temperatures just above freezing. The corresponding INP coding sequence (inaPb or ina) was used to construct recombinant plasmids, with recombinant expression visualized using a green fluorescent protein marker (gfp encoding GFP). Although the P. borealis strain was originally isolated by ice-affinity, bacterial cultures with membrane-associated INP-GFP did not adsorb to pre-formed ice. Employment of a shuttle vector allowed expression of ina-gfp in both Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas cells. At 27 °C, diffuse fluorescence appeared throughout the cells and was associated with low INA. However, after transfer of cultures to 4 °C, the protein localized to the poles coincident with high INA. Transformants with truncated INP sequences ligated to either gfp, or an antifreeze protein-gfp fusion showed that the repetitive ice-nucleation domain was not necessary for localization. Such localization is consistent with the flanking residues of the INP associating with a temperature-dependent secretion apparatus. A polar location would facilitate INP-INP interactions resulting in the formation of larger aggregates, serving to increase INA. Expression of INPs by P. borealis could function as an efficient atmospheric dispersal mechanism for these soil bacteria, which are less likely to use these proteins for nutrient procurement, as has been suggested for P. syringae. PMID:24930584

  19. Nanotechnologies in protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Krizkova, Sona; Heger, Zbynek; Zalewska, Marta; Moulick, Amitava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology became an important research tool for study and detection of proteins, protein-protein interactions and a number of other applications. The utilization of nanoparticle-based materials and nanotechnology-based techniques for immobilization allows us not only to extend the surface for biomolecule immobilization resulting in enhanced substrate binding properties, decreased background signals and enhanced reporter systems for more sensitive assays. Generally in contemporarily developed microarray systems, multiple nanotechnology-based techniques are combined. In this review, applications of nanoparticles and nanotechnologies in creating protein microarrays, proteins immobilization and detection are summarized. We anticipate that advanced nanotechnologies can be exploited to expand promising fields of proteins identification, monitoring of protein-protein or drug-protein interactions, or proteins structures. PMID:26039143

  20. Protein domain architectures.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Nicola J

    2010-01-01

    Proteins are composed of functional units, or domains, that can be found alone or in combination with other domains. Analysis of protein domain architectures and the movement of protein domains within and across different genomes provide clues about the evolution of protein function. The classification of proteins into families and domains is provided through publicly available tools and databases that use known protein domains to predict other members in new proteins sequences. Currently at least 80% of the main protein sequence databases can be classified using these tools, thus providing a large data set to work from for analyzing protein domain architectures. Each of the protein domain databases provide intuitive web interfaces for viewing and analyzing their domain classifications and provide their data freely for downloading. Some of the main protein family and domain databases are described here, along with their Web-based tools for analyzing domain architectures.

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